header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-11-28 INDU 140

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1555)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Welcome, everybody, to meeting 140 as we continue our five-year legislative review of the Copyright Act.

A voice: It's been a long study.

The Chair: It's almost done. We're down to the wire on this study.

First off, we have some folks with us today. Unfortunately, we couldn't be here earlier. We had votes and that seems to take precedence over anything else.

With us today we have, as individuals, Jeremy de Beer, Professor of Law, Faculty of Law, University of Ottawa. We have Marcel Boyer, Emeritus Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Université de Montréal. We have Mark Hayes, Partner, Hayes eLaw LLP, and we have Howard P. Knopf, Copyright Lawyer. Mr. Knopf is Counsel at Macera & Jarzyna.

All right, we have lost half an hour. You have up to seven minutes. Less is better, it gives us more time to ask questions. We do have another committee meeting here at 5:30.

Why don't we start with Mr. de Beer? You have up to seven minutes.

Professor Jeremy de Beer (Professor of Law, Faculty of Law, University of Ottawa, As an Individual):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair and committee members.

My name is Jeremy de Beer. I'm a law professor at the University of Ottawa and a member of the Centre for Law, Technology and Society, but I'm appearing here in my individual capacity.

I offer this committee only my own views, but based on my experience as a former legal counsel to the Copyright Board of Canada and adviser to the Copyright Board of Canada, as well as to collecting societies, user groups, government departments and international organizations. For over 15 years I've designed and taught courses on copyright, argued a dozen cases on copyright and digital policy before the Supreme Court, and published extensively in this field.

I'd like to specifically mention just two of my recent articles commissioned by the Government of Canada. One was a widely cited empirical study on the Copyright Board's tariff-setting process, which I did for the Departments of Canadian Heritage and what is now Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada. The other was a thorough review for ISED on methods and conclusions from evidence-based policy-making. I cite these studies to emphasize that my views aren't based on the special interests of certain industries or mere speculation, but on rigorous research that I hope will help this committee make some well-informed decisions.

It’s my third appearance in about a week before a parliamentary committee. Last week my testimony to the Senate's Standing Committee on Banking, Trade, and Commerce focused on proposed reforms in Bill C-86, the budget implementation act, to the Copyright Board and the collective administration of copyright. Yesterday, I testified to the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage for its study on remuneration models for artists and creative industries, which will feed into this committee's review of the Copyright Act.

I won't repeat that testimony, but I would like to highlight the most important points. First, as I told the banking committee, the resources and proposed reforms to the board and collecting societies are on the whole good, but there remains some important work for this committee to do on a policy level. To the heritage committee, I made the point that if artists have remuneration problems, the root cause may not be copyright at all, but rather power imbalances and unfair contracts with publishers, record labels and other intermediaries. I said that if the government wants to expand anyone’s rights, it could start by recognizing and affirming that copyright doesn't derogate from indigenous people's rights over knowledge and culture.

I think most importantly that whatever the heritage committee and this committee recommends must take account of the dramatic extension of copyright protection in Canada’s most recent trade deal with the United States and Mexico, the USMCA.

With that, let me turn to the statutory review of the Copyright Act that this committee is mandated to do. You do not have an easy task. I've seen the 100 briefs already submitted, and the list of 182, and counting, witnesses you’ve heard from. Here's what I take from all of that. It's much too soon since the last round of amendments to consider any major overhaul of Canadian copyright law. In my view, the most important recommendation this committee can make is to get off the hamster wheel of perpetual copyright reform. lt's not just pointless. It's counterproductive to reopen the act every five years, as section 92 currently requires. Just looking at the list of special interest groups coming to you cap in hand makes one’s head spin.

The act was modernized. That was the word, it was the “modernization” act in 2012. Before that there was a massive expansion of copyright in 1997, and before that in 1989. How can anyone credibly claim to have evidence on whether the last batch of reforms is working or not? How can anyone say with a straight face that the act is already out of date again? These frequent reviews aren't free. There are cash expenses, there are opportunity costs, you could be focusing on other things, and most importantly, there are big policy risks.

To be clear, I'm not suggesting that copyright is unimportant. To the contrary, it's a crucial issue. My point is that we need, and we have, technologically neutral principles, and we need the time to properly implement and interpret, in practice and by the courts, and then consider the principles before giving lobbyists another kick at the can.

(1600)



When it is seen in that light, I think it becomes easier to discount a lot of the rhetoric and the recommendations around—to list just a few examples—statutory damages to coerce educational institutions into buying licences they may not need or want, website-blocking schemes or special injunctions to give copyright owners more procedural powers than other plaintiffs have, iPod or Internet taxes or other cross-subsidies, and on and on and on.

That said, there's one very recent game-changer that I think this committee should consider, and that's the dramatic expansion of copyright required by the USMCA. The USMCA will give copyright owners an additional two full decades of monopoly. Copyright in Canada will soon last for the life of an author plus 70 years. On average, if you look at life expectancy, that's 150 years—a century and a half—that we have to wait to freely build on and embellish works in the public domain.

I understand why we did that. I'm a pragmatist. If that's what it took to salvage free trade in North America, all right. However, what it means is that Canada has now aligned the term of protection of copyright with that in the United States but not the safety valves, like fair use, that are so crucial for driving innovation. Without counterbalancing measures to align Canadian and American copyright flexibilities, Canadian innovators would be at a huge disadvantage.

In light of the time, let me conclude with my general point on this. For the theory of free trade in copyright-protected works to function in practice, both the floor and the ceiling of protection have to be harmonized. We can't take just the bad of American law without taking the good, so my recommendation above all for this committee is to ensure that in any measures it takes, it consider the changes that USMCA will bring in its report.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[Translation]

Mr. Boyer, over to you. You have seven minutes.

Mr. Marcel Boyer (Emeritus Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Université de Montréal, As an Individual):

Thank you very much for the invitation.

Conflict exists between creators and users. Obviously, creators want to benefit from the value their creations generate for users. Users want to minimize payment for such inputs in order to channel savings towards other means of reaching their goals, their objectives or their mission. We have two particular examples before us: replacing copyright payments with scholarships or other services for students, or investments in broadcasting facilities in smaller communities or markets.

Is this a standard conflict between buyers and sellers? The answer is yes and no, and I will explain why. As I am an economist, I am going to talk about what economic efficiency or optimality tells us about this conflict.

(1605)

[English]

Copyrighted works have two characteristics. First, they are information goods, or assets—I'm going to say that—which means that once produced or fixed, their use or consumption does not destroy such goods or assets. They remain available now and in the future for consumption by other people. That would be different from the standard public goods, which have to be produced every year, things like national defence or public security, for instance.

The second point is on digital technologies. What exactly they have changed in the world of copyright is that they have reduced to zero or almost zero the cost of reproducing and disseminating copyrighted works—whether they are music or books—and therefore, maximal dissemination becomes possible. Digitization challenges the delicate balance of creators' and users' rights. The excludability level favoured by copyright may have become too severe for the digital world, hence the conflict we're facing today.[Translation]

Economists have been studying this type of problem for many decades and analytical solutions do exist.

An optimal solution when allocating resources would be to have the price set at zero for this type of good or asset. That way, the goods could be distributed to the maximum extent possible. However, we then have a problem: how to compensate creators within such a system.

Economists have studied solutions such as limited distribution, whereby distribution would not be optimal and the price would be set higher than zero in order to ensure fair compensation for rights holders, while still trying to distribute the products as much as possible with some possible tinkering between the two solutions.

In order to put this or these types of solution into practice, we have to know the value of the product in question. What is the competitive market value of the works that are protected given that they are information goods or assets and that digital technologies have changed the commercial domain, making it nearly impossible to have a competitive market or to even sell those goods commercially?

How can we solve this problem that I have called, in one of my publications, the Gordian knot of today's corporate world?[English]

We can arrive at a solution through four key changes.

First, move away from the current circular heuristics in favour of direct inferences of competitive market value from the behaviour and choices of users. This can be done. It is not done today. We say that we're going to set up the rates today at that level because two years ago or four years ago we did that. Therefore, we're constrained by those decisions.

Rights holders are significantly shortchanged by the current Copyright Act provisions, including exceptions of many kinds, and the way they are implemented. The undercompensation of creators, as compared to the competitive market benchmarks, is a significant impediment to a more efficient and vibrant economy. The undercompensation totals several hundred million dollars per year in Canada.[Translation]

Secondly, we have to avoid stigmatizing creators, who are seen to be opposing the digital economy and maximum distribution of works through exceptions, including fair use.

Who, from apart the creators, should pay for these public policies?

Here's a first example.

In 2012, the government passed regulations to exclude microSD and similar cards from the definition of “audio recording medium”, thereby preventing the Copyright Board from setting a levy on such cards to compensate rights holders.

Here is the government's justification, and I've quoted a governmental publication: Such a levy would increase the costs to manufacturers and importers of these cards, resulting in these costs indirectly being passed on to retailers and consumers. ... thereby negatively impacting e-commerce businesses and Canada's participation in the digital economy.

You will see that I added [sic] at the end of the quote, by which I mean that such thinking could very well bring Canada back to the Stone Age.

Here is the third policy.

(1610)

[English]

Bring to the table all major groups of beneficiaries and make them jointly and severally responsible or liable to ensure the proper, fair, equitable and competitive compensation of creators. It can be done. There's a long list of economic publications showing how this can be done, and why it should be done.[Translation]

Fourthly, the current sequential determination of royalties makes it difficult to implement significant adjustment and reforms.

A little earlier, I stated that when we decide on an amount for royalties or set tariffs, we have to abide by what was decided last year or two years ago in a similar field. We should set up a system to allow all decisions to be taken jointly and concurrently so that we can better adapt to changing technologies.

Given that time is whizzing by, I won't be able to talk about the main difficulties in setting copyright tariffs, but I will just say the following:[English] the level playing field or technological neutrality principle, the competitive market value or balance principle, the socio-economic efficiency principle, and the separation principle. The last one says that it is neither necessary nor optimal that primary users' royalty payments be equal to the competitive market compensation of creators. Commercial radio doesn't mean that what they should be paying is what the authors and composers and performers should receive in terms of compensation.[Translation]

The economics of cultural public policy are really the elephant in the room, alongside rights holders and users. In education, there is a difference between what consumers, i.e. parents and students, pay and what the providers of educational services and content, i.e. teachers, professionals and support personnel, receive.

In health care, there is a difference between what consumers or patients pay and what the providers of health care services such as doctors, nurses, and professional and support staff receive as compensation.

We can also make this type of distinction in the cultural sector.

I believe this is a fundamental aspect of the reform that we should aspire to.

Rather than talking to you about it, I will conclude by inviting you to read some publications in which I've set out ideas that could help you in your work on copyright reform.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[English]

We're going to go to Mr. Hayes. You have up to seven minutes.

Mr. Mark Hayes (Partner, Hayes eLaw LLP, As an Individual):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

I'm not a university professor, and I certainly don't have the long list that my friends have of publications. I've been out there actually doing this stuff for about 35 years, and that involves just about everything in copyright.

You'll see in my covering letter that I've made a list of some of the people I've acted for. I've spent a lot of time with the Copyright Board, including hearing Professor Boyer and his theories on quite a few of the cases.

Today, I want to talk about some practical issues. I've dealt with six of them in my written submissions. Because of time limitations, I'll just talk briefly about three today.

The first one is what I call the royalty penalty. There's been a provision in the Copyright Act for some time that provides an important tool for copyright collectives. In situations where a copyright user is subject to an approved tariff, but refuses or neglects to pay, the copyright collective is forced to take legal action and, on success of the action, can collect from three to 10 times the amount of the royalties.

The intent of this section is a really good one. Users shouldn't be allowed to refuse to pay and then, when discovered later, just pay what they should have paid in the first place. There has to be some kind of a penalty. However, in my experience, this provision of the act has been used far too often by collectives to threaten licensees who have legitimate disputes about how much they should pay in copyright royalties.

In my view, the use of this provision by collectives to try to coerce licensees to accede to demands by collectives, whether or not those demands are reasonable, appropriate or justified, is unfair and certainly not a balanced approach to copyright tariffs.

Let me give you a very simple example. Suppose that a theatre owner who puts on a musical presentation calculates that the royalty that's payable in respect of that is $1,000. They pay, or offer to pay, the $1,000, but SOCAN, the collective who would collect, comes in and says, “We think it's $1,500. If you don't pay $1,500, we're going to sue you and get three to 10 times the amount of what we should have gotten.”

What's the theatre owner going to do? He can stick by his guns and say, “Fine, sue me”, but the risk is that if his interpretation was wrong, which could be the case, he would have to pay between $4,500 and $15,000 in royalties, when the dispute was about $500. As a result, because of this risk, the theatre owner is essentially forced to accede and pay the amount demanded by collective, even if his interpretation of what was owed was correct.

In my view, this scenario is not a proper application of this section. I've actually been involved in cases where this threat was made and 100 times as much money was involved. You can imagine the amount of risk that is taken on at that time.

In my view, this section should make it clear that the punitive royalty provisions do not apply where a copyright user asserts a legitimate dispute concerning the applicability or calculation of royalties in an approved tariff. I suggested appropriate wording in my written brief.

The second issue I want to talk about is authorship of audiovisual works. Some organizations have appeared before you. Yesterday some organizations appeared before the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage and suggested that the act should specify which of the creative contributors to audiovisual work should be deemed to be the author of those works. I'm in particular speaking about the Directors Guild and Writers Guild, who have suggested it should be hard-wired into the Copyright Act that the director and the screenwriter of an audiovisual work should be deemed to be the author.

Some copyright works, in particular audiovisual works such as motion pictures and television shows, involve a lot of creative contributions from a lot of individuals. As a result, it can be really unclear who is the author of the work.

This is what I call a long-term problem and not a short-term problem. In the short term, the producer of these audiovisual works, through contract, gets licenses or assignments of all of the short-term rights that are necessary in order to distribute the work.

However, portions of the rights around an audiovisual work depend on the authorship. For example, the length of the term is based on the life of the author. When the reversion right applies depends on the life of the author. At some point down the road—not in the short term, not when it's in the theatres—after some of the creative contributors start to die, who the author is all of a sudden becomes relevant.

Right now, that's not clear. I admit there is a point to be made as to putting some clarity into this. There is no doubt that the proposal by the Directors Guild and Writers Guild put some clarity into it, but is it the right answer?

(1615)



In the United States, they have a fairly unique situation because they've created a thing called “work for hire”. A motion picture or television producer can get contracts from people and the producer is now deemed to be the author. However, in Canada and most OECD countries that's not the case. Authorship still remains unclear. In some European countries they have deemed some other creative contributors to be the author, including the director and the screenwriter and, in some cases, the cinematographer and the score writer, and there are various other people. This again can lead to some uncertainty.

Yes, while deeming certain people to be the author eliminates the uncertainty, it creates a number of problems, which I've explained in my written brief. I'm just going to point out two.

First, many audiovisual works don't have directors and screenwriters. The perfect example is computer games. Computer games are very important audiovisual works. It's actually a bigger industry in Canada than motion pictures and television. There are no directors. There are no screenwriters. How are they going to be authors?

The second thing is, if you're going to put in a rule like this that is contrary to the authorship rule in the United States, you really have a potential problem with the very important film and television production industry in Canada. You would want to be very, very careful about doing that and jeopardizing that industry.

Last, I want to make a brief mention about the machine learning exemption, which I'm sure you've heard about. You've had several people come before you. I think it is really important that we have some kind of exemption that deals with these incidental reproductions that are created by machine learning.

However, in my view if we've learned anything from the last 20 or 30 years of copyright reform, it's that having specific provisions about developing technology is not a good way to form legislation. The simple reason is that, by the time you actually study it and get the legislation in place, the technology is off somewhere else. You're always going to be chasing this rabbit that's always one step in front of you. In my view, what's important is to make sure we get at the root problem.

What is the root problem that's been talked about in machine learning? It's a thing called incidental reproductions. What happens is that, in technological processes like machine learning and so on, there's a bunch of these little reproductions that have absolutely zero economic impact. They're not being sold to anybody. They're not being leased to anybody. They allow the technology to happen.

The last time we had a very major copyright reform, we created a section called section 30.71 entitled “Temporary Reproductions for Technological Processes”. Everybody thought that this would work, that it would allow these reproductions to be done. Unfortunately, in 2016, the Copyright Board made a decision that very substantially limited the ambit of the section and in essence made it largely a dead letter.

In my submission, what should happen if we have concerns about machine learning—and we certainly should—is to make revisions to section 30.71 to bring back the robust exemption that we intended to have for these technological processes that have been largely eliminated by this interpretation. I've given some suggestions in my written material. I'd be happy to talk to you about it. I think a revised section 30.71 would better position Canada and its technological leaders for future technologies, which we don't yet know what they are. Frankly, I can't guess them and I'm pretty sure most of you can't either.

Thank you very much.

(1620)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Finally, we have Mr. Knopf, for seven minutes.

Mr. Howard Knopf (Counsel, Macera & Jarzyna, LLP, As an Individual):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

Good afternoon, members. I'm also here for my third time this week. As a former prime minister said, I guess that gives me a three-peat.

I won't repeat what I said at the Senate banking committee and yesterday at the heritage committee, but I will repeat one thing I said yesterday, which was this.

There’s no “value gap” in the copyright system. However, there’s a serious what I call “values gap” in the fake news that is being disseminated these days about IP in general and Canadian copyright revision in particular.

Today I'll talk about a few other issues and flag some that I'll include in my written brief in more detail when I submit it on or before December 10 of this year.

For today, number one, we need to clarify that Copyright Board tariffs are not mandatory for users. The elephant in the room—the second elephant today—is the issue of whether the Copyright Board tariffs are mandatory. They are not. I successfully argued that case in the Supreme Court of Canada three years ago, but most of the copyright establishment in Canada today is in denial or actively resisting that ruling.

A tariff that sets the maximum for a train ticket from Ottawa to Toronto is just fine. We used to have such tariffs before deregulation, but travellers were always free to take the plane, the bus, their own car, a limousine, their bicycle or any other legal and likely unregulated means.

Choice and competition are essential not only for users but for creators. Access Copyright charges educators far too much for far too little, and it pays creators far too little. In fact, they only got an average of $190 for 2017 from Access itself and from their share of the publishers' portion.

There is intense litigation ongoing now between Access Copyright and York University, which is now in the appeal stage, and other litigation in the Federal Court involving school boards. Unfortunately, York failed in the trial court to address the issue of whether final approved tariffs are mandatory.

Hopefully, the Federal Court of Appeal and, if necessary, the Supreme Court will get this right in due course, but we can't be sure. The other side is lobbying you heavily on this issue, including with such devious and disingenuous suggestions as imposing a statutory minimum damages regime of three to 10 times the amount, on the totally inappropriate basis of symmetry with the SOCAN regime, which is the way it is for good reasons that go back for more than 80 years, but would be totally inappropriate for tariffs outside of the performing rights regime. In fact, Mr. Hayes has pointed out problems even with the SOCAN regime.

I urge you to codify and clarify for greater certainty—as lawyers and statutory draftspersons like to say—what the Supreme Court said in 2015, consistent in turn with previous Supreme Court and other jurisprudence going back decades, which is that Copyright Board tariffs are mandatory only for collectives but optional for users, who remain free to choose how they can best legally clear their copyright needs.

My second point today is that we need to keep current fair dealing purposes in section 29 and include the words “such as”. The Supreme Court of Canada already included the concept of education in fair dealing before the 2012 amendments kicked in. The U.S.A. allows for fair use “for purposes such as”—and I'm emphasizing those words—“criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use)”.

I ask you to ignore siren calls urging you to delete the word “education” from section 29 and urge you to add those two little words “such as”, as our friends and neighbours in the U.S.A. have had for 42 years.

My number three point today is that we need to ensure that fair dealing rights cannot be overridden by contract. In 1986 the Supreme Court of Canada, in an important but not well-known case, ruled that consumers cannot lose their statutory rights by contracting out or waiving their rights in the case of, for example, when it comes to everybody's right to pay off their mortgage every five years. We need to clarify and codify a similar principle that fair dealing rights and other important users' rights and exceptions cannot be lost by contracting out or by waivers.

Number four, we need to explicitly make technical protection measures—TPMs—provisions subject to fair dealing. We need to clarify that users' fair dealing rights apply to circumvention of technical protection measures, at least for fair dealing purposes in section 29, and for many if not all other exceptions provided in the legislation as appropriate.

(1625)



Number five, we need mitigation for the nation. My friend Jeremy started using the word “mitigation” after the USMCA came in, and he made some good points. We need to mitigate the damage done by copyright term extension under both the Harper government, where it was buried deeply in an omnibus budget bill—heard of one of those recently?—and by this government in the USMCA. These concessions could cost Canada hundreds of millions of dollars a year, and even worse now, must be given to the EU and all our other WTO TRIPS treaty partners because of the most-favoured-nation and national treatment principles to which Canada is bound. One small mitigation measure might be the imposition of renewal requirements and fees for those extra years of protection that are not required by the Berne convention.

Number six, we need to look carefully at enforcement issues. I know that you're under immense pressure from some very well-funded, powerful and aggressive lobbyists and lawyers on site blocking. I'm not convinced that we need any new legislation on this issue, but I am looking into it carefully and may perhaps write more about it. In the meantime, you should be looking at the existing though not the proposed provisions in section 115A of the Australian Copyright Act, and U.K. case law.

We may also need to address the issue of mass litigation against thousands of ordinary Canadians who happen to be associated with an IP address that is the subject of a notice under paragraph 41.26(1)(a) and who are alleged to have infringed a movie that could be streamed or downloaded for a few dollars. This litigation is not akin to a parking ticket. There are systematic efforts to extract thousands of dollars by way of so-called settlements from terrified Internet account holders who may have never heard of BitTorrent until they get that dreaded registered letter in the mail. These efforts may succeed in many cases because access to justice is very difficult in these circumstances. If the government would only do its job on the notice and notice regulations, that might be a good start.

Number seven, we need to repeal the blank media levy scheme. We need to get rid of the zombie-like levy scheme in part VIII of the Copyright Act and stop listening to the big three multinational record companies who conjure new kinds of taxes on digital devices, ISPs, Internet users, the cloud and whatever else looks lucrative. Even the U.S.A. doesn't entertain such fantasies.

I'm getting to my last point now.

We need to stop this five-year ritual of review. I don't always agree with Jeremy on everything, certainly not on certain aspects of this study about the Copyright Board, but I do very much agree with him on this. We have had two major and two medium-scale revisions to copyright law in Canada in the last 100 years, two and two only in the last 100 years, and a few more focused ones in between.

There's no need for a periodic copyright policy review. It's lucrative for lobbyists and lawyers, but it's a waste of time, including Parliament's time, and that's important. Reacting reflexively and prematurely to new technology is usually very dangerous. If we had listened to the whining of the film industry in the early 1980s, the VCR, the video cassette recorder, would have become illegal, and Hollywood as we know it might have committed economic suicide. Who can forget, at least some of us of a certain age, the famous words of the late movie industry lobbyist, Jack Valenti, who said that the VCR was to the American entertainment industry as the Boston strangler was to the woman alone.

Particular issues can be addressed as needed, which is the way most other countries cope with copyright.

I thank you for your patience, and I look forward to your questions.

(1630)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to jump right into questions with Mr. Longfield.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

I'll jump as much as I can, Mr. Chair.

Given the topic, it's a weighty topic. As you've all noted, it's a difficult one for us to be addressing on a frequent basis, frequent being five years.

Something that wasn't mentioned was article 13 in the European agreements. As we develop our trading agreements with Europe and with Asia-Pacific now, and with the new North American trade agreement, copyright competitiveness within our region is something that I'm concerned with and how the market works within Canada compared to other regions. Do we have some opinions on article 13 that you could put forward for our study?

This question is for anybody.

Mr. Howard Knopf:

I'll start on that one. It's very controversial. It's very maximalist, as we say. There's no need for a snippet tax or a Google tax, or whatever you call it. There's no need to put filters on what can be uploaded. This could be, to use an overworked phrase, the end of the Internet. There's no good in it. The Europeans get very maximalist very quickly and sometimes not for anybody's good in the long run.

Let's not race to the bottom of maximalist copyright protection. We stood up to them in CETA. We resisted the 70-year term and some of the other excesses. We caved in to the Americans, and maybe, as Jeremy said, we had no choice with that fellow in the White House, but we don't have to keep making that same mistake.

Prof. Jeremy de Beer:

I'd like to add to that if I may.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Please.

Prof. Jeremy de Beer:

I think it's likely to backfire in the EU. It's a terrible idea. The ostensible purpose is to force Facebook and Google and the other big tech companies, which the Europeans are rightly concerned about, to pay for more content. The more regulations apply in this context, the more it's actually going to entrench the powerful positions of the companies that can afford to pay those royalties and comply with the regulatory requirements like upload filters. I read a great article that said that Google's first choice is no regulation, and their second choice is lots of regulation. This is a terrible idea.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

We've seen that in some recent comments as well. Thank you, both, for that.

On a different topic, Mr. Boyer, I'm really interested in the slides you showed us. I was having trouble keeping up with some of the potential opportunities. We don't have time in the committee to really dive into the topics, but one of the ones that really was interesting was getting all the players around the table. Something we've had problems with since the beginning of this study is trying to find out what parts of the market are working and what parts aren't working. There's general consensus that creators aren't getting paid their fair share, but is that because of copyright or not?

How could we suggest in our report how to bring all the players—the SOCANs and the Access Copyrights and the creators and the publishers—to the table? Who would those people be? How would we bring them together?

(1635)

Mr. Marcel Boyer:

It's going to be difficult, because it needs changes in different laws, I guess, which is a field I don't really understand because I'm not a lawyer. It's clear that if you want to implement the competitive market value of music on commercial radio as estimated from the behaviour inferred from the behaviour of radio station operators, as I did in some of the publications I showed, this would represent, today, something like $450 million per year in royalties. This is the competitive market value of music as revealed by the choices and behaviours of radio station operators.

Today, commercial radio pays about $100 million a year in royalties for music. Of course, you're not going to ask the commercial radio operators to pay the $350 million that is missing there, because that would limit too much the distribution and dissemination of music. Therefore, you want to bring...but how are you going to do it? You have to bring the other beneficiaries—equipment producers, content, other types of...and governments as kinds of collectives, and consumers. They have to be sitting around the table and saying that we have to pay the commercial value, the competitive market value, of music. How can we do it? You have to share it among us.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Maybe in a general statement, is it about having transparency at all levels?

Mr. Marcel Boyer:

Yes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

You might not bring them into the same room, but they could have a reporting structure of some sort in which we could understand where the value is being....

Mr. Marcel Boyer:

Absolutely.

Mr. Mark Hayes:

I think part of the problem is that there is no incentive to anyone on the user side or on the collective side or on the industry side to actually do anything but their talking points. There really is zero benefit to them, and this is one of the problems in the system. In the Copyright Board system, for example, there is zero incentive for anybody to compromise.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

What would an incentive look like?

Mr. Mark Hayes:

I think you have to look at other industries in which people have summits behind closed doors. In this kind of forum, nobody is going to be off their talking points. It's just not possible. If you had some kind of a summit behind closed doors with Chatham House rules so nobody's allowed to talk about it, etc., maybe you'd get some real answers, but in this kind of a setting, you are not going to get anybody telling you what's going on and you're not going to get the transparency you're asking for.

Mr. Howard Knopf:

The commissioner of competition has for a very long time had the ability to weigh in on these issues at the Copyright Board. They've never even opened a file or lifted a finger to do that. They should be encouraged, if not told, by somebody to do that. They're independent, so it's not easy to tell them what to do. Another thing might be that the Copyright Board should, either of its own motion or, if necessary, through regulations that somebody should put in place, be forced to have more transparency. They should force, for example, disclosure—sunshine laws—about the salaries of senior people at collectives, about how much they spend on legal fees, and the average and median return to members of collectives on an annual basis.

The board doesn't want to get anywhere near that. I've urged them to. It seems to me that should be their first order of business, because collectives are there for the public interest.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

For your multiple witnessing at different committees, thank you for all your service to our government.

The Chair:

Before we move onto Mr. Albas, Mr. de Beer, you had referenced a document. Could you send it to the clerk, please?

Prof. Jeremy de Beer:

Yes.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Albas, you have seven minutes.

(1640)

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to all our witnesses for your testimony here today and multiple testimonies at different committees.

I'll start with Mr. Hayes.

You gave in your opening comments the example of SOCAN, where someone is putting on a feature that they calculate to be $1,000 in royalties, SOCAN takes a different position and, therefore, it could be $4,500 if it's three times what it was.

First of all, if collectives are only able to seek actual damages, won't people just automatically refuse to pay tariff as the worst punishment they would face in the first place?

Mr. Mark Hayes:

No. As I said, there is a value in the punitive aspect of it if there's no legitimate dispute. That's why the wording that I suggested in my written brief was that if there is a legitimate dispute, it wouldn't apply. That would be again for the courts to decide as to whether it was a legitimate dispute.

Very often the way this is used is when someone just does not pay, if you have a bar or a restaurant that just doesn't pay. They either don't know or they just refuse to do it and they're hoping they don't get caught. That's not the situation I've been involved in, where you have legitimate disputes as to applicability or calculation. You shouldn't have this punitive provision being used as a cudgel by one side to try to force the other side to settle.

Mr. Dan Albas:

In those types of cases, then, would it not be smarter to make a secondary regime? For example, rather than count the whole $1,500 as being where you take that, times three or times 10, depending. You say it's the difference between the amount that the proprietor had suggested and the value that SOCAN in this case would have said is the right amount, that $500. To me, you would see probably focusing a little more on actual—

Mr. Mark Hayes:

That's one alternative. The problem is that there is no other regime where you, on the one hand, take a position and the other side essentially is saying, “Okay, I have three to 10 times the amount of power than you have in this dispute”.

Mr. Dan Albas:

There is a market power, or at least in this case, a monopoly power—

Mr. Mark Hayes:

Another alternative would be that you wouldn't have to pay the punitive sum if you put up security for the amount that it is said to be. There are various ways to do it.

However, in terms of just having this penalty, remember, it's a minimum of three times. The judge can't go below three times. The minimum is three times, up to 10 times. Just to have that there is a cudgel for one side, and in my submission, is just unfair.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Mr. de Beer, you've been to a number of different committees, as some of the other witnesses have as well. By the way, all of that now is Crown copyright, so I hope you're okay with that. We own your ideas as a parliament. I'm just advising you of this.

Prof. Jeremy de Beer:

Yes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

As a side note, though, can you describe how fair use as it exists in the United States is superior to the fair dealing provision exceptions we have in Canada? I found your argument saying, if you're going to take the worst of a regime, you'd also better complement with some of the release valves or at least some of the best.

Can you explain that in more detail?

Prof. Jeremy de Beer:

The reason it's preferable is essentially for the reasons Mr. Hayes gave around the text and data mining exception, because you don't have to constantly update the list of things that need flexibility or that you need breathing room or safety valves for. Rather than saying “Fair dealing for the purposes of” one, two, three, four, five or six things, which if we look at the pattern of reform have become increasingly specific and technical, you say “Fair dealing for purposes such as” some of the things we have is not an infringement of copyright.

The thing about innovation is that it is by definition disruptive and unpredictable. We want innovation, but you don't know what is going to happen. That's the point of innovation. You can't create a list of specific exceptions to enable things that you haven't thought of yet. The U.S. approach solves that with one swipe.

The argument you hear against that position is that it's too unpredictable, that it's too disruptive to settle Canadian practice. I don't believe that at all. In fact, we can have the best of both worlds by simply doing what Mr. Knopf suggests, called the “such as” solution. Just put in those two words, “such as”. It would give us the breathing room that the Americans have to drive innovation and not stifle it.

Mr. Dan Albas:

In the last meeting of this committee, I asked about an exemption for reaction videos, for example, that allows for people, as you said, to just put up something with their reaction to it. Do you think there needs to be some carve-out for that type of activity?

(1645)

Prof. Jeremy de Beer:

I don't think there needs to be any more specific carve-outs for particular activities. I think what we need is a much more flexible and technology-neutral approach, as fair use is. Look at the provisions. Every time we've tried to put in these technical little micro-exceptions, it backfires. I can give you 20 years of Supreme Court cases to prove it.

Mr. Dan Albas:

You stated before the heritage committee that educational authors earned virtually nothing from their works and that publishers get all the rights and, obviously, profits when they sell the work to academic institutions.

How can the Copyright Act address this?

Prof. Jeremy de Beer:

I think that it's not necessarily a copyright problem. It's a contracts problem. What I like to see are measures the government takes requiring open access to research, for example, by research funding agencies.

I think there are certain measures that you could take to reinforce the bargaining position of authors vis-à-vis publishers and other intermediaries, but it's not easily done. It's a complex issue. The core point is that it's not a copyright problem. That's the point I was trying to make.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Mr. Hayes.

Mr. Mark Hayes:

I've been on both sides of this. I've written, and I've negotiated these deals and so on. The fact is that in academic writing, the publishers have a huge advantage because the academics need to publish. You have a very willing seller and a not-very-willing buyer. They'll buy it or not buy it, and they're going to take most of the money for it.

It's a market issue, and if you get into it in the copyright reform, to try to fix the market, you go down that rabbit hole very fast and get into a lot of trouble.

Mr. Dan Albas:

It's about competitiveness, as Mr. Boyer said.

Mr. Mark Hayes:

Yes, exactly.

Mr. Howard Knopf:

There are potential big antitrust issues with some of the gigantic, multinational, billion-dollar publishers that impose these conditions, but I suggested a solution yesterday that got some good feedback on the Internet, for what that's worth.

The solution came not from me but from Roy MacSkimming, who's a long-time expert who did this work for the Public Lending Right Commission in Canada. He suggested what he called an educational lending right, which would require government funding but would compensate scholarly authors, like Professor de Beer and Professor Boyer, for the use of their work in educational institutions, much like we already have for public libraries where popular authors like Margaret Atwood get up to $3,000 per year for their books being lent. That amount has gone down. It should go up. It needs new funding.

Something like that for the educational realm would provide additional income and incentive for professors, and I also pointed out that professors are rewarded in other ways. If they write papers and books, they get promoted and they get tenure. Finally they're getting decent salaries now—six-figure salaries in Canadian universities—so it's not as if they're not being paid. It's just that they're not being paid as efficiently and elegantly as perhaps they should be.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're over time a bit, but we still have time for more questions. [Translation]

Ms. Quach, you have seven minutes.

Ms. Anne Minh-Thu Quach (Salaberry—Suroît, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you all for being here.

Some of you have mentioned the economic repercussions of extending copyright from 50 to 70 years after the death of a creator.

Do you think that Bill C-86 will make a change in terms of access to fair use?

If so, what will change? Will these changes improve fair use?

Mr. Marcel Boyer:

I believe that fair use should be defined legally and thoroughly to avoid useless legal battles. The economic problem, fundamentally, is that fair use is a type of expropriation of the creators' intellectual property.

We have to find a way to compensate fair use. Some might think that the user is not the one who should be paying royalties for the work used, or that someone else should pay.

When we have or add exceptions, even when we add “such as”, as someone else has suggested, or we tack on other exceptions to copyright, we expropriate creators' intellectual property without giving them any compensation.

In economic terms, the problem is that we have to decide who else should pay the authors, the composers and the artists, the rights holders and the creators for fair use.

The principle of fair use is not problematic in economic terms. It becomes a question of compensation. Someone has to pay, but who?

(1650)

Ms. Anne Minh-Thu Quach:

Have other countries dealt with this problem?

Mr. Marcel Boyer:

Absolutely, and they've worked on fair use in terms of reproduction for private use.

I can make a copy for my private use for research purposes and someone will pay for that, such as equipment suppliers. The equipment supplier who helps me to make copies for research purposes will pay royalties to compensate authors, composers and artists.

In France, for example, reproduction for private use generates $300 million CAD per year in compensation for authors, composers and artists, whereas here in Canada, it is $3 million.

In my slides, which I did not have time to show you, I explain that federal regulations passed in 2012 state that microSD cards are not “audio recording mediums”, which is costing authors, composers and artists $40 million per year. No one is paying for that.

Ms. Anne Minh-Thu Quach:

Thank you, Mr. Boyer.

I will let the other panellists respond as well.

Prof. Jeremy de Beer:

Thank you very much, Ms. Quach.[English]

I understand Professor Boyer's position but I take a different view. I don't think that exceptions and limitations like fair use are expropriations of proprietary rights. The default situation is not that a copyright owner has the right to control every use of its work and every time you limit that it's an expropriation. The default is the opposite.

The default position is freedom of expression and the liberty to do whatever you want. We provide copyright protection as an incentive to encourage investments in creativity. To quote a phrase that the Supreme Court of Canada has used from my former graduate supervisor, Professor David Vaver, “user rights are not just loopholes”. I think that's important. It's a different view of the issue.

Mr. Mark Hayes:

I use this often for students. When you think about copyright it's an island and the island has a bunch of little bays, little cut-outs and little eddies and things in it but the island is still the nature of the rights. The island isn't a bigger island that you're cutting parts out of.

The copyright is the entirety of what is granted, including the things that have been carved out of it, these little bays and eddies. It's not an expropriation to look at an exemption. It is a part of the grand bargain between society and creators and users.

Mr. Howard Knopf:

Yes, I enthusiastically disagree with Professor Boyer here. Fair dealing is user rights. The Supreme Court of Canada said that very eloquently and very famously in the 2004 CCH case. They are users rights as much as the right to be paid is a creator right. They are equal and they balance each other.

Professor Boyer is wrong about the $40-million cost of the SD card exception. I was very much, maybe mainly, responsible for the regulation that made that happen. Give me one good reason, Professor Boyer, why the SD card in my phone so I can take pictures of my cat or my grandson should have a tax on it? Why does that need to go to Access Copyright or some other collective? It doesn't make any sense.

Also you mentioned an issue in term extension. I'll give you a very good example right now of why it's important to make the public domain as big as possible. We have a president in the United States who has everybody worried about a lot of things right now—I don't even like to say his name. All of a sudden a certain book by George Orwell, 1984, has become very popular again for obvious reasons. That book has long since been in the public domain in Canada but Americans have to pay $30 or whatever for it and fewer of them will get access to it.

It's very important to get access to the public domain as soon as possible. Even if it's not a popular book like 1984, to have it overprotected by copyright means it's going to be harder for university students, teachers and researchers to get hold of it. There is going to be more uncertainty. There will be a cloud over it. It's going to enter the dreaded category of what we call “orphan works” where somebody owns a copyright but nobody knows who or where to find them. We need to get into the public domain as soon as possible. That's why I'm suggesting the imposition of formalities for that final term of 20 years.

(1655)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll move to Mr. Graham for seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

A comment we've heard a bit is that the five-year revision is too often. I'd like to point out that it has the advantage of giving every MP who ever comes to the House the opportunity to talk about it.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: I also want to follow up on a point that Mr. Albas raised. He commented that the testimony here is under Crown copyright. I think that's not actually the case. We're not subject to the Crown. We're subject to the Speaker.

I'll put that thought into the analyst's head. Perhaps we could revise what copyright we release our report under.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Just read up on it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Just for fun.... At the start of the report it always states that the Speaker grants permission under his copyright.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC):

Through the chair....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Through the chair, yes.

Mr. de Beer, you mentioned that 150 years is an awfully long period of copyright. I tend to agree with that assessment, although it does assume that people are producing stuff from birth to get to 150 years, so maybe it's only 135.

Prof. Jeremy de Beer:

That's a good point.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What is a reasonable period for copyright? What value does society get out of copyright surviving life in the first place?

Prof. Jeremy de Beer:

That's a great theoretical question, but as I mentioned in my remarks, I'm a pragmatist. There's an international agreement called the Berne convention, which sets the minimum term that any member of Berne, which includes Canada, can have. That is the life of the author plus 50 years. That's the international standard. That's what Canada should stick to, in my view.

Mr. Knopf's idea is a great one. If we're going to extend that, there's no reason why we can't make the extension of copyright term subject to formalities. We can't do that for the first life plus 50 under the Berne convention, but it's a brilliant idea to make that happen for the second. It would create all kinds of positive ripple effects—namely, moving towards a registry of copyright as exists for every other kind of property right in the world. We can deal with the problem of unlocatable owners or orphan works and begin to treat copyright like a commodity, like the property right that it is. We can only do that if it's registered. Putting that in as a condition of the extra 20 years of protection is a brilliant idea.

I don't think this committee needs to do that, incidentally, or recommend that. That's part of the NAFTA or the USMCA implementation, but you can certainly consider it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair. You're suggesting that copyright should be a proactive rather than a reactive thing—not an automatic thing.

We had one person here some weeks ago talking about the fact that there are labels under ACANs with copyright for life plus 70 years. Should copyright require registration to even apply in the first place, or can we do that?

Prof. Jeremy de Beer:

We are not allowed to do that under the Berne convention. We can't impose formalities for the life of the author and the first 50 years, but if we're going to extend to life plus 70, we certainly can and we certainly should.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.[Translation]

Mr. Boyer, I have a question.

If I understood correctly, you basically believe, for example, that all products under copyright are not equal and that the length of copyright should not be the same. Did I understand correctly? Each product is different.

Mr. Marcel Boyer:

Of course, every product is different, but the underlying principles used to calculate royalties should be the same.

All products are different in economic terms, including the various forms of artistic expression which comprise the goods or assets under copyright. That said, the underlying principles of competitive value and fair remuneration which, for an economist, mean competitive remuneration in competitive markets for the asset or product sold, should also apply to goods and services under copyright protection.

The practical application will vary, whether it is a composer, an artist, a producer, an author of printed textbooks or of a novel, and so on, but the underlying principles are the same.

I don't know if that answers your question.

(1700)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, more or less. Thank you, Mr. Boyer.

I have questions for everyone and I don't have enough time to ask them all. I will just carry on.[English]

Mr. Knopf, you mentioned in your comments something about looking at the Copyright Act in Australia as it exists, not at the proposal. What is it in the Australian proposal that you don't want us to see?

Mr. Howard Knopf:

Well, you're free to look.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Howard Knopf: In fact, I'll send you material through the clerk.

They have a provision there, section 115A, that deals with site blocking and it's fairly well balanced. I looked at it in detail and there is some recent case law on it. I'm trying to remember the name of the case. Again, I'll send you the information.

It requires rigorous judicial process, rule of law and fairness to the other side. The injunction can't be any longer or broader than absolutely necessary. It's a balanced proposal. The new proposal would get rid of some of the rule of law and protective aspects of it and allow the injunction to be a lot broader and a lot longer and a lot wider than necessary. It might interfere with freedom of expression and a whole bunch of stuff.

I'm not trying to keep a secret from you. I'm just saying that the current version seems to be working really well, but that's not good enough for the big record and movie companies who always want more.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Mr. Howard Knopf:

And the U.K. doesn't have a specific provision, but they have some—I looked at it quickly—reasonably sensible jurisprudence.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Hayes.

Mr. Mark Hayes:

Yes, as I think I tweeted this morning, the Australians have gone all in on site blocking, and they're the first country really to do it. It's a very interesting experiment.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The first democracy to do it.

Mr. Mark Hayes:

Yes, the Chinese didn't even have laws to do it.

They've really gone all in and it's going to be very interesting to see how it turns out. If anything, I would have thought most other countries would want to sit back for the next three, four, five years and see how good or how bad it turns out, as opposed to necessarily following what they did.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Hayes, you offered to talk more about section 30.71 in your opening remarks. You have 30 seconds to do so.

Mr. Mark Hayes:

I had proposed five things in my written provisions that should be in 30.71: it can involve human intervention; it's not limited to automatic processes; it's not limited to instantaneous processes; obviously machine learning is a technological process. These are the things that I think would necessarily be done, but frankly, the kind of proposal that Mr. de Beer is making, where you have a non-exhaustive list of fair use that mentions machine learning, mentions incidental reproduction, I would have thought that would be a solution to so many of these things and would not require a specific list of things that we have to try to deal with on a going-forward basis.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we move to Matt own-the-podium Jeneroux.

That's what it says there.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Nice. All right,

It's good to be back, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

It's good to have you back.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Thank you, witnesses. It's good to see a thorough study of copyright continues, as back in my previous time here.

Mr. Chair, do I have five minutes?

The Chair:

You have, actually, four and a half now.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Thank you.

I do want to come back to your comments, Mr. de Beer. I'm still struggling to understand why, regardless of whether it's five years or it's 10 years in terms of the mandatory review.... I believe that what we're trying to accomplish as a committee is to look at the long view. We're trying to project what we don't know is essentially determined in copyright. There's so much in terms of technology in the last five years. Things like Twitter and social media weren't to the extent they are today.

I've always supported the five-year review, but your raising it has me a little confused and questioning it somewhat. To reconcile the new technology piece with not doing a review at all, help me out a little.

Mr. Knopf, maybe since you hold the same position, you could also comment on this.

Prof. Jeremy de Beer:

One of the problems is that it takes away some of the responsibility to create a technologically neutral act in the first place, because people think they can just fix it again when they reopen it five years later. That's one problem.

Another problem is that it's very politically expedient. I get that. Everybody's coming here. There are 182 witnesses. They all want something, and you can't give everybody everything they want, so it's very nice to say, come back in five years and we'll talk again. It's very politically expedient, but it just means everybody lines up every five years and asks for the same thing. I've been around this for only 15 years, not as long as some of my colleagues here, and really, it's tiring. It's just the same debate over and over again. It's not very helpful.

I think those are really the main two problems. It's a disincentive to draft technologically neutral principles in the first place, and it just gets us on this constant hamster wheel of lobbying.

I'm not saying the act doesn't need to be reopened, but every five years.... The other part about this is that we don't even know. The implementation of the last reforms is just working its way through the court. All of the regulations to tie up the loose ends from the last batch of reforms aren't even in place yet. There was a Supreme Court decision in the last couple of months dealing with the notice and notice provisions.

It's just too soon. We don't know if things are working or not working yet.

(1705)

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Sorry, Mr. Knopf, just before I go to you, I want to follow up on some of that, quickly.

The YouTube exception, for example, it came out of the last review because YouTube was a new thing, if you will. Who knows what five years from now will bring, so in terms of not reviewing it, how do we react to that? Are you saying we put in draft legislation when those exceptions come up? Because then I worry that there are other impacts on certain things, and we may or may not know what those things are.

Prof. Jeremy de Beer:

The YouTube exception, the user-generated content exception, the text and data mining exception, and all of these micro-exceptions for libraries and archives and museums would all be unnecessary if we just put two words in the act: “such as”. It's a much simpler solution that will stand the test of time.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Sorry, Mr. Knopf, go ahead.

Mr. Howard Knopf:

There's an old song. I won't try to sing it. The fundamental things apply as time goes by. It's in Casablanca. Some things just don't change, even since the first copyright act in 1709. Certain principles don't change very much, and they certainly don't change very quickly.

As I said, it's a really bad idea to try to get ahead of things in the interests of being smart and tech-savvy. If anyone had listened to Jack Valenti, Hollywood as we know it might be dead, if his own industry had listened to him.

It's a big mistake to try to react quickly to technology, because these things don't really change. The details do and the market sorts it out. The best copyright act the world has ever seen was the 1911 U.K. act, which was really short and very general and really simple. Thank God, Canada still has the skeleton of that. The U.K. has gone off the deep end with details, and the U.K. judges hate it. Everybody hates it because they move too quickly, too often.

Working on this VCR case was the first thing I did when I joined the government as an analyst back in 1983. I wrote a paper as to why we don't need legislation.

I'll leave you with one other example. In 1997, I believe—or maybe it was 1988; no, I think it was probably 1997—some wise bureaucrat over at heritage inserted an exception in the Copyright Act called the dry-erase board exception. It said it was okay for a teacher to take chalk or a marker and write on a dry-erase board by hand as long as it was then erased with a dry instrument. I did a sarcastic piece in the newspaper, and the cartoonist showed a janitor using a wet brush. It was a question of whether that was infringing. Mercifully, that frankly stupid exception has been gotten rid of, but this shows the level of detail that people can get involved, with all the best intentions, that are completely counterproductive.

Again, I'm happy to agree with Jeremy on this. I was trying to find the quote—Winston Churchill or somebody. An official came to him and said there was a terrible crisis and he must speak to him immediately. Churchill said, if was still a crisis the next day, he should come back and they would talk about it.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're going to move to Mr. Jowhari.

You have five minutes.

(1710)

Mr. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I'll be sharing my time with Mr. Lametti.

In the two and a half minutes that I have, I'd really like to go back to Mr. Hayes.

Mr. Hayes, in your testimony you indicated that there were six issues that you wanted to talk to us about. You highlighted three of those, and then you ran out of time. With all my other questions being answered, I would really like to give you two and a half minutes or two minutes to be able to highlight those three. I know they are part of the submission, but it would be good if everyone could benefit from it in a quick two minutes. Thank you.

Mr. Mark Hayes:

The first one is the charitable exemption. You had some submissions by, I believe, SOCAN and perhaps some others regarding limitations to be put onto the charitable exemption. The charitable exemption has been in our act for almost a hundred years. The only major litigation about it was in the 1940s involving Casa Loma and concerts they put on and this kind of thing.

I represent a number of charities that operate under the charitable exemption. The reason they do is not because their charity is registered under the Income Tax Act, but because their charitable charter specifically says they put on musical presentations. That's what they do. The charitable exemption is specifically intended to deal with their activities, yet SOCAN has continued to argue that, no, it doesn't, because of these restrictions, which now they claim are implied and they're asking you to put in.

In my submission, there are all sorts of things: musical programs, symphonies, church and school groups. They're all going to be very seriously hindered if that change is made.

My friend, Bob Tarantino, came before you and talked about reversion of copyright and suggested taking out the reversion provision. I know Bob well—

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Quickly go through the other two, because you've only got about—

Mr. Mark Hayes:

He just says you should take reversion of copyright out. I don't see any reason. The only reason he really gives is the uncertainty. The uncertainty comes about because of the life of the author. The life of the author is uncertainty about term. It also makes the uncertainty about reversion rights. You're not going to get away from that.

I think it's a widows and orphans provision. It's for those authors and artists who didn't get the money they deserved, mainly because of bad contracts, or they weren't recognized in time. After they die there's a chance for their widows and children to be able to take the copyright back after a period of time. If there's still value, they can earn it. I don't think anybody has pointed out any real reason why that shouldn't happen.

By the way, there is a tiny proportion of copyright works that actually have any value by the time the reversion right comes up. It's actually done in a tiny number of situations.

The last one is about the definition of sound recording. I'm not really going to get into it. I went to the Supreme Court on it. We won at every single level. It's clear what the statute was intended to do. There's a business reason for it. I invite you to go back and look what the Supreme Court of Canada and everybody else said about it. There's absolutely no reason to change the provision except for the fact that the sound recording owners—in other words, the record companies—would like to get some more money.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

I'll turn it over to Mr. Lametti.

Mr. David Lametti (LaSalle—Émard—Verdun, Lib.):

Thank you.

Mr. Hayes, we've heard a number of different ideas on machine learning or data mining exception, ranging from...to your point on incidental reproductions.

Do you think that your idea catches the use of a particular pool of data in order to draw out the numbers and do some sort of analysis?

Mr. Mark Hayes:

Yes, I think it does. You have to remember that what is being asked for is not the right to be able to use every piece of copyright information or data or whatever. I think all of the submissions have made it clear. They're only talking about legally acquired copyright material. They've gone and bought or licensed a copy of the books, the magazines, the movies or whatever.

You're trying to get away from the copyright owner saying that the machine reading the book, listening to the movie, watching the television show, looking at the photographs—which they have to do by making an incidental reproduction because there's no other way for a machine to learn those things—is a copyright event, and that they should be paid more, in addition to the original purchase price or license price for the copyright work.

Mr. David Lametti:

My concern is in the use and the transformation in running the data through. That there might be a claim that the use of it, not necessarily the copy of it, would fall under the ambit of the rights holder.

Mr. Mark Hayes:

It doesn't seem to. Remember that copyright is a bundle of rights. In order for there to be a copyright event, you have to have done one of the rights. My reading a book is not a copyright event. Absent the reproduction part, there should be no reason why a machine reading a book is a copyright event as well.

(1715)

The Chair:

The time is up.

Mr. Albas, you have five minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Mr. Hayes, I'm going back to the charitable exemption.

Say you have a major festival that's charging big dollars for people to come in to hear a musician who may be using someone else's work. That's then surrounded with an exemption that it's for charitable purposes. I don't know about you, but at least where I come from, charitable purposes are about feeding people—either their minds or their stomachs. When people are utilizing large amounts of money, in some cases.... Some of these festivals might be paying someone $100,000 to come in and put on these productions.

Mr. Mark Hayes:

That can happen, but it's relatively rare. In most cases, for these kinds of charitable things, a lot of the performers are contributing their services as well. Yes, it's true that there are costs.

Mr. Dan Albas:

What's the proportionality, though, where there should be some sort of formal test? Someone just can't say they're doing this for charitable purposes.

Mr. Mark Hayes:

There is a formal test.

Mr. Dan Albas:

When there's no one other than the people who are attending that pay for the tickets...?

Mr. Mark Hayes:

That's what I'm saying. There is a formal test. The test came out of the Supreme Court of Canada case dealing the Kiwanis Club and the Casa Loma. The Kiwanis Club lost and had to pay royalties because their charitable charter said nothing about putting on concerts.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Yes.

Mr. Mark Hayes:

That wasn't what they were talking about.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Isn't it our job, though, to look and see what kinds of behaviours are appropriate and what are not and then to set the law? The court may have at least captured it within the context of that particular case, but I do just want to push back and say that not all charitable purposes are equal. Not all festivals are equal. There's a large difference.

I would hope you would agree with that.

Mr. Mark Hayes:

I think this is a hard thing to capture. Look at some of the charitable organizations like the Royal Conservatory of Music. If you look at what they do, between the educational aspect and the presentation aspects and so on, it is absolutely impossible that they aren't serving, not only a charitable purpose but an important purpose in society and in the community.

That should be supported. I can tell you that if they were paying the same amounts as commercial producers, they would not be able to provide all that they do.

Mr. Dan Albas:

If someone is running something similar to a commercial enterprise, there should be some questioning of whether or not it has a charitable purpose.

I thank you for your comments on it.

Professor de Beer, going back to a problem with contracts versus a problem with copyright, you've clearly said that a lot of this is on the contracts. As you said, every time there's this five-year review, everyone says we have a problem here because we don't like the common denominator or the contracts we've signed. What can we do to address this problem, or do we simply say if people make a bad contract, they have to live within those contracts?

Prof. Jeremy de Beer:

The law of contracts provides one outlet if contracts are unconscionable. We can do more on a policy level to support artists and authors in their negotiations with record labels and publishers, but that's not through copyright. That's activities the Department of Canadian Heritage can do outside the copyright regime. We don't need legislative reform to do that. One of the best things we can do—and I've written about this—is to create a certification scheme. Someone's picked up on this idea and created fair trade music so consumers can make informed decisions. Where artists are fairly compensated, consumers can patronize those businesses that are certified to be compensating authors and creators fairly.

There are lots of examples of what we can do, but it's not a copyright problem.

Mr. Dan Albas:

That's fair enough.

Again, we're discussing Crown copyright. I don't see this as being as big an issue, whether it be the Parliament of Canada or the Government of Canada. From what I've seen from some of the briefs we've had is that it seems to be certain courts—not all are the same—and their reporting functions, and some provinces. For example, if a company is trying to set up chatbots, whether federal or provincial, to talk about what labour law obligations someone might have, where you might talk to an AI, you insert the problem and receive an answer.... There are so many regulations now. If someone tries to draw in provincial law or provincial court cases and either can't obtain that information or is sued by the Crown, and it's a reserve power of the Crown, that would be an issue.

How do we get past this? Many different entities may take a different approach.

(1720)

Prof. Jeremy de Beer:

I would like to see us abolish Crown copyright. In light of what I said earlier about not giving everybody their ask and giving everybody what they want, I'm not asking you to do that.

I would note that a Supreme Court of Canada case is coming up. I got news the hearing has just been moved to February; it was supposed to be in January. I'm acting for the University of Ottawa Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic, CIPPIC. We're filing our written submissions in that case next month. Some time in the next three to nine months the Supreme Court of Canada will issue a ruling on the interpretation of Crown copyright, and depending on what they say, it could either solve the problem or exacerbate it. I have to reserve judgment on the Crown copyright issue until we see what the Supreme Court says.

Mr. Dan Albas:

In your opinion, should we continue to consider this, or should we wait for the court case?

Prof. Jeremy de Beer:

You could abolish it or wait.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you.

The Chair:

I hate to be a grinch, but we do have to be out of here by 5:30.

Mr. Sheehan, you have five minutes.[Translation]

Ms. Quach, you have two minutes.[English]

Then we have to go.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thanks to our presenters.

Since the beginning of this study a while ago, there have been a number of proposals from Canadian creators, amendments if you will, that would directly benefit them. I wanted to get your comments on some of them that have been proposed to us. I'll start with the first one, the resale right on visual works of art that allows the creator to receive a percentage of every subsequent sale, so the painter if you will, and then it's sold and sold. Second is granting first ownership of cinematography works to directors and screenwriters as opposed to producers—I think someone touched on it briefly. Then there's a reversionary right that would bring the copyright of a work back to an artist after a set amount of time, regardless of any contracts to the contrary, and finally, granting journalists a remuneration right for the use of their works on digital platforms such as news aggregators. We heard from Facebook at our last session and they had some comments about it.

Would you endorse these kinds of ideas? Do you think they would benefit creators, as opposed to rights holders more generally? What could be any unintended consequences of these proposals?

There are four of them, and I only have five minutes, so maybe Jeremy, Mark and Howard, you each could take a shot at one of them.

Mr. Mark Hayes:

I talked about two of them in my presentation already: the reversion rights and the second one, the cinematographic works.

I don't really have much more to say on those unless you have specific questions. I think both those proposals don't make any sense.

Mr. Howard Knopf:

Bryan Adams, I believe, actually suggested moving the reversionary right back to 25 years after the contract was signed. He had Professor Daniel Gervais, formerly of the University of Ottawa—quite a brilliant guy, who is now at Vanderbilt—say that should be given serious consideration. As for the resale right, it's a rabbit hole that I don't think Canada should go down. It's great for the auction houses. Maybe in some ways it will complicate the art market a whole lot. The art market has flourished very well for thousands of years without it. I don't know why we need it now. Some countries have it and arguably it's ruining the art market in those jurisdictions.

The other things that you mentioned—I don't remember them all, but many of them are just opportunistic. More rights are not necessarily better. Chocolate is good for you. Wine is good for you. Maybe even vodka is good for you, but all of those things in excess can be very bad for you, and maybe even fatal.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

One of them was granting the journalists remuneration rights. It's come up a few times in different testimonies.

Mr. Howard Knopf:

Journalists should be well paid. They do very important work.

If somebody writes for the Toronto Star, they're getting paid a salary. Just because it shows up on the Internet doesn't mean they should get paid again.

Prof. Jeremy de Beer:

That's the article 13 issue, and the link tax and the upload filters. It's going to backfire if we do it. We should absolutely not do it. The other things are a tempest in a teapot. Do whatever you want. It doesn't really matter in the grand scheme of things.

The problem is a different order of magnitude than is the link tax issue. It's the same thing with site blocking. You've heard a lot about site blocking. I think it's a terrible idea to do it in the Copyright Act. The provisions already exist in the rules of civil procedure and they've been well used. People say it's hard to get a site-blocking injunction. It should be hard to get a site-blocking injunction. It's an impediment of free expression and commerce. Most importantly, if, say, you're a victim of revenge porn, you have to go through the usual processes so why should copyright owners be treated any better or differently? It already exists outside of it. Those are the two big ones that I think you have to really worry about.

(1725)

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Talking about some of the newer technologies that have popped up in the last five years, there's been a lot of testimony about Spotify and how Spotify functions. A lot of the artists are pointing out that revenue in the music industry as a whole has exploded. All the data will show that because of things like Spotify that replace your BearShares and all those other illegal activities...but in the opinion of Canadian creators—and they have data to suggest this—it's not keeping up at the same rate.

Do you have any suggestions, through either copyright or other means or mechanisms, on how that might be resolved?

Mr. Howard Knopf:

The Copyright Board, as I said, should be more intrusive. They should force these collectives and parties to be more transparent about their internal operations and about how much money is actually getting through to the creators. They should not allow a collective or a corporation to operate with a Copyright Board monopoly if that outfit is not behaving fairly. The competition commissioner should get involved, which they've never done but they have the power to do. There are some giant, huge companies out there that are now, in hindsight, making Microsoft look like an angel, and that require anti-trust scrutiny.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Sorry. We are down to the wire. If you'd like to answer that question in writing, please send the answer to the clerk.

We have two minutes left.

Madam Quach, it's all yours. [Translation]

Ms. Anne Minh-Thu Quach:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

My question is twofold. I would like to ask Mr. Boyer what he thinks about defending artists' rights, especially when it comes to copyright protection on the Internet.

It is difficult. There is a lot of uncertainty and costs if one wishes to have one's rights upheld as a copyright holder for the use of works on the Internet, and there are two reasons for this. The first, is that it is tricky for an artist to get paid. Two months ago, the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage heard David Bussières, who composes, writes lyrics and sings for the group called Alfa Rococo. He explained that if a song is played 6,000 times on the radio, he will receive over $17,000 in royalties but if the same song is played 30,000 times on Spotify, he is paid a paltry $10 or so. What can we do to solve this problem?

Sometimes, artists' works find a way onto various platforms or are used elsewhere. How can we help our artists?

Mr. Marcel Boyer:

I don't know how much time is left, but I will try to answer in 30 seconds.

Spotify and commercial radio are two completely different technologies, and the way they calculate royalties owed on music is very different.

One of the reasons why Canadian artists are so badly compensated for streaming is that the Copyright Board of Canada uses commercial radio and equivalent playing time to estimate listener numbers, and so on. As the method used for calculating royalties for commercial radio is not competitive, it doesn't meet the criteria for remuneration in a competitive market.

Obviously, all this has been transferred to streaming and has also hurt our lyricists, our composers and our artists.

I said that we should avoid the sequential calculation of royalties, whereby previous decisions inform current decisions. In the case of streaming, the Copyright Board of Canada did precisely what it shouldn't have, and lyricists, composers and artists are paying the price.

I won't say anymore because the chair is telling me to stop.

The Chair:

I have to do so because another committee will start up very soon.

(1730)

[English]

The meeting is adjourned.

If you have answers to questions that we didn't get through, please send them in to the clerk.

I want to thank you all for being here today. It was another great session.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(1555)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Bienvenue à tous à la réunion 140. Nous poursuivons notre examen quinquennal de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Un député: Ce fut une longue étude.

Le président: Elle est presque terminée. Nous entamons la dernière droite.

Premièrement, nous avons des témoins aujourd'hui. Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas pu arriver plus tôt. Nous devions voter, ce qui semble avoir préséance sur tout le reste.

Nous accueillons aujourd'hui, à titre personnel, Jeremy de Beer, professeur de droit, Faculté de droit, Université d'Ottawa. Nous recevons Marcel Boyer, professeur émérite d'économie, Département de sciences économiques, Université de Montréal. Nous avons Mark Hayes, associé, Hayes eLaw LLP, et nous accueillons enfin Howard P. Knoft, avocat spécialisé en droit d'auteur. M. Knopf est avocat au cabinet Macera & Jarzyna.

D'accord, nous avons perdu une demi-heure. Vous avez jusqu'à sept minutes pour prononcer vos remarques liminaires. Plus elles seront courtes, mieux ce sera, car cela nous donnera plus de temps pour les questions. Un autre comité doit se réunir ici à 17 h 30.

Pourquoi ne pas commencer par M. de Beer? Vous avez jusqu'à sept minutes.

M. Jeremy de Beer (professeur de droit, Faculté de droit, Université d'Ottawa, à titre personnel):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président et mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité.

Je m'appelle Jeremy de Beer. Je suis professeur de droit à l'Université d'Ottawa et membre du Centre de recherche en droit, technologie et société, mais je témoigne aujourd'hui à titre personnel.

Je n'offre au Comité que mon propre point de vue, mais fondé sur mon expérience d'ancien conseiller juridique, de conseiller auprès de la Commission du droit d'auteur du Canada ainsi que de conseiller auprès d'autres sociétés de collecte de droits, de groupes d'utilisateurs, de ministères et d'organisations internationales. Pendant plus de 15 ans, j'ai élaboré et dispensé des cours sur le droit d'auteur, défendu des dizaines d'affaires en matière de droit d'auteur et de politique numérique devant la Cour suprême et publié nombre d'articles dans ce domaine.

J'aimerais seulement mentionner en particulier deux des récents articles que m'a demandé d'écrire le gouvernement du Canada. Le premier a été une étude empirique largement citée sur le processus de tarification de la Commission du droit d'auteur, que j'ai menée pour le compte de Patrimoine canadien et de ce qu'on appelle maintenant Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique Canada. Le second a été un examen rigoureux pour ISDEC des méthodes et des conclusions tirées de politiques fondées sur des données probantes. Je cite ces études pour insister sur le fait que mes vues ne sont pas fondées sur les intérêts spéciaux de certaines industries ou de simples suppositions, mais sur des recherches rigoureuses qui, je l'espère, aideront le Comité à prendre des décisions éclairées.

C'est la troisième fois que je témoigne devant un comité parlementaire en l'espace d'une semaine environ. La semaine dernière, mon témoignage devant le Comité sénatorial permanent des banques et du commerce portait sur les réformes qu'on propose d'apporter dans le projet de loi C-86, Loi d'exécution du budget, à la Commission du droit d'auteur et à la gestion collective du droit d'auteur. Hier, j'ai témoigné devant le Comité permanent du patrimoine canadien dans le cadre de son étude sur les modèles de rémunération pour les artistes et les créateurs, qui va dans la même veine que l'étude que vous faites de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Je ne vais pas répéter ce témoignage, mais j'aimerais souligner les points les plus importants. Premièrement, comme je l'ai dit au comité des banques, les ressources et les réformes proposées à la Commission et aux sociétés de gestion sont bonnes dans l'ensemble, mais il vous reste du travail important à accomplir sur le plan des politiques. J'ai fait valoir au comité du patrimoine que si les artistes ont des problèmes de rémunération, les droits d'auteur pourraient ne pas en être du tout la cause profonde, mais plutôt le déséquilibre du pouvoir et les contrats injustes avec les éditeurs, les maisons de disques et d'autres intermédiaires. J'ai dit que si le gouvernement souhaite élargir les droits de quiconque, il pourrait commencer par reconnaître et affirmer que le droit d'auteur s'applique aussi aux droits des peuples autochtones sur leurs connaissances et leur culture.

Par-dessus tout, je pense que les recommandations du comité du patrimoine et du vôtre doivent tenir compte de la prolongation dramatique des périodes de protection des droits d'auteurs dans l'accord commercial le plus récent du Canada avec les États-Unis et le Mexique, l'AEUMC.

Sur ce, permettez-moi d'aborder l'examen législatif de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur que le Comité a pour mandat de mener. Vous n'avez pas la tâche facile. J'ai vu les 100 mémoires qui ont déjà été présentés, et la liste des 182 témoins que vous avez entendus à ce jour. Voilà ce que j'en retire. C'est bien trop tôt depuis la dernière série de modifications pour envisager une refonte importante de la législation canadienne sur le droit d'auteur. J'estime que la recommandation la plus importante que ce comité puisse formuler est d'arrêter de constamment réformer le droit d'auteur. C'est non seulement peine perdue, mais aussi contreproductif de rouvrir la loi tous les cinq ans, comme l'article 92 l'exige actuellement. La liste de groupes d'intérêts spéciaux qui viennent vous voir pour quémander fait tourner la tête.

La Loi a été modernisée. C'est le mot qui a été employé, on a parlé de la loi de « modernisation » en 2012. Avant, la durée de protection des droits d'auteur avait été grandement prolongée en 1997; elle l'avait aussi été en 1989. Comment une personne peut arguer, de façon crédible, qu'elle est en mesure de prouver que la dernière série de réformes fonctionne ou non? Comment peut-on dire sérieusement que la loi est déjà désuète? Ces examens fréquents ne sont pas gratuits. Ils supposent des dépenses et des coûts de substitution que vous pourriez affecter à autre chose et, par-dessus tout, ils comportent de grands risques en matière de politique.

Pour être bien clair, je ne laisse pas entendre que le droit d'auteur n'est pas important. Au contraire, c'est une question cruciale. Je fais valoir que nous avons besoin — et nous avons — des principes neutres sur le plan technologique, et nous avons besoin de temps pour bien les mettre en oeuvre et les interpréter, en pratique et en cour, et ensuite pour tenir compte des principes avant de donner aux lobbyistes une autre chance.

(1600)



Lorsqu'on prend les choses sous cet angle, je pense qu'il est plus facile de rejeter une bonne partie des arguments et des recommandations qui sont formulés, par exemple, les dommages-intérêts préétablis pour faire pression sur les établissements d'enseignement afin qu'ils achètent des licences qu'ils ne souhaitent peut-être pas avoir ou dont ils n'ont pas besoin, les programmes de blocage de sites Web ou des injonctions spéciales pour donner aux titulaires de droits d'auteur plus de pouvoirs procéduraux que d'autres plaignants, des taxes sur les iPod ou l'Internet ou d'autres subventions croisées, et la liste continue.

Cela dit, je pense que le Comité devrait tenir compte d'un élément qui a récemment changé les choses, soit la prolongation dramatique de la durée de protection des droits d'auteur exigée par l'AEUMC. Cet accord donnera aux titulaires de droits d'auteur deux décennies complètes de monopole supplémentaires. Bientôt, au Canada, les droits d'auteur s'appliqueront pendant la vie d'un auteur et 70 ans après sa mort. En moyenne, si vous prenez l'espérance de vie, nous devrons attendre 150 ans — un siècle et demi — pour faire fond librement sur les oeuvres dans le domaine public et les embellir.

Je comprends pourquoi nous l'avons fait. Je suis pragmatique. Si c'est ce qu'il a fallu faire pour sauver le libre-échange en Amérique du Nord, ainsi soit-il. Cependant, cela signifie que les dispositions du Canada en matière de protection de la durée des droits d'auteur sont parallèles à celles des États-Unis, mais pas les soupapes de sûreté, comme l'utilisation équitable, qui sont des moteurs de l'innovation si cruciaux. Sans mesures de contrepoids pour aligner la marge de manoeuvre du Canada et des États-Unis en matière de droits d'auteur, les innovateurs canadiens seraient grandement désavantagés.

Compte tenu du temps, je vais conclure en vous donnant mon opinion générale en la matière. Pour que la théorie du libre-échange en ce qui concerne les oeuvres protégées par des droits d'auteur fonctionne en pratique, le seuil et le plafond de protection doivent être harmonisés. Nous ne pouvons pas prendre que les mauvais côtés de la loi étatsunienne sans prendre aussi les bons, alors ma première recommandation pour le Comité est de s'assurer que dans toutes les mesures qu'il prend, il tienne compte dans son rapport des changements que l'AEUMC apportera.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Français]

Monsieur Boyer, c'est votre tour, et vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. Marcel Boyer (professeur émérite d’économie, Département de sciences économiques, Université de Montréal, à titre personnel):

Je vous remercie beaucoup de votre invitation.

Il existe un conflit entre les créateurs et les utilisateur. De toute évidence, les créateurs veulent profiter de la valeur qu'ont leurs créations pour les utilisateurs. Les utilisateurs, eux, veulent minimiser les paiements pour cet intrant dans leur modèle d'affaires, afin de canaliser les économies vers d'autres moyens d'atteindre leurs buts, leurs objectifs ou leurs missions. Par exemple, deux cas particuliers sont devant nous: l'utilisation, dans le domaine de l'éducation, des budgets de droits d'auteur pour des bourses d'études ou d'autres services destinés aux étudiants; et l'utilisation des budgets de droits d'auteur pour des investissements dans des installations de radiodiffusion dans de petits marchés ou de petites communautés.

S'agit-il d'un conflit courant entre les acheteurs et les vendeurs? La réponse est oui et non, et je vais vous expliquer pourquoi. Comme je suis un économiste, je vais vous parler de ce que nous enseigne l'efficacité ou l'optimalité économique quant à ce conflit.

(1605)

[Traduction]

Les oeuvres protégées par un droit d'auteur ont deux caractéristiques. Premièrement, ce sont des biens d'information, ou des actifs — c'est ce que je vais dire — si bien qu'une fois que ces biens ou actifs sont produits ou fixés, leur utilisation ou leur consommation ne les détruit pas. Ils demeurent disponibles maintenant et à l'avenir pour d'autres utilisateurs ou consommateurs. Ce serait différent des biens publics usuels, qui doivent être produits tous les ans, comme la défense nationale ou la sécurité publique, par exemple.

Le second point porte sur les technologies numériques. Le changement exact dans le monde du droit d'auteur a été de réduire à zéro ou presque le coût de reproduction et de dissémination des oeuvres protégées par des droits d'auteur, qu'il s'agisse de musique ou de livres; la dissémination maximale devient donc possible. La numérisation remet en cause le délicat équilibre entre les droits des créateurs et ceux des utilisateurs. Le niveau d'exclusivité privilégié par le droit d'auteur est peut-être devenu trop sévère pour le monde numérique, d'où le conflit auquel nous sommes aujourd'hui confrontés.[Français]

Pour les économistes, les solutions analytiques à ce type de problème existent, et elles sont étudiées depuis plusieurs décennies.

Une allocation de premier rang, l'optimum, dans l'allocation des ressources exigerait un prix égale à zéro pour ce type de bien ou d'actif. Cela assurerait une dissémination maximale de ces biens. Le problème est comment rémunérer les créateurs dans un contexte semblable.

Les solutions que les économistes ont étudiées sont des allocations de second rang, ou des optimums contraints, où on fixerait un prix plus grand que zéro pour assurer une compensation juste et équitable aux titulaires de droits, mais en essayant d'obtenir la plus grande dissémination possible ou une combinaison de ces deux types de solution.

Pour appliquer cette solution, ou ces types de solution, il nous faut connaître la valeur du produit dont il est question. Quelle est la valeur de marché concurrentiel des oeuvres protégées vu leur caractéristique de biens ou d'actifs d'information et vu les technologies numériques qui ont changé la donne dans le domaine commercial, rendant l'émergence du marché concurrentiel ou la vente de gré à gré pratiquement impossible?

Comment arriver à solutionner ce que j'ai appelé, dans l'une de mes publications, le noeud gordien du monde du corporatif d'aujourd'hui?[Traduction]

Nous pouvons arriver à une solution en faisant quatre changements clés.

Premièrement, il faut s'éloigner des heuristiques circulaires actuelles et inférer directement la valeur concurrentielle à partir de l'observation des comportements et des choix des utilisateurs. C'est possible. On ne le fait pas à l'heure actuelle. On dit qu'on va fixer les droits aujourd'hui à ce niveau parce qu'on l'a fait il y a deux ou quatre ans. En conséquence, on est limité par ces décisions.

Les dispositions actuelles de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, y compris les nombreuses exceptions de toutes sortes, et leur application sont clairement désavantageuses pour les titulaires de droits. La sous-rémunération des créateurs, par rapport aux repères de marché concurrentiel, constitue un frein important au développement d'une économie plus efficace et dynamique. Cette sous-compensation s'élève à plusieurs centaines de millions de dollars par an au Canada.[Français]

En deuxième lieu, il faut éviter la stigmatisation des créateurs, dépeints comme freinant le développement de l'économie numérique et la diffusion maximale des oeuvres grâce aux exceptions, y compris l'utilisation équitable.

Qui, outre que les créateurs, devrait payer pour ces politiques publiques?

Voici un premier exemple.

En 2012, le gouvernement a adopté un règlement visant à exclure les cartes microSD et autres cartes similaires de la définition de « support d'enregistrement audio », empêchant ainsi la Commission du droit d'auteur d'imposer une redevance sur ces cartes.

Voici l'argument du gouvernement, issu d'une publication gouvernementale: Une telle redevance augmenterait les frais pour les fabricants et les exportateurs de ces cartes, frais qui seraient indirectement transmis aux détaillants et aux consommateurs. [...] ce qui influerait de manière négative les activités cybercommerciales et la participation du Canada à l'économie numérique.

J'ai ajouté « [sic] » à cette citation, voulant indiquer par là que cela pourrait bien ramener le Canada à l'âge de pierre.

Voici la troisième politique.

(1610)

[Traduction]

Amener à la table tous les principaux groupes de bénéficiaires et les rendre solidairement responsables d'assurer la rémunération juste, équitable et concurrentielle des créateurs. C'est possible. Une longue liste de publications économiques montrent comment cela peut être fait et pourquoi ce devrait l'être. [Français]

En quatrième lieu, le processus actuel de détermination séquentielle des redevances rend difficile la réalisation de réformes et d'ajustements significatifs.

Je l'ai mentionné tout à l'heure, lorsqu'on décide d'une redevance ou d'un niveau de tarifs, on est tenu de respecter ce qui a été décidé l'an dernier ou il y a deux ans dans un domaine similaire. Il faut en arriver à ce que toutes ces décisions prises conjointement et au même moment de manière à favoriser l'adaptation aux changements technologiques.

Étant donné que le temps file, je n'aurai pas le temps d'approfondir les principes clés du défi de la tarification du droit d'auteur, mais je peux les mentionner:[Traduction]

Le principe de neutralité technologique ou des conditions de concurrences équitables, le principe de la valeur de marché concurrentiel ou d'équilibre, le principe d'efficacité socio-économique, et le principe de séparation. Ce dernier principe énonce qu'il n'est ni nécessaire ni optimal que les redevances payées par les utilisateurs primaires soient égales à la compensation de marché concurrentiel des créateurs. La radio commerciale ne signifie pas que ce qu'ils devraient payer est ce que les auteurs, les compositeurs et les interprètes devraient recevoir comme compensation.[Français]

L'économie d'une politique publique de la culture, c'est vraiment l'éléphant dans la pièce, aux côtés des utilisateurs et créateurs. En éducation, il y a une séparation entre ce que paient les utilisateurs, c'est-à-dire les parents et les élèves, et ce que reçoivent en compensation les fournisseurs de services et de contenus, à savoir les enseignants, les professionnels et le personnel de soutien.

En santé, il y a une séparation entre ce que paient les utilisateurs, soit les patients, et ce que reçoivent en compensation les fournisseurs de services de santé, soit les médecins, les infirmières, les professionnels et le personnel de soutien.

On peut aussi faire ce genre de séparation dans le domaine culturel.

Je pense que c'est un élément fondamental de la réforme à laquelle on devrait aspirer.

Plutôt que de vous en parler, je terminerai en vous invitant à consulter un certain nombre de publications dans lesquelles j'ai développé ces idées et qui pourraient être utiles au Comité pour donner des directives à la réforme du droit d'auteur.

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Traduction]

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Hayes. Vous avez sept minutes tout au plus.

M. Mark Hayes (associé, Hayes eLaw LLP, à titre personnel):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je ne suis pas professeur, et je n'ai certainement pas à mon actif la longue liste de publications de mes collègues ici présents. Je suis dans le domaine depuis environ 35 ans, et j'ai touché à pas mal tous les aspects du droit d'auteur.

Vous verrez dans ma lettre de présentation que j'ai dressé une liste de certaines des personnes que j'ai représentées. J'ai passé beaucoup de temps auprès de la Commission du droit d'auteur; j'ai notamment entendu le professeur Boyer et ses théories dans pas mal d'affaires.

Aujourd'hui, je veux parler de questions pratiques. J'en ai abordé six dans mes mémoires écrits. Comme mon temps est limité, je ne parlerai brièvement que de trois d'entre elles aujourd'hui.

La première est celle que j'appelle l'amende relatives aux redevances. Depuis un certain temps, la Loi sur le droit d'auteur contient une disposition qui offre un outil important aux sociétés de gestion collective. Dans les situations où un utilisateur est sujet à un tarif approuvé, mais qu'il refuse ou néglige de payer, la société de gestion collective est forcée d'intenter une action en justice. Si elle obtient gain de cause, elle peut percevoir de trois à dix fois le montant des redevances.

L'intention de cet article est vraiment louable. Les utilisateurs ne devraient pas avoir le droit de refuser de payer et, après le fait, de ne payer que ce qu'ils auraient dû payer dès le départ. On doit leur imposer une amende quelconque. Cependant, j'ai constaté que les sociétés de gestion collective ont bien trop souvent invoqué cette disposition pour menacer les titulaires de licences dans des différends légitimes sur le montant des redevances qu'ils devraient payer.

J'estime que le recours des sociétés de gestion collective à cette disposition pour essayer de faire pression sur les titulaires de licences pour qu'ils accèdent à leurs demandes, qu'elles soient ou non raisonnables, appropriées ou justifiées, est injuste et ne constitue certainement pas une approche équilibrée à l'égard des tarifs de droit d'auteur.

Je vais vous donner un exemple très simple. Imaginez que le propriétaire d'un théâtre qui présente une comédie musicale calcule que les redevances qui en découlent sont de 1 000 $. Il paie, ou offre de payer, les 1 000 $, mais la SOCAN, la société de gestion collective qui prélèverait les redevances, lui dit: « Nous croyons que c'est 1 500 $. Si vous ne payez pas ce montant, nous allons vous poursuivre et obtenir entre trois et dix fois le montant que nous aurions dû obtenir ».

Que fera le propriétaire du théâtre? Il peut tenir son bout et dire à la SOCAN de le poursuivre, mais il risque de devoir payer entre 4 500 $ et 15 000 $ de redevances si son interprétation est jugée être erronée, ce qui pourrait être le cas, alors que le montant en litige était de 500 $. Par conséquent, à cause de ce risque, le propriétaire du théâtre est essentiellement forcé d'accéder à la demande de la SOCAN et de payer le montant exigé, même si son interprétation de ce qu'il devait était correcte.

Selon moi, ce scénario n'illustre pas une application adéquate de cet article. J'ai participé à des affaires dans lesquelles cette menace a été proférée alors que des montants 100 fois plus élevés entraient en jeu. Vous pouvez imaginer les risques qu'on prend à ce moment-là.

J'estime que cet article devrait clarifier que les dispositions sur les redevances punitives ne s'appliquent pas lorsqu'un utilisateur fait valoir un différend légitime concernant l'applicabilité ou le calcul des redevances dans un tarif approuvé. J'ai suggéré une formulation appropriée dans mon mémoire écrit.

La deuxième question que je veux soulever est celle de la paternité d'oeuvres audiovisuelles. Certains organismes ont témoigné devant vous. Hier, les représentants de certaines organisations ont témoigné devant le Comité permanent du patrimoine canadien et laissé entendre que la loi devrait préciser lequel des créateurs qui contribuent à l'oeuvre audiovisuelle devrait s'en voir attribuer la paternité. Je parle notamment de la Guilde canadienne des réalisateurs et de la Writers Guild, qui ont suggéré que la notion voulant que la paternité d'une oeuvre audiovisuelle revienne au réalisateur et au scénariste soit bien ancrée dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Les droits d'auteur de certaines oeuvres, en particulier les oeuvres audiovisuelles comme les films et les émissions de télévision, requièrent beaucoup de contributions de la part de nombreux créateurs. Voilà pourquoi il peut être vraiment difficile de déterminer la paternité de l'oeuvre.

C'est ce que j'appelle un problème à long terme et non à court terme. À court terme, le producteur de ces oeuvres audiovisuelles obtient, par contrat, toutes les licences ou les cessions de tous les droits à court terme qui sont nécessaires à la distribution de l'oeuvre.

Cependant, une partie des droits entourant l'oeuvre audiovisuelle dépend de la paternité du projet. Par exemple, la durée du mandat est fondée sur la vie de l'auteur. Le moment où le droit de retour est applicable dépend de la vie de ce dernier. À un moment donné — pas à court terme, pas quand l'oeuvre est diffusée au cinéma — après que certains des créateurs qui y ont contribué ont commencé à mourir, la paternité de l'oeuvre devient soudainement pertinente.

À l'heure actuelle, ce n'est pas clair. J'avoue qu'il y a lieu de clarifier la chose. Il ne fait aucun doute que la proposition de la Guilde des réalisateurs et de la Writers Guild a éclairci la question, mais est-ce la bonne réponse?

(1615)



Les États-Unis sont dans une situation plutôt unique parce qu'ils ont créé ce qui s'appelle le « travail à la commande ». Un producteur de films ou de télévision peut conclure des contrats et être ensuite considéré comme l'auteur. Ce n'est toutefois pas le cas au Canada et dans la plupart des pays de l'OCDE. La paternité de l'oeuvre demeure floue. Dans certains pays européens, la paternité est attribuée à d'autres créateurs, dont le réalisateur et le scénariste ainsi que, dans certains cas, le directeur de la photographie et l'auteur de la musique, de même que d'autres personnes. Une fois de plus, cela peut donner lieu à de l'incertitude.

La désignation de certaines personnes élimine effectivement cette incertitude, mais cela crée un certain nombre de problèmes, que j'ai expliqué dans mon mémoire. Je vais juste en souligner deux.

Premièrement, de nombreuses oeuvres audiovisuelles n'ont pas de réalisateur et de scénariste. L'exemple parfait est celui des jeux d'ordinateur, qui sont d'importantes oeuvres audiovisuelles. À vrai dire, cela représente au Canada une industrie plus grande que celle des films et de la télévision. Il n'y a pas de réalisateurs ni de scénaristes. Comment pourraient-ils en être les auteurs?

Deuxièmement, si vous optez pour une règle comme celle-ci, qui est le contraire de la règle sur la paternité des États-Unis, cela risque vraiment de poser problème à la très importante industrie de production cinématographique et télévisuelle au Canada. Vous voulez faire preuve d'une grande prudence avant de compromettre cette industrie.

Enfin, je veux parler brièvement de l'exemption concernant l'apprentissage machine, dont vous avez certainement entendu parler. Plusieurs personnes ont comparu devant vous. Je crois qu'il est très important d'avoir une sorte d'exemption visant les reproductions accessoires créées par l'apprentissage machine.

Cependant, j'estime que s'il y a une chose que nous avons apprise au cours des 20 ou 30 dernières années de réforme du droit d'auteur, c'est que la mise en place de dispositions qui portent précisément sur une technologie en développement n'est pas une bonne façon de légiférer. La raison en est simple: la technologie évolue pendant l'étude et le processus d'adoption de la mesure législative. Vous allez poursuivre sans cesse un lapin qui a toujours une longueur d'avance sur vous. À mon avis, ce qui compte, c'est de s'attaquer à la base du problème.

Quelle est alors la base du problème dont on a parlé en ce qui a trait à l'apprentissage machine? C'est une chose qui s'appelle la reproduction accessoire. Ce qui se produit, dans des processus technologiques comme l'apprentissage machine et ainsi de suite, c'est une série de ces petites reproductions qui n'ont absolument aucune répercussion économique. Elles ne sont pas vendues ni louées à qui que ce soit. Elles permettent toutefois à la technologie d'exister.

La dernière fois que nous avons effectué une réforme majeure du droit d'auteur, nous avons créé l'article 30.71 intitulé « Reproductions temporaires pour processus technologiques ». Tout le monde pensait que cela allait fonctionner, qu'on s'occuperait ainsi de ces reproductions. Malheureusement, en 2016, la Commission du droit d'auteur a pris une décision qui a considérablement limité la portée de l'article, le rendant essentiellement inutile.

Dans mon mémoire, ce que je propose si l'apprentissage machine nous préoccupe — et cela devrait certainement être le cas —, c'est d'apporter des correctifs à l'article 30.71 pour rétablir la solide exemption que nous voulions avoir pour ces processus technologiques et qui a été largement éliminée compte tenu de l'interprétation de la Commission. J'ai quelques recommandations dans mon mémoire. Je serais heureux d'en parler. Je pense que la révision de l'article 30.71 permettrait au Canada et à ses chefs de file en matière de technologie d'être mieux placés face aux futures technologies, que nous ne connaissons pas encore. Pour être franc, je ne peux pas deviner ce qu'elles seront et je suis pas mal certain que la plupart d'entre vous ne le peuvent pas plus.

Merci.

(1620)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Pour terminer les exposés, nous allons entendre M. Knopf, pendant sept minutes.

M. Howard Knopf (avocat, Macera & Jarzyna, LLP, à titre personnel):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Bonjour, mesdames et messieurs les députés. C'est moi aussi la troisième fois que je suis ici cette semaine. Comme l'a dit un ancien premier ministre, c'est un tour du chapeau.

Je ne vais pas répéter ce que j'ai dit au comité sénatorial des banques et hier au comité du patrimoine, mise à part une chose que j'ai mentionnée hier.

J'ai dit qu'il n'y a pas d'« écart de valeur » dans le système de droit d'auteur. Il y a toutefois de graves « écarts de valeur », comme je les appelle, dans les fausses nouvelles qui circulent ces jours-ci au sujet de la propriété intellectuelle en général et de la révision de la législation canadienne sur le droit d'auteur en particulier.

Je vais parler aujourd'hui de quelques autres problèmes et en signaler quelques-uns dont je parlerai plus en détail dans le mémoire que je vais présenter le 10 décembre ou plus tôt cette année.

Aujourd'hui, nous devons d'abord préciser que ce ne sont pas tous les utilisateurs qui sont assujettis aux tarifs de la Commission du droit d'auteur. Ce qui saute aux yeux — et c'est la deuxième chose aujourd'hui —, c'est la question de savoir si les tarifs sont obligatoires. Ce n'est pas le cas. C'est ce que j'ai fait valoir avec succès à la Cour suprême du Canada il y a trois ans, mais la majorité des instances du droit d'auteur au Canada de nos jours refuse de reconnaître cette décision ou s'y oppose activement.

Un tarif qui établit le maximum à payer pour un billet de train entre Ottawa et Toronto ne pose aucun problème. Nous avions ce genre de tarifs avant la déréglementation, mais les passagers étaient toujours libres de prendre l'avion, l'autobus, leur propre voiture, une limousine, leur bicyclette ou les autres moyens légaux et probablement non réglementés.

Le choix et la concurrence sont essentiels non seulement pour les utilisateurs, mais aussi pour les créateurs. L'entreprise Access Copyright demande beaucoup trop d'argent aux éducateurs pour bien trop peu, et elle ne paye vraiment pas assez ses créateurs. En fait, ils ne reçoivent en moyenne que 190 $ de l'entreprise proprement dite et de leur portion des éditeurs.

Le litige qui oppose actuellement Access Copyright et l'Université York est intense et se trouve actuellement à l'étape de l'appel, et la Cour fédérale doit trancher un autre litige impliquant des commissions scolaires. Malheureusement, au tribunal de première instance, l'Université York n'a pas réussi à régler la question de savoir si les tarifs approuvés définitifs sont obligatoires.

Espérons que la Cour d'appel fédérale et, au besoin, la Cour suprême feront les choses correctement le moment venu, mais nous ne pouvons pas en être certains. La partie adverse exerce d'énormes pressions sur vous dans ce dossier, notamment au moyen de propositions sournoises et malhonnêtes comme l'imposition d'un régime de dommages-intérêts minimaux d'origine législative qui prévoit de 3 à 10 fois le montant, en faisant valoir de façon totalement inappropriée une symétrie avec le régime de la SOCAN, qui est ainsi pour de bonnes raisons qui remontent à plus de 80 années, mais qui serait tout à fait inapproprié pour des tarifs autres que ceux du régime de droit d'exécution. En fait, M. Hayes a signalé des problèmes même dans le régime de la SOCAN.

Je vous exhorte, pour accroître la certitude — comme se plaisent à le dire les avocats et les rédacteurs législatifs —, à codifier et à éclaircir ce que la Cour suprême a statué en 2015, ce qui correspond aussi à d'autres décisions de la Cour suprême et d'autres instances qui remontent à des dizaines d'années, à savoir que les tarifs de la Commission du droit d'auteur sont obligatoires pour les sociétés de gestion, mais pas pour les utilisateurs, qui demeurent libres de choisir la meilleure façon pour eux de satisfaire en toute légalité leurs besoins en la matière.

Le deuxième point que je veux faire valoir aujourd'hui, c'est que nous devons garder les fins prévues à l'article 29 pour l'utilisation équitable et ajouter les mots « telles que ». La Cour suprême du Canada a déjà ajouté le concept de l'éducation dans l'utilisation équitable avant l'entrée en vigueur des modifications de 2012. Les États-Unis autorisent une utilisation équitable « à des fins telles que » — et je mets l'accent sur ces mots — la critique, la formulation de commentaires, les reportages, l'enseignement, y compris en effectuant de multiples copies qui seront utilisées dans les salles de classe.

Je vous exhorte à ne pas tomber dans le piège en supprimant le mot « éducation » de l'article 29 et à plutôt ajouter ces deux petits mots, « telles que », comme l'ont fait nos collègues et voisins américains il y a 42 ans.

Le troisième point que je veux faire valoir aujourd'hui, c'est que nous devons nous assurer que les droits relatifs à l'utilisation équitable ne peuvent pas être bafoués à l'aide d'un contrat. En 1986, la Cour suprême du Canada, dans une affaire importante, mais peu connue, a statué que les consommateurs ne peuvent pas perdre leurs droits statutaires en concluant un contrat ou en y renonçant lorsque, par exemple, on en vient au droit de chaque personne de rembourser son hypothèque tous les cinq ans. Nous devons préciser et codifier un principe similaire voulant que les droits relatifs à l'utilisation équitable et d'autres exceptions et droits importants des utilisateurs puissent être perdus en signant un contrat ou en y renonçant.

Quatrièmement, nous devons explicitement prendre des mesures techniques de protection — des dispositions soumises à l'utilisation équitable. Nous devons préciser que les droits des utilisateurs relativement à l'utilisation équitable s'appliquent au contournement des mesures techniques de protection, au moins pour ce qui est des fins prévues à l'article 29 pour l'utilisation équitable, et d'un grand nombre, voire la totalité des autres exceptions prévues dans la loi s'il y a lieu.

(1625)



Cinquièmement, nous avons besoin de mesures d'atténuation pour le pays. Mon collègue, Jeremy, a commencé à utiliser le mot « atténuation » après la conclusion de l'AEUMC, et il a soulevé de bons points. Nous devons atténuer les dommages causés par la prolongation de la durée du droit d'auteur sous le gouvernement Harper, qui l'avait profondément enfoui dans un projet de loi omnibus d'exécution du budget — avez-vous entendu parler de ces projets de loi dernièrement? — et par le gouvernement actuel dans l'AEUMC. Ces concessions pourraient coûter au Canada des centaines de millions de dollars par année, et pire encore maintenant, elles doivent être accordées à l'Union européenne et à tous nos autres partenaires de l'Accord sur les ADPIC de l'OMC compte tenu des principes de la nation la plus favorisée et du traitement national auxquels le Canada doit rester fidèle. Une petite mesure d'atténuation pourrait être l'imposition d'exigences et de droits de renouvellement pour ces années supplémentaires de protection qui ne sont pas exigées par la Convention de Berne.

Sixièmement, nous devons examiner attentivement les problèmes d'application de la loi. Je sais que vous subissez d'énormes pressions de la part de lobbyistes et d'avocats bien financés, puissants et énergiques qui font obstacle sur place. Je ne suis pas convaincu que nous avons besoin de nouvelles mesures législatives dans ce dossier, mais j'examine la question de près et je vais peut-être écrire davantage à ce sujet. Entre-temps, vous devriez examiner les dispositions actuelles, pas les dispositions proposées à l'article 115A de la loi australienne sur le droit d'auteur, ainsi que la jurisprudence britannique.

Nous devrions peut-être aussi nous attaquer à la question des litiges de masse contre des milliers de Canadiens ordinaires qui sont associés à une adresse ayant fait l'objet d'un avis aux termes de l'alinéa 41.26(1)a) et qui auraient violé le droit d'auteur d'un film qui aurait pu être regardé en continu ou téléchargé pour quelques dollars. Cette infraction ne s'apparente pas à une contravention de stationnement. Ce sont des efforts systématiques pour soutirer des milliers de dollars au moyen de prétendues ententes avec des détenteurs de compte Internet terrifiés qui n'avaient peut-être jamais entendu parler de BitTorrent avant de recevoir par la poste une lettre recommandée redoutée. Ces efforts pourraient porter des fruits dans bien des cas puisque l'accès à la justice est difficile dans ces circonstances. Si le gouvernement pouvait seulement faire son travail en ce qui a trait aux avis et à la réglementation connexe, ce serait un bon début.

Septièmement, nous devons abroger le régime de redevances sur les supports vierges. Nous devons effectivement nous débarrasser du régime fantôme de redevances à la partie VIII de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur et ne plus écouter les trois grandes maisons de disques multinationales qui imaginent de nouvelles sortes de taxes visant les appareils numériques, les fournisseurs de services Internet, les internautes, le nuage et peu importe ce qui paraît lucratif. Même les États-Unis ne s'adonnent pas à des élucubrations fantaisistes du genre.

J'arrive maintenant à mon dernier point.

Nous devons mettre fin au rituel de l'examen quinquennal. Je ne suis pas toujours d'accord avec Jeremy, certainement pas en ce qui a trait à certains aspects de cette étude concernant la Commission du droit d'auteur, mais je suis certainement du même avis que lui à ce sujet. Nous avons effectué deux grandes et deux moyennes révisions de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur au Canada au cours des 100 dernières années, au cours du dernier siècle seulement, et nous en avons fait quelques-unes qui étaient plus ciblées pendant la même période.

Il est inutile d'examiner périodiquement la politique sur le droit d'auteur. C'est lucratif pour les lobbyistes et les avocats, mais une perte de temps pour les autres, y compris le Parlement, et c'est important à retenir. Il est habituellement dangereux de réagir automatiquement et prématurément à une nouvelle technologie. Si nous avions écouté les pleurnichages de l'industrie cinématographique au début des années 1980, le magnétoscope à cassettes serait devenu illégal, et le Hollywood que nous connaissons aurait commis un suicide économique. Comment oublier, du moins pour ceux d'entre nous qui ont un certain âge, les célèbres paroles d'un lobbyiste de l'industrie cinématographique, Jack Valenti, qui a dit que le magnétoscope était pour l'industrie du divertissement ce que l'étrangleur de Boston était pour une femme seule.

Certaines questions peuvent être abordées au besoin, comme le font la plupart des autres pays dans le domaine du droit d'auteur.

Je vous remercie de votre patience, et je suis impatient de répondre à vos questions.

(1630)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer tout de suite aux questions en commençant par M. Longfield.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Je n'irai pas par quatre chemins, monsieur le président.

C'est un sujet dense. Comme vous l'avez tous remarqué, il est difficile pour nous d'y revenir fréquemment, aux cinq ans.

On n'a pas fait mention de l'article 13 dans les accords européens. À mesure que nous élaborons nos accords commerciaux avec l'Europe et avec l'Asie-Pacifique à l'heure actuelle, et le nouvel accord commercial nord-américain, je suis préoccupé par la concurrence en matière de droit d'auteur dans notre région et par la façon dont les marchés fonctionnent au Canada par rapport à d'autres régions. Avons-nous des opinions sur l'article 13 que nous pourrions mettre de l'avant dans notre étude?

Tout le monde peut répondre.

M. Howard Knopf:

Je vais répondre en premier. C'est très controversé. C'est très maximaliste, comme on dit. Il n'est pas nécessaire d'avoir une taxe sur les liens ou une taxe Google, peu importe le nom qu'on lui donne. Il n'est pas nécessaire de filtrer ce qui peut être téléchargé. Il pourrait s'agir, pour reprendre une tournure surutilisée, de la fin d'Internet. Cela n'a rien de bon. Les Européens deviennent très rapidement maximalistes, et ce n'est parfois pas bon pour tout le monde à long terme.

Évitons le nivellement par le bas d'une protection maximaliste du droit d'auteur. Nous leur avons tenu tête dans le cadre de l'AECG. Nous avons résisté face à la durée de 70 ans et à d'autres dispositions excessives. Nous avons toutefois cédé face aux Américains, et peut-être que, comme l'a dit Jeremy, nous n'avions pas le choix compte tenu de l'occupant actuel de la Maison-Blanche, mais il n'est pas nécessaire de répéter la même erreur.

M. Jeremy de Beer:

J'aimerais ajouter quelque chose, si c'est possible.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je vous en prie.

M. Jeremy de Beer:

Je pense qu'il est probable que cela se retourne contre l'Union européenne. C'est une très mauvaise idée. L'objectif apparent est de forcer Facebook, Google et les autres grandes entreprises de haute technologie — les Européens ont raison de s'en préoccuper — à payer pour obtenir plus de contenu. Plus il y aura de règles qui s'appliquent dans ce contexte, plus cela renforcera la position des entreprises qui ne peuvent pas se permettre de payer ces redevances et de satisfaire les exigences réglementaires comme les filtres de téléchargement. J'ai lu un excellent article qui disait que le premier choix de Google, c'était l'absence de réglementation, et que le deuxième était une lourde réglementation. C'est une très mauvaise idée.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

C'est ce qui ressort de certains commentaires que nous avons entendus récemment aussi. Je vous remercie tous deux de ces observations.

Sur un autre sujet, monsieur Boyer, les diapositives que vous nous avez montrées piquent beaucoup ma curiosité. J'ai du mal à bien saisir certaines possibilités. Nous n'avons pas le temps maintenant de creuser ces questions en profondeur, mais l'une des idées très intéressantes consiste à rassembler tous les acteurs autour d'une même table. Depuis le début de cette étude, nous avons du mal à déterminer quelles parties du marché fonctionnent et lesquelles ne fonctionnent pas. Il y a consensus général pour dire que les créateurs ne reçoivent pas leur juste part, mais est-ce à cause du régime du droit d'auteur ou non?

Que pourrions-nous recommander dans notre rapport pour rassembler tous les acteurs autour d'une même table: les sociétés SOCAN, Access Copyright, les créateurs et les éditeurs? Qui seraient ces acteurs? Comment pouvons-nous les rassembler?

(1635)

M. Marcel Boyer:

Cela s'annonce difficile, parce que cela nécessiterait des modifications à différentes lois, je suppose, un domaine que je ne comprends pas vraiment bien, puisque je ne suis pas avocat. Il est clair que si l'on veut utiliser la valeur concurrentielle de la musique sur le marché, à la radio commerciale, en fonction des comportements des exploitants de stations de radio, comme je l'ai fait dans certaines des publications que je vous ai montrées, cela pourrait représenter aujourd'hui quelque 450 millions de dollars par année en redevances. Ce serait la véritable valeur de la musique sur le marché concurrentiel selon les choix et comportements des exploitants de stations de radio.

À l'heure actuelle, les radios commerciales paient environ 100 millions de dollars par année en redevances pour la musique diffusée. Bien sûr, on ne demandera pas aux exploitants de radios commerciales de payer les 350 millions de dollars qui manquent, parce que cela limiterait beaucoup trop la diffusion de la musique. On veut donc aller chercher... mais comment peut-on y arriver? Il faut tenir compte des autres bénéficiaires comme les producteurs de matériel, de contenu, d'autres types de... Il y a aussi les gouvernements, qui forment des genres de collectifs, et les consommateurs. Tous ces acteurs devraient s'asseoir autour d'une même table pour déterminer qu'il faut payer la musique à sa juste valeur commerciale sur le marché concurrentiel. Comment pouvons-nous y arriver? Il doit y avoir un partage entre nous.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

C'est peut-être plus une observation générale qu'autre chose, mais s'agirait-il surtout d'assurer la transparence à tous les niveaux?

M. Marcel Boyer:

Oui.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

On ne pourra peut-être pas rassembler tous ces gens dans la même pièce, mais il pourrait y avoir une quelconque structure de reddition de comptes qui nous permettrait de comprendre où la valeur...

M. Marcel Boyer:

Tout à fait.

M. Mark Hayes:

Je pense qu'une partie du problème vient du fait qu'il n'y a rien qui incite les utilisateurs, la collectivité ou encore l'industrie elle-même à faire quoi que ce soit au-delà des beaux discours. Le fait est qu'il n'ont absolument aucun avantage à en tirer, et c'est l'un des problèmes du système. Dans le système de la Commission du droit d'auteur, par exemple, il n'y a absolument aucun incitatif pour qui que ce soit à faire des compromis.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Qu'est-ce qui pourrait constituer un incitatif?

M. Mark Hayes:

Je pense qu'il faut regarder ce qui se fait dans d'autres milieux, où il y a des sommets à huis clos. Dans ce genre de forum, personne ne peut se contenter de faire de beaux discours. Ce n'est tout simplement pas possible. S'il y avait un genre de sommet à huis clos auquel s'appliqueraient les règles de Chatham House, de sorte que personne ne puisse parler de ce qu'il s'y est dit, on pourrait peut-être avoir de vraies réponses, mais dans ce genre de contexte, personne ne viendra vous dire ce qui se passe vraiment, et vous n'obtiendrez pas la transparence voulue.

M. Howard Knopf:

Le commissaire de la concurrence a depuis très longtemps le pouvoir d'influencer ce genre de choses à la Commission du droit d'auteur. Il n'a jamais même ouvert de dossier à ce sujet ni levé le petit doigt pour cela. Quelqu'un devrait l'encourager à le faire, et même lui dire de le faire. C'est une fonction indépendante, donc il n'est pas facile de dire à un commissaire quoi faire. Sinon, la Commission du droit d'auteur pourrait, de son propre chef ou si nécessaire, par règlement mis en place par quelqu'un d'autre, être forcée d'être plus transparente. Elle devrait exiger, par exemple, la divulgation annuelle des salaires des hauts dirigeants de collectifs — en vertu de lois « d'ouverture » —, de leurs frais juridiques et du rendement moyen et médian des membres des collectifs.

La Commission ne veut vraiment pas s'approcher de cela. Je l'exhorte à le faire, pourtant. Il me semble que ce devrait être sa priorité, parce que les collectifs sont là pour protéger l'intérêt public.

Le président:

Merci.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je vous remercie de vos témoignages multiples devant différents comités et je vous remercie des services que vous rendez à notre gouvernement.

Le président:

Avant de donner la parole à M. Albas, monsieur de Beer, vous avez mentionné un document. Pourriez-vous le faire parvenir à notre greffier, s'il vous plaît?

M. Jeremy de Beer:

Oui.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Albas, vous avez sept minutes.

(1640)

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie tous nos témoins de leurs témoignages d'aujourd'hui et de leurs divers témoignages devant divers comités.

Je commencerai par M. Hayes.

Vous avez donné, dans votre exposé, l'exemple de la SOCAN, en disant que quelqu'un pouvait présenter une pièce et calculer devoir 1 000 $ en redevances. Mais si la SOCAN n'est pas du même avis, la personne pourrait se trouver à devoir payer 4 500 $, soit trois fois plus.

Premièrement, si les collectifs ne peuvent que réclamer les dommages réels, les gens ne refuseront-ils pas juste automatiquement de payer les droits, puisque c'est la pire punition à laquelle ils puissent être exposés au départ?

M. Mark Hayes:

Non. Comme je l'ai dit, il y a une valeur à l'aspect punitif s'il n'y a pas de différend légitime. C'est la raison pour laquelle je propose un libellé particulier dans mon mémoire, de sorte que s'il y a un différend légitime, cela ne s'applique pas. Ce sera cependant aux tribunaux de déterminer s'il s'agit ou non d'un différend légitime.

Très souvent, ce mécanisme est utilisé quand une personne ne paie pas, qu'un bar ou un restaurant ne paie tout simplement pas ses droits. Soit il n'est pas au courant de cette obligation, soit il refuse de s'y astreindre et espère ne pas se faire prendre. Ce n'est pas le genre de situation à laquelle j'ai été confronté, j'ai plutôt connu des différends légitimes sur l'applicabilité ou les calculs. On ne devrait pas pouvoir utiliser cette disposition punitive pour essayer de forcer l'autre partie à convenir d'un règlement.

M. Dan Albas:

Pour ce genre de cas, alors, ne serait-il pas plus judicieux de prévoir un régime secondaire, par exemple, plutôt que de compter ces 1 500 $ de départ au complet, fois 3 ou 10, selon les circonstances? Vous affirmez qu'il s'agit de la différence entre la somme calculée par le propriétaire et la valeur estimée par la SOCAN. Dans ce cas-ci, la différence serait en fait de 500 $. Selon moi, vous voudriez probablement qu'on mette un peu plus l'accent sur la valeur réelle...

M. Mark Hayes:

C'est une possibilité. Le problème, c'est qu'il n'existe aucun autre régime où une partie prend une position et l'autre peut simplement dire: « Très bien, j'ai de 3 à 10 fois plus de pouvoir que vous dans ce différend. »

M. Dan Albas:

Il y a un pouvoir du marché, ou à tout le moins dans ce cas-ci, il y a un monopole...

M. Mark Hayes:

Une autre solution serait qu'on n'ait pas à payer de somme punitive si l'on offre une garantie pour la somme dite. Il y a diverses façons de faire.

Mais au sujet de cette pénalité, il ne faut pas oublier qu'elle est au moins trois fois plus élevée que la somme de départ. Le juge ne peut pas aller en deçà de ça. Le minimum est de trois fois plus élevé et cela peut aller jusqu'à dix fois. Cette disposition avantage un côté de par sa simple existence, à mon avis, et elle est injuste.

M. Dan Albas:

Monsieur de Beer, vous avez comparu devant divers comités, comme d'autres témoins aussi. Soit dit en passant, tous vos propos sont désormais frappés du droit d'auteur de la Couronne, donc j'espère que cela vous convient. Le Parlement est propriétaire de vos idées. Je voulais simplement vous le dire.

M. Jeremy de Beer:

Oui.

M. Dan Albas:

En aparté, pouvez-vous nous décrire en quoi l'utilisation équitable telle qu'elle existe aux États-Unis serait supérieure aux exceptions aux dispositions sur l'utilisation équitable que nous avons au Canada? J'ai trouvé votre argument éloquent: si l'on veut prendre le pire d'un régime, mieux vaut l'accompagner de quelques soupapes de sûreté, à tout le moins des meilleures.

Pouvez-vous nous expliquer cela plus en détail?

M. Jeremy de Beer:

Je pense que ce serait préférable pour les raisons que M. Hayes a données concernant l'exception pour exploration de données et de textes, parce qu'il n'est pas nécessaire de mettre constamment à jour la liste des choses pour lesquelles nous avons besoin de souplesse, d'un peu de marge de manoeuvre ou de soupapes de sécurité. Plutôt que de dire « l'utilisation équitable aux fins un, deux, trois, quatre, cinq, six... », puisque si l'on regarde la tendance qui se dégage de la réforme, ce genre de dispositions est de plus en plus précis et technique, on dirait « l'utilisation équitable à des fins telles que », puis l'on pourrait énumérer quelques exceptions qui ne constituent pas une atteinte au droit d'auteur.

L'affaire, concernant l'innovation, c'est qu'elle est par définition perturbatrice et imprévisible. Nous voulons de l'innovation, mais nous ne savons pas ce qui va arriver. C'est le but de l'innovation. On ne peut pas créer une liste d'exceptions qui permettrait des choses auxquelles on n'a pas encore pensé. La formule américaine résout le problème d'un seul coup.

L'argument évoqué contre cette façon de faire, c'est qu'elle est trop imprévisible, trop perturbatrice pour encadrer les pratiques au Canada. Je ne suis pas d'accord du tout. En fait, nous pourrions avoir le meilleur des deux mondes en faisant simplement ce que M. Knopf propose, c'est-à-dire en adoptant la solution « telle que ». Il suffirait d'inscrire ces deux mots. Cela nous laisserait la marge de manoeuvre dont disposent les Américains pour stimuler l'innovation plutôt que de l'étouffer.

M. Dan Albas:

Lors de la dernière séance du Comité, j'ai posé une question concernant une exemption pour les vidéos de réaction, par exemple, soit des vidéos produites par quelqu'un qui se filme pour montrer sa réaction à quelque chose. Pensez-vous qu'il devrait y avoir une exclusion pour ce genre d'activité?

(1645)

M. Jeremy de Beer:

Je ne crois pas qu'on ait besoin d'exclusions plus précises pour des activités en particulier. Je pense que nous avons surtout besoin d'un cadre plus souple et plus neutre sur le plan technologique, comme pour l'utilisation équitable. Regardez ces dispositions. Chaque fois qu'on essaie d'y ajouter des micro-exceptions techniques, on en paie les conséquences. Je peux vous dresser tout un historique d'arrêts de la Cour suprême depuis 20 ans pour vous le prouver.

M. Dan Albas:

Vous avez dit devant le comité du patrimoine que les auteurs de matériel pédagogique ne touchent à peu près pas un sou pour leur travail et que les éditeurs obtiennent tous les droits, puis évidemment, les profits qu'ils en tirent quand ils vendent ces ouvrages aux institutions d'enseignement.

Comment peut-on corriger ce problème dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur?

M. Jeremy de Beer:

Je pense que ce n'est pas nécessairement un problème lié au droit d'auteur. C'est un problème de contrat. J'aimerais surtout voir le gouvernement exiger, dans ses mesures, un libre accès à la recherche, par exemple, pour les organismes de financement de la recherche.

Je pense qu'il y a certaines mesures que vous pourriez prendre pour renforcer la position de négociation des auteurs par rapport aux éditeurs et aux autres intermédiaires, mais ce n'est pas facile. C'est un enjeu complexe. Le noeud du problème, c'est qu'il ne tient pas au droit d'auteur. C'est ce que j'essaie de dire.

M. Dan Albas:

Monsieur Hayes.

M. Mark Hayes:

Je me suis déjà trouvé des deux côtés. J'ai écrit des ouvrages et j'ai négocié ce genre d'accords. Le fait est que quand on produit de la littérature scientifique, les éditeurs jouissent d'un énorme avantage, parce que les chercheurs doivent publier leur travail. Le vendeur est donc très motivé et l'acheteur, très peu. Il peut décider de l'acheter ou non et gardera la plus grande partie de l'argent qu'il générera.

C'est une question de marché, et si l'on veut s'attaquer à cela dans la réforme du droit d'auteur, pour essayer de corriger le marché, on peut s'enliser très vite et avoir beaucoup de problèmes.

M. Dan Albas:

C'est une question de compétitivité, comme M. Boyer le disait.

M. Mark Hayes:

Exactement.

M. Howard Knopf:

Il pourrait y avoir de graves problèmes antitrust avec les gigantesques multinationales milliardaires du monde de l'édition qui imposent ce genre de conditions, mais j'ai proposé une solution hier, et j'ai reçu quelques bons commentaires sur Internet, pour ce que cela vaut.

L'idée n'est pas de moi, mais de Roy MacSkimming, un spécialiste de longue date qui a réalisé cette étude pour la Commission du droit de prêt public au Canada. Il a proposé ce qu'il appelle un droit de prêt en éducation, qui nécessiterait un financement gouvernemental, mais permettrait d'indemniser les auteurs du monde universitaire comme les professeurs de Beer et Boyer, pour l'utilisation de leurs travaux dans les établissements d'enseignement, un peu comme ce qui existe déjà pour les bibliothèques publiques, où des auteurs populaires comme Margaret Atwood peuvent toucher jusqu'à 3 000 $ par année pour le prêt de leurs livres. Ce montant a baissé, alors qu'il devrait augmenter. Nous avons besoin de nouveaux fonds.

Ce genre d'indemnité dans le domaine de l'éducation fournirait un revenu supplémentaire aux professeurs et un incitatif à publier. J'ai également mentionné que les professeurs en sont récompensés d'autres façons. Quand ils rédigent des articles et des ouvrages, ils ont accès à des promotions et à la titularisation. Enfin, ils touchent des salaires décents, qui atteignent désormais les six chiffres dans les universités canadiennes, donc ce n'est pas comme s'ils n'étaient pas payés. C'est seulement qu'ils ne sont pas payés aussi efficacement et élégamment qu'ils devraient peut-être l'être.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous avons dépassé un peu le temps imparti, mais il nous reste un peu de temps pour d'autres questions.[Français]

Madame Quach, vous disposez de sept minutes.

Mme Anne Minh-Thu Quach (Salaberry—Suroît, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie tous.

Quelques-uns d'entre vous ont abordé les implications économiques du fait que la durée du droit d'auteur va passer de 50 à 70 ans après la mort d'un créateur.

Pensez-vous que le projet de loi C-86 va changer tout ce qui est lié au droit d'utilisation équitable?

Si oui, qu'est-ce que cela va changer? Ces modifications avantageront-elles ou non l'accès à l'utilisation équitable?

M. Marcel Boyer:

Pour ma part, je crois que l'utilisation équitable doit être formulée légalement et de manière appropriée pour éviter les conflits juridiques inutiles. Fondamentalement, le problème économique est que l'utilisation équitable est une forme d'expropriation de la propriété intellectuelle des créateurs.

Il faut donc savoir comment on va compenser cette utilisation équitable. Celle-ci dit que l'utilisateur n'est pas celui qui devrait payer les droits de l'oeuvre utilisée. Or quelqu'un doit payer pour cela.

Quand on applique ou qu'on ajoute des exceptions, même si on met « tel que », comme quelqu'un l'a suggéré, ou qu'on ajoute d'autres exceptions au droit d'auteur, on exproprie la propriété intellectuelle des créateurs, et sans compensation.

Du point de vue économique, le problème est de savoir qui d'autre doit payer les auteurs compositeurs interprètes, les détenteurs de droits et les auteurs pour cette utilisation équitable.

Le principe de l'utilisation équitable n'est pas un problème à caractère économique. Il s'agit d'un problème de compensation. Quelqu'un doit donc payer, mais qui?

(1650)

Mme Anne Minh-Thu Quach:

D'autres pays ont-ils répondu à cette question?

M. Marcel Boyer:

Absolument, et cela touche l'utilisation équitable dans le cas de la copie privée.

Je peux faire des copies privées aux fins de mes recherches et quelqu'un va payer pour cela, notamment les fournisseurs d'équipement. Le fournisseur de l'équipement qui me sert à faire des copies aux fins de mes recherches va payer un droit destiné à compenser des auteurs-compositeurs-interprètes.

En France, par exemple, la copie privée génère 300 millions de dollars canadiens par an en compensation aux auteurs-compositeurs-interprètes, alors qu'au Canada, elle est de 3 millions de dollars.

Dans mes diapositives, que je n'ai pas eu le temps de présenter, j'expliquais que la petite réglementation fédérale de 2012 établissant que les quatre microSD ne sont pas des « supports audio » coûte 40 millions de dollars par an aux auteurs-compositeurs-interprètes. Or personne ne paie pour cela.

Mme Anne Minh-Thu Quach:

Je vous remercie, monsieur Boyer.

Je vais permettre à d'autres personnes d'intervenir aussi.

M. Jeremy de Beer:

Merci beaucoup, madame Quach.[Traduction]

Je comprends la position du professeur Boyer, mais je ne la partage pas. Je ne considère pas que les exceptions et les limites à l'utilisation équitable constituent une expropriation de droits patrimoniaux. Par défaut, la situation n'est pas telle que le titulaire du droit d'auteur peut exercer un contrôle sur toutes les utilisations de son travail et que chaque fois qu'on limite ce droit, il s'agit d'une expropriation. C'est plutôt le contraire.

Par défaut, la situation favorise la liberté d'expression et la liberté de faire ce qu'on veut. Nous octroyons une protection du droit d'auteur pour inciter les gens à investir dans la créativité. Pour citer une phrase que la Cour suprême du Canada a reprise de l'un de mes anciens directeurs de thèse, le professeur David Vaver: « Les droits des utilisateurs ne sont pas que des échappatoires. » Je pense que c'est important. C'est une façon différente de voir la chose.

M. Mark Hayes:

Je l'utilise souvent avec les étudiants. On peut voir le droit d'auteur comme une île, où il y a plein de petites baies, de petites incises, de petits remous, de toutes sortes de choses, mais l'île demeure toujours la nature même des droits. Il n'y a pas de plus grande île qui serait amputée de part et d'autre.

Le droit d'auteur, c'est la totalité de ce qui est accordé, y compris les petites choses qui en ont été retranchées, ces petites baies et ces petits remous. Une exemption ne constitue pas une expropriation. Elle fait partie de l'équation entre la société, les créateurs et les utilisateurs.

M. Howard Knopf:

Oui, je suis profondément en désaccord avec le professeur Boyer à ce propos. L'utilisation équitable, c'est la protection des droits des utilisateurs. La Cour suprême du Canada l'a dit avec beaucoup d'éloquence en 2004, dans l'affaire CCH, qui a fait couler beaucoup d'encre. Ce sont des droits des utilisateurs tout comme le droit d'être payé et le droit du créateur. Les deux sont égaux et il y a un équilibre entre les deux.

M. Boyer a tort lorsqu'il évalue à 40 millions de dollars les coûts de l'exception relative à la carte SD. J'ai joué une très grande partie, peut-être la principale, dans la prise du règlement qui y a donné naissance. Donnez-moi une bonne raison, monsieur Boyer, pour laquelle la carte SD de mon téléphone, qui me permet de prendre des photos de mon chat et de mon petit-fils, devrait être taxée? Pourquoi cet argent devrait-il aller à Access Copyright ou à un quelconque autre collectif? Cela n'a aucun sens.

Vous avez également mentionné un problème relatif à la prolongation de la durée de la protection. Je vais vous donner un excellent exemple actuel de raison pour laquelle il est si important de rendre le domaine public le plus vaste possible. Il y a aux États-Unis un président qui inquiète tout le monde pour toutes sortes de choses, et je ne veux même pas dire son nom. Soudainement, un certain livre de George Orwell, 1984, a regagné en popularité pour des raisons évidentes. Ce livre est du domaine public depuis longtemps au Canada, mais les Américains doivent payer 30 $ ou je ne sais combien pour l'acquérir, et ils sont de moins en moins nombreux à le faire.

Il est très important d'obtenir l'accès au domaine public le plus vite possible. Même s'il ne s'agit pas d'un ouvrage populaire comme 1984, si on le surprotège par le droit d'auteur, il deviendra de plus en plus difficile pour les étudiants, les enseignants et les chercheurs de mettre la main dessus. Cela fera augmenter l'incertitude. Il y aura une épée de Damoclès qui planera. L'oeuvre entrera dans la catégorie redoutée de ce qu'on appelle les « oeuvres orphelines », celle des oeuvres qui sont frappées du droit d'auteur, mais dont on ne sait pas qui en est le bénéficiaire et où le trouver. Les oeuvres doivent intégrer le domaine public le plus vite possible. C'est la raison pour laquelle je recommande l'imposition de formalités pour les 20 dernières années.

(1655)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Passons à M. Graham pour sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Nous avons entendu à maintes reprises qu'une révision quinquennale serait excessive. Je dois souligner que cela a l'avantage de conférer à tous les députés à siéger à la Chambre l'occasion de s'exprimer sur le sujet.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David de Burgh Graham: J'aimerais également revenir à une chose qu'a dite M. Albas. Il a indiqué que les témoignages recueillis ici étaient frappés du droit d'auteur de la Couronne. Je doute que ce soit le cas. Nous ne sommes pas assujettis à la Couronne. Nous sommes assujettis au Président.

J'aimerais soumettre cette réflexion notre analyste. Nous pourrions peut-être revoir quel est le droit d'auteur qui s'applique quand nous publions un rapport.

M. Dan Albas:

Vous lirez là-dessus.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce n'est que par curiosité. Quand on rédige un rapport, il est toujours écrit au début que c'est le Président qui accorde la permission de le reproduire conformément à son droit d'auteur.

M. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, PCC):

Par l'entremise du président...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Par l'entremise du président, oui.

Monsieur de Beer, vous avez mentionné que 150 ans constituaient une période extrêmement longue pour le droit d'auteur. J'aurais tendance à être d'accord avec vous, mais cela laisse entendre qu'il y a des gens qui produisent du matériel de la naissance jusqu'à 150 ans, donc ce n'est peut-être que 135 ans.

M. Jeremy de Beer:

Bon point.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Qu'est-ce qui correspondrait à une période raisonnable pour le droit d'auteur? Quelle valeur la protection des droits d'auteurs après la mort des auteurs a-t-elle pour la société en premier lieu?

M. Jeremy de Beer:

C'est une très bonne question théorique, mais comme je l'ai dit dans ma déclaration préliminaire, je suis pragmatique. Il existe un accord international, soit la Convention de Berne, qui établit la durée minimale de protection pour tous les membres, dont le Canada. Il s'agit de la durée de vie de l'auteur, plus 50 ans. C'est la norme internationale. C'est ce à quoi le Canada devrait s'en tenir, à mon avis.

L'idée de M. Knopf est très bonne. Si nous prolongeons la durée de protection, rien ne nous empêche d'imposer des formalités sur ces dernières années de protection. Nous ne pouvons pas le faire pour la première période qui inclut la vie de l'auteur, plus 50 ans après sa mort, au titre de la Convention de Berne, mais le faire pour la deuxième période est une idée brillante. Cela créerait toutes sortes de répercussions positives — à savoir, l'établissement d'un registre des droits d'auteurs comme il en existe pour tout autre type de droit de propriété dans le monde. Nous pouvons régler le problème de propriétaires introuvables ou d'oeuvres orphelines et commencer à traiter le droit d'auteur comme un produit, comme le droit de propriété qu'il est. Nous ne pouvons le faire que s'il est enregistré. Établir cela comme condition pour les 20 années de protection supplémentaires est une idée brillante.

Je ne crois pas que votre comité a besoin de le faire, en passant, ou de le recommander. Cela fait partie de la mise en oeuvre de l'ALENA ou de l'AEUMC, mais vous pouvez certainement examiner la question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est légitime. Vous dites que pour le droit d'auteur, il faut adopter une approche proactive plutôt que réactive — il ne faut pas que ce soit automatique.

Il y a quelques semaines, un témoin nous a parlé du fait qu'il y a des étiquettes pour lesquelles les droits d'auteurs s'appliquent pendant la vie de l'auteur et les 70 années suivant sa mort. Le droit d'auteur devrait-il nécessiter que l'enregistrement s'applique même au départ, ou est-il possible de le faire?

M. Jeremy de Beer:

La Convention de Berne ne nous permet pas de le faire. Nous ne pouvons pas imposer des formalités pendant la vie d'un auteur et les 50 années suivant sa mort, mais si nous prolongeons la période à 70 ans suivant sa mort, nous pouvons et devrions certainement le faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.[Français]

Monsieur Boyer, j'ai une question à vous poser.

J'ai cru comprendre que, selon vous, fondamentalement, tous les produits impliquant des redevances de droit d'auteur ne sont pas égaux et qu'on ne devrait pas les considérer de la même façon pour ce qui est de la durée des droits d'auteur, par exemple. Ai-je bien compris? Chaque produit est différent.

M. Marcel Boyer:

Bien sûr, chaque produit est différent, mais les principes à la base de la détermination de ces droits doivent être les mêmes.

Tous les produits sont différents sur le plan économique, y compris les différentes formes d'expression dans le domaine des biens ou des actifs qui font l'objet d'un droit d'auteur. Cela dit, les principes de la valeur concurrentielle et de la rémunération juste et équitable qui, pour un économiste, correspondent à la rémunération concurrentielle sur des marchés concurrentiels du facteur ou du produit transigé, doivent s'appliquer aussi aux biens et services qui font l'objet de droits d'auteur.

Cela s'applique différemment selon qu'il s'agisse d'un auteur, d'un compositeur, d'un interprète, d'un producteur, d'un auteur de manuels imprimés ou d'un roman, et le reste, mais les principes sous-jacents sont les mêmes.

Je ne sais pas si cela répond à votre question.

(1700)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, plus ou moins. Je vous remercie, monsieur Boyer.

J'ai des questions à poser à tout le monde et je n'ai pas assez de temps pour toute les aborder. Je vais donc continuer.[Traduction]

Monsieur Knopf, dans vos observations, vous avez dit qu'il fallait examiner les dispositions actuelles de la loi australienne sur le droit d'auteur, et non la proposition. Que contient la proposition australienne que vous ne voulez pas que nous voyions?

M. Howard Knopf:

Eh bien, vous êtes libres de le vérifier.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. Howard Knopf: En fait, je vais envoyer des informations au greffier.

Elle contient une disposition, l'article 115A, qui porte sur le blocage de sites et elle est assez bien équilibrée. Je l'ai examinée en détail et des décisions la concernant ont été rendues récemment. J'essaie de me souvenir du nom de la cause. Encore une fois, je vous enverrai l'information.

Cela nécessite un processus judiciaire rigoureux, la primauté du droit et l'équité envers la partie opposée. L'injonction ne peut durer plus longtemps ou être d'une plus grande portée que nécessaire. Il s'agit d'une proposition équilibrée. La nouvelle proposition consiste à éliminer une partie de la primauté du droit et de ses aspects protecteurs et à permettre à l'injonction d'avoir une portée beaucoup plus vaste et de durer plus longtemps que nécessaire. Cela pourrait porter atteinte à la liberté d'expression et à toutes sortes de choses.

Je n'essaie pas de vous cacher quelque chose. Je dis seulement que la version actuelle semble très bien fonctionner, mais ce n'est pas suffisant pour les grandes compagnies de disques et de films qui ne sont jamais satisfaites.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

M. Howard Knopf:

Et le Royaume-Uni n'a pas adopté de disposition comme telle, mais il a — j'y ai jeté un coup d'oeil — une jurisprudence raisonnable.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Hayes.

M. Mark Hayes:

Oui, comme je crois l'avoir publié sur Twitter ce matin, l'Australie s'est engagée à fond dans le blocage de sites, et c'est le premier pays à le faire. C'est très intéressant.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est le premier pays démocratique à le faire.

M. Mark Hayes:

Oui, les Chinois n'avaient même pas adopté de lois avant de le faire.

Les Australiens s'y sont vraiment engagés et ce sera très intéressant de voir ce qu'il en découlera. En fait, à mon avis, la plupart des autres pays voudront attendre de trois à cinq ans pour voir dans quelle mesure les résultats seront bons ou mauvais, plutôt que de faire la même chose.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Hayes, dans votre déclaration préliminaire, vous avez proposé d'en dire un peu plus sur l'article 30.71. Vous disposez de 30 secondes pour le faire.

M. Mark Hayes:

Dans mes dispositions écrites, j'avais proposé cinq éléments à inclure dans l'article 30.71: peut comprendre une intervention humaine; non limité à des processus automatiques; non limité à des processus instantanés; et évidemment, l'apprentissage machine est un processus technologique. Ce sont les choses qui, à mon avis, seraient faites nécessairement. Or, honnêtement, concernant le type de proposition que fait M. de Beer, où il y a une liste non exhaustive sur l'utilisation équitable qui mentionne l'apprentissage machine, la reproduction accessoire, j'aurais pensé que c'est une solution à bon nombre de ces aspects et que cela ne nécessiterait pas l'établissement d'une liste de choses dont nous devons essayer de nous occuper dans l'avenir.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

C'est maintenant au tour de Matt Jeneroux.

Allez-y, s'il vous plaît.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

C'est bien. D'accord.

Je suis ravi d'être retour, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Je suis heureux de vous revoir.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Je remercie les témoins. C'est bien de constater qu'on poursuit une étude approfondie sur le droit d'auteur, comme c'était le cas à mon départ.

Monsieur le président, est-ce que je dispose de cinq minutes?

Le président:

En fait, vous avez maintenant quatre minutes et demie.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Merci.

Je veux revenir sur vos observations, monsieur de Beer. J'ai encore du mal à comprendre pourquoi, que ce soit 5 ou 10 ans, concernant l'examen obligatoire... Je crois que le Comité essaie d'examiner les choses à long terme. Nous essayons de prédire ce qui est essentiellement déterminé dans le droit d'auteur. Tellement de choses se sont passées sur le plan de la technologie au cours des cinq dernières années. Par exemple, pour Twitter et les médias sociaux, les choses ne sont plus ce qu'elles étaient à l'époque.

J'ai toujours été en faveur de l'examen quinquennal, mais le fait que vous le souleviez me laisse un peu perplexe et je me pose des questions en quelque sorte. Pour ce qui est de la nouvelle technologie et l'idée de ne pas mener d'examen, j'aimerais que vous m'aidiez à comprendre.

Monsieur Knopf, puisque vous avez la même position, vous pourriez également répondre à la question.

M. Jeremy de Beer:

L'un des problèmes, c'est que cela enlève une partie de la responsabilité de créer une loi neutre sur le plan technologique en premier lieu, car les gens pensent qu'ils peuvent simplement arranger les choses cinq ans plus tard. Voilà un problème.

L'autre problème, c'est que c'est très rentable politiquement. Je comprends. Tout le monde vient ici. Il y a 182 témoins. Ils veulent tous quelque chose et on ne peut pas leur donner tout ce qu'ils veulent. C'est donc très bien de leur dire de revenir cinq ans plus tard pour en reparler. C'est très rentable politiquement, mais cela veut dire que tous les cinq ans, tout le monde fait la file et fait les mêmes demandes. Je ne suis là que depuis 15 ans, depuis moins longtemps que mes collègues ici, et vraiment, cela devient lassant. On recommence sans cesse le même débat. Ce n'est pas très utile.

Ce sont vraiment les deux principaux problèmes, à mon avis. C'est un obstacle à la rédaction de principes neutres sur le plan technologique au départ, et c'est ce qui fait que nous sommes constamment en mode lobbying.

Je ne suis pas en train de dire qu'il n'est pas nécessaire de revoir la loi, mais tous les cinq ans... L'autre chose à cet égard, c'est que nous ne savons même pas. La mise en oeuvre des dernières réformes commence à peine à franchir les étapes du processus devant les tribunaux. Tous les règlements concernant les détails restants de la dernière série de réformes ne sont même pas encore en place. Au cours des deux ou trois derniers mois, la Cour suprême a rendu une décision sur l'avis et les dispositions relatives aux avis.

Il est simplement encore trop tôt. Nous ne savons toujours pas si les choses fonctionnent.

(1705)

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Excusez-moi, monsieur Knopf, mais juste avant de passer à vous, je veux revenir rapidement là-dessus.

Par exemple, l'exception YouTube découle du dernier examen, car YouTube était un nouveau truc, si l'on veut. Qui sait comment seront les choses dans cinq ans? Et donc, si nous ne menons pas d'examen, comment réagissons-nous à cela? Voulez-vous dire que nous devrions présenter un projet de loi lorsque ces exceptions se présentent? Je crains alors qu'il y ait d'autres répercussions, et nous ne savons peut-être pas de quoi il s'agira.

M. Jeremy de Beer:

L'exception YouTube, soit l'exception fondée sur le contenu généré par l'utilisateur, l'exception relative à l'exploration de textes et de données et toutes les micro-exceptions pour les bibliothèques, les archives et les musées ne seraient pas nécessaires si nous ajoutions simplement deux mots dans la loi: « telle que ». C'est une solution beaucoup plus simple qui résistera à l'épreuve du temps.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Excusez-moi, monsieur Knopf. Allez-y.

M. Howard Knopf:

Il y a une vieille chanson. Je ne tenterai pas de la chanter. Elle dit que les choses fondamentales s'appliquent au fil du temps. C'est dans le film Casablanca. Certaines choses ne changent tout simplement pas, même depuis l'adoption de la première loi sur le droit d'auteur, en 1709. Certains principes ne changent pas beaucoup, et ils ne changent assurément pas très rapidement.

Comme je l'ai dit, c'est une très mauvaise idée d'aller trop vite pour se montrer intelligent et branché. Si l'on avait écouté Jack Valenti, si les gens de sa propre industrie l'avaient écouté, le Hollywood que nous connaissons n'existerait peut-être plus.

Réagir rapidement à l'égard de la technologie est une grosse erreur, car ces choses ne changent pas vraiment. Les détails changent et le marché démêle les choses. La meilleure loi sur le droit d'auteur que le monde n'ait jamais connue c'est celle qu'a adoptée le Royaume-Uni en 1911. Elle était très brève et générale et vraiment simple. Dieu merci, le Canada en a toujours l'ossature. Le Royaume-Uni s'emballe concernant les détails, et les juges détestent cela. Tout le monde déteste cela, car on agit trop rapidement, trop souvent.

Travailler à cette affaire sur le magnétoscope est la première chose que j'ai faite lorsque je me suis joint au gouvernement à titre d'analyste en 1983. J'ai écrit un article afin d'expliquer les raisons pour lesquelles nous n'avons pas besoin d'adopter des mesures législatives.

Je vais vous donner un autre exemple. En 1997, je crois — c'était peut-être en 1988; non, c'était probablement en 1997 —, un sage bureaucrate de Patrimoine Canada a ajouté une exception dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, soit l'exception du tableau blanc. Elle prévoyait qu'il était acceptable qu'un enseignant écrive sur tableau avec une craie ou un marqueur pourvu que ce qu'il a écrit soit effacé avec un instrument sec. J'ai écrit un article sarcastique dans le journal, et le dessinateur a dessiné un concierge en train d'utiliser une brosse mouillée. La question était de savoir si cela contrevenait à la loi. Heureusement, on s'est débarrassé de cette exception franchement stupide, mais cela montre à quel point malgré leurs bonnes intentions, les gens peuvent s'attarder à des détails, ce qui est tout à fait contre-productif.

Encore une fois, j'appuie volontiers Jeremy là-dessus. J'essayais de trouver la citation — c'était Winston Churchill ou quelqu'un d'autre. Un fonctionnaire est venu lui dire qu'il y avait une crise terrible et qu'il devait lui parler immédiatement. Churchill a dit que s'il y avait toujours une crise le lendemain, il pouvait alors revenir pour en discuter.

Le président:

Merci.

C'est maintenant au tour de M. Jowhari.

Vous disposez de cinq minutes.

(1710)

M. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je céderai une partie de mon temps à M. Lametti.

Pour les deux minutes et demie qu'il me reste, j'aimerais vraiment revenir à M. Hayes.

Monsieur Hayes, dans votre témoignage, vous avez indiqué que vous vouliez nous parler de six questions. Vous avez parlé de trois d'entre elles, et vous avez manqué de temps. Puisque j'ai obtenu des réponses à toutes mes autres questions, j'aimerais bien vous donner les deux minutes et demie, ou deux minutes, suivantes pour que vous puissiez parler de ces trois questions. Je sais qu'il en est question dans la présentation, mais ce serait bien pour tout le monde si vous pouviez en parler deux minutes. Merci.

M. Mark Hayes:

Il y a d'abord l'exemption pour les organismes de bienfaisance. La SOCAN et peut-être d'autres organisations ont fait valoir des arguments pour que cette exemption soit restreinte. Cela fait presque 100 ans que cette exemption est prévue dans la loi. Le seul litige substantiel qui a été intenté à ce sujet, c'était dans les années 1940. Il mettait en cause Casa Loma et des concerts que l'organisme a présentés, etc.

Je représente un certain nombre d'organismes de bienfaisance qui exercent leurs activités en vertu de ladite exemption. S'ils le font, ce n'est pas parce que leur organisme est enregistré en vertu de la Loi de l'impôt sur le revenu, mais parce que leur charte indique précisément qu'ils organisent des prestations musicales. C'est ce qu'ils font. L'exemption s'appliquant aux organismes de bienfaisance vise précisément leurs activités, mais la SOCAN continue de dire que ce n'est pas le cas, en raison de ces restrictions inhérentes qu'elle vous demande d'inclure.

À mon avis, il y a toutes sortes de choses: émissions musicales, symphonies, églises et groupes scolaires. Ils en souffriront tous très gravement si ce changement est apporté.

Mon ami, Bob Tarantino, a comparu devant vous et a parlé du retour du droit d'auteur et il a proposé le retrait de la disposition à cet égard. Je connais bien Bob...

M. Majid Jowhari:

Veuillez aborder brièvement les deux autres, car vous avez seulement environ...

M. Mark Hayes:

Il dit seulement que vous devriez enlever le retour du droit d'auteur. Je ne vois aucune raison de faire cela. La seule raison qu'il donne, c'est l'incertitude. L'incertitude est liée à la vie de l'auteur. La vie de l'auteur cause de l'incertitude sur le terme. Cela cause également de l'incertitude sur les droits de retour. On ne peut pas éviter cela.

Je crois que c'est une disposition pour la veuve et l'orphelin. C'est pour les auteurs et les artistes qui n'ont pas obtenu l'argent qu'ils méritaient, surtout en raison de mauvais contrats ou parce qu'ils n'ont pas été reconnus à temps. Après leur décès, leur veuve et leurs enfants ont la possibilité de reprendre le droit d'auteur après un certain temps. S'il y a toujours une valeur, ils peuvent la percevoir. Je crois que personne n'a donné de raison concrète pour laquelle cela ne devrait pas être fait.

En passant, une minuscule partie des oeuvres protégées par le droit d'auteur a une valeur quelconque au moment où le droit de retour est invoqué. C'est fait dans un très petit nombre de cas.

Le dernier point concerne la définition d'enregistrement sonore. Je ne vais pas entrer dans les détails. Je suis allé devant la Cour suprême à cet égard. Nous avons gagné sur tous les plans. L'intention de la loi est claire. Il y a une raison valable sur le plan opérationnel. Je vous invite à examiner la décision de la Cour suprême et les commentaires sur cet enjeu. Il n'y a absolument aucune raison de modifier la disposition, à part le fait que les propriétaires des enregistrements sonores — autrement dit, les maisons de disque — souhaitent faire plus d'argent.

M. Majid Jowhari:

J'aimerais maintenant donner la parole à M. Lametti.

M. David Lametti (LaSalle—Émard—Verdun, Lib.):

Merci.

Monsieur Hayes, nous avons entendu plusieurs idées sur l'apprentissage automatique ou sur l'exception liée à l'exploration de données, qui vont de... et votre point sur les reproductions accessoires.

Pensez-vous que votre idée tient compte de l'utilisation d'un groupe de données pour en extraire des chiffres et mener des analyses?

M. Mark Hayes:

Oui, je crois que c'est le cas. Vous ne devez pas oublier que ce qu'on demande, ce n'est pas le droit d'être en mesure d'utiliser chaque renseignement lié au droit d'auteur ou chaque donnée ou d'autres renseignements. Je crois que tous les mémoires ont clairement précisé ce point. On parle seulement du matériel visé par le droit d'auteur obtenu de façon légale. Dans ces cas, on a acheté ou obtenu une licence, un exemplaire des livres, des magazines, des films, etc.

On tente de se dissocier du titulaire du droit d'auteur en disant que lorsqu'une machine lit un livre, écoute un film, regarde une émission de télévision, regarde des photographies — et la machine doit faire une reproduction accessoire, car c'est la seule façon par laquelle une machine peut apprendre à faire ces choses —, c'est une infraction au droit d'auteur, et qu'il faudrait donc payer un surplus au prix d'achat initial ou au prix de la licence pour l'oeuvre protégée.

M. David Lametti:

Ce qui me préoccupe, c'est l'utilisation et la transformation qui se produisent lors du traitement des données. Je crains qu'on fasse valoir que l'utilisation, et pas nécessairement la copie, relève du droit d'auteur.

M. Mark Hayes:

Cela ne semble pas être le cas. N'oubliez pas que le droit d'auteur regroupe plusieurs droits. Pour qu'il y ait infraction au droit d'auteur, vous devez avoir enfreint l'un des droits. Lorsque je lis un livre, ce n'est pas une infraction au droit d'auteur. En l'absence de reproduction, une machine qui lit un livre ne devrait pas représenter une infraction au droit d'auteur.

(1715)

Le président:

Votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Albas, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Monsieur Hayes, j'aimerais revenir à l'exemption pour les oeuvres de bienfaisance.

Prenons l'exemple d'un grand festival qui demande un prix d'entrée élevé pour entendre un musicien qui utilise peut-être le travail de quelqu'un d'autre. On ajoute ensuite une exemption à des fins de bienfaisance. Je ne sais pas ce que vous en pensez, mais d'où je viens, les oeuvres de bienfaisance aident à nourrir les gens — que ce soit les esprits ou les estomacs. Lorsque des gens utilisent de grosses sommes d'argent, dans certains cas... Certains de ces festivals peuvent payer 100 000 $ à l'organisateur du spectacle.

M. Mark Hayes:

Cela peut arriver, mais c'est relativement rare. Dans la plupart des cas, de nombreux artistes qui participent à ces activités de bienfaisance offrent leurs services. Oui, c'est vrai qu'il y a des coûts.

M. Dan Albas:

Toutefois, quelle est la proportion des cas dans lesquels il devrait y avoir un certain type de critère officiel? Une personne ne peut pas seulement affirmer qu'elle fait quelque chose à des fins de bienfaisance.

M. Mark Hayes:

Il y a un critère officiel.

M. Dan Albas:

Lorsque personne d'autre que les gens qui assistent au spectacle paie pour les billets...

M. Mark Hayes:

C'est ce que je dis. Il y a un critère officiel. Ce critère a été établi par la Cour suprême du Canada dans sa décision dans l'affaire du Kiwanis Club et du Casa Loma. Le Kiwanis Club a perdu et a dû payer des redevances, car sa charte d'organisme de bienfaisance ne mentionnait rien sur l'organisation de concerts.

M. Dan Albas:

Oui.

M. Mark Hayes:

Ce n'est pas ce dont ils parlaient.

M. Dan Albas:

Mais n'est-ce pas notre travail d'observer et de déterminer les types de comportements qui sont appropriés et ceux qui ne le sont pas et d'élaborer ensuite une loi? Le tribunal a peut-être au moins couvert cela dans le contexte de cette affaire, mais j'aimerais revenir sur le sujet pour préciser que toutes les fins de bienfaisance ne sont pas égales. Tous les festivals ne sont pas égaux. Il y a une grande différence.

J'espère que vous êtes d'accord avec cela.

M. Mark Hayes:

Je crois que c'est un point difficile à saisir. Prenez l'exemple d'un organisme de bienfaisance comme le Conservatoire royal de musique. Si l'on tient compte de ses activités, entre le volet éducatif et le volet de présentation, etc., on doit reconnaître que cet organisme sert non seulement le secteur de la bienfaisance, mais qu'il joue également un rôle important dans la société et dans la collectivité.

On devrait appuyer cela. Je peux vous dire que si cet organisme payait la même chose que les producteurs commerciaux, il ne serait pas en mesure de faire tout ce qu'il fait.

M. Dan Albas:

Si une personne exploite une entité similaire à une entreprise commerciale, on devrait vérifier si elle l'exploite à des fins de bienfaisance ou non.

Je vous remercie de vos commentaires à cet égard.

Monsieur de Beer, pour revenir au problème des contrats et du droit d'auteur, vous avez clairement dit qu'une grande partie de cela concerne les contrats. Comme vous l'avez dit, chaque fois que nous menons cet examen quinquennal, chacun affirme qu'il a un problème, car il n'aime pas le dénominateur commun ou les contrats qu'il a signés. Que pouvons-nous faire pour régler ce problème? Devrions-nous simplement déclarer que si les gens ont signé un mauvais contrat, ils doivent assumer les conséquences?

M. Jeremy de Beer:

Le droit des contrats prévoit une porte de sortie dans le cas des contrats déraisonnables. Nous pouvons améliorer les politiques pour appuyer les artistes et les auteurs dans leurs négociations avec les maisons de disque et les maisons d'édition, mais ce ne sera pas par l'entremise du droit d'auteur. Ce sont des activités que le ministère du Patrimoine canadien peut mener à l'extérieur du régime de protection du droit d'auteur. Nous n'avons pas besoin d'une réforme législative pour cela. L'une des meilleures choses que nous pouvons faire — et j'ai écrit sur le sujet —, c'est de créer un système d'homologation. Une personne a saisi cette idée et a créé de la musique équitable pour permettre aux consommateurs de prendre des décisions éclairées. Lorsque les artistes sont rémunérés de façon équitable, les consommateurs peuvent soutenir les entreprises homologuées parce qu'elles rémunèrent les auteurs et les créateurs de façon équitable.

Il y a de nombreux exemples de ce que nous pouvons faire, mais ce n'est pas lié au droit d'auteur.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord.

Encore une fois, nous discutons du droit d'auteur de la Couronne. Je ne crois pas qu'il s'agisse d'un problème aussi important, que ce soit le Parlement du Canada ou le gouvernement du Canada. Selon ce que j'ai vu dans certains des mémoires que nous avons reçus, il semble que ce soit certains tribunaux — ils ne sont pas tous pareils — et leurs fonctions de production de rapports, ainsi que certaines provinces. Par exemple, si une entreprise tente de créer des agents conversationnels, qu'ils soient fédéraux ou provinciaux, pour parler des obligations que quelqu'un pourrait avoir en matière de droit du travail, et qu'on pouvait parler à une intelligence artificielle, c'est-à-dire qu'on entre le problème et qu'on reçoit une réponse... Il y a tellement de règlements de nos jours. Si une personne tente d'invoquer une loi provinciale ou une affaire juridique provinciale et ne peut pas obtenir ces renseignements ou est poursuivie en justice par la Couronne, et que c'est un pouvoir de réserve de la Couronne, ce serait un problème.

Comment évitons-nous cela? De nombreuses entités différentes peuvent adopter une approche différente.

(1720)

M. Jeremy de Beer:

J'aimerais nous voir abolir le droit d'auteur de la Couronne. Compte tenu de ce que j'ai dit plus tôt sur le fait de ne pas donner à tous ce qu'ils demandent et ce qu'ils veulent, je ne vous demande pas de faire cela.

J'aimerais souligner que la Cour suprême entendra bientôt une affaire. J'ai appris que l'audience vient d'être déplacée au mois de février, alors qu'elle était censée être entendue en janvier. Je représente la Clinique d'intérêt public et de politique d'Internet du Canada de l'Université d'Ottawa, la CIPPIC. Le mois prochain, nous présenterons nos mémoires écrits relatifs à cette affaire. Au cours des trois à neuf prochains mois, la Cour suprême du Canada rendra une décision sur l'interprétation du droit d'auteur de la Couronne, et cette décision pourrait résoudre le problème ou l'aggraver. Je dois attendre la décision de la Cour suprême pour donner mon avis sur la question du droit d'auteur de la Couronne.

M. Dan Albas:

À votre avis, devrions-nous continuer de nous pencher sur cette question ou devrions-nous attendre le jugement du tribunal?

M. Jeremy de Beer:

Vous pourriez l'abolir ou attendre.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci.

Le président:

Je ne veux pas être grincheux, mais nous devons partir à 17 h 30.

Monsieur Sheehan, vous avez cinq minutes.[Français]

Madame Quach, vous aurez deux minutes.[Traduction]

Ensuite, nous devrons partir.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais également remercier nos témoins.

Depuis le début de cette étude, les créateurs canadiens ont présenté plusieurs propositions — ou des modifications, si vous préférez — qui leur procureraient un avantage direct. J'aimerais avoir votre avis sur certaines des propositions que nous avons reçues. Je parlerai d'abord de la première, c'est-à-dire le droit de revente lié aux oeuvres artistiques visuelles, qui permet aux créateurs de percevoir un pourcentage sur chaque vente subséquente, c'est-à-dire que le peintre reçoit ce pourcentage lorsque l'oeuvre est vendue et revendue. Deuxièmement, on propose d'accorder les premiers droits de propriété des oeuvres cinématographiques aux directeurs et aux scénaristes, plutôt qu'aux producteurs — je crois que quelqu'un a abordé ce point brièvement. Ensuite, il y a le droit réversif, qui retournerait le droit d'auteur d'une oeuvre à son artiste après une période déterminée, peu importe les contrats qui affirment le contraire. Enfin, une autre proposition consiste à accorder aux journalistes un droit de rémunération lorsque leurs écrits sont utilisés sur des plateformes numériques tels les regroupeurs de nouvelles. Lors de notre dernière séance, nous avons entendu les commentaires des représentants de Facebook à cet égard.

Appuieriez-vous ces idées? Pensez-vous qu'elles profiteraient plus aux créateurs qu'aux titulaires de droits en général? Quelles pourraient être les conséquences inattendues de ces suggestions?

Il y a quatre propositions, et j'ai seulement cinq minutes. Jeremy, Mark et Howard, vous pourriez peut-être aborder chacun une proposition.

M. Mark Hayes:

J'ai déjà parlé de deux de ces propositions dans mon exposé, à savoir celle sur les droits réversifs et celle sur les oeuvres cinématographiques.

Je n'ai pas grand-chose à ajouter sur ces propositions, à moins que vous ayez des questions précises. Je crois que ces deux propositions n'ont aucun sens.

M. Howard Knopf:

Je crois que Bryan Adams a suggéré de ramener le droit réversif à 25 ans après la signature du contrat. Il a convaincu Daniel Gervais, anciennement professeur à l'Université d'Ottawa — c'est un homme assez brillant qui est maintenant à l'Université Vanderbilt — qu'il faut se pencher sérieusement sur cette question. En ce qui concerne le droit de revente, c'est un terrain glissant sur lequel, à mon avis, le Canada ne devrait pas s'engager. C'est génial pour les maisons de ventes aux enchères, mais cela compliquera peut-être grandement le marché de l'art, d'une certaine façon. Le marché de l'art a très bien prospéré pendant des milliers d'années sans cela. Je ne sais pas pourquoi nous en avons besoin maintenant. Certains pays l'ont adopté, et on pourrait faire valoir qu'il a détruit le marché de l'art dans ces pays.

Les autres choses que vous avez mentionnées — je ne me les rappelle pas toutes, mais un grand nombre d'entre elles sont tout simplement opportunistes. Il n'est pas nécessairement préférable d'avoir plus de droits. Par exemple, le chocolat est bon pour la santé. Le vin aussi. Peut-être même que la vodka est bonne pour la santé, mais toutes ces choses, si on en abuse, peuvent être très mauvaises pour la santé, et peut-être même mortelles.

M. Terry Sheehan:

L'une de ces propositions consistait à accorder des droits de rémunération aux journalistes. Cette suggestion est revenue à quelques reprises dans les témoignages.

M. Howard Knopf:

Les journalistes devraient être bien payés. Ils font un travail très important.

Si une personne écrit pour le Toronto Star, elle reçoit un salaire. Le simple fait que son article est publié sur Internet ne signifie pas que cette personne devrait être payée à nouveau.

M. Jeremy de Beer:

C'est la question de l'article 13, et cela concerne le taxage des liens et les filtres de téléchargement. Si nous faisons cela, il y aura un retour de flamme. Nous ne devrions absolument pas faire cela. Les autres choses sont une tempête dans un verre d'eau. Faites ce que vous voulez. Cela ne change presque rien dans le grand ordre des choses.

Le problème est plus important que la question du taxage des liens. C'est la même chose avec le blocage de sites. Vous avez beaucoup entendu parler du blocage de sites. Je crois que c'est une très mauvaise idée d'inscrire cela dans le cadre de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. En effet, ces dispositions existent déjà dans les Règles de procédure civile et elles sont bien utilisées. On dit qu'il est difficile d'obtenir une injonction liée au blocage d'un site. Il devrait être difficile d'obtenir une injonction liée au blocage d'un site. En effet, c'est un obstacle à la liberté d'expression et au commerce. De plus — et c'est encore plus important —, si vous êtes victime de pornographie vengeresse, par exemple, vous devez passer par les processus habituels; pourquoi donc les titulaires de droits d'auteur devraient-ils être mieux traités ou traités différemment? Ces règles existent déjà. Ce sont les deux choses dont vous devez réellement vous préoccuper, à mon avis.

(1725)

M. Terry Sheehan:

En parlant de certaines des nouvelles technologies qui ont émergé au cours des cinq dernières années, de nombreux témoignages ont mentionné Spotify et son fonctionnement. De nombreux artistes font valoir que les revenus ont explosé dans l'ensemble de l'industrie de la musique. Toutes les données démontrent qu'en raison de toutes ces choses, comme Spotify, qui remplacent BearShares et les autres activités illégales... mais selon les créateurs canadiens — et ils ont des données à l'appui —, cela n'augmente pas au même rythme.

Avez-vous des suggestions sur la façon de résoudre ce problème par l'entremise du droit d'auteur ou d'autres moyens ou d'autres mécanismes?

M. Howard Knopf:

La Commission du droit d'auteur, comme je l'ai dit, devrait être plus intrusive. Elle devrait obliger ces sociétés de gestion collective et ces parties à faire preuve d'une plus grande transparence à l'égard de leur fonctionnement interne et des sommes qui sont versées aux créateurs au bout du compte. La Commission ne devrait pas laisser une société de gestion collective ou une entreprise mener ses activités dans le cadre d'un monopole de la Commission du droit d'auteur si elle n'adopte pas un comportement équitable. Les commissaires de la concurrence devraient intervenir, ce qu'ils n'ont jamais fait, mais ils ont le pouvoir de le faire. En effet, avec le recul, Microsoft a l'air d'un ange comparativement à certaines entreprises colossales d'aujourd'hui, et cette situation exige la mise en oeuvre d'une surveillance antitrust.

Le président:

Merci.

Désolé. Notre temps est presque écoulé. Si vous souhaitez répondre à cette question par écrit, veuillez envoyer votre réponse au greffier.

Il nous reste deux minutes.

Madame Quach, vous avez la parole pour ces deux minutes. [Français]

Mme Anne Minh-Thu Quach:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Ma question est en deux volets, elle s'adresse à M. Boyer et elle porte sur la défense des artistes, en particulier en ce qui concerne l'application des droits d'auteur sur Internet.

C'est difficile, et il y a beaucoup d'incertitudes et de coûts liés au fait de faire valoir ses droits en tant qu'ayant droit pour l'utilisation d'une oeuvre sur Internet, et ce, sur deux aspects. Le premier est la difficulté pour un artiste de se faire payer. Il y a deux mois, le Comité permanent du patrimoine canadien a reçu David Bussières, auteur-compositeur-interprète du groupe Alfa Rococo. Il disait que, pour une chanson qui a tourné 6 000 fois à la radio, il a reçu plus de 17 000 $ en redevances, alors que, pour 30 000 écoutes sur Spotify, il a reçu à peine 10 $. Que peut-on faire pour pallier cela?

Par ailleurs, des oeuvres de peintres se retrouvent parfois sur une plateforme donnée. Or elles finissent parfois par se retrouver ailleurs. Comment fait-on pour aider nos artistes?

M. Marcel Boyer:

Je ne sais pas combien de temps j'ai à ma disposition, mais je peux tenter de vous répondre en 30 secondes.

Spotify et la radio commerciale sont deux technologies complètement différentes, et leurs façons de calculer les droits sur la musique sont très différentes.

L'une des raisons pour lesquelles les artistes canadiens sont mal compensés pour la diffusion en continu, c'est que la Commission du droit d'auteur du Canada s'est basée sur la radio commerciale et un équivalent par écoute de la radio commerciale, faisant une estimation du nombre d'auditeurs, et ainsi de suite. Comme la détermination des droits de la radio commerciale n'est pas concurrentielle, à mon avis, ceux-ci ne satisfont pas au principe d'une rémunération de marché concurrentiel.

Évidemment, tout cela a été transféré au dossier de la musique en continu et a aussi nui aux auteurs compositeurs interprètes.

J'ai mentionné qu'il faudrait éviter cette détermination des droits en séquences, où les décisions précédentes conditionnent les décisions actuelles. Dans le cas de la musique en continu, la Commission du droit d'auteur du Canada est tombée dans ce piège, au détriment des auteurs-compositeurs-interprètes.

Je ne peux pas en dire davantage, puisque le président m'indique de m'arrêter.

Le président:

Je suis obligé de le faire parce qu'un autre comité doit commencer incessamment.

(1730)

[Traduction]

La séance est levée.

Si vous avez d'autres réponses aux questions, veuillez les envoyer au greffier.

J'aimerais remercier tous les témoins d'avoir comparu aujourd'hui. C'était une autre bonne séance.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on November 28, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.