header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-11-29 TRAN 123

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(0845)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

I'm calling the meeting to order. This is the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities of the 42nd Parliament, meeting 123. That shows that we've had a lot of meetings in our session.

Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), we are doing a study assessing the impact of aircraft noise in the vicinity of major Canadian airports.

As a witness today, we have, in person, Antonio Natalizio. Welcome.

From the Direction de santé publique de Montréal, we have David Kaiser, Medical Efficer, urban environment service and healthy lifestyle.

From Les Pollués de Montréal-Trudeau, by video conference, we have Pierre Lachapelle, President.

We will open by asking Mr. Natalizio to give us his comments. Please keep them to five minutes. Thank you very much.

Mr. Antonio Natalizio (As an Individual):

Thank you, Madame Chair and committee members. I speak to you as a resident of Etobicoke Centre of 44 years, where planes fly over as low as 700 feet and their numbers increase yearly. I acknowledge the benefits of airports to our city and region, but there are negative impacts. The two need to be balanced. To achieve a balance, I urge you to consider three things: the health impacts of noise, the need for noise regulation and the need for a long-term plan.

Regarding health, there is now sufficient evidence linking environmental noise exposure to cardiovascular problems, mental health problems and cognitive learning difficulties in children. As parents and grandparents, we need to be concerned about these impacts on infants and adolescents, because they are vulnerable. Other countries, such as Australia, Germany and the U.K., have eliminated or curtailed night flights. I hope you will conclude that it's time for Canada to join them.

Regarding regulations, only three of the many civil aviation regulations pertain to noise. They are ineffective and insufficient to regulate the night sky. This deficiency has allowed Toronto Pearson to remove the old night curfew and reduce the restricted night period from eight hours to six hours. lt has also allowed it to double night flights in the past 20 years, and if nothing is done, they will double again in the next 20 years.

The night sky needs to be regulated. The old night curfew needs to be re-established so we can have uninterrupted sleep. It's a basic human right. We espouse human rights on the world stage but fail to look in our own backyard. Children are our most precious resource, but airports have ignored their right to sleep. Many airports have implemented night curfews and have continued to thrive. Contrary to industry predictions, the sky didn't fall. Airport night hours must be realigned to the body's need for eight hours of sleep, as we had prior to 1985. Six hours are inadequate, and the consequences are significant. Insufficient sleep costs Canadian businesses over $20 billion a year in lost productivity, and it costs society more than $30 billion in health costs.

The U.K. has regulated the night sky, and Heathrow is now a shining example. Although bigger than Pearson, it has an annual night flight limit of only 5,800, compared to Pearson's 19,000 and growing. The GTAA wants to make Pearson the biggest international airport on the continent, and to do that, it will keep increasing night flights. Airports such as Heathrow, Sydney, Zurich, Munich and Frankfurt are leaders in aviation noise management because of government regulation, not because it's in their corporate DNA. New regulations are a must.

Pearson communities are exposed to more than 460,000 flights per year, and this level of traffic generates many concerns. From January to July of this year, the GTAA received 81,000 noise complaints. The equivalent number for last year was 50,000, and it was 33,000 for 2016. How do they compare with other major Canadian airports? They are not even in the same ballpark.

Our growing concerns are not being addressed by the GTAA. Therefore, I urge you to recommend the creation of an independent watchdog. Countries that are concerned about community health impacts have an aviation noise ombudsman. Australia was one of the first, and the U.K. is the most recent. With your help, Canada can have one too.

Regarding the long term, we cannot rely on the aviation industry to find an equitable solution for the region. This is clearly a government responsibility. ln 1989, the government established an environmental assessment panel to address Pearson's expansion plans and the need for new airports to serve the long-term needs of the region.

(0850)



When the panel recommended against Pearson's expansion, the government dissolved it and the long-term question was never addressed. Three decades later, our communities are paying the price for that decision. We now have an urgent need for a long-term solution.

I urge you to address the region's need for another airport and, in the interim, to recommend greater utilization and expansion of neighbouring ones.

In summary, Madam Chair, we need to address health impacts, because they are real and costly; regulate the night sky, because sleep is a basic human right; and study the long-term issue, because a solution is urgently needed.

Thank you for the opportunity to be here. I look forward to your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We move on to Mr. Kaiser for five minutes, please.

Mr. David Kaiser (Medical Officer, Urban Environment Service and Healthy Lifestyle, Direction de santé publique de Montréal):

Thank you for inviting me. I think I'll speak in English, because I understand that that's the majority, but I'm happy to answer questions in English or French.

I'm a public health physician. I'm at the Montreal public health unit. I was invited here because we've done work on the health impacts of environmental noise, and more specifically airplane noise. I want to go through, from a public health perspective, how we see noise from aircraft as being an important issue and where we think there's work to be done in order to improve public health.

At Public Health, we've been working on this for about 10 years. It starts, actually, from community noise complaints. It comes from people who called us to say they think there's something going on here and they would like us to investigate. Building from that, we've been able to develop a lot of knowledge in Montreal about the real impacts.

At an international level, it's very clear. The World Health Organization just put out, actually, their new noise guidelines about a month ago. In the lead-up to that, they did a lot of scientific work over the last year, looking at the health impacts of various environmental noise sources. I want to focus specifically on what they found in terms of scientific evidence for aircraft noise.

There's high-quality evidence, which means many studies that go in the same direction, that indicates a link between noise from aircraft and what is called “annoyance”. Annoyance can maybe sound like something that isn't specifically a public health concern, but if you live in a place that is noisy and have lived there for a while, you know that annoyance over time is something that really does affect quality of life and is related to other health impacts.

Second is sleep disturbance. On this, there's what the WHO calls moderate-quality evidence. That means there are fewer studies, but they do go in the direction of a link between aircraft noise and disturbed sleep.

What's even more concerning is that, in the long term, there is now moderate-quality evidence that aircraft noise specifically has impacts on cardiovascular health. That includes hypertension, or high blood pressure. It includes stroke. It includes heart disease. Some of that is really being annoyed for 30 years by noise in the environment. It generates stress. It generates high blood pressure. It can lead to heart disease but also disturbed sleep. We know that disturbed sleep dysregulates the body and can result in hypertension and heart disease. Also, important in the current context is that it can lead to obesity. There's starting to be better evidence about the links between chronic noise exposure and obesity.

There's less good evidence about cognitive impacts—that includes in children but also in adults—as well as mental health and quality of life.

Just to put some numbers to it, we know that about 60% of the residents on the Island of Montreal are exposed to noise levels that may have impacts on their health. For aircraft noise, more specifically, we have almost 5,000 units with about 10,000 to 12,000 people who live inside what is called the NEF 25, or noise exposure forecast of 25. They're in a zone close to the airport, where we know there are likely to be impacts. About 6% of the people on the Island of Montreal, or one person in 15, say they are highly annoyed by noise, and about 2%, or one person in 50, report that they have their sleep disturbed by airplane noise. This is specifically for airplane noise.

Those numbers can seem small, until you think about how few people actually live close to the airport out of the 2 million people on the Island of Montreal. If you look at distance to the airport, about 40% of the people who live in that NEF 25 report being highly annoyed by noise, and 20% of the people live within two kilometres of the airport. So you're getting people who live pretty far from the airport reporting that they're highly annoyed.

From a public health perspective, that brings us to recommendations that we've put out for several years now. We put out a brief in 2014, and four years, as you know, is not that long for policy to change. A lot of those recommendations are still, I think, very relevant. I just want to highlight two that I think are most pertinent at your level.

(0855)



The first is not a complicated recommendation; it is not based on extensive science. In order to better understand what's going on and to inform people of potential impacts to their health, we need to have access to data. At the present time, we don't have access to information about where planes are in the air, how many there are, and what types they are. We don't have access to the noise measurements. Access to data is recommendation one.

The Chair:

I'm sorry, Mr. Kaiser. We're very tight for time.

Mr. David Kaiser:

Okay.

The second recommendation is just to continue working on administrative and technical improvements to reduce noise at the source. I think those two things at the federal level are still very salient.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Lachapelle, you have five minutes, please. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Lachapelle (President, Les Pollués de Montréal-Trudeau):

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Let me make one point first.

Mr. Lachapelle has given us a graph, but it's in French only. Can I have permission from the committee to distribute it? The clerk did a little bit of innovative work here. Do I have permission to distribute it to the committee members?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Thank you.

Go ahead, please, Mr. Lachapelle. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Lachapelle:

Madam Chair, members of Parliament, thank you for your invitation to present to this committee.

Before I begin, I wanted to mention that I sent the committee clerk a dozen documents. I sincerely hope that these documents will be brought to the attention of the members of the committee. With regard to the data collected by our measuring stations, you already have in hand an example of the noise peaks. Very often, Aéroports de Montréal and public health authorities talk about average data, but it's important to look at the peaks that the public are subject to. I will now move on to my testimony.

I am honoured to present on behalf of the citizens group, Les Pollués de Montréal-Trudeau, concerning the noise pollution around Pierre-Elliott-Trudeau Airport. The noise is deplorable, and impacts thousands of citizens living on the Island of Montreal. This situation is in part the result of the strange decision made in 1996 by the airport authorities to close a modern airport, Mirabel, which resulted in a concentration of passenger traffic over the Island of Montreal.

I want to emphasize that, since the 1990s, citizens have been alerting Parliament to the problem. They have not been heard. Les Pollués de Montréal-Trudeau began their work informally in 2011, and the committee was officially formed in 2013. The objective of this presentation today, honourable members, is to convince you of the need to act, not only to improve the public health of thousands of Montrealers, but also to rebuild the confidence of citizens in the good faith of Parliament. In fact, Parliament has not maintained control over the management of international airports in Canada, nor has it sufficiently controlled the noise pollution caused by airplanes.

(0900)

[English]

I will now go straight to the heart of the matter—namely, the requests made by hundreds of citizens since 2013 concerning the noise and air pollution at Montréal-Trudeau airport.

First, we ask for a complete ban on nighttime flights from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. Being able to sleep at night without interruption from airplane noise is a fundamental need.

Second, last April 30, Aéroports de Montréal announced a $4.5-billion terminal project, a new terminal at Pierre Elliott Trudeau airport. We ask for the immediate freeze and end to this project and the preparatory work that has started.

As our third request, we ask for an economic, environmental, social and health evaluation of the current situation and of the impact of the project announced on April 30. The absence of suitable legislation in Canada allows for the creation of this sort of airport terminal project without adequate public evaluation.

Four, we ask that a public evaluation be carried out by an independent and scientifically competent group, which would include public hearings on the airport situation.

Five, since Aéroports de Montréal began to rent the airport, the management of noise and air pollution has been inadequate. We ask that responsibility for the assessment of its environmental impacts be transferred to an independent and transparent organization that makes its findings public.

Six, we ask Parliament to take back control and monitoring of the international airports in Canada, a role that was relinquished in 1992, when this was taken over by private organizations. Hundreds of citizens consider that the increased noise due to airplanes is a result of Parliament relinquishing its oversight. This change created negative impacts on the health and quality of life of thousands of people in Canada and on the Island of Montreal.[Translation]

Seven, we ask that you take into consideration the analysis of Canada's international airports by Michel Nadeau and Jacques Roy, of the Institute for Governance of Private and Public Organizations. I provided a copy of their work to the committee clerk in both official languages. This study is very revealing of the situation and is accompanied by recommendations that are full of common sense.

These observations and recommendations are the fruit of thousands of hours of work since 2013 provided by volunteers living on the Island of Montreal and coming from all walks of life. These volunteers deplore the noise and air pollution created by the low-flying airplanes over the cities and boroughs of the Island of Montreal.

I will summarize my remaining points because my time is limited.

One of the many actions that led to these requests is a petition of 3,000 names that was tabled in the House of Commons in 2013. The Minister of Transport at the time, the Hon. Lisa Raitt, swept it aside.

We have installed noise measuring stations. This morning, you got an example of the graph they produce. Our stations are public and permanently measure airborne noise at about ten locations in Montreal.

We have tried, together with the citizens of the Papineau riding, to raise awareness of the Right Hon. Justin Trudeau. Our request for an appointment was refused: it seems that the member for Papineau does not want to meet his constituents.

In May, we wrote to the Hon. Catherine McKenna, Minister of the Environment and Climate Change, requesting public hearings on this $4.5 billion project. We have not received any response. I even followed up by phone.

(0905)

[English]

The Chair:

Mr. Lachapelle, I'm sorry to interrupt, but we're over your time limit, and I can assure you that the committee has many questions for you. I'm just going to have to move on to the committee members and their questions.

Mr. Lachapelle has sent in, in French only, a lot of recommendations. There are over 400 pages of what appears, based on his testimony, to be some very important information. Would the committee like the 400 pages translated and distributed, or should we give it all to the analysts to include in the report? Would that be the better thing, to give it all to the analysts so they can review those recommendations and insert them into the report?

Mr. Wrzesnewskyj, go ahead.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke Centre, Lib.):

Madam Chair, just for clarity, are the 400 pages all recommendations, or is it a report with recommendations? If the recommendations are a smaller portion of this report, I wouldn't mind having just the recommendations part translated, but if it's 400 pages of recommendations....

The Chair:

It's 400 pages of various reports that are here, so the suggestion is to take the recommendations specifically and have them translated into both official languages. All that additional information in the 400 pages will then be sent to the analyst for inclusion in her report.

Is everybody good with that?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: All right, thank you. We'll make sure everybody gets the recommendations, Mr. Lachapelle.

Now we're going to move on to questions from the committee members.

Mrs. Block, go ahead.

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

I want to thank our witnesses for joining us today. We're probably nearing the end of our study, and it's been a very good study on the issue of noise around our airports and the effects on communities.

Mr. Kaiser, my first question is for you. Other witnesses have testified that the negative health effects of aviation noise are related to noise annoyance, and you started to get into that a little more. Would you take some time to answer that a bit more fully? Do you agree with that?

Mr. David Kaiser:

Clearly, annoyance is part of the impact. Annoyance is the most studied impact of environmental noise internationally. It's been studied for many years in Europe and now to some extent in North America. It's most common. For example, the studies we've done in Montreal show that about 20% of people say they're highly annoyed by at least one source of environmental noise.

Annoyance is common; it's present and it does have an impact on the quality of life and health. I think what's important from a public health perspective is to make sure we don't see it as just an annoyance problem. Annoyance is real, and it's problematic, but sleep disturbance is quite separate from annoyance, and I'll explain why.

From a health perspective, the problem with sleep disturbance is not so much annoyance or waking up and realizing an airplane went overhead and it's annoying to wake up; the body's response to noise at night is physiological. We know from many laboratory studies, calibrated studies of sleep disturbance, that you don't need to be waking up to have that impact on long-term cardiovascular health and obesity.

Annoyance is an issue, but sleep disturbance is a separate issue. It's much more tied to the long-term effects of heart health. We need to make sure that we have both of those together. From a regulatory and public health perspective, the strategies for dealing with annoyance are not necessarily the same as those dealing with sleep disturbance, because sleep disturbance is really a nighttime issue for the majority of the population. I think it's important to have both.

(0910)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

We've also had many witnesses suggest that public health organizations like Health Canada should develop noise standards based on human health. Do you think this would be an effective initiative? If you do, what factors would need to be included in this kind of standard, and who would need to be at the table?

Mr. David Kaiser:

In terms of noise standards, there is already a very good starting point, which is the WHO guidelines. They were just renewed, and they are based on the best available evidence. We know what we should be aiming for; we have that information. The recommendation for aircraft noise is 45 decibels of an indicator they call Lden. It's a weighted indicator that penalizes noise in the evening and at night.

The issue of standards is important, but we have a very good idea of what we should be aiming for. After that, should public health organizations have a role in that? Absolutely, but the issue is really how we get there. Who needs to be around the table at every level, from the local/regional level to provincial and federal? It's the agencies responsible for zoning and planning, which means municipalities and ministries of planning and development, and the agencies responsible for transport, which means different types of transport at every level. I also think citizen participation is really important.

Who should be around the table? Health should be at the table, clearly, but it's more to bring the information. We already know what we need to do and where we should be aiming. The people who actually do something are much more in planning and transport, and the people who are impacted need to be there too. I think those are the essential building blocks.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

How much time do I have?

The Chair:

You have almost two minutes.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

All right.

Mr. Lachapelle, how would you propose that airport authorities balance the concerns of citizens and communities surrounding night flights with the economic benefits that are offered by these flights? [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Lachapelle:

I'll answer in French, if I may.

Until now, I believe that the airport authorities have failed in their responsibilities to be good neighbours, at least with respect to Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport.

This is a very broad question you are asking, and it concerns the balance between the economy and public health. Montrealers affected by noise pollution, particularly aircraft noise, are certainly seeing their productivity decline. Indeed, unable to sleep, they enter the workplace tired or call in to inform their boss that they won't be in to work. This has an economic impact.

We can't go back to the Middle Ages, when people died at age 30. We are in the 21st century, and airport authorities in Canada are behaving as if we were in the Middle Ages. It is up to Parliament to bring these people to their senses. There is an imbalance at the moment, not on the economic side, but on the environmental and public health side. These people affected by aircraft noise and suffering from psychiatric problems will need to be treated. You will therefore have to increase taxes to add beds in hospitals. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Lachapelle.

You have some very good points. Thank you very much.

We'll move on to Mr. Iacono. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'd like to thank the witnesses for being here this morning.

Mr. Kaiser, Montreal's public health authority has conducted several studies on noise, which led to the publication of a public health notice on the health risks associated with noise from aircraft movements at Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport.

Could you send this document to the clerk, as well as all the others you mentioned this morning? We'd also like to receive two other very intersting documents, the public health notice on transport noise and its potential impact on the health of Montrealers, and “Le bruit et la santé; État de la situation”.

(0915)

Mr. David Kaiser:

Yes. Absolutely.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

You've certainly done a lot of studies. Are there any others that should be conducted with respect to this issue? What aspects should be focused on?

Mr. David Kaiser:

That's a very good question.

Of course we want to know more and better document the problem. Let me come back to what I said earlier: noise is harmful to health, and we have already gathered very good evidence on this subject. In Montreal, we are one step ahead of several other major Canadian cities in the collection of city-specific data. That being said, work is currently under way in several cities, including Toronto and Vancouver, to do the same documentation work. It is important to collect data locally if you want to take action that is appropriate for the region. It is of course possible to use data from other associations, but it should be possible to rely on specific data. In Toronto, for example, will the proportion of people who say they are very bothered by noise be 2%, 3%? This remains to be verified.

What is essential, as I said at the end of my presentation, is to have access to the data in order to do follow-up. This is a real need. This is not about research, but rather what is called surveillance in public health. A sufficient understanding of what is happening with respect not only to noise levels generated, but also to air movements is required to ensure that health interventions can be implemented. For example, it is necessary to understand the increase in certain types of trajectories and the movements of arriving and departing airlines, as well as the potential impact of all this, before looking for ways to work on them. Once again, the need for data is paramount.

The next step is to get the right people around the table, who should agree on a noise control policy at both the provincial and federal levels. This does not necessarily require more data, but action. Data must be integrated into work at the political level.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

You've spoken a lot about data. If you have any documents on the subject, be they on the status of the situation or analyses, could you share them with us?

Mr. David Kaiser:

Yes, I'll send you all the scientific articles we have, as well as the notices mentioned earlier.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Perfect.

Who are the members of the Soundscape Consultative Committee, do you know?

Mr. David Kaiser:

This committee was set up when the public health branch began working on noise issues related to the airport. At the moment, in Montreal, there is no functional committee made up of all the stakeholders in the field.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Are any doctors on the committee?

Mr. David Kaiser:

There were some at the beginning, and the public health branch was also present. It should be noted that Aéroports de Montréal has legal obligations in this regard and that the company has formed its own committee. There is no longer an intersectoral committee like the one established initially, almost 10 years ago.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

We could say today that this committee is ineffective, couldn't we?

Mr. David Kaiser:

Yes. In fact, it no longer exists in this format.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you.

Mr. Lachapelle, you mentioned a petition and the fact that it had been brushed aside. And the response from the minister at the time was apparently a bit evasive.

Could you elaborate on that? What was the intent of the petition?

Mr. Pierre Lachapelle:

The petition was filed in 2013. I have to say that our thinking, at Les Pollués de Montréal-Trudeau, has evolved since then. The petition contained a number of requests, but the three main ones were: a review of landing paths at Pierre Elliott Trudeau Airport, the presence of public representatives on the airport's board of directors and the issue of curfew.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Mr. Lachapelle, could you please provide shorter answers; otherwise, I won't have time to get answers to all my questions.

What year was the petition organized?

(0920)

Mr. Pierre Lachapelle:

You're asking me what was in the petition, right?

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Yes. What was it exactly?

Mr. Pierre Lachapelle:

I made three requests. First, there was the issue of the curfew. Next, as I explained, there was the issue of flight paths. Lastly, the third thing had to do with the make-up of the airport's board of directors.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

When was the petition drafted? What year?

Mr. Pierre Lachapelle:

It was filed in early 2013 by three MPs: Ms. Mourani, Mr. Garneau, who was replacing Stéphane Dion in his absence, and an NDP MP whose name I always forget, who represented the Lac-Saint-Louis and Dorval region.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

And what was the outcome of the petition?

Mr. Pierre Lachapelle:

We received an acknowledgement of receipt from the House of Commons, signed by Ms. Raitt. I could send you the form we received. It was flatly refused. She responded that our requests came under the Montreal airport. It was what we call in French, in Quebec, a “maison de fous”, or a madhouse: you're sent from kiosk to kiosk, door to door, to find a solution.[English]It's a merry-go-round for citizens. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you, Mr. Lachapelle. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go on to Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I would like to thank each of the guests for being with us this morning. You're arriving almost at the end of this study, and there is a very broad consensus in your testimony. I have several questions and would ask you to provide brief answers so I can get as much information as possible. I am now preparing recommendations to table, rather than understanding the issue, since we've already been presented with the real picture.

In his opening remarks, Mr. Natalizio strongly suggested recommending the creation of an ombudsman position, for example. I would like you to tell me quickly if you find this an interesting avenue. If not, would you give more priority to Transport Canada's reappropriating a number of powers that it had before the creation of NAV CANADA, for example, and that it should have?

I would like to hear the answers of Mr. Kaiser, Mr. Lachapelle and Mr. Natalizio, in that order.

Mr. David Kaiser:

I will give you the same answer: this need is real. If Transport Canada is the authority, that's fine, but then it's about bringing the right people to the table and aiming for a more permanent structure and policies to control noise.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

What do you think about it, Mr. Lachapelle?

Mr. Pierre Lachapelle:

Responsibility should be assigned to Transport Canada, with accountability to the public.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Would you like to add anything, Mr. Natalizio? [English]

Mr. Antonio Natalizio:

We have a situation where both Nav Canada and the airport authorities are accountable to no one. Health issues are not going to be addressed by organizations that have a private interest. These are issues that have to be addressed by the government. There's no other way.

I've studied airports around the world. The best ones—the ones that have night curfews, that have restricted hours of operation that are eight hours long and not just six hours, as we have at Toronto Pearson, for example—

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Sorry—

Mr. Antonio Natalizio:

—they are done by regulation, not by goodwill. It's clear. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Could you also talk to us about the notion of data? The graph you sent us, Mr. Lachapelle, speaks for itself.

Is the data you collect at your stations recognized when you interact with the Montreal-Trudeau Airport consultative committee or with NAV CANADA or Transport Canada, or are you told that this data is not conclusive?

Mr. Pierre Lachapelle:

Our measurements are made at our measuring stations, which are equipped with devices that are not certified or approved internationally. However, they have been validated by devices of this type. If our stations have a defect, it is because they exaggerate airborne noise by 2 decibels, which is not significant when the reading is between 70 and 80 decibels.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I fully understand.

Mr. Pierre Lachapelle:

The authorities reject them, but we are eager to see the data of Aéroports de Montréal. That data is secret. This is a democratic society, and Aéroports de Montréal has secret data.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I understand the problem. Not only do you not have access to the data and recommendations will have to be made, but the authorities don't recognize yours, which are based on the same type of devices.

Mr. Kaiser, you said that internationally, it was becoming increasingly clear. However, the Minister of Transport, in almost every one of his bills, always talks to us about harmonization. It is clear, as we have seen, particularly in the case of the passenger charter, that the European Union is far ahead of us.

Is there a model country or model law that we should use as a basis for our recommendations?

(0925)

Mr. David Kaiser:

That's the burning question.

Instead, I would tell you that we have made a lot of progress in Quebec over the past three to five years. For example, there is ongoing work to adopt a provincial noise policy, which is in part a result of work undertaken in Montreal 10 years ago.

It would really be difficult to draw inspiration from a legislative framework that is very different from ours, such as that of the European Union, and to try to draw conclusions from it. I think we should rely on other parameters instead. We could study the reciprocal influence of environment and health or transport and health, and then use the results of these studies to create our own model. Things are going very differently in Europe.

Quebec has done a lot of work on this issue, and we could learn from it and build on it.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Do I have a minute left, Madam Chair? [English]

The Chair:

Yes, you have one minute left. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

With regard to the public health problem related to noise around airports, aren't we also witnessing a change in the urban landscape? I mean, the wealthiest people don't hesitate to move as soon as they realize the problem caused by the proximity of an airway.

Are we witnessing the creation of poorer neighbourhoods where health problems will increase, because of this exodus due to the noise problem?

Mr. David Kaiser:

It's a very complex issue. I can answer that this is the case in general, but not for this specific issue at the moment.

I will be very honest about this. With regard to environmental and transportation noise in a city like Montreal, it is clear that the most disadvantaged people are those who are most exposed because of their location near noise-generating factors.

However, for reasons that go back several years, this is not necessarily the case at the airport. It would be dishonest to say otherwise. No doubt noise reduces home equity, but in Montreal, the problem of aircraft noise is a somewhat special case in relation to health inequalities.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Is it the same for Ontario? [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Aubin. I'm sorry.

Mr. Hardie, go ahead.

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

As the witnesses can tell, we're compressed for time.

If we ask for short answers, please feel free to follow up with something a bit more fulsome if there are more points you want to make.

Is it Dr. Kaiser or Mr. Kaiser?

Mr. David Kaiser:

It can be either, but I'm a doctor.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Okay, it's Dr. Kaiser. I wish we would put proper salutations in our notes here.

On the issue of daytime versus nighttime, we take the point that sleep deprivation caused by interruption is not a very good thing.

In the daytime, it's more of an annoyance feature, and obviously, as much as people want flights to be reduced at nighttime, we can't make the same argument in the daytime because of the economics of the airport and what it needs to do.

If you were sitting in our chair and looking at making recommendations, would you suggest that we parse the nighttime effect versus the daytime effect?

Mr. David Kaiser:

From a scientific perspective, definitely, but we also have to think about what can actually be done.

I think overall exposure to noise and daytime exposure to noise are maybe more in the domain of urban planning, zoning, sound insulation, and making sure that we don't expose more people—for example, that we don't build buildings right next to airports if we can avoid it.

With the nighttime noise, if you could snap your fingers and have no more planes after 11 at night or before seven in the morning, that problem would be gone, even if you have people living next to the airport.

I would definitely separate those out.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I'd like to challenge all of you to take a 360° look at this, because the focus is on airplane noise. If the airplane noise went away, a lot of people would notice that there are a lot of other noises out there too.

Mr. David Kaiser:

Sure.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

There are cars, trucks, motorcycles; there are loud stereos; there are noisy neighbours and a lot of other things. It occurs to me that I've slept in a few hotels at airports, and I can sleep very well because they are built not to let that sound in. So we need to look at home construction standards. Perhaps, as well, there may be an experiment to be had with what you might call active acoustic sound control, like the noise-cancelling headphones you can wear that totally obliterate all outside noise. These are getting more sophisticated and more effective, and there could be a community experiment where we actually allow people to try these and see if their sleep improves, especially.

We have airports, flight paths and runway usage that have to be considered. We have aircraft, the flight techniques and the design. I understand there is one brand of Airbus that could use some retrofits, and Air Canada is going through that process with its fleet right now.

We have regulations with respect to operating hours, and that has to be part of the mix. You mentioned, Dr. Kaiser, that municipal planning, airport location and development along the flight paths have to be much better managed, and as we look at new airports we have to keep the municipalities from growing around them. We should have learned something by now.

Then, finally, when it comes to home construction, there is much more we can do with respect to soundproofing and, again, sort of acting on the personal and active sound control that you can apply in a building and individually.

Again, it's the other sources. This isn't just an airport thing. If the airplanes went away, you'd start to notice a lot of other noises as well.

I'll just conclude quickly here by saying that the challenge is for the complete circle of suggestions. This isn't just an airport issue. It's more a quality of life and community issue that needs a complete 360° look.

Okay, that's it. Thank you.

(0930)

The Chair:

Would you like to hear any response to your comments, or move on?

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Well, the challenge is out there to come back to us with something. We know what the complaints sound like.

Dr. Kaiser, we'll go back to you on this one.

A voice: I would like to respond.

Mr. Ken Hardie: Yes, sure, by all means.

Mr. Antonio Natalizio:

Just recently, I read a medical article from a sleep expert who says there isn't a major organ within the body or a process within the brain that isn't detrimentally impaired when we don't get enough sleep.

There is another article that I've also read recently: You can fool the conscious mind by masking noise, but you cannot fool the unconscious mind. It is the one that is affecting all our organs and body.

From my point of view, last night was the only night I got a good night's sleep in the last three nights, because the wind has been blowing from the northwest and our runway is being used frequently throughout the day. Two nights ago, there were more than 30 planes that went over. I couldn't get any sleep. The night before last, it was the same thing. The bags under my eyes are really not a reflection of my age. That is just sleep deprivation.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

You're 27, right?

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Ken Hardie: Seriously, sir, I do take your point. We've said this before. We are looking at balancing the environment—in this case the human environment—with the economy. We can't shut down the airports, and it isn't easy to move them, so we do have to look at all options, including, obviously, the ones you have raised.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Hardie.

We'll go on to Mr. Wrzesnewskyj.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I would like to underline a point you made, Dr. Kaiser, when you suggested the best time for a curfew. You said from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. I just wanted to make sure that point was underlined.

Mr. Natalizio, you've lived in Markland Wood for 44 years. Forty-four years ago there were no night flights. Along with your statement, you've provided an excellent brief with a number of different sections to it. I'd like to go to the section entitled “Pearson in perspective”. I believe it's quite informative.

No matter which airport you look at in Canada, the impacts of nighttime airplane noise are real for those who are experiencing it. It's fascinating that Pearson is the source of approximately 460,000 out of 1,200,000 flights in the country, which is about 38%, yet the level of complaints from Pearson.... When you take in all the complaints across the whole country, there were 175,540 complaints, and Pearson generated 168,000 of them, or 96% of all complaints in the country.

I just wanted to bring that perspective, because I'd like you to talk about what kind of neighbour and what kind of corporate citizen the GTAA is. They testified before committee earlier this week, and we've experienced in the past how they provide a very rosy picture, especially to elected officials. You call their night impact study “gratuitous”, and you have a section you call “My Experience at Dialogue with the GTAA”.

Could you perhaps tell us succinctly how they deal with the neighbours?

(0935)

Mr. Antonio Natalizio:

That's a very important question. I've heard the statements made by the GTAA here two days ago. Basically, they tried to leave the impression that they were making progress. The fact remains that airport complaints have been increasing by 50% each year in the last three years. How can you tell me, as a resident, that the airport is making progress in addressing noise issues?

I have tried to engage with the GTAA over the last couple of years, but it's not meaningful dialogue. In their noise management action plan, which I'm sure the committee has heard about, they say: With our new Noise Management Action Plan, the culmination of two years of extensive study and consultation, we intend to make Toronto Pearson an international leader in aviation noise management.

That's music to everyone's ears, but it's simply not true. Toronto Pearson is starting from the bottom of the heap, and everyone who's read the Helios best practices report will know that. The action plan talks about more studies and more consultations. There is very little that's concrete, and what little there is may lift Pearson from last place to second-last place, but certainly not to the top.

For example, they talked about the A320 noise fix, which is really a very small thing. Many airlines did it years ago, because it's really a cheap fix. Despite that, we have to wait until 2020, and we're not even sure they will all be done, because Air Canada is not the only one.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Thank you, Mr. Natalizio.

Could you provide us with a full copy of your correspondence, just so we can see how the GTAA tends to deal with citizens with concerns such as yours?

Mr. Antonio Natalizio:

I would really be delighted to do that.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Also, in your brief—

The Chair:

There are 45 seconds remaining.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

—you called the night budget “a strange creation”. It's now allowing close to 20,000 night movements per year, which amounts to 53 per night and nine per minute.

You've talked about your personal experiences. How is it impacting the community in general?

Mr. Antonio Natalizio:

All you have to do is look at the number of complaints. When I moved into this community—

The Chair:

Please give a very brief response, Mr. Natalizio.

(0940)

Mr. Antonio Natalizio:

—there were 250 noise complaints. Now we have 168,000. They have gone up 64,000%.

In 1974, there were 12 complaints per 1,000 flights. Now there is one complaint for every three flights.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We will go on to Mr. Liepert.

Mr. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, CPC):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'm going to try to get in two questions, so I'll ask you to try to be as brief as you can.

I represent a Calgary riding that is a half-hour's drive from the airport. However, they opened a new runway a couple of years ago, and they changed the flight path. All of a sudden, I'm getting all of these complaints about aircraft noise.

I decided to organize a town hall meeting so people would have the opportunity to raise these concerns. We had the heads of the airport authority and Nav Canada in attendance. I couldn't believe the number of people who lived on the same street as the individual complaining about aircraft noise who were telling me, “Why am I wasting everybody's time? Yes, sure, there are a few more aircraft, but the noise is just part of life.” I don't want to downplay the significance of aircraft noise, because I have full confidence in the people who have made the complaints to me.

How do we, as a committee, balance the views of those folks who seem to be a lot more affected by noise than maybe their neighbours are?

I'll throw in my second question at the same time, and then each of you can respond accordingly.

We've heard a number of presentations asking for banning night flights. I think the other thing that this committee has to balance is the noise issue with the changing economic times. We all know that a high percentage of shopping today is done online. People want their product the next day, whether they are in business or whether they are consumers. That's another thing we have to balance, as a committee, in our recommendations.

I would just ask all three of you, briefly, to comment on what I have just stated.

Mr. Antonio Natalizio:

Well, there are those who want overnight deliveries for everything they buy online, and those of us who want a good night's sleep. There are those who would profit from night flights, and there are those who suffer from them. There are both economic benefits and costs.

What if the net benefit is zero, or even negative? Should night flights be allowed if they have a net financial cost to society? More importantly, should night flights be allowed if they have a net benefit to society, even though a segment of society is deprived of sleep, which is a basic human right?

One recent night, 37 planes flew over my house, as I mentioned earlier. Each—

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Sir, I'd like you to help us make a recommendation. Is your recommendation, regardless of what I said, that night flights have to be banned?

Mr. Antonio Natalizio:

There is a situation at Toronto Pearson that may be unique. The airport offers both Air Canada and WestJet a fixed price deal in lieu of landing fees and other fees. This is like a fixed price, all-you-can-eat buffet for the airlines, and they've really been gorging—

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Okay, that's another suggestion we'll take into account.

Dr. Kaiser, go ahead.

Mr. David Kaiser:

I'll give two parts in response. One is from a public health perspective. Our goal is to reduce risk to as close to zero as we can. It was mentioned before that there are many other sources of noise. We have to take all of them into account. The objective should be to reduce exposure if we can. With something like airplanes, we can. We could have no more airplanes; there would be no more exposure. It's not like things that are in the environment that we're obliged to live with. We could make a choice and reduce that exposure to zero. That's my public health perspective; I think it has to be that.

The second part is in terms of the committee. Yes, you need to make recommendations. From your intervention, I get that the issue of noise sensitivity, for example, is important. Some people are more sensitive to noise than others. From a scientific perspective, the studies that have looked at that don't necessarily find that it's a major factor when you take the relationship between noise sources and the impacts on health at population level.

Of course, it's important to consider feasibility and to balance benefits and risks. I think that is where data on airplane movements, noise levels and impacts on the population is super important, so you're not relying on anecdote.

(0945)

Mr. Ron Liepert:

I would agree with that.

Mr. David Kaiser:

The recommendation that addresses that directly is that if we want to make good choices, we need to have the information necessary to make those choices.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

If I had more time, I'd ask you about the data thing.

Do we have time for a brief comment from the gentleman from Montreal?

The Chair:

Make it very brief.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Go ahead, sir. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Lachapelle:

I would definitely say the curfew.

I don't think the economy is going to suffer because a bottle of perfume or an article of clothing someone ordered on Amazon gets delivered six or 12 hours later than scheduled. Here's the imbalance, as I see it: public health is being sacrificed for the sake of the economy, which is increasingly invasive. We are all for a strong economy, but not at the expense of public health. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Lachapelle.

Thank you to all of our witnesses.

Mr. Jeneroux, were you trying to flag me down?

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC):

Yes, Madam Chair. I will be very brief.

We've heard through the grapevine that there is a possibility that the meeting next Thursday with the minister may not be televised. I just wanted to make sure that... It's on his mandate letter; it's not time-sensitive, and we're flexible on the date of the meeting in order for it to be televised. I wanted to let you, as the Chair, know that.

The Chair:

The clerk has been working extensively to try to see if we can get that.

Your suggestion is that if we can't get that, you'd like to hold that meeting off until we can actually televise it.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

It's not ideal, but yes.

The Chair:

Okay. The clerk will attempt to do her magic for us.

Mr. Liepert, go ahead.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

I also wanted to ask about where we're at in this particular study, with witnesses and so on.

I think we had asked at some point to have the airlines come before us. Could the clerk give us an update on what we have for witnesses going forward?

The Chair:

Yes. Go ahead.

The Clerk of the Committee (Ms. Marie-France Lafleur):

It will be December 11 with Air Canada, WestJet and ATAC.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Is that our last meeting?

The Clerk:

That would be our last hour of meeting.

The Chair:

We've had a fair amount of interest, not only from our colleagues, but from members of the general public. We could hold another two meetings in the new year if the committee would like to do that.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

I'm not sure that's necessary. Have you had requests from members for other witnesses? With all due respect, I think we've certainly heard from those who are impacted by it. If we're going to have any extended meetings on this, I would like to hear from people who would actually have some solutions.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Do we have requests for other witnesses?

The Chair:

We don't right now.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Then I would suggest we stick with our plan.

The Chair:

Mr. Wrzesnewskyj, go ahead.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Madam Chair, there seems to be an issue with the response that came back to my question for Transport Canada about the increase on the night budget, compared to the answers given before the committee. Perhaps in the next meeting we could set aside five minutes or so to discuss how we might deal with that particular issue.

The Chair:

I don't believe the committee is aware of the discrepancy you're trying to get clarified, between the testimony that was given and some documentation that has been received and that is inconsistent with the testimony.

Leave that with me, and we'll see how we can do some magic to make it all happen from that avenue.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Thank you.

The Chair:

I have to suspend this part of the session so we can move on to our M-177 discussion.

Thank you very much to the witnesses for sharing their time and their recommendations with us.

(0945)

(0950)

The Chair:

I'm calling the meeting to order. Would our witnesses please take their places, and the other conversations exit the room?

Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), we are now commencing our study of the subject matter of M-177.

Mr. Fuhr, as the person who introduced the motion, would you like to speak for a moment before we introduce the witnesses?

(0955)

Mr. Stephen Fuhr (Kelowna—Lake Country, Lib.):

Yes. Thank you, Madam Chair.

I won't take much time, but I want to thank the committee for taking this up so quickly. I don't think this motion passed more than about 19 hours ago, so this is—

The Chair:

We're a very efficient committee.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

I'd have to check to see if there's one that's gone to committee faster.

I thank my colleagues for their support on this motion. It's a very important issue. Air travel, aviation and pilot production are very important to this country. It affects us in a major way. If it's not healthy, it will have economic impacts that I think all of us agree would be very negative.

I'll leave it to you, and hopefully I'll get to answer a question or two. I have to chair the defence committee at 11 a.m., so I'll go back to you.

The Chair:

We'll do what we can.

As witnesses, we have Johanne Domingue, President of the Comité antipollution des avions de Longueuil; and Cedric Paillard, President and Chief Executive Officer of Ottawa Aviation Services.

Mr. Paillard, would you like to go first? You have five minutes only.

Mr. Cedric Paillard (President and Chief Executive Officer, Ottawa Aviation Services):

Thank you very much. Thank you for your time.

For expediency, I'm going to read my notes. That way will be most efficient.

The Chair:

Please.

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

Good morning. Thank you for inviting Ottawa Aviation Services to be part of the committee's study of flight training schools in Canada.

Our school of professional pilot training is specifically designed for our students to succeed in this industry. The quality of our programs has been recognized by Canadian airlines such as Porter, Jazz, Air Georgian and Keewatin Air. They have formed close partnerships with us now as a result of the quality of the training we're providing.

Thanks to our program, successful graduates who meet the required standards and benchmarks of the course can be put into fast-track paths to a job on the right seat of an airliner, from the CRJ aircraft to Q400 and Boeing 737, a fairly large piece of equipment. I am immensely proud of the graduates and the staff who have actually achieved this training for them. Over the past seven years, we're proud to say, we've had 100% of our graduates employed in the sector as pilots.

OAS is dedicated to good Canadian corporate citizenship. We understand the importance of the aviation sector and its tight link with the socio-economic fabric of Canada, particularly in our northern communities, where aviation is at the centre of their economic development.

I encourage you to review our written brief. It outlines ways in which the federal government and flight training organizations such as OAS can work together to address the pilot shortage to the benefit of our national aviation sector and the Canadian economy as a whole.

No one in this room needs to be convinced of the realities of the impending global pilot shortage. Last year in Montreal, at the ICAO summit of next-generation aviation professionals, the secretary general noted that in 2036, worldwide, 600,000 pilots will be needed to meet the global demand. Within our borders, we are actually talking about an acute pilot shortage that is already creating some issues in specific regions by cancelling flights, and in certain sectors, with some medevac, cargo, and charter flights being cancelled.

For many industries, economies and people, air travel is a necessity, a must. While 2036 seems like a long time from now or a distant future, the reality is that these pilots need about two to four years to be trained and, once they are trained, another three to five years to become captains. The flight schools are uniquely positioned to help face this challenge head on—we see it every day—as long as we are given the tools and the resources to do so.

The first thing we need to focus on is support for our students. Higher education can be expensive, and students want to know that their investment will pay off with a rewarding career. Given the impending labour shortage in the aviation sector, we believe that the federal government has a role in providing leadership in order to encourage more students to choose flight training. This includes taking steps to allow students access to greater financial support through various means, which the Air Transport Association of Canada, of which OAS is a member, is working on. I believe you will be hearing from them sometime next week.

Currently, as an example, time spent in an aircraft, which is what we call “flight time”, is a requirement for all flight training programs, yet this flight time does not qualify towards instructional time. Therefore, students are not able to qualify for as much financial support as they could. While this is somewhat a provincial issue, by amending the terms of the Canada student loan program, the government will show leadership and encourage the provinces to follow suit.

Experienced flight instructors are the next part of the issue. School like ours across the country are reporting backlogs of students wishing to begin their flight training. Today at OAS, we are approaching 55 students who are waiting for flight training, but we are not able to do that due to the shortage of instructors. The reality is that experienced flight instructors are often scooped up by air carriers after only a few months of instructing. The issue of instructor retention needs to be addressed. It's at an all-time low today. Some of my colleagues in the flight training industry are reporting a turnover of way above 100%.

(1000)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Paillard. I have to move on to our other witnesses.

Mr. Cedric Paillard: Okay.

The Chair: Hopefully, you can get in your remaining comments.

Ms. Domingue, you have five minutes, please. [Translation]

Ms. Johanne Domingue (President, Comité antipollution des avions de Longueuil):

Good morning. I just want to make sure you can hear me. [English]

The Chair:

Yes. Thank you very much. Welcome to the committee. [Translation]

Ms. Johanne Domingue:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Members of the committee, good morning.

The last time I was here, you told me that the effort to train pilots would continue given the severe shortage of pilots going forward. Rest assured, we fully appreciate the situation.

What we have an issue with is not pilot training, but rather the sites chosen for that training. We are concerned about the compatibility between flight schools and their locations, which tend to be densely populated areas.

The increase in aircraft movements in flight school areas generates excessive noise, in our view. It's not that we don't want flight schools in our backyard. We simply don't want all of them.

Right now, pilots are being trained for the Asian, African, European and Canadian markets, all in the same place. In 2006-07, the Saint Hubert airport was ranked fourth or fifth busiest airport in the country in terms of flight training. In 2008, when the airport was able to provide international flight training, it climbed to first place, where it stayed for a number of years. Since then, the Toronto-Buttonville airport has been its main rival.

What makes the situation unique is that, when the Saint Hubert airport reaches 199,000 flights, and the Dorval Airport reaches 212,000, the summer season is in full swing. The busiest time for flight school training is usually between April and September. In January, we might have 2,000 or 3,000 local flights versus 10,000 to 15,000 a month in the summer.

That means touch and go landings are happening every 60 seconds, day and night, over our homes. A touch and go landing is when an aircraft lands and then takes off without stopping. An aircraft merely touches the ground briefly before taking off, so the motor continues to run at full force. It's an awful noise that never ends.

It's nice in Quebec in the summertime. We are told that, when the weather is nice for us, it's nice for others, as well, and we have to share those months of good weather. Flight schools run from 8 a.m. to 11 to p.m. What part of the day do residents have to enjoy the good weather? I'll spare you the details, but suffice it to say that cargo planes, helicopters and wide-body aircraft use the Saint Hubert airport as well.

In the summer, going outdoors to enjoy an activity or a meal is almost unthinkable. Some days, there are 800 aircraft movements, and they take place at a rate of every three minutes. We are talking about a noise level of 70 decibels. That's far from negligible. It was all measured and included in a 2009 report. The health impact is significant.

The government has a public health responsibility. In Canada, we should have the right to live in a healthy environment. We protect our wetlands and our wildlife, but do we care about protecting our citizens from noise pollution? Noise is an invasive factor causing residents distress because they have no control over the aircraft flying over their homes or the noise they generate. Not only does this create anxiety among residents, but it also disrupts their sleep.

The last time I appeared before the committee, I submitted a public health report listing all the repercussions. I believe the World Health Organization took a stance on the issue as well. I'll spare you the details, but more and more, these small aircraft are running on leaded gasoline. For the past decade, then, we've been in a dispute with the Saint Hubert airport.

Since 2008, when the number of flights increased, 500 complaints have been filed with Transport Canada and a petition containing 2,000 signatures was presented in the House of Commons. It described the problem as well as the effects. A public consultation process was then held. Finally, in 2011, we launched a class action suit, ending in a court settlement in 2015. Now, consider this: the city then decided to spend $300,000 to have mufflers installed on flight school planes. Taxpayers were the ones who paid for that. We paid for mufflers just so we could get a bit of peace and quiet.

The settlement also set out a second requirement: the creation of a soundscape committee. It met once in 2018. It held a few meetings in 2016 and 2017, but just one in 2018. There is no set plan outlining the priorities, the problem, the ways in which it must be managed or the measures to be implemented. Would it be possible to conduct studies?

In 2018, after all that, we had to file a motion for contempt of court, because the time frames and agreements weren't being respected. The city wants to expand the service, and the schools want to fully develop their training capacity.

(1005)



The airport really wants to be profitable but we just want to be able to enjoy a peaceful environment. We know very well that we will live together, but how? I think it takes transparency. [English]

The Chair:

Excuse me, Ms. Domingue. I'm sorry to interrupt, but the five minutes are up. Perhaps you could get in your comments in responses to questions. [Translation]

Ms. Johanne Domingue:

All right. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Eglinski, go ahead, please, for five minutes.

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC):

Thank you.

I'd like to thank the witnesses for being here this morning. I'll start with Cedric.

Cedric, I just want to follow through with what the lady was just speaking about, the noise of the training schools and stuff like that.

I haven't done a lot of flying in eastern Canada, but I've been flying since 1968—so I'm dating myself—mostly in western Canada. But in the major flight schools and major flight areas, such as Vancouver and Edmonton, we have training areas where the schools go to do their flight training, such as manoeuvres, as I think you fully know.

Maybe you can explain it to the committee, but most of these areas are designated and are usually fairly far away from urban centres.

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

That's correct, yes.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Would you explain a bit why that is, and the cost to you to transition to and from those?

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

Sure. Obviously, airplanes need to take off from an airport, and they need to come back to an airport. Most of the exercises we perform during in-flight training are actually done in specific areas that are well defined. They're actually on our map charts, and we do perform those manoeuvres to train our pilots in those areas.

There's actually one here in Ottawa, between Constance Lake and Constance Bay, on the other side of the river there. We use those areas. I think it does cost and it does take time to actually transition to those zones from the airports. Sometimes the airports are not in those areas, so we do fly to those areas.

I think what we are hearing here is that at the airport there are issues with flight training, and although there are solutions available for us to address them, in my brief you will see that we need the support of the federal government, not necessarily in terms of money but in terms of capabilities for us to actually insert technological changes in the way we train. We have tools today that are not being used because we don't have the authorization of Transport Canada, for example, to do this.

Artificial intelligence, virtual reality, augmented reality, electric aircraft.... There's a whole list of technology that we could actually use, not to remove the noise problems being discussed here, but at least to attack the problem and come up with, as you said, a more manageable situation.

Taking off from and landing at an airport are going to be required. There's no way we can train a pilot without him knowing how to land and take off. But there are ways in which we can actually do it that reduce the noise. We just need a little more support from Transport Canada and from the government to actually get into a position where we can adapt those technologies into a business that is cash flow-sensitive and very profit-dependent, and therefore—

(1010)

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you.

I know I have a few colleagues here who fly. Out of this group, there are at least four or five of us. I noticed that in your brief you mention government assistance. I'm going to go back to 1968. When I went to get my private pilot's licence, it cost $500 in those days. I got $100 back if I continued my flight training to an advanced state, to commercial, and then I could write off the whole commercial training if I went into that area.

Now, the reason they did that back in the 1960s was that we were facing a shortage of pilots in the 1960s because those who came out of World War II were getting older, as our aviation people are today. Maybe you could explain whether this would be of assistance to you. I believe it would, and I believe there is a need to give financial aid to the schools to update equipment and to the students who are enrolling in the programs.

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

You're preaching to the converted here.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Yes, but maybe you can pitch back [Inaudible—Editor].

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

I think it's an issue for us, making sure those students.... For the program today, just to contrast your numbers with our numbers today, you're looking at a program that will actually allow students to go from zero to the right seat of an airliner at Jazz or at Sunwing on the 737 for $85,000 to $90,000. I'm not the cheapest one, and I'm not the most expensive one.

For students, $85,000 in 18 months is a lot of money. So yes, funding to help them would go a long way for us to actually solve that problem.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're on to Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey (Niagara Centre, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I was happy to hear from Ms. Domingue about strategies being established. I want to drill down on those strategies.

We talked a lot with the previous witnesses about how environmental protection, when it comes to lifestyle and health, is recognizable, and that trying to strike a balance with the economy is the order of the day.

My questions for both witnesses are about just that: How do we now make the connection? How do we take the human health risk assessment...? I talked to Mr. Kaiser earlier, who is a medical officer with the Montreal health office, and asked him whether, in fact, they had that. He told me they do in Montreal but not nationally.

How do we connect the human health risk assessment with an assessment on economy? Of course, the impact is the same. How do we do that? Are you already doing that? Finally, if you're not, how do we actually facilitate that process to happen? This is for both of you.

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

Ms. Domingue, go ahead. [Translation]

Ms. Johanne Domingue:

One of the first steps would be for the Airport Soundscape Consultative Committee to be truly able to establish the priorities and needs of each location. Then, noise monitoring stations should be installed to know what is happening in our community, and to be able to identify problems and take action. Local residents should also be informed of what this airport is doing in this regard. If an air corridor is a problem, NAV CANADA should be able to study the situation and determine what adjustments are required and how to proceed. All this could be done if the committee were operational and efficient.

There is a training school that used to do 70 takeoffs and landings at night, but has changed its programs so that there are only 17. Are these practices known? Are they shared? I think that training should be reviewed in the field of transport. We understand the safety aspect, but if one school can limit itself to 17 landings or takeoffs, why can't other schools do the same? There must be a willingness to address the problem. As such, there should be silencers on the aircraft. Some models are approved, and we should be able to install some. Propellers are noisy because they are old aircraft from the 1980s or 1990s.

Let's give ourselves the means to resolve the situation. Pilot training in Canada is highly rated: why shouldn't we have a centre of excellence? I'll give you another example. The City of Miramichi does not impose any noise restrictions. We should therefore set up training centres there. Let's stop putting these centres in densely populated areas and instead develop the rural environment. That is the problem. That is what we are experiencing now. We provide training all over the world. So let's give ourselves the means and become an international benchmark.

(1015)

[English]

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

I'm not an economist, and I don't try to be. It's difficult to actually assess economic impacts in general, but from a training, safety and competency point of view, based on what the airlines are asking us, what Transport Canada is allowing us to do and what technology is available, I think there are options, solutions, that can be used if we work as a team to solve those problems regarding noise.

I'll give you one example. To be an airline transport pilot today, you need 100 hours of flight time at night. That's a serious number of hours that need to be built up. What we do at OAS is send our students all around the country at night, because Transport Canada is mandating that they need to have 100 hours of flight training at night. I could do way more training and way more efficient training, and they could learn a lot more, if I was putting them into a simulator for 20 hours with a scenario-based training environment, and I could reduce my number of hours at night by half or by three-quarters—by whatever the risk assessment analysis would show.

The problem is that a simulator today is half a million dollars. Ours is a fairly large school, so we have maybe more means to play with, but a school that has 20 or 30 students won't be able to offer a simulator of half a million dollars on the economics presented to them.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Paillard.

We'll go to Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I'll give my time to my colleague, whose riding is directly affected by a flying school.

Mr. Pierre Nantel (Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, NDP):

Thank you very much, Mr. Aubin.

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you to the witnesses.

Ms. Domingue, I find your presence here extremely valuable. I think you are the example that best illustrates the angle of the coexistence of airports, and flying schools in particular, with a densely populated area. I would like to point out that beyond the six short minutes I have to talk to you, I hope that everyone around the table will listen to your point of view. The NDP had proposed an amendment that stated that a bill should include a study on the public health consequences of noise pollution and demonstrate greater transparency in the distribution of data collected on the issue, as you mentioned earlier. Unfortunately, this amendment was rejected.

To this end, I would like to tell people around the table that Ms. Domingue is a marathon runner when it comes to representing the rights of riverside communities.

Honestly, this is the most obvious case in Canada of mismanagement regarding the establishment of flying schools in a densely populated area. Obviously, Ms. Domingue, you have been faced with poor management of the situation. I will soon give you the floor, but first I would like to remind you of something important. Too many people say that the people of Saint-Hubert knew very well that they were moving close to an airport. I always remind them that Saint-Hubert Airport, located in a very small suburb of Montreal, is the sixth busiest airport in Canada, after Toronto Pearson International Airport, Dorval Airport, probably Edmonton International Airport, Vancouver International Airport and another one that I forget. This is no joke.

Your testimony perfectly illustrates that, if we don't take this into account in advance when planning the arrival of a flying school, we end up with citizens without resources. You fought, you did everything you could to get corrective action. Is the situation better today or is it clearly not?

Ms. Johanne Domingue:

We held a public consultation and we had 45 recommendations. All we were asking was to sit down together and look at what could be done.

They just finished installing the silencers. Next summer, we will probably see a difference. They will still have to be evaluated. Silencers are being installed, but what will that do in practice? The solution probably does not lie only in silencers. It is one step in the process to achieve a certain climate.

In fact, the airport has not taken this seriously and has not taken the time to sit down with the public, with NAV CANADA or with Transport Canada. Transport Canada is constantly absent from the meetings of the Soundscape Consultative Committee. It is never represented there, I believe. If it had been, I think we could have found ways to come up with effective action plans.

As citizens, we have managed to solve a small part of the problem, namely with two schools. However, there are other schools and other people who come to do touch and go's. Has the problem been solved in Saint-Hubert, despite the class action suit? No, the problem has not been solved.

(1020)

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

I think everyone here has asked you questions, Ms. Domingue. I also invite you to send us the documents to which you refer, including those relating to the consultation. The government must recognize that a situation like the one in Saint-Hubert has been going on since flight schools emerged. We will not go over the history, but clearly your life changed in 2008.

Ms. Johanne Domingue:

Absolutely.

In 2008 and 2009, there were between 10,000 and 15,000 local movements per month. That's equivalent to one movement every minute. Our lives have changed. As we were saying, we were under attack. Going outside became unthinkable.

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

That's very clear.

Ms. Johanne Domingue:

We have even heard someone ask whether we were at war, because there were so many flights.

In short, we have the means, but we have no will. When I came here today, I wondered whether there was a willingness to help the people, in the same way as there is to help the various affected areas. When we vote for elected officials, we assume that they will take care of human beings too. [English]

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds remaining, sir. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Ms. Domingue, as I was saying, the government rejected the amendment that we were proposing. I think it must still be at the heart of the legislation. It is well worded in the text, that it is necessary to “determine whether the infrastructure available to flight schools meets the needs of the schools and the communities where they are located”.

Do you feel that Transport Canada has the contacts they need to respond to problematic situations such as those of the people of Saint-Hubert?

Ms. Johanne Domingue:

I must tell you that Transport Canada has not responded in the quickest and most favourable way to our requests. I even think the department often causes problems. For example, in the case of an agreement with the community and when faced with a Superior Court decision, Transport Canada got involved and tried to overturn the decision by saying that it will not send notices to aviators, which is a much more confrontational attitude.

When we write to Minister Garneau, he tells us to solve the problem locally, and when we do, the minister decides not to issue the notices we ask for, without really responding to our requests for explanations.

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

I hope they'll find a solution for the people of Saint-Hubert. Your situation is a clear case of what not to do.

Thank you, Ms. Domingue. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I'm sorry to interrupt. Your time is up.

Mr. Fuhr, you have five minutes.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I did want to address this noise issue, because I appreciate that there is a sensitivity to noise. I appreciate there's also a hypersensitivity to noise, and there are some things that can be done. Engine technologies on new aircraft are way quieter. There are prop technologies you can adapt to the old aircraft that we typically use for training that can reduce some noise. There's approach pass to airports that you can use with GPS technology that can take the plane out of the way of noise-sensitive areas. There are traffic flow patterns. There are lots of things that can be done.

I was looking at Saint-Hubert on ForeFlight with my colleague. There are more than six other airports within 15 nautical miles where, when you're in the takeoff and landing phase, you could deploy to amortize that noise over a bigger footprint. In reality, the odds are that we're probably not going to build new infrastructure to solve the problem, but there are some things that can be done. I wanted to throw that out there.

With regard to pilot training, Mr. Paillard, how many class 4, 3, 2 and 1 instructors do you have right now?

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

We're a little bit lucky at OAS. We have three class 1 and two class 2, and we carry 12 class 4 instructors.

(1025)

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

Can you quickly explain the importance of those class 1 and class 2 flight instructors to your operation and the production of pilots?

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

Sure.

These are all technical terms. Class 1 instructors are the top of the food chain. They are allowed to teach how to become an instructor. Class 2 instructors are basically the same as class 1, but they're not allowed to teach instructors. They have a lot of experience and they supervise junior instructors. Class 4 is the most junior instructor you will find. They usually come right out of flight school and are trained by us. Class 3 is an intermediate stage, between class 4 and class 2, where they are given a little less supervision.

When we train pilots, we need to spread our instructors over x number of pilots. We do about six students per instructor, which gives us the ability to have the resources to monitor how the training is done and to ensure quality of training. Those instructors are usually class 4 and class 3. The class 2 instructors supervise the class 3 and the class 4. Basically, the class 1 are teaching those instructors on a regular basis how to improve their performance and how to train properly, quality and safety being at the centre of everything we do.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

Based on what you said, and my knowledge of the operation, you absolutely require class 1 and class 2 instructors.

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

Yes.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

What's the turnover rate of your class 1 and class 2 instructors?

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

OAS is a bit special, because we're responding to the need for instructors by hiring carrier instructors. We've promoted the status of instructor to that of a manager. We pay them very well to make sure they stay a long time. At other schools, there isn't the capability to do this. They're reporting 100% to 150% turnaround on those class 1 and class 2 instructors—assuming they go to class 1 and class 2. Most of our colleague schools don't even see the instructors going to class 1 or class 2.

There is a bit of a vicious circle, where the quality of training and the safety aspect are starting to be felt by a lot of the airlines, because the class 4 instructors, obviously, don't have the experience to actually manage—

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

Do you know how much credit military pilots would get if they were to try to get a civilian licence—those who have retired from the military and aren't really interested in the airlines, and maybe have a B category or an A category?

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

No. Well, the answer is yes and no. The answer is peanuts. Basically, we can't do anything. Depending on when and how the military pilot comes out of the tour with the military, it's very difficult for us to actually put them into—

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

I have an A2 category licence and used to run the Instrument Check Pilot School for Canada, with about 900 hours of instructional.... Would you say that a guy like me would be capable, with minimal training, to get...seeing as I've supervised people going solo on many occasions, and taught other instructors—

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

We can't use you.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

Well, you can't use me, but how much training do you think I would need? Would I have to go through the whole program?

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

It would be 35 hours on the ground, assuming that I can convert your licence to a commercial licence.

Mr. Stephen Fuhr:

I have that.

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

You have that, so then it's 35 hours on the ground and 30 hours in the airplane.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Paillard.

I'm sorry, your time is up.

We will go on to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I'll keep going on Mr. Fuhr's line of questioning. Mr. Fuhr has flown the Atlantic solo a number of times, which is something I think many pilots would like to do.

How do we get these very experienced pilots into these class 1 and class 2 slots? One of the problems I see is that if everybody who gets a licence goes on to get a really interesting job flying for an airline, then there's nobody left to train them.

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

I'm lucky enough to have seen both sides of the Atlantic, solo and as a captain on the aircraft as well. I'm also lucky enough that I've actually been trained on both sides of the Atlantic. Maybe I'll use an example of what's going on in the U.K., France or Spain. There is a program in Europe that brings airline pilots back into the flight schools, particularly in their retirement years. There are programs in place, and I strongly encourage the committee to look at this. It actually works very well.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there any equivalent to that in Canada?

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

No, there's no equivalent in Canada. The only thing we've done on our side is design a program that goes around this. The program is designed so that experienced pilots are teaching in our program on the simulator side of things. It doesn't replace the experience needed at class 1, class 2 for the ab initio stage, when the students are learning their key skills. We don't have anybody who actually.... When you're an airline pilot, such as a Boeing 777 captain, flying from Toronto to Hong Kong, you're not going to go back into a Cessna 172, de-icing an aircraft at -60°C. It's hard for them to transition back to that aircraft.

We have to treat our instructors as professionals, and stand the instructor up on the ladder of the pilot profession. Today, everybody sees being a captain of Boeing 777 at Air Canada as the top of the food chain. Yes, it is, to some extent, but I can tell you that I have a lot of respect for my class 1 instructors who are actually teaching these kids today, because they go out every day, even at -20°C in the winter, and they train those kids very well.

(1030)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right. Do you agree with the assessment, building on Mr. Fuhr's comments earlier.... Would it be helpful to make it easier for military instructors to be given some credit in the civilian aviation world for their military instruction experience?

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

Absolutely, yes. Let me add one thing to this. Military pilots are trained to competency. They're trained to mission-specific training. This is exactly what the airlines today are asking us to do, to reduce the training time. Today, it takes 18 months to train an airline pilot in Canada. We need to move, and Transport Canada needs to move, to a point where we can use competency-based training, as they do in Europe today.

Today, it's not unusual to find an 18-year-old or a 19-year-old Airbus 320 first officer at Aer Lingus, British Airways. In Canada, you will never see that, because we don't have competency-based training in place. We're trying other ways to do it. There are a few schools in Canada that are trying to do this, but it is working around Transport Canada, not working with Transport Canada.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's interesting.

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

It makes a difference.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I do have more questions, and I don't have a lot more time.

I flew with Ottawa Aviation Services once, with Adam Vandeven. I understand he's not with you anymore.

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

No, he's gone.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think he's at Air Georgian now, the last I heard.

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What's the demographic of your students? Is it all Canadians looking to become commercial pilots and instructors, or are there a lot of foreign students coming in, who get trained and then leave for other markets?

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

Fifty per cent of the population at OAS is actually international students, which is about the average of what we find for schools in Canada. Fifty per cent of our CPLs are actually international passport holders.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Of that 50%, how many are contributing to the growth of Canada's own aviation industry after they leave?

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

Some of them stay in Canada, because we have this articulation that they can work in Canada, so they go and work for airlines or for flight schools as instructors, but I would say this is maybe 50% of the 50%.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's 25%.

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

All right.

What's the dropout rate? As you talked about, we know it's $85,000 to get there. Of those who start, what percentage complete their training to the right seat?

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

Eighty-five per cent complete their training, and 90% of the failure rate is due to financials.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm being cut off by the tower, so thank you.

The Chair:

Yes. Thank you very much.

Go ahead, Mr. Eglinski.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you.

I think I'll just follow suit with this.

I think you reported in your written document to us that you pay a 13% excise tax on your fuel, and soon your school alone will be close to $2 million in annual excise tax. Of course, then we have the carbon tax thrown on top of that, which will add to your costs.

There are those types of costs, but there's also the cost for you to bring that instructor from class 4 through to class 1. I wonder if you could just explain what it would cost your flight school to take a person who just finished his commercial pilot's licence, whether it be a retired military person or just a young student coming in.... What is the cost to the aviation school that you must recuperate?

(1035)

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

It costs us $10,000 to train someone who has a commercial licence to become an instructor.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Is that class 4?

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

That's class 4. After that, we basically bury the cost of the upgrade from class 3 to class 1 into the day-to-day training. The one that costs us the most is actually the $10,000.

I'll come back to the carbon tax. One thing that is interesting for me when I see a committee like this—and this is my first time.... It's very interesting to see that we have solutions in our pocket today that we can implement to solve the noise issue, to solve the carbon tax issue and to solve the training issue, but we cannot use them because we are either constrained by the regulatory constraints or constrained financially because of the nature of what we can actually get from our students; $85,000 is pretty much the maximum we will get from our students today.

Just by tweaking things around, we'll actually be able to solve Saint-Hubert's issue, and we'll be able to solve our pilot shortage and use those technologies. By using those aspects, such as the electric aircraft that I mentioned in my brief, which make less noise, the carbon footprint is gone.

If the Canadian government gives us the tools to actually implement that, then that works and we can actually find a solution there. However, if you corner us to a point where we can't move, then that's where we're going to need to ask to be removed from the tax or as an exemption on the tax issue for fuel, because we can't move and we can't train anymore. We have no way to play the financial game that we're playing.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

What you're saying to us is that we have an aviation industry that is ready to modernize, but we cannot modernize, because we have a very old and archaic set of regulation rules governing how you can go about your duties. Maybe you can just dwell on this a little more.

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

The answer is that Transport Canada's regulations, the CARs, are really good. Now, we need to put modern elements on top of it that will answer the generation Z people we are training today. It will answer the noise issue. It will answer the pilot shortage and ensure that we have the competency-based training that the airlines are asking us to do. We have the ability to do this. We have the infrastructure to do this. We have the technology to do this. We just need the support to do it, and today, it's not there.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go on to Mr. Hardie for four minutes.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I'll be splitting my time with Mr. Badawey.

Looking at an article that Michael Moore, the filmmaker, wrote in 2010 talking about pilots on food stamps.... Has that situation improved?

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

Yes, it has improved in the U.S. This was a very U.S.-centric report.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Okay. Very good. Yes, it's pretty shocking.

Is it an issue that you have a lot of candidates wanting to go through the school but there's either no space for them or the cost is prohibitive, or is it simply hard finding candidates who want to be pilots?

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

In the past year, we now have candidates who want to be pilots. The press has made very good advertising for us, realizing that there is a pilot shortage. So that helps. The issue is for us to actually find enough instructors and enough airplanes and do it safely so that we can actually train those 55. Because one of the issues—

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I'll leave it at that, if I could.

The other piece that we've heard in past studies is that the capabilities within Transport Canada to recertify pilots, etc.... The number of people who actually have the competency to do that kind of work has also gone down. If we were able to lift that capability within Transport Canada, could those people not also be available as trainers?

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

I think the issue you're talking about is related to the certification of airline pilots when they stay within the airline. That is true, but it's not going to impact what we're doing at the grassroots, the initial training when they start. This is purely an issue for us of getting our class 1 and class 2 instructors, and class 4 instructors, enough of them that we can actually train the demand.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

All right.

I'll pass the rest of my time to Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Mr. Hardie.

I want to discuss the comment that you made with respect to regulatory and financial restraints. I think Mr. Eglinski was correct. I also made a comment a couple of meetings ago with respect to the archaic transportation infrastructure and possibly regulations and financial restraints that we do have in place today—hence the reason why we're discussing this today.

I have two questions. One goes to the comment made about the pricing on pollution. Of course, with that, when you come out with a recommendation and a direction, you want to ensure that you're not defaulting the problem to somebody else. Pricing on pollution is very simple. If the polluters don't pay it, the property taxpayer does. It's already there. We're just trying to alleviate that.

To your point in terms of the recommendations that you have at the ready, is it a solution, or is it simply passing the buck onto someone else?

(1040)

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

No, I think it's really a solution, enabling flight schools to actually use technology, and enabling students to be able to pay for this training program. Some of this technology would use the cost of the training program as well. It's part of an ecosystem that actually is a solution to it.

The problem is that you have to put in a stopgap measure. If those technologies are not available right away, then we are forced to actually ask, for example, for a tax reduction on our fuel, because you can't get blood out of stone. It gets to a point where the students don't have $85,000 or more to pay for it. This is really the constraint. The solution out there is just the stopgap measures that I was trying to define.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Those recommendations that you do have, can you forward those to the committee?

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

Yes. They are actually in the brief that we've provided to the committee.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Okay, great. Thank you.

Thank you, Madam Chair.

The Chair:

Now we'll go to Mr. Jeneroux for two minutes, and then we'll get back to Mr. Nantel for the last minute.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I was a bit surprised that, in the motion, the member from Kelowna—Lake Country makes no reference to the challenges they're facing to get more women involved in flight training. I know that in Edmonton there's a school or a program called Elevate Aviation, run in partnership with Nav Canada. I'm wondering if you could comment on some of those challenges, so it can be included in some of the discussion here today. Thanks.

Mr. Cedric Paillard:

Let's say one thing clearly: Female pilots are usually better than male pilots. I flew with a female captain, who taught me more and was a better pilot. I can confirm that.

The issue with female pilots is the same issue you have for getting female electrical engineers. I don't want to differentiate between pilots and engineers. It's the same issue. Everything that has been written is true.

At OAS, we have a group called Women at OAS. I encourage you to meet with the ladies behind me; one or two of our pilots are here. Please talk to them.

It's hard to be a female pilot in an industry where only 6% are female. We're trying, but it's a marketing issue. It's pushing and advertising.

We're doing this with females and first nations, aboriginals, to make sure that...because they're going to stay in their northern communities. Any help we can get from the government on that front will help; that's for sure.

It's what we're calling a marketing issue....

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll move on to Mr. Nantel for a very short question or comment. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Ms. Domingue, there's no doubt that you did everything possible to reach an agreement with the municipality, airport and flight schools, but that this agreement didn't last because the situation has worsened. What message do you have to convey to the people who will make recommendations and who must take into account both the urgent need for pilots and the need to co-exist with densely populated areas such as this one. The issue has been well documented by a Quebec agency, which confirmed that aircraft flights affect stress levels and that the exhaust generated by the combustion of leaded fuel contributes to air pollution.

Ms. Johanne Domingue:

I think that public consultations should be held to tell communities what's really happening and how to respond. As I was saying, we must live together. Yet things continue to be hidden from us. Journalists let us know what's happening, but we're always the last to know. The airports seem to want to keep us in the dark for fear that the public will react. I think that it would be beneficial to work together, since we need to live together. Can we tell each other the truth and work toward a common solution?

We also need the measurements related to the issue. I can have an idea of the situation. The situation can be improved. However, I won't know this until I can look at scientific evidence and access noise measurements. Show transparency and tell us the truth. We'll come out on top. In addition, please stop establishing noisy air corridors over densely populated residential areas. There are other places for these corridors. After all, car racing circuits aren't built just anywhere. Let's be consistent.

(1045)

Mr. Pierre Nantel:

Thank you, Ms. Domingue. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Thank you to both our witnesses today; we appreciate it very much.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

(0845)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte. Bienvenue au Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités. C'est la réunion 123 de la 42e législature. Cela montre que nous avons eu beaucoup de réunions au cours de la législature.

Conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement, nous réalisons une étude sur l'évaluation de l'incidence du bruit des avions près des grands aéroports canadiens.

Voici les témoins aujourd'hui. Sur place, nous avons Antonio Natalizio. Bienvenue.

Nous avons un représentant de la Direction de santé publique de Montréal: David Kaiser, responsable médical au Service environnement urbain et saines habitudes de vie.

Par vidéoconférence, nous avons Pierre Lachapelle, président de l'organisme Les Pollués de Montréal-Trudeau.

Pour débuter, nous inviterons M. Natalizio à faire son exposé. Veuillez vous limiter à cinq minutes. Merci beaucoup.

M. Antonio Natalizio (à titre personnel):

Merci, madame la présidente, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité. Je témoigne à titre de citoyen d'Etobicoke-Centre depuis 44 ans, soit une région que les avions survolent à une altitude aussi basse que 700 pieds, et leur nombre augmente chaque année. Je reconnais les avantages que procurent les aéroports à notre ville et à notre région, mais il y a aussi des effets négatifs. Il faut un équilibre entre les deux. Pour y arriver, je vous exhorte à tenir compte de trois éléments: l'incidence du bruit sur la santé, la nécessité d'une réglementation sur le bruit et la nécessité d'un plan à long terme.

En ce qui concerne la santé, nous avons maintenant suffisamment de données probantes pour établir des liens entre l'exposition au bruit dans l'environnement et les problèmes cardiovasculaires, les problèmes de santé mentale et les difficultés d'apprentissage et les troubles cognitifs chez les enfants. En tant que parents et grands-parents, nous devons nous préoccuper de ces conséquences sur les enfants en bas âge et les adolescents, parce que ce sont des personnes vulnérables. D'autres pays, comme l'Australie, l'Allemagne et le Royaume-Uni, ont éliminé ou restreint les vols de nuit. J'espère que vous arriverez à la conclusion qu'il est grand temps que le Canada suive leur exemple.

Pour ce qui est de la réglementation, seulement trois des nombreux règlements ayant trait à l'aviation civile portent sur le bruit, et ils sont inefficaces et insuffisants pour réglementer les vols de nuit. Cette lacune a permis à l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto d'éliminer l'ancien couvre-feu et de réduire la période de restriction la nuit de huit à six heures. Elle a aussi permis aux autorités de doubler le nombre de vols de nuit depuis 20 ans. Si rien n'est fait, ce nombre doublera encore d'ici 20 ans.

Il faut réglementer les vols de nuit. Il faut rétablir l'ancien couvre-feu pour nous donner l'occasion d'avoir une nuit de sommeil ininterrompue. C'est un droit fondamental de la personne. Nous défendons les droits de la personne dans le monde, mais nous négligeons de le faire dans notre propre cours. Les enfants sont notre ressource la plus précieuse, mais les aéroports font fi de leur droit à une nuit de sommeil. De nombreux aéroports ont adopté des couvre-feux, et cela ne les a pas empêchés de continuer de prospérer. Contrairement aux prédictions de l'industrie, le ciel ne nous est pas tombé sur la tête. Le corps a besoin de huit heures de sommeil, et nous devons en conséquence rétablir les heures d'exploitation des aéroports la nuit à ce qu'elles étaient avant 1985. C'est inadéquat de dormir six heures, et les conséquences sont énormes. Le manque de sommeil coûte plus de 20 milliards de dollars par année en perte de productivité aux entreprises canadiennes, et cela coûte à la société plus de 30 milliards de dollars en soins de santé.

Le Royaume-Uni réglemente les vols de nuit, et l'aéroport Heathrow est maintenant un véritable modèle. Même si cet aéroport est plus grand que l'aéroport Pearson, le nombre de vols de nuit y est limité à seulement 5 800 par année, alors qu'il y en a 19 000 à l'aéroport Pearson et que ce nombre augmente. L'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto souhaite faire de l'aéroport Pearson le plus important aéroport international du continent, et elle continuera d'augmenter le nombre de vols de nuit pour y arriver. Des aéroports comme l'aéroport Heathrow et ceux de Sydney, de Zurich, de Munich et de Francfort sont des chefs de file dans la gestion du bruit dû au trafic aérien en raison de la réglementation gouvernementale, parce que cela ne fait pas partie de leur ADN.

Les collectivités aux alentours de l'aéroport Pearson sont exposées à plus de 460 000 vols par année, et un tel trafic suscite beaucoup d'inquiétudes. De janvier à juillet dernier, l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto a reçu 81 000 plaintes relatives au bruit. Pour la même période l'an dernier, ce nombre était de 50 000, et il était de 33 000 en 2016. Comment cela se compare-t-il aux autres grands aéroports canadiens? Ce n'est même pas proche.

L'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto ne répond pas à nos préoccupations grandissantes. Par conséquent, je vous exhorte à recommander la création d'un « chien de garde » indépendant. Les pays qui se préoccupent des effets sur la santé de la population ont un ombudsman qui se penche sur le bruit dû au trafic aérien. L'Australie a été le premier à en nommer un, et le Royaume-Uni est le dernier en liste. Avec votre aide, le Canada peut aussi en avoir un.

En ce qui a trait au plan à long terme, nous ne pouvons pas nous fier à l'industrie aérienne pour trouver une solution équitable pour la région. C'est absolument la responsabilité du gouvernement. En 1989, le gouvernement a mis sur pied une commission d'évaluation environnementale pour examiner les plans d'agrandissement de l'aéroport Pearson et la nécessité pour les nouveaux aéroports de répondre aux besoins à long terme de la région.

(0850)



Lorsque la commission s'est opposée à l'agrandissement de l'aéroport Pearson dans ses recommandations, le gouvernement l'a dissoute, et la question ayant trait au plan à long terme n'a jamais été abordée. Trois décennies plus tard, nos collectivités payent le prix de cette décision. Nous avons maintenant besoin d'une solution à long terme. C'est urgent.

Je vous implore de vous pencher sur la nécessité d'un autre aéroport dans la région et de recommander entre-temps un recours accru aux aéroports voisins et leur agrandissement.

En résumé, madame la présidente, nous devons atténuer les conséquences sur la santé, parce qu'elles sont réelles et qu'elles nous coûtent cher. Nous devons réglementer les vols de nuit, parce que le sommeil est un droit fondamental de la personne. Il faut aussi étudier la situation à long terme, parce qu'une solution s'impose de toute urgence.

Je vous remercie de m'avoir donné l'occasion de témoigner devant le Comité. J'ai hâte d'entendre vos questions.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Passons maintenant à M. Kaiser, qui a cinq minutes.

M. David Kaiser (responsable médical, Service environnement urbain et saines habitudes de vie, Direction de santé publique de Montréal):

Merci de l'invitation. Je vais m'exprimer en français, parce que je crois comprendre que c'est la langue de la majorité, mais je suis prêt à répondre à vos questions en français ou en anglais.

Je suis médecin en santé publique, et je travaille à la Direction de santé publique de Montréal. Vous m'avez invité ici parce que nous avons réalisé des travaux sur l'incidence sur la santé du bruit dans l'environnement et plus précisément le bruit des avions. J'aimerais vous expliquer du point de vue de la santé publique pourquoi nous considérons le bruit des avions comme un problème important et les endroits où nous pouvons améliorer les choses, selon nous, pour renforcer la santé publique.

À la Direction de santé publique, nous nous penchons sur la question depuis environ 10 ans. Cela découle en fait au départ de plaintes provenant de citoyens. Ce sont des gens qui nous ont appelés pour nous dire qu'ils avaient l'impression qu'il y avait quelque chose qui clochait et qu'ils aimeraient que nous enquêtions. Cela nous a permis d'amasser beaucoup de connaissances à la Ville de Montréal en ce qui a trait aux conséquences réelles.

Sur la scène internationale, c'est très clair. L'Organisation mondiale de la santé vient de publier il y a environ un mois ses nouvelles lignes directrices relatives au bruit. Pour y arriver, elle a réalisé de grands travaux scientifiques au cours de la dernière année pour examiner les conséquences sur la santé des diverses sources de bruit dans l'environnement. J'aimerais particulièrement me concentrer sur les données probantes que les scientifiques ont recueillies en ce qui a trait au bruit des avions.

Il y a des données probantes de haute qualité, ce qui signifie que de nombreuses études s'accordent pour dire qu'il y a un lien entre le bruit des avions et ce que nous appelons le « désagrément ». Le désagrément peut ne pas vraiment vous paraître comme un problème de santé publique, mais vous savez que le désagrément au fil du temps, si vous vivez longtemps à un endroit qui est bruyant, nuit vraiment à la qualité de vie et que cela cause d'autres effets sur la santé.

Deuxièmement, il y a les effets sur le sommeil. À ce sujet, l'Organisation mondiale de la santé affirme que les données probantes sont de qualité moyenne. Cela signifie qu'il y a moins d'études, mais elles indiquent tout de même qu'il y a un lien entre le bruit des avions et les troubles du sommeil.

Fait encore plus préoccupant, à long terme, nous avons maintenant des données probantes de qualité moyenne qui indiquent que le bruit des avions a des effets sur la santé cardiovasculaire. Cela inclut l'hypertension ou une pression artérielle élevée. Cela inclut des AVC et des maladies cardiaques. Cela découle en partie du désagrément vécu durant 30 ans en raison du bruit dans l'environnement. Cela génère du stress et cela cause de l'hypertension. Cela peut mener à des maladies cardiaques et nuire au sommeil. Nous savons qu'un sommeil perturbé dérègle le corps et que cela peut causer de l'hypertension et des maladies cardiaques. Par ailleurs, il faut mentionner un élément important dans le contexte actuel, et c'est que cela peut causer l'obésité. Nous commençons à avoir de meilleures données probantes qui permettent d'établir des liens entre l'exposition au bruit chronique et l'obésité.

Les données probantes sont de moins bonne qualité au sujet des troubles cognitifs chez les enfants et les adultes et des effets sur la santé mentale et la qualité de vie.

Voici quelques chiffres à ce sujet. Nous savons qu'environ 60 % des gens qui habitent sur l'île de Montréal sont exposés à des niveaux de bruit qui peuvent avoir des effets sur leur santé. En ce qui concerne précisément le bruit des avions, nous avons environ 5 000 logements et environ de 10 000 à 12 000 personnes qui habitent dans ce que nous appelons la courbe NEF 25, soit une prévision d'ambiance sonore de 25. Ces citoyens se trouvent dans une zone à proximité de l'aéroport où nous savons que des effets se font probablement ressentir. Environ 6 % de la population de l'île de Montréal, soit 1 personne sur 15, se dit très dérangée par le bruit, et environ 2 %, soit 1 personne sur 50, rapporte que le bruit des avions perturbe leur sommeil. Cela concerne précisément le bruit des avions.

Ces pourcentages peuvent sembler bas, mais cela change lorsque nous tenons compte du petit nombre de personnes qui habitent en fait à proximité de l'aéroport parmi les deux millions qui vivent sur l'île de Montréal. Si nous examinons le tout en fonction de la distance par rapport à l'aéroport, environ 40 % des gens qui habitent à l'intérieur de la courbe NEF 25 se disent très dérangés par le bruit, et 20 % des gens habitent à moins de deux kilomètres de l'aéroport. Bref, nous avons des gens qui habitent à une bonne distance de l'aéroport et qui se disent très dérangés par le bruit.

Du point de vue de la santé publique, cela nous a amenés à formuler des recommandations depuis quelques années. Nous avons présenté un mémoire en 2014. Comme vous êtes à même de le savoir, ce n'est pas beaucoup quatre ans pour changer une politique. Je crois que bon nombre de ces recommandations sont encore très pertinentes. J'aimerais seulement attirer votre attention sur deux recommandations que je considère comme les plus pertinentes pour le gouvernement fédéral.

(0855)



La première recommandation n'est pas complexe. Cela ne se fonde pas sur de vastes données scientifiques. En vue de mieux comprendre ce qui se passe et d'informer les gens des effets potentiels sur leur santé, il faut avoir accès à des données. Actuellement, nous n'avons pas accès aux données concernant l'endroit où se trouvent les avions dans les airs, leur nombre et le type d'avions, et nous n'avons pas accès aux mesures des niveaux de bruit. La première recommandation concerne l'accès aux données.

La présidente:

Je m'excuse, monsieur Kaiser. Nous avons très peu de temps.

M. David Kaiser:

D'accord.

La deuxième recommandation vise seulement à continuer à chercher des améliorations administratives et techniques en vue de réduire le bruit à la source. Je crois que ces deux éléments sont encore très importants à l'échelle fédérale.

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Lachapelle, vous avez cinq minutes. [Français]

M. Pierre Lachapelle (président, Les Pollués de Montréal-Trudeau):

Merci. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Permettez-moi de mentionner quelque chose avant.

M. Lachapelle nous a remis un graphique, mais il est seulement en français. Le Comité me permet-il de le distribuer? La greffière a fait preuve d'un peu de créativité. Me permettez-vous de distribuer le graphique aux membres du Comité?

Des députés: D'accord.

La présidente: Merci.

Allez-y, monsieur Lachapelle. [Français]

M. Pierre Lachapelle:

Madame la présidente, mesdames et messieurs membres du Comité, je vous remercie de votre invitation et de votre accueil.

Je voulais justement, avant de commencer mon témoignage, mentionner que j'ai fait parvenir au greffe du Comité une douzaine de documents. Je souhaite ardemment que ces documents soient portés à l'attention des membres du Comité. En ce qui concerne les données captées par nos stations de mesure, vous avez déjà en main un exemple des pics de bruit. Bien souvent, Aéroports de Montréal et les autorités de santé publique parlent de données moyennes, mais il faut regarder les pics auxquels la population est soumise. J'en viens maintenant à mon témoignage.

C'est avec plaisir que je témoigne au nom du comité de citoyens Les Pollués de Montréal-Trudeau relativement au bruit des avions autour de l'aéroport Pierre-Elliott-Trudeau et des autres aéroports internationaux au Canada. C'est une situation déplorable, qui touche des milliers de Montréalais et qui découle en grande partie de l'étrange décision prise en 1996 par les autorités aéroportuaires de fermer un aéroport ultramoderne, c'est-à-dire Mirabel. Cette fermeture a nécessairement entraîné la concentration de tout le trafic aérien dans le ciel de Montréal.

Je souligne que, dès les années 1990, les citoyens se sont adressés au Parlement pour lui dire qu'il y avait un problème. Ils n'ont pas été entendus. Les Pollués de Montréal-Trudeau ont commencé leurs travaux de façon informelle en 2011, et le comité s'est officiellement formé en 2013. L'objectif de mon témoignage aujourd'hui, mesdames et messieurs les députés, est que vous agissiez non seulement pour assurer et rétablir la santé publique de milliers de Montréalais, mais également pour rebâtir la confiance des citoyens envers le Parlement, qui a laissé dériver la gestion des aéroports internationaux au Canada et la question de la pollution par le bruit des avions.

(0900)

[Traduction]

Je vais aller droit au but, soit les demandes formulées par des centaines de citoyens depuis 2013 concernant la pollution par le bruit et la pollution de l'air à l'aéroport Montréal-Trudeau.

Premièrement, nous demandons l'adoption d'un couvre-feu complet de 23 heures à 7 heures pour les vols de nuit. La capacité de dormir toute une nuit sans être dérangé par le bruit des avions est un besoin fondamental.

Deuxièmement, le 30 avril dernier, Aéroports de Montréal a annoncé un projet d'agrandissement de 4,5 milliards de dollars pour la construction d'une nouvelle aérogare à l'aéroport Pierre-Elliott-Trudeau. Nous demandons l'arrêt immédiat et la fin de ce projet et des travaux préparatoires qui sont commencés.

Troisièmement, nous demandons une évaluation économique, environnementale, sociale et sanitaire de la situation actuelle et de l'incidence du projet annoncé le 30 avril. L'absence de balises législatives adéquates au Canada permet la création d'un tel chantier visant la construction d'une aérogare sans une évaluation publique complète.

Quatrièmement, nous demandons que cette évaluation publique soit effectuée par une équipe professionnelle et scientifique indépendante qui mènera notamment des audiences publiques sur la situation à l'aéroport.

Cinquièmement, depuis qu'Aéroports de Montréal est devenue locataire de l'aéroport, la gestion du bruit et de la pollution de l'air a été inadéquate. Nous demandons que la responsabilité de l'évaluation de ses répercussions environnementales soit confiée à un organisme indépendant et transparent qui rend publics ses constats.

Sixièmement, nous demandons au Parlement de reprendre le contrôle et la surveillance des aéroports internationaux canadiens, soit un rôle qu'il a cessé d'assumer en 1992 lorsque le secteur privé a pris la relève. Des centaines de citoyens voient l'augmentation du bruit dû au trafic aérien comme le résultat de l'abandon par le Parlement de son rôle de surveillance. Ce changement a eu des conséquences sur la santé et la qualité de vie de milliers de personnes au Canada et sur l'île de Montréal.[Français]

Septièmement, pour prendre du recul relativement à la gestion des aéroports au Canada, je vous invite à prendre connaissance de l'analyse effectuée par MM. Michel Nadeau et Jacques Roy, de l'Institut sur la gouvernance d'organisations privées et publiques. J'ai fourni ce document dans les deux langues officielles du Canada à la greffière du Comité. Cette étude est très révélatrice de la situation et elle est accompagnée de recommandations qui sont pleines de bons sens.

Toutes ces demandes découlent de l'énergie déployée et des milliers d'heures investies depuis 2013 par des bénévoles de tous les horizons de la société montréalaise quant aux problèmes réels du bruit et de la pollution de l'air générés par les avions qui survolent à basse altitude les arrondissements et les villes de l'île de Montréal.

Je vais résumer les points qui me restent puisque mon temps de parole est compté.

Parmi les nombreuses actions qui ont mené à ces demandes se trouve une pétition de 3 000 noms qui a été déposée à la Chambre des communes en 2013. La ministre des Transports de l'époque, l'honorable Lisa Raitt, l'a balayée du revers de la main.

Nous avons installé des stations de mesure du bruit. Ce matin, vous avez obtenu un exemple du graphique qu'elles permettent de produire. Nos stations sont publiques et mesurent en permanence le bruit aérien à une dizaine d'endroits à Montréal.

Nous avons tenté, conjointement avec les citoyens de la circonscription de Papineau, de sensibiliser le très honorable Justin Trudeau. Notre demande de rendez-vous a été refusée: il semble que le député de Papineau ne veuille pas rencontrer ses électeurs.

Au mois de mai dernier, nous avons écrit à l’honorable Catherine McKenna, ministre de l'Environnement et du Changement climatique, pour demander des audiences publiques relativement à ce projet de 4,5 milliards de dollars. Nous n'avons reçu aucune réponse. J'ai même fait un suivi téléphonique.

(0905)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Monsieur Lachapelle, je m'excuse de vous interrompre, mais votre temps est écoulé, et je peux vous assurer que le Comité a de nombreuses questions à vous poser. Je dois maintenant céder la parole aux membres du Comité qui vous poseront des questions.

M. Lachapelle nous a fait parvenir en français beaucoup de recommandations. Je dirais qu'il y a plus de 400 pages de renseignements qui, à la lueur de son témoignage, sont très importants. Le Comité souhaite-t-il que les 400 pages soient traduites et distribuées aux membres du Comité ou devrions-nous donner tout cela aux analystes pour l'inclure dans le rapport? Serait-il préférable de donner tout cela aux analystes pour qu'ils examinent ces recommandations en vue de les inclure dans le rapport?

Monsieur Wrzesnewskyj, allez-y.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke-Centre, Lib.):

Madame la présidente, j'aimerais avoir une précision. S'agit-il de 400 pages de recommandations ou s'agit-il d'un rapport avec des recommandations? Si les recommandations représentent une petite partie du rapport, je ne vois aucun inconvénient à faire seulement traduire les recommandations, mais s'il s'agit de 400 pages de recommandations...

La présidente:

Il s'agit de 400 pages provenant de divers rapports. Il est proposé de prendre les recommandations et de les faire traduire dans les deux langues officielles. Tous les autres renseignements contenus dans ces 400 pages seront ensuite remis à l'analyste pour inclure le tout dans son rapport.

Est-ce que tout le monde est d'accord?

Des députés: D'accord.

La présidente: D'accord. Merci. Nous veillerons à ce que tout le monde reçoive les recommandations, monsieur Lachapelle.

Passons maintenant aux questions des membres du Comité.

Madame Block, allez-y.

Mme Kelly Block (Sentier Carlton—Eagle Creek, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je tiens à remercier nos témoins de leur présence devant le Comité aujourd'hui. Nous approchons probablement de la fin de notre étude, et nous avons connu une excellente étude sur la question du bruit près de nos aéroports et de son incidence sur les collectivités.

Monsieur Kaiser, ma première question s'adresse à vous. D'autres témoins ont rapporté que les effets négatifs sur la santé du bruit dû au trafic aérien sont associés au désagrément causé par le bruit, et vous avez commencé à creuser un peu plus la question. Pourriez-vous prendre un instant pour nous donner un peu plus d'information? Êtes-vous d'accord avec cette affirmation?

M. David Kaiser:

Il ne fait aucun doute que le désagrément fait partie des effets. Le désagrément est l'effet le plus étudié du bruit dans l'environnement dans le monde. Cet aspect est étudié depuis de nombreuses années en Europe et maintenant en Amérique du Nord dans une certaine mesure. C'est le plus fréquent. Par exemple, les études que nous avons réalisées à Montréal montrent qu'environ 20 % des gens se disent très dérangés par au moins une source de bruit dans l'environnement.

Le désagrément est un effet répandu. C'est la réalité, et cette situation a des conséquences sur la qualité de vie et la santé. Du point de vue de la santé publique, je crois que l'important est de nous assurer de ne pas le voir seulement comme un désagrément. Le désagrément est réel, et c'est problématique, mais les troubles du sommeil sont un problème distinct du désagrément. Voici pourquoi.

Du point de vue de la santé, le problème avec les troubles du sommeil n'est pas vraiment associé au désagrément de se réveiller et de se rendre compte qu'un avion vient de passer au-dessus de votre maison; la façon dont réagit le corps au bruit la nuit est physiologique. Bon nombre d'études en laboratoire et d'études étalonnées sur les troubles du sommeil nous ont permis de comprendre qu'il n'est pas nécessaire de se réveiller pour que cette situation ait un effet sur la santé cardiovasculaire à long terme et l'obésité.

Le désagrément est un problème, mais les troubles du sommeil sont un tout autre problème. Cette conséquence est beaucoup plus associée à des effets à long terme sur la santé cardiovasculaire. Nous devons nous assurer de nous attaquer à ces deux problèmes ensemble. Du point de vue de la réglementation et de la santé publique, les stratégies pour réduire le désagrément ne sont pas nécessairement les mêmes que celles visant à atténuer les troubles du sommeil, parce que les troubles du sommeil sont vraiment un problème nocturne pour la majorité de la population. Je crois que c'est important d'avoir les deux.

(0910)

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

Nous avons également entendu de nombreux témoins proposer que des organismes de santé publique comme Santé Canada élaborent des normes relatives au bruit qui se fondent sur la santé humaine. Croyez-vous que ce serait une initiative efficace? Dans l'affirmative, quels facteurs devrions-nous inclure dans de telles normes? Quels sont les intervenants qui devraient y participer?

M. David Kaiser:

En ce qui a trait aux normes relatives au bruit, nous avons déjà un excellent point de départ, c'est-à-dire les lignes directrices de l'Organisation mondiale de la santé. Elles viennent d'être mises à jour et elles se fondent sur les meilleures données scientifiques disponibles. Nous savons ce que nous devrions viser; nous avons cette information. La recommandation pour le bruit dû au trafic aérien est de 45 décibels en fonction de ce que nous appelons l'indice Lden. Il s'agit d'un indice pondéré qui prévoit une pénalité pour le bruit émis le soir et la nuit.

La question des normes est importante, mais nous avons une très bonne idée de ce que nous devrions viser. Toutefois, les organismes de santé publique devraient-ils avoir un rôle dans tout cela? Cela ne fait aucun doute, mais la véritable question est la façon d'y arriver. Qui devrions-nous inviter à participer au processus parmi les intervenants locaux, régionaux, provinciaux et fédéraux? Ce sont les organismes chargés du zonage et de la planification, c'est-à-dire les municipalités et les ministères de la Planification du Développement, et les organismes chargés des transports, c'est-à-dire les divers moyens de transport, tous ordres confondus. Je crois aussi que la participation des citoyens est très importante.

Quels sont les intervenants qui devraient être autour de la table? Il ne fait aucun doute que Santé Canada devrait y être, mais ce serait davantage pour fournir de l'information. Nous savons déjà ce dont nous avons besoin et ce que nous devrions viser. Les personnes qui font en fait quelque chose se trouvent davantage dans les domaines de la planification et des transports, et les personnes qui sont touchées doivent également y participer. Je crois que ce sont les éléments de base.

Mme Kelly Block:

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

La présidente:

Il vous reste presque deux minutes.

Mme Kelly Block:

Très bien.

Monsieur Lachapelle, que proposeriez-vous aux administrations aéroportuaires pour établir un équilibre entre, d'une part, les préoccupations des citoyens et des collectivités concernant les vols de nuit et, d'autre part, les avantages économiques qui sont offerts par ces vols? [Français]

M. Pierre Lachapelle:

Je vais répondre en français, si vous me le permettez.

Jusqu'à maintenant, je crois que les autorités aéroportuaires ont failli à leurs responsabilités de faire preuve de bon voisinage, en tout cas en ce qui a trait à l'aéroport international Pierre-Elliot-Trudeau.

C'est une question très large que vous posez, et elle touche l'équilibre entre l'économie et la santé publique. Les Montréalais affectés par la pollution sonore, notamment par le bruit des avions, voient certainement leur productivité décliner. En effet, ne réussissant pas à dormir, ils entrent au travail fatigués ou appellent leur patron pour l'informer qu'ils n'iront pas travailler. Cela a donc une incidence sur le plan économique.

On ne peut pas retourner au Moyen Âge, époque où les gens mouraient à 30 ans. Nous sommes au XXIe siècle, et les autorités aéroportuaires au Canada se comportent comme si nous étions au Moyen Âge. Il revient au Parlement de ramener ces gens-là à la raison. Il y a un déséquilibre actuellement, non pas du côté économique, mais de celui de l'environnement et de la santé publique. Il faudra soigner ces personnes affectées par le bruit des avions et qui souffrent de problèmes psychiatriques. Vous allez donc être obligés d'augmenter les taxes pour ajouter des lits dans les hôpitaux. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Lachapelle.

Vous faites valoir de très bons arguments. Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons à M. Iacono. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les témoins d'être ici ce matin.

Monsieur Kaiser, la Direction de santé publique de Montréal a mené plusieurs études sur le bruit, et cela a notamment mené à la publication de l'« Avis de santé publique sur les risques sanitaires associés au bruit des mouvements aériens à l'aéroport international Pierre-Elliott-Trudeau ».

Pouvez-vous faire parvenir ce document à la greffière ainsi que tous ceux dont vous avez fait mention ce matin? Nous aimerions aussi recevoir deux autres documents très intéressants, soit « Avis de santé publique sur le bruit du transport et ses impacts potentiels sur la santé des Montréalais » et « Le bruit et la santé; État de la situation ».

(0915)

M. David Kaiser:

Oui. Tout à fait.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Vous avez certainement effectué beaucoup d'études. Y en a-t-il d'autres qui devraient être menées relativement à ce problème? Sur quels aspects faudrait-il se concentrer?

M. David Kaiser:

C'est une très bonne question.

Nous voulons bien sûr en savoir toujours davantage et mieux documenter le problème. Permettez-moi de revenir à ce que je disais tantôt: le bruit nuit à la santé, et nous avons déjà réuni de très bonnes preuves à ce sujet. À Montréal, nous avons une longueur d'avance par rapport à plusieurs autres grandes villes canadiennes pour ce qui est de la collecte de données propres à la ville. Cela étant dit, des travaux sont en cours en ce moment dans plusieurs villes, notamment à Toronto et à Vancouver, pour faire ce même travail de documentation. Il est important de recueillir des données localement si l'on veut prendre des mesures adaptées à la région. Il est bien sûr possible de se servir des données d'autres associations, mais il faudrait pouvoir s'appuyer sur des données spécifiques. À Toronto, par exemple, la proportion des gens qui se disent très dérangés par le bruit sera-t-elle de 2 %, de 3 % ? Cela reste à vérifier.

Ce qui est essentiel, comme je le disais à la fin de ma présentation, c'est d'avoir accès aux données pour pouvoir faire le suivi. Cela constitue un réel besoin. Il ne s'agit pas ici de faire de la recherche, mais plutôt ce qu'on appelle en santé publique de la surveillance. Il faut comprendre suffisamment ce qui se passe concernant non seulement les niveaux de bruit générés, mais aussi les mouvements aériens pour qu'il soit possible d'intervenir au chapitre de la santé. Par exemple, il est nécessaire de comprendre l'augmentation de certains types de trajectoires et les mouvements des compagnies aériennes à l'arrivée ou en partance, ainsi que l'incidence potentielle de tout cela avant de rechercher des moyens d'y travailler. Encore une fois, le besoin de données est primordial.

Par la suite, il s'agit de réunir les bonnes personnes autour de la table, lesquelles devraient s'entendre sur une politique de contrôle du bruit tant au niveau provincial que fédéral. Pour cela, il ne faut pas nécessairement plus de données, mais de l'action. Il faut intégrer les données dans le cadre de travaux menés à l'échelon politique.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Vous parlez beaucoup de données. Si vous disposez de documents qui portent sur le sujet, qu'il s'agisse d'états de la situation ou d'analyses, pourriez-vous nous les faire parvenir?

M. David Kaiser:

Oui, je vais vous faire parvenir tous les articles scientifiques dont nous disposons ainsi que les avis mentionnés plus tôt.

M. Angelo Iacono:

C'est parfait.

Qui sont les membres du Comité consultatif sur le climat sonore, êtes-vous au courant?

M. David Kaiser:

Ce comité a été mis sur pied quand la Direction de santé publique a commencé à travailler sur la problématique du bruit en lien avec l'aéroport. En ce moment, à Montréal, il n'y a pas de comité fonctionnel comprenant tous les acteurs du milieu.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Y a-t-il des médecins qui font partie de ce comité?

M. David Kaiser:

Il y en avait au départ, et la Direction de santé publique était aussi présente. Il faut savoir qu'Aéroports de Montréal a des obligations juridiques en cette matière et que la société a formé son propre comité. Il n'y a plus de comité intersectoriel comme celui établi au début, soit il y a presque 10 ans.

M. Angelo Iacono:

On peut dire, aujourd'hui, que ce comité est inefficace. N'est-ce pas?

M. David Kaiser:

Oui. En fait, il n'existe plus sous cette forme.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci.

Monsieur Lachapelle, vous avez parlé d'une pétition et du fait qu'elle a été écartée. De plus, la réponse du ministre de l'époque aurait été un peu évasive.

Pouvez-vous nous donner plus de détails? Quelle était la visée de cette pétition?

M. Pierre Lachapelle:

La pétition a été déposée en 2013. Je dois dire que notre réflexion, aux Pollués de Montréal-Trudeau, a évolué depuis cette date. La pétition comprenait un certain nombre de requêtes, mais les trois principales étaient les suivantes: une révision des trajectoires d'atterrissage à l'aéroport Pierre-Elliott-Trudeau, la présence de représentants du public au conseil d'administration de l'aéroport et la question du couvre-feu.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Monsieur Lachapelle, je vous demanderais de me donner des réponses plus courtes, sinon je n'aurai pas le temps d'avoir des réponses à toutes mes questions.

En quelle année la pétition a-t-elle été faite?

(0920)

M. Pierre Lachapelle:

Vous me demandez quel était le contenu de la pétition, n'est-ce pas?

M. Angelo Iacono:

Oui. Qu'est-ce que c'était, exactement?

M. Pierre Lachapelle:

J'ai formulé trois requêtes. Tout d'abord, il y avait la question du couvre-feu. Ensuite, comme je vous l'ai expliqué, il était question des plans de vol des avions. Enfin, le troisième élément avait trait à la composition du conseil d'administration de l'aéroport.

M. Angelo Iacono:

En quelle année la pétition a-t-elle été faite?

M. Pierre Lachapelle:

Elle a été déposée au début de l'année 2013 par trois députés: Mme Mourani, M. Garneau, qui remplaçait Stéphane Dion en son absence, et une députée néodémocrate dont j'oublie toujours le nom, qui représentait la région du lac Saint-Louis et de Dorval.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Quelle a été la conclusion de la pétition?

M. Pierre Lachapelle:

Nous avons reçu un accusé de réception de la Chambre des communes signé par Mme Raitt. Je pourrais vous envoyer le formulaire que nous avons reçu. C'était une fin de non-recevoir. Elle nous a répondu que nos demandes relevaient de l'aéroport de Montréal. C'est ce qu'on appelle en français, au Québec, la maison des fous: on vous envoie d'un kiosque à l'autre, d'une porte à l'autre, à la recherche de la solution.[Traduction]C'est un manège sans fin pour les citoyens. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci, monsieur Lachapelle. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est à M. Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NPD):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie chacun des invités d'être parmi nous ce matin. Vous arrivez presque à la fin de cette étude et vos témoignages dégagent de très larges consensus. J'ai plusieurs questions et je vous demanderais de me donner des réponses brèves pour que je puisse avoir le maximum d'informations. Je suis rendu à préparer des recommandations à déposer, davantage qu'à comprendre la question, puisqu'on en a déjà fait un bon tableau.

M. Natalizio nous suggérait fortement, dans son discours préliminaire, de recommander la création d'un poste d'ombudsman, par exemple. J'aimerais que vous me disiez rapidement si c'est une avenue qui vous apparaît intéressante. Sinon, est-ce que vous privilégierez davantage le fait que Transports Canada se réapproprie un certain nombre de pouvoirs qui étaient les siens avant la création de NAV CANADA, par exemple, et qui devraient être les siens?

J'aimerais entendre, dans cet ordre, les réponses de M. Kaiser, de M. Lachapelle et de M. Natalizio.

M. David Kaiser:

Je vais donner la même réponse: ce besoin est réel. Si Transports Canada fait office d'autorité, c'est très bien, mais il s'agit ensuite de réunir les bonnes personnes autour de la table et de viser une structure plus permanente et des politiques ayant pour objectif de contrôler le bruit.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Qu'en pensez-vous, monsieur Lachapelle?

M. Pierre Lachapelle:

La responsabilité devrait être attribuée à Transports Canada, avec une reddition de compte à la population.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose, monsieur Natalizio? [Traduction]

M. Antonio Natalizio:

Nous sommes dans une situation où Nav Canada et les administrations aéroportuaires n'ont de comptes à rendre à personne. Ce ne sont pas les organisations ayant un intérêt privé qui s'occuperont des problèmes de santé. Ces questions doivent être réglées par le gouvernement. Il n'y a pas d'autre façon de s'y prendre.

J'ai étudié les aéroports du monde entier. Les meilleurs — ceux qui imposent un couvre-feu la nuit, qui ont des heures d'exploitation restreintes d'une durée de huit heures au lieu de six, comme c'est le cas à l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto, par exemple...

M. Robert Aubin:

Désolé...

M. Antonio Natalizio:

... bref, les meilleurs aéroports misent sur la réglementation, et non la bonne volonté. C'est évident. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

J'aimerais vous entendre parler également de la notion des données. Le graphique que vous nous avez fait parvenir, monsieur Lachapelle, parle de lui-même.

Est-ce que les données que vous recueillez par vos stations sont reconnues au moment où vous avez des échanges avec le comité de consultation de l'aéroport Montréal-Trudeau ou encore avec NAV CANADA ou Transports Canada, ou est-ce qu'on vous répond que ces données ne sont pas probantes?

M. Pierre Lachapelle:

Nos mesures sont effectuées dans nos stations de mesure équipées d'appareils qui ne sont ni certifiés ni homologués à l'échelle internationale. Cependant, elles ont été validées par des appareils de ce type. Si nos stations ont un défaut, c'est qu'elles exagèrent de 2 décibels le bruit aérien, ce qui n'est pas considérable quand c'est rendu entre 70 et 80 décibels.

M. Robert Aubin:

Oui, je comprends très bien.

M. Pierre Lachapelle:

Les autorités les refusent, mais nous avons hâte de voir les données d'Aéroports de Montréal. Ce sont des données secrètes. On est dans une société démocratique et Aéroports de Montréal a des données secrètes.

M. Robert Aubin:

Je comprends bien le problème. Non seulement vous n'avez pas accès aux données et il faudra faire des recommandations en ce sens, mais les autorités ne reconnaissent pas les vôtres, qui sont basées sur le même genre d'appareils.

Monsieur Kaiser, vous avez dit que, sur le plan international, c'était de plus en plus clair. Or, le ministre des Transports du Canada, dans presque chacun de ses projets de loi, nous parle toujours d'harmonisation. On se rend bien compte, comme on l'a vu notamment dans le cas de la charte des passagers, que l'Union européenne est de loin en avance par rapport à nous.

Y a-t-il un pays modèle ou une loi modèle dont nous devrions nous inspirer pour déposer nos recommandations?

(0925)

M. David Kaiser:

C'est « La question qui tue! »

Je vous dirais plutôt que nous avons fait beaucoup de progrès au Québec ces trois à cinq dernières années. Il y a, par exemple, des travaux en cours visant l'adoption d'une politique provinciale sur le bruit, lesquels découlent en partie de ceux entrepris à Montréal, il y a 10 ans.

Il serait vraiment difficile de s'inspirer d'un cadre législatif très différent du nôtre, comme celui de l'Union européenne, et d'essayer d'en tirer des conclusions. Je pense qu'il faudrait plutôt s'appuyer sur d'autres paramètres. Nous pourrions étudier l'influence réciproque de l'environnement et de la santé ou celle du transport et de la santé, puis utiliser les résultats de ces études pour créer notre propre modèle. Les choses se passent bien différemment en Europe.

Le Québec a fait beaucoup de travail dans ce dossier, et nous pourrions nous en inspirer et bâtir là-dessus.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Me reste-t-il une minute, madame la présidente? [Traduction]

La présidente:

Oui, il vous reste une minute. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Concernant le problème de santé publique lié au bruit aux abords des aéroports, n'assistons-nous pas aussi à une modification du tissu urbain? Je veux dire que les gens les plus aisés financièrement n'hésitent pas à déménager dès qu'ils se rendent compte du problème causé par la proximité d'une voie aérienne.

Sommes-nous en train d'assister à la création de quartiers plus pauvres où les problèmes de santé vont augmenter, et cela à cause de cet exode attribuable au problème de bruit?

M. David Kaiser:

C'est une question très complexe. Je peux répondre que c'est le cas en général, mais pas pour cette problématique spécifique en ce moment.

Je vais être très honnête à ce sujet. En ce qui a trait au bruit environnemental et à celui lié au transport dans une ville comme Montréal, il est évident que les personnes les plus défavorisées sont celles qui sont le plus exposées du fait de leur installation près de facteurs générateurs de bruit.

Par contre, pour des raisons qui remontent à plusieurs années, ce n'est pas nécessairement le cas à l'aéroport. Il serait malhonnête de dire le contraire. Il est certain que le bruit réduit la valeur domiciliaire, mais à Montréal, le problème lié au bruit des avions est un cas un peu particulier par rapport aux inégalités en santé.

M. Robert Aubin:

Est-ce qu'il en va de même en Ontario? [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Aubin. Je suis désolée.

Monsieur Hardie, à vous la parole.

M. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Comme les témoins peuvent le constater, nous sommes pressés par le temps.

Si nous vous demandons de donner des réponses courtes, n'hésitez pas à nous faire parvenir des explications un peu plus détaillées si vous voulez faire valoir d'autres arguments.

Dois-je vous appeler Dr Kaiser ou M. Kaiser?

M. David Kaiser:

L'un ou l'autre me convient, mais je suis médecin.

M. Ken Hardie:

D'accord, c'est donc Dr Kaiser. J'aurais bien aimé qu'on indique les bons titres dans nos notes ici.

En ce qui concerne les vols de jour par rapport aux vols de nuit, nous reconnaissons que la privation de sommeil causée par des interruptions est très néfaste.

Durant le jour, il s'agit surtout d'un désagrément et, bien entendu, même si les gens veulent une réduction du nombre de vols de nuit, nous ne pouvons pas avancer le même argument pour les vols de jour en raison des retombées économiques de l'aéroport et de ce quoi à il doit servir.

Si vous étiez assis à notre place et que vous deviez formuler des recommandations, nous proposeriez-vous d'analyser les effets des vols de nuit par rapport à ceux des vols de jour?

M. David Kaiser:

D'un point de vue scientifique, oui, assurément, mais nous devons également penser à ce qui est réellement faisable.

Je crois que l'exposition générale au bruit, y compris au bruit diurne, relève peut-être davantage de la planification urbaine, du zonage, de l'insonorisation et de l'adoption de normes pour éviter d'y exposer plus de gens — par exemple, en interdisant la construction de bâtiments aux abords des aéroports, dans la mesure du possible.

Pour ce qui est du bruit nocturne, si on pouvait interdire, d'un coup de baguette magique, les vols après 23 heures ou avant 7 heures, ce problème disparaîtrait, même s'il y a des gens qui vivent à côté de l'aéroport.

Je séparerais certainement les deux.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je vous invite tous à examiner la question sous toutes ses coutures parce qu'on met l'accent sur le bruit des avions. Si ce bruit disparaissait, les gens seraient nombreux à remarquer qu'il y a beaucoup d'autres bruits.

M. David Kaiser:

En effet.

M. Ken Hardie:

Il y a les voitures, les camions, les motocyclettes; il y a la musique forte; il y a les voisins bruyants et beaucoup d'autres choses. Les quelques fois où j'ai dormi dans des hôtels près des aéroports, j'ai pu avoir une très bonne nuit de sommeil parce que ces bâtiments sont construits de façon à ne pas laisser entrer ce bruit. Nous devons donc examiner les normes de construction domiciliaire. De plus, il y a peut-être lieu de tenter une expérience axée sur ce qu'on pourrait appeler le contrôle acoustique actif, comme les casques d'écoute antibruit qui permettent de bloquer tout bruit extérieur. Ces dispositifs deviennent plus perfectionnés et plus efficaces, et on pourrait mener un projet pilote communautaire dans le cadre duquel des gens seraient invités à les essayer pour voir plus particulièrement si leur sommeil s'améliore.

Nous devons prendre en considération les aéroports, les trajectoires de vol et l'usage des pistes. S'ajoutent à cela les avions, les techniques de pilotage et la conception des appareils. Je crois comprendre qu'il y a un modèle d'Airbus qui pourrait nécessiter quelques améliorations, et Air Canada fait actuellement la même démarche pour sa flotte.

Nous avons des règlements concernant les heures d'exploitation, et cela doit faire partie de l'équation. Vous avez dit, docteur Kaiser, qu'il faut gérer beaucoup mieux la planification municipale, l'emplacement des aéroports et le développement le long des trajectoires de vol et, lorsque nous envisageons de construire de nouveaux aéroports, nous devons éviter que les municipalités se développent aux alentours. Nous devrions avoir appris quelque chose à l'heure qu'il est.

Enfin, en ce qui a trait à la construction de maisons, nous pouvons faire beaucoup plus sur le plan de l'insonorisation et, encore une fois, mettre en application une sorte de contrôle actif du bruit dans les bâtiments et pour un usage personnel.

Je le répète, il y a d'autres sources. Ce n'est pas un problème propre aux aéroports. Si les avions n'existaient plus, on commencerait à percevoir beaucoup d'autres bruits.

Je vais conclure rapidement en disant que le défi est de formuler une gamme complète de suggestions. Ce n'est pas seulement un problème attribuable aux aéroports. Il s'agit plutôt d'une question de qualité de vie et de collectivité qui nécessite une évaluation tous azimuts.

D'accord, c'est tout. Merci.

(0930)

La présidente:

Souhaitez-vous entendre une réponse à vos observations, ou voulez-vous qu'on enchaîne?

M. Ken Hardie:

Eh bien, le défi est lancé afin qu'on revienne nous présenter quelque chose. Nous avons une bonne idée de la teneur des plaintes.

Docteur Kaiser, nous allons vous redonner la parole à ce sujet.

Une voix: J'aimerais dire un mot.

M. Ken Hardie: Oui, bien sûr.

M. Antonio Natalizio:

Tout récemment, j'ai lu un article médical rédigé par un spécialiste du sommeil qui affirme que le manque de sommeil fait du tort à tous les principaux organes du corps et à toutes les fonctions cérébrales.

Selon un autre article que j'ai lu récemment, on peut duper l'esprit conscient en masquant le bruit, mais on ne peut pas tromper le subconscient. C'est lui qui agit sur tous les organes de notre corps.

Pour ma part, la nuit dernière était la seule fois où j'ai eu un bon sommeil depuis trois jours parce que le vent s'est mis à souffler du nord-ouest, ce qui signifie que notre piste est utilisée fréquemment tout au long de la journée. Il y a deux nuits, plus de 30 avions ont survolé ma maison. Je ne pouvais pas dormir. Avant-hier soir, c'était la même chose. Les poches sous mes yeux ne sont pas vraiment attribuables à mon âge. C'est simplement à cause du manque de sommeil.

M. Ken Hardie:

Vous avez 27 ans, n'est-ce pas?

Des députés: Ha, ha!

M. Ken Hardie: Sérieusement, monsieur, je comprends votre point de vue. Comme nous l'avons dit tout à l'heure, nous cherchons à établir un équilibre entre l'environnement — en l'occurrence, l'environnement humain — et l'économie. Nous ne pouvons pas fermer les aéroports, et il n'est pas facile de les déplacer ailleurs. Nous devons donc examiner toutes les options, y compris, évidemment, celles que vous avez présentées.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Hardie.

La parole est à M. Wrzesnewskyj.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais insister sur un point que vous avez soulevé, docteur Kaiser, lorsque vous avez parlé des heures idéales pour un couvre-feu. Vous avez dit de 23 heures à 7 heures. Je tenais à le souligner.

Monsieur Natalizio, vous vivez à Markland Wood depuis 44 ans. Il y a 44 ans, il n'y avait aucun vol de nuit. Outre vos notes d'allocution, vous nous avez remis un excellent mémoire, qui comporte plusieurs sections. J'aimerais m'attarder sur la section intitulée « Pearson in perspective ». Je crois que c'est très instructif.

Peu importe l'aéroport canadien dont il est question, les effets du bruit nocturne des avions sont réels pour ceux qui les subissent. Il est fascinant de voir que, parmi les 1 200 000 vols effectués au pays, l'aéroport Pearson en assure environ 460 000, soit 38 %, et pourtant, le niveau de plaintes concernant cet aéroport... Au total, 175 540 plaintes ont été déposées à l'échelle du pays, et l'aéroport Pearson en a généré 168 000, ce qui représente 96 % de toutes les plaintes faites au pays.

Je voulais simplement mettre les choses en perspective parce que j'aimerais que vous expliquiez comment l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto se comporte sur le plan de ses relations de voisinage et de ses responsabilités sociales. Ses représentants ont témoigné devant le Comité plus tôt cette semaine, et nous avons vu dans le passé comment ils brossent un tableau idyllique de la situation, surtout devant des élus. D'ailleurs, vous qualifiez d'« inutile » leur étude d'impact sur les vols de nuit et, dans une des sections de votre mémoire, vous parlez de votre expérience de dialogue avec eux.

Pourriez-vous nous dire peut-être brièvement comment ils interagissent avec les voisins?

(0935)

M. Antonio Natalizio:

C'est une question très importante. J'ai entendu les déclarations faites ici, il y a deux jours, par les représentants de l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto. En gros, ils ont essayé de donner l'impression qu'ils réalisaient des progrès. Il n'en demeure pas moins que le nombre de plaintes visant l'aéroport a augmenté de 50 % par an ces trois dernières années. Comment pouvez-vous me dire — à moi, un résidant — que l'aéroport fait des progrès dans la résolution de problèmes liés au bruit?

J'ai essayé d'obtenir la collaboration de l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto au cours des dernières années, mais le dialogue n'a pas porté ses fruits. Dans son plan d'action pour la gestion du bruit, et je suis sûr que le Comité en a entendu parler, l'administration aéroportuaire affirme ceci: Dans le cadre de notre plan d'action pour la gestion du bruit, qui est l'aboutissement de deux ans d'études et de consultations intensives, nous comptons faire de l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto un chef de file international en matière de gestion du bruit lié à l'aviation.

Voilà qui est très agréable à entendre, mais ce n'est tout simplement pas vrai. L'aéroport Pearson de Toronto se trouve en queue de peloton, et tous ceux qui ont lu le rapport du groupe Helios sur les pratiques exemplaires le savent. Le plan d'action parle de mener plus d'études et de consultations. Il y a très peu d'engagements concrets, et les rares mesures qui sont prévues pourraient faire hisser l'aéroport Pearson de la dernière à l'avant-dernière place, mais certainement pas au sommet.

Par exemple, les représentants de l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto ont parlé d'atténuer le bruit émis par les appareils A320, ce qui n'est pas grand-chose. Beaucoup de compagnies aériennes l'ont fait il y a des années puisqu'il s'agit d'une réparation vraiment peu coûteuse. En dépit de cela, il faudra attendre jusqu'en 2020, et nous ne sommes même pas sûrs si tous les appareils seront modernisés parce qu'Air Canada n'est pas la seule.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Merci, monsieur Natalizio.

Pourriez-vous nous fournir une copie complète de votre correspondance afin que nous puissions voir comment l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto a tendance à donner suite aux préoccupations de citoyens comme vous?

M. Antonio Natalizio:

J'en serai ravi.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Toujours dans votre mémoire...

La présidente:

Il vous reste 45 secondes.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

... vous qualifiez le budget de nuit d'« étrange création ». L'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto permet maintenant près de 20 000 déplacements nocturnes par année, ce qui représente 53 déplacements par nuit et 9 par minute.

Vous avez parlé de votre expérience personnelle. Comment cette situation touche-t-elle la collectivité en général?

M. Antonio Natalizio:

Il suffit de regarder le nombre de plaintes. Quand j'ai déménagé dans cette collectivité...

La présidente:

Veuillez répondre très brièvement, monsieur Natalizio.

(0940)

M. Antonio Natalizio:

... il y avait 250 plaintes relatives au bruit. Aujourd'hui, il y en a 168 000. Leur nombre a augmenté de 64 000 %.

En 1974, il y avait 12 plaintes par 1 000 vols. Aujourd'hui, il y a une plainte pour chaque trois vols.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est à M. Liepert.

M. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, PCC):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je vais essayer de poser deux questions, alors je vous demanderai de répondre aussi brièvement que possible.

Je représente une circonscription de Calgary qui se trouve à une demi-heure de route de l'aéroport. Il y a quelques années, l'administration aéroportuaire a ouvert une nouvelle piste, modifiant ainsi la trajectoire des vols. Du coup, j'ai commencé à recevoir une foule de plaintes concernant le bruit des avions.

J'ai décidé d'organiser une assemblée publique pour que les gens aient l'occasion de soulever ces préoccupations. Les dirigeants de l'administration aéroportuaire et de Nav Canada y étaient également présents. J'étais stupéfait devant le nombre de personnes qui vivaient sur la même rue qu'un plaignant et qui me disaient plutôt: « Pourquoi gaspiller le temps de tout le monde? Oui, bien sûr, il y a quelques avions de plus, mais le bruit fait tout simplement partie de la vie. » Je ne veux pas banaliser l'importance du bruit des avions parce que je fais pleinement confiance aux gens qui m'ont adressé leurs plaintes.

Comment notre comité peut-il faire la part des choses en tenant compte du point de vue des gens qui semblent être beaucoup plus touchés par le bruit que, peut-être, leurs voisins?

Je vais poser ma deuxième question tout de suite, puis chacun de vous pourra répondre en conséquence.

Nous avons entendu un certain nombre de témoins qui ont demandé l'interdiction des vols de nuit. À mon avis, notre comité doit également concilier le problème du bruit avec la nouvelle donne économique. Nous savons tous qu'un pourcentage élevé des achats se font aujourd'hui en ligne. Les gens veulent recevoir leur produit le lendemain, qu'il s'agisse d'entreprises ou de consommateurs. Voilà un autre facteur dont nous devons tenir compte au moment de formuler nos recommandations.

Je vous invite, tous les trois, à commenter brièvement ce que je viens de dire.

M. Antonio Natalizio:

Eh bien, il y a ceux qui veulent faire livrer du jour au lendemain tout ce qu'ils achètent en ligne et ceux d'entre nous qui veulent une bonne nuit de sommeil. Il y a ceux qui cherchent à tirer profit des vols de nuit et ceux qui en souffrent. Cela présente à la fois des avantages économiques et des coûts.

Et si l'avantage net était nul, voire négatif? Faut-il autoriser les vols de nuit s'ils entraînent un coût financier net pour la société? Plus important encore, faut-il permettre les vols de nuit s'ils présentent un avantage net pour la société, même si une partie de la population se trouve privée de sommeil, lequel est un droit humain fondamental?

Une nuit, il n'y a pas si longtemps, 37 avions ont survolé ma maison, comme je l'ai mentionné tout à l'heure. Chaque...

M. Ron Liepert:

Monsieur, j'aimerais que vous nous aidiez à faire une recommandation. Est-ce que votre recommandation, indépendamment de ce que j'ai dit, est que les vols de nuit doivent être interdits?

M. Antonio Natalizio:

La situation de l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto est peut-être un cas particulier. L'aéroport offre à Air Canada et à WestJet une entente à prix fixe au lieu de droits d'atterrissage et d'autres frais. Pour les compagnies aériennes, c'est comme un buffet à volonté à prix fixe, et disons qu'elles ne se sont pas privées...

M. Ron Liepert:

D'accord, c'est une autre suggestion que nous allons prendre en considération.

Monsieur Kaiser, je vous écoute.

M. David Kaiser:

Je vais répondre en deux parties. Il y a d'abord le point de vue de la santé publique. Notre objectif est de faire en sorte que le risque soit aussi près que possible de zéro. On a déjà dit qu'il existe de nombreuses autres sources de bruit. Or, nous devons tenir compte de toutes ces sources. L'objectif devrait être de réduire l'exposition lorsque cela est possible. Avec quelque chose comme des avions, il est possible de le faire. Nous pourrions ne plus avoir d'avions; il n'y aurait plus d'exposition. Ce n'est pas comme s'il s'agissait de choses qui font partie de l'environnement et avec lesquelles nous sommes obligés de vivre. Nous pourrions faire un choix et réduire cette exposition à zéro. Du point de vue de la santé publique, je pense que c'est ce qu'il faut faire.

La deuxième partie de ma réponse concerne le Comité. Oui, vous devez faire des recommandations. D'après votre intervention, je comprends que la question de la sensibilité au bruit, par exemple, est importante. Certaines personnes sont plus sensibles au bruit que d'autres. Cependant, d'un point de vue scientifique, les études qui se sont penchées sur la question ne révèlent pas nécessairement qu'il s'agit d'un facteur important lorsque l'on examine la relation entre les sources de bruit et les répercussions sur la santé des populations.

Bien sûr, il est important d'examiner la faisabilité d'une telle mesure et de trouver un équilibre entre les avantages et les risques. Je pense que c'est là que les données sur les mouvements des avions, les niveaux de bruit et les effets sur la population sont particulièrement importantes. Elles veillent à faire en sorte qu'on ne se fonde pas sur de l'anecdote.

(0945)

M. Ron Liepert:

Je suis d'accord avec ça.

M. David Kaiser:

La recommandation qui traite directement de cette question est que si nous voulons faire de bons choix, nous devons avoir l'information nécessaire pour faire ces choix.

M. Ron Liepert:

Si j'avais plus de temps, je vous interrogerais sur cette question des données.

Avons-nous le temps d'entendre un bref commentaire de notre interlocuteur de Montréal?

La présidente:

Soyez très bref.

M. Ron Liepert:

Monsieur Lachapelle, nous vous écoutons. [Français]

M. Pierre Lachapelle:

Ma réponse, c'est certainement le couvre-feu.

En ce qui concerne l'économie, je ne crois pas qu'elle va souffrir du fait qu'un flacon de parfum ou une pièce de vêtement achetés sur le site Amazon arrive 6 heures ou 12 heures plus tard que prévu. Actuellement, le déséquilibre est le suivant: la santé publique souffre d'une économie un peu envahissante. Nous sommes pour une économie prospère, mais il faut tenir compte de la santé publique. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Lachapelle.

Merci à tous nos témoins.

Monsieur Jeneroux, essayiez-vous de me faire signe?

M. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, PCC):

Oui, madame la présidente. Je serai très bref.

Nous avons entendu dire qu'il est possible que la réunion de jeudi prochain avec le ministre des Transports ne soit pas télévisée. Je voulais juste m'assurer que... C'est dans sa lettre de mandat. Ce n'est pas une question de temps et nous sommes flexibles. Nous pouvons changer la date de la réunion afin qu'elle puisse être télévisée. Je tenais à ce que vous, en votre qualité de présidente du Comité, sachiez cela.

La présidente:

La greffière a travaillé d'arrache-pied pour que nous puissions obtenir cette retransmission.

Vous dites que si nous ne pouvons pas l'obtenir, vous aimeriez retarder cette réunion jusqu'à ce qu'elle puisse passer à la télévision.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Ce n'est pas l'idéal, mais oui.

La présidente:

D'accord. La greffière va voir ce qu'elle peut faire pour nous.

Monsieur Liepert, je vous en prie.

M. Ron Liepert:

Je voulais aussi vous demander où nous en sommes dans cette étude particulière, avec les témoins et tout le reste.

Je pense qu'à un moment donné, nous avions demandé que les compagnies aériennes viennent témoigner. La greffière peut-elle faire le point sur les témoins à venir?

La présidente:

Oui. Allez-y.

La greffière du comité (Mme Marie-France Lafleur):

Cette comparution aura lieu le 11 décembre. Il y aura Air Canada, WestJet et l'Association du transport aérien du Canada, l'ATAC.

M. Ron Liepert:

Est-ce notre dernière réunion?

La greffière:

Ce serait notre dernière heure de réunion.

La présidente:

Nos travaux suscitent passablement d'intérêt, non seulement chez nos collègues, mais aussi dans le grand public. Si le Comité le souhaite, nous pourrions tenir deux autres réunions au début de la prochaine session.

M. Ron Liepert:

Je ne suis pas sûr que ce soit nécessaire. Les membres du Comité ont-ils proposé d'autres témoins? Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, je pense que nous avons entendu les témoignages de ceux que cela concerne. Si nous devions avoir d'autres réunions à ce sujet, j'aimerais entendre des gens qui ont des solutions à proposer.

La présidente:

Oui.

M. Ron Liepert:

Avons-nous des demandes pour d'autres témoins?

La présidente:

Pas pour le moment.

M. Ron Liepert:

Alors je propose que nous nous en tenions à notre plan.

La présidente:

Monsieur Wrzesnewskyj, je vous écoute.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Madame la présidente, il semble y avoir un problème avec la réponse que j'ai reçue pour la question que j'avais posée à Transports Canada au sujet de l'augmentation du budget de nuit. Elle ne correspond pas tout à fait aux réponses qui ont été données en comité. Au cours de la prochaine séance, nous pourrions peut-être réserver cinq minutes pour discuter de la façon dont nous pourrions traiter cette question particulière.

La présidente:

Je ne crois pas que le Comité soit au courant de l'écart que vous essayez d'élucider, c'est-à-dire celui qui existe entre le témoignage que nous avons entendu ici et les documents qui ont été reçus.

Laissez-moi m'en occuper, et nous verrons ce que nous pouvons faire pour que tout rentre dans l'ordre.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Merci.

La présidente:

Je dois suspendre cette partie de la séance pour que nous puissions passer à la discussion sur la motion M-177.

Je remercie nos témoins pour le temps qu'ils nous ont consacré et pour leurs recommandations.

(0945)

(0950)

La présidente:

La séance est ouverte. J'inviterais nos témoins à prendre place, et je prierais les gens qui veulent parler d'autres choses de quitter la pièce.

Conformément à l'article 108(2) du Règlement, nous commençons maintenant notre étude de la motion M-177.

Monsieur Fuhr, en tant qu'auteur de la motion, aimeriez-vous prendre la parole un instant, avant la présentation des témoins?

(0955)

M. Stephen Fuhr (Kelowna—Lake Country, Lib.):

Oui. Merci, madame la présidente.

Je ne prendrai pas beaucoup de temps, mais je tiens à remercier le Comité d'avoir réagi aussi rapidement. Je pense que cette motion a été adoptée il y a à peine 19 heures, alors c'est...

La présidente:

Nous sommes un comité très efficace.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

Il faudra que je vérifie s'il y en a déjà eu une qui a été renvoyée au Comité encore plus rapidement.

Je remercie mes collègues de leur appui à l'égard de cette motion. C'est une question très importante. Le transport aérien, l'aviation et la formation des pilotes sont très importants pour notre pays. Ce sont des activités qui nous touchent énormément. Un fonctionnement boiteux dans ces domaines pourrait avoir des répercussions très négatives — je pense que tous en conviendront — sur notre économie.

Je vais m'en remettre à vous, et j'espère avoir le temps de répondre à une ou deux questions. Je dois présider le Comité de la défense à 11 heures, alors je vous reviendrai ultérieurement.

La présidente:

Nous ferons ce que nous pourrons.

Comme témoins, nous accueillons Johanne Domingue, qui est la présidente du Comité antipollution des avions de Longueuil, et Cedric Paillard, qui est président-directeur général de l'organisme Ottawa Aviation Services.

Monsieur Paillard, voulez-vous commencer ? Vous n'avez que cinq minutes.

M. Cedric Paillard (président-directeur général, Ottawa Aviation Services):

Je vous remercie beaucoup. Merci de prendre le temps de nous écouter.

Pour des raisons de commodité, je vais lire mes notes. Ce sera la façon la plus efficace de procéder.

La présidente:

Je vous en prie.

M. Cedric Paillard:

Bonjour. Merci d'avoir invité Ottawa Aviation Services à participer à l'étude du Comité sur les écoles de pilotage au Canada.

Notre école de formation professionnelle en pilotage est spécialement conçue pour permettre à nos étudiants de réussir dans cette industrie. La qualité de nos programmes a été reconnue par des compagnies aériennes canadiennes comme Porter, Jazz, Air Georgian et Keewatin Air. La qualité de la formation que nous offrons a fait en sorte que ces sociétés ont noué d'étroites relations partenariales avec nous.

Grâce à notre programme, les diplômés qui satisfont aux normes et aux critères de notre cours arrivent à se placer dans la voie d'accès rapide au poste de copilote sur un avion de ligne, qu'il s'agisse d'aéronefs CRJ, de Q400 ou de Boeing 737, des engins de taille plus que respectable. Je suis extrêmement fier de nos diplômés et de notre personnel enseignant. Nous sommes fiers de dire qu'au cours des sept dernières années, tous nos diplômés ont trouvé un emploi de pilote dans cette industrie.

Ottawa Aviation Services, l'OAS, souscrit à la responsabilité sociale des entreprises canadiennes. Nous comprenons l'importance du secteur de l'aviation et ses liens étroits avec le tissu socio-économique du Canada, particulièrement dans les collectivités du Nord, où l'aviation est au cœur du développement économique.

Je vous encourage à prendre connaissance de notre mémoire écrit. On y explique comment le gouvernement fédéral et les écoles de pilotage comme l'OAS peuvent travailler ensemble pour remédier à la pénurie de pilotes et ainsi prêter main-forte à notre industrie de l'aviation et à l'économie canadienne dans son ensemble.

Personne dans cette pièce n'a besoin d'être convaincu de la pénurie mondiale imminente de pilotes. L'an dernier, à Montréal, lors du sommet de l'Organisation de l'aviation civile internationale sur les professionnels de l'aviation de la prochaine génération, le secrétaire général a souligné qu'en 2036, à l'échelle mondiale, il faudra 600 000 pilotes pour répondre à la demande mondiale. À l'intérieur de nos frontières, la pénurie de pilotes est déjà préoccupante. Elle crée des problèmes dans certaines régions, avec les annulations de vols, et dans certains secteurs, avec l'annulation de certains vols d'évacuation sanitaire, de fret et de vols nolisés.

Pour beaucoup d'industries, d'économies et de gens, le transport aérien est une nécessité, une chose essentielle. Bien que l'année 2036 puisse sembler lointaine ou comme appartenant à un futur proche, le fait est que la formation de ces pilotes peut prendre de deux à quatre ans et qu'ensuite, il leur faudra de trois à cinq ans pour devenir capitaine. Les écoles de pilotage sont particulièrement bien placées pour nous aider à relever ce défi. C'est quelque chose que nous constatons tous les jours. Il faut cependant qu'elles disposent des outils et des ressources nécessaires pour y arriver.

La première chose sur laquelle nous devons mettre l'accent, c'est le soutien accordé à nos étudiants. Les études supérieures peuvent coûter cher, et les étudiants veulent savoir que leur investissement sera récompensé par une carrière gratifiante. Compte tenu de la pénurie imminente de main-d'œuvre dans le secteur de l'aviation, nous croyons que le gouvernement fédéral a un rôle de leadership à jouer afin d'encourager un plus grand nombre d'étudiants à choisir une formation de pilote. Il s'agit notamment de prendre des mesures pour permettre aux étudiants d'avoir accès à un soutien financier accru par divers moyens. C'est ce à quoi l'Association du transport aérien du Canada — dont nous sommes membres — travaille actuellement. Je crois d'ailleurs que vous allez entendre parler d'eux quelque temps la semaine prochaine.

À titre d'exemple, sachez qu'actuellement, le temps passé dans un avion, ce que nous appelons le « temps de vol », est une exigence pour tous les programmes de formation en pilotage, mais que ce temps de vol ne peut être comptabilisé au titre de temps d'enseignement reçu, et qu'à cause de cela, les étudiants ne sont pas en mesure d'obtenir un soutien financier aussi important qu'ils le pourraient. Nous savons qu'il s'agit d'un enjeu d'ordre provincial, mais si le gouvernement modifie les modalités du Programme canadien de prêts aux étudiants, il fera preuve de leadership et il encouragera les provinces à faire de même.

Les instructeurs de vol expérimentés sont la prochaine donnée de l'équation. Dans l'ensemble du pays, des écoles comme la nôtre signalent des arriérés dans l'admission d'étudiants souhaitant commencer leur formation. Aujourd'hui, à l'OAS, il y a près de 55 personnes qui attendent de pouvoir suivre une formation, mais la pénurie d'instructeurs nous empêche de répondre à cette demande. La réalité, c'est qu'il n'est pas rare de voir les transporteurs aériens « récupérer » les instructeurs de vol expérimentés après seulement quelques mois de formation. Le problème du maintien en poste des instructeurs doit être réglé. La situation n'a jamais été aussi grave qu'aujourd'hui. Certains de mes collègues du secteur de la formation font état d'un taux de roulement qui dépasse largement les 100 %.

(1000)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Paillard. Je dois passer à nos autres témoins.

M. Cedric Paillard: D'accord.

La présidente: Avec un peu de chance, vous aurez peut-être l'occasion de nous faire part du reste de vos observations.

Madame Domingue, vous avez cinq minutes. [Français]

Mme Johanne Domingue (présidente, Comité antipollution des avions de Longueuil):

Bonjour. J'aimerais m'assurer que vous m'entendez bien. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Oui. Merci beaucoup. Soyez la bienvenue au Comité. [Français]

Mme Johanne Domingue:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Bonjour, membres du Comité.

Lors de ma dernière comparution, vous m'avez dit que la formation au pilotage, ce n'était pas terminé compte tenu du manque criant de pilotes pour l'avenir. Je vous prie de croire que nous comprenons très bien la situation.

Ce que nous dénonçons, entre autres, n'est pas la formation au pilotage, mais plutôt le choix des endroits où on la donne. Nous critiquons la compatibilité des écoles de pilotage et les endroits où on les établit, qui sont généralement des lieux densément peuplés.

L'augmentation du nombre de mouvements d'avions dans les endroits où se trouvent ces écoles engendre un bruit abusif, selon nous. Ce n'est donc pas que nous ne voulons pas avoir d'écoles de pilotage dans notre cour. Nous disons que nous ne voulons pas toutes les avoir dans notre cour.

Actuellement, nous formons des pilotes pour les marchés de l'Asie, de l'Afrique, de l'Europe et du Canada, tout cela au même endroit. À l'aéroport de Saint-Hubert, en 2006-2007, nous occupions peut-être le quatrième ou le cinquième rang en importance pour ce qui est de la formation au Canada. En 2008, quand nous avons été en mesure d'offrir une formation internationale, nous avons grimpé au premier rang, pour y rester pendant plusieurs années. Nous sommes en concurrence avec l'aéroport Toronto-Buttonville depuis ce temps.

La particularité de la situation, c'est que lorsque le nombre de vols atteint 199 000 à l'aéroport de Saint-Hubert, et 212 000 à l'aéroport de Dorval, nous sommes en pleine saison estivale. Normalement, la formation des pilotes se fait intensément entre avril et septembre. En janvier, il peut y avoir 2 000 ou 3 000 vols locaux, alors qu'il peut y en avoir de 10 000 à 15 000 par mois pendant l'été.

C'est donc dire qu'au-dessus de nos résidences, toutes les 60 secondes, jour et nuit, il y a des posés-décollés. Il faut comprendre qu'un posé-décollé, c'est lorsqu'un avion atterrit et décolle sans s'arrêter. En faisant des posés-décollés, les avions ne font que toucher terre un peu et ils décollent, le moteur demeurant alors à sa puissance maximum. Cela fait un bruit infernal et continuel.

Il fait beau, au Québec, l'été. On nous dit que, quand il fait beau pour nous, il fait beau pour les autres aussi et qu'il faut se partager le beau temps. Les écoles de formation fonctionnent de 8 h à 23 h. Que reste-t-il à partager pour les citoyens en fait de beau temps? Je vous fais grâce des détails, parce que, en plus des écoles de formation, il y a aussi les cargos, les hélicoptères et les gros porteurs qui utilisent l'aéroport de Saint-Hubert.

Durant l'été, c'est à peine pensable d'aller dehors, d'y vivre ou d'y manger. Il y a des journées où il y a 800 mouvements d'avions, lesquels se produisent toutes les trois minutes. Le niveau sonore s'établit alors à 70 décibels. Ce n'est pas rien. Tout cela a été mesuré et inclus dans un rapport produit en 2009. Cette situation a donc une incidence majeure sur le plan de la santé.

Le gouvernement a une responsabilité à assumer en matière de santé. Il me semble qu'on devrait avoir droit à un environnement sain au Canada. On protège nos milieux humides, on protège les animaux, mais peut-on faire un effort pour protéger les citoyens du bruit? Le bruit est un facteur agressant. Les citoyens sont en détresse, car ils n'ont aucun contrôle sur ce bruit qui est engendré par les avions au-dessus de leurs têtes. Cela crée de l'anxiété et entraîne des problèmes de sommeil.

La dernière fois que je me suis présentée devant vous, je vous ai remis un rapport de la santé publique qui donnait la liste de toutes les répercussions. L'Organisation mondiale de la santé a pris position, je crois. Je vous fais grâce de tous les détails, parce que, de plus, ces petits avions utilisent de l'essence au plomb. Depuis 10 ans, nous vivons donc un conflit avec l'aéroport de Saint-Hubert.

Depuis l'augmentation du nombre de vols, en 2008, 500 plaintes ont été déposées à Transports Canada, et une pétition comportant 2 000 signatures a été présentée à la Chambre des communes, précisant le problème et ses effets. Puis, il y a eu une consultation publique. Finalement, nous avons lancé un recours collectif, en 2011, et une entente à l'amiable a été conclue, en 2015. Imaginez-vous que la Ville a alors décidé d'injecter 300 000 $ pour l'installation de silencieux sur les avions des écoles. Ce sont les citoyens qui ont payé cela. Nous nous sommes payé des silencieux pour essayer d'avoir un peu de quiétude.

L'entente comportait un deuxième élément, à savoir l'établissement d'un comité sur le climat sonore. Nous avons eu une réunion, en 2018. Il y en a eu quelques-unes, en 2016 et en 2017, mais une seule en 2018. Il n'y a pas de plan d'action défini quant aux priorités, au problème et aux façons dont on doit le gérer, ainsi qu'en ce qui concerne les moyens à mettre en place. Pourrait-on faire des études?

En 2018, après tout cela, nous avons dû déposer une requête pour outrage au tribunal, parce que les horaires et les ententes n'étaient pas respectés. La Ville veut développer le service. Les écoles veulent utiliser au maximum leurs capacités pour former les élèves.

(1005)



L'aéroport, lui, veut vraiment être rentable, mais nous, nous voulons seulement pouvoir jouir d'un environnement paisible. Nous savons très bien que nous allons vivre ensemble, mais comment? Je pense que cela prend de la transparence. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Excusez-moi, madame Domingue. Je suis désolée de vous interrompre, mais les cinq minutes sont écoulées. Vous serez peut-être en mesure de nous faire part de vos observations lorsque vous répondrez à nos questions. [Français]

Mme Johanne Domingue:

D'accord. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Eglinski, allez-y. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, PCC):

Merci.

Je remercie les témoins d'être ici ce matin. Je vais commencer par Cedric.

Cedric, j'aimerais que nous parlions du sujet du témoignage que nous venons d'entendre, c'est-à-dire du bruit des écoles de formation et d'autres choses du genre.

Bien que je ne l'aie pas fait souvent dans l'est du Canada, sachez que je pilote des avions depuis 1968 — ce qui vous donne une idée de mon âge —, surtout dans l'Ouest canadien. Or, pour les grandes écoles de pilotage et dans les grandes aires de vol, comme à Vancouver et à Edmonton, il y a des zones réservées où les écoles peuvent donner de la formation et enseigner les diverses manoeuvres. Je crois que ce sont des choses qui n'ont pas de secret pour vous.

La plupart de ces zones sont réservées à cela et elles sont en général situées loin des centres urbains. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer ce qu'il en est?

M. Cedric Paillard:

C'est exact, oui.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Pourriez-vous nous expliquer un peu pourquoi c'est le cas, et ce qu'il vous en coûte de vous rendre à ces zones et d'en revenir?

M. Cedric Paillard:

Bien sûr. De toute évidence, les avions doivent décoller d'un aéroport, et ils doivent revenir à l'aéroport. La plupart des exercices que nous effectuons pendant l'entraînement en vol sont en fait effectués dans des zones particulières bien définies. Ces zones sont indiquées sur nos cartes spécialisées, et c'est là que nous effectuons ces manœuvres pour former nos pilotes.

Il y en a une ici à Ottawa, entre le lac Constance et la baie Constance, de l'autre côté de la rivière. Ce sont ces zones que nous utilisons. Je pense qu'il y a effectivement des coûts et qu'il faut du temps pour passer des aéroports à ces zones. Parfois, ces zones ne sont pas à proximité des aéroports, alors nous devons nous y rendre en volant.

Je pense que ce que nous entendons ici, c'est que la formation en pilotage cause des problèmes à l'aéroport. Or, il existe des solutions pour régler ces problèmes, mais vous verrez dans mon mémoire que nous avons besoin de l'aide du gouvernement fédéral, pas nécessairement sur le plan financier, mais bien en ce qui a trait à notre capacité d'intégrer les nouvelles technologies à nos façons de prodiguer la formation. Par exemple, nous disposons aujourd'hui d'outils que nous ne pouvons pas utiliser parce que nous n'avons pas l'autorisation de Transports Canada pour ce faire.

L'intelligence artificielle, la réalité virtuelle, la réalité augmentée, les avions électriques... Il y a toute une liste de technologies que nous pourrions utiliser, non pas pour éliminer les problèmes de bruit dont il est question ici, mais au moins pour nous attaquer à ce problème et en arriver, comme vous l'avez dit, à une situation plus facile à gérer.

Il va falloir décoller de l'aéroport et atterrir à l'aéroport. On ne peut pas former un pilote sans lui montrer à atterrir et à décoller. Sauf qu'il existe des façons de faire qui réduisent le bruit. Nous avons simplement besoin d'un peu plus d'aide de la part de Transports Canada et du gouvernement pour nous permettre d'adapter ces technologies à notre secteur d'activité, lequel est sensible aux flux de trésorerie et très dépendant des profits. Par conséquent...

(1010)

M. Jim Eglinski:

Je vous remercie.

Je sais que j'ai ici quelques collègues qui pilotent des avions. Parmi nous, il y en a au moins quatre ou cinq. J'ai remarqué que, dans votre mémoire, vous parlez d'aide gouvernementale. Je vais retourner à 1968. Lorsque j'ai obtenu mon brevet de pilote privé, cela coûtait 500 $. Je pouvais récupérer 100 $ si je poursuivais ma formation pour atteindre un niveau avancé, celui de pilote commercial, et je pouvais ensuite déduire toute la formation de pilote commercial si je faisais carrière dans ce domaine.

Or, la raison pour laquelle ils ont fait cela dans les années 1960, c'est qu'il y avait pénurie de pilotes. Ceux qui étaient issus de la Seconde Guerre mondiale vieillissaient, comme c'est le cas du personnel actuel du secteur de l'aviation. Pourriez-vous nous dire si une mesure semblable pourrait vous être utile. Je crois que oui, et je crois qu'il faut donner de l'aide financière aux écoles pour leur permettre de moderniser leurs équipements ainsi qu'aux étudiants qui s'inscrivent à ces programmes.

M. Cedric Paillard:

Vous prêchez à un converti.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Oui, mais vous pourriez apporter de l'eau au moulin [Inaudible].

M. Cedric Paillard:

Je crois que c'est un problème pour nous. Nous devons nous assurer que ces étudiants... Pour comparer vos chiffres d'antan avec les nôtres, disons qu'avec le programme que nous offrons actuellement, il en coûtera de 85 000 à 90 000 $ à un étudiant pour partir de rien et terminer copilote sur un avion de ligne de Jazz ou sur un 737 de Sunwing. Je ne suis pas le moins cher, et je ne suis pas le plus cher non plus.

Or, pour les étudiants, 85 000 $ en 18 mois, c'est beaucoup d'argent. Donc, oui, une aide financière à l'intention des étudiants nous aiderait grandement à résoudre ce problème.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Passons maintenant à M. Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey (Niagara-Centre, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'ai été heureux d'entendre Mme Domingue parler de la mise en place de stratégies. C'est ce que j'aimerais approfondir.

Avec les témoins précédents, nous avons abondamment parlé de toute la place qu'occupe la protection de l'environnement lorsqu'il est question de mode de vie et de santé, et nous avons souligné à quel point il est maintenant rendu important d'essayer de trouver un équilibre entre cela et l'économie.

Les questions que j'aimerais poser à nos deux témoins portent précisément là-dessus: comment établissons-nous ce lien? Comment faut-il évaluer les risques pour la santé humaine? J'ai parlé plus tôt à M. Kaiser, qui est responsable médical à la Direction de la santé publique de Montréal, et je lui ai demandé s'ils avaient quelque chose qui allait dans ce sens. Il m'a dit que c'était le cas à Montréal, mais pas à l'échelle nationale.

Comment relie-t-on l'évaluation des risques pour la santé humaine à la chose économique? Bien sûr, l'impact est le même. Comment y arrive-t-on? Est-ce que vous le faites déjà? Enfin, si ce n'est pas le cas, comment pouvons-nous faciliter ce processus ? La question s'adresse à vous deux.

M. Cedric Paillard:

Madame Domingue, je vous en prie. [Français]

Mme Johanne Domingue:

D'abord, une des premières étapes serait que le Comité consultatif sur le climat sonore soit réellement en mesure d'établir les priorités et les besoins de chaque endroit. Ensuite, il faudrait installer des stations de mesure du bruit pour savoir ce qui se passe dans notre collectivité et être capable de bien identifier les problèmes et d'agir. Il faudrait aussi informer les riverains de ce que fait cet aéroport à ce sujet. Si un corridor aérien pose problème, NAV CANADA devrait pouvoir étudier la situation et déterminer les ajustements requis et la façon de s'y prendre. Tout cela pourrait se faire si le Comité était opérationnel et efficace.

Il y a une école de formation qui faisait 70 décollages et atterrissages de nuit, mais qui a modifié ses programmes pour n'en faire que 17. Ces pratiques sont-elles connues? Est-ce qu'on en fait part? Je pense que la formation devrait être revue dans le domaine des transports. Nous comprenons l'aspect de la sécurité, mais si une école peut se limiter à 17 atterissages ou décollages, pourquoi les autres écoles ne pourraient-elles pas en faire autant? Il faut une volonté de s'attaquer au problème. Ainsi, il devrait y avoir des silencieux sur les avions. Certains modèles sont homologués et nous devrions pouvoir en installer. Les hélices sont bruyantes parce que ce sont de vieux avions qui datent des années 1980 ou 1990.

Donnons-nous les moyens de régler la situation. La formation des pilotes au Canada est très bien cotée: pourquoi n'aurions-nous pas un centre d'excellence? Je vais vous donner un autre exemple. La Ville de Miramichi n'impose aucune restriction relativement au bruit. Nous devrions donc y installer les centres de formation. Cessons de mettre ces centres dans des milieux densément peuplés et développons plutôt le milieu rural. Le problème est là. C'est ce que nous vivons présentement. Nous donnons de la formation partout au monde. Donnons-nous donc les moyens et devenons une référence internationale.

(1015)

[Traduction]

M. Cedric Paillard:

Je ne suis pas économiste, et je n'essaie pas de l'être. Il est difficile d'évaluer les répercussions économiques en général, mais du point de vue de la formation, de la sécurité et des compétences, et compte tenu de ce que les compagnies aériennes nous demandent, de ce que Transports Canada nous permet de faire et des technologies qui sont à notre disposition, je pense qu'il existe des options, des solutions, qui pourraient être mises en oeuvre si nous travaillions en équipe pour résoudre ces problèmes de bruit.

Je vais vous donner un exemple. Pour être pilote de transport aérien aujourd'hui, il faut 100 heures de vol de nuit. C'est un nombre considérable d'heures à accumuler. À l'OAS, ce que nous faisons, c'est que nous envoyons nos étudiants partout au pays, la nuit, parce que Transports Canada exige qu'ils aient 100 heures de formation en vol de nuit. Je pourrais offrir beaucoup plus de formation et donner une formation beaucoup plus efficace — et les étudiants pourraient apprendre beaucoup plus — si je les mettais dans un simulateur pendant 20 heures avec un environnement de formation basé sur certains scénarios, et si je pouvais réduire mon nombre d'heures de vol de nuit de moitié ou des trois quarts — ou selon la proportion qu'indiquerait l'évaluation du risque.

Le problème, c'est qu'aujourd'hui, un simulateur coûte un demi-million de dollars. Notre école est assez grande, donc nous avons peut-être une plus grande marge de manoeuvre, mais une école de 20 ou 30 étudiants ne sera pas en mesure d'offrir un simulateur d'un demi-million de dollars avec les moyens qui lui sont offerts.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Paillard.

Passons maintenant à M. Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie, madame la présidente.

Je vais céder mon temps de parole à mon collègue, dont la circonscription est directement touchée par une école de pilotage.

M. Pierre Nantel (Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, NPD):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Aubin.

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les témoins.

Madame Domingue, je trouve votre présence ici extrêmement précieuse. Je pense que vous êtes l'exemple qui illustre le plus parfaitement l'angle de la cohabitation des aéroports, et des écoles de pilotage en particulier, avec un quartier densément habité. Je tiens à souligner qu'au-delà des six petites minutes que j'ai pour vous parler, j'espère que tout le monde autour de la table veillera à écouter votre point de vue. Le NPD avait proposé un amendement qui stipulait qu'il fallait ajouter dans un projet de loi une étude sur les conséquences de la pollution sonore sur la santé publique et démontrer plus de transparence dans la distribution des données recueillies sur la question, comme vous en parliez tout à l'heure. Malheureusement, cet amendement a été rejeté.

À cet effet, je tiens à dire aux gens autour de la table que Mme Domingue est une marathonienne quand vient le temps de représenter les droits des communautés riveraines.

Honnêtement, c'est le cas le plus patent au Canada de mauvaise gestion quant à l'implantation d'écoles de pilotage dans un territoire densément peuplé. De toute évidence, madame Domingue, vous vous êtes heurtée à une piètre gestion de la situation. Je vous laisse bientôt la parole, mais avant, j'aimerais rappeler quelque chose d'important. Trop de gens disent que les gens de Saint-Hubert savaient très bien qu'ils déménageaient près d'un aéroport. Je leur rappelle toujours que l'aéroport de Saint-Hubert, situé dans une toute petite banlieue de Montréal, arrive pourtant au sixième rang des aéroports les plus achalandés du Canada, après l'Aéroport international Pearson de Toronto, l'aéroport de Dorval, probablement l'Aéroport international d'Edmonton, l'Aéroport international de Vancouver et un autre que j'oublie. Ce ne sont pas des blagues.

Votre témoignage illustre parfaitement que, si on ne prend pas cela en compte à l'avance quand on planifie l'arrivée d'une école de pilotage, on se retrouve avec des citoyens sans ressource. Vous vous êtes battue, vous avez tout fait pour obtenir des correctifs. Aujourd'hui, la situation est-elle meilleure ou est-ce que, à l'évidence, elle ne l'est pas?

Mme Johanne Domingue:

Nous avons eu une consultation publique et nous avions 45 recommandations. Tout ce que nous demandions, c'était de nous asseoir ensemble et de regarder ce qui pouvait être fait.

On vient de terminer l'installation de silencieux. L'été prochain, nous allons probablement constater une différence. Il restera à les évaluer. On installe des silencieux, mais qu'est-ce que cela va donner, concrètement? La solution ne passe probablement pas seulement par les silencieux. C'est une étape dans une démarche pour arriver à atteindre un certain climat.

En fait, l'aéroport n'a pas pris cela au sérieux et n'a pas pris le temps de s'asseoir avec les citoyens, avec NAV CANADA ou avec Transports Canada. Ce dernier est régulièrement absent lors des rencontres du Comité consultatif sur le climat sonore. Il n'y est jamais représenté, je crois. S'il en avait été autrement, je pense que nous aurions pu nous donner des moyens et parvenir à des plans d'action efficaces.

En tant que citoyens, nous avons réussi à régler une petite partie du problème, c'est-à-dire le cas de deux écoles. Cependant, il y a d'autres écoles et d'autres intervenants qui viennent faire des posés-décollés. Le problème a-t-il été réglé à Saint-Hubert, malgré le recours collectif? Non, le problème n'est pas réglé.

(1020)

M. Pierre Nantel:

Je pense que tout le monde ici vous a posé des questions, madame Domingue. Je vous invite d'ailleurs à nous transmettre les documents auxquels vous faites allusion, dont ceux relatifs à la consultation. Le gouvernement doit reconnaître qu'une situation comme celle de Saint-Hubert perdure depuis l'apparition des écoles de pilotage. On n'en fera pas l'historique, mais, manifestement, votre vie a changé en 2008.

Mme Johanne Domingue:

Absolument.

En 2008 et 2009, il y a eu entre 10 000 et 15 000 mouvements locaux par mois. Cela équivaut à un mouvement chaque minute. Notre vie a changé. Comme nous le disions, nous sommes agressés. Il est devenu impensable d'aller dehors.

M. Pierre Nantel:

C'est très clair.

Mme Johanne Domingue:

Nous avons même déjà entendu quelqu'un se demander si on était en situation de guerre, tellement il y avait de vols.

En bref, on a des moyens, mais on n'a pas de volonté. En venant ici aujourd'hui, je me suis demandé si on avait la volonté d'aider les citoyens, de la même façon qu'on aide les différentes zones touchées. Quand on vote pour des élus, on pense qu'ils vont prendre soin des êtres humains aussi. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Il vous reste 30 secondes. [Français]

M. Pierre Nantel:

Madame Domingue, comme je vous le disais, le gouvernement a rejeté cet amendement que nous proposions. Je pense que cela doit quand même être au centre de la loi. Il est bien écrit dans le texte qu'il faut « établir si l'infrastructure à la disposition des écoles de pilotage répond aux besoins de ces dernières et à ceux des collectivités où elles sont situées ».

Est-ce que vous avez le sentiment que Transports Canada a les interfaces requises pour répondre à des situations problématiques comme celles des gens de Saint-Hubert?

Mme Johanne Domingue:

Je dois vous dire que Transports Canada n'est pas l'organisme qui a répondu le plus rapidement et le plus favorablement à nos demandes. Je pense même que ce ministère cause souvent des problèmes. Par exemple, dans le cas d'une entente avec la collectivité et en présence d'un jugement de la Cour supérieure, Transports Canada s'en mêle et tente de faire casser la décision en disant qu'il ne fera pas parvenir d'avis aux navigateurs aériens, ce qui constitue une attitude beaucoup plus conflictuelle.

Quand nous écrivons au ministre Garneau, il nous dit de régler le problème localement, et quand nous le faisons, le ministre décide de ne pas émettre les avis que nous demandons, sans vraiment répondre à nos demandes d'explications.

M. Pierre Nantel:

J'espère qu'ils trouveront une solution pour les gens de Saint-Hubert. Votre situation est un cas patent de ce qu'il ne faut pas faire.

Je vous remercie, madame. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Je regrette de vous interrompre, mais votre temps de parole est terminé.

Monsieur Fuhr, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je voulais aborder la question du bruit, car je comprends qu'on y soit sensible. Je comprends aussi qu'on puisse y être hypersensible, et certaines mesures peuvent être prises. La technologie pour les moteurs des nouveaux avions est beaucoup moins bruyante. Il existe des hélices qui peuvent être adaptées aux vieux avions dont nous nous servons habituellement pour la formation et qui peuvent réduire un peu le bruit. Il y a une approche des aéroports à laquelle on peut recourir grâce à la technologie GPS pour éviter de passer au-dessus de zones sensibles au bruit. Il y a des circuits de circulation. Beaucoup de mesures peuvent être prises.

J'ai regardé avec mon collègue la situation à l'aéroport de Saint-Hubert sur l'application ForeFlight. Dans un rayon de 15 milles nautiques, il y a plus de six autres aéroports où, au décollage et à l'atterrissage, on peut déployer les avions pour amortir le bruit et étendre l'empreinte. En fait, il y a fort à parier que nous n'allons probablement pas construire une nouvelle infrastructure pour régler le problème, mais certaines mesures peuvent être prises. Je voulais le mentionner.

À propos de la formation des pilotes, monsieur Paillard, combien d'instructeurs de vol de classes 4, 3, 2 et 1 avez-vous actuellement?

M. Cedric Paillard:

Nous sommes un peu chanceux à OAS. Nous avons trois instructeurs de classe 1, deux de classe 2 et douze de classe 4.

(1025)

M. Stephen Fuhr:

Pouvez-vous expliquer rapidement l'importance de ces instructeurs de vol de classes 1 et 2 pour vos activités et la formation de pilotes?

M. Cedric Paillard:

Bien sûr.

Les termes sont tous techniques. Les instructeurs de classe 1 sont au sommet de la chaîne alimentaire. Ils peuvent donner la formation suivie pour devenir instructeurs. Les instructeurs de classe 2 sont essentiellement comme les instructeurs de classe 1, mais ils ne peuvent pas former les instructeurs. Ils ont beaucoup d'expérience et ils supervisent les instructeurs subalternes. La classe 4 regroupe les instructeurs au bas de l'échelle. Ils sortent habituellement tout juste de l'école de pilotage et nous les formons. La classe 3 représente le stade intermédiaire, entre les classes 4 et 2, où la supervision est moindre.

Lorsque nous formons des pilotes, nos instructeurs se voient tous assigner un nombre donné d'élèves. Nous en avons environ six par instructeur, ce qui nous permet d'avoir les ressources nécessaires pour surveiller la façon dont la formation est donnée et en assurer la qualité. Ces instructeurs proviennent habituellement des classes 4 et 3. Les instructeurs de classe 2 supervisent les instructeurs des classes 3 et 4. Essentiellement, la classe 1 montre régulièrement à ces instructeurs comment améliorer leur performance et former convenablement les gens. La qualité et la sécurité sont au coeur de tout ce que nous faisons.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

D'après ce que vous avez dit, et d'après ma connaissance des activités, vous avez absolument besoin d'instructeurs de classe 1 et de classe 2.

M. Cedric Paillard:

Oui.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

Quel est le taux de roulement de vos instructeurs de classe 1 et de classe 2?

M. Cedric Paillard:

OAS est une organisation un peu spéciale, car nous répondons à la demande pour des instructeurs en engageant des instructeurs de transporteurs. Nos instructeurs ont été promus à l'échelon de gestionnaire. Nous les payons bien pour qu'ils restent longtemps. À d'autres écoles, on n'a pas les moyens de faire les choses ainsi. Elles font d'ailleurs état d'un taux de roulement des instructeurs de classe 1 et de classe 2 de 100 à 150 % — c'est en supposant que leurs instructeurs se rendent aux classes 1 et 2. Dans la plupart des autres écoles, les instructeurs ne se rendent même pas aux classes 1 et 2.

C'est une sorte de cercle vicieux, et de nombreux transporteurs aériens sont préoccupés par la qualité de la formation et la question de la sécurité, car les instructeurs de classe 4, de toute évidence, n'ont pas l'expérience pour gérer...

M. Stephen Fuhr:

Savez-vous combien de crédit les pilotes militaires obtiendraient s'ils essayaient d'obtenir une licence civile, soit ceux qui ont quitté les forces armées et qui ne s'intéressent pas vraiment aux transporteurs aériens, et qui ont peut-être une licence de catégorie B ou A?

M. Cedric Paillard:

Non. En fait, la réponse est oui et non. Ils n'obtiendraient que des miettes. En gros, nous ne pouvons rien faire. Selon le moment où le pilote militaire termine sa période de service et la façon dont c'est fait, il est très difficile pour nous de les mettre...

M. Stephen Fuhr:

J'ai une licence de catégorie A2 et j'ai dirigé l'École des pilotes examinateurs aux instruments pour le Canada, avec environ 900 heures d'instruction... Diriez-vous qu'une personne comme moi pourrait obtenir, avec une formation minimale... puisque j'ai supervisé à maintes reprises des vols en solo, et former d'autres instructeurs...

M. Cedric Paillard:

Nous ne pouvons pas recourir à vos services.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

Vous ne le pouvez pas, mais combien d'heures de formation devrais-je faire? Devrais-je suivre tout le programme?

M. Cedric Paillard:

Vous auriez besoin de 35 heures de formation au sol, pourvu que je puisse convertir votre licence en licence commerciale.

M. Stephen Fuhr:

J'en ai une.

M. Cedric Paillard:

Puisque vous en avez une, il vous faudrait suivre 35 heures de formation au sol et 30 heures dans l'avion.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Paillard.

Je suis désolé, mais votre temps est écoulé.

Nous allons passer à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je vais poursuivre dans la même veine que M. Fuhr, qui a traversé l'Atlantique en solo un certain nombre de fois. Je crois que c'est une chose que beaucoup de pilotes aimeraient faire.

Comment pouvons-nous donner un poste de classe 1 ou 2 à ces pilotes chevronnés? L'un des problèmes que je vois, c'est que si toutes les personnes qui obtiennent une licence obtiennent un emploi très intéressant auprès d'un transporteur aérien, il n'y a alors plus personne pour les former.

M. Cedric Paillard:

J'ai eu la chance de voir les deux côtés de l'Atlantique, en solo et en tant que capitaine. J'ai également eu la chance d'être formé des deux côtés de l'Atlantique. Je vais peut-être donner comme exemple la situation au Royaume-Uni, en France ou en Espagne. Il existe en Europe un programme pour que les pilotes de ligne retournent dans les écoles de pilotage, surtout lorsqu'ils sont à la retraite. Il existe des programmes, et j'encourage fortement le comité à en prendre connaissance. Ils fonctionnent très bien.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Y a-t-il un programme similaire au Canada?

M. Cedric Paillard:

Non, il n'y en a pas au Canada. Tout ce que nous avons fait de notre côté, c'est concevoir un programme qui contourne le problème. Il est conçu de manière à ce que les pilotes expérimentés enseignent dans le cadre de notre programme, le volet du simulateur. Cela ne remplace pas l'expérience nécessaire aux classes 1 et 2 à l'étape initiale pivot, lorsque les élèves acquièrent leurs compétences de base. Nous n'avons personne qui... Les pilotes de ligne aux commandes d'un Boeing 777 qui fait le trajet entre Toronto et Hong Kong ne retourneront pas dans un Cessna 172, qu'ils devront dégivrer à -60 °C. Il est difficile pour eux de revenir à cet avion.

Nous devons traiter nos instructeurs comme des professionnels, et les placer plus haut sur l'échelle de la profession. De nos jours, tout le monde estime que le capitaine d'un Boeing 777 à Air Canada est au sommet de la chaîne alimentaire. C'est effectivement le cas dans une certaine mesure, mais je peux vous dire que je respecte beaucoup mes instructeurs de classe 1 qui forment les jeunes, car ils sortent tous les jours, même lorsqu'il fait -20 °C l'hiver, et ils les forment très bien.

(1030)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui. Êtes-vous du même avis que M. Fuhr qui a dit plus tôt... Serait-il utile de faciliter la tâche des instructeurs militaires en créditant partiellement dans l'aviation civile leur expérience dans les forces armées?

M. Cedric Paillard:

Tout à fait, oui. Permettez-moi d'ajouter une chose à ce sujet. Les pilotes militaires ont acquis les compétences nécessaires. Leur formation est axée sur la mission. C'est exactement ce que les transporteurs aériens nous demandent de faire de nos jours: réduire le temps de formation. À l'heure actuelle, il faut 18 mois pour former un pilote de ligne au Canada. Transports Canada et nous devons en arriver au point où nous pouvons offrir une formation axée sur les compétences, comme on le fait actuellement en Europe.

De nos jours, il n'est pas inhabituel de voir un copilote de 18 ou 19 ans à Aer Lingus ou à British Airways. Au Canada, on ne voit jamais cela, car nous n'offrons pas de formation axée sur les compétences. Nous essayons de nous y prendre d'autres façons. Quelques écoles au pays essaient de procéder ainsi, mais elles ne collaborent pas avec Transports Canada.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est intéressant.

M. Cedric Paillard:

Cela change les choses.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai d'autres questions, et il me reste peu de temps.

J'ai déjà volé une fois avec Ottawa Aviation Services, en compagnie d'Adam Vandeven. J'ai cru comprendre qu'il n'est plus avec vous.

M. Cedric Paillard:

Non, il est parti.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je crois qu'il travaille maintenant pour Air Georgian, aux dernières nouvelles.

M. Cedric Paillard:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quel est le profil démographique de vos élèves? Sont-ils tous des Canadiens qui souhaitent devenir pilotes professionnels et instructeurs, ou y a-t-il beaucoup d'étrangers, qui reçoivent la formation et vont ensuite dans d'autres marchés?

M. Cedric Paillard:

Cinquante pour cent des élèves d'OAS viennent de l'étranger, ce qui est à peu près la moyenne dans les écoles au Canada. Cinquante pour cent de ceux qui veulent obtenir une licence de pilote professionnel sont détendeurs d'un passeport étranger.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans cette proportion de 50 %, combien y en a-t-il qui contribuent ensuite à la croissance de notre propre industrie aérienne au Canada?

M. Cedric Paillard:

Certains restent au Canada, compte tenu d'une formulation qui leur permet d'y travailler. Ils travaillent donc ensuite pour des transporteurs aériens ou des écoles de pilotage en tant qu'instructeurs, mais je dirais qu'il s'agit environ de la moitié des 50 %.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est 25 %.

M. Cedric Paillard:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vois.

Quel est le taux de décrochage? Comme vous l'avez mentionné, la formation coûte 85 000 $. Quel pourcentage de ceux qui commencent la formation la terminent avec succès?

M. Cedric Paillard:

Quatre-vingt-cinq pour cent des élèves terminent la formation, et une proportion de 90 % du taux d'échec s'explique par un manque de financement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

On m'interrompt. Merci.

La présidente:

Oui. Merci beaucoup.

Allez-y, monsieur Eglinski.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Merci.

Je crois que je vais juste poursuivre dans la même veine.

Je pense que vous nous avez indiqué dans votre mémoire que vous payez une taxe d'accise de 13 % sur le carburant, et que votre seule école payera bientôt près de 2 millions de dollars en taxe d'accise annuelle. Bien entendu, la taxe sur le carbone s'ajoute à cela, ce qui fera augmenter vos coûts.

C'est le genre de coûts que vous assumez, mais vous devez également payer pour que vos instructeurs passent de la classe 4 à la classe 1. Je me demande si vous pouvez juste expliquer ce que votre école de pilotage doit dépenser pour qu'une personne qui vient tout juste d'obtenir sa licence de pilote professionnel, qu'il s'agisse d'un militaire à la retraite ou d'un jeune élève qui... Quel est le coût que votre école d'aviation doit récupérer?

(1035)

M. Cedric Paillard:

Nous devons dépenser 10 000 $ pour qu'un détenteur d'une licence de pilote professionnel devienne instructeur.

M. Jim Eglinski:

C'est la classe 4, n'est-ce pas?

M. Cedric Paillard:

C'est la classe 4. Après cela, nous incorporons le coût du passage de la classe 3 à la classe 1 dans la formation quotidienne. Le montant le plus élevé, c'est celui de 10 000 $.

Je vais revenir à la taxe sur le carbone. L'une des choses que je trouve intéressantes quand je vois un comité comme celui-ci — et c'est ma première fois... Il est très intéressant de voir que nous avons des solutions en main aujourd'hui pour régler le problème de la formation, mais nous ne pouvons pas les appliquer à cause de contraintes réglementaires ou de contraintes financières attribuables à la nature du montant que nous pouvons obtenir de nos élèves, soit 85 000 $, qui est à peu près le maximum que nous pouvons leur demander à l'heure actuelle.

Il faudrait juste changer un peu les choses pour pouvoir régler le problème à l'aéroport de Saint-Hubert, et nous serions en mesure de remédier à la pénurie de pilotes et d'utiliser ces technologies, comme l'avion électrique dont je parle dans mon mémoire, qui est moins bruyant et n'a pas d'empreinte carbone.

Si le gouvernement du Canada nous donnait les outils pour mettre ces choses en oeuvre, cela fonctionnerait et nous pourrions trouver une solution ici. Cependant, si vous nous acculez au mur au point où nous ne pouvons plus bouger, nous devrons alors vous demander de nous soustraire à la taxe sur le carburant, de créer une exemption à cette fin, car nous ne pourrons plus bouger et donner de la formation. Nous sommes dans l'impossibilité de jouer le jeu sur le plan financier.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Ce que vous nous dites, c'est que nous avons une industrie aérienne qui est prête à se moderniser, mais qu'elle ne peut pas le faire à cause d'un ensemble archaïque de règles qui gouvernent ce que vous pouvez faire dans le cadre de vos fonctions. Vous pouvez peut-être en dire un peu plus à ce sujet.

M. Cedric Paillard:

La réponse, c'est que le Règlement de l'aviation canadien, le RAC, de Transports Canada est vraiment bon. Nous devons maintenant y ajouter des éléments modernes pour répondre aux besoins de la génération Z que nous formons aujourd'hui. Cela va régler le problème du bruit et la pénurie de pilotes, et nous pourrons donner la formation axée sur les compétences que nous demandent les transporteurs aériens. Nous sommes en mesure de la faire. Nous avons l'infrastructure et la technologie. Nous avons seulement besoin du soutien nécessaire, que nous n'avons pas à l'heure actuelle.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Hardie, pour quatre minutes.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je vais partager mon temps avec M. Badawey.

J'ai lu un article que Michael Moore, le cinéaste, a écrit en 2010 et qui parle de pilotes qui survivent grâce aux bons alimentaires... La situation s'est-elle améliorée?

M. Cedric Paillard:

Oui, elle s'est améliorée aux États-Unis. C'était une réalité purement américaine.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je vois. Très bien. Oui, c'est consternant.

Ce qui pose problème, est-ce un grand nombre de candidats intéressés par la formation à l'école alors qu'il n'y a pas de place pour eux ou que le coût est prohibitif, ou est-ce tout simplement le manque de personnes voulant devenir pilotes?

M. Cedric Paillard:

Depuis un an, nous ne manquons pas de personnes qui veulent devenir pilotes. La presse a fait de la bonne publicité pour nous lorsqu'on s'est rendu compte de la pénurie de pilotes. C'est donc utile. Le problème pour nous, c'est de trouver assez d'instructeurs et d'avions et de procéder de manière sécuritaire pour que nous puissions former les 55 personnes. Parce qu'un des problèmes...

M. Ken Hardie:

Je vais vous arrêter ici, si c'est possible.

L'autre chose que nous avons vue dans des études antérieures, c'est que les ressources à Transports Canada pour donner un nouveau certificat aux pilotes et ainsi de suite... Le nombre de personnes ayant les compétences nécessaires pour faire ce travail a également diminué. Si nous pouvions accroître les ressources à Transports Canada, ces pilotes ne pourraient-ils pas aussi donner de la formation?

M. Cedric Paillard:

Je pense que le problème dont vous parlez est lié à la délivrance de certificats aux pilotes quand ils continuent de travailler pour un transporteur aérien. C'est vrai, mais cela n'aura pas d'incidence sur ce que nous faisons sur le terrain, sur la formation initiale. Pour nous, le problème est strictement lié à notre incapacité à avoir un nombre suffisant d'instructeurs de classes 1 et 2, et des instructeurs de classe 4, pour répondre à la demande en matière de formation.

M. Ken Hardie:

Très bien.

Je laisserai le reste de mon temps à M. Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, monsieur Hardie.

J'aimerais discuter un peu des commentaires que vous avez faits sur les contraintes réglementaires et financières. Je pense que M. Eglinski a raison. J'ai aussi fait une observation il y a quelques séances sur l'infrastructure de transport archaïque et peut-être les contraintes réglementaires et financières qui se posent à l'heure actuelle, d'où notre discussion d'aujourd'hui.

J'ai deux questions. La première porte sur votre commentaire concernant la tarification de la pollution. Bien sûr, quand on formule une recommandation ou qu'on établit des directives, on veut s'assurer de ne pas simplement refiler le problème à quelqu'un d'autre. La tarification de la pollution est très simple. Si ce ne sont pas les pollueurs qui paient, ce sont les contribuables qui paient de l'impôt foncier qui le feront. C'est déjà ce qui se passe. Nous essayons simplement d'atténuer la chose un peu.

Pour ce qui est des recommandations que vous avez préparées, s'agit-il d'une solution ou simplement d'une façon de renvoyer la balle à quelqu'un d'autre?

(1040)

M. Cedric Paillard:

Non, je pense que c'est une véritable solution que de permettre aux écoles de pilotage d'utiliser la technologie et de permettre aux étudiants de payer pour recevoir ce genre de formation. Les coûts du programme de formation serviraient entre autres à financer ce genre de technologie aussi. Cela fait partie d'un écosystème qui serait une solution au problème.

Le problème, c'est qu'il faut une solution provisoire entre-temps. Si ces technologies ne sont pas accessibles tout de suite, nous serons forcés de demander, par exemple, une réduction de taxe sur le carburant, parce qu'on ne pourra pas faire de miracles. C'est que les étudiants n'ont pas 85 000 $ ou plus afin de payer pour cela. C'est la véritable contrainte. La solution passe simplement par les mesures provisoires que j'essayais de définir.

M. Vance Badawey:

Pourriez-vous transmettre les recommandations que vous avez préparées au Comité?

M. Cedric Paillard:

Oui. Elles figurent en fait dans le mémoire que nous avons remis au Comité.

M. Vance Badawey:

Très bien. Merci.

Merci, madame la présidente.

La présidente:

Nous entendrons maintenant M. Jeneroux pendant deux minutes, puis la dernière minute ira à M. Nantel.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'ai été un peu surpris que dans la motion, du député de Kelowna—Lake Country, il n'y ait aucune mention de la difficulté à attirer un plus grand nombre de femmes vers la formation pour devenir pilote. Je sais qu'à Edmonton, il y a une école ou un programme intitulé Elevate Aviation, qui est administré en partenariat avec Nav Canada. Je me demande si vous pouvez nous parler un peu de ces difficultés, pour qu'elles fassent partie de nos discussions d'aujourd'hui. Merci.

M. Cedric Paillard:

Permettez-moi de mettre une chose au clair: les femmes pilotes sont généralement meilleures que les hommes pilotes. J'ai eu l'occasion de piloter sous les ordres d'une capitaine qui m'a beaucoup appris et qui était bien meilleure pilote que moi. Je peux vous le confirmer.

Le problème, pour attirer les femmes vers la profession de pilote, est le même que pour les attirer vers le génie électrique. Je ne veux pas faire de distinction entre les pilotes et les ingénieurs. C'est le même problème. Tout ce qui a été écrit à ce sujet est vrai.

Chez OAS, nous avons un groupe du nom Women at OAS. Je vous encourage à venir rencontrer les femmes derrière moi, puisqu'une ou deux de nos pilotes sont ici. Je vous prie d'aller leur parler.

Il est difficile d'être une femme pilote dans une industrie où il n'y a que 6 % de femmes. Nous faisons des efforts, mais c'est une question de marketing. Il faut insister et faire de la publicité.

Nous le faisons pour attirer les femmes, comme pour attirer les Autochtones et les membres des Premières Nations, pour nous assurer de... parce qu'ils voudront rester dans leurs communautés du Nord. Toute l'aide que nous pouvons obtenir du gouvernement à cet égard nous aidera, c'est certain.

Je pense que ce que nous qualifions de problème de marketing...

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passerons à M. Nantel, pour une très brève question ou un commentaire. [Français]

M. Pierre Nantel:

Madame Domingue, il n'y a aucun doute que vous avez tout fait pour en arriver à une entente avec la collaboration de la municipalité, de l'aéroport et des écoles de pilotage, mais que cette entente n'a pas duré puisque la situation a empiré. Quel message avez-vous à transmettre à ceux qui vont émettre des recommandations et qui doivent tenir compte tant du besoin criant de pilotes que de la nécessaire cohabitation avec des zones densément peuplées comme celle-ci. Le problème a été bien documenté par une agence québécoise, qui a confirmé que les vols d'avions ont un impact sur le niveau de stress, et que les gaz d'échappement générés par la combustion de carburant au plomb contribuent à la pollution de l'air.

Mme Johanne Domingue:

Je pense qu'il faudrait tenir des consultations publiques pour dire aux collectivités ce qui se passe vraiment et comment y réagir. Comme je le disais, nous devons vivre ensemble. Pourtant, on continue à nous cacher des choses. C'est grâce aux journalistes que nous savons ce qui se passe, mais nous sommes toujours les derniers à l'apprendre. Les aéroports semblent vouloir nous tenir dans l'ignorance de peur que le citoyen réagisse. Je crois qu'il serait bénéfique que nous collaborions, puisque nous devons vivre ensemble. Pouvons-nous nous dire la vérité et travailler à une solution commune?

Il faut aussi avoir des mesures du problème. Je peux avoir une perception de la situation. Cette situation peut s'être améliorée. Cependant, je ne le saurai que si je regarde des preuves scientifiques, des mesure du bruit auxquelles je peux avoir accès. Faites preuve de transparence et dites-nous la vérité: nous partirons alors gagnants. Par ailleurs, s'il vous plaît, cessez d'établir des corridors aériens bruyants au-dessus de milieux résidentiels densément peuplés. Il y a d'autres endroits pour cela. Après tout, on ne construit pas de circuits de course automobile n'importe où. Soyons conséquents.

(1045)

M. Pierre Nantel:

Je vous remercie, madame Domingue. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci infiniment.

Je remercie nos deux témoins d'aujourd'hui; votre témoignage a été très apprécié.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on November 29, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.