header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-10-03 INDU 130

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1625)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order.

As with most things in the House of Commons, sometimes it's unavoidable and we have things that are happening, and today we had votes, so we're just going to go straight into our meeting.

We have with us today, as we continue our statutory review of the Copyright Act, from the Entertainment Software Association of Canada, Jayson Hilchie, president and chief executive officer. From Element AI, we have Paul Gagnon, legal adviser. From BSA The Software Alliance, we have Christian Troncoso, director of policy. From the Information Technology Association of Canada, we have Nevin French, vice-president of policy.

You will all have seven minutes to give your presentation. If you can make it quicker than seven minutes, then we can get everybody on record.

We're going to get started right away with Jayson Hilchie, from the Entertainment Software Association of Canada.

Mr. Jayson Hilchie (President and Chief Executive Officer, Entertainment Software Association of Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to the committee for the opportunity to participate in this study today.

Again, as stated, my name is Jayson Hilchie, and I'm the president and CEO of the Entertainment Software Association of Canada. The ESAC represents a number of leading video game companies with operations in this country, from multinational publishers and console makers, to local distributors and Canadian-owned independent studios.

Canada's video game industry is one of the most dynamic and prolific in the world. We employ close to 22,000 full-time direct employees, while supporting another 19,000 indirect jobs. Our industry's contribution to Canadian GDP is close to $4 billion, and this is not revenue. These are salaries of our employees, those who our industry supports, along with their collective economic impact, and our impact is considerable. With only 10% of the U.S. population, Canada's video game development industry is roughly half the size of the U.S. industry, which is the world's largest, so I cannot stress enough how important Canada is within a global context with respect to the production and the creation of video games.

Many of the most successful games globally are created right here in Canada. Like many other IP-based industries, piracy is still an issue for us and we have to innovate constantly to battle it. One of the ways we have combatted piracy is to move to a model where most of the games we produce have some sort of online component. This involves creating an account that enables content to be downloaded from a central server or, more commonly, including a multi-player mode within the game. This is very effective in limiting the ability of counterfeiters to flourish as pirated games will not be able to access the online functions that are offered. The only content the player accessing the pirated game will be able to use, in most cases, will be the single-player mode, which within our industry is becoming less and less common.

In addition to making games that have this online functionality I just spoke about, our industry uses technological protection measures to combat piracy, both in the form of software encryption technologies and physical hardware found in video game consoles. These technological protection measures essentially do two things: They work to encrypt the data on a game which thwarts copying it, and they make copied games unreadable on the hardware console. While in many cases these measures do eventually fall victim to committed pirates who work to crack the game, they provide a window for the company to sell legitimate copies during the period of most demand, which is often the first 90 days.

As encryption technology improves, it's taking longer and longer for the pirates to crack the game, which improves and lengthens the window a company has to recoup their investment in their product. In some cases, those who sell what we refer to as “modchips” offer their services online with the promise to allow your console to circumvent the protections found within it and play copied games. These circumvention devices were made illegal in Canada in 2012 as part of Canada's Copyright Modernization Act.

In fact, just last year, Nintendo used Canada's copyright law to successfully sue a Waterloo, Ontario, company that was selling circumvention devices online. After a lengthy process, Nintendo was awarded over $12 million in damages, and multiple media outlets reported the ruling in Federal Court affirmed Canada's copyright law as one of the strongest in the world.

The Copyright Modernization Act has proven effective by providing protections to content creators in the games industry. As our economy moves increasingly to one that involves digital goods and services, it's critical that these protections remain in place. However, we can also do more to ensure that consumers understand the impacts of piracy.

The notice and notice regime in its purest form has intentions to do this, but notices are not consistently forwarded from ISPs as is required, and consumers who receive those notices often do not understand them or ignore them. We believe there's an opportunity for the Government of Canada to work with ISPs to ensure that the notice and notice regime is properly enforced and utilized. Ensuring that these notices of infringement are regularly and consistently forwarded by ISPs is the most effective way to increase accountability and promote awareness and education opportunities for those who are infringing content, intentionally or otherwise. By better educating people about the harms of piracy, we can work to improve conditions for creators of all types.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Excellent. Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Paul Gagnon from Element AI, please. You have up to seven minutes.

Mr. Paul Gagnon (Legal Advisor, Element AI):

I have up to seven minutes.[Translation]

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

My thanks to all the members of the committee.

My name is Paul Gagnon. I am a legal advisor with Element AI. I deal with matters of intellectual property and data. [English]

I'll give the testimony on behalf of Element AI in English, although I welcome questions in French in the later stages of today's hearing.

Thank you for giving us the opportunity to speak today. Element AI is a Montreal- and Toronto-based artificial intelligence product company. We're celebrating two years of activity shortly and making headlines all across the world with offices in London, Singapore and Seoul.

It's a great privilege to come before you today, especially as an IP geek. It's a great occasion to come in and comment on copyright reform.

Element AI is bringing fundamental research as quickly as possible into actionable products and solutions for companies. Our momentum is favourable. We're quite proud of our achievements, but the best is yet to come, which is why we're here. We want to discuss how Canada's place as a world leader in AI is not guaranteed. We'd like to invite limited and targeted reform within the Copyright Act, in order to clarify a specific use case around informational analysis, also known as text and data mining.

This lack of certainty around the act impacts a very important activity for the development of artificial intelligence. This informational analysis, within the context of fair dealing, would be beneficial for all Canadians and more specifically as well, those who are active in the sector of AI.

This targeted exemption would help us secure a predictable environment for AI, in order for it to maintain its unprecedented growth. Competition in AI is global. Other countries are actively building policy tools to draw in investment and talent. We urge Canada to do the same.

When we speak to informational analysis, what are we referring to? We're talking about analysis that can be made of data and copyrighted works, in order to draw inferences, patterns and insights. This is informational analysis, not the use of the works themselves, to draw from them and use and extract information from these works. It's distinct from using the works themselves. It's about abstraction. It's not about commercializing the works themselves and undercutting Canadian rights holders.

As a quick example, if we were to look at the paintings in this building when we walked in, it's not about taking pictures of these paintings and making T-shirts. It's about looking at the paintings themselves and drawing patterns, measuring distances and measuring the colours and tones that are used by artists.

To use another example which is more relevant to your day-to-day work in Parliament, if you were to look at the Hansard debates and use them for informational analysis, we wouldn't be binding books and selling the debates. Perhaps we'd be using translated words to build more functional algorithms to translate works. We see that here there's an abstraction. It's not the work itself; it's the information that we can derive that's used.

Data is truly the fuel that powers the engine of AI. Algorithms in AI-based products need diverse, representative and quality data. That is the supply chain around AI to provide actionable insights and data, in order to provide better products and services.

A good old expression in computer science is garbage in, garbage out. This truly applies to artificial intelligence and informational analysis. Our AI will only be as good as the data we provide to it. Therefore, the targeted exemption we want to speak about today aims to broaden this scope, in order for our AI to be quality, representative and in turn, made accessible for Canadians everywhere.

We think that with a clearer right and resolving the legal uncertainty around informational analysis, we can drive fairness, accessibility and inclusion of AI-based solutions. Really, better data means better AI.

Under the current Copyright Act, how is informational analysis understood? How is it apprehended? The Copyright Act protects copyrighted works, but it also protects compilations of copyrighted works and also compilations of data. There are three fronts that are protected.

As you've seen in the works of the standing committee, the Copyright Act is about balancing different interests, users' rights and access, but also rights holders, which is why we suggest that informational analysis be made part of the fair dealing exemptions.

Fair dealing exemptions are limited in purpose. The act clearly states the purposes around what kind of intention we can bring to analysis we can draw, for example, research use, private study or news reporting. Where there's an overarching public interest, the act has clarified that there's a clear purpose that's permitted within fair dealing.

(1630)



Informational analysis, as we've explained it, how is it apprehended as the act exists today? It's not clearly addressed, and so there's legal uncertainty around this. We could look perhaps to the temporary reproduction exemption, but that doesn't quite fit. If you turn to specific fair dealing exemptions, research, private use, this isn't clear. We think it's within reach of Parliament to clarify this, and in turn help drive investment and certainty for Canada's AI sector.

If we look at research purposes more specifically, the uncertainty here is quite impactful. Indeed, it could permit the informational analysis itself under research, but there's clear uncertainty as to whether we can leverage this research into products and solutions. Relying on solely the research exemption might not be enough.

We suggest this exemption not be limited to the identity of the specific entities conducting this informational analysis. Truly, if you look at research around AI, the public sector is quite active, as is the private sector. At Element AI, we collaborate every day with researchers at universities across Canada. If we were to clearly exclude commercial entities such as ours to perform this research, it would fundamentally misapprehend the nature of research in Canada.

What's the impact of this uncertainty? In time, if we do not bring this additional added clarity to informational analysis, it can have real and practical impacts on Canada's competitiveness in the AI sector. It can deter R and D investments, and create risks for businesses. Not having legal clarity around informational analysis disproportionately impacts startups and SMEs. Why? As we all know, certainty and predictability are the currency for our entrepreneurs. On the other hand, big players have deep pockets to litigate and fight through this uncertainty. We might not have this luck for our startups and SMEs.

Should we wait for this to be litigated in court and clarified downstream two or three years on? We don't think so. There's a great opportunity to clarify this now.

We often hear that we live in the age of big data, which is true. In terms of volume, there are massive amounts of data generated every day, but there's a huge data gap. Because we generate that data, it doesn't make it accessible to smaller players. Indeed, there's a huge gap between who controls and has access to this data. To ensure the competitiveness of our SMEs, our startups and our more established companies, it's essential to make sure there can be clearer access to this data in order to bridge this data gap in order for this chasm between Internet giants not to be broader.

Why informational analysis fits well under the fair dealing exemption is it benefits from past interpretation of the courts. It's a clear framework, and it's one that aims for fairness. Through case law, it has established clear criteria we can rely upon. Those criteria are flexible and adaptable to different use cases.

Fundamentally, copyright protects the expression of ideas and information, not information and ideas as such. It's a fundamental principle of copyright law. Fair dealing, in this context, especially for informational analysis, brings a clear fence that is quite reasonable, and clearly brings more certainty to our private sector.

The key point here is that an exemption for informational analysis can help democratize access to data and create certainty for the emerging AI industry. In turn, this will help maintain Canada's leadership role as a global hub for AI.

Thank you.

(1635)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Christian Troncoso from BSA The Software Alliance.

Mr. Christian Troncoso (Director, Policy, BSA The Software Alliance)

Good afternoon, Mr. Chair, vice-chairs and distinguished members of the committee.

My name is Christian Troncoso and I'm the director of policy for BSA The Software Alliance.

BSA is the leading advocate for the global software industry before governments and policy-makers around the world. Our members are at the forefront of software-enabled innovation that powers the global economy and helps businesses in every industry compete more effectively.

Because copyright policy is a critical driver of software innovation, we're deeply appreciative for this opportunity to appear before the committee today.

This committee's review of the Copyright Act comes at a very timely moment.

With the recent announcement of the pan-Canadian artificial intelligence strategy, Canada has staked out an ambitious goal of becoming a global leader in the development of AI. This committee has a critical role to play in helping realize that vision.

To become a global leader in AI, Canada will need to set in place a policy environment that will enable its R and D investments to flourish. One critical competitive factor will be access to data. AI research often requires access to large volumes of data so that software can be trained to recognize objects, interpret texts, listen and respond to the spoken word, and make predictions. Ensuring that Canadian researchers can compete with their counterparts in other AI leading nations will therefore require careful examination of government policies that affect their ability to access data. Copyright is one such policy.

As currently enacted, the Copyright Act may place Canadian researchers at a disadvantage relative to their international competitors. For instance, unlike the U.S. and Japan, the Canadian copyright system creates uncertainty about the legal implications of key analytical techniques that are foundational to the development of AI. This committee can shore up the legal foundations for Canada's investments in AI by recommending the adoption of an express exception to copyright for information analysis.

Many of the most exciting developments in AI are attributable to a technique called machine learning. Machine learning is a form of information analysis that allows researchers to train AI systems by feeding them large quantities of data. This so-called training data is analyzed for the purposes of identifying underlying patterns, relationships and trends that can then be used to make predictions about future data inputs.

For instance, developers have created an app called Seeing AI that can help people who are blind or visually impaired navigate the world by providing audio descriptions of objects appearing in photographs. Users of the app can take pictures with their smart phones and the Seeing AI app is able to translate for them, through an audio description, what is occurring in front of them. To develop the computer vision model capable of identifying those objects, the system was trained using data from millions of photographs, depicting thousands of the most common objects we encounter on a daily basis, such as automobiles, street crossings, landscapes and animals.

It would be understandable if you were wondering right now what any of this has to do with copyright. The uncertainty arises because the machine learning process may involve the creation of machine readable reproductions of the training data. In some instances, the training data may include works that are protected by copyright. In the case of Seeing AI, that would be the millions of photographs that were used to train the computer vision model to identify common objects.

To be clear, the reproductions that are necessary for machine learning are used only for the purposes of identifying non-copyrightable information from lawfully accessed works. However, the Copyright Act currently lacks an express exception to enable that type of informational analysis. Therefore, there is considerable uncertainty about the scope of activity that is permitted under current law. This uncertainty poses a risk to Canada's AI investment, and provides a competitive advantage to those countries that provide firmer legal grounding for AI development.

Japan is one such example. In 2009, Japan passed a first of its kind exception for reproductions that are created as part of an “information analysis” process. Earlier this year, the Japanese diet amended the exception to make it more broadly applicable for AI research. Analysts now credit these legal reforms for transforming Japan into what they call a machine learning paradise.

In the U.S., courts have also confirmed that under the fair use doctrine, incidental copying to facilitate informational analysis is non-infringing. In September, the European Parliament voted in favour of a new copyright provision that would provide member states with the flexibility necessary to create broad exceptions for information analysis. Singapore and Australia are currently considering the adoption of similar exceptions.

(1640)



These developments reflect an emerging consensus that the creation of machine readable copies for purposes of information analysis should not be considered copyright relevant acts. Copyright protection was never intended to prevent users from analyzing a work to derive factual, non-copyrightable information, so it makes little sense for copyright law to prevent such an analysis merely because it's being performed by a computer.

To ensure that Canada's significant investments in AI will pay dividends long into the future, the Copyright Act should be modernized to provide legal certainty for this common sense proposition.

The reproductions that are made in the course of training AI systems are unrelated to the creative expression that copyright is intended to protect, are not made visible to humans, and do not compete with or substitute for any of the underlying works. In other words, exception for information analysis poses no risks to the legitimate interests that copyright is intended to protect.

Copyright is ultimately intended to provide incentives for the creation of new works. An exception for information analysis advances this objective by stimulating the creation of new research and enabling the discovery of new forms of knowledge. By recommending the adoption of this exception, this committee will ensure that the Copyright Act remains fit for purpose in an age of digital intelligence.

Thanks, and I look forward to the questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

From the Information Technology Association of Canada, we have Mr. French.

You have up to seven minutes.

(1645)

Mr. Nevin French (Vice-President, Policy, Information Technology Association of Canada):

Chair and honourable members of the committee, it's a privilege to be here today on behalf of the Information Technology Association of Canada, also known as ITAC, to discuss the review of the Copyright Act.

ITAC is the national voice of Canada's ICT industry, an industry that includes over 37,000 companies, generates over 1.5 million jobs and contributes more than $76 billion to the economy.

In today's world, technology can and is outpacing our laws and regulations, and it's crucial that Canada as a global leader does not fall behind.

Today, I'd like to address how the copyright review will fit into the bigger picture of the digital economy in Canada. I'll focus on machine learning and artificial intelligence, and the ways in which copyright rules and regulations will be impacted.

Copyright plays a crucial role in protecting owners while promoting creativity and innovation, which is vitally important when it comes to the tech sector. The key is finding the balance between protecting the rights of the creator with the ability of users to access and benefit from their creation. The difficulty is maintaining the balance between both ends of the spectrum. Otherwise, the entire balance of the digital economy will suffer. In short, we need to get this policy right.

Let's take a quick look at Canada's technology landscape. This has been an exceptional year of investments in Canadian technology, with unprecedented job growth, sizable FDI and several Canadian tech firms going global.

In today's economy, a tech job could be in almost any sector. Many tech-related jobs are no longer just about computer science or programming. It's now about combining anything you're passionate about with technology. This includes health care, the environment, energy, mining, agriculture, the creative arts, as well as core tech jobs like cybersecurity, networking and data analysis.

This is why ITAC has worked with post-secondary institutions to create business technology management programs that blend training in business and tech. This is important because the battle for tech talent is now fought on a global scale, and Canada is in a unique position and is viewed as a leader. That's one of the reasons so many big-name tech investments are taking place across the country. Technology and its application in cutting-edge fields is no longer a domestic feel-good story, and Canada is a serious player in the digital world economy, a destination for investment and a world leader in artificial intelligence.

Over the past year, global talent has been strongly flowing into Canada, including from the U.S. That is something unforeseen not too long ago. Almost every city in Canada has tech incubators, and there are many examples of massive global tech firms investing significantly in tech jobs. Equally important, there is domestic technology growth going on here as well, owing to increased access to talent and venture capital, and public support for small business. This adds to a combination of competitive tax rates, business costs, and a strong economy, which form an environment that is ready for success.

A key reason for this success is that we have the right approach to copyright, a very balanced approach, and this should continue. The act is working. We need to be careful about recommending sizeable changes that may have unintended consequences to other industries. The tech industry believes that the 2012 review was a successful and important factor in the growth of the Canadian tech sector.

There's no escaping the reality that technology has changed our world forever, and the sheer amount of data that exists, and will grow, will require the use of machines to be able to sort that data. Computers far surpass humans' ability to quickly download and process data, but when they are used in conjunction with human thought and intuition, the way we work, learn, and grow, and the ways we navigate the world around us can be done so much more efficiently.

As I said at the outset, our role as a national industry association is to work closely with our members, so we reached out to them to ask about copyright concerns, and they all named artificial intelligence, or AI, and machine learning.

Canada needs to match its vision of being a leader in AI with a policy framework that supports AI development and commercialization. This requires policies that promote access to data, and broad access to data is fundamental to AI. AI research and products need large quantities of data so that software can be trained to interpret text, recognize patterns and make predictions. Broad access to data is also needed to mitigate the risk of bias in AI solutions.

(1650)



The importance of access to data has been recognized in other countries, including the U.S. and Japan, where copyright laws explicitly allow for the reproduction of copyright-protected works to facilitate information analysis by computers.

If Canada does not amend the Copyright Act to provide a similar exemption to infringement, it's reasonable to predict that we'll fall behind these other countries with AI talent and investment capital migrating to more favourable jurisdictions. We need to be clear: Adding an exemption for information analysis does not undermine the interests of content owners. The right to read, understand and analyze information data has never been subject to control under copyright laws. Using a computer to learn more efficiently, when compared to manual reading, viewing or observing works, does not implicate the rights of owners. Owners will continue to control access to their works.

Today there's a global AI race as other countries are trying to catch up and surpass Canada in this industry. Just because Canada is seen as a global leader, we cannot rest on our laurels. For years we've said, “If only we can convert our reputation from being pure researchers into developing business.” Well, AI is one of these opportunities. We do not want a chilling effect on the growth of AI in Canada, especially right now, and poor policy choices will especially impact and harm small firms, which are the backbone of our economy. If we do not enable broad access to data, SMEs and start-up firms will be impacted the most. These enterprises and firms will have little or no data on their own, making access to published works and data critical to their research and commercialization efforts.

Broadly, this is what we propose: that the committee acknowledge that the Copyright Act does not implicate the copying of lawfully accessed works for AI purposes and the committee recommend that a new exception be added to the Copyright Act to clarify that copying, analyzing and using lawfully acquired works and data to develop new knowledge does not require authorization of the copyright owner. If we want Canada to maintain an industry leadership position in AI, we need to get this policy right.

ITAC has traditionally called on government to better engage the tech community in the development of policies and, frankly, we're pleased to say that government, including this committee, is doing more and more of this. Industry can provide insight and share knowledge and expertise, which is especially important with new technologies.

How can government support the growth of the technology industry? It does not need to be direct funding, although that can help. It can also be setting the policy framework that strikes the right balance. As Canada continues to grow the tech sector, access to data is one variable, along with financial capital, talent and commercial opportunities, that can help ensure that investments continue.

We believe that the global best practice can be applied to the copyright review. The act has a mandatory review every five years; however, technology will continue to outpace the speed of legislation. Thus, we're looking for changes to copyright, but we're looking for a surgical approach. The committee has been assigned a very tough job, and it will be very hard to try to please everyone. However, our overarching message is that the act needs a surgical update and, frankly, will need a scalpel going forward, not a hammer, given the rate of change.

In closing, I'd like to thank the committee for the extensive consultations they've done thus far.

Thank you for the opportunity to present our industry's perspective.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Being mindful of the time, we're going to jump right into questions.

Ms. Caesar-Chavannes, you have seven minutes.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Thank you very much.

Thank you to each of the witnesses.

I will direct my first set of questions to Mr. Hilchie.

What is the current cost to you related to piracy within the gaming industry? Do you have any idea?

Mr. Jayson Hilchie:

It's always been a challenge to quantify that number. We know how much we sell legitimately, but we're not able to put a number on the legitimate copies sold versus those that have been pirated, but it's large. It's mainly much larger now toward cloning and mobile games. Mobile games are now being cloned, and cheats and things like that exist online. If you're looking for an exact number, I'm unable to give that to you.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

That's okay.

We know this is a growing industry. We have some students here from Algonquin College and I have students in my riding at UOIT who are part of a growing set of students going into gaming. I told them I'd give them a shout-out.

I'm just wondering if I could have a better understanding of the impacts of continued piracy, especially when you look at gaming being used for things like health care or other industries that are not particularly just somebody in their home in front of a computer playing a game. What are some of the impacts of copyright when we look at privacy issues or the impact on future developments when you use games for something outside of the gaming industry, for example, health care?

(1655)

Mr. Jayson Hilchie:

Your first question, I believe, is about the impact of copyright on smaller video game companies trying to make it within the video game industry. There are about 600 video game companies in Canada. We're producing over 2,100 different products a year. The vast majority of those products are coming from small, independent studios of two to five people who are making games that they self-publish on the App Store on a mobile device. They are making these either with self-financing or bootstrapping or whatever.

Discoverability in our industry is one of the most difficult things we're dealing with because so many games are coming out all the time that they're hard to find.

First, it's very difficult to make money in video games and independent video game production if you're trying to sell games legitimately. Anything that ends up pirated is confounding that situation even more.

With respect to copyright along the lines of the way our industry is moving toward more serious industries, such as aerospace or health care, and even AI, we're a heavy player within the development of some of the user interfaces within self-driving cars and things like that. I'm unaware of any type of copyright implications that would cause issues with that. We create some programs that end up being used in serious purposes outside of the entertainment industry, but we also partner with universities and with other independent technology companies, for medical device purposes and so forth. I can only assume that those organizations are going through the proper channels for approval in copyright so I'm unaware.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

That's perfect. Thank you.

To the AI guys, I want to start by saying that I understand the need to stay competitive and for Canada to be a leader in this domain, which all three of you very clearly stated in your testimony.

Do companies profit from the abstractions or the predictions that AI produces?

Mr. Paul Gagnon:

The goal is to develop tools that ultimately indirectly are fed off and developed by access to that data. I use the expression “supply chain”. At the beginning, you have fundamental techniques, algorithms and basic hunches, of how to build the product or provide a solution.

If you want specific examples, we can think of development of tools for the environment. We want to develop a tool that can better predict local weather patterns, perhaps tornadoes in the Ottawa area. That's a great topic of note recently. In agriculture, you could want to develop tools that improve crop yields or get smarter about environmental impacts. From there you're going to look at diverse data sources to develop tools. Maybe the deciding factor is when to sow seeds in a field. That's what the algorithm is going to look for. It will come from diverse sources of information to get to that answer.

That's where AI is truly powerful because it can combine and apply this wide-ranging data and then come to a more digestible answer in a way that human minds cannot necessarily do.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

At some point there is some degree of profitability from the tools that are made from the predictions. Is that correct?

Mr. Paul Gagnon:

Right.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

If you're mining this data and there is copyrighted material within that data, then who along the supply chain provides that compensation to the owner?

Mr. Paul Gagnon:

That, I think, is a point. There's a market failure around this because it's so voluminous.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Okay.

Mr. Christian Troncoso:

I think it's important to think about it in everyday terms. If I read a book on how to invest in the financial markets, and I make a lot of money, I don't think anyone would assume that I owe part of those profits to the author of that book. We don't generally assume that any time a work was used in some way that generates any sort of profits for anyone, that the author is necessarily owed financial compensation.

I think the AI we're—

(1700)

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

But the person paid for the book.

Mr. Christian Troncoso:

Certainly.

I think it's very important to make the point.... I won't speak for anyone else. Speaking for me, we're not seeking an exception to get access to new forms of works. We are perfectly prepared to pay. That is fine. But once a company has obtained and paid for access to a work, they should be able to analyze those works much as you do when you read a book that you bought from a store.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Albas.

You have seven minutes, please.

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'm going to exercise the motion that I have on deck in regard to what I said at committee. I'm going to ask the indulgence of members and our witnesses, and I'm going to be as brief as I can, because I think it's important to get this out of the way. Hopefully, the members will support it.

For members who don't have it in front of them, the motion is as follows: To assist in the review of the Copyright Act, that the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology request Ministers Freeland and Bains, alongside officials, to come before the committee and explain the impacts of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) on the intellectual property and copyright regimes in Canada.

First of all, it is challenging for the clerk and the chair to be able to get the ministers. We have Thanksgiving, and we don't have a lot of time before we rise for the Christmas break.

I hope that members would support this motion. There's a lot that's in this new agreement, and I think it impacts our work that we're doing here today.

I would ask for members' support in this request.

The Chair:

Mr. Sheehan.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you very much for the motion.

Of course, the information is being discerned right now and will be debated in the House, so what I'm saying is perhaps we do it later but not right now.

I can't support it right now, but at some point in time we'll be taking a look at various aspects of the new USMCA.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Jowhari.

Mr. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Mr. Chair, I move to adjourn the debate.

The Chair:

That's non-debatable, so we'll go to a vote for that.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Really?

I don't think that's—

The Chair:

It's non-debatable.

I don't understand what the concern is. It's non-debatable, so we go to a vote on that.

Hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, CPC):

On a point of order, Mr. Chair, having chaired House of Commons committees before, my recollection of a dilatory motion is to adjourn the committee, not to adjourn debate.

I never recall a situation where a member of a committee was permitted to move a motion to adjourn debate on a motion. That would be considered a dilatory motion.

My understanding that adjourning a committee is non-debatable, it being a dilatory motion, but not to adjourn debate on a motion in front of the committee.

The Chair:

It is a dilatory motion. This has happened in our committee on numerous occasions.

We don't adjourn the committee. We adjourn debate on that motion, and that's what was called. It is non-debatable.

If you'd like, the clerk can explain that to you.

Mr. Masse.

Mr. Brian Masse:

For clarification, technically I suppose it might be right, but that would be breaking from the more collegial approach at this committee. The Liberals want to shut down even the interest of allowing people to have an intervention.

Perhaps you might be right on the technical aspect of it, but it clearly sends a message to members like me, who can't even participate for a moment in something that is put on the table.

Perhaps you will be ruling in favour of this, but it is a technical thing. It's certainly counter to the history of this committee and what we've worked towards.

The Chair:

Mr. Masse, I would agree.

I think part of the challenge is that we have witnesses in front of us with very limited time because of the votes. There has not been a vote to shut this down.

As Mr. Sheehan said, there is not adequate time today to debate that.

Again, we do have witnesses in front of us with limited time.

We've always tried to operate in a collegial way, and I want to make sure that you have your time with the witnesses as well.

It is a non-debatable motion.

(1705)

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

On a point of order, Mr. Chair, it is my understanding that we can bring this debate up at the next meeting when we have more time.

The Chair:

You certainly may.

There are two choices here: you either vote the motion down and it's done—that's it; it's over—or you bring it up again in the future.

From what I'm understanding, there's not a desire, because of our lack of time, to have a substantive debate about this.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Sorry, Mr. Chair, I have just one last quick question.

Even though I have an amendment to the motion, I cannot put an amendment to the motion.

The Chair:

I go by the hands that go up, so whoever has the floor.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

The Chair:

I just want to make sure that's clear with everybody. We are going to go to a vote.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Can I ask for a recorded vote?

The Chair:

Fair enough.

(Motion agreed to: yeas 5; nays 4)

The Chair: I will ask if you can keep...because I do want to make sure that Mr. Masse gets his time.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I appreciate that, Mr. Chair.

I will just go straight to the Entertainment Software Association of Canada.

Video streaming is a huge market right now. We see twitch streamers getting viewer numbers that many TV shows would be envious of. Streamers are making money from playing a copyrighted work; however, they're also showing potential customers the work. How does the video game industry see streaming? Is it free advertising or do you believe it's copyright infringement?

Mr. Jayson Hilchie:

The answer is that each company that has its content being streamed online has different policies with respect to that. Some actually partner with the streamers in order to partner in the revenue that comes from the advertising revenue that comes from that channel. Others flat out ban it, and others encourage it, as you say, because it does promote the game. You're right in that it is the copyright-protected property of the companies, but each one has its own policy for it.

Mr. Dan Albas:

What is your policy on streaming of the games, as an organization?

Mr. Jayson Hilchie:

My policy on streaming of games with respect to—

Mr. Dan Albas:

Do you believe that the current act's provisions allow for fair use of that copyrighted material, or is it something that your members haven't given you your marching orders on?

Mr. Jayson Hilchie:

Well, as I said, each member has its own policies with respect to the streaming of the TV—

Mr. Dan Albas:

So you have no policy?

Mr. Jayson Hilchie:

I don't have a particular policy on the streaming of games when it comes to simply playing the games. That's outside the scope of what I do.

Mr. Dan Albas:

We've also heard from the music industry that they would like sound recordings used for movies or TV shows to require repeat broadcasting royalties. Obviously, some of the games that are created by many of your members are akin to almost a movie-like production. Do you know how that would affect the video game industry, and would your association oppose such a move?

Mr. Jayson Hilchie:

The issue was...?

Mr. Dan Albas:

It is the soundtrack recordings, because we do have musicians and people who create sounds. When these are included into a work, they are seeking further royalty every time it's rebroadcast and the sound is used.

Mr. Jayson Hilchie:

Every company that licenses music for a game or creates music for a game would license that through a management or a collective or something. They would pay for that up front, typically. But with respect to—and I don't know if you're referring to the making available right, which is with respect to an issue that's currently ongoing before the Copyright Board.

(1710)

Mr. Dan Albas:

Yes, there's an exemption for sound recording, but it sounds to me as if there's an established practice in your industry of people being paid for the use of work.

Mr. Jayson Hilchie:

Absolutely.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Again, some artists are asking for there to be a continual stream of income from the repeated use of sound recordings.

Mr. Jayson Hilchie:

Okay. The only one that I'm aware of is the current issue that's in front of the Copyright Board with respect to the making available right.

Mr. Dan Albas:

In regard to the machine learning, I'm just going to throw this out to Element AI. Obviously, it sounds as if there is an unlevel playing field with Japan and the United States for the certainty that you're asking for.

We also have another group that's made a briefing available to this committee called the Canadian Legal Information Institute, which talks about the Crown copyright provision, section 12. They say that there needs to be further clarification on the use of Crown materials, for example, a government bill, a debate in Parliament and whatnot, because they can't use chat boxes to explain newer requirements or regulations or whatnot. Is this along the same lines of what you're saying, that there's not sufficient certainty for the use of machine learning, but would you also believe there needs to be certainty on the use of Crown copyright?

Mr. Paul Gagnon:

I definitely believe that additional clarity can be reached under Crown copyright as well. It ties back into open data initiatives as well. If you look at licence terms that are offered by the government under open data licences, the aim is to make these things available without restriction. That isn't completely harmonized across different levels of government. Even within different datasets, different information made available by government under Crown copyright, additional clarity there definitely would be most helpful.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay. I really wonder what the AIs would learn, though, listening to all of our debates.

The Chair:

That's funny.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I appreciate that. Thank you.

The Chair:

We're going to move to Mr. Masse for seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to the witnesses for being here.

I'll start with the gaming association. I think that people just think about it in terms of console gaming, but the reality is that it's a serious development with regard to everything from advertising and issues related to training and sport. South Korea, for example, has a minister of gaming. That's really where it's headed or it's already there.

You've used innovation in many respects to block some of the piracy that's taking place. The quandary, for example, with the new Spiderman, is that you can play individually and offline, but to get the full game experience that you want out of the purchase, you need to go online. That requires higher broadband speed and so forth. Can you at least provide some information on how you came about looking at a technological solution to combat piracy versus that of others who have come before the committee? They've basically asked for more enforcement.

I would point to Windsor where we used to have a lot of piracy with regard to DirecTV, for example. It was so easy to get this American channel system. Then they introduced some new measures that eliminated it.

Could you provide a little more information on what the industry has done to invest in combatting piracy with regard to innovation?

Mr. Jayson Hilchie:

As I said in my opening remarks, similar to ITAC, we feel that the Copyright Act is working. We're not looking for many changes. What we are looking for is to ensure that technological protection measures and the circumvention clauses within the Copyright Act remain through any review. As you say, the technological innovation that is happening in our industry to block those who would pirate our games has been one of the reasons that we've been able to continue to grow.

TPMs could be anything from a password that would allow you to enter. It can be that simple. It can be as complicated as hardware in a console that makes copy discs unreadable—like headers on software that would identify what is an authentic copy versus an inauthentic copy. Quite frankly, in Canada we've been fortunate enough that our industry was at the centre of a Federal Court battle where Nintendo used the new law to challenge the clauses and the TPMs. They were successful in getting damages and remedies against a company that was selling what we call modchips that essentially allowed people to play copied games, and also do a number of other things to the console that it was not manufactured to do.

Quite frankly, as Mr. Troncoso said, copyright is really there to ensure that creators have an incentive to continue to make new products. For us, TPMs are one of the number one ways that we protect the creative works that we put out in order to make revenues so that we can continue to make products.

(1715)

Mr. Brian Masse:

This is not for this discussion here, but I also have some concerns with regard to loot boxes and so forth.

There are certainly a lot of positive elements in terms of transferable technology. There are lot of exciting things happening in the industry.

I used to be a board director for the CNIB, as an employment specialist when I had a real job. I used to do job accommodation including voice software and recognition. I want to make sure I understand this correctly. Are you looking to purchase one time the images and materials that have been out there, and then allow them to adapt to the technology that you're driving? I'm trying to get a full understanding and appreciation—

Mr. Christian Troncoso:

I think there are an infinite number of AI possibilities and different use cases. As a general matter, we would advocate for a copyright exception that says if you have access to a work, you should be able to use a computer to analyze that work, compare it to other works and look for correlations and patterns, which can then be used to develop an AI model for future things. In your case, this would mean voice recognition. What you might need is a sort of large corpus of recorded speaking. In addition, you might also need transcripts of those recordings.

You would then train an AI system based on.... It would be a very large corpus with hundreds of thousands of hours of voice recordings and then the transcripts to create a model, so that the AI system looks for the patterns, matches the voice to the transcript, and can do it again in the future when it hears a new speech.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Once your model is developed, I guess you would be concerned about having to pay a fee every time it's in play, as opposed to—

Mr. Christian Troncoso:

Yes, I think that would be the concern. I think right now there's a bit of a legal grey area where a lot of this research is happening. The potential of AI is so great—it's so lucrative and it's going to be helpful to virtually every industry—that at the moment, companies' tolerance for risk may be a bit higher. I think if there were to be an adverse court decision that says, in fact, all of this is infringing, it would have really adverse impacts on Canada's investment in AI.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Mr. Chair, how much time do I have?

The Chair:

You have about six seconds.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you very much for being here.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to go to Mr. Graham. You have seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

I understand Mr. Lametti has a quick question before it comes back to me.

Mr. David Lametti (LaSalle—Émard—Verdun, Lib.):

Thank you.

The question is for Mr. Hilchie.

I think you would find a lot of sympathy for using technological protection measures to protect the game itself, in particular, if you're moving to an online environment.

If the game has to be played on a particular kind of box, how far should the technological protection extend? I know you have the Federal Court decision in your favour, but should a TPM prevent you from using a box to play any kind of game? You have a physical box that perhaps might be better dealt with under the realm of patent. That's extension two. Then, extension three, should a technological protection measure be used—that same kind of protection—to prevent a farmer from amending the copyright-protected material that happens to be on his tractor, and to not be able to use it and get along with it?

At what point should we be drawing lines?

(1720)

Mr. Jayson Hilchie:

Those are two good questions.

With respect to the video game console—and again we do have the Federal Court decision in our favour—in that particular case, Nintendo was arguing that the games they make for that console should only be played on that console and that console should only play the games that they make, and vice versa.

This person was arguing that, essentially, technological protection measures through an exemption for interoperability would allow them to essentially play home-brew games or independent games on the box. There's really no position in any of the major video game console makers' business models right now that doesn't involve working with small independent developers to put content on their box. They're all very much in competition with each other. Exclusives in our industry are now a very, very big thing. If there is a game that should only be played on an Xbox, then there has been a significant financial investment to make that game an exclusive on Xbox, and I see no reason why a TPM should not protect that ability to do so.

With respect to the farmer, I don't know whether I'm qualified to answer that question, but I take your point.

Mr. David Lametti:

[Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. Jayson Hilchie:

Yes, I will.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Let the record show that Mr. Masse doesn't think he has a real job. That's just a point there.

I'll stay on TPMs, which Mr. Lametti has gone into at length. The fair dealing exceptions apply to a whole lot of things. There are many situations where you have fair dealing exceptions. You're asking for a new one to allow aggregate data analysis. If there's a TPM on the data, should the exception still apply? I am asking all of you who advocated for this.

Mr. Paul Gagnon:

Around the exemption for information analysis is the theme of lawful access. I don't think my presentation made that clear enough, but we see lawful access as an important component of that. It's not about undercutting business models and accessing that data through illegal means or means that are not authorized.

The counterpoint to it is that we have to also make sure that the right is effective. If I'm legally accessing a work through a contract, that contract should not have a provision forbidding that informational analysis either.

I don't think the exemption that we're stating is required necessarily means that it needs to be unlawful or completely reckless access to works and data, because that would not respect the balance for the act between rights holders and users' rights.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If somebody produced something that has a TPM on it, that's locked, TPM definitions tell us that the fact that it's on a computer could be defined as a TPM in the first place.

My simple question is, if somebody has a TPM and you want to access that data for your analysis, should the exemption apply, or should the TPM take precedence over the fair-dealing exemption?

Mr. Paul Gagnon:

I'm not aware of court cases that have resolved this issue yet. I'd tend to say that the TPM would probably mean that lawful access is not mandated.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Should reverse engineering itself be legal?

Mr. Paul Gagnon:

I think the act provides for clear rights on reverse engineering in clear, specific settings such as for interoperability or security purposes. The act accepts that there are purposes that override this and allow for a certain form of reverse engineering.

For citizens in the digital world, these kinds of provisions are somewhat important to make sure that we're not locked into platforms we no longer can analyze or control, but in a very limited context.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are there circumstances in which you believe reverse engineering should not be legal?

Mr. Paul Gagnon:

The act right now strikes a good balance in identifying specific cases where reverse engineering makes sense. One example is security measures to identify the underlying security structure, and you can look to another example on interoperability. That gives consumers a good deal of.... As you saw with Mr. Lametti's question, there are still interrogations as to whether that's enough freedom, but in limited context, we can have these purposes and be able.... I wouldn't argue for a broad reverse engineering right.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do we have a shortage of software programmers, people qualified to do that, in the world right now? That question is for all of you.

Mr. Paul Gagnon:

In the field of AI, we definitely have a shortage of AI researchers and people skilled in the art, definitely.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

I worked in the high-tech industry for quite a long time. I'm still involved in it and have been for over 20 years. I've noticed that the people I'm involved with are largely the same people who I was involved with 20 years ago. What we all have in common is that we took our computers apart in the basement. We knew how the things worked. I remember using hex editors to hack games. It was fun to do.

The generation today doesn't have that access. They don't have the access to the machines, which you can't take apart anymore. Is that a problem, and can we use copyright to address it so that the next generation actually knows how these machines work and can develop into the next generation of developers?

(1725)

Mr. Paul Gagnon:

I think IP statutes, whether it is the Patent Act or the Copyright Act, do give some space for private study and research. Research exemptions under the Patent Act can allow for this type of basement hacking. Definitely the commercial exploitation of that hacking would be off-limits.

In the field of AI, we're lucky that we're really in the world of open source software. It's a very collaborative community. Ideally we can tinker out in the open and learn from that and share that knowledge with everyone else. That's a bit of a counterpoint to the basement analogy.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We have time for a quick question from Mr. Lloyd.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you. I appreciate your coming out here today.

I have a question for the Entertainment Software Association. A lot of people are using mods these days with games. Is there any concern from your association that mods are creating copyright infringement issues?

Mr. Jayson Hilchie:

When you're talking about mods, modified games, yes, absolutely there is.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Is there a huge issue with copyright there?

Mr. Jayson Hilchie:

Yes, it's essentially hacking a game. It's bypassing the anti-cirumvention.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Would you agree that there are some legitimate uses for mods? Some mods can be creative—

Mr. Jayson Hilchie:

There are actually exceptions in the copyright bill that allow for modifying games. The interoperability exception is one of them. There's also fair dealing for research and educational purposes and things like that. Those things already exist.

With respect to mods, yes, that's a massive issue for our industry.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

What if it's just for personal use and not for commercial use? Is that a concern?

Mr. Jayson Hilchie:

I believe it falls within an exemption that already exists within the Copyright Act.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

So it's the commercialization of mods that's a very serious issue.

Mr. Jayson Hilchie:

Absolutely. That's why we're here today, to ensure that the technological protection measures remain within the copyright bill. They work and they're extremely valuable for our industry.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

As a quick follow-up, I notice that Blizzard Entertainment just released StarCraft, a very well-known game. It's now free online. When a company makes a decision like that, they're obviously forgoing some revenue. Are those decisions possible in a universe where copyright isn't protected?

Mr. Jayson Hilchie:

I'm unfamiliar with the specific game or the business model they've taken, but perhaps they're offering it for free and there are in-app purchases that will bring in revenue streams. Our industry is evolving and changing rapidly. We use numerous different business models, including subscriptions for online games and in-app purchases, things like that. I would suspect that there is some sort of business model built into that.

With respect to copyright, again, without the ability to protect the game, and have it distributed and played the way it was intended, it certainly limits the incentive for companies to continue to create and invest.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I wish we had more time, but we don't. We have to go out and do some voting, which is coming up.

Thank you, everybody.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

[Énregistrement électronique]

(1625)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte.

Comme c'est le cas la plupart du temps à la Chambre des communes, il y des choses qui sont parfois inévitables et qui se produisent; et aujourd'hui, nous avons dû aller voter, et nous allons donc immédiatement commencer notre séance.

Nous accueillons aujourd'hui, pour poursuivre notre examen prévu par la loi de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, Jayson Hilchie, président-directeur général de l'Association canadienne du logiciel de divertissement, Paul Gagnon, conseiller juridique d'Element AI; Christian Troncoso, directeur, Politique de la BSA, The Software Alliance; et Nevin French, vice-président, Politiques, de l'Association canadienne de la technologie de l'information.

Vous disposez tous de sept minutes pour présenter vos exposés. Si vous pouvez le faire en moins de sept minutes, tout le monde aura un temps de parole aux fins du compte rendu.

Nous commençons tout de suite par Jayson Hilchie, de l'Association canadienne du logiciel de divertissement.

M. Jayson Hilchie (président-directeur général, Association canadienne du logiciel de divertissement):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie le Comité de me donner l'occasion de participer à cette étude aujourd'hui.

Une fois de plus, comme on vient de le dire, je m'appelle Jayson Hilchie, et je suis le président-directeur général de l'Association canadienne du logiciel de divertissement. Cette association représente un certain nombre de grandes sociétés de jeux vidéo qui exercent leurs activités dans notre pays, allant des éditeurs et des fabricants de consoles multinationaux jusqu'aux distributeurs locaux et aux studios indépendants de propriété canadienne.

Le secteur canadien des jeux vidéo est l'un des plus dynamiques et des plus prolifiques au monde. Nous employons directement près de 22 000 personnes à temps plein, et nous soutenons 19 000 autres emplois indirects. La contribution du secteur au PIB canadien s'élève à près de 4 milliards de dollars; ce montant ne représente pas nos revenus. Il représente les salaires de nos employés, de ceux que notre industrie soutient, ainsi que leurs répercussions économiques collectives, et elles sont de taille. Malgré le fait que la population canadienne représente seulement 10 % de la population américaine, le secteur canadien de la conception de jeux vidéo fait environ la moitié de la taille de celui de son voisin, qui est le plus important au monde. Je ne saurais donc trop insister sur l'importance du Canada en matière de production et de création de jeux vidéo, sur la scène mondiale.

Beaucoup de jeux parmi les plus populaires au monde sont créés ici au Canada. Comme dans bien d'autres secteurs basés sur la propriété intellectuelle, le piratage reste encore un problème et nous devons constamment innover pour le combattre. L'une de nos solutions à ce problème a consisté à ajouter une composante en ligne à la plupart de nos jeux. Il s'agit de créer compte qui permet de télécharger du contenu à partir d'un serveur central ou, plus fréquemment, d'intégrer un mode multijoueurs dans le jeu. C'est une solution très efficace pour limiter la prolifération des contrefaçons, étant donné que les jeux piratés ne permettent pas d'accéder aux fonctions en ligne que nous offrons. Dans la plupart des cas, un joueur qui utilise un jeu piraté ne pourra utiliser que le mode monojoueur, qui est de moins en moins courant dans notre secteur.

En plus de créer des jeux qui disposent de la fonctionnalité en ligne dont je viens de parler, notre industrie utilise des mécanismes de protection technologiques pour lutter contre le piratage, c'est-à-dire à la fois des technologies de chiffrement dans les logiciels et des composantes matérielles dans les consoles de jeux vidéo. Ces mesures de protection technologiques ont essentiellement deux fonctions: elles cryptent les données d'un jeu, qui ne pourront pas être copiées, et elles rendent les jeux copiés illisibles sur les consoles. Même si les pirates trouvent souvent le moyen de les contourner, ces mesures donnent aux entreprises le temps de vendre des copies légitimes des jeux pendant la période où la demande est la plus forte, laquelle correspond habituellement aux 90 premiers jours.

Plus la technologie de cryptage s'améliore, plus il faut de temps pour pirater un jeu, ce qui donne aux entreprises une plus grande fenêtre pour récupérer leur investissement dans un produit. Dans certains cas, des vendeurs en ligne proposent des « puces pirates » capables de contourner les protections des consoles afin qu'elles acceptent les jeux copiés. Ces dispositifs de contournement sont devenus illégaux au Canada en 2012 dans le cadre de la Loi sur la modernisation du droit d'auteur du Canada.

En fait, l'an dernier, cette loi a permis à Nintendo d'obtenir gain de cause contre une entreprise de Waterloo, en Ontario, qui vendait des dispositifs de contournement en ligne. Après un long procès, Nintendo a obtenu plus de 12 millions de dollars en dommages et intérêts sur décision de la Cour fédérale, ce qui, selon de nombreux médias, fait de cette loi canadienne sur le droit d'auteur l'une des plus strictes au monde.

La Loi sur la modernisation du droit d'auteur s'est avérée efficace, car elle offre des protections aux créateurs de contenu du secteur des jeux vidéo. Plus notre économie tend vers les biens et les services numériques, plus il est important de maintenir ces mesures de protection. Cependant, nous pouvons aussi en faire davantage pour nous assurer que les consommateurs comprennent les répercussions du piratage.

Le régime d'avis et avis, dans sa forme la plus pure, oeuvre dans ce sens. Mais les avis ne sont pas toujours transmis comme il se doit par les fournisseurs de services Internet, et les consommateurs qui reçoivent ces avis ne les comprennent pas toujours et les ignorent souvent. Nous croyons que le gouvernement du Canada et les fournisseurs de services Internet doivent collaborer afin que le régime d'avis et avis soit correctement appliqué et utilisé. C'est en veillant à ce que les fournisseurs de services Internet transmettent régulièrement et uniformément ces avis de violation que nous pourrons le mieux accroître la responsabilisation et promouvoir la sensibilisation et les occasions d'éducation auprès de ceux qui contrefont le contenu, intentionnellement ou autrement. En éduquant mieux les gens sur les méfaits du piratage, nous améliorons la situation de vie des créateurs de toutes sortes.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Excellent. Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons à M. Paul Gagnon, d'Element AI, je vous en prie. Vous avez jusqu'à sept minutes.

M. Paul Gagnon (conseiller légal, Element AI):

J'ai jusqu'à sept minutes. [Français]

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie tous les membres du Comité.

Je m'appelle Paul Gagnon. Je suis conseiller juridique chez Element AI. Je m'occupe des questions de propriété intellectuelle et de données.[Traduction]

Je témoigne en anglais au nom d'Element AI, bien que je serai heureux de répondre aux questions dans les deux langues, plus tard au cours de la séance.

Je vous remercie de me donner l'occasion de m'adresser à vous aujourd'hui. Element AI est un fournisseur de solutions d'intelligence artificielle qui a ses bureaux à Montréal et à Toronto. Nous célébrons bientôt nos deux ans d'activité et nous faisons la une des journaux du monde entier; nous avons aussi des bureaux à Londres, Singapour et Séoul.

C'est un grand privilège d'être parmi vous aujourd'hui, surtout que je suis un passionné de la propriété intellectuelle. C'est une excellente occasion pour moi d'être ici et de discuter de la réforme du droit d'auteur.

Element AI fait en sorte que la recherche fondamentale aboutisse le plus rapidement possible à des produits exploitables et à des solutions pour les entreprises. Nous sommes sur une bonne lancée. Nous sommes assez fiers de nos réalisations, mais le meilleur reste à venir, et c'est pourquoi nous sommes ici. Nous voulons discuter de la raison pour laquelle le Canada n'a pas une place assurée en tant que leader mondial dans le domaine de l'intelligence artificielle. Nous aimerions entraîner une réforme limitée et ciblée de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, afin de clarifier un cas d'utilisation particulière de l'analyse de l'information, également connue sous le nom d'exploration de textes et de données.

Ce manque de certitude à l'égard de la loi a des répercussions sur de très importantes activités de développement de l'intelligence artificielle. Cette analyse de l'information, dans le contexte d'utilisation équitable, serait bénéfique pour tous les Canadiens et plus spécifiquement pour ceux qui sont actifs dans le secteur de l'intelligence artificielle.

Cette exemption ciblée nous aiderait à mettre en place un environnement sûr et prévisible pour l'intelligence artificielle, afin de maintenir sa croissance exceptionnelle. Dans le domaine de l'intelligence artificielle, la concurrence est mondiale. D'autres pays mettent activement en place des outils stratégiques pour attirer les investissements et les talents. Nous exhortons le Canada à en faire autant.

Lorsque nous parlons d'analyse de l'information, de quoi parlons-nous? Nous parlons des analyses que l'on peut faire de données et d'oeuvres protégées par le droit d'auteur, pour en tirer des conclusions et en extraire des informations et des modèles. Il s'agit d'une analyse de l'information, et non pas de l'utilisation des oeuvres elles-mêmes ou l'extraction d'informations qui seront utilisées et appliquées. C'est différent de l'utilisation directe de ces travaux. Il s'agit d'abstraction. Il ne s'agit pas de commercialiser les travaux ou d'affaiblir les titulaires de droits canadiens.

À titre d'exemple, regarder des peintures dans un immeuble, en entrant, ce n'est pas comme prendre des photos de ces peintures et en faire t-shirts. Il s'agit uniquement de regarder les peintures en question et de dégager les motifs, de mesurer les distances, d'évaluer les couleurs et les tons utilisés par les artistes.

Pour donner un autre exemple plus pertinent pour votre travail quotidien au Parlement, si on devait examiner les débats du hansard et les utiliser dans une analyse d'information, nous cesserions de relier des livres et de vendre les débats. Peut-être que nous utiliserons des traductions pour créer des algorithmes plus fonctionnels pour traduire des travaux. Nous voyons qu'ici il y a une abstraction. Il n'est pas question du travail en lui-même; c'est l'information que nous en retirons qui sera utilisée.

Les données sont réellement le carburant qui alimente l'IA. Les algorithmes des produits basés sur l'IA nécessitent des données diverses, représentatives et de qualité. C'est la chaîne d'approvisionnement de l'IA, celle qui fournit des renseignements et des données exploitables, lesquelles donnent de meilleurs produits et services.

Une expression bien connue en informatique dit: « À données inexactes, résultats erronés ». Elle s'applique réellement au domaine de l'intelligence artificielle et de l'analyse de l'information. Notre IA sera uniquement bonne si les données que nous lui fournissons le sont. C'est pour cela que l'exemption ciblée dont nous voulons parler aujourd'hui vise à élargir la portée, pour que notre IA soit de qualité et représentative et, en conséquence, qu'elle soit accessible pour tous les Canadiens.

Nous pensons qu'avec un droit plus clair et en dissipant l'incertitude juridique qui plane sur l'analyse de l'information, nous pouvons augmenter l'équité, l'accessibilité et l'inclusivité des solutions basées sur l'IA. Vraiment, de meilleures données signifient une meilleure IA.

Sous le régime de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur actuelle, de quelle manière l'analyse de l'information est-elle comprise? Comment est-elle appréhendée? La Loi sur le droit d'auteur s'applique aux oeuvres protégées, mais aussi aux compilations d'oeuvres protégées ainsi qu'aux compilations de données. Il s'agit des trois blocs qui sont couverts par la loi.

Comme vous l'avez constaté pendant les travaux du comité permanent, la Loi sur le droit d'auteur consiste à trouver un équilibre entre différents intérêts, les droits des utilisateurs et l'accès, mais aussi les titulaires de droits, et c'est pourquoi nous proposons que l'analyse de l'information fasse partie des exemptions relatives à l'utilisation équitable.

Les exemptions relatives à l'utilisation équitable ont un but bien délimité. La loi énonce clairement les objectifs relatifs à l'intention que nous poursuivons dans nos analyses; par exemple, l'utilisation des recherches, les études privées ou les reportages. Là où se trouve l'intérêt général du public, la loi a précisé qu'il est permis d'avoir un objectif clair dans le cadre de l'utilisation équitable d'une oeuvre.

(1630)



De quelle façon l'analyse informationnelle, telle que nous l'avons expliquée, est-elle visée par la loi en vigueur? Ce n'est pas clair, il y a donc de l'ambiguïté juridique à cet égard. Si l'on examine l'exemption qui touche les reproductions temporaires, on constate que cela ne s'applique pas tout à fait. Si on se tourne plutôt du côté de l'exemption pour une utilisation équitable précise, pour de la recherche ou pour une étude privée, ce n'est pas clair. Nous sommes d'avis que le législateur est en mesure d'apporter des précisions à la loi et, en conséquence, d'aider à attirer des investissements dans le secteur de l'IA au Canada et à procurer de la certitude à ce secteur.

Si nous nous penchons en particulier sur les utilisations aux fins de recherche, l'ambiguïté qui règne a des conséquences certaines. En effet, les dispositions législatives pourraient permettre d'effectuer de l'analyse informationnelle en soi dans le cadre d'une recherche, mais il y a assurément de l'ambiguïté quant au fait de savoir s'il est possible d'utiliser cette recherche pour offrir des produits et des solutions. Il pourrait être insuffisant de s'appuyer uniquement sur l'exemption qui vise la recherche.

Nous proposons que cette exemption ne soit pas spécifique quant à l'identité des entités qui effectuent l'analyse informationnelle. De fait, si vous prêtez attention aux travaux de recherche touchant l'IA, le secteur public est très actif, tout comme le secteur privé. Chez Element AI, nous collaborons chaque jour avec des chercheurs universitaires de partout au Canada. Si on décidait d'empêcher, de façon précise, les entités commerciales, comme la nôtre, d'effectuer ce type de recherche, ce serait grandement méconnaître la nature des travaux de recherche menés au Canada.

Quels sont les effets de cette ambiguïté? Dans l'avenir, si rien n'est fait pour apporter des précisions concernant l'analyse informationnelle, il pourrait y avoir des conséquences réelles et d'ordre pratique sur la compétitivité du Canada dans le secteur de l'IA. Cette ambiguïté pourrait dissuader de faire des investissements dans la R-D et engendrer des risques pour les entreprises. Le fait qu'il existe une ambiguïté juridique concernant l'analyse informationnelle touche de façon disproportionnée les entreprises en démarrage et les petites et moyennes entreprises. Pourquoi? Comme nous le savons tous, la certitude et la prévisibilité sont essentielles pour nos entrepreneurs. De leur côté, les acteurs importants du domaine peuvent se permettre des batailles juridiques qui pourraient découler de cette ambiguïté. Ce ne serait peut-être pas le cas pour nos entreprises en démarrage et nos PME.

Devrions-nous attendre que des causes soient portées devant les tribunaux et que ceux-ci apportent des précisions dans deux ou trois ans? Nous ne sommes pas de cet avis. Nous avons une excellente occasion d'apporter des précisions à ce sujet maintenant.

Nous entendons souvent dire que nous vivons à l'ère des mégadonnées, ce qui est vrai. Pour ce qui est du volume, il y a des quantités astronomiques de données qui sont générées chaque jour, mais il existe une immense lacune à cet égard. Le fait de générer ces données ne les rend pas accessibles à de petits acteurs. En effet, il y a un fossé immense entre ceux qui contrôlent les données et ceux qui y ont accès. Pour assurer la compétitivité de nos PME, de nos entreprises en démarrage et de nos entreprises établies, il est essentiel de faire en sorte que l'accès à ces données soit défini de façon plus précise afin de réduire cet écart et de ne pas accroître le fossé qui sépare les géants d'Internet.

La raison pour laquelle l'exemption relative à l'utilisation équitable conviendrait à l'analyse informationnelle tient au fait qu'on pourrait tirer avantage de l'interprétation antérieure de la loi faite par les tribunaux. Le cadre est clair, et il vise à assurer l'équité. Les cas ayant fait jurisprudence ont permis d'établir des critères clairs sur lesquels nous pouvons nous appuyer. Ces critères sont flexibles, et il est possible de les adapter à différentes situations d'utilisation.

En somme, le droit d'auteur protège l'expression d'idées et d'informations, et non des informations et des idées en soi. Il s'agit d'un principe fondamental qui sous-tend les lois sur le droit d'auteur. L'utilisation équitable, dans ce contexte, en particulier en ce qui concerne l'analyse informationnelle, pose des limites claires qui sont très raisonnables, et apporte, assurément, plus de certitude à notre secteur privé.

Le point important, c'est qu'une exemption relative à l'analyse informationnelle peut aider à démocratiser l'accès aux données et à créer de la certitude pour la nouvelle industrie de l'IA. En conséquence, cela aidera le Canada à conserver sa position de chef de file et de pôle mondial en matière d'IA.

Merci.

(1635)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant donner la parole à Christian Troncoso de la BSA, The Software Alliance.

M. Christian Troncoso (directeur, Politique, BSA The Software Alliance) :

Bonjour, monsieur le président, madame la vice-présidente, monsieur le vice-président et distingués membres du Comité.

Je m'appelle Christian Troncoso et je suis le directeur, Politique, de la BSA, The Software Alliance.

La BSA agit comme principal défenseur de l'industrie mondiale du logiciel auprès des gouvernements et des décideurs partout dans le monde. Nos membres sont à l'avant-garde de l'innovation logicielle qui alimente l'économie mondiale et qui aide les entreprises de tous les secteurs à devenir plus concurrentielles.

Vu que la politique sur le droit d'auteur est un moteur essentiel de l'innovation dans le domaine du logiciel, nous sommes très reconnaissants de l'occasion qui nous est donnée de témoigner devant ce comité aujourd'hui.

L'examen de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur mené par ce comité arrive à point nommé.

Le Canada, en annonçant récemment la stratégie pancanadienne sur l'intelligence artificielle, s'est fixé l'objectif ambitieux de devenir un chef de file mondial dans le développement de l'IA. Ce comité a un rôle essentiel à jouer pour aider à concrétiser cette vision.

Pour devenir un chef de file mondial de l'IA, le Canada doit mettre en place un ensemble de politiques qui permettront de récolter les fruits de ses investissements en R-D. L'accès aux données représente un facteur concurrentiel déterminant. La recherche sur l'IA nécessite souvent l'accès à d'énormes quantités de données pour entraîner les logiciels à reconnaître les objets, à interpréter un texte, à écouter des paroles et à y répondre et à faire des prédictions. Pour permettre aux chercheurs canadiens de rivaliser avec leurs homologues d'autres grands pays producteurs d'IA, il faut examiner attentivement les politiques gouvernementales qui ont une incidence sur leur capacité d'accéder aux données. Le droit d'auteur est l'une de ces politiques.

Dans sa forme actuelle, la Loi sur le droit d'auteur peut créer un désavantage pour les chercheurs canadiens par rapport à leurs concurrents internationaux. Par exemple, contrairement à la situation qui prévaut aux États-Unis et au Japon, les règles touchant le droit d'auteur au Canada créent de l'incertitude quant aux répercussions juridiques des principales techniques d'analyse sur lesquelles s'appuie le développement de l'IA. Ce comité peut renforcer le fondement juridique des investissements au Canada dans le domaine de l'IA par l'adoption d'une exception expresse au droit d'auteur relative à l'analyse de l'information.

Nombre des progrès les plus excitants en IA découlent d'une technique appelée l'apprentissage machine. Il s'agit d'une forme d'analyse de l'information qui permet aux chercheurs d'« entraîner » les systèmes d'IA en y intégrant de vastes ensembles de données. Les données servant à l'« entraînement » sont analysées, ce qui permet de cerner des schémas, des relations et des tendances sous-jacentes, puis de les utiliser ensuite pour faire des prédictions fondées sur de nouvelles données.

Par exemple, des développeurs ont élaboré l'application Seeing AI, qui aide les personnes aveugles ou malvoyantes à naviguer dans le monde en leur fournissant des descriptions auditives des objets figurant sur des photos. Les utilisateurs de l'application peuvent prendre des photos à l'aide de leur téléphone intelligent, et l'application Seeing Al peut interpréter ces informations à l'aide de descriptions auditives, informant ainsi les utilisateurs de ce qui se trouve devant eux. Pour élaborer un modèle de vision artificielle pouvant identifier les objets, il a fallu « entraîner » le système à l'aide de données tirées de millions d'images, représentant des milliers d'objets usuels qui se trouvent dans notre environnement quotidien, comme des automobiles, des panneaux routiers, des paysages et des animaux.

On pourrait comprendre que vous vous demandiez en ce moment ce que tout cela a à voir avec le droit d'auteur. L'incertitude se manifeste parce que le processus d'apprentissage automatique peut comprendre la création de reproductions des données d'entraînement qui sont lisibles par machine. Dans certains cas, les données servant à l'entraînement peuvent comprendre des oeuvres qui sont protégées par le droit d'auteur. Dans le cas de l'application Seeing AI, il s'agit de millions de photos qui ont été utilisées pour entraîner le modèle de vision artificielle à identifier des objets usuels.

Soyons clairs: les reproductions nécessaires à l'apprentissage machine ne sont utilisées que dans le but de cerner des informations qui ne sont pas visées par le droit d'auteur à partir d'oeuvres accessibles de façon légale. Toutefois, il manque actuellement une exception expresse dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur pour permettre ce type d'analyse informationnelle. En conséquence, il existe une grande incertitude quant à la portée des activités autorisées par la loi dans sa forme actuelle. Cette incertitude pose un risque à l'égard des investissements du Canada en IA, et confère un avantage concurrentiel aux pays qui offrent une assise juridique plus solide au développement de l'IA.

Le Japon en est un exemple. En 2009, ce pays a été le premier à adopter une exception visant les reproductions qui sont créées dans le cadre d'un processus d'« analyse de l'information ». Plus tôt cette année, la Diète japonaise a modifié cette exception pour en étendre la portée en ce qui concerne la recherche sur l'IA. Les analystes attribuent maintenant à ces réformes législatives la transformation du Japon en ce qu'ils appellent un paradis de l'apprentissage machine.

Les tribunaux américains ont aussi confirmé que, en vertu du principe d'utilisation équitable, les reproductions accessoires aux fins d'analyse de l'information ne sont pas contraires à la loi. En septembre, le Parlement européen s'est prononcé en faveur de l'adoption d'une nouvelle disposition sur le droit d'auteur qui donnerait aux États membres toute la souplesse nécessaire pour créer de larges exceptions relativement à l'analyse de l'information. On examine actuellement l'adoption d'exceptions semblables à Singapour et en Australie.

(1640)



Ces modifications reflètent un consensus qui est en train de s’établir, selon lequel la création de reproductions lisibles par machine aux fins d’analyse de l’information ne devrait pas être perçue comme un acte visé par le droit d’auteur. La protection du droit d’auteur n’a jamais eu pour objectif d'empêcher les utilisateurs d’analyser une oeuvre en vue d’en tirer des informations factuelles et ne pouvant être protégées; c’est pourquoi il est peu sensé que la législation sur le droit d’auteur empêche d’effectuer une analyse simplement parce qu’elle est effectuée par ordinateur.

Afin de veiller à que les sommes importantes investies par le Canada dans l'IA portent leurs fruits à long terme, il faut moderniser la Loi sur le droit d'auteur pour assurer la sécurité juridique, comme le veut cette proposition pleine de bon sens.

Les reproductions créées dans le cadre de l'entraînement des systèmes d'IA n'ont aucun rapport avec l'expression créative que le droit d'auteur est destiné à protéger, ne sont pas visibles pour l'être humain et ne font concurrence à aucune des oeuvres originales ni ne les remplacent. Autrement dit, l'exception visant l'analyse de l'information ne crée aucun risque à l'égard des intérêts légitimes que la législation sur le droit d'auteur vise à protéger.

Au bout du compte, le droit d’auteur est censé instaurer des mesures qui encouragent la création de nouvelles oeuvres. Une exception relative à l’analyse de l’information soutient cet objectif en stimulant la création de nouveaux projets de recherche et en permettant de découvrir de nouvelles connaissances. Ce comité, en recommandant l’adoption de cette exception, fera en sorte que la Loi sur le droit d’auteur demeure pertinente quant à l'atteinte de ses objectifs à l'ère de l'intelligence numérique.

Je vous remercie et je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous recevons maintenant le représentant de l'Information Technology Association of Canada, M. French.

Vous disposez d'au plus sept minutes.

(1645)

M. Nevin French (vice-président, Politiques, Association canadienne de la technologie de l'information):

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs, c'est un privilège pour moi de représenter l'Association canadienne de la technologie de l'information, aussi appelée l'ACTI, et de participer aux discussions dans le cadre de l'examen de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

L'ACTI se veut la voix, à l'échelle nationale, de l'industrie des TIC au Canada, qui comprend plus de 37 000 entreprises, crée plus de 1,5 million d'emplois et contribue plus de 76 milliards de dollars à l'économie.

De nos jours, la technologie peut devancer les lois et la réglementation, et c'est le cas. Il est primordial que le Canada, à titre de chef de file mondial, ne prenne pas de retard.

Aujourd'hui, j'aimerais aborder la façon dont l'examen de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur s'inscrit dans le portrait global de l'économie numérique au Canada. Je vais m'attarder à l'apprentissage machine et à l'intelligence artificielle et aux répercussions qui toucheront les règles et la réglementation liées au droit d'auteur.

La Loi sur le droit d'auteur joue un rôle essentiel pour protéger les titulaires de droits, tout en favorisant la créativité et l'innovation, qui sont d'une importance capitale pour le secteur de la technologie. L'important, c'est de trouver un juste équilibre entre la protection des droits des créateurs et la capacité des utilisateurs à avoir accès aux oeuvres créées et à en tirer avantage. La difficulté réside dans le maintien de l'équilibre entre les deux extrêmes. Sans cet équilibre, c'est l'ensemble de l'économie numérique qui souffrira. Pour tout dire, nous devons mettre en place la bonne politique.

Examinons brièvement le contexte en matière de technologie au Canada. Nous venons de connaître une année exceptionnelle pour ce qui est des investissements dans les technologies canadiennes; nous avons vu une croissance sans précédent du nombre d'emplois, des investissements directs étrangers importants, sans compter que plusieurs entreprises canadiennes dans le domaine des technologies ont intégré le marché mondial.

Dans l'économie actuelle, il peut exister des emplois en technologie dans presque n'importe quel secteur. Nombre d'emplois qui sont liés aux technologies ne concernent plus seulement la science informatique ou la programmation. Il s'agit maintenant de combiner passions et technologie. Cela touche la santé, l'environnement, l'énergie, les mines, l'agriculture ou les arts, et certains emplois sont entièrement centrés sur la technologie, comme ceux dans les domaines de la cybersécurité, des réseaux et de l'analyse de données.

C'est pourquoi l'ACTI a collaboré avec des établissements postsecondaires pour créer des programmes en gestion d'entreprise technologique qui allient des cours en commerce et en technologie. Ces initiatives sont importantes, parce que la lutte pour attirer les talents en technologie se déroule maintenant à l'échelle internationale, et le Canada se trouve dans une position particulière et est perçu comme un chef de file. C'est une des raisons pour lesquelles il y a autant d'entreprises de premier plan dans le domaine des technologies qui effectuent des investissements partout au pays. La technologie et ses applications dans des domaines de pointe ne tiennent plus de l'histoire à succès vécue au pays; le Canada est un acteur important dans l'économie numérique mondiale, constitue un endroit de choix où investir et occupe un rôle de chef de file en intelligence artificielle.

Au cours de la dernière année, le Canada a attiré énormément de talents à l'échelle internationale, y compris en provenance des États-Unis. Voilà quelque chose qu'on ne pouvait entrevoir il n'y a pas si longtemps. Presque toutes les villes au Canada comptent des incubateurs de technologie, et on compte de nombreux exemples d'investissements importants faits par de très grandes entreprises de technologie qui sont générateurs d'emplois dans ce secteur. On constate que, de façon aussi importante, le secteur technologique au pays connaît aussi une croissance, grâce à l'accès accru à des talents et à du capital de risque et à l'appui gouvernemental aux petites entreprises. Cela s'ajoute à des taux d'imposition et à des coûts d'exploitation concurrentiels, ainsi qu'à une économie forte, ce qui crée un environnement favorable au succès.

Une des raisons principales de ce succès, c'est que nous avons la bonne approche en matière de droit d'auteur, c'est-à-dire une approche très équilibrée, et cela devrait être maintenu. La loi fonctionne. Nous devons faire preuve de prudence quant à la recommandation d'apporter des modifications importantes qui pourraient entraîner des conséquences inattendues dans d'autres industries. Les acteurs de l'industrie technologique sont d'avis que l'examen mené en 2012 a porté des fruits, et qu'il s'agit d'un facteur important de la croissance du secteur des technologies au Canada.

On ne peut échapper au fait que la technologie a changé notre monde à jamais, et qu'il existe une quantité faramineuse de données, qui ne cessera d'augmenter et dont le traitement exigera le recours à des machines. Les ordinateurs surpassent de loin la capacité des humains à recueillir et à traiter rapidement des données, mais quand on utilise la machine en conjonction avec la pensée et l'intuition humaines, nos façons de travailler, d'apprendre, de grandir, et d'évoluer dans le monde qui nous entoure deviennent beaucoup plus efficaces.

Comme je l'ai mentionné au début, notre rôle à titre d'association nationale de l'industrie consiste à travailler étroitement avec nos membres. C'est pourquoi nous les avons consultés pour connaître leurs préoccupations concernant le droit d'auteur, et ils ont tous mentionné l'intelligence artificielle, ou l'IA, et l'apprentissage machine.

Le Canada doit harmoniser sa vision, qui consiste à devenir un chef de file en IA, avec un cadre stratégique qui soutient le développement de l'IA et sa commercialisation. Il faut pour cela des politiques qui favorisent l'accès aux données, car un accès important aux données est fondamental quand il s'agit d'IA. Les recherches dans ce domaine et les produits qui en sont issus nécessitent de grandes quantités de données pour entraîner les logiciels à interpréter un texte, à reconnaître des tendances et à faire des prédictions. Il est aussi nécessaire d'avoir un large accès aux données pour atténuer le risque d'introduire un biais dans des solutions fondées sur l'IA.

(1650)



Dans d'autres pays, comme les États-Unis et le Japon, on a reconnu l'importance de l'accès aux données, et les lois sur le droit d'auteur permettent de façon expresse la reproduction d'oeuvres protégées par le droit d'auteur pour faciliter l'analyse de l'information par des ordinateurs.

Si le Canada ne modifie pas la Loi sur le droit d'auteur afin d'inclure une exemption à la violation du droit d'auteur similaire à celle qui existe ailleurs, on peut raisonnablement s'attendre à ce que nous prenions du retard par rapport à ces autres pays, et que les talents et les investissements en capital dans le domaine de l'IA migrent vers des administrations plus favorables. Nous devons être clairs. Le fait d'ajouter une exemption visant l'analyse de l'information ne mine pas les intérêts des titulaires de droits d'auteur quant au contenu. Le droit de lire, de comprendre et d'analyser des données n'a jamais été assujetti à un contrôle en vertu de lois sur le droit d'auteur. L'utilisation d'un ordinateur pour apprendre de façon plus efficace qu'en lisant, en regardant ou en observant des oeuvres ne touche pas les droits des titulaires. Ceux qui possèdent les droits d'auteur continueront de contrôler l'accès à leurs oeuvres.

Il existe aujourd'hui une course à l'IA à l'échelle internationale, vu que d'autres pays tentent de rattraper et de dépasser le Canada dans ce domaine. Nous ne pouvons nous asseoir sur nos lauriers simplement parce que le Canada est perçu comme un chef de file. Pendant de nombreuses années, nous nous sommes dit: « Si seulement nous pouvions changer notre réputation de pays où on mène de la recherche fondamentale à celle de pays où on crée des entreprises. » Eh bien, l'IA constitue une occasion en ce sens. Nous ne voulons pas créer un effet de ralentissement de la croissance dans le domaine de l'IA au Canada, en particulier en ce moment, et de mauvais choix stratégiques auront des conséquences néfastes et nuiront en particulier aux petites entreprises, qui forment l'épine dorsale de notre économie. Si nous ne permettons pas un accès élargi aux données, les PME et les entreprises en démarrage seront celles qui écoperont le plus. Ces entreprises auront peu ou pas de données en propre, ce qui fait que l'accès à des oeuvres et à des données rendues publiques est essentiel à leurs travaux de recherche et à leurs efforts de commercialisation.

En somme, nous proposons ce qui suit: que le Comité reconnaisse que la Loi sur le droit d'auteur ne vise pas la reproduction d'oeuvres accessibles légalement aux fins de l'IA, et que le Comité recommande d'ajouter une disposition dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur pour préciser que la reproduction, l'analyse et l'utilisation d'oeuvres et de données légalement acquises visant à acquérir de nouvelles connaissances ne nécessitent pas d'obtenir l'autorisation du titulaire des droits d'auteur. Si nous voulons que le Canada conserve sa position de chef de file de l'industrie de l'IA, nous devons établir correctement cette politique.

Par le passé, l'ACTI a demandé au gouvernement de faire participer davantage la communauté des technologies à l'élaboration de politiques et, pour être franc, nous pouvons dire que le gouvernement, y compris ce comité, en fait de plus en plus en ce sens. Les acteurs de l'industrie peuvent donner leur point de vue et partager leurs connaissances et leur expertise, ce qui est particulièrement important en ce qui concerne les nouvelles technologies.

Comment le gouvernement peut-il soutenir la croissance de l'industrie des technologies? Il n'est pas nécessaire d'avoir recours à du financement direct, même si cela peut être utile. Le gouvernement peut aussi établir un cadre stratégique qui assure un juste équilibre. À mesure que le secteur des technologies au Canada continue de grandir, l'accès aux données, les occasions d'attirer du capital financier et des talents ainsi que la création d'occasions d'affaires constituent des éléments qui peuvent aider à assurer la continuité des investissements.

Nous sommes d'avis que les pratiques exemplaires générales peuvent s'appliquer dans le cadre de l'examen de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. La loi doit faire l'objet d'un examen tous les cinq ans. Toutefois, la technologie continuera de devancer la législation. C'est pourquoi nous demandons d'apporter des modifications à la loi, mais nous souhaitons l'utilisation d'une approche chirurgicale. Le Comité s'est vu confier une tâche très ardue, et il sera très difficile de satisfaire tout le monde. Toutefois, notre message principal, c'est que la loi nécessite une mise à jour ciblée et que, en toute franchise, à l'avenir, il faudra utiliser un scalpel, et non un marteau, vu la vitesse des changements.

Pour terminer, je souhaite remercier le Comité d'avoir mené jusqu'à présent des consultations exhaustives.

Je vous remercie de m'avoir offert l'occasion de présenter le point de vue de notre industrie.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Compte tenu de nos contraintes de temps, nous allons passer immédiatement aux questions.

Madame Caesar-Chavannes, vous avez sept minutes.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Je remercie tous les témoins.

Je vais poser mes premières questions à M. Hilchie.

À combien s'élèvent vos coûts liés au piratage dans l'industrie du jeu vidéo? En avez-vous une idée?

M. Jayson Hilchie:

Cela a toujours été un défi d'établir ce chiffre. Nous savons combien nous vendons de copies légitimes, mais nous ne sommes pas en mesure de dire combien de copies sont piratées par rapport au nombre de copies vendues de façon légitime. Nous savons toutefois que le nombre est important. Il s'agit surtout maintenant de jeux clonés et de jeux pour appareils mobiles. Les jeux pour appareils mobiles sont maintenant clonés, et il existe des façons de tricher et de contourner les protections qui sont accessibles en ligne. Si vous cherchez à obtenir un chiffre précis, je ne suis pas en mesure de vous en donner un.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Très bien.

Nous savons qu'il s'agit d'une industrie en croissance. Nous avons des étudiants du Collège algonquin qui sont présents aujourd'hui, et il y a des étudiants de l'IUTO dans ma circonscription qui font partie d'un nombre grandissant d'étudiants qui se dirigent dans le domaine des jeux vidéo. Je leur ai dit que je les saluerais.

Je cherche à mieux comprendre les conséquences du piratage continu, en particulier dans le cas des jeux utilisés dans des domaines comme la santé ou d'autres industries, où il ne s'agit pas simplement d'une personne devant un ordinateur dans sa maison en train de jouer à un jeu. Quelles sont les incidences des droits d'auteur en ce qui concerne les questions de protection de la vie privée, et les incidences sur des applications futures quand les jeux sont utilisés dans d'autres contextes que celui de l'industrie du jeu vidéo, par exemple en santé?

(1655)

M. Jayson Hilchie:

Je crois que votre première question porte sur les répercussions de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur sur de petites entreprises de jeux vidéo qui essaient de percer dans l'industrie. Il y a environ 600 entreprises de jeux vidéo au Canada. Nous produisons plus de 2 100 produits différents par année. La grande majorité de ces produits sont créés par de petits studios indépendants comptant de deux à cinq personnes qui créent des jeux et qui les publient elles-mêmes sur l'App Store, auquel on a accès sur un appareil mobile. Elles produisent ces jeux en utilisant des fonds personnels ou les revenus d'exploitation, ou autrement.

La possibilité de découvrir les produits dans notre industrie constitue une des plus grandes difficultés auxquelles nous faisons face, et elle découle du fait qu'un très grand nombre de jeux sont constamment créés et qu'ils sont difficiles à trouver.

Tout d'abord, il est très difficile de faire de l'argent avec des jeux vidéo et la production indépendante de jeux vidéo quand vous essayez de les vendre de façon légitime. Tous les jeux qui se font pirater aggravent cette situation.

En ce qui concerne le droit d'auteur relativement à la façon dont notre industrie intègre des domaines plus sérieux, comme l'aéronautique ou la santé, et même l'IA, nous sommes un joueur important en ce qui concerne la création de certaines interfaces utilisateurs dans les voitures autonomes et d'autres choses du genre. Je n'ai pas eu connaissance de situations où le droit d'auteur poserait problème dans ce type d'application. Nous créons des programmes qui sont utilisés, au bout du compte, à des fins sérieuses, autres que dans le divertissement, mais nous établissons aussi des partenariats avec des universités et d'autres entreprises indépendantes dans le domaine des technologies aux fins de développement d'appareils médicaux, entre autres. Je ne peux que tenir pour acquis que ces organisations effectuent les démarches appropriées pour obtenir les autorisations en matière de droit d'auteur, ce dont je ne suis pas au courant.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

D'accord. Merci.

Je vais maintenant m'adresser aux gens du domaine de l'IA. Tout d'abord, je tiens à dire que je reconnais qu'il faille demeurer concurrentiel et que le Canada est un chef de file dans ce domaine, ce que vous avez tous les trois souligné très clairement dans vos témoignages.

Y a-t-il des entreprises qui tirent avantage des abstractions ou des prédictions produites par l'IA?

M. Paul Gagnon:

Le but est d'élaborer des outils qui finissent par être indirectement alimentés et peaufinés grâce à l'accès à ces données. J'utilise l'expression « chaîne d'approvisionnement ». Au début, des techniques fondamentales, des algorithmes et des intuitions de base orientent la façon de construire le produit ou de fournir une solution.

Si vous voulez des exemples précis, nous pouvons songer à l'élaboration d'outils pour l'environnement. Nous voulons élaborer un outil qui permettra de mieux prédire les modèles météorologiques locaux, peut-être les tornades dans la région d'Ottawa. C'est un excellent sujet d'actualité. En agriculture, il se pourrait que l'on veuille élaborer des outils qui amélioreront le rendement des cultures ou qui permettront de gérer de façon plus intelligente les impacts environnementaux. À partir de là, on examine diverses sources de données afin d'élaborer des outils. Le facteur déterminant pourrait être le moment où il faut ensemencer le champ. Voilà ce que l'algorithme cherchera à savoir. Il se servira de diverses sources d'information afin d'obtenir la réponse recherchée.

C'est sur ce plan que l'IA est véritablement puissante, car elle peut combiner et appliquer les données de ce vaste éventail, puis en arriver à une réponse digérable en procédant d'une manière qui ne correspond pas nécessairement à ce que fait l'esprit humain.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

À un certain moment, les outils qu'on crée en se fondant sur les prédictions génèrent un certain degré de rentabilité. Est-ce exact?

M. Paul Gagnon:

Exact.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Si on mine ces données et qu'elles contiennent du matériel protégé par des droits d'auteur, qui, dans la chaîne d'approvisionnement, fournit cette rémunération au propriétaire?

M. Paul Gagnon:

Je pense que c'est une bonne question. Il y a une défaillance du marché à cet égard, en raison du très grand volume.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

D'accord.

M. Christian Troncoso:

Je pense qu'il importe que l'on y réfléchisse d'un point de vue quotidien. Si je lis un livre sur la façon d'investir dans les marchés financiers et que je fais beaucoup d'argent, je pense que personne ne présumerait que je dois une partie de ces profits à l'auteur du livre en question. Nous ne présumons généralement pas à tout moment où une oeuvre est utilisée d'une certaine manière qui génère un quelconque profit pour une personne, une compensation financière est nécessairement due à l'auteur.

Je pense que l'IA que nous...

(1700)

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Mais la personne a payé pour acheter le livre.

M. Christian Troncoso:

Certes.

Je pense qu'il est très important de souligner la question... Je ne parlerai pas au nom de tout le monde. En ce qui me concerne, nous ne souhaitons pas obtenir une exception qui nous permettra d'accéder à de nouvelles formes d'oeuvres. Nous sommes tout à fait prêts à payer. C'est très bien. Toutefois, une fois qu'une entreprise a obtenu l'accès à une oeuvre et qu'elle a payé pour l'avoir, elle devrait pouvoir analyser cette oeuvre autant que vous pouvez le faire lorsque vous lisez un livre que vous avez acheté au magasin.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer à M. Albas.

Vous disposez de sept minutes; allez-y.

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais présenter la motion que j'ai versée au dossier à l'égard des propos que j'ai adressés au Comité. Je demanderai aux députés et à nos témoins de faire preuve d'indulgence, et je serai le plus bref possible, car je pense qu'il importe que nous réglions cette question. J'espère que les députés l'appuieront.

Pour ceux qui ne l'ont pas sous les yeux, la motion est ainsi libellée: Pour aider dans l’examen de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur, que le Comité permanent de l’industrie, des sciences et de la technologie demande aux ministres Freeland et Bains, de venir devant le Comité, accompagnés de fonctionnaires, pour expliquer les répercussions de l’Accord États-Unis-Mexique-Canada (AEUMC) sur les régimes régissant la propriété intellectuelle et le droit d’auteur au Canada.

Tout d'abord, il est difficile pour le greffier et pour le président de pouvoir joindre les ministres. L'Action de grâce arrive, et il ne nous reste pas beaucoup de temps avant que nous ajournions pour le congé des Fêtes.

J'espère que les députés appuieront la motion. Ce nouvel accord contient beaucoup d'éléments, et je pense qu'il a une incidence sur les travaux que nous faisons ici, aujourd'hui.

Je demanderais aux députés d'appuyer cette demande.

Le président:

Monsieur Sheehan.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Merci infiniment d'avoir présenté cette motion.

Bien entendu, on est en train d'examiner l'information, et on en débattra à la Chambre, alors ce que j'affirme, c'est que nous devrions peut-être faire cela plus tard, mais pas maintenant.

Je ne peux pas l'appuyer pour l'instant, mais, à un certain moment, nous étudierons divers aspects du nouvel AEUMC.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Jowhari.

M. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Monsieur le président, je propose que l'on ajourne le débat.

Le président:

Cette motion ne peut pas faire l'objet d'un débat, alors nous allons la mettre aux voix.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Vraiment?

Je ne pense pas qu'elle soit...

Le président:

Elle ne peut pas faire l'objet d'un débat.

Je ne comprends pas quel est le problème. La motion ne peut pas faire l'objet d'un débat, alors nous allons la mettre aux voix.

L'hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, PCC):

J'invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président. J'ai déjà présidé des comités de la Chambre des communes et, d'après mes souvenirs, en cas de motion dilatoire, on suspend les travaux du comité; on n'ajourne pas le débat.

Je ne me souviens d'aucune situation où un membre d'un comité a eu la permission de présenter une motion visant à ajourner le débat sur une motion. C'est considéré comme une motion dilatoire.

Je crois savoir que la suspension des travaux d'un comité ne peut pas faire l'objet d'un débat, puisqu'il s'agit d'une motion dilatoire, mais que ce n'est pas le cas lorsqu'il est question de l'ajournement du débat sur une motion présentée au comité.

Le président:

Il s'agit d'une motion dilatoire. C'est arrivé au sein de notre comité à de nombreuses occasions.

Nous ne suspendrons pas les travaux du Comité. Nous ajournons le débat sur cette motion, et c'est ce qui a été demandé. La motion ne peut pas faire l'objet d'un débat.

Si vous le voulez, le greffier pourra vous expliquer les règles.

Monsieur Masse.

M. Brian Masse:

Pour préciser, techniquement, je suppose que ce pourrait être exact, mais ce serait rompre avec l'approche collégiale adoptée au sein du Comité. Les libéraux veulent étouffer même l'intérêt de permettre aux gens de se prononcer.

Vous avez peut-être raison en ce qui concerne l'aspect technique de la question, mais cela envoie clairement le message aux députés comme moi selon lequel ils ne peuvent même pas participer pour un instant à quelque chose qui est présenté.

Vous allez peut-être trancher en faveur de cet ajournement, mais c'est un choix d'ordre technique. Il est certainement contraire aux antécédents du Comité et à l'objectif que nous travaillons à atteindre.

Le président:

Monsieur Masse, je souscris à votre opinion.

Je pense qu'une partie du problème tient au fait que des témoins comparaissent devant nous et que nous disposons d'une période très limitée en raison des mises aux voix. Aucun vote n'a été tenu dans le but d'arrêter ce débat.

Comme l'a affirmé M. Sheehan, nous ne disposons pas d'assez de temps aujourd'hui pour débattre de cette notion.

Encore une fois, des témoins comparaissent devant nous, et le temps est limité.

Nous avons toujours tenté de fonctionner de façon collégiale, et je veux m'assurer que vous disposerez, vous aussi, d'une période pour poser des questions aux témoins.

Il s'agit d'une motion qui ne peut pas faire l'objet d'un débat.

(1705)

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

J'invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président. Je crois savoir que nous pourrons soulever ce débat à la prochaine séance, quand nous aurons plus de temps.

Le président:

Vous le pouvez certainement.

Voici les deux options: vous rejetez la motion et c'est terminé, ou bien vous la présentez à nouveau dans l'avenir.

À ce que je crois savoir, comme nous manquons de temps, personne ne souhaite tenir un débat de fond à ce sujet.

M. Brian Masse:

Désolé, monsieur le président; je n'ai qu'une dernière question rapide à poser.

Même si j'ai une modification à apporter à la motion, je ne peux pas la proposer.

Le président:

Je procéderais à un vote à main levée, alors quiconque a la parole.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

Le président:

Je veux seulement m'assurer que tout le monde comprend clairement. Nous allons tenir un vote.

M. Brian Masse:

Puis-je demander un vote par appel nominal?

Le président:

D'accord.

(La motion est adoptée par 5 voix contre 4.)

Le président: Je vais vous demander si vous pouvez vous en tenir... parce que je veux m'assurer que M. Masse obtient son temps de parole.

M. Dan Albas:

Je comprends cela, monsieur le président.

Je vais simplement passer directement à l'Association canadienne du logiciel de divertissement.

La diffusion de vidéo de soi en continu représente un énorme marché, actuellement. Sur Twitch, nous voyons des utilisateurs obtenir des nombres de visionnements qui feraient l'envie de nombreuses émissions de télévision. Ces utilisateurs font de l'argent en jouant à un jeu protégé par des droits d'auteur; toutefois, ils font également connaître le jeu à des acheteurs potentiels. Comment l'industrie du jeu vidéo voit-elle la diffusion en continu? Est-ce de la publicité gratuite, ou bien croyez-vous qu'il s'agit d'une violation du droit d'auteur?

M. Jayson Hilchie:

La réponse, c'est que chaque entreprise qui voit son contenu être diffusé en continu sur Internet est dotée de politiques différentes à cet égard. Certaines travaillent en partenariat avec les utilisateurs dans le but de partager les recettes qui découlent de la publicité faite sur la chaîne en question. D'autres interdisent tout simplement la diffusion, et d'autres encore l'encouragent, comme vous le dites, car elle fait la promotion du jeu. Vous avez raison d'affirmer qu'il s'agit d'oeuvres protégées par des droits d'auteur appartenant aux entreprises, mais chacune applique sa propre politique en la matière.

M. Dan Albas:

Quelle est votre politique relative à la diffusion en continu des jeux, en tant qu'organisation?

M. Jayson Hilchie:

Ma politique sur la diffusion en continu des jeux, en ce qui a trait à...

M. Dan Albas:

Croyez-vous que les dispositions actuelles de la loi permettent une utilisation équitable de ce matériel protégé par des droits d'auteurs, ou bien est-ce quelque chose à l'égard de quoi vos membres ne vous ont pas donné de consignes?

M. Jayson Hilchie:

Eh bien, comme je l'ai dit, chaque membre a été établi ses propres politiques en ce qui a trait à la diffusion en continu des émissions de télévision...

M. Dan Albas:

Alors, vous n'appliquez aucune politique?

M. Jayson Hilchie:

Je n'ai pas établi de politique particulière sur la diffusion en continu des jeux lorsqu'il s'agit simplement d'y jouer. C'est hors de la portée de mes tâches.

M. Dan Albas:

Nous avons également entendu des représentants de l'industrie musicale affirmer qu'ils voudraient que les enregistrements sonores utilisés dans des films ou des émissions de télévision donnent lieu à des redevances pour diffusion répétée. Évidemment, certains des jeux qui sont créés par un grand nombre de vos membres ressemblent presque à une production cinématographique. Savez-vous quelle serait l'incidence d'une telle mesure sur l'industrie du jeu vidéo, et votre association s'y opposerait-elle?

M. Jayson Hilchie:

La question était...?

M. Dan Albas:

Ce sont les enregistrements de la bande sonore, parce que ce sont des musiciens et des gens qui créent la musique. Quand ces enregistrements sont inclus dans une oeuvre, les auteurs souhaitent obtenir d'autres redevances chaque fois que l'enregistrement est rediffusé et que la musique est utilisée.

M. Jayson Hilchie:

Chaque entreprise qui octroie des licences musicales pour un jeu ou qui crée de la musique pour un jeu le fait par l'intermédiaire d'une société de gestion ou de quelque chose du genre. Habituellement, elle paie d'emblée pour avoir accès à l'oeuvre. Toutefois, en ce qui a trait à... et je ne sais pas si vous voulez parler du droit de mise à disposition, qui est lié à une affaire actuellement instruite devant la Commission du droit d'auteur.

(1710)

M. Dan Albas:

Oui, il y a une exemption pour les enregistrements sonores, mais j'ai l'impression qu'il y a dans votre industrie une pratique établie, selon laquelle les gens se font payer pour l'utilisation des oeuvres.

M. Jayson Hilchie:

Absolument.

M. Dan Albas:

Encore une fois, certains artistes demandent qu'il y ait un flux de revenus continus découlant de l'utilisation répétée d'enregistrements sonores.

M. Jayson Hilchie:

D'accord. Le seul cas que je connais est celui de l'affaire qui est actuellement instruite devant la Commission du droit d'auteur relativement au droit de mise à disposition.

M. Dan Albas:

Je vais simplement poser une question à Element AI en ce qui concerne l'apprentissage automatique. De toute évidence, il semblerait qu'il y ait des iniquités entre le Canada et d'autres pays, soit le Japon et les États-Unis, pour ce qui est de la certitude que vous cherchez à obtenir.

Il y a aussi un autre groupe, l'Institut canadien de formation juridique, qui a présenté un mémoire à ce comité, qui concerne la disposition sur le droit d'auteur de la Couronne, l'article 12. Ses représentants affirment qu'il faut obtenir davantage de précisions en ce qui concerne l'utilisation des documents de la Couronne, par exemple au moyen d'un projet de loi gouvernemental, d'un débat au Parlement et ainsi de suite, car ils ne peuvent utiliser le clavardage pour expliquer de nouvelles exigences ou de nouveaux règlements ou que sais-je. Cela appuie-t-il vos propos, à savoir que vous croyez qu'il est nécessaire d'obtenir plus de certitude à l'égard du recours à l'apprentissage automatique? Ce besoin s'applique-t-il aussi au droit d'auteur de la Couronne?

M. Paul Gagnon:

Je crois fermement qu'il est aussi possible d'obtenir davantage de clarté au chapitre du droit d'auteur de la Couronne. Cela nous ramène aussi aux initiatives en matière de données ouvertes. Si vous regardez les conditions établies par le gouvernement relativement aux licences de données ouvertes, l'objectif est de rendre l'information accessible sans aucune restriction. Cela n'a pas été complètement harmonisé au sein des différents ordres de gouvernement. Il serait grandement utile d'obtenir davantage de clarté même en ce qui concerne les différents ensembles de données, les divers renseignements rendus accessibles par le gouvernement au titre du droit d'auteur de la Couronne.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord. Je me demande vraiment, par contre, ce que les chercheurs en IA apprendraient en écoutant tous vos débats.

Le président:

C'est drôle.

M. Dan Albas:

Je l'apprécie. Merci.

Le président:

Nous allons donner la parole à M. Masse durant sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci aux témoins d'être ici.

Je vais commencer par l'association du logiciel de divertissement. Je crois que la plupart des gens considèrent qu'elle s'occupe uniquement des jeux vidéo sur console, mais en réalité, elle contribue grandement à l'évolution de bien d'autres domaines, de la publicité aux questions liées à l'entraînement et au sport. En Corée du Sud, par exemple, il y a un ministre responsable du jeu. C'est vraiment vers quoi nous nous dirigeons, ou bien nous y sommes déjà.

Vous vous êtes servis de l'innovation à de nombreux égards afin de contrer certains actes de piratage qui se produisent. Par exemple, le problème avec le nouveau Spider-Man tient au fait qu'il est possible de jouer de façon individuelle hors ligne, mais pour vivre l'expérience complète recherchée lorsque vous achetez le jeu, vous devez aller en ligne. Cela nécessite une connexion rapide à large bande et ainsi de suite. Pouvez-vous, au moins, fournir certains renseignements concernant la manière dont vous en êtes venus à envisager une solution technologique afin de lutter contre le piratage, comparativement aux autres personnes qui se sont présentées devant ce comité avant vous? Essentiellement, elles ont demandé un renforcement de l'application de la loi.

J'aimerais souligner la situation à Windsor, où il y a eu beaucoup de piratage en ce qui concerne DirecTV, par exemple. Il était très facile d'accéder à ce réseau de chaînes américain. Ensuite, des mesures ont été mises en place pour éliminer le piratage.

Pouvez-vous donner un peu plus d'information au sujet des mesures novatrices prises par l'industrie afin de lutter contre le piratage?

M. Jayson Hilchie:

Comme je l'ai mentionné dans mes déclarations préliminaires, et comme l'a dit l'ACTI, nous avons l'impression que la Loi sur le droit d'auteur est efficace. Nous ne cherchons pas à y apporter de nombreuses modifications. Nous cherchons à nous assurer que les mesures techniques de protection et les clauses contre le contournement de ces mesures énoncées dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur continuent à faire l'objet d'un examen. Comme vous dites, l'innovation technologique mise au point par notre industrie afin de contrer le piratage de nos jeux est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles nous avons été en mesure de poursuivre notre croissance.

Les MTP pourraient correspondre à bon nombre de choses comme un mot de passe permettant un accès. Cela peut être aussi simple que ça. Il peut s'agir d'une mesure aussi compliquée qu'un logiciel intégré dans une console qui rend illisibles les disques de copie — comme des en-têtes sur un logiciel qui pourraient distinguer un exemplaire de jeu authentique d'une copie de jeu. Bien honnêtement, au Canada, nous avons eu la chance que notre industrie se soit retrouvée au coeur d'une poursuite judiciaire devant la Cour fédérale où Nintendo a eu recours à la nouvelle loi pour remettre en cause les clauses et les MTP. Nintendo a réussi à obtenir des dommages-intérêts ou une autre forme de redressement à l'égard d'une entreprise qui vendait des puces de modification qui permettaient essentiellement aux gens d'utiliser des jeux copiés, et aussi d'effectuer un certain nombre de choses que la console n'était pas censée faire.

En toute franchise, comme l'a dit M. Troncoso, le droit d'auteur est principalement en place pour inciter les créateurs à continuer de concevoir de nouveaux produits. À nos yeux, les MTP sont l'une des principales façons qui servent à protéger les oeuvres de création que nous mettons sur le marché afin de réaliser des recettes nous permettant de continuer à concevoir des produits.

(1715)

M. Brian Masse:

Ceci n'est pas le sujet de discussion ici, mais j'ai certaines préoccupations quant aux coffres à butin et ainsi de suite.

Il y a certes beaucoup d'éléments positifs en ce qui concerne la technologie transférable. De nombreuses choses intéressantes se produisent dans l'industrie.

J'ai déjà été directeur du conseil d'administration d'INCA, à titre de spécialiste en emploi, lorsque j'avais un vrai travail. Je m'occupais de l'adaptation du lieu de travail, notamment en ce qui a trait au logiciel de reconnaissance vocale. Je veux m'assurer de bien comprendre. Cherchez-vous à vous procurer une seule fois les images et le contenu qui ont été mis sur le marché, et ensuite à faire en sorte qu'ils soient adaptés à la technologie que vous exploitez? J'essaie de bien comprendre...

M. Christian Troncoso:

En ce qui concerne l'IA, je crois qu'il existe un nombre infini de possibilités et de différents cas d'utilisation. En règle générale, nous serions en faveur d'une exception au droit d'auteur selon laquelle si vous avez accès à une oeuvre, vous pouvez utiliser un ordinateur l'analyser, la comparer à d'autres oeuvres et trouver des corrélations et des formes, le tout pour ensuite mettre au point un modèle d'IA pour l'avenir. Dans votre cas, cela correspondrait à la reconnaissance vocale. Vous pourriez avoir besoin d'un genre de grand corpus de paroles enregistrées. De plus, vous pourriez aussi avoir besoin des transcriptions de ces enregistrements.

Ensuite, vous mettriez au point un système d'IA fondé sur... Ce serait un très grand corpus constitué de centaines de milliers d'heures d'enregistrements vocaux et de transcriptions qui servirait à créer un modèle, de manière à ce que le système d'IA repère des formes, fasse correspondre la voix à la transcription, et puisse refaire l'opération ultérieurement lorsqu'il capte un nouveau discours.

M. Brian Masse:

Une fois que votre modèle sera mis au point, je présume que vous serez préoccupé du fait d'avoir à payer des frais à chaque utilisation, contrairement à...

M. Christian Troncoso:

Oui, je crois que ce serait une préoccupation. À l'heure actuelle, je pense qu'il existe un flou juridique en ce qui concerne bon nombre de recherches qui ont cours. Le potentiel que représente l'IA est si important — elle rapporte beaucoup d'argent et sera utile pour pratiquement toutes les industries — qu'à l'heure actuelle, la tolérance des entreprises face aux risques est peut-être un peu plus élevée. Je crois que si l'on rendait une décision judiciaire défavorable qui dirait, en fait, que tout cela enfreint le droit d'auteur, cela aurait des répercussions très négatives sur les investissements du Canada en matière d'IA.

M. Brian Masse:

Monsieur le président, combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Vous avez environ six secondes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci beaucoup d'être ici.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est maintenant à M. Graham. Vous avez sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Je crois comprendre que M. Lametti a une brève question à poser avant que je ne prenne la parole.

M. David Lametti (LaSalle—Émard—Verdun, Lib.):

Merci.

La question s'adresse à M. Hilchie.

Je crois que vous pourriez susciter beaucoup d'appui en ayant recours aux mesures techniques de protection pour protéger le jeu en tant que tel, surtout si vous passez à un environnement en ligne.

S’il faut jouer à un jeu à l'aide d’une sorte d'appareil en particulier, quelle devrait être la portée de la mesure technique de protection? Je sais que la décision de la Cour fédérale joue en votre faveur, mais une MTP devrait-elle vous empêcher d’utiliser un appareil pour jouer à n’importe quel jeu? Il est question d’un appareil qui serait mieux régi s’il était assujetti au domaine du brevet. Voilà pour l'autre volet. Ensuite, pour ce qui est du dernier volet, une mesure technique de protection devrait-elle être utilisée — cette même sorte de protection — afin d’empêcher un agriculteur de modifier le matériel protégé par le droit d’auteur se trouvant sur son tracteur, et faire en sorte qu’il ne puisse l’utiliser sans problème?

Où doit-on fixer les limites?

(1720)

M. Jayson Hilchie:

Ce sont deux bonnes questions.

En ce qui concerne la console de jeux vidéo — et rappelons que la décision de la Cour fédérale joue en notre faveur —, dans ce cas en particulier, Nintendo a soutenu que les jeux qu'elle conçoit pour cette console devraient uniquement être joués sur celle-ci, et que la console devrait uniquement être utilisée pour ces jeux, et vice versa.

Une personne a fait valoir que les mesures techniques de protection, par l’intermédiaire d’une exemption relative à l’interopérabilité, permettraient essentiellement de jouer sur la console à des jeux conçus de manière artisanale ou à des jeux indépendants. À l’heure actuelle, il n’existe aucun poste, dans les modèles d’entreprise des principaux concepteurs de consoles de jeux vidéo, qui ne suppose pas une collaboration avec de petits concepteurs indépendants afin d’intégrer du contenu dans leur console. Ils sont tous en concurrence les uns avec les autres. Les exclusivités sont actuellement très importantes dans notre industrie. Si un jeu peut uniquement être joué sur une console Xbox, c’est qu’il y a eu un investissement financier considérable pour faire en sorte que ce jeu soit une exclusivité, et je ne vois pas pourquoi une MTP ne devrait pas protéger la possibilité de procéder ainsi.

En ce qui concerne l'agriculteur, je ne sais pas si je suis qualifié pour répondre à cette question, mais je comprends ce que vous dites.

M. David Lametti:

[Inaudible]

M. Jayson Hilchie:

Oui, je le ferai.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Que le compte rendu indique que M. Masse ne croit pas qu'il occupe un vrai emploi. Il s'agit simplement d'une précision.

Je vais continuer à parler des MTP, sujet que M. Lametti a abordé en profondeur. Les exceptions concernant l'utilisation équitable s'appliquent à beaucoup de choses. Il existe bon nombre de situations dans lesquelles on applique de telles exceptions. Vous demandez qu'une nouvelle exception soit mise en place afin de permettre l'analyse de données globales. S'il existe une mesure technique qui protège les données, devrait-on tout de même appliquer l'exception? Je pose la question à toutes les personnes qui ont préconisé cette mesure.

M. Paul Gagnon:

L'accès légitime à l'information est directement lié à l'exemption relative à l'analyse de l'information. Je ne crois pas que mon exposé a exprimé cette idée de façon suffisamment claire, mais nous considérons que l'accès légitime à l'information est un élément important à cet égard. Il ne s'agit pas de contourner les modèles d'entreprise et d'accéder aux données par des moyens illégaux ou non autorisés.

En contrepartie, il faut s'assurer que ce qui est prévu par la loi est efficace. Si j'accède à une oeuvre de manière légale au moyen d'un contrat, ce contrat ne devrait pas non plus contenir de disposition qui interdit l'analyse d'information.

Je ne crois pas que l'exemption que nous jugeons nécessaire doit forcément permettre l'accès illégal ou l'accès complètement libre aux oeuvres et aux données, car cela ne respecterait pas l'équilibre qui existe dans la loi entre les détenteurs de droits et les droits des utilisateurs.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si une personne produit quelque chose qui fait l'objet d'une MTP, on ne peut y avoir accès. Selon les définitions des MTP, le fait que l'oeuvre se retrouve sur un ordinateur pourrait correspondre d'emblée à la définition d'une MTP.

Ma question est simple. Si quelqu'un a recours à une MTP et que vous voulez accéder aux données à des fins d'analyse, l'exemption devrait-elle s'appliquer, ou la MTP devrait-elle avoir préséance sur l'exemption concernant l'utilisation équitable?

M. Paul Gagnon:

Je n'ai pas connaissance d'affaires judiciaires où cette question a été tranchée. J'aurais tendance à dire que s'il y a des MTP, cela voudrait probablement dire que l'accès légitime à l'information n'est pas obligatoire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La rétro-ingénierie devrait-elle être légale?

M. Paul Gagnon:

Je trouve que la loi présente clairement les droits relatifs à la rétro-ingénierie en utilisant des termes précis et spécifiques pour ce qui est de l'interopérabilité ou des mesures de sécurité. La loi admet qu'il y a certaines utilisations qui donnent lieu à des exceptions et permettent une certaine forme de rétro-ingénierie.

Pour les citoyens de l'ère numérique, ces dispositions sont quelque peu importantes, car elles nous permettent de nous assurer que nous ne sommes pas pris avec des plateformes que nous ne pouvons plus analyser ni contrôler, sauf dans un contexte très limité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Y a-t-il des circonstances dans lesquelles vous estimez que la rétro-ingénierie ne devrait pas être légale?

M. Paul Gagnon:

La loi établit un bon équilibre pour ce qui est de cerner des cas spécifiques où la rétro-ingénierie est acceptable. Un bon exemple serait les mesures de sécurité qui permettent d'identifier les systèmes de sécurité sous-jacents. Vous pouvez également prendre comme exemple l'interopérabilité. Cela donne aux consommateurs beaucoup de... Comme nous l'avons abordé avec la question de M. Lametti, on peut toujours se demander si c'est assez de liberté, mais dans un contexte limité, nous pouvons avoir ces objectifs et être en mesure de... Je ne militerais pas en faveur d'un droit général à la rétro-ingénierie.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avons-nous une pénurie de programmeurs de logiciel, de gens qualifiés pour ce type de travail dans le monde actuellement? Cette question s'adresse à vous tous.

M. Paul Gagnon:

Dans le domaine de l'IA, nous avons certainement une pénurie de chercheurs et de gens qui maîtrisent cet art, effectivement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

J'ai travaillé dans le domaine de la haute technologie pendant assez longtemps. Cela va faire 20 ans que j'y participe. J'ai remarqué que les gens avec qui je fais affaire actuellement sont, de façon générale, les mêmes personnes qu'il y a 20 ans. Ce que nous avons en commun, c'est que nous démontions nos ordinateurs dans nos sous-sols. Nous connaissions le fonctionnement des appareils. Je me rappelle avoir utilisé des éditeurs hexadécimaux pour pirater des jeux. C'était plutôt amusant.

La génération d'aujourd'hui n'a pas cet accès. Ils n'ont pas accès aux appareils, qui sont maintenant impossibles à démonter. Est-ce un problème? Pouvons-nous utiliser le droit d'auteur pour le régler afin que les gens de la prochaine génération puissent comprendre le fonctionnement des appareils et devenir les développeurs de demain?

(1725)

M. Paul Gagnon:

Je pense que les lois sur la propriété intellectuelle, qu'il s'agisse de la Loi sur les brevets ou de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, laissent place à l'étude personnelle et à la recherche. Les exemptions pour la recherche prévues par la Loi sur les brevets permettent ce type de piratage personnel. Par contre, l'exploitation commerciale de ce type d'activité serait certainement interdite.

Dans le domaine de l'IA, nous avons la chance de travailler avec des logiciels ouverts. Il s'agit d'une communauté très coopérative. Idéalement, nous pouvons bricoler ouvertement et en tirer des leçons et des connaissances que nous partageons avec tout le monde. Cela s'oppose directement à l'image du « patenteux » dans son sous-sol.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous avons le temps pour une brève question de la part de M. Lloyd.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci. J'apprécie votre présence ici aujourd'hui.

J'ai une question pour l'Association canadienne du logiciel de divertissement. Beaucoup de gens utilisent des jeux modifiés actuellement. Votre association se préoccupe-t-elle de ces jeux modifiés, qui pourraient constituer une violation du droit d'auteur?

M. Jayson Hilchie:

Lorsque vous parlez des jeux modifiés, oui, nous avons des préoccupations.

M. Dane Lloyd:

S'agit-il d'un problème important pour le droit d'auteur?

M. Jayson Hilchie:

Oui, il s'agit essentiellement de pirater un jeu. Il s'agit d'un contournement des mesures de sécurité.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Seriez-vous d'accord avec le fait qu'il existe des usages légitimes pour les jeux modifiés? Certains jeux modifiés peuvent être très originaux...

M. Jayson Hilchie:

Il y a quelques exceptions dans le projet de loi sur le droit d'auteur qui permettent la modification de jeux. L'exception d'interopérabilité est l'une d'entre elles. Il y a également une exception relative à l'utilisation équitable pour la recherche et à des fins éducatives. Des exceptions pour ce genre de chose existent déjà.

En ce qui concerne les jeux modifiés, oui, il s'agit d'un énorme problème pour notre industrie.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Dans le cas où il s'agit d'un usage personnel et non d'un usage commercial, cela poserait-il problème?

M. Jayson Hilchie:

Il me semble que ce point est visé par une exception qui est déjà prévue par la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

M. Dane Lloyd:

C'est donc la commercialisation de jeux modifiés qui pose un sérieux problème.

M. Jayson Hilchie:

Absolument. C'est la raison de notre présence ici aujourd'hui. Nous voulons nous assurer que les mesures de protection technologiques demeurent dans le projet de loi sur le droit d'auteur. Elles fonctionnent et elles sont extrêmement cruciales pour notre industrie.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Pour faire un suivi rapide, je remarque que Blizzard Entertainment a sorti StarCraft, un jeu très connu. Il est maintenant disponible gratuitement en ligne. Lorsqu'une entreprise prend une décision comme celle-là, elle renonce certainement à certaines recettes. De telles décisions sont-elles possibles dans un monde où le droit d'auteur n'est pas protégé?

M. Jayson Hilchie:

Je ne connais pas bien ce jeu ni le modèle de gestion que cette entreprise a adopté, mais peut-être offre-t-elle ce jeu gratuitement puisqu'il est possible de faire des achats dans le jeu, ce qui finira par apporter des recettes. Notre industrie évolue et change rapidement. Nous utilisons un grand nombre de différents modèles de gestion, ce qui inclut des abonnements pour les jeux en ligne, des achats à même le jeu et d'autres choses du genre. J'imagine qu'il existe un type de modèle de gestion qui en découle.

En ce qui concerne le droit d'auteur, encore une fois, sans la possibilité de protéger le jeu ou de faire en sorte qu'il soit distribué et joué de la façon prévue, l'intérêt pour les entreprises de continuer à créer et à investir est certainement diminué.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

J'aurais aimé que nous ayons plus de temps, mais ce n'est pas le cas. Nous devons sortir pour aller voter bientôt.

Merci à tous.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on October 03, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.