header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-11-27 TRAN 122

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(0800)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order.

Good morning, everyone. Thank you all very much for coming in for an eight o'clock start this morning. There are so many of you here, so we really appreciate it. I'm sure you didn't appreciate the call for eight o'clock, but thank you all very much for making it here this morning.

We gather here this morning to study a number of votes from the supplementary estimates (A), 2018-19: namely, votes 1a, 5a, 10a, 15a and 20a under Department of Transport; vote 1a under Canadian Air Transport Security Authority; and vote 1a under Canadian Transportation Agency.

I'm delighted to welcome the Honourable Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport, along with officials from Transport Canada. We have Michael Keenan, deputy minister, who has been here often to visit us, and André Lapointe, assistant deputy minister for corporate services and chief financial officer, as well as Lawrence Hanson, assistant deputy minister for policy.

From the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority, I would like to welcome Neil Parry, vice-president of service delivery, and Nancy Fitchett, acting vice-president of corporate affairs and chief financial officer.

From the Canadian Transportation Agency, I'd like to welcome Liz Barker, vice-chair, and Manon Fillion, chief corporate officer.

We also have representatives from three other departments.

From the Department of Western Economic Diversification, we have Barbara Motzney, assistant deputy minister, policy and strategic direction. From the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, we have Sheilagh Murphy, assistant deputy minister, lands and economic development. From the Department of Indigenous Services Canada, we have Scott Doidge, director general, non-insured health benefits directorate, first nations and Inuit health branch.

Welcome, everyone. Thank you very much for coming.

On vote 1a under the Department of Transport, Minister Garneau, you have five minutes, please.

Hon. Marc Garneau (Minister of Transport):

Thank you, Madam Chair.[Translation]

Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for the invitation to meet with the committee. As you know, I am joined by several people today, as the chair mentioned.

I'm pleased to be here to talk about some of the important work being done in the federal transportation portfolio, which includes Transport Canada, Crown corporations, agencies and administrative tribunals. Funding for these federal organizations helps to make Canada's transportation system safer, more secure, more efficient and more environmentally responsible. I, and the organizations in the federal transportation portfolio, remain committed to sound fiscal management and solid stewardship of government resources, while delivering results for Canadian taxpayers.

Transport Canada's supplementary estimates (A) for 2018-19 total $32 million. This figure includes funding for a variety of programs. There is $10.5 million in new funding. Most of this new funding will be used to transition to the Government of Canada's holistic and transformative system for impact assessment and regulatory decision-making.

(0805)

[English]

New and incremental resources will allow Transport Canada to meet its responsibilities, which have been expanded under the new impact assessment and regulatory review system. This includes a transformative approach to working with indigenous peoples to advance reconciliation, recognize and respect indigenous rights and jurisdiction, foster collaboration and ensure that indigenous knowledge is considered.

This system includes modifications that would create the Canadian navigable waters act, which is currently before Parliament as part of Bill C-69. The changes would ensure that the public right to navigate is protected in Canada's navigable waters and would restore lost protections and incorporate modern safeguards.[Translation]

These supplementary estimates include a reprofiling of funds totalling $21.6 million. This reprofiling includes funding for safety-related capital infrastructure at local and regional airports, for a variety of rail safety projects under our rail safety improvement program and for maintenance on ferries on the east coast.

Transfers from Transport Canada to other federal departments in the supplementary estimates total less than $1 million, and there is $840,000 listed for statutory employee benefit plan costs related to the aforementioned projects.

I am very proud of Transport Canada's ongoing work.[English]

I'll take a few moments to highlight a specific priority, which is investment in our country's transportation corridors, particularly our trade corridors. “Trade Corridors to Global Markets” is one of the five themes of transportation 2030, our government's strategic plan for the future of transportation in Canada.

We can have the best products in the world, but if we can't get them to our customers quickly and reliably, we will lose business to other suppliers. We are working with stakeholders to address bottlenecks, vulnerabilities and congestion along our trade corridors, and the trade and transportation corridors initiative is a significant part of this effort.

We announced the trade and transportation corridors initiative in July 2017, including the national trade corridors fund, which is a cornerstone of this initiative. The national trade corridors fund is designed to help infrastructure owners and users invest in our roads, bridges, airports, rail lines, port facilities and trade corridors. Through this fund, our government is investing $2 billion over a span of 11 years. We have already announced funding for projects, including railway corridors, airport runways, port facilities, bridges, highways and more. These are critical transportation assets that support the movement of goods and people in Canada. The national trade corridors fund has been accelerated, as you know, to enable more projects to address bottlenecks to trade diversification.

Our trade corridors are important for moving domestic trade to international markets and for helping Canadian businesses to complete, grow and create more jobs for the country's middle class. Canada is a trading nation, and one in six Canadian jobs depends on international commerce. For our economy to succeed, we have to ensure that our products, our services and our citizens have access to key global markets. This is an important reason why I am proud of the work Transport Canada is doing throughout the trade and transportation corridors initiative and the national trade corridors fund.[Translation]

But Transport Canada is not the only organization in the federal transportation portfolio. The Canadian Air Transport Security Authority, or CATSA, is also an important part of the Canadian transportation landscape.

CATSA is seeking to reprofile $36 million of capital funds in supplementary estimates (A) this year. The majority of this capital reprofiling—approximately $29 million—is for postponed equipment purchase and integration work for the new hold baggage screening system. This is part of CATSA'S capital life-cycle management plan to align with revised airport project plans.

My mandate has not changed since being named Minister of Transport three years ago. I continue to ensure that Canada's transportation system supports economic growth and job creation. I continue to work to ensure that our transportation system is safe and reliable, and facilitates trade and the movement of people and goods. I continue to work to ensure that our roads, ports and airports are integrated and sustainable, and allow Canadians and businesses to more easily engage globally.

The financial resources sought through these supplementary estimates would help the organizations in my portfolio as we continue to ensure that our transportation system serves Canadians' needs now and for years to come.

Thank you. If you have any questions, I would be happy to answer them.

(0810)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister Garneau.

We'll go to Mrs. Block, for six minutes.

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

I want to thank you, Minister Garneau, for joining us today for 90 minutes. We're very pleased to be able to ask many questions. We look forward to your answers. I also want to welcome the departmental officials you've brought with you. There's quite a team here today. I do appreciate the fact that they've taken the time to join us this morning.

I know that we are studying the supplementary estimates and government spending, but I would like to ask some questions around a bill that we studied recently. It was referred to us by the finance committee. It was part of the budget implementation act, Bill C-86.

There were a couple of divisions in the budget implementation act that I think come directly from Transport Canada. They were buried within this budget implementation act between pages 589 and 649, in divisions 22 and 23. They contain substantial changes to the Canada Shipping Act and the Marine Liability Act.

One of the witnesses appearing before the committee for the Chamber of Shipping noted that clause 692 of this bill appears to be another mechanism with which to implement a moratorium on specific commodities through regulation and interim order, not legislation as the government has already done through Bill C-48. The witness noted that this contradicts what should be the government's objective in providing a predictable supply chain.

Quite honestly, Minister, there is no question in my mind that the inclusion of this clause in Bill C-86 will have a further chilling effect on Canada's oil and gas industry. My question for you this morning is, can you assure Canadians that this will not be yet another measure to undermine Canada's oil and gas sector?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I thank my colleague for the question.

Of course, the parts in Bill C-86 that she is referring to have to do with modifications that we will be making to the Canada Shipping Act of 2001 and the Marine Liability Act. These were referenced specifically in the budgets of 2017 and 2018 in the context of the oceans protection plan, which is a very important government initiative.

Canada relies on safe and clean coasts and waters for trade, economic growth and quality of life. We also recognize that our oceans hold a special place in the traditions and culture of Canadians, notably indigenous communities. We are taking decisive, concrete action to ensure that our oceans will continue to be enjoyed by all Canadians today and for generations to come.

To support safe and environmentally responsible shipping, divisions 22 and 23 of Bill C-86 propose legislative amendments to enhance marine environmental protection and strengthen marine safety. That is the purpose of those two.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much. I appreciate your answer on that. I would like to follow up with you on another question, since you did raise the oceans protection plan. We had this question for your ADM, who appeared before our committee on Bill C-86.

We understood that the legislative consultations for the oceans protection plan concluded on Friday, October 26. Bill C-86 was tabled on Monday, October 29. Look, as good as the lawyers are within Transport Canada and at the justice department, no one really believes that they could actually get these clauses drafted and get them to the printer in two days. In fact, the shipping community was very surprised to see these clauses included in Bill C-86.

Minister, when did you decide to include these substantial changes in the BIA, and why did Transport Canada's website continue to suggest that these consultations were still ongoing?

(0815)

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I can tell you that we have been focusing on the oceans protection plan for a little over two years now. As you know, it was announced on November 7, 2016 by the Prime Minister in Vancouver. I was beside him at the time.

There are over 50 measures involved in the oceans protection plan. It is truly a world-leading initiative to ensure that our oceans are safer, that our marine environment is more protected and that our capability to respond is greater. One of the parts of this that we have always been planning to do is to make changes to these two acts that I mentioned to you before.

One of them is directly related to liability in case there is a spill. We've made some very important changes there with respect to that. The other one is to also have the capability within the government to make certain changes to protect marine species, such as the ability to order slowdowns, let's say in the Salish Sea, if we decide that it is important for the protection of endangered species.

We want to strengthen—

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you, Minister. I would like to just quickly follow up. I think I have 45 seconds left.

The Chair:

You have about 20 seconds.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Witnesses who appeared before the committee did note that these were the most substantial changes to be made to the Canada Shipping Act and Marine Liability Act in 10 years, in one case, and in another case, 25 years, so they were very surprised and perhaps even disappointed to see that these were buried within a budget implementation act.

Thank you.

Hon. Marc Garneau: You're welcome.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mrs. Block.

Mr. Hardie, go ahead, please, for six minutes.

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Good morning, everybody, and thanks for being here.

Minister Garneau, we've been spending a little time looking at a couple of very important trade corridors in Canada. My colleague Vance Badawey and I were fortunate to have studies done in our home areas.

In looking at the west coast, I wonder if you could comment on the role and mandate of the WESTAC group. I understand that they have a coordinating function with respect to planning and implementation of improvements in the trade corridor.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I'd be pleased, Mr. Hardie, to comment on that. In fact, my deputy minister is involved with WESTAC as well, as a government representative.

As you hint, it is an organization that is strongly focused on the fluidity of transportation on the west coast. Of course, the port of Vancouver, as we all know, is by far the largest port in Canada. There is significant concern about bottlenecks in the Lower Mainland and all the way into the inland port of Ashcroft. To ensure that we are moving goods as efficiently as possible to this very strategic port, WESTAC fulfills an important function in that respect.

Certainly, the dialogue about where the bottlenecks are is crucial to our decision-making process when we award funding—through the national trade corridors fund—to particular projects, where the purpose, I might repeat, is to reduce bottlenecks or eliminate them. The input from WESTAC is an extremely important input.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

One of the things we noticed in our conversations with the various component parts of metro Vancouver's trade corridor was that there's an option to spend an awful lot of money there to improve the corridor. You mentioned choke points. There are three that lead to the north shore, where a lot of the bulk and break bulk terminals are located in the inner harbour, as we call it. There's the bridge at New Westminster, which is over 100 years old now. There's a tunnel that goes underneath Burnaby Mountain. Then there's another bridge that crosses right next to the Second Narrows bridge.

Looking at the cost of potential improvements there, it would be quite substantial, but at the same time, the potential for growth in terms of the material-handling capabilities of the north shore of Burrard Inlet is somewhat limited. The concern arises that we need to have oversight that looks at the big picture, not just the component parts, to start to identify alternatives for development that might not necessarily be in the field of vision of the railways or the port of metro Vancouver, etc. Are you satisfied that we have that kind of line of thinking going?

(0820)

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I agree with what you've just expressed. We do need to not just zero in on specific projects.

There are a lot of specific projects that are recognized as bottlenecks, some of which we addressed in our first awarding of funding under the national trade corridors fund. We announced them during the course of the past few months.

But you're right. We should look at the bigger picture. I believe that when our department judges the different applications for funding for the different bottlenecks that are in the Lower Mainland, each time we do look at the big picture with the idea of optimizing, because that's the most important criterion: How much will this help to make the transportation more fluid?

As you know, the port of Vancouver and the railways—there are three class I railways that come into it, as well as a very large amount of trucking in a very busy area where there are a lot of people going about their lives and driving their cars—really have to be looked at in a way that we can optimize for the taxpayers' money, because there is more demand than there is money. I think that in itself forces us to try to optimize towards what will provide the best long-term solution in terms of that transport fluidity.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I think a lot of people were comforted by the move to a new class of railcars for shipping oil. We know that's the backup until such time as we get more pipeline capacity to the west coast.

In terms of the overall shipping regime, there are grains to move. There is obviously more oil to move. What is your sense of how the rail system is performing in the national interest or in the national strategy for getting the right things to market?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I think the changes made through Bill C-49 in the modernization of the Canada Transportation Act went in the right direction. That was to try to optimize the movement of commodities. We happen to be at a time when there is a very strong demand for moving goods in this country. You're right to point out that it is the movement of grain, but it is also the movement of many other commodities. I hear regularly from the mining community, from the forestry community, from the potash community. These are important commodities that are headed for our ports. Of course, right now there's an increased demand for shipping oil by rail as well.

The railways know that there is a strong demand, because they're receiving it. At the same time, we have to ensure that there is not a focus that advantages one commodity versus other commodities. That is essentially the situation you have to deal with when the economy is running strongly, as it is at the moment, and there is enormous demand for Canadian products.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Ms. Benson, we will go to you. Welcome to our committee this morning.

Ms. Sheri Benson (Saskatoon West, NDP):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you to the minister and all the folks from the various departments for being here.

I am going to turn the conversation a little bit. I come from Saskatchewan; obviously, access to affordable transportation for rural and remote communities and people's ability to travel are concerns for me. I have raised these a number of times—in particular, the safe transportation for indigenous women and the support we provide for public transportation outside of large urban centres. People may not necessarily have heard what I've said, but I see the bus service in western Canada as our subway. I feel it deserves support and leadership from the federal government.

It's been almost two years since the Saskatchewan Transportation Company closed and 253 communities in Saskatchewan lost service. Folks listening today should understand that this means more than just having an inexpensive way to get to the city to do some shopping. We're talking about students' ability to go to post-secondary education, people's ability to be employed, the movement of medical supplies between urban centres and smaller centres, and of course people accessing health care. Then, of course, the other shoe dropped. We lost Greyhound service in northern Ontario and the rest of western Canada.

I have a couple of questions to get an update on what I feel is the federal government's role in this and the parameters around it. I understand jurisdiction, but it's also my feeling that any level of government can lead on an issue to bring people together and help provide a service to communities while co-operating with other levels of government. I just put that out there to encourage you to think about what role the federal government has.

Minister, concerning Greyhound, we have heard that anywhere between 87% and 90% of the routes have been covered. I'm wondering if you could let us know where the routes are that currently are not being covered and what the federal government's plan is to deal with that. In particular, I'd be interested in hearing where those routes are and if one province is really being left out in the cold, so to speak.

(0825)

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Thank you for your question.

Since July, when Greyhound announced that they were pulling out of the west and a little part of northern Ontario, our ministry did get together with the provinces. You're right that, even though transportation by coach has been on the decrease for a very long time, there are vulnerable populations that depend on it, such as people who have no other choice financially and people in remote regions. There has been a coordination between the federal and the provincial. When I say federal, we've also brought in Indigenous Services Canada and CIRNAC, as well as ISED, so that we could look at this challenge that is in front of us.

As you point out, there was a take-up on 87% of the routes that were dropped by Greyhound, and that's a good thing because they feel they can make a go of it. However, you're right that there are also some that haven't been. We can provide you with the details of the actual trajectories we're talking about that haven't, but we have a plan there as well. If you look at what's been lost by Greyhound leaving, mostly they're in Alberta and British Columbia. We have worked with those two provinces, so that if, at some point, they go out with a request for proposals to find a line through a competitive process, we would be there to assist them financially. That is the plan with respect to that.

On indigenous and remote communities, which is through ISC, we have put in place a plan to work with indigenous communities that want to also set up a commercial capability themselves, so we feel that process is under way as well.

That's only a short-term solution. We need a long-term solution, so part of what we announced a few weeks ago also includes, within two years, coming up with a more national...we're talking about all 10 provinces and three territories.

(0830)

The Chair:

You have 10 seconds left, Ms. Benson.

Ms. Sheri Benson:

I'll underline the point that those who need to access services, particularly those with disabilities, should be included when we're starting to talk about a plan for Canada. I would suggest you start where there is no bus service or where we're really struggling.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Ms. Benson.

We'll move on to Mr. Graham. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Minister, thank you for being here today.

The Laurentians are home to more than 10,000 lakes, so figuring out who has jurisdiction over what in the aquatic domain is extremely complicated. Who is responsible for bodies of water? Who is responsible for what is below the surface? That's one of the biggest concerns in my riding.

Transport Canada is responsible for the Vessel Operation Restriction Regulations. We know that consultations on the regulations were launched. Can you or a member of your team give us an update on the consultation process?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I believe you're referring to navigable water jurisdiction over lakes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

You're right in that, traditionally, the area falls under federal jurisdiction. However, we recognize the numerous challenges that creates given the local regulations that apply to lakes.

We are currently working on that. I have to admit, it's a long-term effort, and we are trying to find a way to delegate some of that responsibility to the most appropriate authorities, meaning the municipalities. We would like to give them greater flexibility. At the same time, though, they will still be required to protect navigation activities on lakes. We are not done yet, but that's the direction we are moving in. We know that it will be a more flexible mechanism that meets municipalities' needs.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you for working on that. It's a major concern for my constituents. We have huge vessels using our small lakes and causing serious damage, so we certainly welcome any progress on the issue.[English]

I want to go to another topic. I think it's a little lighter. I think we're all very happy to hear about the InSight landing on Mars yesterday. I think you might have some particular excitement for that as well.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Did you want my comments on it?

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: I'd like your comments on it.

Hon. Marc Garneau: Well, I thought it was extraordinary. Beyond even space flight with humans, I think the ability to land a rover or a vehicle on Mars is the most technically demanding challenge that any spacefaring nation faces. Only the United States has ever been able to land and have an operational rover or experiment on the surface of Mars.

Now, it's early days; they've landed, but they still have to check out all the systems. I think it is a testimony to the brilliance of NASA, particularly the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, which runs all of these things. I'm very excited and will be watching very carefully what scientific results—they're going to look underground—come out of it.

I wish space were under Transport, but I haven't been successful yet with my colleague Minister Bains.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We'll work on that.

Back to Canada, on VIA Rail, you've announced a renewal for the fleet. Do you have an update on where we're at with that?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

VIA Rail is a Crown corporation. The Government of Canada recognized that the passenger railcar and locomotive fleet was in need of replacement. Some parts of it were over 40 years old, so we announced some time ago that VIA would launch a competition. That competition is under way, and it is open to the world.

At this point, we're looking forward to fairly shortly hearing back officially from VIA Rail on which company will be awarded the contract to replace these old passenger cars, and I know they're old because I take them every week myself between Montreal and Ottawa. I think it's very exciting. This is in the corridor between Quebec and Windsor, where the greatest amount of traffic is taking place, with the objective of having the first new vehicles coming out in 2022.

(0835)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can we expect that this will significantly improve passenger service or at least the experience?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I know that VIA is always striving to improve its service and its on-time record. When you have new equipment, if you get the right equipment, you're going to be spending less time doing maintenance, which helps to improve the reliability.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

Very quickly, you have the airports capital assistance program. Can you talk a bit about what this program is and why it's important? There are five airports in my riding, so it's always interesting to hear about possibilities.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

The airports capital assistance program has been in place for roughly 20 years, I think, and has awarded close to $900 million to our airports. Every year, there's about $38 million to $40 million that's allocated. There are many airports across the country. There are the five you mentioned in your riding.

To be eligible, you have to have.... The actual funding is for safety improvements at the airport. That can be lighting; it can be snow-clearing equipment. It has to be safety-related. There are a lot of applicants every year, so we can't do it for everybody. There is a requirement that the airports in question have a regular service for flights of at least a thousand passengers per year and that they're non-federal airports. It's a federal program that is very hotly competed for. We announce every year those airports that receive funding.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are PPR airports eligible?

The Chair:

I'm sorry, Mr. Graham. Your time is up.

We're moving on to Mr. Badawey.

Mr. Vance Badawey (Niagara Centre, Lib.):

Good morning.

Thank you for being here this morning.

I'll preface my question by stating that, as Mr. Hardie recognized, when we took a trip to Niagara as well as Vancouver, we learned a great deal about the changes happening within world trade, the transport of global trade and the products contained within. We learned that our trade corridors need to be updated.

Let's face it, at the end of the day, we found out quickly how content and complacent this nation has been for the past many generations. To some extent, we are now sitting on archaic transportation assets. There's a need to be very strategic and become more of an enabler, utilizing those assets. As you mentioned, Minister, this will strengthen our nation's overall global performance. I congratulate you. After decades of contentment and complacency, with the economy suffering as a result, the efforts and the direction you're taking are much welcomed, especially in Niagara, which is one of the nation's strategic trade corridors.

With that, Minister, I have a question. Taking into consideration transport, infrastructure, labour, global affairs, environment, international trade, finance, economic development, fisheries and intergovernmental affairs and relations, how are you and Transport Canada utilizing a whole-of-government approach to invest, integrate, optimize, and update our fluidity when it comes to mobility and global trade?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Thank you, Mr. Badawey.

If I may, I will commend you for the work you're doing in the Niagara area with respect to trade corridors. That is an important entry point, particularly for trade between Canada and the United States.

I would answer your question by saying that the recent fall economic statement gives a strong hint of where we're looking at trade with respect to a whole-of-government approach. There were of course measures in our economic statement that were focused on trying to make our Canadian enterprises more competitive. The accelerated depreciation on capital investments was a good example that we believe will create jobs. Of course, if you create jobs and you make more products, you have to move those products. The significant part, although it may not have been mentioned too much, was the fact that the government took some of the funding for out-years on the national trade corridors fund and moved it forward so that we would have access to that funding.

As you know, we've had one competition. We awarded $800 million to 39 projects. There is such a strong demand for this, because there's a recognition that it is crucial for the economy to move our goods efficiently, that we welcome the fact that money for later years has been moved forward so that we can continue going out and having more projects under the national trade corridors fund, which will improve the movement of goods and will be good for the economy.

I think the government has clearly recognized the crucial function of transportation in getting our goods to market. If we don't, our clients will go elsewhere.

(0840)

Mr. Vance Badawey:

I congratulate you for going to a whole-of-government approach. In my former life as a mayor, I was extremely frustrated when we had to communicate individually versus having a government that actually communicates effectively within itself.

Besides the 10 ministries I mentioned earlier, I'll add Innovation, Science and Economic Development. R and D is very important. We have encouraged universities and colleges to assist in bringing new products to market. How are you working with those different ministries to once again create the fluidity we need to expand GDP in the future? How are you working with those different ministries to ensure that we're all communicating to become more of an enabler for the transport of those goods internationally?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Transportation is a highly technical area. There are a lot of examples of where transportation is becoming increasingly sophisticated.

An example would be the fact that we're exploring truck platooning as a possible future method of transporting a great deal of merchandise by truck. Of course, truck platooning is where a platoon of several trucks are following each other, but there is a coordination between the trucks that's all done via technology so that they are all following each other. This is something that is being done throughout the world at the moment. Many western countries are developing this capability.

We rely on science and technology to implement this kind of system. Having been in a platoon of trucks in a demonstration at a Transport Canada facility, I must say that it is a very impressive capability. It's also fixed in such a way that the separation between trucks minimizes the aerodynamic drag on the trucks behind the first one, so you can get fuel economy as well.

Canada is working on that kind of development, not to mention autonomous vehicles, which is another area, or drones, which is also a very strongly emerging field.

In all of those cases, we need to make use of the best available technological capability, as well as the science that will help us deal with these new disruptive technologies.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister Garneau.

Mr. Liepert, you have six minutes.

Mr. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, CPC):

Thank you, Minister, for being here and for being here for 90 minutes.

However, I only get six, so I'd like to ask some quick questions and hopefully we can use committee-of-the-whole rules, where the answers don't exceed the length of the questions.

I want to ask you about transportation 2030. You stated, “We can have the best products in the world, but if we can't get them to our customers quickly and reliably, we will lose business to other suppliers.”

When we were in Vancouver.... The port of Vancouver has something like two billion dollars' worth of construction under way today to help get products to customers. However, the CEO of the port of Vancouver said that if Bill C-69 had been law two years ago, not one dollar of that investment would be made today.

How can you make the statements that you made about transportation 2030 and still rationalize a bill like Bill C-69 being pushed through by the Liberal government?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

All I can say to you is that I didn't make that statement. You referred to the CEO of the port of Vancouver. He can speak for himself on that.

Bill C-69, in our opinion, is absolutely necessary because the previous government, the government that you represented, gutted a lot of the protections for the environment, which were an important part of our commitment—

(0845)

Mr. Ron Liepert:

But you're the transportation minister. It's the environment minister's job to make those statements. You're the transportation minister. You're supposed to be fighting on behalf of Canadians, getting their supplies to world markets, and that's not happening with our oil and gas industry today.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I'll be glad to tell you that we talk to each other in our government, the different ministers. We believe that we can juggle several balls at the same time.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Okay, so then you are obviously losing the argument within your own caucus. I'll leave it at that.

I also want to state—

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I wouldn't put it that way, myself, but you can.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Well, I'd like to, and I will.

I'd like to stay on transportation 2030. It says right in the statement that one of the goals is to decrease the cost of air travel for Canadians. How do you rationalize that with the carbon tax that's been put on aircraft, where there is no other choice but to use jet fuel?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

If you had looked in detail at the measures in Bill C-49, which we're very proud of, you would have seen that there were several measures to increase competition. Competition, I think you would agree, has the potential to lower costs. One of the significant measures that we took was to increase foreign ownership in Canadian airlines from the 25% limit that used to exist to 49%. This allows for more foreign investment, up to 49%, in Canadian airlines, and this can generate new, ultra-low-cost carriers, which can help competition, lower prices and offer new destinations.

That's one part of it that we announced in Bill C-49. We also had some other measures dealing with joint ventures.

We think that we're doing good things to increase competition.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

So, because you didn't address the carbon tax issue, I can assume that this is another loss for the Minister of Transport on behalf of Canadian business to the Minister of Environment within this Liberal cabinet.

Let's move on, then. I want to ask whether or not you're satisfied with how our airports are being managed with the current structure that exists for airport authorities.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Yes, I'll answer that.

As for the tail end of your comment, unlike your party unfortunately, we believe that pollution implies costs and that we can't ignore it. It's not free, as your party seems to believe.

Yes, on airports, better is always possible. There's no question. With the increase in the amount of travel by air in this country, there is more and more pressure on our airports. I was very glad to be at Toronto airport recently, which won the prize for the best large airport customer service in North America. However, with more and more passengers, there are more pressures on CATSA, the security organization responsible for ensuring that when you go to the airport—

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Yes, I know what CATSA is.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Okay, good. So that is an area where we need to make improvements. I think our airports are coping with the expansion. There are always stories about people not being satisfied, but I think that, generally speaking, our airports do a very good job, especially if you compare them to the airports in other countries of the world.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

I have one last question. I have only six minutes.

This committee is currently doing a study on aircraft noise at large urban centres. One of the things that seem to have come out of the testimony we've had is that it's very difficult to find out who is responsible, at the end of the day, for dealing with these concerns.

I am presuming that we, as a committee, will make several recommendations to you as a minister. Will you confirm today that after receiving a report from this committee and studying it, you will respond to it and it won't simply sit and collect dust?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I always take seriously all reports that come from this committee, so we will look at that, and I value the input that you will be providing on the very important issue of noise.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

But will you respond publicly to the report?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I respond to every report that comes out of this committee.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Thank you.

The Chair:

It will be one of the requests in our report, when we file it in the House, that they report back in a specified amount of time in the interests of all committee members.

We'll move on to Ms. Damoff. Welcome to the committee this morning.

(0850)

Ms. Pam Damoff (Oakville North—Burlington, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

How much time do I have?

The Chair:

You have six minutes.

Ms. Pam Damoff:

Minister, thank you for being here today.

You and I have had a number of questions around pedestrian and cycling safety, and I really appreciate your engagement on the issue. I know you announced an intergovernmental task force to improve the safety of vulnerable road users, in particular around heavy vehicles. In the spring of this year, you invited the public to take part in an online consultation.

Could you update us on your efforts on pedestrian and cycling safety?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I'll preface my answer by saying that many areas of transport are shared jurisdictions between provinces, in some cases municipalities, and the federal government. Now that more people are walking and biking and there are even bike paths in busy cities, the issue of vulnerable road users that you refer to, pedestrians and cyclists, has brought to light the fact that there have been fatalities and serious injuries, particularly, as you say, from heavy vehicles. In my riding, two people have lost their lives as a result of that.

About a year ago, I decided to work with the provinces to see if we could address this growing problem. As you said, there was consultation. There was a tour of several cities, as well as online input from Canadians, and that led to a report that was published in late summer. That report identified over 50 measures that could be implemented to improve the situation if different levels of government, including the federal, chose to implement them. Some would have a greater effect, and some would have perhaps a lesser effect, but the actual assessment of each measure was not done. It was mainly a listing of all the things that could be done at the three levels of government.

That's a very important document, and we will be following up when I meet with my provincial and territorial counterparts in January to take the next step and make decisions about which measures we should all consider putting in place to make roads safer for Canadians. I'm looking at some federal measures as well, and we will have more to say once we've had that meeting.

Ms. Pam Damoff:

Thank you, Minister.

Coupled with what our infrastructure minister has done in funding for infrastructure around active transportation, cycling and walking, it's very much appreciated in my riding and across Canada. Thank you very much.

I'm going to turn it over to my colleague, who has a question for you as well.

Mr. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Thank you.

Minister, I had the pleasure of spending the day with you in Mississauga, and I, as well the University of Toronto students, really enjoyed hearing first-hand about your experience of being launched into space.

Earlier in the day, you were speaking at the Mississauga Board of Trade. I am wondering if you could get on the record for the committee some of the numbers you were talking about in terms of transportation announcements in the Peel and GTA region.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I'd have to dig that up. There were 39 projects. My speech is not at hand with me this morning, but there have been investments in the Peel and York regions. I could get back to you on that.

If memory serves me correctly, there were something like 58 or so projects. I can't remember the exact amount, but it is part of the different programs that Transport Canada regulates and coordinates. I know there were some significant ones, because I mentioned them in the speech. I wouldn't have mentioned them if they hadn't been significant, but I can't remember the numbers offhand. I'm sorry.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Could we ask for the exact number to be provided to the committee?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

We can provide those to Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Okay, thank you very much.

The Chair:

If you could supply them to the clerk, please, she will distribute them to all the members of the committee.

(0855)

Ms. Pam Damoff:

I think you're going to get back to me, as there's about a minute left.

Is that right, Chair?

The Chair:

Yes.

Ms. Pam Damoff:

Minister, you've had conversations with Air Canada about the fix for the Airbus that would deal with a lot of the airplane noise, which my constituents contact me about fairly regularly.

I'm wondering if you could update us on your conversations with Air Canada on the Airbus noise issue.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Yes. What we did specifically was to speak to Air Canada, which has an Airbus fleet. Some of these Airbus 320s have this device that protrudes below the left wing, the port wing, and it creates quite a bit of noise as the airplane is coming in. There is a fix for that where the wing can be made flush, and it is something that Air Canada has undertaken to do on all its fleet when it brings those airplanes in for regularly scheduled maintenance. That will be done over time. The process is under way. It affects mostly the GTA, but it does affect some other airports as well.

This is good news. In terms of the specific schedule on when the last one will be completed, I don't have that at the moment, but it is something that we can ask Air Canada.

I do have some statistics, Mr. Sikand, and I'll get back to you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister.

We're moving on to Mr. Jeneroux, for five minutes.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for being here. It's great to see the minister show up for supplementary estimates, unlike the infrastructure minister. I feel we all collectively agree that was a bit of a disaster at the last meeting.

Minister, we have a premier from Alberta who's requesting increased rail capacity—up to 120,000 extra cars. She has requested support from the federal government and apparently hasn't received it. There's nothing in the fiscal update; “crude by rail” isn't a line in there.

I'm curious as to whether that's something you're considering or not.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Thank you for your question.

I have seen the letter from Premier Notley that was sent to the Prime Minister, and I recognize the situation Alberta is in. The request was for additional train capacity. As you know, oil by train is approaching 300,000 barrels a day, and there was demand for an additional capability of 120,000 barrels. We're looking at that, but the situation is the following.

It is something that can be worked out with the railways. Most of the tanker cars are owned either by the oil companies or by shippers; they are not primarily owned by the railways. The railways provide the locomotives to move things. It is something that is a possibility if a deal is done on a commercial basis with the railways.

At the same time, as I mentioned a little earlier, we want to make sure that we move our grain, and other products as well. It's a balancing act that needs to be accomplished. I am definitely aware of Alberta's need and desire to move more oil until we can have more pipeline capacity.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Speaking of pipeline capacity, just to pick up my colleague's line of questioning, you appear to be losing the argument on that one with Minister McKenna as well. We've heard from a number of stakeholders at this committee, through our travel across the country, that initiatives like the carbon tax are detrimental to their competitive nature.

Are these things that you're bringing up in cabinet—that you're hearing the same issues from the stakeholders you're meeting with?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

You won't be surprised that I don't necessarily share your assessment of the situation. As I've said, and as my government has said many times before—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Be clear, Minister. Have you or have you not heard that the carbon tax is detrimental to competitiveness?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

No, I have not.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

You haven't heard that from people.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

No, I have not.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

No stakeholder has told you that.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

No—except for the Conservative Party making allegations.

(0900)

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Well, that's fantastic.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I think most Canadians are enlightened and realize that there is a cost associated with pollution. We in Canada believe it is possible to actually advance the economy and also be responsible.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

But you're exempting the largest emitters. I believe the parliamentary secretary even admitted, in question period the other day, that it is chasing investments away. How can you sit here today and say that you haven't heard from anybody who's telling you that the carbon tax is making it uncompetitive to do business here in Canada?

I invite you to just look at the protest that happened in Alberta. A thousand people in the streets of Calgary were saying those exact same things. They're unemployed. These are families before Christmastime. They are directly blaming initiatives like the carbon tax and your tanker moratorium, initiatives that continue to drive business out of this country. Yet you're sitting here today and telling us that nobody has told you that the carbon tax is detrimental to business.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Well, you weren't here three years ago—I was—when the previous government was in place.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I'm glad you follow my political career so closely, Minister.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

They didn't do anything. They had this fancy thing called a sectorial approach, which they never did anything with.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

So Catherine McKenna—

Hon. Marc Garneau: Let me finish.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux: —is essentially giving you your talking points on this.

The Chair:

Please allow the minister to complete.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

There were two provinces, British Columbia and Quebec, that did show some leadership with respect to putting a price on pollution. If you look at their economies today, you have to come to the realization that it didn't harm them. It actually made the situation better.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

You're exempting the largest emitters, Minister.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Your facts are not facts. They're erroneous assumptions on your part, because those economies that have embraced a responsible approach to both pollution and their economy—

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

You're exempting the largest emitters, Minister.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

—are actually doing much better.

The Chair:

Thank you all very much.

Ms. Benson, you have three minutes.

Ms. Sheri Benson:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I would ask you, Minister, if you could, to table with this committee more information about the mandate of the working group that will look at transportation in western Canada. Greyhound has closed, which you referred to. I'm wondering what kind of representation there will be, and I would encourage you to have regional representation. I'm wondering about the timeline and about the intended outcome for that working group. I would like to encourage that working group to look at service and safety standards when it comes to bus transportation.

I would like to raise with you, Minister, the fact that I have heard from people in my province about some of the bus services that are up and operating in western Canada dropping people on the side of a highway. That is not safe. I know you would agree with that.

I'm wondering as well if you could let us know what indigenous communities have come forward with proposals to offer bus service to their communities or surrounding communities.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

You asked a lot of questions there. I don't know if we'll be able to do all of them.

My deputy minister will talk about the working group. I can talk about safety. With respect to any dialogue with indigenous groups, we can get back to you on the information there. That's being led by ISED and Indigenous Services Canada. We can get back to you on that.

Deputy Minister, go ahead.

Mr. Michael Keenan (Deputy Minister, Department of Transport):

Thank you, Minister.

As the minister indicated, he tasked me to work with our provincial transportation colleagues in developing the immediate measures that were put in place on the day Greyhound closed down in terms of the transition of bus services.

We were also tasked by our ministers to begin work on the future of transportation in the long term. At this point, the overriding focus of the work has been on the immediate challenge in that transition. That has consumed most of the working group's effort. Now that we've done that, we are transitioning. We're beginning a conversation on how we will work together in developing the long-term agenda and how we will engage the key communities in those issues. You will see that coming out in the coming months.

Ms. Sheri Benson:

Would the working group be working with the fact that.... If you're moving on to the next step, what about communities that don't have any bus service?

Mr. Michael Keenan:

I think that is exactly the kind of question that we'll be working through. We'll be looking at the challenges that communities are facing and looking at the challenges that different members in the communities are facing, particularly those who have barriers to transportation because they don't drive or because they have mobility issues, etc.

I'll be frank. We have just begun that conversation about how to move that work ahead, because we have been really focused on the short-term challenge and addressing that.

(0905)

Ms. Sheri Benson:

Would it be possible to table that with the committee, what work you've done and who is on that committee? I've had a really hard time getting any information to find out what exactly is going on since the announcement in July.

Mr. Michael Keenan:

At this point, that committee is really the deputy ministers. There's a committee of the deputy ministers of transportation, and there's a subcommittee of working officials under that. The membership is me and my colleagues in provincial transport ministries from across Canada; essentially, that is the membership right now. We are building a work program that will include engagement, and the development of that work plan is under way.

With respect to engagement with indigenous communities, we have colleagues here from Indigenous Services Canada and CIRNAC. They may wish to comment on the discussion and the engagement with indigenous communities in terms of supporting them in developing transportation services.

Ms. Sheilagh Murphy (Assistant Deputy Minister, Lands and Economic Development, Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development):

I'd be happy to do that.

We have been engaging and reaching out to national and regional indigenous organizations' leadership over the last number of months. They're interested in the idea of indigenous-led business solutions. We have not had active interest in pursuing that in terms of proposals at this point in time.

We are striking a working group with the Canadian Council of Aboriginal Business, the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association, NWAC, and others to work with regional and national indigenous organizations to try to scope out where there might be interest. It's early days, but we intend to do that work over the next couple of months. If businesses come forward—and there are probably tourism companies that are already in the business of transportation that might be interested—then we will work with those indigenous businesses or communities to look at solutions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go to Mrs. Block for five minutes.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

Transport Canada is requesting close to $10.4 million in funding in these estimates. That's a combination of votes 1a, 5a and 15a, and it includes “[c]ontributions to support the participation of Indigenous groups in the navigation protection system and to establish Indigenous advisory groups”.

Minister, your government is already facing a lawsuit from the Lax Kw'alaams Indian Band as a result of a lack of consultation prior to the introduction of Bill C-48. As is widely known, but swept under the carpet, we heard again in committee last Tuesday from witnesses that American environmental groups funnel money to Canadian organizations to oppose resource development and the expansion of pipeline capacity in Canada. These same groups probably had much to do with your government's decision to introduce Bill C-48 in the first place, as there are no economic or environmental reasons to do so.

In the estimates, as I've said, your department is asking for the amount of $10.4 million, and I'm wondering if you can tell us what measures will be taken to ensure that these advisory groups will not be populated or influenced by American-funded special interests.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Thank you for your question.

I can tell you that these consultations are consultations with Canadian organizations and with Canadian indigenous groups. As you know, and as you mentioned in the context of Bill C-48, there are certain coastal first nations that don't agree with the government's decision on the moratorium, but you also know that there are coastal nations in British Columbia who agree 100% with the decision that has been taken. Recently, in fact, they've been providing testimony to the Senate committee that is looking at Bill C-48, where this bill currently resides.

It's an enormously complex situation, but we feel that the input from indigenous groups is extremely important. Does it mean that it is unanimous? No. It's very difficult when we're talking about a very large number of different coastal nations or indigenous groups in any project, including the TMX, to get unanimous consent, but we are committed to continuing to consult in a meaningful way with first nations and, where we can, to try to address their concerns.

(0910)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much.

I want to pick up on what you've just said in terms of continuing to consult. During our study of Bill C-48, we did in fact hear from a number of indigenous communities, and absolutely, there are some that support Bill C-48 and a number that do not. However, I think what was unanimous from those individuals who provided testimony was that they had not been consulted prior to the introduction of Bill C-48. I would just leave that with you.

I want to pick up on the line of questioning of my colleague in regard to the carbon tax. We know that there's been an exemption provided to the air industry in the north, so obviously that's in recognition of perhaps the detrimental effects that the carbon tax will have on that industry and on the costs of operating in the north. I'm wondering if you or your government are contemplating providing an exemption to the rest of the industry across Canada.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

No, that's not in our plans at the moment. We do recognize the particular circumstances of small regional and northern airlines or air transport companies, because they work on extremely small margins in very difficult situations where, as we know, costs in the north are higher in a number of areas. We recognize that.

Let me put it to you. I am really looking forward to hearing from your party on what your plan is, with respect, because you have said that you are going to reach the climate targets of the Paris Agreement, but you have yet to tell us how you will do it. You have some magical painless solution in mind, which we are dying to hear about.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

I'm sure you will, after 2019.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Well, why can't we hear about it now?

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister Garneau.

Mr. Hardie, please go ahead, for five minutes.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Well, it has to do with this magic well.... No, we'll just move on.

I have a couple of issues: trucking and VIA Rail.

Truck drivers, the training, the fitness for operating and the oversight of trucking companies, especially the long-haul ones, would fall into your realm of interest. Obviously, concerns have been raised after a number of high-profile incidents, but on a day-to-day basis, with the growth in trade, truck movements, just-in-time delivery and a lot of other things, what are the trends? What are you seeing? What are we doing about it?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Thank you.

We're doing a lot about it. We announced the implementation of electronic stability control, which is extremely important. It has to be put into trucks because it helps to minimize the possibility of a rollover. That is an important piece of technology.

We've also implemented regulations that will force the implementation of electronic logging devices. This is to ensure that we accurately log how many hours a driver has actually driven, because there have been proven allegations in the past that drivers suffer from fatigue when they exceed the limit on how many hours they can drive. This leads to the possibility of accidents. That's another area where we are making changes.

Another one that recently came up, unfortunately in the tragic context of Humboldt—and this was in a story on CBC—was that only one province in Canada actually has minimum entry-level training requirements before a trucker takes their test. That is Ontario. You have to have 100 hours of training before you take your test. We think that this is something we need to implement in all of the provinces. It is a provincial jurisdiction, but it is an item that I have signalled to the provinces we need to look at. We will be discussing this in January. Those are the initiatives there.

On the trade side, we also recognize that when a truck leaves from Halifax to go to Vancouver, there are a host of different regulations as it moves though the different provinces, which have to do with dead weight on the roads themselves, with the potential use of wide-base tires. These are irritants or impediments in terms of maximizing our trade. That is something that we want to work on with the provinces to improve the internal trade within our country.

(0915)

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I had a constituent drop into the office showing me his VIA Rail ticket. He was actually successful in getting at least half of that ticket reimbursed. He took a trip from Vancouver to the Yorkton—Melville region. There were extensive delays, in one case for seven hours, as freight train after freight train headed west with all of that trade that we value so much. On his way back, he decided to forget the train and take Greyhound. He got as far as Edmonton, and they said, “That's the end of our line. I don't know about yours,” so he had a hard time.

In terms of VIA Rail travel time reliability, especially in the western provinces, in competition with freight movement, is there a strategy under development to maybe improve VIA Rail's performance?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

As you point out, VIA Rail mostly travels on the rail of class I railways, like CN and CP. The arrangements that exist between VIA and those companies are such that they have to yield to those freight trains. On the one hand, we're delighted that there are more freight trains moving all those important goods to our ports, but there's no question that it has an impact on VIA.

VIA is rightfully concerned and is looking at that situation at the moment to see if there's a better arrangement that can come up to minimize these very long delays, which are compounded in the winter, when there are difficult conditions. It is something that is of concern, and VIA rail is looking at it. At this point, I don't have anything further to say.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister.

We'll move on to Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you for joining us this morning, Minister.

The last time I saw you was in my riding of Trois-Rivières. You were there for a forum organized by the Union des municipalités du Québec, or UMQ, to speak to experts on rail transport development. No offence, but I must say I was a bit disappointed by your speech. You focused entirely on rail safety, which is an important issue, to be sure, but we would've liked to hear your vision for developing the rail system. For instance, we would've liked to hear more about the expansion of passenger rail services and possible accommodations involving the Quebec government and its transportation electrification efforts. You made no mention of that.

If you don't mind, then, I'm going to ask you about a wish the UMQ representatives expressed at the very end of your speech. Is your government going to follow through on the VIA Rail high-frequency train project soon, or does it plan to make it an election issue in the upcoming campaign?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Thank you for your question.

I know it's an issue you pay close attention to. That's not surprising, since you're from Trois-Rivières.

One of the options we are considering right now is a high-frequency train for the Quebec City-Montreal corridor, via Trois-Rivières. What I conveyed on that wonderful day I spent in Trois-Rivières, speaking to a number of groups, was that we were very far along in our study.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Are you far enough along, Minister, to at least tell us when you'll make an announcement? In a week, in a month, before Christmas, before the election?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I know you are eager to find out, Mr. Aubin. You're constantly saying that you want an answer by tomorrow. As a government, however, we have responsibilities we have to fulfill. We are talking about a considerable commitment involving taxpayer money. I know taxpayer money is something you worry about, as well.

(0920)

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Absolutely.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Naturally, we have to examine the viability of such a service, passenger volume and other such important considerations.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

It is clear to me that I won't get an answer this morning, Minister.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

No, but it should also be clear that our government has to do its homework, and that's exactly what we are doing.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I see.

You mentioned taxpayer money, the perfect segue for my next question. An increasingly persistent rumour is going around that the contract for renewing VIA Rail's fleet was awarded to a German company, which would do the engineering work in Germany but build the trains in the U.S. That would mean a contract committing nearly a billion dollars in taxpayer money would generate no economic spinoff for Canada and would not safeguard or create any jobs in Canada. I have a huge problem with that.

Don't you think you would be justified in following the lead of many other countries and incorporating a national content requirement into all procurement contracts involving public funds, such as the VIA Rail fleet renewal contract?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

You should understand that I can't comment on rumours.

That said, VIA Rail is a Crown corporation, as you know. A year ago, I announced that VIA would be replacing its fleet and putting out the contract to tender to find the best possible supplier. At that time, I again made clear that performance and price mattered most to make sure taxpayer money was spent wisely. It's a project that—

Mr. Robert Aubin:

You're telling me the request for proposals doesn't require Canadian content?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

I'm getting to that. Please let me finish.

The process is independently conducted by VIA Rail. Although we do ensure a certain degree of transparency, the VIA Rail people are the ones who make the decision. They are the experts, after all.

I know your party isn't in favour of free trade agreements, but we have an obligation to open up federal procurement contracts to all bidders. It doesn't work the same at the provincial level. For projects like these, we can't include contractual clauses favouring Canadian companies. If we did, we wouldn't be living up to our commitments. For your information, it's a two-way street. Our trading partners are under the same obligation. As a country that believes in free trade and seeks to do business with the rest of the world, we have to respect our commitments. In situations like this, we can't impose a Canadian content requirement.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

It's rather strange, though, that other countries we have treaties with do it.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

We hope there will be Canadian content, but we can't require it. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you both very much.

We'll go on to Mr. Badawey, for two minutes.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Thank you, Chair.

I want to state that we look forward to seeing the infrastructure minister come here on December 6. I am sure that discussion can be continued then with Monsieur Champagne.

Second, I want to take this opportunity to thank the committee, especially our Liberal colleagues, as well as Mr. Jeneroux, Mr. Liepert and Mr. Aubin of the Conservative Party and NDP, for coming down to Niagara and recognizing the Niagara-Hamilton trade corridor and the assets that are attached to the same. We are within a day's drive of over 44% of North America's annual income—New York, Baltimore, Washington, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh; and, in the Ohio area, Cleveland and Toledo; as well as Detroit, Chicago, Indiana, and of course back into Ontario with the GTA, and Montreal.

With that, and with how robust it has been, continues to be, and will be, especially with the investments we're looking at making within that trade corridor, I want to ask the minister, with all the work that's being done with all the partners throughout Niagara-Hamilton, and some of the investments that are being made, including the one he announced the other day in Hamilton, what his expectations for us are as we work within that team down in Niagara-Hamilton with respect to strengthening our Niagara-Hamilton trade corridor.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Thank you for your question, Mr. Badawey.

I think there is strong potential in the Niagara Peninsula. We're talking about a very large population density in that area in Canada. There is a great deal of trade done, not only by trucks crossing the border, but also using the St. Lawrence Seaway, which is something we feel is under-exploited at the moment. There's tremendous potential in that area. I think there is growth potential with respect to port activity, seaway activity and trade corridors on land.

I hope we can continue to work, with your implication and those of your colleagues, to identify where we can spend money wisely to grow that capability. At the same time, we're always taking into account that we have to look at all the other factors, like the environment.

There is potential there that has not been exploited. We were delighted to make that announcement at the port of Hamilton, which I think is good news for the port of Hamilton. I congratulate them on their forward-looking vision, in terms of growth.

(0925)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Graham, do you have a very short question?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If you want me to, I can.

There's one topic I would like to bring up. It's a good way to finish the meeting.

There are a number of companies working on flying cars around the world. Are we doing anything at Transport Canada to think about the regulations required to allow that to actually happen?

Hon. Marc Garneau:

It's a very good question. In fact, I was visited a while back by a company that makes a flying car. It sounds like a glib expression—a flying car—but I actually saw—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I want one.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Yes. I saw a video demonstration of it, and it was very impressive. It was electrical, too.

This is something that has to be looked at from a regulatory point of view and not only from a safety point of view. We're looking into the future here, but if people in Orleans suddenly decide they want to come in to work here in downtown Ottawa and you have all of these flying cars coming in—as we see in science fiction movies all the time—then there's an important safety component to it. It would not only be federal, but there would also be provincial and municipal enforcement of the rules of the road—traditionally provincially. In this case, the rules of the air would play a significant role.

It is not just science fiction. It is something that is coming through.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Madam Chair, I will just finish by saying that there are 67 projects in Mississauga for over $97 million.

The Chair:

We would appreciate if that could be submitted to the committee.

We have one minute left, and Mr. Liepert has a question before the minister has to go to a cabinet meeting. You have one minute before he has to leave.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

I wanted to conclude by tying a bow around this Liberal environmental plan.

In your words, we exempt the small airlines from a carbon tax because their profit margins are slim. We will put a carbon tax on the large airlines. We will also put a carbon tax on small businesses, even though their profits are slim, but we will exempt 90% of large emitters because, in the words of the parliamentary secretary, they would leave Canada if we put a carbon tax on because it would be a job killer. Then we use Stephen Harper's emissions targets.

That's the Liberal environmental plan as I can see it. That doesn't scare me very much. What does scare me is this: I would like to know if you or your department did an impact assessment on what a carbon tax would do to the transportation, and the business community relying on transportation, as part of the discussion leading up to the carbon tax.

If you did, would you table it with this committee? If you did not, will you admit that you just rolled over and played dead to the environment minister, who's running energy, who's running transportation and who's running this government today?

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Liepert.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Mr. Liepert, I know you're trying to make a point here, but I also have to say that the only thing Mr. Harper had was some numbers. He actually didn't have a plan—

Mr. Ron Liepert:

It was his targets—

Hon. Marc Garneau:

He didn't have a plan—

Mr. Ron Liepert:

You're using his emission targets, Minister—

The Chair:

Give the minister the opportunity to answer, please.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

He didn't have a plan behind it. I would urge you again to provide that plan.

Secondly, there are two components on airlines. One is internal, where we're talking about a price on pollution. There is also the international component, which is done through ICAO. Canada has taken a significant lead there, because international travel is not under the Canadian budget for greenhouse gases.

Canada has taken the lead there because 2% of greenhouse gases on the planet come from international air travel. I'm very proud of the role Canada has taken there, with sign-on by other nations to take a responsibility for the production of greenhouse gases.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister Garneau, especially for giving us 90 minutes of your time, along with your officials. I know you have to go to a cabinet meeting, so please feel free to leave at this point.

Hon. Marc Garneau:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Pursuant to Standing Order 81(5), the committee will now dispose of the supplementary estimates (A) for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2019 under Transport Canada. These are vote 1a under Canadian Air Transport Security Authority, vote 1a under Canadian Transportation Agency, and votes 1a, 5a, 10a, 15a, and 20a under Department of Transport.

Do I have unanimous consent to deal with all the votes in one motion?

Some hon. members: Agreed. ç CANADIAN AIR TRANSPORT SECURITY AUTHORITY ç Vote 1a—Payments to the Authority for operating and capital expenditures..........$36,038,397

(Vote 1a agreed to on division) ç CANADIAN TRANSPORTATION AGENCY ç Vote 1a—Program expenditures..........$1,671,892

(Vote 1a agreed to on division) DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT Vote 1a—Operating expenditures..........$10,927,693 ç Vote 5a—Capital expenditures..........$1,438,265 ç Vote 10a—Grants and contributions—Efficient transportation system..........$6,049,065 ç Vote 15a—Grants and contributions—Green and innovative transportation system..........$3,131,670 ç Vote 20a—Grants and contributions—Safe and secure transportation system..........$10,549,935

(Votes 1a, 5a, 10a, 15a and 20a agreed to on division)

The Chair: Shall I report these votes to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Thank you all very much.

Thank you to the departmental officials for being here.

We will now suspend for a few minutes so we can have our other witnesses come to the table.

(0930

(0940)

The Chair:

I'll call the meeting back to order.

Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), we are doing a study on assessing the impact of aircraft noise in the vicinity of major Canadian airports.

Welcome to the witnesses. Thank you for being here. At least the weather co-operated enough to get you here. Whether you'll get home or not, who knows, but at least you got here.

From Halton region, we have Jeff Knoll, councillor from the town of Oakville and the regional municipality of Halton.

From the Greater Toronto Airports Authority, we have Hillary Marshall, vice-president of stakeholder relations and communications; Michael Belanger, director of aviation programs and compliance; and Robyn Connelly, director of community relations.

From the Toronto Aviation Noise Group, we have Renee Jacoby, the founding chair, and Sandra Best, the current chair.

Mr. Knoll, we'll start with you. Please limit your comments to five minutes, because the committee always has lots of questions. Thank you.

Mr. Jeff Knoll (Town and Regional Councillor, Town of Oakville and Regional Municipality of Halton, Halton Region):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for the opportunity to appear before you at this standing committee today. My name is Jeff Knoll, and I appear as a long-standing member of the town of Oakville and regional councils, representing the people of ward 5. I also serve as the Halton appointee on the GTAA's Community Environment and Noise Advisory Committee, known as CENAC.

Through my work on that committee, I am highly engaged on the issue of aircraft noise and the resulting impacts on the residents of Halton. As you may know, Halton region comprises the city of Burlington and the towns of Halton Hills, Oakville and Milton. We are a growing community with a population of over 548,000 people, located a mere 15 kilometres to the west of Toronto Pearson Airport.

We acknowledge Pearson's role as an economic engine and the international gateway that links Canadians to the world stage. Each day, thousands of Halton residents travel to Pearson to go to work and to travel for business and pleasure.

However, as an elected municipal official whose constituency is deeply affected by aircraft noise, I am here before you to contend that we have not achieved the proper balance between the ongoing operations of Pearson, its future growth plans and the resulting impacts on Halton residents.

I further contend that aircraft noise is highly detrimental to the well-being of Halton residents. I hear this consistently from residents in my ward and throughout the region.

Recently, as I knocked on doors and spoke to my constituents during this fall's municipal election, we often had to pause our conversations as aircraft shrieked overhead. No other words were necessary at that point, because one of the key issues in my ward was flying right above us.

Some might say that these residents should have considered this when choosing to live in a community under a flight path. In the case of north Oakville, it was not on a flight path until merely six years ago. The changes to the downwind leg, the incessant low and slow overflights, and the resulting noise and nuisance were imposed on these established neighbourhoods as a result of Nav Canada's 2012 flight path changes—changes, I might add, that were made with no consultation and virtually no notice.

I should note that the noise complaints that elected officials are receiving are coming from all across the Halton community. Recently, I was invited to speak at an aircraft noise meeting in Milton. We watched incredulously as one aircraft after another flew over and shook the little community centre to make a final noisy descent into the airport, as if to punctuate the very purpose of the gathering.

Aircraft noise in Halton is disrupting the ability of our residents to go outside and use their backyards, to enjoy our parks and our hiking trails, to talk with their neighbours, to get a full night's sleep. In short, aircraft noise is compromising our residents' quality of life.

I must acknowledge that there have been some positive engagements on this issue over the past few years, including three major studies by the GTAA and Nav Canada. However, while appreciative of this engagement, residents are not satisfied with the pace of implementation of the proposed mitigating measures coming out of these studies. Residents want and need relief today, especially as the airport looks to become a super hub to serve a projected 85 million passengers in 2037, up from 47 million today.

My time today is very limited, so I will submit additional written comments and suggestions to your committee, but I want to raise one last issue before I conclude.

The GTAA is engaged with regional airports in southern Ontario with the objective of solidifying Pearson's role as the main international hub, with regional airports providing complementary passenger and cargo services. While a potentially positive goal, it does raise the question of whether the proper jurisdictional partners, accountability structure, and incentives are in place to ensure that the GTAA adequately brings aircraft noise into the equation along with Pearson's economic interests.

We need the engagement of all levels of government, potentially with Transport Canada playing the lead role, to help in the long-term planning and routing among airports in southern Ontario, a process that needs to focus on a triple bottom line of social responsibility, economic value and environmental impact.

Furthermore, I would like to suggest that it is time for the government to consider a second major airport in the GTA, potentially making use of the Pickering lands that were assembled for this very purpose over 50 years ago. Such an initiative would spread the aircraft and vehicular traffic, as well as the economic development benefits, to the eastern GTA.

Madam Chair, as elected officials we are constantly challenged to find the proper balance between sometimes inherently opposite interests. In the case of Toronto Pearson, Canada's largest airport and the surrounding communities, we're in a situation where we're not achieving the balance between the economic imperatives at Pearson and the impacts of aircraft noise on our community. If we can't achieve that balance, we're at a real risk of seeing the continued and permanent erosion of the quality of life in Halton and across Canada, a prospect that does not serve the interests of governments at any level.

Thank you for your time.

(0945)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Knoll.

Ms. Marshall, you have five minutes, please.

Ms. Hillary Marshall (Vice-President, Stakeholder Relations and Communications, Greater Toronto Airports Authority):

Madam Chair and committee members, good morning.

I'm Hillary Marshall, vice-president of stakeholder relations and communications for the GTAA. With me is Robyn Connelly, the director of community relations—her office manages noise programs—and Mike Belanger, director of aviation programs and compliance.

Thanks for the opportunity to present today and for the work the committee is undertaking to understand the impact of noise. The GTAA shares this goal.

Toronto Pearson is working towards a bold vision: to be the best airport in the world. Today, we're the fifth most connected airport in the world, and we play a vital role in connecting Canadian cities to each other and the world. One in five Canadians uses Toronto Pearson for air travel today. Because of our connectivity, we believe that being the best airport in the world starts closer to home, working hand in hand with our community and in lockstep with our aviation partners and industry experts.

Today, I'd like to tell you about a few of the initiatives that we've developed in collaboration with our community and industry partners.

Every five years, we develop a noise management action plan, which lays out how we will address noise over a five-year cycle. In our previous noise management action plan, we accomplished the following. We removed the 10-nautical-mile boundary that limited where we would accept noise complaints from; this initiative in particular was pushed forward by Councillor Knoll of Oakville, whom you just heard from, and he also pushed to expand the committee membership to include the regions of York, Durham and Halton. We also undertook a review of the locations of our system of noise monitoring terminals and added eight more for a total of 25.

Our 2018-22 noise management action plan is even more ambitious. It has 10 commitments that will make Toronto Pearson a leader in aviation noise management. We created this plan following an international best practices study of 26 comparator airports around the world. The study was conducted for us by Helios, whom you will hear from at a later date, I understand. Additionally, we engaged more than 3,000 residents to help shape the plan by giving us their input through workshops, and we assembled a resident-led reference panel specifically to provide input on noise and airport growth. This plan has been well received by the community and resident groups, and we're now taking action to implement the plan. As part of our implementation, we're continuing to update our community and resident partners, as well as our elected officials.

A key initiative of our plan is the quieter fleet incentive program, which targets noise from aircraft. The A320 family of aircraft has a high-pitched whine related to air intake. This can be eliminated with a simple retrofit. Airlines around the world, such as Lufthansa, Air France, British Airways and easyJet, have already made this change. We've written and engaged with our carriers to ask for their support and to advise them that we are moving ahead with an incentive program in 2020. We continue to work with our airline partners to make this happen as soon as possible.

In 2015, we started working with NavCan to develop what has become known as the “Six Ideas”, specifically designed to reduce noise in our adjacent communities. A description of these six ideas has been provided to you, but I'd like to take a moment to highlight a few of them.

Ideas 1 and 2 were implemented on November 8 by Nav Canada. These are new nighttime flight paths for approaching and departing aircraft. Idea 5 involves alternating east and west runway use on weekends to provide some predictable respite for communities on the final approach or initial departure. This program was tested this past summer. We're examining the results, and we look forward to making those results public shortly.

Following the guidelines of the airspace change communications and consultation protocol, our community partners were involved at every stage of this three-year study. In the last year alone, we reached out to 2.9 million residents via print ads, had 250,000 online views and connected with 160,000 people by phone. About 1,000 people participated directly in surveys. We also met with elected officials throughout the process to ensure that they had information in order to respond to community questions and concerns.

We're seeing positive impacts and also a positive response from the community. In addition to working with our community and industry partners, we have also engaged with experts in the field of noise management and annoyance to guide our work. We're working with the University of Windsor to understand noise annoyance. The committee heard earlier from Professor Novak and Ph.D. student Julia Jovanovic. We are supporting their research to better understand how the community experiences noise effects and how we can work better to mitigate that. We also engaged Helios to be our technical consultant on the delivery of our five-year noise management action plan. Its role is to help us ensure that we're finding responsible and innovative solutions based on international best practices.

In closing, Toronto Pearson is continually looking for ways to manage its noise and annoyance. We do this by balancing our commitment to our neighbours with the pursuit of our vision of making Toronto Pearson the best airport in the world. In 2017, we served more than 47 million passengers and directly employed nearly 50,000 people at our airport. We have the second-largest employment zone in the country, and the airport facilitates more than 6% of Ontario's GDP.

Toronto Pearson's growth is important to future jobs and economic development. We know that it cannot be done without the help of our neighbours and partners. We're working hard to find a way that we can all grow and prosper together.

Thanks again for the opportunity to represent the airport. I look forward to your questions.

(0955)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go on to Ms. Best for five minutes.

Ms. Sandra Best (Chair, Toronto Aviation Noise Group):

Thank you for the opportunity to appear before your committee.

I'm Sandra Best. I'm chair of the Toronto Aviation Noise Group, TANG, established in 2012 in response to Nav Canada's airspace redesign implemented at Toronto Pearson in February of that year.

I am joined today by my colleague, founding co-chair Renee Jacoby.

We are a facts-based, multi-community residents group committed to finding fair, safe and equitable solutions.

I live in High Park, Toronto, and my colleague lives in midtown Toronto, so you're probably asking yourselves why we are addressing your committee.

Well, we are here to dispel the myth that aviation noise is limited to the communities in the vicinity of airports. Imagine, if you will, that you wake up one morning in your relatively quiet neighbourhood, as far as 20 kilometres from the airport, to the torturous sound of low-altitude airplanes deploying their flaps and screeching their brakes directly overhead—it's not “annoyance”.

You call the airport and learn from the noise management office that you now live under what we at TANG affectionately term a “super highway in the sky”, and you can't register a noise complaint because you live outside the radius for reporting. Even with improvements made to date, residents are fatigued, and many have simply given up on using the process.

Imagine the shock you feel when you find out that there was little or no consultation and your elected representatives knew nothing about it: from no aircraft one day to more than 88,000 flights per year in 2017 on our runway alone, which does not include either arrivals crossing en route to other runways or departures. The data in our briefing materials speak for themselves: high flight volumes, high noise monitor readings and disproportionate runway utilization.

You are further shocked when you become aware of the deregulation in 1996 of our air navigation services to Nav Canada, a private company. There was no legislated protocol to challenge the decision made in 2012, and being asked to attend ineffective meetings of the Community Engagement and Noise Advisory Committee, or CENAC, to solve problems at the local level yielded no meaningful change.

What has been achieved to date?

There was the voluntary communications and consultation protocol in June 2015, which we believe must be amended and legislated.

There was the Helios report, the independent Toronto air space review. We commend Nav Canada for commissioning it, as it has built bridges with stakeholders and created dialogue and discussion. We support much of the work carried out by Helios, and we collaborated with them throughout the process. However, we were disappointed that the GTAA, in an attempt to appear more consultative, formed a widely panned reference review panel and deferred better runway utilization to them, among other things.

Also recommended was the restructuring of CENAC, and we understand that the GTAA is about to unveil their new look next month. We haven't been privy to the deliberations involved, but we are cautiously optimistic about the results.

When TANG first engaged with both the GTAA and Nav Canada, public relations were atrocious. Concerns were summarily dismissed and information difficult to obtain. It was very clear that airlines were the customers and that citizens living under aviation routes were an afterthought. We have seen positive changes within Nav Canada in the last two years and more willingness to work with community groups. In particular, we commend Blake Cushnie for his commitment to the process.

However, these changes did not come about voluntarily but as a result of years of hard work and lobbying by members of the general public. Therefore, we continue to believe that consistent, active and objective government oversight of Nav Canada is critical.

There is still much to be done. Pearson projections estimate total movements in excess of 600,000 by 2037, which means that arrivals on our runway alone would increase to a staggering 120,000 per year. Clearly, this is untenable.

Our recommendations are in your briefing materials. We ask that you take these into consideration. In particular, we ask for acceleration of the retrofit of the Airbus A320s and the adoption of the Helios recommendations with regard to night flights.

We believe that Toronto is one of the great livable cities of the world, and we support its economic development. However, as Canadians, we pride ourselves on our belief in justice and fairness, and it is neither just nor fair to ask some communities to bear the burden of concentrated aviation noise while absolving others. Solutions simply must be found.

We invite your questions, and we look forward to the results and recommendations of the study and the minister's response.

Thank you again for this opportunity. It's deeply appreciated.

(1000)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go to Mrs. Block for five minutes.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

My first question will be for TANG.

Could you tell me if your organization has developed a proposal for how airport authorities should balance the concerns of communities surrounding night flights with the economic benefits offered by these flights?

Ms. Renee Jacoby (Founding Chair, Toronto Aviation Noise Group):

I'd be happy to answer that question.

I'd like for the committee to know that we have been involved in the aviation noise issue for the last seven years. It is a temptation at the beginning of the process to chase headlines that invite solutions that we think might be beneficial to us. I can use as an example the Frankfurt Airport, which is often referred to with regard to its curfew at night. You'll hear many positive things about the night curfew; you'll hear equally negative things about it.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

I'm just wondering if you've put together a proposal.

Ms. Renee Jacoby:

Our proposal is to support what Helios has recommended in its report, “Best Practices in Noise Management”. That would be to extend the night flight restricted hours and to form a new formula for the night flight cap.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much.

In the spirit of Tuesday giving, and with the number of colleagues on the other side of the table, I would like to give the rest of my time to one of those members, if they have any questions.

The Chair:

That's why I love this committee. Everybody is so kind to each other.

All right, we have almost four minutes here.

Borys, go ahead.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke Centre, Lib.):

Thank you so much, Mrs. Block. Merry Christmas to you, as well.

Ms. Marshall, in June 2013, Transport Canada increased the GTAA's budget for night flights, with a formula that would continue increasing the number of night flights in future years. Did the GTAA lobby government officials for this change?

Ms. Hillary Marshall:

Thanks for your question.

We undertook extensive consultation and engaged with government officials in the process.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Could you provide us with a list—I'm asking for an undertaking—of who was lobbied and by whom, which department officials and which elected officials?

Ms. Hillary Marshall:

The consultation documents are posted on our website, and we'd be happy to provide a link to that website. It's fully recorded.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

On that same topic, was the minister lobbied on this particular night flight request?

Ms. Hillary Marshall:

I'd have to go back through the documents, but Transport Canada approved the change, so—

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

So you would undertake to provide us all the information that you have.

Ms. Hillary Marshall:

Yes, I'd be happy to.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Thank you.

I was glad to hear you state that you work—and this is your quote—“hand in hand” with our communities. Unfortunately, that wasn't reflected in the opening statement that we heard from one community group. I know that's not the feeling in our community.

Let me zero in on CENAC. There's great community dissatisfaction with CENAC. It's seen as a vehicle to manage and deal with complaints and not actually address the issues.

After going through all these processes, would you support an arm's-length noise committee beyond the control and perceived manipulations of the GTAA?

Ms. Hillary Marshall:

I think what you'll find is that in the coming months we'll be coming forward with a new proposal for CENAC. We've looked at other airports internationally, as I indicated, to understand how they've approached it, and found some great initiatives in terms of industry partnerships. We'll be coming back with those.

(1005)

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Okay. My question is, do you support an arm's-length noise committee that would deal with these issues so that the perceived control and manipulations that the GTAA has over this process would no longer be the reality that communities live with?

Do you support an arm's-length noise committee?

Ms. Hillary Marshall:

The new CENAC, the new approach that we're going to be coming forward with, has industry partnerships. It has more direct community outreach, government outreach.

We think that's a good first step. That's the step we're going to be moving forward with.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

So you're not comfortable with a fully arm's-length noise committee to oversee noise complaints?

Ms. Hillary Marshall:

We think that this approach is a good first step, and we look forward to bringing it forward to discuss with members of the community.

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Members of the community—

The Chair: Sorry, Mr. Wrzesnewskyj—

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj: Thank you.

The Chair:

Ms. Damoff, go ahead.

Ms. Pam Damoff:

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you to all the witnesses for being here. In particular, I want to thank my former colleague, Jeff Knoll. We served together on council.

I know you've been engaged in this issue for many, many years—well, since 2012, when the flight paths were changed—and have seen some positive steps over the last few years.

There have been multiple studies and technical reviews done by Nav Canada, the GTAA, Helios consulting. I had arranged for them to do one of the consultations in Oakville North—Burlington. Community members have been engaged, in particular David Inch and Richard Slatter, from my riding—your ward.

I'm wondering, in all of that, what role the federal government should be playing. We're talking about arm's-length agencies here. How do you see us becoming engaged to ensure that some of the...? There are pilot studies that are being done right now.

I'm wondering if you could comment a little further on that.

Mr. Jeff Knoll:

I'd be happy to. Thank you for the question, Ms. Damoff. I appreciate my member of Parliament asking me a question.

There are a couple of things here. First of all, I acknowledged in my presentation that there have been these studies. There has been some good work and great recommendations coming out of them. As my friends from TANG indicated earlier, there are a number of initiatives left on the cutting room floor—to use a film term—that need to be embraced, specifically the night flight restrictions and the restructuring of the noise advisory committee, which, of course, is apparently in process, and I understand that it's about to be announced.

To get directly to your question of what the government could be directly involved in, I think it would be in potentially taking back some of the responsibility from Nav Canada in terms of addressing these issues. Nav Canada is an independent agency. I understand the formation of an independent organization to deal with difficult issues and decisions. Certainly the issues around safety are paramount and need to be kept at arm's length. Safety should never be a political or neighbourhood decision. Certainly, issues around quality of life and the impact of the operations of any federally regulated service or organization need to be taken into account in decision-making. I would urge your committee to consider changing the terms of reference for Nav Canada so that there can be more direct involvement by the government and the people's representative in some of those decisions.

While we have some terrific ideas on the back burner and things that are working, they're not moving fast enough. There are not enough teeth to make them happen quickly enough. GTAA is certainly doing their level best, but there needs to be more involvement by both Nav Canada and Transport Canada.

I understand you asked a question earlier today about Air Canada, and that's a great example. There was a big flurry about the announcement and press release, and everybody was very happy, but the implementation of the retrofit with the noise-reducing vortex generators is happening at a molasses-like rate. Getting involved and basically having Nav Canada take a more direct role in considering community impacts needs to happen.

The last thing, of course—I mentioned it in my comments and I want to re-emphasize it, because I don't want to see this ignored—is thinking beyond. Those of us who are elected sometimes have to think in terms of what we can accomplish in our term. We need to think of a multi-term solution to this, which is potentially a second airport. Most major jurisdictions around the world have multiple airports in their jurisdictions. The federal government, in its wisdom of the day, 50 years ago, assembled lands for that purpose. It's time to dust them off and start moving in that direction.

(1010)

Ms. Pam Damoff:

Thank you, Councillor Knoll.

The growth of Pearson is something that I know Oakville council and the region of Halton have been quite engaged in, and you've had delegations to both councils.

Do you see a role for the minister and the Department of Transport in that growth? Should there be some engagement by the minister in the growth of the airport?

Mr. Jeff Knoll:

Once again, I'll go back to my previous responses.

First of all, I think the answer to that is absolutely yes. I agree, and I said this in my statement. I fully acknowledge, respect and appreciate the economic contributions made by Pearson and the GTAA organization; however, there is a disconnect between the ambitions and the desires of the board of the GTAA to serve more customers and the impacts on the ground.

I do believe that the federal government, as the people's representatives with this in their jurisdiction, needs to be taking a direct role in this. As I stated, it is having a deleterious impact on the quality of life of surrounding communities. Once upon a time, the airport was built in an area where there was nobody around it. It was built in the middle of a farmer's field, essentially, in Malton. Those times have changed.

The impacts of what takes place at the airport need to be considered in the context of the people who live there in an adjacent community or, like my friends from TANG, in midtown Toronto.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We are going to Mr. Aubin for five minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you to each of the witnesses for being here this morning.

My first question is for Ms. Best and Ms. Jacoby, as well as Mr. Knoll.

Since beginning our study, we have heard from witnesses who suffer the consequences of aircraft noise, and I have absolutely no doubt as to how disruptive it is for them. However, no one has been able to show me a noise level airports and citizens' groups could agree on. The only standard I have found thus far is an average noise limit of 55 decibels, as recognized by the World Health Organization and the International Civil Aviation Organization. We all know, though, that aircraft noise is well in excess of 55 decibels.

Do airport authorities and citizens' groups at least agree on the instruments used to measure the noise so that the data gathered by each side is even accepted for discussion? Again, wouldn't it be up to Transport Canada to be more transparent and provide access to all the data that would allow for a conversation based on the same information? [English]

Ms. Sandra Best:

I think that's a very valid question. Thank you.

I think the issue we all face at the moment is that because GTAA and NavCan are private companies, there is no freedom of information involved, and therefore we cannot see how decisions are made, so we cannot understand how they're trying to do things. In terms of the decibel levels, there has to be some clarity around that. There has to be some agreement among everyone on what that looks like.

More importantly, when we speak with pilots and when we do our research, we find there are two kinds of aircraft noise. There is the noise when you're coming down to land. There's not much you can do about that. You're coming in to land as an aircraft. But, there is a lot you can do about the downwind, which is the initial descent before you turn. I think within that, discussions about decibel levels can be had. Agreements can be made. Planes can fly more quietly and they can fly higher.

Some of that has been undertaken already, but the decibel issue itself is a massive problem worldwide, and I don't think you're going to find agreements anywhere in airports. Those are not happening. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Would you like to add anything, Mr. Knoll? [English]

Mr. Jeff Knoll:

Sure. I'd be happy to jump in.

I think that strictly measuring impacts on a scientific metric like noise compression rates or decibel rates is not the only consideration. The accepted standards do not necessarily take into account concentration, for example. Having 55 decibels once every 20 minutes may be an acceptable standard, but 55 decibels or 45 decibels or any metric on a consistent, concentrated basis leads to a level of frustration and annoyance that is very hard to measure by science.

As I said in my opening statement, it's an issue of quality of life. When you are constantly bombarded with sound, whether it meets a certain standard or not, it's going to have an impact on your ability to conduct your daily activities, your sleep and your well-being.

(1015)

[Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

My next question is for you, Ms. Marshall.

The final report put out by Helios, an independent firm, contains 18 short-term recommendations that take into account best practices for reducing aviation noise. In your opening statement, you said that Pearson airport would be following through on 10 commitments. Do they overlap with the recommendations? Are your 10 commitments among the 18 Helios recommendations? If not, where do you stand on the Helios report? [English]

Ms. Hillary Marshall:

Is there any relationship among the 10 recommendations?

We believe that the recommendations, taken together—whether they're for insulation, a quieter fleet incentive program, changes in reporting or changes in the noise committee—should help us move forward toward international best practices in airport noise management.

Did I understand your question properly? [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Yes, thank you.

Will the airport's 10 recommendations be available soon? Will we be able to see them? [English]

Ms. Hillary Marshall:

They are available. They're posted on our website, as well as the short-, medium- and long-term actions that we're undertaking toward each of them.

The Chair:

Ms. Marshall, can we ensure that the committee gets a copy of that report, please?

Ms. Hillary Marshall:

Yes.

The Chair:

We'll go on to Mr. Sikand and then Ms. Ratansi.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My question will be for the GTAA. I'll start by saying that I really appreciate the engagement I've had with you. I've had two people from my constituency actually participate in public consultation, and I've also enjoyed speaking to you about potentially making Pearson and Mississauga a transit hub.

Having said that, there have been estimates of Pearson expanding to 80 million or 90 million people by 2030, I believe. What is 100% capacity for Pearson?

Ms. Hillary Marshall:

I'll just take a step back and try to explain. We have a certain number of runways at Toronto Pearson. We have five runways, and we are able to operate them in such a way that, as planes get larger and they're carrying more passengers, the number of passengers coming through the airport increases significantly, but the number of movements themselves—

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

I'm sorry; I have limited time. There must be a number, though. You can't continue to have planes coming in indefinitely.

Ms. Hillary Marshall:

Right now, our master plan calls for us to reach about 85 million passengers by 2037. That is with quite a mix of aircraft operating out of Toronto Pearson, but on average, as the planes start to have more seats, we'll be able to manage 85 million passengers with the terminals that we envision, the infrastructure that we have.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

Could you speak to the impact of potentially reducing the night flights?

Ms. Hillary Marshall:

I'll go back and point out that we have communicated to our CENAC committee and members of the public that we are undertaking a study of our night flight operations. Night flights, for a city like Toronto and other cities, are flights that are coming from different parts of the country—Vancouver, Calgary, different time zones—and we're also operating both arrivals and departures from Asian airports. We're a global city, and we're trying our best to serve the demand and the need for tourism, trade and cargo, while respecting and managing within the restrictions.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

I'm going to ask you to speak to a hypothetical situation. Could you speak to the GTAA being in the care and control of another airport, if we were to have one built within proximity of Pearson?

Ms. Hillary Marshall:

There are examples of airports that operate as systems around the world. Today, Toronto Pearson operates within a voluntary network of airports. There are 11 airports in southern Ontario that work together. That is not a mandate; it's not regulated in any fashion, but it is a collaborative, co-operative network of airports that are looking forward to a day when there will be a demand of about 110 million passengers in southern Ontario and looking at how collectively we can service them.

(1020)

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

I do have to share my time, but I have a quick question for Sandra.

Please answer yes or no.

Ms. Sandra Best:

Okay.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

If Billy Bishop Airport was to be expanded, would your community be affected?

Ms. Sandra Best:

I honestly do not know, sorry.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Okay, thank you.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi (Don Valley East, Lib.):

I'll make it quick.

Thank you all for being here.

Our role as MPs is to facilitate when there is a problem. Listening to TANG, I understood that there has been no consultation, so I think all these MPs are here because their constituents have been complaining. When they complain, we send them to your information sessions, etc. The concern I've heard from DMRI has been that whenever they come up with solutions, they've been disregarded. I think it is important for GTAA to actually listen to the concerns.

Sandra Best, I heard you say that the Helios recommendation is what you would like to go with.

My question to GTAA is this. What is the problem in meeting the Helios recommendation? That was commissioned by the minister and by you guys, and it's a consultative process. It took a lot of people to come to the table, to listen to you guys and to listen to the constituents, and yet you have not come up with a solution. What is preventing you from bringing that solution? I am very comfortable if you could say you're balancing the needs of the constituents with safety and with environment issues, but you need to talk to people. You need to listen to them. You need to give them the credence they are due. I think TANG also commissioned a pilot project and you have the report.

Could you give me some answers that we can take back to our constituents?

Ms. Robyn Connelly (Director, Community Relations, Greater Toronto Airports Authority):

Sure.

Airport operations are very complex, and making changes to our operations takes time. Our friends at TANG, as well as Councillor Knoll, mentioned that changes are slowly happening. I think that is a reflection of the complexity of the issue.

You asked a question about a series of different studies. There was one study, a Nav Canada independent airspace review, that was undertaken by Helios. That was released in September 2017. Nav Canada responded with an action plan about how they would enact the recommendations of that report. They are doing that on an ongoing basis and do updates about that at each of our CENAC public meetings. That does happen regularly.

As part of our own practice, we also commissioned Helios to do a noise management best practices benchmarking study for us, which we undertook, and which forms the cornerstone of the noise management action plan we are currently pursuing. We are very much taking the recommendations that came out of that study and exploring how to implement them. It's also important to know that we also conducted consultations around what it would look like and what our guiding principles need to be for consideration. We did that through a randomly selected residents' reference panel, which TANG also mentioned, but we also did that through a series of workshops throughout the summer of 2017 to gather that feedback and guidance.

Finally, you asked about the report from David Inch. His recommendations, as part of the report that went to Nav Canada, fundamentally form the six ideas that Hillary referenced in her remarks. Those six ideas are currently being implemented. It is frustrating that things are happening at a slow pace, but good projects are going forward.

The Chair:

Mr. Virani, go ahead.

Mr. Arif Virani (Parkdale—High Park, Lib.):

Thank you.

I'm going to build on what Yasmin and Pam were saying, but I'll also ask a question directly from my constituents.

Ms. Best, thank you for being here and for illustrating the fact that concerns about airport noise are not germane only to those people who live near an airport; they're germane to people who live under a flight path. That flight path has increased dramatically over the last six years or so. Thank you for your advocacy.

I want to give you a chance to comment on a few things, because I'm sharing my time with Mr. Hardie.

The first point is about the accountability piece. We're hearing about CENAC. We have concerns about CENAC, and it's about the fact that, from your perspective, it's ineffective, as I understood from your submissions. You're not seeing meaningful change. Can you elaborate on that a little, in particular on what we've just heard about industry partnership as we move forward with CENAC? What does that mean to you?

Also, from what was just mentioned about the randomly selected citizens' reference panel, I understand there were concerns about it that were expressed by TANG at the time.

(1025)

Ms. Sandra Best:

Yes, it's a big subject and there isn't enough time today to cover all the issues around CENAC, but I will talk about the reference panel that's been mentioned.

Imagine, if you will, that you've been working on these noise issues for seven years. There are many constituents right across the GTA who have spent time and effort to work on this. We work day and night. For some of us, it became a full-time job. When we start to see some kind of political action, we thank our representatives for it, because, frankly, that's what it took. Before political action, there was no movement.

We find out, however, that recommendations from the Helios report, the GTAA part of it, are going to be referred to a new panel that's going to be set up with 36 members who are going to be randomly selected across Toronto. They're going to be given four days of training and orientation. Now, they are fine people, I'm sure, with the very best of intentions, but they don't have any background information. We are asked to go and present to them for half an hour or an hour, and I think three or four other groups are asked to go as well.

Well, you sit back and you think to yourself that if they really wanted a reference panel that was going to have good recommendations and a real understanding of the issues they were tasked with commenting on, they would go to groups that have been involved in this for many years, groups that have educated themselves on the separate language, what you might call “aviation language”, and on issues of concern in airports worldwide. They would at least put members from those committees on the panel, and then they might do some random selection of other people...but four days? One of those days, I believe, involved orienting them with the airport, visiting the towers. This is not real consultation.

When the word “consultation” is thrown around, what we've found over the years is that it's not real consultation. It's consultation with predetermined answers. We've all been there. We've all been to organizations that do this. They know what they want. They consult about that particular subject matter, and then they staff the tables—as I understand they actually did—with industry experts. What are these good-hearted people going to come up with in terms of recommendations?

They send out a survey across Toronto. Again, I spoke with the group hired to facilitate and they told me directly—I have this on record—that the GTAA designed this survey themselves and this consultative group was only there to carry out and facilitate. Those questions were all moving towards predetermined answers. This was theoretically a massive consultation and a group of people who were used to come up with recommendations on runway utilization, for instance. Well, runway utilization is a complicated thing. It's not as simple as it might sound. Where are the crossover points? How will this affect other people? When you talk about “predictable noise respite”, what does that look like? That's how we ended up with alternating east and west runways on alternate weekends, and deluging people, who were already deluged, with additional traffic on those weekends.

Therefore, when we talk about consultation, we have to be clear that it's meaningful consultation, and meaningful consultation, in our estimation, has been excessively hard to come by, other than the Helios report.

Mr. Arif Virani:

I have two more questions. With respect to the Helios recommendations, there are recommendations about night flights and there are recommendations about the retrofit. Can you talk about what you would like to see in terms of the night flights, the pace of the changes, and the retrofits to the planes? Ms. Marshall mentioned the speed of the retrofitting of the planes.

The Chair:

Give us a brief answer, if you possibly can, to Mr. Virani's question.

Ms. Renee Jacoby:

Our last official retrofit number was five retrofitted planes in June. I think that was up to seven at the September CENAC meeting. Michael Belanger would be in a better position to know how big the fleet is, but I think it's around 40 planes to be retrofitted, the A320s. That's supposed to be completed by 2019. They say they'll get it done, either replace or retrofit.

I think we'd all feel more comfortable having more immediate information and better updates, and an inquiry into why it seems to be taking so long, or perhaps even a schedule as to when those planes are going to be retrofitted. I understand that this is supposed to be done during their regular maintenance. Could we see that? Could we see how many are going to be retrofitted? We'd feel more comfortable with that, rather than being disappointed, with only five done after one year.

(1030)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We will go on to Mrs. Block for five minutes.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thanks very much, Madam Chair.

I want to welcome all of our witnesses here this morning. I should have done that in my first intervention.

I'm going to direct my questions to you, Ms. Marshall and Ms. Connelly.

Perhaps you've touched on this, but I just want to confirm. Other witnesses who have testified before this committee as part of our study have suggested imposing a total ban on night flights, as has been done at Frankfurt Airport, or imposing a steep surcharge for night flights.

What impact would such a policy have on your airport, and how would a ban or surcharge on night flights affect your ability to compete with other large international airports nearby, such as Buffalo?

Ms. Hillary Marshall:

I guess I'd start by saying that there are many types of traffic that comes in during the night. There are about 50 to 53 flights that come in at present during the nighttime hours. A small number of them are cargo flights. About 1% of the night movements would be related to cargo. There are some sun destinations, some Asian and international destinations, as well as domestic routes.

Within each of those movements, there are travellers and cargo vital to the local economy, and we need to understand the consequences of potentially removing those flights or limiting them in some way.

If you look at some of the big international hubs, Frankfurt would be one extreme, but there are many other international airports that have restricted hours, as we do—restricted movements within those hours.

We think that while we can look at the formula, at who is being served by those flights and what the economic opportunity and impact are, the greater Toronto area and the country will continue to need night flights to serve our economy. Whether those flights are coming into Toronto Pearson or another airport in the greater Toronto area, there is still going to be an impact. We're potentially just talking about moving an issue from one airport to another.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much for that.

There has been much discussion here this morning around public consultation and meaningful consultation. I understand that you recently developed a new noise management action plan. Based on your experience developing this strategy, what would you say are the most significant steps that airports can take to mitigate the impact of aircraft noise for surrounding communities? Can you tell us what role public consultations have played in creating your noise management program at the GTAA?

Ms. Robyn Connelly:

Sure. There are couple of questions there, I think.

One is how we consulted to develop our noise management action plan, and then a piece of the best practices study and the noise management action plan is to improve how we work with the surrounding community.

To produce the noise management action plan, as we mentioned, the foundational document that guided us was the Helios best practices study. As Hillary mentioned, it looked at 26 airports worldwide and came forward with a series of recommendations. From that came a series of 10 commitments, which are like vision statements, and under those vision statements are a series of actions we need to take. Some things are about doing what we already do, but doing it better, and some are to stop doing things that aren't making any impact. Of course, we will also be introducing nine new programs as part of this over the next five years.

Part of the best practices research did look at what other airports do—how they conduct their noise committees and their consultations. We certainly came up short. That was a very fair recommendation. Challenges with our committee were the representation and the process through which committee members are appointed.

One of the biggest pieces of feedback, as part of that research, was that our noise committee didn't have a meaningful action plan or work program. Now that we do have this noise management action plan, which is much more ambitious than the ones we've had in the past, we certainly do have a really solid work plan going forward.

We will be making recommendations to make sure that we have the proper elected officials and residents support and infrastructure in place to advise and guide us on how we move forward on these programs—revolutionary things like Canada's first voluntary insulation program, for example. There are big initiatives ahead.

(1035)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go to Mr. Graham and Mr. Oliphant.

You're sharing some time.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, if you can warn me when I have about two minutes left so that he can get his question in, that would be helpful.

To start, I have a very quick question for Ms. Marshall.

You mentioned in your opening comments that you're aiming to make Pearson the best airport in the world. At the moment, it is the most expensive airport in the world outside of Japan. I wonder on what measure you would consider it the best airport.

Ms. Hillary Marshall:

Actually, in regard to Toronto Pearson, I don't know what information you're going on at this point—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's expensive to land there. It has the highest landing fees.

Ms. Hillary Marshall:

We've done more recent studies, where we've brought our landing fees down over the last seven years by about 30% and have held them steady.

We fall in the mid-range on airport improvement fees among Canadian airports, so we're certainly heading in the right direction. We have long-term agreements with our carriers to control the costs.

In terms of being a financially sustainable airport, we're working very hard to continue to head along that track.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

By what measure are you hoping to become the best airport in the world? It's a very subjective thing to call yourself.

Ms. Hillary Marshall:

There would probably be a number of factors on which we'd like to call ourselves the best airport in the world.

For example, in terms of passenger service, just this year we were recognized as the best large airport in North America for passenger service, as voted on by passengers. On behalf of the 300-plus employers and the 50,000 workers at Toronto Pearson, who all come together every day to get planes moving and serve passengers, I know that has been an important point of recognition.

We're making sure that we are environmentally sustainable, that we manage our stormwater, and that we introduce sustainability programs, as well as managing our operations safely.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My time is quite short. This is a very quick question, also following up on a previous comment.

You mentioned that Pearson is part of a network of 11 airports that work together, but we've also heard testimony here that Pearson has effectively poached cargo traffic from Hamilton. Therefore, is it competition or co-operation?

Ms. Hillary Marshall:

I'd say it's co-operation. We haven't poached cargo traffic from Hamilton. I'm not sure what that refers to.

However, we do have a market that many carriers want to be as close to as possible. Understandably, they make a choice. We can't force the carriers to go and operate at any airport. That's not under the terms of our ground lease. We're not allowed to do that.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Oliphant, go ahead.

Mr. Robert Oliphant (Don Valley West, Lib.):

Thank you all for being here.

Thank you particularly to TANG for their long-time engagement on this issue. Also, thanks for helping us as MPs understand this issue quite at depth and with a really fact-based approach that has helped me a lot.

There must be some amusement on the opposition side to see all the government folks here attempting to solve a problem. I've been on that side during this issue and I've been on this side during this issue, and I recognize that the reality is that we have a system of oversight that is completely out of the hands of what we're trying to do as elected officials. It was there when I was in opposition and I was attempting to get to the government, and the government is now on this side. It must be amusing for them.

I'm looking at TANG particularly. Is there a model of oversight you have envisioned that could make this more responsive so that consultation is real, elected officials have insight and impact in it, and citizens' groups actually have a say, without treading upon safety and issues that I know you care about?

Ms. Sandra Best:

There are a number of things, and I'll certainly defer to Renee on this one.

From my perspective, because these are two private companies, they are not subject to freedom of information, so we do not know in fact how decisions are made. If the government makes a decision, we know. If NavCan tells us they can't do this for safety reasons and they can't fly this way, but then two or three years later it's doable, if we had known in the beginning how that decision was made and we had insight into that....

However, they're private companies, so our level of oversight would involve some access to freedom of information that would allow our elected MPs, especially, to understand how NavCan and GTAA makes those decisions behind closed doors. That is the key.

When we find out after decisions are made, there may be consultation, but it's a fait accompli.

(1040)

Mr. Robert Oliphant:

The example of that for me would be runway usage.

Ms. Sandra Best:

Exactly.

Mr. Robert Oliphant:

If you have some ideas on runway usage that you could get to us, then we could look at how we can actually make that happen, because I think you have some good ideas there.

Ms. Renee Jacoby:

I'd be happy to answer that.

We actually brought a few slides if you'd like to refer to them. I can point those out so that they bring up the examples you were speaking about.

The first slide was our background information. I'm going to go on to the second slide.... I can't, and I don't know why.

The Chair:

I'm sorry. Your report will be distributed to the committee.

Ms. Renee Jacoby:

Okay.

The Chair:

We're looking at a new system here, but I think that doesn't really work so well.

Ms. Renee Jacoby:

Okay.

MP Oliphant mentioned that we were fact-based, and that is important to us. We know that aviation issues are emotional and very personal, and at some point we have to remove the emotion from that and somehow come to a solution.

I have heard in the previous hearing—and I thank MP Block—that we are of the opinion that beyond the emotion we have to have good data to find a solution. As a fact-based group, we have done that. We have our material showing you our noise terminal readings and how incredibly high they are at 20 kilometres away from the airport. The highest reading that was taken was at Spadina Road and St. Clair, for those of you who know the Toronto area. It was 81 decibels, far higher than many in the Mississauga and Oakville areas or areas close to the airport. In addition, we've done runway utilization.

I would like to point out that what we brought today is only part of a very large PowerPoint presentation that was presented on May 25 at MP Oliphant's invitation.

Just to follow up on the lack of response, that presentation was done on May 25 and we have yet to have a response from CENAC.

The Chair:

Okay, thank you very much.

The bells are ringing for a vote.

Mr. Liepert, you had a comment.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Yes.

The Chair:

Can we continue for a couple more minutes?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Mr. Liepert, go ahead.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

Madam Chair, I think it's important that I make a comment following Mr. Oliphant's comments. I am not sure if we're still televised, but I do not want anyone, in any way, to misinterpret what was said, that this side of the table is not taking this issue seriously.

I know Mr. Oliphant is not a regular member of this committee, but we did have a number of witnesses—Calgary Airport Authority and others—whom we spent plenty of time questioning.

We recognize that our panel this morning is very localized to the GTA, and there are six GTA area MPs at the table, so our intent here this morning was to allow plenty of time for GTA area MPs to question the panel, which is all localized. I want to put that on record.

I am not suggesting Mr. Oliphant said that. I just don't want an interpretation to be made that somehow we aren't taking this issue very seriously.

Mr. Oliphant, just for your information, I represent a riding in Calgary that is a 30-minute drive from the airport. Because of a new runway, Nav Canada has changed the flight path, and in fact, on our week break two weeks ago, I held a town hall meeting with Nav Canada, airport authority folks and residents. So it's a big issue in Calgary as well, in a riding that never believed the MP would ever have issues with aircraft noise.

I just want to put that on the record, Madam Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

It is 10:44, so I am going to have to end the meeting, unless anyone wants to continue for another 10 minutes or so. I think everybody has had enough, since we started at eight o'clock this morning.

I thank all our witnesses so very much for coming. Thank you to our airport authorities for working very hard to try to find solutions together with the community.

Thank you to the members for their great co-operation.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

(0800)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte.

Bonjour à tous. Merci beaucoup d'être venus nous rencontrer à 8 heures ce matin. Vous êtes très nombreux, et nous en sommes très reconnaissants. Je suis sûr que vous n'avez pas apprécié qu'on vous demande d'arriver à 8 heures, mais je vous remercie tous beaucoup d'être ici ce matin.

Nous nous réunissons ici ce matin pour examiner un certain nombre de crédits du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) 2018-2019, notamment les crédits 1a, 5a, 10a, 15a et 20a sous la rubrique du ministère des Transports, le crédit 1a, sous la rubrique de l'Administration canadienne de la sûreté du transport aérien, et le crédit 1a, sous la rubrique de l'Office des transports du Canada.

Je suis ravie d'accueillir l'honorable Marc Garneau, ministre des Transports, qui est accompagné de représentants de son ministère. Nous accueillons Michael Keenan, sous-ministre, qui est souvent venu nous rendre visite, André Lapointe, sous-ministre adjoint des Services généraux et dirigeant principal des dépenses, et Lawrence Hanson, sous-ministre adjoint des Politiques.

Pour ce qui est de l'Administration canadienne de la sûreté du transport aérien, je tiens à souhaiter la bienvenue à Neil Parry, vice-président de la Prestation de services, et Nancy Fitchett, vice-présidente par intérim des Affaires générales et chef de la direction financière.

Nous entendrons en outre Liz Barker, vice-présidente, et Manon Fillion, dirigeante principale des services corporatifs de l'Office des transports du Canada.

Nous accueillons aussi des représentants de trois autres ministères.

Il s'agit de Barbara Motzney, sous-ministre adjointe, Politique et Orientation stratégique, du ministère de la Diversification de l'économie de l'Ouest canadien, Sheilagh Murphy, sous-ministre adjointe, Terres et développement économique, du ministère des Affaires indiennes et du Nord canadien, et Scott Doidge, directeur général des Services de santé non assurés de la Direction générale de la santé des Premières Nations et des Inuits, du ministère des Services aux Autochtones Canada.

Bienvenue à tous. Merci beaucoup d'être là.

Pour ce qui est du crédit 1a sous la rubrique du ministère des Transports, monsieur le ministre Garneau, vous avez cinq minutes, s'il vous plaît.

L’hon. Marc Garneau (ministre des Transports):

Merci, madame la présidente. [Français]

Mesdames et messieurs, je vous remercie de m'avoir invité à rencontrer les membres du Comité aujourd'hui. Comme vous le savez, je suis accompagné de plusieurs personnes, que la présidente a mentionnées.

Je suis heureux d'être ici pour vous parler de l'important travail exécuté dans le portefeuille fédéral des transports, lequel comprend Transports Canada, des sociétés d'État, des organismes et des tribunaux administratifs. Le financement de ces organisations fédérales aide à rendre le réseau canadien de transport sécuritaire, sûr, efficace et respectueux de l'environnement. Ces organisations du portefeuille fédéral des transports et moi-même demeurerons engagés envers une saine gestion financière et une solide gérance des ressources du gouvernement, tout en obtenant des résultats pour les contribuables canadiens.

Le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) de Transports Canada pour 2018-2019 totalise 32 millions de dollars. Cette somme couvre le financement de divers programmes. Elle comprend également une nouvelle enveloppe de 10,5 millions de dollars. La plus grande partie de ces nouveaux fonds servira à la transition vers un système holistique et transformateur du gouvernement du Canada pour l'évaluation des impacts et la prise de décisions réglementaires.

(0805)

[Traduction]

De nouvelles ressources supplémentaires permettront à Transports Canada de s'acquitter de ses responsabilités, qui ont augmenté en raison du nouveau système d'évaluation des impacts et du nouveau système d'examen de la réglementation. Ce système comprend une approche transformatrice pour travailler en collaboration avec les peuples autochtones en vue de promouvoir la réconciliation, de reconnaître et de respecter les droits et les compétences des Autochtones, de favoriser la collaboration et de s'assurer qu'on tient compte des connaissances autochtones.

Ce système inclut des modifications qui mèneraient à la création de la Loi sur les eaux navigables canadiennes, qui est actuellement devant le Parlement sous la forme du projet de loi C-69. Les changements respecteraient le droit du public à la navigation sur les eaux navigables canadiennes tout en restaurant les mesures de protection perdues et en intégrant les mesures de protection modernes. [Français]

Ce budget supplémentaire des dépenses comprend un report de fonds qui totalise 21,6 millions de dollars. Il s'agit de fonds pour les immobilisations liées à la sécurité dans les aéroports locaux et régionaux, pour divers projets dans le cadre de notre programme de renforcement de la sécurité ferroviaire et pour l'entretien des traversiers de la côte est.

Ce budget supplémentaire des dépenses prévoit des transferts de Transports Canada à d'autres ministères fédéraux totalisant moins de 1 million de dollars, et 840 000 $ sont prévus pour les coûts du régime d'avantages sociaux des employés relativement aux projets susmentionnés.

Je suis très fier du travail actuellement réalisé par Transports Canada.[Traduction]

J'aimerais prendre quelques minutes pour souligner une priorité bien précise, soit le fait d'investir dans les corridors de transport de notre pays, et en particulier nos corridors commerciaux. « Des corridors de commerce aux marchés mondiaux » est l'un des cinq thèmes de Transports 2030, le plan stratégique de notre gouvernement sur l'avenir des transports au Canada.

Même si l'on dispose des meilleurs produits au monde, d'autres fournisseurs prendront notre place si nous ne pouvons pas expédier ces produits rapidement et en toute fiabilité vers nos clients. Nous travaillons en collaboration avec les intervenants pour éliminer les goulots d'étranglement, les vulnérabilités et la congestion le long de nos corridors commerciaux, et l'Initiative des corridors de commerce et de transport est une composante importante de ces efforts.

En juillet 2017, nous avons annoncé l'Initiative des corridors de commerce et de transport ainsi que le Fonds national des corridors commerciaux, un élément essentiel de cette initiative. Ce Fonds est conçu pour aider les propriétaires et les utilisateurs à investir dans nos routes, nos ponts, nos aéroports, nos voies ferroviaires, nos installations portuaires et nos corridors commerciaux. Grâce à ce Fonds, notre gouvernement investit 2 milliards de dollars sur 11 ans. Nous avons déjà annoncé le financement de projets, y compris des corridors ferroviaires, des pistes d'aéroport, des installations portuaires, des ponts, des autoroutes et plus encore. Il s'agit là de biens de transport essentiels au déplacement des marchandises et des personnes au Canada. Le financement des corridors commerciaux nationaux a été accéléré pour permettre à plus de projets d'éliminer les obstacles à la diversification du commerce.

Nos corridors de commerce sont importants pour acheminer des marchandises canadiennes vers les marchés internationaux, pour renforcer la compétitivité et la croissance des entreprises canadiennes et pour créer des emplois destinés aux Canadiens de la classe moyenne. Le Canada est une nation commerçante, et, au Canada, un emploi sur six dépend du commerce international. Pour assurer la prospérité du Canada, nos produits, nos services et nos citoyens doivent avoir accès aux principaux marchés internationaux. C'est là une raison importante pour laquelle je suis fier du travail qu'effectue Transports Canada par l'entremise de l'Initiative des corridors de commerce et de transport et du Fonds national des corridors commerciaux. [Français]

Toutefois, Transports Canada n'est pas la seule organisation à faire partie du portefeuille fédéral des transports. L'Administration canadienne de la sûreté du transport aérien, ou ACSTA, occupe également une place importante dans le paysage des transports au Canada.

L'ACSTA cherche à reporter 36 millions de dollars en fonds d'immobilisations dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) de cette année. La majorité de ces fonds d'immobilisations reportés, soit environ 29 millions de dollars, est destinée à l'achat d'équipement et aux travaux d'intégration pour le nouveau système de contrôle de bagages enregistrés. Cela fait partie du plan de gestion du cycle de vie des immobilisations de l'ACSTA pour aller dans le même sens que les plans de projet révisés des aéroports.

Mon mandat n'a pas changé depuis ma nomination au poste de ministre des Transports il y a trois ans. Je continue à travailler afin que le réseau de transport du Canada favorise la croissance économique et la création d'emplois. Je poursuis mes efforts pour que ce réseau soit sécuritaire et fiable et pour qu'il favorise le commerce ainsi que le transport des marchandises et des personnes. De même, je n'ai pas cessé de travailler pour que nos routes, nos ports et nos aéroports soient intégrés et durables et pour qu'ils permettent aux Canadiens et aux entreprises d'accéder plus facilement au reste du monde.

Les ressources financières demandées dans ce budget supplémentaire des dépenses aideraient les organisations de mon portefeuille à continuer de veiller à ce que le réseau de transport réponde aux besoins des Canadiens, aujourd'hui et pour les années à venir.

Merci. Cela me fera plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

(0810)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre Garneau.

Nous allons maintenant passer à Mme Block, pour six minutes.

Mme Kelly Block (Sentier Carlton—Eagle Creek, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je tiens à vous remercier, monsieur le ministre Garneau, de vous joindre à nous aujourd'hui pendant 90 minutes. Nous sommes très heureux de pouvoir vous poser de nombreuses questions. Nous avons hâte d'entendre vos réponses. Je veux aussi souhaiter la bienvenue aux fonctionnaires du ministère qui vous accompagnent. Il y a toute une équipe ici aujourd'hui. Je suis reconnaissante du fait que vous avez pris le temps d'être parmi nous ce matin.

Je sais que nous étudions le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses et les dépenses du gouvernement, mais j'aimerais vous poser quelques questions au sujet d'un projet de loi que nous avons étudié récemment. C'est un projet de loi qui nous avait été confié par le Comité des finances. Il faisait partie de la loi d'exécution du budget, le projet de loi C-86.

Il y avait deux ou trois sections dans la loi d'exécution du budget qui, si je ne m'abuse, venaient directement de Transports Canada. Elles étaient enfouies dans cette loi d'exécution du budget, entre les pages 589 et 649, aux sections 22 et 23. Ces sections contiennent des changements importants de la Loi sur la marine marchande du Canada et de la Loi sur la responsabilité en matière maritime.

Un des témoins qui ont comparu devant le Comité au nom de la Chambre de la marine marchande a souligné que l'article 692 du projet de loi semblait être un autre mécanisme permettant d'appliquer un moratoire sur des produits précis au moyen de la réglementation et d'ordonnances provisoires, et pas au moyen de textes législatifs, comme le gouvernement l'avait déjà fait par l'intermédiaire du projet de loi C-48. Le témoin a souligné que cette mesure était en contradiction avec ce que devait être l'objectif du gouvernement, soit la prestation d'une chaîne d'approvisionnement prévisible.

Très honnêtement, monsieur le ministre, il ne fait aucun doute selon moi que l'inclusion de cette disposition dans le projet de loi C-86 aura un effet paralysant supplémentaire sur l'industrie pétrolière et gazière du Canada. Ma question pour vous ce matin est la suivante: pouvez-vous assurer aux Canadiens qu'il ne s'agira pas là d'une autre mesure minant le secteur pétrolier et gazier canadien?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je remercie ma collègue de poser la question.

Bien sûr, les parties du projet de loi C-86 auxquelles elle fait référence concernent des modifications que nous apporterons à la Loi de la marine marchande du Canada de 2001 et la Loi sur la responsabilité en matière maritime. Ce sont des choses qui avaient été mentionnées précisément dans les budgets de 2017 et 2018 dans le contexte du Plan de protection des océans, une initiative gouvernementale très importante.

Le Canada compte sur des côtes et des eaux sûres et propres pour le commerce, la croissance économique et la qualité de vie. Nous reconnaissons aussi que nos océans occupent une place spéciale dans les traditions et la culture des Canadiens, notamment les collectivités autochtones. Nous prenons des mesures décisives et concrètes pour nous assurer que nos océans continueront de profiter à tous les Canadiens, aujourd'hui, et pour les générations à venir.

Pour soutenir une navigation sécuritaire et responsable du point de vue environnemental, les sections 22 et 23 du projet de loi C-86 proposent des modifications législatives qui visent à améliorer la protection de l'environnement marin et à renforcer la sécurité maritime. C'est l'objectif de ces deux sections.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup. J'apprécie votre réponse à ce sujet. J'aimerais poursuivre avec une autre question, puisque vous avez soulevé la question du Plan de protection des océans. C'est une question que nous avons posée à votre SMA, qui a comparu devant le Comité au sujet du projet de loi C-86.

Nous savons que les consultations législatives relativement au Plan de protection des océans se sont conclues le vendredi 26 octobre. Le projet de loi C-86 a été déposé le lundi 29 octobre. Vous savez, même si les avocats de Transports Canada et du ministère de la Justice sont très bons, personne ne croit vraiment qu'ils ont pu rédiger ces dispositions et les faire imprimer en deux jours. En fait, le milieu de l'expédition a été très surpris de voir ces dispositions dans le projet de loi C-86.

Monsieur le ministre, quand avez-vous décidé d'inclure ces importantes modifications dans la loi d'exécution du budget et pourquoi le site Web de Transports Canada continuait-il de laisser entendre que ces consultations étaient toujours en cours?

(0815)

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je peux vous dire que nous nous concentrons sur le Plan de protection des océans depuis un peu plus de deux ans maintenant. Comme vous le savez, le Plan a été annoncé le 7 novembre 2016 par le premier ministre à Vancouver. J'étais à ses côtés à ce moment-là.

Il y a plus de 50 mesures liées au Plan de protection des océans. Il s'agit vraiment d'une initiative de calibre mondial qui vise à assurer la sécurité accrue de nos océans, une meilleure protection de notre environnement maritime et le renforcement de notre capacité d'intervention. L'une des choses que nous avons toujours prévu faire, c'est d'apporter des changements aux deux lois que je vous ai mentionnées.

Dans un cas, la modification est liée directement aux responsabilités en cas de déversement. Nous avons apporté certains changements très importants à cet égard. L'autre concerne aussi la capacité du gouvernement d'apporter certaines modifications pour protéger des espèces marines — comme la capacité d'ordonner des ralentissements, par exemple, dans la mer des Salish — si nous jugeons qu'il est important de le faire pour protéger des espèces en voie de disparition.

Nous voulons renforcer...

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci, monsieur le ministre. J'aimerais poser rapidement une question de suivi. Je crois qu'il me reste 45 secondes.

La présidente:

Il vous reste environ 20 secondes.

Mme Kelly Block:

Les témoins qui ont comparu devant le Comité ont souligné qu'il s'agissait des changements les plus importants à avoir été apportés à la Loi sur la marine marchande du Canada et la Loi sur la responsabilité en matière maritime au cours des 10 dernières années dans un cas, et, des 25 dernières années dans l'autre. C'est la raison pour laquelle les gens étaient très surpris et peut-être même un peu déçus de voir ces modifications enfouies dans une loi d'exécution du budget.

Merci.

L'hon. Marc Garneau: Je vous en prie.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, madame Block.

Monsieur Hardie, allez-y, s'il vous plaît. Vous avez six minutes.

M. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Bonjour à tous et merci d'être là.

Monsieur le ministre Garneau, nous avons consacré un peu de temps à l'évaluation de deux ou trois corridors commerciaux très importants au Canada. Mon collègue Vance Badawey et moi-même avons eu la chance de voir certaines des études réalisées dans nos régions d'origine.

Pour ce qui est de la côte Ouest, pouvez-vous formuler des commentaires sur le rôle ou le mandat du groupe WESTAC? Je crois savoir que ce groupe assume une fonction de coordination en ce qui concerne la planification et la mise en oeuvre des améliorations du corridor commercial.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je serais heureux, monsieur Hardie, de formuler des commentaires à ce sujet. En fait, mon sous-ministre interagit aussi avec WESTAC, en tant que représentant du gouvernement.

Comme vous l'avez laissé entendre, il s'agit d'une organisation qui met beaucoup l'accent sur la fluidité des transports sur la côte Ouest. Bien sûr, le port de Vancouver, comme nous le savons tous, est de loin le plus important port du Canada. On s'inquiète beaucoup des goulots d'étranglement dans le Lower Mainland et jusqu'au port intérieur d'Ashcroft. Afin de s'assurer que nous transportons les marchandises de la façon la plus efficiente possible vers ce port très stratégique, WESTAC remplit une fonction importante à cet égard.

Il est évident que le dialogue sur l'endroit où il y a des goulots d'étranglement est crucial à notre processus décisionnel lorsque nous attribuons des fonds — par l'intermédiaire du Fonds national des corridors commerciaux — à des projets précis lorsque l'objectif est, je le répète, de réduire les goulots d'étranglement ou de les éliminer. L'information fournie par WESTAC est extrêmement importante.

M. Ken Hardie:

L'une des choses que nous avons remarquées dans nos conversations avec les représentants des diverses composantes du corridor commercial du Grand Vancouver, c'est qu'il est possible de dépenser vraiment beaucoup d'argent pour améliorer le corridor. Vous avez mentionné les goulots d'étranglement. Il y en a trois qui mènent à la rive Nord, où beaucoup de terminaux vraquiers et de terminaux de marchandises diverses sont situés, dans l'arrière-port comme nous l'appelons. Il y a le pont de New Westminster, qui a plus de 100 ans, un tunnel, qui passe sous le mont Burnaby, et un autre encore qui passe tout juste à côté du pont Second Narrows.

Lorsqu'on considère les coûts des améliorations potentielles à cet endroit, on parle de coûts très substantiels, mais, en même temps, le potentiel de renforcement des capacités de manutention des marchandises de la rive Nord de l'Inlet Burrard est un peu limité. Le problème vient du fait que nous avons besoin d'un cadre de surveillance qui évalue la situation dans son ensemble, et pas seulement les composantes, de façon à pouvoir commencer à trouver des solutions de rechange en matière de développement, des solutions que n'envisagent peut-être pas les compagnies ferroviaires ou le port de la région métropolitaine de Vancouver et ainsi de suite. Êtes-vous convaincu que ce genre de réflexion a lieu?

(0820)

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je suis d'accord avec ce que vous venez d'exprimer. Il ne faut pas seulement se concentrer sur des projets précis.

Il y a beaucoup de projets précis qui concernent des goulots d'étranglement reconnus, et certains fonds connexes y ont été attribués durant la première affectation de fonds dans le cadre du processus du Fonds national des corridors commerciaux. Il s'agit de mesures de financement annoncées au cours des derniers mois.

Cependant, vous avez raison. Il faut regarder la situation dans son ensemble. Je crois que, lorsque notre ministère juge les différentes demandes de financement liées aux différents goulots d'étranglement du Lower Mainland, dans chaque cas, nous regardons la situation dans son ensemble en tentant d'optimiser les choses, parce que c'est le critère le plus important: de quelle façon peut-on aider à accroître la fluidité du transport?

Comme vous le savez, la situation du port de Vancouver et les chemins de fer — il y a trois chemins de fer de classe 1 qui y aboutissent, tout comme il y a aussi beaucoup de camionnage dans une zone très occupée, une zone où beaucoup de personnes vaquent à leurs occupations et utilisent leur véhicule — doit vraiment être évaluée de façon à ce que nous puissions optimiser l'argent des contribuables, parce qu'il y a plus de demandes qu'il n'y a d'argent. Selon moi, cette simple situation nous oblige à essayer d'assurer l'optimisation des ressources afin de fournir les meilleures solutions à long terme pour assurer la fluidité du transport.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je pense que beaucoup de gens ont été réconfortés par l'adoption de nouvelles catégories de wagons pour le transport du pétrole. Nous savons que c'est la solution de rechange jusqu'à ce que nous ayons une plus grande capacité d'oléoducs vers la côte Ouest.

Pour ce qui est du régime global de transport, il y a des grains à transporter. Il y a évidemment plus de pétrole à transporter aussi. Que pensez-vous du rendement du système ferroviaire relativement à l'intérêt national ou à la lumière de la stratégie nationale pour transporter les bons produits vers les marchés?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Selon moi, les modifications apportées par l'intermédiaire du projet de loi C-49 pour moderniser la Loi sur les transports au Canada sont allées dans la bonne direction. On essayait d'optimiser le déplacement des marchandises. Nous sommes à une époque où la demande pour le transport des marchandises au Canada est très forte. Vous avez raison de souligner qu'il s'agit de transport de céréales, mais aussi de beaucoup d'autres marchandises. J'entends souvent parler des représentants du milieu minier, du milieu de la foresterie et des producteurs de potasse. Ce sont des marchandises importantes destinées à nos ports. Actuellement, il y a aussi bien sûr une demande accrue de transport ferroviaire de pétrole.

Les compagnies de chemins de fer savent que la demande est élevée, parce qu'elles reçoivent les demandes. En même temps, nous devons nous assurer de ne pas avantager une marchandise plutôt que les autres. C'est essentiellement la situation avec laquelle il faut composer lorsque l'économie est forte — comme c'est le cas en ce moment — et qu'il y a une énorme demande pour les produits canadiens.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Benson, c'est votre tour. Bienvenue au Comité ce matin.

Mme Sheri Benson (Saskatoon-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Merci au ministre d'être là, et je remercie aussi tous les représentants des divers ministères de leur présence.

Je vais faire un peu dévier la conversation. Je viens de la Saskatchewan. Évidemment, l'accès à des moyens de transport abordables dans les collectivités rurales et éloignées et la capacité des gens de se déplacer font partie de mes préoccupations. Ce sont des sujets que j'ai soulevés un certain nombre de fois, et en particulier dans le cas du transport sécuritaire des femmes autochtones et du soutien que nous fournissons en matière de transport en commun à l'extérieur des grands centres urbains. Beaucoup de personnes n'ont peut-être pas nécessairement entendu ce que j'ai dit, mais je considère que le service d'autobus dans l'Ouest du Canada est notre système de métro. Selon moi, ces services méritent le soutien et le leadership du gouvernement fédéral.

Cela fait aussi presque deux ans que la Saskatchewan Transportation Company a fermé ses portes et que 253 collectivités de la Saskatchewan se sont retrouvées sans service. Les gens qui écoutent aujourd'hui devraient comprendre qu'on ne parle pas seulement d'avoir une façon bon marché d'aller en ville pour magasiner. Nous parlons de la capacité des étudiants de poursuivre des études postsecondaires, de la capacité des gens de trouver un emploi, de la possibilité de transporter des fournitures médicales entre des centres urbains et des plus petits centres et, bien sûr, de la possibilité pour les gens d'avoir accès à des soins de santé. Puis, bien sûr, nous avons à nouveau essuyé une nouvelle perte lorsque Greyhound a décidé d'arrêter de desservir le nord de l'Ontario et le reste de l'Ouest canadien.

J'ai deux ou trois questions à poser pour faire le point sur ce qui est, selon moi, le rôle du gouvernement fédéral dans ce dossier et relativement aux paramètres connexes. Je comprends la question des compétences, mais j'estime aussi que tout ordre de gouvernement peut prendre les devants dans un dossier afin de réunir les gens et d'aider à fournir un service dans les collectivités tout en coopérant avec les autres ordres de gouvernement. Je veux tout simplement le dire pour vous encourager à penser au rôle que le gouvernement fédéral peut jouer.

Monsieur le ministre, concernant Greyhound, nous avons entendu dire qu'entre 87 et 90 % des itinéraires ont été couverts. Pouvez-vous nous dire quels sont les itinéraires qui ne sont pas actuellement couverts et ce que le gouvernement fédéral prévoit faire à cet égard? Plus particulièrement, j'aimerais savoir où se trouvent ces itinéraires et si une province se retrouve vraiment laissée à elle-même, pour ainsi dire.

(0825)

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Merci de la question.

Depuis juillet, lorsque Greyhound a annoncé qu'il se retirait de l'Ouest canadien et d'une petite section du Nord de l'Ontario, notre ministère a interagi avec les provinces. Vous avez raison: même si le transport par autocar est en baisse depuis très longtemps, il y a des populations vulnérables qui ont besoin d'un tel service, comme des personnes qui n'ont pas d'autre choix pour des raisons financières et des gens dans les régions éloignées. On assure une coordination entre le gouvernement fédéral et les provinces. Lorsque je parle du gouvernement fédéral, nous avons aussi fait intervenir Services aux Autochtones Canada et RCAANC — en plus d'ISDE — afin d'examiner le défi auquel nous sommes confrontés.

Comme vous l'avez souligné, 87 % des itinéraires que Greyhound a laissé tomber ont été repris, et c'est une bonne chose, parce que ceux qui l'ont fait pensent pouvoir réussir. Cependant, vous avez aussi raison de dire que, dans certains cas, il n'y a plus de service. Nous pouvons vous fournir des renseignements détaillés sur les itinéraires dont nous parlons et qui ne sont plus desservis, mais nous avons un plan pour ça aussi. Si vous regardez les services perdus suivant le départ de Greyhound, c'était principalement en Alberta et en Colombie-Britannique. Nous avons travaillé en collaboration avec ces deux provinces de façon à ce que, si, à un moment donné, elles présentent des demandes de propositions pour trouver un fournisseur de service grâce à un processus concurrentiel, nous pourrions les aider financièrement. C'est le plan qu'on a mis en place à cet égard.

Pour ce qui est des collectivités autochtones et éloignées, dont on s'occupe par l'intermédiaire de SAC, nous avons mis en oeuvre un plan pour travailler en collaboration avec les collectivités autochtones qui veulent aussi mettre en place elles-mêmes une capacité commerciale. Par conséquent, nous estimons que ce processus est aussi bien en cours.

Il s'agit seulement d'une solution à court terme. Nous avons besoin d'une solution à long terme, et, par conséquent, l'une des choses que nous avons annoncées au cours des dernières semaines inclut aussi le fait de trouver, au cours des deux prochaines années, quelque chose d'envergure plus nationale... les dix provinces et les trois territoires.

(0830)

La présidente:

Il vous reste 10 secondes, madame Benson.

Mme Sheri Benson:

Je veux souligner que ceux qui ont besoin d'avoir accès à ces services, particulièrement les personnes handicapées, devraient participer lorsqu'on commence à parler d'un plan pour le Canada. Je vous suggère de commencer le processus là où il n'y a pas de service d'autocar ou là où la situation est très difficile.

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, madame Benson.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Graham. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur le ministre, merci d'être ici.

On retrouve dans les Laurentides plus de 10 000 lacs. Or, il est extrêmement compliqué de déterminer quels sont les champs de compétence dans le domaine aquatique. Qui est responsable des eaux? Qui est responsable de ce qui se trouve sous la surface? C'est une des grandes préoccupations dans notre circonscription.

Le ministère des Transports est responsable notamment du Règlement sur les restrictions visant l'utilisation des bâtiments. Nous savons qu'une consultation a été lancée sur ce règlement. Est-ce que vos assistants ou vous-même pouvez nous indiquer où en est rendue cette consultation?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Sauf erreur, vous parlez des champs de compétence sur les lacs pour la navigation.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Vous avez raison de dire que cette question relève traditionnellement du gouvernement fédéral. Cependant, nous reconnaissons que cela crée énormément de problèmes, compte tenu des règlements locaux qui s'appliquent sur les lacs.

Nous sommes en train d'y travailler. Il s'agit d'un projet à long terme, je dois l'admettre, dans le cadre duquel nous cherchons une façon de déléguer en quelque sorte cette compétence aux organismes les plus concernés, c'est-à-dire les municipalités. Nous souhaitons leur donner plus de flexibilité. En même temps, elles devront respecter le besoin de protéger la navigation sur nos lacs. Le travail n'est pas complété, mais c'est la direction dans laquelle nous nous en allons. Nous reconnaissons que ce serait quelque chose de plus flexible et qui répondrait aux besoins des municipalités.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous vous remercions de faire ce travail. Il s'agit d'une grande préoccupation pour nous, puisque de gros bateaux sillonnent nos petits lacs et causent de graves dommages. Tout progrès serait donc important pour nous.[Traduction]

Je veux passer à un autre sujet. Je crois que ce sera un peu plus léger. Je crois que nous sommes tous heureux d'avoir appris que InSight s'était bien posé sur mars, hier. J'imagine que cet événement vous intéressait tout particulièrement.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Voulez-vous que j'en parle?

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. David de Burgh Graham: J'aimerais savoir ce que vous en pensez.

L'hon. Marc Garneau: Eh bien, j'ai trouvé ça extraordinaire. Encore plus que les vols spatiaux avec des humains. Je crois que la capacité de faire atterrir un robot ou un véhicule sur Mars est le défi le plus exigeant d'un point de vue technique que toute industrie spatiale peut relever. Seuls les États-Unis ont réussi à faire atterrir un robot fonctionnel ou à faire des expériences sur la surface martienne.

Et là, on en est au tout début. L'atterrissage est réussi, mais il reste à vérifier tous les systèmes. Selon moi, l'événement témoigne de l'excellence de la NASA, et particulièrement le Jet Propulsion Laboratory à Pasadena, en Californie, qui s'occupe de toutes ces choses. Je suis très enthousiaste et je vais regarder très attentivement les résultats scientifiques — ils vont forer le sol — qu'ils en tireront.

J'aurais aimé que la question spatiale relève du ministère des Transports, mais je n'ai pas encore eu de succès à ce sujet auprès de mon collègue le ministre Bains.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous travaillerons là-dessus.

Pour revenir au Canada et parler de VIA Rail, vous avez annoncé le renouvellement du parc. Pouvez-vous faire le point sur là où on est rendus?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

VIA Rail est une société d'État. Le gouvernement du Canada a reconnu que le parc de voitures et de locomotives avait besoin d'être remplacé. Certains véhicules avaient plus de 40 ans, alors nous avons annoncé il y a un certain temps que VIA allait lancer un processus concurrentiel. Le processus est en cours, et il est ouvert au monde entier.

Actuellement, nous croyons pouvoir entendre à ce sujet sous peu des représentants officiels de VIA Rail, qui nous diront quelle entreprise s'est vu attribuer le marché pour remplacer ces vieilles voitures, et je sais qu'elles sont vieilles, parce que je les utilise chaque semaine pour faire l'aller-retour entre Montréal et Ottawa. Je crois que c'est très excitant. Il s'agit du corridor entre Québec et Windsor, là où il y a le plus de circulation, et l'objectif, c'est de voir les premières nouvelles voitures entrer en service en 2022.

(0835)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pouvons-nous nous attendre à ce que le projet permette d'améliorer de façon importante le service aux passagers ou du moins leur expérience?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je sais que VIA tente toujours d'améliorer ses services et sa ponctualité. Lorsqu'on bénéficie de nouvelles pièces d'équipement, si on obtient les bonnes pièces d'équipement, on passera moins de temps à l'entretien, ce qui aide à améliorer la fiabilité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est juste.

Très rapidement, je veux parler du Programme d'aide aux immobilisations aéroportuaires. Pouvez-vous nous parler un peu de ce programme et nous dire pourquoi il est important? Il y a cinq aéroports dans ma circonscription, alors c'est toujours intéressant d'entendre parler des possibilités.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Si je ne m'abuse, le Programme d'aide aux immobilisations aéroportuaires est en place depuis environ 20 ans et il a permis d'accorder près de 900 millions de dollars à nos aéroports. Chaque année, environ de 38 à 40 millions de dollars sont attribués. Il y a beaucoup d'aéroports à l'échelle du pays. Il y a les cinq que vous avez mentionnés dans votre circonscription.

Pour être admissible, il faut avoir... Le financement en tant que tel est destiné à des améliorations de la sécurité dans les aéroports. Il peut s'agir d'éclairage, d'équipement de déneigement. Il doit y avoir un lien avec la sécurité. Il y a beaucoup de demandeurs chaque année, alors on ne peut pas accepter tout le monde. Selon une exigence, les aéroports en question doivent accueillir de façon régulière des vols et au moins 1 000 passagers par année. Il ne doit pas non plus s'agir d'aéroports fédéraux. C'est un programme fédéral dans le cadre duquel la concurrence est féroce. Nous annonçons chaque année les aéroports retenus qui vont obtenir du financement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les aéroports où des autorisations préalables sont requises sont-ils admissibles?

La présidente:

Je suis désolée, monsieur Graham. Votre temps est écoulé.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Badawey.

M. Vance Badawey (Niagara-Centre, Lib.):

Bonjour.

Merci à vous tous d'être là ce matin.

Je commencerai par dire que, comme M. Hardie l'a souligné, lorsque nous nous sommes rendus à Niagara et à Vancouver, nous avons appris beaucoup de choses au sujet des changements qui se produisent dans le milieu du commerce mondial, du transport international à des fins de commerce et des produits visés. Nous avons appris qu'il faut mettre à niveau nos corridors commerciaux.

Regardons les choses en face: au bout du compte, nous avons rapidement constaté à quel point le pays s'est contenté de ce qu'il avait et a été complaisant depuis de nombreuses générations. Dans une certaine mesure, nous comptons actuellement sur des actifs de transport archaïques. Il faut faire preuve d'un grand esprit stratégique et assumer un rôle plus habilitant en utilisant ces actifs. Comme vous l'avez mentionné, monsieur le ministre, on renforcera ainsi le rendement général du pays. Je vous félicite. Après des décennies de contentement et de complaisance — ce qui a miné l'économie —, les efforts et l'orientation que vous adoptez sont vraiment les bienvenus, surtout à Niagara, qui se trouve dans l'un des corridors commerciaux stratégiques du pays.

Cela dit, monsieur le ministre, j'ai une question. En tenant compte des ministères des Transports, de l'Infrastructure, du Travail, des Affaires mondiales, de l'Environnement, du Commerce international, des Finances, du Développement économique et des Pêches et des affaires et des relations intergouvernementales, de quelle façon vous et Transports Canada utilisez-vous une approche pangouvernementale pour investir et intégrer, optimiser et améliorer la fluidité lorsqu'il est question de mobilité et de commerce international?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Merci, monsieur Badawey.

Si vous me permettez, je tiens à vous féliciter du travail que vous faites dans la région de Niagara relativement aux corridors commerciaux. Il s'agit d'un point d'entrée important, surtout pour le commerce entre le Canada et les États-Unis.

Je répondrai à votre question en disant que le récent Énoncé économique de l'automne donne une bonne idée de ce que nous envisageons en matière de commerce dans le cadre d'une approche pangouvernementale. Il y avait bien sûr des mesures dans notre Énoncé économique de l'automne visant à rendre les entreprises canadiennes plus concurrentielles. L'amortissement accéléré des investissements en capital est un bon exemple d'une mesure qui, selon nous, créera de l'emploi. Bien sûr, si on crée de l'emploi et qu'on fabrique plus de produits, il faut transporter tout ça. L'élément important, même s'il n'a peut-être pas beaucoup été mentionné, c'est le fait que le gouvernement a pris une partie du financement prévu pour les dernières années dans le cadre du Fonds national des corridors commerciaux afin qu'on puisse y avoir accès plus rapidement.

Comme vous le savez, nous avons réalisé un processus concurrentiel. Nous avons accordé 800 millions de dollars dans le cadre de 39 projets. Il y a une telle demande pour ce genre de financement parce que les gens reconnaissent qu'un transport efficient des marchandises est crucial à notre économie. On accueille favorablement le fait que des fonds prévus pour les années subséquentes ont été utilisés plus rapidement afin que nous puissions continuer à aller de l'avant et à réaliser plus de projets dans le cadre de ce fonds, des projets qui permettront d'améliorer le transport des marchandises tout en étant bénéfique pour l'économie.

Je pense que le gouvernement a clairement reconnu la fonction cruciale du transport pour acheminer nos marchandises vers les marchés. Sinon, nos clients iront ailleurs.

(0840)

M. Vance Badawey:

Je vous félicite d'avoir adopté une approche pangouvernementale. Dans mon ancienne vie de maire, j'étais extrêmement frustré lorsqu'il fallait communiquer individuellement avec tout le monde plutôt que de se tourner vers un gouvernement au sein duquel la communication est efficace.

À part les 10 ministères que j'ai mentionnés précédemment, j'ajouterais Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique. Les activités de recherche et de développement sont très importantes. Nous avons encouragé les universités et les collèges à aider à commercialiser de nouveaux produits. De quelle façon travaillez-vous en collaboration avec ces différents ministères, encore une fois, pour créer la fluidité dont nous avons besoin pour accroître notre PIB à l'avenir? De quelle façon travaillons-nous en collaboration avec ces différents ministères pour nous assurer que nous communiquons tous afin de jouer davantage un rôle habilitant pour le transport de ces marchandises à l'échelle internationale?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Le domaine des transports est extrêmement technique. Il y a beaucoup d'exemples de situations où les transports deviennent de plus en plus perfectionnés.

Je peux vous dire, par exemple, que nous envisageons des systèmes de circulation en peloton de camions comme méthode future pour transporter beaucoup de marchandises par camion. Bien sûr, la circulation en peloton de camions, c'est lorsque plusieurs camions se suivent, mais il y a une coordination entre les camions qui est rendue possible par la technologie de façon à ce qu'ils se suivent tous les uns les autres. C'est quelque chose qu'on fait à l'échelle internationale en ce moment. Beaucoup de pays occidentaux mettent au point une telle capacité.

Nous nous appuyons sur la science et les technologies pour mettre en oeuvre ce genre de système. Ayant été moi-même dans un peloton de camions dans le cadre d'une démonstration dans une installation de Transports Canada, je dois dire que c'est une capacité très impressionnante. Tout est aussi fait de façon à ce que la distance entre les camions permette de réduire au minimum la traînée aérodynamique sur les camions qui suivent derrière le premier. On peut donc aussi faire des économies de carburant.

Le Canada travaille sur ce genre de possibilité, sans mentionner les véhicules autonomes, un autre domaine, ou encore les drones, qui constituent aussi un nouveau domaine très dynamique.

Dans tous ces cas, nous devons utiliser les meilleures capacités technologiques possible, ainsi que les données scientifiques qui nous aident à composer avec ces nouvelles technologies perturbatrices.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre Garneau.

Monsieur Liepert, vous avez six minutes.

M. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le ministre, d'être là et de nous avoir accordé 90 minutes.

Cependant, je n'ai que six minutes, alors j'aimerais poser rapidement quelques questions et j'espère que nous pourrons invoquer les règles du comité plénier lorsque les réponses ne dépassent pas la durée des questions.

Je veux vous poser une question sur Transports 2030. Vous avez déclaré ce qui suit: « Même si l'on dispose des meilleurs produits au monde, d'autres fournisseurs prendront notre place si nous ne pouvons pas expédier ces produits rapidement et en toute fiabilité vers nos clients. »

Lorsque nous étions à Vancouver... Environ 2 milliards de dollars de travaux de construction sont en cours au port de Vancouver à l'heure actuelle afin que l'on puisse s'assurer d'expédier les produits aux clients. Cependant, le PDG du port de Vancouver a déclaré que, si le projet de loi C-69 avait été adopté il y a deux ans, pas un dollar de ces investissements n'aurait été fait aujourd'hui.

De quelle façon pouvez-vous formuler les déclarations que vous formulez au sujet de Transports 2030 et tout de même justifier le fait que le gouvernement libéral nous impose quelque chose comme le projet de loi C-69?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Tout ce que je peux vous dire, c'est que je n'ai pas fait une telle déclaration. Vous avez parlé du PDG du port de Vancouver. Il peut parler en son propre nom à ce sujet.

Selon nous, le projet de loi C-69 est absolument nécessaire parce que le gouvernement précédent, le gouvernement que vous avez représenté, a vidé de leur substance bon nombre des mesures de protection de l'environnement, quelque chose qui était une composante importante de notre engagement...

(0845)

M. Ron Liepert:

Mais vous êtes le ministre des Transports. C'est le travail de la ministre de l'Environnement de faire de telles déclarations. Vous êtes le ministre des Transports. Vous êtes censé vous battre au nom des Canadiens pour que leurs marchandises se rendent dans les marchés internationaux, et ce n'est pas ce qui se produit actuellement au sein de l'industrie pétrolière et gazière.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je suis heureux de vous dire que nous nous parlons les uns aux autres au sein de notre gouvernement, entre ministres. Nous croyons que nous pouvons jongler avec plusieurs balles en même temps.

M. Ron Liepert:

D'accord. Donc il est évident que vous n'arrivez pas à vous imposer au sein de votre propre caucus. Je vais m'arrêter ici.

Je veux aussi déclarer...

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Ce n'est pas ainsi que je décrirais la situation, mais rien ne vous empêche de le faire.

M. Ron Liepert:

Eh bien, c'est ce que je veux, et je vais le faire.

J'aimerais continuer de parler de Transports 2030. On peut lire directement dans les déclarations qu'un des objectifs consiste à réduire le coût du transport aérien pour les Canadiens. De quelle façon justifiez-vous cette affirmation vu la taxe sur le carbone qui vient d'être imposée aux aéronefs alors qu'on n'a pas d'autre choix que d'utiliser du carburéacteur?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Si vous aviez examiné en détail les mesures prévues dans le projet de loi C-49, ce dont nous sommes très fiers, vous auriez constaté qu'il y a plusieurs mesures visant à accroître la concurrence. La concurrence, j'imagine que vous serez d'accord, a le potentiel de réduire les coûts. L'une des mesures importantes que nous avons prises consistait à accroître le niveau maximal de participation étrangère dans les compagnies aériennes canadiennes, le faisant passer de 25 à 49 %. Cela permet d'attirer plus d'investissements étrangers, jusqu'à concurrence de 49 % dans les compagnies aériennes canadiennes, ce qui peut nous permettre de voir l'arrivée de nouveaux transporteurs à très faible coût. En retour, cela pourra favoriser la concurrence, réduire les prix et offrir de nouvelles destinations.

C'est l'un des éléments qui ont été annoncés dans le projet de loi C-49. Nous avons aussi mis en place certaines autres mesures concernant les coentreprises.

Selon nous, nous faisons de bonnes choses pour accroître la concurrence.

M. Ron Liepert:

Donc, puisque vous n'avez pas abordé la question de la taxe sur le carbone, je peux supposer qu'il s'agit d'une autre défaite du ministre des Transports — au nom des entreprises canadiennes — et au profit de la ministre de l'Environnement au sein du cabinet libéral.

Passons, dans ce cas-là. J'aimerais savoir si vous êtes satisfait ou non de la façon dont les aéroports sont gérés vu la structure actuelle des autorités aéroportuaires.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Oui, je peux répondre.

Pour ce qui est de la fin de votre commentaire, contrairement à votre parti, malheureusement, nous croyons que la pollution entraîne des coûts, ce dont nous ne pouvons pas faire fi. Ce n'est pas gratuit, comme votre parti semble le croire.

Oui, pour les aéroports, il est toujours possible de faire mieux. C'est évident. Vu l'augmentation du nombre de voyages par avion au pays, il y a de plus en plus de pressions sur nos aéroports. J'étais très heureux d'être à l'aéroport de Toronto récemment, qui a gagné le prix du meilleur service à la clientèle offert par un grand aéroport en Amérique du Nord. Cependant, vu le nombre de passagers qui augmente, plus de pression s'exerce sur l'ACSTA, l'organisation de sûreté responsable de s'assurer que, lorsqu'on se rend à l'aéroport...

M. Ron Liepert:

Oui, je sais ce qu'est l'ACSTA.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

D'accord. C'est bien. C'est donc un domaine où, selon nous, il faut apporter des améliorations. Je crois que nos aéroports composent avec l'augmentation. Il y a toujours des récits de personnes qui ne sont pas satisfaites, mais je crois que, de façon générale, nos aéroports font du bon travail, surtout lorsqu'on se compare aux aéroports dans d'autres pays du monde.

M. Ron Liepert:

J'ai une dernière question. J'ai seulement six minutes.

Le Comité réalise actuellement une étude sur le bruit des avions dans les grands centres urbains. L'une des choses qui semblent ressortir des témoignages que nous avons entendus à ce sujet, c'est qu'il est très difficile de trouver qui est responsable, au bout du compte, de gérer ces préoccupations.

J'imagine que le Comité formulera plusieurs recommandations à votre intention, vu votre rôle de ministre. Pouvez-vous confirmer aujourd'hui que, après avoir reçu un rapport du Comité et l'avoir étudié, vous y donnerez suite et qu'il ne va pas tout simplement dormir sur les tablettes et ramasser de la poussière?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je prends toujours au sérieux tous les rapports qui émanent du Comité, alors nous allons l'examiner, et je suis reconnaissant de votre contribution dans le dossier très important du bruit.

M. Ron Liepert:

Mais allez-vous y répondre publiquement?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je vais répondre à tous les rapports produits par le Comité.

M. Ron Liepert:

Merci.

La présidente:

Ce sera l'une des demandes dans notre rapport, lorsque nous le présenterons à la Chambre; nous souhaitons qu'on y réagisse dans un délai précis, dans l'intérêt de tous les membres du Comité.

Nous allons maintenant passer à Mme Damoff. Bienvenue au Comité ce matin.

(0850)

Mme Pam Damoff (Oakville-Nord—Burlington, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

De combien de temps est-ce que je dispose?

La présidente:

Vous avez six minutes.

Mme Pam Damoff:

Monsieur le ministre, merci d'être là aujourd'hui.

Vous et moi nous sommes posé un certain nombre de questions au sujet de la sécurité des piétons et des cyclistes, et je vous remercie vraiment de votre engagement dans ce dossier. Je sais que vous avez annoncé la création d'un groupe de travail intergouvernemental pour améliorer la sécurité des usagers vulnérables, et plus particulièrement en ce qui concerne les véhicules lourds. Au printemps, cette année, vous avez invité le public à participer à un processus de consultation en ligne.

Pouvez-vous faire le point sur vos efforts en matière de sécurité des piétons et des cyclistes?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je commencerai par dire que de nombreuses composantes du secteur des Transports sont visées par une compétence partagée entre les provinces — et dans certains cas les municipalités — et le gouvernement fédéral. Maintenant que plus de personnes marchent et font du vélo — et il y a même des pistes cyclables dans les villes achalandées — l'enjeu des usagers de la route vulnérables dont vous parlez, les piétons et les cyclistes, a mis en lumière le fait qu'il y a eu des décès et des blessures graves, particulièrement, comme vous le dites, en raison de véhicules lourds. Dans ma circonscription, deux personnes ont perdu la vie dans ce genre de situation.

Il y a environ un an, j'ai décidé de travailler en collaboration avec les provinces pour voir si nous pouvions nous attaquer à ce problème croissant. Comme vous l'avez dit, il y a eu une consultation. Il y a eu une tournée dans plusieurs villes et on a aussi recueilli les commentaires des Canadiens en ligne, ce qui a mené à un rapport publié vers la fin de l'été. Le rapport cernait plus de 50 mesures pouvant être mises en oeuvre pour améliorer la situation si les différents ordres du gouvernement, y compris le gouvernement fédéral, choisissaient d'aller de l'avant. Certaines mesures étaient susceptibles d'avoir un effet important, et d'autres, peut-être moins, mais l'évaluation en tant que telle de chaque mesure n'a pas été réalisée. Il s'agissait principalement d'une liste de toutes les choses qui pouvaient être faites par les trois ordres de gouvernement.

C'est un document très important, et nous allons faire un suivi lorsque je rencontrerai mes homologues provinciaux et territoriaux en janvier dans le but de parler des prochaines étapes et prendre des décisions au sujet des mesures que nous envisagerons tous de mettre en place afin de rendre les routes plus sécuritaires pour les Canadiens. J'envisage aussi certaines mesures fédérales, et nous aurons plus de choses à vous dire après cette réunion.

Mme Pam Damoff:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Lorsqu'on ajoute à cela ce que notre ministre de l'Infrastructure a fait pour financer des infrastructures de transport actif, de vélo et de marche, c'est quelque chose que nous apprécions beaucoup dans ma circonscription et partout au Canada. Merci beaucoup.

Je vais maintenant céder la parole à mon collègue, qui a aussi une question pour vous.

M. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Merci.

Monsieur le ministre, j'ai eu le bonheur de passer une journée avec vous à Mississauga, et j'ai eu beaucoup de plaisir à vous entendre parler de votre expérience de lancement dans l'espace, tout comme les étudiants de l'Université de Toronto qui étaient là.

Plus tôt dans la journée, vous aviez pris la parole devant la Chambre de commerce de Mississauga. J'aimerais savoir si vous pourriez mentionner pour le compte rendu certains des chiffres dont vous avez parlé au sujet des annonces concernant les transports dans la région de Peel et la région du Grand Toronto?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Il faudrait que je vérifie. Il y avait 39 projets. Je n'ai pas ce discours avec moi ce matin, mais il y a eu des investissements dans la région de Peel et la région de York. Je pourrais vous revenir là-dessus.

Si ma mémoire est bonne, il y avait environ 58 projets, environ. Je ne me rappelle pas le nombre exact, mais tout ça fait partie des différents programmes que Transports Canada réglemente et coordonne. Je sais qu'il y avait certains projets importants, parce que je les ai mentionnés dans mon discours. Je ne les aurais pas mentionnés s'ils n'étaient pas importants, mais je ne me souviens pas des chiffres à brûle-pourpoint. Je suis désolé.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Pouvons-nous vous demander de fournir le chiffre exact au Comité?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Nous pouvons les fournir à M. Sikand.

M. Gagan Sikand:

D'accord, merci beaucoup.

La présidente:

Si vous pouvez fournir l'information à la greffière, s'il vous plaît, elle la distribuera à tous les membres du Comité.

(0855)

Mme Pam Damoff:

Je pense que vous allez revenir à moi, puisqu'il reste environ une minute.

C'est exact, madame la présidente?

La présidente:

Oui.

Mme Pam Damoff:

Monsieur le ministre, vous avez discuté avec Air Canada au sujet d'une solution pour les Airbus, une solution qui permettrait de régler une grande partie du problème de bruit de ces avions. Il s'agit d'un problème dont mes électeurs me parlent assez régulièrement.

Pouvez-vous faire le point sur vos discussions avec Air Canada en ce qui concerne le bruit des Airbus?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Oui. Ce que nous avons fait, précisément, c'est de parler à Air Canada, qui possède une flotte d'Airbus. Certains de ces Airbus 320 sont dotés d'un dispositif qui dépasse en dessous de l'aile gauche, l'aile bâbord, ce qui crée beaucoup de bruit lorsque les avions se présentent pour atterrir. Il y a une solution qui permet d'éliminer la protubérance sur l'aile, et c'est quelque chose qu'Air Canada a commencé à faire pour tous les aéronefs de sa flotte lorsque ceux-ci font l'objet d'entretiens réguliers. C'est quelque chose qu'on fera au fil du temps. Le processus est en cours. C'est un problème qui touche principalement la région du Grand Toronto, mais aussi certains autres aéroports.

C'est une bonne nouvelle. Pour ce qui est du calendrier précis et du moment où la dernière réparation aura été faite, je ne peux pas vous le dire pour l'instant, mais c'est quelque chose que nous pouvons demander à Air Canada.

J'ai certaines statistiques, monsieur Sikand, et je vous les fournirai.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre.

Nous allons passer à M. Jeneroux pour cinq minutes.

M. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, PCC):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Merci, monsieur le ministre, d'être là. C'est bien de voir le ministre se présenter pour parler du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses, contrairement au ministre de l'Infrastructure. Je crois que nous sommes tous d'accord pour dire que cela a été un peu catastrophique durant la dernière réunion.

Monsieur le ministre, la première ministre de l'Alberta demande d'accroître la capacité ferroviaire, jusqu'à 120 000 wagons supplémentaires. Elle a demandé du soutien au gouvernement fédéral et, apparemment, elle ne l'a pas reçu. Il n'y a rien à ce sujet dans la mise à jour financière; le pétrole brut transporté par voie ferroviaire brille par son absence.

Je suis curieux de savoir si c'est quelque chose que vous envisagez ou non.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Merci de la question.

J'ai vu la lettre de la première ministre Notley qui a été envoyée au premier ministre, et je comprends la situation dans laquelle se retrouve l'Alberta. La demande concernait une capacité ferroviaire supplémentaire. Comme vous le savez, le transport du pétrole brut par rail s'approche des 300 000 barils par jour, et la demande concernait un renforcement de la capacité de 120 000 barils par jour. Nous nous penchons sur cette question, mais la situation est la suivante.

C'est quelque chose qui peut être réglé avec les compagnies de chemins de fer. La plupart des wagons-citernes appartiennent soit aux compagnies pétrolières, soit aux expéditeurs. Ils n'appartiennent pas principalement aux compagnies de chemins de fer. Les compagnies de chemins de fer fournissent les locomotives pour transporter tout ça. Cette situation est possible si on conclut une entente commerciale avec les compagnies de chemins de fer.

En même temps, comme je l'ai mentionné précédemment, nous voulons nous assurer de transporter nos grains et nos autres produits aussi. Il faut trouver un juste équilibre, c'est ce qu'il faut faire. Je sais très bien que l'Alberta a besoin de transporter plus de pétrole et que c'est ce que la province désire faire jusqu'à ce que nous puissions accroître la capacité des pipelines.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Parlant de capacité des pipelines, pour aller dans la même veine que mon collègue, vous semblez aussi perdre la bataille à ce sujet auprès de la ministre McKenna. Un certain nombre d'intervenants nous ont dit devant le Comité, dans le cadre de nos déplacements partout au pays, que les initiatives comme la taxe sur le carbone sont néfastes pour leur compétitivité.

Est-ce des choses que vous soulevez au Cabinet, soit le fait que les intervenants que vous rencontrez vous parlent des mêmes problèmes?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Vous ne serez pas surpris d'apprendre que je ne suis pas nécessairement d'accord avec votre évaluation de la situation. Comme je l'ai dit, et comme mon gouvernement l'a dit plusieurs fois...

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Soyons clairs, monsieur le ministre. Avez-vous entendu dire ou non que la taxe sur le carbone nuit à la compétitivité?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Non, ce n'est pas ce que j'ai entendu.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Vous n'avez pas entendu des gens le dire?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Non, ce n'est pas arrivé.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Aucun intervenant ne vous a dit une telle chose?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Non, à part le parti conservateur qui formule de telles allégations.

(0900)

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Eh bien, c'est fantastique.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je crois que la plupart des Canadiens sont éclairés et qu'ils se rendent compte qu'il y a un coût associé à la pollution. Nous, au Canada, croyons qu'il est possible, en fait, de promouvoir l'économie tout en étant responsable.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Mais vous exemptez les plus grands émetteurs. Je crois que le secrétaire parlementaire a même admis, durant la période de questions, l'autre jour, que le gouvernement chasse les investissements. Comment pouvez-vous être assis ici aujourd'hui et dire que vous n'avez entendu personne dire que la taxe sur le carbone nuit à la compétitivité des entreprises canadiennes, ici, au Canada?

Je vous invite à jeter un coup d'oeil aux manifestations qui ont eu lieu en Alberta. Mille personnes dans les rues de Calgary disaient exactement la même chose. Ils sont au chômage. Ce sont des familles qui se retrouvent ainsi avant le temps des Fêtes. Ces gens blâment directement des initiatives comme la taxe sur le carbone et votre moratoire sur les pétroliers, des initiatives qui continuent de faire fuir les entreprises à l'étranger. Vous êtes assis ici aujourd'hui et vous nous dites que personne ne vous a jamais dit que la taxe sur le carbone nuisait aux entreprises.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Eh bien, vous n'étiez pas ici il y a trois ans — j'étais ici — lorsque le gouvernement antérieur était au pouvoir.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Je suis heureux que vous suiviez de si près ma carrière politique, monsieur le ministre.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Il n'a rien fait. Il avait cette idée fantaisiste, l'approche sectorielle, avec laquelle il n'a jamais rien fait.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Donc Catherine McKenna...

L'hon. Marc Garneau: Laissez-moi terminer.

M. Matt Jeneroux: ... vous donne essentiellement vos notes d'allocution à ce sujet.

La présidente:

Veuillez laisser le ministre terminer, s'il vous plaît.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Il y a deux provinces, la Colombie-Britannique et le Québec, qui ont fait preuve de leadership en ce qui concerne la tarification de la pollution. Si vous regardez leur économie aujourd'hui, vous vous rendrez compte que cela ne leur a pas nui. En fait, leur situation s'est améliorée.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Vous exemptez les plus grands émetteurs, monsieur le ministre.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Vous ne vous fondez pas sur des faits. Ce sont des hypothèses erronées de votre part, parce que ces économies qui ont adopté une approche responsable en matière de pollution et d'économie...

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Vous exemptez les plus grands émetteurs, monsieur le ministre.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

... se portent en fait beaucoup mieux

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Benson, vous avez trois minutes.

Mme Sheri Benson:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais vous demander, monsieur le ministre, si vous pouviez fournir au Comité plus de renseignements sur le mandat du groupe de travail qui se penchera sur la question du transport dans l'Ouest canadien. Greyhound a mis fin à ses services, ce dont vous avez parlé, et je me demande quel genre d'intervenants seront là. En outre, je vous encourage à inclure une représentation régionale. Je me pose des questions sur l'échéancier et le résultat escompté du groupe de travail. J'aimerais encourager ce groupe de travail à réfléchir aux normes de service et de sécurité lorsqu'il est question de transport par autobus.

J'aimerais vous parler, monsieur le ministre, du fait que j'ai entendu des gens dans ma province me parler de certains des services d'autocars en place dans l'Ouest canadien; on fait parfois descendre des gens sur le bord de l'autoroute. Ce n'est pas sécuritaire. Je sais que vous allez être d'accord avec moi.

Je me demande aussi si vous pourriez nous dire quelles collectivités autochtones ont formulé des propositions pour offrir des services d'autocars dans leurs collectivités ou dans les collectivités environnantes.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Vous m'avez posé beaucoup de questions. Je ne sais pas si je pourrai répondre à toutes.

Mon sous-ministre vous parlera du groupe de travail. Je peux vous parler de sécurité. En ce qui concerne un dialogue avec les groupes autochtones, nous pourrons vous fournir plus tard l'information à ce sujet. C'est un dossier mené par ISDE et Services aux Autochtones Canada. Nous pourrons vous revenir là-dessus.

Allez-y, monsieur le sous-ministre.

M. Michael Keenan (sous-ministre, ministère des Transports):

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Comme le ministre l'a indiqué, il m'a demandé de travailler avec nos homologues provinciaux responsables des Transports pour élaborer des mesures immédiates qui ont été mises en place le jour même où Greyhound a mis fin à certains services d'autocars de façon à assurer une certaine transition.

Nos ministres nous ont aussi demandé de commencer à travailler sur l'avenir du transport à long terme. Pour l'instant, nous avons surtout mis l'accent dans le cadre de nos travaux sur le défi immédiat de la transition. Le groupe de travail a consacré à ce dossier quasiment tous ses efforts. Maintenant que c'est fait, la transition est en cours. Nous avons commencé à parler de la façon dont nous travaillerons en collaboration pour élaborer un programme à long terme et sur la façon dont nous mobiliserons les principales collectivités dans ces dossiers. Vous en verrez les résultats au cours des prochains mois.

Mme Sheri Benson:

Le groupe de travail tiendra-t-il compte du fait que... Si vous passez à la prochaine étape, qu'en est-il des collectivités qui n'ont pas de service d'autocars?

M. Michael Keenan:

Je pense que c'est exactement le genre de questions que nous allons nous poser. Nous avons examiné les défis auxquels les collectivités sont confrontées et ceux auxquels font face les différents membres de ces collectivités, particulièrement ceux qui font face à des obstacles en matière de transport parce qu'ils ne conduisent pas, qu'ils ont des problèmes de mobilité ou autre chose.

Je vais être franc. Nous venons de commencer cette conversation sur la façon dont nous travaillerons à l'avenir, parce que, pour l'instant, nous nous étions vraiment concentrés sur le défi à court terme et la façon de s'y attaquer.

(0905)

Mme Sheri Benson:

Est-ce possible de fournir au Comité des renseignements sur ce que vous avez fait et qui est membre du comité? J'ai eu beaucoup de difficulté à obtenir de l'information afin de savoir exactement ce qui se passe depuis l'annonce en juillet.

M. Michael Keenan:

À l'heure actuelle, le comité est composé de sous-ministres. Il y a un comité des sous-ministres des Transports et un sous-comité de travail composé de fonctionnaires. Le comité est composé, essentiellement, de moi et de mes collègues des ministères des Transports de tout le Canada; c'est là où nous en sommes actuellement. Nous définissons un programme de travail qui inclura de la mobilisation, et l'élaboration de ce plan de travail est en cours.

En ce qui concerne la mobilisation des collectivités autochtones, nous avons des collègues, ici, de Services aux Autochtones Canada et de RCAANC. Ils voudront peut-être formuler des commentaires sur les discussions et la mobilisation auprès des collectivités autochtones quant au fait de les soutenir en vue de la mise en place de services de transport.

Mme Sheilagh Murphy (sous-ministre adjointe, Terres et développement économique, ministère des Affaires indiennes et du Nord canadien):

Je serai heureuse de répondre.

Au cours des derniers mois, nous avons mobilisé les dirigeants d'organisations autochtones régionales et nationales et leur avons tendu la main. Ils s'intéressent à l'idée de solutions d'affaires dirigées par les Autochtones. On ne nous a pas fait part d'un intérêt actif à poursuivre ce genre de propositions pour l'instant.

Nous créons un groupe de travail avec le Conseil canadien pour le commerce autochtone, l'Association nationale des sociétés autochtones de financement, l'AFAC et d'autres entités pour travailler en collaboration avec les organisations autochtones régionales et nationales et essayer de définir là où il y a peut-être un intérêt. On en est au tout début, mais nous avons l'intention d'effectuer ce travail au cours des deux ou trois prochains mois. Si des entreprises se présentent — il y a probablement déjà des entreprises touristiques qui oeuvrent dans le domaine du transport et qui pourraient être intéressées —, alors nous travaillerons avec ces entreprises ou ces collectivités autochtones pour trouver des solutions.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant passer à Mme Block pour cinq minutes.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Transports Canada demande près de 10,4 millions de dollars de fonds dans l'actuel budget des dépenses. C'est la combinaison des crédits 1a, 5a et 15a, ce qui inclut des contributions « pour appuyer la participation de groupes autochtones dans le système de protection de la navigation et la mise sur pied de groupes consultatifs autochtones ».

Monsieur le ministre, votre gouvernement fait déjà face à une poursuite de la bande indienne des Lax Kw'alaams en raison d'un manque de consultations avant la présentation du projet de loi C-48. Comme tout le monde le sait — mais c'est souvent quelque chose qu'on tente de cacher —, nous avons entendu à nouveau devant le Comité mardi dernier des témoins dire que les groupes environnementaux américains avaient versé de l'argent à des organisations canadiennes pour qu'elles s'opposent à la mise en valeur des ressources et à l'expansion de la capacité des pipelines au Canada. Les mêmes groupes ont probablement eu un rôle à jouer dans la décision de votre gouvernement de présenter le projet de loi C-48 en premier lieu, puisqu'il n'y a pas de raison économique ou environnementale de le faire.

Dans le budget supplémentaire des dépenses, comme je l'ai dit, votre ministère demande 10,4 millions de dollars, et je me demande si vous pouvez nous parler des mesures qui seront prises pour que l'on puisse s'assurer que ces groupes consultatifs ne seront pas constitués ou influencés par des intérêts spéciaux financés par les Américains.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Merci de la question.

Je peux vous dire que ces consultations sont des consultations menées auprès d'organisations canadiennes et de groupes autochtones canadiens. Comme vous le savez, et comme vous l'avez mentionné dans le contexte du projet de loi C-48, il y a certaines Premières Nations côtières qui ne sont pas d'accord avec la décision du gouvernement concernant le moratoire, mais vous savez aussi qu'il y a des Premières Nations côtières en Colombie-Britannique qui sont d'accord à 100 % avec la décision qui a été prise. Récemment, en fait, elles ont témoigné devant le Comité sénatorial qui examine le projet de loi C-48. C'est là où le projet de loi est rendu actuellement.

C'est une situation extrêmement complexe, mais nous estimons que l'apport des groupes autochtones est extrêmement important. Est-ce que cela signifie d'obtenir l'unanimité? Non. C'est très difficile lorsqu'on parle à un grand nombre de Premières Nations côtières différentes ou un grand nombre de groupes autochtones, quel que soit le projet, y compris le pipeline TMX, d'obtenir un consentement unanime, mais nous sommes déterminés à continuer à consulter sérieusement les Premières Nations et, lorsque nous le pouvons, à essayer de dissiper leurs préoccupations.

(0910)

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup.

Je veux revenir sur ce que vous venez tout juste de dire au sujet de la poursuite des consultations. Durant notre étude du projet de loi C-48, nous avons en fait entendu un certain nombre de collectivités autochtones et, absolument, certaines soutiennent le projet de loi C-48, tandis qu'un certain nombre ne le soutiennent pas. Cependant, ce qui était unanime selon les témoins, c'est qu'ils n'avaient pas été consultés avant la présentation du projet de loi -48. C'est quelque chose que je veux vous dire.

Je veux revenir sur la série de questions de mon collègue concernant la taxe sur le carbone. Nous savons qu'une exemption a été fournie à l'industrie aérienne dans le Nord, et donc, évidemment, c'est parce qu'on reconnaît la possibilité de répercussions négatives de la taxe sur le carbone sur cette industrie et sur les coûts d'exploitation dans le Nord. Je me demande si votre gouvernement envisage de fournir une telle exemption au reste de l'industrie à l'échelle du Canada.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Non. Ce n'est pas dans nos plans pour l'instant. Nous reconnaissons la situation particulière des petites compagnies aériennes régionales et nordiques ou les petites compagnies de transport aérien parce qu'elles ont des marges extrêmement faibles dans des situations très difficiles où, comme vous le savez, les coûts dans le Nord sont plus élevés dans un certain nombre de domaines. C'est quelque chose que nous avons reconnu.

Permettez-moi de vous poser la question: j'ai vraiment hâte d'entendre votre parti parler de votre plan, avec tout le respect que je vous dois, parce que vous avez dit être capable de respecter les cibles climatiques de l'Accord de Paris, mais vous n'avez pas encore dit comment vous allez faire. Vous avez en tête une solution magique sans douleur dont nous mourons d'envie d'entendre parler.

Mme Kelly Block:

Je suis sûre que vous allez en entendre parler après 2019.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Eh bien, pourquoi ne pas en parler maintenant?

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre Garneau.

Monsieur Hardie, allez-y, s'il vous plaît. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Ken Hardie:

Eh bien, ce doit être lié à ce puits magique... Non, passons à autre chose.

J'ai deux enjeux à aborder: le camionnage et VIA Rail.

Les conducteurs de camions, la formation, l'aptitude à conduire et la surveillance des entreprises de camionnage, surtout celles qui transportent des marchandises sur de longues distances, relèvent de votre domaine d'intérêt. Évidemment, des préoccupations ont été soulevées à la suite d'un certain nombre d'incidents très médiatisés, mais, au quotidien, vu la croissance du commerce, les déplacements des camions, la livraison juste à temps et beaucoup d'autres choses, quelles sont les tendances? Que constatez-vous? Que faisons-nous à ce sujet?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Merci.

Nous en faisons beaucoup. Nous avons annoncé la mise en place d'un contrôle électronique de la stabilité, ce qui est extrêmement important. Il faut en munir les camions parce que ce système aide à réduire au minimum la possibilité de renversement. C'est une technologie importante.

Nous avons aussi instauré des règlements qui obligent la mise en place de dispositifs d'enregistrement électronique. On veut ainsi s'assurer de la comptabilité précise du nombre d'heures passées sur la route par un camionneur, parce qu'il y a eu des allégations prouvées dans le passé selon lesquelles les conducteurs souffrent de fatigue lorsqu'ils dépassent le nombre d'heures maximal qu'ils peuvent passer sur la route. Ce genre de choses peut mener à des accidents. C'est un autre domaine où nous apportons des changements.

Une autre question a été soulevée récemment, malheureusement dans le contexte de la tragédie de Humboldt — c'était dans un reportage de CBC —, soit que la seule province canadienne qui impose des exigences de formation minimale au niveau d'entrée avant qu'un camionneur puisse passer le test, c'est l'Ontario. Il faut avoir 100 heures de formation avant de subir le test. Nous croyons que c'est une mesure qu'il faudrait mettre en place dans toutes les provinces. Il s'agit d'une compétence provinciale, mais c'est un dossier sur lequel j'ai demandé aux provinces de se pencher. Nous allons en discuter en janvier. Ce sont là les initiatives dans ce dossier.

Du côté du commerce, nous reconnaissons aussi que, lorsqu'un camion part de Halifax pour se rendre à Vancouver, il y a un ensemble de réglementations différentes qui s'appliquent lorsqu'il passe d'une province à l'autre, des règlements qui concernent le poids à vide sur les routes en tant que telles et l'utilisation possible de pneus larges. Ce sont des irritants ou des obstacles à la maximisation de nos échanges commerciaux. C'est un dossier sur lequel nous voulons travailler en collaboration avec les provinces afin d'améliorer le commerce à l'intérieur du Canada.

(0915)

M. Ken Hardie:

Un de mes électeurs s'est présenté à mon bureau pour me montrer son billet de train de VIA Rail. Il a en fait réussi à se faire rembourser la moitié de la valeur du billet. Il est parti de Vancouver pour se rendre dans la région de Yorkton—Melville. Il y a eu des retards considérables, dont un de sept heures, alors que des trains de marchandises en direction ouest se succédaient et transportaient toute cette marchandise à laquelle nous accordons beaucoup de valeur. À son retour, l'électeur a décidé d'oublier le train et de prendre un autobus Greyhound. Il s'est rendu jusqu'à Edmonton, puis on lui a dit: « C'est la fin de la ligne. Je ne sais pas si vous êtes à destination. ». Il a donc passé un très mauvais moment.

En ce qui concerne la fiabilité de VIA Rail au chapitre du temps de déplacement, particulièrement dans les provinces de l'Ouest, par rapport à celle du transport de marchandises, y a-t-il une stratégie en cours d'élaboration qui nous permettrait peut-être d'améliorer le rendement de VIA Rail?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Comme vous l'avez souligné, la plupart des déplacements de VIA Rail se font sur des chemins de fer de catégorie I, comme ceux du CN et du CP. D'après les ententes qui existent entre VIA et ces entreprises, il faut donner la priorité à ces trains de marchandises. Nous sommes ravis qu'il y ait plus de trains de marchandises qui transportent toutes ces importantes marchandises vers nos ports, mais il ne fait aucun doute que cela a une incidence sur les activités de VIA.

VIA est préoccupée, à juste titre, et examine actuellement la situation pour déterminer si une meilleure entente permettrait de réduire au minimum ces retards très importants, qui s'aggravent en hiver lorsque les conditions météorologiques sont difficiles. Il s'agit d'une question préoccupante, et VIA Rail s'y intéresse. À ce moment-ci, je n'ai rien de plus à ajouter.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre.

Nous allons céder la parole à M. Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NPD):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Monsieur le ministre, merci d'être parmi nous ce matin.

La dernière fois que j'ai eu la chance de vous voir, vous étiez chez nous, à Trois-Rivières, pour un forum particulier de l'UMQ, où des spécialistes du développement du transport ferroviaire s'étaient réunis pour vous entendre. Sans vouloir vous faire de peine, je dois avouer que j'ai été un peu déçu par votre discours. Vous avez consacré l'ensemble de vos propos à la sécurité ferroviaire. Il s'agit d'un sujet important, certes, mais nous aurions souhaité vous entendre parler de votre vision du développement du système ferroviaire. Par exemple, nous aurions aimé en entendre davantage sur l'élargissement des services ferroviaires passagers et sur les accommodements possibles avec le gouvernement du Québec quant à l'électrification des transports. Vous n'en avez pas touché mot.

Permettez-moi donc que je vous pose sous forme de question le souhait exprimé par les représentants de l'UMQ à la toute fin de votre conférence. Est-ce que votre gouvernement concrétisera sous peu le projet de train à grande fréquence de VIA Rail, ou en fera-t-il un enjeu lors d'une prochaine campagne électorale?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Merci de votre question.

Je sais que vous suivez ce dossier de très près. Ce n'est pas surprenant, puisque vous êtes de Trois-Rivières.

Une des possibilités que nous sommes en train d'examiner est le train à grande fréquence dans le corridor entre Québec et Montréal, en passant par Trois-Rivières. Ce que j'ai eu l'occasion de dire durant la belle journée que j'ai passée à Trois-Rivières à parler dans plusieurs forums, c'est que nous sommes à un stade avancé de notre étude de cette question.

M. Robert Aubin:

Est-ce suffisamment avancé, monsieur le ministre, pour que vous puissiez au moins nous dire quand vous ferez une annonce: dans une semaine, dans un mois, avant Noël, d'ici l'élection?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Je sais que vous êtes impatient, monsieur Aubin. Vous mentionnez tout le temps que vous voudriez avoir une réponse demain. Cependant, en tant que gouvernement, nous avons des responsabilités. Nous parlons d'un engagement qui pourrait être très important, et il s'agit de l'argent des contribuables. Je sais que vous aussi, vous vous préoccupez de l'argent des contribuables.

(0920)

M. Robert Aubin:

Tout à fait.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Nous devons bien sûr explorer des questions comme la viabilité d'un service comme celui-là, l'achalandage...

M. Robert Aubin:

Je comprends bien que je n'aurai pas de réponse ce matin, monsieur le ministre.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Non, mais vous comprenez aussi que nous devons faire nos devoirs et c'est ce que nous sommes en train de faire.

M. Robert Aubin:

D'accord.

En parlant de l'argent des contribuables, vous ouvrez la porte à ma prochain question. Une rumeur de plus en plus persistante veut que le contrat de renouvellement de la flotte de VIA Rail soit accordé à une compagnie allemande qui construirait les trains aux États-Unis, mais dont l'ingénierie se ferait en Allemagne. Cela revient à dire que ce contrat de près de 1 milliard de dollars de fonds publics n'entraînera aucune retombée canadienne ni aucune garantie de conserver ou de créer des emplois au Canada. Cela me pose un gros problème.

Ne croyez-vous pas que, dans des contrats où vous utilisez des fonds publics, comme celui du renouvellement de la flotte de VIA Rail, vous pourriez vous permettre, à l'instar de bon nombre d'autres pays, de garantir un pourcentage de contenu canadien?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Vous comprendrez que je ne peux pas commenter des rumeurs.

Cela dit, vous savez que VIA Rail est une société d'État. Quand j'ai annoncé, il y a un an, que VIA Rail allait remplacer sa flotte et lancer un appel d'offres pour trouver le meilleur fournisseur possible, j'ai encore une fois rappelé que ce qui était important, c'était la performance et le prix, afin de dépenser adéquatement l'argent des contribuables. C'est un projet qui...

M. Robert Aubin:

Vous me dites que l'appel d'offres exclut le contenu canadien?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

J'y arrive, attendez.

Ce processus est mené indépendamment par VIA Rail. Même si, en parallèle, nous assurons une certaine transparence, ce sont les gens de VIA Rail qui prennent la décision, car ce sont eux les experts.

Je sais que votre parti n'est pas en faveur des traités de libre-échange, mais nous avons une obligation d'ouvrir à tout le monde les appels d'offres du gouvernement fédéral. Ce n'est pas la même chose au provincial. Dans un projet comme celui-ci, nous ne pouvons pas inclure de clauses qui favoriseraient des compagnies canadiennes. Si nous le faisions, nous ne respecterions pas nos engagements. D'ailleurs, cela s'applique dans les deux sens: nos partenaires commerciaux ont la même obligation. Il faut donc respecter nos engagements, parce que nous sommes un pays qui croit au principe de libre-échange et de commerce avec le reste du monde. Dans le cas présent, nous ne pouvons pas stipuler un pourcentage de contenu canadien.

M. Robert Aubin:

C'est quand même curieux que d'autres pays avec lesquels nous avons des traités le fassent.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Nous espérons qu'il va y avoir du contenu canadien, mais nous ne pouvons pas le stipuler. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci à vous deux.

Nous allons écouter M. Badawey, pendant deux minutes.

M. Vance Badawey:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je tiens à préciser que nous sommes impatients de voir le ministre de l'Infrastructure venir témoigner ici le 6 décembre. Je suis certain que la discussion se poursuivra alors avec M. Champagne.

J'aimerais profiter de l'occasion pour remercier le Comité, particulièrement nos collègues libéraux, de même que MM. Jeneroux, Liepert et Aubin du Parti conservateur et du NPD, d'être venus à Niagara et d'avoir reconnu l'importance du corridor de commerce Niagara–Hamilton et les actifs qui s'y rattachent. Nous nous trouvons à une journée de route des centres qui génèrent plus de 44 % des revenus annuels du continent nord-américain — New York, Baltimore, Washington, Philadelphie, Pittsburgh; et, dans la région de l'Ohio, Cleveland et Toledo; de même que Detroit, Chicago, Indianapolis, et bien sûr, la région du Grand Toronto, en Ontario, et Montréal.

Pour cette raison, et vu la solidité passée, présente et future de ce corridor de commerce, particulièrement à la lumière des investissements que nous cherchons à y faire, de tous les travaux réalisés par l'ensemble des partenaires du corridor Niagara–Hamilton et de certains des investissements qui sont faits, y compris celui qui a été annoncé par le ministre l'autre jour à Hamilton, j'aimerais demander au ministre quelles sont ses attentes à notre égard alors que nous collaborons avec l'équipe de la région Niagara-Hamilton pour renforcer ce corridor de commerce.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Merci de votre question, monsieur Badawey.

Je pense que la péninsule du Niagara présente un fort potentiel. Nous parlons d'une densité de population très élevée dans cette région du Canada. On y fait beaucoup de commerce, pas seulement avec les camions qui traversent la frontière, mais aussi par la voie maritime du Saint-Laurent, que l'on n'exploite pas suffisamment selon moi. Il y a un potentiel incroyable dans cette région. Je pense que nos activités portuaires et maritimes ainsi que nos corridors de commerce terrestres présentent un potentiel de croissance.

J'espère que nous allons continuer de collaborer avec vous et vos collègues pour déterminer comment nous pouvons dépenser judicieusement l'argent afin d'accroître cette capacité. Parallèlement, nous tenons toujours compte du fait qu'il faut examiner tous les autres facteurs, comme l'environnement.

Il y a tout un potentiel qui n'a pas été exploité. Nous étions ravis de faire cette annonce au port d'Hamilton; je pense qu'il s'agit de bonnes nouvelles. Je salue cette vision axée sur l'avenir au chapitre de la croissance.

(0925)

La présidente:

Merci.

Monsieur Graham, avez-vous une brève question à poser?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si vous me le permettez, je peux en poser une.

Il y a un sujet que j'aimerais aborder. C'est une bonne façon de terminer la séance.

Il y a un certain nombre d'entreprises dans le monde qui travaillent sur des voitures volantes. Transports Canada réfléchit-il aux règlements nécessaires pour faire en sorte que cela se concrétise?

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

C'est une bonne question. En fait, j'ai reçu il y a quelque temps la visite d'une entreprise qui fabrique une voiture volante. On dirait un terme fantaisiste — une voiture volante —, mais j'ai vu...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'en veux une.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Oui. J'ai vu une vidéo de démonstration, et c'était très impressionnant. La voiture fonctionnait à l'électricité également.

Il s'agit d'un aspect qu'il faut examiner non seulement du point de vue de la sécurité, mais également du point de vue de la réglementation. Nous sommes en train de parler de l'avenir, mais si les gens d'Orléans décident soudainement de venir ici pour travailler au centre-ville d'Ottawa, et qu'il y a toutes ces voitures volantes qui arrivent — comme on le voit sans arrêt dans les films de science-fiction —, il y a un important volet lié à la sécurité. Il ne s'agirait pas d'un enjeu uniquement fédéral; il faudrait aussi appliquer le Code de la route à l'échelle provinciale et municipale, alors qu'il s'applique normalement à l'échelle provinciale. Dans ce cas-ci, les règles de l'air joueraient un rôle important.

Il ne s'agit pas simplement de science-fiction. C'est quelque chose qui se concrétisera un jour.

La présidente:

Merci.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Madame la présidente, je vais conclure en disant qu'il y a 67 projets au Mississauga, lesquels totalisent plus de 97 millions de dollars.

La présidente:

Nous vous serions reconnaissants si vous pouviez soumettre ces renseignements au Comité.

Il nous reste une minute, et M. Liepert a une question à poser avant que le ministre nous quitte pour une réunion du Cabinet. Vous avez une minute.

M. Ron Liepert:

J'aimerais conclure en réglant la question du plan environnemental des libéraux.

D'après ce que vous dites, nous exonérons les petites compagnies aériennes de la taxe sur le carbone parce que leurs marges de profit sont minces. Nous imposerons une taxe sur le carbone aux grandes compagnies aériennes. Nous l'imposerons aussi aux petites entreprises, même si leurs profits sont modestes, mais nous dispenserons 90 % des grands émetteurs, car, pour reprendre les mots du secrétaire parlementaire, ils quitteraient le Canada si on leur imposait une taxe sur le carbone, ce qui serait néfaste pour l'emploi. Donc, nous utilisons les cibles d'émissions de Stephen Harper.

C'est ce que je comprends du plan environnemental des libéraux. Cela ne m'effraie pas tellement. Voilà ce qui me préoccupe: j'aimerais savoir si vous ou votre ministère avez réalisé une étude d'impact quant à l'incidence d'une telle taxe sur le transport et sur le monde des affaires qui dépend du transport, dans le cadre de la discussion qui a mené à la taxe sur le carbone.

Si vous l'avez fait, pourriez-vous la déposer auprès du Comité? Si vous ne l'avez pas fait, allez-vous admettre que vous avez simplement fait le mort devant la ministre de l'Environnement et les responsables de l'énergie, des transports et du gouvernement actuel?

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Liepert.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Monsieur Liepert, je sais que vous essayez de faire valoir un point, mais je dois ajouter que M. Harper n'avait que quelques chiffres. En fait, il n'avait pas de plan...

M. Ron Liepert:

Il s'agissait de ses cibles...

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Il n'avait pas de plan...

M. Ron Liepert:

Vous utilisez ses cibles d'émissions, monsieur le ministre...

La présidente:

Je vous prie de laisser le ministre répondre.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Il n'avait pas de plan. Je vous exhorte de nouveau à nous fournir ce plan.

En outre, il y a deux volets au sujet des compagnies aériennes. Un est interne, et on y aborde la tarification de la pollution. Il y a aussi le volet international, qui est pris en charge par l'Organisation internationale de l'aviation civile. Le Canada a joué un rôle important à cet égard, car les voyages internationaux ne sont pas visés par le budget canadien d'émissions de gaz à effet de serre.

Le Canada a pris les devants à ce chapitre, car 2 % des gaz à effet de serre sur la planète viennent du transport aérien international. Je suis très fier du rôle qu'a joué le Canada, avec l'approbation d'autres pays, en assumant sa part de responsabilité quant à la production de gaz à effet de serre.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre Garneau, particulièrement de nous avoir accordé 90 minutes de votre temps, en compagnie de vos fonctionnaires. Je sais que vous avez une réunion du Cabinet, donc sentez-vous bien libre de partir maintenant.

L’hon. Marc Garneau:

Merci.

La présidente:

Conformément à l'article 8(5) du Règlement, le Comité va maintenant terminer l'étude du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (A) pour l'exercice se terminant le 31 mars 2019, sous la rubrique Transports Canada. Il s'agit du crédit 1a sous la rubrique Administration canadienne de la sûreté du transport aérien, des crédits 1a, 5a, 10a, 15a et 20a sous la rubrique Ministère des transports et du crédit 1a sous la rubrique Office des transports du Canada.

Ai-je le consentement unanime des membres pour que l'on traite tous les crédits en une seule motion?

Des députés: D'accord. ç ADMINISTRATION CANADIENNE DE LA SÛRETÉ DU TRANSPORT AÉRIEN ç Crédit 1a — Paiements à l'Administration pour les dépenses de fonctionnement et les dépenses en capital......... 36 038 397 $

(Le crédit 1a est adopté avec dissidence.) ç OFFICE DES TRANSPORTS DU CANADA ç Crédit 1a — Dépenses du programme............ 1 671 892 $

(Le crédit 1a est adopté avec dissidence.) MINISTÈRE DES TRANSPORTS Crédit 1a — Dépenses de fonctionnement....... 10 927 693 $ ç Crédit 5a — Dépenses en capital.................... 1 438 265 $ ç Crédit 10a — Subventions et contributions — Réseau de transport efficace................6 049 065 $ ç Crédit 15a — Subventions et contributions — Réseau de transport écologique et novateur.......................3 131 670 $ ç Crédit 20a — Subventions et contributions — Réseau de transport sûr et sécuritaire...............10 549 935 $

(Les crédits 1a, 5a, 10a, 15a et 20a sont adoptés avec dissidence.)

La présidente: Dois-je faire rapport sur ces crédits à la Chambre?

Des députés: Oui.

La présidente: Merci beaucoup à vous tous.

Je remercie les fonctionnaires de leur présence.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pendant quelques minutes afin que nos autres témoins puissent prendre place.

(0930)

(0940)

La présidente:

Nous allons reprendre nos travaux.

Conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement, nous faisons une évaluation de l'incidence du bruit des avions près des grands aéroports canadiens.

Bienvenue aux témoins. Merci d'être ici. À tout le moins, les conditions météorologiques étaient suffisamment favorables pour que vous puissiez comparaître. Qui sait si vous retournerez à la maison ou non, mais à tout le moins, vous êtes ici.

Nous accueillons Jeff Knoll, conseiller de la Ville d'Oakville et de la Municipalité régionale de Halton.

Nous recevons Hillary Marshall, vice-présidente, Relations avec les parties prenantes et communications; Michael Bélanger, directeur, Programmes d'aviation et conformité; et Robyn Connelly, directrice, Relations communautaires, tous de l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto.

Nous recevons Renee Jacoby, présidente fondatrice, et Sandra Best, présidente actuelle, du Toronto Aviation Noise Group.

Monsieur Knoll, nous allons commencer par vous. Veuillez limiter vos commentaires à cinq minutes, car le Comité a toujours beaucoup de questions. Merci.

M. Jeff Knoll (conseiller municipal et régional, Ville d'Oakville et Municipalité régionale de Halton, Région de Halton):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Mesdames et messieurs, je vous remercie de l'occasion de comparaître devant le Comité permanent à l'occasion de la séance d'aujourd'hui. Je m'appelle Jeff Knoll, et je comparais à titre de membre de longue date du conseil de la Ville d'Oakville et du conseil régional, au sein desquels je représente les gens du quartier 5. Je suis également représentant de Halton au Comité consultatif communautaire sur l'environnement et le bruit — qu'on appelle le CENAC — de l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto.

Dans le cadre de mon travail au sein de ce comité, je participe très activement aux activités touchant la question du bruit des aéronefs et des conséquences qui en découlent sur les résidants de Halton. Comme vous le savez peut-être, la région de Halton comprend la ville de Burlington et les villes de Halton Hills, d'Oakville et de Milton. Notre collectivité est en croissance, et sa population s'élève à plus de 548 000 personnes; elle est située à seulement 15 kilomètres à l'ouest de l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto.

Nous reconnaissons le rôle de Pearson comme moteur économique et porte d'accès internationale qui lie les Canadiens au reste du monde. Chaque jour, des milliers de résidants de Halton se rendent à Pearson afin d'y travailler et de voyager pour affaires et par plaisir.

Cependant, en tant que représentant municipal élu dont la circonscription est profondément touchée par le bruit des aéronefs, je comparais devant vous afin de soutenir que nous n'avons pas atteint le bon équilibre entre, d'un côté, l'exploitation continue et les plans de croissance à venir de Pearson, et, de l'autre, les conséquences qui en découlent sur les résidants de Halton.

J'ajoute que le bruit des aéronefs nuit grandement au bien-être des résidents de la région. J'entends constamment des résidants de mon quartier et de partout dans la région l'affirmer.

Récemment, quand j'ai fait du porte-à-porte et que j'ai parlé à mes électeurs durant les élections municipales de cet automne, nous devions souvent interrompre nos conversations pendant que des aéronefs vrombissaient au-dessus de nos têtes. À ce moment-là, il était inutile d'en dire plus, car l'un des problèmes clés dans mon quartier nous survolait directement.

D'aucuns pourraient affirmer que ces résidants auraient dû réfléchir à cela lorsqu'ils ont choisi de vivre dans une collectivité située sous un corridor aérien. Dans le cas d'Oakville-Nord, ce quartier n'était pas sous un corridor aérien jusqu'à il y a à peine six ans. Les changements apportés au parcours vent arrière, les incessants survols lents et à basse altitude, et le bruit et la nuisance qui en découlent ont été imposés à ces quartiers établis à la suite des modifications apportées en 2012 aux trajectoires de vol par Nav Canada, lesquelles, je pourrais ajouter, ont été apportés sans aucune consultation, pratiquement sans préavis.

Je devrais mentionner que les plaintes concernant le bruit que reçoivent les représentants élus proviennent de partout dans la collectivité de Halton. Récemment, j'ai été invité à prendre la parole à l'occasion d'une réunion sur le bruit des aéronefs tenue à Milton. Nous regardions d'un air incrédule les aéronefs se succéder pour survoler et ébranler le petit centre communautaire, avant d'effectuer une bruyante descente finale vers l'aéroport, comme s'ils voulaient souligner l'objet même du rassemblement.

À Halton, le bruit des aéronefs nuit à la capacité de nos résidants d'aller dehors et d'utiliser leurs cours, de profiter des parcs et des sentiers de randonnée de la ville, de parler avec leurs voisins ou d'obtenir une nuit de sommeil complète. En bref, le bruit des aéronefs compromet la qualité de vie de nos résidants.

Je dois reconnaître qu'au cours des dernières années, des mesures positives ont été prises à l'égard de ce problème, notamment trois études majeures effectuées par l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto et Nav Canada. Toutefois, même s'ils apprécient ces initiatives, les résidants ne sont pas satisfaits de la cadence de la mise en oeuvre des mesures d'atténuation proposées qui ressortent de ces études. Ils veulent du répit maintenant et en ont besoin, surtout que l'aéroport aspire à devenir un supercentre par lequel transiteront un nombre prévu de 85 millions de passagers en 2037, par rapport à 47 millions aujourd'hui.

Le temps dont je dispose aujourd'hui est très limité, alors je soumettrai au Comité des commentaires et suggestions supplémentaires par écrit, mais je veux soulever une dernière question avant de conclure.

L'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto intervient auprès des aéroports régionaux du Sud de l'Ontario dans le but de solidifier le rôle de Pearson en tant que principal centre international, tandis que les aéroports régionaux fournissent des services complémentaires de transport de passagers et de marchandises. Bien qu'il s'agisse d'un but potentiellement positif, il soulève la question de savoir si les partenariats avec les administrations, la structure de responsabilisation et les incitatifs appropriés sont en place pour garantir que l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto tiendra adéquatement compte du bruit des aéronefs, en plus des intérêts économiques de Pearson.

Nous avons besoin de la participation de tous les ordres de gouvernement, et peut-être que Transports Canada pourrait jouer le rôle principal, afin de faciliter la planification à long terme et l'établissement d'itinéraires par les aéroports du Sud de l'Ontario, un processus qui doit être axé sur un résultat triple de responsabilité sociale, de valeur économique et d'impact environnemental.

De plus, je voudrais mentionner qu'il est temps que le gouvernement envisage la construction d'un deuxième aéroport majeur dans la RGT, peut-être en utilisant les terres de Pickering qui avaient été mises de côté à cette fin même il y a plus de 50 ans. Une telle initiative étendrait la circulation d'aéronefs et de véhicules, ainsi que les avantages associés au développement économique, vers l'Est de la RGT.

Madame la présidente, en tant que représentants élus, nous devons constamment relever le défi de trouver le bon équilibre entre des intérêts parfois intrinsèquement opposés. Dans le cas de l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto — le plus grand aéroport du Canada — et des collectivités qui l'entourent, nous sommes dans une situation où nous n'atteignons pas l'équilibre entre les impératifs économiques de Pearson et les conséquences du bruit des aéronefs sur notre collectivité. Si nous ne pouvons pas établir cet équilibre, nous courons réellement le risque d'observer l'érosion continue et permanente de la qualité de vie dans Halton et partout au Canada, une perspective qui ne sert les intérêts d'aucune administration ni d'aucun gouvernement.

Merci de votre temps.

(0945)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Knoll.

Madame Marshall, vous disposez de cinq minutes; allez-y.

Mme Hillary Marshall (vice-présidente, Relations avec les parties prenantes et communications, Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto):

Madame la présidente, mesdames et messieurs, bonjour.

Je m'appelle Hillary Marshall, et je suis vice-présidente des relations avec les parties prenantes et des communications pour l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto. Robyn Connelly, directrice des relations communautaires — son bureau gère les programmes relatifs au bruit —, et Mike Bélanger, directeur des programmes d'aviation et de la conformité, m'accompagnent.

Je vous remercie de l'occasion de présenter un exposé aujourd'hui et du travail qu'entreprend le Comité dans le but de comprendre les conséquences du bruit. L'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto partage cet objectif.

L'aéroport Pearson de Toronto travaille à la réalisation d'une vision audacieuse: être le meilleur aéroport au monde. Aujourd'hui, nous sommes le cinquième aéroport en importance au monde en ce qui a trait aux liaisons, et nous jouons un rôle crucial pour ce qui est de relier les villes canadiennes et de les lier au reste du monde. Aujourd'hui, un Canadien sur cinq utilise l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto pour voyager par avion. Nous croyons que, grâce à notre connectivité, le fait d'être le meilleur aéroport au monde commence près de chez nous, à travailler main dans la main avec notre collectivité et en collaboration avec nos partenaires de l'aviation et des experts de l'industrie.

Aujourd'hui, je voudrais vous parler de quelques-unes des initiatives que nous avons élaborées en collaboration avec nos partenaires de la collectivité et de l'industrie.

Tous les cinq ans, nous élaborons un plan d'action pour la gestion du bruit, qui expose la façon dont nous allons atténuer le bruit au cours d'un cycle quinquennal. Voici ce que nous avons accompli dans le cadre de notre plan d'action pour la gestion du bruit précédent: nous avons retiré la frontière de 10 milles nautiques qui limitait les lieux d'où nous acceptions les plaintes concernant le bruit; c'est le conseiller Knoll d'Oakville, dont vous venez tout juste d'entendre le témoignage, qui a fait la promotion de cette initiative particulière, et il a également exercé des pressions dans le but d'étendre l'adhésion au comité afin d'inclure les régions de York, de Durham et de Halton. Nous avons également entrepris un examen des emplacements des terminaux de surveillance du bruit de notre système et en avons ajouté 8, pour un total de 25.

Notre plan d'action pour la gestion du bruit de 2018-2022 est encore plus ambitieux. Il contient 10 engagements qui feront de l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto un chef de file en matière de gestion du bruit lié à l'aviation. Nous avons créé ce plan à la suite d'une étude des pratiques exemplaires internationales de 26 aéroports comparables de partout dans le monde. L'étude a été menée pour nous par Helios, dont vous entendrez le témoignage à une date ultérieure, à ce que je crois savoir. De plus, nous avons mobilisé plus de 3 000 résidants afin qu'ils nous aident à façonner le plan en nous donnant leurs commentaires dans le cadre d'ateliers, et nous avons réuni un groupe de référence dirigé par des résidants précisément dans le but qu'ils fournissent des commentaires sur le bruit et sur la croissance de l'aéroport. Ce plan a été bien reçu par la collectivité et par les groupes de résidants, et nous prenons maintenant des mesures dans le but de le mettre en oeuvre. Dans le cadre de notre mise en oeuvre, nous continuons à tenir notre collectivité et nos résidants partenaires au courant de la situation, de même que nos représentants élus.

Le programme incitatif pour une flotte aérienne plus silencieuse est une initiative clé de notre plan; il cible le bruit des aéronefs. La famille d'aéronefs A-320 produit un gémissement aigu lié à l'entrée d'air. Ce bruit peut être éliminé grâce à une simple mise à niveau. Des entreprises de transport aérien de partout dans le monde, comme Lufthansa, Air France, British Airways et EasyJet, ont déjà apporté cette modification. Nous avons écrit à nos transporteurs et sommes intervenus auprès d'eux afin de leur demander leur appui et de les aviser que nous mettrons en place un programme incitatif en 2020. Nous continuons à travailler avec nos partenaires du transport aérien afin de réaliser ce projet dès que possible.

En 2015, nous avons commencé à travailler avec NavCan à l'élaboration de ce qu'on appelle maintenant les « six idées », lesquelles sont conçues précisément pour réduire le bruit dans nos collectivités adjacentes. Une description de ces six idées vous a été fournie, mais je voudrais prendre un instant pour en souligner quelques-unes.

Les idées 1 et 2 ont été mises en oeuvre le 8 novembre par Nav Canada. Il s'agit de nouveaux corridors aériens de nuit pour les aéronefs en cours d'approche et au départ. L'idée 5 suppose l'utilisation des pistes est et ouest en alternance la fin de semaine afin d'offrir un certain répit prévisible aux collectivités au moment de l'approche finale ou du départ. Ce programme a été mis à l'essai l'été dernier. Nous examinons les résultats, et nous avons hâte de les rendre publics sous peu.

Conformément aux lignes directrices du Protocole de communications et de consultation sur les modifications à l'espace aérien, nos partenaires communautaires ont participé à toutes les étapes de cette étude de trois ans. Au cours de la dernière année seulement, nous avons joint 2,9 millions de résidants au moyen d'annonces imprimées, avons obtenu 250 000 visites en ligne et avons communiqué avec 160 000 personnes par téléphone. Environ 1 000 personnes ont participé directement aux sondages. Nous avons également rencontré des représentants élus tout au long du processus afin de nous assurer qu'ils disposaient d'information leur permettant de répondre aux questions et de dissiper les préoccupations des membres de leur collectivité.

Nous observons des répercussions positives ainsi qu'une réaction favorable de la collectivité. En plus de travailler avec nos partenaires de la collectivité et de l'industrie, nous avons également mobilisé des experts dans le domaine de la gestion du bruit et de la nuisance afin qu'ils orientent nos travaux. Nous travaillons avec l'Université de Windsor afin de comprendre la nuisance sonore. Le Comité a entendu plus tôt le témoignage de M. Novak, professeur, et de Julia Jovanovik, doctorante. Nous appuyons leur recherche dans le but de mieux comprendre comment la collectivité subit les effets du bruit et comment nous pouvons mieux travailler pour atténuer ce bruit. Nous avons également retenu les services d'Helios afin que ses responsables soient nos consultants techniques relativement à l'exécution de notre plan d'action quinquennal sur la gestion du bruit. Leur rôle consiste à nous aider à trouver des solutions responsables et novatrices qui sont fondées sur les pratiques exemplaires internationales.

En conclusion, l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto cherche continuellement des façons de gérer son bruit et sa nuisance. Nous le faisons en établissant un équilibre entre notre engagement envers nos voisins et la poursuite de notre vision consistant à faire de l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto le meilleur au monde. En 2017, nous avons accueilli plus de 47 millions de passagers et employé directement près de 50 000 personnes à notre aéroport. Notre zone d'emploi est la deuxième en importance au pays, et l'aéroport contribue à plus de 6 % du PIB de l'Ontario.

La croissance de l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto est importante pour les emplois et le développement économique à venir. Nous savons qu'il est impossible d'y arriver sans l'aide de nos voisins et de nos partenaires. Nous trimons dur afin de trouver un moyen de nous faire tous croître et prospérer ensemble.

Merci encore de l'occasion de représenter l'aéroport. J'ai hâte d'entendre vos questions.

(0955)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à Mme Best pour cinq minutes.

Mme Sandra Best (présidente, Toronto Aviation Noise Group):

Je vous remercie de l'occasion de comparaître devant le Comité.

Je m'appelle Sandra Best. Je suis présidente du Toronto Aviation Noise Group — TANG —, qui a été établi en 2012 en réaction à la reconfiguration de l'espace aérien par Nav Canada, mise en oeuvre à l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto en février de cette année-là.

Ma collègue, Renee Jacoby, coprésidente fondatrice, m'accompagne aujourd'hui.

Nous sommes un groupe de résidants multicommunautaires axé sur les faits qui est déterminé à trouver des solutions justes, sûres et équitables.

J'habite à High Park, à Toronto, et ma collègue habite dans un quartier du centre de Toronto, donc vous vous demandez peut-être pourquoi nous nous adressons à votre comité.

Eh bien, nous sommes ici pour dissiper le mythe voulant que le bruit produit par les aéronefs ne touche que les collectivités situées aux abords des aéroports. Imaginez, si vous le voulez bien, que vous vous réveillez un matin, dans votre quartier plutôt calme, qui est situé à une distance allant jusqu'à 20 kilomètres de l'aéroport, au son atroce d'avions circulant à basse altitude, lesquels font résonner directement au-dessus de votre tête le son produit par le déploiement de leurs ailerons et de leurs aérofreins; il ne s'agit pas que d'une « nuisance ».

Vous communiquez avec les autorités de l'aéroport et apprenez des responsables du bureau de la gestion du bruit que vous habitez maintenant sous, comme nous le disons affectueusement dans notre association, une « super-autoroute du ciel », et que vous ne pouvez déposer une plainte parce que votre habitation est située à l'extérieur du rayon admissible pour les signalements. Même si des améliorations ont été apportées jusqu'à maintenant, les résidants sont fatigués, et bon nombre d'entre eux ont tout simplement renoncé à avoir recours au processus.

Imaginez le choc que vous ressentez quand vous apprenez qu'il n'y a presque pas eu de consultations, s'il y en a eu, et que vos représentants élus n'étaient même pas au courant des changements. Du jour au lendemain, nous sommes passés d'aucun aéronef à plus de 88 000 vols par année en 2017 uniquement dans la trajectoire de vol qui nous concerne, ce qui exclut les départs et les avions qui arrivent et empruntent la même trajectoire pour atteindre une autre piste d'atterrissage. Les données figurant dans le document que nous vous avons remis parlent d'elles-mêmes et témoignent des importants volumes de trafic aérien, des lectures de contrôleur de bruit élevées et d'une utilisation disproportionnée des pistes d'atterrissage.

Vous êtes d'autant plus atterré quand vous découvrez qu'on a déréglementé en 1996 nos services de navigation aérienne en faveur de Nav Canada, une entreprise privée. Il n'existait aucune mesure législative contenant un protocole à suivre pour s'opposer à la décision prise en 2012, et l'invitation à participer à des réunions inefficaces du Comité consultatif communautaire sur l'environnement et le bruit, le CENAC, pour régler les problèmes à l'échelle locale n'a amené aucun changement important.

Quelles sont les réalisations jusqu'à maintenant?

Il y a eu la création du protocole volontaire de communications et de consultation annoncé en juin 2015, et nous sommes d'avis qu'on doit le modifier et l'inclure dans un texte législatif.

Il y a eu la publication du rapport de la firme Helios à la suite d'un examen indépendant de l'espace aérien à Toronto. Nous saluons le fait que Nav Canada a commandé ce rapport, vu qu'il a permis d'établir des liens avec des intervenants et d'entamer un dialogue et une discussion. Nous appuyons une grande partie du travail effectué par la firme Helios, et nous avons collaboré avec ses responsables tout au long du processus. Toutefois, nous avons été déçus que les responsables de l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto, la GTAA, dans un effort pour sembler plus ouverts à la consultation, aient formé un groupe d'examen fortement critiqué et lui aient confié, notamment, la tâche de régler la question d'une meilleure utilisation des pistes d'atterrissage.

Il avait aussi été recommandé de restructurer le CENAC, et, d'après ce que nous savons, les responsables de la GTAA sont sur le point de dévoiler la nouvelle mouture de ce comité. Nous avons aussi eu le privilège de participer aux délibérations à ce sujet, mais nous sommes d'un optimisme prudent quant aux résultats.

Quand notre association a commencé à communiquer avec les responsables de la GTAA et de Nav Canada, les relations publiques étaient atroces. Nos préoccupations étaient écartées d'emblée, et il était difficile d'obtenir des renseignements. Il était très clair que les transporteurs aériens étaient les clients, et que les citoyens qui habitent sous un corridor aérien ne sont qu'une préoccupation secondaire. Nous avons constaté des changements positifs au sein de Nav Canada au cours des deux dernières années, ainsi qu'une volonté accrue de collaborer avec les groupes communautaires. En particulier, nous saluons Blake Cushnie pour son engagement à l'égard du processus.

Toutefois, ces changements ont été apportés non pas de façon volontaire, mais à la suite de nombreuses années de travail acharné et de pressions politiques de la part de membres du grand public. En conséquence, nous sommes toujours d'avis qu'il est essentiel que Nav Canada fasse l'objet d'une surveillance constante, active et objective de la part du gouvernement.

Il reste beaucoup à faire. Les responsables de l'aéroport Pearson évaluent que le nombre total de mouvements d'aéronefs sera supérieur à 600 000 d'ici 2037, ce qui signifie que les atterrissages sur la piste liée au corridor aérien qui nous touche atteindraient le nombre stupéfiant de 120 000 par année. De toute évidence, cette situation sera intenable.

Nos recommandations figurent dans les documents que nous vous avons remis. Nous vous demandons d'en tenir compte. En particulier, nous demandons de hâter la modernisation des appareils Airbus A320 et l'application des recommandations formulées dans le rapport de la firme Helios concernant les vols de nuit.

Nous sommes d'avis que Toronto compte parmi les grandes villes vivables du monde, et nous appuyons son développement économique. Toutefois, comme Canadiens, nous tirons une grande fierté du fait de croire en la justice et l'équité, et il n'est ni juste, ni équitable d'imposer à certaines collectivités le fardeau d'une concentration élevée du bruit lié à l'aviation, et d'en exempter d'autres. On doit tout simplement trouver des solutions.

Nous vous invitons à nous poser des questions et nous attendons avec impatience les résultats de l'étude menée par le Comité, ainsi que ses recommandations et la réponse subséquente du ministre.

Nous vous remercions de nouveau de nous avoir offert cette occasion de nous exprimer. Nous sommes très reconnaissants.

(1000)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Block, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Ma première question s'adresse à la représentante du TANG.

Votre organisation a-t-elle élaboré une proposition quant à la façon dont les autorités aéroportuaires devraient établir un équilibre entre les préoccupations des collectivités touchant les vols de nuit et les avantages économiques que ces vols offrent?

Mme Renee Jacoby (présidente fondatrice, Toronto Aviation Noise Group):

Je serais heureuse de répondre à cette question.

J'aimerais que le Comité sache que nous avons pris part aux discussions portant sur le bruit produit par l'aviation au cours des sept dernières années. Au début du processus, il est tentant de chercher les grands titres proposant des solutions qui semblent être à notre avantage. Je peux citer en exemple l'aéroport de Francfort, qui est souvent mentionné en ce qui concerne son couvre-feu. Vous entendrez des commentaires positifs à propos du couvre-feu, tout comme des commentaires négatifs à son sujet.

Mme Kelly Block:

Je me demandais simplement si vous avez établi une proposition.

Mme Renee Jacoby:

Nous proposons d'appuyer les recommandations formulées dans le rapport de la firme Helios intitulé Best Practices in Noise Management. Il s'agit d'allonger les heures de vol de nuit visées par des restrictions et de cerner une nouvelle formule pour établir la limite relative aux vols de nuit.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup.

Dans l'esprit du mouvement Mardi je donne, et compte tenu du nombre de collègues présents de l'autre côté de la table, je souhaite donner le reste de mon temps à un de ces membres, s'il y a des questions.

La présidente:

Voilà pourquoi j'adore ce comité. Les membres sont tellement aimables les uns envers les autres.

Très bien, nous disposons de presque quatre minutes donc.

Borys, allez-y.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke-Centre, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, madame Block. Je vous souhaite aussi un Joyeux Noël.

Madame Marshall, en juin 2013, Transports Canada a augmenté le budget de l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto consacré aux vols de nuit, en utilisant une formule qui permettrait de continuer d'augmenter le nombre de vols de nuit dans les années à venir. Les responsables de la GTAA ont-ils fait du lobbyisme auprès des fonctionnaires du gouvernement pour obtenir cette modification?

Mme Hillary Marshall:

Je vous remercie de votre question.

Nous avons entrepris de mener des consultations exhaustives et avons communiqué avec des fonctionnaires dans le cadre de ce processus.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Pourriez-vous nous fournir une liste — je demande un engagement de votre part — des lobbyistes et des personnes avec lesquelles ils ont communiqué, incluant les noms des fonctionnaires des ministères et des députés?

Mme Hillary Marshall:

Les documents de consultation sont accessibles sur notre site Web, et nous serons heureux de vous fournir un lien vers ce site. Tous les renseignements y figurent.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Pour poursuivre sur le même sujet, avez-vous fait du lobbying auprès du ministre à propos de cette demande particulière concernant les vols de nuit?

Mme Hillary Marshall:

Il faudrait que je consulte les documents, mais Transports Canada a approuvé le changement, donc...

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Donc vous êtes disposée à prendre l'engagement de nous fournir tous les renseignements dont vous disposez.

Mme Hillary Marshall:

Oui, je le ferai avec plaisir.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Merci.

J'étais heureux de vous entendre affirmer que vous travaillez — je vous cite — « main dans la main » avec nos collectivités. Malheureusement, cela n'a pas été reflété dans la déclaration préliminaire d'un groupe communautaire qui a comparu devant ce comité. Je sais que ce n'est pas le sentiment des membres de notre collectivité.

Je vais m'attarder au CENAC. Il y a une grande insatisfaction dans la collectivité à l'égard de ce comité. Il est perçu comme un moyen de gérer et traiter les plaintes, et d'éviter de s'attaquer aux problèmes.

Après avoir passé tous ces processus, la GTAA serait-elle prête à appuyer la création d'un comité indépendant sur le bruit, qui ne serait pas contrôlé par la GTAA et ne serait pas visé par la perception de manipulation par cette autorité?

Mme Hillary Marshall:

Au cours des mois qui viennent, vous pourrez constater que nous présenterons une nouvelle proposition concernant le CENAC. Nous avons examiné le cas d'autres aéroports internationaux, comme je l'ai mentionné, pour comprendre l'approche que ces autres autorités aéroportuaires ont adoptée, et avons relevé d'excellentes initiatives en matière de partenariats avec l'industrie. Nous reviendrons avec ces propositions.

(1005)

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Très bien. Ma question était: appuyez-vous la création d'un comité indépendant sur le bruit qui serait chargé de traiter ces questions afin que la perception de contrôle et de manipulation de ce processus par la GTAA soit écartée dans l'esprit des membres des collectivités?

Appuyez-vous la création d'un comité indépendant sur le bruit?

Mme Hillary Marshall:

Le nouveau CENAC et la nouvelle approche que nous annoncerons comportent des partenariats avec des intervenants de l'industrie. Ce comité aura davantage de liens directs avec la collectivité et le gouvernement.

Nous croyons qu'il s'agit d'un bon premier pas. C'est la première étape que nous franchirons.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Donc, vous n'êtes pas à l'aise avec l'idée de créer un comité sur le bruit qui est complètement indépendant pour traiter les plaintes à ce sujet?

Mme Hillary Marshall:

Nous sommes d'avis que cette approche constitue un bon premier pas, et nous sommes impatients de faire cette annonce afin de discuter avec les membres de la collectivité.

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Les membres de la collectivité...

La présidente: Je suis désolée, monsieur Wrzesnewskyj...

M. Borys Wrzesnewskyj: Merci.

La présidente:

Madame Damoff, vous avez la parole.

Mme Pam Damoff:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie tous les témoins de leur présence. En particulier, je souhaite remercier mon ancien collègue, Jeff Knoll. Nous avons été tous deux membres du conseil.

Je sais que vous êtes engagé à l'égard de cette question depuis de nombreuses années — du moins depuis 2012, quand les corridors aériens ont été modifiés — et que vous avez pu constater qu'il y a eu des changements positifs à cet égard au cours des quelques dernières années.

Nombre d'études et d'examens techniques ont été menés par Nav Canada, la GTAA et la firme Helios. J'avais pris les dispositions pour qu'on mène une des consultations dans Oakville-Nord—Burlington. Les membres de la collectivité ont été mobilisés, en particulier David Inch et Richard Slatter, de ma circonscription — votre district.

Je me demande quel rôle le gouvernement fédéral devrait jouer dans tout ça. Il s'agit d'organismes indépendants. De quelle façon concevez-vous notre participation pour nous assurer que certains des...? Des études pilotes sont en cours.

Pourriez-vous nous faire part d'un peu plus de commentaires à ce sujet?

M. Jeff Knoll:

Bien sûr. Je vous remercie de votre question, madame Damoff. Je suis heureux que ma députée me pose une question.

Cela touche quelques points. Tout d'abord, j'ai mentionné dans mon exposé que ces études ont été menées. Il en a découlé du bon travail et d'excellentes recommandations. Comme mes amis du TANG ont mentionné plus tôt, un certain nombre d'initiatives ont été coupées au montage — pour utiliser une analogie cinématographique — et doivent être appliquées, en particulier les restrictions visant les vols de nuit et la restructuration du comité consultatif sur le bruit, ce qui, bien sûr, semble être en cours de réalisation, et, d'après ce que je comprends, on en fera l'annonce bientôt.

Pour répondre à votre question concernant la participation directe du gouvernement, je crois qu'il devrait peut-être reprendre certaines des responsabilités qui incombent actuellement à Nav Canada, pour ce qui est de traiter ces problèmes. Nav Canada est un organisme indépendant. Je comprends la volonté de créer un organisme indépendant chargé de prendre des décisions et de régler des problèmes difficiles. Assurément, les questions touchant la sûreté sont primordiales, et elles doivent être traitées de façon indépendante. Les décisions touchant la sûreté ne devraient jamais être prises par une autorité politique ou relever de l'administration d'un quartier. Assurément, les questions touchant la qualité de vie et les répercussions sur les activités de tout service ou de toute organisation assujettis à la réglementation fédérale doivent être prises en compte dans le processus décisionnel. Je conseille vivement à votre comité d'examiner la possibilité de modifier le mandat de Nav Canada pour qu'il y ait une participation plus directe du gouvernement et de représentants du public dans certains processus décisionnels.

Même si nous avons en réserve d'excellentes idées et des choses en cours, cela ne progresse pas assez vite. Les mesures n'ont pas assez de mordant pour qu'on puisse atteindre nos buts rapidement. Les responsables de la GTAA font sûrement de leur mieux, à leur échelon, mais Nav Canada et Transports Canada doivent tous les deux participer davantage.

Je sais que vous avez posé une question, plus tôt aujourd'hui, à propos d'Air Canada, et il s'agit d'un excellent exemple. L'annonce et le communiqué de presse ont soulevé une tempête médiatique, et tout le monde était très heureux, mais la mise en oeuvre de la modernisation des aéronefs à l'aide de l'installation de générateurs de tourbillon servant à réduire le bruit se déroule à pas de tortue. Le gouvernement doit participer, et il faut faire en sorte que Nav Canada joue un rôle plus direct dans la prise en compte des répercussions sur les collectivités.

Pour terminer, bien entendu — je l'ai mentionné dans mes commentaires et je souhaite le souligner de nouveau, parce que je ne veux pas qu'on l'oublie —, il faut avoir une vision à long terme. Ceux d'entre nous qui sont élus doivent parfois réfléchir en tenant compte de ce qu'ils peuvent réaliser pendant leur mandat. Nous devons réfléchir à une solution à ce problème qui porte sur plusieurs mandats, ce qui veut peut-être dire la construction d'un deuxième aéroport. La plupart des grandes administrations dans le monde ont plus d'un aéroport. Le gouvernement fédéral, dans sa sagesse à l'époque, il y a 50 ans, avait réservé des terrains à cette fin. Il est temps de dépoussiérer ces plans et de commencer à s'engager dans cette voie.

(1010)

Mme Pam Damoff:

Merci, monsieur Knoll.

Je sais que le conseil d'Oakville et la région de Halton ont déployé beaucoup d'efforts pour assurer la croissance de l'aéroport Pearson et que vous avez envoyé des délégués aux deux conseils.

Pensez-vous que le ministre et le ministère des Transports ont un rôle à jouer dans cette croissance? Le ministre devra-t-il participer à l'élargissement de l'aéroport?

M. Jeff Knoll:

Encore une fois, je vais revenir à mes réponses précédentes.

Tout d'abord, je pense que la réponse serait oui, absolument. Je suis d'accord, et je l'ai dit dans ma déclaration. Je reconnais pleinement, je respecte et j'apprécie les contributions économiques de l'aéroport Pearson et de l'Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto; toutefois, il y a un décalage entre les ambitions et les désirs du conseil d'administration de la GTAA de servir plus de clients, d'une part, et les répercussions sur le terrain, d'autre part.

Je crois fermement que le gouvernement fédéral, ainsi que les représentants des citoyens dans leur administration respective, doit jouer un rôle direct dans cela. Comme je l'ai déclaré, cela a des effets néfastes sur la qualité de vie des collectivités avoisinantes. À cette époque, l'aéroport a été construit dans un secteur où personne n'habitait. Il a été construit au milieu du champ d'un agriculteur, essentiellement, à Malton. Cette époque est révolue.

Les répercussions des activités de l'aéroport doivent être envisagées sous l'angle des gens qui vivent dans les collectivités avoisinantes ou, comme mes amis du Toronto Aviation Noise Group, dans les quartiers du centre de Toronto.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Aubin pour cinq minutes. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Merci à chacun des invités d'être parmi nous ce matin.

Ma première question s'adresse à Mmes Best et Jacoby ainsi qu'à M. Knoll.

Depuis le début de cette étude, nous rencontrons des témoins qui subissent les conséquences du bruit causé par les avions, et le grand dérangement qu'ils vivent ne fait aucun doute dans mon esprit. Toutefois, nul n'a encore réussi à me démontrer sur quelle norme les aéroports et les groupes de citoyens pourraient s'entendre. La seule norme que j'ai trouvée au moment où l'on se parle, c'est le niveau moyen maximal de bruit de 55 décibels que reconnaît l'OMS et l'OACI. Or, nous savons tous que ce bruit dépasse largement les 55 décibels.

Est-ce que les organisations aéroportuaires et les groupes citoyens s'entendent au moins sur les instruments de mesure de ce bruit pour que les données des uns et des autres soient admises aux fins de discussion? Encore une fois, est-ce que ce ne serait pas à Transports Canada de rendre plus accessibles et plus transparentes l'ensemble des données qui permettraient au moins d'avoir une conversation sur les mêmes bases? [Traduction]

Mme Sandra Best:

Vous avez posé une très bonne question. Merci.

Je pense que le problème auquel nous faisons tous face en ce moment, c'est que la GTAA et Nav Canada sont des entreprises privées, où l'accès à l'information n'est pas obligatoire, ce qui fait que nous ne pouvons pas savoir comment les décisions sont prises ni comprendre comment elles font les choses. Quant aux niveaux de décibels, il doit y avoir quelques précisions à ce sujet. Il doit y avoir un consensus sur ce que ce devrait être.

Il y a plus important encore; quand nous parlons aux pilotes et quand menons nos recherches, nous constatons qu'il y a deux types de bruit provoqués par les avions. Il y a le bruit de l'avion qui descend pour atterrir. Vous ne pouvez rien faire contre celui-là, l'aéronef doit atterrir. Mais on peut faire beaucoup quant au parcours vent arrière, pendant la descente initiale de l'avion avant un virage. Je pense que dans ce cadre, nous pourrons mener des discussions au sujet des niveaux de décibels. On pourrait conclure des accords. Les avions peuvent voler plus haut en faisant moins de bruit.

Certaines de ces mesures ont déjà été prises, mais la question des décibels est un grand problème mondial, et je ne crois pas que vous réussirez à conclure des accords avec des aéroports. Cela n'aura pas lieu. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Souhaitez-vous ajouter quelque chose, monsieur Knoll? [Traduction]

M. Jeff Knoll:

Bien sûr. Je serai ravi d'intervenir.

Je pense qu'il ne s'agit pas uniquement d'évaluer les répercussions en se fondant sur des mesures scientifiques comme les taux de compression des niveaux sonores ou les niveaux de décibels. Les normes reconnues ne tiennent pas nécessairement compte de la concentration, par exemple. Un bruit de 55 décibels entendu toutes les 20 minutes pourrait être une norme acceptable, mais un bruit de 55 ou 45 décibels, ou de tout autre niveau entendu de manière constante et concentrée mène à un degré de frustration et de contrariété qu'il est difficile de mesurer au moyen de la science.

Comme je l'ai dit dans ma déclaration préliminaire, c'est un problème de qualité de vie. Un bruit que vous entendez constamment, qu'il soit conforme à certaines normes ou pas, aura des répercussions sur votre capacité à mener vos activités quotidiennes, sur votre sommeil et sur votre bien-être.

(1015)

[Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Ma prochaine question s'adresse à vous, madame Marshall.

Le rapport final de la firme indépendante Helios contient 18 recommandations à court terme afin d'adopter les meilleures pratiques en matière de réduction du bruit. Dans vos propos préliminaires, vous avez parlé de 10 engagements qu'allait prendre l'aéroport Pearson. Est-ce qu'il y a un recoupement? Est-ce que vos 10 engagements sont parmi les 18 recommandations? Sinon, comment percevez-vous le rapport de la firme Helios? [Traduction]

Mme Hillary Marshall:

Est-ce qu'il y a un recoupement avec les 10 recommandations?

Nous croyons que les recommandations, prises dans leur ensemble — qu'elles concernent l'isolation, un programme incitatif pour une flotte d'aéronefs plus silencieux, des changements en matière de déclaration ou des changements au sein du comité sur le bruit — devraient nous aider à aller de l'avant et à adopter les pratiques internationales exemplaires en matière de gestion de bruit dans les aéroports.

Ai-je bien compris votre question? [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Oui, merci.

Ces 10 recommandations de l'aéroport seront-elles disponibles bientôt? Allons-nous pouvoir en prendre connaissance? [Traduction]

Mme Hillary Marshall:

Elles sont disponibles. Elles sont affichées sur votre site Web, ainsi que les mesures à court, moyen et long termes que nous prenons pour chacune des recommandations.

La présidente:

Madame Marshall, pourriez-vous vous assurer que le Comité reçoive une copie de ce rapport, s'il vous plaît?

Mme Hillary Marshall:

Oui.

La présidente:

Nous allons entendre M. Sikand, ensuite Mme Ratansi.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Ma question s'adresse aux représentants de la GTAA. Je commencerai par dire que j'apprécie réellement les échanges que j'ai eus avec vous. En fait, deux personnes de ma circonscription ont participé à la consultation publique, et j'ai également apprécié discuter avec vous de la possibilité de faire de Pearson et Mississauga des plaques tournantes du transport.

Cela étant dit, selon certaines prévisions, l'aéroport Pearson pourrait accueillir 80 ou 90 millions de personnes d'ici 2030, je crois. Quelle est la capacité maximale de l'aéroport Pearson?

Mme Hillary Marshall:

Je vais revenir en arrière et essayer d'expliquer. Nous avons un certain nombre de pistes à l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto. Nous avons cinq pistes d'atterrissage, et nous sommes capables de les exploiter de manière que, lorsque les avions seront plus grands et transporteront plus de passagers, et que le nombre de passages qui passeront par l'aéroport augmentera considérablement, le nombre de mouvements eux-mêmes...

M. Gagan Sikand:

Je suis désolé, mais mon temps est limité. Il doit pourtant y avoir un chiffre. Vous ne pouvez pas continuer indéfiniment à accueillir plus d'avions.

Mme Hillary Marshall:

Actuellement, notre plan directeur consiste à atteindre 85 millions de passagers d'ici 2037. Cela peut être réalisé avec toute la gamme des aéronefs de l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto, mais en moyenne, étant donné que les avions comptent de plus en plus de sièges, nous serons en mesure de gérer 85 millions de passagers à l'aide des terminaux que nous envisageons de mettre en place et des infrastructures que nous avons déjà.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci.

Pourriez-vous nous en dire davantage sur les effets potentiels d'une réduction des vols de nuit?

Mme Hillary Marshall:

Je vais revenir en arrière et souligner que nous avons informé notre Comité consultatif communautaire sur l'environnement et le bruit ainsi que les membres du public du fait que nous menons une étude sur les vols de nuit. Les vols de nuit, pour une ville comme Toronto et pour d'autres villes, sont les vols en provenance de différentes régions du pays — Vancouver, Calgary, des fuseaux horaires différents —, et nous nous occupons également des arrivées et des départs des aéroports asiatiques. Nous sommes une ville mondiale, et nous faisons de notre mieux pour répondre à la demande et aux besoins en matière de tourisme, de commerce et de fret, tout en respectant les restrictions et en gérant en fonction de ces dernières.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Je vais vous demander de vous commenter une situation hypothétique. Que se passerait-il si la GTAA était placée sous la garde et la responsabilité d'un autre aéroport, si nous construisions un nouvel aéroport à proximité de l'aéroport de Pearson?

Mme Hillary Marshall:

On trouve des exemples d'aéroports qui fonctionnent comme un système partout dans le monde. Aujourd'hui, l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto fonctionne dans le cadre d'un réseau volontaire d'aéroports. Dans le sud de l'Ontario, 11 aéroports fonctionnent ensemble. Ce n'est pas un mandat; ce n'est réglementé d'aucune manière, mais il s'agit d'un réseau collaboratif et coopératif d'aéroports qui attendent le jour où il leur faudra répondre aux demandes d'environ 110 millions de passagers, dans le Sud de l'Ontario, et qui cherchent ensemble la manière dont ils pourront le faire.

(1020)

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci.

Je dois partager mon temps de parole, mais j'ai une petite question pour Sandra.

Je vous prie de répondre par oui ou par non.

Mme Sandra Best:

D'accord.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Si nous devions agrandir l'aéroport Billy Bishop, votre collectivité serait-elle touchée?

Mme Sandra Best:

Honnêtement, je ne sais pas, désolée.

M. Gagan Sikand:

D'accord, merci.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi (Don Valley-Est, Lib.):

Je vais être brève.

Je vous remercie tous d'être ici.

Notre rôle en tant que députés est de faciliter les choses quand il y a un problème. En écoutant les membres du TANG, j'ai compris qu'il n'y a eu aucune consultation, et je pense que tous les députés sont ici, car leurs électeurs se sont plaints. Quand ils se plaignent, nous les envoyons à vos séances d'information, etc. La préoccupation que les membres du DMRI ont soulevée, c'est qu'à chaque fois qu'ils proposent des solutions, celles-ci sont rejetées. Je crois qu'il est important que la GTAA prête l'oreille à leurs inquiétudes.

Mme Sandra Best, je vous ai entendu dire que vous vouliez suivre les recommandations proposées par Helios.

Ma question pour la GTAA est la suivante: quel serait le problème si nous suivions les recommandations d'Helios? Cela a été commandé par le ministre et par vous, et il s'agit d'un processus consultatif. Il a fallu inviter beaucoup de gens à s'asseoir ensemble, à vous écouter et à écouter vos électeurs, et pourtant vous n'avez toujours pas proposé de solution. Qu'est-ce qui vous empêche de trouver cette solution? Je serais très à l'aise avec l'idée que vous cherchez à établir un équilibre entre les besoins des électeurs et les enjeux environnementaux, mais vous devez parler aux gens. Vous devez les écouter. Vous devez leur accorder la crédibilité qui leur est due. Je crois que le TANG a également demandé l'élaboration d'un projet pilote et que vous avez le rapport.

Pourriez-vous nous donner quelques réponses que nous pourrions transmettre à nos électeurs?

Mme Robyn Connelly (directrice, Relations communautaires, Autorité aéroportuaire du Grand Toronto):

Bien sûr.

Les opérations aéroportuaires sont très complexes, et apporter des changements prend du temps. Nos amis du TANG, ainsi que M. Knoll, ont mentionné que des changements se produisent, mais lentement. Je crois que cela reflète la complexité de la question.

Vous avez posé une question sur différentes études. Une de ces études, menées par Helios, faisait un examen indépendant de l'espace aérien pour Nav Canada. Elle a été publiée en septembre 2017. Nav Canada a élaboré en réponse un plan d'action expliquant comment il mettait en oeuvre les recommandations de ce rapport. Il fait cela de manière continue et fait des mises à jour à ce sujet à chaque réunion publique du CENAC. Cela arrive régulièrement.

Dans le cadre de notre pratique, nous avons également commandé à Helios une étude comparative sur les pratiques exemplaires de gestion du bruit, qui forme aujourd'hui la pierre angulaire du plan d'action sur la gestion du bruit que nous avons élaboré. Nous prenons réellement au sérieux les recommandations découlant de cette étude et nous explorons la façon dont nous les appliquerons. Il est également important de savoir que nous avons mené des consultations sur ce qui en ressortira et sur les principes directeurs que nous devrons prendre en considération. Nous avons pour cela réuni un groupe de référence de citoyens sélectionnés de manière aléatoire — les représentants du TANG en ont également parlé —, mais nous avons également organisé une série d'ateliers durant l'été 2017 afin de recueillir des rétroactions et des conseils.

Enfin, vous avez posé des questions sur le rapport de M. David Inch. Ses recommandations, dans le cadre du rapport envoyé à Nav Canada, forment essentiellement les six idées que Mme Hilary a mentionnées dans ses remarques. Ces six idées sont actuellement mises en oeuvre. C'est frustrant de voir que les choses avancent lentement, mais les bons projets vont de l'avant.

La présidente:

Monsieur Virani, allez-y.

M. Arif Virani (Parkdale—High Park, Lib.):

Merci.

Je vais poursuivre sur ce que Yasmin et Pam disaient, mais je vais également poser des questions qui viennent directement de mes électeurs.

Madame Best, merci d'être venue et d'illustrer le fait que les inquiétudes liées aux bruits des aéroports ne concernent pas seulement les personnes qui vivent à côté des aéroports; elles concernent toutes les personnes qui vivent sous une trajectoire de vol. Les trajectoires de vol ont considérablement augmenté au cours des six dernières années ou plus. Merci pour votre plaidoyer.

J'aimerais vous donner l'occasion de commenter certaines choses, car je partage mon temps de parole avec M. Hardie.

Le premier point concerne la reddition de comptes. Nous entendons parler du CENAC, qui exprime des inquiétudes, et qui, selon vous, est inefficace d'après vos observations. Vous ne constatez pas de changements significatifs. Pourriez-vous nous en dire davantage, en particulier sur ce que nous venons d'entendre sur le partenariat industriel et la suite de notre collaboration avec le CENAC? Qu'est-ce que cela signifie pour vous?

Par ailleurs, d'après ce que vous venez de mentionner sur le groupe de référence de citoyens sélectionnés aléatoirement, j'ai cru comprendre que les membres du TANG ont exprimé des inquiétudes à ce sujet, à ce moment-là.

(1025)

Mme Sandra Best:

Oui, il s'agit d'un sujet important, et nous ne disposons pas d'assez de temps aujourd'hui pour couvrir tout ce qui a trait au CENAC, mais je vais parler du groupe de référence qui a été mentionné.

Imaginez que vous travaillez sur l'enjeu du bruit depuis sept ans. Bon nombre d'électeurs dans l'ensemble de la région du Grand Toronto ont consacré du temps et des efforts sur ce dossier. Nous travaillons jour et nuit. Pour certains d'entre nous, c'est devenu un travail à temps plein. Lorsque nous commençons à voir une quelconque action politique, nous en remercions nos représentants, car, bien franchement, c'est ce qu'il fallait. Avant l'action politique, il n'y avait aucun mouvement.

Nous constatons, cependant, que les recommandations du rapport Helios, dans la partie concernant la GTAA, seront transférées à un nouveau groupe de 36 membres qui seront choisis au hasard à Toronto. Ils recevront quatre jours de formation et d'orientation. Je suis certaine qu'il s'agira de bonnes personnes ayant les meilleures intentions, mais elles ne disposent d'aucun renseignement contextuel. On nous a demandé de leur présenter un exposé d'une demi-heure ou d'une heure, et je pense qu'on l'a demandé à trois ou quatre autres groupes également.

On pourrait penser que, si on voulait vraiment un groupe de référence qui soit en mesure de donner de bonnes recommandations et qui ait une bonne compréhension des problèmes qu'il doit commenter, on se serait tourné vers des groupes qui sont engagés dans le dossier depuis de nombreuses années, qui sont à l'aise avec la terminologie du domaine, ce que l'on appelle « la langue de l'aviation », et qui savent ce qui préoccupe les aéroports partout dans le monde. Il faudrait au moins que des membres des comités participent au groupe, et on pourrait choisir d'autres personnes au hasard... mais quatre jours? L'un de ces jours comprend, il me semble, une séance d'orientation sur l'intérieur de l'aéroport et une visite des tours. Il ne s'agit pas d'une consultation qui soit sérieuse.

Nous avons constaté au fil des ans que lorsque le terme « consultation » est lancé, il ne s'agit pas d'une vraie consultation. C'est une consultation où les réponses sont prédéterminées. Nous sommes tous passés par là. Nous avons tous vu des organisations procéder ainsi. Elles savent ce qu'elles cherchent. Elles examinent un sujet en particulier, puis elles remplissent les tables — selon ce que je comprends de la façon dont elles ont procédé — avec des spécialistes de l'industrie. Quel genre de recommandations ces personnes bien intentionnées pourront-elles apporter?

On a envoyé un sondage aux résidents de Toronto. Encore une fois, je me suis entretenue avec le groupe mis en place, lequel m'a affirmé directement — et j'ai un enregistrement — que la GTAA avait elle-même conçu ce sondage et que le groupe consultatif n'était là que pour le mener. Les questions menaient toutes à des réponses prédéterminées. Il s'agissait en théorie d'une consultation massive et d'un groupe de personnes qui devait présenter des recommandations relatives à l'utilisation des pistes, par exemple. Or, l'utilisation des pistes est un concept qui n'est pas aussi simple qu'il y paraît. Où sont les liens? De quelle façon cette situation affectera-t-elle le reste de la population? Lorsque vous parlez de « répit prévisible », de quoi s'agit-il? C'est pour cette raison que nous nous sommes retrouvés à alterner entre les pistes est et ouest une fin de semaine sur deux, et à inonder les gens, qui l'étaient déjà, d'un trafic supplémentaire pendant ces mêmes fins de semaine.

Par conséquent, lorsqu'on parle de consultation, nous devons préciser qu'il s'agit d'une consultation significative, ce qui, selon nous, s'est avéré extrêmement difficile à mettre en place, mis à part le rapport Helios.

M. Arif Virani:

J'ai deux autres questions. Il y a, dans le rapport Helios, des recommandations relatives aux vols de nuit et à la modernisation des aéronefs. Pouvez-vous nous dire ce que vous souhaiteriez quant aux vols de nuit, au rythme des modifications et à la modernisation des aéronefs? Mme Marshall a parlé de la vitesse de la modernisation.

La présidente:

Seriez-vous en mesure de fournir une brève réponse à la question de M. Virani?

Mme Renee Jacoby:

Selon notre dernier chiffre officiel, cinq aéronefs avaient été modernisés en juin dernier. Je pense que ce chiffre était passé à sept lors de la dernière du CENAC en septembre dernier. Michael Belanger serait mieux placé que moi pour vous parler de la grosseur de la flotte, mais il me semble qu'environ 40 aéronefs doivent être modernisés. Il s'agit des A320. Cela devrait être terminé en 2019. Les responsables affirment que ce sera fait et que les aéronefs seront soit remplacés ou modernisés.

J'estime que nous serions tous plus à l'aise à l'idée d'avoir de plus amples renseignements et de meilleures mises à jour, et qu'une enquête soit menée sur la raison pour laquelle le processus prend autant de temps, voire peut-être même un calendrier montrant à quel moment ces aéronefs seront modernisés. Il me semble que cela doit être fait dans le cadre de leur entretien régulier. Pourrions-nous avoir accès à ces renseignements? Serait-il possible de savoir combien d'aéronefs seront modernisés? Nous préférerions le savoir plutôt que d'être déçus si, après un an, seulement cinq aéronefs avaient été modernisés.

(1030)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à Mme Block pour cinq minutes.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je souhaite la bienvenue à tous les témoins qui sont ici ce matin. J'aurais dû le faire lors de ma première intervention.

Mes questions s'adressent à vous, mesdames Marshall et Connelly.

Peut-être en avez-vous déjà parlé, mais je souhaite simplement confirmer quelque chose. D'autres témoins ont comparu devant notre comité dans le cadre de notre enquête et ont suggéré que l'on impose soit une interdiction complète des vols de nuit, comme c'est le cas à l'aéroport de Francfort, soit une importante surtaxe pour les vols de nuit.

Quelles seraient les répercussions d'une telle politique sur votre aéroport, et en quoi une interdiction ou une surtaxe des vols de nuit auraient-ils une incidence sur votre capacité à concurrencer les autres grands aéroports internationaux situés à proximité, comme celui de Buffalo?

Mme Hillary Marshall:

Je dirais qu'il a beaucoup de types de trafic aérien qui ont lieu la nuit. Il y a environ 50 à 53 vols qui atterrissent présentement les heures nocturnes. Un petit nombre de ces vols servent au transport de marchandises. Environ 1 % du trafic aérien de nuit serait pour le transport de marchandises. On compte quelques destinations ensoleillées, quelques vols vers l'Asie et des pays étrangers, et quelques vols intérieurs.

Dans chacun de ces déplacements, il y a des voyageurs et des marchandises qui sont nécessaires à l'économie locale, et nous devons comprendre les répercussions qui pourraient survenir si l'on mettait fin à ces vols ou si on limitait leur nombre.

Si l'on jette un coup d'oeil à quelques-unes des plaques tournantes internationales, Francfort serait un cas extrême, mais bon nombre d'autres aéroports internationaux ont, tout comme nous, des heures restreintes, et donc, des déplacements restreints pendant ces heures.

Nous estimons que, pendant que nous examinons cette formule, à savoir qui profite de ces vols et quelles sont les possibilités et les répercussions économiques, la région du Grand Toronto et le pays continueront à avoir besoin des vols de nuit pour répondre aux besoins de notre économie. Que ces vols atterrissent à l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto ou à tout autre aéroport situé dans la région du Grand Toronto, il y aura tout de même des répercussions. On ne fera peut-être que déplacer un problème d'un aéroport à un autre.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup.

On a beaucoup discuté ce matin de la consultation du public et de consultations significatives. Je crois comprendre que vous avez récemment élaboré un nouveau plan d'action pour la gestion du bruit. Compte tenu de votre expérience dans la réalisation de cette stratégie, quelles sont, selon vous, les mesures les plus importantes que les aéroports peuvent adopter afin de réduire l'incidence du bruit des avions sur les collectivités avoisinantes? Pourriez-vous nous expliquer le rôle que les consultations du public ont joué dans l'élaboration de votre programme de gestion du bruit à la GTAA?

Mme Robyn Connelly:

Bien sûr. Il y a là plusieurs questions, il me semble.

Tout d'abord, il y a la façon dont nous avons consulté le public afin d'élaborer notre plan d'action sur la gestion du bruit. Une partie de l'étude des pratiques exemplaires et du plan d'action pour la gestion du bruit vise à améliorer la façon dont nous travaillons avec la collectivité avoisinante.

Pour élaborer le plan d'action pour la gestion du bruit, comme nous l'avons mentionné, nous nous sommes fondés sur le rapport Helios portant sur les pratiques exemplaires. Comme Hillary l'a mentionné, ce rapport a étudié le fonctionnement de 26 aéroports partout dans le monde et a présenté une série de recommandations. Il s'en est suivi une série de 10 engagements, qui prennent la forme d'énoncés de vision, desquels découlent une série de mesures que nous devons prendre. Certains points concernent ce qui a déjà été mis en place, mais qui devrait être mieux fait, et certains points concernent l'arrêt de mesures qui ne donnent aucun résultat. Bien entendu, nous allons également mettre en place neuf nouveaux programmes dans le cadre de ce plan au cours des cinq prochaines années.

Une partie de l'étude sur les pratiques exemplaires s'est penchée sur ce que font les autres aéroports et la façon dont leurs comités sur le bruit et leurs consultations sont menés. Nous ne sommes certainement pas à la hauteur. Il s'agit d'une recommandation très juste. Les défis auxquels s'est heurté notre comité étaient la représentation et le processus de nomination des membres.

Un des principaux éléments de rétroaction, dans le cadre de l'étude, tenait au fait que notre comité sur le bruit n'avait pas de plan d'action concret ni de programme de travail. Maintenant que nous avons le plan d'action pour la gestion du bruit, qui est bien plus ambitieux que ceux que nous avons eus par le passé, nous avons certainement un plan de travail solide pour l'avenir.

Nous allons formuler des recommandations afin de nous assurer que nous ayons les représentants élus appropriés, l'appui des résidents ainsi que l'infrastructure en place pour nous orienter et nous guider dans la mise en place de ces programmes — des projets révolutionnaires comme le premier programme volontaire du Canada en matière d'isolation contre le bruit, par exemple. Il y a des initiatives importantes à venir.

(1035)

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Graham et à M. Oliphant.

Vous partagerez votre temps.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, si vous pouviez me faire signe lorsqu'il me restera environ deux minutes afin que M. Oliphant puisse poser sa question, ce serait apprécié.

Tout d'abord, j'ai une petite question pour Mme Marshall.

Vous avez mentionné dans votre déclaration préliminaire que vous avez comme objectif de faire de l'aéroport Pearson le meilleur aéroport dans le monde. À l'heure actuelle, il s'agit de l'aéroport le plus coûteux dans le monde, en excluant le Japon. Je me demande sur quoi vous vous fonderiez pour le considérer comme étant le meilleur aéroport.

Mme Hillary Marshall:

En fait, en ce qui a trait à l'aéroport Pearson de Toronto, je ne sais pas quelle information vous...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Atterrir à cet aéroport coûte très cher. C'est là où les redevances d'atterrissage sont les plus élevées.

Mme Hillary Marshall:

Nous avons mené des études plus récentes; nous avons baissé d'environ 30 % les redevances d'atterrissage au cours des sept dernières années, et les avons maintenues stables depuis.

Nous nous situons dans la moyenne en ce qui a trait aux frais d'améliorations aéroportuaires pour les aéroports canadiens, nous sommes donc assurément sur la bonne voie. Nous avons des ententes à long terme avec nos transporteurs afin de limiter les coûts.

En tant qu'aéroport durable sur le plan financier, nous travaillons d'arrache-pied pour continuer sur la bonne voie.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Selon quelle mesure souhaitez-vous devenir le meilleur aéroport dans le monde? Il s'agit de quelque chose de très subjectif.

Mme Hillary Marshall:

Il y aurait probablement un certain nombre de facteurs pour lesquels nous aimerions nous considérer comme étant le meilleur aéroport dans le monde.

Par exemple, cette année, nous avons été reconnus comme étant le meilleur grand aéroport en Amérique du Nord pour le service aux voyageurs, titre qui a été voté par les passagers. Pour les quelque 300 employeurs et 50 000 travailleurs de l'aéroport de Pearson, qui collaborent chaque jour pour faire en sorte que les avions circulent et que les passagers soient servis, je sais qu'il s'agit d'une distinction importante.

Nous nous assurons d'être durables sur le plan de l'environnement, de gérer les eaux de ruissellement et de mettre en place des programmes de durabilité, en plus de gérer nos activités de façon sécuritaire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps. J'ai une question très brève, qui concerne également un commentaire que vous avez émis plus tôt.

Vous avez mentionné que l'aéroport Pearson fait partie d'un réseau de 11 aéroports qui travaillent ensemble, mais nous avons également entendu en témoignage que l'aéroport Pearson a en fait détourné le trafic du fret aérien en provenance d'Hamilton. S'agit-il alors de concurrence ou de coopération?

Mme Hillary Marshall:

Je dirais qu'il s'agit de coopération. Nous n'avons pas détourné le trafic du fret de Hamilton. Je ne sais pas trop de quoi il s'agit.

Cependant, nous avons un marché dont beaucoup de transporteurs veulent se rapprocher le plus possible. Naturellement, ils font un choix. Nous ne pouvons pas les forcer à aller travailler dans n'importe quel aéroport. Cela ne respecte pas les modalités de notre bail foncier. Nous n'avons pas le droit de faire ça.

La présidente:

Je vous remercie, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Oliphant, allez-y.

M. Robert Oliphant (Don Valley-Ouest, Lib.):

Merci à tous d'être ici.

Merci tout particulièrement à TANG pour son engagement de longue date dans ce dossier. De plus, je vous remercie de nous avoir aidés, en tant que députés, à comprendre cette question en profondeur grâce à une approche vraiment fondée sur les faits qui m'a beaucoup aidé.

L'opposition doit bien s'amuser à voir tous les fonctionnaires ici tenter de régler un problème. J'ai été d'un côté comme de l'autre pendant cette affaire et je comprends que la réalité est que nous avons un système de surveillance qui passe complètement à côté de ce que nous essayons de faire en tant que représentants élus. C'était ainsi quand j'étais dans l'opposition, et j'essayais d'atteindre le gouvernement, et le gouvernement est maintenant de ce côté. Cela doit être amusant pour ces gens.

Je regarde TANG en particulier. Y a-t-il un modèle de surveillance que vous avez imaginé qui pourrait rendre ce processus plus adapté afin que la consultation soit concrète, que les représentants élus aient un aperçu et une influence à cet égard et que les groupes de citoyens aient leur mot à dire, sans que l'on compromette la sécurité et les questions qui, je le sais, vous tiennent à cœur?

Mme Sandra Best:

Il y a un certain nombre de choses, et je m'en remets certainement à Renee à ce sujet.

De mon point de vue, il s'agit de deux entreprises privées qui ne sont pas assujetties à Loi sur l'accès à l'information; nous ne savons donc pas comment les décisions sont prises. Si le gouvernement prend une décision, nous le savons. Si Nav Canada nous dit qu'elle ne peut pas le faire pour des raisons de sécurité et qu'elle ne peut pas voler de cette façon, mais qu'ensuite, deux ou trois ans plus tard, c'est possible de le faire... si nous avions su au début comment cette décision était prise et si nous avions pu comprendre...

Toutefois, il s'agit d'entreprises privées, de sorte que notre degré de surveillance supposerait un certain accès à l'information qui permettrait à nos députés élus, en particulier, de comprendre comment Nav Canada et la GTAA prennent ces décisions à huis clos. Voilà la clé.

Lorsque nous l'apprenons après que les décisions ont été prises, il peut y avoir une consultation, mais c'est un fait accompli.

(1040)

M. Robert Oliphant:

Selon moi, l'utilisation des pistes en serait un exemple.

Mme Sandra Best:

Exactement.

M. Robert Oliphant:

Si vous avez des idées dont vous pourriez nous faire part à propos de l'utilisation des pistes d'atterrissage, nous pourrions alors voir comment il serait possible de les réaliser, parce que je pense que vous avez de bonnes idées.

Mme Renee Jacoby:

Je serais heureuse de répondre à cette question.

Nous avons apporté quelques diapositives, si vous voulez vous y reporter. Je peux vous indiquer celles qui donnent les exemples dont vous parliez.

La première diapositive montrait nos renseignements généraux. Je vais passer à la deuxième diapositive... Je ne peux pas, et je ne sais pas pourquoi.

La présidente:

Je suis désolée. Votre rapport sera distribué au Comité.

Mme Renee Jacoby:

D'accord.

La présidente:

Il s'agit d'un nouveau système, mais je pense qu'il ne fonctionne pas très bien.

Mme Renee Jacoby:

D'accord.

Le député Oliphant a mentionné que nous nous fondions sur des faits, et c'est important pour nous. Nous savons que les questions liées à l'aviation sont de nature émotive et très personnelle, et, à un moment donné, nous devrons laisser de côté nos émotions et trouver une solution.

Au cours de l'audience précédente, j'ai entendu — et je remercie la députée Block — que nous sommes d'avis que, au-delà de l'émotion, nous avons besoin de bonnes données pour trouver une solution. C'est ce que nous avons fait en tant que groupe qui se fonde sur les faits. Nos documents vous montrent les résultats de nos tests de contrôle du bruit et à quel point le niveau sonore est incroyablement élevé à 20 kilomètres de l'aéroport. La mesure la plus élevée a été prise à l'intersection du chemin Spadina et de l'avenue St. Clair, pour ceux d'entre vous qui connaissent la région de Toronto. Elle se chiffrait à 81 décibels, ce qui est beaucoup plus élevé que de nombreux cas dans les régions de Mississauga et d'Oakville ou dans les secteurs près de l'aéroport. De plus, nous nous sommes penchés sur l'utilisation des pistes.

J'aimerais souligner que ce que nous avons apporté aujourd'hui n'est qu'une partie d'une présentation PowerPoint très volumineuse qui a été présentée le 25 mai, à la demande du député Oliphant.

Pour en revenir à l'absence de réponse, cette présentation a eu lieu le 25 mai et nous n'avons pas encore reçu de réponse de la part du CENAC.

La présidente:

D'accord, merci beaucoup.

La sonnerie se fait entendre pour un vote.

Monsieur Liepert, vous aviez un commentaire à formuler.

M. Ron Liepert:

C'est exact.

La présidente:

Pouvons-nous poursuivre pour encore quelques minutes?

Des députés: D'accord.

La présidente: Monsieur Liepert, allez-y.

M. Ron Liepert:

Madame la présidente, je pense qu'il est important que je fasse un commentaire à la suite de ceux qu'a formulés M. Oliphant. Je ne sais pas si la séance est encore télévisée, mais je ne veux en aucun cas qu'on interprète mal ce qui a été dit, c'est-à-dire que les députés de ce côté-ci de la table ne prennent pas cette question au sérieux.

Je sais que M. Oliphant n'est pas un membre régulier du Comité, mais nous avons entendu un certain nombre de témoins — l'autorité aéroportuaire de Calgary et d'autres —, que nous avons longuement questionnés.

Nous sommes conscients que nos témoins de ce matin sont très localisés dans la région du Grand Toronto, et qu'il y a six députés de la région du Grand Toronto à la table, de sorte que notre intention ce matin était d'accorder beaucoup de temps aux députés de la région du Grand Toronto pour leur permettre de questionner les témoins, qui sont tous de la même région. Je tiens à ce que cela soit inscrit au compte rendu.

Je ne prétends pas que M. Oliphant a dit cela. Je ne veux simplement pas que l'on comprenne que nous ne prenons pas cette question très au sérieux.

Monsieur Oliphant, pour votre information, je représente une circonscription de Calgary qui se trouve à 30 minutes en voiture de l'aéroport. À cause d'une nouvelle piste, Nav Canada a changé la trajectoire des vols, et, en fait, il y a deux semaines, pendant notre semaine de relâche, j'ai tenu une assemblée publique avec Nav Canada, des représentants de l'administration aéroportuaire et des résidents. Il s'agit donc d'un gros problème à Calgary également, dans une circonscription qui n'a jamais cru que le député aurait un jour des problèmes avec le bruit des avions.

Je tiens simplement à ce que cela soit inscrit au compte rendu, madame la présidente.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Il est 10 h 44, alors je vais devoir mettre fin à la séance, à moins que quelqu'un ne veuille continuer pour encore dix minutes environ. Je pense que tout le monde en a assez, puisque nous avons commencé à 8 heures ce matin.

Je remercie tous nos témoins d'être venus. Merci à nos administrations aéroportuaires de travailler très fort pour essayer de trouver des solutions en collaboration avec la collectivité.

Merci aux membres du Comité de leur grande collaboration.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on November 27, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.