header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-11-29 PROC 135

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Before I get to the reason for this meeting, I want to update the committee on two things.

One is that the Liaison Committee has asked us where we're travelling between March and June. I said New Zealand, but they wouldn't agree. I assume we'll just put in that we don't need any money for that.

The other thing—and this is more for David Graham—you will remember that the PPS reported in estimates that they will be buying unmarked cars with the new money. You may have noticed there are some new marked cars showing up. PPS just wanted to let you know those were bought with the old money. The new unmarked cars are still coming.

Also, there's been general agreement that in the second half, instead of going into subcommittee, we're going to continue on with the full committee, because then it would have to go to subcommittee anyway.[Translation]

Good morning, welcome to the 135th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

Today, we will consider the fourth report of the Subcommittee on Private Members' Business submitted to the Clerk of the Committee on Thursday, November 22. The subcommittee recommended that Bill C-421, An Act to amend the Citizenship Act (adequate knowledge of French in Quebec) be designated as non-votable.

Pursuant to Standing Order 92(2), we are pleased to have with us the sponsor of the bill, Mario Beaulieu, member of Parliament for La Pointe-de-l'Île, to explain why he is of the opinion that this bill should be votable. He is accompanied by Marc-André Roche, a Bloc Québécois researcher.

Thank you for being here, Mr. Beaulieu. For your information, the correspondence you sent on Tuesday was distributed to the members of the committee. You can now make your presentation to the committee.

Mr. Mario Beaulieu (La Pointe-de-l'Île, BQ):

Mr. Chair and members of the committee, thank you for having us here.

As I indicated in my letter to you, the subcommittee may have found my Bill C-421 clearly unconstitutional, but it did not specify which section of the Constitution or the Charter it was alleged to have violated. In the absence of a clear indication, I will provide an overview of all the provisions that may be relevant. I hope this will answer your question. Otherwise, I am at your disposal to answer any questions you may have.

As you mentioned, I am accompanied by Marc-André Roche, the assistant to my colleague, the member for Joliette. Since we don't have a research team, he gave me a hand.

As you know, the standard used to assess whether a bill is unconstitutional is not very high. On page 1143, Bosc and Gagnon state: Bills and motions must not clearly violate the Constitution Acts, 1867 to 1982, including the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

I emphasize the words “clearly violate the Constitution Acts”. It has long been established that a disagreement on the constitutionality of a bill is not enough to make it non-votable. I have a feeling that you will not have difficulty in making your decision.

Right now, permanent residents must meet a number of criteria to become Canadian citizens. These include passing two proficiency tests: a general knowledge test about their host society and a language proficiency test, where they must demonstrate that they have adequate knowledge of English or French.

Bill C-421 is quite simple. It amends the Citizenship Act to ensure that permanent residents who ordinarily reside in Quebec must demonstrate that they have an adequate knowledge of French.

The first constitutionality criterion is the division of powers. Citizenship falls under federal jurisdiction under section 91.25 of the British North America Act, 1867, which specifies that naturalization and aliens fall under the jurisdiction of Parliament. Clearly, my bill meets that condition.

That leaves the Charter. Since the subcommittee has not indicated any specific provisions to support its decision, I will go through it as quickly as possible.

First, there are mobility rights. Subsection 6(2) of the Charter states that citizens and permanent residents have the right to move anywhere in Canada, to take up residence in any province and to pursue the gaining of a livelihood in any province. Whether or not Bill C-421 is passed, nothing would prevent a permanent resident residing in another province from moving to Quebec, settling and working there. Nothing would prevent a permanent resident residing in another province from obtaining Canadian citizenship there, then moving to Quebec and enjoying all the rights and privileges associated with Canadian citizenship.

Since Bill C-421 has no impact on mobility rights, I gather that this is not why the subcommittee found the bill to be “clearly unconstitutional”.

Then there is the language of communication with federal institutions. Subsection 20(1) of the Charter states that the public may communicate with the federal government in either English or French at their discretion, and that the government must be able to provide services in English or French where numbers or the nature of the service warrant it.

Bill C-421 has no effect on the language of communication between the public and the federal administration. Whether or not this bill is passed, a permanent resident will still be able to communicate with the federal government in either English or French.

Similarly, the oath of citizenship may continue to be administered in either French or English, in Quebec and elsewhere in Canada. I might have preferred it otherwise, but that would have made my bill unconstitutional. That's why I did not propose it.

(1105)



Bill C-421 simply requires that permanent residents residing in Quebec demonstrate that they have an adequate knowledge of French, the official language and the normal language of communication in Quebec.

Let me remind you that there is already a degree of asymmetry in the application of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act. In Quebec, the Government of Quebec selects and supports immigrants and implements integration programs. Knowledge of French holds a prominent place in all those stages.

Bill C-421 supports Quebec's efforts and extends the granting of citizenship, which already exists at the previous stages, namely selection, support and integration. The selection, reception and integration of immigrants, as well as the granting of citizenship are four elements of the same process. I have difficulty seeing how knowledge of French would be constitutional in the first three steps, but unconstitutional in the fourth. In any event, Bill C-421 has no effect on the language of communication between the public and federal institutions, which resolves the issue of its compliance with subsection 20(1) of the Charter.

There are still the provisions on official languages.

Subsection 16(1) of the Charter states: English and French are the official languages of Canada and have equality of status and equal rights and privileges as to their use in all institutions of the Parliament and government of Canada.

I emphasize the words “equal rights and privileges as to their use”. Bill C-421 contains no provisions or requirements regarding the use of English or French. It only refers to the knowledge of French. Knowledge and use are two completely different things. In addition, subsection 16(3) clarifies the scope of the Charter:

Nothing in this Charter limits the authority of Parliament or a legislature to advance the equality of status or use of English and French.

That subsection of the Charter refers to the “equality of status or use of English and French” in Canada. The Supreme Court even recognizes that French is the minority language in Canada. It recognizes that, for English and French to progress towards equality in Canada, French must be predominant in Quebec. In the 2009 Nguyen decision, it ruled as follows: ...this Court has already held... that the general objective of protecting the French language is a legitimate one... in view of the unique linguistic and cultural situation of the province of Quebec...

This allows the court to conclude that: ... the aim of the language policy underlying the Charter of the French Language was a serious and legitimate one. [The materials] indicate the concern about the survival of the French language and the perceived need for an adequate legislative response to the problem...

I am talking about a constitutional judgment.

The measures to ensure the primacy of the French language in Quebec effectively promote the equality of status or use of French in Canada. It could even be argued that the government's current practice with a view to making Quebec bilingual contravenes this, since by making French weaker in Quebec, it does not promote the equality of the two languages in Canada. That being said, there's no need to debate this here.

I had to show you that my bill is not “clearly unconstitutional”. I think I have.

I am at your disposal to answer any questions you may have.

Thank you, Mr. Chair and members of the committee.

(1110)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[English]

I'm not going to do regular rounds of questioning. I'll just let anyone who wants to ask questions to ask questions. Just let me know.

Madame Lapointe. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Welcome to the committee, Mr. Beaulieu.

I am the chair of the Subcommittee on Private Members' Business of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, which deals with all the bills. Last week, we reviewed 15 bills, one after the other, with the analyst responsible for making proposals and providing explanations. We have studied your bill at length to check all that.

Do you know where my riding of Rivière-des-Mille-Îles is located?

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, yes, I know where it is.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

It includes the cities of Deux-Montagnes, Saint-Eustache, Boisbriand and Rosemère.

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

It is the north shore.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Yes, it's in the northern ring of Montreal.

My riding has a number of permanent residents.

I'm going to ask you a question about your bill.

Are you suggesting that those people who live in my riding, who are anglophones, Americans who have become permanent residents, go to Ontario to take their citizenship test since they cannot do it in Quebec because they do not have an adequate knowledge of French?

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

Essentially, I think it would encourage them to learn French in order to have an adequate knowledge of it. That would be a very good thing, because it would make it even easier for them to integrate into the labour market.

In Quebec, it is vital that French be the common language to ensure its own future. Quebec is the only predominantly francophone province, the only province where we can successfully ensure that newcomers know French. This does not mean that they cannot speak English.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Take me, I am a francophone. It doesn't get any more francophone than the name Lapointe. I was raised in Laval, I have always worked in Boisbriand, and I promote French in the House to all my colleagues.

Isn't that right, colleagues? Say yes. Say that I speak to you in French all the time. Even when you don't understand, you manage to understand.

I promote French and do everything I can to make people bilingual. In my opinion, the higher the bilingualism rate in Canada, the better.

I sat on the Standing Committee on Official Languages with Mr. Nater and Ms. Kusie, who are as convinced as I am of the value of bilingualism.

(1115)



I mean, we are promoters of bilingualism and, in my opinion, when it comes to French, we must go even further. I am uncomfortable with your bill.

I am not a constitutional expert. We have people who can help us if need be. Those working at the Library of Parliament can help us. I am just uncomfortable with this bill.

I don't make the decision. If I am told that a bill is not constitutional, I cannot challenge it as a lawyer would. I hold a bachelor of business administration degree. I don't claim to be a lawyer at all.

I cannot see myself telling the anglophone constituents in my riding, who have the right to be permanent residents of Quebec, who contribute to society in their own way even though they speak English, that they will not become Canadian citizens and that they will simply remain permanent residents.

Perhaps some of my colleagues have something to add.

Mr. Marc-André Roche (Researcher, Bloc Québécois):

I may have something to add.

The Chair:

Yes, go ahead, Mr. Roche.

Mr. Marc-André Roche:

The subcommittee's official report is not available yet, but the “blues” are. Let me remind you that your analyst recommended that the bill be votable. I understand from your remarks that you are looking forward to being able to speak in the House and vote against it. That is precisely what we are discussing.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

From the discussions we have had and that were reported in the “blues”, we considered it unconstitutional. [English]

The Chair:

I didn't quite get it, but my understanding is that when the analyst comes to the subcommittee, he doesn't give any opinions on whether it's votable or not. He just gives all the facts from his perspective.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

The analyst basically said that it could be voted either way.

The Chair:

Now we'll go to Mr. Graham.

If you don't understand what he says.... I don't know what language he's going to speak. [Translation]

Mr. Marc-André Roche:

No, that's fine. [English]

The Chair:

None of us understand him either.

Voices: Oh, oh! [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Beaulieu, what would you say if a bill from Alberta, for example, referred to people under 65 years of age on the date of their citizenship application, who ordinarily reside in Ontario and have an adequate knowledge of the English language?

Would that be unconstitutional? Could it be an attack on the French language? Could that mean war in Quebec?

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

I think it would probably be constitutional. However, English and French do not currently have equal status.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

They have it in the Constitution.

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

That's right.

The Constitution seeks to ensure equality.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

However, you are trying to take away from the federal government a power granted by the Constitution.

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

In fact, French is in decline almost everywhere in Canada. All linguistic indicators demonstrate it. The objective is to ensure linguistic diversity in Canada, and therefore the survival and the equal status of French. That is what my bill is about.

French, not English, is the language being threatened in Canada. You are raising a political issue. I think that, as far as the Constitution is concerned, it is not unconstitutional to raise this issue.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I completely disagree with you.

The Constitution is very clear on that point. One example of that is communication with a public servant. You seem to be saying that, in order to be able to speak to an official in our mother tongue, we have to move to the appropriate province and stay there long enough. This would replace the freedom to travel in Canada with an obligation to travel, which is not in accordance with the Constitution. I do not see how you will manage to reconcile this bill with the Constitution.

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

This doesn't affect language use.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You require me to communicate with you in French to prove that I am able to do so.

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

That's right.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

But it's mandatory for communicating with the government.

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

This doesn't mean that you don't know English if you speak to me in French, no more than it would mean that I don't know English if I communicate with you in French.

This is intended to encourage newcomers to learn French. I think it's perfectly legitimate. Quebec is the only province where French is the language of the majority and it's sort of the primary home of francophones in North America. So it is necessary to encourage the use of French and to make it the common language. This doesn't mean that the rights of the anglophone minority are not recognized; that's not the issue at all. If French isn't the common language in Quebec, however, it will not be the language that will enable newcomers to integrate and facilitate exchanges between all Quebeckers.

(1120)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The only way to deem this constitutional would be if English and French did not have equal status in the Constitution. However, their status is indeed equal in the Constitution. Moreover, there is not a single province in Canada, not one, that does not have francophones in its population.

If a bill required being able to speak English throughout the province of Quebec, it would not increase the rights of francophones, but would instead attack them. When you attack English in Quebec, you attack French in the rest of Canada.

I too would like to increase the importance of French across Canada. I am bilingual, I grew up in a family where both parents were French-speaking. However, I was raised in English because my family was not allowed to attend a French-language school because it was not Catholic. I am now English-speaking because I was not Catholic. This makes no sense.

To increase the importance of French across Canada, however, we must see both languages as truly equal. If you will allow me to make this comment, your bill is fully and completely contrary to the objectives of the Constitution. It is by no means constitutional.

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

By that reasoning, the selection criteria for newcomers to Quebec would be unconstitutional, just as would any form of asymmetry. Basically, between the weak and the strong, it is said that the law protects the weak. In practice, the two languages do not have equal status. The law is used to establish this equality of status to promote French as a common language in Quebec. The Constitution recognizes that the situation of French deserves and justifies legislative measures to protect it and ensure its development throughout Canada.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are you talking about across Canada or only in Quebec?

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

I want French to be spoken across Canada. We defend all the francophone and Acadian communities. Quebec is in some way the primary home of the French language.

I don't want to get too involved in the political debate. I think it's better to keep with the constitutional debate. Around the world, regimes based solely on institutional bilingualism, wall to wall, always end up seeing the assimilation of minority languages.

There are several countries where more than one national language is spoken. In Belgium, Switzerland and Cameroon, for instance, there is a common language for a given territory. This doesn't prevent people from knowing five or six second languages very well, but it does protect their language. If you go to Flemish Belgium, you will find that Dutch, which is hardly spoken in the world, isn't threatened in this part of Belgium, where it is the common language.

In general, the Constitution is based on the principle of protecting linguistic duality. In Canada, the endangered language is French. This language must continue to exist and flourish in our country, which explains the additional powers granted to Quebec, particularly through the Cullen-Couture agreement on immigration.

Quebec's Charter of the French Language, which some have said is a great piece of Canadian legislation, aims to make French the common language in Quebec to allow francophones to work and live in their language. I don't think it's unconstitutional.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Let's go back to the Constitution because that's what's at issue here.

I'm also on the Subcommittee on Private Members' Business, where I have already spoken about my wife. She came to Canada in 2005 and spoke five languages, but not French. Just before she obtained her citizenship, she moved to Quebec to be with me. If this bill had been passed, she would not have been able to. She would have had to stay in Ontario because she didn't speak a word of French. She is learning it, but it isn't easy as a sixth language. The purpose of the bill is unconstitutional, because no request made to the government is more important than that of citizenship.

Section 20(1)(a) of the Canadian Charter of RIghts and Freedoms states:

there is a significant demand for communications with and services from that office in such language

A citizenship request is a significant demand. You can't say that it isn't significant enough to be in the Constitution. That's my position, and we'll agree to disagree.

(1125)

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

If we only disagree, then the bill is votable and it is up to the House to deal with it. Just because we don't like a bill doesn't make it unconstitutional. All bills contain an element of constraint. Your spouse probably could have passed the French test. Requesting that people with sufficient knowledge of French be favoured is not an exaggerated requirement.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So you acknowledge that your bill violates the Constitution, but not seriously. Is that what you're telling me?

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

No. I don't think my bill is unconstitutional, let alone meets the test for deeming a bill to be non-votable. I don't think it violates the Constitution. What you are raising is more about the political aspect than the constitutional aspect, and it is up to Parliament to make a decision about the political aspect.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm a member of the Subcommittee on Private Members' Business of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, which has held 18 meetings since the start of this Parliament. I think I've missed just one meeting. To date, we have rejected two bills. Actually, I think it was three—for one of them, it was fairly clear.

It's our job to do this. Every private member's bill passed in the House of Commons has first been studied by this subcommittee, including the Bloc Québécois bill. We analyzed it—you can read the “blues” of our proceedings—and we agreed that your bill was not votable because of its unconstitutional nature.

This is the process, and it is up to us to decide whether or not it is votable. If you don't agree with our decision, you can appeal to the House, which will hold a secret ballot; that's your right.

My recommendation to my colleagues is to consider that your bill is not constitutional.

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

I think it is constitutional. The arguments you've raised are more political in nature. You gave the example of your spouse, who is one specific case, but the Constitution applies to the entire community and the Canadian population as a whole.

Based on your reasoning, you would be against all the measures that Quebec has taken to promote French because you would consider them unconstitutional. You would say that the criterion related to knowledge of French to select immigrants to Quebec is unconstitutional. It's the same thing.

We don't prevent people from communicating with the government in English or French. All we want is an incentive. We want people to demonstrate that they know French. The Citizenship Act already requires knowledge of English or French, and if a person does not have knowledge of either language, their application is rejected.

We believe that in Quebec, knowledge of French should be required of immigrants because it is the common language. This doesn't mean that it's not important to know English or to be bilingual on an individual level. In Quebec, French must be strengthened. I don't want to get into a political debate, but in Montreal, French is on the decline. The indicators show that there is a decline in French because newcomers are not sufficiently francized. It's not a far-fetched requirement that we want to use to crush anyone; it is a requirement that aims to ensure the future of French in Quebec.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This brings us back to the Constitution again. It's a matter of communication between the federal government and aspiring citizens, if I may call them that, and not between them and a province or a private company. It is in that context only that this is unconstitutional. Your bill would force people to choose one language over another, which would run counter to the values of section 20 of the Charter. It's black and white for me, and there's no ambiguity. If it were a Quebec government bill, there would be no problem, but this bill concerns the federal government and the Constitution.

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

My answer to you is that our bill does not have to do with communications between an individual and the government.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, it does.

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

It has to do with language proficiency.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

To demonstrate language proficiency, communication with the government must be established.

I'll give the floor to my colleague, because we could talk about this until we're blue in the face.

(1130)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

I have a question.[Translation]

I apologize for speaking in English. [English]

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

No, it is okay.

The Chair:

You said that Quebec determines who gets to immigrate, so they can already choose to make sure there are only French people applying. Why do you need to have the test in French? You've already taken care of that.

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

It's not exclusive. One of the criteria is to know French. If you know English, it gives you other points. It's not exclusive.

In the integration process, there is the teaching of French, but what we see is that it is not efficient enough. We think that since you already have to show sufficient knowledge of English or French, we say that in Quebec it would be appropriate that a knowledge of French would be the criteria to have citizenship. It is another incentive to make sure that people have a sufficient knowledge of French.

When we look at the Supreme Court judgments like the Nguyen case and these things, it is recognized that French in Quebec needs legislative support to ensure that people are allowed to work and live in French and to ensure the survival of the French language in Quebec and in Canada.

The Chair:

Is there anyone else on the speaking list?

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Stephanie, do you have any questions? We've gone on long enough. [Translation]

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Beaulieu, I would like to thank you for being here today. We have no further questions.

Of course, we had questions about the constitutionality of the bill and the consultations you held when drafting the bill. We have had all the answers we need. So there are no further questions.

I would like to thank you again for being here today, Mr. Beaulieu.

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you so much, Mr. Chair.

Thanks to both of you for being here. I appreciate the discussion.

Let's talk about the Constitution, and let's focus on the legality of things, even though, with respect, your presentation seems to be far more.... I appreciate the passion—the passionate and political versus the legal—but let's focus on this.

I've had the opportunity to sit on the justice committee and have heard a lot of constitutional arguments being put forward. I didn't hear any cases put forward in your opening submission. I've looked at your subsequent submission and it cites the Nguyen case. That case deals with section 23 of the charter, and you're arguing under sections 16 and 20.

Why aren't you bringing forward cases that deal with that? If we're dealing with a very specific legal issue, why are you cherry-picking a paragraph from a case dealing with a different section of the charter to support your arguments on sections 16 and 20?

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

I will let Mr. Roche answer. [Translation]

Mr. Marc-André Roche:

In fact, the selected excerpts were taken from the preliminary section of the judgment, where general observations are made and on which a judgment is subsequently based.

We understood that this was a general observation and that it applied equally well to all articles. [English]

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I did a quick Google search. Neither of you are members of the Barreau du Québec?

(1135)

[Translation]

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

No. [English]

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Do you have any constitutional experts who support your position and have provided any evidence in this case? I haven't seen anything. Again, I'm hearing a very political answer. You're calling on us to provide legal scope to this, and you're not delivering on that. Is there any evidence from a recognized expert?

I'm no constitutional scholar—my fellow lawyers in St. Catharines will assure you of that—but do you have any constitutional scholars who would support your position?

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

Of course. [Translation]

Mr. Marc-André Roche:

We consulted three of them, and I am sure that with the research budget of a recognized party, we would have been able to pay them for a formal legal opinion.

The Chair:

What did these three people say?

Mr. Marc-André Roche:

According to two of them, it was absolutely clear.

The third had some doubt but, in his view, the constraints passed the test of reasonable constraints, since it was based on a public policy objective that had already been recognized in previous Supreme Court decisions.

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

I consulted a lawyer on the part about freedom of movement and establishment, meaning the right to move from one province to another. He didn't give me a legal opinion, but he did give me a written answer.

He didn't feel that this violated a citizen's freedom of going from one province to another because if someone passed their citizenship test in Ontario, they could come to Quebec. At the same time, if someone passed their citizenship test in Quebec, they could very well settle in Ontario or elsewhere.

So this doesn't violate that section of the Constitution. [English]

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I appreciate the answer, but we have nameless individuals. As said by a legal scholar from The Simpsons, Lionel Hutz, hearsay and conjecture are types of evidence. They're not necessarily good evidence.

With respect, I don't think that you provided us with any evidence to support your case from a legal standpoint. I appreciate the budgetary constraint, but if you've talked to these individuals and they're legal scholars, they're used to providing affidavits or support statements. We don't see anything here. There would have been no cost to that.

I appreciate the time. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Mario Beaulieu:

From our point of view, it's up to you to demonstrate that it's unconstitutional.

The lawyer I contacted is François Côté. I could send you his.... [Translation]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Are there any other questions?[English]

I'd like to thank the witnesses very much. It's been a very interesting discussion. We'll suspend for a few minutes and go into committee business.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Avant d'en arriver à l'objet de la réunion, je veux faire le point dans deux dossiers avec le Comité.

Premièrement, le Comité de liaison nous a demandé où nous allions nous rendre entre mars et juin. J'ai parlé de la Nouvelle-Zélande, mais les membres n'étaient pas d'accord. Je présume que nous allons simplement indiquer que nous n'avons pas besoin d'argent pour cela.

Et deuxièmement — et cela concerne principalement David Graham —, vous vous souviendrez que les Services de la Cité parlementaire avaient indiqué dans le budget qu'ils allaient acheter des voitures banalisées avec les nouveaux fonds. Vous avez sans doute remarqué la présence de nouvelles voitures identifiées. Les Services de la Cité parlementaire tenaient à vous informer qu'elles avaient été achetées avec les anciens fonds. Les nouvelles voitures banalisées ne sont pas encore arrivées.

De plus, il a été convenu que dans la seconde moitié, plutôt que d'aller en sous-comité, nous allons poursuivre en comité complet, puisqu'il faudrait passer en sous-comité de toute façon.[Français]

Bonjour, je vous souhaite la bienvenue à la 135e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Aujourd'hui, nous allons examiner le quatrième rapport du Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés présenté au greffier du Comité, le jeudi 22 novembre. Le Sous-comité a recommandé que le projet de loi C-421, Loi modifiant la Loi sur la citoyenneté (connaissance suffisante de la langue française au Québec) soit désigné non votable.

Conformément à l'article 92(2) du Règlement, nous sommes heureux d'avoir parmi nous le parrain du projet de loi, M. Mario Beaulieu, député de La Pointe-de-l'Île, pour expliquer pourquoi il estime que ce projet de loi devrait pouvoir être mis aux voix. Il est accompagné de M. Marc-André Roche, recherchiste au Bloc québécois.

Je vous remercie d'être ici, monsieur Beaulieu. À titre informatif, la correspondance que vous avez envoyée mardi a été distribuée aux membres du Comité. Vous pouvez maintenant faire votre présentation au Comité.

M. Mario Beaulieu (La Pointe-de-l'Île, BQ):

Monsieur le président et chers membres du Comité, je vous remercie de nous recevoir.

Comme je vous l'ai indiqué dans ma lettre, le Sous-comité a eu beau juger que mon projet de loi C-421 était clairement inconstitutionnel, il n'a pas spécifié à quel article de la Constitution ou de la Charte il aurait supposément contrevenu. Faute d'indication précise, je vais faire un survol de l'ensemble des dispositions qui pourraient être pertinentes. J'espère que cela va répondre à votre questionnement. Sinon, je suis à votre disposition pour répondre aux questions.

Comme vous l'avez mentionné, je suis accompagné de M. Marc-André Roche, l'adjoint de mon collègue le député de Joliette. Comme nous n'avons pas d'équipe de recherche, il m'a donné un coup de main.

Comme vous le savez, la norme utilisée pour évaluer si un projet de loi est inconstitutionnel n'est pas très élevée. À la page 1143, le Bosc et Gagnon indique: Les projets de loi et les motions ne doivent pas transgresser clairement les lois constitutionnelles de 1867 à 1982, y compris la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés;

J'insiste sur les mots « transgresser clairement les lois constitutionnelles ». Il est établi de longue date qu'un désaccord sur la constitutionnalité d'un projet de loi ne suffit pas à le rendre non votable. J'ai l'impression que votre décision ne sera pas difficile à prendre.

À l'heure actuelle, les résidents permanents doivent respecter un certain nombre de critères pour obtenir la citoyenneté canadienne. Parmi ceux-ci, ils doivent réussir deux tests de compétence: un test de connaissances générales sur leur société d'accueil et un test de compétences linguistiques, où ils doivent démontrer qu'ils possèdent une connaissance suffisante du français ou de l'anglais.

Le projet de loi C-421 est assez simple. Il modifie la Loi sur la citoyenneté pour faire en sorte que les résidents permanents qui résident habituellement au Québec doivent démontrer qu'ils ont une connaissance suffisante du français.

Le premier critère de constitutionnalité est le partage des compétences. La citoyenneté relève de la compétence fédérale en vertu de l'article 91.25 de la Loi de 1867 sur l'Amérique du Nord britannique, qui précise que la naturalisation et les aubains relèvent de la compétence du Parlement. Manifestement, mon projet de loi satisfait à cette condition.

Il reste la Charte. Comme le Sous-comité n'a indiqué aucune disposition précise pour appuyer sa décision, je vais faire le tour aussi rapidement que possible.

D'abord, il y a la liberté de circulation et d'établissement. Le paragraphe 6(2) de la Charte précise que les citoyens et les résidents permanents ont le droit de se déplacer partout au Canada, de s'établir dans n'importe quelle province et d'y gagner leur vie. Que le projet de loi C-421 soit adopté ou non, rien n'empêcherait un résident permanent qui résiderait dans une autre province de déménager au Québec, de s'y établir et d'y travailler. Rien n'empêcherait un résident permanent qui réside dans une autre province d'y obtenir la citoyenneté canadienne, puis de déménager au Québec et de jouir de tous les droits et privilèges associés à la citoyenneté canadienne.

Comme le projet de loi C-421 est sans effet sur la liberté de circulation et d'établissement, j'en comprends que ce n'est pas sur cette base que le Sous-comité a jugé que le projet de loi était « clairement inconstitutionnel ».

Ensuite, il y a la langue de communication avec les institutions fédérales. Le paragraphe 20(1) de la Charte précise que la population peut communiquer à son choix en français ou en anglais avec l'administration fédérale, et que celle-ci doit être en mesure de lui fournir les services en français ou en anglais lorsque le nombre ou la nature du service le justifie.

Le projet de loi C-421 est sans effet sur la langue de communication entre la population et l'administration fédérale. Que ce projet de loi soit adopté ou non, un résident permanent pourra toujours communiquer soit en français, soit en anglais avec l'administration fédérale.

De même, la prestation du serment de citoyenneté pourra continuer à s'effectuer soit en français, soit en anglais, au Québec comme ailleurs au Canada. J'aurais préféré qu'il en soit autrement, mais cela aurait rendu mon projet de loi inconstitutionnel. C'est pourquoi je ne l'ai pas proposé.

(1105)



Le projet de loi C-421 se contente d'exiger que le résident permanent qui habite au Québec démontre qu'il possède des connaissances suffisantes de la langue française, la langue officielle et la langue normale des communications au Québec.

Je vous rappelle qu'il existe déjà une dose d'asymétrie dans l'application de la Loi sur l'immigration et la protection des réfugiés. Au Québec, c'est le gouvernement du Québec qui sélectionne et qui accompagne les immigrants et qui met en place les programmes d'intégration. La connaissance du français occupe une place de premier ordre dans toutes ces étapes.

Le projet de loi C-421 vient appuyer les efforts du Québec et étendre l'octroi de la citoyenneté, ce qui existe déjà aux étapes précédentes, soit la sélection, l'accompagnement et l'intégration. La sélection, l'accueil et l'intégration des immigrants et l'octroi de la citoyenneté sont quatre éléments d'un même processus. Je vois mal comment la connaissance du français serait constitutionnelle aux trois premières étapes, mais inconstitutionnelle à la quatrième. De toute façon, le projet de loi C-421 est sans effet sur la langue de communication entre la population et les institutions fédérales, ce qui règle la question de sa conformité au paragraphe 20(1) de la Charte.

Restent les dispositions sur les langues officielles.

Le paragraphe 16(1) de la Charte précise ceci: Le français et l'anglais sont les langues officielles du Canada; ils ont un statut et des droits et privilèges égaux quant à leur usage dans les institutions du Parlement et du gouvernement du Canada.

J'insiste sur les mots « droits et privilèges égaux quant à leur usage ». Le projet de loi C-421 ne contient aucune disposition ou prescription à propos de l'usage du français ou de l'anglais. Il ne concerne que la connaissance du français. La connaissance et l'usage, ce sont deux choses complètement différentes. De plus, le paragraphe 16(3) précise la portée de la Charte:

La présente charte ne limite pas le pouvoir du Parlement et des législatures de favoriser la progression vers l'égalité de statut ou d'usage du français et de l'anglais.

Ce paragraphe de la Charte parle de « l'égalité de statut ou d'usage du français et de l'anglais » au Canada. La Cour suprême reconnaît même que c'est le français qui est minoritaire au Canada. Elle reconnaît que, pour que le français et l'anglais progressent vers l'égalité au Canada, il faut que le français prédomine au Québec. Dans l'arrêt de l'affaire Nguyen, en 2009, elle a statué ceci: [...] notre Cour a déjà reconnu que l'objectif général de protection de la langue française représentait un objectif important et légitime [...] eu égard à la situation linguistique et culturelle particulière de la province de Québec [...]

Cela permet à la Cour de conclure que: la politique linguistique sous-tendant la Charte de la langue française vise un objectif important et légitime. [Les documents] révèlent les inquiétudes à l'égard de la survie de la langue française et le besoin ressenti d'une solution législative à ce problème [...]

C'est d'un jugement à portée constitutionnelle que je parle ici.

Les mesures pour assurer la primauté du français au Québec viennent, dans les faits, favoriser l'égalité de statut ou d'usage du français au Canada. On pourrait même estimer que la pratique actuelle du gouvernement visant à rendre le Québec bilingue y contrevient, puisqu'en affaiblissant le français au Québec, elle ne favorise pas l'égalité des deux langues au Canada. Cela dit, il s'agit d'un débat qu'il est inutile d'entreprendre ici.

Je devais vous démontrer que mon projet de loi n'est pas « clairement inconstitutionnel ». Je pense que c'est fait.

Je suis à votre disposition pour répondre à vos questions.

Merci, monsieur le président et membres du Comité.

(1110)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Traduction]

Je ne procéderai pas comme d'habitude aux séries de questions. Je vais simplement donner la parole à qui la demande. Laissez-le-moi savoir.

Madame Lapointe. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Soyez le bienvenu au Comité, monsieur Beaulieu.

Je suis la présidente du Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, qui se penche sur tous les projets de loi. La semaine dernière, nous avons examiné 15 projets de loi, l'un après l'autre, avec l'analyste responsable de faire des propositions et de donner des explications. Nous avons étudié votre projet de loi en long et en large pour vérifier tout cela.

Savez-vous où est située ma circonscription, Rivière-des-Mille-Îles?

M. Mario Beaulieu:

Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, oui, je le sais.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Elle comprend les villes de Deux-Montagnes, Saint-Eustache, Boisbriand, Rosemère.

M. Mario Beaulieu:

C'est la Rive-Nord.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Oui, c'est dans la couronne nord de Montréal.

Dans ma circonscription, il y a plusieurs résidents permanents.

Je vais vous poser une question en ce qui concerne votre projet de loi.

Proposez-vous que ces gens qui demeurent dans ma circonscription, qui sont anglophones, qui sont des Américains devenus résidents permanents, aillent passer leur test de citoyenneté en Ontario, parce qu'ils ne pourraient pas le faire au Québec faute d'une connaissance suffisante du français?

M. Mario Beaulieu:

Essentiellement, je crois que cela les inciterait à apprendre le français pour en avoir une connaissance suffisante. Ce serait une très bonne chose, parce que cela leur permettrait de s'intégrer encore plus facilement au marché du travail.

Au Québec, il est vital que le français soit la langue commune pour assurer son propre avenir. Le Québec est la seule province majoritairement francophone, la seule où on peut réussir à faire en sorte que les nouveaux arrivants connaissent le français. Cela ne veut pas dire qu'ils ne peuvent pas connaître l'anglais.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Prenez mon cas, je suis francophone. Il n'y a pas plus francophone que le nom Lapointe. J'ai été élevée à Laval, j'ai toujours travaillé à Boisbriand, je fais la promotion du français à la Chambre auprès de tous mes collègues.

N'est-ce pas, chers collègues? Dites oui. Dites que je vous parle en français tout le temps. Même quand vous ne comprenez pas, vous réussissez à comprendre.

Je fais la promotion du français et je fais tout pour que les gens puissent devenir bilingues. Selon moi, le plus haut sera le taux de bilinguisme au Canada, le mieux ce sera.

J'ai siégé au Comité permanent des langues officielles aux côtés de M. Nater et de Mme Kusie. Ce sont des gens qui sont convaincus autant que moi de la valeur du bilinguisme.

(1115)



Je veux dire que nous sommes des promoteurs du bilinguisme et, selon moi, en ce qui concerne le français, il faut aller encore plus loin. Votre projet de loi me met mal à l'aise.

Je ne suis pas une spécialiste de la Constitution. Il y a des gens qui sont justement là pour nous aider au besoin. Les gens qui travaillent à la Bibliothèque du Parlement peuvent nous aider. Je suis simplement mal à l'aise devant ce projet de loi.

Ce n'est pas moi qui décide. Si on me dit qu'un projet de loi n'est pas constitutionnel, je ne peux pas le contester comme le ferait un avocat. J'ai fait un baccalauréat en administration des affaires. Je n'ai pas du tout la prétention d'être avocate.

Je me vois mal dire aux citoyens anglophones de ma circonscription, qui ont le droit d'être résidents permanents au Québec, qui contribuent à la société à leur façon même s'il parlent anglais, qu'ils ne deviendront pas citoyens canadiens et qu'ils vont simplement demeurer des résidents permanents.

Je ne sais pas si des collègues veulent ajouter quelque chose.

M. Marc-André Roche (recherchiste, Bloc Québécois):

J'aurais peut-être un élément à ajouter.

Le président:

Oui, allez-y, M. Roche.

M. Marc-André Roche:

Le compte rendu officiel du Sous-comité n'est pas encore disponible, mais les « bleus » le sont. Je vous rappelle que votre analyste recommandait que le projet de loi soit votable. Je comprends de votre intervention que vous avez hâte de pouvoir intervenir à la Chambre et de voter contre. C'est précisément l'objet de notre discussion.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'après les discussions que nous avons eues et qui ont été rapportées dans les « bleus », nous avons considéré que c'était inconstitutionnel. [Traduction]

Le président:

Je n'ai pas très bien compris, mais selon moi, lorsque l'analyste vient au sous-comité, il ne donne pas son avis sur ce qui peut ou ne peut pas faire l'objet d'un vote. Il ne fait que donner les faits selon son point de vue.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

L'analyste a dit essentiellement que cela pouvait aller dans les deux sens.

Le président:

Nous passons à M. Graham.

Si vous ne comprenez pas ce qu'il dit... Je ne sais pas en quelle langue il le dira. [Français]

M. Marc-André Roche:

Non, c'est parfait. [Traduction]

Le président:

Aucun de nous n'a compris ce qu'il a dit également.

Des voix: Oh, oh! [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Beaulieu, que diriez-vous si un projet de loi venant de l'Alberta, par exemple, parlait des personnes de moins de 65 ans à la date de leur demande de citoyenneté, qui résident habituellement en Ontario et qui ont une connaissance suffisante de la langue anglaise?

Serait-ce inconstitutionnel? Serait-ce une attaque contre le français? Serait-ce la guerre au Québec?

M. Mario Beaulieu:

Je crois que ce serait probablement constitutionnel. Par contre, le français et l'anglais n'ont pas un statut égal en ce moment.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ils l'ont dans la Constitution.

M. Mario Beaulieu:

C'est cela.

La Constitution vise à ce qu'il y ait égalité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Toutefois, on essaie d'enlever au fédéral un pouvoir que lui donne la Constitution.

M. Mario Beaulieu:

Dans les faits, le français est en déclin à peu près partout au Canada. Tous les indicateurs linguistiques le démontrent. L'objectif est d'assurer la diversité linguistique au Canada, donc d'assurer le maintien du français, l'égalité de statut du français. C'est ce que mon projet de loi vise.

C'est le français qui est menacé au Canada, pas l'anglais. Vous soulevez une question politique. Je pense qu'en ce qui touche la Constitution, ce n'est pas inconstitutionnel de soulever cette question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne suis pas du tout d'accord avec vous.

La Constitution est très claire à ce sujet. Un exemple en est la communication avec un fonctionnaire. Vous semblez dire que pour pouvoir parler à un fonctionnaire dans notre langue maternelle, il faut déménager dans la province appropriée et y séjourner assez longtemps. Cela remplacerait la liberté de voyager au Canada par une obligation de voyager, ce qui n'est pas conforme à la Constitution. Je ne vois pas comment vous réussirez à harmoniser ce projet de loi avec la Constitution.

M. Mario Beaulieu:

Cela ne touche pas l'usage de la langue.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous exigez que je communique avec vous en français pour prouver que j'en suis capable.

M. Mario Beaulieu:

C'est cela.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pourtant, il est obligatoire de communiquer avec le gouvernement.

M. Mario Beaulieu:

Cela ne veut pas dire que vous ne connaissez pas l'anglais si vous communiquez avec moi en français, pas plus que cela voudrait dire que je ne connais pas l'anglais si je communique avec vous en français.

Cela vise à encourager les nouveaux citoyens à apprendre le français. Je pense que c'est tout à fait légitime. Le Québec est la seule province où le français est la langue de la majorité et c'est en quelque sorte le foyer des francophones en Amérique du Nord. Il est donc nécessaire d'encourager l'usage du français et d'en faire la langue commune. Cela ne veut pas dire que l'on ne reconnaît pas les droits de la minorité anglophone; ce n'est pas du tout la question. Si le français n'est pas la langue commune au Québec, par contre, cela ne sera pas la langue qui va permettre d'intégrer les nouveaux arrivants et de faciliter les échanges entre tous les citoyens du Québec.

(1120)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La seule façon de juger cela constitutionnel serait si l'anglais et le français n'avaient pas un statut égal dans la Constitution. Or leur statut est bel et bien égal dans la Constitution. Par ailleurs, il n'y a pas une seule province au Canada, pas une, qui ne compte pas de francophones dans sa population.

Si un projet de loi exigeait d'être capable de parler anglais dans toute la province du Québec, il n'augmenterait pas les droits des francophones, on les attaquerait plutôt. Quand on attaque l'anglais au Québec, on attaque le français dans le reste du Canada.

J'aimerais moi aussi augmenter l'importance du français partout au Canada. Je suis bilingue, j'ai grandi dans une famille dont les deux parents étaient francophones. J'ai cependant été élevé en anglais, car ma famille n'avait pas le droit à l'école francophone parce qu'elle n'était pas catholique. Je suis maintenant anglophone parce que je n'étais pas catholique. Cela n'a aucun sens.

Pour augmenter l'importance du français partout au Canada, par contre, il faut voir les deux langues comme vraiment égales. Si vous me permettez ce commentaire, votre projet de loi va entièrement et complètement à l'encontre des objectifs de la Constitution. Il n'est en rien constitutionnel.

M. Mario Beaulieu:

En suivant ce raisonnement, les critères de sélection des nouveaux arrivants au Québec seraient anticonstitutionnels, tout comme le serait toute forme d'asymétrie. Dans le fond, entre le faible et le fort, il est dit que la loi protège le faible. Dans les faits, les deux langues n'ont pas un statut égal. La loi sert à établir cette égalité de statut pour favoriser le français en tant que langue commune au Québec. La Constitution reconnaît que la situation du français mérite et justifie qu'il y ait des mesures législatives pour la protéger et pour assurer son épanouissement partout au Canada.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Parlez-vous de partout au Canada ou seulement du Québec?

M. Mario Beaulieu:

Je veux que le français soit parlé partout au Canada. Nous défendons toutes les communautés francophones et acadiennes. Le Québec, c'est un peu le foyer de la langue française.

Je ne veux pas trop m'aventurer dans le débat politique. Je pense qu'il est préférable de rester dans le débat constitutionnel. Partout au monde, les régimes basés uniquement sur un bilinguisme institutionnel, mur à mur, finissent toujours par constater l'assimilation des langues minoritaires.

Il y a plusieurs pays où il se parle plus d'une langue nationale. En Belgique, en Suisse ou au Cameroun, par exemple, il y a une langue commune pour un territoire donné. Cela n'empêche pas les gens de très bien connaître cinq ou six langues secondes, mais cela fait en sorte de protéger leur langue. Si vous allez en Belgique flamande, vous constaterez que le néerlandais — qui n'est guère parlé dans le monde — n'est pas menacé dans cette partie de la Belgique, où il est la langue commune.

De façon générale, la Constitution a pour principe de protéger la dualité linguistique. Au Canada, la langue menacée est le français. Il faut que cette langue puisse continuer d'exister et de s'épanouir dans notre pays, ce qui explique les pouvoirs supplémentaires qui ont été accordées au Québec, notamment par l'entente Cullen-Couture sur l'immigration.

La Charte de la langue française du Québec, dont certains ont dit qu'elle était une grande loi canadienne, vise à faire du français la langue commune au Québec pour permettre aux francophones de travailler et de vivre dans leur langue. Je ne crois pas qu'elle soit anticonstitutionnelle.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous ramène à la Constitution, car c'est ce qui est en cause ici.

Je siège aussi au Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés, où j'ai déjà parlé de ma femme. Elle est arrivée au Canada en 2005, et elle parlait cinq langues, mais pas le français. Juste avant d'obtenir sa citoyenneté, elle est déménagée au Québec pour être avec moi. Si ce projet de loi avait été adopté, elle n'aurait pas pu le faire. Elle aurait été obligée de rester en Ontario parce qu'elle ne parlait pas un mot de français. Elle est en train de l'apprendre, mais ce n'est pas facile comme sixième langue. L'objectif du projet de loi est anticonstitutionnel, parce qu'il n'y a aucune demande faite au gouvernement qui soit plus importante que celle de la citoyenneté.

L'alinéa 20(1)a) de la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés se lit comme suit: l'emploi du français ou de l'anglais fait l'objet d'une demande importante;

Une demande de citoyenneté est une demande importante. Vous ne pouvez pas dire que ce n'est pas assez important pour être dans la Constitution. C'est ma position, et nous serons d'accord pour dire que nous sommes en désaccord.

(1125)

M. Mario Beaulieu:

Si nous ne sommes qu'en désaccord, alors le projet de loi est votable et c'est à la Chambre d'en disposer. Ce n'est pas parce qu'on n'aime pas une loi qu'elle est anticonstitutionnelle pour autant. Toutes les lois contiennent un élément de contrainte. Votre conjointe aurait probablement pu réussir le test de français. Demander qu'on favorise les gens ayant une connaissance suffisante du français n'est pas une exigence exagérée.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous reconnaissez donc que votre projet de loi transgresse la Constitution, mais pas gravement. Est-ce bien ce que vous me dites?

M. Mario Beaulieu:

Non. Je ne crois pas que mon projet de loi soit inconstitutionnel, et il répond encore moins au critère permettant de juger qu'un projet de loi est non votable. À mon avis, il ne transgresse pas la Constitution. Ce que vous soulevez concerne davantage l'aspect politique que l'aspect constitutionnel, et c'est au Parlement de prendre une décision au sujet de l'aspect politique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis membre du Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, qui a tenu 18 réunions depuis le début de cette législature. Je crois n'avoir manqué qu'une seule réunion. À ce jour, nous avons refusé deux projets de loi. En fait, je pense que c'est trois — pour l'un d'entre eux, c'était assez clair.

C'est notre travail de faire cela. Chaque projet de loi émanant d'un député adopté à la Chambre des communes a d'abord été étudié par ce sous-comité, y compris le projet de loi du Bloc québécois. Nous l'avons analysé — vous avez lu les « bleus » de nos délibérations — et nous étions d'accord que votre projet de loi n'était pas votable à cause de son caractère inconstitutionnel.

Il y a ce processus et c'est à nous de décider s'il est votable ou non. Si vous n'êtes pas d'accord sur notre décision, vous pouvez en appeler à la Chambre, qui procédera à un vote secret; vous avez ce droit.

Ma recommandation à mes collègues est de considérer que votre projet de loi ne passe pas le test de la Constitution.

M. Mario Beaulieu:

Je pense qu'il est constitutionnel. Les arguments que vous avez soulevés sont davantage d'ordre politique. Vous avez donné l'exemple de votre conjointe, qui est un cas particulier, mais la Constitution vise toute la collectivité et l'ensemble de la population du Canada.

Selon votre raisonnement, vous seriez contre toutes les mesures qu'a prises le Québec pour favoriser le français parce que vous les jugeriez anticonstitutionnelles. Vous diriez que le critère lié à la connaissance du français pour sélectionner des immigrants au Québec est anticonstitutionnel. C'est la même chose.

Nous n'empêchons pas les gens de communiquer en anglais ou en français avec le gouvernement. Tout ce que nous voulons, c'est un incitatif. Nous voulons que les gens démontrent qu'ils connaissent le français. La Loi sur la citoyenneté exige déjà une connaissance du français ou de l'anglais, et si une personne n'a pas de connaissance d'une de ces langues, sa demande est rejetée.

Nous croyons qu'au Québec, la connaissance du français devrait être exigée des immigrants parce que c'est la langue commune. Cela ne veut pas dire que ce n'est pas important de connaître l'anglais ou d'être bilingue sur le plan individuel. Au Québec, il faut renforcer le français. Je ne veux pas entrer dans un débat politique, mais à Montréal, le français est en déclin. Les indicateurs démontrent qu'il y a un déclin du français parce qu'on ne réussit pas à franciser suffisamment les nouveaux arrivants. Ce n'est pas une exigence farfelue que nous voulons utiliser pour écraser qui que ce soit, c'est une exigence qui vise à assurer l'avenir du français au Québec.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela nous ramène encore à la Constitution. C'est une question de communication entre le gouvernement fédéral et un citoyen aspirant, si je peux l'appeler ainsi, et non entre lui et une province ou une entreprise privée. C'est dans ce cadre seulement que ce n'est pas constitutionnel. Votre projet de loi forcerait les gens à choisir une langue plutôt qu'une autre, ce qui irait à l'encontre des valeurs de l'article 20 de la Charte. Pour moi, c'est noir sur blanc et il n'y a pas d'ambiguïté. Si c'était un projet de loi du gouvernement du Québec, il n'y aurait pas de problème, mais ce projet de loi concerne le gouvernement fédéral et la Constitution.

M. Mario Beaulieu:

Je vous répondrais que notre projet de loi ne porte pas sur les communications entre une personne et le gouvernement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, il porte là-dessus.

M. Mario Beaulieu:

Il porte sur les compétences linguistiques.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pour démontrer une compétence linguistique, il faut établir une communication avec le gouvernement.

Je cède la parole à mon collègue parce qu'on pourrait en parler jusqu'à cinq heures du matin.

(1130)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

J'ai une question.[Français]

Je m'excuse de parler en anglais. [Traduction]

M. Mario Beaulieu:

Non, ça va.

Le président:

Vous avez dit que le Québec peut décider qui a le droit d'immigrer, alors le gouvernement peut déjà s'assurer que seuls des francophones font une demande. Pourquoi avez-vous besoin du test en français? Vous avez déjà réglé la question.

M. Mario Beaulieu:

Ce n'est pas exclusif. Un des critères est de connaître le français. Si une personne connaît l'anglais, cela donne d'autres points. Ce n'est pas exclusif.

Dans le cadre du processus d'intégration, il y a l'apprentissage du français, mais on se rend compte que ce n'est pas suffisant. Selon nous, comme il faut déjà avoir une connaissance suffisante de l'anglais ou du français, nous disons qu'au Québec il serait approprié que la connaissance du français soit un critère de citoyenneté. C'est un autre incitatif pour s'assurer que les gens ont une connaissance suffisante du français.

Dans les jugements de la Cour suprême comme l'affaire Nguyen, on reconnaît que le français au Québec a besoin d'un soutien législatif pour s'assurer que les gens peuvent travailler et vivre en français et pour assurer la survie de la langue française au Québec et au Canada.

Le président:

Y a-t-il quelqu'un d'autre sur la liste?

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Stephanie, avez-vous des questions? Nous avons la parole depuis assez longtemps. [Français]

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Beaulieu, je vous remercie d'être ici, aujourd'hui. Nous n'avons plus de questions.

Bien sûr, nous avions des questions à propos de la constitutionnalité du projet de loi et des consultations que vous avez tenues lors de la création du projet de loi. Nous avons eu toutes les réponses dont nous avions besoin. Il n'y a donc plus de questions.

Je vous remercie encore une fois d'être venu ici aujourd'hui, monsieur Beaulieu.

M. Mario Beaulieu:

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Merci à tous les deux d'être avec nous. Je reconnais les mérites de la discussion.

Parlons de la Constitution, et concentrons-nous sur l'aspect juridique, même si, avec tout le respect que je vous dois, votre exposé semble beaucoup plus... Je comprends la passion — le discours passionné et politique par opposition au discours juridique — mais concentrons-nous sur l'aspect juridique.

J'ai eu l'occasion de siéger au comité de la justice et j'ai entendu beaucoup d'arguments constitutionnels. Je n'en ai entendu aucun dans votre déclaration préliminaire. J'ai regardé votre déclaration subséquente, et on y parle de l'affaire Nguyen, qui porte sur l'article 23 de la Charte, mais vos arguments portent sur les articles 16 et 20.

Pourquoi ne pas présenter d'affaires qui portent sur ces articles? Si on traite d'une question juridique très particulière, pourquoi choisissez-vous un paragraphe dans une affaire qui porte sur un article différent de la Charte pour appuyer des arguments à propos des articles 16 et 20?

M. Mario Beaulieu:

Je vais laisser M. Roche répondre. [Français]

M. Marc-André Roche:

En fait, les extraits choisis ont été pris dans la section préliminaire du jugement, où des observations de portée générale sont émises et sur lesquelles on s'appuie pour porter un jugement par la suite.

Nous en avons compris que c'était une observation de portée générale et qu'elle s'appliquait tout aussi bien à l'ensemble des articles. [Traduction]

M. Chris Bittle:

J'ai fait une recherche rapide dans Google. Vous n'êtes pas membre ni l'un ni l'autre du Barreau du Québec, n'est-ce pas?

(1135)

[Français]

M. Mario Beaulieu:

Non. [Traduction]

M. Chris Bittle:

Y a-t-il des experts constitutionnels qui appuient votre position et qui vous ont fourni des arguments? Je n'ai rien vu. Encore une fois, c'est une réponse politique que j'entends. Vous nous demandez de fournir un argument juridique, mais vous ne le faites pas. Avez-vous des arguments provenant d'un expert reconnu?

Je ne suis pas un expert de la Constitution — mes collègues avocats à St. Catharines vous le confirmeront —, mais avez-vous des experts constitutionnels qui appuieraient votre position?

M. Mario Beaulieu:

Naturellement. [Français]

M. Marc-André Roche:

Nous en avons consulté trois, et je suis sûr qu'avec le budget de recherche d'un parti reconnu, nous aurions été prêts à les payer pour avoir un avis juridique en bonne et due forme.

Le président:

Qu'ont dit ces trois personnes?

M. Marc-André Roche:

Selon deux d'entre eux, c'était absolument clair.

Le troisième avait un doute mais, à son avis, les contraintes passaient le test de la contrainte raisonnable, étant donné que cela s'appuyait sur un objectif de politique publique qui avait déjà été reconnu dans de précédents jugements de la Cour suprême.

M. Mario Beaulieu:

Pour ma part, j'ai consulté un avocat au sujet de la partie sur la liberté de circulation et d’établissement, soit le droit d'aller d'une province à l'autre. Il ne m'a pas donné un avis juridique, mais il m'a quand même fourni une réponse écrite.

Selon lui, cela ne contrevenait pas à la liberté d'un citoyen d'aller d'une province à l'autre, parce que si quelqu'un réussissait son test de citoyenneté en Ontario, il pourrait venir au Québec. De même, si quelqu'un réussissait son test de citoyenneté au Québec, il pourrait très bien s'installer en Ontario ou ailleurs.

Cela ne porte donc pas atteinte à cet article de la Constitution. [Traduction]

M. Chris Bittle:

Je comprends la réponse, mais nous n'avons pas de nom. Comme l'a dit le juriste des Simpsons, Lionel Hutz, les ouï-dire et les conjectures sont des types de preuves, mais ce ne sont pas nécessairement de bonnes preuves.

Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, je ne crois pas que vous nous ayez fourni des preuves juridiques à l'appui de votre position. Je suis conscient des contraintes budgétaires, mais si vous avez parlé à des juristes, ils sont habitués à fournir des affidavits ou des documents d'appui. Mais nous n'avons rien vu. Cela n'aurait rien coûté.

Je suis conscient du temps. Merci, monsieur le président.

M. Mario Beaulieu:

De notre point de vue, c'est à vous de faire la preuve que c'est inconstitutionnel.

L'avocat que j'ai contacté s'appelle François Côté. Je pourrais vous faire parvenir... [Français]

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Y a-t-il d'autres questions?[Traduction]

J'aimerais remercier sincèrement les témoins. La discussion a été très intéressante. Nous allons suspendre la séance pendant quelques minutes, avant de passer aux affaires du Comité.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on November 29, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.