header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-10-29 INDU 134

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1630)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

We're going to get started. Thank you, everybody, for being here. Again, our apologies, but that's the way the House works. Votes take precedence over anything else, especially when they're confidence votes.

Welcome to meeting 134 as we continue our five-year statutory review of copyright.

We have with us today from the Canadian Anti-Counterfeiting Network, Lorne Lipkus, chair; from the Consumer Technology Association, Michael Petricone, senior vice-president, government affairs; from Creative Commons Canada, Kelsey Merkley, representative; and from OpenMedia, Laura Tribe, executive director and Marie Aspiazu, digital rights specialist.

Normally opening statements are seven minutes. You can have up to seven minutes, but the more time we have to ask questions, the better.

We'll begin with Mr. Lipkus.

Mr. Lorne Lipkus (Chair, Canadian Anti-Counterfeiting Network):

Good afternoon.[Translation]

Thank you for the opportunity to speak with you here today.[English]

The Canadian Anti-Counterfeiting Network is made up of intellectual property owners, service providers, certification bodies, legal firms, industry associations and others dedicated to help prevent counterfeiting fraud and copyright piracy in Canada.

Almost every one of the members of CACN have their own day jobs. My own background is as a partner in a law firm, based in Toronto, covering intellectual property brand protection issues for over 80 brands across Canada. I've been doing so since 1985, and I've lived through the changes in trademark and copyright law during that time. Most recently, I have been intricately involved in the border enforcement request for assistance program in Canada.

I spend my days—and as my wife is fond of saying, many other times as well—trying to protect brand owners from the proliferation of illegal, dangerous, counterfeit, as well as pirated products that find their way into Canada and online.

While we can all agree that there's no single solution to address copyright infringement or the sale of counterfeit product, I hope we can also agree that it is in all of our best interests to provide rights holders with the tools that have been proven to be the most effective at reducing copyright infringement around the world, in order to address infringement in Canada.

Unfortunately, Canada has rarely been a leader around the world in these areas. Fortunately, we can now look to and learn from the experience of others in these areas.

I want to make it clear that I'm here to comment and speak about the products, sites and services that contain and sell intellectual properties, copyrights and trademarks. Any and every legitimate, authorized, authentic product, either is or can be counterfeited or pirated, and a look at what we've seen in Canada proves the point.

You've heard from several knowledgeable people during these hearings about the harm to our creative industries through illegally making available music and motion pictures.

The CACN supports the position taken by Bell, Rogers, the Canadian Media Producers Association, the Motion Picture Association - Canada and others on the need to allow rights holders to obtain injunctions, including site blocking and de-indexing orders, and against intermediaries whose services are used to infringe copyright.

However, the focus of CACN and my purpose here today is on what can be done to protect against products, physical goods, merchandise, items that everyday Canadians are making, importing, exporting, buying online, buying on Canadian streets, or buying from stores. These products bear copyright protected works. They also sometimes bear registered Canadian trademarks. Sometimes they contain both copyrights and trademarks.

I have seen counterfeit products, sites and services that make available to Canadians medications, food, contact lenses, electrical products, including extension cords and circuit breakers, some of which have been found in Canadian hospitals, automotive parts, batteries, smart phone chargers and chords, cellular devices, shampoos, makeup, tools, fertilizer, furniture, luxury goods and apparel. You name it; if it's being made, it's being counterfeited or copied.

At CACN, we therefore support needed amendments to the Copyright Act. I've mentioned the injunctive relief and the safe harbour provisions, but the third thing that we've been asking for is a simplified procedure to deal with the products that I've just mentioned.

We would like the introduction of a simplified procedure, under section 44, which relates to CBSA's request for assistance program, so that it is clear that border officers are authorized and mandated to not only detain these products coming into Canada but to seize them. Right now, they detain them. We're asking that they be allowed to seize them, as is the case around the world, and destroy them, without the need for a judicial proceeding which is the hallmark of the existing program.

(1635)



Our organization also hopes that one day Canada will have a meaningful intellectual property rights coordination centre that can intake information obtained by law enforcement, by customs and related agencies, as well as members of the public and intellectual property rights holders under one roof to deal with the proper utilization of resources dedicated to dealing with this ever-increasing problem in Canada.[Translation]

Thank you for your kind attention. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to the Consumer Technology Association. From Washington, D.C., we have Mr. Petricone.

Mr. Michael Petricone (Senior Vice-President, Government Affairs, Consumer Technology Association):

Thank you very much.

On behalf of the Consumer Technology Association, I am pleased to participate in the committee's review of Canada's Copyright Act. I am also honoured to appear before you because as a child I lived in Oakville, Ontario, and I have many happy memories of growing up in your wonderful country.

CTA represents 321 billion Canadian and U.S. consumer technology industries, comprising more than 2,200 Canadian and U.S. companies, of which 80% are small businesses and start-ups. CTA also owns and produces CES, the international trade show for consumer technology.

In our written brief, CTA urged that this review's outcome should be one that makes Canadian and international works, services and technologies more accessible in Canada and abroad. We expressed concern over proposals to move in the opposite direction by imposing new constraints on technologies, devices and local and international service providers. These innovations have helped Canadians to lead the world economy. This review should enhance rather than limit Canada's contribution. Therefore, we have made the following recommendations:

One, maintain and enhance limitations on exceptions such as the doctrines of fair dealing and fair use. Two, avoid unique impositions on online service providers, or OSPs, that would hobble Canada's contribution to international discourse and result in a loss of service in Canada. Three, reject attempts to oversee the design of technology and devices or define classes of technology or devices to be subjected to some sort of levy.

Finally, with respect to copyright terms, we have argued against the extension of copyright terms, believing the focus should be on creating new works and directions. We see the USMCA's contrary results as unfortunate and hope the effect can be mitigated in your law through exceptions, limitations and more discretion with respect to fair dealing.

In terms of fair use, having accepted the U.S. provisions on copyright term and the U.S. policy on circumvention of technical measures, Canada should also balance these with appropriate limitations and exceptions of the sort that mitigate their impact on U.S. law. Canada took constructive steps in 2012 to recognize best practices and fair dealing. These practices promote research, study and criticism, and they recognize the value of satire, parody and user-generated content. While a full fair use regime would perhaps better serve the present dynamic environment, perhaps Canada's fair dealing regime could be made more flexible and more adaptable.

The strict application of a code-based regime such as fair dealing cannot account for new technologies and new uses. One step harmonious with U.S. law would be to add the words "such as", which appear in the U.S. code, section 107. This would allow Canada's courts to keep up with the reasonable and customary practices of businesses and users.

The fair use doctrine, developed by courts as an iteration of the U.S. First Amendment principles, has continued to adapt even after being codified. Its application by the Supreme Court in the 1984 Sony Betamax case opened the door to personal communications, commerce and the Internet. In our industry, we refer to this as the Magna Carta of the consumer technology industry. Fair use has also been the basis of informal codes and best practices, which I know exist in Canada as well in many areas.

Internationally, the ability to quote and criticize has been important for democracy and innovation. CTA believes the U.S., Canada and Europe should encourage these values both at home and abroad.

In terms of technical measures, Canada did follow the U.S. lead in making circumvention of technical measures illegal, but in this area as well has not provided corresponding limitations and exceptions. As the U.S. Register of Copyrights ruled last week in its DMCA section 1201 recommendations, lawful user exceptions are particularly necessary in the diagnosis, maintenance and repair of modern cars, farm equipment and other devices, because embedded software has replaced analog circuitry in mechanical parts. Under the new regulations, U.S. farmers will no longer have to worry about the legality of getting expert assistance to repair a tractor or harvester during a short northern growing season.

After exhaustive study and commentary from CTA and others, the registers found such exceptions can and should be implemented without putting creative expression at risk. This is a step forward that Canada should also consider. Even though fair use is not seen by U.S. courts as a defence to DMCA 1201, it is the metric used by the Register of Copyrights in evaluating exception petitions. Limitations based on such considerations would serve Canada well.

An issue on which Canada and the USMCA now lead together in a positive direction is the recognition of safe harbours for online service providers hosting user-generated content. As we noted in our brief, studies have shown that the impairment of safe harbour protections would have the greatest impact on small and local OSP entrants that don't have the resources to do mass filtering. We recognize, however, that no regime is perfect. In our brief, we urge the consideration of measures to address spamming activities under Canada's notice and notice regime. As in the case of technical measures, both the constraints and necessary relief from them are now moving targets that are best aimed in tandem.

(1640)



In terms of site blocking, this is a measure long opposed by CTA, which has been raised again by participants in your review. When drafted in the U.S. as part of the proposed SOPA/PIPA legislation six years ago, such proposals collapsed under expert scrutiny and public outrage. In the Canadian context, such measures would have the additional drawback of depriving entrepreneurs and users of access to sites available in other portions of North America and beyond.

CTA also opposes recent proposals for new levies and design constraints on products and services. Such measures become distortive of technologies and markets, and eventually are made irrelevant by technology change except for lingering lawsuits. In our experience, device levies do not satisfy rights holders' needs to respond to technical change, and, again, quickly become outmoded.

In terms of copyright term extension, CTA views the public domain as a valuable resource for cultural creativity and for future innovation. We see Canada's agreement in the USMCA to add 20 years to terms to match the situation in the United States as unfortunate, but we would hope that in your review, through the measures we have suggested, you can mitigate the consequences of contracting the public domain. It has been suggested in the U.S. that some formality should apply in the last 20 years of protection to avoid orphan work problems, and Canada may also consider such a solution.

In conclusion, the pace of innovation is often faster than anybody's ability to legislate responsibly. Even the pace of a five-year review cannot anticipate or keep up with the changes that have replaced mechanical devices with digital ones, and then replaced many of those devices with online services. CTA recommends that this committee put a premium on creativity and innovation and be skeptical of impositions on digital services, digital devices and online services.

On behalf of CTA, I thank you for this opportunity to participate.

The Chair:

Excellent. Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Ms. Merkley of Creative Commons Canada.

You have up to seven minutes.

Ms. Kelsey Merkley (Representative, Creative Commons Canada):

Hello. Thank you for inviting me here today.

I'd like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gather is the traditional unceded territory of the Algonquin nation.

My name is Kelsey Merkley. I'm here as a public citizen and a representative of Creative Commons Canada. We are part of a global non-profit organization established in 2001, with 26 country chapters worldwide, each working with artists, librarians, scientists, filmmakers and photographers. We create, maintain and promote the Creative Commons licence suite of globally recognized copyright licences that are free to use. They allow for creators to choose how their works are reused under simple standard terms.

Globally, the CC licences have been applied to over 1.4 billion works around the world. What's powerful to me about those 1.4 billion works is that individuals made an active decision to share 1.4 billion times. If you have used one of Wikipedia's 40 million articles, downloaded a photo from Flickr or watched videos on YouTube, you have come in contact with one of our licences in a commercial or non-commercial context.

Examples of our licences in the world include Lumen Learning, which permits commercial use under an open licence at over 280 institutions in the U.S. This year alone, they've had over four million visits per month to their open education content website. In multiple instances, Lumen has demonstrated that their supported OER, open educational resources, offering eliminates the performance gap between low socio-economic students and higher socio-economic students.

Here in Canada, the globally recognized leader in open textbooks, BCcampus, has saved economically stressed students in British Columbia over $9 million in textbook costs through Canadian-created open licence textbooks.

Canadian science fiction and young adult author Cory Doctorow chooses to license many of his works under a CC non-commercial licence that grants access to everyone as long as they don't sell his creativity. Researchers at MaRS in the Structural Genomics Consortium, Aled Edwards and Rachel Harding, have used the most open licence, CC By Attribution, to accelerate the pace of scientific discovery by opening up their lab notes to other researchers around the world without restriction.

The New York Public Library, the Met, the Rijksmuseum and, most recently, Europeana, all share works under a Creative Commons licence to allow for their collections to travel globally.

We advocate and offer advice to governments and institutions that want to use open licences to help their citizens access content. We've offered advice to the European Space Agency, the U.S. Department of State, the U.S. Department of Education and the European Commission. All of them have used CC licences in their publicly funded works to benefit the public. Here in Canada, Quebec was the first government worldwide to adopt the CC 4.0 licence to all open data released by the province.

I'm grateful to the committee for the opportunity to offer a few thoughts and suggestions as you continue your review for potential changes to the Copyright Act.

First, the public domain is harmed by copyright term extension. Fundamentally, we believe that all creativity builds upon the past and that promoting and protecting a robust public domain are central to our mission. Why? Because works in the public domain may be used by anyone without restriction. Works in the public domain become the raw material for creativity and innovation. The committee should not reopen the terms discussed under the Copyright Act. If the term is to be extended 20 years, significant consideration should be given to other permitted uses and clearer fair dealing to mitigate its impact on education, creativity and innovation.

Second, permit creators to reclaim their rights. We endorse Bryan Adams' recommendation to this committee for Canadian creators to reclaim their rights from 25 years after death to 25 years after assignment.

Third, protect fair dealing, especially for education. Fair dealing for education is crucial to ensuring that copyright fulfills its ultimate purpose of promoting essential aspects of the public interest.

Fourth, the right to read should be the right to mine. Considering the massive potential for novel research discoveries, advancements in AI, machine learning and Canadian innovation, the Copyright Act should clarify that the right to read is the right to mine. It should ensure that all of these non-expressive/non-consumptive uses, like text and data mining, are included under the fair dealing framework or broadly supported under other legal measures.

Fifth, improve open access to government-funded education, research and data. The sharing of works under Creative Commons licences is a legitimate exercise of copyright and should be the norm for all publicly funded resources such as research, education materials, government-collected data and cultural works.

(1645)



Canada should reform Crown copyright regime, because all Canadians should have the right to access and reuse, without restriction, work produced by their government. Canada should place these materials directly into the public domain at the time of publishing.

I hope your questions will allow me the opportunity to speak more to the public value and scientific opportunity of open access publishing.

Gratitude is at the centre of the work we do, so I'll end here with thanks to you for extending the invitation to hear from me today.

The Chair:

Excellent. Thank you very much.

Now we'll go to OpenMedia, with Laura Tribe.

Ms. Laura Tribe (Executive Director, OpenMedia):

Good afternoon and thank you for having us.

I would also like to begin by acknowledging that we are on the traditional territory of the Algonquin people

My name is Laura Tribe. I am the executive director of OpenMedia. We are a community-based organization of more than 500,000 supporters working to keep the Internet open, affordable and surveillance-free. I am joined today by my colleague Marie Aspiazu.

Let me be clear in stating that Canada has a strong and balanced copyright system. But the recent NAFTA renegotiations have struck a significant blow to this balance and to Canada's position as a leader on copyright. We hope that through this review process we can amend the Copyright Act to improve access to content and restore balance to this system.

By allowing an international trade agreement to set a significant portion of Canada's copyright agenda, the government not only accepted troubling amendments, including extending copyright terms by 20 years, but actively undermined this ongoing consultation.

Over the past year, a number of extremely problematic levies, or taxes, have been put forward as a means to help compensate Canadian creators. We simply cannot afford the following proposals that would increase the costs of digital connectivity:

First is an iPod tax. This recycled idea would tax all smart phone devices sold in Canada to compensate for alleged music copying. This idea ignores the decrease in private music copying with the rise of subscription-based services, and the fact that people use smart phones for a wide variety of reasons far beyond music consumption—let alone illegal music consumption.

Next is the Netflix tax. This proposal would reverse the CRTC's digital media exemption order and see over-the-top, or OTT, providers required to comply with the same Canadian content regulations as broadcasters. This fundamentally misunderstands the nature of the Internet and would actually target all OTT services of all sizes, not just Netflix.

Then there's the Internet tax, a requirement for Internet service providers to pay into CanCon funding as Canadian broadcasters do. Unfortunately, we know these prices will be passed on to customers. Canadians already pay some of the highest Internet prices in the world for subpar service. This idea has been rejected by nearly 40,000 Internet users in OpenMedia's community.

Now there's a copyright tax. Recently, we heard a proposal for all Internet use over 15 gigabytes per month, per household to be taxed. This is based on the misguided claim that any Internet usage over 15 gigabytes must be due to streaming content, and that streaming content, even if users pay for it legally, means users should pay more to compensate creators.

Creators should be adequately compensated, but these are not the solutions to make this happen.

As OpenMedia community member Bill put it, “I'm a small business owner and use a lot of bandwidth for online meetings and other related activities. An internet tax would kill my business, putting six people out of work.”

We cannot afford to further increase our digital divide and the price of the Internet in Canada. A fast, affordable Internet connection is essential.

Separately, let's talk about sales tax. Charging federal sales tax to online content providers is often conflated with the above proposals, but is critically distinct. Should the federal government choose to apply HST to international online services, those taxes should rightly be charged and remitted to the government, then allocated into the general budget as the government sees fit, including as funding for arts, culture and creators.

(1650)

Ms. Marie Aspiazu (Digital Rights Specialist, OpenMedia):

Bell Canada's FairPlay website blocking proposal is one of the most dangerous suggestions we've heard yet. This would inevitably censor legitimate content and speech online and violate net neutrality protections, all without court oversight. It would set a dangerous precedent for other censorship proposals in the future.

Experts have pointed out the expensive and problematic technical aspects of implementing these censorship interventions. Additionally, nearly 100,000 OpenMedia supporters spoke out against Bell Canada's FairPlay website blocking proposal when it was tabled both during NAFTA and before the CRTC.

These are the words of our community member Ryan: Arbitrarily allowing website blocking and website takedowns will result in a severe reduction of civil rights and political freedoms, as companies and organizations can decide to remove websites that they don't like, regardless if any terms were violated....We have a strong legal system, where the accused is deemed innocent until proven guilty. Let the courts handle the matters, since they are subject to public scrutiny and inquiry by law.

Additional dangerous proposals making their way to Canada in light of the EU's proposed copyright directive are the link tax and mandatory content filtering algorithms. The link tax would copyright the snippets of text that usually accompany links, often used as previews to help Internet users find content online. Requiring aggregators to pay for content just to be able to promote it actually harms content creators by reducing the discoverability of their content, but it also entrenches the largest content aggregators, such as Facebook and Google, by making the cost for new entrants even higher. This proposal has already been implemented and proven a failure in both Germany and Spain.

Content filtering requirements would turn online platforms into the copyright police. Forcing online platforms to implement mechanisms to identify and block materials believed to infringe copyright before being posted, similar to YouTube's multi-million dollar content ID system, won't come cheap. As we know, it will still result in false positives and inevitably result in the takedown of legitimate content.

We have outlined a number of concerning proposals on the table, but we believe some simple amendments can be made to the system to help restore balance. At the very least, the government should maintain the current fair dealing list, including education, parody and satire. Additionally, explicitly adding transformative use would be greatly beneficial. Ideally, Canada will adopt broader fair use provisions, similar to those in the U.S. We also urge the government to eliminate Crown copyright.

As OpenMedia has previously stated, Canada's notice and notice system is a fair regime for addressing alleged copyright infringements. However, the government should provide content guidelines for notices that prevent threats or demands for settlements.

OpenMedia has been advocating on copyright issues over the past six years. Our community's lengthy efforts include five years of campaigning against the secretive trans-Pacific partnership and its dangerous IP chapter; “Our Digital Future: A Crowdsourced Agenda for Free Expression”, a positive vision for sharing and creativity online, sourced from over 40,000 people; over 50,000 people urging Canada's Minister of Foreign Affairs to stand up for citizens' digital rights in NAFTA; and over 2,500 submissions to this committee's consultation via OpenMedia's online tool at letstalkcopyright.ca.

Before coming here today, we asked our community what we should say to you. We hope their voices are well represented.

In conclusion, we ask the committee to address the needs of the people these rules affect the most: everyday people who depend on a balanced copyright regime for their daily activities.

Thank you. We look forward to your questions.

(1655)

The Chair:

Excellent.

I'd like to thank you all very much for your presentations.

Just so that we're all on the same page, we can extend up until six o'clock. I know that some of our guests may have to leave, and that's fine.

Before we start the questions, Mr. Lloyd wants to read into the record a notice of motion.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Yes. I have a quick motion, that the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology pursuant to Standing Order 108(2) undertake a study of no less than six meetings to investigate and make recommendations on the impact of carbon pricing on Canadian industries’ global competitiveness.

That's just a notice. There's no debate on it at this time.

Thanks.

The Chair:

Thank you. That is correct. There's no debate at this time.

We'll now go to questions.

Mr. Sheehan, you have five minutes.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to our presenters for that very important discussion.

This question is for Lorne from the Canadian Anti-Counterfeiting Network.

In your testimony, you gave quite a few examples that seemed to be more related to trademarks or patents. Do you have any copyright-specific examples you can share?

Mr. Lorne Lipkus:

I believe that every example I gave has a copyright aspect.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Just delve into that.

Mr. Lorne Lipkus:

The fact is that physical goods bear various kinds of intellectual property. One example is medication. For example, medication can come in across our borders or be sold in our stores in pill form without any packaging. If you look just at the medication, it's probably protected by patent laws. There are patents on that medication. You would probably have to know something about the medication itself to tell if it's infringing the patent.

The packaging itself may have logos, names and designs on the packaging. Very often when customs sees product coming into the country, they know by the packaging before they ever get to the product whether there is a problem with it and whether it's potentially counterfeit or pirated. What we've seen with things like pharmaceutical packaging and packaging of toys, packaging of shampoos, packaging of the things I have mentioned, is that the counterfeiter, the pirate, may copy the actual work, the copyrighted work, on the outside of that package and take off the trademark name, not realizing that it's protected by copyright as well. There is the example. Even something as simple as automotive parts can have logos and designs on them that are actually protected by copyright.

I hope that responds to your question.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

That helps a lot. It delves more deeply into it, and you certainly went down into an area.... In reading up on the subject, I saw that the Mounties stated that counterfeiting increased in Canada to $38.1 million in 2012 which was up from $7.7 million in 2005.

What percentage of these items infringe copyright? Do you have that number, or would you have a ballpark figure? Are there certain sectors of the cultural industries that are hit harder than others—more the cultural industries?

Mr. Lorne Lipkus:

Nobody has the number. Anybody who gives a number is guessing. We do know that worldwide some recent studies—one was done by the OECD, which I'm sure has been shown to you. Those are about the most accurate numbers we're going to get. Nobody knows what it is in Canada, but I'll come back to one example that I think is extremely telling.

You read the numbers from the RCMP, which have not really had any pirating or counterfeiting cases in respect of consumer goods in over three and a half years, but when they did, the commanding officer in the Toronto area wanted to see how much counterfeit or pirated goods were coming in through the Toronto airport. At that time, in the entire year. the most amount of counterfeit that had come into Canada was in the $30-million range, so he wanted to see what would happen if for six months we answered all the calls we got from CBSA, how much product would there be.

In six months there was over $70 million in counterfeit just from Toronto, and it was everything you could think of. When I say anything and everything, products that we had not even seen counterfeited were being seized through the RCMP. That was Project O-Scorpion and that was, I believe, in 2012-13. Since that time there have been almost no seizures at the border by the RCMP or by customs.

I think that's pretty telling. If you look for it, you're going to find it, and we find the same thing in the marketplace. We just—

Sorry, I didn't know if you wanted more examples.

(1700)

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

That's okay. Thank you very much for that.

This question is for the CTA. First of all, it's nice to see you again. We met when we were doing our broadband study and we went down to Washington and met some of your members there.

From your perspective, does the Copyright Act restrict the development and use of current or emerging technologies, and if so, to whose advantage? Could you provide the committee with a sense of how new and emerging technologies could offer both opportunities or hinder the enforcement of copyright?

Mr. Michael Petricone:

What keeps me awake at night is that we'll have some well-intended but overly broad regulation that will prevent new and socially beneficial innovations from hitting the market.

What we tend to find in technology is that new technologies come on the market and they are used by consumers in ways that are not originally contemplated. In my testimony I talked about the Sony Betamax controversy where Sony introduced the Betamax, which was a device that allowed people to record television shows. The movie industry took it to court and it ended up in the United States Supreme Court where it was declared a legal product, by one vote. It then became a very popular product.

The irony is that what the movie industry was concerned about was the record button, but what consumers found valuable in the Betamax was the play button. What that did was start a brand new industry in pre-recorded media, such as compact discs and DVDs, which ended up making up the majority of the movie industry's revenues some years out.

Had they been successful in shutting down that technology, they would also have shut down one of their biggest revenue streams. You see that a great deal in technology, where it goes in ways you don't expect.

The general trend is that new technologies open up new distribution platforms, allow access to new consumer groups, and allow new ways to monetize, as you're seeing now on the Internet with the growth of streaming music.

Our advice is always to be very light-handed on the regulation of new technologies because you're not sure what kinds of opportunities in terms of creative opportunities or economic opportunities you may be inadvertently foreclosing.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we're going to move to Mr. Lloyd.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you to all the witnesses today.

My first line of questioning is going to be for you, Mr. Lipkus.

There are a lot of things we've been dealing with at this committee. We've been talking to authors and music creators. These are really intangible things, like with the digital sphere. A lot of the things you were talking about in your testimony are really physical things that could be crossing the borders.

You talked about effective tools. Does your organization have any effective tools that you would recommend for dealing with things exclusively in this digital sphere? What would be these effective tools?

Mr. Lorne Lipkus:

One of the things that we recommended is, as you know, the simplified procedure that is in relation to the physical goods, but I am not sure that I have a good answer for you in relation to something that would just deal with the intangible.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Okay.

Mr. Lorne Lipkus:

The intangible that we're talking about, even in a physical good, is the intangible of the work itself. The work itself finds its way into the physical good—

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Yes.

Mr. Lorne Lipkus:

—so we're still there on the creative side. It's just that it's put onto something that is sold as a physical good.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I appreciate that. Thank you.

My next question is going to be for you, Ms. Merkley.

I was in B.C. as a student when they actually unveiled the Creative Commons. The B.C. Liberal government did that. As a student, it seemed like a really good resource.

Could you explain to me how authors and creators are compensated under a Creative Commons licence? How does that work?

(1705)

Ms. Kelsey Merkley:

There is no difference in how they are compensated. Are we speaking in regard to textbooks?

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Yes, specifically.

Ms. Kelsey Merkley:

Someone has to pay for a textbook to be created. Often, the way the textbooks are created now is either through institutional grants or through the universities themselves.

There is also a branch of study called open pedagogy where they work with the students to create the textbook themselves.

When people talk about the $9 million, we hear publishers say, “Well, we just lost $9 million,” but the rate of inflation of textbooks has outstripped the cost of any student's feasible responsibility. We're looking at textbook costs that are over $1,000 per textbook, and that's one textbook for one course for one term. These costs are just unreasonable.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

The question is how authors are compensated under Creative Commons. Are they not compensated?

Ms. Kelsey Merkley:

They can be compensated through Creative Commons. Creative Commons does not mean that the book cannot be charged for. A book can still be charged for. It's just the creation of the work is made available for free.

Cory Doctorow makes money on his books. It's exactly the same model as a textbook. He creates a book and then the physical book is sold. He sells e-book copies and he makes a PDF available for anyone for free. He is able to make more money as a result because his product is available more widely and people are more likely to purchase the book because a PDF is less readable on a Kindle, on an e-reader. It's the same thing with textbooks.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I appreciate it. Some authors are able to have a wide audience and are able to leverage it and give away some things for free. We've had a number of authors come before this committee. It has not been quite unanimous, but overwhelming that these authors are asking for stronger copyright protection, term extension, because we've seen statistically that their revenues as authors are going down.

We're hearing people say these books are the raw resources that are used for future creativity, but these are the creators, and they are coming here and telling us to please protect their works because they can't make a living off it. If they stop creating these works, then we'll lose a really important value-added industry.

What do you have to say to that?

Ms. Kelsey Merkley:

With Wikipedia and with open content creations, I think we're seeing an additional industry being created that allows for work to be created and for people to still.... I would encourage these authors to look at different revenue streams. We are in a new digital era. The old models simply are not working the way they used to. It's time for new and different business models.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

If we're talking about a medical textbook, though, are you arguing that Wikipedia is a viable replacement?

Ms. Kelsey Merkley:

Wikipedia is written by experts and is accessible. There are many examples of textbooks that are crowd- and community-written by the medical community that are licensed under a Creative Commons licence.

One of the big challenges with Wikipedia is it is currently being written at a too advanced level, not at an encyclopedia level.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you. I appreciate that.

How much time do I have left?

The Chair:

You have 10 seconds.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Then, thank you.

The Chair:

We will get back to you.

Mr. Masse, you have five minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

It was going to be a great 10 seconds.

Mr. Lipkus, I had a piece of legislation that improved CBSA detainment, seize and destroy, and it was on invasive carp. In the past when carp came into Canada, it had to be tested to make sure it was dead. They have so-called zombie-like characteristics. When it was packed in ice, it could live up to 24 hours.

To make a long story short, the Conservatives stole and implemented my bill, which was great because the regulation was that the carp have to be eviscerated so we don't have to have people check to make sure they are alive.

Does your suggestion say the same thing? Can it go through regulation? Can you give a little in terms of detain, seize and destroy? I could see maybe detain and seize, but destroy or sending back probably could be through regulation. Destroy might require some legislation.

Mr. Lorne Lipkus:

Sending it back just adds to the problem.

Mr. Brian Masse:

It doesn't for our country. I've seen stuff get into hospitals. I was part of a parliamentary group on counterfeiting and piracy. Stopping it getting into our country is progress. Sending it back to where it came from makes it their problem now. Therefore, I would disagree because stopping is one thing, but then having to be responsible to destroy it is another. That's where I'm focused. Why not just send it back? It's probably a regulatory change versus destroying, which is probably a legislative change.

(1710)

Mr. Lorne Lipkus:

Leaving aside statistically what happens, I can tell you anecdotally that products that were destined for Canada and were sent back have found their way back into Canada. That happens.

Statistically, I can't tell you how often, but counterfeiters are quite aggressive, and they will find a way to get it back in. Yes, sometimes they will bring it to another country, but if they want to get it here because they have a customer here who wants it, they will get it back in through another port.

Mr. Brian Masse:

With a trade agreement with the port it came from, we could simply send it back. We could notify them that we're not accepting it because we suspect it's counterfeit, is dangerous and so forth. We can send it back to countries that exported it. Most countries have trade agreements or WTO standing with us so we do all those things.

I want to focus on this because a regulatory change means we don't need legislative change, which is probably not likely to happen right now with this time frame, whereas regulatory change could be done in a matter of weeks.

Mr. Lorne Lipkus:

Clearly, any regulatory change that makes it easier to prevent the importation of counterfeit or pirated products into Canada is welcome. Even if it creates another problem, which I've just mentioned, it's still better than what we have.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I'm not trying to discourage that. I'm not trying to be argumentative. It's just that it's about what we can get done here.

I would ask a question to the researchers.

Can we find out whether or not what's being suggested here is a regulatory change or a legislative change, in terms of detaining, seizing or destroying counterfeit items coming into Canada?

Mr. Lorne Lipkus:

Could I make a comment about the destruction part?

Mr. Brian Masse:

Of course.

Mr. Lorne Lipkus:

I don't know if it's a regulatory change or not, but in the existing legislation, there's a 10-day period of notice given to both the importer and to the rights owner. It says, “These goods are on their way into the country. You, Mr. Rights Holder, have 10 days to bring an action or else we're going to be releasing the goods in some way.” The importer is given 10 days' notice to say that these goods are suspected of being counterfeit.

In the cases that we're finding right now, the importer either doesn't respond, or says, “I didn't order those goods.”

If part of the process were an abandonment situation, which is done with other goods in Canada in similar situations—after 10 days the importer does not respond, or responds and says they didn't order these goods—then why can't we destroy them right away?

Why is the government paying to continue to store these goods? They could be destroyed immediately.

Mr. Brian Masse:

That's why I want the legal advice.

I think what you're asking for is a far more complicated process for something on which we could have a simpler solution in the medium and short terms.

I'm not disagreeing in terms of responsibility of it. However, in my opinion, there's low-hanging fruit in your situation that you're advocating, and public health benefits as well, especially with more drugs and so forth now getting into counterfeiting.

At any rate, I'm going to quickly go to OpenMedia.

With regard to your statement about undermining the consultations with the extension of the trade agreement, perhaps you could enlighten us a little more on that. One of the things that has dramatically shifted during these hearings is a trade agreement in principle. We can debate whether it's going to get passed or not, but at the same time, we have agreed that that contains the context, and....

Ms. Laura Tribe:

I think that this committee has been tasked with undertaking a review of the Copyright Act. What we've seen is an international trade agreement that is largely focused on physical goods and how they pass across borders, and provides some of the answers to the questions that this committee is asking.

If that trade agreement is passed and does become ratified, one of the concerns we have is that this committee has asked for what people think and how people feel about these issues and, at the end of the day, some of those answers have been deemed irrelevant by this trade agreement.

That's a concern we have about the democratic process, how these trade agreements are being negotiated. As for the NAFTA consultations and negotiations, the results of those consultations were never released to the public. Again, within that, we're having this consultation here, and we still don't know what the NAFTA consultations said. That deal was then moved forward.

Ultimately, all of these deals, all of these negotiations, all these consultations, are supposed to be in the best interests of people in Canada, and we're not certain where their voices are going or how they're being heard.

That's our concern with that being run in tandem to this consultation.

(1715)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I have less than 10 seconds.

The Chair:

You had less than 10 seconds probably two minutes ago.

Mr. Brian Masse:

It probably wouldn't have been a good 10 seconds anyway.

Thank you.

The Chair:

You are two minutes over, but that's okay; we like to give you your time.

Mr. Graham, you have five minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I was going to go to you, Mr. Lipkus, on the question of why you'd want your toy labels protected for 70 years

However, before I get to that, I'm going to let Mr. Lametti ask a quick question.

Mr. David Lametti (LaSalle—Émard—Verdun, Lib.):

Thank you.

Mr. Lipkus, one of the fundamental principles of copyright law is that copyright on the book doesn't mean ownership of the book. It's a physical object versus copyright.

Most of the examples you gave were a patent or a trademark—I think you would definitely agree with that—with copyright coming in at the end. Now, if there's a copyright violation on the label, why should it give you the right to seize or even destroy the physical object?

Mr. Lorne Lipkus:

That's an excellent question.

In fact, what happens in practice right now is that they seize the package, because it is illegal to be using the packaging to advertise that. If the product is authentic, for example, it doesn't show—

Mr. David Lametti:

But then you're back to trademark and a patent again for authenticity.

Mr. Lorne Lipkus:

No, no. If that package—

Mr. David Lametti:

The copyright only applies to the design on the label.

Mr. Lorne Lipkus:

Exactly.

Mr. David Lametti:

It doesn't apply to the authenticity of what's inside.

Mr. Lorne Lipkus:

Exactly. You're 100% right, and so the product itself can flow through. No one is taking a position on the product.

Unfortunately, when the packaging is an infringement, very often the product is counterfeit as well, but—

Mr. David Lametti:

You seem to be pushing for ability to seize or destroy the product based on copyright. If that's the case, you're misleading us.

Mr. Lorne Lipkus:

No. If I said that, that's only predicated on the product being counterfeit. We've seen toys, for example—

Mr. David Lametti:

We've seen toys under patent or trademark.

Mr. Lorne Lipkus:

Correct.

Mr. David Lametti:

Okay. Thank you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I have questions for everybody, but I'll go to the more interesting ones right now.

You both talked about replacing Crown copyright, or getting rid of it altogether, which is, I think, a very poorly known subject for most people.

Can you briefly explain how you understand Crown copyright? Should it go to public domain, or should there be, for example, a Creative Commons licence for Crown material?

Who wants to go?

Ms. Laura Tribe:

I think it's probably across the board. I'll let Kelsey look at my notes.

Exactly what that looks like in implementation, I'm not the expert to tell you what that solution looks like. I think that what we are advocating for is more content in the public domain. If these are publicly funded materials created by the public service and the Canadian government, then those are things we would expect to be put into the public domain in one form or another.

I'll let Kelsey speak to the Creative Commons aspect of that.

Ms. Kelsey Merkley:

Thanks, Laura. I echo those comments.

Works that are paid for by the public are already the public's and should be easily accessible to use and be able to build, innovate and create on top of. We know that governments such as Australia's retain the copyright but publish works openly under a Creative Commons CC By licence, which means the government would continue to get attribution for the work being done, and allows for a broad reuse with minimum restriction.

We know that the European Commission has recommended open licences, the CC By and the CC0. CC0 is a licence that will apply public domain immediately to the licence. That's for publishing open data collected by public sectors and bodies within Europe.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Kelsey, you made a comment earlier that the right to read should be right to mine. That's a great line. I haven't heard that one before.

Should we differentiate in any way between a person reading something and a machine reading something?

Ms. Kelsey Merkley:

That's a great question.

I think there is ample opportunity for those...there are differences between a machine reading a document and a human reading a document. The speed, access and ease with which a machine can read is vastly different from that of one human.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Ms. Aspiazu, do you have comments on that as well? You seem to.

Ms. Marie Aspiazu:

I agree that the way in which information is processed by an artificial intelligence device is different from how a human being does it. I believe that the outcome of allowing for this exception for mining of text and data would be incredibly beneficial for Canada's AI industry, which is something the government had in mind when they set out the budget this year.

(1720)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned FairPlay. I guess it boils down to this question: Should companies be allowed to be vertically integrated into the media market?

Ms. Marie Aspiazu:

Sorry, can you repeat your question?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Should companies be allowed to be vertically in—

Ms. Marie Aspiazu:

No. Do you mean vertical integration?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Does vertical integration of the media market pose a threat to...?

Ms. Laura Tribe:

I think what we've seen with FairPlay is a clear indication of the difference between those that are vertically integrated and those that are not.

When you look at the companies in the media industry that have come out to support FairPlay, they have clearly been those that have content interests, not those of ISPs. Independent Internet service providers that are strictly focused on providing telecommunication services have not come out with the same position, because it is a huge burden on ISPs in doing this, and is not the business they're in. That's where we really do see the difficulty of the deeply vertically integrated market our telecom and media conglomerates have.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate it.

Dan is going to cut me off. Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Carrie, welcome to our committee. You have five minutes.

Mr. Colin Carrie (Oshawa, CPC):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman.

I used to be on this committee about 10 years ago, and 10 years ago we were talking about copyright. Brian was here. Brian, I thought we had this figured out. What's happened? When I left....

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Colin Carrie: It's been the longest study ever.

The Chair:

We have a trifecta, because you all worked on it.

Mr. Colin Carrie:

You know what, though? These are exciting times. We have the new USMCA.

Mr. Petricone, I was wondering if you could comment on this new deal that actually will be coming to the international trade committee, the committee I do sit on. I'd really like your insight on the new USMCA.

Mr. Michael Petricone:

From our perspective, it is a good deal. It contains important elements for the innovation industry. For example, there are limitations on liability for Internet platforms that host third party content, without which the Internet.... It's a fundamental part of the ability of American Internet companies to exist and thrive. Otherwise, from a legal and liability standpoint, it just wouldn't work. That is in the agreement, and that is good.

Also, there's limitation.... There are no data localization rules. That is good. There's a limitation on duties for digitally purchased goods, and that is good for all of our industries.

In terms of Canada, we would not have been in favour of the extension of copyright term. We believe the focus should be on incentivizing new works and that the public domain is a hugely fertile and dynamic area for new innovation. It's a building block for new innovation and should be protected and extended.

Also, we would have been pleased with a specific mention of fair use in the agreement because we believe that fair use is important. On the whole we believe it is a good agreement for the creative industry and a good agreement for the innovation sector.

Mr. Colin Carrie:

Thank you very much.

Ms. Tribe, could you comment, please?

Ms. Laura Tribe:

Sorry, I missed the last part of it.

Mr. Colin Carrie:

I was wondering if you'd be able to comment on what you think of the new USMCA.

Ms. Laura Tribe:

We have concerns around some of the elements contained within not just the IP chapter but the digital trade chapter. I think that our fundamental concern with the USMCA—as I was starting to get to earlier—is that this is a deal that we have no indication included the voices of Canadians in it. People feel very strongly in support of or against the deal itself based on the issues that they care about.

As an organization that is committed to the future of our digital economy and Canada's Internet, it's very concerning to see issues that are very complicated and technical, like digital trade, like intellectual property, being negotiated in the same way that we are trading cows and milk and chickens. That is not to discredit any of those issues. They are all very important, but they are very different from the types of issues we're looking at in digital trade.

That's the concern we have with this being negotiated as part of a larger trade deal where we're making concessions across the board. To us, it feels like the IP chapter was one of the concessions made as part of this larger negotiation.

Mr. Colin Carrie:

Thank you very much.

I have a question for the panel in front of me, because I believe in your presentations and in our history you do advocate for stronger users' rights. I remember 10 years ago it was a balance between the users and the creators. I remember creators back then were struggling. The stats are out there. I think in 2010, writers' and authors' income was around $29,700, and in 2015 it actually went down to $28,000. It seems that they're struggling.

If you're advocating for stronger users' rights, is it actually the time that we should be advocating for stronger users' rights when we're actually seeing employment income for creators actually dropping and they're struggling?

(1725)

Ms. Kelsey Merkley:

I am a library member. I am a librarian by background. I'm a strong user of the Toronto Public Library. I am an active reader. I have a lot of empathy for those who are trying to make a living selling books.

I don't believe that it is the copyright challenge that is preventing them from making a lot of money. We see this creeping from Amazon's publishing model and the impact it's having on them. There are a lot of levers that are involved in whether or not an author is able to make money. [Inaudible—Editor] it is not solely because there are not enough user rights. We need to be able to give a bigger audience so that users are able to use and participate, especially in the area of textbooks where student costs are extraordinarily high and the textbook costs are not increasing at the same rate as for an author of a novel. It's important to differentiate between those two.

Ms. Laura Tribe:

I would agree with Kelsey and echo what she's saying.

I think that a lot of the problem we're seeing is not a copyright issue. It's the power dynamics between creators, the publishing industry, and where those revenues are going. When we look at some of the larger companies that are in control of these issues, they're doing fine. Their revenues are doing very well.

A lot of this comes down to the power for creators to leverage in their contracts and their negotiations a stronger position for themselves to make sure that they have ways and avenues and venues, whether that's publishing through Creative Commons, whether that's publishing independently and through different avenues, to make sure that they can be compensated. And they should be compensated for their work.

I would agree that I don't think this is a matter of copyright infringement or copyright rules not being stringent enough to ensure they're compensated. I think that's actually the marketplace and the way it's constructed to prevent them from being adequately compensated.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Longfield, you have five minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to all the witnesses. It's a very technical discussion we're having in a very short period of time.

Mr. Petricone, again, thanks for meeting with us when we were in Washington.

I'm wondering whether you've seen some of the same discussions around the revenue share between the creators and the providers of technology in the States. Have the creators in the States had the same kind of drop in revenue that we've seen in Canada?

Mr. Michael Petricone:

It depends on how you want to measure it. One aspect of these new technologies is that they've changed the revenue stream, so not only might there be more or less revenue coming in, but it's also going to different groups.

However, there is some good news. According to the RIAA, the Recording Industry Association of America, the first half revenues in the music industry in the United States are up 10%, to $4.6 billion. Most notably for us, 75% of those revenues come from streaming music.

Clearly, the music industry went through a period of disruption with new technology. That is not uncommon. Now what they're doing is meeting the consumers' needs, because consumers want streaming music. They want to be able to listen to their music anywhere on a variety of devices. Now, the record labels are enabling that and the revenue is coming in. So, as we get through this period of transition, the picture looks quite bright.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Is that something the technology companies are doing voluntarily, or did you have a change in legislation and regulations in the States around how streaming is handled?

Mr. Michael Petricone:

We just passed a law in the United States called the Music Modernization Act, which basically streamlines how digital music is paid for and incorporates pre-1972 music into our system, because before it was a state-by-state policy, which was unhelpful if you're trying to run a national business.

In what has become emblematic of the entire debate, the passage of the Music Modernization Act not only was bi-partisan in Congress but also included all the stakeholders of record labels, publishers, artists, streaming platforms.... At first, when the new technology came out, it was quite adversarial and fractious, but I think there's a growing realization that we are all part of the same ecosystem, and if the ecosystem is healthy, we all benefit.

(1730)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

We've been trying to get some witnesses from the American streaming services to testify at our committee. We're still in the fractious state, I think, in Canada. The creators are getting paid fractions of fractions of pennies per stream. They need millions and millions of streams to try to make up for lost revenue.

There was a pivot point at some point in the discussion in the States. How long ago was that?

Mr. Michael Petricone:

I think it has been gradual, as consumers have been adopting streaming music.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Okay. Thank you. That's definitely something that we need to include in our study.

I'll turn to OpenMedia.

We've had a lot of conflicting testimony, which is why we do these things. We don't want everybody agreeing. I'm wondering where you would sit in terms of the protection of revenue for creators when you look at, let's say, things like resale right, reversionary right, for copyright to go back to the artist after a set amount of time, or granting journalists remuneration rights so that people who are using photos, as an example—revenue used to go to the original photographer.

How does that fit, in terms of the openness you're describing to us today?

Ms. Laura Tribe:

I'm not familiar with the details of all of the proposals that you've put forward, but I would say that, generally speaking, as I said earlier, we do believe that creators should be compensated. I think that if there are copyrighted images that are being passed around by journalists that have had their content—they should make sure that that's being used fairly and appropriately.

I think there are a number of challenges in making sure creators are compensated. What we're looking at is trying to find ways that make sure that is available—specifically, the angle we're going for is making sure people are able to access the content they're interested in and they want, whether that is through the ability to legally license that through streaming services or whether that's through paid news sources where they're accessing content because it's something that matters to them.

If there's a specific proposal within there that you'd like me to dig into a little more to see how it fits against the openness....

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

The chair's looking down, so he's looking at the clock right now. I'm over time.

The Chair:

Thanks for reminding me.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

There's a lot I could dig into, but unfortunately, I don't have the time.

Thank you for your testimony.

The Chair:

I was ignoring you so that you could keep going.

Mr. Lloyd, you have five minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

Ms. Tribe, you talked at length about the USMCA, or NAFTA 2.0, and its impacts on this copyright study, because it's a very fluid environment. I was wondering if you had any comments, in terms of the study, on any recommendations we should have in light of the context of the new NAFTA to promote users' rights in the context of the deal.

Ms. Laura Tribe:

Absolutely. I think the number one thing is we need to actually expand what fair dealing looks like, and fair use, to bring more balance to that. Our concerns with what was agreed to in the USMCA is that it shifts into a more heavy-handed copyright regime without providing anything for users in exchange. What we're really looking for is expanding fair dealing, potentially adopting the U.S. model of fair use to just broaden it more wholeheartedly.

Marie, I'm not sure if there's anything else you want to add on the things he asked for.

Ms. Marie Aspiazu:

The only thing I would add is that we would definitely want to keep our notice and notice system as opposed to taking the U.S. notice and takedown system, which is a lot more restrictive.

However, as I mentioned in my part of the testimony, we can definitely tweak the notice and notice system, especially in terms of the language in the notices and the settlement fees as well as some of the more technical aspects and the ways in which ISPs are asked to deal with these notices, which can be very burdensome.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

You mentioned “heavy-handed”. Can you give us some examples of heavy-handedness?

Ms. Laura Tribe:

I think looking at the copyright term extensions is a good example. We're hearing a lot of arguments here and we're discussing a lot of ways that creators need to be compensated. Extending copyright terms from 50 to 70 years after the life of an artist does not compensate that artist.

We're talking about creators who are looking to be paid now, and that has a lot of challenges; but extending it from 50 to 70 years after their death harms the public. That harms people who are no longer able to access that information in the public domain for another 20 years. We will have a 20-year period in Canada where no new content enters the public domain once this deal is adopted, without any real justification for how that's going to help people in Canada.

Kelsey, did you want to add something?

(1735)

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Isn't that the consensus around the world, though, the 70 years after the death of the author?

Ms. Kelsey Merkley:

We are seeing a definite move towards that. I'm—

Ms. Laura Tribe:

We're seeing the standard of 50 increasingly move to 70 with pressure from the United States.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Where is the standard 50?

Ms. Marie Aspiazu:

The international Berne Convention, which is—

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Every European country is 70, America is 70, so which countries are we talking about?

Ms. Kelsey Merkley:

The Berne Convention.

Ms. Laura Tribe:

The Berne Convention is where it is 50, and we're seeing it increasingly move to 70, particularly with pressure from the United States.

Ms. Kelsey Merkley:

At this point, it's really Russia, the U.S. and now Canada. One other thing I really just want to jump in on, though, is that—

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

One thing I thought was interesting is how Europe's being used as an example for how open they are on these things, but we're also seeing Europe as the front-runner/pioneer on content filters and things like that. Can you comment? It seems there are two different emerging streams of thought coming out of Europe. One is that they're very open to using technologies to crack down on copyright infringement, but then your testimony is saying that Europe is somehow more open. Do you have comments on that?

Ms. Laura Tribe:

I think trying to loop Europe into one viewpoint is like trying to loop every person testifying at this committee into one perspective. There are a lot of diverse approaches, and I think the concern we do have in Europe is there's a lot of pressure from individuals.

We're hearing from people in our community and a lot of creator groups that the copyright directive being proposed through both the link tax and the censorship machines that are being put forward in articles 11 and 13 is heavy-handed. There's, I think, a distinction between the policy proposals that are being put forward and what people are looking for and asking for, and I think that's where the division is.

I think that tension does very much exist. There's a lot of pressure from publisher groups to adopt these stricter regulations, but at the same time, there's a lot of push-back, because not only will these proposals greatly infringe on the openness of the Internet in Europe, but they will also have larger international implications.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

That's interesting, because we've been talking about publishers. Everyone thinks it's just this monolithic industry, but I have a publisher in Edmonton who met with me and said, “The only reason I'm profitable this year is that I haven't taken any salary for myself.” We're seeing lots of publishers, especially Canadian publishers, who are struggling.

How does increasing users' rights help Canadian publishers compete in a world where American and European publishers have more rights and are more competitive than our publishers are?

Ms. Laura Tribe:

I think that we need to make sure that those publishers are able to reach the audiences that can and will pay for that content. I think that the proposals we've seen put forward, through content filtering and through website blocking, do the exact opposite of that. They make it even harder for content to reach users.

In addition to making sure that we are promoting that content and making sure it's available, we have to distribute it. We have to make sure that it gets into the hands of as many people as possible in the ways where they can pay for it, where it's easy. We've seen this across so many different issues, but I really think, fundamentally, that the tension between FairPlay, as an example, and the alternatives is that we're not going to get people to go back to paying for cable TV. You have to make content available in the way that people want it, in the formats that they want it.

How can we facilitate and support Canadian businesses and publishers in getting their content created and produced in the hands of the ways that people want to actually touch it, and make sure that we're supporting those industries to reach those audiences? If those audiences are there—we have seen it; we've seen it with subscription services—people will pay, and they do, as soon as it's easy. How do we support Canadian publishers to do that?

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Ms. Caesar-Chavannes, you have five minutes.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Thank you very much to each of the witnesses. I really appreciated some of your testimony today. I'm going to pick up from where you left off on the last question.

In this copyright review, I'm torn between the testimony that I've heard in terms of our need to make amendments versus whether this is the right place to help people increase their revenue streams or their ability to access different markets for their products.

My question is for each of you, whoever feels like answering it.

Do we increase competition or increase access through amendments to the Copyright Act, or is it required that our artists and creators change their business model to be able to access different markets and create that increase in revenue that is currently not happening? We've seen the decline.

Not all at once, guys. Whenever you're ready.

Voices: Oh, oh!

(1740)

Ms. Laura Tribe:

It looked like Michael wanted to speak.

Michael, do you want to speak?

Mr. Michael Petricone:

I will just add one thing. I think it may be both. Certainly creators will hopefully change their business model to take advantage of new technologies and the abilities to monetize and reach large audiences. That's a good thing.

I think the one thing that I would caution is that.... Certainly, it's a goal of this committee to broaden competition among Internet platforms. That's a good thing. The whole start-up ecosystem is very dynamic and provides more opportunities for artists and creators.

The route that Europe is taking with these regulations, article 11 and article 13, while well-intended, may have the opposite effect by concentrating the power of larger companies. This is just because some of the regimes, like the filtering regimes that are being mandated, are really expensive and resource intensive. Look at YouTube's content ID as an example. They spent $60 million on it.

Those may be mandates and obligations that larger companies are able to meet, but for somebody who's creating a new company in her dorm room and who has to meet the same kind of obligations, she cannot. That's the kind of result that I think we need to be mindful and careful of.

Ms. Kelsey Merkley:

I agree with my colleague's statements.

I also want to echo that we are seeing shifts in business models that are challenging across.... There was a comment that was brought up earlier about Betamax. There's a company in the U.S. called OpenStax, which is a for-profit publishing company that releases its textbooks through an open licence, but is able to make quite a substantial amount of money and increase jobs. There's also the example that I referenced in my testimony, Lumen Learning, which is also a for-profit entity. It still allows some aspects of open educational content, which does reach the most marginalized students, and it is reaching out. Again, I want to reiterate that it's important to separate the creators of novels from those who are making textbooks.

I want to make a point that I was trying to make earlier around creators reclaiming their rights. Artist Billy Joel, who many of us know and love, has said that he will no longer create any new music as a result of overreaching copyright in the U.S. and the deals that he has with record companies. We're in that complicated place right now where we need both new business models for these creators and also some regulation to help us get through this time.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

My subsequent question is around the five-year review. With the speed that the digital age is changing, in my opinion—and perhaps I'll just keep it to me and my opinion—a five-year review is perhaps too slow. What do you say to that, knowing the challenges that the industry currently faces? We're doing a five-year review. We're all sitting here providing input, and by the time legislation comes out, things might change, so is a five-year review relevant?

Ms. Laura Tribe:

I would say that OpenMedia doesn't have an official position on this, but my opinion—

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

I'm just throwing it out there.

Ms. Laura Tribe:

—on your opinion is that I think we are five years now, almost six years in, since this has been another year since the five-year period, and we are debating quite small nuances within the Copyright Act itself. Overall, it's held up for five years, and I think a lot of that is a reflection of the thought that went into making this something that would last, and I think the challenge that I would extend to this committee is recognizing that this does need to last. This is not something that can exist just on the ecosystem we have right now. We cannot predict the future, so how can we try to make these pieces of legislation as future-proof as possible to be flexible for the new technology that comes up as well as the new challenges that arise? That's a big challenge, and you have a large task in front of you.

The Chair:

Yes, we know.

For the final two minutes of the day, Mr. Masse, take it home.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'm going to finish with what Mr. Lipkus said. It appears that we can't do any regulatory changes. There's no shortcut there in terms of maybe low-hanging fruit. The researchers have come back to me with that advice so far.

Very quickly, if we do not get the legislation tabled, because this is a review, what would be some simple things that we could do immediately? There could be an election before any tabling of legislation. We'd have to get it back from the minister, from the review, and it would have to go through the Senate and so forth. Really quickly, what are the things that we could do in the short term?

(1745)

Ms. Kelsey Merkley:

Make articles that are produced by the Canadian government publicly available immediately on publication, either through a Creative Commons licence or releasing it to a public domain.

Ms. Marie Aspiazu:

From my end, I would say reject FairPlay Canada's website-blocking proposal, at least as part of this review. Thank you.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Mr. Lipkus.

Mr. Lorne Lipkus:

I'm not sure, other than what we talked about, that you can do something without legislation.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Okay.

Is there any advice from Washington?

Mr. Michael Petricone:

Yes. Enable innovators and enable start-ups, as that's where the dynamism comes from, and avoid website blocking.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Okay. Thank you very much for your patience.

That's it, Chair.

The Chair:

Will that do it?

Mr. Brian Masse:

Yes.

The Chair:

I want to thank everybody for coming in today.

As you know, we have quite the task ahead of us. There are conflicting stories on either side, and our task, as well as the task of our great analysts who will help guide us to where we need to go, and then we'll blame them later....

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair: But, yes, we have definitely been hearing a lot of good information, and we look forward to putting it all together.

Thank you very much, everybody, for coming in.

Thank you, Michael, from Washington.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(1630)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Nous allons commencer. Merci à tous d’être venus. Encore une fois, toutes nos excuses, mais c’est ainsi que fonctionne la Chambre. Les votes ont préséance sur tout le reste, surtout lorsqu’il s’agit de votes de confiance.

Bienvenue à notre réunion 134, où nous poursuivons notre examen quinquennal du droit d’auteur prévu par la loi.

Nous accueillons aujourd’hui M. Lorne Lipkus, qui est président du Réseau anti-contrefaçon canadien; M. Michael Petricone, qui est premier vice-président, Affaires gouvernementales, à la Consumer Technology Association; Mme Kelsey Merkley, qui représente Creative Commons Canada; Mmes Laura Tribe et Marie Aspiazu, qui sont respectivement directrice exécutive et spécialiste des droits numériques chez OpenMedia.

Normalement, les déclarations préliminaires sont de sept minutes. Vous pouvez prendre jusqu’à sept minutes, mais plus nous aurons de temps pour poser des questions, mieux ce sera.

Nous commençons par M. Lipkus.

M. Lorne Lipkus (président, Réseau anti-contrefaçon canadien):

Bonjour.[Français]

Je vous remercie de me donner l'occasion de parler avec vous aujourd'hui.[Traduction]

Le Réseau anti-contrefaçon canadien est un regroupement de titulaires de propriété intellectuelle, de fournisseurs de services, d’organismes de certification, de cabinets d’avocats, d’associations industrielles et autres qui a pour but d'empêcher la fraude par contrefaçon et le piratage des droits d’auteur au Canada.

Presque tous les membres du Réseau ont leur propre emploi. Je suis moi-même associé d'un cabinet d’avocats de Toronto qui s’occupe de protéger la propriété intellectuelle de plus de 80 marques au Canada. Je le suis depuis 1985 et j’ai vécu tous les changements apportés depuis aux lois sur les marques de commerce et le droit d’auteur. Plus récemment, j’ai participé de près au programme des demandes d’aide pour faire appliquer la loi à la frontière du Canada.

Je passe mes journées — et bien d'autres moments aussi, comme mon épouse aime le rappeler — à essayer de protéger les propriétaires de marques contre la prolifération de produits illégaux, dangereux, contrefaits ou piratés qui se retrouvent en ligne ou qui finissent par entrer au Canada.

Nous convenons tous qu’il n’y a pas de solution unique pour lutter contre la violation du droit d’auteur ou la vente de produits contrefaits, mais nous pouvons convenir aussi, j'espère, qu’il est dans notre intérêt à tous de fournir aux titulaires de droits les outils de lutte qui se sont révélés les plus efficaces dans le monde, afin de les appliquer ici au Canada.

Malheureusement, le Canada a rarement été un chef de file dans ces domaines. Heureusement, nous pouvons maintenant nous inspirer de l’expérience des autres.

Je précise que je suis ici pour parler des produits, des sites et des services qui contiennent et qui vendent de la propriété intellectuelle, c'est-à-dire des droits d’auteur et des marques de commerce. Tout produit légitime, autorisé, authentique peut être contrefait ou piraté, s'il ne l'est pas déjà, et il n'y a qu'à se rappeler ce qui s'est passé au Canada pour s'en convaincre.

Plusieurs personnes bien informées sont venues témoigner devant ce comité du tort causé à nos créateurs par la diffusion illégale de musique et de films.

Le Réseau anti-contrefaçon canadien appuie la position adoptée par Bell, Rogers, la Canadian Media Producers Association, le chapitre canadien de la Motion Picture Association et d’autres encore, sur la nécessité de permettre aux titulaires de droits d’obtenir des injonctions, y compris des ordonnances de blocage et de désindexation de sites Internet, contre les intermédiaires dont les services sont utilisés pour violer le droit d’auteur.

Toutefois, l’objectif du Réseau et mon propos ici aujourd’hui, c'est de voir ce qu'on peut faire pour se prémunir contre les produits, les biens matériels, les marchandises, les articles que des Canadiens ordinaires fabriquent, importent, exportent, achètent en ligne, achètent dans la rue ou dans les magasins. Ces produits portent des oeuvres protégées par droit d’auteur. Ils portent aussi parfois des marques de commerce canadiennes déposées, quand ce n'est pas les deux à la fois.

J’ai vu des produits, des sites et des services de contrefaçon qui mettent à la disposition des Canadiens des médicaments, des aliments, des lentilles cornéennes, des produits électriques comme des rallonges et des disjoncteurs qu'on a trouvés dans des hôpitaux canadiens, des pièces d’automobile, des piles, des chargeurs et des cordons de téléphone intelligent, des appareils cellulaires, des shampooings, des outils, des engrais, des meubles, des articles et des vêtements de luxe... tout ce que vous voulez. Si c'est fabriqué, c'est aussi contrefait ou copié.

Au Réseau anti-contrefaçon canadien, nous appuyons donc les modifications qui s'imposent à la Loi sur le droit d’auteur. J’ai parlé de l’injonction et des dispositions d’exonération, mais la troisième chose que nous demandons, c’est une procédure simplifiée à l'égard des produits que je viens de décrire.

Nous aimerions voir simplifier la procédure prévue à l’article 44, qui porte sur le programme de demande d’aide de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, pour qu’il soit clair que les agents des douanes soient autorisés non seulement à retenir ces produits qui entrent au Canada, mais aussi à les saisir. À l’heure actuelle, ils les retiennent. Nous demandons qu’ils puissent aussi les saisir, comme cela se fait partout dans le monde, et les détruire, sans qu’il soit nécessaire d'engager une poursuite judiciaire, comme c'est le cas actuellement.

(1635)



Notre organisation espère aussi que le Canada aura un jour un centre de coordination des droits de propriété intellectuelle qui pourra regrouper sous le même toit les renseignements obtenus par les corps policiers, les douanes et les organismes connexes, ainsi que par les citoyens et les titulaires de droits de propriété intellectuelle, afin que puissent servir à bon escient les ressources consacrées à ce problème de plus en plus grave au Canada.[Français]

Je vous remercie de votre aimable attention. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à la Consumer Technology Association. De Washington, nous accueillons M. Petricone.

M. Michael Petricone (premier vice-président, Affaires gouvernementales, Consumer Technology Association):

Merci beaucoup.

Au nom de la Consumer Technology Association, je suis heureux de participer à l’examen de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur du Canada. Je suis honoré aussi de comparaître devant vous parce que, enfant, j’ai vécu à Oakville, en Ontario, et j'ai beaucoup de souvenirs heureux de mon enfance dans votre merveilleux pays.

La CTA représente plus de 2 200 entreprises canadiennes et américaines de technologie de consommation, qui valent en tout 321 milliards de dollars. Il s'agit à 80 % de petites entreprises et d'entreprises en démarrage. La CTA produit aussi le Consumer Electronics Show, le CES, le Salon international de l'électronique grand public, dont elle est propriétaire.

Dans notre mémoire, nous vous exhortons à faire en sorte que les oeuvres, les services et les technologies canadiens et internationaux deviennent plus accessibles au Canada et à l’étranger. Nous exprimons notre crainte à l'égard de propositions qui amèneraient le contraire en imposant de nouvelles contraintes aux technologies, aux appareils et aux fournisseurs de services d'ici et d'ailleurs. C'est l'innovation qui a fait des Canadiens des chefs de file de l’économie mondiale. Cet examen de la Loi devrait améliorer plutôt que limiter la contribution du Canada. Nous faisons donc les recommandations suivantes:

Premièrement, maintenir et renforcer les limites aux exceptions comme celles de l’utilisation équitable. Deuxièmement, éviter d’imposer aux fournisseurs de services en ligne des contraintes particulières qui nuiraient à la contribution du Canada au débat international et qui entraîneraient un recul des services au Canada. Troisièmement, résister aux envies de surveiller la conception de la technologie et des appareils ou de définir des catégories de technologie ou d’appareils à frapper d’une redevance quelconque.

Enfin, en ce qui concerne la durée du droit d’auteur, nous nous opposons à ce qu'elle soit prolongée, parce que nous préférons mettre l'accent sur la création de nouvelles oeuvres et de nouvelles orientations. Nous considérons que les résultats contraires obtenus dans l’AEUMC sont malheureux et nous espérons que l’effet pourra être atténué dans votre loi par des exceptions, des limitations et une plus grande discrétion en ce qui concerne l’utilisation équitable.

À propos d’utilisation équitable, comme il a accepté les dispositions américaines sur la durée du droit d’auteur et la politique américaine sur le contournement des mesures techniques, le Canada devrait les contrebalancer par des restrictions et des exceptions qui auraient peu d'incidence sur la loi américaine. Le Canada a pris des mesures concrètes en 2012 pour reconnaître les pratiques exemplaires et l’utilisation équitable. Ces pratiques favorisent la recherche, l’étude et la critique, et elles reconnaissent la valeur de la satire, de la parodie et du contenu généré par l’utilisateur. Si un régime intégral d’utilisation équitable servirait peut-être mieux l’environnement dynamique actuel, le régime canadien d’utilisation équitable aurait peut-être avantage à être plus souple et plus adaptable.

L’application stricte d’un régime codifié comme celui de l’utilisation équitable ne peut convenir à de nouvelles technologies et de nouvelles utilisations. Une mesure conforme à la loi américaine serait d'ajouter les mots « such as », qui figurent à l’article 107 du code américain. Cela permettrait aux tribunaux canadiens de suivre les pratiques habituelles et raisonnables des entreprises et des utilisateurs.

La doctrine de l’utilisation équitable, élaborée par les tribunaux comme une nouvelle lecture des principes du premier amendement des États-Unis, a continué d'évoluer même après sa codification. Son application par la Cour suprême dans l’affaire Sony Betamax de 1984 a ouvert la porte aux communications personnelles, au commerce électronique et à Internet. Pour nous, cela équivaut à la Grande Charte de l’industrie des technologies de consommation. L’utilisation équitable est aussi un fondement des codes de conduite et des pratiques exemplaires implicites qu'on trouve aussi au Canada dans de nombreux domaines.

À l’échelle internationale, la capacité de citer et de critiquer a été importante pour la démocratie et l’innovation. La CTA pense que les États-Unis, le Canada et l’Europe devraient encourager ces valeurs chez eux et à l’étranger.

Pour ce qui est des mesures techniques, le Canada a suivi l’exemple des États-Unis en rendant leur contournement illégal, mais encore là, il n’a pas prévu de restrictions et d’exceptions correspondantes. Comme l’a décidé la semaine dernière le U.S. Register of Copyrights dans ses recommandations en vertu de l’article 1201 de la Digital Millenium Copyright Act, la DMCA, des exceptions d’utilisateur légitime sont nécessaires surtout pour le diagnostic, l’entretien et la réparation des voitures, des machines agricoles et d’autres appareils modernes, parce que les circuits analogiques dans les pièces mécaniques ont été remplacés par des logiciels intégrés. Grâce au nouveau règlement, les agriculteurs américains n’auront plus à s’inquiéter de la légalité de faire appel à des experts pour réparer un tracteur ou une moissonneuse-batteuse pendant la courte saison végétative du Nord.

Après une étude exhaustive et des commentaires de la CTA, et d’autres organismes, les registraires ont conclu que de telles exceptions peuvent et doivent être appliquées sans mettre en péril l’expression créatrice. C’est un pas en avant que le Canada devrait également envisager. Même si les tribunaux américains ne considèrent pas l’utilisation équitable comme un moyen de défense contre l'article 1201 de la DMCA, c'est le critère utilisé par le Register of Copyrights pour évaluer les demandes d’exception. Des restrictions fondées sur de telles considérations serviraient bien le Canada.

Le Canada et l’AEUMC s'orientent maintenant dans la bonne direction en ce qui concerne la reconnaissance des exonérations accordées aux fournisseurs de services en ligne qui hébergent du contenu généré par les utilisateurs. Comme le signale notre mémoire, des études ont montré qu'une atteinte à ces exonérations serait lourde de conséquences surtout pour les petits fournisseurs et les nouveaux venus dans le marché local qui n’ont pas les ressources nécessaires pour faire du filtrage de masse. Nous reconnaissons toutefois qu’aucun régime n’est parfait. Dans notre mémoire, nous vous exhortons à envisager des mesures pour contrer les activités de pollupostage selon le régime de double avis du Canada. Comme dans le cas des mesures techniques, les contraintes et les dispenses qui viennent avec sont maintenant des cibles mobiles qu'il vaut mieux viser en même temps.

(1640)



En ce qui concerne le blocage de sites, qui a refait surface dans le cours de votre examen, c’est une mesure à laquelle la CTA s’oppose depuis longtemps. Les propositions en ce sens formulées aux États-Unis il y a six ans dans les projets de loi SOPA et PIPA n'ont pas résisté à l’examen des experts et à l’indignation du public. Dans le contexte canadien, de telles mesures auraient l’inconvénient supplémentaire d'empêcher des entrepreneurs et des utilisateurs d’accéder à des sites pourtant accessibles dans d’autres parties de l’Amérique du Nord et ailleurs.

La CTA est aussi contre l'imposition de nouvelles redevances et contraintes de conception aux produits et aux services. De telles mesures faussent les technologies et les marchés et finissent par succomber au changement technologique, sauf dans les poursuites qui traînent en cour. Selon notre expérience, les redevances sur les appareils ne répondent pas au besoin des titulaires de droits de réagir au changement technologique et elles deviennent rapidement désuètes.

Pour ce qui est de prolonger la durée du droit d’auteur, la CTA considère le domaine public comme une ressource précieuse pour la créativité culturelle et l’innovation future. Nous trouvons regrettable que le Canada ait accepté dans l'AEUMC d'allonger la durée de 20 ans pour se conformer à la situation des États-Unis, mais nous espérons que, grâce aux mesures que nous proposons, vous pourrez atténuer les conséquences de cet empiètement dans le domaine public. On a laissé entendre aux États-Unis qu’une mesure formelle devrait s’appliquer durant les 20 dernières années de protection pour éviter les problèmes d'oeuvres orphelines, et le Canada pourrait aussi envisager une solution de ce genre.

En conclusion, le rythme de l’innovation est souvent plus rapide que la capacité de légiférer de façon responsable. Même au rythme d’un examen quinquennal, on ne peut pas prévoir ou suivre la cadence des changements qui ont remplacé les appareils mécaniques par des appareils numériques, puis bon nombre d'appareils numériques par des services en ligne. La CTA recommande au Comité de privilégier la créativité et l’innovation et de se garder d'imposer des contraintes aux services numériques, aux appareils numériques et aux services en ligne.

Au nom de la CTA, je vous remercie de cette occasion de nous faire entendre.

Le président:

Excellent. Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à Mme Merkley, de Creative Commons Canada.

Vous avez jusqu’à sept minutes.

Mme Kelsey Merkley (représentante, Creative Commons Canada):

Bonjour. Merci de m’avoir invitée ici aujourd’hui.

J’aimerais signaler pour commencer que nous sommes réunis sur un territoire ancestral non cédé de la nation algonquine.

Je m’appelle Kelsey Merkley. Je suis ici en qualité de citoyenne et de représentante de Creative Commons Canada. Nous faisons partie d’une organisation planétaire à but non lucratif qui a vu le jour en 2001, qui compte 26 chapitres nationaux dans le monde et qui travaille avec des artistes, des bibliothécaires, des scientifiques, des cinéastes et des photographes. Nous créons, nous administrons et nous recommandons les licences de droit d’auteur Creative Commons, qui sont reconnues dans le monde entier et dont l'usage est gratuit. Elles permettent aux créateurs de choisir comment leurs oeuvres peuvent être réutilisées suivant des conditions standards simples.

À l’échelle mondiale, des licences Creative Commons, ou licences CC, s'appliquent aujourd'hui à plus de 1,4 milliard d’oeuvres. Ce qui me frappe le plus au sujet de ce 1,4 milliard d’oeuvres, c’est que des personnes ont pris la décision de partager 1,4 milliard de fois. Si vous avez consulté un des 40 millions d’articles de Wikipédia, téléchargé une photo de Flickr ou regardé des vidéos sur YouTube, vous avez eu affaire à une de nos licences dans un contexte commercial ou non commercial.

Comme exemple de nos licences dans le monde, mentionnons la licence ouverte de Lumen Learning, qui permet l'utilisation commerciale à plus de 280 établissements aux États-Unis. Rien que cette année, Lumen a enregistré plus de 4 millions de visites par mois sur son site Web de contenu éducatif ouvert. À maintes reprises, Lumen a pu démontrer que son offre de ressources pédagogiques en libre accès éliminait l’écart de performance entre les étudiants de faible niveau socioéconomique et ceux de haut niveau socioéconomique.

Ici au Canada, BCcampus, le champion mondial des manuels scolaires ouverts, a épargné plus de 9 millions de dollars à des étudiants de la Colombie-Britannique privés de moyens en mettant à leur libre disposition des manuels scolaires créés au Canada.

Cory Doctorow, l'écrivain canadien de science-fiction destinée aux jeunes adultes, permet d'utiliser un grand nombre de ses oeuvres en vertu d'une licence CC non commerciale, de sorte que tout le monde y a accès à condition de ne pas vendre sa créativité. Des chercheurs de MaRS au Structural Genomics Consortium, Aled Edwards et Rachel Harding, ont choisi la licence la plus ouverte, CC By Attribution, pour accélérer le rythme des découvertes scientifiques en ouvrant sans restriction leurs carnets de laboratoire à d’autres chercheurs du monde entier.

La Bibliothèque publique de New York, le Met, le Rijksmuseum et, plus récemment, Europeana, partagent tous des oeuvres grâce à une licence Creative Commons qui permet à leurs collections de voyager dans le monde entier.

Nous conseillons des gouvernements et des institutions qui veulent utiliser des licences ouvertes pour aider leurs citoyens à accéder à du contenu. Nous l'avons fait auprès de l’Agence spatiale européenne, de la Commission européenne, du Département d’État et du département de l’Éducation des États-Unis. Tous ont utilisé des licences CC pour offrir au grand public le libre accès à leurs oeuvres financées par l'État. Ici, au Canada, le Québec a été le premier gouvernement au monde à adopter la licence CC 4.0 pour toutes les données ouvertes qu'il publie.

Je remercie le Comité de me permettre de lui faire part de quelques réflexions et suggestions dans le cadre de son examen des modifications éventuelles à la Loi sur le droit d’auteur.

Premièrement, la prolongation de la durée du droit d’auteur nuit au domaine public. Fondamentalement, nous croyons que toute créativité s’appuie sur des antécédents et que la promotion et la protection d’un domaine public solide sont au coeur de notre mission. Pourquoi? Parce que les oeuvres du domaine public peuvent être utilisées par n’importe qui sans restriction. Les oeuvres du domaine public deviennent la matière première de la créativité et de l’innovation. Le Comité ne devrait pas toucher à la durée du droit d'auteur prévue par la Loi. S'il faut la prolonger de 20 ans, qu'on pense alors à autoriser d'autres usages et à clarifier l'utilisation équitable afin d’atténuer l'incidence sur l’éducation, la créativité et l’innovation.

Deuxièmement, permettre aux créateurs de récupérer leurs droits. Nous appuyons la recommandation que Bryan Adams a faite au Comité, soit que les créateurs canadiens puissent récupérer les droits sur leurs créations non plus 25 ans après leur mort, mais 25 ans après les avoir cédés.

Troisièmement, il faut protéger l’utilisation équitable, surtout pour l’éducation. C'est essentiel si on veut que le droit d’auteur atteigne son objectif ultime, qui est de promouvoir des aspects essentiels de l’intérêt public.

Quatrièmement, qui a le droit de lire devrait avoir le droit d'exploiter. Étant donné l’énorme potentiel de découvertes nouvelles, les progrès de l'intelligence artificielle, de l’apprentissage machine et de l’innovation au Canada, la Loi sur le droit d’auteur devrait préciser que le droit de lire est le droit d'exploiter. Elle devrait veiller à ce que tous ces usages non expressifs ou non commerciaux, comme l’exploration de textes et de données, soient admis dans le cadre de l’utilisation équitable ou largement appuyés par d’autres mesures juridiques.

Cinquièmement, renforcer le libre accès à l’éducation, à la recherche et aux données financées par l'État. Le partage d’oeuvres sous licence Creative Commons est un exercice légitime du droit d’auteur et devrait être la norme pour toutes les ressources publiques comme les documents de recherche, le matériel didactique, les données recueillies par le gouvernement et les oeuvres culturelles.

(1645)



Le Canada devrait réformer le régime du droit d’auteur de la Couronne, car tous les Canadiens devraient avoir le droit d’accéder aux oeuvres produites par leur gouvernement et de les réutiliser, sans restriction. Le Canada devrait les placer directement dans le domaine public dès leur publication.

J’espère que vos questions m'amèneront à parler davantage de la valeur publique et scientifique de l’édition en libre accès.

La gratitude est au centre de notre travail, alors je vais m'arrêter ici en vous remerciant de m’avoir invitée à témoigner aujourd’hui.

Le président:

Excellent. Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à OpenMedia, avec Laura Tribe.

Mme Laura Tribe (directrice exécutive, OpenMedia):

Bonjour et merci de nous accueillir.

J’aimerais aussi commencer par reconnaître que nous sommes sur le territoire traditionnel du peuple algonquin.

Je m’appelle Laura Tribe et je suis la directrice exécutive chez OpenMedia. Nous sommes une organisation communautaire qui compte plus de 500 000 partisans et qui travaille pour faire en sorte de garder Internet ouvert, abordable et exempt de surveillance. Je suis accompagnée aujourd’hui de ma collègue Marie Aspiazu.

Je tiens à préciser que le Canada a un régime de droit d’auteur solide et équilibré. Mais les récentes renégociations de l’ALENA ont porté un dur coup à cet équilibre et à la position du Canada ce chef de file en matière de droit d’auteur. Nous espérons que ce processus d’examen nous permettra de modifier la Loi sur le droit d’auteur afin d’améliorer l’accès au contenu et de rétablir l’équilibre dans ce système.

En permettant à un accord commercial international d’établir une partie importante du programme du Canada en matière de droit d’auteur, le gouvernement a non seulement accepté des modifications troublantes, y compris la prolongation de 20 ans de la durée des droits d’auteur, mais il a aussi nui activement à la présente consultation en cours.

Pendant la dernière année, plusieurs redevances extrêmement problématiques, ou taxes, ont été mises de l’avant pour aider à rémunérer les créateurs canadiens. Nous ne pouvons tout simplement pas nous permettre les propositions suivantes qui feraient augmenter les coûts de la connectivité numérique:

Il y a d’abord la taxe iPod. Cette idée recyclée taxerait tous les téléphones intelligents vendus au Canada afin de compenser les allégations de reproduction de musique. Cette idée ne tient pas compte de la diminution de la reproduction de musique à des fins privées suite à l’augmentation des services par abonnement et du fait que les gens utilisent les téléphones intelligents pour toutes sortes de raisons qui vont bien au-delà de la consommation de musique, et encore moins de la consommation illégale de musique.

Vient ensuite la taxe Netflix. Cette proposition annulerait l’ordonnance d’exemption du CRTC relative aux médias numériques et obligerait les fournisseurs de services par contournement à se conformer aux mêmes règlements sur le contenu canadien que les radiodiffuseurs. Fondamentalement, c'est mal comprendre la nature d’Internet, en plus de cibler en fait tous les services par contournement, quelle que soit leur taille, pas seulement Netflix.

Il y a aussi la taxe Internet, qui oblige les fournisseurs de services Internet à contribuer au financement du contenu canadien comme le font les radiodiffuseurs canadiens. Malheureusement, nous savons que ces prix seront répercutés sur les clients. Les Canadiens paient déjà les prix Internet parmi les plus élevés au monde pour des services de qualité inférieure. Cette idée a été rejetée par près de 40 000 internautes de la communauté d’OpenMedia.

Il y a maintenant une taxe sur le droit d’auteur. Récemment, nous avons entendu une proposition voulant que toute utilisation d’Internet de plus de 15 gigaoctets par mois, par ménage, soit taxée. Cette idée se fonde sur l’allégation erronée selon laquelle toute utilisation d’Internet de plus de 15 gigaoctets doit être attribuable à la diffusion en continu de contenu, et que la diffusion en continu de contenu, même si les utilisateurs la paient légalement, signifie que les utilisateurs devraient payer davantage pour rémunérer les créateurs.

Les créateurs devraient être adéquatement rémunérés, mais ce ne sont pas là les solutions pour y arriver.

Comme l’a dit Bill, membre de la communauté d’OpenMedia: « Je suis propriétaire d’une petite entreprise et j’utilise beaucoup la bande passante pour les réunions en ligne et d’autres activités connexes. Une taxe Internet tuerait mon entreprise, ce qui mettrait six personnes au chômage. »

Nous ne pouvons pas nous permettre d’accroître davantage le fossé numérique et le prix d’Internet au Canada. Une connexion Internet rapide et abordable est essentielle.

Parlons séparément de la taxe de vente. L’imposition d’une taxe de vente fédérale aux fournisseurs de contenu en ligne est souvent confondue avec les propositions ci-dessus, mais elle est tout à fait distincte. Si le gouvernement fédéral décidait d’appliquer la TVH aux services en ligne internationaux, ces taxes devraient, à juste titre, être perçues et remises au gouvernement, puis affectées au budget général comme bon lui semble, y compris pour le financement des arts, de la culture et des créateurs.

(1650)

Mme Marie Aspiazu (spécialiste des droits numériques, OpenMedia):

La proposition de blocage du site Web FairPlay de Bell Canada est l’une des suggestions les plus dangereuses que nous ayons entendues jusqu’à présent. Cela aurait inévitablement pour effet de censurer le contenu légitime et la liberté d’expression en ligne et de violer les protections de la neutralité d'Internet, tout cela sans surveillance judiciaire. Il s'agirait d'un dangereux précédent pour d’autres propositions de censure à l’avenir.

Les experts ont souligné les aspects techniques coûteux et problématiques de la mise en oeuvre de ces interventions de censure. De plus, près de 100 000 partisans d’OpenMedia se sont prononcés contre la proposition de blocage du site Web FairPlay de Bell Canada lorsqu’elle a été déposée à la fois pendant l’ALENA et devant le CRTC.

Voici ce qu’a dit Ryan, un membre de notre communauté: Le fait de permettre arbitrairement le blocage de sites Web et le retrait de sites Web entraînera une réduction importante des droits civils et des libertés politiques, car les entreprises et les organisations peuvent décider de supprimer des sites Web qu’elles n’aiment pas, même si des conditions ont été violées […] Nous avons un système judiciaire solide, où l’accusé est réputé innocent jusqu’à preuve du contraire. Laissons les tribunaux s’en occuper, puisqu’elles sont assujetties en vertu de la loi à un examen public et à une enquête.

Parmi d’autres propositions dangereuses qui se retrouvent au Canada à la lumière de la proposition de directive sur le droit d’auteur de l’Union européenne, mentionnons la taxe sur les liens et les algorithmes de filtrage de contenu obligatoire. La taxe sur les liens porterait sur les extraits de texte qui accompagnent habituellement les liens, souvent utilisés comme aperçus pour aider les utilisateurs d’Internet à trouver un contenu en ligne. Le fait d’exiger des agrégateurs qu’ils paient pour le contenu simplement pour pouvoir en faire la promotion nuit aux créateurs de contenu en réduisant la possibilité de découvrir leur contenu, mais cela fortifie également les plus grands agrégateurs de contenu, comme Facebook et Google, en faisant augmenter encore les coûts pour les nouveaux venus. Cette proposition a déjà été mise en oeuvre et s’est révélée un échec en Allemagne et en Espagne.

Les exigences de filtrage du contenu transformeraient les plateformes en ligne en police du droit d’auteur. Forcer les plateformes en ligne à mettre en place des mécanismes pour identifier et bloquer les documents que l’on croit enfreindre le droit d’auteur avant leur publication, comme le système Content ID de plusieurs millions de dollars de YouTube, ne sera pas bon marché. Comme on le sait, il y aura encore des faux positifs et il y aura inévitablement un retrait du contenu légitime.

Nous avons présenté un certain nombre de propositions préoccupantes, mais nous croyons que des modifications simples peuvent être apportées au système pour aider à rétablir l’équilibre. À tout le moins, le gouvernement devrait maintenir la liste actuelle de l’utilisation équitable, y compris l’éducation, la parodie et la satire. De plus, l’ajout explicite de l’utilisation transformatrice serait grandement bénéfique. Idéalement, le Canada adoptera des dispositions plus larges sur l’utilisation équitable, semblables à celles que l'on retrouve aux États-Unis. Nous exhortons également le gouvernement à éliminer les droits d’auteur de la Couronne.

Comme OpenMedia l’a déjà dit, le système canadien d'avis sur avis est un régime équitable pour traiter les allégations de violation du droit d’auteur. Cependant, le gouvernement devrait fournir des lignes directrices relatives au contenu des avis qui empêchent les menaces ou les demandes de règlement.

OpenMedia défend les droits d’auteur depuis six ans. Les efforts de longue date de notre communauté comprennent cinq années de campagne contre le Partenariat transpacifique secret et son dangereux chapitre sur la PI; « Our Digital Future: A Crowdsourced Agenda for Free Expression », une vision positive du partage et de la créativité en ligne, provenant de plus de 40 000 personnes; plus de 50 000 personnes exhortent la ministre des Affaires étrangères du Canada à défendre les droits numériques des citoyens dans l’ALENA; et plus de 2 500 mémoires dans le cadre de la consultation menée par votre comité par l’entremise de l’outil en ligne d’OpenMedia à l'adresse letstalkcopyright.ca.

Avant de venir ici aujourd’hui, nous avons demandé aux membres de notre communauté ce que nous devrions vous dire. Nous espérons que leurs voix sont bien représentées.

En conclusion, nous demandons à votre comité de répondre aux besoins des gens que ces règles touchent le plus, c’est-à-dire les gens ordinaires qui dépendent d’un régime équilibré de droits d’auteur pour leurs activités quotidiennes.

Merci. Nous avons hâte de répondre à vos questions.

(1655)

Le président:

Excellent.

Je tiens à vous remercier tous de vos exposés.

Pour que nous soyons tous sur la même longueur d’onde, nous pouvons prolonger la séance jusqu’à 18 heures. Je sais que certains de nos invités devront peut-être partir, et c’est très bien.

Avant de passer aux questions, M. Lloyd veut lire un avis de motion.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Oui. J’ai une brève motion: Que le Comité permanent de l’industrie, des sciences et de la technologie, conformément à l’article 108(2) du Règlement, entreprenne une étude d’au moins six réunions pour enquêter sur l’incidence de la tarification du carbone sur la compétitivité mondiale des industries canadiennes et formuler des recommandations à cet égard.

Ce n’est qu’un avis. Il n’y a pas de débat à ce sujet pour l’instant.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci. C’est exact. Il n’y a pas de débat pour l’instant.

Nous allons maintenant passer aux questions.

Monsieur Sheehan, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je remercie nos témoins de cette discussion très importante.

Ma question s’adresse à Lorne, du Réseau anti-contrefaçon canadien.

Dans votre témoignage, vous avez donné pas mal d’exemples qui semblaient davantage liés aux marques de commerce ou aux brevets. Avez-vous des exemples précis de droits d’auteur que vous pourriez nous donner?

M. Lorne Lipkus:

Je crois que chaque exemple que j’ai donné comporte un aspect lié au droit d’auteur.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Pouvez-vous nous donner plus de précisions?

M. Lorne Lipkus:

Le fait est que les biens matériels comportent divers types de propriété intellectuelle. Les médicaments, par exemple, peuvent traverser nos frontières ou être vendus dans nos magasins sous forme de comprimés sans aucun emballage. Si vous prenez seulement le médicament, il est probablement protégé par les droits sur les brevets. Il y a des brevets sur ce médicament. Il faudrait probablement savoir quelque chose au sujet du médicament lui-même pour déterminer s’il porte atteinte au brevet.

L’emballage peut comporter des logos, des noms et des dessins. Très souvent, lorsque les douaniers voient un produit entrer au pays, ils savent par l’emballage, avant d’arriver au produit, s’il y a un problème et s’il s’agit d’un produit potentiellement contrefait ou piraté. Ce que nous avons vu avec des choses comme l’emballage pharmaceutique et l’emballage de jouets, l’emballage de shampoings, l’emballage des choses que j’ai mentionnées, c’est que le contrefacteur, le pirate, peut copier l’oeuvre réelle, l’oeuvre protégée par le droit d’auteur, à l’extérieur de l’emballage et retirer le nom de marque de commerce, sans se rendre compte qu’il est protégé par le droit d’auteur également. C'est un exemple. Même une chose aussi simple que les pièces automobiles peut comporter des logos et des dessins qui sont protégés par le droit d’auteur.

J’espère que cela répond à votre question.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Cela aide beaucoup. Il est beaucoup plus approfondi, et vous êtes certainement allé dans un domaine... En lisant sur le sujet, j’ai vu que la GRC avait déclaré que la contrefaçon avait augmenté au Canada, passant de 7,7 millions de dollars en 2005 à 38,1 millions de dollars en 2012.

Quel pourcentage de ces articles portent atteinte au droit d’auteur? Avez-vous ce chiffre ou un chiffre approximatif? Y a-t-il certains secteurs des industries culturelles qui sont frappés plus durement que d’autres — plus les industries culturelles?

M. Lorne Lipkus:

Personne ne connaît le chiffre. Quiconque donne un nombre fait des suppositions. Nous savons que des études récentes ont été faites à l’échelle mondiale — l’OCDE en a fait une, et je suis sûr qu’on vous l’a montrée. Ce sont les chiffres les plus exacts que nous allons obtenir. Personne ne sait ce qu’il en est au Canada, mais je vais revenir à un exemple qui, à mon avis, est extrêmement révélateur.

Vous avez lu les chiffres de la GRC, qui n’a pas vraiment eu de cas de piratage ou de contrefaçon de biens de consommation depuis plus de trois ans et demi, mais quand elle a fait son étude, le commandant dans la région de Toronto voulait savoir combien de produits contrefaits ou piratés arrivaient par l’aéroport de Toronto. À ce moment-là, pour toute l’année, la valeur la plus élevée de produits contrefaits entrés au Canada était de l’ordre de 30 millions de dollars. Il voulait donc savoir ce qui se passerait si nous répondions à tous les appels que nous recevions de l’ASFC pendant six mois, quelle quantité de produits il y aurait.

En six mois, il y a eu plus de 70 millions de dollars de contrefaçon à Toronto seulement, et cela concernait tout ce à quoi on pouvait penser. Lorsque je dis tout, je parle de produits que nous n’avions même pas vus être contrefaits et qui étaient saisis par la GRC. C’était le projet O-Scorpion, je crois, en 2012-2013. Depuis, il n’y a eu presque aucune saisie à la frontière par la GRC ou par les douaniers.

Je pense que c’est assez révélateur. Si vous le cherchez, vous allez le trouver, et nous trouvons la même chose sur le marché. Nous...

Excusez-moi, je ne sais pas si vous vouliez d’autres exemples.

(1700)

M. Terry Sheehan:

Ce n'est pas nécessaire. Merci beaucoup.

Ma question s’adresse à la Consumer Technology Association. Tout d’abord, je suis heureux de vous revoir. Nous nous sommes rencontrés dans le cadre de notre étude sur les services à large bande et nous sommes allés à Washington pour y rencontrer certains de vos membres.

Selon vous, la Loi sur le droit d’auteur limite-t-elle le développement et l’utilisation des technologies actuelles ou émergentes et, le cas échéant, qui en a profité? Pourriez-vous donner au Comité une idée de la façon dont les technologies nouvelles et émergentes pourraient offrir à la fois des possibilités ou nuire à l’application du droit d’auteur?

M. Michael Petricone:

Ce qui me tient éveillé la nuit, c’est que nous aurons une réglementation bien intentionnée, mais trop large, qui empêchera les innovations nouvelles et socialement bénéfiques d’arriver sur le marché.

Ce que nous avons tendance à constater dans la technologie, c’est que les nouvelles technologies arrivent sur le marché et qu’elles sont utilisées par les consommateurs d’une façon qui n’était pas prévue au départ. Dans mon témoignage, j’ai parlé de la controverse entourant Sony Betamax, où Sony a introduit le Betamax, un appareil qui permettait aux gens d’enregistrer des émissions de télévision. L’industrie du cinéma a intenté des poursuites et s’est retrouvée devant la Cour suprême des États-Unis, qui a déclaré que c’était un produit légal, par un vote. C’est ensuite devenu un produit très populaire.

L’ironie, c’est que ce qui inquiétait l’industrie cinématographique, c’était le bouton d’enregistrement, mais ce que les consommateurs trouvaient utile dans le Betamax, c’était le bouton de lecture. Cela a donné naissance à une toute nouvelle industrie dans les médias préenregistrés, comme les disques compacts et les DVD, qui ont fini par représenter la majorité des revenus de l’industrie cinématographique quelques années plus tard.

Si l’industrie cinématographique avait réussi à bloquer cette technologie, elle aurait aussi bloqué l’une de ses plus grandes sources de revenus. On le voit beaucoup dans le domaine de la technologie, où les choses se passent de façon inattendue.

La tendance générale est que les nouvelles technologies ouvrent de nouvelles plateformes de distribution, permettent l’accès à de nouveaux groupes de consommateurs et permettent de nouvelles façons de monétiser, comme on le voit maintenant sur Internet avec la croissance de la musique en continu.

Nous vous conseillons toujours d’être très discrets en ce qui concerne la réglementation des nouvelles technologies parce que vous ne savez pas exactement quelles possibilités en matière de création ou de débouchés économiques vous pourriez fermer par inadvertance.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Lloyd.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci à tous nos témoins aujourd’hui.

Ma première série de questions s’adresse à vous, monsieur Lipkus.

Il y a beaucoup de choses dont nous avons discuté dans le cadre de nos travaux. Nous avons parlé à des auteurs et à des créateurs de musique. Ce sont vraiment des choses intangibles, comme dans la sphère numérique. Beaucoup des choses dont vous avez parlé dans votre témoignage sont des choses physiques qui pourraient franchir la frontière.

Vous avez parlé d’outils efficaces. Votre organisation a-t-elle des outils efficaces que vous recommanderiez pour traiter exclusivement de cette sphère numérique? Quels seraient ces outils efficaces?

M. Lorne Lipkus:

L’une des choses que nous avons recommandées, comme vous le savez, c’est la procédure simplifiée dans le cas des biens matériels, mais je ne suis pas certain d’avoir une bonne réponse à vous donner au sujet de quelque chose qui ne porterait que sur les biens incorporels.

M. Dane Lloyd:

D’accord.

M. Lorne Lipkus:

L’aspect incorporel dont nous parlons, même dans un bien matériel, est l’aspect incorporel du travail lui-même. Le travail lui-même se retrouve dans le bien matériel...

M. Dane Lloyd:

Oui.

M. Lorne Lipkus:

... nous sommes donc toujours là pour ce qui est de la création. C’est simplement qu’il est apposé sur quelque chose qui est vendu comme un bien matériel.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je vous en suis reconnaissant. Merci.

Ma prochaine question s’adresse à vous, madame Merkley.

J’étudiais en Colombie-Britannique lors du dévoilement de Creative Commons. C'est le gouvernement libéral de la Colombie-Britannique qui l’a fait. Comme étudiant, cela semblait être une excellente ressource.

Pourriez-vous m’expliquer comment les auteurs et les créateurs sont rémunérés en vertu d’une licence Creative Commons? Comment cela fonctionne-t-il?

(1705)

Mme Kelsey Merkley:

Il n’y a pas de différence dans la façon dont ils sont rémunérés. Parlons-nous des manuels scolaires?

M. Dane Lloyd:

Oui, précisément.

Mme Kelsey Merkley:

Quelqu’un doit payer pour qu’un manuel soit créé. Souvent, les manuels scolaires sont créés soit par des subventions institutionnelles, soit par les universités elles-mêmes.

Il y a aussi une branche d’études appelée « pédagogie ouverte », où l'on travaille avec les étudiants pour créer eux-mêmes le manuel.

Quand on parle des 9 millions de dollars, on entend les éditeurs dire: « Eh bien, nous venons de perdre 9 millions de dollars », mais le taux d’inflation des manuels a dépassé le coût de la responsabilité réalisable de n'importe quel étudiant. Nous sommes devant des coûts de manuels qui dépassent 1 000 $ par manuel, et c’est un manuel pour un cours pendant un trimestre. Ces coûts sont tout simplement déraisonnables.

M. Dane Lloyd:

La question est de savoir comment les auteurs sont rémunérés dans Creative Commons. Ne sont-ils pas rémunérés?

Mme Kelsey Merkley:

Ils peuvent être rémunérés par Creative Commons. Creative Commons ne signifie pas que le livre ne peut pas être facturé. Un livre peut encore être facturé. C’est simplement que la création est gratuite.

Cory Doctorow fait de l’argent avec ses livres. C’est exactement le même modèle que pour un manuel. Il crée un livre, puis le livre est vendu. Il vend des exemplaires de livres électroniques et met gratuitement un PDF à la disposition de tous. Il peut ainsi gagner plus d’argent parce que son produit est plus largement disponible et que les gens sont plus susceptibles d’acheter le livre parce qu’un PDF est moins lisible sur un Kindle, sur un lecteur électronique. C’est la même chose pour les manuels scolaires.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je vous en suis reconnaissant. Certains auteurs sont en mesure d’avoir un vaste auditoire, d’en tirer parti et de donner des choses gratuitement. Un certain nombre d’auteurs ont comparu devant notre comité. Il n’y a pas eu tout à fait unanimité, mais il est renversant que ces auteurs demandent une meilleure protection du droit d’auteur, une prolongation de la durée, parce que nous avons constaté statistiquement que leurs revenus comme auteurs diminuent.

Nous entendons des gens dire que ces livres sont la matière première utilisée pour la créativité future, mais eux sont les créateurs et ils viennent ici et nous demandent de protéger leurs œuvres parce qu’ils ne peuvent pas en vivre. S’ils arrêtent de créer ces œuvres, nous perdrons une industrie à valeur ajoutée vraiment importante.

Qu’avez-vous à dire à ce sujet?

Mme Kelsey Merkley:

Dans le cas de Wikipédia et des créations de contenu ouvert, je pense que nous assistons à la création d’une industrie supplémentaire qui permet de créer du travail et pour que les gens... J’encouragerais ces auteurs à examiner différentes sources de revenus. Nous sommes dans une nouvelle ère numérique. Les anciens modèles ne fonctionnent tout simplement plus comme avant. Il est temps d’adopter des modèles d’affaires nouveaux et différents.

M. Dane Lloyd:

S’il s’agit d’un manuel médical, cependant, soutenez-vous que Wikipédia est un substitut viable?

Mme Kelsey Merkley:

Wikipédia est rédigé par des experts et est accessible. Il y a de nombreux exemples de manuels qui sont rédigés par des gens et des membres de la communauté médicale autorisés en vertu d’une licence Creative Commons.

L’un des grands défis de Wikipédia, c’est qu’il est actuellement rédigé à un niveau trop avancé, et non à un niveau d’encyclopédie.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Il vous reste 10 secondes.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Alors, merci.

Le président:

Votre tour reviendra.

Monsieur Masse, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Nous aurions eu droit à 10 excellentes secondes.

Monsieur Lipkus, j’avais un projet de loi qui améliorait la détention, la saisie et la destruction de la carpe envahissante par l’ASFC. Dans le passé, lorsque des carpes arrivaient au Canada, on devait faire des tests pour s’assurer qu’elles étaient mortes. Elles ont des caractéristiques dites zombies. Emballées dans la glace, elles pouvaient survivre jusqu’à 24 heures.

Bref, les conservateurs ont volé mon projet de loi et l’ont mis en œuvre, ce qui était formidable parce que, selon le règlement, la carpe doit être éviscérée afin que nous n’ayons pas à demander aux gens de vérifier si elle est en vie.

Votre suggestion dit-elle la même chose? Est-ce que cela peut passer par la réglementation? Pouvez-vous nous parler un peu de la détention, de la saisie et de la destruction? Je pourrais envisager la détention et la saisie, mais la destruction ou le renvoi pourrait probablement se faire par voie réglementaire. La destruction pourrait exiger une loi.

M. Lorne Lipkus:

Renvoyer ne fait qu’ajouter au problème.

M. Brian Masse:

Ce n’est pas le cas pour notre pays. J’ai vu des choses arriver dans les hôpitaux. Je faisais partie d’un groupe parlementaire sur la contrefaçon et le piratage. Empêcher un produit d'entrer dans notre pays est un progrès. Le renvoyer d’où il vient, c’est leur problème maintenant. Par conséquent, je ne suis pas d’accord, car arrêter est une chose, mais être responsable de le détruire en est une autre. C’est là-dessus que je me concentre. Pourquoi ne pas simplement le renvoyer? Il s’agit probablement d’un changement réglementaire plutôt que d’une destruction, ce qui est probablement une modification législative.

(1710)

M. Lorne Lipkus:

Indépendamment de ce qui se passe statistiquement, je peux vous dire que des produits qui étaient destinés au Canada et qui ont été renvoyés sont revenus au Canada. Cela arrive.

Statistiquement parlant, je ne peux pas vous dire à quelle fréquence, mais les faussaires sont très agressifs, et ils trouveront le moyen de le faire revenir. Oui, parfois, ils vont l’apporter dans un autre pays, mais s’ils veulent le ramener ici parce qu’ils ont un client ici qui le veut, ils vont le ramener par un autre port.

M. Brian Masse:

Dans le cadre d'un accord commercial avec le port d’où il vient, on pourrait tout simplement le renvoyer. Nous pourrions l'aviser que nous ne l'acceptons pas parce que nous soupçonnons qu’il est contrefait, dangereux, etc. Nous pouvons le renvoyer dans les pays qui l’ont exporté. La plupart des pays ont des accords commerciaux ou qualité pour agir de l’OMC avec nous, alors nous faisons toutes ces choses.

Je veux insister sur ce point parce qu’un changement réglementaire signifie que nous n’avons pas besoin d’une modification législative, ce qui n’est probablement pas le cas en ce moment avec l'échéancier que nous avons, alors que le changement réglementaire pourrait se faire en quelques semaines.

M. Lorne Lipkus:

De toute évidence, tout changement réglementaire qui a pour résultat d'empêcher l’importation de produits contrefaits ou piratés au Canada est le bienvenu. Même si cela crée un autre problème, ce que je viens de mentionner, c’est encore mieux que ce que nous avons.

M. Brian Masse:

Je n’essaie pas de décourager cela. Je n’essaie pas d’argumenter. C’est simplement une question de savoir ce que nous pouvons faire ici.

J’aimerais poser une question aux recherchistes.

Pouvons-nous savoir si ce qui est proposé ici est un changement réglementaire ou une modification législative en ce qui concerne la détention, la saisie ou la destruction d’articles contrefaits qui entrent au Canada?

M. Lorne Lipkus:

Puis-je faire un commentaire au sujet de la destruction?

M. Brian Masse:

Bien sûr.

M. Lorne Lipkus:

Je ne sais pas s’il s’agit d’un changement réglementaire ou non, mais dans la loi actuelle, un préavis de 10 jours est donné à l’importateur et au titulaire des droits. « Ces produits sont en route vers le pays. Vous, monsieur Titulaire des droits, avez 10 jours pour intenter une poursuite, sinon nous allons dédouaner les marchandises d’une façon ou d’une autre. » L’importateur reçoit un préavis de 10 jours pour dire que ces marchandises pourraient être contrefaites.

Dans les cas que nous constatons actuellement, l’importateur ne répond pas ou dit: « Je n’ai pas commandé ces marchandises. »

Si une partie du processus était une situation d’abandon, ce qui se fait avec d’autres marchandises au Canada dans des situations semblables — après 10 jours, l’importateur ne réagit pas ou répond en disant qu’il n’a pas commandé ces marchandises —, alors pourquoi ne pouvons-nous pas les détruire immédiatement?

Pourquoi le gouvernement paie-t-il pour continuer d’entreposer ces produits? Ils pourraient être détruits immédiatement.

M. Brian Masse:

Voilà pourquoi je veux un avis juridique.

Je pense que ce que vous demandez, c’est un processus beaucoup plus compliqué pour une solution plus simple à moyen et à court terme.

Je ne suis pas en désaccord sur le plan de la responsabilité. Cependant, à mon avis, il y a des choses faciles dans votre situation que vous préconisez, et des avantages pour la santé publique également, surtout avec l’augmentation du nombre de médicaments et d'autres produits qui sont maintenant contrefaits.

Quoi qu’il en soit, je vais passer rapidement à OpenMedia.

En ce qui concerne votre déclaration au sujet de la possibilité de nuire aux consultations sur la prolongation de l’accord commercial, vous pourriez peut-être nous en dire un peu plus à ce sujet. Au cours de nos audiences, l'une des choses qui ont considérablement changé, c'est l'accord commercial de principe. Nous pouvons débattre de la question de savoir s’il sera adopté ou non, mais en même temps, nous avons convenu que cela contient le contexte, et...

Mme Laura Tribe:

Je pense que votre comité a été mandaté d’entreprendre un examen de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur. Ce que nous avons vu, c’est un accord commercial international qui est principalement axé sur les biens matériels et la façon dont ils traversent les frontières, et qui fournit certaines des réponses aux questions que pose le Comité.

Si cet accord commercial est adopté et ratifié, l’une de nos préoccupations, c’est que le Comité a demandé aux gens ce qu’ils pensent de ces questions et, au bout du compte, certaines de ces réponses ont été jugées non pertinentes par cet accord commercial.

C’est une préoccupation que nous avons au sujet du processus démocratique, de la façon dont ces accords commerciaux sont négociés. Quant aux consultations et aux négociations entourant l’ALENA, les résultats de ces consultations n’ont jamais été rendus publics. Encore une fois, nous tenons cette consultation ici, et nous ne savons toujours pas ce qu’ont dit les consultations sur l’ALENA. Cet accord a ensuite été conclu.

Au bout du compte, toutes ces ententes, toutes ces négociations, toutes ces consultations sont censées être dans l’intérêt des Canadiens, et nous ne sommes pas certains de savoir où vont leurs voix ni comment elles sont entendues.

C’est ce qui nous préoccupe dans le fait que cela se fasse parallèlement à la présente consultation.

(1715)

Le président:

Merci.

M. Brian Masse:

Il me reste moins de 10 secondes.

Le président:

Il vous restait probablement moins de 10 secondes il y a deux minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

De toute façon, elles n’auraient probablement pas été 10 bonnes secondes.

Merci.

Le président:

Vous avez dépassé votre temps de deux minutes, mais ce n’est pas grave; nous aimons vous donner votre temps.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

J’allais vous demander, monsieur Lipkus, pourquoi vous voudriez que vos étiquettes de jouets soient protégées pendant 70 ans.

Cependant, avant d’en arriver là, je vais laisser M. Lametti poser une brève question.

M. David Lametti (LaSalle—Émard—Verdun, Lib.):

Merci.

Monsieur Lipkus, l’un des principes fondamentaux de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur est que le droit d’auteur sur le livre ne signifie pas la propriété du livre. C’est un objet matériel par rapport au droit d’auteur.

La plupart des exemples que vous avez donnés concernaient un brevet ou une marque de commerce — je pense que vous êtes tout à fait d’accord avec cela —, le droit d’auteur intervenant à la fin. Maintenant, s’il y a une violation du droit d’auteur sur l’étiquette, pourquoi cela vous donnerait-il le droit de saisir ou même de détruire l’objet matériel?

M. Lorne Lipkus:

C’est une excellente question.

En fait, ce qui se passe actuellement, c’est qu’ils saisissent l’emballage, parce qu’il est illégal d’utiliser l’emballage pour faire de la publicité. Si le produit est authentique, par exemple, il ne montre pas...

M. David Lametti:

Mais ensuite, on revient à la marque de commerce et au brevet pour l’authenticité.

M. Lorne Lipkus:

Non, non. Si ce colis...

M. David Lametti:

Le droit d’auteur ne s’applique qu’à la conception de l’étiquette.

M. Lorne Lipkus:

Exactement.

M. David Lametti:

Il ne s’applique pas à l’authenticité de ce qui se trouve à l’intérieur.

M. Lorne Lipkus:

Exactement. Vous avez totalement raison, et le produit lui-même peut passer. Personne ne prend position sur le produit.

Malheureusement, lorsque l’emballage est contrefait, très souvent le produit l'est également, mais...

M. David Lametti:

Vous semblez préconiser la capacité de saisir ou de détruire le produit en fonction du droit d’auteur. Si c’est le cas, vous nous induisez en erreur.

M. Lorne Lipkus:

Non. Si j’ai dit cela, c’est seulement parce que le produit est contrefait. Nous avons vu des jouets, par exemple...

M. David Lametti:

Nous avons vu des jouets visés par des brevets ou des marques de commerce.

M. Lorne Lipkus:

C’est exact.

M. David Lametti:

D’accord. Merci.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

J’ai des questions pour tout le monde, mais je vais commencer par les plus intéressantes.

Vous avez toutes les deux parlé de remplacer les droits d’auteur de la Couronne ou de les éliminer complètement, ce qui est, je crois, un sujet très mal connu pour la plupart des gens.

Pouvez-vous expliquer brièvement comment vous comprenez les droits d’auteur de la Couronne? Devraient-ils être du domaine public ou devrait-il y avoir, par exemple, une licence Creative Commons pour les documents de la Couronne?

Qui veut commencer?

Mme Laura Tribe:

Je pense que c’est probablement généralisé. Je vais laisser Kelsey consulter mes notes.

Pour ce qui est de la mise en œuvre, je ne suis pas l'experte en la matière pour vous dire à quoi ressemble cette solution. Je pense que ce que nous préconisons, c’est plus de contenu dans le domaine public. S’il s’agit de documents publics créés par la fonction publique et le gouvernement canadien, nous nous attendons à ce qu’ils soient rendus publics sous une forme ou une autre.

Je vais laisser Kelsey vous parler de l’aspect Creative Commons.

Mme Kelsey Merkley:

Merci, Laura. Je me fais l’écho de ces commentaires.

Les œuvres qui sont payées par le public appartiennent déjà au public et devraient être facilement accessibles. On devrait pouvoir s'en servir pour construire, innover et créer. Nous savons que des gouvernements comme celui de l’Australie conservent le droit d’auteur, mais publient ouvertement des œuvres en vertu d’une licence Creative Commons CC By, ce qui signifie que le gouvernement continuerait d’obtenir l’indication de la source pour ce qui est fait, et permet une réutilisation générale avec un minimum de restrictions.

Nous savons que la Commission européenne a recommandé des licences ouvertes, le CC By et le CC0. Le CC0 est une licence qui s’appliquera immédiatement au domaine public. Il s’agit de la publication de données ouvertes recueillies par les secteurs et organismes publics en Europe.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Kelsey, vous avez dit tout à l’heure que le droit de lire devrait être le droit d'exploiter. C’est une excellente remarque. Je n’ai jamais entendu cela auparavant.

Devrions-nous faire la différence entre une personne qui lit quelque chose et une machine qui lit quelque chose?

Mme Kelsey Merkley:

C’est une excellente question.

Je pense qu’il y a amplement de possibilités pour ces... Il y a des différences entre une machine qui lit un document et un humain qui lit un document. La vitesse, l’accès et la facilité avec lesquels une machine peut lire sont très différents de ceux d’un humain.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Madame Aspiazu, avez-vous quelque chose à dire à ce sujet également? Vous semblez vouloir intervenir.

Mme Marie Aspiazu:

Je conviens que la façon dont l’information est traitée par un dispositif d’intelligence artificielle est différente de la façon dont un être humain le fait. Je crois que le fait de permettre cette exception pour l’exploitation de textes et de données serait extrêmement bénéfique pour l’industrie canadienne de l’intelligence artificielle, ce que le gouvernement avait en tête lorsqu’il a présenté le budget de cette année.

(1720)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez mentionné FairPlay. Je suppose que cela revient à la question suivante: les entreprises devraient-elles pouvoir être intégrées verticalement au marché des médias?

Mme Marie Aspiazu:

Excusez-moi, pouvez-vous répéter votre question?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Devrait-on permettre aux entreprises d’être verticalement...

Mme Marie Aspiazu:

Non. Parlez-vous de l’intégration verticale?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L’intégration verticale du marché des médias menace-t-elle...

Mme Laura Tribe:

Je pense que ce que nous avons vu avec FairPlay est une indication claire de la différence entre ceux qui sont intégrés verticalement et ceux qui ne le sont pas.

Si vous regardez les entreprises de l’industrie des médias qui ont appuyé FairPlay, il est clair qu’elles ont des intérêts en matière de contenu, et non pas ceux des FSI. Les fournisseurs de services Internet indépendants qui se concentrent strictement sur la prestation de services de télécommunication n’ont pas adopté la même position, parce que c’est un énorme fardeau pour les FSI, et ce n’est pas le genre d’activité qu’ils exercent. C’est là que nous voyons vraiment la difficulté du marché profondément intégré verticalement de nos conglomérats des télécommunications et des médias.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Dan va m’interrompre. Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Carrie, bienvenue à notre comité. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Colin Carrie (Oshawa, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je siégeais à votre comité il y a environ 10 ans, et il y a 10 ans, nous parlions du droit d’auteur. Brian était ici. Brian, je pensais que nous avions compris. Que s’est-il passé? Lorsque je suis parti...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Colin Carrie: C’est l’étude la plus longue jamais réalisée.

Le président:

Nous avons une trifecta, parce que vous y avez tous travaillé.

M. Colin Carrie:

Vous savez quoi, cependant? Nous vivons une période passionnante. Nous avons le nouvel AEUMC.

Monsieur Petricone, je me demandais si vous pouviez nous parler de ce nouvel accord qui sera envoyé au comité du commerce international, dont je fais partie. J’aimerais vraiment savoir ce que vous pensez du nouvel AEUMC.

M. Michael Petricone:

De notre point de vue, c’est une bonne affaire. Il contient des éléments importants pour l’industrie de l’innovation. Par exemple, il y a des limites à la responsabilité pour les plateformes Internet qui hébergent du contenu de tiers, sans lesquels Internet... C’est un élément fondamental de la capacité des entreprises Internet américaines d’exister et de prospérer. Autrement, du point de vue juridique et du point de vue de la responsabilité, cela ne fonctionnerait tout simplement pas. C’est dans l’accord, et c’est bien.

De plus, il y a des limites... Il n’y a pas de règles de localisation des données. C’est bien. Il y a une limitation des droits de douane pour les produits achetés par voie numérique, et c’est bon pour toutes nos industries.

En ce qui concerne le Canada, nous n’aurions pas été en faveur de la prolongation de la durée du droit d’auteur. Nous croyons que l’accent devrait être mis sur l’incitation aux nouvelles œuvres et que le domaine public est un domaine extrêmement fertile et dynamique pour l’innovation. C’est un élément de base pour les nouvelles innovations et il faut le protéger et l’étendre.

De plus, nous aurions été heureux de voir une mention précise de l’utilisation équitable dans l’accord, parce que nous croyons que l’utilisation équitable est importante. Dans l’ensemble, nous croyons que c’est un bon accord pour l’industrie créative et un bon accord pour le secteur de l’innovation.

M. Colin Carrie:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Tribe, pourriez-vous commenter, s’il vous plaît?

Mme Laura Tribe:

Désolée, j’ai manqué la dernière partie.

M. Colin Carrie:

Je me demandais si vous pouviez nous dire ce que vous pensez du nouvel AEUMC.

Mme Laura Tribe:

Certains des éléments du chapitre sur la propriété intellectuelle, mais aussi de celui sur le commerce numérique, nous paraissent problématiques. Mais notre vrai problème à l’égard de l'AEUMC — comme j'y ai fait allusion plus tôt —, c’est que rien n'indique que les Canadiens aient été consultés avant de conclure l'accord. Ils y sont ou très favorables ou très opposés, en fonction des questions qui leur tiennent à coeur.

Pour une organisation soucieuse de l’avenir de notre économie numérique et d’Internet au Canada, il est très inquiétant de voir que, dans les négociations, on met des questions très complexes et techniques, comme le commerce numérique et la propriété intellectuelle, sur le même plan que le commerce des vaches, du lait et des poulets. Sans mettre le moins du monde en cause les mérites et l'importance de ce dernier, il reste qu'il soulève des questions très différentes de celles que pose le commerce numérique.

On craint que le commerce numérique ne fasse les frais de l'opération, si on le met dans le même panier que le reste pour négocier un accord commercial plus vaste où l'on fait des concessions partout. On a l’impression que le chapitre sur la propriété intellectuelle est l’une de ces concessions.

M. Colin Carrie:

Merci beaucoup.

J’ai une question à poser aux témoins qui se trouvent devant moi, parce que dans vos exposés et dans notre histoire, vous prônez un renforcement des droits des utilisateurs. Je me souviens qu’il y a 10 ans, il y avait un équilibre entre les utilisateurs et les créateurs. Je me souviens que les créateurs éprouvaient des difficultés à l’époque. Les statistiques existent. Je crois qu’en 2010, le revenu des écrivains et des auteurs était d’environ 29 700 $ et, en 2015, il est descendu à 28 000 $. Il semble qu’ils éprouvent des difficultés.

Si vous prônez un renforcement des droits des utilisateurs, est-ce vraiment le moment de le faire alors que les revenus d’emploi des créateurs diminuent et qu’ils sont en difficulté ?

(1725)

Mme Kelsey Merkley:

Je suis membre de la bibliothèque. Je suis bibliothécaire de formation. Je suis une grande utilisatrice de la Bibliothèque publique de Toronto. Je suis une lectrice active. J’ai beaucoup d’empathie pour ceux qui essaient de gagner leur vie en vendant des livres.

Ce qui les empêche de gagner beaucoup d’argent, ce n'est pas, selon moi, que l'on conteste leurs droits d'auteur. Cela nous semble découler du modèle d’édition d’Amazon dont on voit l'impact qu'il a sur eux. Le fait qu'un auteur est en mesure de gagner de l’argent tient à une foule de facteurs. [Inaudible] ce n’est pas seulement parce qu’il n’y a pas suffisamment de droits d’utilisation. On doit être en mesure d’offrir un public plus vaste afin que les utilisateurs puissent utiliser et participer, surtout dans le domaine des manuels scolaires où les coûts pour les étudiants sont extraordinairement élevés et les coûts des manuels scolaires n’augmentent pas au même rythme que pour un auteur de romans. Il est important de faire la distinction entre les deux.

Mme Laura Tribe:

Je suis d’accord avec Kelsey et me fais l'écho de ses propos.

Je pense que, pour l'essentiel, le problème ne tient pas au droit d’auteur. Il tient à la dynamique du pouvoir entre les créateurs, l’industrie de l’édition et à la répartition des revenus. Certaines des grandes entreprises qui contrôlent ces enjeux s’en tirent très bien. Leurs revenus se portent très bien.

Cela revient en grande partie au pouvoir qu’ont les créateurs de tirer parti, dans leurs contrats et leurs négociations, d’une position plus forte pour s’assurer qu’ils ont des moyens, des voies et des débouchés pour s’assurer qu’ils peuvent être rémunérés, qu'il s'agisse de publier par Creative Commons ou de façon indépendante et par des voies différentes. Et ils devraient être rémunérés pour leur travail.

Je suis d’accord et je ne pense pas que ce soit une question de violation du droit d’auteur ou que les règles sur le droit d’auteur ne sont pas assez rigoureuses pour garantir qu'un auteur est rémunéré. Je pense que c’est le marché qui est ainsi fait et qu'il comporte des obstacles structurels les empêchant d’être rémunérés convenablement.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Longfield, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à tous les témoins. C’est une discussion très technique qu'on a, en très peu de temps.

Monsieur Petricone, encore une fois, merci de nous avoir rencontrés lorsqu'on était à Washington.

Je me demande si vous avez assisté aux mêmes discussions au sujet du partage des revenus entre les créateurs et les fournisseurs de technologie aux États-Unis. Est-ce que les créateurs aux États-Unis ont subi le même genre de baisse de revenus que celle observée au Canada?

M. Michael Petricone:

Cela dépend de la façon dont on veut le mesurer. L’un des aspects de ces nouvelles technologies, c’est qu’elles ont modifié le flux de revenus, de sorte que non seulement il pourrait y avoir plus ou moins de revenus, mais qu'ils vont aussi à des groupes différents.

Cependant, il y a de bonnes nouvelles. Selon la RIAA, la Recording Industry Association of America, au premier semestre, les revenus de l’industrie de la musique aux États-Unis ont augmenté de 10 % pour atteindre 4,6 milliards de dollars. En ce qui nous concerne plus particulièrement, 75 % de ces revenus proviennent de la musique diffusée en continu.

De toute évidence, l’industrie de la musique a connu une période de perturbation en raison de la nouvelle technologie. Ce n’est pas rare. Maintenant, elle répond aux besoins des consommateurs, parce que les consommateurs veulent de la musique diffusée en continu. Ils veulent pouvoir écouter leur musique n’importe où sur divers appareils. Maintenant, les maisons de disques le permettent et les revenus augmentent. Donc, au terme de cette période de transition, le tableau semble assez brillant.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Est-ce quelque chose que les entreprises de technologie font volontairement ou avez-vous modifié la loi et la réglementation aux États-Unis en ce qui concerne la gestion de la diffusion en continu?

M. Michael Petricone:

On vient d’adopter une loi aux États-Unis, la loi de modernisation de la musique, qui uniformise essentiellement la façon dont on paye la musique numérique et intègre la musique antérieure à 1972 dans notre système, parce qu’avant, chaque État avait sa politique, ce qui ne facilitait pas la gestion d'une entreprise au niveau national.

Dans ce qui est devenu emblématique de tout le débat, l’adoption de la loi de modernisation de la musique a été non seulement bipartite au Congrès, mais a aussi inclus tous les intervenants des maisons de disques, les éditeurs, les artistes, les plateformes de diffusion en continu... Au début, lorsque la nouvelle technologie est sortie, l'accueil a été plutôt conflictuel et divisé, mais je pense qu’on se rend de plus en plus compte qu'on fait tous partie du même écosystème et que si l’écosystème est sain, on en bénéficie tous.

(1730)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

On a essayé de faire venir des témoins des services américains de diffusion en continu. Je crois qu'on est encore divisé au Canada. Les créateurs reçoivent des fractions de fractions de sous par diffusion. Il leur faudrait des millions et des millions de diffusions pour compenser la perte de revenus.

Il y a eu un moment décisif à un moment donné dans la discussion aux États-Unis. Il y a combien de temps?

M. Michael Petricone:

Je pense que cela s’est fait graduellement, à mesure que les consommateurs ont adopté la musique diffusée en continu.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

D’accord. Merci. C’est certainement quelque chose qu'on doit inclure dans notre étude.

Je me tourne vers OpenMedia.

On a entendu beaucoup de témoignages contradictoires, et c’est pourquoi on fait ces comités. On ne veut pas que tout le monde soit d’accord. Je me demande où vous en êtes en ce qui concerne la protection des revenus des créateurs lorsque vous examinez, par exemple, le droit de revente, le droit réversible — prévoyant que le droit d’auteur retourne à l’artiste après un certain temps —, ou l’octroi de droits de rémunération aux journalistes, par exemple, dans le cas des personnes qui utilisent des photos... les revenus allaient au photographe auteur de l'original.

Comment est-ce que cela s'articule avec l’ouverture que vous nous décrivez aujourd’hui?

Mme Laura Tribe:

Je ne connais pas les détails de toutes les propositions que vous avez faites, mais, en général, comme je l’ai dit plus tôt, on estime que les créateurs devraient être rémunérés. Si des journalistes obtiennent et rediffusent des images protégées par le droit d’auteur, ils devraient s’assurer qu’elles sont utilisées de façon juste et appropriée.

Il y a, je pense, un certain nombre de défis à relever pour s’assurer que les créateurs sont rémunérés. On cherche les moyens d'y parvenir, en particulier, en s'assurant que les gens peuvent avoir accès au contenu qui les intéresse, soit en ayant la possibilité d’obtenir une licence légale par l’entremise de services de diffusion en continu, soit par l’entremise de sources de nouvelles payantes leur permettant d'accéder au contenu qui les intéresse.

S’il y a une proposition précise que vous aimeriez que j’approfondisse un peu plus pour voir comment elle cadre avec l’ouverture...

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Le président regarde vers le bas, alors il regarde l’horloge en ce moment. Mon temps de parole est écoulé.

Le président:

Merci de me le rappeler.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je pourrais approfondir pas mal de choses, mais, malheureusement, je n’ai pas le temps.

Merci de votre témoignage.

Le président:

Je vous ignorais pour que vous puissiez continuer.

Monsieur Lloyd, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

Madame Tribe, vous avez beaucoup parlé de l’Accord États-Unis-Mexique-Canada, ou ALENA 2.0, et de ses répercussions sur cette étude sur le droit d’auteur, parce que c’est un environnement très fluide. Je me demandais si vous aviez des commentaires à formuler au sujet de l’étude et des recommandations que l'on devrait formuler dans le contexte du nouvel ALENA pour promouvoir les droits des utilisateurs dans le contexte de l’accord.

Mme Laura Tribe:

Absolument. Je pense que la première chose à faire, c’est d’élargir la définition de l’utilisation équitable, afin d’établir un meilleur équilibre. Ce qui nous préoccupe au sujet de ce qui a été convenu dans le cadre de l'ALENA, c’est que l'on passe à un régime de droit d’auteur plus sévère, sans offrir quoi que ce soit aux utilisateurs en échange. Ce que l'on veut vraiment, c’est élargir l’utilisation équitable, et peut-être adopter le modèle américain d’utilisation équitable pour l’élargir franchement.

Marie, je ne sais pas si vous voulez ajouter quelque chose sur les points qu'il a soulevés.

Mme Marie Aspiazu:

La seule chose que j’ajouterais, c’est que l'on tient absolument à conserver notre système d'avis plutôt que d'adopter le système de notification et de retrait des États-Unis, qui est beaucoup plus restrictif.

Cependant, comme je l’ai mentionné dans ma partie du témoignage, on peut bien sûr modifier notre système d'avis, surtout en ce qui concerne le libellé des notifications et les droits de règlement, ainsi que certains aspects plus techniques et la façon dont les FSI sont appelés à traiter ces notifications, ce qui peut être très lourd.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Vous avez parlé de régime sévère. Pouvez-vous nous citer des cas où le régime a la « main lourde »?

Mme Laura Tribe:

La prolongation de la durée des droits d’auteur est un bon exemple, je pense. On entend beaucoup d’arguments et on envisage de multiples façons de rémunérer les créateurs. Le fait d’étendre la durée du droit d’auteur de 50 à 70 ans après la mort de l'artiste ne rémunère pas cet artiste.

On parle de créateurs qui cherchent à être payés maintenant et cela présente beaucoup de difficultés; mais prolonger le droit de l'auteur en le portant de 50 à 70 ans après sa mort cause du tort à la population. Cela nuit aux gens qui ne peuvent plus avoir accès à cette information dans le domaine public pendant encore 20 ans. Une fois cet accord adopté, aucun nouveau contenu n’entrerait dans le domaine public pendant une période de 20 ans, sans rien qui justifie réellement en quoi cela aiderait les gens au Canada.

Kelsey, voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

(1735)

M. Dane Lloyd:

Mais n’est-ce pas là le consensus qui existe dans le monde, 70 ans après la mort de l’auteur?

Mme Kelsey Merkley:

On constate une nette évolution dans ce sens. Je suis...

Mme Laura Tribe:

On constate que la norme tend de plus en plus à passer de 50 à 70 sous la pression des États-Unis.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Où est fixée la norme de 50?

Mme Marie Aspiazu:

La Convention internationale de Berne, qui est...

M. Dane Lloyd:

Tous les pays européens ont 70 ans, les États-Unis ont 70 ans, alors de quels pays parlons-nous?

Mme Kelsey Merkley:

La Convention de Berne.

Mme Laura Tribe:

La Convention de Berne fixe la norme à 50 ans et on constate qu’elle tend de plus en plus à passer à 70, sous la pression des États-Unis surtout.

Mme Kelsey Merkley:

À ce stade, c’est vraiment la Russie, les États-Unis et maintenant le Canada. Mais je tiens à intervenir sur autre chose...

M. Dane Lloyd:

Une chose que j’ai trouvée intéressante, c’est la façon dont on donne en exemple l’Europe qui est si ouverte sur ces choses, mais on voit aussi l’Europe comme le précurseur des filtres de contenu et des choses de ce genre. Pouvez-vous commenter? Il semble que deux courants de pensée émanent de l’Europe. L'un montre une Europe très ouverte à l’idée d’utiliser les technologies pour sévir contre la violation du droit d’auteur, mais à côté de cela, selon votre témoignage, l’Europe est en quelque sorte plus ouverte. Avez-vous des commentaires à ce sujet?

Mme Laura Tribe:

Je pense qu’essayer de résumer l’Europe à un seul point de vue, c’est comme essayer de reconduire tous les témoignages présentés devant ce comité à une seule perspective. Il y a beaucoup d’approches différentes et ce qui nous préoccupe, je pense, en Europe, c’est qu’il y a beaucoup de pression de la part des particuliers.

Des gens de notre collectivité et de nombreux groupes de créateurs nous disent que la directive sur le droit d’auteur proposée par l’entremise de la taxe sur les liens et des machines de censure mises de l'avant dans les articles 11 et 13 a la main lourde. Il y a une différence, je pense, entre les propositions de politique qui sont présentées et ce que les gens veulent et demandent, et c’est là, je dirais, que se situe la division.

Je pense que cette tension existe bel et bien. Il y a beaucoup de pression de la part des groupes d’éditeurs pour qu’ils adoptent ces règlements plus stricts, mais en même temps, il y a beaucoup de résistance, parce que non seulement ces propositions vont empiéter considérablement sur l’ouverture d’Internet en Europe, mais elles auront aussi des implications internationales plus importantes.

M. Dane Lloyd:

C’est intéressant, parce que l'on parlait des éditeurs. Tout le monde pense que c’est une industrie monolithique, mais j’ai rencontré un éditeur d'Edmonton qui m’a dit: « La seule raison pour laquelle je suis rentable cette année, c’est que je ne me suis pas versé de salaire. » On voit beaucoup d’éditeurs, surtout des éditeurs canadiens, qui éprouvent des difficultés.

En quoi l’augmentation des droits d’utilisation aide-t-elle les éditeurs canadiens à soutenir la concurrence dans un monde où les éditeurs américains et européens ont plus de droits et sont plus concurrentiels que nos éditeurs?

Mme Laura Tribe:

Je pense qu’il faut s’assurer que ces éditeurs sont en mesure de rejoindre les auditoires qui peuvent payer pour ce contenu et le font effectivement. Alors que les propositions que l'on a vues, sur le filtrage du contenu et le blocage de sites Web, font exactement le contraire. Elles rendent encore plus difficile d'apporter les contenus aux utilisateurs.

En plus de faire la promotion de ce contenu et de s’assurer qu’il est disponible, il nous faut le distribuer. On doit veiller à ce que le plus grand nombre de personnes possible y aient accès, sous des formes abordables, lorsque c’est facile. On l’a vu dans tant de dossiers différents, mais je pense vraiment, fondamentalement, que la tension entre Franc-Jeu, par exemple, et les solutions de rechange, c’est qu'on ne forcera pas les gens à en revenir à la télévision par câble payante. Il faut rendre le contenu disponible comme les gens le veulent, dans les formats qu’ils veulent.

Comment peut-on aider les entreprises et les éditeurs canadiens à faire en sorte que leur contenu soit créé et produit de la façon dont les gens veulent le toucher, et comment peut-on s'assurer que l'on aide ces industries à atteindre ces publics? Si ces auditoires sont là — on l’a vu; on l’a vu avec les services d’abonnement — les gens payeront et ils le font, dès que c’est facile. Comment peut-on aider les éditeurs canadiens à le faire?

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Caesar-Chavannes, vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup à chacun des témoins. J’ai beaucoup apprécié certains de vos témoignages aujourd’hui. Je vais reprendre là où vous vous êtes arrêtés sur la dernière question.

Dans le cadre de cet examen du droit d’auteur, je suis déchirée entre les témoignages que j’ai entendus au sujet de la nécessité d’apporter des modifications et la question de savoir si c’est le bon endroit pour aider les gens à accroître leurs sources de revenus ou leur capacité d’accéder à différents marchés pour leurs produits.

Ma question s’adresse à chacun d’entre vous, à qui veut y répondre.

Faut-il accroître la concurrence ou l’accès en modifiant la Loi sur le droit d’auteur ou faut-il que nos artistes et nos créateurs changent leur modèle d’affaires pour avoir accès à différents marchés et créer cette augmentation des revenus qui n’existe pas actuellement? On a vu le déclin.

Pas tous en même temps, les gars. Quand vous êtes prêts.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

(1740)

Mme Laura Tribe:

Il semblait que Michael voulait prendre la parole.

Michael, voulez-vous intervenir?

M. Michael Petricone:

J’aimerais ajouter une chose. Je pense que c’est peut-être les deux. Il est certain que les créateurs changeront leur modèle d’affaires afin de tirer parti des nouvelles technologies et de la capacité de monétiser et d’atteindre un vaste public. C’est une bonne chose.

Si je devais émettre une réserve... Notre comité a certainement pour objectif de promouvoir la concurrence entre les plateformes Internet. C’est une bonne chose. Tout l’écosystème des entreprises en démarrage est très dynamique et offre plus de possibilités aux artistes et aux créateurs.

Mais avec les articles 11 et 13 du règlement, l’Europe s'engage dans une voie qui, malgré ses meilleures intentions, pourrait bien conduire au résultat opposé en concentrant le pouvoir des grandes entreprises. Tout simplement parce que certains des régimes qui sont imposés, comme les régimes de filtrage, sont très coûteux et gourmands en ressources. À titre d’exemple, le système Content ID de YouTube aura coûté 60 millions de dollars.

Sans doute les grandes entreprises sont-elles en mesure de faire face à ces obligations, mais ce n'est pas le cas de la jeune entrepreneuse qui crée sa boîte dans sa chambre. C’est le genre de résultat qu'il nous faut avoir présent à l'esprit et dont on doit se garder.

Mme Kelsey Merkley:

Je suis d’accord avec les propos de mon collègue.

J'estime moi aussi que les changements observés dans les modèles d’affaires suscitent des défis dans tous... On a parlé plus tôt de Betamax. Il y a aux États-Unis une entreprise qui s’appelle OpenStax, une société d’édition à but lucratif qui publie ses manuels grâce à une licence ouverte, mais qui fait beaucoup d’argent et crée des emplois. Il y a aussi l’exemple dont j’ai parlé dans mon témoignage, Lumen Learning, qui est aussi une entité à but lucratif. Elle conserve néanmoins certains aspects du contenu éducatif ouvert, dont bénéficient effectivement les élèves les plus marginalisés, et elle va donc au-devant du public. J'insiste, encore une fois, sur le fait qu’il est important de séparer les créateurs de romans de ceux qui fabriquent des manuels scolaires.

J’aimerais revenir sur mon argument de tout à l'heure concernant les créateurs qui revendiquent leurs droits. L’artiste Billy Joel, que beaucoup d’entre nous connaissent et aiment, a dit qu’il ne créera plus de nouvelle musique en raison de la portée excessive du droit d’auteur aux États-Unis et des ententes qu’il a conclues avec les maisons de disques. On se trouve actuellement dans une situation complexe où l'on a besoin à la fois de nouveaux modèles d’affaires pour ces créateurs et d’une certaine réglementation pour nous aider à sortir de cette passe.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Ma question suivante porte sur l’examen quinquennal. À la vitesse à laquelle évolue l’ère numérique, à mon avis — et je m’en tiendrai à moi et à mon opinion —, un examen tous les cinq ans, c'est peut-être trop peu. Que répondez-vous à cela, compte tenu des défis auxquels l’industrie fait face actuellement? On procède à un examen quinquennal. Chacun ici apporte sa contribution et d’ici à ce que la loi soit adoptée, les choses pourraient changer, alors un examen quinquennal est-il pertinent?

Mme Laura Tribe:

Je dirais qu’OpenMedia n’a pas de position officielle à ce sujet, mais mon avis...

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Je lance simplement la question.

Mme Laura Tribe:

... sur votre avis, c'est que cela fait maintenant cinq ans, presque six ans, puisqu’une année de plus s'est écoulée depuis la période de cinq ans et l'on débat de nuances assez légères dans la Loi sur le droit d’auteur elle-même. Dans l’ensemble, cela a tenu cinq ans, et je pense que cela reflète en grande partie la réflexion qui a mené à la création de quelque chose qui durerait, et je pense que le défi que je lance au Comité est de reconnaître que cela doit durer. Ce n’est pas quelque chose qui peut exister uniquement dans l’écosystème que nous avons actuellement. On ne peut pas prédire l’avenir, alors comment peut-on faire en sorte que ces mesures législatives soient aussi fiables que possible pour faire preuve de souplesse à l’égard des nouvelles technologies et des nouveaux défis qui se présentent? C’est un grand défi, et vous avez une tâche énorme devant vous.

Le président:

Oui, nous le savons.

Monsieur Masse, vous avez les deux dernières minutes de la journée.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je terminerai sur ce que disait M. Lipkus. Il semble que l'on ne puisse pas modifier du tout la réglementation. Pas de raccourci donc, pas de fruit facile à cueillir. C'est du moins ce que m'ont dit les attachés de recherche jusqu’ici.

Très rapidement, si on ne dépose pas le projet de loi, parce qu’il s’agit d’un examen, quelles mesures simples pourrait-on prendre dans l'immédiat? Il pourrait y avoir des élections avant qu’un projet de loi soit déposé. Il faudrait que l'on obtienne la réponse du ministre, à la suite de l’examen, et il faudrait que cela passe par le Sénat et ainsi de suite. Très rapidement, que pourrait-on faire à court terme?

(1745)

Mme Kelsey Merkley:

Mettre immédiatement à la disposition du public les articles produits par le gouvernement canadien dès leur publication, soit au moyen d’une licence Creative Commons, soit en les mettant dans le domaine public.

Mme Marie Aspiazu:

De mon côté, je dirais qu’il faut rejeter la proposition de Franc-Jeu Canada de blocage de sites Web, du moins dans le cadre de cet examen. Merci.

M. Brian Masse:

Monsieur Lipkus.

M. Lorne Lipkus:

Je ne suis pas sûr, à part ce dont nous avons parlé, que l’on puisse faire quelque chose sans une loi.

M. Brian Masse:

D’accord.

Y a-t-il des conseils de Washington?

M. Michael Petricone:

Oui. Habiliter les innovateurs et les jeunes entreprises, car c’est de là que vient le dynamisme et éviter le blocage de sites Web.

M. Brian Masse:

D’accord. Merci beaucoup de votre patience.

C’est tout, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Cela suffira-t-il?

M. Brian Masse:

Oui.

Le président:

Je tiens à remercier tout le monde d’être venu aujourd’hui.

Comme vous le savez, on a beaucoup de pain sur la planche. Il y a des histoires contradictoires d’un côté comme de l’autre et notre tâche, ainsi que celle de nos excellents analystes qui nous aideront à nous orienter, quitte à ce qu'on les blâme plus tard...

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président: Oui, on a certainement reçu beaucoup de bons renseignements et on a hâte de les recouper.

Merci beaucoup à tous d’être venus.

Merci, Michael, de Washington.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on October 29, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.