header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-10-04 TRAN 112

Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities

(0845)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

I am calling to order the meeting of the Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure and Communities. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), we are doing a study of the Canadian transportation and logistics strategy.

With us as witnesses today we have the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities, with Ray Orb, president; and the Shipping Federation of Canada, with Michael Broad, president, and Karen Kancens, vice-president.

Welcome, and thank you very much for being here so early this morning.

We will open it up with five minutes exactly. When I raise my hand, we're going to cut you off. The members always have lots of questions, and we want to give them sufficient time.

Mr. Orb, would you like to start?

Mr. Ray Orb (President, Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities):

Yes, I will. Thank you.

First of all, I'd like to thank the committee for allowing me to appear this morning. My name is Ray Orb, and I am the president of the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities, which is known as SARM. We were incorporated in 1905 and have been the voice of agriculture and rural Saskatchewan for over 100 years. We work on behalf of our members to identify solutions and challenges in rural Saskatchewan.

As an association, we are mandated to work in agriculture, which is an important sector in our province. Saskatchewan is a key producer of Canada's wheat, oats, flaxseed and barley, and we are proud to be home to many farms, cattle ranches and dairy operations.

Our agriculture industry relies on the ability to move product efficiently and cost-effectively. An adequate and efficient transportation system is imperative for producers to move their product across the province and across the country.

Saskatchewan, Canada and North America rely on the rural municipal primary weight infrastructure in Saskatchewan to connect to the provincial network to move goods and services in a reliable, timely and safe manner. Our province boasts the largest provincial road network in Canada. Provincial highways contribute 26,000 kilometres, while rural municipal roadways contribute 162,000 kilometres.

The Saskatchewan Ministry of Highways provides funding to SARM to manage a primary weight network grant-funding program for rural municipalities to maintain rural roads at a primary weight. These primary weight corridors enable the seamless transportation of goods and services throughout the province and the country, while protecting the aging provincial system. The program has proven to be very successful, as there are currently 6,500 kilometres of “clearing the path” primary weight corridors in the province.

We also rely on the rail system to ship grain and agricultural products, and SARM has been really vocal about the rail level of service since 2009.

More recently, we provided comments on Bill C-49. We supported the bill, as it provides legislation for increased data reporting. More data means that producers in the supply chain can make better decisions that are based on good information. We also believe that the federal railways should be required to produce plans that detail how they'll deal with demands resulting from the upcoming crop year.

We're pleased to see reciprocal penalties and the provision for informal dispute resolution services included in Bill C-49. It's important that disputes be resolved quickly so that producers aren't faced with additional penalties or delays.

It is also important that the Transportation Modernization Act and related regulations ensure that the Canadian Transportation Agency and Transport Canada have adequate mechanisms to keep railways accountable. SARM believes that the federal government needs the ability to act if it deems a railway's grain plan to be insufficient. Without adequate enforcement options, Bill C-49 would not bring about meaningful change.

Although rail transportation has primarily been an issue for grain producers in western Canada, the increase of oil by rail causes additional concerns. Thousands of barrels of oil on the track not only cause capacity issues for grain but also pose a threat to the environment.

Pipelines are an environmentally favourable alternative to road and rail transportation and should be used where possible to reduce the risks associated with moving dangerous goods by rail. Pipeline development will also take oil cars off the rail tracks and free up cars for the movement of grain.

My last comment is related to the important role that ports play in our rural economies. Since the port of Churchill stopped operations in 2016, SARM has been closely monitoring the situation and advocating for a solution. The port provided an important export point for producers, and its restoration would help move the grain backlog in the Prairies.

Last year, SARM had the opportunity to meet with officials from the port of Vancouver. We have seen first-hand some of the logistical issues and how the port authority hopes to bring about further efficiencies.

The rural landscape has changed over the course of the last century. Demands on infrastructure have increased and will continue to increase. The report “How to Feed the World in 2050” indicates that by that time the world's population will reach 9.1 billion. Food production must increase by 70%. Annual cereal production will need to reach three billion tonnes, and annual meat production will need to increase by over 200 million tonnes. It is imperative that we have a transportation system that enables producers in rural Saskatchewan to do their part in feeding the world.

(0850)



On behalf of Saskatchewan's rural municipalities, I would like to thank the committee for the opportunity to lend our voice to this important conversation.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Broad, go ahead.

Mr. Michael Broad (President, Shipping Federation of Canada):

Thank you, Madam Chair and committee members, for seeing us today.

Karen and I are here on behalf of the Shipping Federation of Canada, which was established by an act of Parliament in 1903. We are the trade association representing the owners, operators and agents of the ocean ships that carry Canada's imports and exports to and from world markets, including some of Ray's grain.

The ships represented by our members load and discharge cargo at ports across the country and are literally the carriers of Canada's world trade. We were following the meetings the committee held last week in St. Catharines and Vancouver, and we're very interested in hearing the views of our trade chain partners on how to modernize Canada's trade corridors from a regional point of view.

For our part, we'd like to address this issue from a national perspective and focus on a handful of key actions and priorities that we believe will increase the efficiency of vessel operations in Canadian waters for the ultimate benefit of the transportation system as a whole.

One of our priorities for optimizing vessel operations is to invest in modernizing Canada's marine communications and traffic services, or MCTS, which is the Coast Guard-led system that monitors vessel traffic movements in Canadian waters.

We believe that a real opportunity exists to transform this system from what is currently a conduit of information that acts much like a telephone operator into a truly dynamic tool that is able to gather, analyze and broadcast real-time navigational information, not only to the bridge management team on the ship, but also to the shoreside infrastructure, such as ports and terminals. Modernizing the MCTS system would lead to a more holistic approach to managing marine transportation in Canadian waters, with the benefits extending to all our trade corridors on a national basis.

Another element of the marine transportation system that is critical to several of Canada's key corridors is the availability of icebreaking capacity to support safe and efficient transportation during our long and challenging winters, particularly on the northeast coast of Newfoundland, in the St. Lawrence River and the Great Lakes, and, of course, the Canadian Arctic.

Despite its importance, the icebreaking fleet has shrunk significantly over the years and is currently made up of over-age vessels, which are very thinly spread over a vast expanse of water. Although the government has announced some measures to address this situation, including the acquisition of three used icebreakers, we need a concrete plan for renewing the fleet in the long term, which is essential if Canada is to have sufficient icebreaking capacity to meet future demand for safe and efficient marine transportation.

No discussion on optimizing the efficiency of vessel operations in Canadian waters would be complete without talking about pilotage and the ongoing review of Canada's pilotage system. Although there is no question that the Pilotage Act has served as an excellent tool for ensuring safe navigation in Canadian waters, it is our view that the pilotage system is unable to control costs or consistently provide users with the level of service they require in a highly competitive marine transportation environment.

We believe that the recommendations arising from the pilotage review provide a much-needed opportunity to amend and modernize the act, and we urge the members of this committee to communicate the need for such renewal to their fellow parliamentarians.

Finally, we'd like to draw the committee's attention to the marine single window initiative, in which all the information required by Canadian authorities, and CBSA in particular, related to the arrival and the departure of ships in Canadian waters could be submitted electronically through a single portal without duplication. This concept offers tremendous potential to expedite the flow of trade by managing the marine border in a way that eliminates paper processes, minimizes redundancy and reduces the possibility of error and delay with respect to cargo and vessel reporting. A number of countries, including those in the EU, are already in various stages of implementing this concept on a national basis, and we strongly urge Canada to take the necessary steps to ensure that our processes are aligned with those of our international partners.

Although we've tried to be as focused and concrete as possible in our presentation to committee, I'd like to take this opportunity to provide a few comments from a broader policy perspective.

Given that a key role of our transportation and logistics system is to serve the needs of Canada's importers and exporters, it is essential that the government have a vision or a strategy for developing Canada's trade corridors that is national in perspective and closely tied to the broader trade agenda. Such a strategy needs to support the transportation system's ability to efficiently serve all the new markets that have been or will be negotiated as part of Canada's trade diversification agenda, whether through the revised CPTPP, the recent CETA, or the ongoing Mercosur negotiations. Such a strategy also needs to align all the departments and agencies that interact with the carriage of international trade so that supply chain efficiency becomes an integral element of how they operate.

(0855)



Thank you to the committee for your attention. I look forward to answering any questions you may have.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll go on to Ms. Block.

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC):

Thank you very much, Madam Chair. I apologize for arriving a couple of minutes late.

Mr. Orb, you have presented to this committee on a number of occasions. I appreciated the opportunity to meet with you and some of your colleagues who are here representing SARM. I'm going to direct my questions to you. It should come as no surprise, since I am from Saskatchewan.

Given the fact that we have experienced a wet and cool fall, I want to hear whether you have heard that this year's harvest is forecast to be lower in tonnes than in recent years.

Mr. Ray Orb:

I can't speak on behalf of the shipping industry, but only on behalf of producers. In the meetings that we've had with the shippers, they were forecasting a normal-sized crop, I think, within the five-year average, with good quality.

However, at least one third of the crop is still out in Saskatchewan. In Alberta, I believe there's even more than that. We're looking at a lot of crop downgrading. We are a bit concerned about the railroads being able to move this grain, because now we have different grades and different quality issues facing us.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Do you think this shipping year would be a good benchmark to assess whether the changes to the Canada Transportation Act in Bill C-49 will have a meaningful impact for farmers and shippers?

Mr. Ray Orb:

We are certainly hoping that's the case. I can tell you that since Bill C-49 was passed, the two major carriers, CN Rail and CP Rail, have been a lot more apt to sit down with organizations like ours. In fact, I'm scheduled to have a meeting with CP Rail next week in Saskatoon.

They have come forward with their plans. They've also come forward now with their winter plans, which obviously we're facing. I think they are being scrutinized a lot more. This year might actually put them to the test. Although it might not be the volume, we have other issues to deal with right off the bat, including the weather.

Thank you.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

I know the Saskatchewan government has opposed the Liberals' carbon tax quite vehemently. I'm wondering if you would be willing to share your association's view of the carbon tax as it relates to transportation.

Mr. Ray Orb:

Of course, it's no secret that we've been supporting the Province of Saskatchewan in fighting against any kind of federally imposed carbon tax. That's basically because we believe that the province has come up with its own action plan to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions, and we support that action plan.

We're concerned. We have contacted the railroads and asked them about the carbon tax. They informed us that there will be a tax on diesel fuel in particular. We're also concerned, obviously, that the cost will be passed on to farmers in the way of freight trade increases. It's a huge concern.

(0900)

Mrs. Kelly Block:

When we did a study of the Navigation Protection Act, or the Canadian Navigable Waters Act, you provided testimony. Here we are again.

The minister's mandate letter asked him to reverse all of the changes that were made back in 2012-13. I'm wondering if you would also comment on Bill C-69. What are some of the greatest concerns you have in regard to infrastructure and transportation being impacted as a result of reversing those changes?

Mr. Ray Orb:

Of course, we have opposed the amendments, the changes to the legislation. Actually, both Bill C-68 and Bill C-69 affect fisheries and navigable waters. We feel that the changes are actually going to impede what municipalities need to do as far as work is concerned. The projects will be delayed. We have a lot of examples that we showed to the committee of how that would add costs and time delays. We've relayed those concerns. We understand that now the Senate will be looking at that bill. We're actually hoping there will be some amendments to that to make it easier for municipalities, not only in Saskatchewan but across the country, to do their work while still protecting the environment.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

What I would finish with is to ask you to give us your thoughts on what steps could be taken to ensure that rural communities share in the benefits of increased traffic through Canada's major trade corridors.

Mr. Ray Orb:

With regard to how they could share in the benefit, I think some of it is working with the municipalities, as well as the major carriers.

I know that through FCM, the Federation of Canadian Municipalities, there is a good relationship between the carriers and the municipalities, in that they, of course, need to observe rail safety. Mr. Rogers would be familiar with that because he was on the board of directors for some time.

I know that some of the municipalities in the urban centres across the country are concerned about the increased traffic, but at the same time I think that the railroads know they need to work together to solve some of the issues.

Mrs. Kelly Block:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Mr. Hardie, go ahead.

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Welcome back, Mr. Orb. It's good to see you again.

Where do you make your home, Mr. Broad? Where are your offices?

Mr. Michael Broad:

I'm in Montreal. We have offices in Montreal and Vancouver.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Last week, we were on the road looking at trade corridors in the Niagara region, as well as on the west coast.

I'm wondering—and I'll ask both of you as customers of the system—what level of confidence you have that there is an overriding strategic view of what our trade corridors in their totality need to be providing.

Mr. Michael Broad:

I think there needs to be a more defined strategy for the trade corridors. I don't know of any....

Karen, is there any—

Ms. Karen Kancens (Vice-President, Shipping Federation of Canada):

As far as we know, we have the national trade corridors fund. We saw the first round of funding applications, and there were Transport Canada criteria for fulfilling those applications. However, we really don't see an overriding strategy. We need something national in basis that also has a regional lens.

How do you find the right balance between investments and decisions that have to be made in response to regional needs and capacity constraints, and the need to make investments and decisions that have benefits across all trade corridors, for the good of the greater whole?

We need a strategy that has a clear linkage to Canada's overall trade policy. We don't see enough of that. I think we need to try to get more alignment between the efforts of the government to diversify trade and identify new trading partners, and the ability of the relevant Canadian trade corridor to efficiently carry that increased cargo. We need those kinds of discussions.

(0905)

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I'd like to pose the same question to you, Ray.

Sitting there on the Prairies and dealing with your constituencies, what's your level of confidence that—I'll be very colloquial about it—the metro Vancouver leg of the trade corridor has its act together?

Mr. Ray Orb:

That's one of the reasons we went out last July. We were invited by the Vancouver port authority to tour the terminals and the facilities there. We went on the water to see a lot of the facilities, and we saw some of the problems they were going through.

Organizations like ours have been calling for a national transportation strategy that would take in all facets of transportation, including rail. Some of that, of course, is passenger service, and some of that is bus service. There are lots of people in the rural areas who don't have good bus service. A good example of that is what happened this past summer with the Greyhound buses. That's been discussed by a lot of the municipal organizations across the country.

We need to have a better strategy. We're increasing the trade. I mentioned the production on the Prairies alone. We're forcing the crops, which are increasing in size, through the same transportation corridors in this country. We need to adapt pretty quickly.

With the Port of Vancouver and the federal government investing $167 million, that's probably a good start. However, when you look at the strategy.... I have never seen a number, but I would suspect that it needs to be in the billions.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

In that regard, certainly in the testimony last week during the first two stops on our study, we heard that all the component parts—the railways, the ports and the local road systems—seem to be working as hard as they can to maximize their capacity or to do what they need to do. We didn't get the sense that there was somebody or some body overlooking the whole thing as a network and determining whether things were properly balanced and whether the investments were going forward.

Do we try to deputize somebody like, say, the port to take this on in a region, or is there another place where this responsibility should lie?

Mr. Ray Orb:

I would say that there should be someone who has responsibility for all of that.

Yesterday, when we met with some of the MPs here in Ottawa, we discussed the western development strategy, which was actually a federal initiative for which the government had set aside a fund of money to get input from companies across the country that could focus on western economic development. That's why we made the statements we did today. We believe it has to be multi-faceted. We need to look at pipelines. We need to look at increasing the volume going through the grain corridors, but there needs to be someone who oversees all of this, I agree.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you.

Mr. Broad, with respect to pilotage, I'm wondering if, in the pilotage review, we need a kind of one-size-fits-all response to the report versus something that perhaps looks at a broader range of issues. Specifically on the west coast, with all the issues surrounding pipelines and the safe movement of oil by water, I'm thinking whether, for the sake of public confidence, we ensure that the regime there might be different, that it might lean toward the current model, in which we have local pilots with local knowledge being in a better position to ensure safety, versus in other parts of Canada, where other allowances could be made for pilotage.

Mr. Michael Broad:

That's a good question.

Pilotage is regional anyway. There are four authorities across the country: the west coast, the Great Lakes, the St. Lawrence River—

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Do you agree with keeping them separate?

Mr. Michael Broad:

No, I like the idea of, at least at the start, merging the GLPA and the LPA. I think that would be a good start.

Mr. Marc Grégoire submitted a report on pilotage to the minister. I think he had some 39 recommendations. We'd like to see all of those recommendations go through and the Pilotage Act amended. Pilotage is regional, yes, but for the west coast and the St. Lawrence, for instance, pilotage is basically overseen by the pilots themselves, private corporations with a monopoly on service and knowledge.

Now, if people are comfortable with that, having for-profit corporations being responsible for safety, having a monopoly on the service, and having a monopoly on the knowledge.... I don't agree with that. I think we need a change in the way pilotage is organized in Canada. Mr. Grégoire came up with some terrific recommendations, and I think that the report shouldn't be split up. The recommendations are there. The report was made with the idea of all of these recommendations going through.

(0910)

The Chair:

Thank you very much. I appreciate it.

We're running out of time here.

I've asked the clerk if she would get the report you referenced and circulate it for the information of the committee as well.

Mr. Aubin, go ahead. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I thank each of the witnesses for joining us this morning. I am happy to be able to benefit from their expertise.

I will begin with you, Mr. Broad. We will talk about the same topic—pilots—but I would like to first congratulate you on the clarity of your presentation, which does a very good job of indicating where your priorities lie. We will try to discover that together. I think there is consensus around this table on our need to acquire an icebreaker fleet worthy of the 21st century.

I want to come back to the issue of pilotage. You, as well as shipowners, often establish a link between pilotage and costs. So we are talking about the competitiveness of service. Costs excluded, do you recognize the necessity of services provided by Canadian pilots regarding all bodies of water? [English]

Mr. Michael Broad:

Absolutely. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

In your opinion, the problem has to do with competitiveness. Pilotage costs would be higher than in other regions or countries. I have looked at Marc Grégoire's report. Last week, when we went on tour, we heard from pilot associations that submitted a report, which was completely forgotten in Mr. Grégoire's report. That report clearly shows that pilotage costs in Canada are not higher than in other countries. I don't want to get into that debate this morning, but I want to know whether you have a study that would help us make that comparison and see whether there is indeed an issue with pilotage costs. [English]

Mr. Michael Broad:

First, let me state that I think there's a problem with the efficiency of pilotage. Cost is one of the things included in efficiency, but there's also the service aspect.

Second, you're right that the cost of pilotage is pretty well the same all over the world, because pilots are organized as private cartels throughout the world.

When you think of the cost of pilotage and the safety, there's no doubt that pilotage services in Canada have been very safe over the past 25 years, but there are certainly areas for improvement. We can become more efficient on pilotage. I'm not just trying to focus on costs; I'm trying to focus on efficiency, the service to be provided. Because a pilot makes $500,000, is he safer than a pilot who earns $300,000? On the west coast, pilots can make $500,000, but in the river they make $400,000 and in the Great Lakes they make $300,000. Is it safer on the west coast? I don't think so. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

I understand your approach. However, I am wondering whether, once a more competitive market is opened up to pilotage, safety may be jeopardized. The lower the pilotage costs, the more companies that compete amongst themselves may tend to take increased risks in order to moor more vessels and make faster traffic possible. The risk of incidents, which is currently non-existent—the safety record for pilotage associations is quite remarkable—could increase.

(0915)

[English]

Mr. Michael Broad:

We don't believe in competitive pilotage. We believe in a safe, efficient pilotage system.

Mr. Grégoire's report does not make any recommendations to have competitive pilotage. I know that the pilots themselves do not like one of the recommendations, which is to allow the pilotage authorities that oversee all of these pilots the option of hiring entrepreneurial pilots, like those on the west coast or the river, or employee pilots, like those in the Atlantic or the Great Lakes. The pilots are very concerned. They keep saying that if the authority has the option of hiring a contract pilot or an employee pilot, then there is going to be competition.

We disagree with that, because, for the last hundred years, the pilots have been saying that they're professionals. It's something like the medical system. In Canada, we have a public medical system, and we have a private system in some areas. The doctors get paid the same for doing the same thing. The private guys charge the add-ons, but there's no competition between them. You have trucking companies that have owner-operator drivers and employee drivers.

Mr. Grégoire's recommendations were well-thought-out. We don't agree with pilots competing for business, but safety is the number one thing because our ships are big, expensive machines. We appreciate the job that pilots do. I have always said that the pilots in Canada are some of the top pilots anywhere in the world, but there's room for efficiency. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Okay. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Iacono, go ahead. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

I thank the witnesses for joining us this morning.

The Transportation 2030 strategic plan makes a commitment to improving information, data and analysis related to trade and transportation in the country.

Mr. Broad, what is the current state of data on marine transportation? What are its strength and weaknesses? How can we improve it? [English]

Mr. Michael Broad:

I think the ports have data on cargo, tonnage, number of ships, and those kinds of statistics. Transport Canada used to....

Karen, did they used to—

Ms. Karen Kancens:

Statistics Canada used to publish an annual report on transportation with marine stats called “Shipping in Canada”. The last year we saw that was 2011. Yes, there are statistics on a port basis, but there's no comprehensive source that pulls all of that together and gives us a good view of what's coming in which port, what's going out, what the volumes are, what the trends are, and how the numbers have changed over the years, not in general terms but in port-specific and commodity-specific terms.

That's another element of a transportation and trade corridor strategy, access to that kind of information. We simply don't have it now. We have to go to different sources and try to piece it together, but certainly we have no comprehensive source of information on the maritime side. [Translation]

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

What are the repercussions of the decision to stop publishing that document? Why are you asking that it be published again? Can you give us further details on that? [English]

Ms. Karen Kancens:

We have made the request on numerous occasions. Again, I think it's difficult to make good decisions when you don't have the evidence basis on which to make them. You need numbers to back up infrastructure investments and to back up dollars, and you need that broader view. You need to be able to compare regions, compare ports and see trends. As I said, we don't have that now. We don't have all the information that we need to make sound infrastructure investment decisions.

(0920)

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you.

Mr. Broad, you also mentioned something with respect to icebreaking challenges. Which months of the year are affected? You also said we need to create a concrete plan to renew the fleet. Can you elaborate on this, please?

Mr. Michael Broad:

First of all, in the Arctic it's in the summer for resupply. For the St. Lawrence River, we're talking the end of November until the end of March. For the Great Lakes, of course, it's at opening, which is the end of March and at the end December. The season is pretty well from the end of November through the end of March.

What was the second part?

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

You talked about a concrete plan to renew the fleet.

Mr. Michael Broad:

Yes. I think the Coast Guard has been working on coming up with some ideas for the fleet, but there's never anything made public about it, so we don't get the feeling there's a commitment there to invest in the long term.

We have ships there for which I think the average age is 38 years. They are getting on. I think icebreaking is very important. We have to keep commerce moving, both through the lakes and on the St. Lawrence River. Indeed, we need icebreakers in Atlantic Canada, too.

We would like to see the Coast Guard come out publicly with a plan in which the government has agreed on what kinds of ships they are going to build and when those ships are going to be built.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

How many do you have presently?

Mr. Michael Broad:

I think we have 12 or 13, but we have only a few medium-sized and heavy icebreakers right now—I think five or six. The number escapes me, sorry.

Mr. Angelo Iacono:

Thank you.[Translation]

Madam Chair, I would like to give the rest of my time to my colleague Mr. Sikand. [English]

Mr. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Thank you.

Thank you to our witnesses for being here.

I must apologize to you, Mr. Orb. I missed a portion of your initial comments. I was running a bit late.

To pick up on that point, I had an opportunity this summer to go with HMCS Charlottetown through Iqaluit to Greenland. The icebreaking capability came up a couple of times. We had some discussions on that.

I want your continued comments on whether we should have something in Resolute, and the type of icebreaker, because I know they were talking about nuclear capabilities, in terms of the source of power, and perhaps what we need to get to be comparable to nations similar to ours in the Arctic region.

Mr. Michael Broad:

First of all, they are talking about building a polar icebreaker, which started at $700,000 or $1 million. It is now well over $1 billion, and it hasn't started to be built yet. To us, spending that huge amount of money on one vessel is.... I know that Canada wants to show sovereignty in the north, but having one ship, to me, doesn't really do the job.

I think that on the commercial side we're needy. We could spend the money better by building more regular icebreakers.

Unfortunately, Canada's shipbuilding policy prevents ships being built overseas, but you could build ships for half the price of building them in Canada.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

That is what I was about to ask next. What is the cost associated with a regular icebreaker?

Mr. Michael Broad:

When you say “cost”, what do you mean?

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

In order to build it, because you said—

Mr. Michael Broad:

To build it offshore, it would be maybe $450 million, and in Canada it would be at least $800 million.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

What would be an ideal size of fleet for Canada to have?

Mr. Michael Broad:

That's a good question. I have that in my office.

I would say that if we can replace our medium-sized.... It's not necessarily just numbers; it's the age of these vessels. We have to renew them. So we'd like to see the present medium-sized icebreakers and the large icebreakers—

(0925)

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you. I'm out of time.

Could you please provide that information from your office?

Mr. Michael Broad:

Absolutely.

Mr. Gagan Sikand:

Thank you.

Mr. Michael Broad:

Sorry, in fact we did submit a paper just on that subject, so I'll get it to you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Rogers, go ahead.

Mr. Churence Rogers (Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Welcome to our witnesses.

Forgive me if I refer to Mr. Orb as Ray. We spent four years together as members of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities and we became good friends.

I have a couple of comments first, and then a couple of questions for Mr. Orb.

Regarding the comments around Bill C-69, it's my understanding that ditches and sloughs and such types of water are not considered navigable waters under Bill C-69. I remember that discussion, being a past member of the environment committee, so I just want to point that out.

I wonder if you could comment on the role of municipalities in trade and transportation logistics, and whether you think there is really a role for the municipalities in rural Saskatchewan. If so, how would you like to see the role of these municipalities incorporated into a national trade corridors strategy?

Mr. Ray Orb:

Yes, that's an interesting comment. I think our interests in moving products.... It wouldn't matter what product it is; in our case, it's potash or grain products. We need to be at the table with the federal government when we're talking about federal infrastructure programs.

A good example is the new investing in Canada program. As part of FCM, through the rural forum at FCM, we've been pressing FCM and pressing the federal government to make sure that there is a rural infrastructure component. The federal government agreed and said that, yes, there will be a federal infrastructure component and it will contribute 60% into the funding of that.

A major part of that, for us, is that the primary weight corridors I mentioned are where our grain gets to market.

Unfortunately, beyond that we don't have much input. By the time it gets to a port.... In our case, the majority of our grain goes to the Asia-Pacific region, so that's the port of Vancouver. Beyond that we don't have any control of that. That's our side of it.

Mr. Churence Rogers:

What part do roads play in rural Saskatchewan, in terms of transportation? Are your roads and the road structure adequate?

Mr. Ray Orb:

No, our roads and our bridges, in particular.... We have a lot of bridges in rural Saskatchewan, and we're actually doing a study on that right now. We are in a state of disrepair as far as the bridges go. Of course, you know that if you don't have a good bridge system, you don't have reliable roads because you can't use the roads.

We direly need an injection of funding. Yesterday, Saskatchewan finally signed a bilateral agreement. We were the last province in the country to sign on because of the fact that they are looking at moving out of transit the money that the cities weren't able to use. We're hoping that some of that is available for the rural component.

Mr. Churence Rogers:

Okay. Thank you very much.

Mr. Broad, I remember meeting with the Atlantic pilotage group, and they expressed major concerns about where there may be changes to the act in terms of perhaps suggesting increasing costs for pilotage in Atlantic Canada. They pointed out to us that they have a great safety record, an impeccable safety record. Their major concern seems to be that if we make changes and go to a uniform system across the country, we'll see major cost increases for shipping in Atlantic Canada.

How accurate is that?

Mr. Michael Broad:

Well, you know, it's interesting. If you had been with those same people five years ago, they would have been clamouring for change. But the APA appointed a new president, a fellow by the name Sean Griffiths, and he's cleaned things up pretty well.

All of that is to say that the Grégoire report does not say to consolidate all the piloting across Canada. It suggests they consolidate the St. Lawrence River and the Great Lakes pilotage, but the other pilotage authorities would remain the same. In fact, in some of the recommendations he even says, listen, if the pilotage authorities want to do this, they can make a choice; they have the option. If the Grégoire report is implemented, you're not going to see consolidation of pilotage authorities across Canada. If the pilotage authorities want to stay separate, they can.

(0930)

Mr. Churence Rogers:

I appreciate that information.

I want to get to this question. When we talk about Canada's shipping infrastructure and keeping up with the changes that are going on in the industry, such as increasing the size of ships, increasing volumes of traffic and so on, what would you like to see come out of the ports modernization review?

Mr. Michael Broad:

Karen, do you want to answer that?

Ms. Karen Kancens:

Sure.

I hate to keep going back to the same point, but I think we need that national overview. We need that strategy so that we can look at ports—at the role they play in the economy, at the role they play on a national basis and for their local communities and populations. In terms of our approach to the ports review, you can look at it on a port-by-port basis, or you can look at the changes you need to governance in the Canada Marine Act. Again, we need to look at it from a broader perspective.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

This is a short round, Mr. Liepert.

Mr. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, CPC):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Good morning, everyone.

Our colleague Kelly represents Saskatchewan. Rightfully so, she directed her questions to Mr. Orb. Matt and I represent a couple of Alberta constituencies, so I want to talk a bit about oil and the safety of shipping oil on our waterways.

As was mentioned by a colleague here, we were in Vancouver last week. Each time we asked, whether on our port tour or in presentations, about the safety of shipping oil by tanker, every answer was the same: There are no safety concerns by the shipping industry.

That was Vancouver. I'm more interested in shipping oil out of the northern ports. We all know that Bill C-48 was introduced to meet a campaign commitment that was made on the back of a napkin. I'd just like to get some comment on this from you. We have a government that talks about making decisions based on science and statistics.

To the Shipping Federation, do you have any statistics or do you know of any statistics that would support the tanker ban off the west coast?

Mr. Michael Broad:

None. In fact, if you look at the east coast, there's been a lot of tanker activity in the last number of years. If you look at Placentia Bay, and Quebec and Montreal and even the lakes, there's some tanker business. That's been going on for a long time and without incident.

I might also say that in 2016 or 2017, the administrator of the ship-source oil pollution fund issued a report showing the number of oil spills in the last 10 years. There were no oil spills by any foreign-flag ship. Most of the oil spills in Canada are from derelict vessels, abandoned vessels and that kind of thing.

Mr. Ron Liepert:

You would probably agree with us, then, that this was a decision that was not made based on any kind of statistical data or science. It was a decision that was made to meet a campaign promise that was made fleetingly on an airplane somewhere over northern British Columbia.

Mr. Michael Broad:

I'd agree with the first part of that.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Ron Liepert:

I think the second part is agreeable, too.

I don't have any more questions, Madam Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Liepert.

We'll go on to Mr. Graham for three minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Mr. Orb, you represent the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities. These municipalities, I assume, charge taxes. How often do these municipalities go around to the residents and collect garbage and recycling?

Mr. Ray Orb:

Several of the rural municipalities are. Actually, there are disposal companies that most of them hire, and they haul the garbage and do the recycling as well. Saskatchewan right now is working on its waste management strategy.

(0935)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If we didn't do that, what would be happening?

Mr. Ray Orb:

We would have a lot of garbage piling up.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We could call this garbage pollution, could we not?

Mr. Ray Orb:

Pardon me?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We could call this garbage pollution.

Mr. Ray Orb:

I suppose we could.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Could I assume, then, that the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities supports a price on pollution?

Mr. Ray Orb:

A price on pollution...? No, we don't.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No? Well, then, you allow your garbage to go free.

Mr. Ray Orb:

Obviously, that's not fair. You probably need to read the climate change action plan that Saskatchewan has. They actually have a way to mitigate greenhouse gases. I know it's up for debate, but there is a plan there.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

On that happy note, moving right along, I wanted to talk a bit about MCTS, because that was the focus of a very early study by the fisheries committee, where I also sit. Some of us were not necessarily on side with the government's decision to close the Comox base. I'm wondering, Mr. Broad, from your constituency's perspective, whether you find the existing MCTS services reliable.

Mr. Michael Broad:

I think they're reliable, yes, but there's so much more we could do with that system. With the information that the....

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Okay, fair enough.

Mr. Orb, this issue came up when you were with us before. It's come up again in this current study. It's about the health of our short lines. I know that the Saskatchewan short lines were particularly helpful in terms of illustrating what the situation is. Where do they fit in the grand scheme of things, in that whole pipeline of trade—pardon the expression; it's for Ron's benefit—that goes out to the coast?

How important are they, and how much of a weak link do you think they might be?

Mr. Ray Orb:

That's a good question. We've actually been working with the short line association and we have demonstrated that by taking several trucks off our highways and road systems and putting it on a rail car, we're actually reducing greenhouse gas emissions. We should actually be credited for that. We're hoping that the federal government takes it into account when they finally realize that this carbon tax is actually wrong.

I just wanted to mention that the short lines in Saskatchewan are an integral part of moving grain. We have more short-line railroads in Saskatchewan than there are in the rest of the country. They provide a valuable service. They often don't get good service, so we're looking at this legislation. Even though the short lines are regulated in Saskatchewan, we're hoping that the new Bill C-49 actually takes into account the carriers and makes them more accountable, because in the end it's mostly CP Rail that picks up the cars and takes them away.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Orb.

We'll go on to Mr. Jeneroux.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC):

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Thank you, witnesses, for spending the time with us this morning.

Madam Chair, I believe that probably both sides of the table have gotten a lot out of the witnesses here today. Again, I really think that there are some good witnesses with whom I would like to continue to stay in touch as the study progresses.

However, this time I'd like to move a motion. I put a number of motions on notice prior to this committee, and I'd like to move one of those motions.

I'll read it for the record. I move that the committee invite the Parliamentary Budget Officer to provide an update on his report on phase 1 of the investing in Canada plan.

I understand that everybody has a copy of the motion. Would you like me to pause before I continue, Chair?

The Chair:

Mr. Jeneroux, can I suggest that we complete our next few minutes with our witnesses, if it's all right with you?

I'll suspend for a minute so we can deal with your motion, and when we've completed dealing with your motion we'll go into committee business. You've moved the motion. We could just hold it until we complete, if that's all right, and then we will deal with it.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I'm open to the suggestion, Madam Chair, with the exception of ensuring that we still remain in public.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Are there any other comments on this?

Some hon. members: No.

The Chair: Mr. Aubin, go ahead.

(0940)

[Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you, Madam Chair.

My next question is for Mr. Orb.

I am a member from Quebec. I admit that my bank of images on Saskatchewan is pretty limited. That is a gap to be filled. Your description of trucking operations in Saskatchewan in your presentation really impressed me. I would like to know whether the importance of trucking services in Saskatchewan is directly related to the railway system's inability to meet the demand or whether both the railway system and the trucking system are experiencing exponential growth. [English]

Mr. Ray Orb:

It's a good question. I think the two industries should work in parallel, but I don't believe they actually do. I think that in a lot of cases, because of what's happened over the last number of years, railways have not proven that they're reliable. Particularly last year, Canadian National had a terrible record moving grain, and they promised to never let that happen again. It's the same old story. A lot of the slack was picked up by CP Rail, in the southern part of Saskatchewan at least. It forced farmers who farm in the northern part of the greenbelt in Saskatchewan to haul their grain by truck to the southern delivery points so it could be shipped out by CP Rail.

I don't believe there is really a correlation. I know that, obviously, some of the grain companies have contracts with trucking companies to move the grain, but it's not really organized very well. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you.

I asked that question because it seems obvious to me, in this study on trade corridors aimed at increasing trade possibilities, that our greenhouse gas production will also increase. I was wondering how we could align the desired trade growth with a reduction in greenhouse gases.

Have any of the trucks in your fleet gone from oil to liquified gas? Is any work being done in that direction? In other words, is there a concern for reducing greenhouse gases? [English]

Mr. Ray Orb:

To the credit of the trucking industry.... I can only tell you what has been done in Saskatchewan, but most likely it has been done across the country. The truck engines on the semi-trailers are more efficient than they used to be. They're reducing greenhouse gas emissions. They're making themselves more efficient, but it's still not as efficient as moving grain by rail, because they have such higher volumes and obviously there's no infrastructure damage. The rail is already there, although they still have to do repairs, but you're not looking at making repairs on roads and bridges using other equipment that creates greenhouse gas emissions. I think more needs to be done looking at that, but still the efficiency needs to be done by the railways.

In part of my submission, I mentioned increased data. The railways have promised to give more reliable, timely data to the shippers. I think that's starting to happen. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

What is the federal government's responsibility in terms of improving the country's railway system? [English]

Mr. Ray Orb:

I think there was more funding for railways at one time. We used to put in funding, especially into rehabilitating some of the branch lines. The railways now have become very efficient, to the point where they're using the major shipping points where they can load large railcars, but the federal government still has to realize that we have lots of branch lines that need extra funding, and some of the short-line railways also need some federal assistance. [Translation]

Mr. Robert Aubin:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

We have a couple of minutes left. Do any of the committee members have any particular question they'd like to get answered?

Mr. Hardie, go ahead.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Mr. Orb, I've always appreciated Mr. Liepert's questions about oil movements, because I think they build on the narrative that we need to explore. I took your point about the competition that exists between grain movements and oil movements by rail off the prairies. I'm wondering to what degree you are aware of any dialogue going on province to province, or particularly indigenous groups to indigenous groups, between Saskatchewan and British Columbia, to try to square some of the issues that are quite evident on the coast.

(0945)

Mr. Ray Orb:

Those kinds of conversations I'm not actually aware of.

We work with indigenous groups in our own province. I can tell you that when we meet through the Federation of Canadian Municipalities, unfortunately there aren't indigenous people at those meetings. We talk with provincial organizations across the country.

We had a good discussion a couple of weeks ago in Nova Scotia about energy east and the possibility of re-evaluating that. The Ontario municipalities association is especially interested in that because of the sheer increase in the volume of railcars carrying oil. It's becoming quite a safety issue. It's a traffic issue as well, because it holds up traffic.

I believe the same thing is happening in Vancouver. There's a lot of oil moving by railcar.

We need to look at different ways of moving that oil. It would help not only the western economy but the eastern economy in Canada. We have a refinery there that needs the oil and such. We're using Saudi oil right now in that refinery.

We believe it can create jobs and help increase safety as well.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Thank you.

Mr. Broad, I have one quick question for you.

An issue that came up when we were visiting metro Vancouver was the moorage taking place in the Gulf Islands. Is this a flow/efficiency issue with the ports in Vancouver, or is it just a function of the fact that we're getting more and more ship movements with trade?

Mr. Michael Broad:

I think it's the former, mostly because of efficiency, but certainly the amount of cargo has increased. You have ships sitting there for lengthy times waiting for cargo.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Where is the weak link?

Mr. Michael Broad:

I always say that with marine transportation there are a lot of players. We have the truckers, the railways, the terminal operators, the grain elevators, the ports, the ships and the longshoremen. There are a lot of players there, so it's difficult to nail it down.

When the grain comes in, and there's a lot of it.... I think it's a combination of a number of things and a number of players. It's about getting those people together to try to solve the problems.

The Chair:

All right.

Thank you very much.

Mr. Michael Broad:

Madam Chair, I have an answer for Mr. Sikand on the icebreakers.

The Chair:

Go ahead, please.

Mr. Michael Broad:

There are 15 icebreakers: two heavy icebreakers—one of them, Louis S. St-Laurent, is 49 years old—four medium icebreakers, and nine light icebreakers, which are multi-task and don't work well in heavy ice.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Thank you to our witnesses. It was nice to see you again, Mr. Orb.

I'm going to excuse the witnesses from the table at this time. Let's give our witnesses a second to exit the table.

We'll go on to Mr. Jeneroux directly to deal with his motion. Mr. Jeneroux, would you like to move the motion or speak to it?

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Yes. I believe I've already moved it.

Thank you, Madam Chair, for allowing the time. I want to make sure, in full transparency, that we have the chance to talk about these things in public. Thank you for arranging that we get some time to do that.

Again, I'll quickly read the motion so everyone is aware of what we're looking at. I move that the committee invite the Parliamentary Budget Officer to provide an update on his report on phase 1 of the investing in Canada plan.

Being new on this committee, I have been spending a lot of time going through previous meetings and doing my best to catch up. I'm certainly enjoying this current study we're looking at.

However, it was a surprise that we haven't had the Parliamentary Budget Officer before us in this capacity, in terms of looking at the investing in Canada plan, phase 1, which is $180 billion. Probably to the disappointment of the government members, he was quite critical on phase 1 in his report. Knowing that obviously phase 2 is coming, I think it's probably prudent to bring him in front of us before any of that happens again. I think it would be an opportunity for us to question him. Perhaps a study will come out of that, or perhaps it won't, but I think providing the opportunity to have him in front of us would be good, before we head into that second phase of the plan.

(0950)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Hardie, go ahead.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

I think the Parliamentary Budget Officer will have some useful things to say. The government itself, certainly the Prime Minister in his most recent updates to mandate letters, indicated that there was a large interest in seeing the system streamlined because the dollars don't do any good sitting here in Ottawa. They have to be on the street doing what they're meant to do.

Mr. Jeneroux, with respect to your motion, I suggest an amendment that hopefully will be friendly, so that we can add it to your motion: that the chair be empowered to coordinate the necessary witnesses, resources and scheduling to complete this task.

That is pretty much a boilerplate thing, just to make sure that all the details are looked after.

The Chair:

Mr. Jeneroux, did you want to speak to it again?

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

I would just put on the record that I absolutely accept the friendly amendment put forth by Mr. Hardie.

The Chair: Are there any further comments?

(Amendment agreed to)

(Motion as amended agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

Thank you. That's done.

We will now go in camera for a short session.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités

[Énregistrement électronique]

(0845)

[Traduction]

La présidente (L'hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)):

La séance du Comité permanent des transports, de l'infrastructure et des collectivités est ouverte. Conformément à l'article 108(2) du Règlement, nous effectuons une étude sur l'établissement d'une stratégie canadienne sur les transports et la logistique.

Nous accueillons aujourd'hui des témoins. Nous avons tout d'abord M. Ray Orb, président, de la Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities, puis M. Michael Broad, président, et Mme Karen Kancens, vice-présidente, tous deux de la Fédération maritime du Canada.

Bienvenue et merci d'être avec nous si tôt le matin.

Nous allons commencer par les exposés, qui ne doivent pas dépasser cinq minutes. Lorsque je lèverai ma main, nous allons vous interrompre. Les membres ont toujours beaucoup de questions, et nous voulons qu'ils aient le temps de les poser.

Monsieur Orb, aimeriez-vous commencer?

M. Ray Orb (président, Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities):

Oui, bien sûr. Merci.

J'aimerais tout d'abord remercier le Comité de me permettre de comparaître ce matin. Je m'appelle Ray Orb, et je suis président de la Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities, connue sous l'acronyme SARM. L'association a été constituée en 1905 et est la voix des agriculteurs et des régions rurales de la Saskatchewan depuis plus de 100 ans. Nous nous employons, au nom de nos membres, à trouver des solutions aux problèmes recensés dans nos régions rurales.

Notre association a le mandat de travailler en agriculture, un secteur important dans notre province. La Saskatchewan est un important producteur de blé, d'avoine, de lin et d'orge au Canada, et nous sommes fiers de nos nombreuses fermes agricoles, d'élevage et laitières.

Notre industrie agricole doit pouvoir compter sur un réseau de transport économique et efficace pour que les producteurs puissent acheminer leurs produits partout dans la province et au pays.

La Saskatchewan, le Canada et l'Amérique du Nord misent sur l'infrastructure de transport lourd des municipalités rurales de la Saskatchewan pour relier le réseau provincial afin d'acheminer les marchandises et les services de façon sûre, fiable et en temps opportun. Notre province se targue d'avoir le plus important réseau routier provincial au pays. Nous avons 26 000 kilomètres de routes provinciales, et 162 000 kilomètres de routes rurales municipales.

Le ministère de la Voirie de la Saskatchewan accorde du financement à la SARM pour gérer un programme de subventions destiné au réseau de transport lourd afin que les municipalités rurales entretiennent les routes rurales pour répondre aux besoins de ce réseau. Les corridors pour le transport lourd permettent d'acheminer les marchandises et les services de façon continue partout dans la province et au pays, tout en protégeant le réseau provincial vieillissant. Le programme connaît un grand succès puisque l'initiative « Clearing the Path » compte actuellement 6 500 kilomètres de corridors pour les poids lourds dans la province.

Nous comptons également sur le réseau ferroviaire pour transporter le grain et les produits agricoles, et la SARM n'a pas manqué de faire entendre sa voix sur le niveau de service ferroviaire depuis 2009.

Plus récemment, nous avons présenté des observations sur le projet de loi C-49. Nous avons appuyé le projet de loi, car il contenait des mesures pour renforcer la présentation de données. En disposant de plus de données, les producteurs dans la chaîne d'approvisionnement peuvent prendre de meilleures décisions en s'appuyant sur des renseignements fiables. Nous croyons en outre que les compagnies de chemin de fer de compétence fédérale devraient avoir l'obligation de préparer un plan pour répondre à la demande en vue de la campagne agricole à venir.

Nous sommes heureux de plus des sanctions réciproques et des services de règlement informel des différends contenus dans le projet de loi C-49. Il est important que les différends se règlent rapidement, afin que les producteurs n'aient pas à subir de sanctions ou de retards additionnels.

Il est important également que la Loi sur la modernisation des transports et son règlement veillent à ce que l'Office des transports du Canada et Transports Canada disposent de mécanismes valables pour obliger les compagnies ferroviaires à rendre des comptes. Selon la SARM, le gouvernement fédéral doit pouvoir agir s'il considère que le plan de transport du grain d'une compagnie ferroviaire n'est pas suffisant. S'il ne prévoit pas de mécanismes d'application de la loi valables, le projet de loi C-49 n'apportera pas de changements significatifs.

Même si ce sont principalement les producteurs de grain de l'Ouest qui ont des problèmes avec le transport ferroviaire, l'augmentation du transport du pétrole par voies ferrées entraîne d'autres préoccupations, car les milliers de barils de pétrole qui circulent sur le rail ne créent pas seulement un problème de capacité, ils présentent une menace pour l'environnement.

Les pipelines sont une solution de rechange préférable pour l'environnement au transport routier ou ferroviaire et devraient être utilisés lorsque c'est possible pour réduire les risques associés au transport de produits dangereux par rail. La construction d'un pipeline libérera de plus la voie ferrée et des wagons pour le transport du grain.

Ma dernière observation porte sur l'importance des ports pour nos économies rurales. Depuis l'arrêt des activités au port de Churchill en 2016, la SARM suit de près la situation et milite pour une solution. Le port était un point d'exportation important pour les producteurs, et sa réfection permettrait de réduire les retards dans le transport du grain dans les Prairies.

L'an dernier, la SARM a eu l'occasion de rencontrer des représentants du port de Vancouver. Nous avons pu voir directement les problèmes de logistique et ce que l'autorité portuaire espère faire pour accroître l'efficacité.

Les régions rurales ont changé au cours du siècle dernier. Les besoins en infrastructure ont augmenté et vont continuer de le faire. Selon le rapport Comment nourrir le monde en 2050, la population mondiale aura atteint 9,1 milliards d'habitants en 2050. La production alimentaire doit augmenter de 70 %. La production céréalière annuelle devra atteindre trois milliards de tonnes, et la production annuelle de viande devra s'accroître de plus de 200 millions de tonnes. Il est donc indispensable que les producteurs dans les régions rurales de la Saskatchewan puissent compter sur un réseau de transport qui leur permette de faire leur part pour nourrir la planète.

(0850)



Au nom des municipalités rurales de la Saskatchewan, je tiens à remercier le Comité de nous avoir permis de faire entendre notre voix dans cet important débat.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Broad, allez-y.

M. Michael Broad (président, Fédération maritime du Canada):

Merci, madame la présidente, et mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, de nous accueillir aujourd'hui.

Karen et moi sommes ici au nom de la Fédération maritime du Canada, qui a été créée par une loi du Parlement en 1903. Nous sommes l'association commerciale qui représente les propriétaires, les exploitants et les agents des navires océaniques qui transportent les exportations du Canada vers les marchés mondiaux et les importations vers le Canada, y compris une partie du grain de Ray.

Les navires représentés par nos membres chargent et déchargent des marchandises dans les ports partout au pays et sont littéralement les transporteurs du commerce mondial du Canada. Nous avons suivi les séances que le Comité a tenues la semaine dernière à St. Catharines et à Vancouver, et nous avons hâte d'entendre le point de vue de nos partenaires dans la chaîne commerciale sur les façons de moderniser les corridors commerciaux du Canada à l'échelle régionale.

Quant à nous, nous voulons aborder la question du point de vue national et concentrer nos observations sur quelques mesures clés et priorités qui, selon nous, accroîtront l'efficacité de la navigation dans les eaux canadiennes pour servir l'intérêt du réseau de transport dans son ensemble.

Une de nos priorités pour optimiser la navigation consiste à investir dans la modernisation des services de communication et de trafic maritimes, ou SCTM, le système sous la responsabilité de la Garde côtière qui surveille les déplacements des navires dans les eaux canadiennes.

Nous croyons qu'il existe une réelle possibilité de transformer le système, un conduit d'information qui agit un peu comme une téléphoniste, en un outil vraiment dynamique en mesure de recueillir, analyser et diffuser en temps réel de l'information sur la navigation, non seulement à l'équipe de gestion à la passerelle du navire, mais aussi aux responsables des infrastructures à terre, comme les ports ou les terminaux. La modernisation du système des SCTM mènera à une gestion holistique du transport maritime dans les eaux canadiennes, dont les avantages se répercuteront sur tous nos corridors commerciaux au pays.

Un autre élément du transport maritime qui est crucial pour plusieurs corridors importants au Canada est la disponibilité des brise-glaces pour assurer des déplacements sûrs et efficaces pendant les longs et dangereux mois d'hiver, en particulier sur la côte nord-est de Terre-Neuve, dans le fleuve Saint-Laurent et les Grands-Lacs et, naturellement, dans l'Arctique canadien.

Malgré son importance, la flotte de brise-glaces a été réduite considérablement au fil des ans et est composée actuellement de navires très vieux qui sont grandement dispersés sur une vaste étendue d'eau. Le gouvernement a, bien sûr, annoncé des mesures pour corriger la situation, notamment l'acquisition de trois brise-glaces usagés, mais nous avons besoin d'un plan concret pour renouveler la flotte à long terme, afin que le Canada dispose d'une capacité suffisante pour répondre à la demande future et assurer un transport maritime efficace et sécuritaire.

Une discussion sur l'optimisation de l'efficacité de la navigation dans les eaux canadiennes ne serait pas complète sans parler de pilotage et de l'examen en cours du système de pilotage du Canada. La Loi sur le pilotage a été, à n'en pas douter, un excellent outil pour garantir la sécurité de la navigation dans les eaux canadiennes, mais nous croyons que le système de pilotage n'est pas en mesure de contrôler les coûts ou de fournir aux utilisateurs le niveau de service constant dont ils ont besoin dans un environnement maritime hautement concurrentiel.

Nous croyons que les recommandations qui découlent de l'examen du système de pilotage nous offrent une occasion, dont nous avons grandement besoin, de modifier et de moderniser la loi, et nous pressons les membres du Comité d'en informer leurs collègues parlementaires.

En terminant, nous aimerions attirer l'attention du Comité sur l'initiative du guichet unique maritime, dans le cadre de laquelle toute l'information requise par les autorités canadiennes, en particulier l'ASFC, concernant l'arrivée et le départ des navires dans les eaux canadiennes pourraient être soumise de façon électronique dans un portail unique, sans dédoublement. Le concept présente un potentiel énorme pour accélérer les échanges commerciaux en gérant la frontière maritime de façon à éliminer les procédures papier, à minimiser la redondance et à réduire les risques d'erreur et de retard dans la déclaration des marchandises et des navires. Divers pays, dont ceux de l'Union européenne, sont déjà à diverses étapes de mise en oeuvre de ce concept à l'échelle nationale, et nous encourageons fortement le Canada à prendre les mesures nécessaires pour s'assurer que nos procédures sont en harmonie avec celles de nos partenaires internationaux.

Même si nous avons tenté d'être aussi précis et concrets que possible dans notre exposé aujourd'hui, j'aimerais en profiter pour faire quelques observations d'un point de vue stratégique général.

Un rôle important de notre système de transport et de logistique étant de répondre aux besoins des importateurs et des exportateurs canadiens, il est essentiel que le gouvernement se dote d'une vision ou d'une stratégie de portée nationale pour développer les corridors commerciaux et qu'elle soit en lien étroit avec son programme de politique commerciale. La stratégie doit appuyer la capacité du système de servir tous les nouveaux marchés qui ont été ou seront négociés dans le cadre du programme de diversification des échanges commerciaux du Canada, qu'il s'agisse de la version révisée du PTPGP ou du récent AECG, ou des négociations en cours du Mercosur. Une telle stratégie doit aussi faire en sorte que tous les ministères et organismes qui jouent un rôle dans le commerce international travaillent en harmonie, afin que l'efficacité de la chaîne d'approvisionnement fasse partie intégrante de notre façon de fonctionner.

(0855)



Je remercie les membres du Comité de leur attention. Je me ferai un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Block, allez-y.

Mme Kelly Block (Sentier Carlton—Eagle Creek, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la présidente. Je m'excuse d'être arrivée quelques minutes en retard.

Monsieur Orb, vous avez déjà comparu devant le Comité à quelques reprises. Je suis ravie d'avoir eu l'occasion de vous rencontrer ainsi que quelques-uns de vos collègues qui sont ici pour représenter la SARM. Mes questions vous sont destinées, ce qui ne devrait pas être surprenant, puisque je viens de la Saskatchewan.

Comme nous avons eu un automne frais et humide, je me demande si vous avez entendu dire qu'on s'attend à ce que la récolte soit moins importante en nombre de tonnes qu'au cours des dernières années.

M. Ray Orb:

Je ne peux pas parler au nom de l'industrie du transport, mais uniquement au nom des producteurs. Lors des rencontres que nous avons eues avec les transporteurs, ils prévoyaient une récolte normale, je pense, dans la moyenne quinquennale, et de bonne qualité.

Toutefois, au moins le tiers de la récolte se trouve encore en Saskatchewan. En Alberta, je pense que c'est même davantage. On envisage beaucoup de déclassement de la production. Nous sommes un peu inquiets de la capacité des compagnies ferroviaires à transporter le grain, car nous avons maintenant différentes catégories et divers problèmes de qualité.

Mme Kelly Block:

Croyez-vous que la présente année sera un bon point de référence pour évaluer si les changements apportés à la Loi sur les transports au Canada dans le projet de loi C-49 auront des effets concrets pour les agriculteurs et les transporteurs?

M. Ray Orb:

Nous espérons assurément que ce soit le cas. Je peux vous dire que depuis l'adoption du projet de loi C-49, deux transporteurs importants, le CN et le CP, ont montré beaucoup plus d'empressement à s'asseoir avec des organismes comme le nôtre. De fait, j'ai une rencontre de prévue avec le CP la semaine prochaine à Saskatoon.

Ils ont présenté leurs plans. Ils ont également présenté maintenant leurs plans pour l'hiver, qui s'en vient bien sûr. Je pense qu'on les surveille beaucoup plus. La présente année pourrait être un test pour eux. Le volume ne sera sans doute pas un problème, mais nous avons d'autres problèmes dont il faut s'occuper d'emblée, notamment la température.

Merci.

Mme Kelly Block:

Je sais que le gouvernement de la Saskatchewan s'oppose très vigoureusement à la taxe sur le carbone des libéraux. J'aimerais que vous nous fassiez part du point de vue de votre organisme sur la taxe sur le carbone, étant donné que c'est en lien avec le transport.

M. Ray Orb:

Bien sûr, tout le monde sait que nous appuyons le gouvernement de la Saskatchewan dans sa lutte contre toute forme de taxe sur le carbone imposée par le fédéral, et c'est essentiellement parce que nous croyons que la province a élaboré son propre plan d'action pour lutter contre les émissions de gaz à effet de serre, et nous appuyons ce plan d'action

Nous sommes inquiets. Nous avons communiqué avec les compagnies ferroviaires pour leur parler de la taxe sur le carbone. Elles nous ont dit qu'il y aurait une taxe sur le diesel en particulier. On craint, bien sûr, que la facture soit refilée aux agriculteurs sous forme d'augmentation du coût du transport. C'est très inquiétant.

(0900)

Mme Kelly Block:

Vous aviez témoigné dans le cadre de notre étude sur la Loi sur la protection de la navigation, ou la Loi sur les eaux navigables canadiennes, et vous revoilà maintenant parmi nous.

Dans sa lettre de mandat, le ministre a été appelé à annuler toutes les modifications apportées en 2012-2013. Je me demande ce que vous pensez également du projet de loi C-69. Quelles sont certaines de vos principales préoccupations à l'égard des répercussions que pourrait entraîner l'annulation de ces modifications sur les infrastructures et les transports?

M. Ray Orb:

Bien sûr, nous nous sommes opposés aux modifications à la loi. À vrai dire, les projets de loi C-68 et C-69 ont une incidence sur les pêches et les voies navigables. Nous estimons que les changements vont en fait empêcher les municipalités de faire le travail qui s'impose. Les projets seront retardés. Nous avons présenté au Comité beaucoup d'exemples qui montrent comment cela risque d'augmenter les coûts et les retards. Nous avons fait part de ces préoccupations. Nous savons que le Sénat va étudier ce projet de loi. Nous espérons bien que des amendements y seront apportés pour faciliter la tâche des municipalités, non seulement en Saskatchewan, mais partout au pays, afin qu'elles puissent faire leur travail tout en protégeant l'environnement.

Mme Kelly Block:

En dernier lieu, pouvez-vous nous dire quelles devraient être, selon vous, les mesures à prendre pour faire en sorte que les collectivités rurales profitent, elles aussi, des avantages d'une augmentation de la circulation dans les principaux corridors commerciaux du Canada?

M. Ray Orb:

Selon moi, l'une des façons dont elles pourraient en profiter consiste à collaborer avec les municipalités, ainsi qu'avec les grands transporteurs.

Je sais qu'il existe une bonne relation entre les transporteurs et les municipalités, par l'entremise de la FCM, la Fédération canadienne des municipalités, parce qu'il faut évidemment observer les règles de sécurité ferroviaire. M. Rogers s'y connaît sûrement en la matière puisqu'il a siégé au conseil d'administration pendant un certain temps.

Je sais que certaines municipalités urbaines d'un bout à l'autre du pays s'inquiètent de la circulation accrue, mais en même temps, je crois que les compagnies de chemin de fer savent qu'elles doivent travailler ensemble pour résoudre certains de ces problèmes.

Mme Kelly Block:

Merci beaucoup.

La présidente:

Monsieur Hardie, c'est à vous.

M. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Bon retour, monsieur Orb. Nous sommes heureux de vous revoir.

Où êtes-vous installé, monsieur Broad? Où se trouvent vos bureaux?

M. Michael Broad:

Je suis installé à Montréal. Nous avons des bureaux à Montréal et à Vancouver.

M. Ken Hardie:

La semaine dernière, nous avons pris la route pour examiner les corridors commerciaux dans la région de Niagara, ainsi que sur la côte Ouest.

Je me demande — et ma question s'adresse à vous deux, en tant qu'utilisateurs du réseau — à quel point vous êtes persuadés de l'existence d'une vision stratégique fondamentale quant aux retombées que doivent procurer les corridors commerciaux dans leur ensemble.

M. Michael Broad:

Je crois qu'il faut une stratégie plus définie pour les corridors commerciaux. Je ne suis pas au courant de...

Karen, y a-t-il...

Mme Karen Kancens (vice-présidente, Fédération maritime du Canada):

Pour autant que nous le sachions, il y a le Fonds national des corridors commerciaux. Nous avons pris connaissance du premier cycle de demandes de financement, dans le cadre duquel il fallait remplir des critères de Transports Canada. Toutefois, nous n'avons pas vraiment constaté de stratégie fondamentale. Nous avons besoin d'une initiative nationale qui comporte également un volet régional.

Comment trouver un juste équilibre entre, d'une part, les investissements et les décisions qui s'imposent en réponse aux besoins régionaux et aux contraintes de capacité et, d'autre part, la nécessité de faire des investissements et de prendre des décisions qui procurent des avantages dans tous les corridors commerciaux, pour le bien commun?

Il nous faut une stratégie qui est clairement arrimée à la politique commerciale générale du Canada. C'est ce qui fait défaut. Selon moi, nous devons essayer de concilier davantage les efforts du gouvernement visant à diversifier les échanges commerciaux et à trouver de nouveaux partenaires commerciaux avec la capacité de transporter plus de marchandises avec efficacité dans le corridor commercial canadien pertinent. Nous avons besoin de ce genre de discussions.

(0905)

M. Ken Hardie:

Je vous pose la même question, Ray.

Dans le contexte des Prairies et dans le cadre de vos interactions avec vos concitoyens, à quel point avez-vous l'assurance que — pour parler en langage familier — la région métropolitaine de Vancouver a pris les choses en main dans son tronçon du corridor commercial?

M. Ray Orb:

C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles nous sommes allés sur place en juin dernier. Nous étions invités par l'administration portuaire de Vancouver à visiter les terminaux et les installations là-bas. Nous sommes allés sur l'eau pour voir bon nombre des installations, et nous avons constaté certains des problèmes rencontrés.

Les organisations comme la nôtre réclament une stratégie nationale des transports qui tiendrait compte de tous les aspects, y compris du transport ferroviaire. Bien sûr, cela comprend notamment le service voyageurs et le service d'autobus. Beaucoup de gens dans les régions rurales n'ont pas accès à un service d'autobus fiable. À preuve, songeons à ce qui s'est passé l'été dernier dans le cas des autobus de la compagnie Greyhound. Beaucoup d'organisations municipales en discutent à l'échelle du pays.

Il nous faut une meilleure stratégie. Nous allons accroître le commerce. J'ai parlé de la production seulement dans les Prairies. Nous forçons l'acheminement des cultures, dont le volume ne cesse d'augmenter, par l'entremise des mêmes corridors de transport dans ce pays. Nous devons nous adapter assez rapidement.

En ce qui concerne le port de Vancouver et la décision du gouvernement fédéral d'investir 167 millions de dollars, c'est probablement un bon début. Toutefois, en ce qui a trait à la stratégie... Je n'ai jamais vu de chiffre, mais je suppose que c'est de l'ordre de plusieurs milliards de dollars.

M. Ken Hardie:

À cet égard, certainement au cours des témoignages entendus la semaine dernière aux deux premières escales dans le cadre de notre étude, nous avons appris que tous les intervenants — les chemins de fer, les ports et le réseau routier local — semblent faire de leur mieux pour maximiser leur capacité ou prendre les mesures qui s'imposent. Par contre, nous n'avons pas eu l'impression que l'ensemble du réseau était supervisé par une personne ou un organisme chargé de déterminer si les choses étaient bien équilibrées et si les investissements allaient de l'avant.

Devons-nous essayer de confier à une entité, comme le port, la tâche de s'occuper de cet aspect dans une région, ou est-ce que cette responsabilité devrait se situer ailleurs?

M. Ray Orb:

À mon avis, quelqu'un devrait assumer la responsabilité de tout le réseau.

Hier, lorsque nous avons rencontré certains des députés ici, à Ottawa, nous avons discuté de la stratégie de développement de l'Ouest, une initiative fédérale pour laquelle le gouvernement avait mis de côté des fonds afin de recueillir les opinions des entreprises de tout pays pouvant contribuer au développement économique de l'Ouest. C'est pourquoi nous avons fait ces déclarations aujourd'hui. Nous croyons qu'il faut une stratégie multidimensionnelle. Nous devons tenir compte des pipelines. Nous devons songer à accroître le volume qui passe par les corridors de transport du grain, mais il faut quelqu'un qui supervise le tout, j'en conviens.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci.

Monsieur Broad, en ce qui a trait au pilotage, je me demande si, dans le cadre de l'examen du système de pilotage, nous avons besoin d'une réponse uniformisée au rapport, au lieu d'une réponse qui tient compte peut-être d'une vaste gamme de questions. Sur la côte Ouest en particulier, étant donné tous les enjeux liés aux pipelines et au transport sûr du pétrole par voie maritime, je me demande si, pour assurer la confiance de la population, nous permettons que le régime là-bas soit différent, plus axé sur le modèle actuel, dans lequel les pilotes locaux qui connaissent la région sont mieux placés pour assurer la sécurité, par rapport à d'autres régions du Canada, où d'autres concessions pourraient être faites à cet égard.

M. Michael Broad:

C'est une bonne question.

Le pilotage relève, de toute façon, des régions. Il y a quatre administrations à l'échelle du pays: la côte Ouest, les Grands Lacs, le fleuve Saint-Laurent...

M. Ken Hardie:

Convenez-vous qu'il faut les maintenir séparées?

M. Michael Broad:

Non, j'aime l'idée de fusionner, du moins au début, l’Administration de pilotage des Grands Lacs et l'Administration de pilotage des Laurentides. Je crois que ce serait un bon point de départ.

M. Marc Grégoire a présenté au ministre un rapport sur le pilotage qui contient, je crois, environ 39 recommandations. Nous aimerions que toutes ces recommandations soient mises en oeuvre et que la Loi sur le pilotage soit modifiée. Le pilotage est une question régionale, j'en conviens, mais pour la côte Ouest ou le fleuve Saint-Laurent, par exemple, ce domaine est essentiellement supervisé par les pilotes eux-mêmes, des sociétés privées ayant le monopole du service et du savoir.

Cela dit, si les gens sont à l'aise avec cette situation, c'est-à-dire la présence de sociétés à but lucratif qui sont responsables de la sécurité, qui ont le monopole du service et du savoir... Je ne suis pas d'accord là-dessus. À mon avis, il faut changer la façon dont le pilotage est organisé au Canada. M. Grégoire a formulé d'excellentes recommandations, et je pense que le rapport ne devrait pas être scindé. Les recommandations sont là. Si le rapport a été produit, c'est pour que l'on donne suite à l'ensemble de ces recommandations.

(0910)

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup. Je vous en suis reconnaissante.

Nous manquons de temps.

J'ai demandé à la greffière d'obtenir le rapport dont vous avez parlé afin de le distribuer aux membres du Comité à titre d'information.

Monsieur Aubin, c'est à vous. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NPD):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie chacun des invités d'être parmi nous ce matin. Je suis heureux de pouvoir profiter de leur expertise.

Je vais commencer par vous, monsieur Broad. Nous allons parler du même sujet, à savoir les pilotes, mais je voudrais d'abord vous féliciter de la précision de votre présentation, qui indique très bien là où sont vos priorités. Nous allons tenter de découvrir cela ensemble. À mon avis, la nécessité que nous nous dotions d'une flotte de brise-glaces digne du XXIe siècle fait largement consensus autour de cette table.

Je reviens à la question du pilotage. Vous, de même que les armateurs, établissez souvent un lien entre le pilotage et les coûts. On parle donc ici de la compétitivité du service. Si on exclut les coûts, reconnaissez-vous la nécessité du service assuré par les pilotes du Canada quant à l'ensemble des plans d'eau? [Traduction]

M. Michael Broad:

Absolument. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie.

Le problème, à votre avis, en est un de capacité concurrentielle. Le coût du pilotage serait plus élevé que dans d'autres régions ou pays du monde. J'ai consulté le rapport de M. Marc Grégoire. Nous avons reçu la semaine dernière, lors de notre tournée, des associations de pilotes qui nous ont soumis un rapport qui avait été complètement oublié dans celui de M. Grégoire. Ce rapport fait la démonstration claire et nette que les coûts du pilotage au Canada ne sont pas plus élevés que dans d'autres pays du monde. Je ne veux pas engager ce débat ce matin, mais je veux savoir si, de votre côté, vous disposez d'une étude qui nous permettrait de faire cette comparaison et de voir s'il y a effectivement un problème quant au coût du pilotage. [Traduction]

M. Michael Broad:

Premièrement, je tiens à dire que, selon moi, l'efficacité du système de pilotage laisse à désirer. Le coût est un des facteurs inclus dans l'efficacité, mais il y a aussi l'aspect lié au service.

Deuxièmement, vous avez raison de dire que le coût associé au pilotage est, grosso modo, le même partout dans le monde, parce que les pilotes sont organisés en cartels privés aux quatre coins du monde.

Quand on pense au coût de pilotage et à la sécurité, il ne fait aucun doute que les services de pilotage au Canada ont été très sécuritaires au cours des 25 dernières années, mais il y a certainement lieu d'y apporter des améliorations. Nous pouvons accroître notre efficacité au chapitre du pilotage. Je ne parle pas seulement des coûts, mais aussi de l'efficacité et du service offert. Un pilote qui gagne 500 000 $ est-il plus sécuritaire qu'un pilote qui gagne 300 000 $? Sur la côte Ouest, les pilotes peuvent gagner 500 000 $, mais dans le fleuve, ils gagnent 400 000 $ et dans les Grands Lacs, 300 000 $. La sécurité est-elle plus grande sur la côte Ouest? Je ne crois pas. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je comprends bien votre approche. Je me demande cependant si, le jour où l'on ouvrira un marché plus compétitif au pilotage, on risque de jouer sur la sécurité. En effet, plus on ferait descendre les coûts du pilotage, plus les compagnies qui se font concurrence pourraient avoir tendance à prendre plus de risques dans le but de faire amarrer plus de navires et de permettre que la circulation se fasse plus rapidement. Le risque d'incidents, qui n'existe absolument pas maintenant — le bilan de la sécurité du côté des associations de pilotage est effectivement remarquable —, pourrait augmenter.

(0915)

[Traduction]

M. Michael Broad:

Nous nous opposons au pilotage concurrentiel. Nous croyons en un système de pilotage sûr et efficace.

Le rapport de M. Grégoire ne contient aucune recommandation sur l'idée d'instaurer un système de pilotage concurrentiel. Je sais que les pilotes eux-mêmes n'aiment pas l'une des recommandations, celle de permettre aux administrations de pilotage qui surveillent l'ensemble des pilotes d'avoir l'option d'embaucher des pilotes indépendants, comme ceux de la côte Ouest ou de la région du fleuve, ou des pilotes employés, comme ceux de l'Atlantique ou des Grands Lacs. Les pilotes sont très inquiets. Ils répètent que si une administration a l'option d'embaucher un pilote contractuel ou un pilote employé, il y aura alors de la concurrence.

Nous ne sommes pas d'accord, car les pilotes ne cessent d'affirmer, depuis cent ans, qu'ils sont des professionnels. Cela ressemble un peu au système médical. Au Canada, nous avons un système public de soins de santé, parallèlement à un système privé dans certains domaines. Les médecins touchent le même salaire pour faire la même chose. Ceux du système privé imposent des frais supplémentaires, mais il n'y a aucune concurrence entre les deux. On trouve aussi des entreprises de camionnage qui ont recours à des conducteurs propriétaires-exploitants et à des conducteurs salariés.

Les recommandations de M. Grégoire sont bien réfléchies. Nous ne souscrivons pas à l'idée que les pilotes doivent se livrer concurrence, mais la sécurité est la priorité absolue parce que nos navires sont de grosses machines coûteuses. Nous apprécions le travail que font les pilotes. J'ai toujours dit que les pilotes au Canada sont parmi les meilleurs du monde, mais l'efficacité pourrait être améliorée. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

D'accord. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Monsieur Iacono, à vous la parole. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je remercie les témoins d'être parmi nous ce matin.

Le plan stratégique Transports 2030 prend un engagement visant à améliorer les renseignements, les données et les analyses liés au commerce et aux transports au pays.

Monsieur Broad, quel est l'état actuel des données sur le transport maritime? Quels en sont les points forts et les points faibles? Comment pouvons-nous l'améliorer? [Traduction]

M. Michael Broad:

Je pense que les ports ont des données sur les cargaisons, le tonnage, le nombre de navires et ce genre de statistiques. Transports Canada avait l'habitude de...

Karen, est-ce qu'il y avait...

Mme Karen Kancens:

Statistique Canada publiait autrefois un rapport annuel, intitulé Le transport maritime au Canada, qui contenait des statistiques à ce sujet. La dernière année de publication était 2011. Oui, il y a des statistiques sur chaque port, mais il n'existe aucune source exhaustive qui rassemble toutes les données et qui nous donne un bon aperçu des navires qui arrivent dans tel ou tel port, des activités qui s'y déroulent, des volumes, des tendances et de l'évolution des chiffres au fil des ans, et ce, non pas de façon générale, mais de façon précise en fonction de chaque port et de chaque produit.

L'accès à ce genre de renseignements constitue un autre élément d'une stratégie sur les transports et les corridors commerciaux. Cela n'existe tout simplement pas en ce moment. Nous devons consulter différentes sources et essayer de tout rassembler, mais chose certaine, nous ne disposons d'aucune source exhaustive d'information sur le plan maritime. [Français]

M. Angelo Iacono:

Quelles ont été les répercussions de la décision consistant à ne plus publier ce document? Pourquoi demandez-vous qu'il soit publié de nouveau? Pouvez-vous nous donner plus de détails à ce sujet? [Traduction]

Mme Karen Kancens:

Nous en avons fait la demande à maintes reprises. Encore une fois, je pense qu'il est difficile de prendre de bonnes décisions en l'absence de données probantes. On a besoin de chiffres pour appuyer les investissements dans les infrastructures et pour corroborer les dépenses, et il est nécessaire d'avoir une vision plus large des choses. Il faut être en mesure de comparer les régions et les ports pour ensuite dégager des tendances. Comme je l'ai dit, cela n'existe pas pour l'instant. Nous n'avons pas toute l'information dont nous avons besoin pour prendre des décisions judicieuses en matière d'investissements dans les infrastructures.

(0920)

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci.

Monsieur Broad, vous avez aussi évoqué les difficultés liées aux services de déglaçage. Pendant quels mois de l'année ces activités ont-elles lieu? Vous avez également dit que nous devons créer un plan concret pour renouveler la flotte. Pourriez-vous nous en dire davantage à ce sujet?

M. Michael Broad:

Tout d'abord, dans l'Arctique, c'est au cours de l'été pour permettre le ravitaillement. Dans le cas du fleuve Saint-Laurent, cela débute à la fin de novembre et se termine à la fin de mars. Pour les Grands Lacs, bien entendu, cela se fait à l'ouverture, c'est-à-dire vers la fin de mars et la fin de décembre. La saison s'étend, en gros, de la fin du mois de novembre jusqu'à la fin du mois de mars.

Quelle était la deuxième partie de votre question?

M. Angelo Iacono:

Vous avez parlé d'un plan concret pour renouveler la flotte.

M. Michael Broad:

Oui. Je crois que la Garde côtière s'emploie à trouver des idées concernant la flotte, mais rien n'a été rendu public à ce sujet, alors nous n'avons pas l'impression qu'il existe un véritable engagement en matière d'investissement à long terme.

Nous avons des navires dont l'âge moyen est de, sauf erreur, 38 ans. Ils prennent de l'âge. À mon avis, le déglaçage est très important. Nous devons assurer le transport des marchandises sur les lacs et le fleuve Saint-Laurent. D'ailleurs, nous avons besoin de brise-glaces au Canada atlantique aussi.

Nous aimerions que la Garde côtière rende public un plan dans lequel le gouvernement énonce quels types de navires seront construits et quand le tout sera achevé.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Combien en avez-vous actuellement?

M. Michael Broad:

Je pense que nous en avons 12 ou 13, mais nous avons seulement quelques brise-glaces moyens et lourds en ce moment — je crois qu'il y en a 5 ou 6. Le chiffre exact m'échappe, je suis désolé.

M. Angelo Iacono:

Merci.[Français]

Madame la présidente, j'aimerais céder ce qu'il me reste de temps de parole à mon collègue M. Sikand. [Traduction]

M. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.):

Merci.

Merci à nos témoins d'être des nôtres.

Je vous demande de bien vouloir m'excuser, monsieur Orb, car j'ai raté une partie de vos observations préliminaires. Je suis arrivé un peu en retard.

Permettez-moi de revenir sur ce qui vient d'être dit. Cet été, j'ai eu l'occasion de voyager à bord du NCSM Charlottetown pour un trajet d'Iqaluit jusqu'au Groenland. La question de la capacité de déglaçage est revenue à quelques reprises, et nous en avons discuté.

J'aimerais savoir ce que vous pensez de la possibilité d'avoir quelque chose à Resolute et ce que vous recommandez comme type de brise-glace, parce que je sais qu'il y a eu des discussions sur l'énergie nucléaire comme source d'énergie et sur l'idée que nous avons peut-être besoin d'une telle capacité pour être à la hauteur d'autres pays semblables au nôtre dans la région arctique.

M. Michael Broad:

Tout d'abord, le gouvernement parle de construire un brise-glace polaire, dont le coût initial était de 700 000 $ ou de 1 million de dollars. C'est maintenant bien plus de 1 milliard de dollars, et rien n'a pas encore été construit. À notre avis, dépenser une telle somme d'argent pour un navire... Je sais que le Canada veut établir sa souveraineté dans le Nord, mais, selon moi, la construction d'un navire ne fera pas vraiment l'affaire.

Je crois que, sur le plan commercial, nous sommes dans le besoin. Nous pourrions mieux dépenser l'argent en construisant des brise-glaces réguliers.

Malheureusement, la politique canadienne sur la construction navale ne permet pas de faire construire des navires à l'étranger, mais vous pourriez en construire pour la moitié du prix au Canada.

M. Gagan Sikand:

C'est justement ce que j'allais vous demander. Quel est le coût associé à un brise-glace régulier?

M. Michael Broad:

Qu'entendez-vous par « coût »?

M. Gagan Sikand:

Le coût de construction, parce que vous avez dit...

M. Michael Broad:

Pour en construire un à l'étranger, cela coûterait peut-être 450 millions de dollars, alors qu'au Canada, la facture serait d'au moins 800 millions de dollars.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Quelle serait une taille idéale pour la flotte du Canada?

M. Michael Broad:

C'est une bonne question. J'ai cette information à mon bureau.

Je dirais que si nous pouvons remplacer nos navires de taille moyenne... Ce n'est pas nécessairement une question de quantité; l'âge de ces navires entre également en ligne de compte. Nous devons les renouveler. Par conséquent, nous aimerions que les brise-glaces de moyenne et de grande taille...

(0925)

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci. Mon temps est écoulé.

Pourriez-vous nous faire parvenir cette information?

M. Michael Broad:

Absolument.

M. Gagan Sikand:

Merci.

M. Michael Broad:

Désolé. En fait, nous avons effectivement présenté un document qui portait uniquement sur ce sujet. Je vous le ferai donc parvenir.

La présidente:

Merci.

Monsieur Rogers, allez-y.

M. Churence Rogers (Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, Lib.):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Je souhaite la bienvenue à nos témoins.

Pardonnez-moi si j’appelle M. Orb par son prénom, Ray. Nous avons passé quatre années à siéger ensemble au sein de la Fédération canadienne des municipalités, et nous sommes devenus de bons amis.

J’ai d'abord quelques observations à formuler, puis quelques questions à poser à M. Orb.

En ce qui concerne les commentaires au sujet du projet de loi C-69, je crois comprendre que les fossés, les marécages et les plans d’eau de ce genre ne sont pas considérés comme des eaux navigables en vertu du projet de loi C-69. Étant donné que, dans le passé, j’ai été membre du comité de l’environnement, je me souviens de cette discussion. Par conséquent, je tenais simplement à vous le signaler.

Je me demande si vous pourriez formuler des observations au sujet du rôle des municipalités dans le domaine de la logistique commerciale et de la logistique de transport et en ce qui concerne la question de savoir si, selon vous, les municipalités ont réellement un rôle à jouer dans les régions rurales de la Saskatchewan. Dans l’affirmative, aimeriez-vous voir le rôle de ces municipalités intégré dans une stratégie nationale sur les corridors commerciaux?

M. Ray Orb:

Oui, c’est une question intéressante. Je pense que nos intérêts dans le domaine du transport de produits… La nature du produit importe peu; dans notre cas, il s’agit de potasse ou de produits céréaliers. Il faut que nous soyons à la table des négociations avec le gouvernement fédéral, quand les programmes fédéraux d’infrastructures sont discutés.

Le nouveau plan Investir dans le Canada en est un bon exemple. Au moyen du forum rural de la FCM, nous exerçons des pressions sur la FCM et le gouvernement fédéral, afin de garantir l’existence d’une composante liée à l’infrastructure rurale. Le gouvernement fédéral a accepté et a déclaré que, oui, il y aurait une composante fédérale liée à l’infrastructure et qu’il contribuerait pour 60 % au financement de cette composante.

Pour nous, une part importante de cet enjeu est liée au fait que les principaux corridors pour poids lourds, que j’ai mentionnés, sont empruntés pour transporter nos céréales vers les marchés.

Malheureusement, outre cela, nous n’avons pas tellement notre mot à dire. Lorsque les céréales atteignent un port… Dans notre cas, la majorité de nos céréales sont expédiées dans la région de l’Asie-Pacifique. Elles passent donc par le port de Vancouver. Nous n’exerçons aucun contrôle au-delà de cela. C’est là notre facette de ce processus.

M. Churence Rogers:

Quel rôle les routes jouent-elles dans les régions rurales de la Saskatchewan, au chapitre du transport? Vos routes et la structure du réseau routier sont-elles adéquates?

M. Ray Orb:

Non, nos routes et nos ponts, en particulier… Il y a un grand nombre de ponts dans les régions rurales de la Saskatchewan, et nous menons actuellement une étude sur ceux-ci. En ce qui concerne nos ponts, ils sont en très mauvais état. Vous savez bien sûr que si vos ponts ne sont pas en bon état, vos routes ne seront pas fiables parce que vous ne serez pas en mesure de les emprunter.

Nous avons désespérément besoin de financement. Hier, la Saskatchewan a finalement signé un accord bilatéral. Elle est la dernière province du pays à l’avoir fait, en raison du fait que les responsables cherchent à transférer ailleurs les fonds affectés aux transports en commun que les villes n’ont pas été en mesure de dépenser. Nous espérons que certains de ces fonds seront accessibles pour financer la composante rurale.

M. Churence Rogers:

D’accord. Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Broad, je me souviens d’avoir rencontré des membres de l’Administration de pilotage de l’Atlantique et, en l’occurrence, ils ont exprimé de grandes inquiétudes à propos des changements qui pourraient être apportés à la loi, en ce qui concerne la possibilité qu’elle propose d’accroître les coûts de pilotage dans la région du Canada atlantique. Ils nous ont signalé que leur bilan en matière de sécurité était excellent, impeccable même. Leur principale préoccupation semble être liée au fait que, si nous apportons des changements et que nous passons à un système uniforme à l’échelle nationale, les coûts d’expédition dans cette région augmenteront radicalement.

Dans quelle mesure cela est-il exact?

M. Michael Broad:

Eh bien, vous savez, ces observations sont intéressantes. Si vous aviez rencontré ces mêmes personnes il y a cinq ans, elles auraient réclamé des changements. Toutefois, depuis ce temps, l’APA a nommé un nouveau président, un monsieur du nom de Sean Griffiths, qui a mis plutôt de l’ordre dans les choses.

Tout cela pour dire que le rapport Grégoire n’indique pas qu’il est souhaitable de regrouper toutes les activités de pilotage du Canada. Il suggère simplement de regrouper celles du Saint-Laurent et des Grands Lacs. Les autres administrations de pilotage resteraient donc identiques. En fait, dans certaines de ses recommandations, l’auteur dit même : « Écoutez, si les administrations de pilotage souhaitent se regrouper, elles peuvent le faire; elles ont le choix ». Si les recommandations du rapport Grégoire sont mises en oeuvre, vous n’observerez pas un regroupement des administrations de pilotage à l’échelle nationale. Si les administrations de pilotage souhaitent demeurer distinctes, elles le peuvent.

(0930)

M. Churence Rogers:

Je vous suis reconnaissant de cette information.

Je tiens à poser la prochaine question. Lorsque nous parlons de l’infrastructure du transport maritime canadien et de la nécessité de l’adapter aux changements qui surviennent dans l’industrie, comme l’augmentation de la taille des navires et l’accroissement du nombre de navires en circulation, qu’est-ce que vous aimeriez voir se concrétiser à la fin de l’examen de la modernisation des ports?

M. Michael Broad:

Karen, voulez-vous répondre à cette question?

Mme Karen Kancens:

Bien sûr.

Je déteste revenir constamment sur le même point, mais je pense que nous avons besoin de cette vue d’ensemble nationale. Nous avons besoin de cette stratégie afin de pouvoir examiner les ports — à savoir le rôle qu’ils jouent dans l’économie, ou à l’échelle nationale, ou pour les populations et les collectivités locales. En ce qui concerne l'approche que nous avons adoptée à l’égard de l’examen des ports, nous croyons qu’il est possible d’étudier les résultats pour chaque port ou d’étudier les changements à apporter pour assurer la gouvernance décrite dans la Loi maritime du Canada. Je le répète, nous devons examiner la question d’une façon plus générale.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Il s’agit d’une brève série de questions, monsieur Liepert.

M. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, PCC):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Bonjour à tous.

Notre collègue Kelly représente la Saskatchewan. Alors, elle a, avec raison, adressé ses questions à M. Orb. Matt et moi représentons quelques circonscriptions de l’Alberta. Par conséquent, je souhaite discuter un peu du pétrole et du caractère sécuritaire de son transport sur nos voies navigables.

Comme l’a mentionné l'un de mes collègues ici présents, nous étions à Vancouver la semaine dernière. Chaque fois que nous avons posé des questions à propos de la sécurité du transport du pétrole par navire-citerne, que ce soit au cours de notre tournée des ports ou dans le cadre des exposés, la réponse était toujours la même, à savoir qu’il n’y a pas de problèmes de sécurité dans l’industrie du transport maritime.

Voilà ce qui s’est passé à Vancouver. Toutefois, je m’intéresse davantage au transport maritime du pétrole depuis les ports du Nord. Nous savons tous que le projet de loi C-48 a été présenté pour remplir une promesse électorale griffonnée au dos d’une serviette de table. Alors, j’aimerais simplement obtenir quelques commentaires de votre part à ce sujet. Nous avons un gouvernement qui parle de prendre des décisions fondées sur des données scientifiques et des statistiques.

J’adresse la question suivante à la Fédération maritime du Canada: avez-vous des statistiques ou connaissez-vous l’existence de statistiques qui appuient l’interdiction des pétroliers sur la côte de la Colombie-Britannique?

M. Michael Broad:

Je n’en ai aucune. En fait, si vous examinez la situation sur la côte est, vous constaterez qu’au cours des dernières années, des pétroliers ont effectué de nombreuses allées et venues dans cette région. Prenons la baie Placentia, Québec, Montréal et même les lacs. Des pétroliers y ont exercé certaines activités, et cela se produit depuis longtemps sans incident.

Je pourrais également ajouter qu’en 2016 ou 2017, l’administrateur de la Caisse d’indemnisation des dommages dus à la pollution par les hydrocarbures causée par les navires a publié un rapport qui montrait le nombre de déversements d’hydrocarbures survenus au cours des 10 dernières années. Aucun de ces déversements n’avait été causé par un bâtiment battant pavillon étranger. La plupart des déversements d’hydrocarbures qui se produisent au Canada sont attribuables à des navires abandonnés ou négligés, ou à d’autres causes de ce genre.

M. Ron Liepert:

Alors, vous conviendrez probablement avec nous que cette décision ne repose pas sur des données scientifiques ou statistiques, d’une sorte ou d’une autre. Cette décision a été prise pour remplir une promesse électorale faite momentanément, à bord d’un avion survolant le nord de la Colombie-Britannique.

M. Michael Broad:

Je souscris à la première partie de votre énoncé.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Ron Liepert:

Je crois que la deuxième partie est également acceptable.

Je n’ai pas d’autres questions à poser, madame la présidente.

La présidente:

Merci, monsieur Liepert.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Graham qui dispose de trois minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Monsieur Orb, vous représentez l’association des municipalités rurales de la Saskatchewan. Je suppose que ces municipalités imposent des taxes. À quelle fréquence ces municipalités recueillent-elles les ordures et les déchets recyclables de leurs résidents?

M. Ray Orb:

Plusieurs municipalités rurales le font. En fait, la plupart d’entre elles embauchent des entreprises d’élimination des déchets qui transportent par camion les ordures et qui s’occupent également des déchets recyclables. À l’heure actuelle, la Saskatchewan s’emploie à établir sa stratégie de gestion des déchets.

(0935)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si nous ne faisions pas cela, qu’adviendrait-il?

M. Ray Orb:

Nous aurions de nombreuses piles de déchets.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous pourrions qualifier cela de pollution par les ordures, n’est-ce pas?

M. Ray Orb:

Pardon?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous pourrions qualifier cela de pollution par les ordures.

M. Ray Orb:

Je suppose que oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Alors, puis-je présumer que l’association des municipalités rurales de la Saskatchewan appuie la tarification de la pollution?

M. Ray Orb:

La tarification de la pollution...? Non, nous ne l’appuyons pas.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non? Eh bien, vous permettez alors à vos ordures de circuler librement.

M. Ray Orb:

Manifestement, vos assertions sont injustes. Vous devriez probablement lire le plan d’action sur les changements climatiques que la Saskatchewan a établi. En fait, ils ont trouvé une façon d’atténuer les gaz à effet de serre. Je sais que ces mesures pourraient faire l’objet de débats, mais un plan été mis en place.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D’accord.

La présidente:

Allez-y, monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Sur cette joyeuse note, je poursuis nos délibérations. J’aimerais parler un peu des SCTM, parce qu’ils étaient le point de mire d’une étude précoce menée par le comité des pêches, dont je suis également membre. Certains d’entre nous n'ont pas nécessairement approuvé la décision du gouvernement de fermer la base de la 19e Escadre Comox. Monsieur Broad, je me demande si, du point de vue de vos électeurs, vous trouvez les SCTM actuels fiables.

M. Michael Broad:

Oui, je pense qu’ils sont fiables, mais nous pourrions tirer un meilleur parti de ce système. Avec l’information que le....

M. Ken Hardie:

D’accord, c’est de bonne guerre.

Monsieur Orb, la question suivante a été soulevée quand vous étiez parmi nous dans le passé. Elle a été soulevée de nouveau dans le cadre de notre étude actuelle, et elle concerne la santé de nos chemins de fer d’intérêt local. Je sais que les chemins de fer d’intérêt local de la Saskatchewan ont été particulièrement utiles pour illustrer la situation. Où ces chemins de fer s’inscrivent-ils dans le grand ordre des choses, ou dans le pipeline de biens commerciaux — pardonnez mon expression; je l’emploie au profit de Ron — qui se rend jusqu'à la côte?

Quelle importance revêtent-ils et, à votre avis, dans quelle mesure représentent-ils un maillon faible?

M. Ray Orb:

C’est là une bonne question. En fait, nous travaillons en ce moment avec l’association des chemins de fer d’intérêt local, et nous avons démontré qu’en retirant plusieurs camions des autoroutes et des réseaux routiers, et en transférant les marchandises dans un wagon, nous réduisons les émissions de gaz à effet de serre. En fait, le mérite de cette démonstration devrait nous être attribué. Nous espérons que le gouvernement fédéral tiendra compte de cette démonstration lorsqu’il finira par réaliser que sa taxe sur le carbone est nuisible.

Je tenais simplement à mentionner que les chemins de fer d’intérêt local de la Saskatchewan font partie intégrante du transport des céréales. En Saskatchewan, il y a un plus grand nombre de chemins de fer d’intérêt local que dans le reste du pays. Ces chemins de fer fournissent un précieux service et, souvent, ils ne sont pas très bien entretenus. Nous étudions donc la mesure législative. Bien que les chemins de fer d’intérêt local soient réglementés par la Saskatchewan, nous espérons que le nouveau projet de loi C-49 prendra en compte les transporteurs et les forcera à rendre davantage de comptes, parce qu’en fin de compte, c’est surtout le CP qui ramasse les wagons et les emporte.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Orb.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Jeneroux.

M. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, PCC):

Merci, madame la présidente.

Merci, chers témoins, d’avoir pris le temps de comparaître devant nous ce matin.

Madame la présidente, je crois qu’il est probable que les députés des deux côtés de la table ont grandement bénéficié des témoignages apportés d’aujourd’hui. Je le répète, j’estime vraiment que nous avons entendu d'excellents témoins avec qui j’aimerais demeurer en contact pendant que notre étude avance.

Cependant, cette fois, j’aimerais proposer une motion. Avant la séance du Comité, j’ai donné avis de plusieurs motions, et j’aimerais présenter l’une d’elles.

Je vais la lire pour le compte rendu. Je propose que le comité invite le directeur parlementaire du budget pour qu’il fasse le point sur son rapport concernant la phase 1 du plan Investir dans le Canada.

Je crois comprendre que vous avez tous reçu une copie de la motion. Madame la présidente, aimeriez-vous que je fasse une pause avant de poursuivre?

La présidente:

Monsieur Jeneroux, puis-je suggérer que nous finissions d’interroger nos témoins pendant les prochaines minutes, si vous n’y voyez pas d’inconvénient?

Ensuite, je suspendrai la séance pendant une minute afin que nous puissions nous occuper de votre motion et, quand nous aurons terminé, nous reprendrons les travaux du Comité. Comme vous avez maintenant proposé la motion, nous pourrions simplement la mettre de côté jusqu’à ce que nous ayons terminé nos interventions, après quoi nous nous en occuperons.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Je suis ouvert aux suggestions, madame la présidente, sauf pour ce qui est de veiller à ce que la séance demeure publique.

La présidente:

Oui.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Merci.

La présidente:

Quelqu’un a-t-il d’autres observations à formuler à cet égard?

Des voix: Non.

La présidente: Monsieur Aubin, allez-y.

(0940)

[Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie, madame la présidente.

Ma prochaine question s'adresse à M. Orb.

Je suis un député du Québec. J'avoue que ma banque d'images sur la Saskatchewan est plutôt réduite. C'est une lacune à combler. La description que vous avez faite, dans votre présentation, du service de camionnage en Saskatchewan m'a beaucoup impressionné. J'aimerais savoir si l'importance du service de camionnage, chez vous, est directement liée à l'incapacité du système ferroviaire de répondre à la demande ou si aussi bien le système ferroviaire que celui du camionnage sont en croissance exponentielle. [Traduction]

M. Ray Orb:

C’est une bonne question. Je pense que les deux industries devraient travailler en parallèle, mais je ne crois pas qu’elles le fassent. Je pense que, dans bon nombre de cas, en raison de ce qui s’est produit au cours des dernières années, les chemins de fer n’ont pas prouvé qu’ils étaient fiables. En particulier au cours de l’année dernière, le Canadien National a eu un bilan déplorable au chapitre du transport des céréales, et l’entreprise a promis de ne plus jamais permettre que cela se reproduire. C’est la même vieille histoire. En revanche, le CP a comblé une grande partie du manque à gagner, du moins, dans la partie méridionale de la Saskatchewan. Cela a forcé les agriculteurs dont les fermes se trouvaient dans la partie septentrionale de la ceinture de verdure de la Saskatchewan à organiser le transport par camion de leurs céréales jusqu’aux points de livraison du sud où elles pouvaient être expédiées par le CP.

Je ne crois pas qu’il y ait vraiment une corrélation entre les deux. Évidemment, je sais que certaines sociétés céréalières ont conclu des contrats avec des entreprises de camionnage afin d’assurer le transport de leurs céréales, mais ce processus n’est pas très bien organisé. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie.

Je posais cette question parce qu'il m'apparaît évident, dans cette étude sur les corridors de commerce où l'on dit vouloir augmenter la possibilité de faire du commerce, qu'on va aussi augmenter notre production de gaz à effet de serre. Je me demandais comment on pourrait arrimer la croissance du commerce que l'on souhaite à une réduction des gaz à effet de serre.

Parmi la flotte de camionnage, chez vous, certains sont-ils passés du pétrole au gaz liquéfié? Y a-t-il du travail qui est fait dans ce sens ou une préoccupation de réduire les gaz à effet de serre? [Traduction]

M. Ray Orb:

Il importe de souligner le travail de l'industrie... Je peux seulement vous parler de ce qui a été fait en Saskatchewan, mais c'est probablement le cas partout au pays. Le moteur des semi-remorques est beaucoup plus efficace qu'avant. On réduit les émissions de gaz à effet de serre. Ces camions sont plus efficaces, mais pas autant que le transport du grain par rail, parce que les trains peuvent transporter des volumes plus importants et qu'ils ne causent pas de dommages aux infrastructures. Les rails sont déjà là. Bien sûr, il faut effectuer des réparations, mais il ne s'agit pas de réparer des routes et des ponts à l'aide d'autres équipements qui créent des émissions de gaz à effet de serre. Je crois qu'il faut étudier la question plus en profondeur, mais les compagnies de chemin de fer peuvent réaliser des gains d'efficience.

Dans mon mémoire, j'évoque les données supplémentaires. Les compagnies de chemin de fer ont promis de transmettre plus de données fiables et opportunes aux expéditeurs. Je crois qu'on commence à voir ces données. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Quelle serait la responsabilité du gouvernement fédéral en ce qui a trait à l'amélioration du système ferroviaire au pays? [Traduction]

M. Ray Orb:

Je crois que les compagnies de chemin de fer bénéficiaient d'un financement accru à une certaine époque. Nous offrions un financement, surtout pour la réfection de certains embranchements. Les compagnies de chemin de fer sont maintenant très efficaces, au point où elles utilisent les points d'expédition importants où elles peuvent remplir de gros wagons, mais le gouvernement fédéral doit réaliser que nous devons financer de nombreux embranchements et que certaines lignes ferroviaires sur courtes distances ont aussi besoin de l'aide du gouvernement fédéral. [Français]

M. Robert Aubin:

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

La présidente:

Il nous reste quelques minutes. Est-ce que l'un d'entre vous aimerait poser une question?

Allez-y, monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Monsieur Orb, j'ai toujours aimé les questions de M. Liepert au sujet du mouvement des hydrocarbures, parce que je crois qu'elles se fondent sur un message qu'il vaudrait la peine d'explorer. J'ai bien noté votre point au sujet de la concurrence entre le mouvement des grains et le mouvement des hydrocarbures par rail dans les Prairies. Je me demande dans quelle mesure vous êtes au courant d'un dialogue entre les provinces, ou entre les groupes autochtones, entre la Saskatchewan et la Colombie-Britannique, pour tenter de s'attaquer certaines questions qui sont assez évidentes sur la côte.

(0945)

M. Ray Orb:

Je ne suis pas au fait de ces conversations.

Nous travaillons avec des groupes autochtones de notre province. Je peux vous dire qu'il n'y a malheureusement pas d'Autochtones aux rencontres organisées par l'entremise de la Fédération canadienne des municipalités. Nous parlons aux organisations provinciales du pays.

Nous avons eu une bonne discussion en Nouvelle-Écosse il y a quelques semaines au sujet d'Énergie Est et de sa réévaluation possible. L'association des municipalités de l'Ontario s'y intéresse particulièrement en raison de l'augmentation du volume des wagons qui transportent le pétrole. C'est maintenant un enjeu de sécurité. C'est aussi un enjeu de circulation.

Je crois que la situation est la même à Vancouver. On déplace beaucoup de pétrole par wagon.

Nous songeons aux diverses façons de transporter ce pétrole. Cela aiderait non seulement l'économie de l'Ouest, mais aussi celle de l'Est du Canada. Nous avons une raffinerie qui a besoin de pétrole. Nous utilisons actuellement le pétrole de l'Arabie saoudite.

Nous croyons pouvoir créer des emplois et accroître la sécurité également.

M. Ken Hardie:

Merci.

Monsieur Broad, j'aimerais vous poser une question, rapidement.

Lorsque nous avons visité la région métropolitaine de Vancouver, on a soulevé la question de l'amarrage dans les îles Gulf. Est-ce que c'est une question de flux et d'efficacité dans les ports de Vancouver ou est-ce que cela découle seulement d'une augmentation des mouvements de navire avec le commerce?

M. Michael Broad:

Je crois que c'est la première hypothèse, surtout pour l'efficacité, mais de toute évidence, la quantité de marchandises a augmenté. Les navires restent amarrés pendant de longues périodes en attendant la marchandise.

M. Ken Hardie:

Quel est le maillon faible?

M. Michael Broad:

Dans le domaine du transport maritime, les joueurs sont nombreux. Il y a les camionneurs, les compagnies de chemin de fer, les exploitants de terminaux, les élévateurs à grains, les ports, les navires et les débardeurs. Ils sont nombreux, alors il est difficile de cibler le problème.

Lorsque les grains arrivent, et qu'il y en a beaucoup... Je crois que c'est une association de plusieurs choses et de plusieurs joueurs. Il faut que ces gens travaillent ensemble à régler les problèmes.

La présidente:

D'accord.

Merci beaucoup.

M. Michael Broad:

Madame la présidente, j'aimerais répondre à la question de M. Sikand au sujet des brise-glaces.

La présidente:

Allez-y.

M. Michael Broad:

Il y a 15 brise-glaces: deux brise-glaces lourds — l'un d'entre eux, le Louis S. St-Laurent a 49 ans —, quatre brise-glaces moyens et neuf brise-glaces légers, qui peuvent effectuer plusieurs tâches, mais ne fonctionnent pas bien dans la glace épaisse.

La présidente:

Merci beaucoup.

Je remercie nos témoins de leur présence. Nous étions heureux de vous revoir, monsieur Orb.

J'inviterais maintenant les témoins à quitter la table. Nous allons leur donner le temps de le faire.

Nous allons tout de suite entendre M. Jeneroux au sujet de sa motion. Monsieur Jeneroux, voulez-vous présenter votre motion ou en discuter?

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Oui. Je crois que je l'ai déjà présentée.

Merci, madame la présidente, de m'accorder ce temps de parole. Par souci de transparence, je veux être certain que nous ayons la chance de parler de ces choses en public. Je vous remercie de nous donner du temps pour le faire.

Je vais lire rapidement la motion pour que tout le monde sache de quoi nous parlons. Je propose que le Comité invite le directeur parlementaire du budget pour qu’il fasse le point sur son rapport concernant la phase 1 du plan Investir dans le Canada.

Comme je suis un nouveau membre du Comité, j'ai passé beaucoup de temps à revoir les anciennes réunions et j'ai fait de mon mieux pour vous rattraper. J'aime beaucoup notre présente étude.

Toutefois, j'ai été surpris de constater que le directeur parlementaire du budget n'a pas témoigné devant le Comité au sujet de la phase 1 du plan Investir dans le Canada, dont la valeur est de 180 milliards de dollars. Le directeur parlementaire du budget s'est montré plutôt critique à l'égard de la phase 1 dans son rapport, ce qui a probablement déçu le Comité. Sachant que la phase 2 du plan sera bientôt mise en oeuvre, je crois qu'il serait prudent de l'entendre avant que cela ne se reproduise. Nous aurions ainsi l'occasion de lui poser des questions. Une étude en découlera peut-être — ou peut-être pas —, mais je crois qu'il serait bon d'avoir l'occasion de lui parler avant d'entreprendre la deuxième phase du plan.

(0950)

La présidente:

Merci.

Allez-y, monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie:

Je crois que le directeur parlementaire du budget aura des choses intéressantes à dire. Le gouvernement — et surtout le premier ministre dans ses dernières mises à jour des lettres de mandat — a montré son grand intérêt à l'égard de la rationalisation du système, parce que l'argent ne sert pas à grand-chose s'il dort ici, à Ottawa. Il doit circuler et aider les gens partout.

Monsieur Jeneroux, en ce qui a trait à votre motion, je propose un amendement qui, je l'espère, sera favorable. Je propose d'y ajouter ceci: la présidente dispose de tous les pouvoirs nécessaires pour coordonner la comparution des témoins, l'affectation des ressources et l’établissement du calendrier afin de mener à bien cette tâche.

Il s'agit ni plus ni moins d'une phrase passe-partout, pour nous assurer de vérifier tous les détails.

La présidente:

Monsieur Jeneroux, voulez-vous dire quelque chose?

M. Matt Jeneroux:

J'aimerais simplement dire aux fins du compte-rendu que j'accepte sans hésitation l'amendement favorable présenté par M. Hardie.

La présidente: Avez-vous d'autres commentaires?

(La motion est adoptée.)

(La motion modifiée est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

La présidente:

Merci. C'est fait.

Nous allons maintenant tenir une courte séance à huis clos.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on October 04, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.