header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-10-16 PROC 124

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(0905)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning, and welcome to the 124th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.[Translation]

I would like to welcome Peter Fragiskatos.

I would also like to thank Luc Thériault for being with us again.[English]

Once again, we are pleased to be joined by Manon Paquet and Jean-François Morin from the Privy Council Office as we pick up where we left off with clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-76, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act and other acts and to make certain consequential amendments. We will resume with consideration of clause 61 and CPC-22.

Stephanie did a good job of presenting the new amendments in order, and Philippe stayed up late last night to put them in order. When we get to a new amendment, I'll be referring to the number as the reference number, which is on the top left. If you keep them in the order you got them in, they'll come up in that order, and I'll tell you when we get to those particular amendments.

Mr. Nater, go ahead.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

I want to inform the committee that, because CPC-2 was defeated yesterday, the Conservative Party will be withdrawing amendments CPC-93, CPC-116 and CPC-148. Without CPC-2, the other ones wouldn't logically flow, so we'll be withdrawing those three.

The Chair:

What are they, again?

Mr. John Nater:

They are CPC-93, CPC-116 and CPC-148.

(On clause 61)

The Chair:

Thank you very much. That's helpful.

We're going to start at CPC-22. This one just adds the word “knowingly”, so you can't publish results of an election that are inaccurate. This suggestion is to add the word “knowingly” to that.

Mr. Nater, do you want to say anything?

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Chair.

I think you explained it exactly. It's maintaining the “knowingly” element, that there has to be knowledge that what you're doing is not appropriate. We'd like to add the word. I think that would be appropriate.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Mr. Bittle, go ahead.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Excuse me, I believe intent is already required in the offence, so I was wondering if I could ask the officials if this is a redundant section to include.

Mr. Jean-François Morin (Senior Policy Advisor, Privy Council Office):

Thank you for your question, Mr. Bittle.

This motion would amend section 91 of the act. Section 91 is a prohibition. We're not yet at the offence stage. The offences are in part 19 of the act, so this is the prohibition associated with it.

Although you will see “knowingly” many times in prohibitions in the act, it's often considered bad practice in criminal law to include an intent provision such as “knowingly” in the prohibition itself, especially where there's already an element of intent that is expressed. In this case, we already have two: the intent to affect the election as well as the false nature of the statement.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

It's redundant.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, did you hear that? He suggested it may not be a good practice to....

Mr. Cullen, go ahead.

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

For my own edification, can you clarify that a little bit, Jean-François? If we have other sections of the act that include “knowingly” in terms of a contravention, are you suggesting it's bad legal practice to include this?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes, that's why I was saying.... Don't get me wrong. We know that there are other places, other prohibitions in the act where we say “knowingly”, but it's bad practice.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What's the problem with the practice? A Canadian reading this would say that the infringement is included in that, and that the person knowingly sought to, in this case, mislead on the results of an election.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The “knowingly” is a mens rea element that is associated with the offence. When we try to craft legislation, we want to make sure that every offence that Parliament wants a mental element associated with has at least one of those mental elements—so it's those dual procedure offences versus strict liability offences, which don't have a huge intent criterion.

What I am saying is that in many prohibitions we already have an intent criterion. For example, in section 91 we already have the intent to affect the results of the election, and of course the person making the publication would need to know that the information that is published is false.

We already have two intent requirements here.

(0910)

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, go ahead.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to our witnesses.

We live in a digital age where people share things on Facebook and retweet stuff. I think that's part of where adding “knowingly” came from. If someone retweets information that he or she sees, is that individual committing an offence simply by retweeting? The individual doesn't know that it's wrong, doesn't do it “knowingly”, so is this an element that we need to be looking at?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Well, we'll get to that when we study part 19 of the act, which includes the offences. However, you will see at this point that all offences that relate to part 6 of the act are offences for which an intent is required, so there are no strict liability offences for part 6 of the act. Every time somebody republishes something on Facebook or on Twitter, if they do so without intent, if they mistakenly believe that the information is true, that would not usually be sufficient to lay a charge. These charges will really be laid when the person knows that the information is false—in the case of section 91, when the person intends to affect the results of the election by making that publication.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle, go ahead.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Maybe to simplify it a little bit in terms of how it's structured within the law, if there is intent already in it, you don't want to put another word in there that would deal with it.

For example, with regard to murder, the Criminal Code wouldn't say that you “knowingly murder” someone. There is an expectation of intent already in there, and to add more words and phrases dealing with that may complicate the....

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

There is no presumption of intent if somebody repeats information that is false about an election result or a candidate. However, if somebody knowingly repeats and distributes information and tries to affect the election—that is the outcome of this—that seems to be the difference.

If somebody retweets something that in all good intention they think is accurate, or they're just retweeting for the sake of it, that's one case. However, if somebody is knowingly disseminating information that is wrong.... That's my understanding of this section. That's why I was generally appreciative of this, because it includes that.

I'm looking for the redundancy, and I haven't seen it yet. Repeating something that's wrong is not the problem if you have no intent to do it. If you've had intent to do it, then that's the problem.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

“Knowingly” speaks to the mens rea, the guilty mind element of it, so to put another phrase in when you already have that within the act makes the redundancy.

If you are accidentally doing it, you're not guilty of the offence.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I understand, but I guess I have to go back through that section of the act to find out where the explicit mention of intent is already laid out, and where this then becomes redundant, because I don't have that section in front of me. Is that what I'm missing?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Just give me a second.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

It makes perfect sense to the lawyers; that's the problem.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

If you go to page 186 of the bill.... In the English version, I'm at lines 13 to 16.



Every entity is guilty of an offence that



(a) contravenes subsection 91(1) (making or publishing false statement to affect election results); or



(b) knowingly contravenes section 92 (publishing false statement of candidate’s withdrawal).

Do you see the difference there, where 92 speaks of “knowingly” and 91 doesn't? If you go back to the two substantive provisions, the two prohibitions, proposed section 92 only says “No person or entity shall publish a false statement that indicates that a candidate has withdrawn.”

Each of these words refers to an essential element of the offence. In order to be found liable of this, of course you need to know that the statement is false. That's where we need the “knowingly” and the “offence” there. You knowingly published a false statement. This appears unnecessary at section 91, because at section 91 we already have the requirement to intend to affect the results of the election with false information.

(0915)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay. That satisfies me.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

If you add a “knowingly” there, then it's an additional element of the offence that needs to be proven beyond reasonable doubt. It could lead to a judge saying that not only did the person need to want to affect the election with false information, but the person also needed to know that he or she committed this specific infraction.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I see. The “knowingly” is not about the false information; the “knowingly” is that the person knew they were committing crimes. That helps.

The Chair:

Are we ready for the vote on CPC-22?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 61 agreed to on division)

The Chair: On clause 62, there was LIB-3, but that was passed because it was consequential to LIB-2.

(Clause 62 as amended agreed to)

(Clauses 63 to 67 inclusive agreed to)

(Clause 68 agreed to on division)

The Chair: On clause 69, there was a Liberal amendment, but that was approved consequential to LIB-2.

(Clause 69 as amended agreed to)

(On clause 70)

The Chair: LIB-5 suggests that the polling division be on the electors list. Because there is a bunch of polling divisions mixed into a polling station and they go to different tables, you need to know which table they went to.

David, are you going to introduce this?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

It's a technical fix, because there's an omission in indicating the polling division on the electors list in one circumstance.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion on that?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

Our amendment 10008479 is very similar.

The Chair:

We'll vote on LIB-5.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Do you want to introduce the new one? It's 10008479. It's the first new one. You should have it on the stack of your new ones.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's similar in spirit to the previous one. Since we've passed LIB-5, I think it's fine. We don't need to move it.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Is it withdrawn?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie: Yes.

The Chair: Okay, thank you. That's very helpful.

LIB-6 was consequential to LIB-2, so that was approved.

(Clause 70 as amended agreed to)

(On clause 72)

The Chair: Clause 72 had amendment LIB-7, which was consequential to LIB-2, which was passed.

(Clause 72 as amended agreed to)

The Chair: There are no amendments for clauses 73 to 75.

(Clauses 73 to 75 inclusive agreed to)

(On clause 76)

The Chair: On clause 76, we have CPC-23. The returning officer already has to give the names of election officers to the candidates, and this would suggest that he has to give not only the names but also the addresses of election officials to the candidates.

Do you want to introduce that?

(0920)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure. This is something that has historically occurred, and I guess we are uncertain as to why the candidates would no longer receive the addresses. What is the problem in their receiving the addresses in addition to the names?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Can we ask our officials?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure.

The Chair:

I think that in the debate we had there was some concern about giving women's home addresses to people, but go ahead.

Ms. Manon Paquet (Senior Policy Advisor, Privy Council Office):

It was removed from the bill following a recommendation of the Chief Electoral Officer in his report following the 42nd general election. It's a matter of privacy. The CEO didn't feel that it was necessary anymore to provide that information. I would add that parties also receive a list of electors that includes addresses. If necessary, candidates could cross-reference this with that information.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

If they're already receiving the addresses, what's the problem with giving them the addresses once again? If the information is publicly out there, why would we create another obstacle in terms of obtaining the information? If it's out there, then it's out there.

Ms. Manon Paquet:

At this point, it's a policy decision. As I mentioned, it's based on the recommendation of the Chief Electoral Officer that this was no longer necessary.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Just because it's no longer necessary, that doesn't mean that.... I mean, one would argue that there are a lot of things that are no longer necessary that are still completed anyway. To me, this just seems like another obstacle if there's a discrepancy after the fact or after the election. As I said, if the information is already out there, it seems silly to me that we would not provide that information as well.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The list of addresses of election officers used to be provided also because election officers needed to reside within the electoral district. Because that requirement has been removed, there is no longer a need for candidates and parties to confirm that the person actually resides in the electoral district.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Now I have a list: Mr. Nater, Mr. Graham, and then Mr. Cullen.

Mr. John Nater:

Very briefly, that was the point I was going to make. Now that we've removed the requirement that officials have to live in the riding, we won't have access to those addresses based on the voters list, the private voters list with all the addresses but not for the officials, who may no longer reside in the riding. I think that's why this amendment would be necessary.

The Chair:

We have Mr. Graham and then Mr. Cullen.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That point is sort of the opposite of the one I was going to make. We got rid of the requirement that they come from the riding; where they live is more or less irrelevant. I think the CEO is competent to hire his staff, and I don't want to second-guess him based on where people live. I don't see the purpose of that data.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen, go ahead.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's exactly that. Since we've removed the requirement, what are we looking to verify?

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota, go ahead.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Nathan said what I wanted to say.

The Chair:

Mrs. Kusie, where did you say the information about the addresses of the officers is already available?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I believe Madam Paquet just said that the information is already provided to candidates on the electoral list. If the information is provided on the electoral list, would it not be publicly available already?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Of course, all election officers need to be electors. Yes, they will be on the list of electors in the electoral district where their ordinary residence is located. Parties have access to the list of electors for all electoral districts where they support a candidate. Parties would definitely have access to that.

The Chair:

Are we ready for the vote?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 76 agreed to on division)

The Chair: There are no amendments to clauses 77 to 81.

(Clauses 77 to 81 inclusive agreed to)

(On clause 82)

The Chair: In amendment CPC-24, the returning officer has to give a statement of the number of ballots and their serial numbers to an election official at a polling station. This amendment, the way I read it last night, suggests that now that there are a number of polling divisions in the same thing, the returning officer would only have to give it to one officer.

I'll let Stephanie explain that.

(0925)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure.

Essentially, now that we have different tables with different polling stations, we need to ensure the safeguard that there will be proper reconciliation at the end. CPC-24 allows for that.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Mr. Cullen, go ahead.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm trying to figure out how this would function.

Stephanie, are you suggesting that at the end of the voting night, or whenever periodically, all of the ballots are reconciled within the polling station itself? I'm just wondering how this looks on the ground. It's hard not having Elections Canada here.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, that is correct. It's at the end of every day. The way it stands now in the new legislation, it's controlled so that one person has been responsible for the one box all day and knows what is...how many there are at the end of the day. Is that...?

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's probably too late now, but because many of these things are just the practical workings of an election, I think it would be well for the committee to have Elections Canada here at some point. Of course, they don't give us policy direction, but they can certainly tell us how reconciling ballots under this provision would actually work on the ground. I'm not sure if they can be made available. Usually they are quite available to us.

My intention is to vote against it, even though it might be the greatest recommendation to make our elections more accountable, because I don't understand how this would function on a day-to-day basis. I guess I've understood as much as I can in order to be ready to vote.

The Chair:

Jean-François Morin, go ahead.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Actually, Bill C-76 was designed in a way that would allow maximum flexibility.... Well, it's not “maximum” flexibility in that it's not unrestricted flexibility. Nevertheless, it would give a lot of flexibility to the Chief Electoral Officer in managing polling stations on polling day and at advance polls.

I would point you to page 17 of the bill and to proposed section 38, which states: A returning officer shall keep a record of the powers and duties that he or she has assigned to each election officer, and of the time at which or during which each election officer is to exercise a power or perform a duty assigned to him or her.

Proposed section 39 states: An election officer shall exercise or perform, in accordance with the Chief Electoral Officer’s instructions, any power or duty assigned to him or her by a returning officer.

The Canada Elections Act used to designate many functions at the polling stations—for example, the poll clerk, the deputy returning officer, the revising agent, etc. All of these titles have been removed, changed to the generic “election officer”. The Chief Electoral Officer will now be able to manage personnel better at the polling station on polling day by assigning different functions to various election officers.

This motion and a few other motions would just remove some of that flexibility, but of course Elections Canada presented this model of modernized polling stations in its recommendations report and intends to continue administering elections in an—

(0930)

The Chair:

It would be somewhat unusual to have them here, Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Would it?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm into innovation, Chair. I very much appreciate Jean-François describing it. I find Elections Canada is always helpful in just saying, “This is logistically how we manage this.” This new interpretation of their being able to designate roles, combined with what Stephanie is suggesting, would just help clarify in my mind whether this would work or whether they would find this counter to the intention of the amendment.

The Chair:

Stephanie, go ahead.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's what I'm struggling with: How can we ensure the proper reconciliation of the votes at each of the tables under this system?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Elections Canada already has a process for reconciling all ballots at the end of each polling day, so the same process will be extended to the size of a polling station.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I have nothing further.

The Chair:

They already provide the ballots and serial numbers to the polling stations. It's in the act. Is that right?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Absolutely, but in the model where a polling station will include many voting tables, of course, the returning officer will designate one responsible election officer for the polling station who will be responsible for this duty.

The Chair:

Are we ready to vote?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 82 agreed to on division)

(Clause 83 agreed to)

(On clause 84)

The Chair: Clause 84 has CPC-25. My understanding from reading this last night is that it's just adding a new section saying that when you go to vote at a polling station, there are enough of those little screened areas so you can do it privately and efficiently.

Stephanie, do you want to introduce this?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

No, I think you explained it well, Chair.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle, go ahead.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I just want to say it's a good amendment. It adds flexibility for the CEO, which is one of the purposes of the act, and we support it.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you, Mr. Bittle.

The Chair:

We'll vote on CPC-25.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 84 as amended agreed to)

(Clause 85 agreed to)

(On clause 86)

The Chair: Clause 86 has CPC-26. My understanding is that it just limits the number of polling divisions in a polling station to 10.

Stephanie, do you want to introduce this amendment?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I think it's evident. It indicates a maximum of 10 polls per location without the Chief Electoral Officer's approval. I'm not sure if our witnesses would like to speak to situations where there are more than 10 per location.

The Chair:

Would the witnesses like to speak?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I don't have any comment on that.

The Chair:

Do you know if there have ever been situations where there are more than 10?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No, currently there is a limitation of 10 per polling place.

The Chair:

Is there one already?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Sorry, currently the act provides for polling places, and the act limits each polling place to 10 polling stations, but this requirement was removed as part of the modernization of polling services.

The Chair:

So it used to be there, and it's been taken out. Now it's proposed to be put back in.

Mr. Jean-François Morin: Exactly.

The Chair: But you could still have more than 10, with the Chief Electoral Officer's approval, in your proposal.

We have Mr. Nater, and then Mr. Cullen.

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, that was exactly what I was going to say. This is the current practice. It was removed, and this is something we think should be maintained. I think it's just a common-sense approach. It gives some flexibility, with the approval of the CEO. I think any of us who have been to a large polling station on election day know there are a lot of people going in and out, and the confusion that is developed by a large number of polling stations in one facility is significant. I think this is a common-sense approach.

(0935)

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen, go ahead.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

As we have said before, Chair, you and I are both rural. I'm trying to imagine what this looks like. If it goes beyond 10, is it....?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Or what does more than two look like? I don't know.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

How many voters? We only have 25.

Logistically, for some of my urban colleagues, does beyond 10 start to get....? Is it that we're trying to avoid crowds, or what's the problem?

If the Chief Electoral Officer has the discretion to expand it beyond certain circumstances, then this is a guideline saying that about 10 is as big as you want to get before it starts to get too chaotic. But, again, I'm not seeing polling places that big. Does it cause a problem for voters? If it doesn't, then we should let them have full discretion.

The Chair:

Well, this doesn't say it can't be more than 10. It just says that you have to have the chief returning officer approve more than 10.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right.

It says that 10 should be your guide, unless you're going to make an exception.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle is next, and then Mr. Graham.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Unlike the previous amendment, this one seems to run counter to granting the CEO the flexibility to deal with the election and manage the election appropriately, so we're going to be opposed to it.

The Chair:

Well, the CEO can manage it; it's the returning officer who can't.

Mr. Graham, go ahead.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm just going to ask the officials if there's anything that stops the CEO from saying you shouldn't have more than 10 at a location. He can say whatever he wants.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Actually, nothing stops the CEO from saying that it's no more than 10. The CEO, under paragraph 16(d) of the Canada Elections Act, has the power to make instructions to election officers. If I may add, the Chief Electoral Officer has already announced that for the 2019 general election he wouldn't be implementing the model of voting at any table, because he just doesn't have time to implement that.

Let's project ourselves into the future. At the following general election, if the model of voting at any table is allowed, the services to voters at the polling stations should be more efficient, and there should be much less of a wait at the table where you vote, because you will be able to go to the next available election officer. In that context, in very densely populated areas, it may be possible to administer a polling station with more than 10 polling divisions, if the flow of electors is very efficient.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So for 2019.... We're talking about 2023. In the coming election, a year from now, if there are long lineups, we can blame the Liberal government. Is that what you're saying? I just want to make sure I got the testimony. We're in public, right? I just wanted to clarify this one point.

The Chair:

Thank you for that clarification.

Mr. Thériault, go ahead. [Translation]

Mr. Luc Thériault (Montcalm, BQ):

Mr. Chair, I'm not sure I fully understood the witness' remarks.

Mr. Morin, could you please repeat that in French?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

In his last recommendation report, the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada made several recommendations to modernize services to voters at polling stations. It was noted that polling stations were slowed down by the fact that every voter had to go to the polling station associated with the voter's polling division.

The changes made by Bill C-76 will eventually give the Chief Electoral Officer the flexibility to group several polling divisions at a single polling station. When voters arrive, they will be able to vote at the first table available, rather than having to line up in front of the table for their polling division.

Mr. Luc Thériault:

So it's basically like voting at the advance poll. It would be like holding a big advance poll on the big day.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

That's more or less the case. Yes, there are similarities to advance polling, but changes have been made—this is found in some provisions and in the schedule of the bill—so that election officers will have to write the voter's polling division number on the back of the ballot on election day. At the end of the day, the results will still be counted by polling division and reported in this way in the official poll results.

(0940)

Mr. Luc Thériault:

I am referring to advance polling because it is often when frustration is expressed about the flow of the vote. What causes this lack of flow? This is precisely due to the concentration of ballot boxes in a single section. It takes people a long time to find a voter's name on the list to register that they have just voted. The hope or claim is that this will work more smoothly, but let me voice a concern.

If all this were done by computer, it might be another story.

On election day, there are trained scrutineers on site, but, by the way, it is becoming increasingly difficult to find and train these scrutineers. It often takes some time for scrutineers to find the voter's name on the list in a single polling division. I just wanted to tell you that this is not necessarily the best way. Perhaps the process for identifying voters should be reviewed. Indeed, at each election, that is the problem. I have been voting for several years now, and that is what I noticed. The difficulty is not that the voter has to go to a particular place, but rather the time required for the voter to be identified and to be recorded as having voted. [English]

The Chair:

So with the new change, which is not coming in for this election, there's a new thing on the ballot that specifies the polling division. Because you can go to any table, it will be on the ballot, so you'll know which polling division you're voting in. So there's no change there. That's in the general.... I'm not talking about the advance poll. [Translation]

Mr. Luc Thériault:

This is about recounting. However, I do not believe that this approach will make voting more fluid.

In terms of the number of boxes per voting location, I think it is becoming increasingly difficult for returning officers to find places to hold the vote. From year to year, we get to know the different voting locations. They are established by all organizations and by returning officers, who have often been in office for years. It is possible that one facility may allow more than 10 boxes. Under these circumstances, I don't see why we should strictly limit ourselves to 10 boxes. In each election, few places have been inadequate. When this happened, the situation was corrected. Very large gyms or facilities can provide much more than 10 boxes. In the constituencies, it is institutionalized. We all already have such places.

That's what I had to say. [English]

The Chair:

Okay.

Welcome, Elizabeth May, from the Parti vert.

Are we ready for the question on CPC-26?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 86 agreed to on division)

(On clause 87)

The Chair: I just want to make a comment on the next two amendments, CPC-27 and CPC-28. If anyone is interested in both of these, they might want to amend the first one, because the second one won't be able to be put forward, because it's on the same line. It's talking about providing the candidate the information. The returning officer has to give the information on the addresses of all the polling stations. CPC-27 is saying they should also have to give the polling divisions at each station. The one after that says that they should also give the number of ballot boxes or any changes in the ballot boxes.

If you would like both of those ideas to be given to the candidate, you're going to have to amend the first one. Otherwise you won't be able to bring forward the second one, because it's amending the same line as the first one. That's the way I read all this last night.

It's open for discussion.

(0945)

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, you read my mind. I would put a subamendment that CPC-27 be amended by deleting proposed paragraph (c). That would allow us, then, to move the other one if this one passes, as I'm sure it will.

The Chair:

Okay, that removes the problem of the next one not being able to be discussed.

Is there debate on the subamendment that CPC-27 be amended by deleting paragraph (c)?

(Subamendment negatived)

The Chair: We're back to the discussion on the motion. The motion stands like this. The next one can't be added.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I think the purpose of CPC-27 and CPC-28 is to allow better planification for the candidates. On election day, candidates are always looking for a good distribution of scrutineers and volunteers, and I think these amendments allow for better candidate planning going into the elections.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but Elections Canada already does this by practice within their existing power. Is there any reason to do this?

The Chair:

I'll ask the witnesses.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

You're right that Elections Canada already does this.

The Chair:

Do they give to the candidates each polling division that's at a polling station?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Currently, each polling division is assigned to a single polling station, but of course, with the transition, they would provide the polling divisions assigned to each polling station.

The Chair:

Okay. Is there any further discussion?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I think that's why. Presently every station has its own division assigned to it. Again, if there are different stations with different divisions, this ensures that this information is available, whereas under the new requirement, we're not certain that the information will be available.

The Chair:

Didn't you just say that it would be available?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I said it's part of the modernization of polling services initiative. I don't see why Elections Canada wouldn't provide the information.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, go ahead.

Mr. John Nater:

I think there wouldn't be a requirement by law to provide that information. I think that's why this amendment is important, to provide candidates with that information and have a requirement that this information be provided.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion on CPC-27?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We can do CPC-28 because CPC-27 wasn't adopted, so we didn't change that line.

On CPC-28, once again, it's more information to the candidates. They're suggesting that the number of ballot boxes or any changes in the ballot boxes be provided to the candidates.

Does anyone want to introduce this?

While you're doing this, I want to ask the committee a question. Does the committee have any objection to inviting Elections Canada? They might sit at the back and then, if we have technical questions that.... Are there any objections to that? Can we share the amendments with them? Is that okay with you?

Okay, we'll do that. That was a good point. On some of these things, they could say how it would work in reality.

(0950)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

They're probably listening online right now anyway.

The Chair:

It is public.

Stephanie, do you want to introduce CPC-28?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure. It's very similar in spirit to CPC-27. It's just about the candidates receiving this information about ballot boxes, and how many ballot boxes will be established at each station now that there is this new set-up. Again, it allows for better planning by candidates in terms of volunteer coordination, scrutineers, etc. Under this new system, it's uncertain how many ballot boxes will be established at each station, leading to uncertainty in candidates' planning.

I feel that this information would be advantageous for all candidates of all parties to have, and I'm not sure why we would obstruct ourselves from having this information for the opportunity to better plan.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion on CPC-28?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Next is LIB-8. This one is suggesting that the information be also given to the candidates electronically.

David, do you want to introduce this?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes. It's pretty straightforward. It's to make sure that we get electronic maps. I think that's a useful thing to have, nothing like that big tube of maps that we all get at the start of a campaign.

A voice: I like those too, though.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: They're great, too.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Are we going to get both? That's my only question, because I love the tube of maps. I like them on the wall.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It says, “shall be made available in electronic form or in formats that include electronic form.”

It's up to the CEO whether he does electronic or other, but it has to be at least electronic.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

We support this.

The Chair:

Are you ready for—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I have just one small thing.

So, this gives the discretion to Elections Canada to choose, but it must do the electronic.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's correct.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It doesn't have to do the paper?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's my understanding, yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I wish there was a way to amend this.

It might sound ridiculous, but a lot of the campaigns—I don't know about your guys—do prefer putting the maps up on the wall. If you only do them electronically, then you're going to say to all the campaigns, “You have to find a map printer”, which is a three- to four-foot-wide printer.

I don't know if there is a.... Maybe Mr. Morin can help us out here, because I would hate to see Elections Canada say, “We're out of the business of giving you any maps” and all the campaigns now having to go find printers to print them accurately.

Maybe I'm just old school, but we do like slapping the maps up on the wall and trying to figure out the riding.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

This amendment would only cover the maps provided to the parties, so that the parties don't get a stack of 338 maps.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So it's not to the individual candidates.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No. The candidates will—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The candidates will continue to get the paper maps.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's actually good, then, because I know that in my office I didn't have enough walls for all of my maps.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Your riding is so huge.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It has so many insets.

The Chair:

If this amendment passes, it also applies to LIB-16.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is it just an addition to it?

Can you explain that a bit, Mr. Chair, before we go to the vote on this one? If we're voting on two, it's good to know what....

Mr. David de Burgh-Graham: It's “buy one, get one free”.

Mr. Nathan Cullen: It's a two-for-one.

The Chair:

I had to stay at the emergency debate last night until midnight, so I didn't have time to get to the....

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Mr. Chair, it's a shame. Resign.

The Chair:

It's on page 85 of your amendments.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is it just another amendment further on in the act that corresponds?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes, it corresponds, but LIB-16 applies to advance polling stations.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Oh, I see. Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

Are these still the ones that go to the parties?

Mr. Jean-François Morin: Yes.

The Chair: Okay.

Now we vote on LIB-8.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 87 as amended agreed to)

(Clauses 88 to 92 inclusive agreed to)

(On clause 93)

The Chair: Okay.

(0955)

[Translation]

We have amendment BQ-1, the only amendment from the Bloc Québécois.

Mr. Luc Thériault:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Let me quickly explain the principles underlying the legislative intent of this addition, which is to require face-to-face voting. This is a legitimate legislative intention and for which I have had a very clear mandate.

We live in a free and democratic society where there are freedoms and rights guaranteed by the Charter. Unlike a right, a freedom is not associated with responsibility. Everyone has freedom of expression automatically. The right to vote, on the other hand, is associated with a responsibility: that of demonstrating one's status as an elector. Unlike a freedom, a right is not automatically given.

A right may be infringed “within reasonable limits and demonstrably justified in a free and democratic society”; this is what the Charter says. We believe that it is reasonable to interfere with the right to vote if a person does not meet the conditions for demonstrating his or her eligibility as a voter.

In Quebec, we live in a society that has secularized its institutions. Some may have heard their grandfathers say that at one time, before the Quiet Revolution, the priests in the pulpit reminded them that hell was red and the sky was blue. This is called the time of the great darkness of Duplessis.

In a democratic host society, there are two moments when citizens seal their social contract. There are two essential symbolic moments that demonstrate a citizen's commitment to our democratic society and his willingness to integrate into our democracy. There is the oath, of course, and the right to vote, which we are discussing this morning.

For a host society, there is no better way to demonstrate its willingness to integrate a citizen than to grant him the right to vote. It is at this moment that a citizen signs his social contract. Similarly, there is no stronger time to demonstrate a willingness to embrace these democratic values than when citizens, in order to have the right to vote, comply with the law.

Everything always comes from concrete experiences. In 2007 in Quebec, in the middle of an election, the Chief Electoral Officer, wanting to be very inclusive, gave an administrative directive according to which he could even tolerate the full veil. I give this example because that was the problem at the time. This has resulted in unsightly acts by which people have violated the necessary decorum and the solemn moment that voting represents when you are a citizen. Everyone began to say that they would cover their faces when they went to vote—some people even arrived at the polling station with their faces covered—so the directive was removed. Nevertheless, this led to a debate that culminated in the creation of a special parliamentary committee, the Bouchard-Taylor Commission.

That being said, it seems quite reasonable to us that, in order to have the right to vote, citizens must have their faces exposed, since voter identification requires it. This is all the more true because in Quebec, in addition to having their voter card, people will already have taken out their photo ID.

(1000)



We believe it is important that the values on which our democracy is based are respected at a time as important as the signing of the social contract, in other words, exercising the right to vote. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Before I go to Mr. Graham, I want to ask you a question. Do people at the moment have to present photo ID?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Not currently. There are several voting opportunities under the Canada Elections Act where electors don't have to present photo ID.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, go ahead. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If you don't need to present photo identification to vote, is this amendment useful?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I would say that this is more of a political issue that I will leave in your hands. [English]

The Chair:

Is there further discussion on this amendment?

Ruby, go ahead.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I think this goes contrary to freedom of religion. What you have just pointed out, Chair, makes it seem that we're adding an additional requirement for certain religions, which doesn't necessarily exist for any other religion because they don't need to show a piece of photo ID, so what are you comparing it to anyway?

I think in this circumstance I would be opposed to this amendment.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Turning to CPC-29, the Chief Electoral Officer can authorize identification, but this would put in a caveat to that: "other than a notice of confirmation of registration". Do you want to explain this, Stephanie?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure. This essentially just goes back to a voter information card not being an acceptable form of ID. Even with supplementary identification, we're very concerned that someone could just go and get a library card or a Costco card and use it as a supplementary form of identification. We just don't see it as acceptable that the voter information cards are used in addition to the examples from the media yesterday, which I brought up. I mean, the government seems to be against this safeguard entirely. I don't think there's anything I could say to persuade the members otherwise.

I think we've made it very clear that from the position of the official opposition we're very concerned about the legitimacy of the electorate. This piece is probably the most important piece relevant to what we see as safeguarding the legitimacy of the electorate.

That's all I have to say, Chair. As I said, I don't think there's anything that I or any of my colleagues could say at this point to sway the government away from what we see as perhaps an unsafe practice for democracy here in Canada.

I will leave it at that.

The Chair:

Even though you don't think your colleagues can convince the Liberals, one of them is on the speakers list.

Before we go there, there are a number of amendments coming up that deal with this.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure.

The Chair:

Hopefully this discussion will resume when we get to those other ones and we won't discuss it all over again.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

They'll repeat it again and again.

The Chair:

We'll go to Mr. Bittle and then Mr. Nater.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

It's not just the government. It's the Chief Electoral Officer. We even brought in the Chief Electoral Officer of Ontario, and the Conservatives asked him about this practice. It's a perfectly valid practice.

What the Conservatives are looking to do is potentially disenfranchise about 130,000 people—I think that is the evidence we heard, what it worked out to be the last time under the Fair Elections Act—because there may possibly be electoral fraud, even though we have no confirmed cases. Witness after witness was asked to confirm to us a case of electoral fraud, and no one could bring forward a confirmed case.

The Conservative Party is looking for a solution without a problem. We want to make sure that those 130,000 Canadians who weren't given a chance to vote last time around are given a chance to vote. This is something that has been recommended by chief electoral officers across the country, and we will oppose the attempt to bring back the Fair Elections Act.

(1005)

The Chair:

You mean on this particular amendment.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Yes, it's on this particular amendment.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, go ahead.

Mr. John Nater:

Here's just a follow-up to that 130,000 number. I would just note that the study actually showed that 7% more people who responded to that survey said they voted than actually voted in reality, so there's an ability to take that with a grain of salt.

I would just point out, though, regarding the voter information card in the last election, that more than 900,000 of those cards were sent out with inaccurate information. It's a question of accuracy and having the right information. That's why we don't feel it's appropriate as a form of identity.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen, go ahead.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The evidence I was looking for was whether this was a problem of voters voting early and often and attempting to corrupt the system by using this piece of identification. The evidence we heard back was “no”. An inaccuracy could be the difference between “apartment 1A” and “apartment 1B”, and this is somehow pumped up to say that somebody is voting fraudulently, when that is clearly not the case.

I rely on our chief electoral officers across the country, and they've repeatedly told us that this is a practice that is used, and used well, particularly for low-income and transient Canadians. There are circumstances and times when this is the best and most available piece of identification, so we need to be able to trust it. If there are inaccuracies that are concerning, then we can certainly talk to Elections Canada about getting better at that.

We know that about 8%, 9%, 10% of the population moves every year, on average, and some parts of the population move a lot more frequently than others, so I wouldn't want to see anything that tells low-income or younger Canadians that we're not interested in their voice come election time because they're not settled enough to have an ID with the right address on it.

There's a piece around using electricity bills and hydro bills and such, which also has some discriminatory effects, particularly against women. If they're in a relationship where their name is not on the bill, which has been a historical practice in this country and others, and people tell them to just bring in a bill, sometimes that doesn't satisfy either.

Why not use something that the federal government prepares and sends to every elector, something that electors can walk in with?

The Chair:

Just for the record, you can't vote with just the voting card. You need another piece of ID.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right.

The Chair:

Mrs. Kusie, go ahead.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I wanted to add to Mr. Cullen's comments. I believe that in many cases there is no intent of fraud, but the reality is that new residents are receiving these cards allowing them to believe that they have the privilege to vote in the election, when in fact they do not. Regardless of whether or not there is fraudulent intention, these individuals are receiving these cards that give them what I think is the fair understanding that they have the right to vote, which is not the case. However, in signing them up on the voter registry, we are presenting them with the opportunity to do that.

While I don't necessarily believe that it is with fraudulent intentions, I do believe that it is happening nonetheless, as a result of these cards being distributed by Elections Canada, with the unintended consequence of these new Canadians, new residents to Canada, completing them and submitting them with the opportunity to vote as a result.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham is next, then Mr. Bittle.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

As I mentioned yesterday, the only piece of federal ID that doesn't cost anything and has your address on it is the VIC. It's the only one that exists. The only thing you get for free provincially is the health card. The only things every Canadian has for free is the VIC and the health card, which meet the requirements to vote.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle, go ahead.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

It's disappointing to see the Conservatives come back to the same argument from yesterday: “A journalist told us this”, the journalist being Candice Malcolm. Mr. Graham completely debunked that yesterday by reading the Elections Canada piece—that it's not supported and it comes from a place of fear. It's unfortunate to see this dog whistle politics play out through our democracy in an attempt to disenfranchise some of the most vulnerable people in Canada. It's just unfortunate and we can't support it.

(1010)

The Chair:

Mrs. Kusie, go ahead.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I think the journalist who was mentioned wrote the article because she was contacted by not one but several members of Parliament who had received inquiries from concerned new Canadians in regard to having received these cards. This is not a journalist coming up with a story of her own accord. It was the result of her having received information from new residents to Canada about information they had received incorrectly and inappropriately from the Government of Canada. These are the straight facts. These people, who should not be on the voters list, received these cards in an attempt to get them to sign up on the voters list. That's just information that was provided to the journalist. It could have been any journalist. It was that journalist, but these actions did occur.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion? Are we ready for the vote on CPC-29?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: On CPC-30, I have two comments. One is that it also applies to CPC-33, which is on page 57, if you're looking for it. The other is that if this happens to pass, CPC-31 cannot be moved, as they amend the same line.

I'll go to Stephanie in a minute.

It seems to eliminate the declaration vouching option, and I think there are a number of amendments related to this. As per the last discussion we just had, if we can fight this out now, when all the other ones come up, we can come to whatever conclusion we come out with on this one.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

These are excellent instructions to the jury, Chair.

The Chair:

Mrs. Kusie, do you want to introduce this amendment?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure. Essentially, this amendment is reverting to the status quo of no vouching, but with the attestation as to residence, as seen under the Fair Elections Act.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Mr. Cullen, go ahead.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We had scenarios in the last election like the one in my constituency where an elector was coming in to a polling station with their aunt conducting their ID—not having ID and not being able to vote. Their cousin was the one who brought them in to the polling station. Clearly their identity was secure, but nobody could vouch for them.

This applies in many communities, but where I live it particularly hits first nations Canadians, some of the more rural and remote places, and some of the folks who are lower-income. They literally know everybody in the polling station and are related to half of them, and they can't vote.

With the relatively recent history of enfranchisement for indigenous Canadians, the shame of going into a polling station and being rejected is almost a guarantee that the person will never come back again, especially for older indigenous Canadians who maybe in their own lifetime—certainly in their parents' lifetimes—achieved the right to vote in the first place.

This was fought for three years here by a predecessor of mine from Skeena, actually, if we go back to our parliamentary history. Frank Howard filibustered for three years, every Friday, attempting to coerce the government into allowing voting for all Canadians. My point is that this was not easily achieved. Anything that would send a signal to push it back, when clearly nobody is fraudulently casting a vote....

In rural Canada, it's just nonsensical to tell people from your family, people you've known for decades, “I know you but you cannot vote” and send them back out the door. It's humiliating.

The Chair:

We're ready for the vote.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: That also applies to CPC-33 on page 57.

Now we can go on to CPC-31. It seems to be a reduced version of the previous one.

(1015)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, this is like the consolation prize. It's allowing a vouching of identity, established with one piece of ID. I'm not really feeling the will for it around the room, but I don't think I need to say any more, Chair. We can probably go to the vote.

The Chair:

We are ready to vote.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Larry, you should make them show an ID for the vote.

The Chair:

We now have NDP-8. Just so you know, NDP-8 also applies to NDP-9 on page 67, NDP-11 on page 78, NDP-16 on page 114, and NDP-26 on page 352. It's to replace “electors for the same polling division” with “electors for the same electoral district”.

Mr. Cullen, go ahead.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We just think this is common sense. We just talked about vouching. We have circumstances in which the rules, if I'm understanding them right.... Our witnesses can correct me if I'm wrong. They have to be from within that same boundary; if they're not, they can't vouch. They can still be voters. They can still be verified. Why not allow them to vouch, especially if—again, not in our constituencies, Chair, but in ones that are much closer together—they can be friends who live in the neighbourhood, or one neighbourhood over? They're obviously citizens and can be verified as voters, so why not allow them to vouch for somebody who has come in?

It just seems like a strange discretion for us to say that you have to be within that very specific neighbourhood, when it can be one neighbourhood over, just as qualified. Oftentimes, again, with low-income folks, if they have a nursing aide or a careworker who is going to be doing the vouching for them, the chances of their living in the same part of Montreal, in the exact same district, are low to zero. If they're qualified to vouch, why not allow them to vouch for the person? If we believe in it as a principle, why not extend it?

The Chair:

From what I remember, there are actually polling divisions where the street is divided down the middle.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You could have neighbours across the street from each other.

The Chair:

They can't vouch because they're not in the same polling division.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

They cannot vouch because they're in the wrong one.

As I read it again—and officials can correct me if I'm wrong—I think it's just a bit too arbitrary for us. If you believe in the principle, then it should be extended.

The Chair:

Ruby, go ahead.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I believe in the principle you're trying to get at, but I guess, logistically speaking, each polling division only has a list of electors for that polling division. In terms of still having veracity in the system, how would you verify who the voucher is if they're not on the list of electors already? I just feel like it's maybe a little too loose.

The Chair:

Can we get any comments from the witnesses?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It is right that the voucher needs to be from the same polling division. Bill C-76 in that regard would reinstate the situation that was prior to Bill C-23.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The specific question is about the ability to verify the person coming in and vouching.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The list of electors will now be prepared for the polling station, which could include more than one polling division.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right. That's the scenario we've just described. We come in. We have 10 stations established within one polling place. Somebody lives across the street where they can be verified because they're in the same room. They're on the list one over. But we say that you can't vouch for this person because they're at polling box one and you're at polling box three. You can't vouch.

Again, I don't imagine this happening an enormous amount, but still, the act of somebody wanting to be able to validate somebody on the list seems like a reasonable one. If they can be verified, which I understand they can, then what's the difference being across the street from somebody?

(1020)

The Chair:

Ms. May, go ahead.

Ms. Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, GP):

I appreciate, Mr. Chair, the chance to speak to support Nathan's amendment.

The reality is that people in real life don't necessarily know that they're living in the same district or have the same MP. They're voting in the same election but they're not necessarily in the same polling area. Certainly, Elections Canada officials have access to the database. They may not have a printed list in front of them of every elector in every poll, but they have access electronically to a voters list, and they can verify very quickly. I really hope we'll consider this amendment, and I hope the Liberals will vote for it.

This whole notion of carefully scrutinizing voters is new. It wasn't until 2007, I believe, that the Elections Act was changed to require a photo ID. This is a solution that's worse than the non-problem it addresses.

The problem in Canada has never been that people vote more than once; the problem in Canada is that people vote less than once. We need to do everything possible so that when someone comes to a polling station with the intent of vouching, and they have their ID and they live nearby but might not be in the same polling station, they're not turned away.

Thank you.

The Chair:

I just want to confirm with the witnesses. You suggested that every polling station in the country has access to a list of all the electors in that electoral district.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No, not in the electoral district, but for the polling stations.... As we were saying earlier, the election officers at the polling station will have the list of all polling divisions that come under that station, but they wouldn't have ready access to the list of all the electoral districts.

The Chair:

I would imagine that there are polling places in rural Canada that do not have Internet connections.

Stephanie, go ahead.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I want to bring up our alternative solution, as outlined in CPC-32, which we feel would more appropriately address this. It would be for care home electors and residences....

A voice: It's later.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie: I know it's later on, but I'm saying.... It's not a different topic, because it's an alternative to the vouching.

The Chair:

There are four different amendments related to seniors homes that we'll be discussing, which is a very narrow, specific case. It's a good topic, for sure.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I'll leave it for now.

The Chair:

Mr. Genuis is next, and then Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Garnett Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan, CPC):

Mr. Chair, this may be outside of the scope, but I wanted to follow up on a comment Ms. May made, because it may relate to other amendments. She was saying that the problem has never been about people voting more than once. I don't know that it is a problem, but just for the sake of argument, how would we be able to say definitively that it isn't a problem?

The Chair:

Okay. Let's not get off on too much of a tangent here.

We'll go to Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We've asked that question many times: Is voter fraud, people voting multiple times, a problem? We've asked that at the federal and provincial levels, and the evidence has come back overwhelmingly that voter fraud is not a problem in Canada. They do an audit at the end of every election.

That's why the fears around some of the changes that are being proposed in this bill are unwarranted, I would argue. There just isn't broad-scale multiple voting or fraudulent voting going on in Canada. That's one of the things that Elections Canada has to audit about the election: Are people voting in a valid way?

Again, let's come back to our witnesses. Somebody walks in.... I think we have to say that within an electoral district where there are multiple polling stations in a gym, the ability to verify that somebody who is also from that voting district is a qualified voter, to vouch for somebody at a different table, absolutely exists. I think it would be incorrect to say that they can't verify that the person who is also voting in that district is that person. Therefore, once they're verified, they can vouch for the next person over. That's a scenario that exists. Your second scenario, where they're spread apart.... I believe Elections Canada does have Internet as a requirement.

I guess it's about your orientation. Are we trying to help this person vote, or are we setting up a barrier, as Ruby talked about earlier? Folks coming forward without an ID who have secured somebody who is going to come with them and vouch have made an effort. I think we need to have a compensatory effort on our side to say that unless we fear that this is going to be abused or be a problem, or that people are going to cheat on elections somehow, we should be open to something that still requires verification of the voter before they can vouch for somebody else. If that means the returning officer has to make a phone call one district over or down the road, they're still in the same voting district. I just don't see that as a huge mountain to climb.

Let's say I have somebody in front of me. She says she's valid, her name is Ruby—not Dhalla—

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen: —and she would like to vouch for David. With a small confirmation, that can happen. Now we have somebody who's had an experience where we've tried to help them vote, as opposed to saying that because of this technicality the person they brought with them.... People don't know this. As Elizabeth says, people don't know which proper polling station they're at. They just have their card and they go in and try. This just seems to be about the orientation of our effort. We've been trying, within reason, to be oriented toward helping people vote, as opposed to finding reasons for them not to vote.

Again, this does not apply to a great number of Canadians. If they've made that effort, I think we should meet them halfway. That's what this amendment tries to do.

(1025)

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle, go ahead.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you.

I'd like to thank Mr. Cullen for the amendment. My opposition isn't a philosophical one. It becomes a practical one in terms of the actual lists that are there. Perhaps this is something that needs to be revisited when the digital poll books come into effect in the election after next.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Again, I'm talking practically. If somebody comes into the polling station and says, “This is my voucher, but they're not at this box”, the practical heavy lifting is the returning officer saying, “I'm going to need to validate this. Where do you vote?” They tell you where and you phone over, or walk over if you're in a gym with a bunch of boxes, and you validate the person on the list. I hear you that it would get easier, but it's not anywhere close to cumbersome right now.

Again, we just have to imagine the scenario where someone has brought their care provider or social worker or whomever, somebody who can vouch for them and knows them, and we say, “We understand you're trying to vote. We understand you're tying to exercise your right. But we deem it to be just a little too cumbersome, so please leave.” They're not coming back, guys. You know that, right, after they go through that experience? They have their social worker with them. They say, “Hey, I'd like to vote in this election. I have an opinion.” They go through the thing. They wait in line. We say, “Yes, you're probably you. That person beside you is probably a voter. But we're not going to bother verifying them. Please exit the polling station.” There's no chance those folks are coming back.

We set people off on a pattern here, and then we ask why people don't vote. Well, it's because sometimes we tell them not to—for what are, I would argue, more technical reasons than philosophical ones, as Chris said.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

In order to comply, can it be changed here? We just heard that at the electoral division they do have the whole list. Instead of “electoral district”, the “polling division”—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You want it at the “polling station”.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes.

That still widens it from—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Does it? I think that's the status quo, isn't it?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The smallest geographical area in the electoral law is the polling division. Then, under Bill C-76, several polling divisions will be regrouped into one single polling station. Above that, geographically, we have the advance polling district, and above that there is the electoral district as a whole.

This motion, NDP-8, proposes to extend it to the largest electoral geographical unit, which is the electoral district.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Your suggested amendment, Ruby, is to take it to—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's the polling station.

That's what you would be able to comply with, at this point. Is that correct?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The list of electors will be available for the polling station, yes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Right.

That still makes it larger than what we have had. It makes it a little bit better.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Well, half a sandwich is always better than no sandwich at all.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen: Can that amendment be made on the fly, Chair, through you to our clerks?

The Chair:

So instead of “the same electoral district”, it would say “the same polling station”.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is that the accurate term, “polling station”?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It is.

Mr. Nathan Cullen: It's one iteration up.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes, it's something.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's something. I appreciate it.

We'll have to amend that.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The change would be “polling station”.

The Chair:

Right. We're changing the words “electoral district” to “polling station”.

This just allows someone to vouch for someone who can vote at the same station, and it can be from different divisions that are located at that station.

Mrs. Kusie, go ahead.

(1030)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Would a station ever have more than one riding in it? No? Okay.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Because this one applies to five other ones, Philippe is looking up the ramifications.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Could we stand down for five minutes?

The Chair:

Okay, we'll have a five-minute break.

We'll suspend.



(1040)

[Translation]

The Chair:

We're ready to resume the meeting.[English]

We'll go back to NDP-8 and the proposed amendment. It does have some ramifications, but I won't bother going through them all, because they're fairly administrative until we decide what's happening on this one.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Do you want me to get into Liberal-13 or just stick with NDP-8 for now?

The Chair:

Just stay with NDP-8. You can mention Liberal-13 as a background.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay. As I just mentioned to colleagues across the table, as we sort of cast ahead, Maria on my team pointed out that, when we get down to vouching in the case of a nurse or a nurse's aide, in the situation where we have electors in a long-term care facility, Liberal-13 does not require them to be in the same electoral district; they can be in an adjacent electoral district. We just have to figure out the consistencies within the law. If Liberal-13 is going to be supported and passed, which I imagine it is, that sets a practice here where we have somebody vouching outside of the electoral district. We have to be careful that there is consistency. The concern is that the voucher be an actual voter.

How would Elections Canada handle that to verify that the person—in this case the nurse or nurse's aide or whatever—is an elector, even if they're not in the same electoral district? I don't want to get into LIB-13, but I just want this to be consistent, or at least somewhat consistent, across the board.

(1045)

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Can we have it when we get to LIB-13 maybe?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Well, you see how they're connected. I appreciate the amendment on this to get something, some progress, in terms of vouching without the constraints that exist right now. I just anticipate that the arguments need to be consistent. They don't need to be, but they ought to be. It's nice when they are.

A voice: Nathan, where do you think we are?

Mr. Nathan Cullen: I don't know where we are. Sorry, I lost my—

The Chair:

So, Mr. Cullen, we're talking about your amending this to “polling station” from “electoral district”.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes. Again, LIB-13 is even broader than my original one, and we've shrunk my amendment to a smaller geographical destination. If we're going to go to Liberal-13, we're expanding it to an adjacent electoral district, not even just within the one zone.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle, go ahead.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

In terms of Liberal-13, we're dealing with a small category of individuals who have to be identified somehow. There will have to be a letter from management or identification of that individual, and they are working within that polling division. They are working within that group known to those particular individuals, and we know....

I do hear you, and again, when the digital poll books come into effect, I would like to see a broader scope in terms of vouching, but I believe the amendment brings us to a better place than we were before.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Isn't that a procedural question then, Chair? We don't have Elections Canada with us yet, I assume. We've just made the invitation.

Then I guess I'll ask our witnesses now, just in terms of the practicality. We've asked about the practicality of NDP-8. Someone walks in, as my original one said, and they're in the same electoral district. What happens? What would Elections Canada have to do? Would they have to phone over to another polling station? That's what I'm hearing so far.

Is that right, Mr. Morin?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

If NDP-8 were to be passed as is, before the amendment, the election officers at the polling station would more than likely have to call the returning officer's office each time to confirm that the elector is on the list in the electoral district.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

And under Mr. Bittle's description, I'm not sure.... I hear your scenario about a letter or something, but I assume Elections Canada would have to do the same thing. If they're not in the same electoral district, somebody says, “I want to vouch for all these people” and they say, “You're not on our voters list.”

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

That's more than likely. However, the other amendment we're talking about, LIB-13, is for a very precise category of electors—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That I understand.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

—so the magnitude of the change is not very....

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's not about scale for me; it's about principle. If we say the principle is okay here but not there, and if the question is logistics but not the principle of it, then I kind of wish we had done up a clause on Bill C-76—not a sunset clause but a revisit clause—to say, go this far, and then expand it once we have the digital polling books. That's the future scenario we're imagining—that we get to the digital polling books. Is that correct? If somebody walks in from the same electoral district but not that polling station, it's simply a matter of typing into the laptop to find and confirm that the person is who they say they are. Is that right?

(1050)

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I don't have any information on that. It would be—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Let's write to Elections Canada, then.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Absolutely.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Gosh, I wish they were here. They'll get here.

The Chair:

Nathan, in practice there actually is a sunset clause, because for every election, the Chief Electoral Officer makes a report to this committee.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Oh, good.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen, I just want to confirm that we're discussing the amendment and we have changed the words “electoral district” to “polling station”.

Mr. Graham, go ahead.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's the polling location, yes.

The one point I want to make about LIB-13 is that those instances are generally covered by the itinerant polls, which is a whole other kettle of fish. The itinerant polls go around to.... They're the mobile polls. I just want to put it out there that it's a very different beast to work with itinerant polls versus the regular ones.

The Chair:

We are voting on Ms. Sahota's subamendment to Mr. Cullen's amendment, which changes the words “electoral district” to “polling station”.

(Subamendment agreed to)

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: I'll tell you the ramifications of that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Are you going to tell us now?

The Chair:

Now I'm going to tell you.

It's easy to change NDP-9 and NDP-11, so when we get to those, they'll be considered passed, but with that change in those as well. NDP-16 and NDP-26, though, talk about a person living in an electoral district. You can't live in a polling station, so we will—

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair: I know we have a housing shortage, but.... So we're going to put those back in for discussion when we get to them, because they're not dealt with consequentially.

We're going on to PV-4.

There are four amendments or four suggestions—from virtually all the parties, if not more than all the parties—about enfranchising seniors in homes. That's great. It's just a question of which ones we choose.

I know discussions have been had, but what did you discuss?

Ms. Elizabeth May:

My amendment, as you said, Chair, is directly related to some of the concerns raised by our former Chief Electoral Officer, Marc Mayrand, that in seniors homes we might have a problem—and in fact we have had a problem—with staff who were not electors in that district vouching. Everybody wants to fix it.

I'm very fond of my amendment, but having discussed this with Bernadette, it seems to me that LIB-9, which comes up next, is close enough to mine that the simplest procedural thing for me to do is to withdraw my amendment. However, I'm not allowed to withdraw my amendment, because I'm not allowed to move my amendment because of the motion you all passed, which is why I'm here, but I still don't like it. That motion means that my amendment is deemed to have been tabled and deemed to have been moved.

I would like to request, on the advice of the clerk, that by unanimous consent my amendment be withdrawn.

The Chair:

Do we have unanimous consent to withdraw? Okay.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

There we go.

The Chair:

It's withdrawn. Thank you very much to everyone for working together on this.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Go team.

The Chair:

Now we'll go to LIB-9, which has roughly the same objective, but it also applies to LIB-11 on page 61, LIB-13 on page 70, LIB-15 on page 79, LIB-19 on page 113, and LIB-63 on page 353.

(1055)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's all?

The Chair:

Does someone want to present LIB-9?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This is like what we discussed under LIB-13 just a second ago. This is pretty consequential. It's allowing multiple vouching for people in retirement homes or long-term care facilities.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Stephanie, go ahead.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Now I would bring up that we have CPC-32 following as well, which we believe is a more effective solution to this, where the care home electors' residence—and they also do not live in polling stations, Mr. Cullen—is to be established by a list prepared by the home's administrator. That eliminates the need for the vouching, as the home provides the list of the residents.

We present that as a more bona fide alternative to the vouching system.

The Chair:

To be flexible, I think it's okay if we discuss these two amendments together. Does anyone have comments on either one, how it would work or which would work best?

I don't know if the witnesses have any comments related to the ways of enfranchising seniors. You're welcome to comment. There are two different ways here.

Mr. Cullen, go ahead.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's vouching by another form, putting the vouching in the hands of the home care officials or administration. However, home care facilities will have a mix of residents, citizens and non-citizens, and I don't know how that's better than having the vouching process that is described in LIB-9, LIB-13 and some others.

If I had to pick between the two, putting it on the administration to provide the list and verify that the list is of only eligible voters, which is how I understand it.... I don't know if that's any better. In fact, it might be worse.

The Chair:

Is there other input?

Please keep talking while Philippe talks to the witnesses. Someone say something.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Normally, in a room full of politicians this wouldn't be a problem, Chair.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater's going to speak, I'm sure, and Garnett has all his binders with him.

Mr. Nater, go ahead.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Chair.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

He's always willing to serve.

Mr. John Nater:

To clarify the amendment the Conservatives are putting forward, this is simply a list confirming residence. There is no such list of citizenship that anyone would have access to in those types of facilities or elsewhere. Passing CPC-32 would provide an alternative for that proof of identification. Those within the home, who often won't have a driver's licence, won't have that type of identification.

One of the things that count as proof of residence is a pill bottle, a prescription. It's an acceptable form of ID. I just say that tangentially. I find that interesting, and a lot of seniors will have that.

The main point I want to make is that this is a proof of residence for those in the home. It's not a proof of citizenship. That simply doesn't exist in those contexts.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm wondering if these work together or if all it does is provide a list of people in a long-term care facility. I'm trying to see if it does more than that.

The Chair:

Maybe we'll get Mr. Morin to come in.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

If it does just that, then in conjunction with LIB-9, why wouldn't that all...? It's just more information.

(1100)

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Actually, the act already authorizes the Chief Electoral Officer to authorize pieces of ID that can be used at the polling stations. The Chief Electoral Officer has already authorized a letter issued by the management of such institutions to be recognized as a piece of identity.

However, my understanding is that the management or many directors of these organizations do not have time to issue these letters, so in fact the residents find themselves without the proof of address anyway.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Again, my question was that if CPC-32 passes, which asks for the administration to make a list of residents, as John has said, that's not a validation of their citizenship. In combination with LIB-9, is there any reason they don't work together? That is my question. One provides a list, but the other one is about vouching and the ability of a care provider in a facility to vouch for someone. Would a list of residents be any kind of a problem for that?

Mr. John Nater:

On that point, Chair, about a letter from a long-term care administrator, I've been on a board for long-term care before, so I know how busy they are. Making individual letters can be problematic. This is just simply hitting “Print” on the list of residents and you're done. It's not going to be an onerous process of writing letters for 84 or 112 or however many residents there are; it's just hitting “Print” on a list of residents and providing that to Elections Canada as proof of residence. I think it's common sense.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

But—

The Chair:

Mr. Graham—okay, Ms. Sahota, ask your question.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

This list wouldn't verify, and doesn't have to verify, that they're eligible voters. You just want a list of who lives there.

Mr. John Nater:

It provides confirmation of residence. A long-term care home is not going to have proof of citizenship. That's not their role, and there is no such list of citizenship that's provided to those types of facilities. It's simply providing that confirmation of residency to vote. We're looking for alternatives for proving residency for seniors. A list from a long-term care home is a pretty easy one to do, especially within a polling division where the poll is there at that location.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'm just trying to clarify the result of this proposal. Let's say that for some reason they did not do that and did not have time to even hit “Print” and make that list, and it's election day and the polling staff are there. Would the people who did not make it onto that list then still be able to vote because the nursing home didn't hit “Print” and didn't follow that obligation? Would it be a requirement in order to vote to have that list, or would it just be an additional bonus and they would still be able to vote, with LIB-9?

Mr. John Nater:

Yes, as long as they qualified to vote, they can vote. It's not as though the only way they could vote is by hitting “Print”. This is just one more option, one more way to allow proof of residency.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Perfect.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Morin, is there anything that pre-empts or prevents the letter from an institution to include all the names in a single letter?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No, I don't think so. I think it would be allowed, and the Chief Electoral Officer can already authorize that type of identification under subsection 143(2.1) of the act.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

CPC-32 does not compel the creation of this list; it only says that you can, which is a power that they already have. Would it be fair to say that CPC-32 does not actually do anything?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Well, I'll let you come to your own conclusions, but the Chief Electoral Officer already has the authority to authorize such a form of identification.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Genuis is next.

Mr. Garnett Genuis:

I think the CPC amendment is more clear in terms of a process that would happen in providing a list. It doesn't require the extra.... It's more specific.

I was going to comment on an earlier point. The way I understand this would function—and John can clarify for me if I'm misunderstanding it—is it effectively provides another option in terms of ID. For the vast majority of people, in addition to a prescription or some other form of ID, this provides another way of proving residency in addition to the vast number of other ways that are available.

(1105)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Such as the VIC?

Mr. Garnett Genuis:

You've had that debate already.

The Chair:

Mr. Morin, you said some of the institutions didn't have time to push the button and print out the list of their residents. However, that would take less time than going around vouching for each person, wouldn't it?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I'm just saying that while institutions have the power to issue such a letter right now, many do so and it facilitates their residents in voting, but some argue that they don't have time for that.

The Chair:

Okay. Is there any further discussion?

Let's go to the vote on amendment LIB-9, which also applies to LIB-11, LIB-13, LIB-15, LIB-19 and LIB-63.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: That is passed, with a lot of consequential amendments.

We've discussed at length amendment CPC-32. Is there any further discussion?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

No, we'll withdraw it.

The Chair:

Are you going to withdraw it because it can already be done by the Chief Electoral Officer?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes.

The Chair:

We don't need unanimous support to withdraw it because she hasn't moved it yet. You're just not going to move it.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

No.

The Chair:

Okay. That makes things easy.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's what we're here to do.

The Chair:

Yes, for the last two years.

(Clause 93 as amended agreed to on division)

The Chair: On clause 94, CPC-33 was defeated because of CPC-30.

(Clause 94 agreed to on division)

(Clauses 95 and 96 agreed to)

(On clause 97)

The Chair: Amendment CPC-34 adds that an election officer has the mandate to make sure that he adds the polling division on the ballot for the reason I explained earlier today to the Bloc. Now that all the polling divisions are mixed together, you still want to be able to tell the political parties who voted in what polling division. It's on the ballot now. There's a spot for it. This just adds the administrative thing that was missed, so that the election officer should make sure he fills that out on the ballot.

Stephanie, do you want to present this amendment?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes. You're correct that it requires the election officer to write an elector's polling division in the space provided on the back of the ballot.

We believe it was just an oversight in the original draft. We believe that LIB-10 is in the same spirit as CPC-34. This is just a piece of information that is necessary on the ballot. As I said, we think it was an oversight, and this addresses that oversight. This oversight is also recognized by the government in amendment LIB-10.

The Chair:

Okay. Is there any further discussion?

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: The vote on amendment LIB-10 also applies to LIB-22, which is on page 127. Does someone want to introduce LIB-10?

There's a bit of overlap with CPC-34. Is it the same? Okay, so you're not going to move it, then.

(1110)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I would withdraw it. It should be ruled out.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Think of how many words you saved us.

The Chair:

Philippe, does that mean that LIB-22...?

Mr. Philippe Méla (Legislative Clerk):

No, it can be separate.

The Chair:

We'll deal with that separately when we get to it. It's not consequential anymore.

(Clause 97 as amended agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(On clause 98)

The Chair: There's a CPC amendment suggesting that when the person is bringing the ballot back in the polling station, they bring it back to.... It just says “election officer” right now. The CPC amendment is suggesting they bring it back “to the election officer who provided it.”

I'm wondering, if that election officer had gone off shift or something, who they would bring the ballot back to under the CPC amendment.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This is a language issue, not a substantive issue.

The Chair:

Oh, right. It's matching it with the French. This is just a matching of the English and the French type of amendment.

Go ahead, Stephanie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Again, this is just another safeguard within the new system to ensure that the vote itself is returned to the same station at which it was issued.

You mentioned the possibility of the election officer who issued it...but we're talking about a 30-second process. We think it's a common sense safeguard to require the voter to return the ballot to the same election officer who issued it.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion on CPC-35?

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 98 as amended agreed to) [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clauses 99 to 101 inclusive agreed to)

The Chair: We got to 100. Good progress, committee.

(On clause 102)

The Chair: This is the first of the new amendments that we're looking at today from the CPC. You're looking at the reference number at the top left-hand corner, which is 10008654.

Could that be presented?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Essentially we are maintaining the requirements for interpreters to be affirmed. I think it's important to have the legitimacy of the interpretation to ensure the integrity of the voting process.

The Chair:

The officials are welcome to comment on this too, because like the rest of us, they haven't seen this yet.

Anyone can comment. It's open for discussion.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

This is backstopped by a number of offences that are already in the act and really wouldn't particularly add anything.

The Chair:

You think it's already covered. Is that what you're saying?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Yes. It's covered in terms of the offences that already exist within the act on the secrecy of the ballot.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Where?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

It's in the offences section later on.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Could the officials comment on that?

The Chair:

Do we have any comments from the officials?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes.

To answer Mr. Bittle's question, the secrecy of the vote and all the prohibitions associated with it are found in the proposed new part 11.1 of the bill.

The Chair:

What section is that?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It's new part 11.1.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Is there any further discussion? All those in favour of CPC 10008654?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 102 agreed to on division)

(On clause 103)

The Chair: LIB-11 has passed as a result of LIB-9.

(Clause 103 as amended agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(On clause 104)

The Chair: We have another new CPC amendment, which is 10008541.

Would you like to present that, Stephanie?

(1115)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This is also CPC-36, Mr. Chair, I believe.

The Chair:

Okay. Right.

It's not a new one. It's CPC-36.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay.

Essentially, we are requiring transfer certificates to be issued by specially designated election officers when you are voting in a location that isn't your own. We believe that these transfer certificates should be issued by these specially designated election officers. Again, it's just another safeguard that we are attempting to implement in an effort to verify the legitimacy of the electorate.

The Chair:

This comes up in several amendments. Right now, any election officer can provide this transfer certificate, but these amendments are saying it has to be a “designated” election officer. I imagine the officials would say that in the new liberalized regime where there are different things, this defeats that purpose.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes and no.

I would like to correct you; sorry, Mr. Chair.

It would be untrue to say that any election officer can do something. I would refer you again to page 17 of the bill, line 34, in English.[Translation]

In French, it's on line 40.[English]

It says that returning officers have to designate election officers to perform certain duties in the act. Returning officers have to keep a registry of all the duties and functions they have assigned to each election officer.

Again, page 18 of the bill, on section 39 of the Canada Elections Act, reads: An election officer shall exercise or perform, in accordance with the Chief Electoral Officer's instructions, any power or duty assigned to him or her by a returning officer.

The act already provides for that.

The Chair:

Does the act allow the chief returning officer to designate someone?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The act doesn't allow; the act requires a returning officer to designate specific functions to election officers, so no election officer can do anything without being specifically required by the returning officer to do it.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's not—

The Chair:

Okay. Are people ready to vote?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We'll now move to LIB-12. This amendment suggests that if a person gets a transfer certificate because they're working at a poll different from where they vote, where they're going to vote has to be in the same electoral district for them to get that transfer certificate.

Does a Liberal want to present this amendment?

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It cleans up the consistency issue. Other parts of the act do specify that it's in the district. It's always been done implicitly, but this fixes the long-standing error.

The Chair:

Do the election officials have any comments?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I think I would say that this is only an oversight, because prior to Bill C-76 the election officers were required to reside in the electoral district, so of course if they were assigned to a polling station, it would be in the same electoral district. Now that we're allowing them to work in another electoral district—

(1120)

The Chair:

Adjacent.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No, any electoral district.

Of course, electors can only vote in the electoral district in which they ordinarily reside, so this is a consequential amendment to that.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

All in favour of this amendment?

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Thank you.

Shall clause 104, as amended, carry?

(Clause 104 as amended agreed to)

(On clause 105)

The Chair: We're at clause 105.

Again, we're back to designating. Do you want to present it?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

No. I don't think there's any necessity for further discussion on it. We'll move it and vote.

The Chair:

All in favour of CPC-37, please signify. All those opposed?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 105 agreed to on division)

(Clause 106 agreed to)

(On clause 107)

The Chair: We have CPC-38. This is another one about removing the vouching system, so we could just go to a vote.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure.

The Chair:

This applies to CPC-40, which is on page 71. It's related by concept of identification.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: It's defeated, as is CPC-40. We will go on to CPC-39.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Again, I will just move it and go to the question.

The Chair:

This is back to more identification.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: NDP-9 was consequential to NDP-8, so that has been dealt with.

On NPD-10, this is the fourth one related to seniors homes. Are you going to present this, Mr. Cullen?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I will rely on the advice of our analyst, through you, Chair. Remind me about the Liberal amendment on care providers, because I think they were permitted to be in a different electoral district, as we discussed. Was it the same, or was it adjacent? I ask because you just used that language about adjacency. Can someone remind me if the Liberal care provider had to be in an adjacent electoral district, or was it any district?

I believe NDP-10 allows for any electoral district. I'm trying to remember back to Liberal....

The Chair:

Yes, it's an adjacent district.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It's the same or adjacent.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

One could easily imagine a situation in which the care provider is two districts over, certainly in a city environment. It's a distinction without a difference, as we say. If we're okay with this in general, if we're okay that the care provider under a previous Liberal amendment can provide that vouching, but only under the adjacent riding, I don't get why the principle wouldn't also apply if they were one district over.

I'm imagining a Mississauga or a Brampton, or certainly the downtown area. The person may or may not live in the next electoral district over. They may live two or three over, but they are still the care provider. They still have a letter from the facility.

Why is adjacency important? That's my question. Is it relevant to their ability to vouch for the people they are caring for to cast a vote in the election? I don't see how it matters.

Maybe the officials can tell us. Elections Canada are still going to have to call or whatever they do to confirm the care provider's identity, whether they call one district over or two. Is adjacency important for a reason?

(1125)

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I would like to cite the Black's Law Dictionary definition of “adjacent”—“Lying near or close to” but not necessarily touching, versus the definition of “adjoining”, which is “touching” or sharing common boundaries.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

That's the legal dictionary.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's nonsensical, then, is what you're saying. Okay, good.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Well, it makes sense to a segment of people.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's a very special segment of people we call lawyers.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

My mom agrees with that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm glad she does.

Just to be clear on this, the legal interpretation that Elections Canada would take is that the districts would not have to necessarily be one beside the other.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I cannot predict which interpretation Elections Canada will take.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Well, we're going to need you to.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

All I'm saying is that “adjacent” doesn't necessarily mean “adjoining”. The boundaries don't necessarily need to touch. It could be another electoral district that is close by.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I know that we're not talking about a lot of circumstances, but again I just want to avoid somebody setting it up in the nursing home where they're going to validate and vouch for everybody, and then we find out that Elections Canada is going to interpret adjacency the way that I just did, as touching, and then say, “Wait, your care provider is two districts over.”

The Chair:

Where is that definition? Is it in the Canada Elections Act?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No, it's in the Black's Law Dictionary.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That is a highly suspicious text.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary and Le Petit Robert, in French, also define adjacent as near or....

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

But not necessarily touching. I'll let it go, then. If we have the Canadian Oxford Dictionary onside, then I'm fine. This whole Black's Law Dictionary thing....

The Chair:

I think the simplest thing is if you don't propose your amendment.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I think we've covered it off, and every dictionary known to humankind is confirming this interpretation. That's the point of our amendment.

The Chair:

Then this amendment is not being proposed.

LIB-13 was consequential to LIB-9.

Shall clause 107 carry as amended?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Sorry, but have we moved LIB-13 yet?

The Chair:

It was consequential.

(Clause 107 as amended agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We had CPC-40, but it was consequential and was defeated with CPC-38.

(Clause 108 agreed to on division [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: There are no amendments in clauses 109 to 114. There was a new clause 114.1 by LIB-14, but it was withdrawn because LIB-1 passed.

(Clauses 109 to 114 inclusive agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(On clause 115)

The Chair: We have CPC-41. How I read this is that it says that when there are extra advance polls in rural ridings, there can't be more than one in one place on the same day. I'm wondering who cares, but....

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Did you just say “who cares”? Strike that from the record. I care.

The Chair:

If there are more than one on the same day?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, I care deeply. I don't know why. I'll find a reason while we're talking.

The Chair:

I was just wondering with regard to the officials.... Is it not covered in the lines in the original that say, “be at given ones of those premises on different days of advance polling”? Does that deal with the spirit of this amendment?

I'm just wondering if that was already covered, because I was reading from the original, and it says, “be at given ones of those premises on different days of advance polling”.

While you're looking it up, maybe Stephanie can explain why you don't want two different advance polls on the same day in a rural riding.

(1130)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

We think it provides clarity for the voters if it is in the one location for the one day.

I remember as a young child trying to follow the library bus around, and I would hate to see that same confusion extended to our voters.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I am confused.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

In thinking of our rural ridings, I don't know why multiple advance polls would be problematic.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

No, one location.... It's one location per day per poll, not multiple.

Mr. John Nater:

Could I maybe just clarify?

The Chair:

Sure.

Mr. John Nater:

This is trying to prevent a mobile poll from showing up from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. and then picking up at 3 p.m. and going to 5 p.m. onwards for the rest of the day. This is clarifying that it's one location for that. It's not moving around throughout that day.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You're saying that this one itinerant poll, the one mobile station, has to not be mobile all day?

Mr. John Nater:

That's right. On multiple days it can be in different locations, but for a given day it's not picking up midway and going on to....

An hon. member: Correct.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I guess I can kind of hear that. I just don't know if we want to get into that detail on the management of the Election Act. Maybe it's been a problem that's been identified by you folks, but I haven't seen it.

The Chair:

Would your amendment.... In my riding, we have towns that are four hours or 300 miles apart. Would this prevent them from having their advance poll on the same day? As you know, Dawson City and Watson Lake are 300 miles and a 10-hour drive apart.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No. They're saying that the same mobile polling station, if I understand it, would be in Watson Lake from 9 a.m. until 12 p.m. and then would pick up shop and be in Carcross from 2 p.m. until 5 p.m.

The Chair:

You could still have two separate locations for advance polls.

An hon. member: Yes.

The Chair: Okay.

Mr. Graham is next, and then Ms. Dhalla.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair: Oh no, I'm sorry—Ms. Sahota.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't see any reason for this amendment at all—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Now I'm starting to think that something is stirring....

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, go ahead.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't see why we need this. In my riding at least, in my experience the itinerant polls can go to a location and everybody who wants to go there is taken care of in 30 minutes. There's no point in sticking around for the whole day. That exact same crew can go to the next town 20 kilometres or 30 kilometres away and do that one too.

I don't know why you would want to adopt this.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Ruby.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I just want to say that I have faith that Elections Canada would like to facilitate this and provide enough time for any given area to vote. In passing this amendment, I wouldn't want to limit their ability and their accessibility to get to other voters so that they can vote, essentially. That's the whole purpose. I want to leave it in their hands to make sure that as many people can vote as possible as they see fit.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, I can imagine some of the smaller communities having a nine-to-12 slot and then the next village down the road going from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and people.... I'd rather leave it to Elections Canada. Again, I haven't seen this as a problem.

The Chair:

We can probably have one last intervention from Stephanie, and then we'll vote.

Did you have anything more you wanted to add?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This is a new system, as I understand it, that is occurring in terms of the itinerant polls. I've never heard of that word. I wonder what other instances it is used in.

Anyway, I think we just wanted to provide some structure for this system in an effort to keep it as simple as possible and perhaps have more assured success with this new system.

(1135)

The Chair:

Okay. We will vote on CPC-41.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 115 agreed to on division [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(On clause 116)

The Chair: On clause 116, we start with CPC-42. Again, it's the transfer certificate.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, CPC-42 and CPC-43 are the same. I'll move both, and we can go to the vote right away, because we've had the debates.

The Chair:

Okay. We are voting on CPC-42.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: All in favour of CPC-43?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 116 agreed to on division [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(On clause 117)

The Chair: Just before we discuss clause 117, CPC-44 is, again, removing declaration of vouching, and this vote also applies to CPC-46 on page 80, as they are related by the concept of identification. We've sort of had a discussion on vouching.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, we have. Amendments CPC-44 through 46 are kind of a repeat performance.

The Chair:

We will vote on CPC-44.

(Amendment negatived: [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: CPC-46 is also then defeated.

CPC-45 is again on declaration, so we'll just go to the vote.

(Amendment negatived: [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: NDP-11 was consequential to NDP-8. LIB-15 is consequential to LIB-9.

Shall clause 117 as amended pass?

(Clause 117 as amended agreed to on division [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(On clause 118)

The Chair: We had CPC-46, and the vote was applied to it.

(Clause 118 agreed to on division [See Minutes of Proceedings)

The Chair: We're at NDP-12, which was consequential to NDP-1, which was defeated.

(Clause 119 agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings)

(On clause 120)

The Chair: NDP-13 was consequential to NDP-1.

Then we have CPC-47. This is about having to count the votes right away at each advance polling division.

Does someone want to present this?

Mr. John Nater:

I think CPC-47 applies to providing notice of itinerant polls, the mobile polls.

Basically, it's the full notice of all mobile polls, the schedule to go with them. It's to provide that information in advance.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. John Nater:

It's so that voters will know when these mobile polls are happening and where they're happening and so on—the more information, the better.

(1140)

The Chair:

Do the officials have any comments on this amendment?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No.

The Chair:

It doesn't matter whether or not it passes?

Ms. Manon Paquet:

The only thing we could say is that the Chief Electoral Officer or returning officers are already obliged to provide the information on all advance polls, and that would include mobile polls. They have to provide information for all advance polling stations, and since the mobile polls are advance polling stations, that information would need to be provided.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

If it's redundant, Chair....

I know my electors sometimes are unaware of things that are going on, but if we require Elections Canada to let people know when the mobile polls are happening, there's no harm in that. If it's redundant, then that's okay too. We'll have to let them know twice.

The Chair:

Is there further discussion?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

If it's redundant, it's not about letting people know, but about letting the candidates know, so I don't see the advantage to having this. We trust Elections Canada, and I don't think this amendment is necessary.

The Chair:

Elections Canada is saying they have to give this information to everyone; this amendment is saying give it to the candidate. Is that what you're saying?

Go ahead, Mr. Morin.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I also wish to bring to the attention of the committee that this motion will delete subparagraph 172(a)(iv).

The Chair:

If you're eliminating those items, that will have some consequences.

What are you eliminating, Mr. Nater?

Mr. John Nater:

I don't know.

The Chair:

You don't know. Okay.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It would eliminate the notice: that the counting of the votes cast shall begin on polling day as soon after the close of the polling stations as possible, or, with the Chief Electoral Officer's prior approval, one hour before the close of the polling stations;

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I think that's an inaccurate reading. This is just simply replacing lines 5 and 6 with this. The remainder would stay, so it's not replacing the entire clause.

The Chair:

Okay, I'm not sure this—

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

You're correct. Sorry.

The Chair:

Thanks for that clarification.

We are ready to vote on CPC-47.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We're at CPC-48. It's again specific to each advance polling station. Does someone want to present this amendment?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure.

These are technical corrections to the wording. Currently the wording indicates that you would have to inform the candidate as to the change of location. This just provides that the candidate has to be informed of multiple locations—not location, but locations.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Would the officials comment?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Just because this particular amendment starts halfway through a sentence and finishes with another half-sentence, do we have some interpretation of its impact?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Again, in the context where subsection 168(8) would apply, this is the kind of mobile advance polling station that we discussed a few minutes ago. This means that the candidate would need to be informed of the locations where that specific advance polling station will be going, but again, as my colleague Manon was saying a few minutes ago, this advance polling station would still be an advance polling station. My understanding is that this location would need to be disclosed to candidates already.

(1145)

The Chair:

The location would need to be disclosed to everyone, not just candidates, right?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I think that this specific provision applies to notices sent to candidates.

The Chair:

It's to candidates. Right.

Are we ready to vote?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Oh, sorry, wait—it applies to everybody.

The Chair:

We will now vote on CPC-48.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: LIB-16 was consequential to LIB-8.

(Clause 120 as amended agreed to)

The Chair: Clause 121 had no amendments.

(Clause 121 agreed to)

(On clause 122)

The Chair: We have CPC-49. The vote on this will apply to CPC-50 on page 87, CPC-51 on page 90 and CPC-144 on page 265, as they are related by the concept of handling ballot boxes.

This part of the amendment just says sections 174 and 175 are replaced by the following, and then what follows I think is in the subsequent amendment.

Go ahead, Stephanie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Essentially we are requesting that we maintain the existing provisions for advance poll closing procedures and the daily ballot box.

In the existing procedures, the ballot box is sealed at the end of the day. Under the new provisions, the ballot box would be reopened with the new votes would be cast into it. We're just concerned that the new provisions allow for the potential of more irregularities and give less control of the ballots.

We would suggest that if we maintain the existing provisions, there would be greater safeguards. Rather than reopening and closing the box, once the box is sealed, the box is sealed.

The Chair:

Are there any comments from officials?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The amendment described by Mrs. Kusie is clear. It would maintain the status quo with regard to the handling of ballot boxes at the end of advance polling days.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Ms...Ruby.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

The pause is now there forever.

This undoes the recommendation of the Chief Electoral Officer. We took his recommendations quite sincerely and made sure they were implemented in this bill, for the most part, and this undoes one of those. He or she should be the authority on how to conduct the election.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mrs. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

We've stated our concern, and it's a legitimate concern. If you open something and keep opening and closing it, it does leave it more susceptible to inaccuracies.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

Voting on CPC-49 also applies to CPC-50, CPC-51, and CPC-144.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We have a new CPC amendment, and it's reference number 10008543.

Go ahead, Mrs. Kusie.

(1150)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you, Chair. This was rectifed under LIB-11, LIB-9, or something like that, because again it's not in regard to the requirement that the new elections officer write an elector's advance polling district number in the space provided on the back of the ballot.

A voice: Is there any discrepancy?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie: Yes, the difference here is that this would specify the advance polling number as apart from just the polling number.

The Chair:

We voted on the Liberal one that said that on the regular poll day, the election officer has to make sure he writes the polling division on the ballot, and this is suggesting the same thing on the advance poll.

Is there any further discussion?

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: CPC-50 was consequential to CPC-49.

(Clause 122 as amended agreed to on division)

The Chair: There was a new clause 122.1 in CPC-51, but it was defeated consequential to CPC-49.

We're going on to clause 123.

NDP-14 was defeated with NDP-1.

Shall clause 123 carry?

(Clause 123 agreed to on division)

The Chair: There was a new clause 123.1 in LIB-17, but it's withdrawn because LIB-1 passed.

There are no amendments to clauses 124 to 142.

Shall clauses 124 to 142 carry?

(Clauses 124 to 142 inclusive agreed to)

(On clause 143)

The Chair:

We're going on to clause 143, and we will discuss CPC-52, which again is the voter registration card, so we could probably just vote on this.

Shall CPC-52 carry?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 143 agreed to on division)

The Chair: There are no amendments to clauses 144 to 150.

Shall clauses 144 to 150 carry?

Ms. Stephanie Kusie: Clauses 144 to 148 can carry, and clause 149 can carry on division, please.

(Clauses 144 to 148 inclusive agreed to)

(Clause 149 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Shall clause 150 carry?

Ms. Stephanie Kusie: On division, please.

(1155)

The Chair:

It carries on division.

(Clause 150 agreed to on division)

(On clause 151)

The Chair: We move on to clause 151. We're getting into foreign voters. Once again, there are a number of similar amendments related to a person returning to Canada, etc. Once we discuss this, hopefully we can apply that concept, the result of what we decide.

CPC-53 adds wording that these foreign electors reside “temporarily” outside of Canada, but, as you know, in the proposal in the bill, it doesn't have to be temporarily. There's no requirement for them to come back.

We kind of know where everyone stands on this, but, Mrs. Kusie, do you want to make any comments?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure, I will.

I'm sorry; what was the clause again, please?

The Chair:

It's CPC-53, and it's just saying that the elector resides “temporarily” out of Canada.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, sorry, but what is the clause? I apologize. I'm just trying to get to the right one.

The Chair:

It's clause 151.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Clearly we, the official opposition, want to revert to the status quo, which is a five-year maximum departure from Canada and an intention to return to Canada.

Again, we're very much committed to ensuring the legitimacy of the electorate, and we're concerned that the clause as it exists does not do so, so with that, we would like to see it revert to the status quo.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Chair.

To get some clarity from the officials, do you have any indication of how many potential electors could be added to the voter rolls based on Bill C-76? How many Canadians currently living abroad could be added, based on this change?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The minister mentioned this in her opening notes yesterday, and the Chief Electoral Officer mentioned it when he appeared. There is an estimation that about one million electors could regain a right to vote under this provision.

Mr. John Nater:

Just as a follow-up, are you aware if there are other Commonwealth countries that have similar prohibitions on a requirement to return back to their country within a certain number of years? Are you aware of any other Commonwealth countries that have the requirement to return?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

There are various delays. I think that the United Kingdom has a 15-year time frame.

Mr. John Nater:

Then there is somewhere where there is a requirement to return.

Mr. Jean-François Morin: Absolutely.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 151 agreed to on division)

(On clause 152)

The Chair: We're on CPC-54, which is the same thing about residing outside of Canada and an intent to return Canada, and the vote on CPC-54 will apply to CPC-57 on page 99.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We are on CPC-55. As we discuss this, it's the same thing—returning to Canada—but this also applies to CPC-58.

(1200)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, this is the same consolation prize again. We're trying to instill other safeguards in regard to non-resident electors. This is maintaining the removal of the existing five-year requirement, but requiring the intention to return to Canada.

The Chair:

Okay, so a vote on CPC-55 applies to CPC-58, which is on page 100, and CPC-60, which is on page 102, because they are related by concept of residence in Canada.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 152 agreed to on division)

(On clause 153)

The Chair: We go on to clause 153. We will go on to CPC-56, which would require that foreign voters have proof of the elector's Canadian citizenship, which they don't have to do under the presently proposed regime.

Do you want to present this amendment?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure. If that was the consolation prize, this is the prize you get for playing.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It sounds like a participation prize.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, that's right.

Essentially, it's that the Chief Electoral Officer does not have to ask for proof of citizenship, but that it is a requirement.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

As I understand it, the Elections Act already requires you to demonstrate proof of citizenship. This would be redundant. Is that correct?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I'm sorry?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The Canada Elections Act already requires proof of citizenship, so would this add anything?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No, there is no requirement for proof of citizenship under the act. The act requires the Chief Electoral Officer to determine what is a sufficient proof of identity, and only identity in this case. As a matter of fact, for this section of part 11, the Chief Electoral Officer requires proof of passport to prove citizenship.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

He already has the power to compel proof of citizenship.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Well, in this case it's combined identity and citizenship through the passport.

The Chair:

But this amendment is saying they have to do it every time, as opposed to having the ability to do it. Is that right, Stephanie?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, that's right. It would be required.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

If we're looking at potentially adding a million people to the voting rolls, it only makes common sense if people are mailing in ballots from Davos, Paris—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Nairobi.

Mr. John Nater:

—or wherever. There should be an assumption that there is proof of citizenship for those voting.

The Chair:

You do understand that Elections Canada has said it does have the power to request it if it has a concern.

Is there any further discussion on CPC-56?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Can we have a recorded vote?

The Chair:

Yes.

(Amendment negatived: nays 6; yeas 3 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: That's defeated. We will now go on to CPC-57, which is consequential to CPC-54, so that's defeated.

CPC-58 was consequential to CPC-55, so that's defeated.

CPC-59 is again about foreign persons providing some proof of residence. Is that proof of residence overseas or in Canada?

(1205)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's proof of the last Canadian residential address if overseas.

The Chair:

Okay, so describe your amendment.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I don't even know what this prize is. I think it's very straightforward. It's to require proof of the last Canadian residential address. It's another attempt to safeguard the legitimacy of the electorate. I'll leave it at that, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

All in favour of amendment CPC-59?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 153 agreed to on division)

The Chair: We're on clause 154.

Amendment CPC-60 was defeated as a result of CPC-55.

(Clause 154 agreed to on division)

(On clause 155)

The Chair: We're on clause 155 now.

There's amendment CPC-60.1. Once again, it's providing for more identification for overseas voters.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: This also applies to amendment CPC-62.1, which is on page 107. They're related to the concept of proof of identification.

(Clause 155 agreed to on division)

The Chair: There's a proposed new clause, clause 155.1. This is one of the new amendments that were submitted yesterday.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

We can withdraw amendment 10016360.

The Chair:

It just won't be presented. When we withdraw it, we just won't present it.

(Clause 156 agreed to on division)

(On clause 157)

The Chair: Now we go to clause 157. We have amendment CPC-61.

Do you want to present this, Stephanie?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Essentially as it reads, it is to establish deadlines for the Chief Electoral Officer's decision to extend deadlines for special ballot applications. Basically a deadline should be established in an effort to have sort of decision as to the deadline for special ballot applications. The way it is right now, it's open-ended, and we feel that a deadline would just provide more clarity to the act.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I think, just to clarify, this does not set the date itself, but requires that the CEO set a date by 17 days before that. That way there's certainty for all participants in the system. There's no uncertainty among those participants. We'd know that by 17 days before polling day, a date has been set by the CEO, and it would be well known to those participants in the system.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Do the officials have any comments?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

This would remove some discretion from the Chief Electoral Officer, and as this applies to applications for registration in the special ballots that are received after 6 p.m. on the sixth day before polling day, this could defeat the purpose.

(1210)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I don't doubt Jean-François. He can't take our amendments anymore. That's understandable.

The Chair:

Leave it in those words.

All in favour of amendment CPC-61?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 157 agreed to on division)

The Chair: There are no amendments from clauses 158 to 162.

(Clauses 158 to 162 inclusive agreed to )

There's a new clause 162.1 proposed in amendment CPC-62.

Could you present that, Stephanie?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's clarifying that no polling division is to be written on the back of the ballot cast under the special ballot process. I think this is similar to the previous oversight that we identified.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I'll expand a little more. This is a privacy issue as well. By adding a polling division on a special ballot, a person's identity could be ascertained. Given the relatively small number of people who would vote by special ballots, having the polling number could potentially identify how an individual elector voted in a lot of cases. This is a privacy issue. It's to ensure their votes are anonymous, as they ought to be.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Would that ballot ever be correlated back to its poll? There's a separate box for them in the end.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No. It would never be reconciled. It would never be sent back to the ballot box used on polling day. These ballots are the ballots counted under division 4 of part 11. They would be reported on within the votes under the special voting rules.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It would be in aggregate.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

In aggregate, yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

All right. Thank you.

The Chair:

Do you have a comment on the privacy concern that Mr. Nater just raised?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I think that is a valid concern.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That was my question as well.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

All in favour of CPC-62?

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clauses 163 to 181 inclusive agreed to)

There was a new clause, 181.1, under NDP-15, but unfortunately it was lost with NDP-1.

We go on to clause 182. It had amendment CPC-62.1, but that was consequential to CPC-60.1, so it was negatived.

(Clause 182 agreed to on division)

There is a new clause, 182.1, proposed in CPC-62.2.

Do you want to introduce this, Stephanie, please?

(1215)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's requiring separate reporting of results in special ballots cast by non-residents. We're concerned about the possibility of irregularities within the special ballots cast by non-residents, so we would like to see a requirement that they be reported separately.

It's very clear which electors belong to which polling stations. This is not the case with non-residents and with special ballots, outside of being their own large conglomerate at a single polling station. We think that separate reporting adds another safeguard in terms of the ballots that are received, because there are two layers of specialness: They are special ballots, and they are cast by non-residents. Better and specific reporting, we think, is necessary.

The Chair:

Do the officials have any comments on that?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes, please.

As it currently stands, just for everybody's understanding, these are the divisions that are in the motion. Division 2 is for Canadian Forces electors. Division 3 is for electors residing outside Canada. Division 4 is for electors residing in Canada, and division 5 is for incarcerated electors. Currently, these results are disclosed by Elections Canada in groups. The results for division 4—electors residing in Canada—are disclosed under group 2, which at the last general election represented approximately 90% of the votes cast under the special voting rules.

As for divisions 2, 3 and 5, they are reported under group 1, which at the last election represented approximately 10% of the votes cast under the special voting rules. I would caution the committee against—again, for privacy reasons....

Of course, the provisions of Bill C-76 might have an effect on the number of votes cast under division 3; this number might increase. However, by grouping divisions 2 and 5 together—Canadian Forces electors and incarcerated electors.... Proportionally to the number of ballots cast, there is a very low number of electors voting under these divisions, and because they are released per electoral district, that's why I'm urging the committee to consider some privacy concerns. It could be easier to identify which elector in the division has voted for which specific party or candidate.

The Chair:

So, if you had 10 of them and they all voted one way, you would know how some individuals voted.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Exactly.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

We have to remember that we are considering the potential addition of a million voters, non-resident voters, given the new rules. I mean, 10% is a significant amount. I think there may be people around the table who won by 10% or less. Thank you, Jean. I think those things come into consideration as well. Certainly we want to respect the privacy of Canadians, but the main purpose of this bill, where this is concerned, should be to protect the legitimacy of the electorate.

(1220)

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, go ahead.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, I agree with the privacy concerns expressed by the officials, and if we're going to single out.... How many foreign electors voted in the last election? Something like 12,000?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

As I said, we cannot know exactly how many foreign electors voted. The numbers I have here indicate that 60,000 electors voted under group 1—Canadian Forces electors, electors residing abroad, and incarcerated electors—and the numbers can be quite low. For example, in Prince Edward Island, the number was only 317, and in Yukon, it was only 97 electors.

So, if you remove group 3 from that, which is electors residing abroad, you end up with groups 2 and 5—Canadian Forces electors and incarcerated electors—that can be quite low.

The Chair:

Thank you for referencing the Yukon.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My question is this: If we're going to split out the foreign electors, why wouldn't we separate the prisoners from the military, just to see how they're voting? I'd be curious as well.

I think the privacy issues are too important to do this. I cannot support this.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion on CPC-62.2?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: There are no amendments to clauses 183 to 189.

(Clauses 183 to 189 inclusive agreed to)

The Chair: I apologize for carrying on so long without a break, but I think people would rather finish earlier in the week rather than later, so we'll do it. However, if someone needs to have a break, let me know.

CPC-62.3 proposes a new clause, 189.1. Stephanie, do you want to present this?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I don't think there's anything more to state. It's very similar, if not identical, to CPC-62.2, the separate reporting of results of special ballots cast by electors...perhaps in the advance poll.

The Chair:

Okay, so it's the same concept here. We'll vote again. It's on CPC-62.3, which proposes a new clause, 189.1.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(On clause 190)

The Chair: There are about 15 amendments.

LIB-18 was first. That passed because it's consequential to LIB-1.

We'll go to CPC-63. Stephanie, could you present this one, please?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This is in regard to requiring the election officers to write an elector's polling division in the space provided for it on the back of the ballot.

This is similar to the previous one, where we had a similar situation.... In fact, I'm struggling to see a difference.

Mr. John Nater:

May I build on that, Chair?

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. John Nater:

This has to do as well with destroying a ballot, defacing it, and altering what's been written on it. That's the added element of this. You don't want to be scrubbing out the polling number after it's been written in by the elections official. This is a matter of defacing the ballot.

(1225)

The Chair:

Do the officials have any comments?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

That would actually complete the prohibition in a way that is consequential to the amendments that have been brought already. The number should or should not be added at the back of the ballot, depending on the situation.

The Chair:

Are you saying it's a positive amendment?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes.

The Chair:

We'll leave it at that.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: CPC-64 cannot be presented because LIB-19 was adopted, and it is related to the same line.

The next amendment, LIB-19, is already adopted because it was consequential to LIB-9. Therefore, NDP-16, which deals with the same line as LIB-19, cannot be considered.

We go on to CPC-65.

Stephanie, go ahead.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This is extending the prohibition on undue foreign influences to the pre-election period.

If we are truly trying as a government—and I say that in the little “g” sense, not the big “G” sense—then I think we have the obligation to put in every safeguard possible for Canadians, to absolutely make certain we do everything possible to ensure that these influences do not have the opportunity to enter our electoral processes. This amendment does that.

Why would the big “G” government be opposed? Why would they not want to extend this prohibition to the pre-election period?

(1230)

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, go ahead.

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, could I get clarification from you on whether or not CPC-65 would conflict with CPC-67? If it does, then I would move a subamendment to ensure that they don't conflict.

The Chair:

CPC-67 could not be moved if CPC-65 was adopted.

Mr. John Nater:

I would then move a subamendment that amendment CPC-65 be amended by deleting paragraph (b). That way it wouldn't conflict with the same lines that are in CPC-67 and it would allow us to deal with both.

The Chair:

I'll ask the legislative clerks: Does that mean we could then debate CPC-67? Okay.

(Subamendment agreed to)

The Chair: Now we can debate CPC-65 as amended.

Mr. Cullen, go ahead.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm thinking of them together, and I'll speak to them together. Is the intention of CPC-67 and CPC-65 to prohibit businesses that are only established in Canada with the primary role of trying to influence voters, and then extending a prohibition to those business into the pre-election period in terms of spending? Is that what I understand?

Mr. John Nater:

That's my understanding.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay, that seems like a good idea. We are trying to get at the foreign influence question.

The Chair:

Are there any comments from the officials or the government?

Mr. Bittle, go ahead.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

We appreciate the spirit of the amendment coming forward. The problem or the concern is that once we move further away from election day, the risks under section 2 of the charter increase dramatically. That's our concern with this.

The Chair:

Mr. Morin, go ahead.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I would also like to note that the prohibition found at proposed subsection 282.4(1) is related to “influenc[ing] an elector to vote or refrain from voting, or to vote or refrain from voting for a particular candidate or registered party, at the election”.

This specific prohibition was crafted to apply only during an election period. It's only from day one of the election period that an elector can actually cast a ballot. This motion would potentially create an enforcement problem with regard to the pre-election period, because electors don't have an ability to vote during that period.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater is next, then Mr. Cullen.

Mr. John Nater:

Just as a corollary to that, if it's impossible to influence a vote, I'm curious as to why there are pre-writ spending limits for political parties? If it's impossible to influence a vote during the pre-writ period, why do we have limits for political parties in those pre-writ periods? It just seems to be at odds there. We have one but not the other. If it's impossible to influence them, why are we preventing that?

(1235)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What are we doing? Is this an existential question?

Mr. John Nater:

It is, yes. It's not rhetorical.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The spending limit that would be applicable during the pre-election period is only on partisan advertising for registered parties, and partisan advertising, partisan activities and election surveys for third parties. It's not on the entire scope of expenses.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen, go ahead.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

First, to Mr. Bittle's concern, the pre-election spending limits, which have been struck down in B.C., at least, were for Canadian and Canadian-based outfits. I don't know if we've taken it to the Supreme Court yet, if it's been tested there. What I understand is that the attempt here is to seek to limit the influence during the pre-election period of businesses that are established within Canada only for the purpose of trying to influence electors.

It holds with what John said. If we put restrictions on political parties and third parties in the pre-election period, clearly there are votes at play, whether the ballots have been issued or not. I assume that's why the Liberals created the pre-election period at all—to recognize when the election truly starts. It's not when the writ drops.

If I'm reading the language correctly, this restriction here is on businesses whose primary purpose in Canada during an election period is to influence electors during that period. If there is any contemplation of foreign influence playing a role in our elections—which there ought to be, considering recent examples in the U.K., the U.S. and others—I suppose this one falls within the scope of “Try it”.

Someone may attempt to strike it down in court, but the intention seems pretty straightforward. We've already essentially broken the seal on the pre-election notion with this whole bill. Voters are at play in the pre-writ period. Why not restrict businesses whose sole purpose in the country—again, back to the legislative amendment line—is to try to influence voters? Those would be the ones I'd want to limit the most, frankly.

The Chair:

Mr. Morin, are you saying there would be an enforcement problem with it?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes, the enforcement problem is related to the fact that the prohibition really is on unduly influencing an elector to vote or refrain from voting, or vote or refrain from voting for a particular candidate at the election.

I'm just saying that during the pre-election period, the writs have not been issued and it would be difficult to interpret the change in the context of this prohibition during the pre-election period.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

To go back to my point, though, if an attack comes from wherever saying, “Don't vote for Mr. Bittle; he's going to be on the ballot”, we would see that as an attempt to influence before the ballot has been issued. What's the difference?

In terms of enforcement, if this were law and someone tried to do that, then we would prohibit that action. I don't see the enforcement problem. Just because we're not in the writ period, if somebody is trying to influence a voter to vote for or against a certain candidate.... That is the pre-writ period. It's exactly what's happening.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, go ahead.

Mr. John Nater:

I'll just follow up on the concern about a charter challenge that Mr. Bittle was talking about.

I'm not a lawyer, so I don't admit to knowing exactly how this works, but in proposed section 282.4 undue influence refers to “an individual who is not a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident...and who does not reside in Canada”; a corporation that does not operate in Canada; “a trade union that does not hold bargaining rights...in Canada”; “a foreign political party”; or “a foreign government or an agent or mandatary of a foreign government”.

My understanding is that these foreign entities don't hold charter rights, so I'm not sure how that would be considered a challenge under the charter.

Could our officials comment on whether that would be a challenge to the charter?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Sorry, could you repeat that specific question?

Mr. John Nater:

The section on undue influence talks about foreign governments, foreign political parties. Would they hold charter rights within Canada and would they be able to challenge this under the charter?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I won't answer that question. That would be a question for the Department of Justice.

(1240)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What if they have a presence in Canada?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The question of the extraterritoriality of application of the charter is quite debatable. Of course, a person, including a company, who has a presence in Canada would have charter rights. But for a company or a person who is outside Canada and doesn't have activities in Canada, the charter rights could be more volatile.

Mr. John Nater:

Proposed section 282 refers specifically to those that do not operate within Canada, such as a foreign entity that does not have a presence.

The Chair:

Is there further discussion?

We'll have a recorded vote on CPC-65 as amended.

(Amendment as amended negatived: nays 5; yeas 4 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Now we'll go on to CPC-66.

Mrs. Kusie, go ahead.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Essentially, this amendment attempts to treat as foreign third parties entities that are incorporated in Canada but with foreign direction, and whose primary purpose is political activity.

I don't think it's any secret that we had a number of these types of entities in the 2015 election. These entities were operating in Canada and may or may not have claimed to be Canadian entities. In reality, they were actually foreign entities, because their direction was external to Canada. Their primary purpose was political activity. This wasn't in regard to some other type of advocacy. It wasn't in regard to corporate activity. It wasn't in regard to charitable activity. These were external organizations that specifically operated in Canada with political purposes, which is essentially, I would say, both foreign influence and foreign interference.

With that, we propose this amendment in an effort to ensure that this type of possible activity is absolutely eliminated going forward. I would really urge the government to consider supporting this in an effort to show Canadians that it is committed to only Canadian political activity within Canada.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, go ahead.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Chair. I have a question for our officials.

Would it be possible for a foreign entity to simply incorporate within Canada and then be considered as a third party within a Canadian election, if this amendment were not in place?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I am not an expert in incorporation law, so I won't answer that portion of your question, just because I don't know.

That being said, we were just discussing the application of the charter a few minutes ago. I would point out that a corporation that is present in Canada would also have freedom of speech rights in Canada. There could be a risk associated with such an amendment.

The Chair:

Okay. Is there any discussion? Are we ready for the vote?

Stephanie, go ahead.

(1245)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I would like a response from the government as to why they are not in support of this amendment. There have been some instances where we've made amendments similar in spirit to Liberal amendments, but it appears that's not the case this time.

Why is the government opposed to this?

The Chair:

Ruby, go ahead.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

As was mentioned, it's very similar to the last one, but this one clarifies even more that this company has a presence in Canada. Therefore, we wouldn't want to go outside of election periods to limit their freedom of expression.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle, go ahead.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

That's fine.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's foreign expression with the intent and purpose of political activity. It's not Canadian expression, because it's being directed from somewhere external to Canada. So even if it is freedom of expression, it's not Canadian expression. It's foreign expression. I don't understand why we wouldn't attempt to prohibit that.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, go ahead.

Mr. John Nater:

I'll just go back to proposed section 282. We're talking about a foreign entity whose only activity in Canada is the political influence. That's in proposed paragraph 282.4(1)(b). We're talking about the only purpose being that of influencing an election. I think that's where the real concern is. There's a gaping loophole here through which you could drive a Mack truck with this influence.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's the two together.

Mr. John Nater:

It's a foreign entity. Absolutely the only purpose it's become incorporated is to influence an election. I think that's a pretty big loophole.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I have nothing else to add.

The Chair:

Mr. Morin, go ahead.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

While we're not in this part of the act, I would like to point out that such a company or such an entity would be considered a third party under part 17 of the act. Part 17 of the act includes amendments from both the Liberals and the Conservatives to restrict foreign funding for third parties. I would just like to point out that even if that corporation were present in Canada, as a third party it would be subject to amendments to come and it wouldn't be able to use foreign money to fund its activities here in Canada. This is part of a greater scheme that includes part 17.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

The problem goes further than that. We don't have the safeguards in place to ensure that with absolute certainty, in terms of the specific bank accounts or reporting. I don't think there is certainty even with those clauses, Mr. Morin.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I don't have any further comment on that.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, of course. Thank you.

The Chair:

When you said that the third party thing applies, does that apply through the writ period, the pre-writ period and the rest of the year?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The proposed subsection we're talking about, 282.4(1), applies only during the writ period. Part 17 of the act includes a period during the pre-writ period and the writ period, and one Liberal amendment contemplates adding a new division that would cover periods that are neither election periods nor pre-election periods.

The Chair:

So, in effect, because it wouldn't have any money, the foreign body couldn't do anything all year round, if the Liberal amendment you just talked about was passed.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It could have activities in Canada, but it could not fund these activities with foreign funds. It would need to get money from a Canadian source for partisan activities.

The Chair:

Stephanie, I think Ruby wants to talk to you.

(1250)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's such a broad definition of what could be seen as interference. Take, for instance, the emergency debate we had yesterday on climate change. A UN report gets put out. Do we see acts like that as maybe interference in elections when there are issues that maybe certain parties side with and other parties do not? I worry that we may be limiting organizations' ability to express their points of view on issues. It's a risk, too, if we go too far.

I do understand the other risk, when it's done in a malicious way with false evidence and statements—although you can't call it “evidence”—false information put out to sway actors. However, if it's just information that happens to influence, then are we going too far?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I have no other comments.

The Chair:

Are we ready to vote?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I'd like a recorded vote, please.

The Chair:

We'll have a recorded vote on CPC-66.

(Amendment negatived: nays 5; yeas 4 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We'll go on to CPC-67.

Mrs. Kusie, go ahead.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Actually, this is in a similar vein, but not entirely. It's in a similar spirit, in a very broad sense, of increasing the threshold for foreign entities to establish bona fide Canadian connections. It is making sure that third parties are Canadian entities, and that the proper thresholds are put in place in an effort to establish them as Canadian players and not those who are external.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, go ahead.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is the objective of the amendment to change it from “only activity” to “primary purpose”? That addresses the problem you were complaining about earlier, and it's quite supportable.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion on CPC-67?

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We have a couple more amendments on this clause, so if we could finish this clause before we break, that would be great.

We'll now go on to LIB-20. If LIB-20 is adopted, CPC-67.1 cannot be moved as it amends the same line.

Could someone present LIB-20?

Ms. Sahota, go ahead.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'll present in support of this amendment, since I proposed it.

This is basically to remove the redundancy and ambiguity, and to move the foreign entity stuff and lump it in together. The Commissioner of Canada Elections had indicated to PROC that, in his view, proposed paragraph 282.4(2)(b) is redundant, since a foreign entity could already be charged for breach of either proposed section 91 or proposed paragraph 282.4(2)(c).

Bill C-76 would move the content of section 331 of the Canada Elections Act, which prohibits foreign interference in Canadian elections, to a comprehensive provision, which is in proposed section 282.4, setting out exactly what constitutes undue influence by a foreigner. It just makes it neater, and you know where to find all of those provisions.

(1255)

The Chair:

Do the officials have any comments?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

This amendment actually implements the recommendation of the Commissioner of Canada Elections exactly in the way that Ms. Sahota explained it. Someone making a false statement that is prohibited could be charged with the offence associated with proposed section 91, and could also be charged under the provision at proposed section 282.4 with reference to (2)(c), which would now become (2)(b).

The Chair:

Is there further discussion?

I think Mr. Nater might have something to say.

Mr. John Nater:

No. It's the only time, Chair.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion on Liberal-20?

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: CPC-67.1 cannot be discussed because it amends the same line.

We have two more. Next is CPC-68.

Stephanie, go ahead.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This amendment attempts to address the narrow broadcasting exception for foreign interference in elections.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Mr. Nater, go ahead.

Mr. John Nater:

Mr. Chair, I just have a bit of information here.

We don't want to see normal courses of action, such as letters to the editor, captured within this. That's obviously within the act. Specifically, this amendment is looking to capture foreign programming and foreign influence where the purpose of that program or publication is specifically to influence the election. We're talking about specific instances. We're not talking about the Canadian example. We're talking about foreign examples, where programming and publications are specifically intended to influence an election, including the way in which an elector votes. That's what we're really getting at here—foreign publications influencing a Canadian election.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle, go ahead.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I'd like to ask the officials what effect the amendment would have. I don't think it will do much to change how the provision operates.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Thank you, Mr. Bittle.

The exception that is provided at proposed paragraph 282.4(3)(c) is for the transmission of programs, or print such as an editorial, a debate, a speech, an interview, a column, a letter, etc. This language has been used for a long time in the Canada Elections Act as an exception to the definition of election advertising, so there is a history to that kind of exception in the act.

I'm not sure that a program or a publication whose primary purpose is to influence an elector to vote or refrain from voting, or to vote or refrain from voting for a particular candidate or party, would actually be recognized within that existing exception. Of course, that would be for the courts to interpret eventually, but I would be suspicious about whether a partisan program would be recognized within this recognized exception.

(1300)

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, go ahead.

Mr. John Nater:

Maybe I'll ask our officials by using an example. Let's say a late night talk show host in New York or L.A. dedicates an entire episode during the writ period to how great a Canadian leader is. Whoever that leader might be, and whatever talk show that might be, would that be captured? We're all thinking of Jagmeet Singh.

Would that be captured?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I don't think it's within the spirit of the exception, but of course it would depend on the context. It would depend on what was said and the amount of time that was devoted to that specific topic, etc.

Mr. John Nater:

Would it be appropriate to say that this amendment would give further direction to the courts on how to interpret that?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Of course.

The Chair:

We'll vote on CPC-68.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: The last thing before we break for QP is Liberal-21.

Could someone present that?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The Commissioner of Canada Elections was concerned that the wording of this provision was unnecessarily complex and could cause some enforcement problems.

The behaviour intended to be prohibited is simply the selling of advertising space to a foreign person or entity to allow them to transmit election advertising. The amendment would implement the commissioner's recommendation to simplify the wording of the provision. It's a recommendation from the commissioner to simplify some complex wording.

I think it's eminently supportable.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 190 as amended agreed to on division)

The Chair: To the members, first of all, thank you for your great co-operation and respect for everyone. It was excellent work.

I would ask everyone to leave quickly, though, because the Subcommittee on Private Members' Business is meeting here in one minute.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Some of us have to stay for that.

The Chair:

Those who are on that committee can stay.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(0905)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour et bienvenue à cette 124e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.[Français]

Je souhaite la bienvenue à M. Peter Fragiskatos.

Merci également à M. Luc Thériault d'être de nouveau parmi nous.[Traduction]

Nous sommes heureux d'accueillir à nouveau Manon Paquet et Jean-François Morin du Bureau du Conseil privé pour la poursuite de notre étude article par article du projet de loi C-76, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada et d'autres lois et apportant des modifications corrélatives à d'autres textes législatifs. Nous en sommes rendus à l'étude de l'article 61 et de l'amendement CPC-22.

Il faut remercier Stephanie d'avoir présenté les nouveaux amendements en bonne et due forme, et Philippe d'avoir veillé tard hier soir pour les mettre en ordre. Lorsque nous arriverons à un nouvel amendement, je le désignerai par son numéro de référence qui apparaît dans le coin supérieur gauche. Si vous les conservez dans l'ordre où on vous les a remis, vous n'aurez pas de difficulté à suivre, car ils seront examinés dans cet ordre et j'indiquerai à chaque fois qu'il s'agit d'un nouvel amendement.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je veux informer le Comité qu'en raison du rejet de l'amendement CPC-2 hier, le Parti conservateur retire les amendements CPC-93, CPC-116 et CPC-148. Comme l'amendement CPC-2 n'a pas été adopté, il ne sert à rien de présenter les trois autres, si bien que nous allons les retirer.

Le président:

Pouvez-vous répéter les numéros des amendements en question?

M. John Nater:

Ce sont les amendements CPC-93, CPC-116 et CPC-148.

(Article 61)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Voilà une bonne chose de faite.

Nous débutons par l'amendement CPC-22. Il s'agit simplement d'ajouter l'adverbe « sciemment » à l'interdiction de publier une fausse déclaration visant à influer sur les résultats d'une élection.

Monsieur Nater, avez-vous des précisions à apporter?

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je crois que vous avez très bien expliqué l'amendement. Il s'agit d'ajouter l'adverbe « sciemment » pour indiquer que la personne savait qu'elle agissait de façon inappropriée. Nous estimons qu'il serait bon d'ajouter cet élément.

Le président:

Quelqu'un veut en débattre?

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Je suis d'avis que la nécessité d'intention est déjà exprimée dans l'énoncé de l'infraction. J'aimerais que nos témoins puissent nous dire s'ils croient qu'il s'agit d'un ajout superflu.

M. Jean-François Morin (conseiller principal en politiques, Bureau du Conseil privé):

Merci pour la question, monsieur Bittle.

Cette disposition vise à modifier l'article 91 de la loi. L'article 91 énonce une interdiction. Nous n'en sommes pas encore à l'étape des infractions, lesquelles figurent dans la partie 19 de la loi. Nous avons donc ici une interdiction pouvant éventuellement donner lieu à une infraction.

Bien que l'adverbe « sciemment » apparaisse à de nombreuses reprises dans les dispositions d'interdiction de cette loi, il n'est généralement pas recommandé en droit pénal d'inclure une mention d'intention comme « sciemment » dans l'interdiction elle-même, surtout lorsque la notion d'intention est déjà exprimée par ailleurs. En l'espèce, nous avons déjà deux expressions de l'intention: la volonté d'influencer les résultats d'une élection ainsi que le fait de savoir que la déclaration est fausse.

M. Chris Bittle:

C'est redondant.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, avez-vous bien entendu ce qu'a dit le témoin? Il a dit qu'il n'est pas nécessairement recommandé de...

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

Pourriez-vous m'aider à comprendre un peu mieux, Jean-François? Êtes-vous en train de nous dire qu'il n'est pas recommandé du point de vue juridique d'inclure le terme « sciemment » dans une telle disposition alors qu'on le retrouve pourtant dans d'autres articles de la loi?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui, c'est d'ailleurs pour cette raison que je disais... Ne vous méprenez pas. Nous savons qu'il y a d'autres dispositions d'interdiction dans la loi pour lesquelles on utilise « sciemment », mais ce n'est pas la bonne façon de faire les choses.

M. Nathan Cullen:

En quoi est-ce problématique? Un Canadien qui lirait cet article considérerait que l'infraction y est intégrée, et que la personne a sciemment essayé de fausser les résultats d'une élection.

M. Jean-François Morin:

L'adverbe « sciemment » associe à l'infraction un élément d'intention coupable. Lors de la rédaction d'un texte de loi, nous nous assurons d'inclure un élément moral pour chacune des infractions au titre desquelles le Parlement le juge nécessaire. C'est ce qui distingue les infractions mixtes des infractions à responsabilité stricte qui ne sont habituellement pas assorties d'un critère d'intention.

Je dis simplement que nous avons déjà un critère d'intention dans bon nombre des interdictions. À titre d'exemple, l'article 91 énonce l'intention d'influencer les résultats d'une élection, en plus du fait que la personne qui publie l'information doit savoir qu'elle est fausse.

Il y a donc déjà deux critères d'intention qui doivent être remplis.

(0910)

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai une question pour nos témoins.

Nous vivons à l'ère du numérique où chacun peut partager du contenu sur Facebook et Twitter. Je crois que cela explique en partie la volonté d'ajouter la précision « sciemment ». Une personne peut-elle se rendre coupable d'une infraction du simple fait qu'elle republie ainsi de l'information dont elle a pris connaissance? Comme elle ne sait pas que l'information est fausse, elle n'agit pas « sciemment », un élément que nous devons prendre en compte.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Nous allons nous pencher sur la question lors de notre étude de la partie 19 de la loi où l'on retrouve les infractions. Vous pouvez toutefois d'ores et déjà constater que toutes les infractions découlant de la partie 6 de la loi font intervenir la notion d'intention. La partie 6 de la loi ne donne donc pas lieu à des infractions de responsabilité stricte. Lorsqu'une personne republie du contenu sur Facebook ou sur Twitter sans intention malveillante et en croyant à tort que l'information est véridique, il n'y a généralement pas d'éléments suffisants pour porter une accusation. De telles accusations seraient en fait portées lorsque la personne sait que l'information est fausse et qu'elle la republie avec l'intention, dans le cas de l'article 91, d'influencer les résultats d'une élection.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Essayons d'exprimer les choses un peu plus simplement. S'il y a déjà une notion d'intention exprimée dans la loi, vous ne voulez pas ajouter un terme qui aurait le même effet.

À titre d'exemple, on ne voudrait pas indiquer dans le Code criminel qu'une personne a « sciemment assassiné » quelqu'un. Il y a déjà une présomption d'intention, et l'ajout d'autres termes et expressions dans le même sens risquerait de compliquer...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il n'y a pas de présomption d'intention si quelqu'un republie de l'information fausse au sujet d'un résultat électoral ou d'un candidat. Cependant, si une personne rediffuse sciemment une telle information en voulant influer sur les résultats d'une élection, ce n'est pas tout à fait la même chose.

Si quelqu'un republie de l'information en considérant, en toute bonne foi, qu'elle est exacte, ou s'il ne fait que la republier sans se poser de questions, c'est une chose. Cependant, si une personne transmet sciemment de l'information qu'elle sait fausse... C'est mon interprétation de cet article. C'est la raison pour laquelle j'étais plutôt favorable à cette proposition qui tient compte de cet élément.

Je n'arrive pas à voir en quoi cela pourrait être redondant. Il n'est pas problématique qu'une personne republie des informations erronées si cela n'était pas son intention. Si elle le fait de façon intentionnelle, c'est une tout autre histoire.

M. Chris Bittle:

L'adverbe « sciemment » traduit l'intention coupable. Si l'on ajoute un tel énoncé alors que la notion d'intention est déjà exprimée dans la loi, il y a redondance.

Si vous faites quelque chose sans le vouloir, vous ne vous rendez pas coupable d'une infraction.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je comprends, mais je suppose qu'il faudrait que je lise à nouveau cet article de la loi pour trouver à quel endroit il est fait explicitement mention de l'intention et en quoi il y aurait donc redondance. C'est peut-être ce que j'ai mal compris, mais je n'ai pas l'article sous les yeux.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Donnez-moi une seconde.

M. Chris Bittle:

C'est tout à fait logique aux yeux des avocats, ce qui montre bien que c'est problématique.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Si vous allez à la page 186 du projet de loi... Je suis aux lignes 15 à 21 de la version française.



Commet une infraction:



a) l'entité qui contrevient au paragraphe 91(1) (faire ou publier de fausses déclarations concernant le candidat);



b) l'entité qui contrevient sciemment à l'article 92 (publication de fausses déclarations relatives au désistement).

Voyez-vous la différence? On indique « sciemment » pour l'article 92, mais pas pour l'article 91. Si l'on revient aux deux dispositions premières énonçant les interdictions, on constate que l'article 92 proposé indique seulement: « Il est interdit à toute personne ou entité de publier une fausse déclaration portant que le candidat s'est désisté. »

Chacun des termes utilisés renvoie à un élément essentiel de l'infraction. Pour être reconnu coupable, il faut bien sûr que la personne sache que la déclaration est fausse. Le terme « sciemment » est donc nécessaire dans l'énoncé de cette infraction. La personne doit avoir sciemment publié une fausse déclaration. Cela ne semble pas nécessaire dans le cas de l'article 91 qui exige déjà que le prévenu ait eu l'intention d'influer sur les résultats de l'élection avec une fausse déclaration.

(0915)

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord. Cette explication me convainc.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Si l'on ajoutait « sciemment » à cet article, il y aurait un autre élément d'infraction dont on devrait établir la preuve hors de tout doute raisonnable. Un juge pourrait en arriver à déterminer que non seulement la personne doit avoir voulu influer sur les résultats de l'élection avec une fausse déclaration, mais qu'elle devait aussi savoir qu'elle commettait ainsi l'infraction énoncée.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vois. L'adverbe « sciemment » ne se rapporte pas à l'information fausse, mais plutôt au fait que la personne savait qu'elle commettait un crime. Je comprends mieux maintenant.

Le président:

Sommes-nous prêts à mettre l'amendement CPC-22 aux voix?

(L'amendement est rejeté [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 61 est adopté avec dissidence)

Le président: Pour l'article 62, nous avons l'amendement LIB-3, mais celui-ci est considéré comme déjà adopté, car il était corrélatif à l'amendement LIB-2.

(L'article 62 modifié est adopté)

(Les articles 63 à 67 inclusivement sont adoptés)

(L'article 68 est adopté avec dissidence)

Le président: Pour l'article 69, nous avons un autre amendement libéral qui a été adopté parce qu'il était corrélatif à l'amencement LIB-2.

(L'article 69 modifié est adopté)

(Article 70)

Le président: L'amendement LIB-5 propose qu'il soit fait mention du numéro de la section de vote sur la liste électorale. Étant donné que plusieurs sections de vote peuvent être regroupées au sein d'un bureau de scrutin, l'électeur doit savoir à quelle table se présenter.

David, voulez-vous nous présenter cet amendement?

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

C'est une simple correction technique. Il y a eu un cas où l'on a omis d'indiquer le numéro de la section de vote sur la liste électorale.

Le président:

Quelqu'un veut en débattre?

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Notre amendement no 10008479 est très similaire à celui-ci.

Le président:

Nous allons mettre aux voix l'amendement LIB-5.

(L'amendement est adopté [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Voulez-vous tout de même proposer votre nouvel amendement? C'est le 10008479. C'est le premier dans la pile des nouveaux amendements que l'on vous a remis.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il est assez semblable en principe à celui qui vient d'être présenté. Comme nous avons adopté l'amendement LIB-5, je ne crois pas qu'il soit nécessaire de présenter celui-ci.

Merci.

Le président:

L'amendement est retiré?

Mme Stephanie Kusie: Oui.

Le président: D'accord, merci. Cela nous aide beaucoup.

Comme l'amendement LIB-6 était collatéral à l'amendement LIB-2, il a aussi été adopté.

(L'article 70 modifié est adopté.)

(Article 72)

Le président: Pour l'article 72, nous avons l'amendement LIB-7 qui est réputé adopté du fait qu'il est corrélatif à l'amendement LIB-2.

(L'article 72 modifié est adopté.)

Le président: Il n'y a pas d'amendement pour les articles 73 à 75.

(Les articles 73 à 75 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

(Article 76)

Le président: Concernant l'article 76, nous avons l'amendement CPC-23. Le directeur du scrutin doit déjà communiquer aux candidats les noms des fonctionnaires électoraux. On propose ici qu'il leur communique également les adresses de ces fonctionnaires.

Voulez-vous présenter cet amendement?

(0920)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Certainement. C'est ainsi que l'on procédait auparavant, et nous ne savons pas trop pour quelle raison les candidats ne devraient plus recevoir les adresses. En quoi est-il problématique qu'on leur communique les adresses en même temps que les noms?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pouvons-nous demander l'avis de nos témoins?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Certainement.

Le président:

Je crois qu'il est ressorti de nos discussions qu'il y avait certaines inquiétudes quant à la communication de l'adresse domiciliaire des femmes, mais je vous laisse poursuivre.

Mme Manon Paquet (conseillère principale en politiques, Bureau du Conseil privé):

Cette mesure a été retirée du projet de loi à la suite d'une recommandation formulée par le directeur général des élections dans le rapport qu'il a produit à l'issue de la 42e élection générale. C'est une question de protection de la vie privée. Le directeur général des élections ne croyait plus nécessaire de fournir cette information. J'ajouterais que les partis politiques ont également reçu une liste électorale où figure l'adresse des électeurs. Au besoin, les candidats pourraient se servir de cette liste pour faire des vérifications.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Si les adresses sont déjà communiquées par ailleurs, pourquoi ne pourrait-on pas le faire une fois de plus? Si l'information est rendue publique, pourquoi vouloir créer un obstacle supplémentaire pour la rendre moins accessible? Si c'est public, c'est public.

Mme Manon Paquet:

Comme je l'indiquais, c'est une décision qui a été prise en fonction de la recommandation du directeur général des élections qui jugeait que ce n'était plus nécessaire.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Le fait que ce ne soit plus nécessaire ne signifie pas pour autant... Je vous dirais qu'il y a bien des choses que l'on continue de faire même si elles ne sont plus vraiment nécessaires. À mes yeux, c'est simplement un obstacle de plus à franchir si l'on constate qu'il y a non concordance après le fait ou après l'élection. Comme je le soulignais, si l'information est déjà accessible, il m'apparaît insensé de vouloir nous empêcher de la transmettre autrement.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Si l'on fournissait la liste des adresses des fonctionnaires électoraux, c'était parce que ceux-ci devaient résider dans le district électoral. Comme cette exigence a été supprimée, il n'est plus nécessaire pour les candidats et les partis de confirmer qu'une personne vit bel et bien dans le district électoral.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci.

Le président:

J'ai maintenant une liste d'intervenants: M. Nater, M. Graham et M. Cullen.

M. John Nater:

C'est justement ce que je voulais faire valoir. Maintenant que nous n'exigeons plus des fonctionnaires électoraux qu'ils résident dans la circonscription, nous n'aurons plus accès à ces adresses via la liste électorale qui indique toutes les adresses, mais pas nécessairement celles des fonctionnaires électoraux, car ils ne sont plus tenus de vivre dans la circonscription. Je crois que c'est pour cette raison que l'amendement est nécessaire.

Le président:

Nous avons maintenant M. Graham, puis M. Cullen.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cet argument va tout à fait à l'encontre de celui que j'allais avancer. Comme il n'est plus exigé qu'ils résident dans la circonscription, il n'est plus vraiment pertinent de savoir où ils vivent. Je pense que le directeur général des élections a toute la compétence voulue pour embaucher son personnel, et je ne veux pas remettre en question ses décisions en fonction du lieu de résidence de ses employés. Je ne vois pas à quoi pourrait servir cette information.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est exactement ce que je voulais dire. Étant donné que nous avons supprimé cette exigence, qu'allons-nous vouloir vérifier exactement?

Le président:

Madame Sahota, à vous la parole.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Nathan a dit exactement ce que je voulais dire.

Le président:

Madame Kusie, où disiez-vous que cette information au sujet des adresses des fonctionnaires électoraux était déjà accessible?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je crois que Mme Paquet vient tout juste de dire que les candidats peuvent déjà avoir accès à l'information sur la liste électorale. Si l'information se trouve sur la liste électorale, ne pourrait-on pas dire qu'elle est d'ores et déjà du domaine public?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Comme de raison, tous les fonctionnaires électoraux doivent aussi être des électeurs. Leur nom figurera donc effectivement sur la liste électorale du district où ils résident normalement. Les partis ont accès à la liste électorale de tous les districts où ils présentent un candidat. Ils auraient donc certes accès à cette information.

Le président:

Sommes-nous prêts pour la mise aux voix?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 76 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Il n'y a pas d'amendement relativement aux articles 77 à 81.

(Les articles 77 à 81 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

(Article 82)

Le président: Nous passons à l'amendement CPC-24. Le directeur du scrutin doit fournir aux fonctionnaires électoraux affectés à un bureau de scrutin un document indiquant le nombre de bulletins de vote et leurs numéros de série. Selon l'interprétation que j'ai faite de cet amendement hier soir, étant donné le regroupement des sections de vote, le directeur du scrutin n'aurait à remettre le document qu'au fonctionnaire responsable.

Je vais laisser Stephanie nous expliquer l'amendement.

(0925)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Certainement.

Maintenant que nous retrouvons différentes tables pour les différentes sections de vote, nous devons prendre les précautions nécessaires pour pouvoir concilier le tout à la fin de l'exercice. C'est ce que permet l'amendement CPC-24.

Le président:

Quelqu'un veut en débattre?

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J'essaie de comprendre comment cela pourrait fonctionner.

Stephanie, voulez-vous dire qu'à la fin d'une journée de scrutin, ou encore à intervalles réguliers, il y a conciliation de tous les bulletins utilisés pour chaque section de vote? Je me demande simplement comment les choses se passent sur le terrain. Il est dommage que nous n'ayons pas convoqué les gens d'Élections Canada.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, c'est bien cela. C'est à la fin de chaque journée. En vertu des nouvelles mesures proposées, il y a un contrôle qui s'exercerait de telle sorte qu'une personne serait responsable de chaque urne pendant toute la journée et saurait, le soir venu, exactement combien de bulletins ont été utilisés. Est-ce que...?

Le président:

D'autres interventions?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il est sans doute déjà trop tard, mais je pense qu'il serait bon, étant donné tous ces éléments qui concernent le fonctionnement pratique d'une élection, que le Comité convoque éventuellement des représentants d'Élections Canada. Ils ne seraient bien sûr pas ici pour nous fournir une orientation stratégique, mais ils pourraient certes nous expliquer comment se déroulerait dans les faits la conciliation des bulletins en vertu de cette disposition. Je ne sais pas s'ils pourraient être disponibles. Généralement, ils n'hésitent pas à venir témoigner devant nous.

J'ai l'intention de voter contre cet amendement même s'il s'agit peut-être de la meilleure recommandation que l'on puisse faire pour améliorer la reddition de comptes au sein de notre système électoral. Je ne pourrais pas l'appuyer, car je ne comprends pas comment les choses se dérouleraient dans les faits. Je suppose en avoir compris juste assez pour être prêt à voter.

Le président:

Jean-François Morin, allez-y.

M. Jean-François Morin:

En fait, le projet de loi C-76 a été conçu de façon à accorder un maximum de souplesse... Eh bien, ce n'est pas un « maximum » de souplesse, car ce n'est pas une souplesse illimitée. Néanmoins, cela permettrait au directeur général des élections d'avoir une grande souplesse dans la gestion des bureaux de scrutin le jour du scrutin et des bureaux de scrutin par anticipation.

J'aimerais attirer votre attention sur la page 17 du projet de loi et sur l'article 38 proposé, qui énonce ce qui suit: Le directeur du scrutin tient un registre des attributions qu'il confère à chaque fonctionnaire électoral et il consigne le moment ou la période au cours de laquelle chacun d'eux les exerce.

L'article 39 proposé énonce ce qui suit: Le fonctionnaire électoral exerce, conformément aux instructions du directeur général des élections, les attributions qui lui sont conférées par le directeur du scrutin.

Autrefois, la Loi électorale du Canada désignait de nombreuses fonctions dans les bureaux de scrutin — par exemple, les greffiers du scrutin, les scrutateurs, les agents réviseurs, etc. Tous ces titres ont été éliminés et remplacés par l'appellation générale « fonctionnaires électoraux ». Le directeur général des élections sera maintenant en mesure de mieux gérer le personnel au bureau de scrutin le jour du scrutin en assignant différentes fonctions à différents fonctionnaires électoraux.

Cette motion et quelques autres motions ne feraient qu'éliminer une partie de cette souplesse, mais évidemment, Élections Canada a présenté ce modèle de bureaux de scrutin modernisés dans son rapport sur les recommandations et a l'intention de continuer de gérer les élections dans un...

(0930)

Le président:

Il serait inhabituel de les faire comparaître, Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vraiment?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J'aime l'innovation, monsieur le président. Je comprends ce que Jean-François décrit. Je trouve que les représentants d'Élections Canada nous aident toujours lorsqu'ils nous expliquent les composantes logistiques de leur gestion. Cette nouvelle interprétation qui leur donne la capacité de désigner des rôles, en plus de ce que suggère Stephanie, m'aiderait simplement à comprendre si cela fonctionnerait ou si les représentants jugeraient que cela va à l'encontre de l'intention de l'amendement.

Le président:

Stephanie, allez-y.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C'est ce qui me cause des difficultés. Dans ce système, comment pouvons-nous assurer le rapprochement des votes à chacune des sections de vote?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Élections Canada a déjà un processus pour rapprocher tous les bulletins de vote à la fin de chaque jour de scrutin, et le même processus sera appliqué aussi à la taille d'un bureau de scrutin.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je n'ai pas d'autres commentaires.

Le président:

Ils fournissent déjà les bulletins de vote et les numéros de série aux bureaux de scrutin. C'est prévu dans la Loi. Est-ce exact?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Absolument, mais dans le modèle dans lequel il y aura de nombreuses sections de vote dans un bureau de scrutin, le directeur du scrutin désignera manifestement, dans ce bureau de scrutin, un fonctionnaire électoral qui sera responsable de cette tâche.

Le président:

Sommes-nous prêts à voter?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 82 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(L'article 83 est adopté.)

(Article 84)

Le président: L'article 84 est lié à CPC-25. D'après ce que je comprends de cet amendement — je l'ai lu hier soir —, il ajoute simplement un nouvel article selon lequel on doit prévoir un nombre suffisant d'isoloirs dans un bureau de scrutin pour assurer un vote confidentiel et efficace.

Stephanie, voulez-vous présenter l'amendement?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Non, je crois que vous l'avez bien expliqué, monsieur le président.

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle, allez-y.

M. Chris Bittle:

J'aimerais seulement dire que c'est un bon amendement. En effet, il offre une plus grande souplesse au directeur général des élections, ce qui est l'un des objectifs de Loi. C'est pourquoi nous l'appuyons.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci, monsieur Bittle.

Le président:

Nous votons maintenant sur l'amendement CPC-25.

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 84 modifié est adopté.)

(L'article 85 est adopté.)

(Article 86)

Le président: L'article 86 est lié à CPC-26. D'après ce que je comprends, il ne fait que limiter à 10 le nombre de sections de vote dans un bureau de scrutin.

Stéphanie, aimeriez-vous présenter cet amendement?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je crois que c'est évident. Il indique un maximum de 10 sections de vote par emplacement sans devoir obtenir l'approbation du directeur général des élections. Je ne sais pas si nos témoins souhaitent parler des situations dans lesquelles il y a plus de 10 sections de vote dans un bureau.

Le président:

Les témoins souhaitent-ils formuler des commentaires?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je n'ai aucun commentaire sur ce sujet.

Le président:

Savez-vous s'il y a déjà eu plus de 10 sections de vote dans un bureau de scrutin?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non, actuellement, il y a une limite de 10 sections de vote par bureau de scrutin.

Le président:

Y a-t-il déjà une limite?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Désolé, la Loi actuelle régit les sections de vote, et elle limite chaque bureau de scrutin à 10 sections de vote. Toutefois, cette exigence a été éliminée dans le cadre de la modernisation des services de scrutin.

Le président:

Cette limite existait donc auparavant et elle a été éliminée. Maintenant, on propose de la remettre en oeuvre.

M. Jean-François Morin: C'est exact.

Le président: Mais dans votre proposition, on pourrait toujours avoir plus de 10 sections avec l'approbation du directeur général des élections.

Nous entendrons M. Nater, et ensuite M. Cullen.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, c'est exactement ce que j'allais dire. C'est la façon dont on fonctionne actuellement. La limite a été éliminée, mais nous croyons qu'elle devrait être remise en oeuvre. Je crois que c'est simplement une approche fondée sur le bon sens. Elle permet également d'avoir une certaine souplesse avec l'approbation du directeur général des élections. Je crois que tous ceux qui sont allés dans un grand bureau de scrutin un jour d'élection savent qu'il y a énormément de va-et-vient, et qu'un grand nombre de bureaux de scrutin dans un seul endroit crée beaucoup de confusion. Je crois que c'est une approche qui a beaucoup de bon sens.

(0935)

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen, allez-y.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Comme nous l'avons déjà dit, monsieur le président, nous venons tous les deux d'une région rurale. Je tente d'imaginer à quoi cela ressemble. S'il y a plus de 10 sections, est-ce...?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ou à quoi un bureau de scrutin avec plus de deux sections de vote ressemble-t-il ? Je ne sais pas.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Combien d'électeurs? Nous avons seulement 25 électeurs.

Sur le plan logistique, pour certains de mes collègues qui vivent en région urbaine, est-ce qu'un endroit avec plus de 10 sections commence à devenir...? Essaie-t-on d'éviter les foules? Quel est le problème?

Si le directeur général des élections a le pouvoir discrétionnaire d'augmenter ce nombre dans certaines circonstances, il s'agit donc d'une ligne directrice selon laquelle on peut se permettre d'avoir au plus 10 sections de vote avant que ce soit trop chaotique. Mais encore une fois, je ne vois pas de bureaux de scrutin aussi grands. Cela cause-t-il des problèmes aux électeurs? Dans le cas contraire, nous devrions laisser cela à la discrétion du directeur général des élections.

Le président:

Eh bien, on ne dit pas qu'il ne peut pas y avoir plus de 10 sections. On dit seulement qu'il faut obtenir l'approbation du directeur général des élections lorsqu'il y a plus de 10 sections.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord.

On dit qu'il faudrait se limiter à 10 sections de vote, sauf en cas d'exception.

Le président:

Nous entendrons M. Bittle, et ensuite M. Graham.

M. Chris Bittle:

Contrairement à l'amendement précédent, celui-ci semble ne pas donner au directeur général des élections la souplesse nécessaire pour gérer les élections de façon appropriée, et nous sommes donc contre l'amendement.

Le président:

Eh bien, le directeur général des élections peut gérer cela; c'est le directeur du scrutin qui ne peut pas.

Monsieur Graham, allez-y.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aimerais seulement demander aux représentants si quelque chose empêche le directeur général des élections de décider qu'on ne peut pas avoir plus de 10 sections dans un bureau de scrutin. Il peut décider ce qu'il veut.

M. Jean-François Morin:

En fait, rien n'empêche le directeur général des élections de décider qu'il ne peut pas y avoir plus de 10 sections de vote. Le directeur général des élections, en vertu de l'alinéa 16d) de la Loi électorale du Canada, a le pouvoir de donner des instructions aux fonctionnaires électoraux. Et j'aimerais ajouter que le directeur général des élections a déjà annoncé que lors des élections générales de 2019, il ne mettra pas en oeuvre le modèle de vote à n'importe quelle table, car il n'a tout simplement pas le temps.

Réfléchissons à l'avenir. Lors de l'élection générale suivante, si on permet le modèle consistant à voter à n'importe quelle table, les services aux électeurs devraient être plus efficaces dans les bureaux de scrutin et il devrait y avoir moins d'attente à la table de vote, car on pourra aller au premier fonctionnaire électoral libre. Dans ce contexte, dans les régions densément peuplées, il pourrait être possible de gérer un bureau de scrutin qui compte plus de 10 sections de vote, si les électeurs peuvent voter de façon très efficace.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Donc, pour 2019... Nous parlons de 2023. Lors de la prochaine élection, c'est-à-dire dans un an, s'il y a de longues files d'attente, nous pourrons blâmer le gouvernement libéral. Est-ce ce que vous dites? Je veux simplement m'assurer d'avoir compris votre témoignage. Cette réunion est publique, n'est-ce pas? Je voulais simplement éclaircir ce point.

Le président:

Nous vous remercions de cet éclaircissement.

Monsieur Thériault, allez-y. [Français]

M. Luc Thériault (Montcalm, BQ):

Monsieur le président, je ne suis pas sûr d'avoir bien compris l'intervention du témoin.

Monsieur Morin, pourriez-vous répéter cela en français, s'il vous plaît?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Dans son dernier rapport de recommandation, le directeur général des élections du Canada a fait plusieurs recommandations visant à moderniser les services aux électeurs dans les bureaux de scrutin. On a noté que les services de vote dans les bureaux de scrutin étaient ralentis notamment par le fait que chaque électeur devait absolument aller à la table de vote associée à sa section de vote.

Les changements apportés par le projet de loi C-76 vont éventuellement donner au directeur général des élections la flexibilité nécessaire pour regrouper plusieurs sections de vote dans un même bureau de scrutin. Lorsque les électeurs se présenteront, ils pourront aller voter à la première table disponible, plutôt que de devoir faire la file devant la table de leur section de vote.

M. Luc Thériault:

Au fond, c'est comme pour le vote par anticipation. Ce serait comme si on tenait un gros vote par anticipation lors du jour J.

M. Jean-François Morin:

C'est plus ou moins le cas. Oui, il y a des ressemblances avec le vote par anticipation, mais des modifications ont été apportées — on retrouve cela dans certaines dispositions ainsi qu'à l'annexe du projet de loi — de sorte que les fonctionnaires électoraux devront, le jour du scrutin, inscrire au dos du bulletin de vote le numéro de la section de vote de l'électeur. À la fin de la journée, les résultats seront toujours comptés par section de vote et rapportés de cette façon dans les résultats officiels du scrutin.

(0940)

M. Luc Thériault:

Si je fais allusion au vote par anticipation, c'est parce que c'est souvent à cette occasion que de la frustration est exprimée quant à la fluidité du vote. Qu'est-ce qui cause ce manque de fluidité? C'est dû précisément à l'agglomération de boîtes de scrutin dans une seule section. Cela prend énormément de temps aux gens pour retrouver le nom d'un électeur sur la liste en vue d'inscrire qu'il vient de voter. On espère ou on prétend que ce fonctionnement sera plus fluide, mais permettez-moi de mettre un bémol.

Si tout cela se faisait par voie informatique, ce serait peut-être une autre histoire.

Le jour de l'élection, il y a sur place des scrutateurs formés, mais, soit dit en passant, il est de plus en plus difficile de trouver et de former ces scrutateurs. Il faut souvent un certain temps aux scrutateurs pour trouver le nom de l'électeur sur la liste dans une seule et même section de vote. Je voulais simplement vous dire que ce n'est pas nécessairement le meilleur moyen. Il faudrait peut-être revoir le processus visant à identifier les électeurs. En effet, à chaque élection, c'est ce qui cause problème. Je vote tout de même depuis plusieurs années, et c'est ce que j'ai pu remarquer. La difficulté n'est pas le fait que l'électeur doive se rendre à tel ou tel endroit, mais plutôt le temps requis pour que l'électeur soit identifié et pour qu'on inscrive qu'il a voté. [Traduction]

Le président:

Avec ce nouveau changement — qui ne s'appliquera pas à la prochaine élection —, le bulletin de vote précisera la section de vote. Étant donné qu'on pourra se rendre à n'importe quelle table, ce sera inscrit sur le bulletin de vote et on saura donc dans quelle section de vote on a voté. Il n'y a donc aucun changement à cet égard. C'est dans le vote général... Je ne parle pas des bureaux de scrutin par anticipation. [Français]

M. Luc Thériault:

Cela concerne le recomptage. Or je ne crois pas que cette façon de procéder rendra le vote plus fluide.

Pour ce qui est du nombre de boîtes par lieu de vote, je pense qu'il est de plus en plus difficile pour les directeurs du scrutin de trouver des endroits où tenir le vote. D'année en année, on finit par connaître les différents lieux de vote. Ils sont établis par toutes les organisations et par les directeurs du scrutin, qui sont souvent en poste depuis des années. Il se pourrait qu'une installation permette plus que 10 boîtes. Dans ces circonstances, je ne vois pas pourquoi on se limiterait strictement à 10 boîtes. À chaque élection, rares ont été les lieux inadéquats. Quand cela s'est produit, la situation a été corrigée. De très grands gymnases ou de très grandes installations permettent d'avoir beaucoup plus que 10 boîtes. Dans les circonscriptions, c'est institutionnalisé. Nous disposons tous déjà de tels endroits.

C'est ce que j'avais à dire. [Traduction]

Le président:

D'accord.

J'aimerais souhaiter la bienvenue à Elizabeth May, du Parti vert.

Sommes-nous prêts à voter sur CPC-26?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 86 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 87)

Le président: J'aimerais formuler un commentaire au sujet des deux amendements suivants, c'est-à-dire CPC-27 et CPC-28. Toute personne qui souhaite adopter ces deux amendements devrait modifier le premier, car le deuxième ne pourra pas être présenté, étant donné qu'il modifie la même ligne. On parle de fournir des renseignements aux candidats. Le directeur du scrutin doit fournir les renseignements sur les adresses de toutes les sections de vote. Dans CPC-27, on dit qu'il devrait également être tenu de fournir la liste des sections de vote rattachées à chacun des bureaux de scrutin. L'amendement suivant dit qu'on devrait également préciser le nombre d'urnes ou tout changement apporté aux urnes.

Si vous souhaitez que ces deux renseignements soient fournis au candidat, vous devrez modifier le premier amendement. Autrement, vous ne pourrez pas présenter le deuxième amendement, car il modifie la même ligne que dans le premier. C'est ce que j'ai compris quand j'ai lu cela hier soir.

Y a-t-il des commentaires?

(0945)

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, vous lisez dans mes pensées. J'aimerais proposer un sous-amendement pour modifier CPC-27 en supprimant l'alinéa c). Cela nous permettra ensuite de proposer l'amendement suivant si celui-ci est adopté, car je suis sûr qu'il le sera.

Le président:

D'accord, cela résout le problème qui empêchait l'amendement suivant de faire l'objet d'une discussion.

Y a-t-il des commentaires sur le sous-amendement visant à modifier CPC-27 en supprimant l'alinéa c)?

(Le sous-amendement est rejeté.)

Le président: Nous revenons à la discussion sur la motion. La motion est telle quelle. Le suivant ne peut pas être ajouté.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je crois que CPC-27 et CPC-28 visent à aider les candidats dans leur planification. Le jour de l'élection, les candidats veulent toujours bien répartir les scrutateurs et les bénévoles, et je crois que ces amendements permettent aux candidats de mieux se préparer avant les élections.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Corrigez-moi si je me trompe, mais Élections Canada fait déjà cela dans le cadre de ses pouvoirs actuels. Y a-t-il une raison de faire cela?

Le président:

Je vais demander aux témoins.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Vous avez raison lorsque vous dites qu'Élections Canada fait déjà cela.

Le président:

Indiquent-ils aux candidats chaque section de vote qui se trouve dans un bureau de scrutin?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Actuellement, chaque section de vote est rattachée à un seul bureau de scrutin, mais manifestement, dans le cadre de cette transition, ils préciseraient les sections de vote rattachées à chaque bureau de scrutin.

Le président:

D'accord. Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je crois que c'est la raison pour laquelle on fait cela. Actuellement, chaque bureau de scrutin a sa propre section de vote qui lui est rattachée. Encore une fois, s'il y a différents bureaux de scrutin avec différentes sections de vote, cela permet de rendre ces renseignements accessibles. Toutefois, avec la nouvelle exigence, nous ne sommes pas sûrs que ces renseignements seront accessibles.

Le président:

Ne venez-vous pas de dire qu'ils seraient accessibles?

M. Jean-François Morin:

J'ai dit que cela fait partie de l'initiative de modernisation des services de scrutin. Je ne vois pas pourquoi Élections Canada ne fournirait pas ces renseignements.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, allez-y.

M. John Nater:

Je crois que la loi n'obligerait pas la diffusion de ces renseignements. Je crois que c'est la raison pour laquelle cet amendement est important, car il veille à ce que les candidats obtiennent ces renseignements et qu'il soit obligatoire de les fournir.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires sur CPC-27?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous pouvons traiter CPC-28, car CPC-27 n'a pas été adopté, et nous n'avons donc pas modifié cette ligne.

Encore une fois, CPC-28 vise à fournir des renseignements supplémentaires aux candidats. On suggère de préciser aux candidats le nombre d'urnes ou tout changement apporté aux urnes.

Quelqu'un veut-il présenter cet amendement?

Pendant ce temps, j'aimerais poser une question aux membres du Comité. Les membres du Comité ont-ils une objection à ce que nous invitions des représentants d'Élections Canada? Ils pourraient s'asseoir à l'arrière et si nous avons des questions techniques que... Y a-t-il des objections à cette proposition? Pouvons-nous leur communiquer les amendements? Êtes-vous d'accord?

D'accord. Nous ferons cela. C'était un bon point. Ils pourraient nous décrire comment certaines de ces mesures s'appliqueraient de façon concrète.

(0950)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ils écoutent probablement déjà la réunion en ligne.

Le président:

La réunion est publique.

Stéphanie, voulez-vous présenter CPC-28?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Certainement. Dans l'ensemble, il ressemble beaucoup à CPC-27. Il s'agit de fournir aux candidats les renseignements sur les urnes et sur le nombre d'urnes qui se trouveront dans chaque bureau de scrutin dans le cadre de ce nouvel arrangement. Encore une fois, cela permet aux candidats de mieux planifier la coordination des bénévoles, des scrutateurs, etc. Dans ce nouveau système, on ne connaît pas le nombre d'urnes qui se trouveront dans chaque bureau de scrutin, ce qui crée de l'incertitude dans la planification des candidats.

Je crois que ces renseignements seraient avantageux pour tous les candidats de tous les partis, et je ne vois pas pourquoi nous nous priverions de ces renseignements qui nous permettraient de mieux planifier.

Le président:

Y a-t-il des commentaires sur CPC-28?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous abordons maintenant LIB-8. Cet amendement suggère que les renseignements soient aussi fournis aux candidats sous forme électronique.

David, voulez-vous présenter cet amendement?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui. Il est assez simple. Il s'agit de veiller à obtenir des cartes électroniques. Je crois qu'elles sont utiles et préférables au gros tube de cartes qu'on nous remet au début de chaque campagne.

Une voix: Mais j'aime ces tubes.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Ils sont aussi excellents.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Obtiendrons-nous les deux formats? C'est ma seule question, car j'adore le tube de cartes. J'aime qu'elles soient affichées au mur.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il est écrit: « ... le sont notamment sous forme électronique ».

Il revient au directeur général des élections de décider s'il utilisera le format électronique ou un autre format, mais cela doit être au moins en format électronique.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Nous appuyons cela.

Le président:

Êtes-vous prêt à...?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Encore un petit détail.

Ça donne donc à Élections Canada la faculté de choisir, mais il faut l'information électronique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très juste.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Le papier n'est pas nécessaire?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est ce que je crois comprendre.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il devrait y avoir moyen de faire mieux.

Ça peut sembler ridicule, mais beaucoup d'équipes de campagne — j'ignore si c'est vrai, des vôtres — préfèrent épingler les cartes au mur. L'existence de cartes seulement électroniques oblige à les prévenir de devoir trouver une imprimante de cartes, un meuble de trois à quatre pieds de largeur.

J'ignore s'il y a... Peut-être que M. Morin peut nous dépanner, ici, parce que je détesterais qu'Élections Canada dise qu'elle ne s'occupe plus de nous fournir des cartes et que tous les candidats devront désormais dénicher des imprimantes de précision.

Je suis peut-être de la vieille école, mais nous adorons accrocher les cartes au mur et chercher à percer les secrets de la circonscription.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Cet amendement ne vise que les cartes fournies aux partis pour ne pas leur imposer une pile de 338 cartes.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ça ne concerne donc pas le candidat.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non. Il...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il continuera d'obtenir les cartes de papier.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En fait, c'est bon, parce que mon bureau manquait de murs pour toutes mes cartes.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Votre circonscription est tellement vaste.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il faut tellement d'encarts.

Le président:

Si l'amendement est adopté, il s'applique aussi à l'amendement LIB-16.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce seulement un ajout?

Pouvez-vous nous donner des explications, monsieur le président, avant de mettre cet amendement aux voix? Si nous votons sur deux, il est bon de savoir ce que...

M. David de Burgh-Graham: C'est deux pour le prix d'un.

M. Nathan Cullen: Oui.

Le président:

J'ai dû assister au débat d'urgence, hier soir, jusqu'à minuit. Je n'ai pas donc eu le temps de me rendre à...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Monsieur le président, c'est honteux. Démissionnez.

Le président:

C'est à la page 85 des amendements.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Y a-t-il plus loin un autre amendement qui lui correspond?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui, mais l'amendement LIB-16 s'applique aux bureaux de vote par anticipation.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oh! Je vois. D'accord. Merci.

Le président:

Est-ce encore celles qui vont aux partis?

M. Jean-François Morin: Oui.

Le président: Très bien.

Nous mettons maintenant aux voix l'amendement LIB-8.

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 87 modifié est adopté.)

(Les articles 88 à 92 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

(Article 93)

Le président: D'accord.

(0955)

[Français]

Nous avons l'amendement BQ-1, le seul amendement du Bloc québécois.

M. Luc Thériault:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Laissez-moi expliquer rapidement les principes sous-jacents à l'intention législative de cet ajout, qui vise à exiger qu'on vote à visage découvert. C'est une intention législative légitime et pour laquelle j'ai eu un mandat très clair.

On vit dans une société libre et démocratique où il y a des libertés et des droits garantis par la Charte. À la différence d'un droit, une liberté n'est pas associée à une responsabilité. La liberté d'expression, tout le monde l'a d'office. Le droit de vote, quant à lui, est associé à une responsabilité: celle de démontrer sa qualité d'électeur. Contrairement à une liberté, un droit n'est pas donné d'office.

On peut porter atteinte à un droit « dans des limites qui soient raisonnables et dont la justification puisse se démontrer dans le cadre d'une société libre et démocratique »; c'est la Charte qui le dit. Nous pensons qu'il est raisonnable de porter atteinte au droit de vote si une personne ne satisfait pas aux conditions de démonstration de sa qualité d'électeur.

Au Québec, on vit dans une société qui a sécularisé ses institutions. Certains ont peut-être entendu leurs grands-pères dire qu'à une certaine époque, avant la Révolution tranquille, les curés en chaire leur rappelaient que l'enfer était rouge et que le ciel était bleu. On appelle cela l'époque de la grande noirceur de Duplessis.

Dans une société d'accueil démocratique, il y a deux moments où le citoyen scelle son contrat social. Il y a deux moments symboliques incontournables qui démontrent l'adhésion d'un citoyen à notre société démocratique et sa volonté de s'intégrer à notre démocratie. Il y a l'assermentation, bien sûr, et le droit de vote, dont nous discutons ce matin.

Pour une société d'accueil, il n'y a pas de meilleur moyen de démontrer sa volonté d'intégrer un citoyen que de lui accorder le droit de vote. C'est à ce moment qu'un citoyen signe son contrat social. De la même manière, il n'y a pas de moment plus fort pour démontrer sa volonté d'adhérer à ces valeurs démocratiques que celui où le citoyen, pour avoir le droit de vote, se conforme à ce que prescrit la loi.

Tout vient toujours d'expériences concrètes. En 2007 au Québec, en pleine élection, le directeur général des élections, voulant être très inclusif, a donné une directive administrative selon laquelle il pouvait même tolérer le voile intégral. Je donne cet exemple parce que c'était cela, le problème, à cette époque. Il s'est ensuivi des gestes disgracieux par lesquels des gens ont porté atteinte au décorum nécessaire et au moment solennel que représente le vote quand on est un citoyen. Tout le monde s'est mis à dire qu'il se couvrirait le visage pour aller voter — d'ailleurs, des gens sont même arrivés à visage couvert au bureau de scrutin —, de sorte que la directive a été enlevée. Néanmoins, cela a mené à un débat qui a culminé à la création d'une commission parlementaire spéciale, soit la commission Bouchard-Taylor.

Cela dit, il nous semble tout à fait raisonnable que, pour avoir le droit de voter, un citoyen doive avoir le visage découvert, puisque l'identification de l'électeur le commande. C'est d'autant plus vrai qu'au Québec, en plus d'avoir leur carte d'électeur, les gens auront déjà sorti leur pièce d'identité avec photo.

(1000)



Nous pensons qu'il est important que les valeurs à la base de notre démocratie soient respectées dans un moment aussi important que celui où se signe le contrat social, c'est-à-dire lors de l'exercice du droit de vote. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Avant de donner la parole à M. Graham, je tiens à vous poser une question. Actuellement, les électeurs doivent-ils produire une carte d'identité à photo?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Pas actuellement. La Loi électorale du Canada prévoit plusieurs circonstances où ce n'est pas obligatoire.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si on n'a pas besoin de présenter une pièce d'identité avec photo pour voter, cet amendement sert-il à quelque chose?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je vous dirais que c'est davantage une question politique que je vais laisser entre vos mains. [Traduction]

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions sur cet amendement?

Ruby.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je pense que ça entrave la liberté de religion. Monsieur le président, vous venez de faire remarquer que ça semble imposer une obligation supplémentaire aux adeptes de certaines religions, mais pas à ceux d'autres religions, qui, eux, n'ont pas besoin de présenter une pièce d'identité avec photo. À quoi la compare-t-on de toute façon?

Je pense que, dans les circonstances, je m'opposerai à cet amendement.

Le président:

D'autres points à débattre?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: D'après l'amendement CPC-29, le directeur général des élections peut autoriser l'identification de l'électeur, mais avec la réserve suivante: « sauf l'avis de confirmation d'inscription ». Voulez-vous nous l'expliquer, Stephanie?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Volontiers. Essentiellement, ça revient au fait que la carte d'information de l'électeur n'est pas une pièce acceptable d'identité. Même avec des pièces supplémentaires, nous craignons beaucoup que quelqu'un utilise comme pièce supplémentaire d'identité une simple carte d'abonnement à la bibliothèque ou la carte Costco. Nous ne considérons pas comme acceptable l'utilisation des cartes d'information de l'électeur à d'autres fins que les exemples cités par les médias, hier, et que j'ai soulevés. Je veux dire que le gouvernement semble s'opposer tout à fait à ce garde-fou. Je ne crois pas pouvoir convaincre les membres du contraire.

Je pense que nous avons très clairement exposé la position de l'opposition officielle, sa profonde inquiétude pour la légitimité de l'électorat. Ce document est peut-être le plus important pour ce que nous considérons comme la sauvegarde de cette légitimité.

Je n'ai rien d'autre à dire, monsieur le président. Comme je l'ai dit, je ne vois aucun argument que je pourrais ou que mes collègues pourraient encore formuler pour détourner le gouvernement de ce que nous considérons comme un exercice risqué de la démocratie au Canada.

J'en resterai là.

Le président:

Même si vous ne croyez pas que vos collègues puissent convaincre les libéraux, l'un d'eux est inscrit sur la liste des intervenants.

Mais avant de l'entendre, je dois préciser qu'un certain nombre d'amendements à venir portent sur le même sujet.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Bien sûr.

Le président:

Il est à espérer qu'on abrégera la discussion qui reprendra quand nous y arriverons.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ils répéteront sans cesse les mêmes choses.

Le président:

Entendons M. Bittle, ensuite M. Nater.

M. Chris Bittle:

Ce n'est pas seulement le gouvernement. C'est le directeur général des élections. Nous avons même convoqué le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario, et les conservateurs l'ont questionné sur cette pratique, qui est parfaitement valide.

Les conservateurs cherchent à priver de leur droit de vote 130 000 personnes — d'après les témoignages, c'était, la dernière fois, sous le régime de la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections — à cause du risque de fraude électorale, même si nous n'en connaissons aucun cas confirmé, malgré nos demandes en ce sens, à tous les témoins.

Le parti conservateur cherche une solution à une absence de problème. Nous voulons redonner le droit de voter aux 130 000 Canadiens qui en ont été privés aux dernières élections. Nous donnons suite aux recommandations des directeurs généraux des élections de partout dans le pays et nous nous opposerons aux tentatives pour le retour de la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections.

(1005)

Le président:

Vous voulez dire par cet amendement en particulier.

M. Chris Bittle:

Oui, par cet amendement.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Voici une actualisation de ce nombre de 130 000. En fait, l'étude a révélé que 7 % de plus de sondés qu'en réalité ont dit avoir voté. On peut donc ne pas le prendre au pied de la lettre.

Remarquons, en ce qui concerne la carte d'information de l'électeur, que, aux dernières élections, plus de 900 000 comportaient des erreurs. C'est une question d'exactitude et de vérité. Voilà pourquoi nous n'estimons pas que c'est une pièce convenable d'identité.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J'ai cherché à déterminer si le problème est dû à des électeurs qui votaient par anticipation et souvent, et qui tentaient d'empêtrer le système en utilisant cette pièce d'identité. Selon les témoignages, ce n'était pas le cas. Les erreurs pouvaient être simplement une confusion entre l'« appartement 1A » et l'« appartement 1B », par exemple. On les a exagérées par la publication d'une nouvelle manifestement fausse dénonçant des votes frauduleux.

Je m'en remets aux directeurs généraux des élections de partout dans notre pays qui, à maintes reprises, nous ont souligné l'utilité de la carte, particulièrement pour les Canadiens à faible revenu qui changent souvent d'adresse. Il y a des circonstances et des moments où c'est la pièce d'identité la meilleure et la plus facile à obtenir. Nous avons donc besoin de compter sur elle. Si cette pièce comporte des inexactitudes inquiétantes, nous pouvons certainement amener Élections Canada à corriger le problème.

Nous savons que, en moyenne, 8 à 10 % de la population changent d'adresse chaque année, et que des Canadiens déménagent beaucoup plus souvent que d'autres. Je ne voudrais donc pas que les jeunes Canadiens et les Canadiens à faible revenu croient que nous ne voulons pas les entendre au moment des élections pour la raison qu'ils ne sont pas assez solidement établis pour posséder une pièce d'identité portant la bonne adresse.

On peut contourner le problème par la facture d'électricité, par exemple, dont certains effets sont discriminatoires, particulièrement contre les femmes. Si elles se trouvent dans une relation qui empêche que leur nom figure sur la facture, ce qui a été la pratique de tout temps dans notre pays et dans d'autres, on ne peut pas se contenter de leur demander de seulement produire ce document.

Pourquoi ne pas utiliser un document fédéral envoyé à chaque électeur, dont l'électeur peut se munir?

Le président:

Pour votre information, on ne peut voter en étant seulement muni de la carte d'information de l'électeur. Il faut une autre pièce d'identité.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est vrai.

Le président:

Madame Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

J'ajoute mes commentaires à ceux de M. Cullen. Je crois que, dans de nombreux cas, il n'y a pas de fraude délibérée, mais ce qui se produit, c'est que les nouveaux résidents, quand ils reçoivent ces cartes, croient à tort obtenir le privilège de voter aux élections. Abstraction faite de l'intention ou non de commettre une fraude, ces cartes leur font croire qu'ils ont le droit de voter. Mais leur inscription dans le registre des électeurs leur donne l'occasion de voter.

Même si je ne crois pas nécessairement en l'intention frauduleuse, je crois néanmoins que la chose arrive, à cause de la distribution de ces cartes par Élections Canada. La conséquence non voulue, le résultat est que ces nouveaux Canadiens, ces nouveaux résidents les remplissent et les présentent et peuvent, de ce fait, voter.

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham. Ensuite ce sera M. Bittle.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comme je l'ai dit hier, la seule pièce fédérale d'identité qui ne coûte rien et qui porte l'adresse du détenteur est la carte d'information de l'électeur. La seule. Dans la province, la seule carte gratuite est la carte d'assurance-maladie. Les seules cartes que les Canadiens obtiennent gratuitement sont la carte d'information de l'électeur et la carte d'assurance-maladie, qui satisfont aux exigences à remplir pour exercer son droit de vote.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Quelle déception que d'entendre le même argument qu'hier dans la bouche des conservateurs: « Un journaliste nous a dit que... », le journaliste étant Candice Malcolm. M. Graham l'a complètement dévoilé hier en lisant le document d'Élections Canada — la nouvelle, non corroborée provient d'une usine à propager la peur. Il est malheureux de voir se répandre dans toute notre démocratie ce message subliminal qui cherche à priver du droit de vote certains des membres les plus vulnérables de la société canadienne. C'est simplement malheureux et intolérable pour nous.

(1010)

Le président:

Madame Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je pense que la journaliste en question a rédigé l'article parce qu'elle a été contactée non pas par un, mais plusieurs députés, qui avaient reçu des demandes de renseignements de la part de Néo-Canadiens inquiets d'avoir reçu ces cartes. Cette nouvelle n'était pas le pur fruit de son imagination. Elle a reçu de l'information de nouveaux résidents au Canada sur les renseignements inexacts et inappropriés qu'ils avaient reçus du gouvernement du Canada. Voilà les faits. Ces personnes, dont le nom ne devrait pas se trouver dans le registre des électeurs, ont reçu ces cartes, et on tentait ainsi de les faire inscrire dans le registre. C'est simplement de l'information communiquée à la journaliste. Ç'aurait pu être n'importe quel journaliste. Ç'a été elle, mais ces actions ont bien été commises.

Le président:

D'autres intervenants? Sommes-nous prêts à mettre l'amendement CPC-29 aux voix?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Sur l'amendement CPC-30, j'ai deux observations. D'abord, il s'applique aussi à l'amendement CPC-33, à la page 57, si vous le cherchez. Ensuite, si cet amendement est adopté, ça empêche qu'on propose l'amendement CPC-31, puisque les deux amendent la même ligne.

Je m'adresserai à Stephanie dans une minute.

Ça semble empêcher qu'on réponde d'un autre électeur par une déclaration, et je pense que ça concerne un certain nombre d'amendements. D'après notre dernière discussion, si nous pouvons régler le cas de cet amendement, nous pourrons réserver le même sort à tous les autres qui viendront.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Voilà d'excellentes instructions au jury, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Madame Kusie, voulez-vous présenter cet amendement?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Volontiers. Essentiellement, cet amendement revient au statu quo: pas de déclaration pour répondre d'un autre électeur, mais attestation du lieu de résidence, comme dans la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections.

Le président:

D'autres intervenants?

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pendant les dernières élections, dans ma circonscription, un électeur s'est présenté à un bureau de vote avec sa tante pour faire établir son identité — c'était impossible de voter, faute de pièce d'identité. Un cousin les y avait transportés. Leur identité était visiblement au-dessus de tout soupçon, mais personne ne pouvait répondre d'eux.

Ça arrive dans de nombreuses communautés, mais, chez nous, ça touche particulièrement les Autochtones et les habitants des régions les plus rurales et les plus reculées ainsi que certains électeurs à faible revenu. Ils ont beau connaître toutes les personnes présentes dans le bureau de vote et compter la moitié d'entre elles dans leur parenté, ils ne peuvent pas voter.

Vu l'acquisition assez récente du droit de vote par les Canadiens autochtones, la honte de se voir refuser la possibilité de l'exercer garantit presque qu'on ne reverra plus la personne, particulièrement si elle est âgée et l'a peut-être obtenu de son vivant — certainement du vivant de ses parents.

Un de mes prédécesseurs de Skeena, en fait, a combattu pendant trois ans pour faire accorder ce droit. D'après l'histoire du Parlement, Frank Howard a fait de l'obstruction pendant trois ans, tous les vendredis, pour obliger le gouvernement à l'accorder à tous les Canadiens. Je veux montrer que ça n'a pas été facile. Tout ce qui pourrait être perçu comme une réaction, quand, manifestement, aucune fraude n'est commise dans un suffrage...

Dans le Canada rural, il est simplement absurde de refuser à quelqu'un de sa parenté, qu'on connaît depuis des décennies, le droit de voter et de lui faire quitter les lieux dans l'humiliation.

Le président:

Nous sommes prêts pour la mise aux voix.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Ce résultat s'applique aussi à l'amendement CPC-33, à la page 57.

Nous pouvons maintenant passer à l'amendement CPC-31. Il semble une version réduite de l'amendement antérieur.

(1015)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, c'est comme un prix de consolation. Il autorise à répondre de l'identité de l'électeur, établie au moyen d'une pièce d'identité. Je ne sens pas vraiment la volonté de l'adopter parmi l'assistance, mais je ne crois pas nécessaire d'en dire davantage, monsieur le président. Nous pouvons peut-être passer à la mise aux voix.

Le président:

Nous sommes prêts.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Larry, vous devriez exiger une pièce d'identité pour voter.

Le président:

Nous sommes maintenant saisis de l'amendement NDP-8. Sachez que l'amendement NDP-8 s'applique également aux amendements NDP-9, à la page 67, NDP-11, à la page 78, NDP-16, à la page 114 et NDP-26, à la page 352. Il vise à remplacer « dont le nom figure sur la liste électorale de la même section de vote » par « dont le nom figure sur la liste électorale de la même circonscription ».

Monsieur Cullen, allez-y.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous croyons simplement que c'est logique. Nous venons tout juste de parler des répondants. Il y a des circonstances où les règles, si je les comprends bien... Les témoins peuvent me corriger si j'ai tort. L'individu doit habiter à l'intérieur des mêmes limites que l'autre personne; sinon, il ne peut pas être un répondant. Il peut voter, et on peut vérifier son identité, alors pourquoi ne pas lui permettre d'être un répondant, surtout — non pas dans nos circonscriptions, monsieur le président, mais dans des circonscriptions qui sont beaucoup plus rapprochées — s'il s'agit de deux amis qui habitent le même quartier ou des quartiers voisins? Il est évident qu'il est un citoyen et qu'on peut vérifier s'il a le droit de voter, alors pourquoi ne pas lui permettre d'être répondant pour quelqu'un d'autre?

Il semble étrange de préciser que le quartier doit être le même, alors qu'il peut s'agir de deux quartiers voisins. Souvent, dans le cas des personnes à faible revenu, si l'individu est responsable de fournir des soins à l'autre personne et qu'il veut être son répondant, la probabilité que les deux personnes vivent dans le même secteur de Montréal, par exemple, est pratiquement nulle. Si l'individu est admissible pour agir à titre de répondant, pourquoi ne pas lui permettre d'être le répondant pour la personne? Si c'est un principe qui est important pour nous, alors pourquoi ne pas élargir la disposition?

Le président:

Si je me souviens bien, les deux côtés d'une rue peuvent appartenir chacun à une section de vote différente.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Des voisins qui sont un en face de l'autre pourraient ne pas avoir la même section de vote.

Le président:

On ne peut pas agir comme répondant parce qu'on ne fait pas partie de la même section de vote.

M. Nathan Cullen:

On ne peut pas agir comme répondant parce qu'on ne se trouve pas dans la bonne section de vote.

D'après ce que je comprends — et les témoins peuvent me corriger si j'ai tort — c'est un peu trop arbitraire. Si ce principe est important, il faudrait alors élargir la disposition.

Le président:

Ruby, allez-y.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je comprends le principe dont vous parlez, mais, du point de vue de la logistique, chaque section de vote dispose d'une liste des électeurs pour cette section en particulier. Par souci de vérification, comment pourrait-on vérifier l'identité du répondant s'il ne figure pas sur la liste des électeurs? Je crois que c'est un peu trop large.

Le président:

Pouvons-nous avoir des commentaires de la part des témoins?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Il est vrai que le répondant doit faire partie de la même section de vote. Le projet de loi C-76 rétablirait la situation telle qu'elle était à cet égard avant le projet de loi C-23.

M. Nathan Cullen:

La question concerne la capacité de vérifier l'identité de la personne qui se présente comme répondant.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Dorénavant, il y aura une liste des électeurs pour chaque bureau de scrutin, qui pourrait comprendre plus d'une section de vote.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord. C'est la situation que nous venons de décrire. Il peut y avoir 10 boîtes de scrutin dans un même bureau de vote. L'identité de l'individu qui habite en face de l'autre personne, de l'autre côté de la rue, peut être vérifiée parce qu'il s'agit du même bureau de vote. Son nom figure sur la liste. Cependant, il ne peut pas agir comme répondant parce qu'il vote à la boîte de scrutin un et que l'autre personne vote à la boîte de scrutin trois. Il ne peut pas être un répondant.

Je ne crois pas que ce genre de situation se produit souvent, mais il est raisonnable qu'on souhaite vérifier l'identité d'un individu dont le nom figure sur la liste électorale. Si c'est possible de vérifier l'identité, et c'est possible d'après ce que je comprends, alors qu'est-ce que cela peut faire s'il n'habite pas du même côté de la rue que l'autre personne?

(1020)

Le président:

Allez-y, madame May.

Mme Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, PV):

Je vous suis reconnaissante, monsieur le président, de me donner l'occasion de m'exprimer en faveur de l'amendement de M. Cullen.

Dans la réalité, les gens ne savent pas nécessairement s'ils habitent dans la même circonscription ou s'ils ont le même député. Ils votent aux mêmes élections, mais ils ne font pas nécessairement partie de la même section de vote. Les représentants d'Élections Canada ont accès à la base de données. Ils n'ont peut-être pas en main une liste papier de tous les électeurs pour chaque section de vote, mais ils ont accès par voie électronique aux listes électorales, et ils peuvent vérifier très rapidement. J'espère vraiment que nous allons adopter cet amendement et j'espère que les libéraux l'appuieront.

L'idée de vérifier minutieusement l'identité des électeurs est nouvelle. C'est seulement en 2007, je crois, que la Loi électorale a été modifiée pour exiger que les électeurs présentent une pièce d'identité avec photo. C'est une solution qui est pire que le faux problème qu'elle vise à régler.

Au Canada, le problème n'a jamais été que les gens votent plus d'une fois; au Canada, le problème est que les gens ne votent pas. Lorsqu'une personne se présente à un bureau de vote pour agir comme répondant, qu'elle montre une pièce d'identité et qu'elle prouve qu'elle habite dans les environs, mais que son bureau de vote n'est pas le même, nous devons faire tout ce qui est possible pour accepter cette personne comme répondant.

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Je veux seulement confirmer quelque chose avec les témoins. Vous avez laissé entendre que chaque bureau de scrutin au pays a accès à la liste de tous les électeurs d'une circonscription.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non, pas d'une circonscription, mais les bureaux de scrutin... Comme nous l'avons dit plus tôt, le personnel électoral au bureau de vote a en main la liste des électeurs de toutes les sections de vote qui font partie de ce bureau de vote en question, mais il n'a pas facilement accès à la liste des électeurs de toutes les circonscriptions.

Le président:

J'imagine qu'il y a des bureaux de scrutin dans le Canada rural qui n'ont pas de connexion à Internet.

Stephanie, allez-y.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

J'aimerais parler de la solution que nous proposons, qui fait l'objet de l'amendement CPC-32, et qui, selon nous, serait plus appropriée. Elle vise les électeurs qui vivent dans des centres de soins et des résidences...

Une voix: Nous en serons saisis plus tard.

Mme Stephanie Kusie: Je sais que nous l'examinerons plus tard, mais ce que je dis... Ce n'est pas un sujet différent, car c'est une autre solution au problème des répondants.

Le président:

Il y a quatre amendements différents reliés aux électeurs qui vivent dans des résidences pour personnes âgées dont nous allons discuter. C'est une situation bien précise. Il est certain que c'est un bon sujet.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je vais m'arrêter là pour l'instant.

Le président:

La parole est maintenant à M. Genuis, et ensuite, ce sera au tour de M. Cullen.

M. Garnett Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan, PCC):

Monsieur le président, je vais peut-être être hors sujet, mais je voulais faire suite à un commentaire formulé par Mme May, parce qu'il pourrait avoir un lien avec d'autres amendements. Elle a dit que le problème n'a jamais été que les gens votent plus d'une fois. Je ne sais pas si c'est vrai, mais aux fins de la discussion, j'aimerais savoir comment on peut dire avec certitude que ce n'est pas un problème.

Le président:

D'accord. Tâchons de ne pas trop nous éloigner du sujet.

La parole est maintenant à M. Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous avons posé la question à de nombreuses reprises: Est-ce que la fraude électorale, précisément voter plusieurs fois, constitue un problème? Nous avons posé cette question aux gouvernements fédéral et provinciaux, et on nous a fait largement la preuve que la fraude électorale n'est pas un problème au Canada. Au terme de chaque élection, on procède à une vérification.

C'est pourquoi les craintes reliées à certains des changements proposés dans le projet de loi ne sont pas fondées, à mon avis. Voter plusieurs fois ou voter de façon frauduleuse ne constitue pas un problème de grande ampleur au Canada. C'est l'un des aspects qui fait partie de la vérification qu'effectue chaque fois Élections Canada. On vérifie si les gens votent en respectant les règles.

Revenons à ce qu'ont dit nos témoins. Quelqu'un se présente... Je crois que nous pouvons dire qu'au sein d'une circonscription, où il y a plusieurs bureaux de scrutin, il est tout à fait possible de vérifier qu'un individu de cette circonscription est habilité à voter et peut agir comme répondant pour une autre personne qui fait partie d'une autre section de vote que lui. Je crois qu'il est incorrect d'affirmer qu'on ne peut pas vérifier l'identité de cet individu qui vote également dans cette même circonscription. Par conséquent, une fois que son identité a été vérifiée, il peut agir comme répondant pour l'autre personne. C'est une situation qui se produit. Pour ce qui est du deuxième cas dont vous avez parlé, lorsqu'ils ne sont pas... Je crois qu'Élections Canada exige une connexion à Internet.

Je crois que tout dépend de notre façon de voir les choses. Est-ce qu'on veut aider cette personne à voter, ou est-ce qu'on veut créer un obstacle, comme Ruby l'a mentionné plus tôt? La personne qui se présente avec une pièce d'identité avec quelqu'un qui l'accompagne pour agir comme répondant a fait un effort. Je crois que, de notre côté, nous devons aussi faire un effort et déterminer qu'une personne dont on peut vérifier l'identité peut agir comme répondant pour quelqu'un d'autre, à moins de craindre que ce genre de situation devienne un problème ou que les gens vont tricher. Si le directeur de scrutin doit faire un appel téléphonique dans une circonscription voisine ou un bureau de vote à proximité, je ne considère pas que cela constitue un énorme problème.

Disons que j'ai quelqu'un devant moi. Elle affirme qu'elle est habilitée à voter et que son nom est Ruby, mais son nom de famille n'est pas Dhalla...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Nathan Cullen: ... et elle dit qu'elle veut agir comme répondant pour David. Après avoir fait une vérification, ce serait possible. Dans ce cas-ci, nous aurions aidé une personne à voter, au lieu de lui dire que, en raison d'un détail technique, la personne qui l'accompagne... Les gens ne sont pas au courant. Comme Elizabeth l'a dit, les gens ne savent pas s'ils se trouvent au bon bureau de vote; ils se présentent avec leur carte et ils essaient. Tout cela dépend de l'effort que nous voulons faire. Nous essayons, avec raison, d'aider les gens à voter au lieu de trouver des raisons de les empêcher de voter.

Je le répète, ce n'est pas une situation qui concerne beaucoup de Canadiens. Si les gens ont fait cet effort, je crois que nous devrions nous aussi faire un effort. C'est pour cette raison que nous présentons cet amendement.

(1025)

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle, allez-y.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je vous remercie.

Je remercie M. Cullen pour son amendement. Mon objection ne procède pas d'une philosophie. Elle est liée à un aspect pratique, précisément aux listes électorales. Peut-être que nous devrions revenir sur cet élément lorsque les registres de scrutin numériques auront été mis en place lors des élections qui suivront les prochaines.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je le répète, je parle de l'aspect pratique. Si quelqu'un se présente au bureau de scrutin et dit: « Voici mon répondant, mais il ne vote pas à la même urne que moi. », dans la pratique, le directeur du scrutin lui demanderait où il vote. Il ferait ensuite un appel ou il pourrait se déplacer s'il s'agit d'un gymnase où il y a plusieurs urnes pour vérifier l'identité de la personne. C'est le gros du travail. Je comprends que ce sera plus facile, mais en ce moment, ce n'est pas compliqué du tout.

Il faut imaginer une situation où quelqu'un se présente avec son fournisseur de soins ou son travailleur social, peu importe, une personne qui peut agir comme répondant et qui le connaît. Si nous lui disons que nous comprenons qu'il essaie de voter, d'exercer son droit de vote, mais que nous trouvons que c'est un peu trop compliqué de vérifier l'identité de l'autre personne et qu'il doit repartir sans voter, je vous garantis qu'il ne reviendra pas. Vous le savez, n'est-ce pas? Il ne reviendra pas après cette expérience, après s'être présenté avec, par exemple, son travailleur social. Il se présente avec la volonté de voter, d'exprimer son opinion. Il fait la file, puis nous lui disons: « Oui, vous êtes probablement la personne que vous affirmez être, et la personne qui vous accompagne est probablement habilitée à voter, mais nous n'allons pas faire l'effort de vérifier tout cela. Vous allez devoir partir car vous ne pouvez pas voter. » Il est absolument certain que cette personne ne reviendra pas.

Nous faisons ce genre de chose, et puis, nous nous demandons pourquoi les gens ne votent pas. Eh bien, c'est parce que parfois nous leur disons qu'ils ne peuvent pas voter pour des raisons, je dirais, davantage techniques que philosophiques, comme Chris l'a mentionné.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Compte tenu de ce qui est faisable actuellement, est-ce que nous pouvons modifier cela? Nous venons tout juste d'entendre dire qu'il existe une liste électorale pour l'ensemble de la circonscription. Au lieu de « circonscription » et de « section de vote »...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous voulez « bureau de scrutin ».

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui.

C'est plus large que...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vraiment? Je crois que c'est la même chose, n'est-ce pas?

M. Jean-François Morin:

La plus petite zone géographique dans la Loi électorale est la section de vote. En vertu du projet de loi C-76, plusieurs sections de vote seront regroupées au sein d'un même bureau de scrutin. Le district de scrutin anticipé est une zone géographique plus grande, et la circonscription est la zone la plus grande.

L'amendement NDP-8 vise à modifier la disposition pour qu'il s'agisse plutôt de la zone géographique la plus grande, c'est-à-dire la circonscription électorale.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ce que vous proposez, Ruby, c'est d'y aller avec...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Le bureau de scrutin.

C'est ce qui serait faisable pour le moment, n'est-ce pas?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Les bureaux de scrutin disposeront en effet de la liste électorale.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est exact.

C'est déjà mieux que ce que nous avions. C'est une petite amélioration.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Eh bien, avoir la moitié d'un sandwich, c'est mieux que rien.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Nathan Cullen: Est-ce que l'amendement peut être présenté au greffier à brûle-pourpoint, monsieur le président, par votre entremise?

Le président:

Donc, au lieu de « circonscription », ce serait « bureau de scrutin ».

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce que « bureau de scrutin » est le bon terme?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen: C'est un peu mieux.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui, c'est une amélioration.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est une amélioration. J'en conviens.

Nous allons devoir modifier l'amendement.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ce sera donc « bureau de scrutin ».

Le président:

D'accord. Nous remplaçons « circonscription » par « bureau de scrutin ».

Ce changement vise à permettre à quelqu'un d'agir comme répondant pour une autre personne qui peut voter au même bureau de scrutin, même si les deux n'ont pas la même section de vote au sein de ce bureau.

Madame Kusie, allez-y.

(1030)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Est-ce qu'un bureau de scrutin peut couvrir plus d'une circonscription? Non? D'accord.

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Puisque cet amendement est lié à cinq autres, Philippe est en train d'examiner les conséquences sur ceux-ci.

M. Chris Bittle:

Pouvons-nous faire une pause de cinq minutes?

Le président:

D'accord, nous allons faire une pause de cinq minutes.

La séance est suspendue.



(1040)

[Français]

Le président:

Nous sommes prêts à reprendre la séance.[Traduction]

Nous allons revenir à l'amendement NDP-8 et au changement proposé. Cet amendement a en effet des conséquences, mais je ne les exposerai pas pour l'instant, car elles sont de nature assez administrative, et nous n'avons pas encore voté sur le NDP-8.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Voulez-vous que j'aborde l'amendement LIB-13 ou que je m'en tienne au NDP-8 pour l'instant?

Le président:

Tenez-vous-en à l'amendement NDP-8, mais vous pouvez faire référence à l'amendement LIB-13.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord. Comme je viens de le mentionner à des collègues d'en face, Maria, qui fait partie de mon personnel, m'a fait remarquer que, dans le cas d'une infirmière ou d'une aide-infirmière qui agit comme répondant pour un électeur qui vit dans un centre de soins de longue durée, l'amendement LIB-13 ne prévoit pas que les deux personnes doivent faire partie de la même circonscription électorale; leurs circonscriptions peuvent être adjacentes. Il faut simplement que la loi soit cohérente. Si l'amendement LIB-13 est adopté, et j'imagine qu'il le sera, cela fera en sorte qu'on permettra à une personne d'agir comme répondant dans une circonscription qui n'est pas la sienne. Nous devons faire attention à la cohérence. Ce qui nous préoccupe, c'est que le répondant soit une personne habilitée à voter.

Comment Élections Canada ferait-il pour vérifier que la personne, qu'il s'agisse d'une infirmière, d'une aide-infirmière ou peu importe, est effectivement un électeur, même si elle ne fait pas partie de la même circonscription électorale que l'autre personne? Je ne veux pas commencer une discussion sur l'amendement LIB-13, mais je veux que la loi soit cohérente, ou du moins un tant soit peu.

(1045)

Le président:

Y a-t-il des commentaires?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pouvons-nous discuter de cela lorsque nous serons saisis de l'amendement LIB-13?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Eh bien, vous voyez que les deux amendements sont reliés. Je comprends que cet amendement vise à éliminer certaines des contraintes qui existent en ce moment en ce qui concerne les répondants. Je pense seulement que les arguments doivent être cohérents. Ils n'ont pas besoin de l'être, mais ils devraient l'être. C'est bien qu'ils le soient.

Une voix: Nathan, où croyez-vous que nous en sommes?

M. Nathan Cullen: Je ne le sais pas. Je suis désolé, j'ai perdu...

Le président:

Donc, monsieur Cullen, il est question de remplacer « circonscription » par « bureau de scrutin ».

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui. Je le répète, l'amendement LIB-13 est plus large que mon amendement original, qui vise maintenant une plus petite zone géographique. Si nous adoptons l'amendement LIB-13, nous élargissons tout cela pour inclure une circonscription électorale adjacente. On ne se limite même plus à une seule circonscription.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle, allez-y.

M. Chris Bittle:

L'amendement LIB-13 vise un petit groupe de personnes, qu'il faut identifier d'une façon ou d'une autre. Il faudra une lettre de la direction ou un document qui prouve l'identité de la personne, qui est vérifiée à la section de vote. Il s'agit d'un groupe de personnes en particulier, et nous savons...

Je comprends ce que vous dites, et je le répète, lorsque nous aurons des registres de scrutin numériques, nous pourrons élargir les dispositions en ce qui concerne les répondants, mais je crois que ce changement constitue une amélioration.

M. Nathan Cullen:

N'est-ce pas une question de procédure alors, monsieur le président? Nous ne nous sommes pas entretenus encore avec des représentants d'Élections Canada. Nous venons tout juste de leur adresser une invitation.

Alors je vais poser une question à nos témoins sur l'aspect pratique. Nous avons parlé de l'aspect pratique en ce qui concerne l'amendement NDP-8. Si un individu se présente et qu'il fait partie de la même circonscription que l'autre personne, que se passe-t-il? Que feraient les représentants d'Élections Canada? Devraient-ils téléphoner à un autre bureau de scrutin? C'est ce que je comprends d'après ce qu'on a dit jusqu'à maintenant.

Est-ce exact, monsieur Morin?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Si l'amendement NDP-8 est adopté tel quel, avant l'amendement, les fonctionnaires fédéraux au bureau de scrutin devront fort probablement appeler chaque fois le bureau du directeur du scrutin pour confirmer que le nom de l'électeur est sur la liste de la circonscription.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Et selon la description de M. Bittle, je ne suis pas certain... Je comprends votre scénario à propos d'une lettre ou autre, mais je présume qu'Élections Canada devra faire la même chose. Si on n'a pas la même circonscription, quelqu'un peut vouloir être le répondant d'un groupe de personnes, et il se fera dire qu'il n'est pas sur la liste électorale.

M. Jean-François Morin:

C'est plus que probable. Cependant, l'autre amendement dont nous parlons, le LIB-13, vise une catégorie très précise d'électeurs...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je comprends cela.

M. Jean-François Morin:

... par conséquent, l'ampleur du changement n'est pas très...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pour moi, il n'est pas question de l'ampleur du changement, mais du principe. Si nous disons qu'il est respecté ici, mais pas là-bas, et que c'est une question de logistique, pas de principe, je crois alors que nous aurions dû rédiger un article pour le projet de loi C-76 — pas une disposition de caducité, mais une disposition de réexamen — afin de mentionner ce qu'il faut faire et ensuite en élargir la portée une fois que nous avons le registre numérique du scrutin. C'est le scénario que nous imaginons pour l'avenir, à savoir un registre numérique du scrutin, n'est-ce pas? Lorsqu'une personne de la même circonscription se présente, mais à un autre bureau de scrutin, il n'y aura qu'à saisir son nom dans un ordinateur portable pour confirmer qu'elle est bien qui elle prétend être, n'est-ce pas?

(1050)

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je n'ai pas de renseignements à ce sujet. Ce serait...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il faut donc écrire aux gens d'Élections Canada.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Tout à fait.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Bon sang, j'aimerais qu'ils soient ici. Ils finiront par comparaître.

Le président:

Nathan, dans les faits, il y a une disposition de caducité, car à chaque campagne électorale, le directeur général des élections présente un rapport à notre comité.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oh, bien.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen, je veux juste confirmer que nous parlons de l'amendement et que nous avons substitué le terme « bureau de scrutin » à « circonscription ».

Monsieur Graham, allez-y.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il est question du bureau de scrutin, oui.

Ce que je veux dire au sujet de l'amendement LIB-13, c'est que ces cas sont généralement pris en charge par les bureaux de scrutin itinérants, ce qui est une tout autre paire de manches. Les bureaux itinérants se déplacent pour... Ce sont les bureaux de scrutin mobiles. Je veux juste mentionner qu'il est très différent de recourir à des bureaux itinérants par rapport aux bureaux ordinaires.

Le président:

Nous allons mettre aux voix le sous-amendement à l'amendement de M. Cullen, qui substitue le terme « bureau de scrutin » à « circonscription ».

(Le sous-amendement est adopté.)

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Je vais vous dire ce qu'il en est.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Allez-vous le faire maintenant?

Le président:

Je vais vous le dire maintenant.

Il est facile de modifier les amendements NDP-9 et NDP-11. Donc, lorsque nous en serons rendus là, ils seront considérés comme ayant été adoptés, mais avec ce changement également. En revanche, les amendements NDP-16 et NDP-26 parlent d'une personne qui vit dans la circonscription. On ne peut pas vivre dans un bureau de scrutin, et nous allons donc...

Des députés : Oh, oh!

Le président: Je suis au courant de la pénurie de logements, mais... Nous allons donc y revenir pour en discuter lorsque nous en serons saisis, parce qu'ils ne seront pas réglés de façon corrélative.

Nous sommes rendus à l'amendement PV-4.

Il y a quatre amendements ou quatre suggestions — de pratiquement tous les partis, peut-être même plus — qui visent à faire exercer le droit de vote d'aînés dans les résidences. C'est excellent. Il ne reste plus qu'à faire un choix.

Je sais que vous en avez discuté, mais qu'avez-vous dit?

Mme Elizabeth May:

Comme vous l'avez dit, monsieur le président, mon amendement renvoie directement à certaines des préoccupations soulevées par notre ancien directeur général des élections, Marc Mayrand, à propos d'un problème que nous pourrions avoir — et à vrai dire, nous en avons eu un — concernant les aînés dans les foyers lorsqu'un membre du personnel agissant à titre de répondant n'est pas électeur de la circonscription. Tout le monde veut régler le problème.

J'aime beaucoup mon amendement, mais après en avoir discuté avec Bernadette, il me semble que l'amendement LIB-9, le suivant, est assez similaire pour que l'approche procédurale la plus simple pour moi soit de retirer le mien. Je ne suis toutefois pas autorisé à le faire, car je ne peux pas proposer mon amendement compte tenu de la motion que vous avez tous adoptée. C'est pour cela que je suis ici, mais cela ne me plaît pas plus. Cette motion signifie que mon amendement est réputé avoir été déposé et adopté.

J'aimerais demander, sur l'avis du greffier, le retrait de mon amendement par consentement unanime.

Le président:

Y a-t-il consentement unanime pour le retirer? Bien.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Et voilà.

Le président:

Il est retiré. Je vous remercie tous de votre collaboration.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Bon travail d'équipe.

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à l'amendement LIB-9, qui a à peu près le même objectif, mais qui s'applique aussi à LIB-11, à la page 61; à LIB-13, à la page 70; à LIB-15, à la page 79; à LIB-19, à la page 113; et à LIB-63, à la page 353.

(1055)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est tout?

Le président:

Quelqu'un veut-il présenter l'amendement LIB-9?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est comme ce que nous avons dit il y a une seconde au sujet de l'amendement LIB-13. C'est très corrélatif. Cela permet aux personnes dans les maisons de retraite ou les établissements de soins de longue durée d'agir à titre de répondant de nombreuses personnes.

Le président:

Quelqu'un veut-il en discuter?

Stephanie, allez-y.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je signale que l'amendement CPC-32 suivra également. Nous croyons qu'il apporte une solution plus efficace au problème. Il est question de valider le lieu de résidence des électeurs des foyers — et eux aussi ne vivent pas dans des bureaux de scrutin, monsieur Cullen — à l'aide d'une liste préparée par l'administrateur du foyer. On élimine ainsi le besoin d'avoir un répondant, car le foyer donne la liste des résidents.

Nous présentons cela comme une solution de rechange légitime au système de répondants.

Le président:

Pour faire preuve de souplesse, je pense qu'il est acceptable de discuter de ces deux amendements en même temps. Quelqu'un a-t-il des observations sur l'un d'eux, sur la façon dont cela fonctionnera ou sur celui qui fonctionnerait le mieux?

Je ne sais pas si les témoins ont des observations concernant les façons de permettre à nos aînés d'exercer leur droit de vote. Vous êtes libres d'intervenir. Il y a ici deux façons différentes de procéder.

Monsieur Cullen, allez-y.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est une autre façon de recourir à un répondant, qui consiste à laisser les responsables ou l'administration du foyer s'en occuper. Les établissements de soins ont toutefois un mélange de résidants, des citoyens et des non-citoyens, et je ne sais pas en quoi c'est mieux que le système de répondants décrit dans les amendements LIB-9, LIB-13 et ainsi de suite.

Si je devais choisir entre les deux, l'option qui consiste à demander à l'administration de fournir la liste et à vérifier si les électeurs sont admissibles, car c'est ainsi que je comprends... Je ne sais pas si c'est mieux. En fait, cela pourrait être pire.

Le président:

Quelqu'un a-t-il quelque chose à ajouter?

Veuillez continuer de parler pendant que Philippe parle aux témoins. Quelqu'un peut prendre la parole.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Normalement, dans une salle remplie de politiciens, ce n'est pas un problème, monsieur le président.

Le président:

M. Nater va prendre la parole, j'en suis certain, et Garnett a tous ses dossiers en main.

Allez-y, monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

M. Nathan Cullen:

On peut toujours compter sur lui.

M. John Nater:

Pour clarifier l'amendement présenté par les conservateurs, il n'est question que d'une liste qui confirme le lieu de résidence. Il n'y a pas de liste des citoyens auquel on aurait accès dans ce genre d'établissements et ailleurs. L'adoption de l'amendement CPC-32 offrirait une solution de rechange pour prouver l'identité des gens. Les personnes qui habitent dans un foyer, qui n'ont souvent pas de permis de conduire, n'ont pas ce genre de preuve d'identité.

Les bouteilles de pilules et les ordonnances font partie des preuves de résidence. C'est une sorte de pièce d'identité. Je le mentionne au passage. Je trouve cela intéressant, et beaucoup d'aînés s'en servent.

Le principal point que je veux soulever, c'est qu'il s'agit d'une preuve de résidence dans le foyer. Ce n'est pas une preuve de citoyenneté. Cela n'existe tout simplement pas dans ce genre de contexte.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je me demande si cela fonctionne ensemble ou si tout ce que cela fait, c'est fournir une liste des résidants d'un établissement de soins de longue durée. J'essaie de voir si cela en fait plus.

Le président:

Nous pourrions peut-être demander à M. Morin d'intervenir.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si cela ne fait rien d'autre, alors, combiné à l'amendement LIB-9, pourquoi cela ne ferait pas tout... C'est juste plus de renseignements.

(1100)

M. Jean-François Morin:

Merci, monsieur le président.

En fait, la loi autorise déjà le directeur général des élections à indiquer quelles pièces d'identité peuvent être utilisées aux bureaux de scrutin. Le directeur général des élections a déjà autorisé le recours à des lettres provenant de la direction de ce genre d'établissements comme pièces d'identité.

Je crois toutefois comprendre que de nombreux directeurs n'ont pas le temps de rédiger ces lettres. Les résidants se retrouvent donc de toute façon sans preuve de résidence.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je répète ce que j'ai dit dans ma question, à savoir que si l'amendement CPC-32, qui demande à l'administration de faire une liste des résidants, comme John l'a dit, est adopté, cela ne constitue pas une validation de leur citoyenneté. Combiné à l'amendement LIB-9, y a-t-il une raison pour laquelle ils ne fonctionneraient pas ensemble? C'est ma question. L'un procure une liste, mais l'autre porte sur les répondants et la possibilité pour un fournisseur de soins à agir à ce titre. Une liste des résidants serait-elle problématique à cette fin?

M. John Nater:

Sur ce point, monsieur le président, au sujet d'une lettre d'un administrateur d'un établissement de soins de longue durée, j'ai déjà siégé au conseil d'administration de ce genre d'établissement, et je sais donc à quel point on y est occupé. Il pourrait être problématique de devoir rédiger de nombreuses lettres individuelles. Or, dans ce cas-ci, il suffit d'imprimer la liste des résidants, et c'est fait. Ce ne sera pas le processus coûteux qui consiste à rédiger 84 ou 112, peu importe le nombre, lettres qui seront transmises à Élections Canada en tant que preuves de résidence. Cela me paraît logique.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Mais...

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, bien. Madame Sahota, posez votre question.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pour préparer cette liste, on ne vérifierait pas et on n'aurait pas à vérifier s'il s'agit d'électeurs admissibles. On veut juste une liste des résidants de l'établissement.

M. John Nater:

Elle confirmerait la résidence. Un établissement de soins de longue durée n'aurait pas à prouver la citoyenneté. Ce n'est pas son rôle, et aucune liste de ce genre n'est remise à cette sorte d'établissements. Il est tout simplement question de confirmer la résidence pour permettre de voter. Nous cherchons d'autres moyens de prouver le lieu de résidence des aînés. Une liste d'un établissement de soins de longue durée est une solution très simple, surtout au sein d'une section de vote où le scrutin se fait sur place.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'essaie juste de clarifier le résultat de cette proposition. Disons que pour une certaine raison, on n'a pas donné la liste à défaut d'avoir eu même le temps de l'imprimer. C'est le jour des élections et le personnel est là. Les personnes dont le nom ne figure pas sur une liste seront-ils malgré tout en mesure de voter même si les responsables de la maison de soins infirmiers n'ont pas imprimé la liste, n'ont pas rempli cette obligation? La liste sera-t-elle obligatoire pour pouvoir voter, ou ne serait-elle qu'une autre option possible puisqu'on pourrait tout de même voter grâce à l'amendement LIB-9?

M. John Nater:

Oui, tant qu'on est admissible à voter, on peut le faire. Ce n'est pas comme si cela dépendait uniquement de la liste imprimée. Ce n'est qu'une autre option, une autre façon de prouver la résidence.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Parfait.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Morin, y a-t-il quelque chose qui empêche un établissement d'inscrire tous les noms dans la même lettre?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non, je ne pense pas. Je pense que ce serait permis, et le directeur général des élections peut déjà autoriser ce genre d'identification en vertu du paragraphe 143(2.1) de la loi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'amendement CPC-32 n'exige pas la création de cette liste; il dit seulement qu'on peut le faire, et c'est un droit qu'on possède déjà. Serait-il juste de dire que, dans les faits, l'amendement CPC-32 ne fait rien?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Eh bien, je vais vous laisser tirer vos propres conclusions, mais le directeur général des élections a le pouvoir d'autoriser le recours à cette forme d'identification.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Le prochain intervenant est M. Genuis.

M. Garnett Genuis:

Je pense que l'amendement CPC est plus clair quant au processus suivi pour produire une liste. Il n'a pas besoin des autres... C'est plus précis.

Je m'apprêtais à aborder un point soulevé plus tôt. Si je comprends bien la façon dont cela fonctionnerait — et John peut me donner des explications si je me trompe —, cela donne effectivement une autre option pour s'identifier. Pour la vaste majorité des gens, en plus d'une ordonnance ou d'une forme de pièce d'identité, on peut ainsi prouver son lieu de résidence, ce qui s'ajoute au grand nombre d'autres moyens disponibles.

(1105)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comme la carte d'information de l'électeur?

M. Garnett Genuis:

Nous en avons déjà discuté.

Le président:

Monsieur Morin, vous avez dit que certains établissements n'ont pas le temps d'imprimer la liste de leurs résidants. Ce serait toutefois moins long que de devoir répondre de chaque personne, n'est-ce pas?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Tout ce que je dis, c'est que les établissements sont déjà autorisés à produire ce genre de lettre et qu'ils sont nombreux à le faire pour que leurs résidants votent plus facilement, mais il y en a certains qui disent ne pas avoir assez de temps pour le faire.

Le président:

Bien. Quelqu'un a-t-il quelque chose à ajouter?

Nous allons mettre aux voix l'amendement LIB-9, qui s'applique aussi aux amendements LIB-11, LIB-13, LIB-15, LIB-19 et LIB-63.

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: C'est adopté, en même temps que de nombreux amendements corrélatifs.

Nous avons discuté longuement de l'amendement CPC-32. Quelqu'un a-t-il quelque chose à ajouter à ce sujet?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Non, nous allons le retirer.

Le président:

Allez-vous le retirer parce que le directeur général des élections peut déjà procéder ainsi?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui.

Le président:

Nous n'avons pas besoin du consentement unanime pour le retirer, car elle ne l'a pas encore proposé. Vous n'allez tout simplement pas le proposer.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Non.

Le président:

Bien. Cela rend les choses faciles.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Nous sommes ici pour cela.

Le président:

Oui, depuis deux ans.

(L'article 93 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Pour l'article 94, l'amendement CPC-33 a été rejeté à cause de l'amendement CPC-30.

(L'article 94 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Les articles 95 et 96 sont adoptés.)

(Article 97)

Le président: L'amendement CPC-34 ajoute qu'un fonctionnaire électoral a le mandat d'inscrire la section de vote sur le bulletin pour la raison expliquée plus tôt aujourd'hui par le Bloc. Maintenant que toutes les sections de vote sont mélangées, vous voulez encore être en mesure de dire aux partis politiques qui a voté et à quelle section de vote. C'est dorénavant sur le bulletin de vote. Il y a un endroit prévu à cette fin. On ne fait qu'ajouter ainsi un aspect administratif qui avait été oublié, afin que le fonctionnaire électoral s'assure d'inscrire ce renseignement sur le bulletin.

Stephanie, voulez-vous présenter cet amendement?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui. Vous avez raison de dire que le fonctionnaire électoral est ainsi tenu d'écrire la section de vote d'un électeur à l'endroit prévu à cette fin au verso du bulletin de vote.

Nous croyons qu'il ne s'agit que d'un oubli dans la version originale. Nous croyons aussi que l'amendement LIB-10 est dans le même esprit que l'amendement CPC-34. C'est juste un renseignement nécessaire sur le bulletin de vote. Comme je l'ai dit, nous pensons que c'est un oubli, et cet amendement le répare. Le gouvernement le reconnaît également dans l'amendement LIB-10.

Le président:

D'accord. Est-ce que quelqu'un aimerait ajouter quelque chose?

(L'amendement est adopté. Voir le [Procès-verbal])

Le président: Le vote relatif à l'amendement LIB-10 s'applique aussi à l'amendement LIB-22, qui se trouve à la page 127. Est-ce que quelqu'un veut présenter l'amendement LIB-10?

Il y a un peu de chevauchement avec l'amendement CPC-34. Est-ce la même chose? D'accord. Vous n'allez pas le proposer, donc.

(1110)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je le retirerais. Il faudrait l'exclure.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pensez à tous les mots que vous nous épargnez.

Le président:

Philippe, est-ce que cela veut dire que l'amendement LIB-22...?

M. Philippe Méla (greffier législatif):

Non. Il peut être distinct.

Le président:

Nous allons nous en occuper séparément quand nous y arriverons. Il n'y a plus de rapport.

(L'article 97 modifié est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(Article 98)

Le président: Il y a un amendement du PCC qui vise la version anglaise seulement et selon lequel la personne qui apporte le bulletin de vote doit le remettre au... et cela dit seulement « election officer » en ce moment. L'amendement du PCC suggère que la personne remette le bulletin « to the election officer who provided it ».

La question que je me pose, c'est que si ce fonctionnaire électoral en question a terminé son quart, ou quelque chose de ce genre, à qui la personne va-t-elle remettre son bulletin de vote?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est une question de libellé et non une question de fond.

Le président:

C'est vrai. C'est pour que cela corresponde au français. C'est un amendement dont le but est de faire correspondre l'anglais et le français.

Nous vous écoutons, Stephanie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Encore là, ce n'est qu'une mesure de plus du nouveau système pour veiller à ce que le bulletin soit remis au poste où il a été émis.

Vous avez mentionné qu'il est possible que le fonctionnaire électoral qui l'a émis... mais nous parlons d'un processus de 30 secondes environ. Nous pensons qu'il est sensé de maintenir l'obligation pour l'électeur de remettre le bulletin de vote au fonctionnaire électoral qui l'a émis.

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un a autre chose à dire à propos de l'amendement CPC-35?

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 98 modifié est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(Les articles 99 à 101 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

Le président: Nous nous sommes rendus à 100. Nous progressons, chers collègues.

(Article 102)

Le président: C'est le premier des nouveaux amendements du PCC que nous regardons aujourd'hui. Le numéro de référence se trouve dans le coin supérieur gauche, et c'est le 10008654.

Est-ce que quelqu'un peut le présenter?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Nous maintenons essentiellement l'assermentation obligatoire des interprètes. Je crois qu'il est important de garantir la légitimité de l'interprétation et ainsi de veiller à l'intégrité du processus de scrutin.

Le président:

J'invite les fonctionnaires à faire des observations à ce sujet aussi, car comme nous tous, ils n'ont pas vu cela encore.

Tout le monde peut réagir. La discussion est ouverte.

M. Chris Bittle:

Cela est soutenu par diverses infractions qui sont déjà prévues dans la Loi, alors cela n'ajouterait rien de particulier.

Le président:

Vous croyez que c'est déjà couvert. Est-ce bien ce que vous dites?

M. Chris Bittle:

Oui. C'est couvert par les infractions qui sont déjà prévues dans la Loi concernant le secret du vote.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Où?

M. Chris Bittle:

Dans les articles qui portent sur les infractions, plus loin.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Est-ce que les fonctionnaires pourraient réagir à cela?

Le président:

Est-ce que les fonctionnaires vont répondre?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui.

Pour répondre à la question de M. Bittle, la question du secret du vote et de toutes les interdictions liées au vote fait l'objet de la nouvelle partie 11,1 du projet de loi.

Le président:

De quel article s'agit-il?

M. Jean-François Morin:

C'est la nouvelle partie 11.1.

Le président:

Merci.

Est-ce qu'il y a d'autres interventions? Ceux qui sont pour l'amendement 10008654 du PCC?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 102 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 103)

Le président: L'amendement LIB-11 a été adopté du fait de l'adoption de l'amendement LIB-9.

(L'article 103 modifié est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(Article 104)

Le président: Nous avons un autre nouvel amendement du PCC, soit l'amendement 10008541.

Voulez-vous nous présenter cela, Stephanie?

(1115)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C'est également l'amendement CPC-36, je crois, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Oui. D'accord.

Ce n'en est pas un nouveau. C'est l'amendement CPC-36.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord.

En gros, nous voulons que les certificats de transfert soient délivrés par des fonctionnaires électoraux spécialement désignés à cette fin quand vous votez ailleurs qu'à votre bureau de scrutin. Nous croyons que les certificats de transfert devraient être délivrés par ces fonctionnaires électoraux spécialement désignés. Encore là, ce n'est qu'une mesure de sécurité de plus que nous cherchons à mettre en place pour la vérification de la légitimité de l'électorat.

Le président:

Cela revient dans plusieurs amendements. En ce moment, un fonctionnaire électoral peut délivrer un tel certificat de transfert, mais ces amendements disent qu'il faut que ce soit un fonctionnaire électoral « désigné ». J'imagine que les fonctionnaires nous diraient que c'est inutile dans le cadre du nouveau régime libéralisé qui comporte diverses choses.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui et non.

J'aimerais vous corriger, et j'en suis désolé, monsieur le président.

Il serait faux de dire qu'un fonctionnaire électoral peut faire quelque chose. Je vous invite à vous rendre à la page 17 du projet de loi, ligne 40 de la version française.[Français]

En français, c'est à la ligne 40.[Traduction]

On y dit que le directeur du scrutin doit affecter les fonctionnaires électoraux à diverses tâches prévues dans la Loi. Le directeur du scrutin doit tenir un registre de toutes les attributions qu'il confère à chaque fonctionnaire électoral.

Encore, à la page 18 du projet de loi, on peut lire à l'article 39 de la Loi électorale du Canada: Le fonctionnaire électoral exerce, conformément aux instructions du directeur général des élections, les attributions qui lui sont conférées par le directeur du scrutin.

La Loi prévoit déjà cela.

Le président:

Est-ce que la Loi permet au directeur du scrutin de désigner quelqu'un?

M. Jean-François Morin:

La Loi ne le permet pas; elle exige que le directeur du scrutin attribue des fonctions précises aux fonctionnaires électoraux, de sorte qu'aucun fonctionnaire électoral ne peut faire quelque chose sans que le directeur du scrutin lui ait demandé de le faire.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Ce n'est pas...

Le président:

D'accord. Est-ce que les gens sont prêts à voter?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous en sommes maintenant à l'amendement LIB-12. Selon cet amendement, pour qu'une personne puisse obtenir un certificat de transfert parce qu'elle travaille à un bureau de scrutin différent de celui où elle doit voter, elle doit aller voter dans un autre bureau de scrutin de la même circonscription.

Est-ce qu'un libéral peut présenter cet amendement?

Nous vous écoutons, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est une question d'uniformité. Dans d'autres parties de la Loi, on précise que c'est dans la même circonscription. Cela a toujours été implicite, mais cet amendement corrige une erreur de longue date.

Le président:

Est-ce que les fonctionnaires ont des observations à faire à ce sujet?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je dirais que ce n'est qu'un oubli, parce qu'avant le projet de loi C-76, les fonctionnaires électoraux étaient tenus de résider dans la circonscription. Bien sûr, s'ils étaient affectés à un bureau de scrutin, c'était assurément dans la même circonscription. Maintenant que nous leur permettons de travailler dans une autre circonscription...

(1120)

Le président:

Adjacente.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non. Dans n'importe quelle circonscription.

Bien entendu, les électeurs ne peuvent voter que dans la circonscription où ils résident normalement, alors c'est un amendement corrélatif.

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un veut ajouter quelque chose?

Ceux qui sont pour cet amendement?

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Merci.

L'article 104 modifié est-il adopté?

(L'article 104 modifié est adopté.)

(Article 105)

Le président: Nous sommes rendus à l'article 105.

Il est encore une fois question de la désignation. Qui veut présenter cela?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je crois qu'il n'est pas nécessaire d'en discuter encore. Nous allons le proposer et voter.

Le président:

Ceux qui sont pour l'amendement CPC-37, veuillez l'indiquer. Ceux qui sont contre?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 105 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(L'article 106 est adopté.)

(Article 107)

Le président: Nous avons l'amendement CPC-38. C'est un autre amendement qui vise le retrait du système des répondants. Nous pourrions donc simplement le mettre aux voix.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Bien sûr.

Le président:

Cela s'applique à l'amendement CPC-40, qui est à la page 71. C'est lié au principe de l'établissement de l'identité.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: L'amendement est rejeté, tout comme l'amendement CPC-40. Nous passons à l'amendement CPC-39.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Encore là, je vais simplement le proposer pour qu'il soit mis aux voix.

Le président:

C'est encore la question d'identité.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: L'amendement NDP-9 est corrélatif à l'amendement NDP-8, alors c'est réglé.

Nous en sommes à l'amendement NPD-10, le quatrième qui vise les résidences pour personnes âgées. Allez-vous présenter cela, monsieur Cullen?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vais me fier aux conseils de notre analyste, monsieur le président. Rappelez-moi ce que disait l'amendement libéral concernant les fournisseurs de soins, car je pense qu'on leur permettait d'être dans une circonscription différente, comme nous en avons discuté. Était-ce la même circonscription ou une circonscription adjacente? Je pose la question, car vous venez de parler de circonscription adjacente. Est-ce que quelqu'un peut me dire si l'amendement libéral concernant les fournisseurs de soins exigeait que ce soit dans une circonscription adjacente? Était-ce n'importe quelle circonscription?

Je crois que l'amendement NDP-10 permet que ce soit dans n'importe quelle circonscription. J'essaie de me souvenir de ce qu'il y avait dans l'amendement libéral...

Le président:

En effet, c'est dans une circonscription adjacente.

M. Jean-François Morin:

La même circonscription ou une circonscription adjacente.

M. Nathan Cullen:

On pourrait facilement imaginer une situation où un fournisseur de soin se trouve dans une circonscription un peu plus éloignée de sa circonscription. Ce serait certainement possible dans un milieu urbain. C'est une distinction qui ne change rien, comme on le dit. Si nous sommes d'accord avec cela en général — que le fournisseur de soins puisse répondre d'une autre personne, en application d'un amendement libéral antérieur, mais seulement dans une circonscription adjacente —, je ne vois pas pourquoi le même principe ne pourrait pas s'appliquer à une circonscription légèrement éloignée.

Je pense à Mississauga ou Brampton, ou du moins au centre-ville. La personne ne vit pas nécessairement dans la circonscription voisine. Elle peut vivre dans une circonscription plus éloignée, mais c'est quand même elle qui fournit les soins. Elle a quand même une lettre de l'établissement.

Pourquoi est-ce important que ce soit une circonscription adjacente? C'est la question que je pose. Est-ce pertinent pour déterminer la capacité d'une personne de répondre de l'identité d'une autre personne dont elle s'occupe, afin que celle-ci puisse voter? Je ne vois pas en quoi c'est important.

Les fonctionnaires pourraient nous le dire. Élections Canada va quand même devoir appeler ou confirmer d'une façon ou d'une autre l'identité du fournisseur de soins, et il importe peu que ce soit la circonscription voisine ou une autre un peu plus loin. Est-ce qu'il y a une bonne raison d'exiger que ce soit une circonscription adjacente?

(1125)

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je vais vous lire la définition du Black's Law Dictionary pour « adjacent »: « Lying near or close to », donc proche, sans nécessairement se toucher, alors qu'il y a la définition de « adjoining », qui est « touching », ou « attenant », en français, qui signifie que les circonscriptions seraient limitrophes.

M. Chris Bittle:

C'est la définition du dictionnaire juridique.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela ne donne rien, donc. C'est ce que vous dites. D'accord, c'est bon.

M. Chris Bittle:

C'est sensé pour un segment de la population.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est un segment très spécial composé des avocats.

M. Chris Bittle:

Ma maman est d'accord avec cela.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J'en suis bien content.

Donc, en clair, l'interprétation juridique qu'en ferait Élections Canada serait que les circonscriptions n'auraient pas à se toucher.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je ne peux prédire l'interprétation qu'Élections Canada en fera.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Eh bien, nous allons avoir besoin que vous le fassiez.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Tout ce que je dis, c'est qu'« adjacent » ne signifie pas nécessairement « adjoining », ou « attenant » en français. Les circonscriptions n'auraient pas à se toucher nécessairement. L'autre circonscription pourrait être proche.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je sais que les cas possibles ne sont pas très nombreux, mais encore une fois, je veux éviter que quelqu'un prenne les mesures requises afin de répondre des gens dans une résidence pour personnes âgées pour plus tard constater qu'Élections Canada interprète l'idée de la circonscription adjacente comme je l'ai fait — des circonscriptions qui se touchent —, et que l'électeur se fasse dire: « Un instant. Votre fournisseur de soin se trouve dans une circonscription qui est un peu plus loin. »

Le président:

Où se trouve cette définition? Est-ce qu'elle est dans la Loi électorale du Canada?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non. C'est la définition du Black's Law Dictionary.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est hautement douteux, comme texte.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Le Canadian Oxford Dictionary et Le Petit Robert définissent aussi adjacent comme signifiant proche ou...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Sans se toucher. Je vais laisser tomber, alors. Si nous avons le Canadian Oxford Dictionary pour confirmer cela, je l'accepte. Ce Black's Law Dictionary...

Le président:

Je crois que le plus simple serait de ne pas proposer votre amendement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je crois que nous avons réglé cela, et tous les dictionnaires du monde confirment cette interprétation. C'est le but de notre amendement.

Le président:

L'amendement n'est donc pas proposé.

L'amendement LIB-13 est corrélatif à l'amendement LIB-9.

L'article 107 modifié est-il adopté?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je suis désolé, mais est-ce qu'on a proposé l'amendement LIB-13?

Le président:

Il était corrélatif.

(L'article 107 modifié est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous avions l'amendement CPC-40, mais il était corrélatif et a été rejeté avec l'amendement CPC-38.

(L'article 108 est adopté avec dissidence. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Il n'y a pas d'amendements pour les articles 109 à 114. Il y avait l'amendement LIB-14 visant la création de l'article 114.1, mais il a été retiré en raison de l'adoption de l'amendement LIB-1.

(Les articles 109 à 114 inclusivement sont adoptés. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(Article 115)

Le président: Nous en sommes à l'amendement CPC-41. D'après ma compréhension de cela, il ne peut pas y en avoir plus d'un à un emplacement par jour. Je me demande qui cela dérange, mais...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Venez-vous de dire que vous vous demandez qui cela dérange? Retirez vos paroles. Cela me dérange.

Le président:

S'il y a plus d'un endroit le même jour?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui. Cela me dérange beaucoup. Je ne sais pas pourquoi, mais je vais trouver une raison au fur et à mesure que nous en parlons.

Le président:

Je me demandais simplement, concernant les fonctionnaires électoraux... Est-ce que ce n'est pas déjà couvert dans le texte original, où l'on dit: « ... à l'un ou l'autre de ces différents locaux à différents jours du vote par anticipation... »? Est-ce que cela règle l'enjeu visé par cet amendement?

Je me demande simplement si c'est déjà couvert, car je lisais l'original, et cela dit: « ... à l'un ou l'autre de ces différents locaux à différents jours du vote par anticipation... »

Pendant que vous vérifiez cela, Stephanie pourrait nous expliquer pourquoi nous ne voulons pas deux locaux différents le même jour pour le vote par anticipation dans une circonscription rurale.

(1130)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Nous croyons que c'est plus clair pour les électeurs s'il n'y a qu'un endroit chaque jour.

Je me souviens, quand j'étais jeune, avoir essayé de retrouver la bibliothèque mobile, et j'aimerais vraiment éviter ce genre de confusion à nos électeurs.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis confus.

Le président:

Nous vous écoutons, monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Dans nos circonscriptions rurales, je ne vois pas pourquoi il serait problématique d'avoir de multiples endroits pour le vote par anticipation.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Non, c'est un endroit... C'est un endroit par jour, par bureau de scrutin.

M. John Nater:

Me permettez-vous d'éclaircir cela?

Le président:

Bien sûr.

M. John Nater:

On essaie ainsi d'empêcher qu'un bureau de scrutin itinérant se trouve à un endroit de 10 heures à 15 heures pour ensuite partir à 15 heures, puis aller ailleurs à partir de 17 heures, jusqu'à la fin de la journée. On précise ainsi que c'est un seul endroit pour cela. Il n'y aura pas de déplacement pendant cette journée.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous dites que ce bureau de scrutin itinérant ne doit pas bouger de la journée?

M. John Nater:

Exactement. Il peut changer d'endroit d'un jour à l'autre, mais à l'intérieur d'une même journée, il ne peut pas partir au milieu de la journée pour aller...

Un député: C'est cela.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je peux comprendre cela, mais je me demande si nous voulons autant entrer dans les détails de la gestion de la Loi électorale du Canada. C'est peut-être un problème que vos gens ont relevé, mais nous n'avons pas vu cela.

Le président:

Votre amendement... Dans ma circonscription, nous avons des villes qui sont à une distance de quatre heures ou de 300 milles. Cet amendement les empêcherait-il d'avoir leur vote par anticipation la même journée? Comme vous le savez, Dawson City et Watson Lake sont à 300 milles et à 10 heures de route.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non. Si je comprends bien, le même bureau de vote itinérant serait à Watson Lake de 9 heures à midi puis il se déplacerait et serait à Carcross de 14 heures à 17 heures.

Le président:

On pourrait quand même avoir deux lieux distincts pour le vote par anticipation.

Un député: Oui.

Le président: D'accord.

M. Graham est le prochain intervenant, suivi de Mme Dhalla.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président: Oh non, je suis désolé — Mme Sahota.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne vois aucune raison pour que cet amendement...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je commence à penser que quelque chose se prépare...

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, allez-y.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne vois pas pourquoi nous avons besoin de cela. Dans ma circonscription à tout le moins, les bureaux de vote itinérants peuvent être à un endroit et tous ceux qui veulent s'y rendre peuvent voter en 30 minutes. Ils n'ont aucune raison de rester là toute la journée. La même équipe peut se rendre à la prochaine ville 20 ou 30 kilomètres plus loin pour établir un bureau de vote itinérant.

Je ne sais pas pourquoi on voudrait adopter cet amendement.

Le président:

On vous écoute, Ruby.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je veux simplement dire que je suis convaincue qu'Élections Canada aimerait faciliter le processus et accorder suffisamment de temps aux gens d'une région pour voter. En adoptant cet amendement, je ne voudrais pas limiter la capacité et l'accessibilité d'Élections Canada de se rendre à d'autres électeurs pour leur permettre de voter, essentiellement. C'est le but visé. Je veux laisser Élections Canada le soin de s'assurer que le plus grand nombre de personnes possible peuvent voter.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, je peux imaginer que les communautés de petite taille ont un créneau de 9 heures à midi, puis que le village voisin a le créneau de 13 heures à 17 heures et que les gens... Je préfère laisser le soin à Élections Canada de décider. Là encore, je ne considère pas que c'est un problème.

Le président:

Nous pouvons probablement entendre une dernière intervention de Stephanie, puis nous procéderons au vote.

Aviez-vous quelque chose à ajouter?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C'est un nouveau système, si je comprends bien, en ce qui concerne les bureaux de vote itinérants. Je n'ai jamais entendu cette expression. Je me demande dans quelles autres circonstances elle est utilisée.

Quoi qu'il en soit, je pense que nous voulions seulement apporter une structure à ce nouveau système pour qu'il soit le plus simple et peut-être le plus efficace possible.

(1135)

Le président:

D'accord. Nous allons procéder au vote sur l'amendement CPC-41.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 115 est adopté avec dissidence [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(Article 116)

Le président: En ce qui concerne l'article 116, nous commençons avec l'amendement CPC-42. Là encore, c'est sur le certificat de transfert.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, les amendements CPC-42 et CPC-43 sont pareils. Je vais proposer les deux, et nous pouvons passer au vote tout de suite car nous en avons déjà débattu.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous allons nous prononcer sur l'amendement CPC-42.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Tous ceux en faveur de l'amendement CPC-43?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 116 est adopté avec dissidence. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(Article 117)

Le président: Juste avant que nous discutions de l'article 117, le CPC-44 vise à éliminer la déclaration du répondant, et ce vote s'applique aussi à l'amendement CPC-46 à la page 80 car ces deux amendements se rapportent au concept d'identification. Nous avons plus ou moins eu une discussion sur le recours à un répondant.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui. Les amendements CPC-44 à C-46 sont redondants en quelque sorte.

Le président:

Nous allons nous prononcer sur le CPC-44.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: L'amendement CPC-46 est donc aussi rejeté.

Le CPC-45 porte encore une fois sur la déclaration, alors nous allons passer au vote.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Le NDP-11 est corrélatif au NDP-8. Le LIB-15 est corrélatif au LIB-9.

L'article 117 modifié est-il adopté?

(L'article 117 modifié est adopté avec dissidence. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(Article 118)

Le président: Nous avons étudié le CPC-46, qui a fait l'objet d'un vote.

(L'article 118 est adopté avec dissidence. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous sommes saisis de l'amendement NDP-12, qui était corrélatif au NDP-1, qui a été rejeté.

(L'article 119 est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(Article 120)

Le président: Le NDP-13 était corrélatif au NDP-1.

Nous avons maintenant le CPC-47. Il porte sur le comptage des votes immédiatement à chaque bureau de vote par anticipation.

Quelqu'un veut-il le présenter?

M. John Nater:

Je pense que le CPC-47 vise à donner un avis pour informer les gens au sujet des bureaux de vote itinérants.

Essentiellement, il s'agit de fournir les renseignements complets au sujet de tous les bureaux de vote itinérants avec l'horaire. Ces renseignements doivent être remis à l'avance.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. John Nater:

C'est pour que les électeurs sachent quand et où il y aura ces bureaux de vote itinérants dans leur région — plus il y a de renseignements, mieux c'est.

(1140)

Le président:

Les fonctionnaires ont-ils des observations à faire sur cet amendement?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non.

Le président:

Qu'il soit adopté ou non n'a pas d'importance?

Mme Manon Paquet:

Tout ce que nous pourrions dire, c'est que le directeur général des élections ou les directeurs du scrutin sont déjà tenus de fournir les renseignements sur tous les bureaux de vote par anticipation, ce qui inclut les bureaux de vote itinérants. Ils doivent fournir les renseignements pour tous les bureaux de scrutin par anticipation, et étant donné que les bureaux de vote itinérants sont des bureaux de scrutin par anticipation, ces renseignements doivent être fournis.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si c'est redondant, monsieur le président...

Je sais que mes électeurs ignorent parfois des événements qui ont lieu, mais si nous obligeons Élections Canada de faire connaître aux gens quand les bureaux de vote itinérants ont lieu, il n'y a rien de mal à cela. Si c’est redondant, c’est correct aussi. Nous devrons fournir ces renseignements aux gens deux fois plutôt qu’une.

Le président:

Quelqu'un d'autre veut-il intervenir?

M. Chris Bittle:

Si c'est redondant, ce n'est pas une question d'informer les gens, mais d'informer les candidats, alors je ne vois pas l'avantage de cet amendement. Nous faisons confiance à Élections Canada, et je ne pense pas que cet amendement soit nécessaire.

Le président:

Élections Canada dit qu'il doit donner ces renseignements à tout le monde; cet amendement dit de remettre les renseignements au candidat. Est-ce bien ce que vous dites?

Allez-y, monsieur Morin.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je tiens également à faire remarquer au Comité que cette motion supprimera le sous-alinéa 172a)(iv).

Le président:

Si vous éliminez ces éléments, il y aura des conséquences.

Qu'éliminez-vous, monsieur Nater?

M. John Nater:

Je ne le sais pas.

Le président:

Vous ne le savez pas. D'accord.

M. Jean-François Morin:

L'amendement éliminerait l'avis suivant: l'obligation de procéder au dépouillement le jour du scrutin, le plus tôt possible après la fermeture des bureaux de scrutin ou, avec l'autorisation préalable du directeur général des électeurs, une heure avant cette fermeture;

Le président:

On vous écoute, monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Je pense que c'est une lecture inexacte. On ne fait que remplacer les lignes 5 et 6 par cela. Le reste de la disposition demeurerait telle quelle, si bien qu'on ne remplace pas la disposition en entier.

Le président:

D'accord, je ne suis pas certain que...

M. Jean-François Morin:

Vous avez raison. Désolé.

Le président:

Merci de cette clarification.

Nous sommes prêts à nous prononcer sur l'amendement CPC-47.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous sommes rendus au CPC-48. Il porte encore une fois sur les bureaux de scrutin par anticipation. Quelqu'un veut-il présenter cet amendement?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord.

Il y a des corrections techniques à apporter au libellé. À l'heure actuelle, le libellé prévoit qu'il faut informer le candidat du changement d'emplacement. Le candidat doit donc être informé des multiples emplacements — pas d'un emplacement mais de plusieurs.

Le président:

Quelqu'un veut-il intervenir?

Les fonctionnaires veulent-ils se prononcer là-dessus?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Juste parce que cet amendement particulier commence au milieu d'une phrase et se termine par une autre moitié de phrase, avons-nous une idée de son incidence?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Là encore, dans le contexte où le paragraphe 168(8) s'appliquerait, c'est le type de bureau de scrutin itinérant par anticipation dont nous discutions il y a quelques minutes. Le candidat doit être informé des emplacements où un bureau de scrutin par anticipation sera établi, mais comme ma collègue Manon l'a dit il y a quelques minutes, il reste que c'est un bureau de scrutin par anticipation. Je crois que l'on doit déjà divulguer l'emplacement aux candidats.

(1145)

Le président:

Il faudrait que l'emplacement soit communiqué à tout le monde, et non pas seulement aux candidats, n'est-ce pas?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je pense que cette disposition précise s'applique aux avis envoyés aux candidats.

Le président:

Ce sont les avis aux candidats. D'accord.

Sommes-nous prêts à passer au vote?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oh, désolé, attendez... elle s'applique à tout le monde.

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant nous prononcer sur le CPC-48.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: L'amendement LIB-16 était corrélatif au LIB-8.

(L'article 120 modifié est adopté.)

Le président: L'article 121 n'avait aucun amendement.

(L'article 121 est adopté.)

(Article 122)

Le président: Nous sommes saisis du CPC-49. Le vote sur cet amendement s'appliquera au CPC-50 à la page 87, au CPC-51 à la page 90 et au CPC-144 à la page 265, car ils se rapportent au concept de la manipulation des boîtes de scrutin.

Cette partie de l'amendement précise simplement que les articles 174 et 175 sont remplacés par ce qui suit, et je pense que ce qui suit se trouve dans l'amendement subséquent.

On vous écoute, Stephanie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Nous demandons essentiellement de maintenir les dispositions existantes relatives aux procédures pour la fermeture des bureaux de scrutin par anticipation et à la boîte de scrutin quotidienne.

Dans les procédures existantes, la boîte de scrutin est scellée à la fin de la journée. En vertu des nouvelles dispositions, la boîte de scrutin serait rouverte et on y placerait les nouveaux votes. Nous sommes inquiets que les nouvelles dispositions pourraient donner lieu à un plus grand nombre d'irrégularités et donner moins de contrôle au scrutin.

Si nous maintenons les dispositions existantes, nous suggérons de mettre en place des mesures de protection accrues. Plutôt que de rouvrir et de fermer la boîte, une fois que la boîte est scellée, elle devrait rester scellée.

Le président:

Les fonctionnaires ont-ils des observations à faire?

M. Jean-François Morin:

L'amendement décrit par Mme Kusie est clair. Il maintiendrait le statu quo en ce qui concerne la manipulation des boîtes de scrutin à la fin des journées de vote par anticipation.

Le président:

Allez-y, madame... Ruby.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Mme Ruby Sahota:

La pause restera maintenant à jamais.

Cela annule la recommandation du directeur général des élections. Nous avons pris ses recommandations très au sérieux et avons veillé à ce qu'elles soient mises en oeuvre dans ce projet de loi, pour la plupart, et cet amendement défait l'une d'elles. Il ou elle devrait avoir le pouvoir de décider de la tenue des élections.

Le président:

Allez-y, madame Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Nous avons exprimé notre préoccupation, et c'est une préoccupation légitime. Si vous ouvrez quelque chose et que vous la rouvrez et la refermez sans cesse, le risque d'inexactitudes augmentera.

Le président:

Quelqu'un d'autre veut intervenir?

Le vote sur le CPC-49 s'applique aussi au CPC-50, au CPC-51 et au CPC-144.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous avons un nouvel amendement du CPC, et son numéro de référence est le 10008543.

On vous écoute, madame Kusie.

(1150)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci, monsieur le président. Cet élément a été rectifié avec les amendements LIB-11 ou LIB-9, je crois, car il ne se rapporte pas à l'exigence selon laquelle le nouveau directeur des élections écrit un numéro de district de vote par anticipation dans l'espace prévu à l'endos du bulletin de vote.

Un député: Y a-t-il une différence?

Mme Stephanie Kusie: Oui, la différence est que cela préciserait le numéro du vote par anticipation par opposition au numéro du scrutin.

Le président:

Nous nous sommes prononcés sur l'amendement libéral qui faisait état que la journée de vote régulière, le directeur des élections doit s'assurer d'écrire la section de vote sur le bulletin de scrutin, et cet amendement suggère de faire la même chose pour le vote par anticipation.

Quelqu'un d'autre veut intervenir?

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Le CPC-50 était corrélatif au CPC-49.

(L'article 122 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: L'amendement CPC-51 proposait un nouvel article 122.1, mais il a été rejeté à la suite du rejet du CPC-49.

Nous passons maintenant à l'article 123.

Le NDP-14 a été rejeté avec le NDP-1.

L'article 123 est-il adopté?

(L'article 123 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Le LIB-17 proposait un nouvel article 123.1, mais on le retire parce que le LIB-1 a été adopté.

Il n'y a pas d'amendement aux articles 124 à 142.

Les articles 124 à 142 sont-ils adoptés?

(Les articles 124 à 142 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

(Article 143)

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant passer à l'article 143 et nous discuterons de l'amendement CPC-52, qui porte encore une fois sur la carte d'inscription de l'électeur, si bien que nous pouvons probablement juste passer au vote.

Le CPC-52 est-il adopté?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 143 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Il n'y a pas d'amendement aux articles 144 à 150.

Les articles 144 à 150 sont-ils adoptés?

Mme Stephanie Kusie: Les articles 144 à 148 peuvent être adoptés, et l'article 149 peut être adopté avec dissidence, s'il vous plaît.

(Les articles 144 à 148 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

(L'article 149 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: L'article 150 est-il adopté?

Mme Stephanie Kusie: Avec dissidence, s'il vous plaît.

(1155)

Le président:

Il est adopté avec dissidence.

(L'article 150 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 151)

Le président: Nous passons à l'article 151. Nous abordons la question des électeurs étrangers. Là encore, il y a un certain nombre d'amendements semblables liés à une personne qui retourne au Canada, etc. Une fois que nous en aurons discuté, j'espère que nous pourrons appliquer ce concept, le résultat de ce que nous aurons décidé.

Le CPC-53 ajoute au libellé que ces électeurs étrangers résident « temporairement » à l'étranger mais, comme vous le savez, dans le projet de loi proposé, il n'est pas nécessaire que ce soit temporaire. Ils ne sont pas obligés de revenir.

Nous connaissons plus ou moins la position de tout le monde à ce sujet, mais madame Kusie, voulez-vous faire des observations?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord, je le ferai.

Je suis désolée; quelle était la disposition?

Le président:

C'est l'amendement CPC-53, qui porte sur l'électeur résidant « temporairement » à l'étranger.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, désolée, mais c'est quel article? Je m'excuse. J'essaie de trouver la bonne disposition.

Le président:

C'est l'article 151.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Nous, l'opposition officielle, voulons clairement revenir au statu quo, qui est un départ du Canada maximal de cinq ans et une intention de revenir au Canada.

Là encore, nous sommes très déterminés à assurer la légitimité de l'électorat, et nous sommes préoccupés que l'article dans sa forme actuelle n'atteint pas cet objectif, si bien que nous voudrions rétablir le statu quo.

Le président:

On vous écoute, monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Pour obtenir quelques clarifications de la part des fonctionnaires, avez-vous une idée du nombre d'électeurs éventuels qui pourraient être ajoutés aux listes électorales en vous fondant sur le projet de loi C-76? Combien de Canadiens qui vivent actuellement à l'étranger pourraient être ajoutés, à la lumière de ce changement?

M. Jean-François Morin:

La ministre l'a mentionné dans ses remarques liminaires hier, et le directeur général des élections l'a mentionné lorsqu'il est venu témoigner. On estime qu'environ un million d'électeurs pourraient regagner le droit de vote en vertu de cette disposition.

M. John Nater:

Simplement pour faire un suivi, savez-vous si d'autres pays du Commonwealth ont des interdictions semblables sur une exigence de retourner dans leur pays à l'intérieur d'un certain nombre d'années? Savez-vous si d'autres pays du Commonwealth imposent une exigence de retourner au pays?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Les délais varient. Je pense que c'est 15 ans au Royaume-Uni.

M. John Nater:

Il y a donc un autre pays qui impose une exigence de retour au pays.

M. Jean-François Morin: Absolument.

Le président:

Quelqu'un d'autre veut intervenir?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 151 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 152)

Le président: Nous sommes maintenant saisis de l'amendement CPC-54, qui porte aussi sur le fait de résider à l'étranger et d'avoir l'intention de rentrer au Canada, et le vote sur le CPC-54 s'appliquera au CPC-57 à la page 99.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous sommes saisis du CPC-55. Il porte sur le même sujet — le retour au Canada —, mais cela s'applique aussi au CPC-58.

(1200)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, c'est le même prix de consolation encore une fois. Nous essayons de mettre en place d'autres mesures de protection concernant les électeurs non résidents. On maintient le retrait de la période de cinq ans actuelle, mais on exige qu'il y ait une intention de rentrer au Canada.

Le président:

D'accord, alors le vote sur le CPC-55 s'applique au CPC-58, qui se trouve à la page 100, et au CPC-60, qui se trouve à la page 102, car ils portent sur le concept de résidence au Canada.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 152 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 153)

Le président: Nous passons à l'article 153. Nous allons examiner le CPC-56, qui exigerait des électeurs à l'étranger une preuve de citoyenneté canadienne, ce qui n'est pas le cas sous le régime proposé actuellement.

Voulez-vous présenter l'amendement?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Bien sûr. S'il s'agissait précédemment du prix de consolation, voici le prix pour jouer.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

On dirait un prix de participation.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, c'est exact.

Le directeur général des élections n'a pas, essentiellement, à demander une preuve de citoyenneté, puisqu'elle est obligatoire.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si je comprends bien, la Loi électorale prévoit déjà qu'il faut présenter une preuve de citoyenneté. Cela serait redondant. Est-ce exact?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Désolé?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La Loi électorale du Canada prévoit déjà qu'il faut présenter une preuve de citoyenneté, alors est-ce que cela ajoute quelque chose?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non, la loi n'exige pas la présentation d'une preuve de citoyenneté. La loi exige du directeur général des élections qu'il détermine en quoi consiste une preuve d'identité suffisante, et d'identité seulement dans ce cas. En fait, pour cet article de la partie 11, le directeur général des élections exige le passeport comme preuve de citoyenneté.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il a déjà le pouvoir d'exiger une preuve de citoyenneté.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Eh bien dans ce cas, le passeport combine la preuve d'identité et de citoyenneté.

Le président:

L'amendement prévoit toutefois qu'on doit le faire, et non pas qu'on peut le faire. Est-ce bien le cas, Stephanie?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, c'est exact. Ce sera une obligation.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, allez-y.

M. John Nater:

Si on pense qu'un million de personnes pourraient s'ajouter à la liste électorale, c'est tout à fait logique, puisque les gens vont envoyer leur bulletin de vote par la poste depuis Davos, Paris, ...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Nairobi.

M. John Nater:

... ou ailleurs. On devrait pouvoir présumer que ceux qui votent ont une preuve de citoyenneté.

Le président:

Vous comprenez qu'Élections Canada a dit avoir le pouvoir d'exiger une preuve en cas de doute.

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires au sujet du CPC-56?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Peut-on avoir un vote par appel nominal?

Le président:

Oui.

(L'amendement est rejeté par 6 voix contre 3.) [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: L'amendement est rejeté. Nous passons maintenant au CPC-57, qui est corrélatif au CPC-54, alors il est rejeté.

Le CPC-58 était corrélatif au CPC-55, alors il est rejeté.

Le CPC-59 exige également des personnes à l'étranger une preuve de résidence. S'agit-il d'une preuve de résidence à l'étranger ou au Canada?

(1205)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Si la personne se trouve à l'étranger, c'est la preuve de sa dernière adresse résidentielle au Canada.

Le président:

D'accord, alors parlez-nous de votre amendement.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je ne sais pas de quel type de prix il s'agit ici. Je pense que c'est assez simple. Il s'agit d'exiger une preuve de la dernière adresse résidentielle au Canada. C'est une autre tentative de préserver la légitimité de l'électorat. C'est tout ce que j'ai à dire, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Tout ceux qui sont en faveur de l'amendement CPC-59?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 153 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Nous en sommes à l'article 154.

L'amendement CPC-60 est rejeté dans la foulée du CPC-55.

(L'article 154 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 155)

Le président: Nous sommes maintenant à l'article 155.

Nous avons l'amendement CPC-60.1, qui prévoit encore une fois plus de preuves d'identité des électeurs qui se trouvent à l'étranger.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Cela s'applique également à l'amendement CPC-62.1, qui se trouve à la page 107. Ils sont liés au concept de la preuve d'identité.

(L'article 155 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: On propose un nouvel article, le 155.1. C'est l'un des nouveaux amendements qui ont été présentés hier.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Nous pouvons retirer l'amendement 10016360.

Le président:

Il ne sera pas présenté. Pour le retirer, nous ne le présenterons pas, tout simplement.

(L'article 156 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 157)

Le président: Nous passons maintenant à l'article 157. Nous avons l'amendement CPC-61.

Stephanie, voulez-vous le présenter?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Comme on peut le voir à la lecture, l'amendement vise à fixer un délai au directeur général des élections pour décider de prolonger la période lorsqu'il reçoit une demande de bulletin de vote spécial. Il faudrait essentiellement établir un délai pour avoir une décision à cet égard. Le libellé actuel est vague, et nous pensons qu'un délai clarifierait la loi.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, allez-y.

M. John Nater:

À titre de précision, cela ne fixe pas une date en soi, mais exige que le directeur général des élections fixe une date au plus tard 17 jours avant le jour du scrutin. Dans ce cas, il y a une certitude qui s'applique à tous les participants dans le système. Il n'y a pas d'incertitude pour les participants. Nous saurions que, au plus tard 17 jours avec le jour du scrutin, le directeur général des élections a fixé une date, et elle serait connue de tous les participants.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

Les fonctionnaires ont-ils quelque chose à ajouter?

M. Jean-François Morin:

L'amendement aurait pour effet d'enlever un certain pouvoir discrétionnaire au directeur général des élections, et comme cela concerne les demandes d'inscription et de bulletin de vote spécial qui sont reçues après 18 heures le sixième jour précédant le jour du scrutin, cela pourrait aller à l'encontre du but recherché.

(1210)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je ne doute pas de Jean-François. Il n'en peut plus de nos amendements. C'est compréhensible.

Le président:

Laissons cela ainsi.

Tous ceux qui sont en faveur de l'amendement CPC-61?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 157 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Il n'y a pas d'amendement aux articles 158 à 162.

(Les articles 158 à 162 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

L'amendement CPC-62 propose d'ajouter l'article 162.1.

Stephanie, pourriez-vous le présenter?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

On précise qu'il ne doit pas y avoir de section de vote d'indiquer au dos du bulletin de vote dans le processus de bulletin de vote spécial. Je pense que c'est semblable au précédent mécanisme de surveillance qui a été mentionné.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, allez-y.

M. John Nater:

J'aimerais ajouter qu'il s'agit également d'une question de confidentialité. En ajoutant la section de vote sur le bulletin spécial, on pourrait déterminer l'identité d'une personne. Comme il n'y a qu'un nombre relativement petit de gens à voter par bulletin de vote spécial, en ayant la section de vote, on pourrait éventuellement savoir dans de nombreux cas pour qui une personne a voté. C'est un problème de confidentialité. On veut s'assurer que leurs votes sont anonymes, comme il se doit.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, allez-y.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pourrait-on faire un lien entre le bulletin et la section de vote? Ces bulletins sont déposés dans une boîte distincte, après tout.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non. Ce ne serait absolument pas possible de le faire. On ne retournerait pas les bulletins dans l'urne de vote utilisée le jour du scrutin. Ces bulletins sont ceux qui sont dépouillés au titre de la section 4 de la partie 11. Les résultats seraient communiqués selon ce que prévoient les règles électorales spéciales.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce serait un regroupement.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Un regroupement, oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien. Merci.

Le président:

Aimeriez-vous commenter le point que vient de soulever M. Nater au sujet de la confidentialité?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je pense que c'est une préoccupation légitime.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen, allez-y.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je me posais la même question.

Le président:

Quelqu'un a-t-il quelque chose à ajouter?

Tous ceux qui sont en faveur du CPC-62?

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(Les articles 163 à 181 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

Il y avait un nouvel article, le 181.1, dans l'amendement NDP-15, mais malheureusement, il était corrélatif au NDP-1.

Nous passons à l'article 182. Nous avions le CPC-62.1, mais comme il était corrélatif au CPC-60.1, il a été rejeté.

(L'article 182 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le CPC-62.2 propose un nouvel article, le 182.1.

Stephanie, voulez-vous le présenter, s'il vous plaît?

(1215)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

On requière que les résultats concernant les bulletins de vote spéciaux des non-résidents soient communiqués de façon distincte. Nous craignons les irrégularités, et c'est pourquoi nous demandons à ce qu'ils soient communiqués de façon distincte.

On sait, de toute évidence, quels électeurs font partie de tel ou tel bureau de vote. Ce n'est pas le cas des non-résidents et des bulletins de vote spéciaux, si ce n'est qu'ils font partie du même grand conglomérat à un seul bureau de vote. Selon nous, le fait que les résultats soient communiqués de façon distincte ajoute une mesure de protection, car les bulletins ont deux particularités: ce sont des bulletins spéciaux et ils viennent de non-résidents. Selon nous, il faut améliorer la façon de communiquer l'information et le faire de façon distincte.

Le président:

Les fonctionnaires ont-ils des commentaires sur le sujet?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui, s'il vous plaît.

À l'heure actuelle, pour que tout le monde comprenne bien, voici les sections qui sont mentionnées. La section 2 concerne les électeurs des Forces canadiennes. La section 3 concerne les électeurs qui résident à l'extérieur du Canada. La section 4 concerne les électeurs qui résident au Canada, et la section 5 concerne les électeurs incarcérés. À l'heure actuelle, Élections Canada divulguent les résultats par groupes. Les résultats pour la section 4 — les électeurs qui résident au Canada — sont divulgués dans le groupe 2, qui, lors de la dernière élection générale, représentait environ 90 % des votes exprimés en vertu des règles électorales spéciales.

Pour ce qui est des sections 2, 3 et 5, les résultats sont divulgués dans le groupe 1, qui, lors de la dernière élection générale, regroupait environ 10 % des votes exprimés en vertu des règles électorales spéciales. Je mettrai en garde le Comité contre... encore une fois, pour des raisons de confidentialité...

Bien sûr, les dispositions du projet de loi C-76 pourraient avoir un effet sur le nombre de votes provenant de la section 3; ce nombre pourrait augmenter. Toutefois, en regroupant les sections 2 et 5 — les électeurs des Forces Canadiennes et ceux qui sont incarcérés... Proportionnellement au nombre de votes exprimés, il y a un très faible nombre d'électeurs dans ces sections, et comme les résultats sont divulgués par circonscription, c'est pourquoi je presse le Comité de penser aux problèmes de confidentialité. Il pourrait alors être facile de déterminer quel électeur dans la section a voté pour tel parti ou tel candidat.

Le président:

Donc, si on en ajoutait 10 et qu'ils votaient tous de la même façon, on pourrait savoir pour qui certains ont voté.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Exactement.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il faut se rappeler qu'on envisage qu'un million d'électeurs additionnels pourraient voter, des électeurs non résidents, en raison des nouvelles règles. Ce que je veux dire, c'est que 10 %, c'est beaucoup. Il y a sans doute des gens autour de la table qui ont remporté par une marge de 10 % ou moins. Merci, Jean. Je pense qu'il faut tenir compte de cela également. Nous voulons bien sûr respecter la vie privée des Canadiens, mais le but premier du projet de loi, sur ce point, devrait être de protéger la légitimité de l'électorat.

(1220)

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, allez-y.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, je suis d'accord avec les préoccupations des fonctionnaires au sujet de la confidentialité, et si on doit isoler... Combien d'électeurs à l'étranger ont voté lors de la dernière élection? Environ 12 000?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Comme je l'ai mentionné, on ne peut pas le savoir exactement. Selon les données que j'ai ici, 60 000 électeurs ont voté dans le groupe 1 — les électeurs des Forces canadiennes, les électeurs résidant à l'étranger et les électeurs incarcérés — et leurs nombres peuvent être assez bas. Par exemple, à l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard, il n'y en avait que 317, et au Yukon, seulement 97.

Donc, si on retire le groupe 3, soit les électeurs qui résident à l'étranger, il ne reste que les groupes 2 et 5 — les électeurs des Forces canadiennes et les électeurs incarcérés — et leur nombre peut être assez limité.

Le président:

Merci d'avoir parlé du Yukon.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ma question est la suivante: si on veut séparer les électeurs qui résident à l'étranger, pourquoi ne pas séparer les prisonniers des militaires, pour savoir comment ils votent? Je me le demande également.

Les problèmes de confidentialité sont trop importants pour qu'on fasse cela. Je ne peux pas appuyer l'amendement.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires sur le CPC-62.2?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Il n'y a pas d'amendement aux articles 183 à 189.

(Les articles 183 à 189 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

Le président: Je m'excuse de ne pas prendre de pause, mais je pense que les gens préfèrent terminer plus tôt que tard cette semaine, alors nous allons poursuivre. Toutefois, si quelqu'un a besoin d'une pause, n'hésitez pas à me le faire savoir.

Le CPC-62.3 propose d'ajouter un article, le 189.1. Stephanie, voulez-vous le présenter?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je pense qu'il n'y a rien à ajouter. C'est très semblable, si ce n'est pareil, au CPC-62.2, soit le fait de communiquer de façon distincte les résultats des bulletins spéciaux... sans doute lors du vote par anticipation.

Le président:

D'accord, donc c'est le même concept. Nous allons voter encore une fois. Il s'agit du CPC-62.3, qui propose l'ajout d'un article, le 189.1.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(Article 190)

Le président: Il y a environ 15 amendements.

Le premier était le LIB-18, mais il a été adopté, car il est corrélatif au LIB-1.

Nous passons au CPC-63. Stephanie, pourriez-vous nous le présenter, s'il vous plaît?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il s'agit d'exiger des fonctionnaires électoraux qu'ils inscrivent la section de vote de l'électeur dans l'espace prévu à cette fin au dos du bulletin de vote.

C'est la même chose que le précédent, où la situation était semblable... en fait, je cherche la différence.

M. John Nater:

Puis-je ajouter quelque chose, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Allez-y.

M. John Nater:

On parle également ici du fait de détruire un bulletin de vote, de le détériorer ou d'altérer ce qui y est inscrit. C'est l'élément additionnel ici. On ne veut pas que le numéro du bureau de vote soit effacé après qu'il a été inscrit par le fonctionnaire électoral. Il est question de l'altération du bulletin de vote.

(1225)

Le président:

Les fonctionnaires ont-ils des commentaires?

M. Jean-François Morin:

On parachèverait ainsi l'interdiction corrélative aux amendements qui ont déjà été apportés. Le numéro devrait ou ne devrait pas être ajouté au dos du bulletin, selon la situation.

Le président:

S'agit-il à votre avis d'un amendement positif?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui.

Le président:

Nous allons nous en tenir à cela.

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Le CPC-64 ne peut pas être présenté, puisque le LIB-19 a été adopté et qu'il portait sur la même ligne.

Le prochain amendement, le LIB-19, est déjà adopté, car il était corrélatif au LIB-9. Ainsi le NDP-16, qui porte sur la même ligne que le LIB-19, ne peut pas être examiné.

Nous passons au CPC-65.

Stephanie, allez-y.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

On veut étendre l'interdiction d'exercer une influence indue à la période préélectorale.

Si le gouvernement veut vraiment agir — le gouvernement avec un petit « g » et non un grand « G » —, je pense qu'il doit protéger les Canadiens de toutes les manières possibles, et tout mettre en oeuvre pour s'assurer que nos processus électoraux sont à l'abri des influences indues. C'est ce que fait cet amendement.

Pourquoi le gouvernement avec un grand « G » s'y opposerait-il? Pourquoi ne souhaiterait-il pas étendre l'interdiction à la période préélectorale?

(1230)

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, allez-y.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, pourrais-je avoir une clarification? Le CPC-65 entre-t-il en conflit avec le CPC-67? Si c'est le cas, je présenterais un sous-amendement pour m'assurer qu'ils n'entrent pas en conflit.

Le président:

Le CPC-67 ne pourrait pas être proposé si le CPC-65 était adopté.

M. John Nater:

Je propose donc un sous-amendement à l'amendement CPC-65: qu'il soit modifié par suppression de l'alinéa b). Ainsi, il ne chevaucherait pas les mêmes lignes qui se trouvent dans l'amendement CPC-67, ce qui nous permettrait de traiter les deux.

Le président:

J'ai une question pour les greffiers législatifs: cela veut-il dire que nous pourrions ensuite discuter de l'amendement CPC-67? D'accord.

(Le sous-amendement est adopté.)

Le président: Nous pouvons maintenant discuter de l'amendement CPC-65 modifié.

Monsieur Cullen, la parole est à vous.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je les associe dans mon esprit, alors je vais parler des deux en même temps. L'intention des amendements CPC-67 et CPC-65 est-elle d'interdire les entreprises qui ne sont établies au Canada que dans le but principal d'exercer une influence sur les électeurs et ensuite d'étendre l'interdiction à ces entreprises pendant la période préélectorale au chapitre des dépenses? Ai-je bien compris?

M. John Nater:

C'est ce que je comprends.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord, cela semble être une bonne idée. Nous essayons d'en venir à la question de l'influence étrangère.

Le président:

Les fonctionnaires ou les membres du gouvernement ont-ils quelque chose à ajouter?

Monsieur Bittle, la parole est à vous.

M. Chris Bittle:

Nous comprenons l'esprit de l'amendement proposé. Ce qui nous préoccupe ou nous pose problème c'est que, une fois qu'on s'éloigne de la date des élections, les risques énoncés à l'article 2 de la Charte augmentent de façon dramatique. C'est ce qui nous préoccupe.

Le président:

Monsieur Morin, nous vous écoutons.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais aussi faire remarquer que l'interdiction qui se trouve au paragraphe 282.4(1) du projet de loi est celle « d’exercer une influence... sur un électeur... afin qu’il vote ou s’abstienne de voter ou vote ou s’abstienne de voter pour un candidat donné ou un parti enregistré donné à une élection ».

Cette interdiction précise a été formulée pour ne s'appliquer qu'en période électorale. C'est seulement à partir de la première journée de la période électorale qu'un électeur peut voter en fait. Cette motion pourrait entraîner un problème d'application concernant la période préélectorale, car les électeurs ne peuvent pas voter pendant cette période.

Le président:

C'est maintenant au tour de M. Nater, suivi de M. Cullen.

M. John Nater:

En contrepartie, s'il est impossible d'influencer un vote, je suis curieux de savoir pourquoi on impose un plafond de dépenses préélectorales aux partis politiques. S'il est impossible d'influencer un vote en période préélectorale, pourquoi imposons-nous un plafond aux partis politiques pendant cette période? Cela semble un peu étrange. Nous avons l'un, mais pas l'autre. S'il est impossible d'influencer les électeurs, pourquoi prendre des mesures de prévention?

(1235)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Que faisons-nous? Est-ce une question existentielle?

M. John Nater:

C'en est une, oui. Elle n'est pas rhétorique.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Le plafond des dépenses pendant la période préélectorale ne s'appliquerait qu'aux publicités partisanes des partis enregistrés, et aux publicités partisanes, aux activités partisanes ainsi qu'aux sondages électoraux auprès de tiers. Il ne vise pas toutes les dépenses.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen, la parole est à vous.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je commencerai par répondre à M. Bittle: le plafond des dépenses en période préélectorale, qui a été invalidé en Colombie-Britannique, du moins, s'appliquait aux entreprises canadiennes et aux entreprises établies au Canada. Je ne sais pas si la question a déjà été portée devant la Cour suprême et si on l'a soumise à un critère juridique. Je crois comprendre qu'on cherche à limiter, pendant la période préélectorale, l'influence exercée par les entreprises établies au Canada dans le seul but d'essayer d'influencer les électeurs.

Cela revient à ce que John a dit. Si nous imposons des restrictions aux partis politiques et aux tiers pendant la période préélectorale, il est clair qu'il y a des votes en jeu, que les bulletins aient été émis ou pas. Je suppose que c'est la raison pour laquelle les libéraux ont créé la période préélectorale au départ — pour reconnaître le moment où la campagne électorale commence vraiment, et ce n'est pas quand le bref est émis.

Si je comprends bien le libellé, ce plafond s'applique ici aux entreprises dont le but principal au Canada, en période électorale, est d'exercer une influence sur les électeurs. Si on envisage que des entités de l'étranger puissent jouer un rôle dans nos élections — ce qu'on devrait faire compte tenu des exemples récents au Royaume-Uni, aux États-Unis et ailleurs — je suppose que cette mesure entre dans la catégorie « Essayons ».

Quelqu'un pourrait tenter de l'invalider devant les tribunaux, mais l'intention semble être assez claire. Nous avons essentiellement déjà levé le scellé sur la notion de période préélectorale avec ce projet de loi. Les électeurs sont en jeu pendant la période préélectorale. Pourquoi ne pas imposer de plafond aux entreprises dont le seul but au Canada — encore une fois, on en revient à la modification d'ordre législatif — est d'essayer d'exercer une influence sur les électeurs? Ce serait ceux que je voudrais qu'on limite le plus, honnêtement.

Le président:

Monsieur Morin, êtes-vous en train de dire qu'il y aurait un problème d'application?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui, le problème d'application est lié au fait que l'interdiction vise vraiment l'exercice d'une influence indue sur un électeur afin qu'il vote ou s'abstienne de voter ou vote ou s'abstienne de voter pour un candidat donné à une élection.

Je dis simplement que pendant la période préélectorale, le bref n'a pas été émis et il serait difficile d'interpréter le changement dans le contexte de cette interdiction pendant la période préélectorale.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pour en revenir à mon argument, cela dit, si on lançait une attaque exhortant les gens à ne pas voter pour M. Bittle qui sera candidat, nous verrions cela comme une tentative d'exercer une influence avant que le bulletin ne soit émis. Quelle est la différence?

Côté application, si ce texte avait force de loi et que quelqu'un essayait de le faire, nous l'en empêcherions. Je ne vois pas le problème d'application. Simplement parce qu'on n'est pas en période électorale, si quelqu'un essaie d'exercer une influence sur un électeur pour qu'il vote pour ou contre un candidat donné... Il s'agit de la période préélectorale. C'est exactement ce qui se produit.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, allez-y.

M. John Nater:

J'aimerais simplement revenir à ce que M. Bittle disait concernant les contestations fondées sur la Charte.

Je ne suis pas avocat, alors je ne prétends pas savoir exactement comment cela fonctionne, mais à l'article 282.4 du projet de loi, l'influence indue se rapporte aux « particuliers qui ne sont pas des citoyens canadiens ni des résidents permanents... et qui ne résident pas au Canada »; les personnes morales qui n'exercent pas d'activités au Canada; « les syndicats qui ne sont pas titulaires d'un droit de négocier... au Canada »; « les partis politiques étrangers » ou « les États étrangers ou l'un de leurs mandataires ».

Je crois comprendre que ces entités étrangères ne jouissent pas des droits garantis par la Charte, alors j'ignore comment on pourrait juger qu'il s'agit d'une contestation fondée sur la Charte.

Les fonctionnaires pourraient-ils nous dire s'il s'agirait d'une contestation fondée sur la Charte?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Désolé, pourriez-vous répéter cette question précise?

M. John Nater:

L'article sur l'influence indue parle des États étrangers et des partis politiques étrangers. Jouiraient-ils de droits fondés sur la Charte au Canada et seraient-ils en mesure de soulever une contestation fondée sur la Charte?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je ne vais pas répondre. Ce serait une question pour le ministère de la Justice.

(1240)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Et s'ils ont une présence au Canada?

M. Jean-François Morin:

La question de l'extraterritorialité de l'application de la Charte est assez discutable. Bien sûr, une personne, y compris une entreprise, qui a une présence au Canada jouirait de droits garantis par la Charte. Mais pour une entreprise ou une personne à l'extérieur du Canada qui n'exerce pas d'activités chez nous, ces droits pourraient être moins sûrs.

M. John Nater:

L'article 282 du projet de loi fait précisément allusion à ceux qui n'exercent pas d'activités au Canada, comme des entités étrangères n'ayant pas de présence au pays.

Le président:

Quelqu'un a-t-il quelque chose à ajouter?

Nous allons tenir un vote par appel nominal sur l'amendement CPC-65 modifié.

(L'amendement modifié est rejeté par 5 voix contre 4 [Voir le Procès-verbal]

Le président: Nous allons maintenant passer à l'amendement CPC-66.

Madame Kusie, la parole est à vous.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

En gros, cet amendement tente de traiter comme des tiers étrangers les entités constituées en société au Canada, mais dirigées par des étrangers, dont l'objectif principal est de mener des activités politiques.

Je pense que ce n'est un secret pour personne qu'il y avait un certain nombre de ces types d'entités pendant les élections de 2015. Elles exerçaient des activités au Canada et ont peut-être fait valoir ou non qu'elles étaient canadiennes. En réalité, il s'agissait d'entités étrangères, car elles étaient dirigées par des personnes à l'extérieur du Canada. Leur principal objectif était de mener des activités politiques, pas un autre type d'activités militantes, organisationnelles ou caritatives. C'étaient des organismes externes qui exerçaient des activités politiques précises, ce qui en gros, selon moi, constitue à la fois une influence et une ingérence étrangères.

Sur ce, nous proposons cet amendement en vue d'assurer que ce type d'activité potentielle soit entièrement éliminé à l'avenir. J'encourage vivement le gouvernement à envisager de l'approuver pour montrer aux Canadiens qu'il s'engage à ne permettre que les activités politiques canadiennes au Canada.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, nous vous écoutons.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président. J'ai une question pour les fonctionnaires.

Serait-il possible pour une entité étrangère de simplement se constituer en société au Canada pour être ensuite considérée comme un tiers dans le contexte d'élections canadiennes si cet amendement n'était pas adopté?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je ne suis pas un spécialiste de la loi sur la constitution des entreprises, alors je ne vais pas répondre à cette partie de votre question, tout simplement parce que je l'ignore.

Cela étant dit, nous parlions justement de l'application de la Charte il y a quelques minutes. Je ferais remarquer qu'une personne morale présente au Canada jouirait aussi de droits de liberté d'expression chez nous. Un risque pourrait être associé à pareil amendement.

Le président:

D'accord. Quelqu'un a-t-il quelque chose à ajouter? Sommes-nous prêts à mettre l'amendement aux voix?

Stéphanie, nous vous écoutons.

(1245)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

J'aimerais que les membres du gouvernement expliquent pourquoi ils ne sont pas en faveur de cet amendement. Dans certains cas, nous avons présenté des amendements dans un esprit semblable à ceux des amendements libéraux, mais il semble que ce ne soit pas le cas cette fois-ci.

Pourquoi le gouvernement s'y oppose-t-il?

Le président:

Ruby, la parole est à vous.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Comme on l'a mentionné, cet amendement ressemble beaucoup au dernier, mais il clarifie encore plus que l'entreprise concernée a une présence au Canada. En conséquence, nous ne voudrions pas aller au-delà des périodes électorales pour limiter leur liberté d'expression.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle, allez-y.

M. Chris Bittle:

C'est bien.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il s'agit de la liberté d'expression d'entités étrangères qui ont l'intention et pour objectif d'exercer des activités politiques. Il ne s'agit pas de la liberté d'expression d'entités canadiennes, car ces entités viennent de l'extérieur du Canada. Alors même s'il est question de liberté d'expression, il ne s'agit pas de la liberté d'expression d'une entité canadienne, mais bien étrangère. Je ne comprends pas pourquoi nous n'essaierions pas de l'interdire.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, c'est à vous.

M. John Nater:

Je vais simplement revenir à l'article 282 du projet de loi. Il est question d'une entité étrangère dont la seule activité au Canada est d'exercer une influence politique à l'alinéa 282.4(1)b) du projet de loi. On y dit que le seul objectif est celui d'exercer une influence sur des élections. Je pense que c'est là que réside la véritable préoccupation. En ce qui concerne l'influence, il y a là une faille suffisamment béante pour y laisser passer un camion.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Ce sont les deux combinés.

M. John Nater:

C'est une entité étrangère. C'est clair que sa seule raison de se constituer en société est d'influer sur des élections. Je pense que c'est une faille assez importante.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je n'ai rien d'autre à ajouter.

Le président:

Monsieur Morin, allez-y.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Bien que nous ne soyons pas dans cette partie du projet de loi, j'aimerais indiquer que pareille entreprise ou entité serait considérée comme un tiers aux termes de la partie 17 de la Loi. Cette partie comprend des amendements à la fois des libéraux et des conservateurs pour limiter le financement étranger des tiers. J'aimerais simplement faire remarquer que même si une personne morale se trouvait au Canada, à titre de tiers elle serait assujettie aux amendements à venir et elle ne serait pas en mesure de se servir de fonds étrangers pour financer ses activités au Canada. Cela s'inscrit dans un contexte plus large qui inclut la partie 17.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Le problème va plus loin. Nous n'avons pas mis en place les mesures de protection nécessaires en ce qui concerne les comptes en banque précis ou la présentation de rapports pour l'assurer avec une certitude absolue. Je ne pense pas qu'il y ait de la certitude même avec ces articles, monsieur Morin.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je n'ai rien d'autre à ajouter sur ce point.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, bien sûr. Merci.

Le président:

Lorsque vous avez dit que la question du tiers s'appliquait, est-ce pendant la période du bref, la période précédant la délivrance du bref et le reste de l'année?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Le paragraphe du projet de loi dont il est question, le paragraphe 282.4(1), s'applique uniquement pendant la période du bref. La partie 17 comprend une période pendant la période précédant la délivrance du bref et la période du bref, et un amendement libéral envisage d'ajouter une nouvelle section qui couvrirait les périodes qui ne sont ni électorales ni préélectorales.

Le président:

Alors, dans les faits, parce qu'elle n'aurait pas d'argent, l'entité étrangère ne pourrait rien faire de l'année si on approuvait l'amendement libéral dont vous venez de parler.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Elle pourrait exercer des activités au Canada, mais elle ne pourrait pas les financer au moyen de fonds étrangers. Elle aurait besoin d'obtenir des fonds d'une source canadienne pour financer des activités partisanes.

Le président:

Stéphanie, je crois que Ruby veut vous parler.

(1250)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est tellement une vaste définition de ce qui pourrait être vu comme de l'ingérence. Prenez, par exemple, le débat d'urgence que nous avons tenu hier sur les changements climatiques. Un rapport de l'ONU est publié. Est-ce que nous voyons pareils actes comme une éventuelle ingérence dans les élections lorsqu'il y a des questions auxquelles certains partis sont peut-être favorables et d'autres pas? Je m'inquiète qu'on puisse limiter la capacité des organismes d'exprimer leurs points de vue sur des questions. C'est aussi un risque si nous allons trop loin.

Je comprends l'autre risque, lorsque l'ingérence se fait avec malice au moyen de fausses preuves et de fausses déclarations — bien qu'on ne puisse pas parler de « preuves » — bref, de fausses informations qu'on diffuse pour influencer les acteurs. Cependant, si c'est uniquement des informations qui ont une influence, alors allons-nous trop loin?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je n'ai rien d'autre à ajouter.

Le président:

Sommes-nous prêts à mettre l'amendement aux voix?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

J'aimerais un vote par appel nominal, s'il vous plaît.

Le président:

Nous allons procéder à un vote par appel nominal sur l'amendement CPC-66.

(L'amendement est rejeté par 5 voix contre 4 [Voir le Procès-verbal]

Le président: Nous allons passer à l'amendement CPC-67.

Madame Kusie, nous vous écoutons.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

En fait, ce n'est pas tout à fait dans la même veine, mais c'est semblable. Cet amendement vise, au sens très large, à hausser le seuil pour permettre aux entités étrangères d'établir des liens canadiens de bonne foi. Il s'assure que les tiers soient des entités canadiennes et que les seuils adéquats soient mis en place pour déterminer qu'il s'agit de joueurs canadiens et non externes.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, allez-y.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'amendement vise-t-il à remplacer « seules activités » par « l'objectif principal »? Cela règle le problème dont vous vous plaigniez tout à l'heure et c'est tout à fait justifiable.

Le président:

Quelqu'un a-t-il quelque chose à ajouter concernant l'amendement CPC-67?

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Il nous reste quelques amendements de plus concernant cet article, alors si nous pouvions terminer cet article avant la pause, ce serait excellent.

Nous allons maintenant passer à l'amendement LIB-20. S'il est adopté, l'amendement CPC-67.1 ne pourra être proposé puisqu'il modifie la même ligne.

Est-ce que quelqu'un pourrait présenter l'amendement LIB-20?

Madame Sahota, nous vous écoutons.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je vais parler en faveur de cet amendement vu que c'est moi qui l'ai proposé.

Grosso modo, il vise à éliminer la redondance et l'ambiguïté et à déplacer les références aux entités étrangères et à les regrouper. Le commissaire d'Élections Canada avait indiqué à PROC qu'il estimait que l'alinéa 282.4(2)b) du projet de loi était redondant puisqu'une entité étrangère pouvait déjà être accusée d'avoir enfreint l'article 91 ou l'alinéa 282.4(2)c) du projet de loi.

Le projet de loi C-76 déplacerait le contenu de l'article 331 de la Loi électorale du Canada, qui interdit l'ingérence étrangère dans les élections canadiennes, vers une disposition exhaustive, à l'article 282.4 du projet de loi, qui énonce exactement ce qui constitue une influence indue par un étranger. Cet amendement ne fait que clarifier les choses et fait en sorte qu'on sache où trouver toutes ces dispositions.

(1255)

Le président:

Les fonctionnaires ont-ils des observations à faire?

M. Jean-François Morin:

En fait, cet amendement permet de mettre en oeuvre la recommandation du commissaire aux élections fédérales, exactement comme Mme Sahota l'a expliqué. Une personne qui fait une fausse déclaration interdite pourrait être accusée d'avoir commis l'infraction prévue à l'article 91 proposé et pourrait aussi être accusée aux termes de l'article 282.4 proposé, qui contient un renvoi à l'alinéa (2)c), lequel deviendrait maintenant l'alinéa (2)b).

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres observations?

Je crois que M. Nater aurait quelque chose à dire.

M. John Nater:

Non. C'est la seule fois, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres observations concernant l'amendement Libéral-20?

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: L'amendement CPC-67.1 ne peut être débattu parce qu'il modifie la même ligne.

Il nous en reste deux autres. Nous passons maintenant à l'amendement CPC-68.

Stephanie, vous avez la parole.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Cet amendement tente de corriger la portée étroite de l'exception de radiodiffusion concernant l'ingérence étrangère dans les élections.

Le président:

Y a-t-il des observations?

Monsieur Nater, allez-y.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, j'ai seulement quelques renseignements à fournir à ce sujet.

Nous ne voulons pas que cette disposition vise des pratiques normales, comme des lettres à la rédaction. C'est évidemment prévu dans la loi. Cet amendement vise plus précisément des émissions étrangères et une influence étrangère lorsque l'objectif de l'émission ou de la publication consiste justement à influencer les résultats des élections. On parle donc de cas précis. On ne parle pas d'exemples dans le contexte canadien. Il est question d'exemples de cas étrangers, où des émissions et des publications visent expressément à influencer les résultats des élections, y compris la manière dont les électeurs votent. C'est ce que nous voulons réellement viser ici: les publications étrangères qui influencent les résultats d'une élection canadienne.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle, allez-y.

M. Chris Bittle:

J'aimerais demander aux fonctionnaires quel serait l'effet de l'amendement. Je ne crois pas que cela change grand-chose à la façon dont la disposition s'applique.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Merci, monsieur Bittle.

L'exception qui est prévue à l'alinéa 282.4(3)c) proposé concerne la diffusion d'émissions ou de publications imprimées, comme des éditoriaux, des débats, des discours, des entrevues, des chroniques, des lettres, etc. Ce libellé est employé depuis longtemps dans la Loi électorale du Canada en guise d'exception à la définition de publicité électorale; il y a donc un historique lié à ce genre d'exception dans la loi.

Je ne suis pas convaincu qu'une émission ou une publication dont le but principal est d'inciter un électeur à voter ou à s'abstenir de voter, ou à voter ou à s'abstenir de voter pour un candidat ou un parti donné, soit effectivement visée par l'exception en vigueur. Bien entendu, ce sera aux tribunaux d'en donner leur interprétation au bout du compte, mais je doute qu'une émission partisane soit visée par cette exception reconnue.

(1300)

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, à vous la parole.

M. John Nater:

Je vais peut-être demander l'avis des fonctionnaires en utilisant un exemple. Disons qu'un animateur d'une émission-débat de fin de soirée à New York ou à Los Angeles consacre tout un épisode, en pleine campagne électorale, à l'éloge d'un chef canadien. Peu importe de quel chef il est question et de quelle émission-débat il s'agit, est-ce que cela tomberait sous le coup de cette disposition? Nous pensons tous à Jagmeet Singh.

Est-ce qu'un tel cas serait visé par cette disposition?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je ne pense pas que ce soit conforme à l'esprit de l'exception, mais, évidemment, cela dépendrait du contexte, c'est-à-dire des propos tenus et du temps alloué à ce sujet précis, etc.

M. John Nater:

Conviendrait-il de dire que cet amendement permettrait de donner de plus amples instructions aux tribunaux quant à la façon d'interpréter cette exception?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui, bien sûr.

Le président:

Nous allons mettre aux voix l'amendement CPC-68.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: La dernière chose, avant notre pause suivie de la période des questions, c'est l'amendement Libéral-21.

Quelqu'un pourrait-il en parler?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le commissaire aux élections fédérales a dit craindre que la formulation de cette disposition soit inutilement complexe et risque de causer certains problèmes d'application.

Le comportement que cette disposition vise à interdire, c'est la vente d'un espace publicitaire à une personne ou à une entité étrangère afin de lui permettre de diffuser un message de publicité électorale. L'amendement donnerait suite à la recommandation du commissaire de simplifier le libellé de la disposition. Il s'agit d'une recommandation faite par le commissaire pour simplifier un libellé complexe.

Je crois que c'est tout à fait acceptable.

Le président:

Y a-t-il des observations?

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 190 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Chers collègues, je tiens avant tout à vous remercier de votre grande collaboration et de votre esprit de respect mutuel. Vous avez fait un excellent travail.

Cela dit, je vous invite tous à quitter la salle rapidement, car le Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés tiendra sa réunion ici dans une minute.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Certains d'entre nous doivent rester pour y assister.

Le président:

Ceux qui siègent à ce comité peuvent rester.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on October 16, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.