header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-10-20 TRAN 27

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(0845)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

I call to order meeting number 27 of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities to discuss the study of the Navigation Protection Act.

Today we have with us the representatives of the Alberta Association of Municipal Districts and Counties, the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities, [Translation]

the Fédération québécoise des municipalités[English] and the regional municipality of Argenteuil as well. Thank you very much for taking the time to speak to us today and to add your comments on the Navigation Protection Act. I will ask you to introduce yourselves as we go forward. Who would like to go first?

Mr. Kemmere, please go ahead.

Mr. Al Kemmere (President, Alberta Association of Municipal Districts and Counties):

I want to thank you for the opportunity to present to the body today and give some of our perspectives on the Navigable Waters Protection Act. Just for a little bit of background, AAMDC, the Alberta Association of Municipal Districts and Counties, represents all the rural municipalities in Alberta. We cover 85% of the land base in this province. We cover the province from north to south, east to west, touching all other borders. We manage almost 4,400 bridges, which account for more than 60% of the total bridge inventory in the province.

For years rural municipalities have been working with the Navigable Waters Protection Act, so AAMDC has a strong position to speak to the impacts of the changes made to it from the 2012 rural municipal perspective. The former NWPA posed considerable challenges for municipalities, including that many water bodies that had not recently supported any navigation still required costly impact assessments. Many water bodies in Alberta are either used exclusively for irrigation or are not high enough to support navigation through seasonal runoffs. They would never actually be navigable, and yet they're still subject to the costs of an impact assessment.

Municipalities are often required to build much costlier bridges than they had originally planned in order to support navigation even though the water body is not actively navigated. In many cases a proposed culvert would have been upgraded to a much more expensive bridge.

Municipalities are often faced with excessive delays in having their applications reviewed and approved by Transport Canada because of the broad scope of the previous legislation.

The definition of navigability has often varied from project to project, which would make municipal costs in complying with the previous legislation even less practical.

Repairs and modifications to older structures would often trigger the need for an impact assessment, even if the water body had not been navigated in recent history.

Rural municipal concerns with the previous act were not about their being closed to navigation or about federal oversight, but rather the unreasonable scope that the previous legislation placed on water bodies that obviously did not support navigation. The previous legislation did not utilize local knowledge on how water bodies were being used and therefore increased the cost to municipalities and to the Government of Canada.

The new legislation balances federal oversight with municipal autonomy. The new legislation allows the minister to add more water bodies to the schedule as they see fit and allows owners of works that have work [Technical difficulty—Editor] subject to the NPA, even if it's not on a scheduled water body, by opting into the process.

Clearly many different organizations manage works that cross water bodies. The municipalities are similar to the federal government in that they operate in the best interests of their constituents. If a non-scheduled water body is used for navigation, it is highly unlikely that the municipality will ignore that function when building a bridge or a culvert. Navigation is important to local economies and the quality of life, and the current NPA empowers municipalities to make those decisions locally.

With this background in mind, the AAMDC has a few recommendations for the committee to consider in reviewing the NPA.

First, the use of a schedule is a good idea and should be maintained. Including every water body in Canada is simply impractical. It showed in the extra work and cost that it caused municipalities and the capacity challenge it caused to Transport Canada.

Second, there may be value in expanding the schedule to include more water bodies, based on conversations with first nations, aboriginal groups, and other stakeholders who may be involved. The development of a formal process to propose and evaluate additions may be an effective compromise.

It is important that municipalities be treated as distinct from other owners and managers of works that cross water bodies. Municipalities make decisions in the best interests of their constituents and typically have a strong knowledge of whether a body is actually being used for navigation.

(0850)



If the scope of the NPA is broadened to include more waterways, it must be matched by an increase in federal capacity to process the applications in a timely manner. It is important to remember that the NPA is ultimately about the safe navigation of Canada's water bodies. Other acts address environmental and land use concerns associated with works over water bodies, and expanding the NPA to address this will increase confusion among those who interact with the legislation.

Thank you for your time. I'll entertain questions at your call.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Kemmere. We very much appreciate your being very direct and to the point and making your comments as brief as possible.

Mr. Orb, would you like to go next?

Mr. Raymond Orb (President, Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities):

Yes.

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen. Thank you for the opportunity to speak to you about the Navigation Protection Act and its effect on municipalities in Saskatchewan.

My name is Ray Orb and I'm president of the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities, or SARM. We represent all 296 rural municipalities in the province.

I'm also here today to speak on behalf of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities, or FCM, in particular the rural forum of which I'm currently the chairperson.

SARM's concerns with the Navigation Protection Act are in regard to the added costs to municipal infrastructure projects. SARM's environmental concerns are already looked after by the environment departments, both federally and provincially.

Water quality and other important environmental considerations fall under the responsibility of both the federal and provincial environment departments. SARM is confident that they have the proper legislation and regulations in place to ensure that there is a strong balance between the environment and infrastructure projects.

Before amendments were made to the Navigation Protection Act, RMs, rural municipalities, faced increased costs, project delays, and generally more red tape when planning, designing, and constructing infrastructure projects. This was a result of the requirements to accommodate non-existent public water travel.

These requirements made sense in 1882 when the act was created. However, our modes of transportation have evolved drastically and the need for ensuring passage of canoes has decreased significantly.

This used to mean that projects involving culverts were required to be large enough to allow passage of canoes or other similar vessels. Municipalities were told by Transport Canada to redesign and alter their projects, which resulted in delays and increased costs. Unfortunately, these alterations were required even though there was no public travel on these waterways.

Take the example from the RM of Insinger, in the east central part of Saskatchewan. In 2005 they faced a series of delays in attempting to replace a bridge on the Whitesand River. A representative from Transport Canada deemed that the waterway was navigable, despite the many beaver dams, rocks, brush, and no one living in the area could recall a canoe attempting to travel this waterway.

The original project cost was $125,000, and that proposal from Transport Canada would have cost $400,000, an increase of $275,000 from the original design. The RM and Transport Canada discussed this issue back and forth until SARM became involved in late 2005. Discussions continued until eventually the original project design was allowed to continue as planned. This delayed the project for well over a year.

A second example comes from the RM of Meadow Lake, in the northwest area of the province. In 2010 the RM applied for approval to construct a new road and bridge to cross Alcott Creek. The application was submitted in April 2010, and approval wasn't received until November 2011. In Saskatchewan our construction season ends in November, resulting in the RM of Meadow Lake having to wait two full construction seasons to start the project.

Upon receiving approval, the RM was required to raise the bridge above the existing road-top elevation to accommodate canoe traffic. This resulted in a hump in the road that is now experienced by several vehicles per day and will only accommodate a recreational canoe once every five years.

The amendments that came into force in 2014 addressed these concerns and allowed for municipalities to carry out their infrastructure projects without these unnecessary delays.

SARM and its membership are appreciative of these changes and are concerned that a review of these changes may result in a reversal. This would bring back the same old challenges that I have highlighted to you this morning.

We suggest that any amendments made as a result of this review take into consideration the positive effect that the amendments from 2014 have had on municipalities. SARM recommends that the federal government remain committed to these amendments which reduced the financial burden on municipalities.

(0855)



On the FCM rural forum, I would also like to add the following points to consider.

The FCM rural forum is mandated by FCM to deal with real specific issues, and it's composed of member municipalities all across rural Canada.

The FCM welcomed changes to the Navigation Protection Act brought about in 2012, which eliminated unnecessary requirements to accommodate non-existent public water travel. The amendments allowed the existing legislation to be brought up to date and into line with the country's current transportation routes.

By reducing project delays and higher building costs to municipalities, while at the same time providing protection to these important waterways, the changes to the Navigation Protection Act directly related to municipal concerns aimed at improving the capacity of local governments to build infrastructure and to deliver essential services. To make environmental planning easier, the federal government also recognized the limited capacity of rural municipalities and ensured that these communities have access to rural-specific resources, including tools, expertise, and financial capacity.

At this moment when the federal government has committed to community building as nation building, rural municipalities must be full partners in plotting the path forward. It will take continued dialogue to build Canada's future, with durable growth and more livable communities. Through FCM, rural Canada will continue to have a full seat at the table.

Thank you for the opportunity to speak this morning.

(0900)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Orb.

We will now move to teleconferencing with Mr. Pearce.

Mr. Scott Pearce (Administrator, Fédération québécoise des municipalités):

Good morning. I'm Scott Pearce. First, I would like to thank the committee for this consultation and their interest in the opinion of the Quebec federation of municipalities.

I have the pleasure of sitting on the FCM board of directors with Mr. Kemmere and Mr. Orb. The three of us make up the chair and two vice-chairs of the FCM rural forum. While Quebec's opinion may differ, for different reasons, I support everything they've said so far today.

As I said, I am here representing the Quebec federation of municipalities, which is 1,200 municipalities in Quebec, with over three million lakes and rivers.

I'll be as brief as I can, given the time allotted to us. I would like to summarize what we've retained from the 2014 amendments: a name change to better reflect the intention of the act; addition to the law of an appendix that lists navigable waters for which necessary regulatory approval is required to build structures that might interfere with navigation significantly; the public right to navigation; and the right to use navigable waters as a road, which continues to be protected in Canada under common law, whether the waterway is or is not included in the annex of the act.

We are here to comment on the four points related to these changes. Our concerns are more environmental. Comments from the FQM will be pretty much just on that. Regarding the effectiveness of the changes globally from a user perspective, with other laws that affect all users, we want to actually talk to the committee about the overall effectiveness of these changes in the context of the management of boating.

The change of name clearly indicates that we want to protect navigation instead of navigable waters. FQM has focused its priorities on the issue of regulations on boating. On September 29, we had a resolution, which we have forwarded to you.

It is so important that priority be given to bodies of water and their environmental protection before protecting pleasure boating. The law on merchant marine and the office of boating safety doesn't protect lakes adequately, because these laws deal with navigation without a clear distinction between pleasure and commercial transport and relegate the water as a secondary consideration. The lakes and rivers of Canada are our natural wealth, and once the watershed is damaged, we have a long way to come back.

Concerning navigable waters, the new annexes remove the largest share of Quebec lakes to keep only three: Lac des Deux Montagnes, Lac Memphrémagog, and Lac Saint-Jean. Besides the Saint Lawrence River, five of our major rivers are also included: Rivière des Mille-Îles, Rivière des Prairies, Richelieu River, Rivière Saint-Maurice, and Saguenay River.

Those bodies of water have one thing in common: they are navigable and they all have serious environmental problems related to pleasure boating. They're not alone. All the navigable lakes not listed on this list have the same problems, often exacerbated due to their less extensive surface areas.

On the public right to navigation, the FQM considers that boating is not a right. The public right to navigation, a principle of common law, comes from an antiquated thought process mainly based on trade. Boating should not be considered a right. It's not economically feasible nor safe, and is less sustainable. It's a privilege that has otherwise endangered and degraded the lakes. The FQM hopes to address this issue further with the Minister of Transport as soon as the opportunity arises. It is for us, absolutely fundamental.

The right to use a waterway as a road is unsustainable. Supporting this principle is to ignore that each lake or river has its own morphology and its weaknesses, banks, shallows, swamps, and spawning areas, just to name a few.

Imagining that a lake is a road is unthinkable as to believe we could move either by car, bike, or walk in any area of a Canadian park without restriction, arguing that the place is public. This idea would not occur to anyone, even if their right to travel is essential. So this is not the case of navigation.

There are rules in parks and there must be rules on lakes. It should be added that on the roads there are limits, and national and provincial standards governing the roads and highways. In the case of lakes, not only is the water considered a road, but in addition, there are very few restrictions, obtained in each case through a very long and expensive procedure, which makes it almost impossible for local municipalities to regulate their own bodies of water.

Many of the lakes are suffering severe problems because there are no protections.

(0905)



The amendments to the act on the protection of navigation overall, interrelated with the Canada Shipping Act and the regulation on restrictions on the use of buildings, are inefficient and have serious implications for users: ecological damage, harm to public health, security problems, economic concerns, engagement of public access, and reduced quality of life.

For the FQM, it is urgent to find solutions to manage boating efficiently, ecologically, and in ways that are economically profitable. This natural resource must become safer and remain accessible to all Canadians before the damage observed today is irreversible.

The municipal sector is very interested in supporting the government in this task. We need to work together to find solutions. We have proposed a working group led by the federal government, including municipalities and watershed management folks, who are the closest stakeholders on the ground, and it would be a first step towards the necessary changes to be considered for the management of recreational boating on inland waters in Canada.

I have now stated what the FQM professionals have put together for me to discuss with you. I'll just go on a more personal level for the next 30 seconds.

I am a fisherman. I am the mayor of my town and the warden of my region and I sit on the FQM and the FCM. We have a serious problem. The way our laws are, people can bring boats of any size onto small lakes across the country. What it's doing is damaging our shorelines in ways we've never seen. I am not a hard-line environmentalist; I am an average Canadian. Frankly, we need the government's help, because the damage that is being done is going to be irreversible.

The FCM as well as the FQM passed a resolution regarding the boating, but I often talk to people in what I think is a simple way to look at it. An average person takes a bath in their bathtub at home, and it's not really a problem, but when you put a 1,000-pound person into a regular bathtub, you have a problem. This is exactly what's happening on our lakes throughout this country at this point. We need the federal government to work with municipalities to protect our water for all Canadians.

I thank you so very much for taking the time to listen to us.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Thank you to all of you. As you would know, we have a lot of members interested in asking some critically important questions.

I'm going to turn to Ms. Block for six minutes.

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC):

I want to welcome all of our witnesses here today. Even though it's through video and teleconferencing, it's good to hear the testimony you bring.

I also want to acknowledge the background briefing material we received from our analyst the week before we broke to be in our ridings. I think it reminded us that the changes to the Navigable Waters Protection Act actually started long before they were enshrined in legislation; I think she noted it as being back in 2009.

I also recognize that a number of you have appeared before this committee two or three times to share your thoughts, your concerns, and perhaps your recommendations on how this legislation needs to be changed.

I have in my hand an article that was published in The Hill Times on September 14, with the headline “Leave Navigation Protection Act 'as is,' say municipalities”. That article sparked quite a lively debate here in committee and in the media, as both the parliamentary secretary, Kate Young, and a departmental official indicated that the study would be done and a report would be tabled in early 2017, even before the committee had decided to undertake this study.

We know that undertaking this study is in the minister's mandate letter and that the letter is pretty clear about restoring the protections that were changed in 2014. We know that there is a view to do this in early 2017.

I agree with the headline of that article, which says to leave the Navigation Protection Act as is. I think there was a lot of good work done to get that act to where it is so that it could remove the barriers that many municipalities were facing when dealing with the issues they have to deal with, in rural Canada especially. We know that there is ministerial discretion built into the act whereby waterways can be added or removed, if a municipality applies to have that done.

Because I agree with the headline in this article and believe that we got it right, I am going to offer the rest of my time to my colleagues across the table. Most of them are new to this committee, and it's obvious that they are the driving force behind this study, so I'm going to offer them the rest of my time to ask questions of the municipalities.

(0910)

The Chair:

That's excellent. Thank you very much for being so co-operative, Ms. Block, as we move forward on this.

We'll go to Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Thanks, Ms. Block, I appreciate that.

As Ms. Block noted, everybody on the Liberal side of the table is new. We were consuming negative public feedback when the changes to the act were brought in. I am from British Columbia, where there's a very robust environmental sector. There was doom and gloom being spread everywhere about the implications of this. However, when we really looked at taking on a review of the Navigation Protection Act , it was more to fulfill what we saw was a missed obligation to actually go out and consult.

I understand that there was a sense of urgency on the part of the previous government to get economic activity going and to get construction projects under way and completed. You can't disagree with that, but at the same time, we come in. I think I can speak for the whole group. We are not ideologically bent on rolling something back just because somebody else did it. We think, in fact, that, as you've noted, there have been some benefits to these changes. We want to preserve those while at the same time perhaps taking a little extra time to reflect on others' views of what should happen. With that in mind, I have a number of questions.

First, we'll go to you, Mr. Kemmere. Has there been enough time for municipalities to experience the new regime, the new Navigation Protection Act? Have you had a chance to see the difference in how your projects are conducted under the new act?

Mr. Al Kemmere:

Municipalities already shared with us their ability to move forward on works that are crossing the rivers and streams. They have been able to be expedited. Rather than taking a year and a half, they're down to a four-month process of approvals for all the environmental aspects. At the same time, the structures that are being dealt with are adequate to the municipality and also adequate to look after the environmental health of the streams. Our members are sharing with us that there have definitely been improvements.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Great, thank you for that.

We'll swing to you, Mr. Orb.

In terms of the projects that have gone forward, is it customary that the individual municipalities adopt some kind of standardized mechanism for getting public input before a project goes forward? In other words, do you open the doors to hear from the public on a proposal to build a culvert instead of a bridge, for instance?

Mr. Raymond Orb:

It's not necessary other than going through the standard procedure of doing tendering and things like that. If it's an existing bridge or a culvert, there isn't a consultation period unless, I suppose, they're looking at altering waterways, the flow of water, and things like that. If it is kind of business as usual, there is not a consultation period that's needed. The exception would be, of course, with first nations. If it affected a first nations reserve, or it affected a waterway on a reserve or something like that, there would be a consultation done. The duty to consult would be a standard procedure.

It's not a standard procedure to have to consult. In a lot of cases, the water only runs for a few weeks during the spring runoff. It's not considered by us to be a navigable water. That's the issue, because before the regulations were changed, we were forced to go through all of the stringent regulations that were in place to have access for watercraft to go down the stream. These are simply streams that don't run very much during the year, so it's something that we see as a low priority.

(0915)

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I'll open this up to everybody on the teleconference or on the video conference.

Has there been any adverse public reaction that you have on record to any of the projects that you've taken forward?

Mr. Al Kemmere:

From an Alberta point of view, I am not aware of any adverse push-back or any adverse concerns that have come forward.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

What about Saskatchewan?

Mr. Raymond Orb:

I would say the same thing. We've only had positive feedback from our members. Of course, we've since speeded up the process.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Okay.

What about Quebec?

Mr. Scott Pearce:

There has not, at this point. Everything seems to be going well.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

There is a principle that I've learned to respect even more over time, the principle of fair process, whereby, when you have the doors open and you allow for public input on issues, if there is none, you can take that as a signal that things have been going along pretty well okay.

The one thing that popped out to me in the new act that might be problematic is that the only recourse for somebody who really does have an issue with what's being proposed or with what has already been done is the courts, which can be—it's the same thing you spoke about in terms of the old process—time-consuming and expensive.

Would you be agreeable to a perhaps more amenable system for public input and public objections to a particular project that didn't involve somebody having to wait until it's done and then go to court?

Mr. Raymond Orb:

May I comment on that?

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Go ahead. We'll go to Saskatchewan first.

Mr. Raymond Orb:

I would comment on that to say that our municipal council meetings are all open to the public. In the case of tendering, which applies to most of the construction infrastructure projects, either culverts or bridges, they are advertised to the general public. People see that.

I think that if people have issues, whether we're changing or taking out a bridge and installing a culvert, people would get back to our local politicians pretty quickly if they had concerns about it.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Is it possible to send along to us a couple of examples of these processes that have been advertised in a given municipality so that we can go back and look at the minutes of those meetings, etc.? I would like to familiarize myself with the process that's being used right now. This may not be the greatest analogy, but the changes to the act were made for a reason, and we don't want to throw out the good reason—the baby with the bathwater kind of thing.

Has the—

The Chair:

Mr. Hardie, I'm sorry, but your time has is up.

The Chair:

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

I also thank our guests for being here this morning.

You are our eyes and ears on the ground. In the span of a few minutes, we are going to be able to cover more municipalities than anything we would be able to do during the hours devoted to the study.

My first question has two parts and is for all of you. For the first part, I would ask that you provide a yes or no answer. If the answer is yes, an explanation will be required.

When the minister appeared at the very beginning of our study, he said that no less than 40 bills, most of which I suspect were private members’ bills, have been introduced to add a waterway to the list set out in the legislation. Have the members you are representing asked that a body of water be added to that list, yes or no?

If the answer is yes, what was the process to add that body of water, river or lake to the list set out in the legislation?

Perhaps you could answer in the same order in which you made your presentations this morning.

Let’s start with Alberta.

(0920)

[English]

Mr. Al Kemmere:

To my knowledge, we have not had any requests to have additions or appeals to any projects that way. I am not aware of any. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

What about Saskatchewan? [English]

Mr. Raymond Orb:

No, we haven't had any requests from our members. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Now, let’s turn to Quebec.

Mr. Scott Pearce:

So far, there have been none.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, that answers my first question.

My second question is about the reverse onus. We know that Transport Canada no longer accepts complaints. Consequently, a citizen, a group of citizens or an association wanting to object must now obtain a legal recourse. In any of the municipalities you are representing, have you received those types of complaints? Have you had to deal with that?

Please answer in the same order, starting with Alberta. [English]

Mr. Al Kemmere:

Presently, to my knowledge, we have not received any complaints. Be aware that we don't have a direct link into every municipal decision-making body, but to my knowledge, we have not had any. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Mr. Orb, I’m listening. [English]

Mr. Raymond Orb:

None that I know about up to this point. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Mr. Pearce, you have the floor.

Mr. Scott Pearce:

We basically receive one complaint a day, but not about projects. The complaints have more to do with the size of the boats that have the right to navigate our waterways. They are often very large and cause environmental damage. That’s more the type of complaint that we receive pretty much every day.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Mr. Pearce. Let me take this opportunity to ask you another question directly, because your environmental concerns in particular caught my attention during your presentation.

As we know, under this navigation protection act, all the pipeline assessments were removed and redirected to the National Energy Board.

Do you think the situation is the same, better or worse as a result of this transfer of expertise from Transport Canada to the National Energy Board?

Mr. Scott Pearce:

The way the legislation is worded imposes no limit on the size of the boats allowed to use navigable waterways. As a result, boats that are too big and that create five- to six-foot waves and major damage to the shoreline are found on small recreational lakes in Quebec, Ontario or Alberta.

Municipalities would like the Government of Canada to at least implement the rules. It is not normal that a 100-foot boat, weighing 100,000 pounds, has the right to sail on a small navigable lake. There is not much we can do to repair the damage once it is caused. It is already too late.

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

Have the amendments to the former Navigable Waters Act and to the current Navigation Protection Act changed your relationships or your consultations with other levels of government?

In other words, have provincial or municipal authorities changed their ways as a result of those amendments?

Mr. Scott Pearce:

Would you first like to hear the answer of the folks from Alberta and Saskatchewan? [English]

Mr. Al Kemmere:

From the Alberta point of view, I think it's only helped enhance our relationships with the various levels of government as the processes have been able to be expedited. We know that there are still eyes on the important items, but I believe that in all three levels of government, we've been able to see processes being expedited and as a result, the relationships I think have been enhanced. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

We’ll go back to Mr. Orb. [English]

Mr. Raymond Orb:

I don't think it's changed the relationship with our senior levels of government. In the case of projects that are approved, that receive grants, they could be, for instance, Building Canada, that could be a project that's approved to install a bridge or a culvert. The necessary permits are still in order. Are there aquatic permits as the case may be? There are permits from Environment that still have to be approved. Those people are still out there. They're still looking at the projects.

As my colleague from Alberta has stated, it simply expedites the process and that's what we're pleased with. We're pleased with the regulations in their current state.

(0925)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Aubin. Thank you to our witnesses.

Mr. Fraser.

Mr. Sean Fraser (Central Nova, Lib.):

I'd like to kick things off by saying that I think I sensed a little hesitancy at the outset of some of your testimony about the potential of there being serious changes made to the legislation that might run counter to what your wishes are.

If I could reflect the comments of my colleague, Mr. Hardie, we've learned in some of the testimony that there are actually some good changes that have been made. To the extent that there are positive developments, we don't want to further drive up the expenses to municipalities for the sake of making projects more expensive. I'd like to put your minds at ease there. At the same time, we do want to make sure that the legislation operates as it was intended to.

By way of background, I think we may have wildly different experiences. I'm from out in Nova Scotia where I'm surrounded by coast five minutes from my house at any given point in time. A lot of local businesses in fact use lakes or rivers to get their products to market as well. So it's sometimes a business-friendly approach that we take to making sure that there's a free right of navigation in their relationship with municipal works.

I'd like to give you an opportunity to explain if there are projects that you have been able to take on as a result of the changes to the legislation we're dealing with that weren't possible before .

Maybe respond in the order that you testified.

Mr. Al Kemmere:

In terms of projects that we have taken on, I can't say that there are extra projects that we have taken on. I believe we've been trying to respond to the needs that have been on the landscape for many years.

You make an interesting point with the roles they play in Nova Scotia compared to Alberta, because there is not a lot of trade on our rivers and streams, only because we are landlocked and so we don't have access to the major bodies of water that you would need to do trade on.

Many of the items that we ran into problems with on this, as Ray Orb pointed out, are streams that are barely navigable for one month of the year because they're intermittent streams that only happen at runoff time, and they are truly not navigable year-round. Those are the ones where we ran into as many issues with our process as reasonable....

There are streams, major streams, that could be navigable waters for trade that are still protected under the act in Alberta and they are listed in the schedule. If there are new ones to be identified that are necessary to enhance trade or to enhance the oversight, then they can be added to that list. That's one of the great things about this. The minister has that discretion through an application process. I think that addresses any future trade needs that could come forward.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Before we move on to the other witnesses, I think you hit on something that's important to me in my region of the country.

The application process, as far as I understand it, is limited to municipalities or potentially provincial governments, I would argue, under the wording of the legislation, not that it matters greatly for present purposes. Is there a mechanism in place that allows users of the waterway, whether for recreational purposes, traditional purposes, or economic purposes, let's say a local business that wants to get their product onto a river for trade, to bring it to a municipality? If they don't have the power to apply, is there a mechanism to allow them to ask you to do it on their behalf? Has that ever happened? Do you see a mechanism there?

Mr. Al Kemmere:

I don't see that it has happened, but I think as a municipal government if we have a local businessperson or local residents who are looking for exactly what you're speaking about, that would be council's role, to work through that request and then decide to move it forward that way.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

I'll give the other witnesses an opportunity to perhaps elaborate on whether the changes made have allowed them to take on projects that may not have been possible before the changes were made.

(0930)

Mr. Raymond Orb:

I'd like to answer that.

In Saskatchewan we have the municipal roads for the economy program, and our province allocates funding to the rural municipalities that can apply. The ones that meet the criteria for the program can actually receive funding. We can send to the committee the list of the projects that have gone ahead. I think those projects could have gone ahead before the rules were changed on navigable waters, but as I stated, they would have been delayed, and they would have been very costly. I think a lot of those projects would not have been able to go ahead if the regulations had not been changed.

Right now, the process is working the way we would like it to work. As I mentioned, we still have the checks and balances along the way with Environment, but we can certainly forward that list.

I'd just like to make a comment. Part of the problem is municipalities across the country only receive about eight cents out of every tax dollar. Those are the funds that we operate with. That's not unique to Saskatchewan. I think it's very common across the country. We need funding from Building Canada. Saskatchewan municipalities, the smaller ones, like the rural municipalities, haven't received much funding, in most cases none from Building Canada. We're using our own provincial money. So we're making a pitch, of course, to have the criteria changed so that rural municipalities and smaller communities can qualify for the funding.

We can certainly send you the list of the projects that we're doing now.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Sure, and as a rural MP, that's something I'm interested in as well.

The Chair:

Your time is up, Mr. Fraser. Thank you very much.

Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Madam Chair, I'll be sharing my time with my colleague, Mr. Iacono.

My colleagues have touched upon this but I'd like some further clarification from each of you, please.

Transport Canada's navigation program no longer accepts complaints about works that impede navigation on unlisted waterways. Individuals who believe that a work on an unlisted waterway has an impact on the public right to navigation need to seek a court order to resolve the issue. Have any of the municipalities you represent been taken to court following the receipt of a complaint about a non-compliant municipal work on an unlisted waterway?

Mr. Al Kemmere:

From an Alberta point of view, I don't know of any. I would hope that communication would take place at the council level, long before they would see if they would go to court.

Mr. Raymond Orb:

As far as I know, there haven't been any municipalities that have been taken to court.

I would just like to mention one thing. There is the Trans Canada Trail across the country which is due to be completed before 2017. We have lots of blue ways, designated routes for people to travel on our waterways, by canoe especially. In Saskatchewan, our trail has just been completed, and we have signs up that people can use, when they put their canoes in, to travel down the waterway.

We think it's making a big difference that people who want to use it for recreation or for short travel distances can use that route.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

You don't know of any complaints being taken to court.

Mr. Raymond Orb:

No. None.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you. That's my question.

The Chair:

Mr. Iacono, go ahead. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Gentlemen, thank you for being here this morning.

I have a question for Scott Pearce.

How can the legislation be amended to better protect navigable waters?

Mr. Scott Pearce:

Thank you so much for your question, sir.

First of all, there is no conflict in terms of the right of navigation to bring our products to market or to perform infrastructure work needed on the waterways.

Here’s the problem. Based on the way the legislation is worded, there is no limit on the size of vessels on our waterways, which means that the waterways are dying.

There are several ways to look at the problem. A number of experts have conducted studies on the issue. Clearly, we must start with the damage caused by a boat that is too large for a waterway and that may create waves five or six feet high, destroying the shoreline.

There is no limit. Take the example of a person who has a cottage or a house in Quebec City by a lake that is three kilometres long and 7.5 metres deep. Legally, the person has the right to bring a 60-metre-long boat on the lake from Lake Ontario. The municipality cannot do anything to stop them.

This means that there are no constraints on the navigation on our waterways. There are no constraints on the size and weight of the boats or the waves they make. Unfortunately, as they say, it’s the wild west on our lakes and rivers. The sky’s the limit. Without a limit, of course people will take advantage and think bigger and bigger.

Does that answer your question, sir?

(0935)

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Yes.

Madam Chair, do I still have time? [English]

The Chair:

You still have two and half minutes.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

I'll take this opportunity to share my time with my colleague, David Graham.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, go ahead.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

Mr. Pearce, I am your neighbour from the Laurentians. I've read about you in Main Street. It's a pleasure to sort of meet you through the system.

Mr. Scott Pearce:

I know a lot about you as well, sir.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's always concerning.

As you know, our region has huge problems with lakes. It's one of the biggest issues in my riding, after Internet access.

I heard you talking to Angelo. I missed the beginning of your presentation. I'm sorry about that.

Could I ask you what your ideas are for solutions on dealing with these lake problems? I know that in Sainte-Agathe, for example, we've had studies that demonstrate lake depth and distance from shoreline where large boats are permissible, and I know that this is not a unanimous position. I wonder what your thoughts are.

Mr. Scott Pearce:

The way we look at it at the FQM level is that the federal government has to find some sort of common ground. As you know, boats are getting bigger and bigger, and the lakes are not getting bigger. It could be something based on—

Mr. Luc Berthold (Mégantic—L'Érable, CPC):

I have a point of order, Madam Chair.

I think this is not relevant to the study we are now studying here. These are environmental issues. I'm speaking in English; I'm sorry.

The Chair:

You're doing a very good job, Mr. Berthold. It's much better than my French. [Translation]

Mr. Luc Berthold:

I don’t think the question is really relevant to the study that we are doing right now.

Mr. Scott Pearce:

Sir, I would like to answer that. [English]

The Chair:

Excuse me for just one moment.

I recognize that, but it was Mr. Iacono's time. He is sharing it with Mr. Graham. If they want to use the other half a minute left to answer it, even though you're very correct that it's starting to go into a different area, I will allow that 35 seconds remaining for the answer.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Pearce, I'll give you the opportunity to respond.

Mr. Scott Pearce:

Just briefly, yes, it is an environmental issue, but the environmental issue is caused by the Ministry of Transport. This is a transport problem that is having an impact on the environment, so there is a direct link.

The Chair:

Thank you both very much.

Mr. Berthold. [Translation]

Mr. Luc Berthold:

Madam Chair, I’ll be sharing my time with Mr. Rayes. We agreed on a small change. [English]

The Chair:

Welcome, Mr. Rayes. We're glad to have you with us. [Translation]

Mr. Alain Rayes (Richmond—Arthabaska, CPC):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair. I am pleased to join your committee.

I support what my colleague, Mr. Berthold, said about the last topic that was discussed. I think Quebec’s ministry of sustainable development, environment and the fight against climate change and the federal Department of Environment and Climate Change could help a great deal in that area.

I would like to turn to the mandate letter to go back to the crux of the matter. Minister Garneau’s mandate letter states: Work with the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard to review the previous government’s changes to the Fisheries Act and the Navigable Waters Protection Act, restore lost protections...

Personally, I think that, if the idea is to restore that, there’s nothing to discuss as the Liberals simply want to reverse all measures put in place and return to the past. But as I listen to you, I don’t feel that you want to backtrack and undo what has been done in the previous amendments.

The quotation continues as follows: “...and incorporate modern safeguards.” If that's the case, perhaps the minister can tell us what he wants to do. The committee could then do its study, consult experts to confirm it, and say whether it’s good or not.

Gentlemen, I would like to hear what you have to say about that. First, those from Alberta and Saskatchewan, followed by the representative from the Fédération québécoise des municipalités.

(0940)

[English]

The Chair:

Mr. Kemmere.

Mr. Al Kemmere:

Our concerns were with going back to an act that was written in days long before the modern world of today. I missed part of your question, but our concerns are still that we have this opportunity to be heard and try to retain what we felt was progressive legislation. That's why we're here.

I know this may not answer your question, so I may have to ask you to repeat the core of it. [Translation]

Mr. Alain Rayes:

I would like to hear from the other witness. I will come back to it later if we have enough time. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Orb.

Mr. Raymond Orb:

I think what you're asking is about the process.

When the previous government was looking at making the changes, we already knew what the regulation changes would be and we were onside. I've appeared in front of the transport committee many times on this issue, and my colleagues across Alberta did the same, and I think Manitoba did, too. Although we like to be consulted, we're a little bit concerned. We saw this idea being thrown out during the federal election and we were concerned about it. We're not sure why the government wanted to do it, but nevertheless, we would still get our point across that we would like to leave the regulations in place. [Translation]

Mr. Alain Rayes:

Thank you.

I will have to give the floor to my colleague, Mr. Berthold. I apologize for not allowing you to speak, Mr. Pearce. I just want to say that we are having discussions in many committees right now, but we don’t know what the projects are. I can tell you that it's very frustrating for us as well.

I turn the floor over to Mr. Berthold.

Mr. Luc Berthold:

Thank you very much.

Yes, that’s what’s frustrating. We want to know what the amendments are because the Minister clearly has something in mind.

To my colleagues opposite who are doing the exercise in good faith, this is unfortunately not what the minister has in mind. In question period, on October 6, the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard said that the purpose of the consultation on the Navigation Protection Act was—and I will read the quote in English:[English] ...not simply how to cut and paste the protections that were in the previous legislation that was deleted by the Conservatives, but how we could further strengthen them.... [Translation]

You are telling the witnesses that you want to keep what was good. But that is not at all in line with the intent of the bill.

In closing, Madam Chair, in light of the testimony we have heard this morning, I would like to move a motion as follows: Whereas the municipality associations have confirmed that they have not received complaints and have not requested that bodies of water be added, I ask that the Committee immediately cease its study of the Navigation Protection Act. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Berthold.

Does he need 48 hours?

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Bartholomew Chaplin):

Unless there is unanimous consent, normally there is a notice period.

The Chair:

There is a notice period, as you know, Mr. Berthold, of 48 hours. We will deal with that motion, if you like, at the next meeting or the one after that.

Mr. Luc Berthold:

Yes, that's okay.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Madam Chair, I have a point of order. This side is prepared to waive the 48 hours' notice and have a vote.

The Chair:

Is that the wish of the committee?

Mr. Aubin.

(0945)

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Yes.

The Chair:

At this point I will thank the witnesses for their participation.

We very much appreciate your taking valuable time to come and help us with this review. At the end of our review, it could end up that we simply say that we think everything is working and functioning well. Part of what we're looking at are interferences to navigation that should be regulated or prohibited and how best to implement these under legislation. We're looking for advice as to where we are today and how to make it better, recognizing that there are certainly some improvements that were very necessary. That's where we are, from our committee's perspective.

Thank you very much for participating.

Would you like to read out that motion again, please. [Translation]

The Clerk:

The motion reads as follows: Whereas the municipality associations have confirmed that they have not received complaints and have not requested that bodies of water be added, I ask that the Committee immediately cease its study of the Navigation Protection Act. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Berthold.

(Motion negatived)

The Chair: Moving along, our next guests are the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association, as well as Michael Atkinson from the Canadian Construction Association.

We will just continue on with our list if that's okay with everyone.

Mr. Atkinson, welcome to our committee.

Mr. Michael Atkinson (President, Canadian Construction Association):

Thank you.

Madam Chair and honourable members, it is a pleasure to be here with you today.

The Canadian Construction Association represents the non-residential sector in the construction industry in Canada. We build Canada's infrastructure: shopping malls, industrial facilities, schools, hospitals, and condominium developments. Essentially, we build everything except single-family homes.

We have an integrated membership structure of some 70 local and provincial associations from coast to coast to coast, with a membership of just over 20,000 firms, more than 95% of which are small and medium-sized businesses.

As a whole, the construction industry employs approximately 1.4 million Canadians and accounts for 7% of Canada's overall gross domestic product, so it's fair to say that we're an essential element of the economic viability of Canada.

We very much appreciate the opportunity to be before you and to share some of our views on the Navigation Protection Act.

Let me start by saying that our members were very pleased with the changes made in 2012 in conjunction with amendments made to both the Fisheries Act and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. It has been said that the 2012 changes to the Navigable Waters Protection Act reduced environmental protections across the country. We couldn't disagree more.

To begin with, the amended act was no longer a trigger for the environmental assessment under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. Any change to that would have to be taken into consideration with the changes that were made to CEAA. To do that unilaterally with respect to this act without taking into consideration the changes that were made to CEAA to ensure that the triggers were reasonable would be a gross oversight.

Protecting the right to navigate waters in Canada has nothing to do with—nor should it have been, as I've just mentioned—a trigger for environmental assessment and the protection of the environment, which is already within the mandate of the federal government.

The federal government already has the Fisheries Act to protect fisheries and fish habitat; the Canadian Environmental Protection Act to protect water rights and land from the dumping of chemicals and other substances; the Species at Risk Act to protect threatened and endangered species; the Migratory Birds Convention Act for the protection of migratory birds; as well as a number of related regulations and policies specific to various industries, such as pulp and paper, mining and petroleum refining, and the protection of wetlands.

Furthermore, it is a little disingenuous on the part of motivated stakeholders to think that only the federal government protects the environment. Provinces, territories, aboriginal governments, and municipalities have a full suite of laws and regulations that also protect the environment.

With all that said, I come back to my basic premise. The Navigation Protection Act is about protecting the common law right to commercial navigation in Canada. It is not about environmental protection. As the minister himself stated in his appearance before you, “The purpose of the act is to balance the right of navigation with a need to construct infrastructure such as bridges and dams.”

Since it is our members who build those infrastructure assets, our work is often regulated under this act. Under the current system, proponents are able to self-assess, and since most of our products are designated works as defined by the minor works order, there is no need for Transport Canada to issue a permit. This clarity, certainty, and predictability is good for our industry.

I'll give you one example under the Fisheries Act. The Fisheries Act will issue guidelines as to how culverts and other structures need to be built over fish habitats. Knowing that in advance allows us to design and propose designs in construction with respect to those structures. It is a clear process. It can become a very timely process, because we can work that into our own designs.

Under the previous act, there was no ability to self-assess, so all decisions to proceed with construction required Transport Canada approval, and the attendant bureaucratic processes and delays, as you have heard from the other witnesses earlier today, happened in almost every case. They were the rule rather than the exception.

Furthermore, many of these assessments were only carried out after an environmental assessment approval had been completed and the project approved for development. If there's one thing we builders can't stand it's inconsistency; it's a green light turning amber going red. We want certainty, we want schedule, we want timeliness. The more the legislation and regulation can give us that, the better for all parties.

(0950)



In summary, we would recommend, first, to keep Transport Canada's focus under this legislation on bodies of water most utilized for commercial and important recreational navigation.

Second, enhance the self-enhancement process by expanding the list of projects on the minor works order, providing design performance criteria that are clear. Many of these projects are perfunctory and should be able to proceed without any type of permitting circumstances.

Third, do not recommend the Navigation Protection Act be used as a means to trigger the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act because the protection of commercial navigation has nothing to do with protecting the environment, and the amendments to triggering CEAA 2012 using a list-based approach has massively improved the timeliness and certainty of federal environmental assessments. That goes back to my opening point that anything you were to do in that area with respect to this act must be considered in conjunction with the amendments that were made in the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act about the same time.

That concludes my remarks. I would be happy to take questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Atkinson.

Now we have Mr. Bloomer from the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association.

Welcome, and thank you very much for taking time to speak to us today.

Mr. Chris Bloomer (President and Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Energy Pipeline Association):

Good morning, and thank you for the opportunity. I wish I were there. I'll be there next week, but couldn't make it today.

I'm going to speak on behalf of the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association. The association represents the 12 major energy pipelines crossing Canada. About 119,000 kilometres move 97% of Canada's oil and natural gas liquids energy.

I want to mention at the beginning that CEPA will be actively participating in all of the federal regulatory reviews under way, including the Fisheries Act, CEAA, and NEB modernization, but today I'll confine my comments to the review at hand, the Navigation Protection Act. First, there are some fundamental principles of good regulation that apply equally to all of those reviews and you will hear us talking about that in the months ahead.

The most effective and efficient regulatory framework for all stakeholders is one that is clear, efficient, and comprehensive. In particular, the process should be science and fact based, be conducted by the best-placed regulator, avoid duplication, outline clear accountabilities, contain transparent rules and processes, allow for meaningful participation of those who have valuable contributions to make, and balance the need for timeliness with other objectives. CEPA supports any efforts the government makes to achieve these outcomes. We are in the process of finalizing our written submission and technical background for this review, which we will be filing by the deadline next week.

My comments today will focus briefly on the purpose of the legislation, the changes made over the past few years that relate to our industry, and how these changes are working today.

Overall, the previous reforms were aimed at modernizing the legislation, reducing duplication and inefficiencies, and clarifying the purpose of the NWPA, Navigable Waters Protection Act, relative to other legislation. With that in mind, the primary intent of the Navigation Protection Act is to ensure that navigation is protected and to balance navigation rights with the need to construct infrastructure.

The NPA is intended to provide oversight of works and undertakings that can interfere with navigation and its priority is to ensure that development can be done safely and with minimal impact on navigation. Other legislation that is also under review by parliamentary committees or expert panels, namely, CEAA 2012, the National Energy Board modernization, the Fisheries Act, consider the impact to habitat and the environment and how pipelines are regulated.

Given the broad mandate of other environmental legislation, we do not believe that environment protection has been watered down or impaired by changes in the NPA. Rather, the pipeline industry project reviews under other legislation, and particularly by the NEB, fully consider the environmental impact of pipelines crossing water bodies.

In addition, the changes implemented in 2012 reduce duplication and allow government, industry, and stakeholders to improve outcomes by focusing assessments on key areas of impact and allocating resources more efficiently. These changes have strengthened, focused, and clarified the purpose of the NPA and other environmental legislation and set the scene for enhanced environmental outcomes going forward.

We are hopeful that this review of the NPA will be mindful of not duplicating the regulations and protections available under other legislation. We are also hopeful that this review will look at the intent and purpose of the changes under the NPA, with a view to which changes are working and which require modification.

Before talking about these changes, I think it would be helpful to understand how pipelines cross watercourses. During construction, there are some, albeit often temporary, disturbances to the water body from both an environmental and navigation perspective. Sometimes it may be necessary to install a temporary bridge, culvert, ice, snow or log fill in the water to allow construction vehicles a safe place to cross. These are fully removed after construction is complete.

Also, we would point out that CEPA members employ world-class watercourse crossing methodology that combines safety, engineering, and environmental expertise. We use the latest available technologies to minimize environmental impacts and, where necessary, employ mitigation measures that are grounded in science to address any remaining concern.

(0955)



Importantly, for our purpose here, once the crossing is completed, things go back to normal in the watercourse, and there is generally no impact on navigation.

There are three key changes in the legislation that impact the pipeline industry.

The first is delegating authority to the NEB to assess impacts on navigation for federally regulated pipelines. These changes require the NEB to take into account effects on navigation and navigation safety before recommendations or decisions are made for new pipelines. Previously, this was the responsibility of Transport Canada post-NEB approval.

Second, narrowing the scope of the act from all waterways in Canada to a schedule covering 162 rivers, lakes, and oceans is important.

The third is the minor works order of 2009. Provincially regulated pipelines that are not regulated by the NEB are still subject to Transport Canada authorization if they cross a scheduled waterway. However, some of these crossings meet the minor works order criteria for pipelines, so they don’t need a specific authorization.

We believe that these changes have had a positive impact, without watering down navigation protection or environmental protection.

Previously, there was duplication of authority, with the NEB having authority to regulate pipelines under the NEB Act, and the Minister of Transport having duplicate authority under the NWPA for water crossings. The 2012 changes consolidated that authority, with the NEB as a one window or best-placed regulator. CEPA believes this is a positive step that will create not only a more efficient permitting process, but also a better outcome by reinforcing accountability with a single regulator. It also builds on the industry's record of safety and performance in construction and operation of watercourse crossings. An integrated approach, taking into account the full range of safety and environmental concerns of a pipeline watercourse crossing, allows the industry and the regulator to work together more effectively to achieve the best results.

The NEB takes navigation and navigation safety into account with the same rigour as previously carried out by Transport Canada. The NEB conducts an independent, fair, and publicly accessible regulatory review process. It employs experts on staff who are familiar with pipeline construction and operation. They have the expertise to identify safety and environmental effects that are potentially significant. Although other federal government departments have specific expertise, none have experience related to pipelines.

(1000)

The Chair:

Mr. Bloomer, I don't want to cut you off, but you can get the balance of your comments in when you are answering questions from the members. They have many questions.

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

Sure. Understood.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Hardie, go ahead.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you to the folks for being here.

I guess we'll start with you, Mr. Atkinson.

What we mentioned to the previous panel probably bears repeating, that my colleagues' standpoint on this review isn't necessarily to roll back everything that was done before; we don't want to throw out the baby with the bathwater. We have heard that there are some definite benefits resulting from the changes. What was missing from the previous process, in our view.... The way this was brought in, in the middle of a very large omnibus bill, involved very little consultation with proponents and opponents of the idea, so the purpose of this is basically a fair process, in order to give people a chance to tell us what they think and to get everything on the table so that we can go forward not just based on what we perceive to have happened—because the public communication that we heard after this was brought in tends to be quite different from the actual one that we've heard since having a chance to hear from people like you.

Mr. Atkinson, to what extent would you say the construction standards that your members follow remain influenced by the previous legislation?

Mr. Michael Atkinson:

To a great degree.... I am talking about changes that were made not just to the NPA but to environmental assessment generally. A lot of those changes put back into play more certainty and predictability. For example, if a provincial highway—

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I'm sorry, sir. You are going down the wrong road here.

I am talking about the construction standards they use. I'll be a bit more specific. A concern I would have is that.... Say you have a waterway that is now not listed, basically, not protected, to use that expression. Previously, there were some limitations, prohibitions about throwing stuff into the water, chunks of concrete, whatever, or depositing material, etc. Now, if that waterway is no longer protected in terms of the Navigable Waters Protection Act, does this happen?

Mr. Michael Atkinson:

Dumping construction waste into a waterway would not be allowed under most of the standard specifications that we would see in a municipal or provincial project and would be covered by other legislation. Whether or not it was covered under the old legislation or the new legislation here, it would have been covered under other legislation or city bylaws, etc., because these would deal with the treatment of construction waste.

From that perspective, I wouldn't see any change in those standards as a result of changes to this act. This would be something that was a requirement in our contract specifications, which would be developed by the municipality or by the provincial owner requiring the work. As a matter of contract, we would be required to follow those specifications. In addition, there would likely be other either municipal bylaws or other provincial laws that would prevent it from happening.

(1005)

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Would the same apply to the pipeline industry, Mr. Bloomer?

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

Of course. In this case we're talking about navigation. The pipeline industry is regulated under CEAA. It's continually inspected and managed. This in no way affects the protection or future impacts on the waterways, as it falls within the other environmental legislation.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I would say that in some quarters, not all, but in some quarters, there's deep suspicion about what you get when you have self-regulation and self-management of things. When we have the recreational users in to talk about any proposed changes to this act, what are they going to tell us about your performance out there under a self-regulatory regime?

Mr. Michael Atkinson:

Well, it's not self-regulatory. As contractors or builders we're still required to follow the rules and regulations through other legislation, bylaws, regulations, and we're also required to perform the work in the standards that are specified by the municipality or by the province in the particular specifications related to that work. Noise, for example, dust emissions, many other items that come from construction, are all regulated in other forms, so it's not self-regulation. We still have to deal with standards, requirements, bylaws, regulations that are imposed by other pieces of legislation.

The Chair:

Mr. Hardie, your time is up.

Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Madam Chair, quickly, before I ask my questions, I've been hearing some rumours that the Minister of Transport is going to be rolling out a transportation strategy over the next few months. Would you or perhaps the parliamentary secretary be able to provide us with a bit of an update at the end of this committee meeting?

The Chair:

Possibly that could be done at our next committee meeting, but certainly not today, just because of the fact that we have our witnesses and we haven't allocated any time.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Okay. I was thinking about at the very end.

We know that the minister has the ability to both add or remove waterways under subsection 29(2) of the act. We heard from departmental officials and municipalities that there have only been two requests to add waterways and that to the best of their knowledge, there have been no complaints filed in Quebec, Alberta, and Saskatchewan in regard to projects undertaken. If you look at the act, you know that it's not just municipalities and provinces that could ask for a waterway to be added, but first nations would be included in that as well.

I really appreciate the clarity, Mr. Atkinson, that you have provided with respect to the focus of the Navigation Protection Act, and the reminder that there are other pieces of legislation that speak to some of the concerns that were raised by different groups at the time the Navigable Waters Protection Act was changed.

We've heard a lot from members across the way that perhaps they're not really focusing on the legislation but more on the process that was undertaken. I know that we have another panel coming next week, which I think is largely environmental groups—interestingly enough, given your observations, coming to speak to the Navigation Protection Act.

I also want to follow up, Mr. Bloomer, with some questions that my colleague asked of the municipalities about the change, in respect to pipelines under the Navigation Protection Act, over to the NEB. I believe that was done through Bill C-46, the Pipeline Safety Act. I wonder whether you can speak to that.

Then I have perhaps two questions. Do these changes in any way reduce the environmental oversight of projects? How has commercial navigation been affected by the changes that were made?

(1010)

The Chair:

Mr. Bloomer, would you like to respond?

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

Thank you.

The move to the NEB, as I said in my statement, was basically.... Before, the transportation board would opine on navigation aspects after the NEB; now, it's incorporated in the whole process, and the navigation piece is taken as seriously with the NEB, as probably the best-placed regulator to do that and more efficient.

I think that was the key thing, to move it to where the science and technical expertise was, to make it more [Inaudible—Editor] and incorporate it into the overall process.

With respect to reducing protections and so on, under CEAA 2012 those protections in the Fisheries Act and so on are still there; it didn't diminish the protections at all, as this is focused strictly on navigation.

If there's any impact on navigation, there has not been any impact due to the changes on any kind of navigational aspects of pipeline projects.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you.

Mr. Atkinson.

Mr. Michael Atkinson:

As I understand it, some of the concern is with the automatic trigger for an assessment based on a navigable water. Part of the whole reform with respect to CEAA was to look at some of those triggers and to make sure that we didn't have a duplication. If the provincial government, for example, has already done an environmental assessment, why does it have to be assessed again federally just because somebody has floated an idea and thinks a drainage ditch is navigable? It just didn't make a lot of sense.

With respect to what the impacts have been on commercial navigation, we certainly aren't aware of any problems or concerns with structures being constructed on navigable waters that have changed or made them different in any way from the previous legislation.

The Chair:

You have half a minute left.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

I'm going to take this half a minute to summarize what I see the issue as being. I appreciate my colleagues' comments. I believe each one of them is genuine in their attempts to understand the Navigation Protection Act and what led us up to the changes that were made in 2012.

I guess I would suggest, as my colleague has formerly, that we're studying this because it's in the minister's mandate letter to restore the protections that were removed by the previous government. I think that has been our biggest concern. The conclusions, what this committee may choose to recommend, may not even be considered, because there's a foregone conclusion about what needs to happen, which is why we have opposed this study right from the beginning.

I appreciate so much the clarity that you've brought today.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Gentlemen, thank you for being here this morning. Your expertise is appreciated.

Without further ado, I’ll turn to Mr. Bloomer.

As an overview, could you provide us with an estimate, even a rough one, of the number of Canadian navigable waterways where pipelines cross, either in or under the bodies of water? [English]

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

Do you mean the absolute number of the pipeline crossings? Well, there are probably hundreds if not thousands of different water crossings and so on. Different techniques are used for each crossing, depending on the size. Directional drilling is a key thing, whereby we don't affect the bed at all, but there are quite a number, obviously. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

What advantage do you see in the transfer of assessments from Transport Canada to the National Energy Board?

Are the assessments simpler, more effective?

Could you give us one or two examples that would enable us to compare the new system with the old one?

(1015)

[English]

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

I think the whole purpose of making the change was to make it less cumbersome, put it in a place where you had the technical capability within the NEB, to make sure that the process was not creating redundancies in evaluations, and so on. As I said, before, the transportation board would provide their opinion post the NEB's opinion. Now, it's incorporated into the process, and the same considerations are in the NEB process as were in the previous process.

In the past, as Mr. Atkinson mentioned, it was the triggers that really created the issue. By defining in a schedule the types of water bodies that are included in the assessments I think greatly indicates where the issues should be focused.

In some cases, where you had small ephemeral waterways, ephemeral ponds, and so on, it was an automatic trigger that created a tremendous amount of regulatory burden to deal with those things. It really wasn't dealing with navigation per se, and it was not really dealing with how the pipelines affect those areas. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Now that the entire environmental study process falls under the National Energy Board, can you tell whether it has helped achieve the much sought-after social licence that is essential now that the time has come to carry out major infrastructure projects such as yours? [English]

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

I think we have to put the pipeline piece into context. There is the project approval piece. A lot of discussions are happening around that right now, obviously. Then there's the life cycle aspect of it. The NEB, having the environmental reviews within the regulator, has the technical expertise to deal with it, and they also manage the pipeline throughout its life cycle after it's built. Rather than having it spread out in competing jurisdictions, it's in one spot where you have the best technical expertise that manages it throughout the life of the pipeline.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I'm sorry, Mr. Aubin, your time is up.

Mr. Rayes. [Translation]

Mr. Alain Rayes:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My thanks to both witnesses for being here today.

In a previous life, before I was elected to Parliament a year ago, I was the mayor of a municipality of 45,000 residents.

Mr. Atkinson, I confirm that there are many bylaws, many environmental regulations—particularly at the provincial level—that stand in the way of people who want to create wealth and to develop the various municipalities across Canada.

In any case, I can confirm that this is the reality in rural areas. It often causes more problems than anything else. As mayor, I had to play the role of mediator, to deal with provincial authorities to try to untangle projects that were subject to excessive regulations for all sorts of reasons. I could prepare a whole list, but I don't think this is the objective today. For anyone wondering, I confirm that there are a lot of them.

Let me ask you both some simple questions.

First of all, on a scale of one to 10, what is your level of satisfaction with the existing legislation and with the amendments that were implemented in 2012? [English]

Mr. Michael Atkinson:

As far as bringing certainty and predictability and timeliness is concerned, it's at seven, eight, or nine, but the truth will tell. We haven't had enough real experience with the changes, but certainly the intent to ensure that is so important.

We are not the proponents of these projects. We're the builders. When we get the green light, assuming the environmental assessment has been properly done and scrutiny with all the regulations, etc., being contractors we want to go from A to B as fast as possible and get the project done in the quality and time and budget that the proponent has asked for.

The worst case is that we start with a bunch of uncertainty hanging over us. The chance that the project could be stopped or delayed because of a challenge based on, “Oh, there should have been another assessment” or “This has been triggered now” frankly was our biggest concern.

It appears to me that the changes that were made with respect to this legislation would diminish that probability substantially, from a builder's perspective.

Frankly, under the old regime the definition of navigable water was anything you could float an opinion on. That was the uncertainty we would often start projects with which had already received environmental assessments. They would have started it, and somebody would have said, “Wait a minute; that's navigable”, even though it might be a dry drainage ditch in July and August. That was the problem we the builders had: the lack of certainty, the lack of knowing that we had now received the green light to proceed and could now proceed.

(1020)

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

I would echo those comments. I would say that the principles that underlie the objectives of CEAA 2012, and certainly the changes to the Navigable Waters Protection Act, of certainty, clarity, and reducing duplication in the process are still valid today. While nothing is perfect, I think that proceeding with the way things were thought of in 2012 is the corporate way to go. [Translation]

Mr. Alain Rayes:

Great.

My understanding is that—just answer yes or no, unless you want to elaborate—the minister's mandate letter is quite clear. He wants us to go back, despite what has been said in terms of not “throwing out the baby with the bathwater.” From the minister's various comments, we feel that the Liberals want to destroy what was done by the previous government. Do you think we should go back, before 2012? [English]

Mr. Michael Atkinson:

I would not want to see a return to a system that had uncertainty and the ability for a project that had already received the green light to be derailed because somebody floated an opinion. [Translation]

Mr. Alain Rayes:

Great. [English]

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

I think we are now in a process wherein we have an NEB modernization review, a review of CEAA, fisheries, and navigation. Those processes are under way right now. We're obviously going to participate in those things. As I said before, we're going to reinforce in our views that the principles of CEAA 2012 are still very valid and positive. [Translation]

Mr. Alain Rayes:

Thank you.

I'll give the 50 seconds I have left to my colleague. [English]

The Chair:

You have 45 seconds. [Translation]

Mr. Luc Berthold:

Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

Given the testimony, given the minister's mandate letter that is very clear on the expected outcome, given the letter to the committee in which the minister had promised to hold consultations—and we have learned that there will not be any—given his testimony before us, I move the following motion, Madam Chair: Whereas the minister of Transport has already decided the changes to be made to the Navigation Protection Act and following the hearing of the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association and the Canadian Construction Association. I ask that the Committee suspend the study until the minister of Transport submits his own modifications to the Navigation Protection Act to this Committee.

I'm submitting a copy of that motion to the clerk. Thank you very much. [English]

The Chair:

I think we've all heard it.

What are the wishes of the committee? It's 48 hours' notice that is required.

It looks as though this will be a continuation filing.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Madam Chair, I think, given that we have witnesses here and still have time to ask questions, if we could defer this and deal with it more than 48 hours from now, that would be my preference.

The Chair:

There's no consent.

Mr. Fraser, go ahead.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Thank you very much to our witnesses. I did appreciate your testimony here today.

To provide a bit of context, there was some discussion about this potentially being more about process than substance. I appreciate my colleague, Ms. Block's, comments that she is taking this as being genuine.

I have to say, though, I have some problems with the legislation itself. There's no preordained outcome, but I don't expect my feedback will be offensive to you. I'm not here to conflate navigation concerns with the need to conduct environmental assessments on drainage ditches. When we say there were some good things in there, I don't think anybody should have to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars to hire environmental consultants because it rained too hard one Tuesday. That's not what this is about to me. Perhaps it's my own lived experience that has informed my opinion.

My concerns with the revisions to the act are primarily economic. I'm worried that we've shrunk down the number of scheduled waters significantly. There's some good and bad in there. My real concern is that it's going to interfere with marine tourism and trade on significant, but not necessarily large from a national perspective, rivers and streams that actually serve the economic purposes of the people and businesses in my own community. I also come from a litigation background. Before my career in politics, I usually got involved in projects when somebody didn't do what they were supposed to do.

I'll start by dealing with some of the obstructions that could land on what was previously navigable water, but is no longer scheduled. From the pipeline industry, we heard that the typical practice is that if you have to erect a temporary bridge or some infrastructure to allow you to complete your project, it's removed.

If you're dealing with an unscheduled water, do you think the minister should have some power to enforce the behaviour of somebody who is constructing a pipeline, but doesn't do what is supposed to be done? What should the government's role be when saying that the obstruction has to be removed?

(1025)

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

Are you asking if the pipeline company leaves stuff in the waterway?

Mr. Sean Fraser:

The company or one of its subcontractors. Is this regulated elsewhere?

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

Under the NEB, there's a leave to construct, and then there's a leave to operate. Once the pipeline is constructed, the NEB will review everything. If that's not taken care of, they won't be able to operate the pipeline or start it up. There is a very strict process for dealing with those things and to make sure all those things are done. After construction, the NEB will say, “Well, you didn't do this, you didn't do that.” If that's the case, then they have to do it before they start up. It's very well scrutinized.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Sure.

From the construction industry, we started to go down this path a little bit, but more in the context of construction standards. Let's forget standards for the moment and just think that sometimes there may be a naughty subcontractor out there who leaves materials in the waterway. If we're dealing with perhaps a strategically important river for an exporter, is there authority that already exists, or is there authority that should exist, so the minister or the government could help ensure that there's commercial access to these waterways?

Mr. Michael Atkinson:

If we're working for a municipal owner, absolutely. There is a lot of leverage in the construction contract itself that can be brought to bear to ensure that proper construction methodology and standards are complied with. I don't think we need a federal piece of legislation to ensure that that happens with respect to bodies of water that are important to other levels of government.

Right now, that's the case for any earthmoving as well that's related to a riverbank or for highway or road construction. Those regulations, standards, requirements, etc. are very much standard in the construction contracts and specifications that a municipality or a provincial government would have in those circumstances.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

You mentioned a municipal owner. Do you mean of the project or of the waterway?

Mr. Michael Atkinson:

Both. They may have governing jurisdiction, or they may have ownership of the project.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Sure.

If we're dealing with a private owner, does your answer differ?

Mr. Michael Atkinson:

No. In most of those situations the private owner is going to have to get some kind of authority from the municipality to construct whatever they're constructing, and the municipality has the ability to enforce strict adherence to construction performance through that measure. You wouldn't need a piece of legislation at the federal level to do that.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Are there local practices everywhere that require you to factor in that navigation on...not drainage ditches, but streams, lakes, rivers when you're doing the design phase of a construction or pipeline project?

Maybe deal with construction first.

(1030)

Mr. Michael Atkinson:

The design in most cases is very much directed or regulated by the owner—whoever we're building for. If it's a private owner, then they have to get a building permit or some other kind of permit in order to proceed with that construction. They would have to have submitted their design, and if their design is lacking in achieving the standards you've just spoken about—respecting other property rights, respecting navigation, etc.—they won't get the permit.

Mr. Sean Fraser:

Do you mean from the municipal body?

Mr. Michael Atkinson:

Right.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Fraser. Your time is up.

Monsieur Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I would like to quickly go back to Mr. Bloomer's statement in response to one of the last questions. He said that the National Energy Board process had already been modernized.

Could you elaborate on the modernization of the National Energy Board? [English]

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

Maybe I misspoke. I didn't say that the modernization.... I think with CEAA 2012.... That was a step forward.

Mr. Luc Berthold:

I have a point of order, Madam Chair. [Translation]

The modernization of the National Energy Board Act is not on the agenda. I don't understand the point of my colleague's question. [English]

The Chair:

It's Mr. Aubin's time, and if that's how he want to use it, to focus on this, I think it's his right to do that.

Please go ahead. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

However, the answer is very simple, Madam Chair. We are studying a piece of legislation that initially covered the pipeline work. Now, that’s no longer the case. I guess that modernization could also mean that we can go back to it someday, if it is the best solution. I think it's quite relevant.

Mr. Bloomer, let me go back to the principle of modernization of the National Energy Board, because, first, you're talking about 2012, which I understand. However, to talk about the elephant in the room, we have a situation—such as with one of the largest projects, Energy East, not to mention any names—in which, for now, the National Energy Board does not seem to have the credibility needed to move the matter forward and enable all citizens to express themselves clearly and precisely to achieve social licence.

Would it not be more objective to refer this matter to Transport Canada, or do you really think the National Energy Board can modernize its way of doing things to accommodate the wishes of the public? [English]

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

Well, I think the Navigation Protection Act covers the whole aspect of what we're talking about here in terms of energy east or any other new project. I think the NEB...there is a process under way now to have...there is a panel around energy modernization, and those discussions will be had. The NEB has addressed and the government has addressed the consultation issue through the additional consultations on both Kinder Morgan and energy east. Many of those issues are being dealt with, and we'll see the results of the current government processes to deal with them and will participate in that process fully. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

I have a question for Mr. Atkinson. [English]

The Chair:

Keep it very short, Mr. Aubin. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Okay.

Do provincial or municipal standards for environmental assessment seem higher or more restrictive than in the Navigation Protection Act? [English]

Mr. Michael Atkinson:

My experience and the information I get back from our members is that it's just as diligent, just as vigilant at the provincial level. This is one of the reasons why triggering so many federal reviews under CEAA was really a questionable practice, because since the introduction of CEAA, most if not all provinces have entered into environmental assessment processes themselves. To actually duplicate those processes was a complete waste of time. It had nothing to do with protecting the environment. It was just introducing red tape and uncertainties into the program.

I can tell you that I hear quite a bit from our members. Our members don't go through the process—it's the proponents who go through the process—but they hear from the proponents that the rigour that's used at the provincial level...it's not an easy path for the proponents. Let me put it that way.

(1035)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Sikand.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

I'm sharing Mr. Iacono's time, and so, gentlemen, if you could keep your answers brief, I'd appreciate it.

Starting with Mr. Atkinson, could you speak to the utility of the opting-in scheme or measure?

Mr. Michael Atkinson:

That's something for the proponents. We wouldn't ourselves be involved in that, since we're just the builders. That's something the proponents would have to consider: whether it's in their best interests or not. I can't really speak for the proponents. I only represent the builders.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Okay, that's fair enough.

Mr. Bloomer.

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

I apologize; I didn't hear the question.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

I was asking for your thoughts on the opting-in scheme.

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

You mean the opt-in or opt-out?

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Yes.

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

I think the scheduling piece provides the opportunity to be able to identify, if a water body does come up...to be either opting into the process or opting out. That's a decision that can be brought forward at the time, and the legislation accommodates for that.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Okay, that's fair enough.

The Chair:

Mr. Iacono. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I just want to make a clarification for my colleagues opposite.

We often hear that we Liberals want to change and destroy what was done by the previous government, but that is not the case. On a number of occasions, we have said that we just wanted to make sure that the changes that were made without prior consultation—let me stress that—are effective and meet the needs of Canadians. I don’t understand what is so difficult to grasp about that.

This is a transparent and honest process to gather the views of different organizations. You can see that we have asked questions and the organizations responded today. We are here to hear from witnesses, not to introduce partisan motions that slow down our work.

I’m sorry, but I just had to say that.

Let’s now move to my question. In your opinion, would it be possible to improve the process of adding waterways to a schedule without undermining the certainty you have mentioned and without affecting the speed of the approval process? [English]

Mr. Michael Atkinson:

Again, from my perspective, that's a question that's more appropriately put to the proponents of the projects. I have seen some reports that suggest to me that in cases in which some projects have some sensitivity, some provinces or some proponents are looking at perhaps opting in simply because of that aspect. Again, that's a question more appropriate for the proponents. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you. [English]

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

I think the provision to add water bodies is again in the legislation. I think that provision can be enacted to add water bodies, if it's deemed necessary, and there's a process and there will be principles that apply to that. I think it's on a case-by-case basis, and I think that's probably the best way to deal with it.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you.

Do I have any more time, Madam Chair?

The Chair:

Yes, you have two minutes left.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

I'll share my time with my friend Ken Hardie.

The Chair:

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you very much.

We heard the word “conflate” brought into this conversation, and it's very difficult not to do that in some cases. Because I'm also on the fisheries and oceans committee, the whole issue of environmental protection obviously comes into my thinking. But I guess the question is, has anybody actually ever done a graphic that layers the federal, provincial, and municipal requirements so as to give anybody a really clear picture of the hoops that either a proponent or the builder has to clear, even under today's more open standards?

(1040)

Mr. Michael Atkinson:

I'm not aware of one. I would be deathly scared of one, in that we wouldn't get any building done if people saw all the different hoops, etc., that we had to go through.

No, I'm not aware of anybody doing that. I can tell you, though, that contractors generally have a very good understanding of local requirements and of what's required in their local municipal jurisdiction, regional municipality, etc., and how provincial and federal legislation may well impact those requirements. The building community become very aware of that and of what needs to be done. The more proactive a regulatory authority is in saying, “Here's the standard you have to meet; here's what you have to do” and—my earlier example with DFO—in providing a guideline that says, “If it's a fish habitat, your culvert had better look like this”.... That is extremely helpful.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Perhaps I could interject right now.

If you had to choose between dealing with the current regime of regulatory frameworks between municipalities, between provinces, versus having a standard Canada-wide framework administered by the federal government, would the latter improve things? Do you see, for instance, marked differences between jurisdictions?

Mr. Michael Atkinson:

That's a tough question to answer with one straightforward answer. In general application, it changes. I guess the more uniform regulation and legislation is, the easier it should be, you would think, but 99% of our members are SMEs and often don't work much beyond their local jurisdiction or area and so would not necessarily run up against the differing or varying jurisdictions.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Maybe I could ask the same question of Mr. Bloomer.

Mr. Chris Bloomer:

Well, the pipelines that CEPA represents are all NEB-regulated, so there is regulation across the country. The provinces have their own regulatory framework, and it's pretty straightforward. Within the provinces, if there's a designated body, it would trigger a review. Having the designated water through the Navigable Waters Protection Act would trigger that. I think it's pretty clear, and the way the process is now is fairly direct. It's easy to examine, and I think that the provincial regulations and the federal regulations overall are similar, and the way the process is structured now is fairly efficient.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you.

Do I have any time left?

The Chair:

You have time for one more question.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I actually want to close with a comment. One of the things we look at on the fisheries and oceans committee is something that the DFO operates under. It's called the precautionary principle: basically, use caution when approaching something, or as we used to say in the communications business, “When in doubt, leave it out”.

My comment to you is that you probably do this as a result of the influence of the old regime and the old legislation, but as you go forward, use that precautionary principle. If you have an option not to obstruct a waterway, even though you may be allowed to, don't, because one of the things you'll be continuously challenged to do is to trade minds with the people who are very suspicious of what you're up to or don't trust your motives or trust your processes. To the degree to which you can say we operate according to this principle, everybody will be better off, and the heavy hand of government will be avoided.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Hardie.

To our witnesses, thank you very much for participating today. We look forward to staying in touch with you as we complete this review.

Thank you very much.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

(0845)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

Je déclare ouverte la séance numéro 27 du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités. Nous sommes ici pour discuter de l'étude portant sur la Loi sur la protection de la navigation.

Aujourd'hui, nous accueillons les représentants de l'Alberta Association of Municipal Districts and Counties, de la Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities, de[Français] la Fédération québécoise des municipalités[Traduction] ainsi que de la municipalité régionale du comté d'Argenteuil. Merci infiniment de prendre le temps de venir nous parler aujourd'hui et de nous faire part de vos observations sur la Loi sur la protection de la navigation. Je vous invite à vous présenter à mesure que vous prendrez la parole. Qui veut commencer?

Monsieur Kemmere, nous vous écoutons.

M. Al Kemmere (président, Alberta Association of Municipal Districts and Counties):

Je tiens à vous remercier de nous donner l'occasion de témoigner devant le Comité aujourd'hui et de vous présenter certaines de nos observations sur la Loi sur la protection de la navigation. En guise de contexte, l'Alberta Association of Municipal Districts and Counties, ou AAMDC, représente toutes les municipalités rurales en Alberta. Nous couvrons 85 % de la masse terrestre de la province, du nord au sud et d'est en ouest, d'une frontière à l'autre. Nous gérons presque 4 400 ponts, qui comptent pour plus de 60 % de l'inventaire total des ponts de la province.

Pendant des années, les municipalités rurales ont eu à se conformer à la Loi sur la protection des eaux navigables. L'AAMDC est donc très bien placée pour parler des conséquences des modifications qui y ont été apportées en 2012, du point de vue des municipalités rurales. L'ancienne Loi sur la protection des eaux navigables présentait des difficultés considérables pour les municipalités; par exemple, il fallait réaliser des études d'impact coûteuses concernant de nombreuses étendues d'eau dans lesquelles il n'y avait pas eu récemment de navigation. L'Alberta compte un grand nombre de cours d'eau qui servent exclusivement à l'irrigation ou qui ne sont pas assez profonds pour permettre la navigation pendant les ruissellements saisonniers. En réalité, ces cours d'eau ne seraient jamais navigables, et pourtant, il faut quand même défrayer les coûts liés à la réalisation d'études d'impacts.

Les municipalités sont souvent tenues de construire des ponts beaucoup plus coûteux que ce qu'elles avaient prévu initialement afin de faciliter la navigation, même s'il n'y a aucune navigation dans l'étendue d'eau. Dans bien des cas, un projet de ponceau serait modifié afin de construire un pont beaucoup plus coûteux.

Les municipalités font souvent face à des retards excessifs dans l'examen et l'approbation de leurs demandes par Transports Canada en raison de la vaste portée de l'ancienne loi.

La définition de navigabilité a souvent varié d'un projet à l'autre, ce qui a donné lieu à des coûts municipaux encore plus inégaux pour satisfaire aux exigences législatives précédentes.

Les réparations et les modifications aux structures plus anciennes exigeaient souvent une étude d'impact, même s'il n'y avait aucun antécédent récent de navigation dans l'étendue d'eau.

Les préoccupations des municipalités rurales à l'égard de l'ancienne loi ne constituaient pas une opposition à la navigation ou à la surveillance fédérale, mais elles étaient plutôt fondées sur la portée déraisonnable que l'ancienne loi imposait aux cours d'eau dans lesquels il n'y avait manifestement aucune navigation. L'ancienne loi ne mettait pas à profit les connaissances locales quant à la façon dont les cours d'eau étaient utilisés, ce qui augmentait les coûts pour les municipalités et le gouvernement du Canada.

La nouvelle mesure législative établit un équilibre entre la surveillance fédérale et l'autonomie municipale. Elle permet au ministre d'ajouter, à sa discrétion, d'autres cours d'eau à l'annexe et elle permet aux propriétaires d'ouvrages qui [Note de la rédaction: difficulté technique] aux termes de la Loi sur la protection de la navigation, même s'il ne s'agit pas d'un cours d'eau inscrit à l'annexe, puisque les propriétaires peuvent choisir d'adhérer au régime.

De toute évidence, de nombreuses organisations gèrent des ouvrages qui traversent des étendues d'eau. Les municipalités jouent un rôle semblable à celui du gouvernement fédéral en ce sens qu'elles agissent dans l'intérêt de leurs résidants. Si une voie d'eau non répertoriée sert à la navigation, il est très peu probable que la municipalité fasse fi de cette fonction au moment de construire un pont ou un ponceau. La navigation revêt une importance pour les économies locales et la qualité de vie, et l'actuelle Loi sur la protection de la navigation permet aux municipalités de prendre ces décisions à l'échelle locale.

À la lumière de ce contexte, l'AAMDC a quelques recommandations à formuler, et elle invite le Comité à en tenir compte dans le cadre de son étude de la Loi sur la protection de la navigation.

Premièrement, l'utilisation d'une annexe est une bonne idée et cette approche devrait être maintenue. L'idée d'inclure tous les cours d'eau au Canada n'est tout simplement pas pratique. Comme on peut le voir, cela a entraîné des travaux et des coûts supplémentaires pour les municipalités, en plus de créer des problèmes de capacité pour Transports Canada.

Deuxièmement, il pourrait s'avérer utile d'élargir l'annexe afin d'y inclure d'autres étendues d'eau, en fonction des consultations menées auprès des Premières Nations, des groupes autochtones et d'autres intervenants éventuels. L'établissement d'un mécanisme officiel permettant de proposer et d'évaluer des ajouts pourrait être un compromis efficace.

Il est important que les municipalités soient traitées séparément des autres propriétaires et gestionnaires d'ouvrages enjambant des cours d'eau. Les municipalités prennent des décisions dans l'intérêt de leurs résidants et, normalement, elles savent très bien si une étendue d'eau est utilisée pour la navigation.

(0850)



Si la portée de la Loi sur la protection de la navigation est élargie pour inclure d'autres cours d'eau, il faut parallèlement accroître la capacité fédérale de traiter les demandes en temps opportun. Il est important de se rappeler que la Loi sur la protection de la navigation vise, au bout du compte, à favoriser la navigation sécuritaire dans les étendues d'eau canadiennes. Il existe d'autres lois qui abordent les préoccupations relatives à l'environnement et à l'utilisation des terres en ce qui concerne les ouvrages sur les étendues d'eau, et l'élargissement de la portée de la Loi sur la protection de la navigation causera davantage de confusion chez ceux qui interagissent avec la loi.

Merci de votre attention. Je serai à votre disposition pour répondre aux questions.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Kemmere. Nous vous sommes très reconnaissants d'avoir été très direct dans vos propos et d'avoir limité le plus possible la durée de votre exposé.

Monsieur Orb, voulez-vous être le suivant?

M. Raymond Orb (président, Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities):

Oui.

Bonjour, mesdames et messieurs. Je vous remercie de me permettre de vous parler aujourd'hui de la Loi sur la protection de la navigation et de son incidence sur les municipalités de la Saskatchewan.

Je m'appelle Ray Orb et je suis président de la Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities, ou SARM, qui représente les 296 municipalités rurales de la province.

Je suis également ici pour vous parler au nom de la Fédération canadienne des municipalités, ou FCM, en particulier du forum rural que je préside actuellement.

Les préoccupations de la SARM à l'égard de la Loi sur la protection de la navigation concernent les coûts additionnels pour les projets d'infrastructure municipale. Les ministères fédéral et provinciaux de l'Environnement s'occupent déjà des préoccupations environnementales de la SARM.

La qualité de l'eau et les autres considérations environnementales importantes relèvent de la compétence de ces ministères à l'échelle tant fédérale que provinciale. La SARM sait que ceux-ci ont établi des lois et des règles appropriées pour veiller à mettre en place un solide équilibre entre l'environnement et les projets d'infrastructure.

Avant que des modifications soient apportées à la Loi sur la protection de la navigation, les municipalités rurales avaient vu leurs coûts augmenter, leurs projets retardés et, en général, davantage de paperasse entourer la planification, la conception et la construction des projets d'infrastructure. Cette situation était due aux exigences liées à un transport maritime public inexistant.

Ces exigences avaient leur raison d'être en 1882, lorsque la loi a été créée. Toutefois, nos modes de transport ont largement évolué depuis, et la nécessité d'assurer le passage de canots a considérablement diminué.

Auparavant, il fallait que les infrastructures comportant des ponceaux soient suffisamment grandes pour que les canots et les autres embarcations semblables puissent passer sous celles-ci. Transports Canada indiquait aux municipalités qu'elles devaient repenser et modifier leurs projets, ce qui causait des retards et une hausse des coûts. Malheureusement, on exigeait ces modifications même si le public ne naviguait pas dans ces eaux.

Prenons l'exemple de la municipalité rurale d'Insinger, située dans la partie centre-est de la Saskatchewan. En 2005, elle a subi une série de retards lorsqu'elle a tenté de remplacer un pont sur la rivière Whitesand. Un représentant de Transports Canada a déterminé que la rivière était navigable, et ce, même si son lit était bloqué par des barrages, des pierres et des broussailles, et que personne dans la région ne se souvenait d'avoir vu voguer un canot sur ce cours d'eau.

Le coût initial du projet était de 125 000 $, et la proposition de Transports Canada aurait coûté 400 000 $, soit une augmentation de 275 000 $ par rapport à la conception initiale. La municipalité et Transports Canada ont discuté de cette question jusqu'à ce que la SARM intervienne vers la fin de 2005. Les discussions ont continué jusqu'au jour où la conception initiale du projet a été autorisée à se poursuivre comme prévu. Le projet avait été retardé de bien plus d'une année.

Un deuxième exemple est celui de la municipalité rurale de Meadow Lake, dans le nord-ouest de la province. En 2010, elle a demandé le feu vert pour construire une route et un pont enjambant le ruisseau Alcott. La demande avait été présentée en avril 2010, mais l'approbation n'est arrivée qu'en novembre 2011. En Saskatchewan, la saison de la construction prend fin en novembre. La municipalité rurale de Meadow Lake a donc dû attendre deux saisons de construction complètes avant d'amorcer le projet.

Une fois l'approbation reçue, la municipalité a dû hausser le pont au-dessus du niveau de la surface de chaussée existante pour permettre aux canots de circuler. Il en a résulté une bosse sur la route qu'empruntent plusieurs véhicules par jour, pour un canot de loisirs qui ne passera qu'une fois tous les cinq ans.

Les modifications entrées en vigueur en 2014 ont réglé ces préoccupations, car elles permettent aux municipalités de construire leurs infrastructures sans subir ces retards inutiles.

La SARM et ses membres sont reconnaissants de ces changements, mais ils craignent que l'examen de ces modifications puisse entraîner leur annulation. Nous aurions alors les mêmes vieux problèmes que ceux que je viens de vous indiquer.

Nous suggérons que les modifications qui seront apportées à la suite de cet examen tiennent compte de l'effet positif que les modifications de 2014 ont eu sur les municipalités. La SARM recommande au gouvernement fédéral de rester attaché à ces modifications, qui ont permis de réduire le fardeau financier imposé aux municipalités.

(0855)



En ce qui concerne le forum rural de la Fédération canadienne des municipalités, j'aimerais ajouter les points suivants.

Le forum rural de la Fédération canadienne des municipalités a pour mandat de s'occuper de questions concrètes, et ses membres comprennent des municipalités de tout le Canada rural.

La Fédération canadienne des municipalités a accueilli favorablement les modifications apportées en 2012 à la Loi sur la protection de la navigation, ce qui a éliminé les exigences inutiles liées à une navigation publique inexistante. Les modifications ont permis de mettre à jour la loi en vigueur et de la rendre conforme aux voies de transport actuelles du pays.

En réduisant les retards dans les projets et les coûts de construction élevés imposés aux municipalités, tout en assurant la protection de ces cours d'eau importants, les modifications apportées à la Loi sur la protection de la navigation donnaient suite directement aux préoccupations des municipalités en vue d'améliorer la capacité des administrations locales de construire des infrastructures et d'offrir des services essentiels. Pour faciliter la planification environnementale, le gouvernement fédéral a également reconnu la capacité limitée des municipalités rurales, d'où sa décision de faire en sorte que ces collectivités aient accès à des ressources propres aux régions rurales, ce qui comprend les outils, l'expertise et la capacité financière.

À l'heure où le gouvernement fédéral s'est engagé à renforcer l'esprit communautaire pour contribuer à l'édification du pays, les municipalités rurales doivent être des partenaires à part entière dans les efforts visant à tracer la voie à suivre. Il faudra un dialogue continu pour bâtir l'avenir du Canada, grâce à une croissance durable et à des collectivités où il fait bon vivre. La Fédération canadienne des municipalités veillera à ce que le Canada rural continue d'avoir une place à la table.

Je vous remercie de m'avoir invité à m'adresser à vous ce matin.

(0900)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Orb.

Nous allons maintenant entendre, par téléconférence, M. Pearce.

M. Scott Pearce (administrateur, Fédération québécoise des municipalités):

Bonjour. Je m’appelle Scott Pearce. Premièrement, je tiens à remercier le Comité de tenir ces consultations et de l’intérêt qu’il porte à l’opinion de la Fédération québécoise des municipalités.

J’ai le plaisir de siéger au conseil d’administration de la Fédération canadienne des municipalités avec M. Kemmere et M. Orb. Nous occupons les postes de président et de vice-présidents du forum rural de cet organisme. Bien que l’opinion du Québec puisse différer, pour toutes sortes de raisons, je suis d’accord avec tout ce qu’ils ont dit jusqu’à présent aujourd’hui.

Comme je l’ai mentionné, je suis ici pour représenter la Fédération québécoise des municipalités, qui se compose de 1 200 municipalités au Québec et de plus de trois millions de lacs, de rivières et de fleuves.

Je serai aussi bref que je puisse l’être, compte tenu du temps qui nous est alloué. J’aimerais résumer ce que j’ai retenu des modifications de 2014: un changement de nom pour mieux refléter l’intention de la Loi; l’adjonction à la Loi d’une annexe qui dresse la liste de toutes les eaux navigables pour lesquelles il faut obtenir l’approbation réglementaire nécessaire afin d’ériger des structures susceptibles de perturber considérablement la navigation; le droit du public à la navigation; et le droit d’utiliser les eaux navigables comme route, protégé par la common law au Canada, que la voie navigable figure ou non à l’annexe de la Loi.

Nous sommes ici pour formuler des commentaires sur les quatre points relatifs à ces modifications. Nos préoccupations sont plutôt d’ordre environnemental. Les commentaires de la Fédération québécoise des municipalités porteront pas mal exclusivement sur ces points. En ce qui concerne l’efficacité des changements à l’échelle mondiale du point de vue d’un utilisateur, avec d'autres lois qui touchent tous les utilisateurs, nous voulons, en fait, parler au Comité de l’efficacité globale de ces modifications dans le contexte de la gestion de la navigation de plaisance.

Le changement de nom montre clairement que nous tenons à protéger la navigation plutôt que les eaux navigables. La Fédération québécoise des municipalités a accordé la priorité à la question de la réglementation de la navigation de plaisance. Le 29 septembre, nous avons pris une résolution, que nous vous avons transmise.

Il est très important qu’on accorde la priorité aux bassins d’eau et à leur protection au plan environnemental avant de protéger la navigation de plaisance. La Loi sur la marine marchande et le Bureau de la sécurité nautique ne protègent pas adéquatement les lacs, car ils s’attachent à la navigation sans faire de distinction claire entre la navigation de plaisance et le transport commercial, et ils traitent les eaux comme des facteurs secondaires. Les lacs et les rivières du Canada sont notre richesse naturelle, et une fois que le bassin hydrographique sera endommagé, nous aurons beaucoup de mal à remédier à la situation.

En ce qui concerne les eaux navigables, les nouvelles annexes retranchent la majorité des lacs du Québec pour n’en garder que trois: le lac des Deux Montagnes, le lac Memphrémagog et le lac Saint-Jean. À part le fleuve Saint-Laurent, cinq de nos principales rivières y figurent aussi: la rivière des Mille-Îles, la rivière des Prairies, la rivière Richelieu, la rivière Saint-Maurice et la rivière Saguenay.

Ces plans d’eau ont une chose en commun: ils sont navigables et ont tous de graves problèmes environnementaux à cause de la navigation de plaisance. Ils ne sont pas les seuls. Tous les lacs navigables qui ne figurent pas sur cette liste ont les mêmes problèmes, souvent exacerbés par le fait que leur surface est moins étendue.

En ce qui concerne le droit du public à la navigation, la Fédération québécoise des municipalités estime que la navigation de plaisance n’est pas un droit. Le droit du public à la navigation, principe du common law, découle d’un processus mental archaïque principalement fondé sur le commerce. La navigation de plaisance ne devrait jamais être considérée comme un droit. Elle n’est ni viable au plan économique ni sécuritaire; en outre, elle est moins durable. C’est un privilège qui a mis en danger et dégradé les lacs. La Fédération québécoise des municipalités espère en discuter plus à fond avec le ministre des Transports dès que l’occasion se présentera.

Pour nous, c’est tout à fait fondamental. Le droit d’utiliser une voie maritime comme route n’est pas viable. Appuyer ce principe, c’est ne pas tenir compte du fait que chaque lac, rivière ou fleuve a sa propre morphologie et ses faiblesses, ses berges, ses bas-fonds, ses marécages et ses aires de fraie, pour ne nommer que quelques éléments.

Il est aussi impensable d’imaginer qu’un lac puisse être une route que de croire qu’on puisse se promener en auto, à vélo ou à pied dans n’importe quel secteur d’un parc canadien sans restriction, sous prétexte qu’il s’agit d’un endroit public. L’idée ne viendrait à personne, même si leur droit de voyager est essentiel. Alors ce n’est pas le cas de la navigation de plaisance.

Il existe des règles dans les parcs et il doit en aller de même pour les lacs. Il faudrait ajouter qu’on impose des limites sur les routes et que des normes nationales et provinciales gouvernent les routes et les autoroutes. Dans le cas des lacs, non seulement on considère que l’eau est une route, mais il existe aussi très peu de restrictions, qui ont été imposées, dans chaque cas, à l’issue d’une procédure très longue et coûteuse, si bien qu’il est quasi impossible pour les municipalités locales de réglementer leurs propres plans d’eau.

Nombreux sont les lacs qui souffrent de graves problèmes par manque de protection.

(0905)



Les modifications apportées à la Loi en ce qui concerne la protection de la navigation dans son ensemble, étroitement liées à la Loi sur la marine marchande et à la réglementation des restrictions imposées à l’utilisation de constructions, sont inefficaces et ont des conséquences graves pour les utilisateurs: dommages au plan écologique, dangers pour la santé publique, problèmes de sécurité, problèmes économiques, obstruction de l’accès public et amoindrissement de la qualité de vie.

Pour la Fédération québécoise des municipalités, il est urgent de trouver des solutions pour gérer la navigation de plaisance de façon efficace, écologique et profitable au plan économique. Cette ressource naturelle doit devenir plus sécuritaire et rester accessible à tous les Canadiens avant que les dommages observés aujourd’hui ne soient irréversibles.

Le secteur municipal est très intéressé à seconder le gouvernement dans cette tâche. Nous devons travailler ensemble à trouver des solutions. Nous avons proposé la création d’un groupe de travail mené par le gouvernement fédéral, auquel participeraient les municipalités et les personnes responsables de la gestion du bassin hydrographique, qui sont les intervenants les plus proches sur le terrain. Cette démarche représenterait une première étape vers les changements qu’il faut envisager de faire sur le plan de la gestion de la navigation de plaisance dans les eaux intérieures au Canada.

J’ai maintenant énoncé les points que les professionnels de la Fédération québécoise des municipalités ont préparés pour que j’en discute avec vous. J’aimerais seulement dire quelque chose d’un peu plus personnel pendant les 30 prochaines secondes.

Je suis pêcheur. Je suis maire de ma ville et gardien de ma région, et je siège à la Fédération québécoise des municipalités ainsi qu’à la Fédération canadienne des municipalités. Nous avons un grave problème. Nos lois actuelles permettent aux gens de venir dans les petits lacs au pays avec des bateaux de toutes tailles. Ce faisant, ils endommagent nos berges comme jamais auparavant. Je ne suis pas un environnementaliste pur et dur; je suis un Canadien ordinaire. Honnêtement, nous avons besoin de l’aide du gouvernement, car les dommages causés seront irréversibles.

La Fédération canadienne des municipalités ainsi que son pendant québécois ont adopté une résolution concernant la navigation de plaisance, mais j’explique toujours la situation en termes que j’estime être simples. Disons qu’une personne moyenne prend un bain dans sa baignoire à la maison; ce n’est vraiment pas problématique, mais quand vous mettez une personne qui pèse une tonne dans une baignoire normale, cela change la donne. C’est exactement ce qui se passe dans nos lacs à la grandeur du pays à ce stade. Il faut que le gouvernement fédéral travaille avec les municipalités afin de protéger nos plans d’eau pour tous les Canadiens.

Je vous remercie infiniment d’avoir pris le temps de nous écouter.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Merci à vous tous. Comme vous le savez, nous avons bien des membres intéressés à poser des questions cruciales.

La parole est à Mme Block pour six minutes.

Mme Kelly Block (Sentier Carlton—Eagle Creek, PCC):

Je tiens à souhaiter la bienvenue à tous nos témoins d'aujourd’hui. Même si c’est par vidéo et téléconférence, c’est bon d’entendre vos témoignages.

Je tiens aussi à parler des documents d’information que nous avons reçus de notre analyste cette semaine avant de partir dans nos circonscriptions. Je pense qu’ils nous ont rappelé que les modifications à la Loi sur la protection des eaux navigables ont commencé à se faire bien avant qu’elles soient inscrites dans la loi; je pense qu’elle a dit qu’elles remontaient à 2009.

Je reconnais aussi qu’un certain nombre d’entre vous ont témoigné devant le Comité à deux ou trois reprises pour nous faire part de vos opinions, de vos préoccupations et peut-être aussi de vos recommandations sur la façon dont il faut modifier cette mesure législative.

J’ai en main un article qui a été publié dans The Hill Times le 14 septembre, et qui a pour titre « Leave Navigation Protection Act “as is,” say municipalities ». Cet article a suscité un débat assez animé au Comité et dans les médias, étant donné que la secrétaire parlementaire, Kate Young, et un représentant ministériel ont indiqué qu’on procéderait à une étude et qu’on présenterait un rapport au début de 2017, même avant que le Comité ait décidé d’entreprendre cette étude.

Nous savons qu’il est question de cette étude dans la lettre de mandat du ministre, et que cette lettre énonce clairement qu’on entend rétablir les protections qui ont été modifiées en 2014. Nous savons qu’on envisage de le faire au début de 2017.

Je suis d’accord avec le titre de cet article, qui demande qu’on ne touche pas à la Loi sur la protection de la navigation. Je pense qu’on a fait beaucoup de bon travail pour que cette loi en arrive où elle est afin de pouvoir écarter les obstacles contre lesquels bien des municipalités se butaient lorsqu’elles géraient les questions de leur ressort, surtout au Canada rural. Nous savons que la loi confère au ministre le pouvoir discrétionnaire d’ajouter ou de retrancher des voies navigables à la demande d’une municipalité.

Étant donné que je suis d’accord avec le titre de cet article et que je crois que nous avons déjà fait ce qu’il fallait, je vais offrir le reste de mon temps de parole à mes collègues de l’autre côté de la table. La plupart d’entre eux sont nouveaux au Comité, et c’est évident qu’ils sont les moteurs de cette étude, alors je vais leur offrir le temps qu’il me reste pour poser des questions aux représentants des municipalités.

(0910)

La présidente:

C’est excellent. Merci beaucoup de vous montrer aussi coopérante, madame Block, dans le cadre de notre étude.

Nous allons passer à M. Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Merci, madame Block, je vous en sais gré.

Comme Mme Block l’a fait remarquer, tous les députés libéraux sont nouveaux. Nous avons reçu de la rétroaction négative de la part du public lorsque les modifications ont été apportées à la Loi. Je suis de Colombie-Britannique, où le secteur environnemental est très solide. On brossait partout un portrait très sombre des répercussions de ces modifications. Cependant, lorsque nous avons vraiment envisagé d’entreprendre une étude de la Loi sur la protection de la navigation, c’était plutôt pour remplir ce que nous considérions être l’obligation de consulter qui n’avait pas été honorée.

Je crois comprendre que le gouvernement précédent était pressé de stimuler l’activité économique ainsi que de mettre en chantier des projets de construction et de les mener à bien. Impossible d’être en désaccord avec cela mais, en même temps, nous sommes arrivés. Je pense que je peux parler pour tout le groupe quand je dis que nous ne sommes pas déterminés au plan idéologique à annuler quelque chose simplement parce que quelqu’un d’autre l’a fait. Nous pensons, en fait, que ces modifications ont eu des conséquences positives, comme vous l’avez mentionné. Nous voulons les conserver tout en prenant peut-être un petit peu plus de temps pour réfléchir à ce que les autres estiment qu’il devrait arriver. Par conséquent, j’ai un certain nombre de questions.

Nous allons d’abord nous tourner vers vous, monsieur Kemmere. Les municipalités ont-elles eu suffisamment de temps pour faire l’expérience du nouveau régime, de la nouvelle Loi sur la protection de la navigation? Avez-vous eu une chance de voir une différence dans la façon dont vos projets sont menés dans le contexte de la nouvelle loi?

M. Al Kemmere:

Les municipalités nous ont déjà fait part de leur capacité d’exécuter des travaux qui traversent les rivières et les ruisseaux. Il leur a été possible de hâter le processus d’approbation des aspects environnementaux; au lieu de le faire en un an et demi, il leur faut quatre mois. Parallèlement, les structures dont il est question conviennent à la municipalité et sont aussi adéquates pour prendre soin de la santé environnementale des ruisseaux. Nos membres nous disent qu’ils ont observé des améliorations réelles.

M. Ken Hardie:

Excellent, merci de cette réponse.

Nous allons maintenant nous adresser à vous, monsieur Orb.

Les municipalités individuelles ont-elles coutume d’adopter un type de mécanisme normalisé pour connaître l’avis du public avant de mettre un projet en chantier? Autrement dit, donnez-vous au public la possibilité de se prononcer sur un projet de construction d’un ponceau au lieu d’un pont, par exemple?

M. Raymond Orb:

Ce n’est pas nécessaire à part dans le cadre de la procédure normale d’appels d’offres et ce type de choses. S’il s’agit d’un pont ou d’un ponceau qui existe déjà, il n’y aura pas de période de consultation à moins, je suppose, qu’on cherche à modifier les voies navigables, le débit de l’eau et des choses du genre. Si les choses se passent comme elles le font normalement, une période de consultation n’est pas nécessaire. L’exception serait, bien sûr, avec les Premières Nations. Si le projet avait des conséquences néfastes sur une réserve des Premières Nations ou sur une voie navigable dans une réserve ou quelque chose du genre, on tiendrait des consultations. Le devoir de consulter serait une procédure standard.

Le devoir de consulter n’est pas une procédure standard. Dans bien des cas, l’eau ne coule que quelques semaines pendant le ruissellement printanier. Nous n’estimons pas qu’il s’agisse d’eaux navigables. C’est la question, car avant la modification de la réglementation, nous étions obligés de suivre toute la réglementation stricte en vigueur pour qu’une embarcation puisse emprunter le ruisseau. Il s’agit simplement de ruisseaux qui ne coulent pas beaucoup pendant l’année, si bien que nous n’estimons pas qu’ils soient prioritaires.

(0915)

M. Ken Hardie:

J’adresse ma question à tout le monde qui participe à la réunion par téléconférence ou vidéoconférence.

Êtes-vous au courant d’une quelconque réaction publique négative à un des projets que vous avez entrepris?

M. Al Kemmere:

Du côté de l’Alberta, je ne suis pas au courant que les projets aient suscité une quelconque réaction négative ou des préoccupations.

M. Ken Hardie:

Qu’en est-il de la Saskatchewan?

M. Raymond Orb:

Je dirais la même chose. Nous n’avons eu que de la rétroaction positive de la part de nos membres. Bien sûr, nous avons, depuis, accéléré le processus.

M. Ken Hardie:

D’accord.

Qu’en est-il du Québec?

M. Scott Pearce:

Rien pour l’instant. Tout semble bien aller.

M. Ken Hardie:

Il y a un principe que j’ai appris à respecter encore plus au fil du temps, celui du processus équitable, celui par lequel vous permettez au public de formuler des commentaires dans un dossier. En l’absence de rétroaction, vous pouvez en déduire que les choses se passent bien.

La seule chose dans la nouvelle loi qui m’a porté à penser qu’elle pourrait poser problème est que si une personne n’est pas d’accord avec ce qui est proposé ou ce qui a déjà été fait, son seul recours est de passer par les tribunaux, ce qui peut être long et coûteux — vous avez dit la même chose de l’ancien processus.

Seriez-vous ouverts à un système peut-être plus souple de rétroaction publique par lequel il serait possible de s’opposer à un projet en particulier sans devoir attendre qu’il soit réalisé pour ensuite aller devant les tribunaux?

M. Raymond Orb:

Puis-je me prononcer là-dessus?

M. Ken Hardie:

Allez-y. Nous allons aller d’abord nous adresser au représentant de la Saskatchewan.

M. Raymond Orb:

Je dirais que nos réunions du conseil municipal sont toujours ouvertes au public. Les appels d’offres, qui s’appliquent à la plupart des projets de construction d’infrastructure — qu’il s’agisse de ponceaux ou de ponts — sont annoncés publiquement. Les gens les voient.

Je pense que si les gens s’objectent à une de nos décisions, par exemple celle de changer ou d’enlever un pont et d’installer un ponceau, ils s’adresseront très rapidement à nos politiciens locaux.

M. Ken Hardie:

Est-il possible de nous envoyer deux ou trois exemples de ces processus qui ont été annoncés dans une municipalité donnée pour que nous puissions, entre autres, revenir en arrière et consulter le procès-verbal de ces réunions? J’aimerais me familiariser avec le processus qu’on suit en ce moment. Peut-être qu’il ne s’agit pas de la meilleure analogie, mais les modifications à la Loi ont été apportées pour une raison, et nous ne voulons pas jeter le bébé avec l’eau du bain, si vous voulez.

Est-ce que…

La présidente:

Monsieur Hardie, je suis désolée, mais votre temps est écoulé.

La présidente:

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NPD):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Je remercie également nos invités de leur présence, ce matin.

Vous êtes nos yeux et nos oreilles sur le terrain. En quelques minutes, nous allons parcourir davantage de municipalités que tout ce que nous pourrions faire au cours des heures consacrées à cette étude.

Ma première question comporte deux volets et s'adresse à chacun d'entre vous. En ce qui a trait au premier volet, je vous demanderais de répondre par un oui ou par un non. Dans le cas d'un oui, il faudra une explication.

Lors de sa comparution, au tout début de notre étude, le ministre nous a dit que pas moins de 40 projets de loi, dont la plupart émanent de députés, j'imagine, ont été déposés dans le but d'ajouter un cours d'eau à la liste qui est prévue par la loi. Des membres que vous représentez ont-ils demandé d'ajouter un cours d'eau à cette liste, oui ou non?

Dans la mesure où la réponse serait oui, comment s'est passé le processus pour que ce cours d'eau, cette rivière ou ce lac soit ajouté à la liste prévue par la loi?

Vous pourriez peut-être répondre dans le même ordre dans lequel vous avez fait vos présentations, ce matin.

Nous allons commencer par l'Alberta.

(0920)

[Traduction]

M. Al Kemmere:

À ma connaissance, personne n’a demandé que des cours d’eau soient ajoutés à une liste. Pas que je sache. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Qu'en est-il de la Saskatchewan? [Traduction]

M. Raymond Orb:

Non, nous n’avons reçu aucune demande de la part de nos membres. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Maintenant, passons au Québec.

M. Scott Pearce:

Jusqu'à présent, il n'y en a pas.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, cela répond à ma première question.

Ma deuxième question porte sur l'inversion du fardeau de la preuve. Nous savons que Transports Canada n'accepte plus les plaintes. Par conséquent, un citoyen, un groupe de citoyens ou une association qui souhaiterait s'opposer doit maintenant obtenir un recours judiciaire. Dans l'une ou l'autre des municipalités que vous représentez, avez-vous reçu ce type de plainte? Avez-vous dû faire face à cela?

Je vous demanderais de répondre dans le même ordre, en commençant par l'Alberta. [Traduction]

M. Al Kemmere:

Que je sache, à l’heure actuelle, nous n’avons reçu aucune plainte. Sachez cependant que nous n’avons pas de lien direct avec chaque organe décisionnel municipal mais, à ma connaissance, nous n’en avons pas reçu. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Monsieur Orb, je vous écoute. [Traduction]

M. Raymond Orb:

Aucune dont j’aie entendu parler à ce stade. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Monsieur Pearce, vous avez la parole.

M. Scott Pearce:

Nous recevons pratiquement une plainte par jour, mais ce n'est pas lié à des projets. Il s'agit surtout de la taille des bateaux qui ont le droit de naviguer dans nos cours d'eau. Ils sont souvent très grands et causent des dommages environnementaux. C'est davantage ce genre de plainte que nous recevons, pratiquement chaque jour.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, monsieur Pearce. J'en profite pour vous poser une autre question, directement, parce que lors de votre présentation, j'ai été particulièrement interpellé par vos préoccupations environnementales.

Comme nous le savons, dans le cadre de cette loi qui protège la navigation, l'ensemble des évaluations des pipelines a été évacué pour être redirigé du côté de l'Office national de l'énergie.

Selon vous, ce transfert de compétences de Transports Canada à l'Office national de l'énergie fait-il en sorte que la situation est équivalente, meilleure ou pire?

M. Scott Pearce:

La façon dont la loi est libellée fait en sorte qu'aucune limite n'est imposée quant à la taille des bateaux autorisés à emprunter les cours d'eau navigables. Par conséquent, des bateaux beaucoup trop gros, qui créent des vagues de 5 à 6 pieds de hauteur et des dommages majeurs à la bande riveraine se retrouvent sur de petits lacs de villégiature au Québec, en Ontario ou en Alberta.

Les municipalités aimeraient au moins que le gouvernement du Canada mette des règles en vigueur. Il n'est pas normal qu'un bateau de 100 pieds, qui pèse 100 000 livres, ait le droit de circuler sur un petit lac navigable. Il n'y a pas grand-chose qu'on puisse faire pour réparer des dommages une fois qu'ils ont été causés. Il est déjà trop tard.

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Ces modifications à la Loi sur les eaux navigables, jadis, et à la Loi sur la protection de la navigation, maintenant, ont-elles modifié vos relations ou vos consultations auprès d'autres ordres de gouvernement?

Autrement dit, les autorités provinciales ou municipales ont-elles modifié leur façon de faire à la suite de ces changements?

M. Scott Pearce:

Voulez-vous entendre d'abord la réponse des gens de l'Alberta et de la Saskatchewan? [Traduction]

M. Al Kemmere:

En Alberta, je pense que cela n’a fait qu’améliorer nos relations avec les divers ordres de gouvernement puisqu’il a été possible d’accélérer les processus. Nous savons qu’on surveille toujours les points importants, mais je crois que dans les trois ordres de gouvernement, nous avons été en mesure de hâter les processus et, par conséquent, d’améliorer les relations. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Nous allons revenir à M. Orb. [Traduction]

M. Raymond Orb:

Je ne crois pas que cela ait changé la relation avec les échelons supérieurs du gouvernement. Les projets approuvés, qui reçoivent des subventions, par exemple, de Chantiers Canada — il pourrait s’agir de projets d’installation de pont ou de ponceau  — requièrent toujours les permis nécessaires. Faut-il des permis aquatiques, selon le cas? Il faut toujours faire approuver des permis d’Environnement Canada. Ces gens sont toujours là. Ils continuent d’examiner les projets.

Comme mon collègue de l’Alberta l’a affirmé, cela ne fait que hâter le processus, ce qui nous satisfait. Nous sommes satisfaits de la réglementation actuelle.

(0925)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Aubin. Merci à nos témoins.

Monsieur Fraser.

M. Sean Fraser (Nova-Centre, Lib.):

J’aimerais commencer par dire que je pense avoir senti une légère hésitation au début de certains de vos témoignages concernant le potentiel d’apporter des modifications importantes à la Loi qui pourraient être contraires à ce que vous souhaitez.

Pour reprendre les commentaires formulés par mon collègue, monsieur Hardie, nous avons appris dans certains des témoignages que, dans les faits, de bonnes modifications avaient été apportées. Dans la mesure où il y a des développements positifs, nous ne voulons pas hausser davantage les dépenses des municipalités dans le seul but de rendre les projets plus coûteux. J’aimerais vous rassurer. Parallèlement, nous voulons nous assurer que la Loi fonctionne comme elle devrait.

Pour ce qui est de nos antécédents, je pense que nos expériences diffèrent peut-être grandement. Je suis originaire de la Nouvelle-Écosse, où je peux me rendre à la côte de chez moi en cinq minutes à n’importe quel moment. Nombre d’entreprises locales utilisent, en fait, les lacs ou les rivières pour envoyer leurs produits vers les marchés. Alors c’est parfois une approche favorable aux entreprises que nous privilégions en leur garantissant un droit à la navigation dans le cadre des travaux municipaux.

J’aimerais vous donner une occasion d’expliquer si les modifications à la Loi vous ont permis d’entreprendre des projets que vous n’auriez pas pu entreprendre avant.

Peut-être que vous pourriez répondre dans l’ordre dans lequel vous avez témoigné.

M. Al Kemmere:

Je ne peux pas dire que nous ayons entrepris de projets supplémentaires. Je crois que nous avons essayé de répondre aux besoins qui demandent à être comblés depuis de nombreuses années.

Vous soulevez un argument intéressant concernant les rôles qu’ils jouent en Nouvelle-Écosse par rapport à l’Alberta car, comme nous sommes enclavés, nous n’utilisons pas beaucoup nos rivières, nos fleuves et nos ruisseaux pour le commerce; c’est donc dire que nous n’avons pas accès aux plans d’eau importants dont nous aurions besoin pour faire commerce.

Nombre des points qui nous ont posé problème à cet égard, comme Ray Orb l’a indiqué, sont les ruisseaux qui sont à peine navigables un mois par année parce que leur débit d’eau n’est suffisamment important que pendant le ruissellement printanier; ils ne sont vraiment pas navigables à l’année. Ce sont les points qui nous ont occasionné autant de problèmes avec notre processus qu’il n’est raisonnable…

Il y a des ruisseaux, des ruisseaux importants, qui pourraient être des eaux navigables pour le commerce et qui sont toujours protégés en vertu de la Loi en Alberta; ils figurent à l’annexe. S’il y en a de nouveaux à cerner qui sont nécessaires pour rehausser le commerce ou la surveillance, ils peuvent être ajoutés à cette liste. C’est une des très bonnes choses à cet égard. Le ministre a le pouvoir discrétionnaire de le faire par le truchement d’un processus de demande. Je pense que cela couvre tout besoin commercial futur qui pourrait se faire sentir.

M. Sean Fraser:

Avant de passer aux autres témoins, je dois dire que vous avez soulevé un point important à mes yeux, compte tenu de ce qui se passe dans ma région du pays.

Si j'ai bien compris, le libellé de la loi fait en sorte que seules les municipalités et, éventuellement, les administrations provinciales peuvent avoir accès au processus de demande. Même si cette question ne revêt pas une grande importance dans le contexte de notre présente étude, pouvez-vous m'indiquer s'il existe un mécanisme permettant aux utilisateurs d'un cours d'eau, que ce soit à des fins récréatives, traditionnelles ou économiques, de saisir une municipalité d'une telle requête? Je pense, par exemple, à une entreprise locale qui voudrait utiliser une rivière pour livrer ses produits. Si ces gens-là ne peuvent pas eux-mêmes soumettre une demande, leur est-il possible de s'adresser à vous pour que vous le fassiez en leur nom? Est-ce que c'est déjà arrivé? Y a-t-il un mécanisme semblable?

M. Al Kemmere:

Ce n'est pas arrivé à ma connaissance. Je crois toutefois que si un entrepreneur ou un résidant de la localité devait s'adresser aux autorités municipales pour obtenir exactement ce dont vous parlez, il reviendrait au conseil d'analyser cette requête et de décider s'il convient d'aller de l'avant.

M. Sean Fraser:

J'aimerais maintenant donner aux autres témoins l'occasion de nous dire si les changements apportés leur ont permis de réaliser des projets qui n'auraient pas nécessairement été possibles auparavant.

(0930)

M. Raymond Orb:

J'aimerais répondre, si vous permettez.

En Saskatchewan, nous avons un programme permettant de répondre aux demandes de financement des municipalités rurales qui souhaitent améliorer leur réseau routier à des fins économiques. Les fonds sont répartis entre les municipalités qui satisfont aux critères établis. Nous pouvons transmettre au Comité la liste des projets qui ont été lancés grâce à ce programme. Je crois que ces projets auraient pu aller de l'avant avant les changements apportés aux règles touchant les eaux navigables mais, comme je l'indiquais, ils auraient été retardés et auraient entraîné des coûts considérables. On estime que bon nombre de ces projets n'auraient pas pu être réalisés si la réglementation n'avait pas été changée.

Pour l'instant, le processus se déroule exactement comme nous le souhaitions. Comme je l'ai mentionné, il y a encore des mesures de contrôle en place du point de vue environnemental, mais nous pouvons certes vous communiquer cette liste.

Je voudrais simplement ajouter un commentaire. La situation des municipalités est notamment problématique du fait que nous recevons seulement environ huit cents pour chaque dollar de rentrées fiscales. Ce sont les fonds à notre disposition. La situation ne se limite pas à la Saskatchewan. Je crois que c'est un peu la même chose partout au pays. Nous avons besoin du financement de Chantiers Canada. Les petites municipalités de la Saskatchewan, comme celles en milieu rural, ne reçoivent pas grand-chose, voire rien du tout dans la plupart des cas, de Chantiers Canada. Nous devons utiliser nos fonds provinciaux. Il va donc de soi que nous préconisons une modification des critères de telle sorte que les municipalités rurales et les petites localités puissent être admissibles au financement.

Nous pouvons sans problème vous fournir la liste des projets en cours.

M. Sean Fraser:

Certainement, et c'est d'autant plus intéressant pour moi en ma qualité de député représentant une circonscription rurale.

La présidente:

Vous n'avez plus de temps, monsieur Fraser. Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Sikand.

M. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Madame la présidente, je vais partager mon temps avec mon collègue, M. Iacono.

Mes collègues ont déjà abordé la question, mais j'aimerais que chacun de vous puissiez me fournir de plus amples précisions à ce sujet.

Le programme de navigation de Transports Canada n'accepte plus les plaintes visant des ouvrages entravant un cours d'eau non désigné. Les personnes qui estiment qu'un ouvrage sur un cours d'eau non désigné porte atteinte au droit public à la navigation doivent obtenir une ordonnance judiciaire pour régler la situation. Parmi vos membres, est-ce qu'une municipalité a été poursuivie en justice après avoir reçu une plainte visant un ouvrage municipal non conforme sur un cours d'eau non désigné?

M. Al Kemmere:

Je n'ai pas eu connaissance de cas semblables en Alberta. J'ose espérer que l'on tenterait de régler la question au niveau du conseil municipal, longtemps avant que le recours aux tribunaux ne devienne nécessaire.

M. Raymond Orb:

À ce que je sache, aucune municipalité n'a fait l'objet de poursuites judiciaires à ce sujet.

J'aimerais juste mentionner quelque chose. L'aménagement du Sentier transcanadien qui traverse le pays doit être terminé avant 2017. Nous avons de nombreuses portions où les gens peuvent emprunter des cours d'eau, en canot tout particulièrement. Nous venons tout juste de terminer notre segment de ce sentier en Saskatchewan. Nous avons différents panneaux pour guider ceux qui veulent mettre leur canot à l'eau.

Nous croyons que cela facilite grandement les choses pour les gens qui veulent utiliser les cours d'eau pour leurs loisirs ou pour parcourir de courtes distances.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Mais vous n'avez pas entendu parler de plaintes dont les tribunaux auraient été saisis.

M. Raymond Orb:

Non. Aucune.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci. C'était ma question.

La présidente:

Monsieur Iacono, à vous la parole. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Merci, messieurs, d'être ici avec nous ce matin.

J'aurais une question pour M. Scott Pearce.

De quelle façon la loi pourrait-elle être modifiée afin de mieux protéger les eaux navigables?

M. Scott Pearce:

Merci énormément pour votre question, monsieur.

Tout d'abord, il n'y a pas de conflit en ce qui a trait au droit de la navigation pour amener nos produits aux marchés ou effectuer des travaux d'infrastructures nécessaires dans les cours d'eau.

Le problème est le suivant. De la façon dont la loi est faite, il n'y a pas de limite concernant la grandeur des bateaux sur nos cours d'eau, ce qui a pour conséquence que ceux-ci sont en train de mourir.

Il y a plusieurs façons de voir le problème. Plusieurs experts ont fait des études sur le sujet. Il est clair qu'il faut commencer par les dommages causés par un bateau qui est trop grand pour un cours d'eau et qui fait, par exemple, des vagues de 5 ou 6 pieds, ce qui détruit la bande riveraine.

Il n'y a pas de limite. Prenons l'exemple d'une personne qui a un chalet ou une maison à Québec au bord d'un lac de 3 kilomètres de longueur et de 7,5 mètres de profondeur. Légalement, elle a le droit d'amener sur ce lac un bateau de 60 mètres de longueur venant du lac Ontario. La municipalité ne peut rien faire pour l'arrêter.

Cela veut dire qu'il n'y a aucune contrainte concernant la navigation sur nos cours d'eau. Il n'y a aucune contrainte à l'égard de la grandeur et du poids des bateaux ou des vagues qu'ils font. Malheureusement, comme on dit, c'est le far west sur nos lacs et nos cours d'eau. Il n'y a pas de limite. S'il n'y a pas de limite, il est certain que les gens en profitent et voient de plus en plus grand.

Cela répond-il à votre question, monsieur?

(0935)

M. Angelo Iacono:

Oui.

Madame la présidente, ai-je encore du temps de parole? [Traduction]

La présidente:

Il vous reste encore deux minutes et demie.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Je vais profiter de l'occasion pour partager mon temps avec mon collègue, David Graham.

La présidente:

Monsieur Graham, c'est à vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Monsieur Pearce, je suis votre voisin des Laurentides. J'ai d'ailleurs lu quelque chose à votre sujet dans Main Street. C'est un plaisir de vous rencontrer, si je puis dire.

M. Scott Pearce:

J'ai beaucoup entendu parler de vous également, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Voilà qui est toujours un peu inquiétant.

Comme vous le savez, les lacs sont une grande source de problèmes dans notre région. C'est l'une des principales préoccupations dans ma circonscription, juste après l'accès à Internet.

J'ai entendu vos réponses à Angelo. Vous m'excuserez, mais j'ai raté le début de votre exposé.

Puis-je vous demander si vous avez des pistes de solution à nous proposer concernant ces problèmes que nous posent les lacs? Je sais qu'à Sainte-Agathe, à titre d'exemple, il y a eu des études pour indiquer à quelle profondeur et à quelle distance du rivage pouvaient circuler les embarcations de grande taille, et je sais que ces mesures ne font pas l'unanimité. J'aimerais savoir ce que vous en pensez.

M. Scott Pearce:

À la Fédération québécoise des municipalités, nous estimons que le gouvernement fédéral devrait trouver un terrain d'entente. Comme vous le savez, les embarcations deviennent de plus en plus grosses, mais la superficie des lacs n'augmente pas. Il pourrait y avoir des critères fondés...

M. Luc Berthold (Mégantic—L'Érable, PCC):

J'invoque le Règlement, madame la présidente.

Je ne vois pas vraiment le lien avec les questions que nous étudions actuellement. Il s'agit ici de considérations environnementales.

La présidente:

Je vois, monsieur Berthold. [Français]

M. Luc Berthold:

Je pense que cette question n'est vraiment pas pertinente par rapport à l'étude que nous sommes en train de faire en ce moment.

M. Scott Pearce:

Monsieur, j'aimerais répondre à cela. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Un instant, s'il vous plaît.

Je veux bien que vous répondiez, mais nous sommes dans la période allouée à M. Iacono qui partage son temps avec M. Graham. Ils peuvent vous laisser les 35 secondes qui restent pour répondre, même s'il est vrai que nous commençons à aborder une problématique différente.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Pearce, je vais vous laisser répondre.

M. Scott Pearce:

Il s'agit effectivement d'un problème environnemental, mais ce problème environnemental est causé par le ministère des Transports. C'est donc un problème de transport qui a un impact sur l'environnement, ce qui fait qu'il y a un lien direct.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup à tous les deux.

Monsieur Berthold. [Français]

M. Luc Berthold:

Madame la présidente, je vais partager mon temps de parole avec M. Rayes. Nous avons convenu d'un petit changement. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Bienvenue, monsieur Rayes. Nous sommes heureux de vous compter parmi nous. [Français]

M. Alain Rayes (Richmond—Arthabaska, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente. C'est avec plaisir que je me joins à votre Comité.

J'appuie les propos de mon collègue, M. Berthold, relativement au dernier sujet qui a été abordé. Je pense que le ministère du Développement durable, de l’Environnement et de la Lutte contre les changements climatiques du Québec et le ministère fédéral de l'Environnement et du Changement climatique pourraient beaucoup aider dans ce domaine.

Je voudrais revenir sur la lettre de mandat pour revenir à la base du sujet. Dans la lettre de mandat du ministre Garneau, il est écrit ceci: Travailler avec le ministre des Pêches, des Océans et de la Garde côtière canadienne afin de revoir les modifications à la Loi sur les pêches et à la Loi sur la protection des eaux navigables apportées par le précédent gouvernement, réinstaurer les protections éliminées [...]

Quant à moi, s'il s'agit de réinstaurer cela, on ne peut pas discuter de grand-chose puisque les libéraux veulent simplement annuler toutes les mesures qui ont été mises en place et retourner dans le passé. Or, quand je vous écoute, je n'ai pas l'impression que vous souhaitez revenir en arrière et défaire ce qui a été fait lors des dernières modifications.

La citation se poursuit comme suit: « [...] et intégrer des mécanismes de protection modernes. » Si c'est le cas, le ministre pourrait nous dire ce qu'il souhaite faire. Le Comité pourrait alors faire son travail d'analyse et consulter les experts pour valider cela, et dire si, oui ou non, ce serait bon.

J'aimerais vous entendre à cet égard, messieurs, particulièrement ceux de l'Alberta et de la Saskatchewan, et par la suite, le représentant de la Fédération québécoise des municipalités.

(0940)

[Traduction]

La présidente:

Monsieur Kemmere.

M. Al Kemmere:

Nous n'aimions pas trop l'idée d'un retour à une loi rédigée longtemps avant l'ère moderne. Il y a une partie de votre question que je n'ai pas bien entendue, mais nous sommes tout de même heureux de pouvoir faire valoir nos points de vue en faveur du maintien de mesures législatives que nous jugeons progressistes. C'est la raison de notre présence ici.

Je sais que cela ne répond peut-être pas à votre question, et je vais peut-être devoir vous demander de la répéter. [Français]

M. Alain Rayes:

J'aimerais entendre l'autre témoin. J'y reviendrai par la suite si nous avons assez de temps. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Monsieur Orb.

M. Raymond Orb:

Je pense que votre question porte sur le processus.

Lorsque le gouvernement précédent envisageait ces changements, nous savions déjà quelles modifications réglementaires s'ensuivraient et nous étions d'accord. J'ai comparu à maintes reprises devant le comité des transports à ce sujet, et c'est la même chose pour mes collègues de l'Alberta et du Manitoba également, je crois. Nous apprécions être ainsi consultés, mais nous sommes tout de même un peu inquiets. Nous nous sommes posé de sérieuses questions lorsque cette idée a été lancée durant la campagne électorale fédérale. Nous ne savions pas exactement pourquoi le gouvernement souhaitait le faire, mais nous allons néanmoins continuer à préconiser le maintien de la réglementation en vigueur. [Français]

M. Alain Rayes:

Je vous remercie.

Je vais maintenant devoir donner la parole à mon collègue, M. Berthold. Je m'excuse de ne pas vous permettre de vous exprimer, monsieur Pearce. Je veux simplement dire que dans bien des comités, on constate en ce moment qu'on discute, mais on ne connaît pas le projet. Je peux vous dire que c'est très frustrant pour nous aussi.

Je laisse la parole à M. Berthold.

M. Luc Berthold:

Merci beaucoup.

En effet, c'est ce qui est frustrant. Nous voulons savoir quelles sont les modifications parce qu'il est clair que le ministre a quelque chose en tête.

Pour mes collègues d'en face qui amorcent l'exercice de bonne foi, ce n'est malheureusement pas ce que le ministre a en tête. À la période des questions, le 6 octobre, le ministre des Pêches, des Océans et de la Garde côtière canadienne a dit que l'objectif de la consultation sur la Loi sur la protection de la navigation était — et je vais lire la citation en anglais:[Traduction] ... de la façon dont nous pourrions non seulement rétablir les protections supprimées par les conservateurs, mais aussi les renforcer... [Français]

Vous dites aux témoins qu'on veut garder ce qui était bon. Or cela ne correspond pas du tout à l'intention du projet de loi.

En terminant, madame la présidente, compte tenu des témoignages que nous avons entendus ce matin, j'aimerais déposer une motion. Elle va comme suit: Considérant que les associations des municipalités confirment ne pas avoir reçu de plainte et ne pas avoir demandé d'ajout de cours d'eau, il est demandé que le Comité mette fin immédiatement à son étude de la Loi sur la protection de la navigation. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Berthold.

Doit-il y avoir un préavis de 48 heures?

Le greffier du Comité (M. Andrew Bartholomew Chaplin):

Un préavis est normalement requis, à moins qu'il y ait consentement unanime.

La présidente:

Comme vous le savez, monsieur Berthold, il y a un préavis de 48 heures à donner. Si vous le voulez bien, nous allons étudier votre motion lors de notre prochaine séance ou de celle qui suivra.

M. Luc Berthold:

Oui, c'est d'accord.

M. Ken Hardie:

Madame la présidente, j'invoque le Règlement. De notre côté, nous sommes disposés à renoncer au préavis de 48 heures et à mettre la motion aux voix.

La présidente:

Est-ce la façon dont le comité veut procéder?

Monsieur Aubin.

(0945)

M. Robert Aubin:

Oui.

La présidente:

Le moment est venu de remercier nos témoins de leur participation.

Nous vous sommes reconnaissants d'avoir trouvé du temps dans vos horaires très chargés pour venir nous aider dans la poursuite de cette étude. Il est possible que nous en arrivions à la conclusion que tout fonctionne bien et qu'il n'y a rien à changer. Nous nous intéressons notamment aux obstacles à la navigation qui devraient être réglementés ou interdits et à la meilleure façon de s'y prendre dans le cadre du processus législatif. Nous sommes à la recherche de recommandations quant à la manière d'améliorer la situation actuelle, en reconnaissant que certains des changements apportés étaient certes absolument nécessaires. C'est l'optique dans laquelle notre comité aborde ces questions.

Merci beaucoup pour votre contribution à notre étude.

Pourriez-vous relire la motion, s'il vous plaît? [Français]

Le greffier:

La motion se lit comme suit: Considérant que les associations des municipalités confirment ne pas avoir reçu de plainte et ne pas avoir demandé d'ajout de cours d'eau, il est demandé que le Comité mette fin immédiatement à son étude de la Loi sur la protection de la navigation. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Berthold.

(La motion est rejetée)

La présidente: Passons maintenant à nos témoins suivants qui représentent l'Association canadienne de pipelines d'énergie ainsi que l'Association canadienne de la construction dans le cas de M. Michael Atkinson.

Si cela convient à tout le monde, nous allons simplement poursuivre.

Monsieur Atkinson, bienvenue à notre comité.

M. Michael Atkinson (président, Association canadienne de la construction):

Merci.

Madame la présidente et honorables membres du Comité, c'est un plaisir pour moi de comparaître devant vous aujourd'hui.

L'Association canadienne de la construction représente les entreprises du secteur non résidentiel au sein de l'industrie de la construction au Canada. C'est nous qui construisons les infrastructures comme les centres commerciaux, les usines, les écoles, les hôpitaux et les condominiums. Pour ainsi dire, nous construisons tout ce qu'il y a à construire, à l'exception des unifamiliales.

Nous nous sommes dotés d'une structure intégrée regroupant quelque 70 associations locales et provinciales d'un océan à l'autre. Nous représentons un peu moins de 20 000 entreprises, dont plus de 95 % sont des PME.

L'industrie de la construction dans son ensemble procure de l'emploi à environ 1,4 million de Canadiens et compte pour 7 % du produit intérieur brut de notre pays, ce qui nous permet d'affirmer que nous sommes une composante essentielle à la viabilité économique du Canada.

Nous sommes très heureux de pouvoir témoigner aujourd'hui pour vous présenter quelques-unes de nos réflexions au sujet de la Loi sur la protection de la navigation.

Je dois d'abord vous dire que nos membres étaient très heureux des changements intervenus en 2012, parallèlement aux modifications à la Loi sur les pêches et à la Loi canadienne sur l'évaluation environnementale. Certains ont prétendu que les changements apportés en 2012 à la Loi sur la protection des eaux navigables ont réduit l'efficacité des mesures de protection de l'environnement dans tout le pays. Nous ne sommes pas du tout d'accord.

Précisons d'abord que la Loi modifiée a cessé de figurer parmi les éléments pouvant déclencher une évaluation environnementale aux termes de la LCEE. Tout changement apporté devait être pris en considération dans le contexte des modifications à la LCEE. On commettrait une grave erreur en voulant modifier unilatéralement cette loi-ci sans tenir compte des changements qui ont été apportés à la LCEE pour faire en sorte que les éléments déclencheurs demeurent raisonnables.

La protection du droit à la navigation ne concerne aucunement — ou ne devrait aucunement concerner, comme je viens de l'expliquer — la protection de l'environnement et le déclenchement d'une éventuelle évaluation environnementale, des responsabilités qui sont déjà prévues dans le mandat du gouvernement fédéral.

Le fédéral peut déjà compter sur la Loi sur les pêches pour protéger les pêches et l'habitat du poisson; la Loi canadienne sur la protection de l'environnement pour que les cours d'eau et les terres soient à l'abri du déversement de produits chimiques et d'autres substances nocives; la Loi sur les espèces en péril pour protéger les espèces menacées ou en danger; la Loi sur la convention concernant les oiseaux migrateurs pour protéger les oiseaux migrateurs; ainsi qu'un éventail de règlements et de politiques connexes s'appliquant aux différentes industries comme les pâtes et papiers, les mines et le raffinage du pétrole, ou visant la protection des terres humides.

En outre, les intervenants intéressés font montre d'une certaine mauvaise foi en agissant comme si le gouvernement fédéral était le seul responsable de la protection de l'environnement. Les provinces, les territoires, les gouvernements autochtones et les administrations municipales ont adopté toute une gamme de lois et de règlements qui visent également la protection de l'environnement.

Tout cela étant dit, j'en reviens au principe de base que je souhaite défendre. La Loi sur la protection de la navigation vise à protéger le droit à la navigation commerciale prévu par la common law au Canada. Elle ne vise pas la protection de l'environnement. Comme le ministre lui-même l'a déclaré lors de sa comparution devant votre Comité: « L'objectif de la Loi est de trouver l'équilibre entre ce droit de navigation et la nécessité de construire des infrastructures comme des ponts et des barrages. »

Comme ce sont les membres de notre association qui construisent ces infrastructures, il n'est pas rare que notre travail soit réglementé en application de cette loi. En vertu du régime en place, les promoteurs peuvent procéder à une auto-évaluation et l'obtention d'un permis de Transports Canada n'est pas nécessaire étant donné que la plupart de nos travaux sont des ouvrages désignés conformément à la définition établie dans l'arrêté sur les ouvrages secondaires. Un tel climat de clarté, de certitude et de prévisibilité est bénéfique pour notre industrie.

Je vais vous donner un exemple dans le contexte de la Loi sur les pêches. On y retrouve des lignes directrices sur la façon de construire des ponceaux et d'autres structures au-dessus des habitats du poisson. En connaissant à l'avance ces lignes directrices, nous sommes à même de concevoir et de proposer des projets de construction de structures semblables. Tout est clair pour tout le monde. Nous pouvons ainsi gagner du temps, car nous pouvons prendre en compte ces considérations à l'étape de la conception.

La loi précédente n'offrait aucune possibilité d'auto-évaluation de telle sorte qu'une approbation de Transports Canada était toujours requise pour pouvoir aller de l'avant avec un projet de construction. Comme d'autres témoins vous l'ont indiqué précédemment, il s'ensuivait dans presque tous les dossiers des complications bureaucratiques et des retards. C'était la règle, et non l'exception.

Qui plus est, bon nombre de ces évaluations étaient menées seulement une fois que l'approbation avait été obtenue pour aller de l'avant avec le projet à l'issue d'une évaluation environnementale. S'il y a une chose que les entrepreneurs en construction ne peuvent pas tolérer, c'est bien un tel manque d'uniformité: un feu vert qui passe au jaune, puis au rouge. Il nous faut un certain degré de certitude, notamment quant aux échéanciers. Plus la loi et le règlement peuvent nous offrir de certitude, le mieux c'est pour toutes les parties en cause.

(0950)



Bref, nous recommanderions, premièrement, que Transports Canada se concentre aux fins de l'application de cette Loi sur les cours d'eau les plus utilisés pour la navigation commerciale et récréative.

Deuxièmement, il conviendrait d'améliorer le processus d'auto-évaluation en allongeant la liste des projets visés par l'arrêté sur les ouvrages secondaires et en établissant des critères clairs quant à la performance nominale. Il s'agit bien souvent de travaux de routine qui devraient pouvoir être réalisés sans qu'un permis soit nécessaire.

Troisièmement, la Loi sur la protection de la navigation ne devrait pas servir d'élément déclencheur à l'application de la Loi canadienne sur l'évaluation environnementale étant donné que la protection de la navigation commerciale n'a rien à voir avec la protection de l'environnement, et que les modifications apportées à la LCEE en 2012 ont permis d'accélérer le processus fédéral des évaluations environnementales en lui injectant une plus grande certitude grâce à une approche fondée sur une liste des éléments déclencheurs possibles. Cela me ramène à mon argument initial à l'effet que toutes les mesures que vous pouvez envisager par rapport à la loi à l'étude doivent l'être en tenant compte des modifications apportées à la LCEE à la même époque.

Voilà qui termine mes observations préliminaires. Je me ferai un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Atkinson.

Nous allons maintenant entendre M. Bloomer de l'Association canadienne de pipelines d'énergie.

Bienvenue et merci d'avoir pris le temps de nous parler aujourd'hui.

M. Chris Bloomer (président et chef de la direction, Association canadienne de pipelines d'énergie):

Bonjour à tous et merci de me permettre de témoigner. J'aimerais bien être sur place. Je serai à Ottawa la semaine prochaine, mais il m'était impossible de m'y rendre aujourd'hui

Je vais donc vous parler au nom de l'Association canadienne de pipelines d'énergie. L'association représente les 12 principales sociétés de pipelines d'énergie au Canada. Nos membres assurent le transport de 97 % de la production canadienne de pétrole et de gaz naturel sur un réseau de quelque 119 000 kilomètres de pipelines.

Je tiens à mentionner d'entrée de jeu que notre association va participer activement à tous les processus d'examen réglementaire en cours au niveau fédéral, y compris ceux touchant la Loi sur les pêches, la LCEE et la modernisation de l'Office national de l'énergie. Je vais toutefois m'en tenir dans mes observations d'aujourd'hui à l'étude qui nous intéresse, soit celle de la Loi sur la protection de la navigation. Soulignons d'abord et avant tout qu'il existe des principes fondamentaux de bonne réglementation s'appliquant sans distinction à tous les processus d'examen en cours, et que nous ne manquerons pas de les invoquer au cours des mois à venir.

Pour tous les intervenants, un cadre réglementaire est optimal lorsqu'il est clair, efficient et complet. Plus précisément, le processus devrait reposer sur des données scientifiques et des faits, être mené par l'instance réglementaire la mieux placée pour le faire, éviter les dédoublements, définir clairement les responsabilités de chacun, être assorti de règles et de modalités transparentes, permettre la participation véritable de ceux dont la contribution peut être la plus utile, et assurer le juste équilibre entre la nécessité d'agir rapidement et les autres objectifs à atteindre. Notre association appuie tous les efforts déployés par le gouvernement pour obtenir de tels résultats. Nous mettons actuellement la dernière main à notre mémoire écrit et à notre documentation technique aux fins de cet examen. Nous soumettrons le tout d'ici l'échéance fixée à la semaine prochaine.

Je vais traiter brièvement aujourd'hui de l'objectif de cette loi, des changements qui y ont été apportés au cours des dernières années et des répercussions qu'ils ont maintenant pour notre industrie.

D'une manière générale, les modifications apportées visaient à moderniser la Loi, à réduire les dédoublements et les pratiques non efficientes, et à préciser l'objectif de la Loi sur la protection des eaux navigables dans le contexte de l'application d'autres lois. Tout cela bien considéré, la Loi sur la protection de la navigation a d'abord pour but de veiller à ce que la navigation soit protégée en assurant un juste équilibre entre le respect du droit à la navigation et la nécessité de construire des infrastructures.

La Loi sur la protection de la navigation doit permettre la surveillance des travaux et des projets pouvant faire obstacle à la navigation en s'assurant en priorité que le tout se déroule en toute sécurité, avec le moins d'impact possible sur la navigation. Les autres lois en cours de révision par des comités parlementaires ou des groupes d'experts, à savoir la LCEE de 2012, la modernisation de la Loi sur l'Office national de l'énergie et la Loi sur les pêches, traitent des répercussions sur l'habitat et l'environnement et de la façon dont les pipelines sont réglementés.

Étant donné le vaste mandat des autres lois environnementales, nous ne croyons pas que les changements apportés à la Loi sur la protection de la navigation aient pu nuire de quelque manière que ce soit à la protection de l'environnement. Je peux plutôt vous assurer que les impacts environnementaux des projets de franchissement de cours d'eau par des pipelines sont pleinement pris en compte dans les examens auxquels notre industrie doit se soumettre en application d'autres lois, et plus particulièrement de celle de l'Office national de l'énergie.

De plus, les changements mis en oeuvre en 2012 ont réduit le double emploi tout en permettant au gouvernement, à l'industrie et aux autres intervenants d'obtenir de meilleurs résultats en axant les évaluations sur les principaux facteurs d'impact et en pouvant ainsi utiliser les ressources plus efficacement. Ces changements ont permis de mieux définir et clarifier l'objectif de la Loi sur la protection de la navigation et des autres lois environnementales, ce qui pave la voie à une amélioration des résultats en matière de protection de l'environnement.

Nous osons espérer que cet examen de la Loi sur la protection de la navigation sera réalisé en gardant à l'esprit la nécessité d'éviter les dédoublements avec les mesures de réglementation et de protection déjà prévues par d'autres lois. Nous souhaiterions en outre que cet examen porte sur l'intention et les objectifs visés par les changements apportés à la Loi sur la protection de la navigation en cherchant à déterminer si ces changements produisent les résultats escomptés et si des améliorations s'imposent.

Avant de parler de ces changements, je pense qu'il convient de s'assurer de bien comprendre la façon dont les pipelines franchissent les cours d'eau. Durant la construction, il y a certaines perturbations, bien qu'elles soient souvent temporaires, qui touchent le cours d'eau tant en matière environnementale que du point de vue de la navigation. Pour permettre aux véhicules de construction de traverser le cours d'eau en toute sécurité, il est parfois nécessaire d'installer de façon temporaire un pont, un ponceau ou un pont de glace, de neige ou de billots. Toutes ces installations temporaires sont enlevées une fois la construction terminée.

Il faut de plus signaler que nos membres ont recours à des méthodes éprouvées de franchissement des cours d'eau qui font appel à l'expertise combinée de spécialistes en sécurité, en génie et en environnement. Nous utilisons les plus récentes technologies disponibles pour minimiser les impacts environnementaux et nous déployons, lorsque la situation l'exige, des mesures d'atténuation s'appuyant sur des bases scientifiques à l'égard de tout problème pouvant subsister.

(0955)



Il est important de noter aux fins de la présente étude que les choses reviennent à la normale dans le cours d'eau une fois que l'infrastructure de franchissement est terminée et qu'il n'y a généralement aucun impact sur la navigation.

L'industrie du pipeline est touchée par trois changements importants apportés à la Loi.

Il y a d'abord la délégation à l'Office national de l'énergie du pouvoir d'évaluer les impacts sur la navigation des pipelines sous réglementation fédérale. En vertu des modifications apportées, l'ONE doit prendre en compte les effets sur la navigation et la sécurité maritime avant de formuler des recommandations ou de prendre des décisions concernant un nouveau pipeline. Auparavant, c'est Transports Canada qui devait s'en charger une fois l'approbation de l'ONE obtenue.

Deuxièmement, la réduction de la portée de la Loi à 162 fleuves, rivières, lacs et océans inscrits dans une annexe représente un changement important, d'autant plus que cette loi s'appliquait auparavant à tous les cours d'eau au Canada

Troisièmement, il y a l'arrêté sur les ouvrages secondaires de 2009. Les pipelines sous réglementation provinciale qui ne relèvent pas de l'ONE doivent toujours obtenir l'autorisation de Transports Canada s'ils franchissent un des cours d'eau inscrits à l'annexe. Cependant, certains de ces franchissements satisfont aux critères établis dans l'arrêté sur les ouvrages secondaires pour les pipelines, de telle sorte qu'une autorisation spéciale n'est pas requise.

Nous estimons que ces changements ont eu des répercussions favorables, sans nuire à la protection de la navigation ou à la protection de l'environnement.

Il y avait auparavant dédoublement des pouvoirs. L'ONE avait le pouvoir de réglementer les pipelines en vertu de la Loi sur l'ONE, alors que le ministre des Transports disposait de ses propres pouvoirs à l'égard des ouvrages de franchissement de cours d'eau en vertu de la Loi canadienne sur la protection des eaux navigables. Les modifications de 2012 ont permis de regrouper ces pouvoirs dans les mains de l'ONE à titre de guichet unique ou d'instance réglementaire la mieux placée pour intervenir. Notre association y voit une mesure favorable qui va contribuer non seulement à accroître l'efficience du processus d'octroi des permis, mais aussi à assurer une meilleure responsabilisation grâce au recours à un organe de réglementation unique. C'est aussi une façon de tabler sur les bons résultats de l'industrie en matière de sécurité et de qualité dans la construction et l'exploitation des ouvrages de franchissement de cours d'eau. Une approche intégrée, prenant en considération tout l'éventail des préoccupations sécuritaires et environnementales liées au franchissement d'un cours d'eau par un pipeline, permet à l'industrie et à l'instance réglementaire de collaborer plus efficacement afin d'obtenir des résultats optimaux.

L'ONE tient compte des considérations liées à la navigation et à la sécurité maritime avec la même rigueur que le faisait auparavant Transports Canada. Le processus d'examen réglementaire de l'ONE est indépendant, équitable et transparent. L'Office compte au sein de son personnel des experts qui s'y connaissent en construction et en exploitation d'un pipeline. Ces gens-là peuvent déceler les impacts pouvant être significatifs en matière de sécurité et d'environnement. D'autres ministères fédéraux peuvent aussi compter sur une expertise spécialisée, mais aucun d'eux ne s'y connaît en pipelines.

(1000)

La présidente:

Monsieur Bloomer, je ne voudrais pas vous interrompre mais vous pourrez faire le reste de vos observations en réponse aux questions des députés. Ils ont beaucoup de questions à vous poser.

M. Chris Bloomer:

Très bien. C'est entendu.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Hardie, allez-y.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je vous remercie, messieurs, dames, d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Je commencerai par vous, monsieur Atkinson.

Il vaut probablement la peine de répéter ce que nous avons dit au groupe précédent: l'angle d'approche de mes collègues, dans cet examen, n'est pas nécessairement d'annuler tout ce qui a été fait; nous ne voulons pas jeter le bébé avec l'eau du bain. Nous avons entendu que certains changements ont eu des effets positifs évidents. Ce qui manquait, dans le processus précédent, à notre avis... La façon dont ces mesures ont été adoptées, noyées dans un énorme projet de loi omnibus, est telle qu'il y a eu très peu de consultations des groupes pour ou contre, donc l'objectif de cet exercice est essentiellement d'assurer un processus juste, de donner à la population la chance de nous dire ce qu'elle pense, pour pouvoir prendre tous les éléments en compte et non seulement nous fonder sur notre perception de la situation, parce que les communications publiques entendues après la mise en place de ces mesures sont en général très différentes de ce que nous entendons depuis que nous avons la chance d'entendre des personnes comme vous.

Monsieur Atkinson, dans quelle mesure diriez-vous que les normes de construction que vos membres suivent restent influencées par la loi précédente?

M. Michael Atkinson:

Dans une grande mesure, et je ne parle pas seulement des modifications apportées à la LPN, mais de celles apportées à l'évaluation environnementale en général. Bon nombre de ces modifications ont amélioré la certitude et la prévisibilité. Par exemple, si une autoroute provinciale...

M. Ken Hardie:

Je m'excuse, monsieur, vous faites fausse route.

Je parle des normes de construction qu'ils utilisent. Je vais être un peu plus précis. J'ai peur que... Supposons qu'un cours d'eau ne soit pas inscrit à l'annexe, donc qu'il ne soit pas protégé, pour utiliser cette expression. Il y avait des limites avant, il était interdit de rejeter certaines choses dans l'eau, des blocs de béton, peu importe. Si ce cours d'eau n'est plus protégé par la Loi sur la protection des eaux navigables, y aura-t-il des rejets?

M. Michael Atkinson:

Le rejet de déchets de construction dans un cours d'eau ne serait pas permis selon la plupart des dispositions standards qu'on voit dans un projet municipal ou provincial et serait régi par d'autres lois. Que ce soit ou non régi par l'ancienne ou la nouvelle loi, c'est régi par d'autres lois, des règlements municipaux, etc., parce qu'il y a toutes sortes de dispositions sur le traitement des déchets de construction.

De ce point de vue, je doute que des modifications à cette loi ne changent ces normes. C'est une exigence contractuelle, et ces clauses sont établies par la municipalité ou le propriétaire provincial qui demande le travail. En vertu du contrat, nous devons respecter ces exigences, et il y a probablement d'autres règlements municipaux ou d'autres lois provinciales qui empêcheraient ces rejets.

(1005)

M. Ken Hardie:

La même chose vaut-elle pour l'industrie des pipelines, monsieur Bloomer?

M. Chris Bloomer:

Bien sûr. Dans ce cas-ci, nous parlons de navigation. L'industrie des pipelines est régie par la LCEE. Les oléoducs sont continuellement inspectés et surveillés. Cela n'influence en rien la protection ou les répercussions futures de ces structures sur les cours d'eau, puisque c'est régi par d'autres lois environnementales.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je dirais que dans certains milieux, pas partout, mais dans certains milieux, il y a énormément de méfiance à l'égard de l'auto-réglementation et de l'auto-gestion. Quand les utilisateurs récréatifs viendront nous parler des modifications proposées à cette Loi, que nous diront-ils au sujet de votre rendement dans un régime d'auto-réglementation?

M. Michael Atkinson:

Ce n'est pas un régime d'auto-réglementation. Les contracteurs ou les constructeurs sont toujours tenus de suivre les règles et règlements prescrits par d'autres lois, règlements municipaux, fédéraux ou provinciaux, et nous devons aussi respecter les normes établies par la municipalité ou la province par contrat relativement aux travaux. Il y a toutes sortes de choses qui entourent la construction, comme le bruit, la poussière et toutes sortes de choses qui sont toutes réglementées autrement; il n'y a donc pas d'auto-réglementation. Nous devons toujours respecter les normes, obligations, règles et règlements imposés par les autres textes législatifs.

La présidente:

Monsieur Hardie, votre temps est écoulé.

Madame Block.

Mme Kelly Block:

Madame la présidente, rapidement, avant de poser mes questions, j'ai entendu des rumeurs selon lesquelles le ministre des Transports lancerait une stratégie en matière de transport au cours des prochains mois. Pourriez-vous, vous ou peut-être la secrétaire parlementaire, nous dire ce qu'il en est à la fin de la séance du Comité?

La présidente:

Nous pourrons peut-être en parler à notre prochaine séance, mais ce ne sera certainement pas aujourd'hui, simplement parce que nous recevons des témoins et que nous n'avons pas prévu de temps pour cela.

Mme Kelly Block:

Très bien. Je pensais qu'on aurait pu le faire à la toute fin.

Nous savons que le ministre a le pouvoir d'ajouter ou de retirer des eaux navigables de l'annexe par application du paragraphe 29(2) de la Loi. Des fonctionnaires du ministère et du personnel des municipalités nous ont dit qu'à leur connaissance, il n'y avait eu que deux demandes d'ajout d'eaux navigables et qu'aucune plainte n'avait été déposée au Québec, en Alberta ni en Saskatchewan à l'égard des projets entrepris. Si l'on regarde la Loi, on sait qu'il n'y a pas que les municipalités et les provinces qui peuvent demander l'ajout d'eaux navigables, les Premières Nations peuvent le faire aussi.

Je vous remercie beaucoup de votre clarté, monsieur Atkinson, quant à l'objectif de la Loi sur la protection de la navigation. Vous nous avez clairement rappelé qu'il y a d'autres textes législatifs qui touchent les sujets évoqués par différents groupes au moment où la Loi sur la protection des eaux navigables a été modifiée.

Ce que nous avons entendu des députés de l'autre côté montre peut-être qu'ils ne mettent pas tant l'accent sur la Loi elle-même que sur le processus. Je sais que nous entendrons d'autres groupes de témoins la semaine prochaine, essentiellement des groupes environnementaux (ce qui est assez intéressant, compte tenu des observations que vous avez formulées) qui viendront nous parler de la Loi sur la protection de la navigation.

J'aimerais également vous poser quelques questions, monsieur Bloomer, dans la foulée des questions que mes collègues vous ont posées sur la position des municipalités sur le transfert de responsabilité à l'ONE, pour ce qui est des pipelines sous le régime de la Loi sur la protection de la navigation. Je pense que le changement a été apporté par le projet de loi C-46, Loi sur la sûreté des pipelines. Je me demande si vous pouvez nous en parler.

J'ai ensuite peut-être deux questions à vous poser. Ces modifications réduisent-elles d'une quelconque façon la surveillance environnementale des projets? Quels effets ces modifications ont-elles sur la navigation commerciale?

(1010)

La présidente:

Monsieur Bloomer, souhaitez-vous répondre à ces questions?

M. Chris Bloomer:

Merci.

Le transfert à l'ONE, comme je l'ai dit dans mon exposé, était essentiellement... Jusqu'alors, le bureau des transports approuvait les éléments liés à la navigation après l'ONE; c'est maintenant intégré au processus, et la navigation est prise très au sérieux à l'ONE, qui est probablement l'organisme de réglementation le mieux placé pour en juger efficacement.

Je pense que c'était la clé, de confier cette tâche aux experts scientifiques et techniques, pour la rendre plus [Note de la rédaction: inaudible] et qu'elle fasse partie intégrante du processus.

Pour ce qui est de l'affaiblissement des protections, les protections découlant de la LCEE de 2012 et de la Loi sur les pêches restent les mêmes, elles ne s'en trouvent pas le moindrement diminuées, puisqu'il ne s'agit ici strictement que de navigation.

S'il y a une incidence sur la navigation, ces modifications n'ont eu absolument aucun effet sur les aspects des projets de pipelines liés à la navigation.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci.

Monsieur Atkinson.

M. Michael Atkinson:

D'après ce que je comprends, le problème vient en partie de ce qui déclenche une évaluation relative à des eaux navigables. Une partie de la réforme de la LCEE consistait justement à évaluer les éléments déclencheurs pour qu'il n'y ait pas de doublons. Si le gouvernement provincial, par exemple, a déjà réalisé une évaluation environnementale, pourquoi le gouvernement fédéral devrait-il en faire une autre parce que quelqu'un a lancé une idée et croit qu'un fossé constitue un cours d'eau navigable? Ce n'était pas très logique.

Pour ce qui est des effets sur la navigation commerciale, il n'y a aucun problème à notre connaissance concernant les structures construites sur les eaux navigables qui diffère de la situation qui prévalait sous le régime de l'ancienne loi.

La présidente:

Il vous reste une demi-minute.

Mme Kelly Block:

Je prendrai cette demi-minute pour résumer le problème, tel que je le vois. Je remercie mes collègues de leurs observations. Je pense que chacune est légitime pour bien comprendre la Loi sur la protection de la navigation et ce qui a mené aux changements apportés en 2012.

Comme mon collègue l'a déjà dit, je crois que nous sommes saisis de cette étude parce qu'il est écrit dans la lettre de mandat du ministre de rétablir les protections éliminées par l'ancien gouvernement. Je pense que c'est notre plus grande crainte. Les conclusions du Comité, quelles qu'elles soient, risquent de ne pas être prises en considération, parce que le résultat est convenu d'avance, et c'est la raison pour laquelle nous nous opposons à cette étude depuis le début.

Je vous remercie infiniment de toute la clarté que vous apportez aujourd'hui.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je vous remercie, messieurs, d'être parmi nous ce matin. Votre expertise est appréciée.

Je vais m'adresser, sans plus tarder, à M. Bloomer.

Pour nous donner une vue d'ensemble, pourriez-vous nous donner une estimation, même grossière, du nombre de cours d'eau navigables canadiens qui sont traversés par des pipelines, que ce soit dans le cours d'eau ou sous le cours d'eau? [Traduction]

M. Chris Bloomer:

Voulez-vous le nombre absolu d'endroits où un pipeline traverse un cours d'eau? Eh bien, il y en a probablement des centaines et même des milliers. Différentes techniques sont utilisées pour traverser un cours d'eau, selon sa taille. Le forage dirigé est l'une des principales techniques utilisées et ne touche pas le lit du tout, mais il y en a beaucoup d'autres, évidemment. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Quel avantage voyez-vous au fait que Transports Canada transfère ses évaluations à l'Office national de l'énergie?

Les évaluations sont-elles plus simples, plus efficaces?

Pourriez-vous nous donner un ou deux exemples qui nous permettraient de comparer le nouveau système à l'ancien?

(1015)

[Traduction]

M. Chris Bloomer:

Je pense que le but de ce changement était d'alléger le processus, de confier cette tâche à une équipe ayant des compétences techniques au sein de l'ONE pour éviter la redondance dans les évaluations, entre autres. Comme je l'ai déjà dit, avant, le bureau des transports donnait son avis après l'ONE. Il y a maintenant un processus intégré, mais les mêmes éléments sont pris en considération dans l'évaluation de l'ONE.

Comme M. Atkinson l'a mentionné, c'était les éléments déclencheurs de l'évaluation qui posaient problème. Le fait de définir dans une annexe les types de cours d'eau visés par ces évaluations nous indique vraiment, à mon avis, sur quoi nous concentrer.

Dans certains cas, la présence d'un petit cours d'eau éphémère, d'un étang éphémère, par exemple, déclenchait automatiquement une évaluation et tout le fardeau réglementaire qui venait avec. Cela n'avait rien à voir avec la navigation en tant que telle, ni même avec les répercussions des pipelines sur ces milieux. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Maintenant que tout le processus d'étude environnementale relève de l'Office national de l'énergie, sauriez-vous dire si cela a favorisé l'obtention de cette acceptabilité sociale qui est tant recherchée et qui est même incontournable maintenant lorsque vient le temps de réaliser des projets d'infrastructures aussi importants que les vôtres? [Traduction]

M. Chris Bloomer:

Je pense qu'il faut mettre la question des pipelines en contexte. Il y a le processus d'approbation de projet. Il y a beaucoup de discussions à ce sujet en ce moment, comme nous le savons. Il y a ensuite le cycle de vie d'un pipeline. L'ONE, qui est l'organisme de réglementation effectuant les examens environnementaux, a les compétences techniques pour étudier la question, et c'est également lui qui gère le pipeline pendant tout son cycle de vie après sa construction. Plutôt que de disperser l'expertise entre différents organismes concurrents, toute l'expertise technique est regroupée au même endroit, au sein d'une équipe qui gère le pipeline pendant toute sa vie.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Je suis désolée, monsieur Aubin, votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Rayes. [Français]

M. Alain Rayes:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les deux témoins de leur présence aujourd'hui.

Dans ma vie passée, avant d'être élu député fédéral il y a un an, j'étais maire d'une municipalité de 45 000 habitants.

Monsieur Atkinson, je vous confirme qu'il y a beaucoup de règlements municipaux, beaucoup de règlements environnementaux — au provincial particulièrement — qui mettent beaucoup de bâtons dans les roues des gens qui veulent créer de la richesse et développer les différentes municipalités partout au Canada.

En tout cas, je peux confirmer que c'est ainsi en milieu rural. Bien souvent, cela cause beaucoup plus de problèmes qu'autre chose. Comme maire, j'ai eu à jouer le rôle de médiateur, à intervenir auprès d'instances provinciales pour essayer de faire débloquer des projets qui étaient soumis à une réglementation excessive pour toutes sortes de raisons. Je pourrais en faire toute une liste, mais je pense que ce n'est pas l'objectif aujourd'hui. À tous ceux et celles qui se posent la question, je confirme qu'il y en beaucoup.

Je vous poserai des questions simples à tous les deux.

Tout d'abord, sur une échelle de 1 à 10, quel est votre niveau de satisfaction par rapport à la loi qui existe et avec les modifications qui ont été mises en place en 2012? [Traduction]

M. Michael Atkinson:

Pour ce qui est de la clarté, de la prévisibilité et de la rapidité du processus, je donnerais sept, huit ou neuf, mais on verra bien. Nous n'avons pas encore assez d'expérience concrète des modifications apportées pour nous prononcer, mais l'intention est clairement très importante.

Nous ne sommes pas les promoteurs des projets. Nous en sommes les constructeurs. Quand nous obtenons le feu vert, à supposer que l'évaluation environnementale ait été faite comme il faut et que tous les règlements aient été pris en compte, en tant que contracteurs, nous voulons pouvoir nous rendre du point A au point B le plus rapidement possible et réaliser le projet selon les normes de qualité, l'échéancier et le budget du promoteur.

Le pire scénario, c'est de démarrer un projet dans un contexte de grande incertitude. Honnêtement, ce que nous déplorions le plus, c'était le risque que le projet soit interrompu ou retardé à cause d'une contestation, parce qu'il aurait dû y avoir une telle autre évaluation ou qu'il y en avait une nouvelle qui s'amorçait.

Je pense que les modifications apportées à la Loi ont de bonnes chances de réduire beaucoup cette probabilité, du point de vue des constructeurs.

En toute franchise, dans l'ancien régime, les eaux navigables étaient définies comme tout ce sur quoi pouvait naviguer une opinion. Nous commencions souvent les projets dans l'incertitude, même si les évaluations environnementales avaient été faites. On commençait, et quelqu'un venait dire « attendez un instant, c'est une voie navigable », même s'il s'agissait d'un fossé asséché en juillet et en août. C'était le problème pour nous, les constructeurs: le manque de certitude. Nous ne savions jamais si nous avions vraiment reçu le feu vert pour avancer.

(1020)

M. Chris Bloomer:

C'est la même chose pour nous. Je dirais que les principes sous-jacents aux objectifs de la LCEE de 2012, notamment les modifications apportées à la Loi sur la protection des eaux navigables, soit la certitude, la clarté et la réduction des doublons dans le processus, sont toujours valides aujourd'hui. Rien n'est parfait, mais je pense que le processus conçu en 2012 est la voie à suivre pour les entreprises. [Français]

M. Alain Rayes:

Parfait.

Si je comprends bien — répondez simplement par oui ou par non, à moins que vous ne vouliez développer votre idée — la lettre de mandat du ministre est assez claire. Il souhaite que nous retournions en arrière, malgré ce qui a été dit, soit de ne pas « jeter le bébé avec l'eau du bain ». Lors des différentes interventions du ministre, nous sentons bien que les libéraux veulent détruire ce qui a été fait par l'ancien gouvernement. Est-ce que vous pensez que nous devrions retourner en arrière, soit avant 2012? [Traduction]

M. Michael Atkinson:

Je ne voudrais pas revenir à un système qui laisse la place à l'incertitude et qui permet à un projet ayant déjà reçu le feu vert de dérailler dès que quelqu'un exprime une opinion. [Français]

M. Alain Rayes:

Parfait. [Traduction]

M. Chris Bloomer:

Je pense que l'exercice actuel vise la modernisation de l'ONE, ainsi qu'une révision de la LCEE et des lois sur les pêches et la navigation. Les démarches sont entamées. Nous y participerons évidemment. Comme je l'ai déjà dit, nous y répéterons notre point de vue selon lequel les principes de la LCEE de 2012 sont toujours valides et positifs. [Français]

M. Alain Rayes:

Merci.

Je vais laisser les 50 secondes de temps de parole qu'il me reste à mon collègue. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Vous avez 45 secondes. [Français]

M. Luc Berthold:

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente.

Compte tenu des témoignages, compte tenu de la lettre de mandat du ministre qui est très claire en ce qui concerne les résultats attendus, compte tenu de la lettre au Comité dans laquelle le ministre avait promis de mener des consultations — et nous avons appris qu'il n'y en aura pas —, compte tenu de son témoignage devant nous, je vais déposer la motion suivante, madame la présidente: Considérant que le ministre des Transports a déjà décidé des changements devant être apportés à la Loi sur la protection de la navigation et tenant compte des témoignages de l’Association canadienne de pipelines d’énergie et de l’Association canadienne de la construction. Il est demandé que le Comité mette fin immédiatement à son étude sur la Loi sur la protection de la navigation jusqu’à ce que le Ministre soumette ses propres modifications à la Loi sur la protection de la navigation au Comité.

Je remets une copie de cette motion au greffier. Je vous remercie beaucoup. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Je pense que nous avons tous bien entendu la motion.

Quelle est la volonté du Comité? Il doit y avoir un préavis de 48 heures.

Il semble que ce sera une constante.

M. Sean Fraser:

Madame la présidente, je pense que comme nous accueillons des témoins en ce moment et qu'il nous reste du temps pour leur poser des questions, je préférerais que nous reportions l'étude de cette motion de plus de 48 heures.

La présidente:

Il n'y a pas consentement unanime.

Monsieur Fraser, allez-y.

M. Sean Fraser:

Je remercie infiniment nos témoins. Je vous remercie de votre témoignage d'aujourd'hui.

Pour vous mettre un peu en contexte, on a dit que le problème tenait peut-être davantage à la façon de faire qu'au contenu. Je remercie ma collègue, Mme Block, d'admettre qu'elle trouve ces questionnements légitimes.

Je dois dire, toutefois, que je vois des problèmes dans la loi elle-même. L'issue n'est pas décidée d'avance, mais mes propos ne devraient pas vous insulter. Je ne suis pas ici pour faire des amalgames entre les préoccupations liées à la navigation et la nécessité de réaliser des évaluations environnementales sur les fossés. Même si nous affirmons qu'il y avait de bons éléments dans cette loi, je crois que personne ne devrait devoir payer des centaines de milliers de dollars pour embaucher des consultants environnementaux parce qu'il a plu trop fort un mardi. Ce n'est pas le but à mon avis. C'est peut-être ma propre expérience personnelle qui a forgé mon opinion.

Mes réserves à l'égard des modifications apportées à la loi sont surtout économiques. Je crains que nous ayons trop réduit le nombre d'eaux inscrites à l'annexe. Il y a de bons et de mauvais côtés à cela. Je crains principalement que cela ne nuise au tourisme et au commerce maritime sur les rivières et les cours d'eau importants, mais pas nécessairement très grands d'un point de vue national, en raison de leur valeur économique pour les personnes et les entreprises de mon domaine. J'ai aussi une certaine expérience des litiges. Avant ma carrière en politique, je n'entrais en scène dans les projets que quand quelqu'un n'avait pas fait ce qu'il devait faire.

Parlons d'abord des ouvrages qui pourraient obstruer des eaux auparavant considérées navigables, mais ne figurant plus à l'annexe. Des gens de l'industrie des pipelines nous ont dit que la norme était telle que s'il faut ériger un pont ou une infrastructure temporaire pour terminer un projet, cette infrastructure est ensuite retirée.

Si un cours d'eau n'est pas inscrit à l'annexe, croyez-vous que le ministre devrait avoir le pouvoir d'obliger le constructeur d'un pipeline à le faire s'il ne fait pas ce qu'il devait faire? Quel devrait être le rôle du gouvernement pour faire retirer un ouvrage qui fait obstruction?

(1025)

M. Chris Bloomer:

Si l'entreprise responsable du pipeline laisse des choses dans le cours d'eau?

M. Sean Fraser:

L'entreprise ou l'un de ses sous-contractants. Est-ce régi par un quelconque règlement?

M. Chris Bloomer:

L'ONE doit accorder une autorisation de construction et une autorisation d'exploitation. Une fois le pipeline construit, l'ONE vérifie tout. Si cela n'a pas été fait, l'entreprise ne pourra pas exploiter le pipeline ou commencer ses activités. Il y a un processus très strict, pour nous assurer que toutes ces choses soient faites. Après la construction, l'ONE dira: « Vous n'avez pas fait ceci, vous n'avez pas fait cela. » Si tel est le cas, ce devra être fait avant que l'entreprise puisse commencer à exploiter le pipeline. C'est surveillé de près.

M. Sean Fraser:

D'accord.

Nous avons commencé à évoluer en ce sens dans l'industrie de la construction, mais surtout dans le contexte des normes de construction. Oublions les normes un instant et ne pensons qu'au fait qu'il peut parfois y avoir de mauvais sous-contractants qui laissent des matériaux dans le cours d'eau. Si ce cours d'eau est une rivière d'importance stratégique pour un exportateur, y a-t-il déjà des pouvoirs qui s'appliquent ou qui devraient s'appliquer, pour que le ministre ou le gouvernement puisse assurer l'accès commercial au cours d'eau?

M. Michael Atkinson:

Si nous travaillons pour une municipalité, tout à fait. Il y a beaucoup de leviers dans le contrat de construction lui-même qui peuvent être utilisés pour assurer le respect des normes et des règles de construction. Je ne pense pas que nous ayons besoin d'une loi fédérale pour assurer le bon déroulement des travaux dans les cours d'eau importants pour les autres ordres de gouvernement.

À l'heure actuelle, c'est le cas pour toute activité de terrassement et pour tout ce qui touche des berges ou la construction de routes ou d'autoroutes. Ces règlements, normes et obligations sont assez standards dans les contrats de construction et les modalités prescrites par une municipalité ou un gouvernement provincial dans les circonstances.

M. Sean Fraser:

Quand la municipalité est responsable du projet ou du cours d'eau?

M. Michael Atkinson:

Les deux. Elle peut avoir compétence sur un cours d'eau ou être carrément le promoteur d'un projet.

M. Sean Fraser:

D'accord.

Si le projet relève d'un promoteur privé, votre réponse sera-t-elle différente?

M. Michael Atkinson:

Non. Dans la plupart des cas, le promoteur privé devra obtenir une autorisation quelconque de la municipalité pour construire ce qu'il veut construire, et la municipalité aura le pouvoir d'exiger le respect strict des normes de construction pour lui donner son aval. Nous n'avons pas besoin d'une loi fédérale pour cela.

M. Sean Fraser:

Les parties sont-elles toujours tenues de tenir compte de la navigation selon les usages locaux, peut-être pas dans les fossés, mais sur les ruisseaux, dans les lacs et les rivières à la phase de la conception du projet de construction ou de pipeline?

Vous pouvez peut-être commencer par les projets de construction.

(1030)

M. Michael Atkinson:

La conception dépend énormément des visées du promoteur ou des règles qu'il établit, quel que soit le promoteur. S'il s'agit d'un promoteur privé, il doit obtenir un permis de construction ou un autre type de permis pour pouvoir réaliser son projet. Il doit pour cela soumettre des plans, et si ces plans ne respectent pas les normes dont vous venez de parler, les droits de propriété, les exigences en matière de navigation et tout le reste, le promoteur ne pourra pas obtenir de permis.

M. Sean Fraser:

De l'organe municipal, vous voulez dire?

M. Michael Atkinson:

Exactement.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Fraser. Votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je voudrais revenir rapidement sur une affirmation que M. Bloomer a faite en réponse à l'une des dernières questions. Il disait que le processus de l'Office national de l'énergie avait déjà été modernisé.

J'aimerais que vous nous parliez plus en détail de la modernisation de l'Office national de l'énergie. [Traduction]

M. Chris Bloomer:

Je me suis peut-être mal exprimé. Je n'ai pas dit que la modernisation... Je pense que la version 2012 de la LCEE... C'était un pas en avant.

M. Luc Berthold:

J'invoque le Règlement, madame la présidente.[Français]

La modernisation de la Loi sur l'Office national de l'énergie n'est pas un sujet à l'ordre du jour. Je ne comprends pas le sens de la question de mon collègue. [Traduction]

La présidente:

C'est le temps de parole de M. Aubin, et si c'est ainsi qu'il souhaite utiliser son temps, je pense qu'il a le droit de le faire.

Allez-y. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Toutefois, la réponse est très simple, madame la présidente. Nous sommes en train d'étudier une loi qui, au départ, couvrait les travaux de pipelines. À présent, elle ne les couvre plus. Je suppose que la modernisation pourrait aussi vouloir dire que nous puissions y revenir un jour, si c'était la meilleure solution. Je crois que c'est tout à fait pertinent.

Monsieur Bloomer, je reviens au principe de modernisation de l'Office national de l'énergie, parce que, d'abord, vous parlez de 2012 et je comprends bien. Toutefois, pour parler de l'éléphant dans la pièce, nous sommes devant une situation — c'est le cas de l'un des plus gros projets, soit Énergie Est, pour ne pas le nommer — où, pour l'instant, l'Office national de l'énergie ne semble pas avoir la crédibilité nécessaire pour faire avancer le dossier et permettre à l'ensemble des citoyens de se prononcer de façon claire et précise en vue d'une acceptabilité sociale.

Ne serait-il pas plus objectif de remettre ce dossier à Transports Canada, ou croyez-vous vraiment que l'Office national de l'énergie peut moderniser ses façons de faire pour répondre aux souhaits de la population? [Traduction]

M. Chris Bloomer:

Eh bien, je pense que la Loi sur la protection de la navigation couvre tout ce dont nous parlons ici, qu'on pense au projet Énergie Est ou à tout autre nouveau projet. Je pense que l'ONE... il y a actuellement un processus en cours pour que... il y a un comité responsable de la modernisation de l'énergie, et ces discussions auront lieu. L'ONE et le gouvernement ont répondu à la demande de consultations en organisant de nouvelles séries de consultations sur les projets Kinder Morgan et Énergie Est. Beaucoup de ces questions font l'objet de débats, et nous verrons ce qui ressortira des démarches entreprises par le gouvernement actuel pour régler ces questions. Nous participerons pleinement à ce processus. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Merci.

Je voudrais poser une question à M. Atkinson. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Soyez très bref, monsieur Aubin. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

D'accord.

Les normes provinciales ou municipales en matière d'évaluation environnementale vous apparaissent-elles supérieures ou plus contraignantes que ce qui était contenu dans la Loi sur la protection de la navigation? [Traduction]

M. Michael Atkinson:

D'après mon expérience et les renseignements que j'ai reçus de nos membres, les provinces se montrent tout aussi diligentes et vigilantes. C'est une des raisons pour lesquelles il était vraiment contestable d'entreprendre autant d'examens fédéraux en vertu de la LCEE, puisque depuis l'adoption de cette loi, la plupart, sinon la totalité des provinces ont elles-mêmes mis en oeuvre des processus d'évaluation environnementale. C'était une perte totale de temps que de reprendre les mêmes processus. Cela ne concerne en rien la protection de l'environnement: on ne fait qu'accroître les formalités administratives et l'incertitude dans le programme.

Je peux vous dire que j'ai entendu beaucoup de commentaires de nos membres. Ce ne sont pas eux, mais les promoteurs qui suivent le processus, mais ces derniers leur disent que la rigueur du processus provincial ne leur facilite pas la tâche. Disons les choses ainsi.

(1035)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Sikand.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Je partagerai mon temps avec M. Iacono; je vous serais donc reconnaissant de rester bref, messieurs.

Je m'adresserai d'abord à M. Atkinson. Pourriez-vous parler de l'utilité du mécanisme ou de la mesure d'adhésion volontaire?

M. Michael Atkinson:

Cela concerne les promoteurs. Ce mécanisme ne nous concerne pas, puisque nous ne sommes que les constructeurs. C'est aux promoteurs qu'il revient de déterminer s'il est de leur intérêt ou non d'adhérer. Je ne peux parler en leur nom; je ne représente que les constructeurs.

M. Gagan Sikand:

D'accord. Fort bien.

Monsieur Bloomer.

M. Chris Bloomer:

Veuillez m'excuser, je n'ai pas entendu la question.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Je voulais savoir ce que vous pensez du mécanisme d'adhésion volontaire.

M. Chris Bloomer:

Vous voulez parler de la possibilité d'adhérer ou non au processus?

M. Gagan Sikand:

Oui.

M. Chris Bloomer:

Je pense que l'annexe permet de décider, en présence d'un plan d'eau, si on y adhère ou non. C'est une décision qui peut être prise en temps opportun, et la loi permet de le faire.

M. Gagan Sikand:

D'accord, c'est juste.

La présidente:

Monsieur Iacono. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci, madame la présidente.

J'aimerais simplement apporter une précision à l'intention de mes collègues d'en face.

Nous entendons souvent dire que nous, les libéraux, voulons changer et détruire ce qui a été fait par le gouvernement antérieur, mais ce n'est pas le cas. À plusieurs reprises, nous avons dit que nous voulions simplement nous assurer que les modifications qui ont été faites, sans consultation préalable — je veux le souligner —, sont efficaces et répondent bien aux besoins de la population canadienne. Je ne comprends pas ce qui peut être difficile à saisir à cet égard.

Il s'agit d'un processus transparent et honnête afin de connaître l'opinion des différents organismes. Vous voyez bien que nous avons posé des questions et que ces organismes y ont répondu, aujourd'hui. Nous sommes ici pour entendre les témoins et non pour présenter des motions partisanes, ce qui ralentit notre travail.

Excusez-moi, mais il fallait que je m'exprime à ce sujet.

Passons maintenant à ma question. Selon vous, serait-il possible d'améliorer le processus d'ajout de cours d'eau à une annexe sans miner la certitude dont vous parlez et sans affecter la rapidité du processus d'approbation? [Traduction]

M. Michael Atkinson:

Ici encore, à mon point de vue, c'est une question qu'il vaudrait mieux poser aux promoteurs des projets. J'ai vu quelques rapports qui me laissent penser que dans certains cas, quand des projets visent des zones délicates, certaines provinces et certains promoteurs souhaitent peut-être adhérer au mécanisme simplement pour cette raison. Mais la question s'adresse davantage aux promoteurs. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci. [Traduction]

M. Chris Bloomer:

Je pense que la disposition sur l'ajout de cours d'eau est, ici encore, dans la loi. Elle peut être appliquée pour ajouter des plans d'eau si on le juge nécessaire; un processus et des principes s'appliqueront à ce sujet. Je pense qu'il faut agir au cas par cas; c'est probablement la meilleure manière de procéder.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci.

Me reste-t-il encore du temps, madame la présidente?

La présidente:

Oui, il vous reste deux minutes.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Je partagerai mon temps avec mon ami, Ken Hardie.

La présidente:

Monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous avons entendu l'expression « faire des amalgames » au cours de la conversation; or, il est très difficile de ne pas en faire dans certains cas. Comme je suis également membre du Comité des pêches et des océans, j'ai évidemment toute la question de la protection de l'environnement à l'esprit. Mais je suppose que ma question est la suivante: est-ce que quelqu'un a déjà établi un graphique faisant état des exigences fédérales, provinciales et municipales afin de brosser un tableau exhaustif des formalités auxquelles le promoteur ou le constructeur doivent s'astreindre, même en vertu des normes plus souples d'aujourd'hui?

(1040)

M. Michael Atkinson:

J'ignore s'il en existe un. Je serais mort de peur si j'en voyais un, car rien ne se construirait si on voyait toutes les formalités et les exigences à respecter.

Je n'ai jamais entendu dire que quelqu'un avait préparé un tel graphique. Je peux toutefois vous dire que les entrepreneurs ont, de façon générale, une très bonne compréhension des exigences locales, de ce que demandent les autorités municipales et les municipalités régionales, et de l'incidence des lois fédérales à cet égard. Le milieu de la construction devient très au fait de ces exigences et de ce qu'il faut faire. Plus un organisme de réglementation se montre proactif en indiquant « Voici les normes à respecter et les démarches à entreprendre » et en fournissant des lignes directrices stipulant que « S'il y a un habitat du poisson, voici ce dont votre ponceau devrait avoir l'air » — comme dans mon exemple précédent avec le MPO —, plus cela nous aide.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je pourrais peut-être intervenir ici.

Si vous deviez choisir entre composer avec le régime actuel de cadres de réglementation imposés par les municipalités et les provinces, et un cadre national normalisé géré par le gouvernement fédéral, est-ce que ce dernier améliorerait les choses? Observez-vous des différences marquées entre les régions, par exemple?

M. Michael Atkinson:

Il est difficile de donner une réponse simple à cette question. De façon générale, la situation change. Je suppose que plus les règlements et les lois sont uniformes, plus cela devrait être facile, mais 99 % de nos membres sont des PME qui, souvent, ne travaillent pas beaucoup à l'extérieur de leur municipalité ou de leur région. Ils n'auraient donc pas nécessairement à composer avec des autorités différentes.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je pourrais peut-être poser la même question à M. Bloomer.

M. Chris Bloomer:

Eh bien, les pipelines que l'ACPE représente sont tous réglementés par l'ONE; la réglementation est donc la même à l'échelle du pays. Les provinces ont leur propre cadre de réglementation, qui est assez simple. Les provinces exigent un examen s'il y a un plan d'eau désigné. La présence d'un plan d'eau désigné dans la Loi sur la protection des eaux navigables entraînerait un examen. Cela me semble assez clair, et le processus actuel est assez direct. C'est facile à examiner, et je pense que les règlements provinciaux et fédéraux sont, dans l'ensemble, similaires. Le processus est actuellement structuré de manière assez efficace.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci.

Me reste-t-il du temps?

La présidente:

Vous avez le temps de poser une autre question.

M. Ken Hardie:

En fait, je veux clore mon propos avec une observation. Le Comité des pêches et des océans s'intéresse à un principe sur lequel le MPO s'appuie. Il s'agit du principe de précaution, en vertu duquel on fait essentiellement preuve de prudence quand on aborde une question. Comme on le disait dans le domaine des communications: « Dans le doute, abstiens-toi. »

Ce que je veux vous dire, c'est que vous agissez probablement comme vous le faites en raison de l'influence de l'ancien régime et de l'ancienne loi, mais à l'avenir, appliquez ce principe de précaution. Si vous pouvez ne pas obstruer un cours d'eau, ne l'obstruez pas, même si vous pouvez le faire, car vous devrez constamment composer avec des gens qui se montrent très soupçonneux à l'égard de ce que vous faites ou qui ne font pas confiance à vos motifs ou à vos processus. Tant qu'on pourra dire qu'on applique ce principe, tout le monde s'en portera mieux, et on évitera la poigne de fer du gouvernement.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Hardie.

Merci beaucoup à nos témoins d'avoir comparu aujourd'hui. Nous nous réjouissons à la perspective de demeurer en rapport avec vous alors que nous achevons cet examen.

Merci beaucoup.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on October 20, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.