header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-10-04 PROC 122

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1115)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning and welcome to the 122nd meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

For members' information, this meeting is being held in public. It's great to have Bill Curry here.

Remember from Tuesday's meeting that we're carrying on discussion of scheduling for clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-76.

Ruby, you wanted to speak.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Mr. Chair, I want to propose that we try to seek unanimous consent for the following: That Mr. Reid's subamendment and Mr. Nater's amendment to my motion respecting the scheduling of the clause-by-clause of Bill C-76 be deemed withdrawn, and that my previous motion be amended so that it now reads—and I can read the motion, if you would like.

The Chair: It might be better to withdraw all of it and then just start over with a new motion.

Ms. Ruby Sahota: I don't know if they would want to hear the motion before withdrawing the amendment and subamendment. Perhaps you could advise how to proceed on that.

The Chair:

Does everyone have a copy of what she is going to say?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

Yes.

The Chair:

Ruby, the clerk's suggesting it might be cleaner to just withdraw the motion and all amendments and then propose your new motion.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay. That's what we'll do. If we can get—

The Chair:

We would just withdraw the motion and amendments on the table, and then Ruby's proposing a new—

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

Would you first clear the table and then introduce something new?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay. Do you need to seek unanimous consent to do that first?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes. Can we get unanimous consent to withdraw all the subamendments and amendments and my original motion, so I can propose a new motion?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

(Subamendment withdrawn)

(Amendment withdrawn)

(Motion withdrawn)

Ms. Ruby Sahota: Thank you.

The new motion is: That the Hon. Karina Gould, Minister of Democratic Institutions, be invited to appear from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Monday, October 15, 2018, in relation to the study of Bill C-76; That the Committee commence clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-76 on Monday, October 15, 2018 at 4:30 p.m.; That the Chair be empowered to hold meetings outside of normal hours to accommodate clause-by-clause consideration; That the Chair may limit debate on each clause to a maximum of five minutes per party, per clause; That if the Committee has not completed the clause-by-clause consideration of the Bill by 1:00 p.m. on Friday, October 19, 2018, all remaining amendments submitted to the Committee shall be deemed moved, the Chair shall put the question, forthwith and successively, without further debate on all remaining clauses and proposed amendments, as well as each and every question necessary to dispose of clause-by-clause consideration of the Bill, as well as questions necessary to report the Bill to the House and to order the Chair to report the Bill to the House as soon as possible; and, That Bill C-76, in Clause 232, be amended to—

Sorry, I have an error. Can we double-check? I had it written down incorrectly, so I just want to make sure the clause we're amending is not 232, but in fact is 262.

There's a minor correction: That Bill C-76, in Clause 262, be amended by replacing line 32 on page 153 with the following: “election period is $1,400,000.”

The Chair:

There's a little trouble in the sound booth. They're going to reboot the system. It's a technical issue.

Okay. Let's try it again.

Are you finished, Ms. Sahota?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes, I am finished.

Did it get through translation completely?

(1120)

The Chair:

The clerk will read it again so that it's on the record.

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

The motion is as follows: That the Hon. Karina Gould, Minister of Democratic Institutions, be invited to appear from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Monday, October 15, 2018, in relation to the study of Bill C-76; That the Committee commence clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-76 on Monday, October 15, 2018, at 4:30 p.m.; That the Chair be empowered to hold meetings outside of the normal hours to accommodate clause-by-clause consideration; That the Chair may limit the debate on each clause to a maximum of five minutes per party, per clause; That if the committee has not completed the clause-by-clause consideration of the Bill by 1:00 p.m. on Friday, October 19, 2018, all remaining amendments submitted to the Committee shall be deemed moved, the Chair shall put the question, forthwith and successively, without further debate on all remaining clauses and proposed amendments, as well as each and every question necessary to dispose of clause-by-clause consideration of the Bill, as well as questions necessary to report the Bill to the House and to order the Chair to report to the House as soon as possible; and, That Bill C-76, in Clause 262, be amended by replacing line 32 on page 153 with the following: “election period is $1,400,000.”

The Chair:

With the trouble in the sound booth, can I suggest that if the language didn't come through properly the committee just agree that the copy they have in front of them is the one for the official record?

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

If I may, in French there's something missing.[Translation]

On the last line, where it mentions the amount of $1.4 million, it does not mention the election period.

Is that not necessary?

Okay. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Just to clarify, Chair, the French version is correct even though the two versions are different in the amendment.[Translation]

Was that the point of your question, Ms. Lapointe?

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Yes. [English]

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay.

Chair, do we have interpretation services now?

The Chair:

Yes, it's working now. [Translation]

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is it working?[English]

Okay.

You were asking for this to be officially.... I'm just confused as to why your suggestion was to make this....

As Ruby just...or, sorry, as Ms. Dhalla just read it—

An hon. member: That's the wrong Ruby.

Mr. Nathan Cullen: Oh, my gosh. Did I do that? I did that, didn't I?

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

An hon. member: You owe five dollars for that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen: Is it five bucks? Wait. Does that go on inflation, similar to the amendment?

My apologies. Her memory is burned into me.

An hon. member: For so many, for so many.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

For so many; more you than me, probably.

Did you get that adjustment made?

I just want to understand how we're proceeding on Ruby's amendment.

The Chair:

Just keep talking because it's still not—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Be careful what you wish for. I'm a professional.

I just want to understand how we're proceeding, because you asked for the written one to be the official one. Typically, on committee, what's spoken goes into Hansard, and that's what we work off of. Were you doing that because interpretation services were not functioning? Now that they are, and if they are, then we should just proceed.

The Chair: They're not yet.

They're still not. Trust me, I don't want to delay anything. We need to have functioning interpretation services for the committee to work.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

The problem is not just that. I don't know if that means we're not being recorded, which is what they're going to base our Hansard on.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is not just our normal committee meeting. This is a sensitive meeting with amendments that we're trying to get through. If we move to amendments and clause-by-clause stage, interpretation services have to work, because my French is not good enough to understand.

The Chair:

Let's just suspend for a couple of minutes while the technicians work on this.



(1130)

The Chair:

Let's just summarize. We have agreement to withdraw the amendment, the subamendment, and the previous motion.

We'll have the clerk reread the motion so it's official in both languages.

The Clerk:

The text of the motion is, again: That the Hon. Karina Gould, Minister of Democratic Institutions, be invited to appear from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Monday, October 15, 2018, in relation to the study of Bill C-76; That the committee commence clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-76 on Monday, October 15, 2018 at 4:30 p.m.; That the Chair be empowered to hold meetings outside of normal hours to accommodate clause-by-clause consideration; That the Chair may limit debate on each clause to a maximum of five minutes per party, per clause; That if the committee has not completed the clause-by-clause consideration of the Bill by 1:00 p.m. on Friday, October 19, 2018, all remaining amendments submitted to the Committee shall be deemed moved, the Chair shall put the question, forthwith and successively, without further debate on all remaining clauses and proposed amendments, as well as each and every question necessary to dispose of clause-by-clause consideration of the bill, as well as questions necessary to report the Bill to the House and to order the Chair to report the bill to the House as soon as possible; and That Bill C-76, in Clause 262, be amended by replacing line 32 on page 153 with the following: "election period is $1,400,000."

The Chair:

We have a speakers list.

Mr. Cullen, you're the one person on the speakers list.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I was just looking to appreciate efforts, because saying this has been a long and winding road would be a compliment to this process. It's been a couple of years of going back and forth. I wanted to get my citation correct, because it's important.

I think it was Otto von Bismarck, the iron prince, who said that laws are like sausages; it's better not to see them being made. To retain respect for sausages and laws, one must not watch them in the making. There is apparently some debate on the Internet as to whether he was the one, in fact, who said it, but the citation works for this particular process that we're in.

Here we are. The New Democrats have expressed for more than a year and a half the urgency to want to reform our election laws, and in particular get rid of the so-called unfair elections act changes that were made unilaterally in the previous Parliament, which I think sought to disenfranchise certain Canadians, particularly low-income, indigenous and young Canadians, making it harder for them to vote. Interest and enthusiasm from me and Mr. Christopherson has been strong from the start, and I hope that the government acknowledges that we've been trying in good faith to see these amendments and other things that we think the election laws needed to be updated on acted on.

The delays have caused us to come to this point. The delay is initially, I would argue, on the government's side. A bill was introduced and then nothing was done with it for a year and a half. Then this new, larger bill—it's a little over 340 pages—is in front of us. It does more than the original bill. We now have the bill in front of us with 300-plus amendments to it, and there's the suggestion I've heard from Ruby as to the process that we use.

If I understand it right, Ruby, it's to have the minister come in on a Monday when we're back from the riding week, to begin clause-by-clause, and to wrap all that up five days later.

Ms. Ruby Sahota: Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen: There's some allocation of time that's not designated in your motion, that the chair has the discretion to set committee times.

Within the motion are two things that are troubling for me. One is that there is a time allocation on amendments, that there's a time restriction on a party's ability to speak to amendments.

We've talked about it in the past, and this is a question I have for committee members. I would like for that to not be enforced strictly, because there are some amendments that I will suggest will either pass or be defeated without much commentary, and there are other amendments of much greater substance and import that may require a little more than five minutes to explain the rationale. I think that discretion should go to the chair.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen, it does say “may”.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is “may” a sufficient discretion for you, Chair, to be able to say you're going to let people talk it through?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay. Thank you for that.

“May” has been interpreted in Parliament in several ways. Sometimes governments loathe “may”, and what they actually meant was “shall” and “must”.

There is a second concern that we have. The negotiations that I assume have happened between the government and the Conservative official opposition were primarily around what's included at the very end of Ruby's motion, that there is now a pre-election spending limit of $1.4 million.

I have an inquiry to the government as to what that means for 2019. This is pro-rated to inflation, is it not? “Adjusted to inflation” is the more correct term. It comes out to somewhere near $2 million in a pre-writ period. I'm still seeking to know what that will be in 2023 through inflationary numbers. This is not an insignificant amount of money.

I can't help but reflect—and Ruby will understand why this is interesting or ironic—that at the end of our last efforts at democratic reform, the ERRE committee made negotiations between me, the Greens, the Bloc, and the Conservatives to arrive at a report that we could agree to. The then minister of democratic reform expressed such disappointment with me that we would ever negotiate with Conservatives over anything to do with our elections. I thought that was the point, actually. I thought the point of that exercise was to try to come to some multipartisan agreement.

I have to register this. While I appreciate that there has been whatever back channel negotiations among the parties, if the process required unanimous consent, it would have been a really good idea to contact us more than five minutes before the meeting to understand what was being negotiated. It's hard for us to feel particularly respected or included if a piece of paper is dropped on our desk five minutes before the meeting.

All that being said, as my grandma used to say, a lack of planning on my part didn't make for a crisis on hers. However, here we are, having blown through the Chief Electoral Officer's deadlines on making some reforms. He's told us that he can't do a bunch of things in Bill C-76 because so much time has been lost that it's not going to happen for the next election. There are some really good things actually, if we were to pass them as a committee. That is unfortunate, and that was unnecessary, in my mind.

It seems that the Liberals are okay with increasing the spending limits. Chair, I question that as a principle in terms of the fairness of the election. Parties that have more will do more and be able to influence more.

There is a cap, which is appreciated, but it's a significant cap. To most Canadians, $2 million is a lot of money. To most third party civil society groups, $2 million is an unimaginable amount of money to spend in an election period. They'll never attain that kind of influence.

However, we prefer and favour parties all the time in our legislation, as you know, Chair, over the voices of others. Parties are protected.

The last thing I'll say, and I'll wrap up, is that I hope this is seen—if we support this—as good faith towards some of the amendments we have, around some of the other important things we've heard evidence on from our Chief Electoral Officer, the Privacy Commissioner, and others, about making our elections truly fair. We've tried to only put forward amendments that were based on evidence, and particularly around things like privacy and the intervention of social media.

I don't know if folks are following Cambridge Analytica and what the ethics committee is looking at right now. There was a report on the CBC this morning, on The Current, with a member of that committee. It is incredibly disturbing, and we are incredibly unprepared.

Our British colleagues were unprepared for having a free and fair vote on their Brexit decision, where a Canadian company was receiving what I think were illegal funds to then influence British voters.

We have fewer protections than the British do as the law sits right now. Some of our amendments are attempting to fix those holes, plug those holes, so that our elections, our referenda, are fought fairly, and not with outside money from foreign governments and foreign interference.

All that said, there's a bit of nose holding on this, to see this thing through. But in the larger effort of fixing the damage that was done in the previous Parliament to our ability to vote freely in this country, we're prepared to vote for this. That's with the understanding of some good faith intention as we move forward with further clause-by-clause consideration and the amendments we've brought forward.

(1135)

The Chair:

Are there any other speakers to the motion?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have a question for Mr. Cullen.

You made reference to having proposals. Is that a reference to the amendments that the New Democrats have put in?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, particularly the amendments around responsibilities in social media and advertising, as well as toward Canadians' privacy and the information that parties collect—not on their behalf, but on our behalf.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right, I've got it. Thank you.

The Chair:

We will go to the vote.

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair:I'd just like to do a couple of things before we adjourn.

One is just a technical point. When I listed the amendments last time I gave you the number of the amendments. There have been a few more Conservative amendments since those numbers. They're in your package and you have them.

(1140)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Do you know the total number?

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen: Let the record show a large intake of breath.

Mr. Philippe Méla (Legislative Clerk):

I was going to say plus 15, but I would say around 340 or so.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

There are 340 amendments.

Mr. Philippe Méla:

Yes, 340.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's the total.

Mr. Philippe Méla: Yes, more or less.

Mr. Nathan Cullen: When we return, the work for the committee is to consider 340 amendments in some four or five sitting days, plus the clauses themselves—346 pages of clauses.

The Chair:

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

For the amendments that are considered to be redundant and are being grouped together for one particular vote—not to mention those that may be out of the scope of the principle of the bill—have they been decided yet, or are we still in the process of that?

Mr. Philippe Méla:

We are still in the process of doing it.

They are quite technical. It is complicated to analyze, so we are looking at that. We usually look at how the vote is going to affect one versus the other, the line conflict and so on. If there are some that need to be grouped together because they are linked together, we usually do that.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay, but didn't you do this in stages, where you started back when you got the first amendments? Do you have to do it all at once?

Mr. Philippe Méla:

Right.

The Chair:

Everyone knows this is the legislative clerk for this?

An hon. member: A genius.

The Chair: Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I don't think it would be reasonable for any of us to make unreasonable requests, but I will just ask this question. The earlier we get the package to look at, the greater the chance is we'll be able to figure ways, chatting informally, of determining which items are more likely to require a lengthier discussion and which ones can be passed through quickly.

Do you have any kind of estimated time on when you'd be able to get back to us?

Mr. Philippe Méla:

It was distributed Tuesday, I believe. It is the final one

Mr. Scott Reid:

It is the final one. Okay, so it's up to us.

Mr. Philippe Méla:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Hopefully we can start with those kinds of chats to find ways of.... We all know when it's going to leave here. It will be out of here at 1:00 p.m. on Friday, plus however much time it takes to go through calling a vote on each one. Obviously, getting as much of that done prior to 1:00 p.m. on Friday as opposed to afterwards would be beneficial to everybody. It's not going to affect the actual outcome on anything; it's just going to affect whether people get home to see their families. That's why I make that point.

The Chair:

I have a couple more things.

First of all, I'd like to thank the committee for getting this far. How we vote in Canada is very important. In any country in the world, it's very important. The committee has done over a year of very good, positive, professional deliberations, by and large. Even when there are different opinions, people have been very professional and have put good ideas on the table. I think every party is going to add something positive to make this a good package.

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

The Chair: On the record I'd like to thank Elections Canada, who have been a big part of this with good suggestions to help guide us.

We should have a brief discussion on the times people would like to meet next week. Obviously, we're going to meet every day.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

It's not next week.

The Chair:

Sorry, the week after next we're going to meet every day up until Friday, and probably in the morning and after QP.

Is there any direction, especially from the opposition?

There are a lot of amendments, as everyone knows. For the good of Canada and the good of intellectuals, try to think of which ones are insignificant so that we can, as Mr. Cullen said, have a good debate on those that are significant. Pick your battles and I'll be judicious with the time. I'll allow more time on those things that are really important, but I won't allow them to run on forever so that everything can be discussed a bit.

About the timing for next week, particularly from the opposition, do you have any suggestions for how long you would like to meet, and the rough time slots, so that people can prepare for the schedule?

Mr. Cullen.

(1145)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I've noticed in committees that we do it all the time where we have extended long hours. Productivity and intelligence usually go down together when we get beyond six hours or eight hours a day, in my experience. Others might have more fortitude than I do. Not for a general debate with committee, but I've traded away a lot of House duties in the last couple of weeks, and they're all coming in the week when we return, so that's a thing, but that's me.

Monday is good. I'm prepared for a good long stretch on Monday. Tuesday afternoon is a problem. On Wednesday, of course, we have caucus. On Wednesday afternoon we're hanging Mr. Scheer, so that's something.... His portrait is being hung.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen: It's gallows humour. That's what they call it. They call it a hanging.

The Chair:

We could help you.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I don't like to miss a good hanging.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Never.

It's happening right upstairs. I have to be at that for a different reason.

Thursday is bad, and on Friday, of course, everyone is going to be panicked.

Not to have a big debate around it, but it's going to mean a lot of juggling. Mornings are typically better. From 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. is always a better slot.

The Chair:

Could I hear from the Conservatives on this?

Do you have some preferences? I know you have a lot of amendments.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

The times that are being suggested by our team are Monday from 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. or 9 p.m.

I'm not sure why we would be contrary to Monday morning....

An hon. member: It's for hearing from the minister.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie: Oh, excuse me. Yes, of course, it has to come after the minister. That's true. It's laid out in the motion we just passed.

Then, potentially, Tuesday and Thursday from 9 to 11:45, and then 3:30 to 7—

The Chair:

I'm sorry. Was that nine o'clock in the morning?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's correct.

The Chair:

Until...?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Until 11:45.

The Chair:

At night?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

No, in the morning. Excuse me for not clarifying. Then it's 3:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., and on Wednesday, 3:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. or 9 p.m.

Do you need me to repeat that?

The Chair:

Yes, well.....

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Did you say until 11:45? Why not go until one o'clock?

Mr. Scott Reid:

We're doing two chunks, so it gives us a bit of a break.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

QP is in between.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Generally we go until one o'clock for the regular committee time, right?

The Chair:

That's okay.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Do we go from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

May I make a suggestion here?

We might want to knock off early on some of these days if we get exhausted, but if we give ourselves the openness to just keep going by—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's a good idea, yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

—booking rooms so we don't have to stop, that would let people get a sense of whether we have to stop because we're exhausted or to keep going because we're able to do whatever....

The Chair:

Tentatively, the average day you're proposing would be 9 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. and then 3:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. or 9 p.m., or between 7 p.m. and 9 p.m., when we get tired.

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

How about we just make the suggestion that the chair work with the vice-chairs to come up with that?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I like that even better.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My one request is that you give the schedule to all of us by the end of this week so we know what we're doing.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Chris, that was the intervention that got you back on my Christmas list.

The Chair:

We'll use those general guidelines, but we'll work with each party and the vice-chairs.

Roughly, it's from 9 to 11:45 in the mornings and from 3:30 p.m. to sometime between 7 p.m. and 9 p.m., depending on how tired we are. We will not meet during caucus on Wednesday. We will not meet during question period under any circumstances.

Is that okay?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You have my request, if it's possible at all, to get the schedule out by the end of this week.

The Chair:

We will try.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It will help us organize our duties and things.

The Chair:

Yes. We'll get the clerk to send a proposal around to the vice-chairs, and then we'll get back to you when we can so that people can plan their schedule next week.

Is there is anything else?

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I have just this last thing, through you, Chair.

I know that we thank our clerks often. This is a pretty onerous piece of work that they're going through, so to the committee members, happy Thanksgiving, and to our clerks, a happy different kind of Thanksgiving. Good luck with putting all of this together for us.

Chair, I appreciate your work as well.

(1150)

The Chair:

Thank you, everyone, for your co-operation. I think the committee is working well together. We look forward to the week after Thanksgiving.

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1115)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour et soyez les bienvenus à cette 122e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

À titre d'information, sachez que cette réunion est publique. Nous sommes ravis de la présence de Bill Curry.

Comme il a été dit lors de la réunion de mardi, nous poursuivons aujourd'hui notre débat sur la planification de l’étude article par article du projet de loi C-76.

Ruby, vous avez quelque chose à nous dire.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Monsieur le président, je veux proposer que nous tentions d'avoir un consentement unanime à propos de ceci: que le sous-amendement de M. Reid et l'amendement de M. Nater à ma motion visant à respecter le débat sur la planification de l'étude article par article du projet de loi C-76 soient réputés retirés, et que ma motion précédente soit modifiée pour qu'elle soit désormais énoncée comme suit — et je peux lire la motion, si c'est ce que vous voulez.

Le président: Il serait mieux de la retirer au complet et de repartir avec une nouvelle motion.

Mme Ruby Sahota: Je ne sais pas s'ils veulent entendre la motion avant de retirer l'amendement et le sous-amendement. Vous pourriez peut-être nous donner des conseils sur la marche à suivre à cet égard.

Le président:

Est-ce que tout le monde a une copie de ce qu'elle va dire?

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Oui.

Le président:

Ruby, le greffier semble dire qu'il serait moins compliqué de retirer la motion et d'en proposer une nouvelle.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord. C'est ce que nous allons faire. Si nous pouvons avoir...

Le président:

Nous allons tout simplement retirer la motion et les amendements qui sont sur la table, puis Ruby va proposer une nouvelle...

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

Faut-il d'abord faire table rase, puis proposer quelque chose de nouveau?

Le président:

Tout juste.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord. Vous faut-il d'abord obtenir un consentement unanime pour procéder de la sorte?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui. Pouvons-nous avoir un consentement unanime pour que soient retirés tous les sous-amendements et amendements ainsi que ma motion originale, de manière à ce que je puisse proposer une nouvelle motion?

Des députés: Oui.

(Le sous-amendement est retiré.)

(L'amendement est retiré.)

(La motion est retirée.)

Mme Ruby Sahota: Merci.

La nouvelle motion se lit comme suit: Que l'hon. Karina Gould, ministre des Institutions démocratiques, soit invitée à comparaitre de 15 h 30 à 16 h 30 le lundi 15 octobre 2018, dans le cadre de l'étude du projet de loi C-76; Que le Comité entreprenne l'étude article par article du projet de loi C-76 le lundi 15 octobre 2018 à 16 h 30; Que le président soit autorisé à tenir des réunions en dehors des heures normales pour permettre l'étude article par article; Que le président puisse limiter le débat sur chaque article à un maximum de cinq minutes par parti, par article; Que, dans l'éventualité où le Comité n'aurait pas terminé l'étude article par article du projet de loi avant 13 heures le vendredi 19 octobre 2018, les amendements qui lui ont été soumis et qui restent soient réputés proposés, que le président mette aux voix immédiatement et successivement, sans plus ample débat, les articles et amendements qui restent, ainsi que toute question nécessaire pour disposer de l'étude article par article du projet de loi, et toute question nécessaire pour faire rapport du projet de loi à la Chambre et ordonner au président de faire rapport du projet de loi à la Chambre le plus tôt possible; et, Que le projet de loi C-76, à l'article 232, soit modifié par...

Désolé, je vois une erreur. Pouvons-nous vérifier de nouveau? J'ai fait une erreur en l'écrivant. Je voudrais simplement m'assurer que l'article que nous allons modifier est bien l'article 262 et non 232.

Il s'agit d'une correction mineure. Je poursuis: Que le projet de loi C-76, à l'article 262, soit modifié par substitution, à la ligne 32, page 153, de ce qui suit: « est de 1 400 000 $ ».

Le président:

Il y a des difficultés avec la cabine de son. Ils doivent redémarrer le système. C'est un problème technique.

D'accord. Essayons de nouveau.

Avez-vous terminé, madame Sahota?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui, j'ai terminé.

La motion a-t-elle été traduite au complet?

(1120)

Le président:

Le greffier va la relire pour qu'elle soit consignée dans le compte-rendu.

Le greffier du comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

Voici le texte de la motion: Que l'hon. Karina Gould, ministre des Institutions démocratiques, soit invitée à comparaitre de 15 h 30 à 16 h 30 le lundi 15 octobre 2018, dans le cadre de l'étude du projet de loi C-76; Que le Comité entreprenne l'étude article par article du projet de loi C-76 le lundi 15 octobre 2018 à 16 h 30; Que le président soit autorisé à tenir des réunions en dehors des heures normales pour permettre l'étude article par article; Que le président puisse limiter le débat sur chaque article à un maximum de cinq minutes par parti, par article; Que, dans l'éventualité où le Comité n'aurait pas terminé l'étude article par article du projet de loi avant 13 heures le vendredi 19 octobre 2018, les amendements qui lui ont été soumis et qui restent soient réputés proposés, que le président mette aux voix immédiatement et successivement, sans plus ample débat, les articles et amendements qui restent, ainsi que toute question nécessaire pour disposer de l'étude article par article du projet de loi, et toute question nécessaire pour faire rapport du projet de loi à la Chambre et ordonner au président de faire rapport du projet de loi à la Chambre le plus tôt possible; et, Que le projet de loi C-76, à l'article 262, soit modifié par substitution, à la ligne 32, page 153, de ce qui suit: « est de 1 400 000 $ ».

Le président:

Étant donné les difficultés que nous avons avec la cabine de son, puis-je proposer, si la traduction n'a pas été retransmise correctement, que les membres du Comité conviennent que le texte qu'ils ont sous les yeux est celui qui sera versé au compte-rendu officiel?

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Si vous me le permettez, je tiens à signaler une omission dans la version française.[Français]

À la dernière ligne, où il est question de la somme de 1,4 million de dollars, on ne mentionne pas la période d'élection.

Ce n'est pas nécessaire?

D'accord. [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen, nous vous écoutons.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Par souci de clarté, monsieur le président, vous affirmez que la version française est correcte, même si les deux versions sont différentes dans l'amendement.[Français]

Est-ce que c'était l'objet de votre question, madame Lapointe?

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Oui. [Traduction]

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord.

Monsieur le président, les services d'interprétation ont-ils été rétablis?

Le président:

Oui, ils fonctionnent maintenant. [Français]

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce que cela fonctionne?[Traduction]

D'accord.

Vous demandiez que cela soit officiellement... Je ne comprends pas tout à fait pourquoi votre proposition cherchait à...

Comme Ruby vient de... ou, pardonnez-moi, comme vient de le lire Mme Dhalla...

Un député: Il y a erreur sur la Ruby.

M. Nathan Cullen: Mon Dieu! Est-ce que j'ai fait ça? Je l'ai fait, non?

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Un député: Cette erreur vous coûtera cinq dollars.

M. Nathan Cullen: Cinq dollars? Un instant. Est-ce que cela suit l'inflation, un peu comme ce que dit l'amendement?

Mes excuses. Elle a laissé une trace indélébile dans ma mémoire.

Un député: Comme pour beaucoup d'entre nous.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pour beaucoup d'entre nous; probablement plus pour vous que pour moi.

Avez-vous fait cet ajustement?

Je veux tout simplement comprendre comment nous allons procéder pour l'amendement de Ruby.

Le président:

Continuez de parler, parce que les choses ne sont pas encore...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Faites attention à ce que vous souhaitez. Je suis un professionnel.

Je veux tout simplement comprendre comment nous allons procéder, car vous avez demandé que la version écrite soit la version officielle. Habituellement, dans les comités, ce qui est parlé se retrouve dans le Hansard, et c'est avec cela que nous travaillons. Avez-vous dit cela, parce que les services d'interprétation ne fonctionnaient pas ? Maintenant qu'ils sont rétablis, en admettant qu'ils le soient, nous devrions tout simplement aller de l'avant.

Le président: Ils ne le sont pas.

Ils ne sont pas encore rétablis. Croyez-moi, je ne cherche pas à retarder quoi que ce soit. Pour que le Comité puisse travailler, il faut que les services d'interprétation fonctionnent.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Le problème ne se limite pas à cela. Je ne sais pas si cela signifie que nos échanges ne sont pas enregistrés. C'est sur ces enregistrements qu'ils se fondent pour le Hansard.

M. Nathan Cullen:

La présente séance n'est une réunion ordinaire du Comité. C'est une réunion d'importance particulière pendant laquelle nous devons débattre des amendements qui seront adoptés. Si nous passons aux amendements et à la question de l'adoption article par article, les services d'interprétation doivent fonctionner, car je risque d'avoir de la difficulté à bien saisir ce qui se dira en français.

Le président:

Faisons une pause de quelques minutes pendant que les techniciens essaient de régler le problème.



(1130)

Le président:

Récapitulons. Nous avons convenu de retirer l'amendement, le sous-amendement et la motion précédente.

Nous allons demander au greffier de relire la motion afin qu'elle soit captée officiellement dans les deux langues.

Le greffier:

Encore une fois, le texte de la motion va comme suit: Que l'hon. Karina Gould, ministre des Institutions démocratiques, soit invitée à comparaitre de 15 h 30 à 16 h 30 le lundi 15 octobre 2018, dans le cadre de l'étude du projet de loi C-76; Que le Comité entreprenne l'étude article par article du projet de loi C-76 le lundi 15 octobre 2018 à 16 h 30; Que le président soit autorisé à tenir des réunions en dehors des heures normales pour permettre l'étude article par article; Que le président puisse limiter le débat sur chaque article à un maximum de cinq minutes par parti, par article; Que, dans l'éventualité où le Comité n'aurait pas terminé l'étude article par article du projet de loi avant 13 heures le vendredi 19 octobre 2018, les amendements qui lui ont été soumis et qui restent soient réputés proposés, que le président mette aux voix immédiatement et successivement, sans plus ample débat, les articles et amendements qui restent, ainsi que toute question nécessaire pour disposer de l'étude article par article du projet de loi, et toute question nécessaire pour faire rapport du projet de loi à la Chambre et ordonner au président de faire rapport du projet de loi à la Chambre le plus tôt possible; et, Que le projet de loi C-76, à l'article 262, soit modifié par substitution, à la ligne 32, page 153, de ce qui suit: « est de 1 400 000 $ ».

Le président:

Nous avons une liste d'intervenants.

Monsieur Cullen, vous êtes la seule personne sur cette liste.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je me proposais de saluer les efforts qui ont été déployés, car le fait de dire que la route a été longue et sinueuse serait un compliment à l'égard de ce processus. Cela fait deux ans que nous faisons des allers-retours. Je voulais trouver la citation juste, car c'est important.

Je crois que c'est Otto von Bismarck, le « chancelier de fer », qui a dit que les lois sont comme des saucisses, et qu'il valait mieux de ne pas voir leur préparation. Pour conserver notre respect à l'égard des saucisses et des lois, il ne faut pas regarder comment on les fabrique. Il y a apparemment un certain débat sur le Web à savoir si c'est bien lui qui a dit cela. Quoi qu'il en soit, la citation convient bien au processus dans lequel nous sommes.

Voilà la situation. Les néo-démocrates soulignent depuis plus d'un an et demi à quel point il est urgent de procéder à une réforme de nos lois électorales et, en particulier, de se débarrasser des modifications réputées injustes qui ont été apportées unilatéralement à la loi électorale par le gouvernement précédent, modifications qui, je le crois, visaient à priver certains Canadiens de leur droit de vote ou à leur rendre l'exercice de ce droit plus difficile. On pense ici notamment aux personnes à faible revenu, aux Autochtones et aux jeunes. L'intérêt et l'enthousiasme que M. Christopherson et moi avons manifestés à ce sujet ont été bien sentis dès le début. J'espère d'ailleurs que le gouvernement reconnaîtra que nous avons cherché en toute bonne foi à faire en sorte que ces amendements et d'autres éléments que nous estimions nécessaires pour nos lois électorales soient mis à jour et pris en considération.

Ce sont les retards qui expliquent pourquoi nous en sommes rendus là. J'aurais tendance à dire que le retard est, à l'origine, la faute du gouvernement. Un projet de loi a été présenté, mais rien n'a été fait pendant un an et demi. Et maintenant, nous avons ce nouveau projet de loi, ce projet de loi plus imposant — il fait un peu plus de 340 pages — qui ratisse plus large que le projet de loi initial. Nous voilà donc avec ce projet de loi et une liste de plus de 300 amendements, ce à quoi vient s'ajouter la proposition de Ruby quant au processus à suivre.

Si j'ai bien compris, Ruby, il s'agirait de demander à la ministre de comparaitre le lundi suivant notre retour au Parlement, de commencer l'étude article par article et de compléter le tout cinq jours plus tard.

Mme Ruby Sahota: Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen: Votre motion ne se prononce pas sur une certaine affectation du temps, c'est-à-dire sur le fait qu'il est laissé à la discrétion du président de fixer l'horaire du Comité.

La motion contient deux choses que je trouve préoccupantes. Premièrement, c'est qu'elle fixe un certain temps pour les amendements, c'est-à-dire qu'elle limite le temps dont disposera un parti pour donner son point de vue sur les amendements.

Nous avons déjà parlé de cela, et ma question s'adresse aux membres du Comité. J'aimerais que cette limite de temps ne soit pas appliquée avec trop de rigueur, puisque certains amendements pourront être adoptés ou rejetés sans grand débat, alors que d'autres, plus substantiels et plus importants, pourraient exiger plus de cinq minutes d'explications. Je crois que cet aspect devrait être laissé à la discrétion du président.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen, la motion dit bien que le président « puisse ».

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce que ce « puisse » est une garantie de discrétion adéquate pour vous, monsieur le président? Cela vous permettra-t-il de dire que vous allez laisser les intervenants vider la question?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord. Merci de cette précision.

Au Parlement, ce « puisse » a été interprété de plusieurs façons. Parfois, les gouvernements exècrent cette notion de possibilité ouverte, alors que ce qu'ils cherchent vraiment à dire c'est « devra » ou « doit ».

Il y a un autre aspect au sujet duquel nous avons des réserves. Les négociations qui, je le présume, se sont passées entre le gouvernement et l'opposition officielle conservatrice portaient avant tout sur ce qui figure à la toute fin de la motion de Ruby, c'est-à-dire que les dépenses préélectorales soient limitées à 1,4 million de dollars.

J'aimerais que le gouvernement me dise comment cela va se traduire pour les élections de 2019. Cette somme est proportionnelle à l'inflation, n'est-ce pas? « Ajustée à l'inflation » serait le terme plus juste. Cela va chercher aux alentours de 2 millions de dollars au cours d'une période préélectorale. J'essaie toujours de voir à combien ce sera rendu, en 2023, avec l'inflation. Il est ici question de sommes non négligeables.

Je ne peux m'empêcher de penser à ce qui s'est passé — et Ruby pourra comprendre pourquoi cela est intéressant ou ironique — vers la fin de notre dernier travail sur la réforme démocratique. Le Comité spécial sur la réforme électorale avait tenté de négocier avec moi, les verts, les bloquistes et les conservateurs afin de mettre au point un rapport sur lequel nous pourrions nous entendre. La ministre des Institutions démocratiques de l'époque m'avait dit à quel point elle avait été déçue de voir que nous avions négocié avec les conservateurs sur quoi que ce soit qui touchait à nos élections. En ce qui me concerne, j'étais d'avis que c'était le but du processus. Je croyais que la raison d'être de l'exercice était d'essayer d'arriver à une sorte d'entente multipartite.

Je dois me souvenir de cela. Je suis conscient qu'il y a eu toutes sortes de tractations discrètes entre les partis, mais si le processus nécessitait un consentement unanime, c'eût été une très bonne idée de nous contacter plus de cinq minutes avant la réunion pour nous informer de ce qui était négocié. Il est difficile pour nous de se sentir respecté ou inclus quand on balance une feuille de papier sur notre bureau cinq minutes avant le début de la réunion.

Toutefois, comme ma grand-mère avait l'habitude de dire: un manque de planification de ma part ne devrait pas bouleverser ses propres plans. Or, nous sommes rendus là, et nous avons fait fi des dates limites que le directeur général des élections nous avait fixées pour faire certaines réformes. Il nous a dit qu'il y a plein de choses qui sont dans le projet de loi C-76 qu'il ne pourra pas appliquer aux prochaines élections, faute de temps. Il y a en fait certaines dispositions de très bonne tenue, si nous devions les adopter en tant que Comité. C'est dommage et, à mon avis, il n'était pas nécessaire que les choses se passent de cette façon.

J'ai l'impression que les libéraux ne voient pas d'objection à l'idée d'augmenter les limites de dépenses. Monsieur le président, permettez-moi de remettre cela en question sur la base du principe du caractère équitable du processus électoral. Les partis qui possèdent plus de moyens seront en mesure de faire plus et d'augmenter leur influence.

Il y a un plafond, ce qui est bien, mais il est très haut. Pour la majorité des Canadiens, 2 millions de dollars est une grosse somme. Pour la plupart des partis tiers issus de la société civile, 2 millions de dollars est une somme impensable à dépenser dans le cadre d'une élection. Ils ne pourront jamais avoir cette sorte d'influence.

Cependant, lorsque nous préparons des lois, nous préférons toujours nos partis et nous nous arrangeons pour les favoriser aux dépens d'autres voix. Les partis sont protégés.

La dernière chose que je veux dire, et je vais terminer là-dessus, c'est que j'espère que cela sera perçu — si nous l'appuyons — comme un geste de bonne foi à l'égard de certains amendements que nous avons proposés au sujet d'autres choses importantes qui nous ont été signalées par notre directeur général des élections, par le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée et par d'autres témoins, et qui visaient à rendre nos élections vraiment équitables. Nous avons tenté de limiter nos propositions d'amendements à des thématiques qui s'appuyaient sur du concret, comme la protection des renseignements personnels et l'intervention des médias sociaux pour ne nommer que ceux-là.

Je ne sais pas si les gens s'intéressent au sort de Cambridge Analytica et à l'objet actuel des travaux du comité sur l'éthique. Il y avait un reportage là-dessus à CBC, ce matin, à l'émission The Current. On pouvait y entendre un membre de ce comité. Tout cela est extrêmement dérangeant, et nous ne sommes absolument pas prêts à faire face à de telles choses.

Nos collègues britanniques n'étaient pas prêts à tenir un vote libre et équitable sur le Brexit, alors qu'une société canadienne recevait ce qui était, je crois, des fonds illégaux pour influencer l'électorat.

Dans l'état actuel de nos lois, nous disposons de moins de protection que les Britanniques. Certains de nos amendements tentent de combler ces manques, de boucher ces trous, afin que nos élections, nos référendums, soient gagnés de façon juste et équitable, sans l'apport d'argent de gouvernements étrangers et sans influence étrangère.

Cela dit, chacun va devoir mettre un peu d'eau dans son vin si nous voulons voir la fin de cela. Or, dans nos efforts supérieurs pour réparer les torts causés par le Parlement précédent à l'égard de notre capacité de voter librement, nous sommes prêts à voter en ce sens. Cela pourra se faire grâce à la bonne foi dont nous ferons montre pour l'étude article par article du projet de loi et des amendements que nous avons proposés.

(1135)

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres intervenants pour cette motion?

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai une question pour M. Cullen.

Vous avez fait allusion à de possibles propositions. Cela concernait-il les amendements que les néo-démocrates ont mis de l'avant?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, en particulier en ce qui concerne les amendements sur les responsabilités en matière de médias sociaux et de publicité, ainsi qu'à propos de la protection de la vie privée des Canadiens et de l'information que les partis recueillent — pas en leur nom, mais en notre nom.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord, j'ai compris. Merci.

Le président:

Nous allons passer à la mise aux voix.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: J'aimerais faire une ou deux choses avant la levée de la séance.

Il y a d'abord cette question d'ordre technique. Lorsque j'ai fait la liste des amendements la dernière fois, je vous ai donné leur numéro. Or, depuis ce temps, d'autres amendements ont été proposés par les conservateurs. Ils sont dans votre trousse.

(1140)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Savez-vous combien il y en a en tout?

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Nathan Cullen: Inscrivez au compte-rendu que l'assemblée inspire profondément.

M. Philippe Méla (greffier législatif):

J'allais dire 15 de plus, mais il y en aura environ 340.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il y a 340 amendements.

M. Philippe Méla:

Oui, 340.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est le total.

M. Philippe Méla: Oui, plus ou moins 340.

M. Nathan Cullen: Lorsque nous allons revenir, le Comité devra examiner 340 amendements en 4 ou 5 jours d'audience, en plus des articles proprement dits, c'est-à-dire 346 pages d'articles.

Le président:

Monsieur Simms, nous vous écoutons.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

A-t-on pris une décision quant aux amendements qui pourraient être considérés comme étant redondants et qui pourraient être regroupés pour faire l'objet d'une seule et même mise aux voix, sans parler de ceux qui pourraient échapper à la portée du principe du projet de loi? Dans la négative, sommes-nous toujours en train d'évaluer la chose?

M. Philippe Méla:

Le processus est en marche.

Les amendements sont passablement « techniques ». Il est compliqué d'en faire l'analyse et c'est ce qui nous occupe à l'heure actuelle. Habituellement, nous tentons de voir l'incidence que la mise aux voix peut avoir sur les uns par rapport aux autres, de repérer les problèmes de lignes, etc. Si certains peuvent être regroupés en raison des liens qu'ils ont entre eux, en général, nous les regroupons.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord, mais n'est-ce pas quelque chose que vous avez fait par étape, en commençant à partir des premiers amendements reçus? Devez-vous faire tout d'un seul coup?

Le greffier:

Oui.

Le président:

Tout le monde sait que nous avons le greffier législatif par excellence pour faire ce genre de travail?

Un député: Un génie.

Le président: Monsieur Reid, vous avez la parole.

M. Scott Reid:

Je ne crois pas qu'il serait raisonnable pour nous de formuler des demandes déraisonnables, mais je vais tout de même poser cette question. Plus vite nous recevrons la trousse afin de pouvoir l'examiner, meilleures seront nos chances de trouver des façons — en échangeant de manière informelle — de cerner les éléments qui demanderont des discussions plus longues et ceux qui pourront être adoptés rapidement.

Avez-vous une idée du temps qu'il vous faudra pour terminer cela et du moment où vous pourrez nous revenir avec une liste définitive?

M. Philippe Méla:

Je crois que c'est ce qui a été distribué mardi. C'est la version définitive.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est la version définitive, d'accord. Alors, la balle est dans notre camp.

M. Philippe Méla:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Idéalement, nous pourrions commencer par des discussions de ce genre afin de trouver des façons de... Nous savons tous à quel moment le projet de loi va sortir d'ici. Il va sortir d'ici à 13 heures, vendredi, en plus du temps qu'il faudra pour procéder à la mise aux voix de chacun d'entre eux. À l'évidence, le fait de mettre les bouchées doubles avant 13 heures, vendredi, plutôt que d'attendre après cette date sera à l'avantage de tout le monde. Cela n'aura pas d'incidence sur le résultat proprement dit, seulement sur la possibilité pour les membres du Comité de rentrer chez eux pour voir leurs familles. C'est la raison de mon intervention.

Le président:

Il y a deux autres choses dont je voudrais parler.

Tout d'abord, je tiens à remercier le Comité de s'être rendu jusqu'ici. La façon dont nous votons au Canada est très importante. C'est un enjeu important pour n'importe quel pays. De façon générale, le Comité a fait du très bon travail depuis un an. Nos délibérations ont été positives et professionnelles. Même lorsque les opinions différaient, les gens ont fait montre de professionnalisme et ils ont proposé de bonnes idées. Je crois que chaque parti a apporté une contribution positive et que nous arriverons à un bon résultat.

Des députés: Bravo!

Le président: Je tiens à ce qu'il soit porté au compte-rendu que je remercie Élections Canada, qui a joué un rôle immense dans ce processus et qui nous a donné de bons conseils pour nous guider.

Nous devrions discuter rapidement du moment où les gens voudraient se rencontrer la semaine prochaine. De toute évidence, nous allons nous voir tous les jours.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Ce n'est pas la semaine prochaine.

Le président:

Pardonnez-moi, c'est la semaine d'ensuite. Nous allons nous réunir tous les jours jusqu'au vendredi, et probablement en matinée et après la période des questions.

Y a-t-il des choses à signaler, en particulier de la part de l'opposition?

Comme tout le monde le sait, il y a beaucoup d'amendements. Pour le bien de notre pays et pour le bien des intellectuels, essayez de cerner ceux qui ne riment pas à grand-chose pour que nous puissions, comme le disait M. Cullen, avoir des discussions de bonne tenue sur ceux qui sont importants. Choisissez vos batailles et je verrai à gérer le temps de façon judicieuse. Je vais accorder plus de temps aux choses qui sont vraiment importantes, mais je ne laisserai pas les discussions s'éterniser, car il faudra quand même discuter de tout, même brièvement.

Pour ce qui est de notre emploi du temps pour la semaine prochaine, avez-vous une idée de la longueur des séances que vous aimeriez avoir — je m'adresse surtout à l'opposition —, et des plages horaires qui seraient appropriées, afin que les personnes concernées puissent préparer un horaire?

Monsieur Cullen, allez-y.

(1145)

M. Nathan Cullen:

J'ai remarqué que lorsque les comités doivent siéger durant de longues périodes, la productivité et l'intelligence s'essoufflent inexorablement après six ou huit heures de délibérations. D'autres seront peut-être plus vaillants que moi. Je ne veux pas débattre de cela avec le Comité, mais je veux que vous sachiez que j'ai laissé aller beaucoup de responsabilités à la Chambre au cours des deux dernières semaines, et qu'elles arriveront toutes au cours de la semaine où nous reviendrons. C'est la situation en ce qui me concerne.

Je ne vois pas d'empêchement pour le lundi. Je suis prêt à donner un bon coup ce jour-là. Mardi après-midi, ce sera un problème. Mercredi, bien entendu, nous avons une réunion du caucus. Mercredi après-midi, nous pendons M. Scheer, alors il faut être là... C'est son portrait qu'on suspend.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Nathan Cullen: C'est de l'humour noir. C'est le mot qu'ils utilisent en anglais, la « pendaison ».

Le président:

Nous pourrions vous aider.

M. Scott Reid:

Je n'aime pas rater une bonne pendaison.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Jamais.

Cela va passer juste ici, à l'étage. Je dois y être pour une autre raison.

Jeudi, ça ne marchera pas, et vendredi, bien entendu, tout le monde sera en état de panique.

Je ne veux pas que nous en débattions outre mesure, mais il faut savoir que cela va demander beaucoup d'organisation. En général, les matins sont plus propices que le reste de la journée. De 9 heures à 11 heures, c'est toujours mieux comme plage horaire.

Le président:

Qu'en disent les conservateurs?

Avez-vous des préférences? Je sais que vous avez proposé beaucoup d'amendements.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Ce que notre équipe propose pour lundi, c'est de commencer à 16 h 30 et de siéger jusqu'à 19 ou 21 heures.

Je ne suis pas certaine de ce qui nous bloque pour le lundi matin...

Une députée: Ce sera la visite de la ministre.

Mme Stephanie Kusie: Oh, pardonnez-moi. Oui, bien sûr, il faut que ce soit après le passage de la ministre. C'est bien vrai, et c'est dans la motion que nous venons d'adopter.

Ensuite, potentiellement, mardi et jeudi, de 9 heures à 11 h 45, puis de 15 h 30 à 19 heures...

Le président:

Pardonnez-moi. Vous avez dit 9 heures du matin, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui.

Le président:

Et ce serait jusqu'à quelle heure?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Jusqu'à 11 h 45.

Le président:

Du soir?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Non, du matin, sinon, j'aurais dit 23 h 45. Puis, nous pourrions siéger de 15 h 30 à 19 heures, et le mercredi, de 15 h 30 à 19 ou 21 heures.

Voulez-vous que je répète?

Le président:

Oui... Enfin...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous avez bien dit 11 h 45. Pourquoi ne pas aller jusqu'à 13 heures?

M. Scott Reid:

C'est une façon d'avoir une pause entre les deux blocs.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

La période des questions est entre les deux.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

En temps normal, les comités siègent jusqu'à 13 heures, non?

Le président:

Ce n'est pas un problème.

M. Scott Reid:

Allons-nous siéger de 9 heures à 13 heures, mardi et jeudi?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Puis-je faire une suggestion?

Il se peut que nous voulions finir plus tôt certains jours si nous sommes fatigués, mais nous pouvons nous garder la possibilité de poursuivre nos travaux...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Ça, c'est une bonne idée, oui.

M. Scott Reid:

... en réservant des locaux de manière à ce que nous ne soyons pas obligés d'arrêter. Cela nous donnerait la latitude voulue pour arrêter, si nous sommes épuisés, ou continuer, si nous nous sentons d'attaque...

Le président:

Provisoirement, disons que la journée moyenne que vous proposez irait de 9 heures à 11 h 45, puis de 15 h 30 à 19 ou 21 heures, selon notre degré de fatigue.

Monsieur Bittle, nous vous écoutons.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Plus simplement, que diriez-vous de proposer que le président travaille avec les vice-présidents pour mettre cet horaire au point?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Bien sûr.

M. Scott Reid:

J'aime encore mieux cette solution.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce que je demanderais, c'est que vous nous remettiez cet horaire d'ici la fin de la semaine pour que nous sachions à quoi nous en tenir.

M. Scott Reid:

Chris, cette intervention est celle qui vient de vous remettre sur ma liste de Noël.

Le président:

Nous allons retenir ces grandes lignes directrices, mais nous allons travailler avec chaque parti et avec les vice-présidents.

Mais en gros, disons que ce sera de 9 heures à 11 h 45, puis de 15 h 30 à quelle part entre 19 et 21 heures, selon notre degré de fatigue. Nous allons nous abstenir de siéger durant les réunions de caucus du mercredi, ainsi que durant la période de questions, et ce, peu importe les circonstances.

Est-ce que cela vous va?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

N'oubliez pas ma demande. Si c'était possible de recevoir l'horaire d'ici la fin de la semaine, ce serait très apprécié.

Le président:

Nous allons essayer d'y arriver.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela nous aidera à planifier ce que nous avons à faire et d'autres choses.

Le président:

Oui. Nous allons demander au greffier d'envoyer une proposition d'horaire aux vice-présidents, puis nous vous donnerons l'heure juste dès que nous le pourrons afin de permettre à tous de planifier leur emploi du temps pour la semaine prochaine.

Y a-t-il autre chose?

Monsieur Cullen, allez-y.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Juste une dernière chose, monsieur le président.

Je sais que nous remercions souvent nos greffiers. Le projet de loi sur lequel ils travaillent n'est pas une mince affaire. Alors, à mes collègues du Comité, je souhaite un bon congé de l'Action de grâce, et à nos greffiers, un bon congé de l'Action de grâce, mais d'un autre genre. Je leur souhaite bonne chance avec ce casse-tête qu'ils auront à assembler pour nous.

Monsieur le président, sachez que j'apprécie aussi votre travail.

(1150)

Le président:

Merci à tous de votre coopération. Je crois que les membres de notre Comité travaillent bien les uns avec les autres. Nous nous faisons une joie à l'idée de reprendre nos travaux après la pause de l'Action de grâce.

Bonne fête de l'Action de grâce à tous.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on October 04, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.