header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-10-15 PROC 123

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order.

Good afternoon. Welcome to the 123rd meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

For members' information, today's meeting is being televised as we continue our study of Bill C-76, An Act to amend the Canada Elections Act and other Acts and to make certain consequential amendments.

We are pleased to be joined by the Honourable Karina Gould, Minister of Democratic Institutions. She is accompanied by officials from the Privy Council Office: Manon Paquet, Senior Policy Advisor, and Jean-François Morin, Senior Policy Advisor.

Thank you, Minister Gould, for coming back. I will turn the floor over to you for some opening remarks.

Hon. Karina Gould (Minister of Democratic Institutions):

Thank you very much, Chair, and the committee, for inviting me here again. I am delighted to be back with my officials to look into BillC-76 before you start your clause-by-clause study of the legislation.

I'd like to thank you for your commitment to study Bill C-76, the elections modernization act. I truly appreciate the hard work you have already put into studying this pivotal piece of legislation, one that will, I believe, help strengthen our electoral laws and safeguard our future elections at the federal level here in Canada.[Translation]

Our government is committed to strengthening Canada's democratic institutions and restoring Canadians' trust and participation in our democratic process.[English]

I firmly believe that the strength of our democracy depends on the participation of as many Canadians as possible. I also firmly believe that the elections modernization act is the right piece of legislation to make our electoral process more accessible for all Canadians.[Translation]

This bill will reduce the barriers to participation that Canadians currently face when voting or participating in the democratic process in general.

No Canadian should face barriers to voting, whether they live abroad, are in the Canadian Forces, are studying at university or are without a fixed address. [English]

Reinstating the voter identification card as a proof of residency means making voting easier for more Canadians. Restoring the option of vouching for another eligible Canadian means making voting easier for more Canadians. Voting is a right, and it is our responsibility to make voting accessible to as many Canadians as possible.[Translation]

Through Bill C-76, we are extending accommodation measures to include all people with disabilities, not just those with physical disabilities.

The bill will increase support and assistance to voters with disabilities at polling stations, regardless of their type of disability, and will provide them with the opportunity to vote at home.[English]

Canadians with disabilities may also find it more difficult to participate in political campaigns because campaign materials in offices are not accessible. Bill C-76 will encourage political parties and candidates to accommodate electors with disabilities by creating a financial incentive through reimbursement of expenses related to accommodating measures. For example, this would include sign language interpretation during an event and making the format of material more accessible.[Translation]

This bill also amends election expenses so that candidates with disabilities and candidates caring for a young family member who is ill or disabled find it easier to run for election.

The bill will allow candidates to use their own funds, in addition to campaign funds, to pay for disability-related expenses, child care costs or other relevant expenses related to home care or health care. These expenses will be reimbursed up to 90%.[English]

Our Canadian Armed Forces members make tremendous sacrifices in protecting and defending our democracy. The elections modernization act will make it easier for our soldiers, sailors and air personnel to participate in our democracy. It allows our CAF members the same flexibility as other Canadians in choosing where to cast their ballot, whether it be to vote at regular polls where they reside in Canada, to vote abroad, to vote at advanced polls, or to vote in special military polls as they currently do.[Translation]

Many of us have constituents in our ridings who have lived in Canada but who are currently living abroad. Whether they are there to work or study, Canadians living abroad should always have the opportunity to participate in our democratic process and to express themselves on issues that affect them.[English]

Bill C-76 will remove the requirement that non-resident electors must have been residing outside Canada for fewer than five years. It will also remove the requirement that non-resident electors intend to return to Canada to resume residence in the future. This will extend voting rights to over one million Canadians who are living abroad.[Translation]

As a federal government, it is our responsibility to make it easier and more convenient for Canadians to vote. This includes their experience during the voting process, whether it is at the advance polls or on election day.[English]

The elections modernization act provides Canadians with more flexibility by increasing the hours of advance polls to 12-hour days. We will also streamline the intake procedures during regular and advance polls.[Translation]

This bill will also expand the use of mobile polling stations on advance polling days and election day to better serve remote, isolated or low-density communities.

For Canadians to participate fully in their democratic right to vote, they must first know when, where and how to vote. Historically, Elections Canada has conducted various educational activities with Canadians as part of its election administration mandate.[English]

In 2014, the previous government limited the Chief Electoral Officer's education mandate, removing the CEO's abilities to offer education programs to new Canadians and historically disenfranchised groups.[Translation]

Our government believes that we should empower Canadians to vote and participate in our democracy. We believe that the Chief Electoral Officer should be able to communicate with all Canadians on how to exercise their democratic right.[English]

This is not about partisanship. This is about providing electors with information related to the logistics of voting, such as where, when and how to cast a vote. We want Canadians to be ready for election day, no matter what political party they vote for.

This also means preparing first-time voters. The creation of a register of future electors will allow Canadian citizens between the ages of 14 and 17 to register with Elections Canada. When they turn 18, they will be automatically be added to the voters list.[Translation]

While more young people voted in 2015 than in previous elections—57% of voters aged 18 to 24 voted—their rate of participation was still lower than that of older Canadians. In fact, 78% of voters aged 65 to 74 voted. This measure will encourage more young Canadians to participate in our democratic process.

(1540)

[English]

As the Minister of Democratic Institutions, it is my responsibility to ensure we maintain the trust of Canadians in our democratic process. The elections modernization act will make it more difficult for election lawbreakers to evade punishment by strengthening the powers of the commissioner of Canada elections and offering a wider range of tools for enforcement.[Translation]

By making the Commissioner of Canada Elections more independent and giving him new powers to enforce the Canada Elections Act and investigate violations, we will continue to work to ensure the strength and security of our democratic institutions.[English]

The commissioner of Canada elections will be independent from the government, moving back to Elections Canada and reporting to Parliament though the Chief Electoral Officer rather than a senior member of cabinet.[Translation]

He will also have new powers with the administrative option to impose monetary penalties for minor violations of the act related to election advertising, political financing, third-party expenses and minor voting violations. Most importantly, he will also have the power to lay charges without the prior approval of the director of public prosecutions and will be able to seek a court order to compel a witness to testify during an investigation of electoral offences.[English]

Through budget 2018, the government allocated $7.1 million over five years, beginning in 2019, to support the work of the office of the commissioner of Canada elections. This funding will help ensure the Canadian electoral process continues to uphold the highest standards of democracy.[Translation]

Many Canadians are concerned about the consequences and influence of money on our political process. With Bill C-76, we are ensuring that our electoral process is more transparent and fair. The bill creates a pre-election period beginning on June 30 of the year of the fixed-date election and ending with the issuance of the writ.[English]

During the pre-election period, third parties will have a spending limit of approximately $1 million, adjusted to inflation, with a maximum of $10,000 per electoral district. This spending limit will include all partisan advertising, partisan activities and election surveys. During the election period, there will be a spending limit of approximately $500,000, and a maximum of $4,000 per electoral district in 2019.

This legislation will require third parties that spend more than $500 on partisan advertising and activities during the pre-writ and writ period to register with Elections Canada. Third parties will also be required to open a dedicated Canadian bank account and use identifying tag lines on all partisan advertising. These measures will ensure greater transparency and provide Canadians with more information with respect to who is trying to influence their decision.[Translation]

The Government of Canada must ensure that our democratic institutions are modern, transparent and accessible to all Canadians. We are committed to maintaining and strengthening the confidence of Canadians in our democratic process.[English]

Building on the recommendations of the Chief Electoral Officer and the work of this committee, the elections modernization act will improve Canadians' trust and confidence in Canada's electoral system.

I look forward to your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister.

Welcome, Ms. Elizabeth May. I understand the Liberals are giving you a speaking slot later. Welcome to the committee.

Ms. Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, GP):

That is so nice.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

We'll start with Madame Lapointe.[Translation]

You have seven minutes.

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

I would like to welcome the minister and the people accompanying her.

The other day, the Chief Electoral Officer appeared before the committee. Following his testimony, I wondered something. As a result of the amendments proposed in Bill C-76, how many Canadians could exercise their right to vote outside the country? Has this already been identified?

Hon. Karina Gould:

As a result of amendments in the bill, approximately 1 million Canadians would be able to vote outside the country.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Does that also include both military and embassy personnel and expatriate Canadians working abroad?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes, that's right.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Like our colleague Mrs. Kusie, my brother worked in embassies, and did so for 20 years. I have also known expatriates. It wasn't easy to exercise your right to vote outside Canada.

How would Bill C-76 make it easier for these people to exercise their right to vote outside the country?

(1545)

Hon. Karina Gould:

I don't think the Canadian electoral process will change for people living outside the country. The same provisions will apply to identity verification. What will change is that these people won't have to come back to Canada. They won't be subject to the limit of not living outside the country for more than five years. Canadians who spend more than five years abroad will retain their right to vote abroad.

Two general elections were held while I was living outside the country. I exercised my right to vote from the United States and Mexico. There are always very strict rules to follow to ensure the integrity of the vote.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

I am pleased about this. Indeed, for everyone I've known, this situation was not simple.

I now have a more specific question to ask you. Since the introduction of Bill C-76, the Chief Electoral Officer has stated that the bill does not go far enough to prevent the transmission of misleading information. Should this bill be strengthened so that organizations and individuals do not intentionally mislead the public about elections?

As you know, there are many ways to make information questionable, unsound and non-transparent. What can we do about it?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think it would be difficult, in the context of this bill, to ensure the integrity of information that is disseminated to the public. In my opinion, it is not the role of government to tell Canadians what information is good and what is not.

For social media platforms, however, this bill proposes significant changes to increase the transparency of announcements and ads. This affects not only social media platforms, but all media. Indeed, we could know which people had certain intentions or wanted to influence people, how they voted or what they thought about a particular subject.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

So we could target both civil society and political parties, and check whether some want to disseminate misleading information.

Hon. Karina Gould:

There are some planned amendments or parts of the bill that make misleading information illegal in some cases. Following the instructions of the Chief Electoral Officer, who appeared before this committee, we recommended that this be more specific, since he could have certain powers in this regard. We have also given more powers and tools to the Commissioner of Canada Elections, since he could conduct investigations. If individuals or organizations were to disseminate misleading information about how to vote or about a party candidate, and it could be proven that this did not comply with the rules, these individuals or organizations could be investigated and punished.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

You mentioned earlier that the bill proposed that the Chief Electoral Officer should have new powers to impose sanctions or even lay charges. Is that what you were referring to?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I was talking about the elections commissioner. After the last election, the Chief Electoral Officer proposed amendments to simplify the application of the provisions. So we suggested amendments to strengthen the commissioner's powers to enforce the act.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Do you think we should go further?

Hon. Karina Gould:

We need to see how these new powers will work during the next election. I look forward to receiving the recommendations from the elections commissioner and the Chief Electoral Officer after the 2019 elections.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

How much time do I have left, Mr. Chair?

(1550)

The Chair:

You have 45 seconds.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

That's a bit short for asking a question.

You talked about accessibility for people with visual or hearing disabilities. The bill sets out measures to facilitate access for these people. Will they be able to be accompanied by the person of their choice?

Hon. Karina Gould:

That's exactly it.

Several recommendations made by the Chief Electoral Officer stem from the committee on accessibility to the electoral process, which heard from people from all regions of Canada. This is a suggestion they made to us, and we listened to them in order to facilitate the vote and give them more dignity in the process.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you very much. In fact, it's heartbreaking sometimes. [English]

The Chair:

Now we will go to Ms. Kusie for seven minutes. [Translation]

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for being here today, Madam Minister.[English]

Professor Lori Turnbull, a former adviser in the PCO's democratic institutions unit, which supports you, appeared before the committee this spring and suggested creating segregated bank accounts and fundraising practices for third parties' political activities.

Why do you not support your former adviser's suggestion to implement this measure?

Hon. Karina Gould:

In Bill C-76, we have actually proposed that third parties create a separate bank account for any activities with regard to funds that they intend to use for political activities in the pre-writ period and the writ period.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay.

However, this is not created for all times, as you've indicated: It's specifically for the pre-writ and writ periods, and therefore not specifically demonstrating the origin of funds.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Well that's also the case for political candidates as well.

When you ran for office, you opened a separate bank account as a political candidate that was separate from your riding association or from the political party, so it's in line with that practice.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

You are confirming that it's not for all times. Why would you say that you do not support disclosure at any time for any purpose?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Could you repeat that?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Why do you not support disclosure of expenditures at any time for any purpose?

With regard to the clauses in the bill, as it stands presently, it is not possible to entirely follow the inflow of money and the expenditure of money by these third parties at all times.

Why do you not support disclosure at any time for any purpose?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think it's important to clarify what exactly a third party is. Third parties are anything that are not political parties or candidates. That could be an individual or civil society; that could be any group or individual in Canada.

We believe it's important that it should only meet that threshold when that individual or organization will be conducting political or partisan activities in the lead-up to the campaign. Otherwise, I think that would be going too far into either people's personal lives or the activity of organizations that may not actually be participating in political activities.

However, what Bill C-76 does is to require that if a third party is intending to participate either during the pre-writ period or the writ period, they must disclose all donations received in the lead-up to that election.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you.

The Chief Electoral Officer asked specifically to have items in the bill related to anti-collusion, yet the measures and the amendments that were brought forward by the government deal only with third parties and not with all parties. Why is this?

Hon. Karina Gould:

It's with regard to third parties and political parties, which we think is very important.

We also wanted to make sure.... For example, in the case of the New Democratic Party at the provincial level, if you remember, you're also a member at the federal level, and we didn't want to impede their ability to work as one party. We tried to understand the Canadian landscape of political parties in creating this. I think that's really important, but it is specifically there so you don't have a third party colluding with a political party for those objectives.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

In Bill C-76, you attempt to tackle foreign interference in Canadian elections. Let's take a hypothetical case of a foreign entity donating $1 million to a Canadian organization for administration costs, let's say. Then this organization, which had raised money for these costs, suddenly finds itself with this $1 million available to campaign in Canada.

Can you confirm that this type of foreign funding and interference will remain legal, despite Bill C-76?

(1555)

Hon. Karina Gould:

Within Bill C-76, there's a blanket ban on using foreign funding for partisan activities during the pre-writ or political period. There are anti-circumvention rules within Bill C-76 as well, to ensure that this is not the case; however, it's important to recognize that we strongly believe that Bill C-76 goes quite far with regard to doing our best to ensure there is no foreign funding either at the third party or political party level in Canada.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Can you say with absolute certainty that you have done everything within your power as the Government of Canada to ensure that there is no foreign influence for Canadians, be it at the social media level or at the funding level?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think we should determine the difference between “foreign influence” versus “foreign interference”. Foreign influences are things that could be overt—for example, a foreign government saying this is what they believe on a particular subject. That's within the rules of diplomacy.

Foreign interference would be the covert attempt to undermine Canadians' information or access to information, or understanding the results of the election. I believe that Bill C-76 does what's possible within the law to do our best to ensure that this does not happen; however, I think that what we've tried to do, and what I've tried to do with Bill C-76, is plan for the things that we know of and ensure that they're grounded in the values and the principles that are important for Canadians with regard to our elections.

However, there could always be something that happens in the future that we are unaware of, but I think that this is a very robust framework and grounding to do our best to protect Canadian elections from foreign interference.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

At the United Nations recently, your Prime Minister indicated that there was not much foreign influence or interference in the last election here in Canada.

In your opinion, how much is too much? Is “not much” too much? Do you feel that with Bill C-76 we will have no influence or interference entering the 2019 federal election?

Hon. Karina Gould:

His comments were based on the Communications Security Establishment report that was released in June 2017, which was the first time that a signals intelligence agency, or any intelligence agency around the world, had publicly examined and released information on foreign interference in elections around the world. While low levels were seen, they were not seen to have interfered in the election itself; however, Bill C-76, and other actions that are being taken in collaboration with the political parties and the CSE are all done to prevent and prepare Canadians for what could be an eventuality in 2019, or it could not.

As I've said, I think this is a very robust framework and I think it prepares and sets up Canadians well for 2019, and that we can have confidence in both our intelligence and security agencies, and also in our elections administration to do what they can to protect Canadian democracy.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you, Minister.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Kusie.

Now we go to Mr. Cullen for seven minutes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

Thank you, Chair. Thank you, Minister and your team, for being here.

I'm looking through the amendments that your government has moved to this bill and I'm considering the track that has taken us here. It has been 700 days since you introduced Bill C-33, which was the original effort to get rid of the unfair elections act. It's five months past the deadline that was set by Elections Canada to bring these changes to completion and into law. It more than two years after the broken promise to make 2015 the last election under the first-past-the-post system.

I'm surprised, because I thought there would be more in here on things that your government, and you personally, have claimed to support, and because you seem unsupportive of things that I think would help.

I think of the launch of the parliamentary session. The Prime Minister said to your caucus, “Add women. Change politics is how we will make a better country.”

One of the Liberal fundraising ads said, ”Canada needs more women from diverse backgrounds making decisions in Ottawa. Because when women succeed, we all succeed.”

We have an amendment in here that is based upon a model that Ireland and other countries have used. In the case of Ireland, it increased the participation of women candidates by 90% and helped elect 40% more women to their parliament.

We're ranked 61st in the world right now, Minister. You know this, of course. The Parliament is 26% women, and at the current pace, as the Daughters of the Vote pointed out to the Prime Minister, it will take 90 years to get to equity in our legislature, yet you're planning to vote against an amendment to get us there, an amendment as has been applied in other democracies.

Did you get the IT alert that I received just recently from our IT service department here in Ottawa? It just happened a couple of hours ago. It was an IT alert for a Facebook data breach. You commissioned a report, which was delivered to you by the CSE, and I'm quoting from that report. It said: ...almost certainly, political parties and politicians, and the media are more vulnerable to cyber threats and related influence operations....

The Privacy Commissioner has said that one of the ways to counter those threats to our democracy is to include political parties under privacy rules. The British Columbia Civil Liberties Association just wrote to you and said that the provisions on privacy are so inadequate as to be meaningless, and the current Privacy Commissioner has said that Bill C-76—this bill—has “nothing of substance” when it comes to privacy.

British Columbia has existed under these privacy rules for 15 years. Parties have been able to communicate effectively with voters. Europe has had it for 20 years, and they've been effectively able to communicate with their voters.

We're proposing Sunday voting, which the former Chief Electoral Officer has promoted. In other democracies, it has increased voter participation by 6% to 7%.

I guess what I find confusing about all of this is that I'm trying to match the words and the rhetoric of your government with your actions when we now have an opportunity to do something about it. You've been in office for three years. Here's an opportunity to deal with the rules that guide us as politicians, that guide the electoral process. I would think that one of your fundamental mandates would be to increase the participation of women and diverse voices, yet your party has chosen to protect all incumbents, thereby ensuring the status quo. The status quo should be unacceptable to everybody.

When we have amendments that would help more women become candidates, help more women and diverse voices actually get elected, you want to vote against them. We see the cyber-threats and the cybersecurity issues that your own agency identified after your request to investigate, but this bill has nothing in it to increase protection of data and privacy.

When the current Chief Electoral Officer was here testifying, we asked him what he knew about what the parties gather in terms of the data on Canadians, and he said, “I have no idea.” Your report says that we, as political parties, are vulnerable to attacks and that Canada as a country is susceptible to these attacks. Having watched Brexit, having watched the U.S. elections, we have important and very recent examples of the reasons to strengthen privacy laws, but this bill has nothing in it.

Seven hundred days after introducing the first iteration of this bill, five months after passing over the deadline set by Elections Canada to get us to this place so we can introduce these changes, and after having made so many promises to women and diverse groups to do better, we're offering opportunities to do better through amendments, based on evidence that is in front of us.

(1600)



Your government claims to be evidence-based. We are using evidence to improve the things that your government and your party claim to want to improve, and you're choosing not to do them. My question is, why?

Hon. Karina Gould:

How much time do I have left?

The Chair:

You have two minutes.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Okay, thanks.

Thank you for all of your comments and your question.

With regard to cybersecurity, I think there are many things in this bill that are working to improve cybersecurity for Canadians and improve our democracy.

The other thing I want to note is that the Communications Security Establishment has reached out to political parties and is engaging with them to ensure that they have the best practices in place, and it is available to provide advice on an ongoing basis.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

There's nothing that requires that. All your bill says is that parties have to post the policy somewhere on their website, and there are no consequences if they fail to keep the data safe.

Hon. Karina Gould:

There are a couple of points with regard to that. This is the first time we are requiring in legislation that political parties post a public privacy policy. I would note that after this bill was introduced, the New Democratic Party, for example, updated their privacy policy, which had been quite out of date. I think you can see that is a real, tangible step in the right—

(1605)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's enough?

Hon. Karina Gould:

—direction. There are strong consequences if parties do not do that, in the sense that they will be deregistered as a political party—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

All they have to do is post the policy.

Hon. Karina Gould:

On the other hand, there is also a requirement for political parties not to mislead Elections Canada, and that would come with very strong repercussions. We are empowering the commissioner of Canada elections, if a complaint is made, to be able to do that investigation.

I think these are really positive first steps and I would encourage the committee, if this is an issue they think is of importance, to study it more deeply and more broadly.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You are not accepting efforts to help more women and diversities get elected. Why not?

Hon. Karina Gould:

In this legislation, I'm very proud of the fact that with regard to child care and other care provisions for candidates, we will now be reimbursing that at up to 90% if this legislation is passed, and it will be outside of the total spend that candidates are allowed with regard to the election period. This is really important, because if it was within the spend limit, it would result in, for someone who has care costs for a family member, including a sick family member, a decrease in their competitiveness with others who may not have those costs, and they can also be reimbursed at a higher level.

There are some practical things in here that I think will encourage people of greater diversity to run.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So being able to—

Hon. Karina Gould:

I also think that all of us here in this room as leaders should be doing our part to encourage women to participate—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Maybe protecting incumbents wasn't such a good idea.

Hon. Karina Gould:

—and our government has also recently announced $4.5 million for the Daughters of the Vote, as well as support for Equal Voice, and is really working to encourage and increase diverse participation.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Now we'll go on to Ms. Sahota for seven minutes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Some of those incumbents include women, Mr. Cullen, so you could have things go the other way around.

Anyway, I also have some questions regarding Facebook, Google, Twitter, and other social media, which have become very common for use in advertising for political purposes and during campaigns as well.

Currently they keep records of advertisements, but when that advertisement is old and no longer available, you no longer can see any record of the advertising. Do you think when it comes to political advertising that there should be better recording? How should that recording be made available? Should it be made available to the Chief Electoral Officer or made available publicly? What are your thoughts on that?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Absolutely, it should be made available to both the Chief Electoral Officer and to the Canadian public, because I think as we've seen in jurisdictions around the world and within their electoral experiences, one of the key ways that foreign actors have attempted to interfere in the electoral process is specifically with regard to not disclosing that they are in fact the ones who are purchasing advertising on social media platforms. I think a stronger transparency regime with regard to advertising on social media, but also on media more broadly, is also very important.

I think it's really important for this registry to be available for a period of time following the election as well, so that if there are questions or complaints, there is a public registry where people can go look and where the commissioner can also take a look at what was advertised and how it was advertised.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Do you have any suggestions on what that period of time should be?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think it should be for two to five years, because we would want to be able to go through an entire parliamentary process.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

Going back to some of the third party spending and foreign money coming in for third party spending here, especially when it comes to social media platforms—I know this question was raised, but it was in a little bit of a different way—even outside the writ period or the election period, if a foreign actor is spending for political advertising but maybe not during the writ or the pre-writ period, should that still be captured somehow?

(1610)

Hon. Karina Gould:

This legislation would only deal with the writ and the pre-writ period, but I do think that more information is always better, and transparency is always the right policy to pursue. I think there are often times when Canadians may think they are getting information from a domestic actor when in fact it could very well be coming from a foreign source, so I think there is an onus on social media platforms to disclose that information, because it contributes to the domestic dialogue.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

But you don't feel that it's the place of this legislation or the Chief Electoral Officer—

Hon. Karina Gould:

This is the first time we'll be putting a pre-writ period into practice, should this legislation pass—which I sincerely hope it does—and I think we would then have evidence to determine how that took place during the pre-writ and the writ period and would provide further evidence for this committee or parliamentarians or Canadians or Elections Canada to make further recommendations as to what else would need to be done. However, it should be noted that foreign funding is banned at all times for anything that has to do with partisan process.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

During the CEO's testimony at committee, the commissioner of Canada elections said that there are challenges of enforcement in the provisions of Bill C-76 to prohibit organizations or individuals from selling ad space to any foreign entity. Ensuring enforceability is obviously key to keeping foreign actors outside of Canadian elections. Do you agree, and if so, do you feel the bill should be amended to include this aspect?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

Building on that, there was also another suggestion by the CEO that when anyone enters the database or the computer system, whether it is with intent or without intent, the bill should capture it either way and then be able to enforce against those actors. Whether they knowingly wanted to affect the outcome of the election or not, just being in that space alone should be a violation.

I have heard arguments on both sides about whether we can go that far and remove intent from the actor. I know that our act coincides with the Criminal Code as well.

Can I get a little bit more direction on how the two acts, the Criminal Code and this piece of legislation, would act together and whether it is possible to remove the intent portion?

Hon. Karina Gould:

If you don't mind, I'm going to turn it over to Jean-François to answer.

Mr. Jean-François Morin (Senior Policy Advisor, Privy Council Office):

Thank you very much for your question.

Yes, there is an amendment that has been proposed to partially implement the Chief Electoral Officer's recommendation. This amendment would actually make it also an offence to attempt to do anything that is currently in Bill C-76, but always with the intent to affect the election. This new provision in Bill C-76 mirrors an existing provision of the Criminal Code, so in Bill C-76 the provision about malicious use of a computer includes two intent requirements: one specific intent requirement related to the election, and one more general intent requirement that is only related to fraud.

In parallel to that, the Criminal Code provision will continue to apply, and of course the Criminal Code provision doesn't have that specificity about federal elections.

Therefore, yes, definitely the commissioner of Canada elections will be able to investigate this offence in the Canada Elections Act, but if he finds that all essential elements of the offence are met except for the one related to the electoral context, he can also turn to another investigative body and ask that charges be laid under the Criminal Code.

(1615)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Thank you very much, Ms. Sahota.

Now we'll go back to Ms. Kusie for five minutes.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Minister, my apologies: I didn't complete my comment thanking you for being here today, so thank you for being here today.

Minister, normally during an election there are severe limits on activities that the government can undertake at the same time that there are stringent limits on election activities. Bill C-76 extends the time period during which political parties and third parties are subject to strict rules, so it stands to reason that there will be some reasonable limits on government activity during the same period. You've already announced a ban on most government advertising in the 90 days prior to the fixed election date; can you commit to extending this ban to include the entire pre-writ period?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you.

Will your government also ensure that major announcements, particularly spending announcements, cannot be made during the pre-writ period?

Hon. Karina Gould:

If it's outside the government advertising policy, then government activity will continue as normal, as with all activity of members of Parliament.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you.

Will your government ensure that government resources are not used to pay for campaign-style events—for example, town halls featuring the Prime Minister or other ministers, public consultations featuring elected politicians as opposed to public servants, or other publicly televised or streamed events during the pre-writ period?

Hon. Karina Gould:

As I said, any activity that would take place by the government normally would continue during that period, as is the case with all members of Parliament and the House.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Will your government ensure that government departments cannot release public opinion research, reports, or other documents that may influence public opinion, except those of course required by law during the pre-writ period?

Hon. Karina Gould:

As I've said, normal government activity will continue until the writ period.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Will your government ensure that no major announcements about policy intentions or budget projections can be made during the pre-writ period?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Normal government activity will continue during the pre-writ period.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That concludes my questions, Mr. Chairman. Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Are there any other Conservatives? Two and a half minutes are left.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I want to go back to the original question asked in the first round by Ms. Kusie regarding the segregated bank accounts.

You threw back that we know well, as candidates, that we open our own campaign bank account during the writ period, and that's true; we as politicians do open our bank accounts, but the fact is that our riding associations cannot receive foreign funding at all.

I'm going back to the recommendation made by Professor Turnbull, a former adviser to your department, who recommended that there be a segregated bank account for a third party wherein all that information can be tracked, including where those donations came from through the entire period leading up to a pre-writ and a writ period. Why is it that you don't support what I would think is a common sense approach by your former adviser to segregate those bank accounts to ensure that there is absolutely no chance, and verifiably no chance, that foreign funding is being used in those situations?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Again, Bill C-76 does require third parties that intend to spend or that have spent up to $500 on advertising to open a bank account and to disclose any money that's going into it and where all the money came from. I think this is a reasonable provision to ensure the integrity of where and how they are using their money.

Mr. John Nater:

Again, I would only point out that by not having a separate segregated bank account for the entire duration when that money flows in, there's nothing preventing foreign funding from commingling in another bank account and being transferred to that bank account for the writ and pre-writ period.

Hon. Karina Gould:

In Bill C-76 they have to account for where the money comes from and they also have to attest that there is no foreign funding in that bank account. If they do not do that, then they would be breaking the law if Bill C-76 passes. I think that is substantial.

Mr. John Nater:

Again I would only point out as well that this can only happen after the fact. I'll leave it at that.

Going back to the question just asked by Ms. Kusie about ministerial and parliamentary travel, in this bill you're limiting what an opposition party can do during the pre-writ period, but at the same time you're not limiting what a government can do. I know you said “normal government activity”, but normal government activity often mirrors—

(1620)

Hon. Karina Gould:

You're conflating partisan activity with the work of members of Parliament, and those are two separate things.

Mr. John Nater:

So campaign-style—

Hon. Karina Gould:

Political parties will have a fair and level playing field with regard to the activities. It's only with regard to partisan advertising. Members of Parliament, regardless of what political party they are in, will be able to carry out their normal activities and duties as required by their position.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go on to Ms. May. Welcome to the committee.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Thank you again.

I want to thank Mr. Bittle, who gave me his slot. It was very kind of you.

Thank you, Minister. The last time you were here relates to one of my questions, which was a discussion of what we would do about leaders' debates.

I just thought I'd take the opportunity to say that I am supportive of the bill. The way I see it, it's a vast improvement on the current state of affairs. It really matters to get it passed before we go back to the polls in fall 2019.

However, I do see—and I agree with my colleague Mr. Cullen—that there are a number of lost opportunities here. It didn't accomplish what it could have done in a number of areas.

My overarching question is, first, how willing are you and this government to accept any of the amendments that are being put forward with the goal of improving those areas where your government, and you personally, are on the record as wanting to see more?

Hon. Karina Gould:

It's good to see you here as well. It's always nice to have you at committee or elsewhere.

As I have stated publicly before, we are willing to entertain amendments. Of course, it depends on what the amendment is and whether it's within the scope that we're willing to move forward on. However, there are a number of amendments that have been presented that I think can be accepted.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

May I ask you specifically about the privacy piece, which is one that is worrying me? As a matter of fact, when the Conservatives' Bill C-23 was before this committee in the 41st Parliament, I put forward an amendment that political parties would not be exempt from the Privacy Act.

My amendment in this case is more specific to the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act, PIPEDA. This would be much more effective, I think everyone would agree, than each party coming up with its own privacy plan and tabling it.

Can you give me a sense—and I know this is highly specific—of whether there is any willingness to entertain this amendment, and if not, why not?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I would like to see a broader study of privacy in political parties. I think it's really important. This legislation is strongly based on the recommendations that PROC put forward over the course of 2016 and 2017, and with regard to privacy there was not unanimity with regard to what we should do moving forward. I think it does require a deeper dive.

I think that political parties do play an essential role in terms of engaging Canadians in the political process, and I think it would be worthwhile to understand how we could apply a privacy framework in a way that enables parties to continue to do that work and engage with Canadians, but also to ensure that we're doing more with regard to privacy.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Thank you.

The first amendment I have up is actually the first amendment in the whole package, and I just wondered if I could get your reaction. There is currently, as you know, a quite public controversy in Quebec between one of Quebec's leading environmental groups, Équiterre, and the view taken by the Quebec election officials as to what is election advertising and what isn't.

In my former life as executive director of the Sierra Club of Canada, there was a new information bulletin put forward by CRA in the 2006 election that made some groups think, “We can't even publish surveys. We can't say that this is where the Conservatives stand, this is where the Liberals stand, and this is where the NDP stand, and take your pick.” The elections advertising clarification that I am putting forward would ensure that we distinguish between partisan activities and public information activities. I'm wondering if you have any views of whether the amendment I have put forward might be acceptable to the government.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think I would need to take a further look at it. However, one thing that should be noted is that during the pre-writ period, measures in Bill C-76 are only with regard to partisan-related activity. In the current Canada Elections Act, as has been the case for a long time, in the writ period it's any advertising, so there is no distinction between partisan and issue advertising. I think that distinction, in fact, is important to maintain, because as the Supreme Court has illustrated in times past, particularly in Harper v. Canada, the supremacy of the voice needs to be with political parties and political actors during the writ period. I think that is an important distinction to maintain.

(1625)

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Your colleague has a point there.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I may also add, Ms. May, that the third party intervention regime in the province of Quebec is quite different. At the federal level, anybody can be a third party and there are spending limits, but in Quebec, I think only individuals may intervene, and they can only spend a maximum of $200 or $300. It's much more limited than at the federal level.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Thank you.

Let me try to fit in one quick last question.

The Chair:

Make it really quick.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

We had been discussing a commissioner of leaders' debates, and that's not been brought forward. Do you anticipate the 2019 election will, therefore, be run by the consortium in the fashion that it had been since the 1960s, or are any further changes proposed?

Hon. Karina Gould:

There will be further changes. I do have an intent to ensure that in 2019 there will be a debates commission and commissioner. I will look forward to discussing this with you shortly.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you both.

Now we'll go back to Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Will there be legislation brought forward for that commission?

Hon. Karina Gould:

No.

Mr. John Nater:

Why not?

Hon. Karina Gould:

It's October 2018, and I will be drawing strongly on the recommendations in the report from the Procedure and House Affairs committee.

Mr. John Nater:

You're not going to introduce legislation this late in the game for a commission, yet you're going to introduce legislation this late in the game for a massive overhaul of the electoral system.

Hon. Karina Gould:

This legislation was actually introduced in the spring, and we're here today because of a filibuster, so....

Mr. John Nater:

It was introduced on the date by which the Chief Electoral Officer stated that he needed the legislation fully passed, after leaving Bill C-33 unmoved and unloved at second reading during that period of time—

Hon. Karina Gould:

This study could have started much earlier.

Mr. John Nater:

I want to go back to a comment that was made by our provincial chief electoral officer about the value of third party advertising.

He actually recommended potentially going with any spending being considered third party spending and needing to register. Do you agree with that?

Hon. Karina Gould:

In the legislation, I think it is important to have a reasonable threshold. As my colleague Mr. Morin has noted, at the federal level any individual or organization is considered to be a third party during an election, and I think that $500 is a reasonable amount to have as a ceiling to be able to report. We have to remember that there are fairly onerous reporting requirements on third parties, and you'd want to have a certain dollar amount that could have a substantial impact on how Canadians are understanding the information that's coming at them. I think $500 is reasonable.

Mr. John Nater:

His contention was that it's much easier to see spending, period, than a funny $500 amount, which when you are looking at online digital sales, is tough to see. I'll leave that there.

With regard to a register of future voters, the provincial example was a minuscule number of people on the register of future voters. How do you foresee there being more people on the federal register?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think there will be. I think Canadians will be excited about it. We are very excited about getting Canadians on the future electors list. It's about encouraging more young people to participate, so I am hopeful that it will be one additional step in seeing a higher youth voter turnout.

Additionally, Bill C-76 also returns the mandate of the CEO of Elections Canada to be able to inform and educate the public about voting. Should Bill C-76 pass, I am sure that we will see much more engagement by the CEO of Elections Canada for voters at all age levels and for everyone who is intending to participate in our elections, which I think will be very positive.

Mr. John Nater:

Would you support an explicit amendment from the Conservatives to ban the sharing of that information with political parties?

Hon. Karina Gould:

It would already be outside the mandate of Elections Canada to share that information.

Mr. John Nater:

Would you support an amendment to explicitly state that?

Hon. Karina Gould:

What's important to recall is that Elections Canada only shares the register of electors, and the future electors do not end up on the electors list until they are 18, so that would not be necessary.

Mr. John Nater:

Am I hearing that you won't explicitly state that in legislation?

Hon. Karina Gould:

It would be unnecessary to do so.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Does anyone have one quick question without a long preamble—first come, first served?

Go ahead, Elizabeth.

(1630)

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Minister, when do you anticipate we will see the rules for the leaders' debates?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Soon.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen, you can have your short question.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thanks, Chair.

The specific question is this: Can you point to a measure in here that will make good the claim of wanting to increase the diversity of voices, particularly women's voices, in future parliaments?

Hon. Karina Gould:

The amendment I was discussing with regard to care expenses is very important, because it will enable people who may have thought they couldn't run for office to put their names forward as candidates.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Specifically, is that for the pre-writ period or just during the 35 days, typically, of the election itself?

Hon. Karina Gould:

It's for the writ period, because the pre-writ period would not be reimbursable.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right, so the measure you're pointing to is 35 days of being able to use fundraised money for child care?

Hon. Karina Gould:

It could be 50, but it's really important, because that's the time you are working full time on this and need access to those services.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The only reason I ask is that in all the surveys of candidates coming forward, women talk about the nomination process as being much more difficult than the actual writ period itself in terms of family obligations. The one measure you point to isn't aimed at what women point to as the most significant barrier.

I really encourage my colleagues to consider measures that have worked in other jurisdictions to elect more women, which are generally connected back to the reimbursements we give back to parties. That's the amendment we're moving. If we want it, let's walk the talk.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister, for coming. It's a great way to start out our clause-by-clause study today, and we look forward to reporting back to you.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes. Thank you for having me.

The Chair:

We'll suspend so that people can get their notes ready for clause-by-clause consideration.



(1645)

The Chair:

Good afternoon, and welcome back to the 123rd meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

This afternoon we'll begin clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-76, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act and other acts and to make certain consequential amendments.

I would like to again note the presence of the officials from the Privy Council Office: Manon Paquet, Senior Policy Advisor, and Jean-François Morin, Senior Policy Advisor. They will attend our meetings to provide assistance to the committee should members have questions about the bill. Thank you both for being here.

Before we begin, I would like provide members with some general information about how we will proceed with clause-by-clause consideration of the bill.

The committee will consider each of the clauses in the order in which they appear in the bill. Once I have called a clause, it is subject to debate and vote.

If there are amendments to the clause in question, I will recognize the member proposing the amendment, who will explain it in around a minute or so. The amendment will then be open for debate. When no further members wish to intervene, the amendment will be voted on.

I would like to remind members to ensure that clause-by-clause consideration proceeds in an efficient, orderly fashion.

I may limit debate to five minutes per party per clause. As I said earlier, I'll be flexible as long as people don't spend a lot of time on minor clauses where things are obvious, etc. If I do enforce the five minutes, it's per clause, not per amendment. There is the odd clause that has 10 or 20 amendments, but there are still only five minutes, so keep—

Yes?

(1650)

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

You said you “may”, so I'm assuming that you'll show greater generosity on many, particularly if it's obvious that we're not simply trying to use up time.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay, thank you.

The Chair:

I will, however, endeavour to use my discretion as chair to allow as much debate as may be deemed necessary, provided that members are judicious in their use of time.

Amendments will be considered in the order in which they appear in the package that each member received from the clerk. If there are amendments that are consequential to each other, they will be voted on together.

In addition to having to be properly drafted in a legal sense, amendments must also be procedurally admissible. The chair may be called upon to rule amendments inadmissible if they go beyond the principle of the bill or beyond the scope of the bill, both of which were adopted by the House when it agreed to the bill at second reading, or if they offend the financial prerogative of the Crown.

If you wish to eliminate a clause of the bill altogether, the proper course of action is to vote against that clause when the time comes, not to move an amendment to delete it.

If during the process the committee decides not to vote on a clause, that clause can be put aside by the committee, so that we revisit it later in the process.

Amendments have been given a number, found on the top right corner, to indicate which party submitted them. There is no need for a seconder to move an amendment. Once an amendment is moved, unanimous consent is required to withdraw it.

While I'm on the subject of amendments, I would like to remind members that the committee has already agreed to amend clause 262 by replacing line 32 on page 153 with the following: “election period is $1,400,000.” That means we can't amend that clause any more.

If the committee has not completed clause-by-clause consideration of the bill by 1:00 p.m. Friday, all remaining amendments submitted to the committee will be deemed moved, the question put forthwith and successively without further debate on all remaining clauses and proposed amendments, as well as each and every question necessary to dispose of the committee stage of the bill.

The committee's report to the House will contain only the text of any amendments that were adopted, as well as an indication of any clauses that were deleted.

I thank the members for their attention.

We will now proceed to clause-by-clause consideration.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I have just a technical question, Chair, before we start. It's a question through you to our guests.

First of all, thank you for being here and being willing to spend some...I don't know about “willing”, but you're going to spend some time with us.

Procedurally, I've dealt with other legislation, and we usually have witnesses from the minister's office as well. Is Privy Council handling all of this, or are there technical advisers from Minister Gould's office who will be made available to the committee as we go through some of these amendments?

That's through you to our—

The Chair:

The PCO is mostly Minister Gould's office. It's sort of the—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The PCO is Minister Gould's office? Is that the structure here?

The Chair:

That's where most of this work is. It's sort of different from other bills.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No, we're from the democratic institutions group at PCO, so we're public servants. We will very likely inform you on technical questions related to the bill, but we cannot answer questions that relate to policy.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No, of course.

I missed what you said. You're from which department of the PCO?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

We're from the democratic institutions group within the Privy Council Office.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's the democratic institutions group within the PCO.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Then my question—again through you, Chair—is about there not being somebody from Minister Gould's office.

You're answering technical questions. My assumption is, then, that the bill was also designed within the—forgive me—democratic institutions department of the PCO. We're going to run through hundreds of amendments. I just want to know, before the committee launches into this, who we need to ask. Is there anybody else to ask?

If the bill was designed within the PCO, then great; let's roll. If the bill was designed in the minister's office, then I suspect we're concerned about bumps along the road when we're asking about things that you weren't involved in. Is my first assumption correct?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No, it was designed within our group.

(1655)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It was designed within your group.

Okay, that's all I needed to know, Chair. Thank you.

The Chair:

Okay. Thank you.

Pursuant to Standing Order 75(1), the short title is postponed.

(On clause 2)

The Chair: The chair calls clause 2, and we have Green Party amendment 1.

Do you want to speak to that?

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Yes. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I will very briefly put on the record—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Mr. Chair, pardon me; before we begin, I had a point of order, please.

The Chair: Oh, sorry.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie: My apologies, and my apologies to you, Ms. May.

Before we begin our extensive clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-76, I want to give the courtesy of a heads-up to my colleagues about some additional Conservative amendments.

There are approximately 21 amendments that were drafted by legislative counsel between June and September, but for one reason or another, and maybe several, they did not not make it into the package that was circulated on October 2.

Mr. Chair, we intend to move each of these amendments from the floor at the appropriate point in our proceedings, but to ensure colleagues have the advantage of advance review, I'm happy to circulate copies of the amendments now.

These amendments are in both official languages and are in the manner and form produced by the law clerk's office.

Before members get worried that we may be unleashing a number of new issues, I should point out that most of the amendments in this supplementary package actually complement the existing amendments that have been previously circulated. In fact, I believe there are fewer than a handful of amendments that are not connected or related to amendments that have already been circulated.

To assist you, Mr. Chair and our clerks, with identifying where these amendments will be moved, considering line positions and so forth, I can advise that the first amendment for clause 2 will be moved before amendment PV-1 and the other amendment for clause 2 will be moved after amendment PV-1.

There is an amendment for clause 37 to be moved after amendment Liberal-2.

There is an amendment for clause 45.

There is an amendment for clause 70, to be moved after amendment Liberal-5.

There is an amendment for clause 102.

There is an amendment for clause 122, to be moved after amendment CPC-49.

There is an amendment for a new clause, clause 155.1.

There is an amendment for clause 191, to be moved before amendment CPC-69.

The first amendment for clause 223 will be moved after amendment CPC-88. The other amendment for clause 223 will be moved after amendment CPC-92.

There is an amendment for clause 225, to be moved after amendment CPC-101.1.

The first amendment for clause 234 will be moved after the amendment CPC-113. The other amendment for clause 234 will be moved after amendment CPC-114.

There is an amendment for clause 235.

There are two amendments for a new clause, 252.1.

There is an amendment for clause 326.

There is an amendment for clause 357, to be moved after amendment Liberal-60.

There is an amendment for a new clause, 365.1

Finally, there is an amendment for clause 377.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you.

I think that will keep our legislative counsel busy.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

That was almost as fast as David. I'm impressed.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I tried to be more expressive than Bardish. That's a joke.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

Ms. Kusie, you said you were going to move your first amendment now?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes. The first amendment will be moved before amendment PV-1.

The first amendment, entitled CPC-10008563, is: That Bill C-76, in Clause 2, be amended by adding after line 25 on page 2 the following: (e.1) the ballot reconciliation reports prepared under section 283.1;

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I have a point of order, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Mr. Chair, is this amendment related to clause 2?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Is PV-1 related to clause 1?

The Chair:

No, it's related to clause 2.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

My apologies. I'll keep up next time.

The Chair:

Okay.

Could you briefly explain the intent of your amendment?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure. It relates to the inverted polling division/polling station relationship, and adds a ballot reconciliation requirement where multiple polls are at one polling station.

(1700)

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

To the mover, can you repeat the argument for this particular one, whatever we're calling this amendment? Are we going to call this CPC-1, or 10008563?

The Chair:

It would be minus one, because we already have CPC-1.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Can we just have the argument for this amendment? Referring back to the legislation, it is difficult to know what section 283.1 within the bill is and what this amendment would do.

The Chair:

Mrs. Kusie, there is a request that you explain the amendment again.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Apparently the reason for this amendment is concern that there will not be the ability to identify the numeric outcomes at one polling station, whereas the existing system ensures that there is the ability to determine the number coming from one specific polling station.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This may be unfair to our witnesses, who have just seen this amendment, as we have. Do you have any ability to confirm or add to the explanation given on the effect of CPC minus one, or whatever we're calling this—the ballot reconciliation reports?

Are you familiar with this section of the Canada Elections Act and what changing Bill C-76 in this way would do? I ask this as you're getting the amendments right now.

As I said in my preamble, this might be unfair to ask, but if you are familiar with this....

I thank my colleague for the explanation. My inclination is to vote against something if I don't have the ability to base my vote on some evidence that I have seen at the committee so far, and I don't recall this issue being raised. That's unless our officials can tell us in the next little bit why this might be an improvement to our election laws.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Just give me a second to find the reference.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Sure. I'll do the same.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

You're right that Bill C-76 makes many changes to the way that polling stations will be managed. Currently in the act, we have a polling station, which is basically a ballot box, and election officers who take the votes for one polling division. When many polling stations are regrouped in the same place, we call that a “polling place”.

What Bill C-76 changes is that polling places will become polling stations, and inside polling stations there will be many tables where election officers will be able to receive the votes. This follows a recommendation by the Chief Electoral Officer to modernize the administration of the vote at the polling stations. I'm getting to—

(1705)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Just so that I can understand the scenario you were talking about—and forgive me, committee members, but I exist in a visual world—traditionally, particularly in urban centres, you would come into a school or a church gym, where there would be many polling stations from different districts, all contained within one. We would call that a polling place. Is it the case that Bill C-76 changes that to call it not a polling place anymore, but would consider that one entire polling station?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Exactly. This will become a polling station.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Then that change under proposed paragraph (e.1) isn't a new way of voting; it's just a new way of organizing the votes that come in. It doesn't matter which one an elector goes to.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Eventually. The Chief Electoral Officer will be given more flexibility in the management of polling stations. He has already indicated that the “voting at any table” concept will not be applied for the 2019 election.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You're saying the CEO doesn't have time now, given the lateness of the bill, to make the change that we're contemplating under this section, which would allow a voter to simply find a polling station, be enumerated, and be able to vote. This would be for future elections beyond 2019.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Absolutely.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay, and then can you comment on the change that this amendment would make to that scenario?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

This amendment would bring a change to the definition of “election documents” so that the ballot reconciliation reports would be considered an election document. Ballot reconciliation reports are a concept that will be introduced by a further amendment, but section 533 of the Canada Elections Act—it's not in the bill, but the act—already requires the Chief Electoral Officer to make a report of the results by polling division—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Aren't those commonly referred to as “bingo sheets”? Is that the reconciliation report, or is that—

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No, that's different. The Chief Electoral Officer will still have to report results for each polling division in a separate manner. Not all polling divisions included in the polling station will be amalgamated. They will still need to be reported separately.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

You're saying this isn't necessary? It's already being done?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I think the other motion will allow us to learn more about the context, but I'm just saying that if the concern is about results not being given by polling division, the act already requires that.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Just as a clarification, this clause is a pre-coordinating amendment for the CPC-72 amendment, which we'll debate later on. It's just adding that definition to the election document. Because of where those election documents fall in the bill itself, we have to consider it first, before we move on to CPC-72.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

We're ready for the vote on that amendment.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Okay. Next is amendment PV-1.

Go ahead, Ms. May.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Before we launch into the last amendment, I want to put on the record that the process by which I find myself here is still offensive and difficult for me. This committee's motion requires that I be in the committee to present amendments at clause-by-clause consideration. This is a substantial interference with my ability to do my work, because we quite often have committee hearings and clause-by-clause consideration at the same time, with two different committees meeting on clause-by-clause at the same time. It's a motion I don't welcome, but I do welcome the opportunity to be among colleagues and present these amendments, which I will do as quickly as I can, given how many the committee has to deal with on Bill C-76.

My first amendment falls under the subsection, just to remind people, where election advertising has a carve-out that says election advertising does not mean one of these things. Election advertising, for instance, in the bill as it now is drafted doesn't include transmission of an editorial or an opinion in a newspaper.

The concern I'm trying to address in this amendment comes from non-governmental organizations that are not actually in any way, shape or form advocating or in any way being partisan, but want to publish results, for instance, of surveys—in other words, it's for information purposes, but they're not third parties.

To enter into a campaign as a third party suggests you're favouring someone. That could be very difficult, for instance, for a charity that must not take a position in an election, but which, by its mandate, has an educational function. To ensure that the educational function is not precluded, I have the amendment that adds, for greater certainty, that election advertising does not include “general advocacy on an issue that does not actively promote or oppose a registered party or the election of a candidate”.

Then the rest is consistent with that to ensure we also are not considering it as identifying or commenting on the position taken on an issue by a registered party or nomination contestant and so on.

I hope that's clear. We already have heard the minister's answer, so I'm relatively sure about what's going to happen to my amendment, but I think it's really important that the voices of non-government organizations that are not advocates and are not partisan be allowed to be heard, because those voices are an extremely important source of information for voters. Registering as a third party is not only onerous but may mislead people as to the intention of civil society organizations that are completely non-partisan.

Thank you.

(1710)

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I have a question through you to Ms. May.

Thank you for the amendment. I know it's not directly related, but recently we've seen new finance rules coming out from the CRA with regard to what charities can advocate for a period and receive donations. That was introduced under the last regime. It was shot down in I think the Ontario Superior Court a while ago. The government has suggested it is going to appeal.

I'm wondering about the combination of the ability of charities to receive money to advocate. These are environment groups and anti-poverty groups, and religious organizations, I would imagine, fall under this category as well, with their inability to advocate for the issues that they care about in elections.

We all know as political actors that if Canadians are going to donate to a political party to advocate for their views, they get a very generous tax receipt back. If they donate to some of these charities, they get much less back, yet Canadians continue to use charities to advocate for issues.

The challenge I pose to you is this: does this survive the challenge at court? That's going to be some of the balance in this bill, Chair: it's of some concern whether some of the restriction the government is against would be survivable at court versus the freedom of speech amendments that the court has to deal with.

Does your amendment to this bill allow the voices of charities and those that support them to continue their advocacy?

You mentioned surveys. If a charity comes forward and ranks parties and says, “We're an anti-poverty or religious charity, and we like this party, this candidate”, how can that not be perceived by the public and the media as just straight-up partisan activity?

Ms. Elizabeth May:

I would agree with you. That would look like partisan activity if they said, “We like what this party has said.” We're talking about publishing the results so someone can read them and say, “Oh, this party has this position.” In other words, it's pure education. It's not saying, “We like what this party said because we surveyed them.” It's saying, “Here is a survey we circulated to the parties in this election and individual candidates on a riding-by-riding basis.” One must remember there are independent candidates seeking to become members of Parliament. In our Westminster parliamentary system, they have just as much a right to get the public's attention as those who are in the larger parties.

The reality is that my amendment would actually make the legislation more robust in protecting free speech, without increasing the risk that third party actors will use their position to engage in partisan activities through the back door. They'd have to be very clear that it's general advocacy on an issue that does not promote or oppose. That means it's straight-up public information. It's education.

I don't want to take too long, but I have to say I have experienced this at the Sierra Club of Canada. Starting in 2006 and without any changes to the law, CRA information bulletins began to restrict very significantly the ability of NGOs to speak during election campaigns, even about the most basic fact-checking around issues on which they have expertise. We invite NGOs to testify at committees because they have expertise. That expertise is very valuable to a voter.

Political parties have rights to speak, but voters can quite appropriately apply a discount factor to the truth of what they hear from political parties during election campaigns. However, if they know there's a group they trust, whether it's CARE Canada or Oxfam speaking to poverty issues or a major organization that advocates for the rights of women like Equal Voice, their ability to publish a survey should not fall under the election advertising provisions of Bill C-76.

(1715)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

Are we prepared to vote?

You'd like a recorded vote?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, just on this one.

The Chair:

We will have a recorded vote.

(Amendment negatived: nays 8; yeas 1) [See Minutes of Proceedings]

The Chair: We have CPC-1, tabled by Mr. Richards. Could someone briefly explain the intent of CPC-1?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

In CPC-9950080, we are proposing that—

A voice: You have to move it first.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie: Oh, sorry.

The Chair:

Is this a new one or the one that you presented before?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This is a new one, because I believe now that PV-1 has been defeated, the other is moot.

The Chair:

We'll call this CPC-0.2 for the administrators here.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay.

Mr. Vance Badawey (Niagara Centre, Lib.):

Just use the reference number.

The Chair:

It will also be reference number 9950080, if you want to follow. It's the one that was handed out.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, on a point of order, do you in each case want the whole thing to be read out, “I move...”, and have us go through the whole thing, or would you prefer us to just go right into the explanation?

The Chair:

I'd just like a quick explanation of what it is.

Mr. Scott Reid:

We can skip “I move that this be amended in line such-and-such on page....” That can all be skipped?

The Chair:

Yes, I think so.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. That's the answer to your question.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay, well, I think it's obvious in here: “future elector means a Canadian citizen who is 16 years”.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Go ahead, Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Just to clarify, this would amend the definition of “future elector”. Instead of age 14 to 18, it would be from 16 years of age to 18, so it narrows the age group and moves the lower end up to 16 for that requirement. It just provides a slight increase in the age.

I'll leave it at that, Chair.

The Chair:

Okay. Everyone understands that. Is there any further comment? Are you ready for a vote?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I have one quick comment. How old do you have to be to be a member of the Conservative Party?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, do you mind if I do this one? It's 14, which I have always thought was way too low; and I have tried for years to raise the age to 16 instead of 14.

My own experience in dealing with youth activists is that there's a greater maturity difference between a 14-year-old to 16-year-old than there is between a 16-year-old and, say, a 20-year-old. It's just one of those things that seems to me, based on plenty of party experience, to justify the age of 16 instead of 14. There you are.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Anyway, right now it's consistent, and this is a future elector, not a current elector.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's absolutely consistent, but speaking for myself, I would like to see both of these be 16; and if I can get around to changing our party constitution, I'd like to see that be 16 as well.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

Now we're going to go to what was originally CPC-1. The reference number, which you already have, is 9985169, just for clarity.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

That one actually has a number of CPC-1.

(1720)

The Chair:

Yes, it has CPC-1 on it, and the reference is at the top left-hand corner so that you don't mix it up with the other CPC-1s.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What reference are we going to now?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We're back to that paper.

The Chair:

We're doing CPC-1.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Oh, okay.

The Chair:

Would someone like to explain briefly what this amendment does?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure. It is in coordination with my question to the minister during her appearance here today about the government at present enjoying specific advantages in regard to being the government. What this attempts to do is level the playing field for the other registered parties in terms of restricting partisan advertising specifically, and in relation to other acts.

The Chair:

Okay. Is there discussion? Are you ready for the vote?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Pardon me; before we go to the vote, is this what she committed to within the discussion just now, when I asked her, “Will you commit to not...”, in your opinion?

So, no.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm wondering if this is attempting to have cabinet ministers—including the Prime Minister, of course—list all expenses in the pre-election period and then include that as partisan. Is it attempting to make those expenses part of the partisan advertising limits and/or ban?

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, just to clarify, we're still in clause 2, which includes definitions. This is again basically a pre-coordinating amendment for later on. It is, as Mr. Cullen noted, to align those periods.

The Chair:

Okay. Are you ready for the vote?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We are on PV-2. If this is adopted, CPC-2 cannot be moved, as they amend the same line.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. Just out of interest for those members who are wondering what “PV” is, it is le Parti vert.[Translation]

Surely, one day there will be another party with the letter “P”, Maxime Bernier's for example, but I want to point out that “PV” here refers to the Green Party.[English]

I think it was when I first started doing amendments in the 41st Parliament that the government of the day was worried that if we called the amendments “G”.... They liked to hold onto “G” for “government”, but that's my hope, too. Anyway, never mind.

In the pre-election period, my amendment would, at line 22 on page 5, extend the pre-writ period. I think it's very good that this legislation is going to apply rules to the pre-writ period on spending limits and conduct. I'd love to see the pre-writ period begin on the day after an election. However, in this amendment I've extended it only by two months so that it would start on April 30 instead of June 30.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle is next, and then Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you so much.

I would like to agree with Ms. May and think that it should be extended; however, the legal evidence that we've heard is that there may be issues with respect to extending that period based on previous decisions, I believe, out of the British Columbia....

Mr. Cullen is going to correct me on this, but—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I would never even suggest it.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

He would never suggest that I could be incorrect on this.

This was planned in order to make it at a point when Parliament was no longer sitting and to make the election period more compliant with court decisions.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I have a question to our witnesses.

What was the pre-election period in Ontario for the last campaign?

You're saying it was six months.

It too was challenged in court as being too onerous. It survived that court challenge.

I think, as I mentioned earlier, Chair, that just with the bill as it is, there's tension as civil liberties and freedom of speech and those types of important values that we have in Canada go up against trying to set down limits.

I think Ms. May's interjection here, to extend the intention of what the bill does to make it more meaningful.... We know that much of that pre-writ period extends right through the summer, with fixed election dates at least. Am I right in saying that? If we go back from the election, the writ period, and then we go two and a half months back from that, we're mostly dealing with summer—

(1725)

Ms. Elizabeth May:

With summer, yes....

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

—in Canada, which I know is an impassioned political time for many of our voters. They're keenly tuning in to CPAC, as they are right now.

If what we're trying to do is level the playing field, then you certainly can't take that last two months or two and a half months and say, “This is the most fevered time. We have to move the pre-election limits.” We have to go further back, I think, because while Ms. May may be right that the election seemed to start right after the last election, the intensity certainly increases in that May-June-July period, and certainly in May and June before the House rises, typically.

I am supportive of the amendment and I think it is pretty strong in court, just to Mr. Bittle's concern that we have already seen it tested once, and Ontario just went through it. The results may have been terrible, but it wasn't this change to the Ontario election rules that caused the results that we saw.

The Chair:

Could I just ask a question, Mr. Morin? Are there other people in the room from your department?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes.

The Chair:

Feel free to call on them at any time. Don't worry about that.

Okay, are we ready for the vote on PV-2?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Now we'll go on to CPC-2.

Do you have a quick explanation of what it does?

Mr. John Nater:

It's in a similar vein, only we make “January 1, in the case of a third party” and keep the other dates for all other cases.

The Chair:

Is there discussion?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This would actually go back to Chris's point about constitutionality, that we have seen this aspect challenged.

Did you say “January”?

Mr. John Nater:

It's January 1.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

In terms of limitations on freedom of expression, I don't think extending it to January 1 would make it for six minutes in a court, so I try not to vote for those things.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

We've spent a long time on clause 2, but I'm going to allow a little more time on this next one, NDP-1, because this vote also applies to NDP-2, NDP-3, NDP-4, NDP-5, NDP-6, NDP-7, NDP-12, NDP-13, NDP-14 and NDP-15. The result of this vote applies to all those amendments.

Mr. Cullen, do you want to introduce this amendment?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, absolutely, and all the consequential amendments.

Essentially, this is a question I put to the minister when she was here. We've had people testify on this issue. If the intention is that we are all democrats of various natures, we like people voting. We've seen a steady decline in voter turnout, with the odd uptick.

One of the things we've learned from past surveys by Elections Canada and the different provincial sections is that we don't have a five-day workweek anymore. We don't have a regular-hour workweek anymore. People work all sorts of hours, and this is essentially around Sunday voting. According to most international experts, the ability to allow this would result in a 6% to 7% gain in the turnout at elections.

The countries that do this, just to give people some reassurance that it functions in functioning democracies, are Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Portugal, Romania, Sweden, Switzerland, Uruguay, and a whole bunch of others.

I don't know if Samara, which we have all referenced and used quite a bit, have testified on Bill C-76. Did they?

The Chair:

Probably. Everyone did.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Everyone testified on this bill. They highly support this. The former Chief Electoral Officer, Marc Mayrand, whom many of us know and who is held in high regard in terms of his running of elections, has said this: Weekend voting would also increase the availability of qualified personnel to operate polling stations and of accessible buildings, such as schools and municipal offices, for use as polling places.

It's not just on the voter side of things. By all the evidence—and we're supposed to be an evidence-based committee, an evidence-based government, as I think they keep saying—the evidence for voters is helpful, but it's also helpful for Elections Canada in their staffing.

When did we start doing early voting as a major effort? I want to say it was 2006 when it started to really ramp up, 2004 or 2006. More and more early voting dates have become available, and voters like it. They like to be able to vote at their convenience rather than in long lineups. Some still like the tradition of voting day as the official day.

This amendment would simply get rid of an old aberration when maybe political times were different and the idea of having people work on a Sunday to staff the voting stations and having people participate in politics was seen as a negative.

That is clearly not the reality in Canada anymore. We're a diverse country. I think if we want more people voting and we want to help Elections Canada run elections, this amendment and the consequential ones would be good to vote for.

(1730)

The Chair:

Just to go on the record for people who are interested in this particular discussion, we did have a lengthy discussion at PROC on both sides of this. People who are interested can refer to that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

PROC has also done some work on this. There are some divided opinions on it.

We were looking around for what the evidence was. How does this hurt the democratic process? Does it hurt Elections Canada's ability to run elections? I don't want to be casual about it, but it was more that a feeling was behind people's opposition—“I just don't like it” or “It doesn't feel right”—as opposed to showing the evidence that it will make our democracy less effective.

Again, in all those 42 other countries that are doing it right now, it just works. It's not even a thought. Many of them moved to it quite some time ago.

The Chair:

Is there further discussion?

Go ahead, Ruby, and then Elizabeth.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

To that last point, I did want to say that I agree. I think there should be evidence. There was a lengthy discussion here. Everyone was divided. I think throughout that time we even had subs in this committee, and there were people in all parties who were feeling differently about it and a feeling that something of this magnitude maybe should be done through some consultation, and that we should get the proper evidence to figure out how people would feel about it rather than it just being an amendment to this piece of legislation.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Ms. May.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

I briefly wanted to say that in the 41st Parliament, Bill C-23, for the first time, broke the barrier against Sunday voting. The previous Conservative government had put in the legislation that advance polling would be mandatory on Sundays. That's the current state of the law, as far as I know it.

What Nathan's amendment would do would be to provide a voting day quite close to election day, but this would not be breaking a precedent or a taboo on Sunday voting. That was done by the previous government.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I thank both colleagues for their comments.

Again, I know there are mixed feelings about it. I'm really trying to drive at why evidence supports this amendment.

One of the groups that spoke to us talked about under-represented voters. These are folks who work shift work, folks who are single parents, and we were told in an overwhelming number of cases that one more opportunity rather than the Tuesday between this time and this time is easier on child care. It's easier to not be doing shift work that day. For voters who are under-represented in the voting tallies—low income, single mom, that type of voter—Sunday voting has been identified as something positive.

The Chair:

I have a question for the witnesses. Are any of the advance polls on Sundays?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes. As Ms. May has said, following Bill C-23 in the 41st Parliament, Sunday was introduced as a day of advance polling.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Are we ready for the vote on NDP-1?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: All those consequential ones have been not passed.

Next is amendment PV-3. This has some consequences too. This will also apply to PV-6, which, if you're interested, is on page 156; PV-9, on page 181; PV-12, on page 227; PV-13, on page 231; PV-15, on page 278; PV-16, on page 285; PV-17, on page 298; and PV-18, on page 304, because they are all related by the concept of coordination.

Also, if this is passed, CPC-150 on page 279 cannot be moved because it amends the same line as PV-15.

CPC-152 cannot be moved because it amends the same line as PV-16.

Could you introduce PV-3, Ms. May?

(1735)

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Yes. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

As you said, there are many consequential amendments. This goes to the issue of parties or entities in an election campaign coordinating their activities in a way that is offensive to the principles of democracy—in other words, appearing in sheep's clothing to deliver a much more partisan message, under-the-table coordination, and that sort of thing.

With the better definitions that I'm providing, particularly in this first amendment, PV-3, I'm trying to present what things are not “coordination”. This will make it much easier as a standard by which a future court might be trying to judge whether there has been collusion, whether there has been a coordination that offends the Elections Act.

I'll just read the kinds of things that do not constitute coordination: an endorsement of a party in such a form, if it's an endorsement by “a person, group, corporation”, their members or “shareholders, as the case may be”, or inquiries that are being made “in respect of legislation or policy-related matters". That doesn't give rise to the idea that that was a coordinated effort.

Another is “joint attendance at a public event or an invitation to attend a public event”. This is very important, because quite often you see organizations inviting a candidate from one party plus a candidate from another party. It should be clear in the legislation that this is not coordination. That's not what the legislation is trying to get at.

There's also "communication of information that is not material” in carrying out partisan activities, advertising or election surveys. Again, it's trying to provide more clarity and create a standard that will be far easier to prove down the road to avoid the offence.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen and Ms. Sahota are next.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Through you to our witnesses, one of the scenarios that Ms. May just described is about a group inviting candidates. Let's say in the midst of an election, you have a woman's group or an indigenous group that says they'd like you to come and speak at this thing. That's something that happens in every election that I've ever seen. Would that trip the collusion aspect of what's envisioned in Bill C-76?

I have no problem with it if an anti-poverty group wants to invite candidates to speak or debate or whatever. If a women's group does that, it's more than normal. It's actually quite healthy. I think if I understood Ms. May's intervention correctly, she is trying in this amendment to clarify that this should be both legal and encouraged. However, perhaps I have something wrong in my understanding of it.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

If I could just add, to remind members of the committee, my amendments come from testimony you heard from Professor Mike Pal at the University of Ottawa law school.

He felt the collusion test would be difficult and that the coordination evidence would be easier to.... Well, the word “coordination” is used, but what does it mean? What is the difference between “collusion” and “coordination”?

By specifying what kinds of examples would not trigger the act, we're clarifying things. I don't want to assert that without my amendments, one would automatically assume that was collusion, but by having a carve-out in the definition section, I think we'll avoid a lot of confusion later on.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Let me make my question more specific, then.

Could it be interpreted under this act that the scenario I just described would potentially constitute collusion and therefore have effect on the third party that organized a debate or a survey amongst candidates standing for election?

Ms. Manon Paquet (Senior Policy Advisor, Privy Council Office):

The series of amendments that are being proposed by Ms. May lowers the threshold for what is prohibited from "collusion" to "coordination".

The commissioner would have to make a determination, but it's not meant to stop exchanges of ideas from organizations. If an organization were to do activities to support a party, that could be considered a non-monetary contribution to the party and would be covered under those provisions.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Chair, I have a last question on this piece.

In the scenario I describe, could a third party—because that's what we're predominantly talking about, right?—in coordinating a survey of candidates, a debate of candidates, be under risk of being deemed in that "collusion" frame, which is a very strong term, a strong idea? It's somehow that they're being manipulative over the election rather than just making evidence available to voters.

(1740)

Ms. Manon Paquet:

In a scenario like the one you describe, I would say it would be unlikely, given that it's also working with multiple parties to organize such an event. It's not necessarily working with one specific party to get to a certain result.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay, thanks, Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Go ahead, Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I think it's a really bad idea when you take a term that's really specific and already defines coordination that is unethical in the word "collusion" and then take it to a broader word and have to possibly make a list of what that means and what it excludes.

I think we're really muddying the waters and casting a net that's far too large to solve a problem that maybe is not.... I think a targeted approach is always best. From a legal standpoint, I think it's better when we have more concise language rather than getting into definitions.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

All in favour of PV-3 and all of the attendant ramifications?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: On amendment CPC-3, can someone relate it to the Government of Canada again?

Go ahead, Mrs. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

First of all, I'm going to go back and apologize. I will say that the previous amendment that I was referring to was specifically in regard to ministerial travel. In discussions with the minister, she did make it clear that this was something that would not be of discussion.

However, I do feel that in CPC-3 the inclusion of “the Prime Minister or another Minister” under the definition of partisan advertising is keeping and in alignment with her commitment to our committee here today. With that, and with her commitment, I would ask for support for this amendment, please.

The Chair:

Is there discussion?

Go ahead, Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I may have missed that. This is attempting to do what? Is it to affect the way that the government, the minister specifically...?

Is it in similar vein to the previous...?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

No, I don't think it's previous....

I think it is including specifically the actions of the prime minister and the ministers under the definition of partisan advertising.

Further, it's to the commitment made by the minister in her appearance today to limit the presence of the government advertising in the pre-writ period to align the government of the day with the rules that essentially exist for third and registered parties, with everyone else.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have just a quick question.

As I read this, as I understand it, if the revenue agency says, “Don't forget to file your taxes”, because the election is during the tax season, that would be illegal and it would count toward the party's expenses. I don't support that.

Thanks.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I'm sorry, David; you'll have to ask that again. My apologies.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's all right.

You're saying that anything the government says during the pre-election period would count as partisan advertising. If we have an election in the spring for one reason or another, and it happens to be tax season and CRA says, “Don't forget to file your taxes”, that is now considered to be partisan advertising.

I think that's a very hard position to support.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It does say, “the message was necessary for the health and safety of Canadians.”

Does something like CRA affect the health and safety of Canadians? I would say no....

That's right; I have seen people die from heart attacks from tax evasion.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Pay your taxes or go to jail. That's health and safety.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I don't know. Perhaps we need an amendment to the amendment, indicating....

I feel as though this amendment provides for the fairness of putting the government on a level playing field with third parties and registered parties. I do agree with Mr. de Burgh Graham that certainly there are some messages that are vital for Canadians to know, but perhaps that would be included within the health and safety of Canadians.

(1745)

The Chair:

Okay....

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I don't think it's fair to suggest other scenarios at this time outside of health and safety. I think the point of including health and safety is that if there were pertinent information for Canadians, the government would certainly have the right to provide that information to Canadians. Outside of that, partisan is partisan.

I think there is a very common sense standard that would apply either way.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You're right. There's government and there's partisan, and they should remain separate, so I don't support this amendment.

The Chair:

Are you ready for the vote?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: CPC-4 is about a book being part of partisan advertising. Perhaps you could speak to that, Stephanie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's pretty obvious from the explanation that if the author or editor of a book is a member of the Senate or the House of Commons, it is included within partisan advertising.

For example, if I were to release a book called Right Here, Right Now during the election period, perhaps this would be perceived as—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You're wrong, now. That's my book. That's the book I'm publishing.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's just a hypothetical title, Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Now you have to declare that as election spending.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Clearly, we wouldn't want someone to have this type of publication advantage during this time.

The Chair:

Are you ready for the question?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Please note that I'll be releasing my book Not Here, Not Now during the writ period in the next election.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Shall clause 2 carry?

(Clause 2 agreed to)

(On clause 3)

The Chair: First of all, we're on Liberal amendment 1. It applies to Liberal-18, which is on page 110, and Liberal-62, which is on page 351. I will get the witnesses, because I think this is just a technical problem of the wording in French, and the order of it. Can you explain what this amendment is?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Absolutely, Mr. Chair. I will start with a bit of history, if you don't mind.

Prior to the year 2000, when the former Canada Elections Act was in force, it was very clear from the provisions included in that former Canada Elections Act that in order to vote, you needed to be a Canadian citizen and 18 years of age or older.

There were two other provisions related to these two requirements for qualification as an elector. One clarification was saying that provided you would be 18 years of age or older on polling day, you could actually vote before polling day—in advance polls, for example. With regard to citizenship, it was also very clear that if you were to become a Canadian citizen before the end of the revision of the list of electors, then your name could be included for future voting at advance polling.

When the new Canada Elections Act came into force in 2000, this question became a bit unclear by reason of the wording of section 3 of the Canada Elections Act in French. The English version of section 3 can be interpreted to say that you need to be 18 years of age or older on polling day, but you need to be a Canadian citizen at all times.

On the other hand, the French version of the Canada Elections Act says that you need to be a Canadian citizen and 18 years old on polling day, which could lead to the interpretation that if someone were to become a Canadian citizen before polling day.... For example, if someone knows that his or her citizenship ceremony is scheduled for 10 days before polling day, that person could vote before swearing the oath of citizenship.

When the new Canada Elections Act came into force in 2000, our consultations with Elections Canada informed us that Elections Canada always took a more traditional approach to interpreting section 3. Elections Canada never allowed someone who would become a Canadian citizen in the future to vote. It always required that persons be citizens before voting.

When Bill C-76 was introduced, other amendments toward the end of the bill brought this little imprecision to light again. Therefore, the proposed amendment would fix that. It would make it clear that you need to be a Canadian citizen when you exercise your right to vote.

(1750)

The Chair:

If we leave it the way it is, they were going to become a Canadian citizen, but something happened and the ceremony was cancelled, so they didn't become one, and they could have voted already. That's what it's clearing up.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Exactly.

The Chair:

Okay.

Is there any discussion?

Is someone moving it? David?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I so move.

The Chair:

Did you want to say anything?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think you said everything I need to say. Thank you.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That has a consequential withdrawal.

The Chair:

Yes, I read that out. If you weren't listening, I read that out.

Mr. Vance Badawey:

Pay attention, will you?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

The Chair:

That means LIB-18 on page 110 and LIB-62 on page 351 also carry.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, but there are also some withdrawals as a consequence.

The Chair:

There are some what?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There are some withdrawals as a consequence. LIB-14, LIB-17 and LIB-42 no longer need to go forward.

The Chair:

You're withdrawing Liberal....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We're withdrawing LIB-14, LIB-17 and LIB-42.

The Chair:

Okay, it's LIB-14, LIB-17 and LIB-42, when we get to them. We'll bring that up again.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll try to remember.

The Chair:

I just want to make sure everyone is in agreement.

(Clause 3 as amended agreed to)

(Clauses 4 and 5 agreed to)

(On clause 6)

The Chair: Under clause 6, we have CPC-5.

I think it changes something from two days to seven days, but did you want to explain that, Mrs. Kusie?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure. We are requesting longer notice for MPs seeking re-election to change the voting location.

The Chair:

Say that again.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

We are requesting requiring longer notice for MPs seeking re-election to change the voting location.

The Chair:

You want longer notice to change the voting location of what?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's to change their own voting location.

The Chair:

Do you mean where they vote?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, it's to change the notice of where they vote to at least seven days.

The Chair:

Right now they only have to give two days' notice that they want to vote somewhere else, and the amendment is suggesting they have to give seven days' notice.

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Where does this come from? There's been no evidence or suggestion that we needed to do this from Elections Canada or in the reports or anywhere else.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

You know, two days isn't that long. Seven does seem like a more...but it is a longer period of time, obviously.

(1755)

The Chair:

Do you want to vote?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

Shall clause 6 carry?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

If there's consent, can we lump clauses 6 to 14? It seems—

The Chair:

Let's just do clause 6 now, because we discussed something.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Okay.

(Clause 6 agreed to)

The Chair:

You cannot be chair.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

All in favour?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I'll vote in favour of that.

The Chair:

There are no amendments to clauses 7 to 14. Shall clauses 7 to 14 carry?

(Clauses 7 to 14 inclusive agreed to on division)

(On clause 15)

The Chair:

On clause 15, we turn to CPC-6.

We can get an introduction. This one may be hard to read, because they're referring to.... It's in two parts. In the first one, where it looks as if there's nothing there, it's just because they're taking out 18 and replacing 18.1, but go ahead, Stephanie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I am consulting....

Mr. John Nater:

This amendment proposes to have the effect of the Chief Electoral Officer maintaining the existing public education mandate.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's in the Fair Elections Act.

The Chair:

Okay.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

Next is CPC-7. This is related to no electronic voting without the House or the Senate—

Do you want to introduce this?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I don't have anything further to add.

John, do you?

Mr. John Nater:

It's just that Parliament would be our final decision-maker on whether we go to electronic voting or not.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm sorry, I missed that. Who would be the prime...?

Mr. John Nater:

It would be Parliament.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is Parliament not the prime decision-maker on this already? Could Elections Canada wake up tomorrow morning and say we're going to move to an electronic vote?

Mr. John Nater:

That could happen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I don't see it.

The Chair:

Okay.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 15 agreed to)

(Clauses 16 to 19 inclusive agreed to on division)

(On clause 20)

The Chair: We have CPC-8. It is about an officer not being able to live in the adjacent electoral district, whereas I think the act is proposing they could. This amendment would not allow them to do that, if I've read it correctly.

I think Elections Canada said often officials are very close, but this amendment wouldn't allow them unless they're in the adjacent district.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It would not be so much for jurisdictions like ours, Chair, but certainly in some of the urban jurisdictions I can imagine that an election officer is one street over and not technically in the district. Am I correct in saying that?

Elections Canada can hire somebody as an election officer who lives two blocks away, but they're outside the district. I don't see the motivation for this amendment, unless I'm understanding it incorrectly, which is highly likely.

(1800)

Mr. Scott Reid:

I think what can happen is that riding boundaries can change, so someone who was in the middle of it now is not.

You could have two skilled officers, each in their own riding. Thanks to boundary change, they're both in different ridings or they're both living in the same riding now, but one of them can't....

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

But imagine outside any boundary change scenario, just a scenario in which you have an election officer who lives not in Toronto Centre but Toronto one up. Literally, they're a block or five blocks outside the riding; it doesn't really matter. Does that prohibit them from performing the duties we expect of them?

I get it in large, rural, dispersed ridings. Some intimate knowledge is required of the district to hold the election, but I just don't see that it's going to matter to the voter in a lot of urban and suburban contexts. They can handle most of the questions and problems that can come up.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 20 agreed to)

(Clauses 21 to 24 inclusive agreed to on division)

(On clause 25)

The Chair: We have CPC-9.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Our amendments in CPC-9 are to maintain procedures to object early to persons who are incorrectly on the list of electors.

Obviously if there are people who are incorrectly on the list of electors, we would want to ensure that as much time as possible was allowed in an effort to correct the list.

Mr. John Nater:

Just to clarify, currently as the bill is written, at the end of the day Elections Canada has rules in place whereby you can object to incorrect names on elections lists a couple of weeks in advance. The Liberal bill takes out that provision. This amendment is reversing that provision that has been inserted by the government in this bill.

The Chair:

There's no ability to object now to someone on the list?

Mr. John Nater:

That's if this bill were to pass. Currently there is an ability to object in advance. If this bill passes, that will be gone. That's why this amendment is being put in place.

The Chair:

Do the witnesses have any comment on that?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I can confirm that this procedure is being removed from the Canada Elections Act. My understanding is that procedure was not used very much because it dates back to the time when lists were posted on telephone poles.

Ms. Manon Paquet:

The only thing I would add is that the procedure is removed, I believe, at clause 68. This is a reference to the procedure.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Just very quickly, this provision is based on a recommendation that was made by the Chief Electoral Officer, which is why this is in the bill. We trust the CEO's judgment on this particular clause, so we're opposed.

Mr. John Nater:

Just to clarify, if this were to pass, the only place where you could object is at the polling location on election day, if you make this change.

The Chair:

You're saying the procedure would be that if you think someone shouldn't be able to vote, you'd complain at the polling place.

Mr. John Nater:

That's correct. That would be the practical effect of this change.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 25 agreed to)

The Chair: There are no amendments on clauses 26 to 28.

(Clauses 26 to 28 inclusive agreed to)

(On clause 29)

The Chair: On clause 29, I think CPC-10 limits the number of election staff from one party, but I'll leave it to the Conservatives to propose it.

(1805)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, it just indicates a cap at 50% to the proportion of a single party's nominees for election officers who are assigned to a given polling station. It strikes me as fair that you wouldn't want a single party's election officers to have the opportunity to be the majority of election officers.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm just trying to think of scenarios in which this would be hard to achieve. Are there such scenarios in which you wouldn't be able to run the polling station? I'm just trying to think about.... On the surface it seems like an interesting idea, but again, many of these things are going to have practical impacts on how the elections are run. Could we not imagine a scenario of people not being available from other parties, and it ends up with more than 50% of election officers being from one party?

The Chair:

While we're on this topic, I thought there might have been other changes in the bill somewhere related to parties appointing people. Do you remember?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Absolutely, yes. Part of the polling station modernization portion of the bill gives more flexibility for returning officers in electoral districts to hire election officers in advance of receiving the party appointment suggestions. The returning officers will now be able to appoint up to 50% of the election officer positions before receiving the party nominations.

This is consequential to a recommendation by the Chief Electoral Officer. The party recommendations were coming later in the election period, and often were not sufficient to fill all the positions.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

For one, I trust Elections Canada to administer elections. More to the point, in my election, during the first couple of days of the campaign, my phones rang off the hook with people who wanted to be named to work at Elections Canada. I had never heard of any of them before and I have never heard from any of them since, and I suspect that these people called all the different parties so they would show up on all the different lists. If you have to say that only 50% are named by each party, they might have people who were named by all three parties, and everyone's named by everybody, so they could be anywhere.

I see that being problematic in implementation. I don't see any need for this amendment.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen, you're on the list.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I find the sometimes crossover partisan nature of what happens in polling stations just odd. The first returning officer I sat down with in my first election said, “Hi, I'm so-and-so, and I'm a Liberal.” I didn't know that happened. I was new to politics and didn't understand why that happened.

Again, sometimes we have to imagine the worst-case scenarios, not the best-case scenarios, when we're designing these laws. Many laws are only designed for worst-case scenarios. With this new 50% provision offered to returning officers, is it not possible that returning officers who are of a more partisan nature and like their partisan family might hire from only one party and then essentially have virtually all returning officers coming in at their discretion?

I'm just asking for scenarios in which that election officer is dealing with somebody of an “opposing” party. Is that possible with this provision that's coming later in the bill? I say that through you to our witnesses.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Mr. Cullen, when were you first elected?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I was elected in 2004.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

At that point, returning officers were still appointed by the Governor in Council, but the Canada Elections Act was amended a few years ago to provide that returning officers are now appointed by the Chief Electoral Officer following a fair recruitment process.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I note that Mr. Cullen has been re-elected since then and knows that information.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Well, that was despite the best efforts of some of those returning officers and some voters, but I understand that.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Also, returning officers are now subject to a code of conduct that prevents them from acting in a partisan manner.

(1810)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay. I've not read their code of conduct. I'm a bad democrat that way.

Again, to go back to this amendment, what is being attempted is to limit it so that in any group of returning officers, no more than 50% can be named by one party. Have I got that right?

The Chair:

If there is no further discussion, we will now vote.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clauses 29 and 30 agreed to)

(On clause 31)

The Chair: CPC-11 is related to when you have merged parties and you need to know the number of votes in the previous election. The present proposal refers to the biggest of the merged parties, and the CPC proposal is for the total of the merged parties.

I would like to ask the witnesses about the reason you need these numbers of electors. The title of this section in the act is “Appointments”. What appointments is that talking about?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

As we just mentioned a few minutes ago, political parties will still be able to recommend election officers to the attention of returning officers. The ratio that is assigned to each party is determined with reference to the results of the last general election.

The Chair:

In the marginal notes on page 18 for section 42, it says “Attribution of votes for appointments”. I'm just curious as to what the “appointments” are.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It is for the appointment of election officers. For example, in the 43rd general election, the parties will be able to recommend to returning officers the names of potential election officers in various electoral districts.

Had two major parties merged following the previous general election, the 42nd general election, this section deals with how these votes from the 42nd general election would be counted toward the attribution of names that can be recommended by each registered party.

The Chair:

Okay. Do you want to introduce your amendment? You're suggesting the number of votes for both parties that merged, whereas the present proposal is that the largest party of the—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's on the best result, yes. This essentially just mirrors the party's allocation of broadcasting time. It's in coordination with that.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Sorry; can you remind me which CPC we're on now?

Mr. John Nater:

It's CPC-11.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you.

The Chair:

All in favour of this amendment?

Sorry, Mr. Cullen, I didn't...?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I was opposing.

The Chair:

You were opposing?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 31 agreed to)

(Clauses 32 to 35 inclusive agreed to)

(On clause 36)

The Chair: We're on CPC-12. Right now you don't need to get parental consent to be on the pre-registered voters list. I think this CPC amendment is suggesting that if you're younger than 16, you need to get parental consent.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's correct.

(1815)

The Chair:

I think we just recently got a paper from Elections Canada noting that they did research on this, and it included other countries.Where this was—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You've got a paper on this?

The Chair:

Yes, I think I read it over the break week.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We have to get better break weeks planned for you, Chair.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen: We're all looking shocked and incredulous that you got that report.

The Chair:

I probably have it with me.

Is there any discussion on this amendment? If you're a young elector and you want to get on the list, it's being proposed that if you're under 16, you need parental consent. Right now you don't need parental consent for the list at any age, which goes down to 14, I think still, because the other amendment was defeated.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, CPC-2 was defeated, so it is not included.

We certainly live in an age of the Internet and threats on the Internet. I think that parents have not only the obligation but also the right to know what their children are up to on the Internet. I think that something such as signing up for the voting registry is significant, and I certainly would want to know if my children were doing that.

I don't think that it is an unreasonable request or position to ask for this parental consent as a requirement for 14- and 15-year-olds to be on the voting registry.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think our objective here is to knock down barriers to youth participation. I think putting up new ones is not helpful to our purposes here, so I'll be opposing this amendment.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Ruby.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

If only we were so blessed that our children were trying to sign up for a pre-electoral list online rather than doing other things, I think I'd be really happy and wouldn't need to know. Anyway, that's my opinion.

The Chair:

Is there anyone else?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings)

(Clause 36 agreed to)

(On clause 37)

The Chair: Note that if we pass this amendment, LIB-2 cannot be moved because they amend the same line. We're at CPC-13, and this is about having to report people, not only people who are on the list but also people who are being removed from the list.

Stephanie, do you want to...?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay.

Is this the amendment that I suggested in my list of amendments? Is that what this is referring to, the 9950142?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's 9952756.

The Chair:

It's CPC-13 in the book.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay.

The Chair:

It's one of the original ones, and it's relating to when the people have to provide lists. Your other one will be right after this one—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay. Thanks a lot. I appreciate that.

The Chair:

—because it comes after LIB-2.

Go ahead, Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Every campaign runs into this. I think sometimes the electoral lists are not “cleaned”, and we end up trying to contact dead people, to not put too rough a point on it.

It can be quite traumatic. I don't know if any of you have gone through it, but when you try to contact somebody and you remind them that their husband, wife, or family member has passed, it's not a great call to make. It's kind of frustrating.

If this ups the bar for the electoral list and allows Elections Canada to provide a cleaner list to us, I think that would be nothing but good.

(1820)

The Chair:

Mr. Graham is next, and then Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I would propose a subamendment in the hopes of maybe reconciling with Mr. Graham's amendment that's forthcoming. I have this in writing and I'll hand it over to you.

It reads, “That amendment CPC-13 be amended by adding, after the words “tors — of”, the following: 'in electronic form, or in formats that include electronic form' ”

The Chair:

Okay. Basically the subamendment puts in what's going to be in LIB-2, but it keeps the fact that they must report on who's removed from the list.

We have Mr. Graham now.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There's technology from the 1970s, even the 1960s, called a TIFF, that lets you get a list and then compare it to the old list and see where the differences are.

When Elections Canada sends its updated lists, dead people are already supposed to be removed. If they're not, sending this list isn't going to change that fact. I don't see the purpose of the amendment in the first place, and I don't see what the purpose is of sending a list of only deceased people. I don't see any advantage to this.

I appreciate what you're trying to do, John, but I can't support your amendment in the first place.

The Chair:

Does Elections Canada have anything on the—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's PCO.

The Chair:

—suggestion of the need to report people who were deleted from the list as well as giving the updated list?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

As was just said, this amendment would require Elections Canada to send the list of deceased people who were specifically removed from the list.

I cannot comment on the need, but these persons are not on the list of electors that is provided by Elections Canada anymore, so....

The Chair:

Okay.

I'd like to welcome Luc Thériault from the BQ. Thank you for coming.

So that people understand the subamendment, it will add in the electronic aspect that would be otherwise added in amendment LIB-2, but keep the nature of this amendment, CPC-13, to also provide a list of who has been deleted.

(Subamendment negatived)

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Going on to LIB-2, which is suggesting that Elections Canada also has to produce the list electronically, does someone want to introduce this?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Sure.

It's to ensure continuity in the provision to registered parties of lists in electronic formats. Proposed amendments would clarify that such documents must remain available in electronic format, in addition to any other format that Elections Canada sees fit.

A similar provision would apply to the distribution of maps.

I think it's a pretty straightforward change.

The Chair:

Before you think about this, know that it also applies to LIB-3 on page 37, LIB-4 on page 38, LIB-6 on page 40 and LIB-7 on page 41.

Is there any further discussion?

All in favour of Elections Canada having to produce the voters lists electronically as well? It seems to be of the age.

(Amendment agreed to)

The Chair: Shall clause 37 carry as amended?

(Clause 37 as amended agreed to)

The Chair: Okay, there are no amendments in clauses 38 to 46.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Mr. Chair, on clause 37 we had amendment 9950142. That was the one that we—

The Chair:

Oh, yes. Sorry, we do have another amendment.

Do you want to introduce it? Is it one of the new ones?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes. It adds for the Register of Future Electors the express prohibition on sharing registered data with parties, candidates and MPs.

The Chair:

Sorry; did everyone understand that?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's that it is absolutely prohibited to share the information obtained and retained within the Register of Future Electors with parties, candidates and MPs.

If we are going to put our children on the list without requiring parental consent, then at the very least what we can do is ensure that their data is not shared beyond the list.

Again, I think that's the minimum that we can do for our young people.

(1825)

The Chair:

Are there witnesses who have a comment on that?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I would only comment that section 45 already provides the information that the Chief Electoral Officer is allowed to provide to the parties, and in administrative law, if a governing body is not given a specific power, it basically cannot do what is not specifically allowed.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I would just clarify...it's moot.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Well, it would certainly add clarity, but I think it's already quite clear that the Chief Electoral Officer cannot provide that data to registered parties.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Can you further define how it would provide clarity, please?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Sorry?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Can you further provide...define how it is not clear in the existing legislation?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Provide how it is not clear? Sorry; could you repeat that?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

You're saying it would provide clarity if we were to insert this amendment.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I'm just saying that it would provide a very special situation in which a power is denied to the Chief Electoral Officer. That would be very uncommon in the act. Yes, it would say that he or she cannot provide that information, but I think the act is already quite clear that he or she cannot provide it.

The Chair:

Those in—

Mr. John Nater:

I request a recorded vote.

The Chair:

A recorded vote has been called.

(Amendment negatived: nays 5; yeas 4 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

Just for the record, the amendment we just voted on is reference number 9950142.

For clauses 38 to 44, there are no amendments.

(Clauses 38 to 44 inclusive agreed to)

The Chair: There's a new amendment for clause 45.

Would you like to introduce the new amendment, Stephanie?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure. In a similar vein to the last amendment, this prohibits the Chief Electoral Officer from sharing data with provinces and territories that are obliged to share the information with parties, and so on.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is this 0142...which?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It is reference number 9952296.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay, it's 2296. I'm with you.

The Chair:

Is this what we just talked about? Is this the register of future electors again?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, that's correct. Pardon me.

The Chair:

I assume that PCO has the same response—that it's not necessary because it's already covered, in your opinion, and they're not allowed to share that.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No, actually I don't think it's already covered. The act is currently pretty broad on the agreements with the provincial chief electoral officers that Elections Canada can enter into, so such an amendment would make it clearer that the standards that apply at the federal level should also apply when shared at the provincial level.

The Chair:

Are you saying that without this amendment, Elections Canada could give the list of young voters to the provinces?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes, there is a provision in the bill that allows Elections Canada to enter into agreements with provincial bodies that manage a list of electors—so yes, if this amendment is not passed, then the information that is found on the register of future electors could be shared. Of course, the Chief Electoral Officer has no obligation to enter into such an agreement, but yes, in theory that could be the case.

(1830)

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's enough for me to know. We're collecting this information for a very specific reason. It should only be for that reason. We just had affirmation that none of that information could go to political parties. It only makes sense that we would also imagine that the information doesn't go to provincial electoral officers, who may then also have different rules about how they share information with political parties. Let's just not open up the possibility that information that's offered in good faith by young people trying to get on the register list doesn't stay exactly where it's intended and go no further.

The Chair:

Are there any comments from the government?

Are there any further comments at all?

Mr. John Nater:

Let's have a recorded vote.

(Amendment agreed to: yeas 9 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

Okay, that was unanimous. The amendment with the reference number—Philippe, make sure I get this right—9952296 is passed unanimously.

(Clause 45 as amended agreed to)

(Clause 46 agreed to)

The Chair: There is a new clause, 46.1. NDP-2 has already been defeated, because of amendment NDP-1, and amendment NDP-3 was also a casualty of amendment NDP-1, but we'll have amendment CPC-14 introduced now. This is about protecting the list of electors.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes. I guess it's interesting to me because it would seem that reference number 9952296 would be included with this amendment if it were passed. It does also seem eerily similar to amendment reference number 9950142, although I guess 9950142 expresses the prohibition to the specific entities of parties, candidates and MPs, whereas this is on sharing information outside of Elections Canada.

Maybe our witnesses could say if there are ever situations now of the information being shared outside of Elections Canada. Could they could see it in any circumstances, such as if Health Canada or whatever requested this information? I can't imagine scenarios. Would there be a necessity to share this information outside of Elections Canada?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I do not think so.

I would refer you to the bill on page 26, line 11, in English. I think that the new proposed subparagraph 56(e.1) would provide for what you are trying to achieve here.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

What does it say, please?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It says that no one can knowingly use personal information that is obtained from the Register of Future Electors except as follows: (i) for the purposes of updating the Register of Electors, (ii) for the purposes of the transmission of information in the course of public education and information programs implemented under subsection 18(1), (iii) for the purposes of the administration and enforcement of this Act or the Referendum Act, or (iv) in accordance with the conditions included in an agreement made under section 55, in the case of information that is transmitted in accordance with the agreement;

Therefore the act is already quite clear on what—

(1835)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Did we ever have an example of something being used outside Elections Canada?

Okay, we'll go to a vote, please.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. John Nater:

Could we have a recorded vote, please?

The Chair:

Elections Canada was saying this was already covered in the clause just read, but do you want to call the roll?

(Amendment negatived: nays 6; yeas 3 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Clause 46.1 disappeared because of the various decisions already made.

(On clause 47)

The Chair: We'll look at CPC-15. This is related to the timing of when the election is called.

Mr. John Nater:

Mr. Chair, this is just in cases when the election writ is issued at a certain period of time close to the Christmas season. It provides the added writ period for that period of time so that we'd not necessarily have polling days on Christmas Day.

It's between November 12 and November 30, and then it's extended up to a 57-day writ period.

As a quick commentary, the 2005-2006 election is an example of how that could have been a significant issue. I wasn't here. Mr. Cullen was here in 2005. The Paul Martin government was defeated in late November, so if he did the 35-day writ period, there would have been advance polling on Christmas Day. At that point, the prime minister of the day called the election for January 23, 2006. It was a longer writ period, falling over the Christmas season.

I can't remember the result of that election off the top of my head, but I think it was a good one.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

Yes, Mr. Cullen?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The scenario was in a minority Parliament. The whole preview to that was the Stronach crossing. I guess what I'm saying is the circumstances were somewhat exceptional, the outcome less so.

I understand the intention of it is not to have government locked into an election cycle. If there was another unusual circumstance that led to an election call and then it couldn't be extended beyond the holiday season, voters would be pretty ticked off. They were ticked off anyway. It was a 60-day campaign. It was horrible.

The Chair:

The present act limits it to 50 days, so if it were November 30, that would take it to about January 20, and this would make it January 27.

Why do you end it November 30? Wouldn't it be more problematic if it were in December?

Mr. John Nater:

Sorry; could you repeat that, Chair?

The Chair:

It doesn't look as if November 30 is a problem. What if the writ were issued during December? That wouldn't be a problem because it would be too far out. Right.

Mr. John Nater:

It's a situation in which you would potentially have polling days on Boxing Day, Christmas Day, New Year's Day, and that type of thing.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I already see two weeks of flexibility in this. It's not as if you have to go 50 days—that's the upper limit, not the lower limit. I don't see what we're getting out of this at all.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Are you saying that if they just called it on the short end of the stick, it would be early December, mid-December?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, you have your time. If you have to go longer, you have two extra weeks. You can go past Christmas and New Year's.

I don't see the advantage for that situation, which would happen once in three generations.

(1840)

Mr. John Nater:

There are other dates, as well: the nomination deadline date and dates that have to be complied with. If you're doing it over the Christmas season, there are going to be days that are going to be problematic for Elections Canada to find staff and to have offices open.

I recall that in 2005-2006, Elections Canada's offices were open on Christmas Day. It's problematic when you have to find people to staff those offices at that point in time. It's a range, an extra seven days, and I think it provides some flexibility when those situations happen in minority parliaments, and there could well be minority parliaments in the future.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion on CPC-15?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: CPC-16 is relating also to adding seven days to the election period.

Mr. John Nater:

Mr. Chair, this is just extending the writ period up to a 57-day period, again giving some flexibility for timing at different points in time. It's an extra week added to the maximum, and it provides for the ability to—

The Chair:

But it's not related to Christmas this time.

Mr. John Nater:

Not necessarily, but it's potentially related to the Christmas season, or to other significant—

The Chair:

This is a broader extension.

Mr. John Nater:

Exactly. It provides some flexibility for significant dates in the calendar that could be proven problematic, depending on the timing, such as holidays or significant religious observances.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Isn't it redundant? It really it can't go that long anyway.

The Chair:

Well, we'll vote anyway.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

There was NDP-4, but that was lost with NDP-1.

Shall clause 47—

Mr. John Nater:

Let's have a recorded vote.

The Chair: We will have a recorded vote.

(Clause 47 agreed to: yeas 6; nays 3 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(On clause 48)

The Chair:

We're going on to CPC-17, which I can't find. If CPC-17 is adopted, then CPC-18 and CPC-19 cannot be moved, because they amend the same line.

Can we have an introduction of CPC-17?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I believe it's just essentially opposing the 50-day maximum writ period, which I would expect the government would be in support of, considering how well it worked for them in the last election. In fact, I remember being at Mercedes Stephenson's wedding when the election was called, and thinking, “Federal election—day one”. It was a sad day. It was a day in August.

That's just to say that you should support this amendment. This is something that has historically worked in the government's favour.

Mr. John Nater:

Just to clarify as well, this specific clause 48 applies to elections that have been rescheduled based on a candidate's death or a natural disaster, so that is the differentiation in these ones.

The Chair:

Does that make a stronger argument?

Mr. John Nater:

Absolutely.

The Chair:

Okay.

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

To our witnesses, if we start passing some of these amendments and make it 57 days and we refuse other ones, what happens?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

A day off?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I rest my case.

(1845)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I want to campaign forever.

The Chair: All in favour of CPC-17?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We can go on to CPC-18 now because that was defeated.

Stephanie, you're on again.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, I'm going to get used to this for tomorrow, let me tell you.

I'm having a hard time seeing what the difference is between this and CPC-15, because it refers to a 57-day maximum writ period and a writ issued between November 11 and 30. I feel we defeated this already, essentially.

Mr. John Nater:

Again, this clause is only for elections that have been rescheduled based on a death or a natural disaster.

The Chair:

Okay, so it's the same Christmas period, but on rescheduled elections.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Next is CPC-19.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Again, I see this as being similar to CPC-16, increasing it to the 57-day maximum for other arrangements, such as Groundhog Day, I guess.

The Chair:

There doesn't seem to be any appetite for these extensions, so can we have a vote?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: NDP-5 is lost because it's consequential to NDP-1.

(Clause 48 agreed to on division)

The Chair: There are no amendments on clauses 49 to 51, unless we have a new one there.

(Clauses 49 to 51 inclusive agreed to)

(On clause 52)

The Chair: On CPC-20, go ahead, Ms. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This prohibits responsible officers of third parties that fail to file expense reports from being candidates, mirroring the current rules for candidates and official agents.

It makes sense to me that if an officer of a third party failed to file an expense report, then they would have essentially broken the rule and requirement in an effort to be a candidate or official agent. It makes sense to me also because of the government's efforts to provide transparency and accountability for third parties.

The Chair:

Could we have the PCO give us a comment on that?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Section 65 of the Canada Elections Act currently provides ineligibility criteria for candidates, and paragraph 65(i) says that a person who was a candidate or an official agent and basically failed to provide his or her returns is then ineligible to be a candidate again in a future election.

However, paragraph 65(i) applies only to former candidates; it doesn't apply, for example, to the official agent of any other registered entity under the act.

The Chair:

You're saying part of this is already covered—

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No, no—

The Chair:

—and part is not covered.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No, I'm just saying that the amendment would create the situation that, for example, the financial agent of the party who did not file on behalf of the party would be able to run as a candidate, but the financial agent of a third party, which is more remote from the election process, would be ineligible to file as candidate.

(1850)

The Chair:

That doesn't make any sense, does it? That doesn't make any sense; it's an inequity, right?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It's a policy choice, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Nater is next, and then Mr. Bittle.

Mr. John Nater:

Mr. Chair, I think it's just a fairness issue. If I as a candidate fail to file reports, I can't run as a candidate. I think it would be the same for a third party's responsible person. If he or she fails to file reports, he or she should also suffer similar consequences and be unable to run as a candidate as well.

The Chair:

I think the Elections Canada person was saying that the official agents of parties one and two are not prohibited, so this would just prohibit party three and put the third party at a disadvantage, but not the first two parties.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I don't think we should be engaging in taking away someone's ability to run for elected office lightly. I don't think we really heard any evidence on this aspect, and I don't think this is something we should proceed with at this point.

The Chair:

We're ready for the vote.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 52 agreed to)

(Clause 53 agreed to)

(On clause 54)

The Chair: For clause 54, we have CPC-21.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This is essentially that voter information cards are not an acceptable form of ID. We have just seen in the media this week examples of refugee claimants who received voter eligibility cards in the mail. If they were to not say anything, complete them and send them in, they would receive voter information cards and be on the electorate list.

We feel strongly that they should not be used as an acceptable form of identification in voting. I think that this example we just saw in the media provides great evidence of that. We don't know how many of the voter registration cards were issued at this time to persons who were not entitled to them. This is just one case and one example. It leaves us, as the opposition, to call into question the validity of the voter information cards as acceptable forms of identification.

The Chair:

If I were a betting man, I would say the jury's not still out on this, but we'll go to Mr. Graham and Mr. Bittle.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I cannot think of a part of the Fair Elections Act that was more offensive than the restriction of the VIC as a voting identity.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I'm sorry; there's nothing more offensive than...?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Than what you want to put back in this thing. The—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

What would you say, then, to the example that just happened?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Again, at the end of the day, we're hearing it coming out, and it's shocking to hear that it's refugees, that the refugees could vote. We're afraid of this “other”. We're carrying on this dog-whistle politics that seems to put itself into Conservative Party policy. Previously in the Conservative Party government, we heard from witness after witness that there is no case of voter fraud.

Who does this help? This helps my grandmother, who gets the card, puts a magnet on her fridge, goes with her voter card, goes with her health card, and goes to vote at the election day poll. Under your provision, she wouldn't be permitted, because we're afraid of this possibility, this Republican Party idea that there's voter fraud out there, that there's potential that refugees may be able to vote. There's no evidentiary basis apart from stirring up fear in the Canadian population.

We heard from witness after witness and we heard from Elections Canada. I can't support this.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Stephanie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I think what Canadians are most worried about is the legitimacy of the electorate. A Canadian is a Canadian is a Canadian, but we must ensure that it is Canadians who have obtained this right to vote. This example, which was in the media this past week, specifically identifies a case of individuals who did not have the right to vote potentially ending up with these cards and being counted in the electorate when they are not a legitimate part of the electorate.

I believe that Canadians are just as concerned, if not more concerned, about maintaining the legitimacy of the electorate.

(1855)

[Translation]

The Chair:

Mr. Thériault, you have the floor.

Mr. Luc Thériault (Montcalm, BQ):

Thank you for giving me the opportunity to speak, Mr. Chair.

I want to support the amendment presented by my Conservative colleague. I urge my colleague to be cautious, because his interpretation of the intent behind such an amendment seems to reflect what he is denouncing.

I will give the example of Quebec. We heard the same comments following the 1998 election, when there was a phenomenon of identity theft, what was called the $10 votes. As a result, there is now a requirement in that province to present photo ID.

According to Quebec's parliamentary tradition, the electoral law cannot be changed if there is no consensus. It isn't even changed by a vote, as was mentioned earlier; there must be a consensus.

We had to go to court as a result of this phenomenon. I invite my colleague to read the Berardinucci decision. The latter had appealed, but the Superior Court of Quebec ruled in favour of the plaintiffs. So there was an organized system of identity theft when there was no obligation to show a voter card with a photo.

At the federal level, I was pleased to see that voters could show several documents to the scrutineer to be able to vote. If it was as restrictive as the current system in Quebec, where showing photo identification is mandatory, I might be able to understand that people would rant and rave about it, and say that this would prevent people from voting. In Quebec, it's just the way things are. Before even being asked, people present photo ID and don't feel mistreated or anything.

The legitimacy of the electoral process is fundamental. A voter card is something that can be duplicated. In Quebec, during a general election, people were able to pay others to assume the identities of other voters. People had the nerve to go to the same polling station and swear on the Bible that they had not already voted. It isn't just in Quebec that such a thing can happen.

I think the integrity of the electoral process is much more important. There are plenty of cards or documents that can be presented to vote in a federal election. The voter card is more of a reminder. It allows the election to take place in an orderly way, people find out where to go, and the vote is seamless.

If we allow the voter card to be used as a piece of identification, we open the door to the duplication of these cards by malicious people who know the electoral process, and by people elsewhere.

That's why I support the amendment. I urge my colleague to be cautious: we aren't here to stigmatize each other.

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Does the PCO have any comments on this issue? [Translation]

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Indeed, the Quebec Election Act contains an obligation to present photo identification; only five pieces of identification are permitted. However, there is a major difference between the Quebec and federal systems: in Quebec, voters only need to prove their identity, while in the federal system, voters need to prove their identity and place of residence. That's why many more pieces of ID are authorized for federal elections. [English]

The Chair:

The voter card isn't the only thing in the federal election.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No, of course. Bill C-76 would lift the prohibition on identifying the voter information card as one of the potential pieces of identification that can be used, but if these amendments are passed, someone presenting himself or herself with a voter information card at a poll will always have to show at least a second piece of identification to prove his or her identity.

(1900)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Go ahead, Mr. Graham. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There is no free federal document that proves both the identity and address of a person. The bill requires that proof of address and identification be presented separately; both are required.

I don't agree with any of your remarks.

I will read to you what Elections Canada posted on Twitter this week.[English]

“Recently, people have been sharing inaccurate information about voter registration and ID. We'd like to clear the record.”

This is from Elections Canada directly.

“Elections Canada mails voter registration letters to potential electors. ... These letters say the recipient is not registered to vote. They invite the recipient to register “if” they are a Canadian citizen and at least 18 years of age.

“Voter registration letters for potential electors are not the same thing as voter information cards. ... Voter information cards are cards we send at election time to registered voters only.

“When a potential elector goes to register themselves, they must sign a statement to the effect that they are a Canadian citizen, aged 18 years older.

“The voter information card is not currently accepted as ID. At no time have electors been allowed to vote by showing a voter information card as their only piece of ID.

“Bill C-76, currently before Parliament, would allow the voter information card to be used as a proof of address. Elections Canada would not accept the voter information card alone—it would have to be shown with another accepted piece of ID that proves their identity.”

A voter information card provides access to proof of address. That's all it provides, and that is a very important point.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

Mr. John Nater:

I'd like a recorded vote.

The Chair:

We'll have a recorded vote on CPC-21.

(Amendment negatived: nays 6; yeas 3 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 54 agreed to on division)

(Clause 55 agreed to)

The Chair: There was an amendment to propose a clause 55.1, but it was a casualty of amendment NDP-1, so that disappears. There are no amendments on clauses 56 to 60.

(Clauses 56 to 60 inclusive agreed to)

The Chair: There was a new clause 60.1, but it was also a casualty of NDP-7.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

There are so many casualties. War is brutal, Chair.

The Chair:

We'll move on.

On clause 61, we have CPC-22.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Chair, wasn't this meeting scheduled till 7:00?

The Chair:

Oh, yes, you're right.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No, Stephanie, we're on a roll.

The Chair:

Okay. Do you want to stop now?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes.

The Chair:

Okay.

Thank you, everyone, for making good progress, with a good attitude and good help. Thank you to the officials for helping us, for being here. We'll see you tomorrow at 9:00 a.m., and we'll be in room 112 north.

Do I need to say anything else?

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Je déclare la séance ouverte.

Bonjour, et bienvenue à la 123e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Je tiens à informer les membres que la séance d'aujourd'hui, au cours de laquelle nous poursuivons notre étude du projet de loi C-76, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada et d'autres lois et apportant des modifications corrélatives à d'autres textes législatifs, est télévisée.

Nous avons le plaisir de recevoir l'honorable Karina Gould, ministre des Institutions démocratiques, qui est accompagnée de fonctionnaires du Bureau du Conseil privé, soit Manon Paquet, conseillère principale en politiques, et Jean-François Morin, conseiller principal en politiques.

Nous vous remercions, madame la ministre Gould, de revenir témoigner. Nous allons vous laisser la parole pour que vous puissiez faire un exposé.

L'hon. Karina Gould (ministre des Institutions démocratiques):

Monsieur le président, distingués membres du Comité, merci beaucoup de m'avoir invitée de nouveau. Je suis enchantée de témoigner de nouveau avec mes fonctionnaires pour traiter du projet de loi C-76 avant que vous n'en entrepreniez l'étude article par article.

Je voudrais vous remercier de vous être engagés à étudier le projet de loi C-76, aussi appelé Loi sur la modernisation des élections. Je vous suis extrêmement reconnaissante de tout le travail que vous avez déjà investi dans l'examen de cette mesure législative cruciale qui contribuera, selon moi, à renforcer nos lois électorales et à protéger les élections fédérales à venir au Canada. [Français]

Notre gouvernement est déterminé à renforcer les institutions démocratiques du Canada et à rétablir la confiance des Canadiens ainsi que leur participation à notre processus démocratique.[Traduction]

Je suis convaincue que le renforcement de la démocratie dépend de la participation du plus grand nombre possible de Canadiens. Je considère aussi que la Loi sur la modernisation des élections est la mesure à prendre pour rendre notre processus électoral plus accessible à l'ensemble de la population canadienne.[Français]

Ce projet de loi réduira les obstacles à la participation auxquels les Canadiens se heurtent actuellement lorsqu'ils votent ou participent au processus démocratique en général.

Aucun Canadien ne devrait faire face à des obstacles pour voter, qu'il vive à l'étranger, qu'il soit dans les Forces canadiennes, qu'il étudie à l'université ou qu'il soit sans adresse fixe.[Traduction]

En refaisant de la carte d'identité électorale une preuve de résidence et en rétablissement la possibilité de faire appel à un répondant, on fera en sorte qu'il soit plus facile de voter pour un plus grand nombre de Canadiens. Le vote est un droit, et il nous incombe de rendre le vote accessible au plus grand nombre de Canadiens possible.[Français]

Au moyen du projet de loi C-76, nous étendons les mesures d'accommodement pour inclure toutes les personnes handicapées, et pas seulement celles qui ont un handicap physique.

Le projet de loi augmentera le soutien et l'aide apportés aux électeurs handicapés dans les bureaux de vote, quel que soit leur type de déficience, et leur offrira la possibilité de voter à domicile.[Traduction]

Les Canadiens ayant un handicap éprouvent également plus de difficultés à participer aux campagnes électorales parce que les documents de ces campagnes ne sont pas accessibles. Le projet de loi C-76 encouragera les partis politiques et les candidats à prendre des mesures d'accommodement pour les électeurs ayant un handicap en créant un incitatif financier sous la forme d'un remboursement des dépenses liées à ces mesures. Par exemple, ils pourraient offrir un service d'interprétation gestuelle au cours d'une activité et prendre le format des documents plus accessible. [Français]

Ce projet de loi modifie également les dépenses électorales pour que les candidats handicapés et les candidats qui s'occupent d'un jeune membre de la famille qui est malade ou handicapé trouvent plus facile de se présenter aux élections.

Le projet de loi permettra aux candidats d'utiliser leurs propres fonds, en plus des fonds de campagne, pour payer les dépenses liées à leur invalidité, les frais de garde ou d'autres dépenses pertinentes liées aux soins à domicile ou aux soins de santé. Ces frais seront remboursés jusqu'à 90 %.[Traduction]

Les membres des Forces armées canadiennes font des sacrifices énormes en protégeant et en défendant notre démocratie. La Loi sur la modernisation des élections fera en sorte qu'il soit plus facile pour nos soldats, nos marins et les membres des forces aériennes de participer à la démocratie en leur accordant la même souplesse que celle dont jouissent les autres Canadiens en leur permettant de choisir l'endroit où ils voteront, que ce soit dans des bureaux de vote normaux au Canada, à l'étranger, lors du vote par anticipation ou à des bureaux de scrutin militaires spéciaux, comme ils le font actuellement.[Français]

Beaucoup d'entre nous ont dans leur circonscription des électeurs ayant vécu au Canada, mais qui vivent actuellement à l'étranger. Qu'ils y soient pour travailler ou pour étudier, les Canadiens vivant à l'étranger devraient toujours avoir la possibilité de participer à notre processus démocratique et de s'exprimer sur les questions qui les concernent.[Traduction]

Le projet de loi C-76 éliminera l'exigence voulant que les électeurs non résidents soient demeurés à l'extérieur du Canada pendant moins de cinq ans et aient l'intention de revenir au Canada pour y résider dans l'avenir. Voilà qui élargira le droit de vote à plus d'un million de Canadiens vivant à l'étranger. [Français]

En tant que gouvernement fédéral, il nous incombe de faciliter le vote et de le rendre plus pratique pour les Canadiens. Cela comprend leur expérience lors du scrutin, que ce soit lors du vote par anticipation ou le jour des élections.[Traduction]

La Loi sur la modernisation des élections accorde aux Canadiens une plus grande souplesse en augmentant les heures de vote par anticipation à 12 heures par jour. Nous simplifierons également les procédures d'accueil lors du vote par anticipation et le jour du scrutin.[Français]

Ce projet de loi élargira également l'utilisation des bureaux de scrutin mobiles lors des jours de vote par anticipation et le jour des élections, afin de mieux servir les communautés éloignées, isolées ou à faible densité.

Pour que les Canadiens participent pleinement à leur droit démocratique de voter, ils doivent d'abord savoir quand, où et comment voter. Historiquement, Élections Canada a mené diverses activités d'éducation auprès des Canadiens, dans le cadre de son mandat d'administration des élections.[Traduction]

En 2014, le gouvernement précédent avait limité le mandat d'éducation du directeur général des élections, lui retirant la capacité d'offrir des programmes d'éducation aux néo-Canadiens et aux groupes depuis toujours laissés pour compte. [Français]

Notre gouvernement croit que nous devrions donner aux Canadiens les moyens de voter et de participer à notre démocratie. Nous croyons que le directeur général des élections devrait pouvoir communiquer avec tous les Canadiens sur la façon d'exercer leur droit démocratique.[Traduction]

Ce n'est pas une question de partisanerie. L'objectif consiste à fournir aux électeurs des renseignements sur les aspects logistiques du vote, comme le lieu et la date du scrutin et la manière de voter. Nous voulons que les Canadiens soient prêts pour le jour des élections, peu importe le parti pour lequel ils votent.

Cela signifie aussi qu'il faut préparer ceux qui votent pour la première fois. La création d'un registre d'électeurs futurs permettra aux citoyens canadiens de 14 à 17 ans de s'inscrire auprès d'Élections Canada pour être automatiquement ajoutés à la liste électorale quand ils auront 18 ans.[Français]

Alors que plus de jeunes ont voté en 2015 que lors des élections précédentes — 57 % des électeurs âgés de 18 à 24 ans ont voté —, leur taux de participation était encore inférieur à celui des Canadiens plus âgés. De fait, 78 % des électeurs âgés de 65 à 74 ans ont voté. Cette mesure invitera plus de jeunes Canadiens à participer à notre processus démocratique.

(1540)

[Traduction]

À titre de ministre des Institutions démocratiques, il m'incombe de veiller au maintien de la confiance des Canadiens à l'égard de notre processus démocratique. La Loi sur la modernisation des élections fera en sorte qu'il soit plus difficile pour ceux qui enfreignent les lois électorales d'échapper aux sanctions en renforçant les pouvoirs du commissaire aux élections fédérales et en offrant un large éventail d'outils d'application de la loi.[Français]

En rendant le commissaire aux élections fédérales plus indépendant et en lui conférant de nouveaux pouvoirs pour faire respecter la Loi électorale du Canada et pour enquêter sur les violations, nous continuerons de travailler pour assurer la force et la sécurité de nos institutions démocratiques.[Traduction]

Le commissaire aux élections fédérales sera indépendant du gouvernement, car il réintégrera les rangs d'Élections Canada et relèvera du Parlement par l'entremise du directeur général des élections plutôt que d'un membre éminent du Cabinet.[Français]

Il aura également de nouveaux pouvoirs avec l'option administrative d'imposer des sanctions pécuniaires pour des violations mineures à la Loi liées à la publicité électorale, au financement politique, aux dépenses des tiers et aux infractions mineures au droit de vote. Surtout, il aura aussi le pouvoir de porter des accusations sans l'approbation préalable du directeur des poursuites pénales et sera en mesure de demander une ordonnance de la cour afin de contraindre un témoin à témoigner pendant une enquête sur des infractions électorales.[Traduction]

Dans le budget de 2018, le gouvernement a accordé 7,1 millions de dollars, qui seront investis sur cinq ans à partir de 2019, pour appuyer le travail du Bureau du commissaire aux élections fédérales. Ces fonds contribueront à faire en sorte que le processus électoral canadien continue de satisfaire aux normes les plus élevées de démocratie.[Français]

De nombreux Canadiens s'inquiètent des conséquences et de l'influence de l'argent sur notre processus politique. Avec le projet de loi C-76, nous veillons à ce que notre processus électoral soit plus transparent et équitable. Le projet de loi crée une période préélectorale commençant le 30 juin de l'année du scrutin à date fixe et se terminant à la délivrance du bref.[Traduction]

Au cours de la période préélectorale, les dépenses des tiers seront limitées à environ 1 million de dollars, montant qui sera indexé à l'inflation, alors que la limite sera fixée à un maximum de 10 000 $ par circonscription. Cette limite inclura la publicité, les activités partisanes et les sondages électoraux. Pendant la période électorale, les dépenses seront limitées à quelque 500 000 $ et à un maximum de 4 000 $ par circonscription en 2019.

Le projet de loi exigera que les tiers qui dépensent plus de 500 $ en publicité et en activités partisanes en période préélectorale et électorale s'inscrivent auprès d'Élections Canada. Ils devront, en outre, ouvrir un compte bancaire canadien réservé à cette fin et utiliser des inscriptions permettant de les identifier sur toutes les publicités partisanes. Ces mesures permettront d'assurer une plus grande transparence et de fournir aux Canadiens plus d'information sur ceux qui tentent d'influencer leur décision. [Français]

Le gouvernement du Canada doit veiller à ce que nos institutions démocratiques soient modernes, transparentes et accessibles à tous les Canadiens. Nous nous engageons à maintenir et à renforcer la confiance des Canadiens à l'égard de notre processus démocratique.[Traduction]

Fondée sur les recommandations du directeur général des élections et le travail du Comité, la Loi sur la modernisation des élections améliorera la confiance et la foi des Canadiens à l'égard du système électoral du Canada.

Je répondrai à vos questions avec plaisir.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre.

Bienvenue, madame Elizabeth May. Je crois comprendre que les libéraux vous accordent une période d'intervention plus tard. Bienvenue parmi nous.

Mme Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, PV):

C'est très gentil à eux.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Nous commencerons par Mme Lapointe.[Français]

Vous disposez de sept minutes.

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je souhaite la bienvenue à la ministre ainsi qu'aux gens qui l'accompagnent.

L'autre jour, le directeur général des élections a témoigné devant le Comité. À la suite de son témoignage, je me pose une question. Dans la foulée des modifications proposées dans le projet de loi C-76, combien de Canadiens pourraient se prévaloir de leur droit de vote à l'extérieur du pays? A-t-on déjà recensé cela?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Grâce aux modifications prévues dans le projet de loi, environ 1 million de Canadiens pourraient voter à l'extérieur du pays.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Est-ce que cela comprend aussi bien les militaires et les gens des ambassades que les Canadiens expatriés qui travaillent à l'extérieur du pays?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui, c'est exact.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Comme notre collègue Mme Kusie, mon frère a travaillé dans des ambassades. Il l'a fait pendant 20 ans. J'ai aussi connu des personnes expatriées. Il n'était pas simple de se prévaloir de son droit de vote à l'extérieur du Canada.

Comment le projet de loi C-76 permettrait-il à ces personnes d'exercer plus facilement leur droit de vote à l'extérieur du pays?

(1545)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Selon moi, le processus électoral canadien ne changera pas pour les gens qui habitent à l'extérieur du pays. Les mêmes dispositions vont s'appliquer pour ce qui est de la vérification de l'identité. Ce qui va changer, c'est que ces gens n'auront pas à revenir au Canada. Ils ne seront pas assujettis à la limite voulant qu'ils ne vivent pas plus de cinq ans à l'extérieur du pays. Les Canadiens qui passeront plus de cinq ans à l'étranger maintiendront leur droit de vote à l'étranger.

Pendant que je vivais à l'extérieur du pays, il y a eu deux élections générales. J'ai exercé mon droit de vote à partir des États-Unis et du Mexique. Il y a toujours des règles très rigoureuses à suivre pour assurer l'intégrité du vote.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Cela me fait plaisir. En effet, pour tous ceux que j'ai connus, cette situation n'était pas simple.

J'ai maintenant une question plus pointue à vous poser. Depuis la présentation du projet de loi C-76, le directeur général des élections a déclaré que le projet de loi n'allait pas assez loin pour empêcher la transmission d'informations trompeuses. Ce projet de loi devrait-il être renforcé pour que les organisations et les individus n'induisent pas intentionnellement le public en erreur au sujet des élections?

Comme vous le savez, il est possible de bien des façons de rendre les informations douteuses, sans rigueur et sans transparence. Que pouvons-nous faire à ce sujet?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je crois qu'il serait difficile, dans le cadre de ce projet de loi, d'assurer l'intégrité de l'information qui est diffusée dans le public. À mon avis, ce n'est pas le rôle du gouvernement de dire aux Canadiens quelle information est bonne et laquelle ne l'est pas.

En ce qui concerne les plateformes des médias sociaux, par contre, ce projet de loi propose d'importantes modifications en vue d'accroître la transparence des annonces et des publicités. Cela touche non seulement les plateformes des médias sociaux, mais tous les médias. En effet, on pouvait savoir quelles personnes avaient certaines intentions ou voulaient influencer les gens, leur manière de voter ou ce qu'ils pensaient à propos de tel ou tel sujet.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

On pourrait donc viser autant la société civile que les partis politiques, et vérifier si certains veulent diffuser des informations trompeuses.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Certaines modifications prévues ou certaines parties du projet de loi font que, dans certains cas, les informations trompeuses sont illégales. À la suite des directives du directeur général des élections, qui a témoigné devant ce comité, nous avons recommandé que ce soit plus précis, puisqu'il pourrait disposer de certains pouvoirs à cet égard. Nous avons également donné plus de pouvoirs et plus d'outils au commissaire aux élections fédérales, puisqu'il pourrait faire des enquêtes. Si jamais des personnes ou des organisations diffusaient des informations trompeuses sur la façon de voter ou sur un candidat d'un parti et qu'il était possible de prouver que cela ne respecte pas les règles, ces personnes ou ces organisations pourraient faire l'objet d'une enquête et de sanctions.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Vous avez dit tantôt que le projet de loi proposait que le directeur général des élections ait de nouveaux pouvoirs pour imposer des sanctions ou même porter des accusations. Est-ce à cela que vous faisiez allusion?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je parlais du commissaire aux élections. Après la dernière élection, le directeur général des élections a proposé des modifications pour simplifier l'application des dispositions. Nous avons donc suggéré des modifications en ce sens, pour renforcer les pouvoirs du commissaire concernant l'application de la loi.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Devrait-on aller plus loin, selon vous?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Nous devons voir comment ces nouveaux pouvoirs fonctionneront pendant la prochaine élection. J'ai hâte de recevoir les recommandations que formuleront le commissaire aux élections et le directeur général des élections après les élections de 2019.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Me reste-t-il du temps, monsieur le président?

(1550)

Le président:

Il vous reste 45 secondes.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

C'est un peu court pour poser une question.

Vous avez parlé d'accessibilité pour les personnes ayant un handicap visuel ou auditif. Le projet de loi prévoit des mesures pour faciliter l'accès de ces gens. Pourront-ils être accompagnés par la personne de leur choix?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

C'est exactement cela.

Plusieurs recommandations faites par le directeur général des élections découlent du comité sur l'accessibilité au processus électoral, auquel ont participé des personnes de toutes les régions du Canada. C'est une suggestion qu'elles nous ont faite et nous les avons écoutées, afin de faciliter le vote et de leur donner plus de dignité dans le processus.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Merci beaucoup. En effet, cela fait mal au coeur, parfois. [Traduction]

Le président:

Nous accorderons maintenant la parole à Mme Kusie pour sept minutes. [Français]

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre, je vous remercie de votre présence aujourd'hui.[Traduction]

Mme Lori Turnbull, ancienne conseillère de l'unité des institutions démocratiques du Bureau du Conseil privé, qui vous accorde son appui, a témoigné devant le Comité au printemps et a proposé de créer des comptes bancaires et des pratiques de collecte de fonds distincts pour les activités politiques des tiers.

Pourquoi ne soutenez-vous pas la proposition de votre ancienne conseillère?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Dans le projet de loi C-76, nous proposons que les tiers ouvrent un compte bancaire pour les fonds qu'ils entendent utiliser pour mener des activités politiques en période préélectorale et électorale.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord.

Cependant, ces comptes ne sont pas créés tout le temps, comme vous l'avez indiqué. Ils le sont uniquement pendant les périodes préélectorale et électorale; rien n'indique donc précisément l'origine des fonds.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Eh bien, c'est également le cas pour les candidats politiques.

Quand vous vous êtes portée candidate, vous avez ouvert un compte bancaire distinct de celui de l'association de votre circonscription ou de votre parti politique; cette mesure cadre donc avec cette pratique.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Vous confirmez que ce n'est pas tout le temps. Pourquoi diriez-vous que vous n'appuyez pas la divulgation en tout temps et pour toutes les fins?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Pourriez-vous répéter la question?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Pourquoi n'appuyez-vous pas la divulgation des dépenses en tout temps et pour toutes les fins?

En ce qui concerne les dispositions du projet de loi dans sa forme actuelle, n'est-il pas possible de suivre complètement les entrées et les sorties de fonds des tiers en tout temps?

Pourquoi n'appuyez-vous pas la divulgation en tout temps et pour toutes les fins?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je pense qu'il importe d'expliquer ce que sont exactement les tiers. Les tiers sont toutes les entités autres qu'un parti politique ou un candidat. Il pourrait s'agir de particuliers, de la société civile ou de n'importe quel groupe ou personne au Canada.

Nous considérons qu'il est important que ces limites ne s'appliquent que lorsque les tiers s'adonnent à des activités politiques ou partisanes pendant la période qui précède la campagne. Sinon, je pense qu'on s'ingérerait trop dans la vie personnelle des gens ou les activités d'organisations qui pourraient, en fait, ne pas participer à des activités politiques.

Le projet de loi C-76 exige toutefois que les tiers divulguent tous les dons qu'ils reçoivent avant les élections s'ils ont l'intention de participer pendant la période préélectorale ou électorale.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci.

Le directeur général des élections a expressément demandé que le projet de loi prévoie des mesures anticollusion; pourtant, les mesures et les modifications proposées par le gouvernement visent uniquement les tiers et non toutes les parties. Pourquoi donc?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Les mesures visent les tiers et les partis politiques, ce que nous considérons comme très important.

Nous voulions aussi nous assurer... Par exemple, dans le cas du Nouveau Parti démocratique à l'échelle provinciale — si vous vous souvenez, vous qui êtes membre à l'échelle fédérale —, nous ne voulions pas nuire à sa capacité de travailler comme un seul et unique parti. Nous avons tenté de comprendre le paysage canadien des partis politiques lorsque nous avons élaboré le projet de loi. Je pense que c'est très important, mais ces mesures ont été pensées précisément pour qu'un tiers ne puisse se mettre de connivence avec un parti politique avec ces objectifs en tête.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Dans le projet de loi C-76, vous tentez de vous attaquer à l'ingérence étrangère dans les élections canadiennes. Prenons le cas hypothétique d'une entité étrangère faisant don de 1 million de dollars à une organisation canadienne pour couvrir des frais administratifs. Cette organisation canadienne, qui avait recueilli des fonds pour couvrir ces frais, se retrouve tout à coup avec 1 million de dollars pour faire campagne au Canada.

Pouvez-vous confirmer que ce genre de financement et d'ingérence venant de l'étranger demeurera légal en dépit du projet de loi C-76?

(1555)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le projet de loi C-76 interdit complètement l'utilisation de fonds étrangers pour des activités partisanes au cours de la période préélectorale ou électorale. Il contient également des règles anti-contournement pour éviter que pareille chose ne survienne. Sachez que nous sommes convaincus qu'il va assez loin et que nous faisons de notre mieux pour veiller à ce qu'aucun tiers ou parti politique du Canada ne reçoive de fonds étrangers.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Pouvez-vous affirmer avec une certitude absolue que le gouvernement du Canada a fait tout en son pouvoir pour que les Canadiens ne subissent pas d'influence étrangère, que ce soit grâce aux médias sociaux ou au financement?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je pense que nous devrions faire la différence entre « influence étrangère » et « ingérence étrangère ». L'influence étrangère pourrait être ouverte; par exemple, un gouvernement étranger pourrait donner son opinion sur un sujet donné. Cela s'inscrit dans les règles de la diplomatie.

L'ingérence étrangère prendrait la forme d'une tentative faite subrepticement pour fausser les renseignements fournis aux Canadiens, entraver l'accès à l'information ou empêcher de comprendre les résultats des élections. Je pense que le projet de loi C-76 fait ce qu'il est possible d'accomplir en vertu de la loi pour empêcher de pareilles manoeuvres. Cependant, je considère que nous avons ici tenté de prévoir les choses en fonction de ce que nous connaissons et de veiller à ce que les mesures du projet de loi C-76 soient fondées sur les valeurs et les principes qui importent aux yeux des Canadiens dans le domaine des élections.

Il pourrait toutefois toujours se produire quelque chose d'imprévu dans l'avenir, mais je pense que nous avons là un cadre et une base solides pour protéger de notre mieux les élections canadiennes contre l'ingérence étrangère.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Le premier ministre a déclaré récemment devant les Nations unies qu'il y avait eu peu d'influence ou d'ingérence étrangère au cours des dernières élections au Canada.

D'après vous, qu'est-ce qu'une ingérence indue? Est-ce que « pas beaucoup », c'est trop? Considérez-vous qu'avec le projet de loi C-76, il n'y aura pas d'influence ou d'ingérence lors des élections fédérales de 2019?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

La déclaration du premier ministre s'appuyait sur le rapport que le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications a publié en juin 2017. C'était la première fois qu'un organisme du renseignement électromagnétique ou que n'importe quel organisme du renseignement du monde se penchait sur l'ingérence étrangère au cours d'élections et publiait des renseignements à ce sujet. Même s'il a détecté une faible ingérence, le Centre n'a pas considéré que cela avait influencé les élections comme telles. Cependant, le projet de loi C-76 et d'autres mesures prises en collaboration avec les partis politiques et le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications visent tous à prévenir le coup et à préparer les Canadiens à ce qui pourrait survenir, ou non, en 2019.

Comme je l'ai fait remarquer, je pense qu'il s'agit d'un cadre solide qui prépare adéquatement les Canadiens aux élections de 2019, et que nous pouvons nous fier à nos organismes du renseignement et de la sécurité, et aux responsables de l'administration des élections pour faire ce qu'ils peuvent pour protéger la démocratie canadienne.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci, madame la ministre.

Le président:

Merci, madame Kusie.

Nous entendrons maintenant M. Cullens pour sept minutes.

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je remercie la ministre et son équipe de témoigner.

Je passe en revue les modifications que votre gouvernement propose dans ce projet de loi et j'examine le chemin qui nous a menés jusqu'ici. Il s'est écoulé 700 jours depuis le dépôt du projet de loi C-33, le premier effort visant à nous débarrasser de l'inéquitable loi électorale. Vous avez dépassé de cinq mois le délai fixé par Élections Canada pour élaborer ces modifications et les apporter à la loi et ce, plus de deux ans après que le gouvernement eu renié sa promesse de faire des élections de 2015 les dernières se déroulant sous le système majoritaire uninominal.

Voilà qui m'étonne, car je pensais que le projet de loi contiendrait davantage de mesures que votre gouvernement, et vous personnellement, avez déclaré soutenir, car vous semblez ne pas appuyer celles qui seraient, selon moi, utiles.

Je pense au lancement de la session parlementaire. Le premier ministre a demandé au caucus qu'il y ait plus de femmes, affirmant que c'est en modifiant les politiques qu'on édifie un meilleur pays.

Dans une publicité de collecte de fonds du Parti libéral, on peut lire que « Le Canada a besoin que davantage de femmes de différents horizons prennent des décisions à Ottawa. Car lorsque les femmes réussissent, nous sommes toutes et tous gagnants. »

Nous avons ici une modification inspirée d'un modèle que l'Irlande et d'autres pays ont utilisé. Dans le cas de l'Irlande, il s'est traduit par un accroissement de 90 % de la participation de candidates et de 40 % du nombre de femmes au Parlement.

Nous nous classons actuellement au 61e rang mondial, madame la ministre. Vous le savez, bien entendu. Le Parlement compte 26 % de femmes, et au rythme actuel, comme les Héritières du suffrage l'ont fait remarquer au premier ministre, il nous faudra 90 ans pour que le Parlement atteigne l'équité. Pourtant, vous comptez voter contre une modification qui nous permettrait d'atteindre l'équité, une modification que d'autres démocraties ont appliquée.

Avez-vous reçu l'alerte en matière de TI que j'ai reçue récemment de notre service des TI à Ottawa, il y a de cela quelques heures à peine? Cette alerte concernait une fuite de données touchant Facebook. Vous avez commandé un rapport, que le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications vous a remis, et je vais citer ce rapport, qui indique ce qui suit: ... les partis politiques, les politiciens et les médias sont plus vulnérables aux cybermenaces et aux opérations d'influence...

Le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée a indiqué qu'on pouvait contrer ces menaces à la démocratie en assujettissant notamment les partis politiques aux règles de protection de la vie privée. La British Columbia Civil Liberties Association vient de vous écrire pour vous dire que les dispositions relatives à la protection de la vie privée sont si inadéquates que c'est un coup d'épée dans l'eau. Quant au commissaire à la protection de la vie privée actuel, il a déclaré que le projet de loiC-76 ne contenait rien de substantiel sur le plan de la protection de la vie privée.

En Colombie-Britannique, où ces règles s'appliquent depuis 15 ans, les partis ont pu communiquer efficacement avec les électeurs. L'Europe applique ces règles depuis 20 ans, et les partis communiquent efficacement avec les électeurs également.

Nous proposons de tenir le scrutin un dimanche, comme l'ancien directeur général des élections l'a préconisé. Dans d'autres démocraties, cette mesure a permis d'augmenter de 6 à 7 % la participation des électeurs.

Je suppose que ce que je trouve mêlant dans toute cette affaire, c'est que je tente de concilier les propos de votre gouvernement avec ses actions, alors que nous avons maintenant une occasion de faire quelque chose à ce sujet. Vous êtes en poste depuis trois ans. L'occasion se présente ici de modifier les règles qui nous régissent à titre de politiciens et qui guident le processus électoral. J'aurais pensé qu'un de vos mandats fondamentaux consisterait à accroître la participation des femmes et des diverses voix, mais votre parti a choisi de protéger ses membres, maintenant ainsi le statu quo, un statu quo qui ne devrait être acceptable pour personne.

Quand on propose des modifications qui inciteraient un plus grand nombre de femmes à se porter candidates et qui aideraient plus de femmes et de voix diverses à se faire élire, vous votez contre elles. Nous voyons les cybermenaces et les problèmes de cybersécurité que votre propre organisme a détectés après que vous eussiez réclamé une enquête, mais le présent projet de loi ne contient rien qui augmente la protection des données et de la vie privée.

Quand le présent directeur général des élections a témoigné, nous lui avons demandé s'il savait quelles données les partis politiques recueillaient sur les Canadiens, et il nous a répondu qu'il n'en avait pas la moindre idée. Votre rapport indique que les partis politiques et le Canada sont vulnérables aux attaques. Après avoir été témoins du Brexit et des élections américaines, nous avons des exemples importants et très récents qui nous fournissent des motifs de renforcer les lois qui protègent la vie privée, mais ce projet de loi ne contient rien à ce sujet.

Sept cent jours après le dépôt de la première version du projet de loi, cinq mois après que soit écoulé le délai fixé par Élections Canada pour en arriver à apporter ces modifications, et après avoir tant promis de mieux faire aux femmes et aux divers groupes, nous offrons des occasions de faire mieux grâce à des modifications fondées sur les preuves qui se trouvent devant nous.

(1600)



Votre gouvernement dit qu'il se fie à la preuve. Nous utilisons la preuve pour améliorer les choses que votre gouvernement et votre parti dites vouloir améliorer, et vous choisissez de ne pas le faire. Je vous pose donc la question suivante, pourquoi?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Il vous reste deux minutes.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

D'accord, merci.

Merci pour tous vos commentaires et votre question.

En ce qui concerne la cybersécurité, bon nombre de dispositions du projet de loi visent à améliorer la cybersécurité et la démocratie pour le compte des Canadiens.

Je voulais également vous dire que le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications a communiqué avec les partis politiques et travaille avec eux afin de s'assurer qu'ils mettent en oeuvre des pratiques exemplaires, et le Centre se porte volontaire pour offrir des conseils sur une base permanente.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il n'y a rien qui exige de telles pratiques. Le projet de loi se contente de dire que les partis doivent afficher leur politique quelque part sur le site Web, et aucune conséquence n'est prévue s'ils négligent de protéger les données.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

J'aurais quelques observations à vous faire à ce sujet. C'est la première fois que nous prévoyons dans une loi que les partis politiques doivent afficher une politique sur la protection des renseignements personnels. J'ajouterais que lorsque le projet de loi a été déposé, le Parti néo-démocratique, par exemple, a mis à jour sa politique sur la protection des renseignements personnels, laquelle était vétuste. Je crois qu'on peut y voir ici une mesure réelle et tangible qui va dans la bonne...

(1605)

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est assez?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

... direction. Il y a aura des conséquences sévères si les partis ne respectent pas la consigne, car ils seront rayés de la liste des partis politiques...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ils n'ont qu'à afficher leur politique.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Par ailleurs, on précise également que les partis politiques ne doivent pas induire en erreur Élections Canada, car ils s'exposeront à de sérieuses pénalités. Nous habilitons le commissaire aux élections du Canada à mener une enquête si une plainte est déposée.

Ce sont de bonnes premières mesures et j'encourage le Comité, s'il estime que c'est un dossier important, de se pencher là-dessus plus longuement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous ne faites aucun effort pour aider les femmes et les membres des minorités à se faire élire. Pourquoi pas?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je suis très fière du fait que si le projet de loi est adopté, il sera désormais possible de se faire rembourser les frais de garde des enfants et d'autres frais connexes jusqu'à concurrence de 90 %, et ce remboursement ne fera pas partie du plafond des dépenses électorales. C'est très important, car si le remboursement était compris dans les dépenses, un candidat qui aurait à s'occuper d'un membre de la famille, y compris d'une personne malade, verrait sa compétitivité amenuisée par rapport à ceux qui n'ont pas ces dépenses, et le remboursement se fera à un taux plus élevé.

Le projet de loi contient des mesures pratiques qui encourageront une meilleure diversité des candidats.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Donc le fait d'être capable de...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je crois que tous ici présents devraient faire leur part, en tant que leaders, pour encourager les femmes à participer...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ce n'était peut-être pas une bonne idée que de protéger les députés sortants.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

... et notre gouvernement, qui a annoncé récemment la somme de 4,5 millions de dollars pour le groupe Héritières du suffrage, ainsi qu'un soutien pour À voix égale, travaille d'arrache-pied pour encourager et accroître la diversité des candidats.

Le président:

Merci, madame la ministre.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Sahota, qui aura sept minutes.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Cullen, certains des députés sortants sont en fait des femmes, donc l'inverse pourrait se produire également.

De toute façon, j'ai des questions sur Facebook, Google, Twitter et d'autres médias sociaux, dont l'usage est devenu monnaie courante pour ce qui est des publicités politiques, notamment pendant les périodes électorales.

Actuellement, les médias sociaux diffusent des publicités, mais lorsque l'annonce est vieille et est retirée, on n'en voit plus la trace. Devrait-on tenir un registre des publicités politiques? Comment procéder à ce moment-là? Le registre pourrait-il être consulté par le directeur général des élections ou encore par le public? Qu'en pensez-vous?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je suis tout à fait d'accord que le registre puisse être consulté à la fois par le directeur général des élections et le public canadien, car nous avons observé dans certains pays que l'une des tactiques principales dont se sont prévalues les acteurs étrangers pour perturber le processus électoral, c'est le fait d'agir en catimini, de cacher le fait que ce sont eux qui placent des annonces sur les plateformes des médias sociaux. Je crois qu'un régime de transparence renforcé visant les annonces dans les médias sociaux, en fait dans tous les médias, s'impose.

Il est également vital que le registre puisse être consulté pendant une certaine période de temps suivant les élections de façon à permettre, s'il y a des questions ou des plaintes, la consultation du registre par le public et par le directeur général des élections pour y voir ce qui a été annoncé et comment.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Avez-vous des suggestions quant à la période de temps?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je crois que cela devrait être de deux à cinq ans afin de pouvoir suivre tout un processus parlementaire.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

Revenons à la question des dépenses des tiers et de l'argent venant de l'étranger pour être dépensé par des tiers, notamment sur les plateformes des médias sociaux. Je sais que la question a déjà été soulevée, mais l'optique était différente. Si un acteur étranger paye pour de la publicité politique à l'extérieur de la période électorale ou préélectorale, devrait-on en tenir en compte d'une façon quelconque?

(1610)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le projet de loi ne porte que sur la période préélectorale et la période électorale, mais je crois qu'il vaut toujours mieux d'avoir plus d'information, et la transparence est toujours de mise. Il arrive parfois que des Canadiens pensent qu'ils reçoivent de l'information d'une source canadienne, alors qu'en fait cela pourrait aussi bien provenir d'une source étrangère, et à mon avis, il incombe aux médias sociaux de l'indiquer pour nourrir le dialogue ici au pays.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Mais vous ne trouvez pas qu'il revient au directeur général des élections ou encore que l'on devrait l'indiquer dans le projet de loi...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

C'est la première fois que nous prévoyons une période préélectorale. Si le projet de loi est adopté, ce que j'espère sincèrement d'ailleurs, nous aurons alors des preuves servant à déterminer comment une chose s'est produite pendant la période préélectorale et électorale. Votre comité, de même que les parlementaires, les Canadiens et Élections Canada, seront mieux placés pour faire des recommandations sur les prochaines mesures à prendre. Toutefois, il faut bien souligner le fait que le financement étranger est interdit en tout temps dans tout ce qui ressemble à de la partisanerie.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

Lorsque le directeur général des élections a témoigné ici, il a dit qu'il y avait des difficultés liées à l'application des dispositions du projet de loi C-76 visant à interdire aux organismes et aux particuliers de vendre de l'espace publicitaire à une entité étrangère. Le fait de veiller au respect de la loi est bien sûr un élément clé pour interdire toute ingérence étrangère dans les élections canadiennes. Êtes-vous d'accord, et si oui, pensez-vous que le projet de loi devrait être modifié pour en tenir compte?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

Sur le même thème, le directeur général des élections a également suggéré que lorsque quelqu'un réussit à infiltrer la base de données ou le système informatique, avec des mauvaises intentions ou non, ce cas de figure devrait être prévu par le projet de loi et il devrait y avoir des pénalités. Que ces agents veuillent ou non influer sur les résultats des élections, le fait de commettre cet acte à lui seul devrait constituer une violation.

J'ai entendu des arguments pour et contre une telle mesure, c'est-à-dire de ne pas tenir compte de l'intention de l'agent. Je sais que le projet de loi reproduit les dispositions pertinentes du Code criminel.

Puis-je comprendre un peu mieux comment les deux textes, le Code criminel et le projet de loi, agiraient ensemble et s'il serait possible de supprimer la notion d'intention?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je vais demander à Jean-François de vous répondre.

M. Jean-François Morin (conseiller principal en politiques, Bureau du Conseil privé):

Merci pour la question.

Il y a effectivement un amendement qui a été proposé pour mettre en oeuvre partiellement la recommandation du directeur général des élections. Cet amendement ferait une infraction de toute tentative de commettre des actes prévus actuellement dans le projet de loi C-76, à condition que l'acteur ait l'intention d'influer sur les élections. La nouvelle disposition du projet de loi C-76 est la même que la disposition existante du Code criminel, ce qui fait que dans le projet de loi C-76, la disposition portant sur l'utilisation malicieuse d'un ordinateur comprend deux critères pour ce qui est de l'intention: l'une concernant une intention spécifique visant les élections, et l'autre une intention plus générale qui concerne uniquement la fraude.

La disposition du Code criminel continuera à s'appliquer en parallèle, et bien sûr cette disposition ne vise pas uniquement les élections fédérales.

Je vous réponds donc que oui, le directeur général des élections pourra enquêter sur toute violation de la Loi électorale du Canada, mais s'il trouve que tous les éléments de l'infraction sont réunis à part le contexte électoral, il peut s'en remettre à un autre organisme et lui demander d'enquêter et de déposer des chefs d'accusation en vertu du Code criminel.

(1615)

Le président:

Merci.

Merci beaucoup, madame Sahota.

Au tour maintenant de Mme Kusie, qui aura cinq minutes.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre, je vous présente mes excuses: je ne vous ai pas remerciée pour votre présence ici aujourd'hui, je le fais donc maintenant.

Madame la ministre, normalement, pendant les élections, il existe des limites bien précises quant aux activités que le gouvernement peut mener parallèlement, et les activités électorales sont strictement encadrées. Le projet de loi C-76 prolonge la période de temps pendant laquelle les partis politiques et les tiers sont assujettis à des règles strictes, et il est donc logique de conclure qu'il y aura des limites raisonnables sur les activités gouvernementales pendant la même période. Vous avez déjà annoncé une interdiction sur la plupart des annonces gouvernementales pendant les 90 jours précédant la date fixe des élections; pouvez-vous nous confirmer que cette interdiction comprendra toute la période préélectorale?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci.

Votre gouvernement s'assurera-t-il également que les grandes annonces, notamment en ce qui concerne les dépenses, ne pourront pas être faites pendant la période préélectorale?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Si les activités gouvernementales ne sont pas visées par la politique sur les annonces gouvernementales, elles se poursuivront comme d'habitude, tout comme l'ensemble des activités des députés parlementaires.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci.

Votre gouvernement s'assurera-t-il que les ressources gouvernementales ne sont pas utilisées pour défrayer des activités typiques des campagnes électorales, par exemple les assemblées locales mettant en vedette le premier ministre ou des ministres, les consultations publiques auprès des politiciens élus plutôt que des fonctionnaires, ou tout autre événement diffusé à la télévision ou sur un autre médium à l'intention du public pendant la période préélectorale?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Comme je l'ai dit auparavant, toute activité gouvernementale qui se déroule normalement se poursuivra pendant la période, et cela vaut pour tous les députés parlementaires et la Chambre.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Votre gouvernement s'assurera-t-il que les ministères ne pourront rendre publics les résultats de la recherche sur l'opinion publique, les rapports, ou tout autre document qui pourrait influencer l'opinion publique, sauf bien sûr les documents exigés par la loi pendant la période préélectorale?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Comme je l'ai déjà dit, toute activité gouvernementale normale continuera jusqu'à la période électorale.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Votre gouvernement s'assurera-t-il qu'aucune grande annonce concernant les orientations politiques ou les projections budgétaires ne se fera pendant la période préélectorale?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Toute activité gouvernementale normale se poursuivra pendant la période préélectorale.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Voilà toutes mes questions, monsieur le président. Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres conservateurs? Il nous reste deux minutes et demie.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais revenir à la question qu'a posée Mme Kusie lors de la première série de questions concernant les comptes bancaires distincts.

Vous avez dit que nous le savons bien, en tant que candidats, que nous ouvrons notre propre compte bancaire électoral pendant la période électorale, et c'est vrai: les politiciens ouvrent des comptes bancaires, mais il demeure que les associations de circonscription ne peuvent recevoir des fonds provenant de l'étranger.

Je vais revenir à la recommandation avancée par la professeure Turnbull, une ancienne conseillère de votre ministère, selon laquelle il devrait y avoir un compte bancaire distinct pour les tiers et tous les renseignements seraient enregistrés, y compris l'origine des dons pendant toute la période ayant précédé les périodes préélectorale et électorale. Pourquoi n'êtes-vous pas d'accord, car c'est une approche logique avancée par votre ancienne conseillère qui vise à isoler les comptes bancaires afin de s'assurer qu'il n'y a absolument aucune possibilité que des fonds étrangers puissent être utilisés dans de telles circonstances?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je le répète, le projet de loi C-76 prévoit que les tiers ayant l'intention de dépenser ou qui ont versé jusqu'à 500 $ sur de la publicité pour ouvrir un compte bancaire doivent déclarer toute somme qui y est versée et son origine. Je crois que c'est une disposition raisonnable visant à veiller à l'intégrité de l'origine et de l'utilisation faite de l'argent.

M. John Nater:

Encore une fois, si l'on n'a pas de compte bancaire séparé et distinct pour toute la période pendant laquelle les fonds entrent, il n'y a rien qui n'empêche des fonds provenant de l'étranger d'être versés sur un autre compte bancaire et ensuite être transférés à ce compte pendant la période préélectorale et la période électorale.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Dans le projet de loi C-76, il est indiqué que l'on doit attester l'origine des fonds et également le fait qu'aucun argent étranger n'a été versé sur le compte bancaire. Si les détenteurs de compte ne le font pas, il y aura alors violation des dispositions du projet de loi C-76, s'il est adopté. Je crois que c'est suffisant.

M. John Nater:

Je le répète, un tel cas de figure ne peut se produire qu'une fois l'infraction commise. Je m'arrêterai là.

Si l'on revient à la question que vient de vous poser Mme Kusie sur les déplacements des ministres et des parlementaires, dans le projet de loi, vous limitez ce que peut faire un parti de l'opposition pendant la période préélectorale, mais en même temps, vous n'imposez aucune limite sur les activités gouvernementales. Je sais que vous avez bien dit toute « activité gouvernementale normale », mais bien souvent, l'activité gouvernementale se fait le miroir...

(1620)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Vous confondez l'activité partisane et le travail des députés parlementaires, alors que ce sont deux choses bien distinctes.

M. John Nater:

Donc, les activités typiques des campagnes...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Les partis politiques profiteront des mêmes conditions équitables en ce qui concerne leurs activités. Il n'est question que des publicités partisanes. Les députés, quelle que soit leur couleur politique, seront en mesure d'assumer les activités et responsabilités habituelles de leur fonction.

Le président:

Merci.

Passons maintenant à Mme May. Soyez la bienvenue au Comité.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Merci encore.

Je veux remercier M. Bittle, qui m'a donné son temps de parole. C'est très aimable.

Merci, madame la ministre. On a abordé une de mes questions la dernière fois que vous étiez ici pour discuter de l'avenir des débats des chefs.

J'ai pensé que j'allais saisir l'occasion pour exprimer mon soutien au projet de loi. À mon avis, il améliore grandement l'état actuel des choses. Il est vraiment important de le faire adopter avant que nous retournions aux urnes à l'automne 2019.

Je vois toutefois — et je suis d'accord avec mon collègue, M. Cullen — un certain nombre d'occasions perdues. Il ne fait pas ce qu'il pourrait faire pour certains aspects.

Ma grande question est, tout d'abord, à quel point êtes-vous disposée et le gouvernement est-il disposé à accepter les amendements présentés dans le but d'améliorer ces aspects, pour lesquels le gouvernement, et vous personnellement, a publiquement affirmé souhaiter qu'on en fasse davantage?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je suis également ravie de vous voir ici. Il est toujours bien de vous voir à un comité ou ailleurs.

Comme je l'ai déjà affirmé publiquement, nous sommes disposés à accepter des amendements. Bien entendu, cela dépend de l'amendement et de la mesure dans laquelle il correspond à ce que nous sommes disposés à mettre de l'avant. Cela dit, on en a présenté certains qui sont acceptables selon moi.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Puis-je vous parler plus précisément des modifications à la protection des renseignements personnels, qui sont préoccupantes selon moi? En fait, lorsque votre comité a été saisi du projet de loi C-23 des conservateurs au cours de la 41e législature, j'ai présenté un amendement voulant que les partis politiques ne soient pas exemptés de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels.

Dans ce cas-ci, mon amendement se rapporte plus précisément à la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels et les documents électroniques, la LPRPDE. Il serait beaucoup plus efficace — je pense que tout le monde en conviendra — de procéder ainsi plutôt que de laisser chaque parti élaborer et déposer son propre plan de protection des renseignements personnels.

Pouvez-vous me dire — et je sais que c'est très précis — si on est disposé à accepter cet amendement, et dans la négative, pourquoi pas?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

J'aimerais voir une étude plus approfondie de la protection des renseignements personnels au sein des partis politiques. Je crois que c'est très important. Cette mesure législative s'appuie largement sur les recommandations que le Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre a formulées en 2016 et en 2017, et la question de l'avenir en matière de protection des renseignements personnels ne faisait pas l'unanimité. Je pense qu'il faut examiner la question plus en profondeur.

Je pense que les partis politiques jouent un rôle essentiel pour faire participer les Canadiens au processus électoral, et je pense qu'il serait utile de comprendre comment nous pourrions appliquer un cadre de protection des renseignements personnels d'une façon qui permet aux partis de poursuivre ce travail et de dialoguer avec les Canadiens, mais aussi d'en faire plus pour protéger les renseignements personnels.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Merci.

Le premier amendement que j'ai ici est le premier du groupe, et je me demande juste si je peux savoir ce que vous en pensez. Comme vous le savez, la différence de point de vue entre l'un des principaux groupes écologiques au Québec, Équiterre, et les fonctionnaires électoraux quant à ce qu'on entend par de la publicité électorale a déclenché une controverse publique.

Dans mon ancienne vie en tant que directrice générale du Sierra Club du Canada, un nouveau bulletin d'information préparé par l'Agence du revenu du Canada pendant la campagne électorale de 2006 a fait dire à certains groupes qu'ils ne peuvent même pas publier de sondages, énoncer la position des conservateurs, des libéraux et des néo-démocrates pour ensuite laisser le soin aux gens de faire un choix. Les précisions que je propose concernant la publicité électorale nous permettraient de faire une distinction entre les activités partisanes et les activités visant à informer le public. Je me demande si vous estimez que mon amendement pourrait être acceptable pour le gouvernement.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je pense que je devrais l'examiner de plus près. Il convient toutefois de souligner que pendant la période préélectorale, les mesures prévues dans le projet de loi C-76 ne visent que les activités partisanes. À l'heure actuelle, dans la Loi électorale du Canada, et c'est le cas depuis longtemps, il est question de toutes les publicités pendant la période électorale, ce qui signifie qu'on ne distingue pas les publicités partisanes de celles qui portent sur des enjeux. À vrai dire, je pense qu'il est important de maintenir cette distinction, car comme l'a montré autrefois la Cour suprême, notamment dans l'affaire Harper c. Canada, la suprématie de la voix doit être accordée aux partis politiques et aux acteurs politiques pendant la période électorale. Je pense qu'il est important de maintenir cette distinction.

(1625)

Mme Elizabeth May:

Votre collègue veut intervenir.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je pourrais peut-être également ajouter, madame May, que le régime d'intervention des tiers est très différent au Québec. À l'échelle fédérale, tout le monde peut être un tiers et il y a des limites de dépenses, mais au Québec, je pense que seuls les particuliers peuvent intervenir, et ils ne peuvent dépenser qu'un maximum de 200 ou 300 $. C'est beaucoup plus limité qu'à l'échelle fédérale.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Merci.

Je vais essayer de glisser rapidement une dernière question.

Le président:

Soyez très brève.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Nous avons discuté d'un commissaire des débats des chefs, et cela n'a pas été mis de l'avant. Par conséquent, vous attendez-vous à ce que les élections de 2019 soient organisées par le consortium de la façon dont c'est fait depuis les années 1960, ou propose-t-on d'autres changements?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Il y aura d'autres changements. J'ai l'intention de veiller à ce qu'il y ait une commission des débats et un commissaire en 2019. Je serai ravie d'en discuter avec vous sous peu.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci à vous deux.

Nous allons maintenant revenir à M. Nater.

M. John Nater:

Va-t-on déposer une mesure législative pour créer cette commission?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Non.

M. John Nater:

Pourquoi pas?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Nous sommes en octobre 2018, et je vais m'inspirer grandement des recommandations dans le rapport du Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

M. John Nater:

Vous n'allez pas déposer de mesure législative aussi tard au cours de la législature pour créer une commission, mais vous le faites pourtant pour réformer en profondeur le système électoral.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

À vrai dire, cette mesure législative a été déposée au printemps, et nous sommes ici aujourd'hui à cause d'une obstruction systématique, donc...

M. John Nater:

Elle a été déposée la date à laquelle le directeur général des élections a affirmé qu'il fallait adopter la mesure en entier, après avoir laissé stagné le projet de loi C-33, faute d'amour, à l'étape de la deuxième lecture pendant cette période...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

L'étude aurait pu être entamée beaucoup plus tôt.

M. John Nater:

Je veux revenir à une observation faite par le directeur général des élections de notre province à propos de la valeur de la publicité par des tiers.

Il a recommandé de peut-être tenir compte de toutes les dépenses considérées comme des dépenses de tiers et de rendre l'inscription obligatoire. Êtes-vous du même avis?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Dans la loi, je pense qu'il est important d'avoir un seuil raisonnable. Comme l'a souligné mon collègue, M. Morin, à l'échelle fédérale, tous les particuliers et toutes les organisations sont considérés comme des tiers pendant la campagne électorale, et je pense qu'un plafond de 500 $ est raisonnable pour pouvoir produire un rapport. N'oublions pas que les exigences en matière de rapport que doivent satisfaire les tiers sont plutôt coûteuses, et on veut un montant d'argent qui pourrait permettre d'avoir une incidence considérable sur la façon dont les Canadiens comprennent l'information qui leur est présentée. Je pense que le montant de 500 $ est raisonnable.

M. John Nater:

Il a fait valoir que c'est beaucoup plus facile de voir les dépenses, un point c'est tout, qu'un drôle de montant de 500 $, qu'il est difficile de voir quand on regarde les ventes numériques. Je vais en rester là.

À propos d'un registre des futurs électeurs, l'exemple provincial faisait état d'un nombre infime de futurs électeurs inscrits. Comment envisagez-vous un nombre supérieur d'électeurs inscrits au registre?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je pense que ce sera le cas. Je crois que les Canadiens seront enthousiastes à cet égard. Nous nous réjouissons grandement à la perspective de faire inscrire des Canadiens sur la liste des futurs électeurs. Il est question d'encourager un plus grand nombre de jeunes à participer, et j'espère donc que ce sera une autre étape pour accroître leur participation aux élections.

De plus, le projet de loi C-76 modifie le mandat du directeur général des élections pour qu'il puisse de nouveau informer et sensibiliser le public au sujet du scrutin. S'il est adopté, je suis certain qu'il en fera davantage auprès des électeurs de tous les âges, de toutes les personnes qui ont l'intention de participer à nos élections, ce qui sera très positif à mon avis.

M. John Nater:

Seriez-vous favorable à un amendement explicite des conservateurs pour interdire la communication de ces renseignements aux partis politiques?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

La communication de ces renseignements dérogerait déjà au mandat d'Élections Canada.

M. John Nater:

Seriez-vous favorable à un amendement pour l'indiquer de manière explicite?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Ce qu'il faut se rappeler, c'est qu'Élections Canada ne montre que le registre des électeurs, et le nom des futurs électeurs n'y figure pas tant qu'ils n'ont pas 18 ans. L'amendement ne serait donc pas nécessaire.

M. John Nater:

Vous dites alors que vous ne l'indiquerez pas explicitement dans la loi.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Cela serait inutile.

Le président:

Merci.

Quelqu'un a-t-il une question rapide sans long préambule — premier arrivé, premier servi?

Allez-y, Elizabeth.

(1630)

Mme Elizabeth May:

Madame la ministre, selon vous, à quel moment pourrons-nous voir les règles relatives aux débats des leaders?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Bientôt.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen, vous pouvez poser votre question brève.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Voici la question: pouvez-vous indiquer une mesure dans le document qui donnera suite à la demande visant une diversité accrue des voix, plus particulièrement chez les femmes, dans les prochaines législatures?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

L'amendement dont j'ai parlé concernant les frais de garde est très important, car il permettra à des personnes qui ne pensaient pas pouvoir se présenter aux élections de poser leur candidature.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Plus précisément, est-ce pour la période préélectorale ou juste pour les 35 jours, habituellement, de la campagne électorale proprement dite?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

C'est pour la période électorale, car les frais engagés pendant la période préélectorale ne seraient pas remboursés.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vois. Donc, la mesure dont vous parlez permettrait d'utiliser des fonds recueillis pour payer les frais de garde pendant 35 jours, n'est-ce pas?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Il pourrait être question de 50 jours, mais c'est très important, car c'est pendant cette période qu'on travaille à temps plein et qu'on a besoin de ces services.

M. Nathan Cullen:

La seule raison pour laquelle je pose la question, c'est que dans tous les sondages effectués auprès des candidats, les femmes disent que le processus de nomination est beaucoup plus difficile que la période électorale proprement dite pour ce qui est des obligations familiales. La mesure dont vous parlez ne vise pas ce que les femmes considèrent comme le principal obstacle.

J'encourage vraiment mes collègues à examiner des mesures qui ont fonctionné dans d'autres pays pour faire élire un plus grand nombre de femmes, et qui se rapportent généralement aux remboursements accordés aux partis. C'est l'amendement que nous proposons. Si c'est ce que nous voulons, joignons le geste à la parole.

Le président:

Merci d'être venue témoigner, madame la ministre. C'est une excellente façon de commencer aujourd'hui notre étude article par article, et nous sommes impatients de vous présenter notre rapport.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui. Merci de m'avoir accueillie.

Le président:

Nous allons suspendre la séance pour que les gens puissent préparer leurs notes en vue de l'étude article par article.



(1645)

Le président:

Bonjour, et je vous souhaite de nouveau la bienvenue à la 123e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Cet après-midi, nous allons entamer l'étude article par article du projet de loi C-76, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada et d'autres lois et apportant des modifications corrélatives à d'autres textes législatifs.

Je tiens à souligner encore une fois la présence des fonctionnaires du Bureau du Conseil privé: Manon Paquet, conseillère principale en politiques, et Jean-François Morin, conseiller principal en politiques. Ils assisteront à nos réunions pour aider le Comité si les membres ont des questions au sujet du projet de loi. Merci à vous deux d'être ici.

Avant de commencer, j'aimerais donner aux députés des renseignements généraux sur la façon de faire l'étude article par article du projet de loi.

Le Comité va examiner tous les articles dans l'ordre où ils figurent dans le projet de loi. Chaque article que je mettrai en délibération fera l'objet d'un débat et d'un vote.

S'il y a des amendements à l'article, je vais donner la parole au député qui les propose, qui prendra alors environ une minute pour expliquer de quoi il s'agit. Les amendements feront ensuite l'objet d'un débat. Quand aucun autre député ne souhaitera intervenir, ils seront mis aux voix.

Je rappelle aux députés de veiller à ce que l'étude article par article se déroule de manière efficace et ordonnée.

Je pourrais limiter le débat sur un article à cinq minutes par parti. Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, je serai souple tant que les gens n'accordent pas trop de temps à des articles mineurs dont le contenu est évident et ainsi de suite. Si j'applique la règle des cinq minutes, ce sera pour chaque article, pas pour chaque amendement. Il arrive parfois qu'un article ait 10 ou 20 amendements, mais le temps accordé ne sera malgré tout que de cinq minutes, veuillez donc...

Oui?

(1650)

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Vous avez employé le conditionnel, et je suppose donc que vous pourriez vous montrer plus généreux dans bien des cas, surtout s'il est évident que nous ne tentons pas tout simplement de faire passer le temps.

Le président:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Bien, merci.

Le président:

Je vais toutefois m'efforcer d'utiliser le pouvoir discrétionnaire de la présidence pour faire durer le débat comme on le juge nécessaire, pourvu que les députés emploient judicieusement leur temps de parole.

Les amendements seront examinés dans l'ordre dans lequel ils apparaissent dans le dossier que le greffier a remis à chaque député. Lorsque des amendements sont corrélatifs, ils seront mis aux voix ensemble.

Ils doivent non seulement être bien rédigés sur le plan juridique, mais aussi être recevables sur le plan de la procédure. La présidence pourrait être appelée à juger irrecevables les amendements s'ils outrepassent le principe ou la portée du projet de loi, les deux ayant été adoptés par la Chambre lorsqu'elle a donné son consentement au projet de loi à l'étape de la deuxième lecture, ou s'ils vont à l'encontre de la prérogative financière de la Couronne.

Si vous souhaitez éliminer entièrement un article du projet de loi, la bonne façon de procéder consiste à voter contre l'article le moment venu, pas à proposer un amendement pour le supprimer.

Si, dans le cadre du processus, le Comité décide de ne pas mettre aux voix un article, il est possible de le mettre de côté, pour que nous puissions y revenir plus tard.

Les amendements sont numérotés — regardez dans le coin supérieur droit — pour indiquer quel parti les a présentés. Aucun comotionnaire n'est nécessaire pour proposer un amendement. En revanche, une fois qu'il est proposé, le consentement unanime est nécessaire pour l'éliminer.

Puisque je parle d'amendements, j'aimerais rappeler aux membres que le Comité a déjà accepté de modifier l'article 262, par substitution, à la ligne 34, page 153, de ce qui suit: « est de 1 400 000 $. » Nous ne pouvons donc plus modifier cet article.

Dans l'éventualité où le Comité n'aurait pas terminé l'étude article par article du projet de loi d'ici vendredi, 13 heures, tous les amendements non mis aux voix qui auront été soumis au Comité seront réputés avoir été proposés et avoir été mis aux voix immédiatement et successivement sans plus amples débats sur l'ensemble des articles et des amendements proposés qui restent, ainsi que sur toutes les questions nécessaires pour terminer l'étape de l'étude en comité du projet de loi.

Le rapport du Comité à la Chambre ne comprendra que le libellé des amendements adoptés, ainsi qu'une mention pour chaque article supprimé.

Je remercie les députés de leur attention.

Nous allons maintenant procéder à l'étude article par article.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je n'ai qu'une question technique, monsieur le président, avant que nous commencions. Je veux adresser une question à nos invités par votre intermédiaire.

Premièrement, merci d'être là et de bien vouloir passer du temps... Je ne sais pas si « vouloir » est le bon mot, mais vous allez passer du temps avec nous.

Sur le plan procédural, j'ai participé à l'étude d'autres projets de loi, et habituellement, des témoins du cabinet du ministre sont également présents. Est-ce que c'est le Conseil privé qui s'occupe de tout, ou est-ce que le Comité aura accès à des conseillers techniques du cabinet de la ministre Gould, pour notre examen de ces amendements?

Je vous pose la question, à l'intention de nos...

Le président:

Le BCP est essentiellement le cabinet de la ministre Gould. C'est en quelque sorte le...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Le BCP est le cabinet de la ministre Gould? Est-ce ainsi que c'est structuré?

Le président:

C'est là où se fait l'essentiel du travail. C'est différent des autres projets de loi, en quelque sorte.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non. Nous sommes du groupe des institutions démocratiques, au BCP, alors nous sommes des fonctionnaires. Nous allons vraisemblablement vous renseigner sur les questions techniques relatives au projet de loi, mais nous ne pouvons pas répondre aux questions relatives à la politique.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non, bien sûr.

Je n'ai pas saisi ce que vous avez dit. De quel service êtes-vous, au BCP?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Du groupe des institutions démocratiques du Bureau du Conseil privé.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est le groupe des institutions démocratiques au BCP.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ma question donc — que je vous adresse, encore une fois, monsieur le président — est à propos de l'absence de représentants du cabinet de la ministre Gould.

Vous répondez à des questions techniques. Je présume donc que le projet de loi a aussi été conçu — pardonnez-moi — au sein du département des institutions démocratiques du BCP. Nous allons parcourir des centaines d'amendements. J'aimerais simplement savoir, avant que le Comité se lance dans cela, à qui nous devons poser des questions. Est-ce qu'il y a quelqu'un d'autre que nous pouvons interroger?

Si c'est au BCP que le projet de loi a été rédigé, c'est excellent. Allons-y. Mais si c'est au cabinet de la ministre que le projet de loi a été rédigé, je soupçonne qu'il y aura des problèmes quand nous poserons des questions sur des choses auxquelles vous n'avez pas participé. Est-ce que ma première hypothèse est juste?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non. C'est notre groupe qui a rédigé le projet de loi.

(1655)

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est votre groupe qui l'a fait.

D'accord. C'est tout ce que je veux savoir, monsieur le président. Merci.

Le président:

D'accord. Merci.

Conformément à l'article 75(1) du Règlement, le titre abrégé est reporté.

(Article 2)

Le président: Nous passons à l'article 2, et nous avons l'amendement 1 du Parti vert.

Voulez-vous en parler?

Mme Elizabeth May:

Oui. Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais très brièvement préciser...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Monsieur le président, pardonnez-moi. Avant que nous commencions, je voulais faire un rappel au Règlement.

Le président: Oh, je suis désolé.

Mme Stephanie Kusie: Je vous fais mes excuses, ainsi qu'à vous, madame May.

Avant que nous entreprenions notre longue étude article par article du projet de loi C-76, je veux faire la courtoisie à mes collègues de leur donner une idée des amendements conservateurs qui s'ajoutent.

Le conseiller législatif a rédigé quelque 21 amendements de juin à septembre, mais pour une ou plusieurs raisons inconnues, ces amendements n'ont pas été inclus dans le dossier qui a été distribué le 2 octobre.

Monsieur le président, nous avons l'intention de proposer chacun de ces amendements au moment opportun, au cours de notre étude, mais c'est avec plaisir que je les distribue maintenant pour que mes collègues puissent les examiner à l'avance.

Ces amendements sont rédigés dans les deux langues officielles et leur présentation correspond au format utilisé par le Bureau du légiste.

Avant que les membres du Comité se mettent à s'inquiéter de ce que nous donnions libre cours à de nombreuses autres questions, je tiens à souligner que la plupart des amendements de ce dossier supplémentaire viennent en fait compléter les amendements distribués précédemment. En réalité, je crois qu'une poignée seulement d'amendements n'est pas liée aux amendements.

Monsieur le président, ainsi que nos greffiers, pour vous aider à déterminer le moment de proposer ces amendements, compte tenu de leur position dans le texte et ainsi de suite, je peux vous dire que le premier amendement visant l'article 2 sera proposé avant l'amendement PV-1, et que le l'autre amendement visant l'article 2 sera proposé après l'amendement PV-1.

Un amendement visant l'article 37 sera proposé après l'amendement LIB-2.

Un amendement porte sur l'article 45.

Un amendement porte sur l'article 70, et il sera proposé après l'amendement LIB-5.

Il y a un amendement pour l'article 102.

Il y a un amendement pour l'article 122, qui sera proposé après l'amendement CPC-49.

Un amendement vise un nouvel article, soit l'article 155.1.

Un amendement porte sur l'article 191, et il sera proposé avant l'amendement CPC-69.

Le premier amendement qui vise l'article 223 sera proposé après l'amendement CPC-88. Le deuxième amendement visant ce même article sera proposé après l'amendement CPC-92.

Il y a un amendement pour l'article 225, qui sera proposé après l'amendement CPC-101.1.

Le premier amendement portant sur l'article 234 sera proposé après l'amendement CPC-113. L'autre amendement visant l'article 234 sera proposé après l'amendement CPC-114.

Il y a un amendement pour l'article 235.

Deux amendements visent la création du nouvel article 252.1.

Il y a un amendement qui vise l'article 326.

Il y a un amendement pour l'article 357, et il sera proposé après l'amendement LIB-60.

Un amendement crée le nouvel article 365.1

Enfin, un amendement vise l'article 377.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci.

Je crois que cela va tenir notre conseiller juridique occupé.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

C'était presque aussi rapide que David. Je suis impressionné.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

J'ai essayé d'être plus expressive que Bardish. C'est une blague.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

Le président:

Madame Kusie, vous avez dit que vous proposeriez maintenant votre premier amendement?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui. Le premier amendement précède l'amendement PV-1.

Le premier amendement, le CPC-10008563, est: Que le projet de loi C-76, à l'article 2, soit modifié par adjonction, après la ligne 23, page 2, de ce qui suit: e.1) les rapports de rapprochement des bulletins de vote établis au titre de l'article 283.1;

M. Chris Bittle:

J'invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Oui.

M. Chris Bittle:

Monsieur le président, est-ce que cet amendement vise l'article 2?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Chris Bittle:

Est-ce que l'amendement PV-1 porte sur l'article 1?

Le président:

Non, il porte sur l'article 2.

M. Chris Bittle:

Mes excuses. Je vais essayer de mieux suivre.

Le président:

D'accord.

Pouvez-vous rapidement expliquer le but de votre amendement?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Bien sûr. C'est lié à l'inversion du lien entre la section de vote et le bureau de scrutin, et cela ajoute l'exigence de rapports de rapprochement des bulletins de vote dans les cas où il y a plusieurs bureaux de scrutin en un seul lieu.

(1700)

Le président:

Quelqu'un veut dire quelque chose à ce sujet?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce que la marraine de la motion peut répéter l'explication de cet amendement, peu importe comment on l'appelle? Est-ce qu'on l'appelle l'amendement CPC-1, ou 10008563?

Le président:

Ce serait moins un, car nous avons déjà un amendement CPC-1.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pouvons-nous simplement entendre l'explication de cet amendement? Dans la loi, il est difficile de savoir ce qu'est l'article 283.1 dans le projet de loi et ce que cet amendement accomplit.

Le président:

Madame Kusie, on vous demande d'expliquer de nouveau l'amendement.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Apparemment, la raison de cet amendement est que l'on craint qu'il ne soit pas possible de déterminer les résultats numériques à un bureau de scrutin, alors que le système existant garantit la possibilité de déterminer le nombre relatif à un bureau de scrutin en particulier.

Le président:

Nous vous écoutons, monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est peut-être injuste pour nos témoins qui viennent de prendre connaissance de cet amendement, tout comme nous. Êtes-vous en mesure de confirmer cette explication ou de l'étayer, concernant l'effet de CPC moins un — peu importe sa désignation —, qui porte sur les rapports de rapprochement des bulletins de vote?

Connaissez-vous cet article de la Loi électorale du Canada et savez-vous quel effet cette modification produira sur le projet de loi C-76? Je vous pose cette question, car vous proposez ces amendements en ce moment.

Comme je l'ai dit en introduction, il est peut-être injuste de demander cela, mais connaissez-vous ce...

Je remercie ma collègue de son explication. J'ai tendance à voter contre si je ne suis pas en mesure de fonder mon vote sur des témoignages présentés au Comité à ce jour, et je ne me souviens pas que cet enjeu ait été soulevé. À moins que nos fonctionnaires puissent nous expliquer, dans les minutes qui viennent, en quoi cela améliorerait nos dispositions législatives en matière d'élections.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Donnez-moi un instant pour que je trouve la référence.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui. Je vais faire de même.

M. Jean-François Morin:

En effet, le projet de loi C-76 apporte de nombreux changements à la façon de gérer les bureaux de scrutin. En ce moment, dans la Loi, nous avons un bureau de scrutin, qui est en fait une urne, et des fonctionnaires électoraux qui reçoivent les votes pour chaque bureau de scrutin. Quand plusieurs bureaux de scrutin sont regroupés au même endroit, on parle d'un « centre de scrutin ».

Ce que le projet de loi C-76 change, c'est que les centres de scrutin vont devenir des bureaux de scrutin, et qu'à l'intérieur de chaque bureau de scrutin, il y aura plusieurs tables où des fonctionnaires électoraux vont pouvoir recevoir les votes. Cela est conforme à une recommandation du directeur général des élections visant la modernisation de l'administration du vote aux bureaux de scrutin. J'en arrive à...

(1705)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je veux bien comprendre le scénario dont vous parlez — et pardonnez-moi, mesdames et messieurs, mais je suis visuel. Traditionnellement, en particulier dans les centres urbains, vous alliez dans le gymnase d'une école ou dans une église, et il y avait là plusieurs bureaux de scrutin pour divers secteurs, tous au même endroit. Nous appelions cela un centre de scrutin. Est-ce qu'en effet, le projet de loi C-76 modifie cela pour que ce ne soit plus appelé un centre de scrutin, mais un bureau de scrutin unique?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Exactement. Cela deviendra un bureau de scrutin.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Donc, ce changement, dans l'alinéa e.1) proposé ne constitue pas une nouvelle façon de voter, mais plutôt simplement une nouvelle façon d'organiser les votes. L'électeur peut aller à n'importe quelle table, et cela n'a pas d'importance.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Ce sera le cas éventuellement. Le directeur général des élections aura plus de flexibilité dans la gestion des bureaux de scrutin. Il a déjà indiqué que le principe du « vote à n'importe quelle table » ne s'appliquera pas aux élections de 2019.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ce que vous dites, c'est que le directeur général des élections n'aura pas le temps, parce que le projet de loi arrive trop tard, pour faire les changements que nous envisageons dans cet article et qui permettraient à l'électeur de simplement trouver un bureau de scrutin, se faire inscrire et voter. Ce serait pour les élections qui viendront après celles de 2019.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Exactement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord. Dans ce cas, pouvez-vous nous parler de ce que cet amendement changerait à ce scénario?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Cet amendement modifierait la définition de « documents électoraux » de sorte que les rapports de rapprochement des bulletins soient considérés comme des documents électoraux. Le principe du rapport de rapprochement des bulletins va être présenté dans un prochain amendement, mais l'article 533 de la Loi électorale du Canada — pas le projet de loi, mais la Loi — exige déjà du directeur général des élections qu'il prépare un rapport des résultats, section de vote par section de vote...

M. Nathan Cullen:

N'est-ce pas ce qu'on appelle communément les « feuilles de bingo »? Est-ce le rapport de rapprochement, ou est-ce...

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non, c'est différent. Le directeur général des élections devra encore faire rapport des résultats, section de vote par section de vote de façon distincte. Les sections de vote des bureaux de scrutin ne seront pas toutes amalgamées. Elles devront toujours faire l'objet de rapports distincts.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord. Merci.

Le président:

Vous dites que ce n'est pas nécessaire? Qu'on le fait déjà?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je crois que l'autre motion va nous permettre d'en savoir plus sur le contexte, mais je dis simplement que si la préoccupation est que les résultats ne seront pas fournis pour chaque section de vote, la Loi exige déjà cela.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Pour préciser, cet article est un amendement qui vise à assurer à l'avance la coordination avec l'amendement CPC-72, dont nous allons discuter plus tard. Il ne fait qu'ajouter cette définition relative aux documents électoraux. Parce que les documents électoraux sont traités à cet endroit dans le projet de loi, nous devons en parler avant que nous puissions proposer l'amendement CPC-72.

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un d'autre aimerait dire quelque chose?

Nous sommes prêts à mettre cet amendement aux voix.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: D'accord. Nous passons maintenant à l'amendement PV-1.

C'est à vous, madame May.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Avant de parler de l'amendement, je tiens à dire que le processus selon lequel je suis présente est toujours aussi insultant et difficile pour moi. La motion du Comité exige que je sois présente à la réunion du Comité pour présenter des amendements au moment de l'étude article par article. Cela gêne sérieusement ma capacité de faire mon travail, car nous avons très souvent des audiences de comités et des études article par article qui se déroulent simultanément devant des comités différents. Je ne suis pas contente de cette motion, mais je suis satisfaite de pouvoir me retrouver avec des collègues et présenter ces amendements, ce que je vais faire aussi rapidement que possible, compte tenu de tout ce que le Comité doit examiner pour le projet de loi C-76.

Mon premier amendement, en guise de rappel, vise le paragraphe sur la publicité électorale, qui comporte une liste de ce qui n'est pas considéré comme de la publicité électorale. Par exemple, dans le projet de loi, la publicité électorale n'inclut pas la diffusion d'éditoriaux ou d'opinions dans un journal.

La préoccupation que je cherche à résoudre par cet amendement a été exprimée par des organisations non gouvernementales qui ne sont absolument pas partisanes, mais qui veulent publier des résultats de sondages, par exemple. Autrement dit, ce serait à des fins d'information, mais ces organisations ne sont pas des tiers.

Intervenir dans une campagne en tant que tiers signifie que vous favorisez quelqu'un. Cela pourrait être très difficile, par exemple, pour un organisme de bienfaisance, qui ne peut pas prendre position lors d'une élection, mais qui, en raison de son mandat, joue un rôle éducatif. Pour garantir que le rôle éducatif n'est pas interdit, je propose un amendement qui ajoute, comme précision, que la publicité électorale n'inclut pas « les activités de sensibilisation sur une question qui ne favorisent ni ne contrecarrent activement un parti enregistré ou l'élection d'un candidat ».

Le reste découle de cela et garantit que nous ne considérons pas cela non plus comme le fait de signaler ou de commenter la position prise sur une question par un parti enregistré, un candidat potentiel, et ainsi de suite.

J'espère que c'est clair. Nous avons déjà entendu la réponse de la ministre, alors je suis assez certaine de ce qui va arriver à mon amendement, mais je pense qu'il est vraiment important que les organisations non gouvernementales qui ne sont pas partisanes puissent se faire entendre, car elles sont une source d'information très importante pour les électeurs. L'inscription comme tiers, en plus d'être onéreuse, peut induire les gens en erreur concernant les intentions des organisations de la société civile qui sont entièrement impartiales.

Merci.

(1710)

Le président:

Vous avez la parole, monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J'aimerais poser une question à Mme May par votre entremise, monsieur le président.

Nous vous remercions pour votre amendement. Je sais qu'il n'y a pas de lien direct, mais récemment, l'ARC a présenté de nouvelles règles financières relatives à la période au cours de laquelle les organismes de bienfaisance peuvent recevoir des dons et réaliser des activités de sensibilisation. Ces règles ont été rejetées par la Cour supérieure de l'Ontario, il y a un moment, je crois. Le gouvernement a laissé entendre qu'il allait porter la cause en appel.

Je me pose des questions au sujet de la capacité des organismes de bienfaisance à recevoir de l'argent en vue de leurs activités de sensibilisation. Les groupes environnementaux, les groupes de lutte contre la pauvreté et les organismes religieux font partie de cette catégorie également, je suppose, et ne peuvent défendre les enjeux qui leur tiennent à coeur pendant les élections.

Nous savons tous, en tant qu'acteurs politiques, que si les Canadiens font un don à un parti politique pour qu'il défende leur point de vue, ils recevront un très généreux reçu à des fins fiscales. S'ils font un don à l'un de ces organismes de bienfaisance, ils obtiendront beaucoup moins en retour. Or, les Canadiens continuent de demander aux organismes de bienfaisance de parler en leur nom.

Ma question pour vous est la suivante: est-ce que c'est défendable devant les tribunaux? C'est l'équilibre qu'il faudra atteindre avec le projet de loi, monsieur le président: on se demande si la restriction à laquelle s'oppose le gouvernement tiendra la route devant les tribunaux, par opposition aux amendements relatifs à la liberté d'expression que les tribunaux doivent aborder.

Est-ce que l'amendement que vous souhaitez apporter au projet de loi permet aux organismes de bienfaisance et à ceux qui les appuient de se faire entendre; de défendre leur cause?

Vous avez parlé des sondages. Si un organisme de bienfaisance classe les partis et dit: « nous luttons contre la pauvreté, nous sommes un organisme religieux et nous appuyons ce parti, ce candidat », comment cela ne peut-il pas être perçu par le public et les médias comme une activité partisane pure et simple?

Mme Elizabeth May:

Je suis d'accord avec vous. On croirait à une activité partisane si ces organismes disaient: « Nous aimons ce que dit ce parti. » Nous parlons de publier les résultats de sorte que les gens puissent connaître la position des partis. En d'autres termes, nous voulons informer les gens, tout simplement. Il n'est pas question de dire: « Nous aimons ce qu'a dit ce parti parce que nous l'avons sondé. » Il est plutôt question de sonder les partis et les candidats individuels aux élections en fonction de chaque circonscription. Il ne faut pas oublier qu'il y a des candidats indépendants qui souhaitent devenir députés. Dans notre système parlementaire de Westminster, ces gens ont autant le droit d'avoir l'attention du public que les membres des grands partis.

Dans les faits, mon amendement permettrait de protéger la liberté d'expression avec plus de vigueur, sans accroître le risque que les acteurs tiers utilisent leur position pour s'adonner à des activités partisanes par des voies détournées. Ils devront clairement établir qu'il s'agit d'une activité de sensibilisation qui ne favorise ni ne contrecarre un parti ou un candidat. Il s'agit de renseignements publics purs et simples. C'est une question d'éducation.

Je ne veux pas prendre trop de temps, mais je dois dire que j'ai vécu l'expérience au Sierra Club du Canada. À partir de 2006, et sans aucune modification à la loi, les bulletins d'information de l'ARC ont commencé à restreindre de manière importante la capacité des ONG à parler pendant les campagnes électorales, ne serait-ce que pour faire une vérification de base sur leurs sujets d'expertise. Nous invitons les ONG à témoigner devant les comités en raison de leur expertise. Cette expertise est précieuse pour les électeurs.

Les partis politiques ont le droit de parler, mais les électeurs peuvent prendre avec un grain de sel leurs affirmations pendant les campagnes électorales. Toutefois, lorsque les électeurs font confiance à un groupe, que ce soit CARE Canada ou Oxfam, qui parle des questions de pauvreté, ou une grande organisation qui défend les droits des femmes comme À voix égales, leur capacité de publier une enquête ne devrait pas être visée par les dispositions du projet de loi C-76 sur les publicités électorales.

(1715)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci.

Le président:

Avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter?

Sommes-nous prêts à passer au vote?

Vous voulez un vote par appel nominal?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, seulement cette fois.

Le président:

Nous allons tenir un vote par appel nominal.

(L'amendement est rejeté par 8 voix contre 1. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous passons à l'amendement CPC-1, présenté par M. Richards. Est-ce que quelqu'un peut nous expliquer l'intention de l'amendement CPC-1, brièvement?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Dans l'amendement CPC-9950080, nous proposons que...

Une voix: Vous devez d'abord présenter l'amendement.

Mme Stephanie Kusie: Oh, excusez-moi.

Le président:

Est-ce que c'est un nouvel amendement ou celui qui a déjà été présenté?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C'est un nouvel amendement, parce que l'amendement PV-1 a été rejeté. Celui qui avait été présenté n'a donc plus d'intérêt.

Le président:

Nous allons parler de l'amendement CPC-0.2, afin que ce soit clair pour nos administrateurs.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord.

M. Vance Badawey (Niagara-Centre, Lib.):

Vous pouvez utiliser le numéro de référence.

Le président:

Le numéro de référence est le 9950080, si vous voulez suivre. C'est le document qui vous a été remis.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, j'invoque le Règlement. Est-ce que vous voulez à chaque fois que nous disions: « Je propose »... et que nous lisions tout le texte ou est-ce que vous préférez que nous passions directement aux explications?

Le président:

J'aimerais que vous nous expliquiez rapidement de quoi il s'agit.

M. Scott Reid:

Nous pouvons passer l'étape où nous disons: « Je propose de modifier ceci et cela à telle ligne de telle page »... Nous pouvons passer tout cela?

Le président:

Je crois que oui.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. C'est la réponse à votre question.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord. Je crois que c'est évident ici: « futur électeur Citoyen canadien âgé de 16 ans ou ».

Le président:

Voulez-vous en discuter?

Allez-y, monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

À titre de précision, cela modifierait la définition de « futur électeur ». Au lieu d'être de 14 à 18 ans, l'âge d'un futur électeur serait de 16 à 18 ans, ce qui réduirait le groupe d'âge et ferait passer l'âge minimal à 16 ans. On rehausse donc quelque peu l'âge minimal.

Je vais en rester là, monsieur le président.

Le président:

D'accord. Tout le monde comprend cela. Avez-vous d'autres commentaires? Êtes-vous prêts à passer au vote?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'aimerais faire un commentaire, rapidement. Quel est l'âge minimum requis pour être membre du Parti conservateur?

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, me permettez-vous de répondre à cette question? L'âge minimum est de 14 ans, ce qui est trop jeune, à mon avis. Je tente depuis des années de faire passer l'âge minimum à 16 ans.

Selon ma propre expérience avec les jeunes activistes, ceux-ci gagnent beaucoup plus en maturité entre 14 et 16 ans qu'entre 16 et 20 ans, par exemple. C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles, selon mon expérience avec le parti, il faudrait faire passer l'âge minimum de 14 à 16 ans. Voilà.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

De toute façon, à l'heure actuelle, c'est cohérent. Il s'agit d'un futur électeur, pas d'un électeur actuel.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est tout à fait cohérent, mais pour ma part, j'aimerais que l'âge minimum soit 16 ans pour les deux; et si j'arrive à changer la constitution de notre parti, j'aimerais aussi que l'âge minimum y soit de 16 ans.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à ce qui était au départ l'amendement CPC-1. À titre de précision, le numéro de référence, que vous avez déjà, est le 9985169.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

En fait, ce numéro de référence est associé à l'amendement CPC-1.

(1720)

Le président:

Oui, CPC-1, et le numéro de référence se trouve dans le coin supérieur gauche, pour ne pas le confondre avec les autres amendements CPC-1.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

De quel numéro de référence parle-t-on?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous revenons à ce document.

Le président:

Nous en sommes à l'amendement CPC-1.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oh, d'accord.

Le président:

Quelqu'un peut-il nous expliquer brièvement le but de cet amendement?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Bien sûr. L'amendement est associé à la question que j'ai posée à la ministre lors de son témoignage d'aujourd'hui au sujet de certains avantages dont profite le gouvernement actuel. L'amendement vise à rendre les règles du jeu équitables pour les autres partis inscrits en restreignant la publicité partisane de façon précise et en ce qui a trait à d'autres lois.

Le président:

D'accord. Voulez-vous en discuter? Êtes-vous prêts à passer au vote?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Excusez-moi. Avant que nous passions au vote, est-ce que c'est à cela qu'elle s'est engagée dans le cadre de notre discussion, lorsque je lui ai demandé si elle s'engageait ou non... à votre avis?

Donc, non.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je me demande si l'amendement vise à obliger les ministres du Cabinet — y compris le premier ministre, bien sûr — à dresser une liste de toutes les dépenses relatives à la période préélectorale et de les classer à titre de dépenses partisanes. Est-ce qu'on veut restreindre ou bannir ces dépenses?

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, à titre de précision, nous en sommes toujours à l'article 2, qui comprend les définitions. L'amendement vise une coordination préalable, pour plus tard. Comme l'a fait valoir M. Cullen, nous voulons harmoniser ces périodes.

Le président:

D'accord. Êtes-vous prêts à passer au vote?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous passons à l'amendement PV-2. S'il est adopté, l'amendement CPC-2 ne peut être présenté, puisque les deux amendements visent à modifier la même ligne.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Merci, monsieur le président. Pour les anglophones qui se le demandent, « PV » signifie Parti vert.[Français]

Il y aura sûrement un jour un autre parti avec la lettre P, par exemple celui de Maxime Bernier, mais je veux souligner que « PV » signifie ici « Parti vert ».[Traduction]

Je crois que lorsque j'ai présenté mes premiers amendements au cours de la 41e législature, le gouvernement de l'époque craignait de voir des amendements dont la première lettre serait un « G », pour Green Party... Ils voulaient que ce « G » soit associé au « gouvernement ». C'est mon souhait également. Enfin...

L'amendement vise à modifier la ligne 10, page 4, afin de prolonger la période préélectorale. Je crois que c'est une très bonne chose qu'en vertu du projet de loi, les règles relatives aux dépenses maximales et à la conduite s'appliquent également à la période préélectorale. J'aimerais que cette période commence le jour suivant une élection. Toutefois, dans cet amendement, je prolonge la période de deux mois seulement, afin qu'elle commence le 30 avril au lieu du 30 juin.

Le président:

Je vais donner la parole à M. Bittle pour commencer, puis à M. Cullen.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci beaucoup.

J'aimerais être d'accord avec vous, madame May, et je crois que la période devrait être prolongée. Toutefois, selon les témoignages juridiques que nous avons entendus, le prolongement de cette période pourrait poser problème en raison de décisions prises en Colombie-Britannique, je crois...

M. Cullen me corrigera, mais...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je ne ferais jamais cela.

M. Chris Bittle:

Il ne dira jamais que je me trompe sur ce sujet.

Cette date visait une période où le Parlement ne siège pas et à harmoniser la période électorale aux décisions des tribunaux.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J'aimerais poser une question aux témoins.

Quelle était la période préélectorale en Ontario lors des dernières élections?

Vous dites qu'elle était de six mois.

Cette période a été contestée devant les tribunaux parce qu'on la jugeait trop coûteuse, mais elle a résisté à cette contestation judiciaire.

Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, monsieur le président, je crois que le projet de loi tel qu'il est rédigé est associé à une certaine tension relative aux libertés civiles et à la liberté d'expression; à ces valeurs importantes que nous avons au Canada. Nous pourrions perdre certaines d'entre elles en établissant ces limites.

Je crois que l'interjection de Mme May visant à élargir l'intention du projet de loi afin d'en accroître la signification... Nous savons qu'une bonne partie de la période préélectorale se passe pendant l'été, du moins avec les élections à date fixe. Est-ce que j'ai raison? Si nous revenons des élections, de la période préélectorale et que nous reculons de deux mois et demi, nous allons nous retrouver en été...

(1725)

Mme Elizabeth May:

En été, oui...

M. Nathan Cullen:

... au Canada, et je sais que bon nombre des électeurs s'intéressent beaucoup à la politique pendant cette période. Ils regardent CPAC avec intérêt, tout comme ils le font présentement.

Si nous voulons uniformiser les règles du jeu, alors nous ne pouvons pas prendre les deux derniers mois — ou deux mois et demi — et dire: « Il s'agit de la période la plus intense. Nous devons déplacer les limites préélectorales. » Nous devons reculer davantage, à mon avis, parce que bien que Mme May ait peut-être raison lorsqu'elle dit que la période préélectorale a semblé commencer juste après les dernières élections, l'intensité est plus grande au cours de la période de mai, juin et juillet, et certainement au cours des mois de mai et juin, juste avant la fin de la session, habituellement.

J'appuie l'amendement et je crois qu'il résisterait à une contestation devant les tribunaux, pour répondre aux préoccupations de M. Bittle. L'Ontario est déjà passé par là. Les résultats ont peut-être été terribles, mais ce n'est pas le changement aux règles électorales de l'Ontario qui ont donné lieu à ces résultats.

Le président:

Est-ce que je peux vous poser une question, monsieur Morin? Y a-t-il d'autres représentants de votre ministère dans la salle?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui.

Le président:

Vous pouvez leur demander d'intervenir à tout moment. N'hésitez pas.

D'accord. Sommes-nous prêts à voter au sujet de l'amendement PV-2?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous passons maintenant à l'amendement CPC-2.

Pouvez-vous nous expliquer rapidement en quoi il consiste?

M. John Nater:

Il va dans le même sens que l'autre amendement, mais nous parlons de la période commençant le 1er janvier dans le cas des tiers. Nous n'avons pas changé les dates dans les autres cas.

Le président:

Voulez-vous en discuter?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela reviendrait au point soulevé par Chris au sujet de la constitutionnalité. Cet élément a été contesté.

Avez-vous dit « janvier »?

M. John Nater:

C'est le 1er janvier.

M. Nathan Cullen:

En ce qui a trait à la liberté d'expression, je ne crois pas que le prolongement de la période afin qu'elle commence le 1er janvier résisterait une seule minute à une contestation judiciaire. J'essaie donc de ne pas voter pour ce genre de choses.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Nous avons passé beaucoup de temps à parler de l'article 2, mais je vais vous permettre de passer un peu plus de temps à l'étude du prochain amendement, l'amendement NDP-1, parce que ce vote s'appliquera aussi aux amendements NDP-2, NDP-3, NDP-4, NDP-5, NDP-6, NDP-7, NDP-12, NDP-13, NDP-14 et NDP-15. Le résultat du vote s'applique à tous ces amendements.

Monsieur Cullen, voulez-vous nous présenter l'amendement?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, absolument, et tous les amendements corrélatifs.

Essentiellement, j'ai posé la question ici à la ministre. Nous avons convoqué des témoins sur cette question. Malgré nos divergences d'opinions, nous sommes tous des partisans de la démocratie et nous voulons que les électeurs votent. Les taux de participation ont constamment baissé, exception faite de l'étrange augmentation.

L'une des leçons des études antérieures d'Élections Canada et des différentes sections provinciales est que la semaine à cinq journées ouvrables, subdivisée en heures régulières, n'existe plus. On travaille à toute heure, et c'est essentiellement centré sur le scrutin dominical. D'après la plupart des spécialistes étrangers, cette autorisation ferait augmenter de 6 à 7 % le taux de participation aux élections.

Simplement pour rassurer les gens et que ça donne des résultats dans les démocraties en bonne santé, les pays qui le font sont l'Autriche, la Belgique, le Brésil, le Chili, la France, l'Allemagne, la Grèce, l'Italie, le Japon, le Mexique, le Portugal, la Roumanie, la Suède, la Suisse, l'Uruguay et une foule d'autres.

J'ignore si Samara, que nous avons tous cité et exploité amplement, a témoigné sur le projet de loi C-76. L'a-t-il fait?

Le président:

Peut-être. Tout le monde l'a fait.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Tout le monde a témoigné sur ce projet de loi. Il bénéficie de beaucoup d'appuis. L'ancien directeur général des élections Marc Mayrand, que beaucoup d'entre nous connaissent et qui est tenu en haute estime en raison des élections qu'il a dirigées a fait cette déclaration: Si les élections se tenaient durant la fin de semaine, il serait plus facile de trouver du personnel qualifié et des emplacements accessibles comme des écoles et des bureaux municipaux.

Ce n'est pas seulement pour la participation au scrutin. Il y a tout lieu de penser — et notre comité, tout comme le gouvernement, est censé s'appuyer sur les faits, comme on nous le répète sans cesse — que les renseignements destinés aux électeurs sont utiles, et utiles aussi à la dotation en personnel d'Élections Canada.

À quand remonte le vote par anticipation sur une grande échelle? Je dirais que ç'a vraiment commencé en 2004 ou 2006. On a multiplié les dates de vote par anticipation, et les électeurs l'ont bien apprécié. Ils aiment voter à leur convenance plutôt que d'être bloqués dans de longues files d'attente. Certains continuent de préférer la tradition du jour officiel du scrutin.

Cet amendement permettrait tout simplement de nous débarrasser d'une vieille aberration qui date d'une époque où, peut-être, la politique était différente et où il était inconcevable de faire travailler des préposés dans des bureaux de scrutin et de convoquer les électeurs un dimanche.

Ce n'est certainement plus la réalité du Canada, pays maintenant diversifié. Je pense que si nous voulons attirer plus d'électeurs et aider Élections Canada dans l'organisation des élections, cet amendement et les amendements corrélatifs méritent d'être adoptés.

(1730)

Le président:

À l'intention, officiellement, des intéressés, notre comité a longuement discuté du pour et du contre. Avis aux intéressés qui voudront en prendre connaissance.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Notre comité a également fait du travail sur cette question. Des opinions divergent.

Nous nous sommes attachés à la recherche des faits. Comment cela nuit-il au processus démocratique? Est-ce que ça entrave l'organisation des élections par Élections Canada? Sans vouloir la prendre à la légère, j'ai l'impression que l'opposition se nourrissait plutôt d'impressions — « Je n'aime pas ça » ou « Ça ne me semble pas correct » — plutôt que de présenter des preuves d'une perte d'efficacité de notre démocratie.

Encore une fois, dans les 42 pays qui le font actuellement, ça fonctionne. Ce n'est même plus un projet. Beaucoup d'entre eux ont franchi ce pas il y a belle lurette.

Le président:

D'autres opinions?

Allez-y, Ruby. Elizabeth, ensuite.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Sur ce dernier point, je tiens à dire que je suis d'accord. Je pense qu'on devrait s'appuyer sur des faits. La discussion s'est étirée. Les opinions divergeaient. Je pense que, en même temps, il a même été proposé des sous-amendements dans notre comité, qui ont suscité des sentiments divergents chez tous les partis, avec l'impression qu'un phénomène de cette amplitude devrait faire l'objet de consultations et que nous devrions obtenir les preuves qui permettraient de connaître l'opinion des gens plutôt que de seulement proposer un amendement à ce projet de loi.

Le président:

Madame May.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Rapidement, je tenais à dire que, dans la 41e législature, le projet de loi C-23 a brisé, pour la première fois, les résistances au scrutin dominical. Le gouvernement conservateur antérieur y rendait obligatoire le vote par anticipation le dimanche. C'est ce que dit actuellement la loi, à ce que je sache.

L'amendement de Nathan aménagerait pour le scrutin par anticipation une journée très rapprochée de la journée du scrutin, mais sans créer de précédent ni enfreindre un tabou sur le scrutin dominical. Ç'a été fait par le gouvernement antérieur.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je remercie mes deux collègues pour leurs observations.

Encore une fois, je sais que les sentiments sont mitigés. J'essaie vraiment d'en venir aux motifs pour lesquels les faits appuient cet amendement.

Un groupe de témoins nous a parlé des électeurs sous-représentés, ceux qui exercent des tâches postées, des chefs de famille monoparentale, et une immense majorité nous a dit qu'une occasion de plus, plutôt que le jeudi entre telle et telle date, facilite le gardiennage. Il est plus facile d'éviter le travail posté ce jour-là. Pour les électeurs sous-représentés dans le dépouillement des votes — faible revenu, mère monoparentale — le scrutin dominical est le bienvenu.

Le président:

J'ai une question pour les témoins. Y a-t-il des votes par anticipation le dimanche?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui. Comme Mme May l'a dit, après l'adoption du projet de loi C-23 par la 41e législature, le dimanche a été choisi pour la première fois, journée pour la tenue du vote par anticipation.

Le président:

Merci.

Êtes-vous prêts à la mise aux voix de l'amendement NDP-1?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Tous les amendements corrélatifs sont rejetés.

Suit l'amendement PV-3, avec, aussi, des conséquences. Ça s'appliquera aussi à l'amendement PV-6, qui, si ça vous intéresse, se trouve à la page 156; PV-9, à la page 181; PV-12, à la page 227; PV-13, à la page 231; PV-15, à la page 278; PV-16, à la page 285; PV-17, à la page 298; et PV-18, à la page 304, parce que tous ces amendements concernent la notion de collaboration.

De plus, si cet amendement est adopté, on ne peut pas proposer le CPC-150, à la page 279, parce qu'il modifie la même ligne que l'amendement PV-15.

On ne peut pas proposer le CPC-152, parce qu'il modifie la même ligne que l'amendement PV-16.

Madame May, pourriez-vous présenter l'amendement PV-3?

(1735)

Mme Elizabeth May:

Oui. Merci, monsieur le président.

Comme vous l'avez dit, beaucoup d'amendements sont corrélatifs. Ça rejoint la question des partis ou des entités qui, en campagne électorale, coordonnent leurs activités en enfreignant les principes de la démocratie, autrement dit, en communiquant un message beaucoup plus partisan que ne le montrent les apparences, une collaboration illicite, ce genre de chose.

Grâce aux définitions bonifiées que je fournis, particulièrement dans ce premier amendement, le PV-3, j'essaie de présenter ce qui n'est pas de la collaboration. Cet étalon permettra à un éventuel tribunal de déterminer s'il y aura eu collusion, une collaboration enfreignant la Loi électorale du Canada.

Je me contenterai de lire la description des actions qui ne sont pas de la collaboration: soutien d'un parti politique, peu importe le moyen, par une personne, un groupe, une personne morale, ses membres ou actionnaires, selon le cas, ou le fait de poser des questions concernant des dossiers législatifs ou des enjeux de politique publique. Ça n'évoque pas l'idée de collaboration.

Il y a aussi la participation commune à une activité publique ou l'invitation à participer à une telle activité. C'est très important, parce que, très souvent, des organisations invitent le candidat d'un parti et celui d'un autre parti. Ce devrait être clair, dans la loi, que ce n'est pas de la collaboration. Ce n'est pas ce à quoi la loi essaie d'en venir.

Il y a aussi la communication de renseignements qui a peu d'incidence sur la tenue d'activités partisanes, la diffusion de publicités partisanes et la réalisation de sondages électoraux. Encore une fois, c'est pour clarifier la notion et établir un étalon qu'il sera beaucoup plus facile de prouver un jour, pour éviter une infraction.

Le président:

M. Cullen, puis Mme Sahota.

M. Nathan Cullen:

L'un des scénarios évoqués par Mme May est celui d'un groupe qui invite des candidats. Posons l'hypothèse que, au beau milieu des élections, un groupe de femmes ou d'Autochtones vous invite à venir parler de tel sujet. Ça arrive à toutes les élections, et je l'ai vu. Est-ce que cela allumerait les voyants rouges de la collusion au sens du projet de loi C-76?

Je n'ai rien à redire contre l'invitation faite par un groupe antipauvreté à des candidats à participer à une discussion ou à un débat. Si c'est un groupe de femmes, c'est tout à fait normal et même sain. Si j'ai bien compris son intervention, Mme May essaie de clarifier la licéité de cette opération louable. Mais j'ai peut-être mal compris.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Puis-je ajouter, pour le rappeler à mes collègues, que mon amendement découle du témoignage de M. Mike Pal, de l'école de droit de l'Université d'Ottawa.

Il estimait que le critère de collusion serait difficile à appliquer et que celui de la collaboration serait plus facile à... Eh bien, on se sert du mot « collaboration », mais que signifie-t-il? Quelle est la différence entre collusion et collaboration?

En précisant les types d'exemples qui ne déclencheraient pas l'intervention de la loi, nous projetons de la clarté. Je ne veux pas affirmer que, sans mes amendements, on supposerait automatiquement la collusion, mais, en aménageant une précision dans l'article des définitions de la loi, je pense que nous éviterons plus tard beaucoup de confusion.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Permettez-moi, alors, de poser une question plus précise.

Se pourrait-il qu'on juge, sous le régime de cette loi, que le scénario que je viens de décrire puisse constituer de la collusion et que, en conséquence, il ait de l'effet sur le tiers ayant organisé un débat ou un sondage auprès des candidats en lice?

Mme Manon Paquet (conseillère principale en politiques, Bureau du Conseil privé):

La série d'amendements proposée par Mme May abaisse le seuil de ce qui est interdit entre la collusion et la collaboration.

Le commissaire devrait déterminer ce qu'il en est, mais ce n'est pas censé mettre fin aux échanges d'idées entre organisations. Si une organisation devait organiser des activités pour appuyer un parti, ce pourrait être considéré comme une contribution non pécuniaire au parti et ce serait visé par ces dispositions.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Monsieur le président, j'ai une dernière question sur cet amendement.

Dans le scénario que je décris, un tiers pourrait-il — parce que c'est ce dont, surtout, nous parlons, n'est-ce pas? —, en coordonnant un sondage auprès des candidats, un débat entre eux, risquer d'être réputé se trouver dans le domaine de la collusion, ce qui est très connoté? C'est que, en quelque sorte, il manipule les élections plutôt que de simplement renseigner les électeurs.

(1740)

Mme Manon Paquet:

Dans votre scénario, ce serait peu probable, vu la collaboration avec d'autres partis pour organiser une manifestation. Il ne collabore pas nécessairement avec un parti précis pour obtenir un certain résultat.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord. Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'après moi, c'est vraiment une mauvaise idée que de partir d'un terme vraiment précis, qui définit déjà, par le terme « collusion », une collaboration qui manque à l'éthique, puis d'en élargir le sens pour, éventuellement, devoir dresser une liste des notions incluses et exclues.

Je pense que nous brouillons vraiment les pistes et ratissons beaucoup trop large pour résoudre un problème qui n'est peut-être pas... Je pense qu'il est mieux de suivre une démarche plus ciblée. Du point de vue juridique, je pense qu'il est mieux d'être concis que de rédiger des définitions.

Le président:

D'autres opinions?

Tous ceux qui sont pour l'adoption de l'amendement PV-3 et toutes les incidences que ça suppose?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: En ce qui concerne l'amendement CPC-3, quelqu'un peut-il, encore une fois, établir le lien avec le gouvernement du Canada?

Allez-y, madame Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'abord, je reviendrai en arrière et je vous demande de bien m'excuser. Je dois dire que l'amendement antérieur auquel j'ai fait allusion concernait précisément les déplacements des ministres. Pendant ma discussion avec la ministre, elle a clairement expliqué que ce n'était pas à discuter.

Cependant, j'ai l'impression que, dans l'amendement CPC-3, l'inclusion du premier ministre ou d'un autre ministre dans la définition de publicité partisane est conforme à la promesse qu'elle a faite à notre comité, ici, aujourd'hui. Le sachant et forte de sa promesse, je demanderais qu'on appuie cet amendement, si vous le voulez bien.

Le président:

D'autres observations?

Allez-y, monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ç'a m'a peut-être échappé. Qu'est-ce qu'on essaie de faire? Est-ce de modifier la façon dont le gouvernement, la ministre, précisément...?

Est-ce que c'est dans le même ordre d'idées que la précédente...?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Non, je ne crois pas que ça précède...

Je pense que ça englobe précisément les agissements du premier ministre et des ministres correspondant à la définition de publicité partisane.

De plus, ça répond à la promesse de la ministre, à sa comparution, aujourd'hui, pour limiter les publicités du gouvernement pendant la période préélectorale, pour faire respecter par le gouvernement les règles visant essentiellement les tiers partis et les partis enregistrés, et tous les autres.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai seulement une petite question.

Si je comprends bien ce que je lis, si l'agence du revenu rappelle de ne pas oublier de faire sa déclaration de revenus alors que les élections ont lieu pendant ce temps de l'année, ce message serait illégal et il entrerait dans les dépenses du parti. Je ne suis pas d'accord.

Merci.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je suis désolée, David; pouvez-vous répéter la question?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien.

Vous dites que tous les messages du gouvernement pendant la période préélectorale pourraient être considérés comme de la publicité partisane. Si les élections ont lieu au printemps, pour une raison ou une autre et que, par hasard, c'est aussi le temps où les contribuables déclarent leurs revenus et où l'Agence du revenu du Canada leur rappelle ce devoir, c'est désormais considéré comme de la publicité partisane.

Je pense que c'est très difficile à défendre.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il est précisé que « le message était nécessaire pour la santé et la sécurité des Canadiens ».

Est-ce qu'une organisation comme l'agence du revenu influe sur la santé et la sécurité des Canadiens? Pas d'après moi...

Vous avez raison; j'ai vu des contribuables mourir de crises cardiaques après des tentatives d'évasion fiscale.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Payez vos impôts ou vous irez en prison. Cela affecte la santé et la sécurité.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je ne sais pas. Il nous faut peut-être modifier l'amendement pour indiquer...

Je trouve que l'amendement permet de mettre le gouvernement sur un pied d'égalité avec les tiers partis et les partis enregistrés, ce qui est juste. Je suis d'accord avec M. de Burgh Graham. Il y a des messages qu'il est essentiel de transmettre aux Canadiens, mais peut-être que ce serait inclus dans ceux qui sont nécessaires pour la santé et la sécurité des Canadiens.

(1745)

Le président:

D'accord...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je ne crois pas qu'il soit juste de suggérer d'autres scénarios que des raisons de santé et de sécurité. Inclure la santé et la sécurité est utile parce que si le gouvernement avait de l'information pertinente à communiquer aux Canadiens, il aurait certainement le droit de la leur transmettre. À part cela, ce qui est partisan est partisan.

Je crois qu'une norme très sensée s'appliquerait d'une façon ou d'une autre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez raison. Il y a les messages gouvernementaux et les messages partisans et ils devraient rester séparés. Je n'appuie donc pas l'amendement.

Le président:

Êtes-vous prêts à vous prononcer?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: L'amendement CPC-4 porte sur les ouvrages considérés comme de la publicité électorale. Vous pourriez dire quelque chose à ce sujet, Stephanie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'après l'explication, de toute évidence, si l'auteur ou l'éditeur d'un ouvrage est sénateur ou député, on parle de publicité électorale.

Par exemple, si je devais publier un ouvrage intitulé Right Here, Right Now pendant une période électorale, cela pourrait être perçu...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous vous trompez. C'est le titre de mon ouvrage. C'est l'ouvrage que je publie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C'est un titre fictif, monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il vous faut maintenant déclarer cela comme une dépense électorale.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il est clair que nous ne voudrions pas que quiconque ait ce type d'avantage lié à une publication au cours de cette période.

Le président:

Êtes-vous prêts à vous prononcer?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je vous informe que je publierai mon ouvrage Not Here, Not Now pendant la prochaine période électorale.

Merci.

Le président:

L'article 2 est-il adopté?

(L'article 2 est adopté.)

(Article 3)

Le président: Tout d'abord, nous en sommes à l'amendement LIB-1. Cela s'applique à l'amendement LIB-18, qui est à la page 110, et à l'amendement LIB-62, qui est à la page 351. Je vais demander des explications aux témoins, car je crois qu'il ne s'agit que d'un problème technique dans la version française et l'ordre. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer l'amendement?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Certainement, monsieur le président. Je vais tout d'abord faire un petit retour dans le temps, si vous n'y voyez pas d'inconvénient.

Avant l'an 2000, lorsque l'ancienne Loi électorale du Canada était en vigueur, selon les dispositions, il était très clair que pour pouvoir voter, il fallait être citoyen canadien et avoir 18 ans ou plus.

Deux autres dispositions étaient liées à ces deux conditions qui permettent d'avoir qualité d'électeur. Il était précisé entre autres qu'une personne qui allait avoir 18 ans ou plus le jour du scrutin pouvait voter avant le jour du scrutin — par anticipation, par exemple. Pour ce qui est de la citoyenneté, il était très clair que si une personne allait devenir citoyenne canadienne avant la fin de la révision de la liste électorale, elle pouvait voter par anticipation.

Lorsque la nouvelle Loi électorale du Canada est entrée en vigueur en 2000, le libellé français de l'article 3 a rendu les choses un peu nébuleuses à cet égard. La version anglaise de l'article 3 peut signifier qu'il faut avoir 18 ans ou plus le jour du scrutin, mais qu'il faut être citoyen canadien en tout temps.

D'autre part, la version française de la Loi électorale du Canada stipule qu'il faut être citoyen canadien et avoir atteint l'âge de 18 ans le jour du scrutin, ce qui peut laisser supposer que si un individu devait devenir citoyen canadien avant le jour du scrutin... Par exemple, si une personne sait que sa cérémonie de citoyenneté est prévue 10 jours avant le scrutin, elle pourrait voter avant d'avoir prêté le serment de citoyenneté.

Lorsque la nouvelle Loi électorale du Canada est entrée en vigueur en 2000, dans nos consultations auprès d'Élections Canada, nous avons appris que ce dernier interprétait toujours l'article 3 d'une façon traditionnelle. Élections Canada n'a jamais permis à une personne qui devait devenir citoyenne canadienne de voter. L'organisme a toujours exigé qu'une personne soit citoyenne canadienne pour pouvoir voter.

Lorsque le projet de loi C-76 a été présenté, d'autres modifications à la fin du projet de loi ont fait ressortir à nouveau cette même petite imprécision. Par conséquent, l'amendement proposé corrigerait le problème. Il établirait clairement qu'une personne doit être citoyenne canadienne au moment où elle exerce son droit de vote.

(1750)

Le président:

Supposons que nous laissons le libellé tel quel. Si une personne devait devenir citoyenne canadienne, mais que la cérémonie a été annulée pour une raison quelconque, elle n'est pas devenue citoyenne, mais il se peut qu'elle ait déjà voté. Voilà le problème que l'amendement vient corriger.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Exactement.

Le président:

D'accord.

Y a-t-il des interventions?

Quelqu'un propose la motion? David?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je la propose.

Le président:

Vouliez-vous dire quelque chose?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je crois que vous avez dit tout ce que j'ai à dire. Merci.

Le président:

Y a-t-il des interventions?

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela entraîne un retrait.

Le président:

Oui, je l'ai mentionné. Si vous n'étiez pas attentif, sachez que je l'ai indiqué.

M. Vance Badawey:

Soyez attentif, d'accord?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Le président:

Cela signifie que les amendements LIB-18 et LIB-62, aux pages 110 et 351 respectivement, sont également adoptés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, mais il en résulte le retrait de certains amendements.

Le président:

Il en résulte quoi?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il en résulte le retrait de certains amendements. Il n'est plus nécessaire d'examiner les amendements LIB-14, LIB-17 et LIB-42.

Le président:

Le retrait de...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous retirons les amendements LIB-14, LIB-17 et LIB-42.

Le président:

D'accord. LIB-14, LIB-17 et LIB-42. Lorsque nous y arriverons, nous le signalerons de nouveau.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais essayer de ne pas l'oublier.

Le président:

Je veux simplement m'assurer que tout le monde s'entend là-dessus.

(L'article 3 modifié est adopté.)

(Les articles 4 et 5 sont adoptés.)

(Article 6)

Le président: Concernant l'article 6, nous avons l'amendement CPC-5 à examiner.

Je crois qu'il s'agit de faire passer le nombre de jours de deux à sept, mais vouliez-vous expliquer l'amendement, madame Kusie?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Bien sûr. Nous demandons que les députés qui tentent de se faire réélire avisent le directeur du scrutin plus rapidement du changement du lieu de vote.

Le président:

Je vous demanderais de répéter cela.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Nous demandons que les députés qui tentent de se faire réélire avisent le directeur du scrutin plus rapidement du changement du lieu de vote.

Le président:

Vous voulez qu'ils l'avisent plus rapidement du changement du lieu de vote de quoi?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Du changement du lieu où ils voteront.

Le président:

Voulez-vous dire du lieu où ils voteront?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui. il s'agit de faire en sorte qu'ils avisent le directeur du scrutin au moins sept jours avant le jour du scrutin du lieu où ils voteront.

Le président:

À l'heure actuelle, ils n'ont à le faire que deux jours à l'avance s'ils veulent voter ailleurs, et l'amendement propose qu'ils soient obligés de le faire sept jours à l'avance.

Allez-y, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'où vient cette idée? On n'indique nulle part, que ce soit dans les rapports ou ailleurs, qu'Élections Canada est d'avis qu'il nous faut apporter ce changement.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Vous savez, deux jours, ce n'est pas très long. Un préavis de sept jours semble plus..., mais c'est une plus longue période, évidemment.

(1755)

Le président:

Voulez-vous que nous votions?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Bien sûr.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

L'article 6 est-il adopté?

M. Chris Bittle:

S'il y a consentement, pouvons-nous regrouper les articles 6 à 14? Il semble...

Le président:

Occupons-nous d'abord de l'article 6, car nous avons discuté de quelque chose.

M. Chris Bittle:

D'accord.

(L'article 6 est adopté.)

Le président:

Vous ne pouvez pas être président.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Tous ceux qui sont pour?

M. Chris Bittle:

Je voterai pour cela.

Le président:

Aucun amendement n'est proposé pour les articles 7 à 14. Les articles 7 à 14 sont-ils adoptés?

(Les articles 7 à 14 inclusivement sont adoptés avec dissidence.)

(Article 15)

Le président:

Au sujet de l'article 15, nous sommes saisis de l'amendement CPC-6.

Nous pouvons demander qu'on nous le présente. Cet amendement est peut-être difficile à comprendre, car il s'agit de... Il y a deux choses. Tout d'abord, il semble ne rien y avoir, mais c'est simplement parce qu'il s'agit de retirer « 18 » et de remplacer « 18.1 », mais allez-y, Stephanie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je consulte...

M. John Nater:

L'amendement propose de faire en sorte que le directeur général des élections conserve le mandat d'éducation du public actuel.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est dans la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections.

Le président:

D'accord.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Nous en sommes à l'amendement CPC-7. Cela concerne le vote électronique et l'agrément de la Chambre ou du Sénat...

Voulez-vous le présenter?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je n'ai rien à ajouter.

Et toi, John?

M. John Nater:

C'est seulement que c'est le Parlement qui prendrait la décision finale sur l'utilisation du vote électronique.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Excusez-moi, je n'ai pas tout saisi. Qui serait le principal...?

M. John Nater:

Ce serait le Parlement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

N'est-ce pas déjà le cas? Est-ce qu'Élections Canada pourrait décider demain matin que nous passons au vote électronique?

M. John Nater:

Cela pourrait se produire.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je ne crois pas.

Le président:

D'accord.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 15 est adopté.)

(Les articles 16 à 19 inclusivement sont adoptés avec dissidence.)

(Article 20)

Le président: Nous en sommes à l'amendement CPC-8. Il s'agit de la situation où un fonctionnaire ne pourrait pas résider dans la circonscription adjacente, alors que je crois qu'on propose le contraire ici. L'amendement ne le lui permettrait pas, si j'ai bien lu.

Je crois qu'Élections Canada a dit que souvent, les fonctionnaires résident très près, mais l'amendement ne le leur permettrait pas à moins que ce soit dans la circonscription adjacente.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il ne s'agirait pas tant de circonscriptions comme les nôtres, monsieur le président. Or, dans certaines circonscriptions urbaines, je peux imaginer qu'un fonctionnaire électoral réside sur une rue voisine qui ne fait pas partie de la circonscription. Ai-je bien compris?

Élections Canada peut embaucher une personne qui réside à deux pâtés de maisons, mais à l'extérieur de la circonscription. Je ne comprends pas pourquoi on présente cet amendement, à moins que je ne le comprenne pas bien, ce qui est fort possible.

(1800)

M. Scott Reid:

Je crois que ce qui peut se produire, c'est qu'en raison d'un changement apporté aux limites des circonscriptions, une personne qui habitait dans une circonscription n'en ferait alors plus partie.

Il peut y avoir deux fonctionnaires compétents, dans deux circonscriptions différentes. En raison d'un changement des limites, ils se retrouvent dans différentes circonscriptions ou ils font désormais partie de la même circonscription, mais l'un d'eux ne peut pas...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Or, mettons de côté la situation où un changement a été apporté aux limites. Prenons l'exemple d'un fonctionnaire électoral qui ne réside pas dans Toronto-Centre, mais dans une circonscription plus loin. Il vit seulement à un ou cinq coins de rue de la circonscription. Cela n'a pas vraiment d'importance. Cela l'empêche-il de bien remplir ses fonctions?

Je comprends la logique s'il s'agit de grandes circonscriptions rurales dont la population est dispersée. Les fonctionnaires électoraux doivent bien connaître la circonscription pour y tenir l'élection, mais dans bien des zones suburbaines et urbaines, je ne vois simplement pas en quoi cela a de l'importance pour l'électeur. Ils peuvent régler la plupart des problèmes qui peuvent survenir.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 20 est adopté.)

(Les articles 21 à 24 inclusivement sont adoptés avec dissidence.)

(Article 25)

Le président: Amendement CPC-9.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

L'amendement CPC-9 vise le maintien des procédures permettant de formuler une objection concernant les gens dont le nom ne devrait pas figurer sur la liste électorale.

Évidemment, si des gens ne devraient pas être sur la liste, nous voulons nous assurer que l'on dispose du temps nécessaire pour corriger la liste.

M. John Nater:

Je veux préciser qu'à l'heure actuelle, tel que le projet de loi est rédigé, au bout du compte, Élections Canada a des règles selon lesquelles il est possible de faire opposition à des noms inscrits sur les listes électorales deux ou trois semaines à l'avance. Le projet de loi libéral retire cette disposition. L'amendement annule la disposition que le gouvernement propose dans le cadre du projet de loi.

Le président:

On ne peut pas faire opposition à l'inscription d'une personne sur la liste présentement?

M. John Nater:

Ce sera le cas si le projet de loi est adopté. À l'heure actuelle, il est possible de le faire à l'avance. Si le projet de loi est adopté, ce ne sera plus possible. Voilà pourquoi l'amendement est proposé.

Le président:

Les témoins ont-ils des observations à faire à ce sujet?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je peux confirmer qu'on retire cette procédure de la Loi électorale du Canada. Je crois comprendre qu'on n'avait pas recours à cette procédure très souvent, car elle remonte à l'époque où les listes étaient affichées sur des poteaux de téléphone.

Mme Manon Paquet:

J'ajouterais seulement que la procédure est retirée, je crois, à l'article 68. Il en est question.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Très brièvement, cette disposition se fonde sur une recommandation formulée par le directeur général des élections, et c'est la raison pour laquelle elle se trouve dans le projet de loi. Nous faisons confiance au jugement du DGE relativement à cette disposition, et nous sommes donc contre l'amendement.

M. John Nater:

À titre d'information, si cet amendement est adopté et si vous faites ce changement, vous pourrez seulement vous opposer au bureau de scrutin le jour des élections.

Le président:

Vous dites que selon cette procédure, si quelqu'un pense qu'une personne ne devrait pas être en mesure de voter, il devra formuler sa plainte au bureau de scrutin.

M. John Nater:

C'est exact. Ce serait l'effet concret de cette modification.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 25 est adopté.)

Le président: Il n'y a aucun amendement aux articles 26 à 28.

(Les articles 26 à 28 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

(Article 29)

Le président: Pour l'article 29, je crois que l'amendement CPC-10 limite le nombre de membres du personnel électoral venant d'un parti, mais je vais laisser les conservateurs le proposer.

(1805)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, on limite simplement à 50 % la proportion de fonctionnaires électoraux d'un parti qui sont affectés à un bureau de scrutin. Il me semble juste de ne pas permettre aux fonctionnaires électoraux d'un seul parti d'être majoritaires.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J'essaie seulement de penser à des scénarios dans lesquels ce serait difficile à accomplir. Existe-t-il des scénarios dans lesquels on ne serait pas en mesure de faire fonctionner le bureau de scrutin? J'essaie seulement de penser à... À première vue, cela semble une idée intéressante, mais encore une fois, un grand nombre de ces choses auront des effets concrets sur la façon dont les élections seront menées. N'y a-t-il pas un scénario dans lequel personne n'est disponible dans les autres partis, ce qui signifie que plus de 50 % des fonctionnaires électoraux doivent venir d'un seul parti?

Le président:

Puisque nous abordons cette question, je pense que le projet de loi apporte d'autres changements relatifs aux nominations effectuées par les partis. Vous souvenez-vous?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui, absolument. Une partie de la partie sur la modernisation des bureaux de scrutin, dans le projet de loi, accorde une plus grande souplesse aux directeurs du scrutin des circonscriptions électorales, afin qu'ils puissent embaucher des fonctionnaires électoraux avant de recevoir les suggestions des partis. Les directeurs du scrutin pourront maintenant nommer 50 % des fonctionnaires électoraux avant de recevoir les nominations des partis.

Cela fait suite à une recommandation formulée par le directeur général des élections. En effet, les recommandations des partis arrivaient plus tard dans la période électorale et souvent, elles ne suffisaient pas à pourvoir tous les postes.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Tout d'abord, je fais confiance à Élections Canada pour gérer les élections. Plus précisément, lors de mon élection, pendant les premiers jours de ma campagne, j'ai reçu d'innombrables appels de gens qui voulaient être nommés pour travailler à Élections Canada. Je n'avais jamais entendu parler d'eux auparavant et je n'ai jamais entendu parler d'eux par la suite. Je soupçonne donc que ces gens ont appelé tous les partis afin que leur nom se retrouve sur toutes les listes. Si seulement 50 % des fonctionnaires électoraux sont choisis par chaque parti, des gens pourraient être nommés par les trois partis et tout le monde est nommé par tout le monde, et ils pourraient donc être partout.

Je crois que cela posera un problème dans la mise en oeuvre. Je ne vois pas pourquoi cet amendement est nécessaire.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen, vous avez la parole.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je trouve que la nature de la partisanerie parfois croisée qu'on retrouve dans les bureaux de scrutin est tout simplement bizarre. Le premier directeur du scrutin avec lequel j'ai parlé lors de ma première élection s'est présenté en précisant qu'il était libéral. Je ne savais pas que cela pouvait arriver. J'étais nouveau dans le milieu de la politique et je ne comprenais pas pourquoi cela arrivait.

Encore une fois, nous devons parfois imaginer les pires scénarios, et non les meilleurs, lorsque nous élaborons ces lois. De nombreuses lois sont seulement conçues pour les pires scénarios. Dans le cadre de cette nouvelle disposition qui permet aux directeurs du scrutin de choisir 50 % des fonctionnaires électoraux, n'est-il pas possible que des directeurs du scrutin qui sont plus partisans et qui aiment leur famille partisane embauchent des personnes d'un seul parti, ce qui signifierait que le choix de tous les directeurs du scrutin serait essentiellement laissé à leur discrétion?

Je pose seulement la question pour les scénarios dans lesquels ce fonctionnaire électoral fait affaire avec une personne d'un parti « rival ». Est-ce possible avec cette disposition qui se trouve plus loin dans le projet de loi? Je m'adresse à nos témoins par votre entremise.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Monsieur Cullen, quand avez-vous été élu pour la première fois?

M. Nathan Cullen:

J'ai été élu en 2004.

M. Jean-François Morin:

À ce moment-là, les directeurs du scrutin étaient encore nommés par le gouverneur en conseil, mais la Loi électorale du Canada a été modifiée il y a quelques années, et les directeurs du scrutin sont maintenant nommés par le directeur général des élections à la suite d'un processus de recrutement équitable.

M. Scott Reid:

J'aimerais souligner que M. Cullen a été réélu depuis ce temps-là et qu'il connaît donc ce processus.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Eh bien, c'était malgré les meilleurs efforts de certains de ces directeurs du scrutin et de certains électeurs, mais je comprends cela.

M. Jean-François Morin:

De plus, les directeurs du scrutin sont maintenant assujettis à un code de déontologie qui les empêche d'agir de manière partisane.

(1810)

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord. Je n'ai pas lu leur code de déontologie. Je suis un mauvais démocrate à cet égard.

Encore une fois, pour revenir à cet amendement, on tente d'imposer une limite, afin qu'au plus 50 % des directeurs du scrutin d'un même groupe puissent être nommés par un parti. Est-ce exact?

Le président:

S'il n'y a pas d'autre commentaire, nous allons maintenant mettre la question aux voix.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(Les articles 29 et 30 sont adoptés.)

(Article 31)

Le président: L'amendement CPC-11 concerne une situation dans laquelle il y a des partis fusionnés et on doit connaître le nombre de votes lors de l'élection précédente. La proposition actuelle fait référence au plus gros des partis fusionnés, et la proposition des conservateurs vise le total des partis fusionnés.

J'aimerais demander aux témoins de nous expliquer pourquoi ils ont besoin du nombre d'électeurs. Dans la Loi, le titre de cette partie est « Nominations ». De quelles nominations s'agit-il?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Comme nous venons de le mentionner il y a quelques minutes, les partis politiques seront toujours en mesure de recommander des fonctionnaires électoraux aux directeurs du scrutin. La proportion affectée à chaque parti est calculée à partir des résultats de la dernière élection générale.

Le président:

Dans les notes de marge, à la page 18, pour l'article 42, il est écrit « Attribution de votes pour les nominations ». J'aimerais seulement savoir ce que sont les « nominations ».

M. Jean-François Morin:

Cela concerne les nominations des fonctionnaires électoraux. Par exemple, dans le cadre de la 43e élection générale, les partis seront en mesure de recommander des fonctionnaires électoraux potentiels aux directeurs du scrutin dans diverses circonscriptions électorales.

Si deux partis importants avaient fusionné à la suite de l'élection générale précédente, c'est-à-dire la 42e élection générale, cet article détermine comment les votes de la 42e élection générale seraient comptés pour calculer le nombre de nominations qui peuvent être recommandées par chaque parti enregistré.

Le président:

D'accord. Voulez-vous présenter votre amendement? Vous suggérez le nombre de votes pour les deux partis qui ont fusionné, alors que dans la proposition actuelle, le plus gros parti...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, on se fonde sur le meilleur résultat. Cela reflète essentiellement le temps de radiodiffusion alloué au parti. C'est coordonné avec cela.

Le président:

Y a-t-il des commentaires?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Désolé, mais pouvez-vous me rappeler de quel amendement CPC nous sommes saisis?

M. John Nater:

Nous sommes saisis de CPC-11.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci.

Le président:

Tous ceux qui sont pour cet amendement?

Désolé, monsieur Cullen, je n'ai pas...?

M. Nathan Cullen:

J'étais contre.

Le président:

Vous étiez contre?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 31 est adopté.)

(Les articles 32 à 35 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

(Article 36)

Le président: Nous abordons maintenant CPC-12. Actuellement, une personne n'a pas besoin d'obtenir le consentement de ses parents pour être inscrite sur la liste des futurs électeurs. Je crois que cet amendement CPC suggère qu'une personne de moins de 16 ans doit obtenir le consentement de ses parents.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C'est exact.

(1815)

Le président:

Je crois que nous avons récemment reçu un document d'Élections Canada dans lequel il est indiqué que l'organisme a mené des recherches à cet égard, en incluant d'autres pays. Où c'était...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous avez reçu un document à cet égard?

Le président:

Oui, je crois que je l'ai lu pendant la semaine de pause.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous devons vous organiser de meilleures semaines de pause, monsieur le président.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Nathan Cullen: Nous avons tous l'air extrêmement surpris que vous ayez ce rapport.

Le président:

Je l'ai probablement avec moi.

Y a-t-il des commentaires sur cet amendement? Si un jeune électeur souhaite s'inscrire sur la liste, selon cette proposition, s'il a moins de 16 ans, il doit obtenir le consentement de ses parents. Actuellement, un jeune n'a pas besoin d'obtenir le consentement de ses parents pour être inscrit sur la liste, peu importe son âge, et cela descend jusqu'à 14, je crois, car l'autre amendement a été rejeté.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, CPC-2 a été rejeté, et ce n'est donc pas inclus.

À notre époque, nous devons certainement composer avec Internet et les menaces cybernétiques. Je crois que les parents ont non seulement l'obligation, mais également le droit de savoir ce que font leurs enfants sur Internet. Je crois que le fait de signer son nom sur une liste électorale a une grande portée, et si mes enfants faisaient cela, je voudrais certainement le savoir.

Je ne crois pas qu'il soit déraisonnable d'exiger le consentement des parents dans le cas des jeunes de 14 et 15 ans qui veulent s'inscrire sur la liste électorale.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je crois que notre objectif est d'éliminer les obstacles à la participation des jeunes. Je crois qu'ajouter de nouveaux obstacles ne nous aidera pas à atteindre cet objectif, et je suis donc contre cet amendement.

Le président:

Allez-y, Ruby.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Si seulement nous étions assez chanceux pour que nos enfants tentent de s'inscrire sur une liste de futurs électeurs en ligne plutôt que de faire d'autres choses. Dans un tel cas, je crois que je serais très heureuse et qu'il ne serait pas nécessaire de m'informer. En tout cas, c'est mon opinion.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 36 est adopté.)

(Article 37)

Le président: Veuillez noter que si nous adoptons cet amendement, LIB-2 ne peut pas être proposé, car les deux amendements modifient la même ligne. Nous sommes saisis de CPC-13, et il s'agit de l'obligation de signaler non seulement les gens qui sont sur la liste, mais également les gens qui ont été retirés de la liste.

Stephanie, voulez-vous...?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord.

Est-ce l'amendement que j'ai suggéré dans ma liste d'amendements? Est-ce que nous parlons de 9950142?

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est 9952756.

Le président:

C'est CPC-13 dans le document.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord.

Le président:

C'est l'un des amendements originaux, et cela concerne les cas où les gens doivent fournir des listes. Votre autre amendement viendra juste après celui-ci...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord. Merci beaucoup. Je vous suis reconnaissante.

Le président:

... car il vient après LIB-2.

Allez-y, monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela arrive dans toutes les campagnes. Je crois que parfois, les listes électorales ne sont pas « nettoyées » et au bout du compte, nous tentons de communiquer avec des personnes décédées — sans vouloir être trop brusque.

C'est une expérience qui peut être assez traumatisante. Je ne sais pas si vous avez déjà vécu cela, mais lorsque vous tentez de communiquer avec une personne et que vous rappelez à une autre personne que son mari, sa femme ou un membre de sa famille est décédé, ce n'est pas du tout agréable. C'est assez frustrant.

Si cela resserre les critères de la liste électorale et permet à Élections Canada de nous fournir une liste à jour, cela ne peut qu'être une bonne chose.

(1820)

Le président:

Nous entendrons M. Graham, et ensuite M. Nater.

M. John Nater:

J'aimerais proposer un sous-amendement en espérant parvenir à réconcilier cela avec le prochain amendement de M. Graham. Je l'ai par écrit et je vais vous le remettre.

Voici le libellé: « Que l'amendement CPC-13 soit modifié en ajoutant, après les mots « des électeurs: », les mots suivants « notamment sous forme électronique ».

Le président:

D'accord. Essentiellement, le sous-amendement intègre les éléments de l'amendement LIB-2, mais il conserve l'obligation de signaler les noms qui sont retirés de la liste.

La parole est maintenant à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il existe une technologie qui date des années 1970 — et même des années 60 — appelée TIFF; elle permet de comparer une liste à son ancienne version pour repérer les différences.

Lorsque Élections Canada envoie ses listes mises à jour, les gens décédés devraient déjà avoir été retirés de ces listes. Si ce n'est pas le cas, l'envoi de cette liste ne changera pas ce fait. Je ne comprends pas la raison d'être de cet amendement, et je ne comprends pas pourquoi il faudrait envoyer une liste de personnes décédées. Je ne vois aucun avantage à faire cela.

Je comprends ce que vous tentez de faire, John, mais je ne peux pas appuyer votre amendement.

Le président:

Élections Canada a-t-il quelque chose sur la...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est le BCP.

Le président:

... suggestion selon laquelle il est nécessaire de signaler les noms qui ont été éliminés de la liste et d'envoyer une liste à jour?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Comme on vient de le dire, cet amendement exigerait qu'Élections Canada envoie la liste des personnes décédées dont les noms ont été retirés de la liste.

Je ne peux pas formuler de commentaires sur la nécessité de cette mesure, mais ces personnes ne sont plus sur la liste d'électeurs fournie par Élections Canada, donc...

Le président:

D'accord.

J'aimerais souhaiter la bienvenue à Luc Thériault, du Bloc québécois. Merci d'être venu.

Afin que les gens puissent comprendre le sous-amendement, il ajoutera la notion du format électronique qui serait autrement ajoutée par l'amendement LIB-2, mais en conservant la nature de l'amendement CPC-13, afin qu'il soit nécessaire de fournir aussi une liste des noms qui ont été éliminés.

(Le sous-amendement est rejeté.)

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous abordons maintenant LIB-2, qui suggère qu'Élections Canada doit également produire une liste électronique. Quelqu'un souhaite-t-il présenter cet amendement?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Certainement.

Il s'agit de veiller à ce que des listes en format électronique soient toujours fournies aux partis enregistrés. Les amendements proposés précisent que de tels documents doivent demeurer accessibles en format électronique, en plus de tous les autres formats jugés appropriés par Élections Canada.

Une disposition semblable s'appliquerait à la distribution de cartes.

Je crois que c'est un changement assez simple.

Le président:

Avant de vous laisser vous pencher sur cet amendement, je vous rappelle que votre décision s'appliquera également aux amendements LIB-3 à la page 37, LIB-4 à la page 38, LIB-6 à la page 40 et LIB-7 à la page 41.

D'autres interventions?

Tous ceux qui sont pour qu'Élections Canada doive également produire les listes électorales en format électronique? Il semble que ce soit bien de notre époque.

(L'amendement est adopté.)

Le président: L'article 37 est-il adopté?

(L'article 37 modifié est adopté.)

Le président: D'accord, il n'y a aucun amendement concernant les articles 38 à 46.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Monsieur le président, nous avons l'amendement 9950142 concernant l'article 37. C'est l'un de ceux que nous avons...

Le président:

Oh, oui. Désolé, nous avons un autre amendement.

Voulez-vous nous le présenter? Cela fait partie des nouveaux amendements?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui. Il s'agit d'interdire expressément la communication des renseignements figurant au Registre des futurs électeurs aux partis, aux candidats et aux députés.

Le président:

Désolé, mais est-ce que tout le monde a bien compris?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il est absolument interdit de communiquer aux partis, aux candidats et aux députés l'information recueillie et conservée dans le Registre des futurs électeurs.

Si nous devons permettre que l'on inscrive nos enfants à ce registre sans que le consentement parental ne soit exigé, il faut tout au moins s'assurer que ces données ne seront pas diffusées par ailleurs.

Encore là, c'est le minimum que nous puissions faire pour nos jeunes.

(1825)

Le président:

Est-ce que nos témoins auraient des observations à ce sujet?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je préciserais seulement que l'article 45 stipule déjà quelles informations le directeur général des élections peut fournir aux partis. En droit administratif, les actions d'une instance dirigeante sont essentiellement limitées à ce qu'elle a été expressément autorisée à faire.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Ce serait donc sans intérêt dans la pratique.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Cela permettrait certes de préciser le tout, mais je crois qu'il est déjà très clair que le directeur général des élections n'est pas autorisé à fournir ces renseignements aux partis enregistrés.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Pouvez-vous nous expliquer comment exactement cela préciserait les choses?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Pardon?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Pouvez-vous nous indiquer en quoi la loi en vigueur n'est pas claire à ce sujet?

M. Jean-François Morin:

En quoi la loi n'est pas claire? Désolé, mais pourriez-vous répéter votre question?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Vous dites que ce serait plus clair si l'on adoptait cet amendement.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je dis simplement que l'on créerait une situation très particulière où le directeur général des élections se verrait explicitement dépossédé d'un pouvoir. Ce serait tout à fait inusité dans la loi. Je dirais effectivement qu'il ne faut pas qu'il puisse communiquer ces renseignements, mais je crois que la loi établit déjà très clairement quelles informations il n'est pas autorisé à fournir.

Le président:

Tous ceux qui...

M. John Nater:

Je demande un vote par appel nominal.

Le président:

Un vote par appel nominal a été demandé.

(L'amendement est rejeté par 5 voix contre 4. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Je précise aux fins du compte rendu que l'amendement que nous venons de mettre aux voix porte le numéro de référence 9950142.

Il n'y a pas d'amendement concernant les articles 38 à 44.

(Les articles 38 à 44 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

Le président: Nous avons un nouvel amendement au sujet de l'article 45.

Voulez-vous nous le présenter, Stephanie?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Certainement. Un peu dans la même veine que le précédent, il s'agit d'interdire au directeur général des élections de communiquer ces renseignements aux provinces et aux territoires qui sont tenus de les rendre accessibles aux partis, etc.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce le 0142... ou bien?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C'est l'amendement numéro 9952296.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord, le 2296. Je vous suis.

Le président:

Est-ce sur le même sujet? Est-il encore question du Registre des futurs électeurs?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, c'est bien cela. Désolée de ne pas avoir été assez claire.

Le président:

Je présume que la réponse des représentants du Bureau du Conseil Privé sera la même. Cet amendement n'est pas nécessaire, parce que vous estimez qu'il est déjà stipulé qu'il ne leur est pas possible de communiquer ces renseignements.

M. Jean-François Morin:

En fait, je ne crois pas que cela soit déjà prévu. La loi en vigueur n'est pas très précise quant aux accords qu'Élections Canada peut conclure avec les directeurs généraux des élections des provinces. Cet amendement permettrait donc de bien établir que les normes applicables à l'échelon fédéral demeurent pertinentes lorsque des renseignements sont communiqués aux provinces.

Le président:

Êtes-vous en train de nous dire qu'en l'absence d'un tel amendement, Élections Canada pourrait transmettre la liste des jeunes électeurs aux provinces?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Il y a effectivement dans le projet de loi une disposition permettant à Élections Canada de conclure des accords avec les instances provinciales gérant une liste électorale. Si cet amendement n'est pas adopté, les renseignements figurant dans le Registre des futurs électeurs pourraient donc effectivement être communiqués aux provinces. Le directeur général des élections n'est bien évidemment pas tenu de conclure des accords semblables, mais cela demeure possible en théorie.

(1830)

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est suffisant pour moi. Nous recueillons ces renseignements pour une raison bien précise. Nous devrions nous limiter à cette raison-là. On vient tout juste de confirmer que les partis politiques ne doivent avoir aucunement accès à cette information. Il serait seulement logique que l'on interdise également la communication de ces renseignements aux directeurs généraux des élections des provinces qui peuvent être assujettis à des règles différentes quant aux informations pouvant être transmises aux partis politiques. Nous ne devons pas nous exposer aux risques que ces renseignements fournis de bonne foi par des jeunes souhaitant figurer au registre puissent servir à des fins autres que celles prévues.

Le président:

Des commentaires du côté du parti gouvernemental?

D'autres observations?

M. John Nater:

Je demande un vote par appel nominal.

(L'amendement est adopté par 9 voix. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

D'accord, c'est unanime. L'amendement portant le numéro de référence — et vous me corrigerez si j'ai tort, Philippe — 9952296 est adopté à l'unanimité.

(L'article 45 modifié est adopté.)

(L'article 46 est adopté.)

Le président: Il y a un nouvel article 46.1. L'amendement NDP-2 a déjà été défait en raison de la décision rendue relativement à l'amendement NDP-1, et l'amendement NDP-3 a subi le même sort. Nous allons donc passer à l'amendement CPC-14. Il s'agit de la protection de la liste électorale.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui. Je trouve que c'est plutôt intéressant, car il me semble que l'amendement 9952296 aurait été inclus dans celui-ci s'il avait été adopté. Cet amendement semble également étrangement similaire à celui portant le numéro 9950142, bien que ce dernier précisait l'interdiction de communication à des entités spécifiques comme les partis, les candidats et les députés, alors que celui-ci traite d'une manière plus générale de la communication d'information à l'extérieur d'Élections Canada.

Peut-être nos témoins pourraient-ils nous indiquer s'il y a actuellement des cas où des renseignements sont communiqués à l'extérieur d'Élections Canada. Est-ce qu'ils peuvent l'envisager dans certaines circonstances où cette information serait demandée, par exemple, par Santé Canada? Je n'arrive pas à voir dans quelle situation cela pourrait se produire. Peut-il arriver qu'il soit nécessaire de transmettre ces renseignements à l'extérieur d'Élections Canada?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je ne le crois pas.

Je vous prierais de vous référer à la ligne 7 de la page 26 du projet de loi dans sa version française. Je crois que vous allez trouver réponse à votre question dans le nouvel alinéa 56e.1) qui est proposé.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Pouvez-vous nous dire ce qu'il prévoit?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Il indique qu'il est interdit à quiconque d'utiliser sciemment un renseignement personnel tiré du Registre des futurs électeurs sauf: i) pour la mise à jour du Registre des électeurs, ii) pour la communication d'un renseignement transmis dans le cadre des programmes d'information et d'éducation populaire visés au paragraphe 18(1), iii) pour l'exécution et le contrôle d'application de la présente loi ou de la Loi référendaire, iv) pour la communication d'un renseignement transmis dans le cadre de l'accord prévu à l'article 55, conformément aux conditions prévues par celui-ci.

La loi précise donc déjà quels...

(1835)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Avons-nous un exemple d'une situation où des renseignements auraient déjà été utilisés à l'extérieur d'Élections Canada?

D'accord, je demande le vote.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. John Nater:

Pouvons-nous avoir un vote par appel nominal?

Le président:

Les gens d'Élections Canada nous disaient que c'était déjà prévu dans la disposition que l'on vient de nous lire, mais vous voulez un vote par appel nominal?

(L'amendement est rejeté par 6 voix contre 3 [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: L'article 46.1 est supprimé en raison des différentes décisions qui ont été prises.

(Article 47)

Le président: Nous examinons maintenant l'amendement CPC-15 qui porte sur le moment où une élection est déclenchée.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, c'est uniquement pour les cas où le bref électoral est délivré dans la période précédant le temps des Fêtes. Il s'agit de prolonger alors la période électorale afin d'éviter par exemple que Noël devienne un jour de scrutin.

Si le bref est délivré entre le 12 et le 30 novembre, la période électorale peut être prolongée jusqu'à 57 jours.

Je peux vous dire rapidement que l'élection de 2005-2006 nous a montré à quel point cela pouvait devenir problématique. Je n'étais pas ici à la fin de 2005, mais M. Cullen y était. Le gouvernement de Paul Martin a été défait à la fin novembre, si bien qu'avec une période électorale de 35 jours, nous aurions dû tenir le scrutin par anticipation le jour de Noël. Le premier ministre sortant a alors choisi de tenir les élections le 23 janvier 2006, une période électorale plus longue qui a permis d'éviter le temps des Fêtes.

Je ne me souviens plus exactement du résultat de cette élection, mais je crois que c'était plutôt positif.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord. Merci.

Le président:

Oui, monsieur Cullen?

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'était dans le contexte d'un Parlement minoritaire. Tout cela faisait suite à la décision de Mme Stronach de traverser l'allée. Je veux simplement vous faire comprendre que les circonstances étaient quelque peu exceptionnelles, bien que les résultats l'aient été beaucoup moins.

Je comprends que l'on veuille faire en sorte que le gouvernement ne soit pas coincé dans un cycle électoral. S'il se produisait d'autres circonstances inhabituelles menant au déclenchement d'une élection sans qu'il soit possible de la reporter après le temps des Fêtes, les électeurs seraient plutôt mécontents. Ils l'ont été de toute manière à l'époque. La campagne a duré 60 jours, ce qui est tout à fait horrible.

Le président:

Comme la loi en vigueur limite la campagne à 50 jours, si le bref était délivré le 30 novembre, cela nous amènerait environ au 20 janvier, alors qu'on pourrait aller jusqu'au 27 janvier avec ce qui est proposé ici.

Pourquoi fixer la date limite au 30 novembre? Ne serait-ce pas encore plus problématique si c'était en décembre?

M. John Nater:

Désolé, mais pouvez-vous répéter, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Il ne semble pas que la date du 30 novembre pose problème. Qu'arriverait-il si le bref était délivré pendant le mois de décembre? Il n'y aurait pas de problème, car cela nous amènerait trop loin dans la nouvelle année. Je vois.

M. John Nater:

C'est une situation où il pourrait y avoir des jours de scrutin le lendemain de Noël, le jour de Noël ou le jour de l'An, par exemple.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je constate que l'on prévoit déjà une marge de manoeuvre de deux semaines. Ce n'est pas comme si l'on était obligé de tenir une campagne de 50 jours. C'est la limite maximale, et non le minimum. Je ne vois pas pourquoi on voudrait changer quoi que ce soit à ce qui est déjà prévu.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous voulez dire que si l'on s'en tenait au minimum, l'élection pourrait avoir lieu au début ou au milieu de décembre?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, c'est chose possible. Si la période électorale doit être plus longue, vous disposez de deux semaines supplémentaires. Vous pouvez attendre que Noël et le jour de l'An soient passés.

Je ne vois pas en quoi il est avantageux de prévoir des dispositions spéciales pour une situation semblable qui ne se produit qu'une fois à toutes les trois générations.

(1840)

M. John Nater:

Il y a d'autres échéances à respecter, comme par exemple la date limite de mise en candidature. Si la période électorale empiète sur le temps des Fêtes, il y a certaines journées où il sera difficile pour Élections Canada de trouver du personnel pour garder ses bureaux ouverts.

Je me souviens que les bureaux d'Élections Canada étaient ouverts le jour de Noël en 2005. À cette période de l'année, il peut être particulièrement ardu de dénicher des gens prêts à travailler dans ces bureaux. Selon moi, en proposant ces sept journées supplémentaires, nous offrons une marge de manoeuvre pour les situations pouvant se produire lorsque le gouvernement est minoritaire, ce qui pourrait fort bien arriver à nouveau dans les années à venir.

Le président:

D'autres interventions concernant l'amendement CPC-15?

(L'amendement est rejeté [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: L'amendement CPC-16 vise également à ajouter sept jours à la période électorale.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, il s'agit simplement de pouvoir prolonger la période électorale jusqu'à un maximum de 57 jours afin d'offrir une plus grande souplesse à différents moments de l'année. Cette semaine supplémentaire ajoutée au maximum prévu offre la possibilité de...

Le président:

Mais ce n'est pas uniquement pour le temps des Fêtes.

M. John Nater:

Pas nécessairement, il peut s'agit du temps des Fêtes, mais aussi de toute autre période importante...

Le président:

C'est une mesure plus générale.

M. John Nater:

Tout à fait. Cela procurait une plus grande marge de manoeuvre à l'égard de dates importantes pouvant devenir problématiques, comme les jours fériés ou les grandes fêtes religieuses.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

N'est-ce pas redondant? La période électorale ne peut pas durer aussi longtemps de toute manière.

Le président:

Eh bien, nous allons mettre l'amendement aux voix de toute manière.

L'amendement est rejeté [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Nous avions un amendement NDP-4, mais il n'est plus recevable compte tenu de la décision concernant NDP-1.

L'article 47 est-il...

M. John Nater:

Je voudrais un vote par appel nominal.

Le président: Nous tiendrons donc un vote par appel nominal.

(L'article 47 est adopté par 6 voix contre 3 [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(Article 48)

Le président:

Nous passons à l'amendement CPC-17 que je n'arrive plus à retrouver. Si cet amendement est adopté, alors les amendements CPC-18 et CPC-19 ne pourront pas être présentés, car ils visent à modifier la même ligne.

Quelqu'un peut nous présenter l'amendement CPC-17?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je crois qu'il s'agit essentiellement de s'opposer au maximum de 50 jours pour la période électorale, une proposition qui devrait obtenir selon moi le soutien du parti gouvernemental, étant donné que cette formule lui a si bien réussi lors des dernières élections. Je me souviens que j'étais au mariage de Mercedes Stephenson lorsque l'élection a été déclenchée et que je me suis dit que l'on était au jour 1 de la campagne fédérale. Quel triste constat en plein coeur du mois d'août.

Tout cela pour vous dire que vous devriez être en faveur de cet amendement, car cette formule a toujours favorisé le gouvernement.

M. John Nater:

Je veux juste préciser que l'article 48 en question s'applique aux élections dont la date doit être reportée en raison du décès d'un candidat ou d'une catastrophe naturelle. C'est donc ce qui distingue cet amendement des précédents.

Le président:

Est-ce un argument de plus en faveur de l'amendement?

M. John Nater:

Tout à fait.

Le président:

D'accord.

À vous la parole, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que nos témoins peuvent nous dire ce qu'il adviendra si l'on commence à adopter certains de ces amendements visant à porter le maximum à 57 jours après avoir rejeté les autres?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Un jour de congé?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'ai rien à ajouter.

(1845)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Aussi bien être en campagne électorale en permanence.

Le président: Tous ceux qui sont en faveur de l'amendement CPC-17?

(L'amendement est rejeté [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Étant donné que celui-ci a été défait, nous pouvons passer à l'amendement CPC-18.

Stephanie, c'est encore à vous.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, je peux vous assurer que je suis en train de me faire une carapace.

J'arrive difficilement à voir la différence entre cet amendement-ci et le CPC-15, car il est également question d'un maximum de 57 jours pour la période électorale et d'un bref délivré entre le 11 et le 30 novembre. J'ai l'impression que nous venons de rejeter essentiellement la même proposition.

M. John Nater:

Je répète que cet article s'applique uniquement aux élections dont la date a été reportée en raison d'un décès ou d'une catastrophe naturelle.

Le président:

D'accord, c'est la même mesure que pour le temps des fêtes, mais en cas de report d'une élection.

(L'amendement est rejeté [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous en sommes à l'amendement CPC-19.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Un peu de la même façon, je considère que celui-ci est similaire à l'amendement CPC-16 qui voulait que l'on porte le maximum à 57 jours dans d'autres circonstances. C'est comme le jour de la marmotte.

Le président:

Comme il ne semble pas y avoir beaucoup d'intérêt pour ces prolongations, pouvons-nous mettre l'amendement aux voix?

(L'amendement est rejeté [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: L'amendement NDP-5 n'est plus valable, car il était corrélatif à NDP-1.

(L'article 48 est adopté avec dissidence)

Le président: Il n'y a pas d'amendement concernant les articles 49 à 51... à moins qu'il n'y en ait un nouveau à ce sujet?

(Les articles 49 à 51 inclusivement sont adoptés)

(Article 52)

Le président: Madame Kusie, parlez-nous de l'amendement CPC-20.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il s'agit d'interdire aux agents responsables des tiers de devenir candidats s'ils n'ont pas produit leurs rapports de dépenses. C'est conforme aux règles actuellement applicables aux candidats et aux agents officiels.

Il m'apparaît logique que l'agent d'un tiers ayant négligé de produire un rapport de dépenses ne puisse pas devenir candidat ou agent officiel du fait qu'il ne s'est pas conformé aux règles et exigences applicables. Il me semble également que cela va tout à fait dans le sens des efforts déployés par le gouvernement pour assurer une plus grande transparence et une meilleure reddition de comptes de la part des tiers.

Le président:

Est-ce que les représentants du Bureau du Conseil Privé peuvent nous indiquer ce qu'ils en pensent?

M. Jean-François Morin:

L'article 65 de la Loi électorale du Canada dans sa forme actuelle énonce les critères en vertu desquels des candidats doivent être considérés inéligibles. L'alinéa 65i) précise que quelqu'un qui a été candidat ou agent officiel lors d'une élection antérieure et n'a pas produit les rapports requis devient inéligible à devenir candidat lors d'une élection subséquente.

L'alinéa 65i) s'applique toutefois uniquement aux anciens candidats. Il ne vise pas par exemple un agent officiel d'une autre entité enregistrée en vertu de la loi.

Le président:

Vous nous dites que c'est déjà partiellement prévu...

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non, non...

Le président:

... mais pas entièrement.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non, je dis simplement que cet amendement ferait en sorte que, par exemple, l'agent financier d'un parti qui n'aurait pas produit de rapport au nom de ce parti pourrait se présenter comme candidat, alors que l'agent financier d'un tiers, plus éloigné du processus électoral, ne pourrait pas le faire.

(1850)

Le président:

C'est tout à fait illogique. N'est-ce pas totalement inéquitable?

M. Jean-François Morin:

C'est un choix stratégique, monsieur le président.

Le président:

D'accord.

La parole est maintenant à M. Nater, et ensuite, ce sera au tour de M. Bittle.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, je crois que c'est seulement une question d'équité. Si, en tant que candidat, j'omets de présenter des rapports, je ne peux pas me présenter comme candidat. Il devrait en être de même pour l'agent d'un tiers parti. Si cette personne omet de présenter des rapports, elle devrait subir les mêmes conséquences, et ne pas pouvoir se porter candidat.

Le président:

Je crois que le représentant d'Élections Canada a expliqué que les agents officiels des premier et second partis ont le droit de se porter candidats, contrairement à ceux du tiers parti, ce qui signifie que le tiers parti est désavantagé par rapport aux deux premiers partis.

M. Chris Bittle:

Nous ne devrions pas retirer à la légère le droit d'une personne de se présenter à des élections. Je ne pense pas que nous avons entendu des témoignages sur cet aspect, alors je ne crois pas que nous devrions aller de l'avant à ce stade-ci.

Le président:

Nous sommes prêts à passer au vote.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 52 est adopté.)

(L'article 53 est adopté.)

(Article 54)

Le président: Nous avons l'amendement CPC-21 au sujet de l'article 54.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Cet amendement vise essentiellement à faire en sorte que les cartes d'information de l'électeur ne soient pas acceptées comme pièce d'identité. Nous avons vu dans les médias cette semaine des exemples de demandeurs du statut de réfugié qui ont reçu par la poste un avis d'inscription sur la liste électorale. S'ils ne mentionnent rien et s'inscrivent, ils reçoivent une carte d'information de l'électeur et leur nom figure sur la liste électorale.

Nous croyons fermement que la carte d'information de l'électeur ne devrait pas être acceptée comme pièce d'identité pour voter. Je pense que cet exemple dont les médias ont fait état prouve que nous avons raison. Nous ne savons pas pour l'instant combien d'avis d'inscription ont été envoyés à des personnes qui n'ont pas le droit de voter. Ce n'est qu'un seul exemple. En tant que membres de l'opposition, nous devons remettre en question l'utilisation des cartes d'information de l'électeur comme pièce d'identité.

Le président:

Je parierais que le jury n'a pas encore tranché la question. La parole est à M. Graham, et ensuite à M. Bittle.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne peux penser à aucune autre disposition de la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections qui soit plus insultante que celle visant à exclure les cartes d'information de l'électeur de la liste des pièces d'identité acceptées.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Pardonnez-moi; aucune disposition n'était plus insultante que...?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Que ce que vous voulez rétablir. Le...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Qu'avez-vous à dire, alors, au sujet de l'exemple que je viens de donner?

M. Chris Bittle:

Nous avons entendu parler de ces cas, et il est choquant d'entendre dire que des réfugiés pourraient voter. Il y a cette peur de l'autre. Les membres du Parti conservateur utilisent un langage politique codé. Lorsque le Parti conservateur était au pouvoir, nous avons entendu de nombreux témoins affirmer qu'il n'y avait aucun cas de fraude électorale.

À qui profite cette mesure? Elle profite à ma grand-mère, qui reçoit cette carte, la met sur son frigo, puis, le jour des élections, la présente au bureau de vote avec sa carte d'assurance-maladie. En vertu de votre disposition, elle ne pourrait plus le faire, car nous craignons cette possibilité, à cause de cette idée républicaine selon laquelle il y a de la fraude électorale, que des réfugiés puissent voter. Cet amendement n'est fondé sur aucune preuve et vise à susciter des craintes au sein de la population canadienne.

Nous avons entendu de nombreux témoins et nous avons entendu des représentants d'Élections Canada. Je ne peux pas appuyer cet amendement.

Le président:

Allez-y, Stephanie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je pense que ce qui préoccupe le plus les Canadiens, c'est la légitimité des électeurs. Un Canadien est un Canadien, mais nous devons nous assurer que ce sont bel et bien des Canadiens qui obtiennent le droit de voter. Cet exemple, que nous avons vu dans les médias la semaine dernière, concerne précisément le cas de personnes qui n'avaient pas le droit de voter, mais qui pouvaient obtenir une telle carte et faire partie de l'électorat alors qu'elles ne sont pas autorisées à voter.

Je crois que les Canadiens sont tout aussi préoccupés, sinon davantage, par la légitimité des électeurs.

(1855)

[Français]

Le président:

Monsieur Thériault, vous avez la parole.

M. Luc Thériault (Montcalm, BQ):

Merci de me donner la parole, monsieur le président.

Je veux appuyer l'amendement présenté par ma collègue conservatrice. J'invite mon collègue à la prudence, parce que son interprétation de la volonté sous-jacente à un tel amendement semble traduire ce qu'il dénonce.

Je vais donner l'exemple du Québec. On a entendu les mêmes propos à la suite de l'élection de 1998, où il y avait eu un phénomène d'usurpation d'identité, ce qu'on a appelé les votes à 10 $. Par conséquent, il y a maintenant dans cette province une obligation de présenter une carte d'identité avec photo.

Selon la tradition parlementaire québécoise, on ne change pas la loi électorale s'il n'y a pas consensus. On ne la change même pas par vote, comme on l'a évoqué tantôt; il faut qu'il y ait consensus.

Il a fallu aller en cour à la suite de ce phénomène. J'invite mon collègue à aller lire l'arrêt Berardinucci. Ce dernier avait interjeté appel, mais la Cour supérieure du Québec a donné raison aux plaignants. Il y a donc eu un système organisé d'usurpation d'identité alors qu'il n'y avait pas d'obligation de montrer une carte d'électeur avec photo.

Au niveau fédéral, j'ai été ravi de voir que les électeurs pouvaient montrer plusieurs documents au scrutateur pour pouvoir voter. Si c'était aussi restrictif que le système actuel du Québec, où il est obligatoire de présenter une carte d'identité avec photo, je pourrais peut-être comprendre qu'on s'époumone et qu'on déchire sa chemise en disant que cela va empêcher des gens de voter. Au Québec, cela fait partie des moeurs. Avant même qu'on n'ait besoin de le demander, les gens présentent une carte d'identité avec photo et ne se sentent pas du tout maltraités ou quoi que ce soit.

La légitimité du processus électoral est fondamentale. Une carte d'électeur est une chose qui peut être dupliquée. Au Québec, au cours d'une élection générale, on a été capable de payer des gens pour qu'ils usurpent l'identité d'autres électeurs. Des gens ont eu le culot de se présenter au même bureau de scrutin et de jurer sur la Bible qu'ils n'avaient pas déjà voté. Ce n'est pas juste au Québec qu'une telle chose peut se produire.

Je pense que l'intégrité du processus électoral est beaucoup plus importante. Il y a tout plein de cartes ou de documents qu'on peut présenter pour voter à une élection fédérale. La carte d'électeur est davantage un rappel. Elle permet que l'élection se déroule dans l'ordre, que les gens s'orientent rapidement et que le vote soit fluide.

Si on autorise la carte d'électeur comme pièce d'identité, on rend possible la duplication de ces cartes par des gens mal intentionnés qui connaissent très bien le processus électoral, et non par des gens d'ailleurs.

C'est pour cette raison que j'appuie l'amendement. J'invite mon collègue à la prudence: nous ne sommes pas ici pour nous stigmatiser les uns les autres.

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Est-ce que les représentants du Bureau du Conseil privé ont des commentaires à formuler à ce sujet? [Français]

M. Jean-François Morin:

Effectivement, la Loi électorale québécoise contient une obligation de présenter une pièce d'identité avec photo; seulement cinq pièces d'identité sont permises. Par contre, il y a une différence majeure entre le système québécois et le système fédéral: au Québec, il est seulement nécessaire de prouver son identité, alors qu'au fédéral, il faut prouver à la fois son identité et son lieu de résidence. C'est notamment pour cela que beaucoup plus de pièces d'identité sont autorisées au fédéral. [Traduction]

Le président:

La carte d'électeur n'est pas le seul élément à prendre en compte dans le cadre d'élections fédérales.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non, bien entendu. Le projet de loi C-76 supprimerait l'interdiction d'inclure la carte d'information de l'électeur parmi les pièces d'identité qui peuvent être utilisées, mais si ces amendements sont adoptés, une personne qui se présente à un bureau de vote avec une carte d'information de l'électeur devra toujours présenter au moins une deuxième pièce d'identité pour prouver son identité.

(1900)

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Allez-y, monsieur Graham. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il n'existe aucun document délivré gratuitement par le fédéral qui prouve à la fois l'identité et l'adresse d'une personne. Le projet de loi demande qu'on présente une preuve d'adresse ainsi qu'une pièce d'identité séparément; il faut les deux.

Je ne suis pas d'accord avec vous sur aucun de vos propos.

Je vais vous lire ce qu'Élections Canada a publié sur Twitter cette semaine.[Traduction]

« Dernièrement, des renseignements inexacts ont été partagés au sujet de l'inscription au vote et des pièces d'identité. Nous souhaitons donc vous offrir l'information exacte. »

Ce message vient directement d'Élections Canada.

« Élections Canada envoie par la poste des avis d'inscription aux électeurs potentiels. Cet avis indique au destinataire qu'il n'est pas inscrit pour voter. Il l'invite à s'inscrire s'il est un citoyen canadien âgé d'au moins 18 ans. »

« Les avis d'inscription sont différents des cartes d'information de l'électeur. Les cartes d'information de l'électeur sont seulement envoyées aux électeurs inscrits, lors d'une élection. »

« Lorsqu'un électeur potentiel s'inscrit, il doit signer une déclaration stipulant qu'il est un citoyen canadien âgé de 18 ans ou plus. »

« À l'heure actuelle, la carte d'information de l'électeur n'est pas une pièce d'identité acceptée. Les électeurs n'ont jamais eu le droit de voter en présentant seulement leur carte d'information de l'électeur comme pièce d'identité. »

« Le projet de loi C-76, à l'étude au Parlement, autoriserait l'utilisation de la carte d'information de l'électeur comme preuve d'adresse. Élections Canada n'accepterait pas la carte d'information de l'électeur comme seule pièce d'identité — la carte devrait être présentée avec une preuve d'identité acceptée. »

La carte d'information de l'électeur fournit une preuve d'adresse. C'est tout ce qu'elle fournit, et c'est là un point très important.

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

M. John Nater:

J'aimerais un vote par appel nominal.

Le président:

Nous allons tenir un vote par appel nominal au sujet de l'amendement CPC-21.

(L'amendement est rejeté: contre 6; pour 3. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 54 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(L'article 55 est adopté.)

Le président: Il y avait un amendement visant à proposer une nouvelle disposition, l'article 55.1, mais il a été éliminé en raison de l'amendement NDP-1, alors il est supprimé. Il n'y a aucun amendement pour les articles 56 à 60.

(Les articles 56 à 60 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

Le président: Il y avait un amendement pour proposer un nouvel article, l'article 60.1, mais il a aussi été éliminé en raison de l'amendement NDP-7.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il y a beaucoup d'éliminations; c'est dur, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Nous allons continuer.

Nous avons l'amendement CPC-22 au sujet de l'article 61.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Monsieur le président, la réunion ne devait-elle pas se terminer à 19 heures?

Le président:

Oui, vous avez raison.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ah non, Stephanie, nous étions bien partis.

Le président:

D'accord. Voulez-vous arrêter maintenant?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui.

Le président:

D'accord.

Je vous remercie tous. Nous avons bien progressé grâce à votre bonne attitude et à votre aide. Je remercie également les témoins pour leur contribution et leur présence. Nous nous réunirons à nouveau demain, à 9 heures, dans la pièce 112 nord.

Y a-t-il autre chose?

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on October 15, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.