header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-10-25 TRAN 116

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(0845)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

I'm calling to order the meeting of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. We are doing a study on assessing the impact of aircraft noise in the vicinity of major airports.

Before I introduce the witnesses, my colleague has a point that he would like to make.

Mr. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, CPC):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

This is not a transport committee issue, but it's a transport issue. I think that many of you were invited last night to the screening of First Man. There weren't many of us there, but a few of us went. The minister spoke and did a fine job of it, and so did our soon-to-be astronaut, David Saint-Jacques. We watched our current astronaut, Ryan Gosling, play Neil Armstrong in First Man. There we were, about 45 minutes into the movie, and they just blasted off to the moon. It was noisy and there were all kinds of crazy sounds, including this beep...beep...beep. All of a sudden, the screen went off, lights came on, and it was a fire alarm.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Ron Liepert: There were 500 people, the entire movie theatre audience, all standing out in the cold. Some of us didn't bother hanging around to see whether he made it to the moon or not. I don't know if he made it to the moon, but I'll tell you what I did get, Madam Chair: a pair of free socks.

The Chair:

Oh, wow! Look at those.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

I'm going to declare them with the Ethics Commissioner.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

I wish we'd had a camera at that moment.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

I think there are another pair of free socks over in the corner there.

A voice: He made it.

Mr. Ron Liepert: He made it? Oh, you came back. How long was it?

A voice: Yes, we did. It was 50 minutes.

The Chair:

All right.

Thank you very much for bringing that to everybody's attention.

As witnesses this morning we have Peter Bayrachny, a representative from Neighbours Against the Airplane Noise, and as individuals, Richard Boehnke and Tom Driedger. Welcome to all of you.

Peter, would you start, please? You have five minutes.

Mr. Peter Bayrachny (Representative, Neighbours Against the Airplane Noise):

Madam Chair and honourable members of the committee, thank you for having me appear before you today. I'm very pleased that this committee has chosen to study this important topic, which applies to Canadians across the country living in close proximity to airports.

Airport noise is the first thing people notice, complain about or discuss on the subject of nearby airports. I'm a resident of Markland Wood, the residential area closest to Pearson international airport, which is currently managed by the Greater Toronto Airports Authority, the GTAA.

I must also note that all surrounding neighbourhoods are affected by GTAA noise and should not be excluded from this study; however, my experience is as a resident of an affected neighbourhood. I can speak only from this experience and will concentrate my remarks on the effects of Pearson airport and the management of the GTAA.

The GTAA has announced their intention to double air traffic by 2040. This means that there will be a proportionate increase in aircraft noise overall. Pearson and many large airports are landlocked and cannot expand to gain more space. Fitting more takeoffs and landings into an existing infrastructure is the only way to expand, thus exacerbating the noise issue, which is already critical.

I believe that if parliamentary committees such as this one were to concentrate only on noise as the fundamental issue, you would be doing Canadians who live around these airports a great disservice. Noise is only one of the issues residents have to contend with. Associated with it are the health effects that such repetitive high levels of noise have on human beings living in these areas, as well as the impact of interrupted sleep due to aircraft noise.

To date, there have been no studies done by Health Canada or independent consultants on the current noise level effects on humans within the last 10 years or to consider the higher noise levels in the future, as proposed by the GTAA and other airports. Talking about noise does not matter if you do not consider current and future effects on the population living near these airports.

One important point to mention is night flights, a topic of great concern for all residents near an airport, especially Pearson. Night flight bans should be instituted at major airports in Canada. A number of major airports worldwide have night flight bans, including Heathrow Airport, the third-largest airport by worldwide rankings, and Frankfurt Airport, the ninth-largest one. Both have night flight bans, meaning no flights past 11 p.m. This should be the norm, not the exception.

Taking the theme of noise and effects on human health further, there is the environmental effect of increased air traffic. There also should be coordinating studies on the effects of exhaust fuel pollution and the environmental effects of the increased traffic. We currently have no pertinent data on environmental effects of added aircraft traffic. Environment Canada, in coordination with Health Canada, should set up monitoring stations around major airports such as Pearson to gather data on both noise and pollution. This is critical to making future decisions on important subjects such as increased aircraft traffic and its effects.

Let's now look into the future. Why does the GTAA want increased air traffic? The answer is income. As stated by Hillary Marshall of the GTAA, the organization is approximately $5 billion in debt. We have a not-for-profit corporation that can only survive if it gets more revenue, which has translated into increased air traffic. With Toronto's population growth, current size and projections, we are already the fourth-largest metropolitan area in North America, recently overtaking Chicago.

Instead of trying to fit more air traffic into the same space at Pearson, why not add another airport? All of the top five cities in North America have at least two major airports, except for Toronto. The GTAA would not support this idea. They need to recoup their massive $5-billion debt. We have alternatives such as Pickering, with land which the federal government already owns, or an existing airport in Hamilton, which could augment and add capacity to the Toronto area for airport traffic for years to come.

In conclusion, I would like to state the facts.

The federal government has given up control and management of many large airports in Canada to private corporations. This is not a partisan issue; this problem has been present through many governments, both Liberal and Conservative. I believe that airport noise, health effects and environmental issues should be monitored and managed by the government, not corporations such as the GTAA, which have only one goal: increasing income.

I suggest that in this committee report, recommendations be made to legislate more control over entities such as the GTAA so that government has the ability to control noise, health effects and pollution and how they affect the citizens you have been elected to serve.

(0850)



Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, sir.

Mr. Boehnke, would you like to go next?

Mr. Richard Boehnke (As an Individual):

Yes.

Good morning.

My name is Richard Hermann Boehnke, and I'm from Etobicoke. I thank the standing committee for inviting me to share my view on aircraft noise.

My neighbours and I live south of the Lester B. Pearson International Airport, also known as Toronto Pearson or as “the little postage stamp” to the unkind. Well into my third decade of dealing with the airport administration—the Greater Toronto Airports Authority, the GTAA—with respect to its major waste product, aircraft noise, I have concluded that there are two mandatory actions that must be undertaken to improve the aircraft noise situation for Toronto residents.

In this 21st century, we must first have Health Canada establish and enforce human health-based standards for aircraft noise. Second, once these human health standards are established, they must be used to create a fixed and permanent allotment of night flights to replace the variable and ever-increasing formula used at present—a creation with a high-water mark calculation guaranteed never to reduce by design.

This is ironic, given that there is increased focus on sleep, and virtually everybody knows that sleep deprivation leads to increased blood pressure, anxiety, mood changes, difficulty concentrating, etc. Achieving this noise-health focus would clearly establish science-based responses to community noise complaints, and it would permit predictable aircraft movement patterns at night, again based on health science. Sound sleep is a basic human need that is equal to good food, potable water and safe housing.

Further, I'm certain that such health-based standards already exist in the European Union, among other sources, thereby sparing Health Canada much time and money in carrying out complex studies. Health Canada must monitor and must enforce these standards in order to build public confidence that the government is protecting them from a known noise hazard.

For the first time, this would also provide meaningful guidance to the airport's expansion plans, taking into account—and making just as important—human health considerations, as well as the economic sketches of the Toronto Pearson business planners as they aim at their 90-million-passenger target. After all, if we think it's noisy with 45 million passengers, imagine the noise by-product from 90 million people flying in and out annually.

Finally, if the aforementioned is not alarming enough to the standing committee, we could take a glance at the topic of safety. I observed that Transport Canada wishes to decrease its involvement in direct oversight of pilots with 45 million more passengers arriving in Toronto and that the SMS is not getting full support from its participants. We also hear about decades of delayed action on seatbelts for school buses and a similar lack of leadership on truck driver training across Canada. Then we hear about the airport's growth plans, and there are no impact studies. This really causes worry on the street.

Others have spoken to you about the funding challenges for Transport Canada, the constant cutbacks, the self-regulation plans being considered in place of direct oversight in the cockpit, and the general concern with regard to a perceived lack of public access in reviewing Transport Canada's enforcement responsibilities. Transport Canada has a lot of work that it is entrusted with. It likely needs the standing committee's help.

Thank you for the forum to share my words and my suggestions. Please help us before the cement sets on the expansion. Get us the health standards for noise.[Translation]

Thank you.

(0855)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Driedger is next.

Mr. Tom Driedger (As an Individual):

Thank you.

My interest in airport noise comes from two sources. First of all, I live near the airport, and second, my career was in airports and the last 30 years were at Pearson, largely in the planning area. My topic today is the increasing night flights and the by-products of annoyance, sleep deprivation and decreased quality of life.

In 1996 there were about 9,600 flights at night between 12:30 and 6:30 in the morning. In 1997, the first full year after the airport was transferred to the GTAA from Transport Canada, the budget was 10,300. Currently, through a strange formula in which the budget for night flights increases in proportion to passenger growth, Transport Canada allows more than 19,000 flights during the night.

Compare this to other airports. Frankfurt imposes a complete ban. Heathrow allows 5,800, but that is tied to a noise quota budget that is decreasing. Montreal bans large aircraft over 45,000 kilograms, which reduces the overall noise dosage.

Although the aviation industry likes to point out that there is a budget that restricts the number of night flights, a restriction that increases annually is merely a temporary limitation. In the long term, it is a restriction in name only.

With the hope of attracting more business, the GTAA determined that the natural growth in the budget would not be sufficient to meet the demand and petitioned Transport Canada to permit three bump-ups of 10%. The approval was granted in 2013. Although the increase has not been used, it remains on the books.

I would to illustrate the nature and the severity of night noise by a graph, which is on the wall. In the bottom right corner, you see an airplane flying over a square, which is the noise monitoring station at a place in Garnetwood Park. Garnetwood Park is located just north of Markham, where these two gentlemen come from, and south of another residential area in Mississauga, which the aircraft will pass over en route to the airport. The noise level is 80 decibels, which the equivalent of an alarm clock.

Below that, you'll see another plane coming in, which will arrive at the noise monitoring station about two minutes later, and beyond that another and another and another.

In the middle, there is a panel that shows some information on the aircraft. It shows the elevation, which is 1,480 feet. This is somewhat misleading because that is ASL, above sea level. It is actually less than 1,000 feet above the ground. You'll note the origin of that flight, which is Puerto Vallarta, and the time, 3:18 a.m.

The current night flight budget is unreasonable. There must be an absolute upper limit on the number of flights and the maximum allowable noise. Night flights should be treated as a scarce and decreasing resource to be used judiciously, not one that is used with no upper limit. It is unacceptable for the industry to enjoy all the increasing economic benefits while the community bears all the increasing social and environmental costs.

Some night flights are necessary for the well-being of the region, but there must be a balance between the wants of the industry and the needs of the community. I doubt that the economy would be in peril if flights from sunspot destinations were not permitted to land in the middle of the night.

I have some suggestions for improvement. First, eliminate the provision for the annual increase in the night flight budget and the provision for the three bump-ups.

Second, over a five-year phase-in period, reduce the night flight budget back to the 9,600 that was in place when Transport Canada last operated the airport. Along with that, introduce measures to manage the total annual noise dosage and the maximum allowable levels for individual flights.

Third, introduce a substantial surcharge on night flights so that the true social and environmental costs of night flights are reflected in the total costs. This should apply to all airlines, including those that currently pay a fixed annual fee to operate at Pearson.

Undoubtedly the industry will vigorously protest any changes from the current scheme, as it will then have to make decisions on which flights to operate and which flights to drop.

(0900)



However, changes are necessary and new regulations are needed so that the interests of the communities in the vicinity of the airport no longer remain secondary to the interests of the industry at Pearson and at all other airports.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you all very much.

We will go on to our questioners and Mr. Liepert.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Thank you, Madam Chair. I'm going to share my time with my colleague, Ms. Block.

I'm going to ask one basic question and have everyone comment on it.

I represent a Calgary riding that isn't anywhere near the airport. However, because of the second runway they've put in, there's a change in flight paths, so now I have constituents who are having air traffic they've never had before. I can't comment on Toronto, so I'm not specific to Toronto, but I want each one of you to know that I am encountering as a member of Parliament some of the same concerns that I'm hearing, but probably not to the same degree.

One of the things I struggle with is the fact that we're a bit of a victim of our own success. One of the reasons they put a second major airstrip in Calgary was because of the demand. I said to some other witnesses the other day that we now have three flights a day from Calgary to Palm Springs, and they're putting two more on because they're full, so the demand is there. Our consumer shopping model has changed significantly, from going to the local mall to bringing it in overnight from Amazon.

One of the things I'd like a general comment on is this: If we look at some of the things that all of you are proposing, how would that impact the business community and how would that impact consumers' ability to get what they want expeditiously, which is also what they want?

Mr. Peter Bayrachny:

If you don't mind, I can be the first to answer that.

It's very simple, sir. Hamilton airport can offload some of the traffic that the GTAA is currently experiencing. Hamilton has been, and still is, a cargo hub for certain carriers, such as UPS, etc. The GTAA has been outbidding Hamilton airport for their business, and they've been winning business as a result. I'll get back to this $5-billion debt. They need to recoup that $5 billion debt, and the only way they can do it is by accessing more business.

To answer your question, if we augmented Hamilton, for example, in the Toronto area—it's a cargo hub—we could increase that cargo hub to allow for more flights, because the cargo is typically night-flight activity, as well as the charters. Hamilton started off as a charter focal point, and it still is to a certain extent. The GTAA bids for that business, however, and they outbid other airports for it. That's the crux of the problem.

(0905)

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Could we have a couple more comments, please?

Mr. Richard Boehnke:

I have no interest at all, nor do most of the people I work with, in curtailing Canadian business in any way, but if the product of the business has a known danger, we really do have to find out how dangerous it is and at what level it can be safely done. If they add, in our case, 45 million passengers, or in your case another runway, the secret is knowing the standard they have to adhere to.

Right now they leave that nice and loose, and it just keeps getting bigger and bigger and bigger. We know—we know—there are dangers inherent in that, so we want it actually defined.

Mr. Tom Driedger:

That situation was similar to one that was faced at Pearson in the nineties, and they constructed a new runway. Knowing the new runway would impact people who had not previously been affected by noise, they put restrictions on it. Essentially they said it could only be used when winds prevented use of the east-west runways. Transport is backpedalling on that now, but that's a different issue.

In the case of Calgary, it might be possible to put more emphasis on one runway than on the other. It might be possible to assign one for arrivals and one for departures. I don't know, but the long and the short of it is that a new runway is there to help the growing business, and this has impacted more people, and that's the dilemma. That's the dichotomy we're faced with: growing the economy or addressing human factors.

The Chair:

Ms. Block is next.

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC):

In Tuesday's testimony we heard solutions and suggestions that perhaps we could shift commercial operations like air cargo to airports further outside a city's perimeter. I'm wondering if you would speak to the economic feasibility of moving operations like air cargo to a place like Hamilton, for example.

Mr. Tom Driedger:

I think that's very challenging, because the cargo companies have established major facilities at Pearson. FedEx has a huge facility. Vista Cargo is there. Also, a great deal of cargo comes in the belly of passenger aircraft.

The other point is that they moved from Hamilton to Pearson not only for economics but because it's closer to the market. The business wants you to be close to the market.

The Chair:

Mr. Hardie is next.

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

An issue raised in our earlier session was land use decisions by cities that allow for development in areas where there is the potential for noise and disruption. One thing we need to consider is that you have an airport there, and it's probably not going to go away, or replacing it with something would be quite expensive and wouldn't happen overnight. When we deal with overnight, are there some things that could be done for homes along the flight path?

Consider that open-office concepts in buildings often have noise suppression devices that reduce the amount of ambient noise so that people can conduct their business in a cubicle somewhere. Would those same devices not be available for homes to at least do some noise suppression over the nighttime hours to help people sleep better? Are there any thoughts about that, or has anybody looked at that possibility?

Mr. Peter Bayrachny:

With all due respect, Mr. Hardie, I invite you to my home when we have night flights. You tell me whether or not any noise suppression can drown out an aircraft and shaking windows, etc. Markland and the other areas around the airport were there as communities before the airport expanded. As Mr. Boehnke has said, it's time to at least have a control on the effects of this.

(0910)

Mr. Ken Hardie:

In that respect, then, we also know that people have various tolerances to noise. Some people can sleep on a picket fence and some can't.

Would there not also be some utility in looking at real estate transactions and have some notice on a house listing that says that is on a flight path and that the people need to be aware of that? Far too often, people will move into an area without really understanding the dynamics of noise, be it from a rail switching yard to a truck route to a fly-over. Should that not also be part of the mix, as we look to try to mitigate the existing situation?

Mr. Peter Bayrachny:

Mitigating that would mean decreased property values. At this point, we would be sitting here talking about noise and people's net worth and value as a result of making it public in a listing. Most real estate agents know where the flight paths are in Toronto, for example. It's the same thing with Montreal, and I'm sure Calgary—

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Would they disclose that to a potential buyer?

Mr. Peter Bayrachny:

Well, I think so. They wouldn't be much of a real estate agent if they didn't.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

One never knows.

What role can Toronto and the surrounding communities play in trying to mitigate the existing situation?

Mr. Richard Boehnke:

I would suggest that when you have a standard, you can then make that kind of determination. Until we actually have a measurable, scientifically based, human-health-focused standard of what is acceptable and what is not in Canada, you can't really make that decision. You're making it just on the basis that it's noisy. Well, “noisy” doesn't tell you a hell of a lot.

That's why I keep pushing this simple little thing that we all go skating around, because it would start to tighten things down. When people phone in a complaint, the airport could then say, “Well, it was within the standard.” That's legitimate.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I believe, sir, that the next time a city close to the airport decides to take out some industrial land to build more townhouses, somebody should raise this point.

Mr. Richard Boehnke:

I agree, but the point is that we will not have a change in people's circumstances, either the Torontonians who will live there or the people out west. We still need that factor to actually make a determination before you publish anything as though it's a warning, a dark sign.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Did you have anything to add, Mr. Driedger?

Mr. Tom Driedger:

Many of the newer homes around the airport already have a noise warning on their titles, particularly the ones to the west. There are sections of Mississauga that were taken to the OMB, and the GTA lost and houses were built.

Going forward, it's developed. Some tinkering can be done maybe for infilling or redevelopment, but what you see is what you have. On Tuesday, Dr. Novak talked about the NEF contours and how they were out of date and they no longer reflected the standard. He said they were out of date in 1976.

That creates a problem for the government, because new standards may come out that may identify certain areas that are already developed that are inappropriate for housing. What does the government do? On the flip side of that—

Okay, thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you. We're running out of time.

Mr. Aubin is next. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I thank our guests for joining us.

I will get right to the heart of the matter because time is running out.

Transport Canada is asking airports to have noise management committees made up of citizens. Perhaps you have even sat on such a committee in the past.

Here is my first question. Is that essentially a public performance or does it lead to concrete results for those who live close to an airport?

You can take turns answering. [English]

Mr. Tom Driedger:

I would like to comment on that.

I believe you used the word “facade”, and I don't think that is inappropriate. These committees are not committees that will take action, and there are no concrete results.

By way of example, the GTAA has just come out with its noise management action plan, and with respect to helping our neighbours sleep at night, what are they going to do? They're going to publish a report outlining the economic necessity for night flights. They are also going to look at increasing landing fees specifically for night flight slots while they develop quieter fleet incentive programs. They're going to take money from the airlines for flying in at night, it seems to me, and give it back to them for retrofitting the aircraft, which seems bizarre. They also talk about immediately exploring changes to night flight restrictions.

It's a debating society. It's meant to placate the public, but I don't think the committee as it is now structured is an effective means of managing noise. That is the prerogative of the government, Transport Canada and the industry, and they do not have a mindset to manage noise.

(0915)

[Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Mr. Bayrachny, do you want to add anything? [English]

Mr. Peter Bayrachny:

Yes, I have a comment on that as well. Your description of “facade”—I think I agree with the previous speaker—is accurate. That noise committee, when you look at the members of it—and I've met some of them—are from Whitby, Ajax and Scarborough, many areas far away from the GTAA. At the formation of the committee, taking Markland Wood as an example, there was not one member on that committee from Markland Wood or Tom's area.

Mr. Richard Boehnke:

In the 30 years that I've worked with the noise management committee of the GTAA—and this is in their minutes—I asked in several sequential meetings whether they had ever reduced by one decibel any aircraft noise from the work they had done in the 30 years that I had brought this up. The answer was no. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Concerning the standards you were talking about, I agree that an attempt to resolve an issue must be evidence-based. We have the example of an airplane that generates a noise of 80 decibels, while the WHO says that the average should be around 55 decibels. There is a massive discrepancy there.

We have data on pure noise. As for health effects, that is a more tenuous matter. In your opinion, would it not be appropriate for this committee to recommend to Health Canada to conduct a concrete study that would provide us with evidence on the impacts of noise pollution on health? [English]

Mr. Peter Bayrachny:

Yes, absolutely I agree 110%.

Mr. Tom Driedger:

On Tuesday, Mr. Novak commented and said, “Look, it's sleep deprivation.” He emphasized that this was a key cause of annoyance.

The Chair:

You have one minute. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

This is not talked about as much now, but there is always the possibility of the government privatizing airports. We have gone from management by Transport Canada to management by port authorities.

What do you think about the idea of airports some day being privatized? Would that make the situation worse? [English]

Mr. Tom Driedger:

I'm not in favour of it. Assigning the airports to the airport authorities has distanced the people from the decision-making authority. Assigning it to the private sector would make it even worse, because then you have legal documents that you're dealing with. I'm quite sure that the community would not be given the emphasis they have now, which is much less than they used to have.

Mr. Richard Boehnke:

It's all the more reason to have a standard in place, because if it privatize, you can be sure they will do everything in their power to keep the whole sky open for themselves.

Mr. Peter Bayrachny:

I agree. It's all about income for them. It's not about people and health and whatever else. That doesn't play into it.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Iacono is next.

Mr. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Mr. Peter, in 2017 you were interviewed by Radio-Canada, and if I may cite you, you said, “It's certain terminology that they call 'noise sharing' and they're starting to market that as a concept”. Can you please elaborate on this terminology and what its features are, both positive and negative?

Mr. Peter Bayrachny:

This idea came from both the GTAA and Helios, which was a consultant that GTAA hired to study noise.

Noise sharing is a method whereby you take problem areas of the GTAA, meaning the east-west runways, and you share that noise. All of a sudden the north-south runways, which are far closer to the airport, get their share of the noise. At the end of the day, Helios, in their final report that was published on September 11, stated that noise sharing is a bad idea. It's taking a problem and making it wider and sharing it. I urge every one of the members of the committee to read that report; it's very important.

Hopefully I answered your question.

(0920)

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Do you know if it was used at the Pearson airport? Was this idea being tested?

Mr. Richard Boehnke:

It certainly was. The problem is that the winds go from west to east 70% of the time, thereby shifting it around. Planes have to go into the wind. That isn't something you vote on. That's something that simply happens. That was the final decision. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Mr. Driedger, among other solutions, you suggest limiting the number of night flights to 9,600, as was the case in 1996. Do you think that limit may help radically reduce night noise? [English]

Mr. Tom Driedger:

If you cut the number of flights in half, you reduce the amount of noise, so yes, it would reduce it, but you have to keep in mind that in order to meet their goal of 90 million passengers, they're going to have to bring in larger planes, and larger planes make more noise. Even if you're bringing in fewer planes, I'm not convinced that the total noise dosage would go down, and that's important. If you have fewer flights, you get less noise. Whether 9,600 is the right number, I don't know, but I just think 19,000 is not.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Has this noise problem been going on for a long time?

Mr. Tom Driedger:

It's been going on for a long time. It was triggered last year when they were doing construction on the two east-west runways and they had to use the north-south runway more, which is not one of their preferred runways. That added to it.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

I was told by my constituents that they've noticed the noise getting louder and louder within the last three to five years, and they've concluded that the planes are flying a lot lower. Is that the case at Pearson?

Mr. Tom Driedger:

I don't think it's the case for arrivals, because they come in at a fixed slope. For departures, it's very dependent on the winds and the weather. If there are strong winds, they climb faster.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Would you like to add a comment to that?

Mr. Richard Boehnke:

It's certainly hard when you see them take off over your house. You want to help lift it, but that's an impression.

Mr. Peter Bayrachny:

I'll add to that very briefly. Again I refer to the Helios study, which each one of the members should read. It's a public study. They made a recommendation of different landing approaches for aircraft. Right now they do a very slight slope down, whereas Helix said there's another way. They'd be up higher and come in quicker and steeper to the runway, which would decrease the noise across that stretch. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Last Tuesday, the example of Pickering was brought up and was even commended by the Community Alliance for Air Safety. However, I must admit that my knowledge on that issue is limited.

Mr. Driedger, I think that, between 2004 and 2007, you studied the environmental repercussions of developing an airport in Pickering. Can you tell the committee about the analysis you carried out and its results? [English]

Mr. Tom Driedger:

The work I did was to prepare a document called the Pickering draft plan, which outlined what the project would be. I summarized the number of technical studies and made it into a readable public document.

I also prepared a draft document of the project description, which was the document that would have been used to launch an environmental assessment, but the board of the GTAA determined that we should not proceed with that project.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Would it be possible for you to provide us with these two reports, these two documents that you have completed?

Mr. Tom Driedger:

The first one was never finalized and released. The second one used to be on Transport Canada's website. I personally do not have a copy of it, but I know you could get one from Transport Canada.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Do I still have more time?

The Chair:

I'm sorry, you don't. It's gone.

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I only have a couple of minutes, so I'll be as quick as I can, which is relatively fast.

Pearson is the fourth most expensive airport in the world to land at. The top three are all in Japan. Large planes pay as much as $17 a tonne to land there, small planes $145. It's a very expensive airport.

Traffic is going up very fast, as we've discussed. You talk about it increasing by exponential amounts over the next few years. My question is for all of you. When you fly, what decisions do you make to not add to the problem? What can consumers do to not pick those night flights and so forth? Do you have any thoughts on that?

(0925)

Mr. Richard Boehnke:

I don't fly very much. I have taken some of those tour flights to the Caribbean and have always felt the absolute peak of guilt, because there are no alternatives, so I either tell my wife we can't go, or I go and hold my nose.

It's true that they have this rule for some reason; they must make money by keeping the planes flying back and forth.

That's the only thing I can say. We don't take many, but when we do, we are conscious of it. I booked three of them because they landed before midnight.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Otherwise one could fly out of Hamilton, for example, as you're suggesting.

Mr. Richard Boehnke:

That would be an excellent alternative, but that doesn't exist at the present time.

Mr. Peter Bayrachny:

I can add why it doesn't exist: It's because Pearson or the GTAA will fight any expansion into Hamilton because they don't own Hamilton. They get eliminated from those landing and takeoff rights. If the traffic goes to Hamilton, then that $5-billion debt becomes $6 billion.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Very quickly, in the Canada Flight Supplement, which is the document given to all pilots on what airports have what rules, there are a number of very strict rules about noise controls at Pearson. It says that all non-noise-certified jet aircraft are restricted from landing between 8 p.m. and 8 a.m., with different noise levels having different time restrictions. Do you see any effect at all from the different restrictions? Are you aware of them at all?

Mr. Tom Driedger:

I think that those non-noise-certified aircraft are few and far between. Many airports now are banning stage 2 aircraft—well, they are banning stage 3 aircraft, while the GTAA and Transport Canada are very proud that they no longer let stage 2 in there.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm out of time. Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Wrzesnewskyj is next.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke Centre, Lib.):

I have very little time, so I'll try to be pretty quick here.

We know that the GTA, the greater Toronto area, is an economic engine for the country. It's continuing to grow very rapidly, and the GTAA in tandem is looking to expand operations and increase its bottom line profitability at a cost to local neighbourhoods. This all gets back to accountability.

It is a regional monopoly, and it appears there is no accountability. It is not interested, as was mentioned, in sharing with Hamilton. It's looking at where it can increase its profitability. One of the things that was mentioned was having it as a nighttime hub for flights out of the Middle East, flights out of other destinations into North America. I assume Hamilton would be able to act as that sort of hub. The passengers aren't people coming to Toronto. They're just transferring on to other planes to go on to Houston, for instance. I assume Hamilton could also handle not just cargo but those kinds of nighttime hub flights, but that would break Pearson's regional monopoly.

What I'd like to get to is the accountability. It appears that the GTAA doesn't have accountability, the federal government is not providing the oversight, and Nav Canada switches around flights in ways that impact neighbourhoods, even though it also is an arm's-length non-profit corporation. What needs to be done to bring accountability to this regional monopoly that is increasing its profits at the cost to the quality of life of local neighbourhoods?

Mr. Tom Driedger:

The GTAA just plays in the sandbox that's provided by Transport Canada. I think they're doing what anyone would do: they will operate within the limits that are set for them. If limits are to be placed, I think they have to come from Transport Canada, both on the airport side and on the Nav Canada side, and that applies to airports across the country.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

So the question then becomes—

The Chair:

I'm sorry; time is up. Mr. Jeneroux is next.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you to the witnesses for being here today and for travelling to come here.

You mentioned Hamilton a number of times. The GTA's Pearson airport has now—we'll use the word “absorbed”—Hamilton.

Are you aware of any other opportunities that Pearson is trying to gain within the GTA at this point? Is Pearson shifting to more cargo-based business than some airports? We had the opportunity to see Hamilton airport recently, and it's a great airport with the opportunity for more cargo. I'm curious as to your thoughts on the vision Pearson has, and if you're seeing it.

(0930)

Mr. Peter Bayrachny:

From what I've seen at the community meetings and the facts that have come up is that further to Borys's comment, you have lack of oversight. Profitability is dictating this whole thing. They are trying to pay down a $5-billion debt by taking business from other areas.

I think Hamilton still is a cargo hub. It was a cargo hub, but it was also a charter hub, which Pearson has taken away over the last number of years. To Richard's comment about whether I would drive to Hamilton to pick up a 5 a.m. or 6 a.m. flight to the Caribbean—absolutely. That's a very logical thing.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Do you have any comments, Mr. Driedger?

Mr. Tom Driedger:

I somewhat disagree with that. The market is Toronto. The market is Pearson. That's where they want to be. I don't agree that Pearson is attracting them as much as that they want to be here. WestJet was in Hamilton, and they wanted to grow their business; you grow it where the people are.

I think Hamilton has a role, but I think it has to develop its own role around its own market.

Part of the growth at Pearson and its international hub is the pricing structure that the GTAA has with two major airlines. They pay a fixed sum and they can operate as many flights as they want, including night flights. The more flights they operate, the lower their unit costs.

With respect to night flights, I think there should be a substantial surcharge so that the true environmental and social cost are reflected in the total cost.

Mr. Richard Boehnke:

In my view, it would be simply be that we not play airport. I've always found you shouldn't stick your nose where it doesn't belong, and you always dance with the one you came with.

We're dealing here with a problem they have, and that is noise. I've always managed to steer clear of all the other aspects of their business relationships, because that's neither my expertise nor my business.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

That's good life advice, I think, Madam Chair.

The Chair:

For a lot of things.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Yes.

I'll end with a comment.

I'm from Edmonton, and the airport there is expanding its commercial business. There's certainly a growing cargo piece to it, but it's about half an hour or 45 minutes away from the first home within the city of Edmonton. I constantly hear that the airport is too far from the city limits. The city is expanding and it's growing closer to it, but it's interesting to hear your perspective from the GTA, because we face quite a different perspective in Edmonton.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll move on to Mr. Sikand for about three minutes or so.

Mr. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Okay. I'll move pretty quickly.

I represent a riding called Mississauga—Streetsville, which on your map is Highway 40 at Meadowvale and 45 and 48 near Streetsville, so this is definitely a concern to my residents.

We have Hamilton, which is underutilized; Pickering is a bit farther outside the GTA, but we have a lot of land just north of the 407 and the escarpment, and Metrolinx has preliminary plans to get more rail out that way.

Is there a conversation that should be had about whether an airport can go up past the escarpment, up north there?

I'll start with you, Peter.

Mr. Peter Bayrachny:

Certainly we need to have a conversation, and when we talk about airports being too far or too close and the centres of communities, if you look at the major centres such as Chicago, you see O'Hare and Midway. They're an hour apart, two hours in traffic.

Toronto is the same way. If you try to get from Whitby to Pearson, it's a two-hour ride at any particular time, so—

(0935)

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Sorry; I don't mean to cut you off. It's just because I have limited time.

Is that yes or no?

Mr. Peter Bayrachny:

Yes, absolutely.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

If that were the case, Tom, could we talk about fragmenting the type of flights then, if you had that proximity to Pearson?

Mr. Tom Driedger:

It's very difficult. Airlines have alliance partners. They use flights domestically that will fly out internationally. Split operations are not very efficient or useful.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Mr. Wrzesnewskyj, you have a minute and 30 seconds.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

I'd like to follow up on the whole question of accountability.

The GTAA has a lack of trust when it comes to relations with the community. As was mentioned, this noise committee appears to be a facade. They are a regional monopoly. They appear to not be accountable to anyone. They are an arm's-length non-profit, so we don't even see a lot of the inner workings and decision-making.

You've lived in the neighbourhood for a very long time. At the end of the day, it's a federal responsibility. Do you feel that Transport Canada has lived up to its responsibilities to the electorate in your neighbourhoods?

Mr. Richard Boehnke:

There's little evidence of it.

Mr. Peter Bayrachny:

I would say no. I agree.

Mr. Tom Driedger:

They no longer have the ability to understand how airports operate. Years ago, there was this flow of people from regions to airports to headquarters, and Transport Canada was knowledgeable. That knowledge is gone now. There is no airports branch.

I don't think they really have a deep understanding of the way they operate and how they affect people, and it appears to me that they do not have the mindset to go after the airlines and the airports to make the tough decisions. They should be the ones who are leading the charge, but I get the feeling that Transport Canada is in the corner with the airline industry, and the community is on the outside looking in.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Thank you so much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We have a very tight meeting today, because we have to be in the House by 10 o'clock.

The witnesses can just stay for a moment.

Rather than go in camera, I'm going to ask the committee about a suggestion we have of an additional meeting on the study we're doing and that we invite Transport Canada, Air Canada and WestJet. We've had some interest from them, and they are part of this issue as well.

Do we have everybody's approval to schedule one more meeting with some of the airlines and Transport Canada?

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Could I make a suggestion that if we have Air Canada and WestJet here, we get somebody who is a decision-maker from those two companies, and not their GR guys?

The Chair:

I certainly will put in the request.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Madam Chair—

Mr. Ron Liepert:

I would suggest, actually, that we do more than put in a request. We as a committee have the right to call witnesses, and when we ask these companies, so often we get their GR guys who say, “Well, it's not my decision.”

I'd like decision-makers, whether it's the CEO or the COO. If we're going to take our time, let's get decision-makers at the table, and not their GR guys.

The Chair:

That's a terrific suggestion.

Go ahead, Borys.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

I support this. Of course, we should be judicious in using this, but we do have subpoena powers as committees.

I'd also like to suggest Nav Canada. They are a very important part of this particular puzzle.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

I think they're already on it.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Oh, they're on the roster.

The Chair:

Yes, they're on next Tuesday.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

They're crucial to this.

The Chair:

On one other committee business item—

Sorry; go ahead, Monsieur Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Are we talking about an additional hour or an additional meeting, or two hours of committee? [English]

The Chair:

It would need to be a two-hour block. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Okay. [English]

The Chair:

You have a budget in front of you that needs to be adopted for this study. Everybody is in agreement with that.

As just a reminder, the preliminary recommendations on our interim trade corridors report should be in by November 1, if possible.

We are having the first nations come later on in November, but our analysts say they can move forward on that report and add to it following that other meeting.

Wellington is blocked off, but our buses are there.

The committee is adjourned.

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

[Énregistrement électronique]

(0845)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

Je déclare ouverte la séance du Comité permanent des transports, de l’infrastructure et des collectivités. Nous faisons une étude sur l’évaluation de l’incidence du bruit des avions à proximité des grands aéroports.

Avant de présenter les témoins, je vais laisser mon collègue faire une remarque.

M. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, PCC):

Merci, madame la présidente.

La question n'intéresse pas directement le Comité des transports, mais c'est tout de même une question de transport. Je crois que beaucoup d’entre vous avaient été invités hier soir à la projection de First Man, le premier homme sur la lune. Nous n’étions pas nombreux, mais certains d’entre nous y sont allés. Le ministre a pris la parole et il s'en est très bien tiré, tout comme notre futur astronaute, David Saint-Jacques. Nous avons vu notre astronaute actuel, Ryan Gosling, jouer Neil Armstrong dans First Man. Nous étions là, environ 45 minutes après le début du film, et la fusée venait à peine de décoller. Le bruit était infernal, avec toutes sortes de sons absolument dingues, en plus d'un bip... bip... incessant. Tout à coup, l’écran s’est éteint, les lumières se sont allumées et l'alarme incendie a sonné.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Ron Liepert: Toute la salle, soit quelque 500 spectateurs, nous nous sommes retrouvés à cailler, debout dans la rue. Certains, dont moi, nous ne nous sommes pas donné la peine d'attendre pour voir si l'astronaute alunirait ou pas. J'ignore quel a été le dénouement, mais le fin mot de l'histoire, madame la présidente, c'est qu'on m'a fait cadeau de cette paire de chaussettes.

La présidente:

Oh! Regardez-moi comme elles sont superbes!

M. Ron Liepert:

Je vais les déclarer auprès de la commissaire à l’éthique.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

La présidente:

J’aurais aimé avoir une caméra à ce moment-là.

M. Ron Liepert:

Je pense qu’il y a une autre paire de chaussettes gratuites qui traîne dans le coin.

Une voix: Il a réussi.

M. Ron Liepert: Il a réussi? Oh, vous êtes retourné à la salle. Combien de temps est-ce que ça a duré?

Une voix: Oui, nous y avons été. Il y en a eu pour 50 minutes.

La présidente:

Très bien.

Merci beaucoup d’avoir porté cela à l’attention de tout le monde.

Ce matin, nous accueillons Peter Bayrachny, représentant de Neighbours Against the Airplane Noise, et à titre personnel, Richard Boehnke et Tom Driedger. Bienvenue à tous.

Peter, voulez-vous commencer? Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Peter Bayrachny (représentant, Neighbours Against the Airplane Noise):

Madame la présidente, mesdames et messieurs, je vous remercie de m’avoir invité à comparaître devant vous aujourd’hui. Je suis très heureux que le Comité ait choisi d’étudier cet important sujet qui touche les Canadiens qui vivent à proximité des aéroports.

Le bruit est la première chose que les gens remarquent, dont ils se plaignent ou dont ils discutent au sujet des aéroports avoisinants. Je réside à Markland Wood, le quartier résidentiel le plus proche de l’aéroport international Pearson, qui est actuellement géré par l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto, la GTAA.

Je dois également souligner que tous les quartiers avoisinants sont touchés par le bruit de la GTAA et ne devraient pas être exclus de cette étude. Cependant, mon expérience étant celle d’un résidant d’un quartier concret, je me limiterai à parler des effets de l’aéroport Pearson et de la gestion de la GTAA.

La GTAA a annoncé son intention de doubler le trafic aérien d’ici 2040. Cela signifie qu’il y aura une augmentation proportionnelle du bruit des aéronefs dans l’ensemble. L’aéroport Pearson et de nombreux grands aéroports sont enclavés et ne peuvent pas être élargis pour gagner plus d’espace. La seule forme d'expansion dans une infrastructure existante est d’accroître le nombre de décollages et d’atterrissages, ce qui ne fera qu'accentuer le problème du bruit, qui est déjà grave.

Je crois que si des comités parlementaires comme celui-ci se concentraient uniquement sur la question fondamentale du bruit, vous rendriez un très mauvais service aux Canadiens qui vivent à proximité de ces aéroports. Le bruit n’est que l’un des problèmes auxquels les résidants sont confrontés. À cela s’ajoutent les effets de ces niveaux élevés et répétitifs de bruit sur la santé des êtres humains qui vivent dans les environs, ainsi que l’impact des interruptions de sommeil causées par le bruit des aéronefs.

À ce jour, personne, ni Santé Canada ni des experts-conseils indépendants, n'ont mené une étude sur les effets des niveaux actuels du bruit sur les humains au cours des 10 dernières années ou sur les niveaux de bruit plus élevés qui seront observés à l’avenir, comme le proposent la GTAA et d’autres aéroports. Parler du bruit ne sert à rien si on ne tient pas compte des effets actuels et futurs sur la population vivant à proximité de ces aéroports.

Il est important de mentionner les vols de nuit, un sujet qui préoccupe énormément tous ceux qui résident à proximité d’un aéroport, surtout de l'aéroport Pearson. Les interdictions de vol de nuit devraient être instaurées dans les grands aéroports du Canada. Un certain nombre de grands aéroports dans le monde ont des interdictions de vol de nuit, y compris l’aéroport de Heathrow, le troisième aéroport en importance dans le monde, et l’aéroport de Francfort, le neuvième en importance. Les deux ont des interdictions de vol de nuit, c’est-à-dire aucun vol au-delà de 23 h. Ce devrait être la norme, et non l’exception.

Si l’on pousse plus loin le thème du bruit et des effets sur la santé humaine, il y a l’effet environnemental de l’augmentation du trafic aérien. Il faudrait aussi coordonner les études sur les effets de la pollution par les gaz d’échappement et les effets environnementaux de l’augmentation du trafic, car nous ne disposons actuellement d’aucune donnée pertinente à ce sujet. Environnement Canada, en collaboration avec Santé Canada, devrait établir des stations de surveillance autour des grands aéroports comme Pearson pour recueillir des données sur le bruit et la pollution. La mesure est essentielle pour la prise de décisions futures sur des sujets importants comme l’augmentation du trafic aérien et ses effets.

Regardons maintenant vers l’avenir. Pourquoi la GTAA veut-elle une augmentation du trafic aérien? La réponse, c’est le revenu. Comme l’a dit Hillary Marshall, de la GTAA, l’organisation a une dette d’environ 5 milliards de dollars. Nous avons une société sans but lucratif qui ne peut survivre que si elle obtient plus de revenus, ce qui s’est traduit par une augmentation du trafic aérien. Avec la croissance démographique, la taille actuelle et les projections de Toronto, nous sommes déjà la quatrième région métropolitaine en importance en Amérique du Nord, ayant dépassé récemment Chicago.

Au lieu d’essayer d’augmenter le trafic aérien dans le même espace à Pearson, pourquoi ne pas ajouter un autre aéroport? Toutes les cinq plus grandes villes d’Amérique du Nord ont au moins deux grands aéroports, à l’exception de Toronto. La GTAA n’appuierait pas cette idée. Elle doit récupérer son énorme dette de 5 milliards de dollars. Nous avons des solutions de rechange comme Pickering, avec des terrains que le gouvernement fédéral possède déjà, ou un aéroport existant à Hamilton, qui pourrait grandir et augmenter la capacité de trafic dans la région de Toronto pour les années à venir.

En conclusion, j’aimerais énoncer les faits.

Le gouvernement fédéral a cédé le contrôle et la gestion de nombreux grands aéroports canadiens à des sociétés privées. Ce n’est pas une question partisane; ce problème a été présent sous de nombreux gouvernements, tant libéraux que conservateurs. Je crois que le bruit dans les aéroports, les effets sur la santé et les questions environnementales devraient être surveillés et gérés par le gouvernement, et non par des sociétés comme la GTAA, qui n’ont qu’un seul objectif, soit l’augmentation des revenus.

Je suggère que dans son rapport, le Comité formule des recommandations en vue de légiférer de sorte que l'on puisse exercer davantage de contrôle sur des entités comme la GTAA et que le gouvernement ait la capacité de contrôler le bruit, les effets sur la santé et la pollution et la façon dont ils affectent les citoyens par et pour lesquels vous avez été élus.

(0850)



Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur.

Monsieur Boehnke, voulez-vous prendre la parole?

M. Richard Boehnke (à titre personnel):

Oui.

Bonjour.

Je m’appelle Richard Hermann Boehnke et je viens d’Etobicoke. Je remercie le Comité permanent de m’avoir invité à lui faire part de mon point de vue sur le bruit des aéronefs.

Mes voisins et moi habitons au sud de l’aéroport international Lester B. Pearson, aussi connu sous le nom de Toronto Pearson ou de « petit timbre-poste » pour les moins aimables. Depuis la trentaine d'années que je fais affaire avec l’Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto au sujet de son principal élément pollueur, soit le bruit des aéronefs, j’ai conclu qu’il y a deux mesures qui s'imposent pour améliorer la situation des résidants de Toronto à ce chapitre.

En ce XXIe  siècle, il faut d’abord que Santé Canada établisse et applique des normes de santé humaine face au bruit des avions. Une fois établies, ces normes doivent servir à créer une allocation fixe et permanente de vols de nuit afin de remplacer la formule variable, qui est de plus en plus répandue de nos jours et qui prévoit un seuil tellement élevé qu'il est garanti que le taux ne pourra jamais être baissé à dessein.

C’est ironique, étant donné que l’on insiste de plus en plus sur l'importance du sommeil, et presque tout le monde sait que la privation de sommeil entraîne une augmentation de la tension artérielle, de l’anxiété, des changements d’humeur, des difficultés de concentration, etc. L’atteinte de cet objectif en matière de bruit et de santé établirait clairement des réponses scientifiques aux plaintes relatives au bruit dans la collectivité, et permettrait de prévoir les déplacements des aéronefs la nuit, en fonction de données scientifiques sur la santé. Un sommeil sain est un besoin humain fondamental au même titre qu'une bonne nourriture, de l’eau potable et un logement sûr.

De plus, je suis certain que de telles normes sanitaires existent déjà dans l’Union européenne, par exemple, ce qui évite à Santé Canada de consacrer beaucoup de temps et d’argent à des études complexes. Santé Canada doit surveiller et faire respecter ces normes afin que le public ait la certitude que le gouvernement les protège contre les dangers connus attribuables au bruit.

Pour la première fois, on obtiendrait ainsi des indications utiles sur les plans d’expansion qui tiendraient compte des esquisses économiques des planificateurs d’affaires de l’aéroport Pearson de Toronto, qui visent à atteindre leur cible de 90 millions de passagers, mais accordant tout autant d'importance à des considérations relatives à la santé humaine. Après tout, si on trouve que c’est déjà bruyant avec 45 millions de passagers, imaginez ce qu'il en serait avec les allées et venues de 90 millions de personnes chaque année.

Enfin, si ce qui précède n’est pas suffisamment alarmant pour le Comité, il s'agirait de jeter un coup d’oeil sur la question de la sécurité. J’ai constaté que Transports Canada souhaite diminuer sa participation à la surveillance directe des pilotes s'il faut compter avec 45 millions de passagers de plus à leur arrivée à Toronto, et aussi que le système de gestion de la sécurité n’a pas l'appui inconditionnel de ceux qui y participent. On entend également parler de décennies de retard dans l’adoption de ceintures de sécurité pour les autobus scolaires et d’un manque de leadership en ce qui a trait à la formation des conducteurs de camions au Canada. Ensuite, on parle des plans d'expansion de l’aéroport sans avoir fait d’études d’impact. Tout cela inquiète vraiment le public.

D’autres vous ont parlé des problèmes de financement de Transports Canada, des compressions constantes, des plans d’autoréglementation envisagés pour remplacer la surveillance directe dans le poste de pilotage et des préoccupations générales concernant le manque apparent d’accès du public à l’examen des responsabilités de Transports Canada en matière d’application de la loi. Ce ministère a beaucoup de travail à faire et il a sans doute besoin de l’aide du Comité permanent.

Je vous remercie de m'avoir donné l’occasion de vous faire part de mes commentaires et de mes suggestions. Aidez-nous avant que l'expansion ne finisse de se cimenter. Faites imposer des normes sanitaires en matière de bruit.[Français]

Je vous remercie.

(0855)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

C’est au tour de M. Driedger.

M. Tom Driedger:

Merci.

Mon intérêt pour le bruit dans les aéroports vient de deux sources. Tout d’abord, j’habite près de l’aéroport et, deuxièmement, j’ai fait carrière dans les aéroports, ayant passé les 30 dernières années, à Pearson, surtout dans le domaine de la planification. Mon sujet aujourd’hui est l’augmentation des vols de nuit et partant, des aléas qui vont avec, dont l'agacement, la perturbation du sommeil et la détérioration de la qualité de vie.

En 1996, il y avait environ 9 600 vols au cours de la période comprise entre 12 h 30 et 6 h 30. En 1997, la première année complète qui a suivi le transfert de l’aéroport à l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto, la GTAA, le budget des vols de nuit a été fixé à 10 300. À l’heure actuelle, en s’appuyant sur une formule étrange en vertu de laquelle le budget des vols de nuit augmente proportionnellement à la croissance du nombre de passagers, Transports Canada permet qu’il y ait plus de 19 000 vols pendant la nuit.

Comparez ces chiffres à ceux d'autres aéroports. Francfort impose une interdiction absolue. Heathrow en autorise 5 800, mais cela dépend d'un budget de quotas de bruit en diminution. Montréal interdit les gros aéronefs de plus de 45 000 kilos, ce qui réduit la dose de bruit globale.

Bien que l’industrie aéronautique aime souligner que le budget restreint le nombre des vols de nuit, un nombre restreint qui augmente chaque année n’est qu’une limitation temporaire. À long terme, cette limitation devient purement théorique.

Dans l’espoir d’attirer plus de clients, la GTAA a déterminé que la croissance naturelle du budget n’était pas suffisante pour répondre à la demande et a sollicité l'approbation de Transports Canada pour trois augmentations de 10 %, ce que le ministère lui a accordé en 2013. Bien que cette augmentation n’ait pas encore été appliquée, elle demeure autorisée.

J’aimerais illustrer la nature et la gravité du bruit de nuit à l’aide du graphique qui est affiché au mur. Dans le coin inférieur droit, vous voyez un avion survolant un carré, c’est-à-dire la station de surveillance du bruit située dans le parc Garnetwood, qui est juste au nord de Markham, d’où viennent ces deux messieurs, et au sud d’un autre secteur résidentiel de Mississauga, que l’avion survolera en route vers l’aéroport. Le niveau de bruit est de 80 décibels, soit un bruit équivalent à celui d’un réveil-matin.

En dessous, vous verrez un autre avion qui arrivera à la station de surveillance du bruit environ deux minutes plus tard, et ensuite, un autre et encore un autre.

Au milieu, il y a un panneau qui montre de l’information sur l’avion. Il montre l’élévation, qui est de 1 480 pieds. C’est un peu trompeur, parce que c’est calculé au-dessus du niveau de la mer. En fait, il se trouve à moins de 1 000 pieds. Vous remarquerez l’origine de ce vol, qui est Puerto Vallarta, et l’heure, 3 h 18.

Le budget actuel des vols de nuit est déraisonnable. Il doit y avoir une limite absolue au nombre de vols et au bruit maximal permis. Les vols de nuit devraient être traités comme une ressource rare et décroissante à utiliser judicieusement, et non comme une ressource utilisée sans limites. Il est inacceptable que l’industrie profite d'avantages économiques toujours croissants alors que la collectivité supporte tous les coûts sociaux et environnementaux, qui ne font que croître eux aussi.

Certains vols de nuit sont importants pour le bien-être économique de la région, mais il faut concilier les désirs de l’industrie et les besoins de la collectivité. Je doute que l’économie serait en péril si les vols en provenance des destinations de vacances ne pouvaient pas atterrir au milieu de la nuit.

J’ai quelques suggestions d’amélioration. Premièrement, supprimer la disposition concernant l’augmentation annuelle du budget des vols de nuit et celle qui se rapporte aux trois augmentations.

Deuxièmement, sur une période de transition de cinq ans, ramener progressivement le budget des vols de nuit à la limite de 9 600 déplacements qui était en place lorsque Transports Canada a exploité l’aéroport pour la dernière fois et adopter des mesures pour gérer à la fois la dose annuelle totale de bruit et les niveaux de bruit maximaux admissibles pour chaque vol.

Troisièmement, il faudrait imposer une surtaxe substantielle sur les vols de nuit afin que les coûts sociaux et environnementaux véritables des vols de nuit soient reflétés dans le coût total. La mesure devrait s’appliquer à toutes les compagnies aériennes, y compris à celles qui paient à l’heure actuelle une somme fixe annuelle pour exercer leurs activités à l'aéroport Pearson.

Il ne fait pas de doute que l’industrie protestera vigoureusement contre toute modification du régime actuel, car il lui faudra alors prendre des décisions quant aux vols à exploiter et aux vols à laisser tomber.

(0900)



Il est cependant nécessaire d’apporter des modifications et d’adopter une nouvelle réglementation afin que les intérêts des collectivités situées à proximité des aéroports ne soient plus subordonnés aux intérêts de l’industrie, qu'il s'agisse de Pearson ou de tout autre aéroport .

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup à tous.

Nous allons passer aux questions et à M. Liepert.

M. Ron Liepert:

Merci, madame la présidente. Je vais partager mon temps avec ma collègue, Mme Block.

Je vais poser une question fondamentale à laquelle tout le monde pourra répondre.

Je représente une circonscription de Calgary qui est loin de l’aéroport. Cependant, avec l'aménagement d'une deuxième piste, la trajectoire des vols a changé, et j’ai maintenant des électeurs aux prises avec un trafic aérien qu’ils n’ont jamais eu auparavant. Je ne peux pas faire de commentaires spécifiquement sur Toronto, mais sachez que comme député, je rencontre des gens qui ont ce genre de préoccupations, même si elles ne sont peut-être pas aussi intenses.

Un aspect qui me travaille, c’est le fait que nous sommes un peu victimes de notre propre succès. L’une des raisons pour lesquelles on a aménagé une deuxième grande piste d’atterrissage à Calgary était la demande. J’ai dit à d’autres témoins l’autre jour que nous avons maintenant trois vols par jour entre Calgary et Palm Springs, et on compte en rajouter deux autres parce qu’ils sont pleins. La demande est donc là. Aussi, la manière d'acheter a beaucoup changé, et le consommateur n'a plus besoin de se rendre à un centre d'achat. Il se fait livrer du jour au lendemain par Amazon.

J’aimerais avoir un commentaire général sur la question que voici: si nous examinons certaines des choses que vous proposez tous, quelles seraient les répercussions sur le milieu des affaires et sur la capacité de livraison rapide que souhaite le consommateur?

M. Peter Bayrachny:

Si vous n’y voyez pas d’inconvénient, je peux être le premier à répondre.

C’est très simple, monsieur. L’aéroport de Hamilton peut alléger la GTAA d'une partie du trafic qu'elle connaît actuellement. Hamilton a été, et demeure, une plaque tournante du fret pour certains transporteurs, dont UPS. La GTAA a obtenu des clients à force de surenchère, au détriment de Hamilton. Je reviens à sa dette de 5 milliards de dollars. Elle doit pouvoir la rembourser, et la seule façon de le faire, c’est d’avoir accès à plus d’entreprises.

Pour répondre à votre question, si nous augmentions la capacité de Hamilton, par exemple, dans la région de Toronto — il s’agit d’une plaque tournante pour le fret —, nous pourrions prévoir un plus grand nombre de vols, car les marchandises sont habituellement expédiées par vols de nuit ou vols nolisés. Au début, Hamilton était un carrefour des vols nolisés, et c’est encore le cas dans une certaine mesure. Cependant, la GTAA soumissionne pour ce genre d'affaires et l'emporte sur les autres aéroports. C’est là le fond du problème.

(0905)

M. Ron Liepert:

Pourrions-nous avoir quelques autres observations, s’il vous plaît?

M. Richard Boehnke:

Je n'ai aucun intérêt, pas plus d'ailleurs que la plupart des gens avec qui je travaille, à restreindre les activités commerciales canadiennes de quelque façon que ce soit, mais si le produit d'une entreprise présente un danger connu, nous devons vraiment déterminer à quel point il est dangereux et à quel niveau il peut être introduit en toute sécurité. S’ils ajoutent, dans notre cas, 45 millions de passagers ou, dans votre cas, une nouvelle piste, ce qui importe de savoir, c'est la norme à laquelle ils doivent se conformer.

À l’heure actuelle, on laisse les choses évoluer sans trop de contraintes, avec le résultat que les activités ne cessent d'augmenter. Nous savons — nous le savons — qu’il y a des dangers inhérents à cela, et nous voulons donc que la situation soit bien définie.

M. Tom Driedger:

La situation était semblable à celle de l’aéroport Pearson dans les années 1990, et on a construit une nouvelle piste. Sachant que la nouvelle piste toucherait des personnes jusqu'alors épargnées par le bruit, ils ont imposé des restrictions. En gros, ils ont dit que la nouvelle piste ne serait utilisée que lorsque les vents empêcheraient l’utilisation des pistes est-ouest. Le ministère des Transports fait maintenant marche arrière à cet égard, mais c’est là une autre question.

Dans le cas de Calgary, il serait peut-être possible de privilégier une piste plutôt que l’autre. Peut-être qu'on pourrait en désigner une pour les arrivées et une pour les départs. Je ne sais pas, mais pour tout dire, une nouvelle piste a été aménagée pour aider les entreprises en croissance et cela a eu une incidence sur un plus grand nombre de personnes. Là est le dilemme. Voilà la dichotomie du problème auquel nous sommes confrontés: favoriser la croissance de l’économie ou tenir compte des facteurs humains.

La présidente:

C’est au tour de Mme Block.

Mme Kelly Block (Sentier Carlton—Eagle Creek, PCC):

Dans le témoignage de mardi, nous avons entendu des solutions et des propositions de déplacement éventuel d'activités commerciales, comme le fret aérien, vers des aéroports plus éloignés du périmètre d’une ville. Je me demande si vous pourriez nous parler de la faisabilité économique de déplacer des opérations comme le fret aérien vers un endroit comme Hamilton, par exemple.

M. Tom Driedger:

Je pense que ce serait difficile parce que les entreprises de fret se sont dotées de grandes installations à Pearson. FedEx a une installation énorme. Vista Cargo est là. De plus, une grande quantité de fret arrive dans la soute des avions de passagers.

L’autre point, c’est que ces entreprises ont déménagé de Hamilton à Pearson non seulement pour des raisons économiques, mais aussi parce que Pearson est plus près du marché. Les entreprises veulent être à proximité du marché.

La présidente:

C’est au tour de M. Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Au cours de notre séance précédente, nous avons abordé la question des décisions municipales en matière d’utilisation du sol qui ouvrent la porte à des aménagements résidentiels dans des secteurs où le bruit et les perturbations sont possibles. Un facteur qui doit entrer en ligne de compte, c’est bien la présence d'un aéroport. Il est peu probable qu'il disparaisse ou soit remplacé par quelque chose qui serait sans doute très coûteux et qui ne se ferait pas du jour au lendemain. S'agissant des vols de nuit, est-ce qu’il y a quelque chose à faire pour soulager les résidants le long de la trajectoire de vol?

Songez que, dans les immeubles à bureaux, l'aménagement de bureaux à aire ouverte comprend souvent des dispositifs de suppression du bruit qui réduisent le niveau de bruit ambiant et permettent aux gens de travailler dans un cubicule quelque part. De tels dispositifs ne seraient-ils pas disponibles pour les résidences touchées afin de réduire dans une certaine mesure le bruit pendant la nuit et d’aider les gens à dormir? Y a-t-il des réflexions à ce sujet ou quelqu’un a-t-il envisagé cette possibilité?

M. Peter Bayrachny:

Avec tout mon respect, monsieur Hardie, je vous invite à venir chez moi quand passent les vols de nuit. Vous me direz ensuite si, oui ou non, ces dispositifs peuvent supprimer le bruit d'un avion, empêcher les fenêtres de trembler, etc. Markland et les autres quartiers autour de l’aéroport existaient déjà avant l’expansion de l’aéroport. Comme M. Boehnke l’a dit, il est temps de contrôler, à tout le moins, ses répercussions.

(0910)

M. Ken Hardie:

À cet égard, on sait aussi que la tolérance au bruit varie d'une personne à l'autre. Certaines personnes peuvent dormir n'importe où et d’autres non.

Ne serait-il pas également utile de regarder du côté des transactions immobilières et d’exiger, dans la description de propriétés à vendre, une mention du couloir aérien afin que les gens en soient conscients? Trop souvent, les gens s'installent dans un secteur sans vraiment comprendre la dynamique du bruit, qu’il s’agisse d’une gare de triage ferroviaire, d’un itinéraire de camion ou d’un couloir aérien. Cela ne devrait-il pas également faire partie de l’équation, lorsque nous étudier les moyens d’atténuer la situation actuelle?

M. Peter Bayrachny:

Une telle mesure entraînerait une diminution de la valeur des propriétés. Nous serions alors assis ici à parler du bruit et de la valeur nette des propriétaires du fait que la présence du couloir aérien serait divulguée dans la description des propriétés à vendre. La plupart des agents immobiliers savent où se trouvent les couloirs aériens à Toronto, par exemple. Il en est de la même à Montréal et, j'en suis sûr, à Calgary...

M. Ken Hardie:

L'agent immobilier le divulguerait-il à un acheteur éventuel?

M. Peter Bayrachny:

Eh bien, je pense que oui. Il ne serait pas vraiment un agent immobilier s’il ne le faisait pas.

M. Ken Hardie:

On ne sait jamais.

Quel rôle Toronto et les collectivités avoisinantes peuvent-elles jouer pour tenter d’atténuer la situation actuelle?

M. Richard Boehnke:

Je dirais que lorsqu’il y a une norme, on peut prendre ce genre de décision. Tant que nous n’aurons pas au Canada une norme mesurable, scientifique et axée sur la santé humaine de ce qui est acceptable et de ce qui ne l’est pas, nous ne pourrons pas vraiment prendre cette décision. On tâche d'agir de quelque façon tout simplement parce que c’est bruyant. Eh bien, « bruyant » ne nous dit pas grand-chose.

C’est pourquoi je continue d’insister sur cette petite mesure simple devant laquelle nous hésitons, parce que cela commencerait à resserrer la situation. Lorsque les gens appellent pour se plaindre du bruit, l’autorité aéroportuaire peut bien dire: « Eh bien, ça ne dépassait pas la norme. » C’est une réponse légitime.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je crois, monsieur, que la prochaine fois qu’une ville voisine de l’aéroport décide de rezoner des terrains industriels pour permettre la construction de maisons en rangée, quelqu’un devrait soulever ce point.

M. Richard Boehnke:

Je suis d’accord, mais le fait est que la situation des gens ne changera pas, que ce soit les Torontois qui vivront là-bas ou les gens de l’Ouest. Nous avons toujours besoin de ce facteur pour prendre la décision d'exiger la mention d'un couloir aérien, comme d'une mise en garde, d'un signe sinistre.

M. Ken Hardie:

Avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter, monsieur Driedger?

M. Tom Driedger:

Beaucoup des nouvelles maisons situées autour de l’aéroport ont déjà une mention de la pollution par le bruit inscrite dans leur titre de propriété, surtout celles situées à l’ouest. Des secteurs de Mississauga ont fait l'objet d'une contestation devant la CAMO, qui a débouté la Région du Grand Toronto. Les maisons ont été construites.

Le développement domiciliaire est maintenant chose faite. On peut faire du rafistolage, peut-être par des aménagements intercalaires ou des réaménagements, mais ce que vous voyez, c’est ce qui va rester. Mardi, M. Novak a parlé des contours de la PAS et du fait qu’ils étaient désuets et ne reflétaient plus la norme. Il a dit qu’ils étaient déjà désuets en 1976.

Cela crée un problème pour le gouvernement parce que de nouvelles normes pourraient être adoptées qui rendraient certains secteurs bâtis impropres au logement. Que peut faire le gouvernement? En revanche...

D’accord, merci.

La présidente:

Merci. Nous allons manquer de temps.

C’est au tour de M. Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NPD):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie nos invités d'être parmi nous.

Je vais plonger dans le vif du sujet parce que le temps passe vite.

Transports Canada demande aux aéroports d'avoir des comités de gestion du bruit auxquels siègent des citoyens. Peut-être avez-vous même déjà siégé à un de ces comités.

Ma première question est la suivante. Est-ce cela se résume à un spectacle public, ou est-ce que cela donne réellement des résultats concrets pour les citoyens qui vivent dans le voisinage d'un aéroport?

Vous pouvez répondre à tour de rôle. [Traduction]

M. Tom Driedger:

J’aimerais faire un commentaire à ce sujet.

Je crois que vous avez utilisé le mot « façade », et je ne pense pas que ce soit inapproprié. Ces comités ne sont pas des comités qui vont agir, et il n’y a pas de résultats concrets.

À titre d’exemple, la GTAA vient de présenter son plan d’action pour la gestion du bruit. Et, pour ce qui est d’aider ses voisins à dormir la nuit, que va-t-elle faire? Elle va publier un rapport soulignant la nécessité économique des vols de nuit. Elle va également envisager d’augmenter les droits d’atterrissage dans les créneaux de vol de nuit, tout en élaborant des programmes incitatifs pour une flotte aérienne plus silencieuse. Il me semble qu’elle va soutirer de l’argent aux compagnies aériennes pour les vols de nuit et le leur redonner pour qu’elles puissent adapter leurs appareils, ce qui me semble bizarre. Elle parle aussi d’explorer immédiatement les changements à apporter aux restrictions de vols de nuit.

C’est un club de discussion. Il a pour objet d'apaiser le public, mais je ne pense pas que le comité, dans sa forme actuelle, soit un moyen efficace de gérer le bruit. C’est la prérogative du gouvernement, de Transports Canada et de l’industrie, qui ne songent pas tellement à la gestion du bruit.

(0915)

[Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie.

Monsieur Bayrachny, voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose? [Traduction]

M. Peter Bayrachny:

Oui, j’ai aussi une observation à faire à ce sujet. Votre description de « façade » — j'entérine ce qu'a dit l’intervenant précédent — est exacte. Ce comité sur le bruit, si vous vous arrêtez aux membres qui y siègent — et j’en ai rencontré quelques-uns —, vous constaterez qu'ils viennent de Whitby, d’Ajax et de Scarborough, et de nombreuses régions loin de l'aéroport. Au moment de la formation du comité — je cite celui de Markland Wood en exemple —, il n’y avait pas un seul membre de Markland Wood ou de la région de Tom.

M. Richard Boehnke:

Au cours des 30 années de ma collaboration avec le comité de gestion du bruit de la GTAA — cela est consigné dans ses procès-verbaux —, j’ai demandé à plusieurs reprises, au cours de réunions successives, s’il y avait eu une réduction d’un seul décibel à la suite du travail qu’il avait fait au cours des 30 années pendant lesquelles j'avais soulevé la question. La réponse a été non. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie.

En ce qui a trait aux normes dont vous parliez, je suis d'accord sur le fait que lorsqu'on veut tenter de solutionner un problème, il faut le faire à partir de données probantes. Nous avons l'exemple d'un avion qui émet un bruit d'une puissance de 80 décibels, alors que l'OMS dit que la moyenne devrait se situer autour de 55 décibels. On constate déjà un écart colossal.

Nous avons des données quant au bruit pur. Quant aux effets sur la santé, c'est plus ténu. À votre avis, ne serait-il pas approprié de la part de ce comité de recommander à Santé Canada de faire une étude concrète qui nous apporterait des données probantes sur les effets sur la santé de la pollution par le bruit? [Traduction]

M. Peter Bayrachny:

Oui. Je suis d’accord à 110 %.

M. Tom Driedger:

Mardi, M. Novak nous a dit que le problème, c'était la privation de sommeil. Il a insisté sur le fait qu’il s’agissait d’une cause majeure d’irritation.

La présidente:

Il vous reste une minute. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

On en parle un peu moins présentement, mais il y a toujours possibilité que le gouvernement privatise les aéroports. On est passé d'une gestion par Transports Canada à une gestion par des administrations portuaires.

Que pensez-vous de l'idée qu'on puisse un jour privatiser les aéroports? Cela va-t-il empirer la situation? [Traduction]

M. Tom Driedger:

Je n’y suis pas favorable. La dévolution de la responsabilité des aéroports à des administrations aéroportuaires a éloigné les gens de l’autorité décisionnelle. Le fait de confier cette responsabilité au secteur privé ne ferait qu’empirer les choses, puisque vous auriez alors à composer avec tout ce que prévoient les documents juridiques. Je suis certain que la collectivité n’aurait pas l’importance qu’elle a actuellement, qui est déjà beaucoup moindre que celle qu’elle avait auparavant.

M. Richard Boehnke:

C’est une raison de plus d’avoir une norme en place, parce que s'il y a privatisation, on peut être sûr qu’ils feront tout en leur pouvoir pour empêcher la restriction du trafic aérien.

M. Peter Bayrachny:

Je suis d’accord. C’est une question de revenu pour eux. Il n'est pas question pour eux des personnes, de leur santé ou de quoi que ce soit d’autre. Cela n’entre pas en ligne de compte.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

M. Iacono est le suivant.

M. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur Peter, en 2017, vous avez été interviewé par Radio-Canada, et si vous me permettez de vous citer, vous avez dit qu'il y avait une certaine terminologie, qu’ils appellent « répartition de bruit » et qu'ils commencent à vouloir vendre ce concept. Pouvez-vous nous en dire davantage sur cette terminologie et sur ses caractéristiques, tant positives que négatives?

M. Peter Bayrachny:

Cette idée est venue de la GTAA et de Helios, qui était un consultant embauché par la GTAA pour étudier le bruit.

La répartition du bruit est une méthode par laquelle on prend les secteurs problématiques de la GTAA, c’est-à-dire les pistes est-ouest, et on déplace le bruit. Tout à coup, les pistes nord-sud, qui sont beaucoup plus près de l’aéroport, reçoivent leur part du bruit. En fin de compte, Helios, dans son rapport final publié le 11 septembre, a déclaré que la répartition du bruit était une mauvaise idée. Il s’agit de prendre un problème, de l’étendre et de le répartir. J’exhorte tous les membres du Comité à lire ce rapport; il est très important.

J’espère avoir répondu à votre question.

(0920)

M. Angelo Iacono:

Savez-vous s’il a été utilisé à l’aéroport Pearson? Cette idée a-t-elle été mise à l’essai?

M. Richard Boehnke:

C’était certainement le cas. Le problème, c’est que les vents soufflent de l’ouest vers l’est dans 70 % des cas, ce qui fait que le problème se déplace. Les avions doivent voler nez au vent. Ce n’est pas une question sur laquelle on peut voter. C’est quelque chose qui se produit tout simplement. C’était la décision finale. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Monsieur Driedger, parmi d'autres solutions, vous suggérez de ramener le nombre des vols de nuit à une limite de 9 600, comme c'était le cas en 1996. Croyez-vous que cette limite puisse permettre de réduire radicalement le bruit de nuit? [Traduction]

M. Tom Driedger:

Si vous réduisez le nombre de vols de moitié, vous réduisez le bruit, donc oui, il y aurait une réduction. Mais il ne faut pas oublier que pour atteindre l'objectif de 90 millions de passagers, ils devront faire venir des avions plus gros, lesquels sont plus bruyants. Même s'il y a moins d’avions qui arrivent, je ne suis pas convaincu que la quantité totale de bruit diminuera, et c’est cela qui importe. S’il y a moins de vols, il y a moins de bruit. Je ne sais pas si 9 600 est le bon chiffre, mais je pense que 19 000 ne l’est pas.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Ce problème de bruit dure-t-il depuis longtemps?

M. Tom Driedger:

Il dure depuis longtemps, mais a été exacerbé l’an dernier avec les travaux de construction sur les deux pistes est-ouest, qui ont entraîné une utilisation plus fréquente de la piste nord-sud, qui n’est pas l’une des pistes préférées. Cela a amplifié le problème.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Mes électeurs m’ont dit qu’ils avaient remarqué que le bruit était de plus en plus fort depuis les trois ou cinq dernières années, et ils ont conclu que les avions volaient beaucoup bas. Est-ce le cas à Pearson?

M. Tom Driedger:

Je ne pense pas que ce soit le cas pour les arrivées, parce que les avions arrivent suivant une pente fixe. Pour les départs, cela dépend beaucoup des vents et de la météo. S’il y a de forts vents, les avions montent plus vite.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Voudriez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

M. Richard Boehnke:

C’est certainement difficile quand on les voit s’envoler au-dessus de sa maison. On voudrait les aider à monter, mais c’est une impression.

M. Peter Bayrachny:

J’aimerais ajouter quelque chose très brièvement. Encore une fois, je parle de l’étude d’Helios, que chacun des membres du Comité devrait lire. C’est une étude publique. Helios a recommandé différentes approches d’atterrissage pour les aéronefs. À l’heure actuelle, la pente d'approche est très faible, mais Helios a dit qu’il y a une autre façon de faire. Les avions voleraient plus haut et feraient leur approche suivant une pente plus abrupte et plus rapidement, ce qui réduirait le bruit sur cette partie de la piste. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Mardi dernier, l'exemple de Pickering a été soulevé et a même suscité les félicitations de la Community Alliance for Air Safety. Je dois reconnaître cependant que mes connaissances à ce sujet sont limitées.

Monsieur Driedger, je crois qu'entre 2004 et 2007, vous avez étudié les répercussions environnementales liées à l'établissement d'un aéroport à Pickering. Pouvez-vous éclairer le Comité sur l'analyse que vous avez menée et sur ses résultats? [Traduction]

M. Tom Driedger:

Mon travail consistait à rédiger un document intitulé Pickering Draft Plan, qui décrivait le projet. J’ai récapitulé bon nombre d’études techniques et j'ai rédigé un document accessible au public.

J’ai également rédigé une ébauche de la description du projet, c’est-à-dire le document qui aurait été utilisé pour lancer une évaluation environnementale, mais le conseil d’administration de la GTAA a décidé de ne pas aller de l’avant avec ce projet.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Serait-il possible de nous faire parvenir ces deux rapports, ces deux documents que vous avez terminés?

M. Tom Driedger:

Le premier rapport n’a jamais été finalisé et publié. Le deuxième se trouvait sur le site Web de Transports Canada. Moi-même je n'en ai pas de copie, mais je sais que vous pourriez en obtenir une de Transports Canada.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Me reste-t-il du temps?

La présidente:

Je suis désolée, il ne vous en reste pas. Il s'est envolé.

Allez-y, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Il ne me reste que quelques minutes, et je serai donc aussi succinct que possible.

L’aéroport Pearson vient au quatrième rang mondial pour ce qui est des coûts d'utilisation. Les trois premiers sont tous au Japon. Les gros avions paient jusqu’à 17 $ la tonne pour y atterrir, les petits avions 145 $. C’est un aéroport où les coûts sont très élevés.

La circulation augmente très rapidement, comme nous en avons discuté. Vous dites qu’il augmentera de façon exponentielle au cours des prochaines années. Ma question s’adresse à vous tous. Lorsque vous prenez l’avion, quelles décisions prenez-vous pour ne pas aggraver le problème? Que peuvent faire les consommateurs pour éviter ces vols de nuit et ainsi de suite? Avez-vous quelque chose à dire à ce sujet?

(0925)

M. Richard Boehnke:

Je ne prend pas souvent l'avion. J’ai pris certains de ces vols d’excursion dans les Antilles et je me suis toujours senti coupable au plus haut degré parce qu’il n’y a pas d’autres options. Alors, soit je dis à ma femme que nous ne pouvons pas y aller, soit je vais y aller plein de remords.

Il est vrai qu’il y a cette règle pour une raison ou une autre: pour faire de l'argent, il faut s'assurer d'avoir des avions qui sillonnent le ciel.

C’est tout ce que je peux dire. Nous ne prenons pas souvent l'avion, mais quand nous le faisons, nous sommes conscients du problème. Il y a trois vols que j'ai réservés parce qu’ils atterrissaient avant minuit.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Autrement, on pourrait prendre l’avion à partir de Hamilton, par exemple, comme vous le suggérez.

M. Richard Boehnke:

Ce serait une excellente solution, mais cette option n’existe pas à l’heure actuelle.

M. Peter Bayrachny:

Je peux ajouter que c’est parce que Pearson ou la GTAA s’opposeront à toute expansion à Hamilton du fait qu’ils n’en sont pas propriétaires. Ils ne veulent pas perdre ces droits d’atterrissage et de décollage. Si le trafic va à Hamilton, la dette de 5 milliards de dollars passera à 6 milliards.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très rapidement, dans le Supplément de vol — Canada, qui est le document remis à tous les pilotes sur les règles appliquées dans les aéroports, il y a un certain nombre de règles très strictes au sujet du contrôle du bruit à l’aéroport Pearson, notamment que tous les avions à réaction non homologués contre le bruit ne peuvent atterrir entre 20 heures et 8 heures, et que les niveaux de bruit varient selon le temps. Pensez-vous que les différentes restrictions auront un effet quelconque? Êtes-vous au courant de leur existence?

M. Tom Driedger:

Je pense que ces appareils non homologués sont peu nombreux. Beaucoup d'aéroports interdisent maintenant les avions du chapitre 2 — en fait, on est en train d'interdire les avions du chapitre 3, mais la GTAA et Transports Canada se montrent très fiers de ne plus permettre l'arrivée d'avions du chapitre 2.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mon temps est écoulé. Merci.

La présidente:

M. Wrzesnewskyj est notre prochain intervenant.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke-Centre, Lib.):

J'ai très peu de temps, alors je vais tâcher d'être assez succinct.

Nous savons que la région du Grand Toronto est un moteur économique pour le pays. Elle continue de croître très rapidement, et la GTAA, en parallèle, cherche à étendre ses activités et à accroître sa rentabilité au détriment des quartiers locaux. Tout cela revient à la question de la reddition de comptes.

La GTAA est un monopole régional et il semble qu'il n'y ait pas de reddition de comptes. Elle n'est pas intéressée, comme on l'a dit, à partager le trafic aérien avec Hamilton. Elle cherche à accroître sa rentabilité. L'un des points qui a été mentionné, c'est d'en faire une plaque tournante de nuit pour les vols en partance du Moyen-Orient et de villes en Amérique du Nord. Je suppose que Hamilton pourrait servir de plaque tournante. Les passagers ne viennent pas à Toronto. Ils ne font que changer d'avion pour aller à Houston, par exemple. Je suppose que Hamilton pourrait s'occuper non seulement du fret, mais aussi de ce genre de vols de nuit, mais cela briserait le monopole régional de Pearson.

J'aimerais parler de la reddition de comptes. Il semble que la GTAA n'ait pas de comptes à rendre, que le gouvernement fédéral n'assure pas la surveillance et que Nav Canada change les vols sans souci des répercussions sur les quartiers, bien qu'il s'agisse également d'une société indépendante sans but lucratif. Que faut-il faire pour responsabiliser ce monopole régional, qui augmente ses bénéfices au détriment de la qualité de vie dans les collectivités locales?

M. Tom Driedger:

La GTAA se contente de jouer dans le terrain de jeux préparé par Transports Canada. Je pense qu'elle fait comme n'importe qui ferait: elle fonctionne dans les limites qui lui sont fixées. Si des limites doivent être imposées, je pense qu'elles doivent venir de Transports Canada, tant pour les aéroports que pour Nav Canada, et cela vaut pour les aéroports partout au pays.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Alors la question devient...

La présidente:

Je m'excuse de vous interrompre, mais votre temps est écoulé. C'est au tour de M. Jeneroux.

M. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, PCC):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les témoins de s'être déplacés pour venir ici aujourd'hui.

Vous avez mentionné Hamilton à plusieurs reprises. L'aéroport Pearson de la région du Grand Toronto a maintenant — j'utilise le mot « absorbé » — Hamilton.

Savez-vous si Pearson a d'autres visées dans la région du Grand Toronto? L'aéroport Pearson devient-il un aéroport davantage axé sur le fret que certains autres aéroports? Nous avons eu l'occasion de nous rendre à l'aéroport de Hamilton récemment. C'est un excellent aéroport qui pourrait absorber plus de fret. Je suis curieux de savoir ce que vous pensez de la vision de Pearson et si vous la voyez.

(0930)

M. Peter Bayrachny:

D'après ce que j'ai vu aux réunions communautaires et d'après les faits qui ont été soulevés, je pense, faisant suite à l'observation de Borys, qu'il y a un manque de surveillance. La rentabilité dicte tout. La GTAA cherche à rembourser une dette de 5 milliards de dollars en étendant ses activités à d'autres domaines.

Je pense que Hamilton est encore une plaque tournante pour le fret. C'était déjà une plaque tournante pour le fret, mais aussi pour les vols nolisés, que Pearson lui a ravis ces dernières années. Pour répondre à la question de Richard, à savoir si je me rendrais à Hamilton pour prendre un vol à 5 ou 6 heures du matin vers les Antilles, certainement que oui. C'est tout à fait logique.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Avez-vous des observations, monsieur Driedger?

M. Tom Driedger:

Je ne suis pas tout à fait d'accord. Le marché, c'est Toronto. Le marché, c'est Pearson. C'est là que les affréteurs veulent être. Je ne suis pas d'accord pour dire que Pearson attire les affréteurs de vols nolisés autant que ceux-ci désirent prendre pied à Pearson. WestJet était à Hamilton et voulait prendre de l'expansion. Pour cela, il fallait être là où se trouvent les gens.

Je pense que l'aéroport de Hamilton a un rôle à jouer, mais qu'il doit définir son propre rôle en fonction de son propre marché.

La croissance de l'aéroport Pearson et de sa plaque tournante internationale s'explique en partie par la structure tarifaire de la GTAA dont bénéficient deux grands transporteurs aériens. Ceux-ci paient un montant fixe et ils peuvent exploiter autant de vols qu'ils le veulent, y compris des vols de nuit. Plus leurs vols sont nombreux, plus leurs coûts unitaires diminuent.

En ce qui concerne les vols de nuit, je pense qu'il devrait y avoir une majoration substantielle pour que le coût environnemental et social réel soit pris en compte dans le coût total.

M. Richard Boehnke:

À mon avis, il faudrait simplement éviter de jouer à « Play Airport ». J'ai toujours trouvé qu'il ne faut pas se mettre le nez là où il n'a pas d'affaire et qu'on finit toujours avec celui avec qui on est venu.

Nous avons affaire ici à un problème des autorités aéroportuaires, c'est-à-dire le bruit. J'ai toujours veillé à me tenir à l'écart de tous les autres aspects de leurs relations d'affaires parce que ce n'est pas dans mon domaine de compétences, ni de mes affaires.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

C'est un bon conseil, madame la présidente.

La présidente:

Dans beaucoup de choses.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Oui.

Je vais terminer par une observation.

Je viens d'Edmonton, et l'aéroport là-bas étend ses activités commerciales. Il y a certainement de plus en plus de fret, mais l'aéroport est à environ une demi-heure ou 45 minutes des premières habitations à la périphérie d'Edmonton. J'entends constamment dire que l'aéroport est trop loin des limites de la ville. La ville prend de l'expansion et elle s'en rapproche, mais je trouve intéressant d'entendre le point de vue venant de la région du Grand Toronto, parce que nous avons une perspective très différente à Edmonton.

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci.

Nous allons passer à M. Sikand pour environ trois minutes.

M. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

D'accord. Je vais procéder assez rapidement.

Je représente une circonscription qui s'appelle Mississauga—Streetsville et qui, sur votre carte, chevauche la route 40 à Meadowvale et les routes 45 et 48 près de Streetsville. Cette question est donc certainement une préoccupation pour mes résidents.

Nous avons l'aéroport de Hamilton, qui est sous-utilisé; Pickering est un peu plus loin à l'extérieur de la région du Grand Toronto, mais nous avons beaucoup d'espace juste au nord de la 407 et de l'escarpement, et Metrolinx a des plans préliminaires pour y amener la voie ferrée.

Devrait-on discuter de la possibilité de l'implantation d'un aéroport derrière l'escarpement, vers le nord?

Je vais commencer par vous, Peter.

M. Peter Bayrachny:

Il est certain que nous devons en discuter et, lorsque nous parlons des aéroports trop loin ou trop près et des centres urbains, il faut regarder les grandes agglomérations comme Chicago, où il y a deux aéroports, O'Hare et Midway. Ils sont à une heure de distance l'un de l'autre, à deux heures si la circulation est dense.

À Toronto, c' est la même chose. Si vous essayez de vous rendre de Whitby à Pearson, c'est un trajet de deux heures à n'importe quel moment, alors...

(0935)

M. Gagan Sikand:

Désolé; je regrette de vous interrompre. C'est simplement que mon temps de parole est limité.

Est-ce oui ou non?

M. Peter Bayrachny:

Oui, tout à fait.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Dans un tel cas, Tom, pourrions-nous alors envisager une fragmentation selon le type de vols, s'il y avait cette proximité avec Pearson?

M. Tom Driedger:

Ce serait très difficile. Les compagnies aériennes ont des partenaires d'alliance. Pour des vols intérieurs, elles utilisent des avions qui s'envoleront ensuite vers l'étranger. Les opérations fragmentées ne sont pas très efficaces ni utiles.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci beaucoup.

La présidente:

Monsieur Wrzesnewskyj, vous avez une minute et demie.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

J'aimerais revenir sur toute la question de la reddition de comptes.

La GTAA manque de confiance dans ses relations avec la collectivité. Comme cela a été dit, ce comité sur le bruit semble être une façade. La GTAA est un monopole régional. Elle ne semble pas avoir de comptes à rendre à qui que ce soit. Comme il s'agit d'un organisme indépendant sans but lucratif, nous ne voyons pas grand-chose de ses mécanismes internes et du processus décisionnel.

Vous habitez votre quartier depuis très longtemps. En fin de compte, il s'agit d'une responsabilité fédérale. Avez-vous l'impression que Transports Canada s'est acquitté de ses responsabilités envers l'électorat de votre quartier?

M. Richard Boehnke:

Il y a peu d'indications que ce soit le cas.

M. Peter Bayrachny:

Je dirais que non. Je suis d'accord.

M. Tom Driedger:

Transports Canada n'a plus la capacité de comprendre comment fonctionnent des aéroports. Voilà bien des années, il y avait ce mouvement de gens des régions vers les aéroports, vers l'administration centrale, et Transports Canada avait les connaissances voulues. Ces connaissances ont disparu. Il n'y a plus de direction responsable de la gestion aéroportuaire.

Je ne pense pas que le ministère comprend vraiment la façon dont les compagnies aériennes et les aéroports sont exploités et leurs répercussions sur les gens, et il me semble qu'il n'est pas disposé à se montrer rigoureux à l'endroit des compagnies aériennes et des aéroports et à prendre des décisions difficiles. C'est Transports Canada qui devrait mener la charge, mais j'ai l'impression qu'il s'est acoquiné avec l'industrie aérienne et que la population est laissée pour compte.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Merci beaucoup.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous avons été contraints par le temps aujourd'hui du fait que nous devons être à la Chambre à 10 heures.

Les témoins peuvent rester un instant.

Plutôt que de passer à huis clos, je vais demander au Comité s'il accepterait de tenir une séance supplémentaire pour notre étude et d'y inviter Transports Canada, Air Canada et WestJet. Ils nous ont manifesté un certain intérêt, et n'oublions pas que ce problème les concerne également.

Est-ce que tout le monde est d'accord pour prévoir une autre séance avec certaines des compagnies aériennes et Transports Canada?

M. Ron Liepert:

Pourrais-je suggérer, si Air Canada et WestJet viennent témoigner ici, qu'ils soient représentés par des décideurs, non pas leurs responsables des relations gouvernementales?

La présidente:

Je vais certainement répercuter cette requête.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Madame la présidente...

M. Ron Liepert:

En fait, je suggère que nous fassions plus qu'une simple requête. Le Comité a le droit de convoquer des témoins, et lorsque nous invitons ces entreprises, trop souvent elles nous envoient des gens des relations gouvernementales qui disent: « Eh bien, la décision ne m'appartient pas. »

J'aimerais voir des décideurs, que ce soit le PDG ou le chef de l'exploitation. Si nous nous donnons la peine d'ajouter une séance, faisons comparaître les décideurs, pas les types des relations gouvernementales.

La présidente:

C'est une excellente suggestion.

Allez-y, Borys.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

J'appuie cette idée. Les comités ont le pouvoir d'assigner des témoins à comparaître, pouvoir que nous devons, bien entendu, exercer judicieusement.

J'aimerais aussi suggérer de convoquer Nav Canada, qui est une pièce très importante dans ce casse-tête.

M. Ron Liepert:

Je pense que c'est déjà fait.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Oh, ils sont dans la liste des témoins.

La présidente:

Oui, pour mardi prochain.

M. Ron Liepert:

Nav Canada est essentiel à cet égard.

La présidente:

Sur un autre point des travaux du Comité...

Désolée; allez-y, monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Est-ce qu'on parle d'une heure supplémentaire ou d'une rencontre supplémentaire, c'est-à-dire deux heures de comité? [Traduction]

La présidente:

Il faudrait que ce soit un bloc de deux heures. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

D'accord. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Vous avez devant vous un budget pour cette étude qui doit être adopté. Tout le monde est d'accord.

Je vous rappelle que les recommandations préliminaires pour notre rapport provisoire sur les corridors commerciaux devraient, si possible, être présentées d'ici le 1er novembre.

Nous allons entendre les représentants des Premières Nations plus tard en novembre, mais nos analystes disent qu'ils peuvent aller de l'avant avec la rédaction du rapport, quitte à y faire des ajouts à la suite de cette autre réunion.

La rue Wellington est bloquée, mais nos autobus sont là.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on October 25, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.