header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-10-02 PROC 121

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. Welcome to the 121st meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs as we continue our study of Bill C-76, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act and other acts and to make certain consequential amendments.

We are pleased to be joined by Greg Essensa, the Chief Electoral Officer of Ontario. He is appearing by video conference from Toronto.

Thank you for making yourself available today, Mr. Essensa. I know you're very busy, so I'm glad we could finally get a time together. This is very exciting for us. We have lots of great questions.

You can proceed with some opening remarks. We did get your notes, but we haven't translated them yet, which means we can't circulate them yet.

If you would go ahead with your opening remarks, that would be great.

Mr. Greg Essensa (Chief Electoral Officer, Elections Ontario):

Good morning, Mr. Chair and members of the committee. I would like to begin by thanking the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs for inviting me to provide my observations on Bill C-76, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act and other acts and to make certain consequential amendments.

I welcome the chance to offer you my insights and observations on the electoral process. When I provide comments to a committee of the House of Commons, I am very aware that I am addressing Canada's lawmakers.

Today I would like to briefly address the following topics: the provisions of the bill and my observations from Ontario's 2018 general election.

In reviewing the provisions of this bill and other bills related to elections, I always ask myself whether the change protects the integrity of the electoral process, preserves fairness and promotes transparency. I have reviewed this bill closely and I offer the following observations.

The bill offers amendments that, if passed, would improve access and reduce barriers to voting. A number of the provisions in this bill were implemented in Ontario, and I am highly supportive of them.

I specifically want to highlight the provision that allows voter information cards as a piece of identification. The voter information card is a staple of electoral administration and, in my humble opinion, a core piece of the Canadian electoral fabric. The voter information card unites every elector group, giving them the confidence that they are registered, and provides them with the information they require to cast their ballot. This proposed amendment creates consistency with Ontario's identification requirements, and I applaud this government for recognizing its importance.

Additionally, lengthening the election calendar and extending advance poll hours are important amendments to contribute to the success of the election. I appreciate the flexibility that these provisions and others provide to the chief electoral officer. Election administrators are in the best position to make decisions on how elections are delivered. Allowing the chief electoral officer to make decisions on their mandates while complying with legislation is a key factor of success in overseeing elections.

I will now turn my attention to third party regulation. In 2016 Ontario implemented substantive reform with respect to election finances. While Ontario was undergoing significant electoral reform, I had been asked, and agreed, to serve as an adviser to the Standing Committee on General Government. This committee undertook an extensive process in consulting the public by travelling Ontario and hearing from interested individuals and stakeholder groups on the proposed legislation.

I also appeared three times in front of the standing committee to provide my thoughts on the provisions in this bill. My messaging in this area has been simple and consistent. The concept of the level playing field is central to our democracy. It is also a unifying principle of election administration, tying together the voting process and the campaign process.

Election outcomes are intended to reflect the genuine will of the people. Political finance rules are in place to ensure that all political actors have an equal opportunity to raise and spend funds to advance their message and win votes. Electoral outcomes should not be distorted because of unequal opportunities to influence the electorate. Third parties are no exception to this. Creating a regulation system for third parties is critical in creating a level playing field, and I am supportive of the proposed provisions in this bill.

There are amendments in this bill that align with Ontario's model, with some exceptions. Spending thresholds differ in Ontario compared with what is being proposed in Bill C-76. While I will not comment on the specific amounts and whether it is appropriate or not, what is important to me is that regulation be in place prior to the writ period and during the writ period. In Ontario, prior to the legislative reform in 2016, we never had pre-writ regulation. It was something I long advocated for because of the lack of transparency on what could be incurred by third parties in the six months leading up to an election.

One feature of Bill C-76 that I am quite supportive of is the requirement for third parties to provide interim reports. I believe this contributes to effective oversight and better transparency.

I would also like to highlight the area of foreign spending. I strongly support restricting third parties from using funds from a foreign entity. However, this bill does not address how it will regulate this source of funding. There are no requirements to disclose where third parties are receiving funding from, which could very well be from foreign entities. I highlight that for the committee to consider.

Overall, I view these provisions as a step in the right direction.

The next area I would like to address involves the provisions related to enforcement. In order to effectively enforce, it is important to provide regulators with the tools they require.

(1105)



I am pleased to see the commissioner of Canada elections' ability to issue administrative monetary penalties, compel testimony and lay charges where he or she deems fit. I also believe it is appropriate that the commissioner of Canada elections be relocated to the Office of the Chief Electoral Officer. Being equipped with these tools allows the commissioner to fulfill the mandate effectively and maintain public trust by holding political actors accountable.

I would now like to focus the remainder of my time on my observations from Ontario's 2018 general election.

This year's election saw an unprecedented amount of change. Elections Ontario operationalized four different pieces of legislation in advance of the June 2018 election. These amendments enabled Ontario to implement new boundaries, new technology, new staffing models, new processes and modern tools for all elections-related stakeholders.

The 2018 general election in Ontario, in my humble opinion, was a great success, and the legislation helped support our efforts to provide greater access and modernized services to electors.

There are a few key areas that I'd like to highlight for your consideration.

The first is privacy and security. With an increased focus on personal data and intrusion into public networks, privacy and cybersecurity were and are top of mind.

This was the first general election where technology was implemented, including e-poll books to strike off electors and vote-counting equipment to count ballots.

In order to ensure security, we worked closely with the provincial security adviser, who was appointed by Ontario's secretary of cabinet. We went to him to seek advice on ensuring our processes and systems met thresholds and limited the risk of threat. In coordination with the provincial security adviser, Elections Ontario had a security expert carry out comprehensive audits of our systems, processes and people. The report recommended a number of actions that we implemented to reduce vulnerability.

There is little evidence to suggest that the 2018 general election in Ontario was significantly affected by cybersecurity intrusions, fake news or any other form of electronic interference.

The last area I'd like to speak to is third party spending. With a new regime in place, similar to Bill C-76, third parties now had registration requirements and spending limits for both the pre-writ and writ periods. In the 2018 general election we had a total of 59 third party registrants—34 in the six-month pre-writ period and 25 during the writ period. By comparison, in 2014 we only had 37 third parties registered in the writ period. This represented a 59% increase in the total number of third parties that registered compared to 2014.

At this time it is difficult to assess the overall impact of the new regulations, as we will not receive full financial filings until December of this year. However, I am confident that regulation significantly impacted how much money was spent on third party advertising. I will give you an example. In 2014, 37 registered third parties spent approximately $8.67 million during the writ period alone. In 2018, we had 25 third parties registered in the writ period who, combined, could only have spent $2.55 million under the new regime. This represents a decrease of more than $6.12 million in spending during the writ period. This is a significant reduction, and I look forward to seeing the final expenses of all third parties in December.

One area of challenge for us, though, was in registration requirements. In Ontario, similar to the provisions in Bill C-76, a third party is only required to register once it incurs $500 in expenses. This registration requirement was a challenge for us to navigate and regulate. We received numerous complaints on third parties, many of which had not registered with us, as they kept their spending under $500. The result was unregulated third party advertising. The difficulty we encountered was that many of these parties spent money on advertising exclusively through the Internet. This made it a challenge to ascertain if and when they went past the $500 threshold.

Third party registration is an area of reform I will be commenting on to Ontario's legislators early next year, and something you may wish to consider as a review in this bill.

I would finally like to take this opportunity to thank the committee for inviting me to speak and to offer my perspectives as chief electoral officer of Ontario. I applaud the work this committee is doing on electoral reform, and I would be happy to answer any questions you may have at this time.

(1110)

The Chair:

Thank you very much. That certainly addressed a number of the topics that people wanted to address, so that's great. I appreciate your time.

Now we'll start some questioning with Mr. Simms from the Liberal Party.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Mr. Essensa, thank you very much for this. I thoroughly enjoyed it. You were well worth the wait, sir.

Mr. Greg Essensa:

Thank you.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I'll start with the last point that you made concerning your difficulty ascertaining who went above $500 in spending. That causes some alarm

You said you were going to make recommendations to legislators in Queen's Park. Very briefly, what would they be?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I would actually recommend that they either take the $500 threshold off and it be a zero threshold or extend the threshold to a higher number, $3,000, $5,000, something that is a little easier to ascertain.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I see. So the higher dollar value, obviously.... You're saying there is basically a minimum dollar amount where it becomes detectable, if I can use that word.

Mr. Greg Essensa:

It was very difficult to ascertain the $500 with the Internet providers.

Sometimes there were discounts on banner ads and it became a real challenge, as an administration perspective.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I see.

Mr. Greg Essensa:

My recommendation to you, as you're reviewing Bill C-76, would be to consider either increasing the threshold so that it is relatively easy for the commissioner of Canada elections to ascertain whether they met that threshold or not.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay, I appreciate that.

I want to go to one of the first things you talked about. I couldn't agree with you more about the voter information card, as you put it, being a staple for our voting, the core. I want to thank you for that because I am glad it is returning.

Within this legislation we're returning some things that were taken out with prior legislation. We're also adding—I guess you could say we're updating—to today's context, and—

I'm sorry; I had to sneeze.

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

Your emotions took over.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I know. I'm verklempt completely.

I've been in this business now for 15 years; I've been elected for almost 15, and five elections in, so I'm always interested.... The idea about vouching. It is a right—it's in our charter—to vote, and sometimes as we get lost in the conversation about ascertaining the right identification, we keep forgetting that it is a person's right to vote. Therefore, we have to keep that in mind. I think vouching goes a long way for that.

How do you feel about the vouching contained within this legislation, or the changes that are in this legislation?

(1115)

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I think any provision in any electoral reform bill that enhances both the integrity and the transparency of the electoral process, while ensuring that we provide access to every eligible elector to exercise their right to vote, is paramount.

We don't have vouching in Ontario. We have not used that in very many years. I know it has been used federally. I have witnessed it at various elections I have attended to.

If it assists certain segments of the electorate who find difficulty with appropriate ID and other challenges I am always supportive of that.

Mr. Scott Simms:

There are other things contained within this legislation. For instance, you talked about a pre-writ period and throwing more transparency upon the pre-writ period. You're obviously in favour of that.

Mr. Greg Essensa:

Yes, I have written quite extensively about that over the last 10 years, in my role as CEO. I am a firm believer that all political actors should be treated equitably and fairly. Where political parties and candidates have spending limits and expense limitations, third parties in Ontario for a long period of time had no such requirements. It meant that third parties would spend unknown amounts of money during that period because there was no transparency, there was no regulation, and there was no requirement for them to provide any information to us, as the regulator.

There were always concerns raised by a multitude of different parties that this was an unfair advantage, and sometimes it could potentially impact the electoral results.

I had advocated for a long period of time that we needed to treat all political actors fairly and equitably and under the guiding principle of a fair and level playing field.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes, and that playing field you did talk about certainly should incorporate up to six months before the election day, and not just in the precise writ period. Would that be correct?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I would agree. One part of the provision of your bill that I actually quite like is the requirement to have those third parties provide interim reports. The more transparency we can provide as to who is expending what type of expenditures in advertising as well as who is contributing to third parties I think goes a long way to building the health and strength of our democracy.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Speaking of this, it leads to my next question and the interim reports that you like, which are outlined in this legislation. Do you think there is enough interim reporting, or should there be a higher requirement for interim reports?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I think that, any time you make substantive electoral reform, you really need to go through one electoral cycle to be able to assess. What I said when we were deliberating Bill 2 here in Ontario is that we were making substantive reforms on the campaign in electoral financing regime here in Ontario. My recommendation was that we needed to go through one electoral cycle so that we could see how it operationalized itself. Then folks in my role could comment back to the legislators when we may have to tweak some provision or make some amendment based on the facts of what we've seen has happened.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes, I think that's a valid point, road testing any particular type of thing that we do. It could be like administrative penalties and that sort of thing, which I and obviously you are in favour of. I think maybe other agencies in the federal government should look at that model.

Nevertheless, in the few minutes that I have left, I want to talk about flexibility.

The Chair:

You have one minute.

Mr. Scott Simms:

In the one minute that I have left, as I've been reminded.

In an organization such as yours, obviously being arm's length from the government and independent of government, flexibility is key. Can you expand on that, and not just for doing your job for voting, but also communicating to voters what your role is to promote voting and participation?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

Ontario, not dissimilar to Canada, is obviously a large and very diverse province. I've often advocated that legislators should write legislation and provide its flexibility to their electoral administrators, because we are in the best position to make determinations.

For example, if I take this pair of glasses and the legislation tells me to put them in my right hand, put them in my left hand and then put them on the table, I find that very prescriptive. I would prefer the legislators tell me they want me to use the glasses. That's fine. I can figure out how best to use them. I can tell you that, in Ontario, how we would use the glasses in Kenora would differ from Windsor, would differ from Ottawa—Vanier and differ from Toronto—St. Paul's.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That was a very nice job. Thank you.

(1120)

The Chair:

Thank you.

It's over to the Conservatives with Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I appreciate your final comments about how something might work in Kenora versus Ottawa—Vanier, and I may come back to that at the end or in a future round, if I have time.

I want to pick up on something you mentioned when you talked about cybersecurity and threats. Maybe I'm reading too much into it, but I'd like your feedback. You mentioned there was little evidence that there was a threat or any concern. When you say “little evidence”, does that indicate there was some evidence or are you saying that more generally as a kind of “cover your butt” type of comment there was some evidence but it was discounted? I'm just curious. It was an interesting choice of words.

Mr. Greg Essensa:

In any election the size of Ontario's or the size of Canada's, there has to be a consideration of cybersecurity on all fronts and on all means that we utilize both public data, public information, and the electoral process as a whole.

We spend considerable time, as I articulated, working with privacy and provincial security experts to have them come in and do a full scope of penetration, infiltration testing and pen testing of all of our systems to ensure that they were secure throughout the event.

I've been conducting elections for 30 years. There were clearly attempts to infiltrate our systems. None were successful, and that's what I meant by “little evidence”. There was no evidence of anyone being successful in accessing any of our data electronically or by any other means, but it doesn't mean that people didn't try.

Mr. John Nater:

I appreciate that. Following up on that, are there information-sharing mechanisms between you as Elections Ontario with Elections Canada on attempts that may have been made?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I've already met with folks from CSE federally and CSIS federally. We've provided them all of our materials. We've provided them all of the documentation on the penetration and infiltration testing that we did. I have met with the CEO of Elections Canada. We've provided them advice and guidance on what we experienced during the 2018 general election as well as provided them access any time that they have questions. We are more than happy to assist and help in any manner whatsoever.

Mr. John Nater:

Great. Thank you, sir, for that.

As part of the provincial legislation that was brought in in 2016, there was an element to prohibit collusion between third parties and between third parties and other political actors in terms of advertising, in terms of co-operation. I have two questions from that.

First, was there any evidence that there was collusion between third parties and political actors or among third parties to get around some of the limits? Did that happen? Were there any allegations of that?

The second one is on the challenge of enforcement. How is that proven? How is that dealt with from an enforcement standpoint? What powers does Elections Ontario have to enforce that and to determine whether that's happened or not?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

There was no evidence whatsoever during this election that there had been any collusion whatsoever. There were some complaints, which we investigated fully, but we determined there was no factual evidence of anything. I had recommended prior to the deliberation on Bill 2 that they reform the definition of “collusion” in the previous Election Finances Act because I did not feel comfortable that it met the requirements we would need at Elections Ontario.

At Elections Ontario, I have the same authority that a public inquiries judge has, so I can compel testimony. I can compel information from financial institutions. I can compel any such information in the course of an investigation. I was supportive of the current bill in providing that to the commissioner of elections because that authority helps escalate the investigative nature and enforcement nature of our business. It reduces time substantively. We don't have to get into a big long-winded debate with political actors, because we have that authority. It's already enshrined into our legislation to compel that information, and it, quite frankly, speeds up the enforcement process considerably.

Mr. John Nater:

That leads into something that Mr. Simms talked about a little bit, in terms of third party registration, using that $500 limit, either lowering it to nothing or increasing it. Certainly $500 doesn't go very far. I'm curious as to what resources an entity like Elections Ontario, or in our case Elections Canada, has available to seek out those examples of third parties. Certainly if I were to run third party ads for under $500 in Skeena—Bulkley Valley, for example—

(1125)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Don't do it.

Mr. John Nater:

No, don't do it. Unless my colleague Mr. Cullen has people actively looking for these ads running in a remote part of his riding, conceivably it's a challenge to determine where that's happening and when that's happening. What type of resources are needed to determine whether this is or isn't happening, and what type of resources ought we to be considering at a federal level?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I would suggest to you they would be considerable. Quite simply, with the advent of the Internet, and its utilization now as a major, what I would call, advertising forum for political entities to utilize, it is a challenge. We receive a number of complaints from political parties, from other political actors, from stakeholders, and it's resource intensive to try to find out exactly whether that third party went past the threshold. You have to work very extensively with a lot of the social media networks and companies. Sometimes they provide discount advertising, so where it might appear to us that a third party has gone over the $500 threshold, when we do a little further investigation, we realize they got a discount rate on some ads and they're below it. It's just very, very labour-intensive. We had to substantially increase our election compliance team during the writ period.

The other issue pertaining to this is simply time. We have a 28-day writ period. When these complaints come in, we feel the need to try to investigate them as quickly and as effectively as possible to determine whether those third parties do need to register with us so there is greater transparency under that regime.

Mr. John Nater:

I have just a few seconds left in this round, but to follow up on that, how have your response and working relationship been with the social media networks, with Facebook, with Twitter and with Instagram? Has there been a strong or useful working relationship with them? What kind of response have you had from those networks?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I think we have found that the social media networks we have dealt with, the main ones which you just articulated, have been very forthcoming to work with. I think for some of the issues there have been, which have garnered a great deal of media attention over the last year or so, certainly with us here in Ontario, the response has been very favourable. They were quick to respond to us and to get us the information we needed. They did not try to get away from providing us that information in a timely fashion.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we'll go to the aforementioned second most beautiful riding in the country.

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

On a point of privilege, Chair, again, your riding is quite pretty—

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen:—and if only you could see it in the darkness of the Yukon, we'd be able to verify that, whereas Skeena—Bulkley Valley is just gorgeous all the time.

Sorry about that, Mr. Essensa. It's a long-running battle between the chair and me.

If a third party takes out an ad on Facebook in Ontario, do they have to identify who paid for the ad?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

At present they don't, unless they pass that $500 threshold.

Then, they have to register with us. They have to provide all of the other requirements in Bill 2, which includes who is funding their campaigns, who is making contributions, as well as expenses they are incurring.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Imagine there is a manufacturers association or a pharmaceutical association. They place a number of ads across the social media spectrum and they form a group to sponsor the ads, something like “Pharmaceuticals for Ontario”, and they exceed the $500 limit. They place that name underneath it, and then report to you where all the individual funding came from for that ad campaign. Is that right?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

That is correct.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is there any identification of whether that money is entirely sourced within Canada, or can it be internationally sourced as well?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

It's one of the challenges, because the third parties only have to indicate to us where they source that money during the writ period. If they bring money through the campaign prior to the writ period or registration, there's no requirement for them to indicate to us exactly where those funds came from.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm thinking more of, by nature, multinational associations, be they oil, gas or pharmaceutical. If you simply stock the money pre-writ, you put a million bucks into the bank that you collected from a number of organizations, form an association, and then in the writ period spend that $1 million on ads promoting a certain policy or agenda, and then the accountability back to Ontarians.... They wouldn't know if that money came from the United States, Europe, China, or if it was entirely Canadian. Is that right?

(1130)

Mr. Greg Essensa:

Outside of the third party indicating to us that the money had come from some foreign entity, we would not be able to see that. It is one of the things I will be commenting on to Ontario's legislators. It's why I brought it forward in my speaking comments that, as you are reviewing this bill, I don't see a similar type of provision that would prevent third parties, in the circumstance you described, from using foreign money. It's something you may wish to consider.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

There was the very highlighted case of....

Let me start with this first to help the committee. What privacy rules are political parties subjected to right now? Are they subjected to the Ontario privacy act in terms of disclosing the data that parties collect? Also, can voters gain access to what parties have collected about them individually?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

In Ontario, a political party has to provide to me an acceptable privacy policy.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

An acceptable privacy policy?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

Yes. We have worked with our information and privacy commissioner's team to develop what guidelines need to be incurred in that policy. We provide samples and examples of what is acceptable to us. Every political party must provide that to my office prior to receiving any of the tools, voters lists, maps, etc., in connection with an election. Should they not—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

For example, is one of those guidelines or things they have to follow that if a voter phones the New Democrats, the Conservatives or the Liberals and says that he or she wants all the data they have on him or her, does the party have to then disclose that to the voter? The right to know, essentially, is what....

Mr. Greg Essensa:

No, that's not part of our privacy policy.

What our privacy policy indicates is that the information we provide to the political parties is to be used for the electoral purpose for that general election. Their requirement is that they dissolve that information, and provide to me a certificate indicating they have eliminated all of that information from their files. The information we provide—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's the main piece. You give them the voter list, for example, and the parties then have to prove to you that they've then since removed all of that data from their systems.

Mr. Greg Essensa:

And that they've destroyed the data.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You looked into the Highway 407 data breach. Is that right?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

There is a conjunctive investigation ongoing with the York Regional Police and my office.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is it ongoing?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

It is ongoing.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

In that case, and correct me if I'm wrong, the allegations were that some 600,000 customers had their data, more or less...?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I am really not in a position to comment on an ongoing investigation.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

As we look at federal laws right now, the only thing that's required under this bill is that parties have a privacy policy. That's what's required federally. There are no limits, restrictions or even best practices that are described in the bill, of which our now permanent Chief Electoral Officer has been critical. The Privacy Commissioner has been incredibly critical.

How important is having strong and enforceable privacy rules within our election laws?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I think it's critical. You have to go no further than to read many of the publications on issues of Facebook and other social media issues that have been raised in the last several months.

I think it is incumbent on political parties and all political actors to ensure the personal privacy of those individuals whose information they've been given.

I am supportive of our regime in Ontario. It requires political parties to effectively swear to me that they've destroyed that information, and it's no longer in their domain.

I think that Bill C-76 should consider revisions or amendments to strengthen the privacy requirements. I think all Canadians would expect that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I have one last question that might be difficult to answer.

We were talking about social media. Going back to that topic, it's not just the placement of ads encouraging voters to think about certain issues. We've also heard from some of our U.S. colleagues that the search algorithms that are used and what gets profiled in people's newsfeeds can be either intentionally or unintentionally manipulated so that certain news stories come up and are directed and subtargeted at certain voters. Do you have any insights into that, as we're designing this law?

You talked about fairness at the very beginning of your presentation. If someone is able to make Google always point in a certain way so that when people search “Ontario election” or “Canadian election”, a certain party or issue always pops up, is there any prescription we can place into law to help clarify that or pull the veil back?

(1135)

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I wish I could give you a concrete solution to this problem. I think this is something that chief electoral officers are discussing amongst ourselves. This is a new facet and regime that we're seeing with the advent of the Internet and these large social media companies that, as you correctly articulated, can direct messaging to a certain segment of society.

At this particular time as an electoral administrator, I don't have a clear-cut solution for you. I think it is something that legislators, experts in the field of social media, and electoral administrators need to work on to find an effective solution. I do believe Canadians would expect that of us.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we'll go to Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

I'd like to start with your pre-writ spending limits for parties, not third parties. What is that limit for Ontario?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

In Ontario, it was $1 million in pre-writ spending for political parties during the six months prior to the event.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Has that been consistent or was that a change that came about in your last legislation?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

With the changes in Bill 2, this was a new provision. We had never had this in the past. It was the first time that we had absolutely implemented it.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Was there any limit in the past?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

No. There was no pre-writ.... None whatsoever.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Why did you find it necessary to put a limit in place? Once you did so, why did you choose the limit of $1 million?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I've been an electoral administrator for over 30 years. From watching elections being conducted federally, provincially and even municipally, it is clear that campaigns start much earlier than the 28-day or 35-day writ period.

Messaging and people's perspectives on political parties, leaders, etc., can often be informed in that pre-writ period. We were seeing an unequal balance between some political actors who had extensive funds and could fund many of these campaigns.

From my perspective, it effectively violated the core principle of our democracy, which is a fair and level playing field. We needed to ensure that those who had more funds than others could not just dominate the airwaves and, in effect, have a direct impact on the electoral result at the end of the writ period.

In Ontario, there was considerable debate amongst us. I travelled with the committee across the province. I heard from a number of stakeholders who supported some form of a pre-writ advertising limit.

I can't honestly say where $1 million came from. There was a lot of debate about different figures. Ultimately, that's what the government landed on and it made its way into the final versions of Bill 2.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

You also mentioned in your previous testimony that we should consider having a mechanism to regulate and figure out whether any of the money in our third party spending is coming from foreign actors. How have you gone about doing that? You referenced it a little bit.

I'm thinking more in terms of large, international organizations that have presence in Canada, have a branch in Canada or operate out of here, but also collect donations to do international work. How do they segregate the money that they spend and where is the money coming from, when it comes to the Ontario election?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I will be recommending to Ontario's legislators that we provide greater transparency into where the money comes from third parties and that there be a requirement for third parties to differentiate where funds are actually coming from in their financial reporting requirements and materials that they need to provide to us at Elections Ontario.

I would suggest this is something your committee may wish to consider while you're deliberating Bill C-76, to provide those mechanisms for the commissioner of Canada elections to, in fact, investigate where some of those funds are, requiring third parties to provide information on a fulsome basis as to the derivative of exactly where that money has come from and whose money is being used during the campaigns. I think there are—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Help me clarify. You were unable to do that in this last election.

Mr. Greg Essensa:

We did not have the authority to do that.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

Mr. Greg Essensa:

It is something that I will be commenting on post-election, next March.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

How would you envision greater transparency? Would it be a separate election fund? Then they'd have to be able to trace all money that's deposited into the election campaign fund for that organization and let you know who the donors were. How would you do that?

(1140)

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I think it's very clear it's no different from what political parties are required to do now. You have to provide us with a list of who is providing you money that you utilized during your campaign.

We publicize those lists. Federally, here in Ontario, we have a 10-day direct posting, so if someone gives you $100 towards your campaign, we post it within 10 days of that. There are financial reporting requirements. I think that similar types of requirements could be put in place for third parties that would clearly indicate where the money was coming from, so that if XYZ corporation was supporting a third party and they're based in Alberta, and they gave $5,000 towards that third party, then you would clearly understand that's where the money came from, from that corporation. They provided the money and there was transparency to that.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Where does it end? That corporation may have money in their account that comes from foreign actors as well.

Mr. Greg Essensa:

Very well, and you will have multinational corporations that have that. But I do believe there does need to be greater transparency in this process. I hear from Ontarians. Certainly up until we made the changes in Bill 2, and certainly when I travelled the province, I heard extensively from Ontarians who said that having third parties just spend in an unregulated way was something they were quite concerned about. They wanted to have greater transparency on where the money was coming from and who was spending this money.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

This piece of legislation doesn't deal with fundraising, but I've been dying to ask what the government's intentions were behind changing its fundraising rules to not allow candidates or nomination contestants to be present when conducting any kind of fundraising activities.

Mr. Greg Essensa:

I think the previous government members, back in 2015 or 2016, found themselves on the wrong side of public opinion when it came to some of the fundraising tactics that they might've been using here in Ontario. They quickly moved to introduce Bill 2. They wanted to do it in a very transparent process. They asked me to sit as an adviser to the committee. They made the committee travel the province to hear. But, I think primarily, they wanted to get away from the public perception that ministers and politicians were influencing directly with contributors.

The bill did go to the extent of eliminating MPPs, ministers and leaders from attending fundraising events. It was quite a departure from the previous regimes that we had in place. I think early on, the party struggled a little bit with how to fundraise in that regard, but I think as we got closer to the event in 2018, all three parties sort of found their feet on how they could manage within those restrictions.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Sahota.

We'll go to Mr. Nater again for five minutes.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Chair.

Again, thank you, Mr. Essensa, for joining us.

I'm going to jump around a couple of different topics in my short five minutes, and hopefully I can get to the topics I wanted to touch on.

I wanted to touch on the pre-writ spending. In that pre-writ period, is there also a limitation on government spending, or government advertising?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

There is a limitation that is overseen by the Auditor General of Ontario, but there are limitations. There's a separate statute that is not my home statute which does regulate that, and the Auditor General does review those ads.

Mr. John Nater:

Okay. Thank you, sir.

You mentioned e-poll books, and that you'd piloted that in by-elections and then implemented that in the general election back in June. I'm going to tie this with another question that goes with that.

On e-poll books, I'd appreciate any lessons learned from that piloting and implementation process, specifically on the technical side of things, but also on the connectivity side. There are regions of the province that don't have perfect connectivity coverage, 3G coverage.

This leads me to tying that with another question about the vote tabulators. Certainly from a viewer's perspective, the results came fast and furious. I was walking into a victory party about 12 minutes after the polls had closed and my local candidate had already been declared elected. It's a quick process with the vote tabulators.

I'm curious about lessons learned from that, again tying this with e-poll books. Were there any connectivity issues and challenges that came about because of rural and remote areas?

With regard to tying those two questions together, what are your thoughts?

(1145)

Mr. Greg Essensa:

We did our pilots in both Whitby—Oshawa, and Scarborough—Rouge River. When I wrote to the legislators, we were very transparent. We believed going into the election that we would only put technology in where we knew it would work.

We had our returning officers do a review of all the voting locations with a technical device to determine what type of connectivity we would get there. We put the technology in just slightly more than 50% of the voting locations in Ontario, but it represented that 90% of the electorate were going to those locations, meaning that 90% of electors voted using the technology.

As far as the technology itself is concerned, it far surpassed our expectations. On election day, we hovered between 99.4% and 99.6% connectivity with the 3,900 locations in which we had technology. It worked really, really well.

From the electorate's perspective, we recently received all of our research data. In Ontario, there is a requirement in the act to do a large survey. We ask about 10,000 Ontarians various questions, and some of the numbers coming back are staggeringly high. About 95% of general electors in Ontario were very supportive and found the technology easy to use, efficient and secure.

When it comes to the vote tabulators, they were the easiest part. It is a paper ballot. When I went into this process of trying to modernize the election, I was very cognizant that we wanted to maintain a paper ballot. I've conducted elections right across this country and in speaking to Canadians, most Canadians believe they want a tangible piece of evidence of how they voted. Maintaining a paper ballot was core to us.

With respect to the tabulators themselves, the technology is relatively simple. It's been around for 30 years. It's the same technology when you go to your grocery store and the clerk takes your cereal box and runs it over the scanner. It's not cutting-edge technology; it's tried and true technology.

On election day, we had over 4,000 tabulators in the field, and we literally had nickels and dimes, meaning we had some issues with 10 to 20 of them throughout the course of the day. No elector was ever disenfranchised. We had processes in place to ensure that they could still vote by using an auxiliary box.

From our perspective, the technology was a big benefit to us in this election.

Mr. John Nater:

Very briefly, as I only have about a minute left, with regard to the audit function post-election, was an audit done to ensure that the number of votes cast through a tabulator corresponded with the number of paper ballots and the exact votes that were cast? Was an audit done to ensure that aligned?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

We are currently doing that.

We effectively go through all 124 ridings here in Ontario and we do a complete audit. We look at every aspect. We look at the official returns; we recalculate them. We recount hand ballots, and we recount tabulator ballots by hand.

We're in the process of doing that complete audit right now. Our official results will be published at the end of November or early December, but we have found so far that everything has worked exactly as we intended and expected it to.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we'll go to Madam Lapointe. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Welcome, and thank you for being with us today, Mr. Essensa.

For the 2014 election, you changed your rules regarding the number of polling hours. Did I understand you correctly? [English]

Mr. Greg Essensa:

We had the same hours. What we did change substantively were advance voting days. In the previous regime we had 10 days of advance voting and the ability to rotate advance poll locations. If you were in central Ontario, it provided the returning officer the ability to have an advance poll for three days here, two days there, etc., and rotate throughout the riding.

The new rules that were in place for 2018 dramatically reduced that. We now had five consecutive days of voting. It also reduced the hours at advance polls by an hour. We no longer went from 9:00 a.m. until 9:00 p.m.. We went from 9:00 a.m. until 8:00 p.m.. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Was the percentage of advance votes higher in 2018 than in 2014?

(1150)

[English]

Mr. Greg Essensa:

We saw a dramatic increase in advance polls. We had over 780,000 people vote in our five days of advance polls compared to 640,000 in 2014. It was a very healthy increase. A number of factors went into that. We moved to a spring election. We had longer daylight hours. There was a great deal of interest here in Ontario's election, given some of the changes that happened with some of the political parties. There was a great deal of media attention on that as well. I think all that contributed to a great deal of interest in the election and the increased turnout. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

For information purposes, what percentage of electors voted in 2018, in Ontario? [English]

Mr. Greg Essensa:

We saw a 58% turnout. We had just over 5.7 million Ontarians vote. That represented about a 7.5% increase from where we were in 2014. We saw a very healthy increase this election in voter turnout. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Were you able to easily reach young people of 25 or less? Earlier, there was a fair bit of talk about social media. Did you use different means to reach young people of 25 or under? [English]

Mr. Greg Essensa:

We did this election. We had a very active engagement and outreach program in Ontario. There are 50 college and university campuses. We were on all 50. We were on them six months before the election doing pre-registration drives. We launched an e-registration tool this election where we had almost a million people come on board to check and see whether they were on the list or not.

During the month of March, we had the legislature deem it voter registration month, and we had an extensive outreach campaign. Again, we were back on the 50 college and university campuses with outreach campaigns, registration drives. Then we proceeded to be on a third time during the writ period. For many of them we provided opportunities for them to vote at advance polls and again we had registration drives.

We are digesting all the numbers now and looking at the 18- to 24-year-old demographic, but we anticipate we'll see a higher turnout in that demographic this election. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

You say you expended a lot of effort to incite university and college students to vote. Did you use other means to reach those youngsters, for instance, social media? [English]

Mr. Greg Essensa:

We had an extensive social media campaign; we started two years ago. I'm a big believer that we need to have more frequent communication in particular on social media, on our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram accounts. Our goal was to ensure we were the factual representative of the election. If people had questions about who could vote, where, when and how they vote, all those facts, we wanted to drive them to our website. We wanted to drive them to us to get that factual information. We began our social media campaigns two years out. We would tweet twice a week. Sometimes they were just innocuous tweets, but they were tweets about coming to us to find out who can vote. If you need to use a special ballot, here's the special ballot program. Over the course of those two years we consistently increased the frequency; we tried to communicate using this forum as a vehicle to get our information to everyone. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we'll go back to Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Chair.

Following up a little on the youth voter turnout, Ontario implemented the provisional voter register for those who are 16 and 17. It included an option to withdraw. I'm curious about the success of that provisional register, how many names are on it and how many people may have withdrawn their name. What privacy and protection of personal information safeguards are included for that provisional register? Who has access to it and is it shared with anyone outside Elections Ontario?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

There are a couple of things. The changes in Bill 45 did provide us with the ability to establish a future voters registry of 16- to 17-year-olds. We did work with our outreach teams. We worked with CIVIX and some of the other outreach initiatives that we have in place for the election.

My belief is that we have slightly more than 1,200 people now on our register of 16- to 17-year-olds. When we built our register we made it completely separate. It is not connected whatsoever to our current permanent register of electors and there is high security around who has access to it. We do not share the information with anyone and there are clear opportunities for an individual to remove themselves once they have put themselves on the register.

When they move towards 18, they are automatically moved to the permanent register of electors, but we do communicate with them and they do have an ability to opt out at that time should they wish to. I don't have the figures exactly in front of me, but I'm not aware of a very high number of people opting out at this particular time.

(1155)

Mr. John Nater:

Is there an automatic registration provision for when someone turns 18 who is not on the provisional register?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

No. It's one of the challenges that all electoral administrators.... I've had extensive conversations with Elections Canada. It's an area we all struggle with because when someone automatically turns 18 sometimes the traditional means by which we get that information into our registers—CRA data or motor vehicle information, health information—is not as up to date as perhaps we would like it to be. It does create a bit of an issue for us in trying to get all of that 18- to 24-year-old demographic onto the register so that we can communicate with them effectively.

Mr. John Nater:

Certainly one of the issues I hear about from time to time is the issue of accessibility. In this last provincial election, there was a concerted effort to ensure that voting locations were accessible for those Ontarians who are living with a disability, whether it was a mobility issue or other less visible types of disabilities.

I'm curious as to what challenges you encountered in ensuring the accessibility of voting locations, particularly in smaller rural and remote areas. As well, there seem to be distinctly fewer voting locations compared to before. Could I get your comments on whether that was a direct link to the accessibility side of things?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

In Ontario, we have the Ontarians with Disabilities Act that we have to adhere to. We have standards that every voting location has to maintain.

At Elections Ontario, many times, particularly in the rural areas that you speak of, we have to mitigate accessibility issues. Oftentimes we will put in temporary ramps. We will provide infrastructure support to a particular location, because quite simply, that's the only location that we can utilize in a particular community that we now have to make accessible. We do spend a considerable amount of resources to in fact make many of those locations accessible. There are occurrences where quite simply, due to the nature of the building, we just cannot make it accessible and we sometimes have to look at other alternatives.

I would suggest to you that it's rare. It's more frequent, though, in the rural parts of Ontario where there is a limited number of sites that we can actually use for elections.

Mr. John Nater:

In terms of candidates, campaigns and political parties, are there any resources or rebates provided to campaigns or to candidates to make their campaign offices accessible or to make their websites more friendly for those living with a disability? Are there any types of rebates or resources available from that side of things?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

Not currently in Ontario's laws, no.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We have two minutes left. Would the Liberals like to give that to Mr. Cullen?

An hon. member: Absolutely.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Look at the cross-partisan collaboration that's going on.

I have one quick question about the per-vote subsidy. How long has it existed in Ontario and is there any assessment as to the impact on the way that parties organized or fundraised and the effect on reaching other voters? Are you planning to do any kind of an impact analysis on it or does that not involve your office?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

We definitely are going to do an impact analysis after this current election.

This was the first cycle that we had a per-vote subsidy that we've provided. When the deliberation under Bill 2 happened and the government made the determination to eliminate corporations and unions from being eligible to donate, the trade-off somewhat was to establish the per-vote subsidy that we've had in place. We pay that quarterly to the political parties.

I think the analysis that we're going to have to do is an overall analysis as to how much money they fundraised in relationship to the elimination of the corporate and union donations. When I appeared on Bill 2, I provided some insight into that. Between 2011 and 2014, $50 million of the $98 million that the parties had raised came from corporations and trade unions, so it was slightly more than 50%. The per-vote subsidy does not fully replace all of that.

(1200)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No.

Mr. Greg Essensa:

We'll do an analysis as to how parties have done on the fundraising aspect since we've eliminated corporations and trade unions, and what the impact of the per-vote subsidy has been overall to their spending abilities.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That analysis will be made public, I assume.

Mr. Greg Essensa:

Yes, it will, absolutely.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Providing a copy to this committee would help us a great deal.

Do you have a deadline as to when you're going to try to conduct it?

Mr. Greg Essensa:

It won't be until next March. We're in the process of it now.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Great. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for coming. We had a lot of questions. There was a lot of great information you provided. It's a big operation. We really appreciate that. It's quite relevant to our study.

Mr. Greg Essensa:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

We'll suspend for a couple of minutes while we let people get organized.



(1205)

The Chair:

Welcome back to the 121st meeting of the committee on procedure and House affairs. We're in public.

I had a request to distribute the amendments. Is anyone opposed to the legislative clerk distributing the amendments he's received?

An hon. member: Only the good ones....

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

I'm not at all opposed to that.

The Chair:

Is it agreed?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Okay. We'll distribute them right away.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I guess the obvious question is, are they in both official languages?

Okay, yes. All right.

The Chair:

We'll assume this is the deadline for submitting amendments, but people can always bring them to the floor.

We were debating the scheduling of Bill C-76, and subamendments and amendments.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, if you don't mind my starting this, I could just start talking about it, but I think it makes more sense to do this as a point of order, if you'll forgive me.

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The wording of the initial motion was: That the Committee commence clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-76 on Tuesday, October 2, 2018 at 11:00 a.m.; This, of course, is now a point that is in the past.

The Chair:

We have to change that, obviously.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I was going to make a proposal to amend that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I would amend it so it is just more logical, so that the committee would commence clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-76 on Thursday, October 4, at 11 a.m.

The rest of the motion would remain the same.

Mr. Scott Reid:

What are the rules on changing something like that? Does it require unanimous consent, given that we're debating an amendment to this?

The Chair:

That would be the easiest way.

Is there unanimous consent to do that?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'll just find out what my colleagues are—

The Chair:

Obviously, we can't start clause-by-clause yesterday.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It wouldn't approve the motion. It would just be approving the date so it would be a logical motion now and would not be in the past.

The Chair:

Does everyone consider that to be a friendly amendment to the motion?

Mr. John Nater:

No, I don't agree with that.

The Chair:

Okay.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay. I would like to formally move an amendment to my motion then.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I know what Ruby wants to do, and it's a reasonable thing. I know we're technically on my point of order, but if she can explain what it is she wants to do, I think that would add some light to it and it would be helpful in disposing of the point of order.

Maybe we could have Reid's codicil to the Simms protocol which says that even when it's a point of order, someone can interrupt to deal with something that will bring context.

(1210)

Mr. Scott Simms:

So you need permission then, don't you?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Does that say anything about filibusters?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

The point of order was on that point, which would resolve the point of order and no longer require the point of order to be made—

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

—if the original motion was amended.

So I propose that amendment to the original motion. That is my motion, to begin with, that the date now be revised to Thursday, October 4.

The Chair:

Unfortunately, we have to deal with the subamendment to the amendment first, and then the amendment, and then your amendment.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

And then my amendment.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

Going back to the point of order...that was helpful.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

You're welcome.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Procedurally, there are several ways one could go about this. One could seek to amend the current motion, which I think is what Ruby just proposed to do and which I think can be done only by unanimous consent.

The second thing one could do would be to simply seek to withdraw the initial motion entirely. I'm not sure if it's all right to transfer things.

Finally, we still have to deal with the fact that we're on a subamendment.

There was the initial motion. There was—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

[Inaudible—Editor] subamendment.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right, but procedurally we can still dig our way out.

The amendment was that the committee not commence clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-76 on Tuesday, October 2, 2018, at 11 a.m.

The first motion would have been nonsensical and therefore would have been made moot by the passage of time. Given the fact that we're talking about not doing something at a point in the past, I think it still would be in order if that amendment were actually to pass.

Finally, there was my own amendment to the amendment. This was before the committee had heard from the Ontario chief electoral officer “nor until the committee has heard from the Minister for Democratic Institutions for not less than one hour”.

I'll just stop there.

The Chair:

Okay.

Ms. Sahota, you're on the list.

You're just debating Mr. Reid's subamendment to the amendment.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Am I on the list for today or the previous list?

The Chair:

I mean right now.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

The reason I was raising my hand originally was to get on the list first so that I could propose the revision to my original motion so it wouldn't be nonsensical at this point. That's the reason I had my hand up.

The Chair:

Okay.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's already been said.

The Chair:

So we have no speakers on the list.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I go back to the question of whether this motion is in order, since it does deal with a date that has passed.

Is this motion in order at this point in time?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Let's vote on the subamendment now.

Mr. John Nater:

Can we continue to debate a motion that, as has been mentioned, is nonsensical, on that point?

I look to the chair for clarification on that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Remember that the amendment causes it to not be nonsensical. You cannot agree to not do something that would have involved being in the past, thereby bringing logic to it. That wasn't the reason for the amendment being put in, but it does have that effect.

The Chair:

You want the subamendment, then the amendment, and then the main motion can be amended if the committee wishes to.

Mr. John Nater:

Well, then I'll—

The Chair:

You're on Mr. Reid's subamendment to your amendment.

Mr. John Nater:

I'm on the subamendment.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, again, to the committee for giving me the floor. It's always a pleasure to discuss this motion and discuss the subamendment that my able colleague has proposed.

Certainly one aspect of Mr. Reid's amendment has been dealt with in terms of the appearance today of the chief electoral officer of Ontario. Frankly, I found his testimony to be interesting, intriguing and fascinating. He touched on a number of issues that I think are related to the bill that we have before us in this committee in the examples that they had provincially, whether it be third party financing, the provisional voter registry or, more generally, concerning technology, which isn't directly foreseen in this bill, but has been something that the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada has touched on and commented on, particularly as it relates to e-poll books, how that was implemented provincially and the challenges that our CEO, Mr. Perrault, is having federally in terms of implementing that in a professional and appropriate way.

In his testimony last week, he noted that he is not in a position to roll forward with that in a testing capacity, which would normally be done in a by-election, in the by-election that we expect will occur at some point this fall. Currently there are vacancies in York—Simcoe as of Sunday, in Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes, in Outremont, and I believe in Mr. Di Iorio's seat as well. I did notice that Mr. Di Iorio is still on the website. I'm not sure when his resignation takes effect. I thought it had happened back in the spring, but that doesn't seem to be the case since he still seems to be on the website. So, potentially there will be a by-election there, as well as in Burnaby—Douglas, which I think is Burnaby South right now.

Certainly there are opportunities in those by-elections to pilot certain things. However, the understanding is—and I think appropriately so—that the CEO is not willing to undertake that unless he has full confidence that the technology is there, has been tested and is ready to go. The information that we received this morning from the provincial CEO about how he rolled out that testing in the Whitby—Oshawa by-election and then rolled it out province-wide this past June is a positive.

His testimony was also worthwhile in terms of technology and how it is implemented. An interesting dynamic that those of us who have rural or remote ridings—mine is certainly more rural than remote—but, rural in terms of connectivity and the challenges we are faced with in terms of using new technology, whether it be e-poll books or vote tabulators.... I had the great privilege of using this technology during our federal leadership race in May 2017. I believe it was the same company and the same technology. They look like old fax machines.

An hon. member: [Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. John Nater: It's related to the provincial CEO's testimony, which is—

(1215)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It has nothing to do with the subamendment.

Mr. John Nater:

—part of the subamendment. And so—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

[Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Mr. Graham, for that comment.

When I was a deputy returning officer, this technology was being used in the polling location that I was responsible for near Fergus, Ontario. Even there, in a relatively established area, there were challenges with the Wi-Fi, using the modem to connect, to the point that I had to physically move locations to connect. So there is that challenge.

What I found interesting and informative from the CEO's testimony is that 90% of voters voted at locations that employed this technology, whereas 50% of the locations employed the technology. That certainly takes into account a lot of the challenges that are faced in a number of areas. When we look at how the results came in, how they were tabulated, we see that the speed with which the results initially came in for the vast majority of the ridings, the vast majority of the polls within the ridings, showed the success of that. But we waited for some period of time to hear back from those locations that were using traditional tabulating of paper ballots. I think that's informative of how it worked. Certainly, the testimony he provided us in terms of the success rates—between 99.4% and 99.6% in terms of connectivity throughout the day—is positive, worthwhile and good to hear.

Whenever we, as a committee, or Canadians talk about new technology, there's always the concern of interference. The system that's been undertaken, as the CEO mentioned this morning, is really technology that is 30-plus years old, so it's not as though it's new in that sense, but it's certainly a new use of it.

But the ability to use that technology and also have the hard-copy ballots saved and maintained afterwards is worthwhile.

(1220)

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, I'll just remind you that the subamendment is only that the minister appear, so if you agree with that, you'll be making arguments as to why the minister should appear, or if you disagree, to why the minister should not appear.

Mr. John Nater:

Sure, Chair. I'll focus my comments more going forward. I thought the subamendment included both the CEO of Ontario and the minister.

I do apologize for that, Chair.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That's already happened.

Mr. John Nater:

That is interesting. That has happened. We enjoyed hearing the CEO's testimony.

Going forward, I think it's absolutely important that we hear from the minister before we proceed to clause-by-clause. I was quite looking forward to hearing the minister testify at committee on Thursday at 3:30 p.m. Unfortunately, that didn't happen.

What really frustrated me was that from the government's side there was this implication that the testimony from the minister was some kind of gift bestowed upon the opposition by the government. Frankly, it's not. That's not the way it should be. The minister and her counterparts across the cabinet were given clear direction in their mandate letters that they should be available to committees. My hope is that the minister will appear once more before committee before we move to clause-by-clause so we can discuss some of the amendments.

I appreciate that the clerk will be distributing the amendments that have been submitted by all parties, and I understand that there are a number of them: from the government, the opposition and the third party, and from I believe the Green Party and potentially the Bloc, although I don't know that for a fact. I do know that Ms. May has submitted proposed amendments.

It's important, I think, that before we actually go to clause-by-clause—and now in the coming days we'll have access to the proposed amendments—we have the opportunity to speak with the minister. It's important to to hear from her and to have her indicate to us what direction she's looking to take in terms of which amendments would be acceptable to her from a government perspective, and what amendments she's not willing to undertake. The ability to have her appear before this committee at a certain point in time I think would be worthwhile. I think it would be beneficial.

Certainly, those of us who are on this committee have an interest in this file, obviously, since we're sitting on the committee that's studying the bill, but she, as the responsible minister, has an important vested interest as the minister responsible for this matter to appear and to indicate the government's direction. I appreciate, certainly, that we may not agree with every amendment that she proposes, and we may not agree with every amendment that the NDP or the Green Party may propose, but we would at least have an indication from the minister of what direction she would like to see.

From my perspective, I would be curious to see what amendments she would be willing to accept as they relate to third parties, so the ability to ask her whether she would agree to additional strengthening of some of the provisions on third parties.... Certainly, taking into account some of the comments that came from our Ontario CEO as they relate to third parties, I would be intrigued to hear whether she'd be amenable to strengthening some of those concerns, particularly—and again, this is in relation to the ongoing commentary and controversy south of the border—with regard to foreign influence and foreign interference. None of us wants to be talking about Russian interference and #FakeNews in terms of that foreign influence.

Clearly, too, I think most of the population, with perhaps some leading American figures excluded, believes that there was an act of interference in that election. I want to hear from the minister how she will go about addressing the concerns that are rightfully held by members—I think on all sides of this table—about how foreign influence will be dealt with in an upcoming election. How the minister will deal with that is certainly an open question.

I'd be curious to question her on whether she would adopt some of the testimony of the provincial CEO in terms of having all donations disclosed for a third party in regard to where the funding comes from, and whether that funding comes from a foreign entity or from an entity that perhaps mixes foreign funds with domestic funds. Hearing from the minister on that particular matter in terms of whether she'd be open to some increased reporting standards and accountability mechanisms that would prevent entities from using foreign funds in Canadian elections I think would be worthwhile.

As well, I think it would be worthwhile to question the minister on the role of the Auditor General. I found it interesting that the CEO brought up the point that the Auditor General conducts a review of government spending in the pre-writ period. That's an interesting way to address it.

(1225)



As far as I know, the Auditor General doesn't have that role federally. I'd be curious to see the minister's comments on that, and whether she'd be open to having an audit role for the AG or another similar entity, perhaps the CEO, or perhaps someone not directly related to the elections, to review how government advertising is undertaken during the writ period and in the pre-writ period.

That goes along with a further commentary that, in the proposed legislation there is the pre-writ spending cap applying to political parties. I'd be interested to hear the minister's comments on whether she would be open to aligning the periods for federal advertising, as well as ministerial announcements and parliamentary and ministerial travel that could conceivably be seen as being done with an electoral purpose. I would want to know whether the minister would be open to reviewing that type of function.

For all intents and purposes, it appeared as though the minister was open to having these conversations. She certainly, physically, showed up on Thursday at 3:30 p.m. She sat through the entire meeting in Centre Block. She had notes in front of her. Conceivably, she was prepared to testify and was open to questions from this committee.

That didn't happen. A motion was brought forward at the beginning of the meeting, before the minister could testify, which we debated throughout the meeting. It was the guillotine motion that's now before us. The actual original motion, I guess, was to revive that motion for debate rather than doing so after the minister's testimony. That's unfortunate. As I said, I don't think the appearance of a minister at committee should be seen as some kind of gift or some kind of benefit that's provided to committees only if we agree to a programming motion, only if we agree to a guillotine motion. I don't think that's appropriate, especially when you review the mandate letters of ministers, which focus on them appearing before committees.

Another thing I wanted to hear from the minister before we move forward is her focus and her efforts to implement a similar provisional voter registry, as was undertaken in Ontario. The CEO of Ontario provided some positive commentary on that. In their example, it was an optional registry. In ours, it was an automatic registry. In both cases, the option is to withdraw at some point in time. I'd be curious to know the minister's thoughts on those two strategies, and which one is more appropriate from a federal perspective.

On the provincial perspective, the CEO, Mr. Essensa, mentioned that about 1,200 people, give or take, were on the register. That seems exceptionally low given the population of Ontario and given the number of 16-year-olds and 17-year-olds that are out there, particularly since the vast majority of 16-year-olds and 17-year-olds are currently in high school, so they're in a public institution that a CEO or an elections official would have access to. That 1,200 number seems low. I'd be curious to hear the minister's commentary, one way or another, in terms of how that's undertaken. The CEO appeared to indicate that the number of people who have withdrawn is exceptionally low. I think that's a positive outcome. It would be curious to see whether that bears out when it's a mandatory or an automatic registration.

This ties in with the privacy concerns with that. I was pleased to hear from the provincial CEO that this data is guarded within Elections Ontario. It is not shared with political parties. It's not shared with third parties. It's not shared outside of Elections Ontario. I think that's an important matter that we need to assure ourselves of: that similar provisions are in place.

(1230)



Federally, we've heard from the former acting minister, Mr. Brison, in a commentary on the bill itself in the House, that it would not be the case that this information would be shared with people outside Elections Canada. That's reassuring, but as well, we need to assure ourselves that it is the fact.

As the corollary to that as well, when people do turn 18 and they become eligible to vote, those names are then added to the permanent voters list, at which point, of course, as registered voters, people are entitled to vote in the federal election. That information would be shared with those actors in the political process that have the right to have that information.

While I'm on the subject of privacy, and Mr. Cullen brought up the issue of privacy regulations, privacy rules, how we go about dealing with the challenges of protection of personal data, protection of information. Certainly, this bill has some measures designed to move us toward that, but on hearing from different witnesses, different experts, there is no agreement that it goes far enough. I'd be curious to know from the minister, if she's had any change of heart in terms of how questions of privacy are dealt with in this legislation.

One matter on which I'd like to hear from the minister, when she appears and hopefully that can happen, is whether she feels the federal privacy legislation, PIPEDA, applies completely to those actors within the political process, or whether some aspects of it could be applied to the process. We've heard testimony both from the CEO and from the Privacy Commissioner who have made specific suggestions around the privacy question and personal information. Being able to go forward and have that conversation with the minister and question her as to whether or not she will accept those recommendations from those commissioners, or whether she has an alternative proposal to do so, would be of benefit to the committee.

Certainly, the legislation has made the provision that parties will have a privacy policy that would be subject to oversight by the Chief Electoral Officer. That's probably a worthwhile process with which to begin. Whether that's the long-term policy or not would be something the minister will have to address during her testimony, if and when she appears before this committee.

Another issue that is worth articulating, and worth having that conversation with the minister about, relates to the anti-collusion provisions that the provincial government has implemented. I was heartened to hear there were allegations—I shouldn't say heartened to hear there were allegations. I should say that I was heartened to hear how the CEO dealt with allegations of collusion among political actors, among third parties and how those were investigated.

I'd be curious to hear whether the minister would be open to strengthening and implementing strong anti-collusion provisions within the federal legislation to ensure that third parties and political actors are not trying to get around the rules and the limits that exist within legislation to influence beyond what they ought to be able to influence.

The Ontario CEO, as a corollary to that, brought up the example of the minimum spending limit, it being $500 in Ontario, and the challenge of forcing that within a digital environment. We could take a step further and look at that writ large with advertising in general.

(1235)



With online advertising, whether it's on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter or more traditional banner ads on websites, it's difficult to maintain a registry or an observation of these advertisements. Unless you or someone connected with the campaign have observed them first-hand, there's not typically a permanent record of that available online. It may not ever even appear to someone individually, based on the metrics that are indicated in an advertisement.

For example, on Facebook, it can be targeted to people who like a certain page, who may have certain page likes within their Facebook account, so based on that, you may or you may not see a political ad.

If I happen to like the Conservative Party of Canada on Facebook, if I happen to like Andrew Scheer on Facebook, the Liberal Party or the New Democrats—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You might need a sanity check.

Mr. John Nater:

I might need a sanity check, but that goes for politicians in general.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's probably true.

Mr. John Nater:

Chances are that, if the NDP or the Liberals are running an ad, those who like Andrew Scheer and those who like the Conservative Party or similar entities will be excluded from seeing that ad. The ability to know what its money is being spent on is largely limited to actually being able to physically view an ad. When we have the minister here, we need to have that conversation about how we go about ensuring that, particularly as it relates to third parties.

In terms of political actors, the disclosure of information is, I would say, fairly robust. We are, through the Canada Elections Act, required to report all expenses, all contributions, so it's dealt with that way. Again, there are always challenges, but if money was spent on Facebook advertising, if money was spent on online advertising, as a matter of the law and as a matter of electoral rebates, for that matter, political entities report that on their returns.

A third party who is not required to register, though, will not have those same dynamics, so we need to have the conversation with the minister in terms of how we go about addressing those types of concerns, particularly in a digital environment.

Now, I don't claim to have the magic solution to any of those challenges. Certainly, there are options available for this committee, and I look forward to seeing the amendments that are being brought forward by all political parties, to see if there's something in there that we could adopt and implement that would allow us the opportunity to go about that direction, to look at ways in which we can ensure that third party rules foresee some form of digital advertising and how to address that digital advertising when it happens. Perhaps it is real-time reporting of all expenses of third parties, together with the forced registry of all third parties, so whether they spend $1, $500, or $5,000, I think that would be one way to go about that. Certainly, the provincial CEO indicated that it would be easier for him to determine a $3,000 or $5,000 threshold, or a zero-dollar threshold, but when you come to a $500 threshold, you're certainly kind of using a judgment call and it makes it more challenging to see where that happens and where that comes into play.

Certainly more generally, it's a conversation that needs to be had with the minister more broadly, on how we deal with new technologies and new ways of communicating that don't always appear in the traditional way of doing business in an election. I'm a new MP, but I've been involved in election campaigns for my adult life, and I very much remember that original advertising was very much focused on radio and television ads, and in smaller communities on the weekly newspaper and the local newspaper. For those, it was very easy to indicate who spent the money to pay for the ad, which campaign was doing that, because it said that it was authorized by the official agent for so and so. That certainly was the way it was dealt with in the past, in terms of how we traditionally campaign.

In the new era, it's more challenging to have that clarity in terms of what ads pop up in one's stream. There are ways that you can see individual pages and what advertisements they are undertaking, but it's not always clear to a voter, to a constituent, to a Canadian, in terms of where those are being targeted and where they are undertaken.

I would note that you can click on, I believe, the “About” tab and see which ads are being currently run by a particular page, but again it doesn't show who paid for them and who's authorized those ads. Particularly on a Facebook page, it may not have a clear definition of who it is. Certainly, if the Facebook page was “John Nater, MP”, you could reasonably assume that's a Facebook page that is related to John Nater, or John Nater for the Conservative Party, or some kind of indication that it's connected to that.

(1240)



The challenge we're facing, however, and where we need direction and clarity is with other entities. If there were a “Friends of John Nater” campaign that had a Facebook page, determining exactly who the friends of John Nater are would be a challenge.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Just in general?

Mr. John Nater:

Just in general.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's a challenge we've all struggled with.

Mr. John Nater:

Yes, who your friends are in politics is not always easily determined.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's so sad, John.

Mr. John Nater: I kid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

We could be reduced to tears by this. This is very unexpected.

Mr. John Nater:

The point is that we need some clarity from the department and from the minister in terms of how we go about that. Any individual can create a Facebook page and call it whatever they want. “Friends of John Nater” is an example, but it could be a Facebook page such as “Canadians for a Clean Environment”, “Canadians for Increased International Trade”, or “Canadians for a Strong Manufacturing Sector”. There are no limits on how a Facebook page can be created, and for an issue like that, we need to ensure that we are engaging the supply management, or rather, social media companies, in terms of what efforts we make. I had SM in my mind, so social media, supply management....

I think that on a proactive basis, we've seen movement from social media companies to ensure that clearly fake accounts or bots, as they are called, are being whittled away. They are being eliminated, but you can only do so much in any given situation. When we hear from the minister, we need to hear her plan and her strategy to go forward, in terms of what options there are to go about that process.

We talk about Facebook and we talk about Twitter. Those seem to be the primary mechanisms. We heard from the Ontario chief electoral officer this morning, who noted that he has had a relatively positive working relationship with those companies, those businesses. That's what they are; they are businesses.

I'd be curious to hear from the minister about what outreach efforts she has undertaken, in terms of working with Facebook or Twitter, to determine what the next steps are, either with a voluntary approach or with a regulatory or legislative approach, whether it's in time for the next election or whether it's something that we will wait for a future election to see, an election in 2023. I guess that would be the conceivable next step.

I think we need to hear from the minister and have that conversation with her about what the appropriate steps are on this. We hear about Cambridge Analytica, and we hear about the data mining practices that went on in other jurisdictions, but hearing from her, hearing her perspective about what the next steps should be on a matter such as this would be worth the conversation.

Again, when we see the amendments that have come forward from all parties around this table and those represented in the House but not necessarily holding official party status, it would be worthwhile to see if there is one that may address the digital progress that's being undertaken.

The corollary to that is enforcement. Enforcement is a challenge, especially for elections where so much of the enforcement would happen after the fact. If you have an election that is completed, and there's evidence of overspending, of non-registry, or of foreign influence, it's very difficult to correct that fact after an election has been completed. Certainly that's something that was noted before this committee by those who testified. It has been noted in other places and in other commentary. Being able to enforce something at the time of the infraction is a matter that we as a committee have to grapple with and to deal with.

Failure to do so, and the forced wait until after an election has occurred provide very little in terms of corrective practices or corrective ability to fix it at that point in time. If we wait until we've submitted all our financial filings and our audited financial statements after an election campaign, often that's months in before Elections Canada can determine whether an infraction has taken place. We need to look at where that ought to go and what powers should rest with either the Chief Electoral Officer or perhaps the commissioner of elections to make that happen.

(1245)



Of course, that's one matter, but another matter that I think we as Canadians worry about is security and privacy. More generally, we want to ensure that our data, our personal information, is safe, whether that's information held by Elections Canada or by political parties.

I found the testimony from the Ontario CEO to be informative when he stated there was little evidence of that type of interference and threat, but I thought his additional commentary was even more important, that there were in fact failed attempts to access information, which is positive to see, but nonetheless there were attempts to do so.

I was heartened that he made the comment that this information was then shared with the appropriate channels, the CSE, Communications Security Establishment.... I think it's worthwhile to try to determine where these threats may have come from. I would say the robustness of the province's structures and mechanisms in place to have prevented that attempt is positive.

I'd be curious to hear from the minister if she is aware of specific examples of threats against federal information and whether that's within Elections Canada itself or maybe within a political party—their apparatus, their databases—or any other entity at the federal level that would, by its nature, have personal data on Canadian voters.

I know each political party has access to the voters list of every Canadian who is eligible to vote. That information is shared with Elections Canada by a variety of sources, not the least of which is the Canada Revenue Agency. Certainly, Canada Revenue Agency ensures that Canadians pay their taxes, so one would hope that information would be correct, but that's not always the case. My questions for the minister would be the following: How do we work out a plan? What suggestions would she have to ensure that the information shared with Elections Canada, from entities such as Canada Revenue Agency, will be accurate? How would she ensure that only those who are eligible to vote can vote in elections?

In each of our constituencies we can point to examples of constituents who may have failed to file their taxes on time and have challenges with wrong addresses, wrong names, that end up with CRA data, which is then transferred from the Canada Revenue Agency to Elections Canada. I know of at least two examples in my riding where someone was indicated as being deceased by CRA. If that information is then passed on to Elections Canada, it would be a concern when someone goes to vote. Having a process in place would ensure that is dealt with at that point in time.

Any voter who is eligible to vote could go to the poll on election day and prove who they are and be added to the voters list at that point, but that information being foreseen at that point in time is a challenge.

(1250)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

A point of order, Chair.

The Chair:

Just before the point of order, I want to let the committee know how many amendments there are. The clerk just gave me this, which you are going to be receiving soon. There are from the Liberals, 66; from the Conservatives, 204; from the NDP, 29; from the Green Party, 17; and from the Bloc, two.

You have a point of order, Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm disappointed in the Bloc. I mean, two amendments. Where's the effort?

This is a small point, and I know it somewhat involves people at the table and people not at the table. At some point, considering the number of amendments, substantive work on this bill is needed. I'm not sure I've encountered a bill with that many amendments coming from all sides.

Clearly, from the testimony we've heard to this point, which I think is the last of the testimony we'll hear, there's an enormous amount of work to be done.

There seem to be some sticking points, particularly between the Liberals and the Conservatives, over some of the issues around pre-writ spending and some of the other factors. They are legitimate concerns to have, and a legitimate conversation to have. We have, of course, some amendments that we're working on around privacy and social media, which I think, again, have been supported by testimony.

To the larger case of the parliamentary process, with whatever urgency I would encourage the government and the official opposition to work some of this stuff out so that we can get some sort of process in front of us. As we've heard from the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada, they've prepared some of these changes. The longer we take, the fewer and fewer options they have to make the changes, many of which all parties at this table agree with.

I fully support allowing Mr. Nater and others to use the privileges that were granted to apply pressure to a bill by using up time, but I don't yet get the sense from the government or the official opposition.... I'm going to say to colleagues on the government side in particular to get on with figuring out where the sticking points are. If we can't solve them, then press the point. People may smile, but at some point you have to decide what you actually want done with this bill and at what urgency you wish to see it done. Some of it is unpleasant, but it's required if you want to see this through. New Democrats want this bill passed with some substantial things in it changed, yet we want to see this bill passed.

I apologize to Mr. Nater and his commentary—

(1255)

Mr. John Nater:

Not at all.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

—but going through this same process again and again, meeting after meeting, is less than productive, and the pressure is not mounting sufficiently to change the course we're on right now.

I'm trying to be fair. Everyone has a role to play. My goodness, let's not have these meetings if they're just going to be the same thing. If we're going to have these meetings, then let's have some productive dialogue over the disputes on what this bill should look like. That is what we're here to do.

That's it, Chair, and that wasn't a point of order.

The Chair:

Okay, thank you.

If you continue the filibuster, I may at some time propose we just see the clock at four in the morning.

Anyway, Mr. Nater, carry on.

Mr. John Nater:

I do see, Chair, that it's nearing one o'clock.

Is there an indication that we'll continue past one o'clock?

The Chair:

At one o'clock, I'll ask the committee what its will is on whether to go past the scheduled time.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

That's in about four minutes.

Mr. John Nater:

Okay. Thank you, Chair. I appreciate that.

I think the commentary from Mr. Cullen is informative. It is incumbent on all political parties to see if we can't come to an agreement. It may be an agreement to disagree on a number of points but an agreement to agree on certain points—what the next steps are and what the next few days and few meetings may entail in terms of where we go. I also appreciate the commentary from our clerk and the information provided.

In terms of the number of amendments proposed by each political party, I do see the 204 from the Conservatives as a healthy number. I think that's reflective of the role of the official opposition in terms of the scrutiny of legislation. But I find it interesting and informative, and it relates directly to this amendment, that 66 proposals for amendments have been submitted by the government to their own legislation.

I think that's very germane to the subamendment at hand in terms of hearing from the minister on these 66 amendments that have been proposed by the governing party—where those amendments are focused; why the government feels that the initial draft of the bill was not appropriate in those 66 cases; which ones are substantive elements; and which ones are more housekeeping or minor amendments, whether it's a grammatical change, spelling errors, or fixing numbers within a bill. I think those are general housekeeping matters, and I think that's what happens with any bill that might be brought forward.

For the substantive matters, however, exactly why has this decision been made? Whether it's reflective of testimony we heard here at committee, whether it's a reflection of the change in opinion or the change in direction that the government has decided to take, or whether it's unrelated to those matters but is related, rather, to current events that have happened between the time this bill was implemented and where we are today, on October 2, nearly five months after the initial implementation of this bill, hearing from the minister, hearing her address those 66 amendments, and hearing her outline the reasons for those as well....

When the time comes and we get to clause-by-clause, the government will have the majority to pass any or all of those 66 amendments. In the same way, the government has their numbers to pass or not pass the 204 Conservative amendments, the 29 NDP amendments, the 17 Green Party amendments, and the two amendments from the Bloc. Certainly, I suspect there will be overlap in terms of these amendments and where the interest lies. It will be a matter of trying to choose which of the....

Sorry, Chair.

(1300)

The Chair:

We're at our scheduled time. I need to know the will of the committee on whether they wish to carry on or not. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

I move that the meeting be adjourned. [English]

The Chair:

Is there no interest in carrying on? Okay.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour, et bienvenue à la 121e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, où nous poursuivrons l'étude du projet de loi C-76, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada et d'autres lois et apportant des modifications corrélatives à d'autres textes législatifs.

C'est avec plaisir que nous accueillons Greg Essensa, directeur général des élections de l'Ontario, qui témoigne par vidéoconférence depuis Toronto.

Nous vous remercions de vous être libéré aujourd'hui, monsieur Essensa. Je sais que votre agenda est très chargé, alors je suis ravi que nos horaires concordent enfin. Nous sommes emballés et nous avons beaucoup d'excellentes questions à vous poser.

Je vous laisse commencer par votre déclaration liminaire. Nous avons bien reçu vos notes d'allocution, mais nous ne les avons pas distribuées parce que nous ne les avons pas encore fait traduire.

Je vous cède la parole pour votre déclaration préliminaire.

M. Greg Essensa (directeur général des élections, Élections Ontario):

Monsieur le président, membres du Comité, bonjour. D'entrée de jeu, je tiens à remercier le Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre de m'avoir invité à commenter le projet de loi C-76, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada et d'autres lois et apportant des modifications corrélatives à d'autres textes législatifs.

Je suis ravi d'avoir l'occasion de vous faire part de mes observations sur le processus électoral. Quand je formule des observations à un comité de la Chambre des communes, j'ai pleinement conscience que je m'adresse aux artisans des lois du Canada.

J'aborderai aujourd'hui les points suivants: les dispositions du projet de loi et mes observations sur l'élection générale de 2018 en Ontario.

Quand j'examine les dispositions d'un projet de loi qui porte sur les élections, comme celui-ci, je me demande toujours si les changements proposés préservent l'intégrité du processus électoral, s'ils maintiennent la notion d'équité et s'ils favorisent la transparence. Voici mes observations à l'issue de mon examen attentif de ce projet de loi.

Le projet de loi propose des modifications qui, si elles sont adoptées, favoriseront l'exercice du droit de vote en éliminant des obstacles au suffrage. Beaucoup de ses dispositions sont en vigueur en Ontario, et j'y suis très favorable.

J'insiste en particulier sur celle qui reconnaît la carte d'information de l'électeur en tant que pièce d'identité. Cette carte est un incontournable de l'administration électorale et, à mon humble avis, elle est un élément essentiel de la mosaïque électorale canadienne. La carte d'information de l'électeur est rassembleuse, car elle garantit à tout groupe d'électeurs qu'ils figurent sur la liste électorale, tout en leur fournissant les renseignements nécessaires pour qu'ils expriment leur suffrage. Cette modification harmoniserait les exigences d'identification avec celles de l'Ontario, et je félicite le gouvernement d'en reconnaître la pertinence.

De plus, la prolongation du calendrier électoral et des heures de vote par anticipation contribuera à inscrire le scrutin sous le signe du succès. Ces dispositions, parmi d'autres, élargiront la marge de manoeuvre du directeur général des élections. En effet, c'est le directeur général des élections, en tant que gestionnaire du scrutin, qui est le mieux à même de décider de l'organisation des élections. Le laisser libre de prendre les décisions qui relèvent de son mandat, dans le respect de la loi, est un facteur de réussite clé pour la gestion d'élections.

Passons maintenant à la réglementation des tiers. En 2016, l'Ontario a mis en application une refonte des règles de financement électoral. Alors que la province réformait son processus électoral en profondeur, on m'a demandé d'agir comme conseiller auprès du Comité permanent des affaires gouvernementales, ce que j'ai accepté. Le Comité a lancé un vaste processus de consultation de la population; il a sillonné l'Ontario pour écouter ce que de simples citoyens et des groupes d'intérêt avaient à dire sur le projet de loi.

J'ai par ailleurs témoigné à trois reprises devant le comité permanent afin d'exprimer de mes réflexions sur la teneur du projet de loi. Mon message était simple et invariable: le concept de concurrence à armes égales est au coeur de notre démocratie. Il s'agit par ailleurs d'un principe unificateur pour gérer des élections, car il s'applique aussi bien au volet scrutin qu'au volet campagne du processus électoral.

Les résultats électoraux sont censés refléter la volonté sincère du peuple. Les règles de financement électoral visent à garantir que les acteurs politiques aient tout autant que les autres la possibilité d'amasser et de dépenser des fonds pour faire rayonner leur message et engranger les votes. Les résultats électoraux ne devraient pas être faussés parce que certains ont les moyens d'influencer indument l'électorat. Les tiers ne font pas exception. Pour assurer une concurrence à armes égales, il est impératif d'imposer un cadre réglementaire applicable aux tiers; en conséquence, je suis favorable aux dispositions proposées dans le projet de loi.

À quelques exceptions près, les amendements mis de l'avant dans le projet de loi C-76 s'apparentent au modèle ontarien. Ainsi, les seuils de dépenses ne sont pas les mêmes. Cela dit, je ne me prononcerai pas sur les montants précis et leur bien-fondé. L'important, à mes yeux, c'est qu'une réglementation s'applique à la période préélectorale ainsi qu'à la période électorale. En Ontario, avant la réforme législative de 2016, la période préélectorale n'était aucunement réglementée. C'est une question pour laquelle je milite depuis longtemps, vu le manque de transparence qui entoure les dépenses que les tiers pourraient engager au cours des six mois qui précèdent les élections.

L'obligation pour les tiers de fournir un rapport provisoire compte parmi les éléments du projet de loi C-76 que j'appuie fortement. J'estime que l'encadrement des dépenses n'en sera que plus efficace et la transparence, accrue.

Je m'arrête également sur la question du financement en provenance de l'étranger. Je suis extrêmement favorable à l'idée d'empêcher les tiers d'employer des fonds provenant d'une entité étrangère. Par contre, le projet de loi garde le silence sur la validation des sources de financement. En effet, rien n'oblige les tiers à déclarer d'où proviennent les fonds qu'ils reçoivent, et il pourrait fort bien s'agir d'une source étrangère. C'est un élément que je tiens à porter à l'attention du Comité.

Dans l'ensemble, le projet de loi me semble aller dans la bonne direction.

J'en viens maintenant aux dispositions relatives au contrôle de l'application de la loi. En effet, pour que le contrôle soit efficace, il importe de fournir aux responsables les outils qu'il leur faut.

(1105)



Je suis ravi de constater que le commissaire aux élections fédérales aura le pouvoir d'imposer des sanctions administratives pécuniaires, d'assigner des témoins à comparaître et de porter des accusations, le cas échéant. Il m'apparaît également justifié qu'il soit transféré au bureau du directeur général des élections. Ainsi outillé, le commissaire pourra s'acquitter efficacement de son mandat et préserver la confiance de la population en exigeant des comptes des acteurs politiques.

Je consacrerai le reste de mon temps de parole à des observations au sujet de l'élection générale de 2018 en Ontario.

Les élections de cette année se sont déroulées sous le signe d'un changement sans précédent. Élections Ontario a dû mettre en application quatre lois distinctes en prévision des élections de juin 2018. Les modifications apportées ont redessiné la carte électorale et ils ont permis à la province de mobiliser de nouvelles technologies, des modèles de dotation novateurs, des procédures renouvelées et des outils modernes pour les divers intervenants en cause.

L'élection générale de 2018 en Ontario s'est avérée, à mon humble avis, un franc succès. Les lois ont étayé nos efforts dans le but de favoriser l'exercice du droit de vote et la modernisation des services à l'électorat.

Je tiens néanmoins à faire ressortir quelques points cruciaux.

Tout d'abord, il y a la question de la protection de la vie privée et de la sécurité. Puisque les données personnelles et les intrusions dans les réseaux publics sont de plus en plus sous les projecteurs, les notions de protection de la vie privée et de cybersécurité sont passées à l'avant-plan des préoccupations.

L'élection générale de 2018 a été la première où divers outils technologiques ont été adoptés, notamment un registre de scrutin électronique pour consigner qui a voté et de l'équipement permettant de compter les bulletins de vote.

Dans un souci de sécurité, nous avons travaillé en étroite collaboration avec le conseiller provincial en matière de sécurité, nommé par le secrétaire du Conseil des ministres de l'Ontario. Nous lui avons demandé conseil pour que nos procédures et nos systèmes respectent certains seuils, de manière à limiter les menaces éventuelles. En concertation avec le conseiller provincial, Élections Ontario a mandaté un expert en sécurité pour procéder à des vérifications en profondeur des systèmes, des procédures et des effectifs. Cet expert a produit un rapport où il a recommandé diverses interventions, que nous avons appliquées afin de réduire la vulnérabilité.

Rien ne laisse supposer que les intrusions relevant de la cybersécurité, les fausses nouvelles ou quelque autre forme d'ingérence de nature électronique ont influé indûment sur l'élection générale de 2018 en Ontario.

Le dernier point que j'aborderai concerne les dépenses des tiers. Depuis l'entrée en vigueur du nouveau régime ontarien, qui est analogue à ce qui figure dans le projet de loi C-76, les tiers ont l'obligation de s'enregistrer et de tenir compte des plafonds de dépenses en période tant préélectorale qu'électorale. Pour l'élection générale de 218, un total de 59 tiers se sont enregistrés, soit 34 durant la période préélectorale de six mois et 25 durant la période électorale. En comparaison, en 2014, seuls 37 tiers s'étaient inscrits pendant la période électorale. Il s'agit donc d'une progression de 59 % par rapport à 2014.

Il est encore difficile d'évaluer les répercussions générales de la nouvelle réglementation, car nous ne recevrons les documents financiers complets qu'en décembre prochain. Néanmoins, je suis convaincu que la réglementation a largement influé sur les dépenses publicitaires des tiers. Voici un exemple. En 2014, 37 tiers enregistrés ont dépensé environ 8,67 millions de dollars en période électorale seulement. Or, en 2018, sous le nouveau régime, les 25 partis enregistrés pendant la période électorale n'ont pu dépenser à eux tous que 2,55 millions de dollars, une baisse de plus de 6,12 millions de dollars. C'est considérable, et j'ai hâte de savoir combien les tiers ont dépensé, en décembre.

Nous avons toutefois eu des difficultés au chapitre des exigences d'enregistrement. En Ontario, un peu comme ce que prévoit le projet de loi C-76, un tiers n'est tenu de s'enregistrer que s'il dépense au moins 500 $. Nous avons eu du mal à exercer un contrôle; nous avons un peu pataugé. Nous avons reçu de nombreuses plaintes à propos de tiers, dont beaucoup ne s'étaient pas enregistrés auprès d'Élections Ontario, car ils étaient restés sous le plafond des 500 $. Nous nous sommes donc retrouvés avec des publicités de tiers non réglementées. Le problème, c'est que beaucoup de tiers affichaient des publicités exclusivement sur Internet, ce qui nous a compliqué largement la tâche lorsque nous avons voulu déterminer s'ils avaient franchi le seuil des 500 $ et à quel moment.

J'en aurai beaucoup à dire aux législateurs ontariens sur ce volet de la réforme. Je vous invite à vous pencher sur la question pendant votre étude du projet de loi.

Enfin, je profite de l'occasion pour remercier le Comité de m'avoir invité à lui faire part de mon point de vue en tant que directeur général des élections de l'Ontario. Je vous félicite de votre travail dans le dossier de la réforme électorale et je serai ravi de répondre à vos questions.

(1110)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Vous avez traité de bon nombre des sujets auxquels certains voulaient en venir. C'est une excellente chose. Je vous remercie d'avoir pris le temps de témoigner.

Passons maintenant aux questions, en commençant par M. Simms, du Parti libéral.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Essensa, je vous remercie énormément de votre présentation. J'ai eu beaucoup de plaisir à vous écouter. Notre patience a été amplement récompensée.

M. Greg Essensa:

Merci.

M. Scott Simms:

Je vais commencer par votre dernier point, sur la difficulté de déterminer qui a dépensé plus de 500 $. Il y a de quoi s'inquiéter.

Vous avez affirmé que vous alliez formuler des recommandations aux législateurs à Queen's Park. Très rapidement, quelles seront-elles?

M. Greg Essensa:

Je recommande soit d'éliminer carrément le seuil, soit de le porter à un montant plus élevé, comme 3 000 $ ou 5 000 $, quelque chose d'un peu plus facile à confirmer.

M. Scott Simms:

Je vois. Donc, si on hausse le montant, de toute évidence... Essentiellement, il y aurait donc un montant minimal où une dépense devient détectable, pour ainsi dire.

M. Greg Essensa:

Il a été très difficile de confirmer auprès des fournisseurs d'accès Internet qu'un tiers avait dépensé plus de 500 $.

Parfois, il y a des rabais pour les bannières publicitaires. C'est devenu très compliqué à gérer.

M. Scott Simms:

Je vois.

M. Greg Essensa:

Ce que je vous recommande, pendant votre étude du projet de loi C-76, c'est d'envisager de hausser le seuil pour qu'il soit relativement facile au commissaire aux élections fédérales de confirmer s'il a ou non été dépassé.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord, je comprends.

Je reviens maintenant sur l'un des premiers points dont vous avez traité. Je suis entièrement d'accord avec vous au sujet de la carte d'information de l'électeur. Comme vous l'avez dit, c'est un incontournable pour voter, un élément essentiel. Je vous en remercie donc, car je me réjouis de son retour.

Le projet de loi rétablit certains éléments qu'une loi antérieure a fait disparaître. Nous faisons par ailleurs des ajouts — une mise à jour, quoi — en fonction du contexte actuel, et...

Pardon, j'ai dû éternuer.

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

Vous vous êtes laissé emporter par l'émotion.

M. Scott Simms:

Je sais. Mes émotions débordent.

Je suis dans le milieu depuis maintenant 15 ans. Je suis député depuis presque 15 ans et je suis passé par cinq campagnes électorales, alors je m'intéresse toujours... Je parle du recours à un répondant. Nous jouissons du droit de vote — c'est dans la Charte —, mais, parfois, quand on se laisse emporter dans les discussions sur la validation de l'identité, on oublie trop souvent que l'on parle du droit de vote de quelqu'un. Il faut donc garder cela à l'esprit. À mon avis, le recours à un répondant est très utile à ce chapitre.

Que pensez-vous du recours à un répondant, tel que le présente le projet de loi, ou des changements apportés dans le projet de loi?

(1115)

M. Greg Essensa:

Je pense que toute disposition d'un projet de réforme électorale qui permet d'accroître à la fois l'intégrité et la transparence du processus électoral tout en permettant à chaque électeur admissible d'exercer son droit de vote est de la plus haute importance.

Il n'y a pas de recours à un répondant en Ontario. C'est quelque chose que nous ne faisons plus depuis des années. Je sais que c'est utilisé à l'échelle fédérale. J'en ai été témoin à diverses élections.

C'est un moyen d'aider certains segments de l'électorat qui ont du mal à exercer leur droit de vote, que ce soit parce qu'ils ne possèdent pas de pièce d'identité admissible ou pour d'autres raisons. Je suis toujours pour ce genre de choses.

M. Scott Simms:

Le projet de loi renferme d'autres dispositions. Par exemple, vous avez parlé de l'amélioration de la transparence en période préélectorale. Vous y êtes manifestement favorable.

M. Greg Essensa:

Oui, et j'ai beaucoup écrit à ce sujet au cours des 10 dernières années, en ma qualité de directeur général des élections. Je crois fermement que tous les acteurs politiques devraient être traités de manière juste et équitable. Or, pendant longtemps, alors que les partis politiques et les candidats étaient tenus de respecter des seuils et des plafonds de dépenses, en Ontario, les tiers ne l'étaient pas. Ils pouvaient donc dépenser autant qu'ils le voulaient parce qu'il n'y avait aucune transparence, aucune réglementation, ni aucune obligation pour eux de fournir quelque information que ce soit à Élections Ontario, l'organisme de réglementation.

Depuis toujours, divers intervenants exprimaient des réserves au motif qu'il s'agissait d'un avantage indu et susceptible d'influer sur les résultats électoraux.

Pour ma part, je faisais valoir depuis longtemps qu'il fallait traiter tous les acteurs politiques de manière juste et équitable en se laissant guider par le principe de la concurrence à armes égales.

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, et cette concurrence à armes égales dont vous parlez devrait sans doute s'appliquer aux six mois précédant le jour des élections et pas uniquement à la période électorale en tant que telle, n'est-ce pas?

M. Greg Essensa:

C'est mon avis. Une des dispositions du projet de loi à l'étude me plaît particulièrement: l'obligation pour les tiers de fournir un rapport provisoire. Pour moi, une démocratie saine et solide passe par une transparence maximale sur qui fait quelles dépenses publicitaires et qui finance les tiers.

M. Scott Simms:

Voilà qui m'amène à ma prochaine question et aux rapports provisoires que propose le projet de loi, quelque chose qui vous plaît. Croyez-vous que ces rapports provisoires seront suffisants, ou les exigences devraient-elles être resserrées?

M. Greg Essensa:

Je pense que lorsque l'on procède à une réforme électorale en profondeur, il faut absolument attendre qu'un cycle électoral se soit écoulé avant de pouvoir l'évaluer. Ce que j'ai dit lorsque le projet de loi 2 a été débattu en Ontario, c'est que l'on procédait à une refonte en profondeur au régime de financement des campagnes électorales dans la province. J'ai recommandé que l'on attende la conclusion d'un cycle électoral pour constater comment le nouveau régime aura été mis en application, ce qui permettrait au directeur général des élections de rétroagir auprès des législateurs afin qu'ils apportent des ajustements à telle disposition ou qu'ils procèdent à des modifications en fonction de ce qui aura été constaté sur le terrain.

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, je pense que c'est un bon point. Il faut mettre tout ce que nous faisons à l'épreuve. Il pourrait s'agir des sanctions administratives ou de quelque chose du genre. J'y suis favorable, et vous aussi, de toute évidence. Je pense que d'autres organismes fédéraux devraient s'intéresser à ce modèle.

Cela dit, j'aimerais consacrer les quelques minutes qu'il me reste à la notion de latitude.

Le président:

Vous avez une minute.

M. Scott Simms:

Dans la minute qu'il me reste, comme on vient de me le rappeler.

Un organisme tel que celui où vous travaillez, qui est évidemment indépendant du gouvernement, a absolument besoin de latitude. Pouvez-vous nous en dire davantage à ce sujet? Je ne parle pas seulement de votre rôle par rapport au scrutin, mais aussi du fait de faire connaître votre fonction aux électeurs afin de favoriser l'exercice du droit de vote et la participation.

M. Greg Essensa:

Un peu comme le Canada, l'Ontario est comme on le sait une province aussi vaste que diversifiée. Je fais souvent valoir que les législateurs devraient écrire les lois en donnant de la latitude aux gestionnaires des élections, car c'est nous qui sommes le mieux à même de juger des situations.

Par exemple, si la loi me dit de prendre ces lunettes dans la main droite et de les faire passer dans ma main gauche avant de les poser sur la table, je trouve que c'est extrêmement prescriptif. Je préférerais que les législateurs me disent qu'ils veulent que je me serve de lunettes. Pas de problème. Je peux déterminer moi-même quel est le meilleur moyen de le faire. Je peux vous dire qu'en Ontario, on n'utiliserait pas les lunettes de la même façon à Kenora qu'à Windsor, que dans Ottawa—Vanier ou que dans Toronto—St. Paul's.

M. Scott Simms:

Beau travail, merci.

(1120)

Le président:

Merci.

Nous passons maintenant aux conservateurs. M. Nater a la parole.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je comprends ce que vous avez dit à la fin, que quelque chose peut bien fonctionner à Kenora, mais pas dans Ottawa—Vanier. J'y reviendrai peut-être à la fin de ce tour ou pendant une prochaine série de questions, si j'en ai le temps.

Je reviens sur quelque chose que vous avez dit lorsque vous avez parlé de cybersécurité et de menaces. Je me coupe peut-être les cheveux en quatre, mais j'aimerais connaître votre opinion. Vous avez dit que rien ne laisse supposer qu'il y a un risque, qu'il y a de quoi s'inquiéter. Or, quand vous employez le mot « rien », faut-il l'interpréter littéralement ou de manière générale, en y voyant un genre de façon de protéger ses arrières parce qu'on a fait abstraction de certains éléments de preuve? J'aimerais simplement le savoir. Votre choix de mot m'a frappé.

M. Greg Essensa:

Lorsque des élections de l'envergure de celles qui ont lieu en Ontario ou au Canada sont en cause, il faut veiller à la cybersécurité sur tous les fronts et relativement à toutes nos interactions avec les données et l'information sur la population, dans l'ensemble du processus électoral.

Comme je l'ai expliqué, nous travaillons énormément avec des experts en sécurité et le conseiller provincial en matière de sécurité pour qu'ils procèdent à une analyse complète des risques d'intrusion ainsi qu'à des tests d'infiltration et d'intrusion pour tous nos systèmes, de manière à garantir qu'ils sont sûrs tout au long du scrutin.

Je m'occupe d'élections depuis 30 ans. Il y a manifestement eu des tentatives d'infiltrer les systèmes. Aucune n'a réussi, et c'est ce que j'entends lorsque j'emploie le mot « rien ». Rien ne laisse supposer que quiconque a réussi à accéder aux données que nous possédons, que ce soit par voie électronique ou par tout autre moyen, mais il ne faut pas pour autant en déduire que personne n'a essayé de le faire.

M. John Nater:

Je comprends. Dans le même ordre d'idées, existe-t-il des mécanismes de mise en commun des données entre vous, c'est-à-dire Élections Ontario, et Élections Canada à propos d'éventuelles tentatives?

M. Greg Essensa:

À l'échelle fédérale, j'ai déjà rencontré des représentants du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications Canada et du Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité. Nous leur avons fourni tout ce que nous avions, toute la documentation relative aux tests d'intrusion et d'infiltration que nous avions effectués. J'ai aussi rencontré le directeur général des élections fédérales. Nous avons formulé des conseils et des recommandations à Élections Canada au sujet du déroulement de l'élection générale de 2018 en invitant son équipe à nous contacter en tout temps si elle a des questions. C'est avec plaisir que nous l'aiderons, de quelque façon que ce soit.

M. John Nater:

Parfait. Je vous en remercie.

La loi provinciale adoptée en 2016 comporte une disposition qui interdit la collusion entre tiers ainsi qu'entre des tiers et d'autres acteurs politiques sur le plan de la publicité, de la coopération. J'ai deux questions à ce sujet.

Primo, y a-t-il des preuves d'une éventuelle collusion entre tiers ou entre des tiers et des acteurs politiques désireux de contourner les règles relatives aux seuils? Est-ce déjà arrivé? Y a-t-il déjà eu des allégations en ce sens?

Secundo, il y a les problèmes d'application de la loi. Comment prouve-t-on une telle collusion? Que fait-on pour faire respecter la loi? Quels sont les pouvoirs d'Élections Ontario pour faire appliquer la loi et pour établir qu'il y a ou non eu collusion?

M. Greg Essensa:

Absolument rien n'indique qu'il y a eu la moindre collusion au cours de la dernière élection générale. Il y a eu des plaintes, alors nous avons enquêté en bonne et due forme, mais nous avons déterminé qu'il n'y avait aucune preuve de quoi que ce soit. Avant la présentation du projet de loi 2, j'avais proposé aux députés de revoir la définition de « collusion » dans l'ancienne Loi sur le financement des élections, car je n'étais pas convaincu qu'elle correspondait à ce qu'il faudrait à Élections Ontario.

Au sein d'Élections Ontario, je possède les mêmes pouvoirs qu'un juge qui dirige une commission d'enquête, alors je peux assigner quelqu'un à comparaître. Je peux contraindre une institution financière à me communiquer de l'information. Au cours d'une enquête, je peux exiger que l'on me transmette tout renseignement pertinent. Je suis favorable au fait que l'actuel projet de loi confère ces pouvoirs au commissaire aux élections, car ils témoignent de l'importance de notre rôle en matière d'enquêtes et d'application de la loi. C'est un énorme gain de temps. Il n'est pas nécessaire de se lancer dans un débat interminable avec les acteurs politiques parce que les pouvoirs sont acquis; la loi prévoit déjà que nous avons le pouvoir d'exiger la communication de l'information en cause, ce qui, bien franchement, accélère considérablement le processus d'application.

M. John Nater:

J'en arrive à quelque chose qu'a évoqué M. Simms: l'enregistrement des tiers, l'application du seuil de 500 $, qu'il faudrait éliminer ou hausser. Bien sûr, on ne va pas très loin avec 500 $. J'aimerais savoir de quelles ressources dispose une entité comme Élections Ontario ou, dans notre cas, Élections Canada pour détecter les tiers qui devraient s'enregistrer. De toute évidence, si j'étais un tiers et que je diffusais pour moins de 500 $ de publicités dans Skeena—Bulkley Valley, par exemple...

(1125)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ne le faites pas.

M. John Nater:

Non, ne le faites pas. À moins que mon collègue M. Cullen dispose d'une équipe chargée de repérer de telles publicités dans un recoin de sa circonscription, j'imagine qu'il lui sera difficile de détecter ce qui se passe et à quel moment. Quels types de ressources seraient nécessaires pour déterminer si une telle chose se passe et quels types de ressources faudrait-il envisager de mobiliser à l'échelle fédérale?

M. Greg Essensa:

Je dirais qu'elles devraient être considérables. Pour tout dire, compte tenu de l'avènement d'Internet, qui est aujourd'hui pour ainsi dire une énorme tribune publicitaire à la disposition des entités politiques, c'est difficile. Nous recevons des plaintes de la part de partis politiques, d'autres acteurs politiques et de parties intéressées, et il faut investir beaucoup de ressources pour déterminer avec précision si un tiers a franchi le seuil. Il faut garder un oeil attentif sur les médias sociaux et collaborer de près avec les entreprises qui les possèdent. Parfois, ces entreprises proposent des rabais sur la publicité, alors même si un tiers peut nous sembler avoir dépassé le seuil de 500 $, il nous suffit de pousser l'enquête un peu plus loin pour nous rendre compte qu'ils ont dans certains cas bénéficié d'un rabais et qu'ils sont donc sous le seuil. C'est simplement qu'il faut énormément de main-d'oeuvre. Nous avons dû élargir considérablement notre équipe de vérification de la conformité en période électorale.

L'autre problème, c'est carrément le manque de temps. La période électorale dure 28 jours. Lorsque nous recevons une plainte, nous cherchons à lancer l'enquête la plus efficace possible dans les plus brefs délais afin d'établir si les tiers en cause ont besoin de s'enregistrer, conformément au régime en vigueur, dans un souci de transparence accrue.

M. John Nater:

Il ne me reste que quelques secondes pour cette série de questions, mais pour revenir là-dessus, comment qualifieriez-vous la réaction des réseaux de médias sociaux — Facebook, Twitter, Instagram — et vos interactions avec eux? Votre relation de travail est-elle solide ou utile? Comment réagissent-ils?

M. Greg Essensa:

Lorsque nous sommes intervenus auprès de réseaux de médias sociaux — vous venez de nommer les principaux —, ils se sont montrés très ouverts. Certaines affaires ont largement fait les manchettes depuis environ un an, et, du moins dans notre cas, en Ontario, la réaction a été très positive. Les réseaux nous ont fourni rapidement l'information qu'il nous fallait. Ils n'ont pas cherché à éviter de nous la fournir dans les plus brefs délais.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Passons maintenant à cette fameuse deuxième circonscription en importance au pays par sa beauté.

Monsieur Cullen, à vous la parole.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je soulève la question de privilège, monsieur le président. Je répète que votre circonscription est en effet très jolie...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Nathan Cullen:... et si nos yeux parvenaient à percer la noirceur impénétrable de l'hiver yukonnais, nous serions à même de le confirmer. En comparaison, Skeena—Bulkley Valley est tout bonnement magnifique à longueur d'année.

Pardonnez-nous, monsieur Essensa. Le président et moi croisons le fer de longue date sur ce sujet.

Si un tiers fait afficher une publicité sur Facebook en Ontario, faut-il identifier qui l'a payée?

M. Greg Essensa:

Actuellement, tant que le seuil de 500 $ n'est pas franchi, non.

Si le seuil est franchi, le tiers doit alors s'inscrire et se conformer à toutes les exigences prévues dans le projet de loi 2, ce qui inclut de préciser qui finance ses campagnes, qui fait des contributions et quelles sont les dépenses engagées.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Prenons une association de manufacturiers ou encore une association de fabricants de produits pharmaceutiques. Celle-ci décide de diffuser des publicités dans divers médias sociaux et de former un groupe pour commanditer les annonces — un truc du genre « Des produits pharmaceutiques pour l'Ontario ». Si elle dépasse le seuil de 500 $, elle doit s'inscrire et vous rendre compte de la provenance du financement de la campagne de publicité. C'est bien cela?

M. Greg Essensa:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Y a-t-il quelque indication que ce soit que l'argent provient entièrement du Canada? Peut-il provenir d'un autre pays?

M. Greg Essensa:

C'est l'une des difficultés, car c'est uniquement durant la période électorale que le tiers est tenu d'indiquer la source de son financement. S'il reçoit des fonds avant la période électorale ou avant de s'inscrire, il n'est pas obligé de nous préciser d'où ils viennent.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je pense en particulier, naturellement, aux associations multinationales des secteurs pétrolier, gazier ou pharmaceutique. Un tiers peut engranger des fonds avant le déclenchement des élections, déposer à la banque un million de dollars recueillis auprès d'un certain nombre d'organisations, former une association, puis, en période électorale, dépenser ce million de dollars en publicités servant à faire la promotion de telle politique ou tel programme. Qu'en est-il de la reddition de comptes aux Ontariens? Ceux-ci n'ont aucun moyen de savoir si l'argent vient des États-Unis, de l'Europe, de la Chine, ou s'il est de source strictement canadienne. Je me trompe?

(1130)

M. Greg Essensa:

À moins que le tiers nous informe que le financement provient d'une entité étrangère, nous ne sommes pas en mesure de le savoir. C'est un élément sur lequel j'attirerai l'attention des législateurs de l'Ontario. Je tenais à aborder la question dans mon discours liminaire. Je ne vois pas dans le projet de loi que vous êtes en train d'examiner de disposition qui empêcherait un tiers, dans les circonstances que vous mentionnez, d'utiliser des fonds étrangers. Vous voudrez peut-être vous pencher là-dessus.

M. Nathan Cullen:

On a fait grand cas de...

Permettez-moi de commencer par les quelques questions que voici pour aider le Comité. À quelles règles de protection des renseignements personnels les partis politiques sont-ils assujettis? Est-ce que la communication des données recueillies par les partis est visée par la Loi sur la protection de la vie privée de l'Ontario? Par ailleurs, les électeurs peuvent-ils avoir accès à l'information que les partis ont recueillie sur eux?

M. Greg Essensa:

En Ontario, tout parti politique doit me montrer qu'il s'est doté d'une politique acceptable en matière de protection de la vie privée.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Une politique acceptable en matière de protection de la vie privée?

M. Greg Essensa:

Oui. De concert avec l'équipe du commissaire à l'information et à la protection de la vie privée, nous avons défini les principes devant servir de base aux politiques. Nous avons fourni des exemples de politiques acceptables à nos yeux. Chaque parti doit faire connaître sa politique à mon bureau avant de pouvoir utiliser les outils, les listes électorales, les cartes et tout ce qui se rapporte à des élections. S'il omet...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Admettons qu'un électeur téléphone aux néo-démocrates, aux conservateurs ou aux libéraux afin d'obtenir les données que le parti détient sur son compte. Est-ce que l'un de ces principes ou critères à respecter veut que le parti communique les renseignements à l'électeur? Le droit de savoir, pour l'essentiel, implique...

M. Greg Essensa:

Non, cela ne fait pas partie de notre politique de protection de la vie privée.

Ce que la politique prévoit, c'est que les renseignements que nous transmettons aux partis politiques doivent être utilisés aux fins de l'élection générale. La politique exige que les partis suppriment les données par la suite et me fournissent un certificat attestant que les renseignements ont été éliminés de leurs dossiers. Les renseignements que nous transmettons...

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est l'élément principal. Vous leur donnez la liste électorale, par exemple, et les partis doivent vous prouver par la suite qu'ils ont retiré toutes les données de leurs systèmes.

M. Greg Essensa:

Et qu'ils les ont détruites.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous vous êtes penché sur l'atteinte à la sécurité des données détenues par la société qui gère l'autoroute 407, n'est-ce pas?

M. Greg Essensa:

Mon bureau et la police régionale de York mènent une enquête conjointe.

M. Nathan Cullen:

En ce moment?

M. Greg Essensa:

En ce moment.

M. Nathan Cullen:

En l'occurrence, et corrigez-moi si je me trompe, les données de quelque 600 000 clients, plus ou moins, auraient...

M. Greg Essensa:

Je ne peux pas vraiment commenter une enquête en cours.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pour revenir aux lois fédérales, la seule exigence contenue dans le projet de loi, c'est que les partis adoptent une politique de protection des renseignements personnels. C'est l'obligation qui existe au niveau fédéral. Le projet de loi n'établit aucune limite ou restriction et ne définit aucune pratique exemplaire, ce qu'a dénoncé notre directeur général des élections nouvellement nommé à titre permanent. Le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée a vivement condamné cet état de choses.

Quelle importance attachez-vous à l'existence de règles exécutoires rigoureuses dans nos lois électorales?

M. Greg Essensa:

C'est primordial. Il suffit de lire les nombreux écrits sur les problèmes soulevés relativement à Facebook et aux autres médias sociaux ces derniers mois.

Il incombe aux partis et aux acteurs politiques de veiller à la protection de la vie privée des personnes au sujet desquelles ils obtiennent de l'information.

Je crois dans le régime ontarien, qui oblige les partis politiques à me jurer qu'ils ont détruit les données et que celles-ci ne sont plus en leur possession.

Je pense que le projet de loi  C-76 devrait prévoir des modifications visant à renforcer les exigences en matière de protection de la vie privée. M'est avis que c'est ce à quoi s'attendent l'ensemble des Canadiens.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J'ai une dernière question à laquelle il pourrait s'avérer difficile de répondre.

Nous discutons de médias sociaux. Le problème ne réside pas uniquement dans la diffusion de publicités incitant les électeurs à s'intéresser à certains enjeux. Des collègues des États-Unis ont aussi mis en lumière le fait que les algorithmes de recherche et les fils de nouvelles des gens peuvent être manipulés, intentionnellement ou non, de sorte que certaines sous-catégories d'électeurs sont exposées à des nouvelles en particulier. Avez-vous des réflexions à cet égard pour nous aider à concevoir la loi?

Vous avez parlé d'équité au tout début de votre exposé. Si quelqu'un est capable de faire en sorte que Google pointe vers une direction donnée et que chaque fois que les gens tapent « élections ontariennes » ou « élections canadiennes », tel parti ou tel enjeu s'affiche, pouvons-nous inclure des prescriptions dans la loi pour clarifier les choses ou faire la lumière sur ces pratiques?

(1135)

M. Greg Essensa:

J'aimerais pouvoir vous donner une solution concrète à ce problème. C'est une question dont les directeurs généraux des élections discutent entre eux en ce moment. L'arrivée d'Internet et des grandes sociétés de médias sociaux qui, comme vous l'avez bien expliqué, peuvent orienter des messages vers certains segments de la société a créé une nouvelle facette et un nouveau régime.

À l'heure actuelle, comme administrateur d'élections, je n'ai aucune solution claire et nette à vous offrir. Il faut que les législateurs, les experts des médias sociaux et les administrateurs d'élections se penchent sur le problème et y trouvent une solution efficace. Je crois que les Canadiens s'attendent à ce que nous le fassions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Je veux d'abord parler du plafond des dépenses en période non électorale pour les partis, et non les tiers. Quel est le plafond en Ontario?

M. Greg Essensa:

En Ontario, le total des dépenses qu'un parti politique engage au cours des six mois précédant le déclenchement des élections ne doit pas dépasser 1 million de dollars.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Cela a toujours été le cas ou c'est le nouveau montant prévu dans la dernière loi?

M. Greg Essensa:

C'est une nouvelle disposition qui a été inscrite dans le projet de loi 2. Nous n'avions rien de tel auparavant. C'était la première fois que nous mettions en place une limite.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il n'y avait aucun plafond auparavant?

M. Greg Essensa:

Non. Aucun plafond pour la période préélectorale... Rien du tout.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pourquoi avez-vous jugé nécessaire d'en imposer un? Et pourquoi l'avoir fixé à 1 million de dollars?

M. Greg Essensa:

Je suis administrateur d'élections depuis plus de 30 ans. Pour avoir observé maintes élections fédérales, provinciales et même municipales, je peux dire qu'il est évident que les campagnes commencent bien avant le début de la période électorale de 28 ou 35 jours.

En période préélectorale, il est souvent possible d'influer sur le message et sur l'opinion des gens en ce qui a trait aux partis politiques, aux chefs, etc. Nous avions constaté un déséquilibre entre les acteurs politiques, certains disposant de fonds considérables pour financer bon nombre de ces campagnes.

À mon avis, cela allait à l'encontre du principe fondamental de notre démocratie, c'est-à-dire des règles équitables pour tous. Il nous fallait empêcher les acteurs plus en moyens de dominer les ondes et, par conséquent, d'avoir une incidence directe sur le résultat des élections.

La question a suscité un vif débat en Ontario. J'ai accompagné le comité un peu partout dans la province et j'ai entendu de nombreuses parties intéressées se prononcer en faveur d'une limite des dépenses de publicité avant le déclenchement des élections.

Bien franchement, je ne saurais dire d'où vient le montant de 1 million de dollars. Le débat a porté sur différents montants. C'est le montant qu'a fini par retenir le gouvernement et il a été intégré aux versions finales du projet de loi 2.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous avez également dit dans votre témoignage précédent que nous devrions envisager un mécanisme permettant de déterminer si l'argent ayant servi à payer les dépenses d'un tiers provient d'acteurs étrangers et permettant de réglementer le financement. Comment vous y êtes-vous pris à cet égard? Vous y avez fait allusion un peu.

Je pense spécialement aux grandes organisations internationales présentes au Canada, qui ont une succursale ou qui exercent leurs activités ici, mais qui amassent aussi des dons pour faire du travail à l'échelle internationale. Dans le contexte électoral en Ontario, comment les tiers ventilent-ils leurs dépenses et indiquent-ils d'où vient l'argent?

M. Greg Essensa:

Je vais recommander aux législateurs ontariens d'accroître la transparence relativement à la provenance des fonds dépensés par les tiers. Je recommanderai que les tiers soient tenus de préciser la source de leur financement dans les rapports financiers et les autres documents qu'ils doivent fournir à Élections Ontario.

Dans le cadre de son étude du projet de loi C-76, votre comité voudra peut-être envisager de donner au commissaire aux élections fédérales des moyens d'enquêter là-dessus et d'exiger que les tiers fournissent de l'information détaillée sur la provenance des fonds utilisés durant les campagnes. Il y a...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je veux éclaircir un point. Vous n'avez pas été en mesure d'agir lors des dernières élections.

M. Greg Essensa:

Nous n'en avions pas le pouvoir.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

M. Greg Essensa:

C'est un sujet dont je veux traiter dans mon évaluation postélectorale, en mars.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Comment accroître la transparence, à votre avis? Est-ce qu'il y aurait un fonds distinct pour les élections? Les tiers seraient alors tenus de déterminer la provenance de toutes les sommes versées dans le fonds destiné à la campagne électorale et de vous dire qui sont les donateurs. Comment procéderiez-vous?

(1140)

M. Greg Essensa:

Manifestement, ce n'est pas différent de ce que les partis politiques sont tenus de faire. Il faut produire une liste des personnes qui ont fourni l'argent utilisé durant la campagne.

Nous rendons les listes publiques. Ici, en Ontario, les règles fédérales exigent un affichage dans les 10 jours. Si quelqu'un vous donne 100 $ pour votre campagne, il faut publier ce montant dans les 10 jours. Il y a des exigences de production de rapports financiers. Pareilles exigences pourraient être imposées aux tiers, qui seraient obligés d'indiquer clairement d'où vient leur financement. Ainsi, si une société albertaine appuie un tiers et lui verse 5 000 $, il serait facile de voir qu'elle a fourni de l'argent au tiers. L'origine des fonds serait indiquée en toute transparence.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Où cela s'arrête-t-il? Cette société peut avoir dans son compte de l'argent qui provient aussi d'acteurs étrangers.

M. Greg Essensa:

Fort bien et c'est le cas de certaines multinationales. Il n'en demeure pas moins qu'il faut un processus plus transparent. Les Ontariens me font part de leur point de vue. Avant que nous apportions des changements au moyen du projet de loi 2 et lorsque j'ai parcouru la province, j'ai entendu le témoignage de nombreux Ontariens préoccupés par l'absence de réglementation des dépenses des tiers. Ils souhaitaient une transparence accrue quant à la provenance des fonds et aux entités qui les dépensent.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Cette mesure législative ne traite pas des activités de financement, mais je brûle de connaître les intentions du gouvernement relativement à la modification de ses règles dans le but d'empêcher les candidats ou les candidats à l'investiture d'être présents lors du déroulement d'une activité de financement.

M. Greg Essensa:

Je pense que, en 2015 ou 2016, les membres du gouvernement précédent ont été mal perçus par l'opinion publique en raison des tactiques de financement qu'ils ont pu utiliser en Ontario. Le gouvernement s'est empressé de présenter le projet de loi 2. Il désirait un processus très transparent et il m'a demandé d'agir comme conseiller auprès du comité. Le comité a été envoyé aux quatre coins de la province pour entendre la population. Je crois que le gouvernement cherchait surtout à changer la perception des gens selon laquelle les donateurs pouvaient influencer directement les ministres et les politiciens.

Le projet de loi est allé jusqu'à interdire aux députés provinciaux, aux ministres et aux chefs de participer aux activités de financement. Tout un changement par rapport aux anciens régimes. Au début, je pense que le parti a eu un peu de mal à organiser ses collectes de fonds, mais à l'approche des élections de 2018, les trois partis avaient trouvé comment fonctionner malgré les restrictions.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, madame Sahota.

Nous revenons à M. Nater. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie encore une fois de comparaître devant nous, monsieur Essenda.

Je vais aborder plusieurs sujets différents dans les cinq brèves minutes dont je dispose. J'espère que nous réussirons à traiter les questions que je souhaite traiter.

Je veux parler des dépenses en période préélectorale. Durant cette période, les dépenses ou les publicités du gouvernement sont-elles soumises à un plafond?

M. Greg Essensa:

Il y a bel et bien un plafond, mais cela relève du vérificateur général de l'Ontario. Une loi, autre que celle que je suis chargé de faire appliquer, régit les limites. C'est le vérificateur général qui examine les publicités.

M. John Nater:

D'accord. Merci, monsieur.

Vous avez mentionné les registres du scrutin électroniques, que vous avez mis à l'essai lors d'élections partielles, puis mis en oeuvre à l'occasion de l'élection générale de juin dernier. Je ferai un lien avec une autre question.

J'aimerais que vous nous fassiez part des leçons tirées des processus d'essai et de mise en oeuvre des registres du scrutin électroniques, sur le plan technique et aussi en ce qui concerne la connectivité. Dans certaines régions de la province, la connexion au réseau 3G n'est pas optimale.

J'en arrive à l'autre question sur les tabulatrices de vote. Pour un observateur, les résultats sont arrivés à une vitesse fulgurante. Environ 12 minutes après la fermeture des bureaux de scrutin, mon candidat local avait déjà été déclaré élu et j'arrivais à la réception organisée pour célébrer sa victoire. Les tabulatrices de vote accélèrent le processus.

Je suis curieux de connaître les leçons tirées de l'utilisation de cette technologie, en conjonction avec les registres du scrutin électroniques. Y a-t-il eu des problèmes de connectivité dans les régions rurales et éloignées?

Qu'avez-vous à dire en réponse à ces deux questions connexes?

(1145)

M. Greg Essensa:

Nous avons effectué les projets pilotes dans Whitby—Oshawa et Scarborough—Rouge River. Lorsque j'ai écrit aux législateurs, j'ai été très transparent. Nous estimions qu'il fallait utiliser la technologie uniquement là où nous savions qu'elle fonctionnerait.

Nous avons demandé aux directeurs du scrutin d'examiner tous les lieux de vote à l'aide d'un dispositif technique permettant de déterminer la connectivité. Nous avons équipé tout juste un peu plus de la moitié des bureaux de vote de l'Ontario de la technologie en question, mais comme 90 % de l'électorat était censé se rendre dans ces bureaux-là, cela signifie que 90 % des électeurs ont voté à l'aide de cette technologie.

Celle-ci a d'ailleurs largement dépassé nos attentes. Le jour des élections, la connectivité a oscillé autour de 99,4 % et 99,6 % dans les 3 900 lieux de vote munis de la technologie. Les résultats ont été excellents.

Nous avons récemment reçu toutes les données de recherche sur l'opinion de l'électorat. La loi ontarienne nous oblige à mener un vaste sondage. Nous avons posé diverses questions à 10 000 Ontariens, et certains des chiffres obtenus sont extraordinairement élevés. Environ 95 % des électeurs de la province sont très en faveur de la technologie et ils l'ont trouvée facile à utiliser, efficace et sûre.

Les tabulatrices de vote ont été l'élément le plus facile à mettre en oeuvre. Nous utilisons un bulletin de vote en papier. Lorsque j'ai entamé le processus de modernisation des élections, j'étais très conscient que nous voulions garder un bulletin de vote en papier. J'ai présidé au déroulement d'élections un peu partout au pays et la plupart des Canadiens à qui j'ai parlé veulent une preuve tangible de leur vote. Pour nous, il était impératif de conserver un bulletin de vote en papier.

La technologie des tabulatrices de vote est relativement simple. Elle existe depuis 30 ans. C'est la même technologie qui est utilisée à l'épicerie lorsque le commis scanne votre boîte de céréales. Cela n'a rien de révolutionnaire; c'est une technologie éprouvée.

Le jour des élections, sur 4 000 tabulatrices, nous avons éprouvé des problèmes avec 10 à 20 d'entre elles, ce qui est dérisoire. Aucun électeur n'a été privé de son droit de vote. Nous avions un processus en place pour permettre aux gens de voter au moyen d'une autre boîte.

Selon nous, la technologie a présenté un avantage considérable lors des élections.

M. John Nater:

Il ne me reste qu'une minute environ, alors je serai très bref. Après les élections, est-ce qu'une vérification a été faite pour garantir que le nombre de votes enregistrés à l'aide des tabulatrices correspondait au nombre de bulletins de vote en papier et au nombre exact de votes exprimés? A-t-on vérifié si tout concordait?

M. Greg Essensa:

Nous nous y employons en ce moment.

Nous effectuons une vérification complète dans les 124 circonscriptions de l'Ontario. Nous examinons chaque aspect. Nous regardons les résultats officiels et nous refaisons les calculs. Nous recomptons les bulletins de vote et nous recomptons manuellement les résultats obtenus avec les tabulatrices.

Nous sommes en train de réaliser cette vérification complète. Les résultats seront publiés à la fin novembre ou au début décembre, mais pour l'instant, nous constatons que tout a fonctionné exactement comme prévu.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est à Mme Lapointe. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je vous souhaite la bienvenue et vous remercie d'être avec nous aujourd'hui, monsieur Essensa.

Pour l'élection de 2014, vous avez changé vos règles relatives au nombre d'heures de scrutin. Vous ai-je bien compris? [Traduction]

M. Greg Essensa:

Nous avons conservé les mêmes heures, mais ce qui a changé considérablement, ce sont les jours de vote par anticipation. Sous l'ancien régime, nous tenions 10 jours de vote par anticipation et il était possible d'alterner entre les lieux de vote. Dans le centre de l'Ontario, le directeur du scrutin pouvait tenir un vote par anticipation à tel endroit pendant trois jours, puis à tel autre endroit pendant deux jours et ainsi de suite en alternance dans la circonscription.

Les nouvelles règles mises en place pour 2018 ont grandement réduit ces journées. Il y a eu cinq jours de vote consécutifs. On a aussi retranché une heure à la période de vote par anticipation. Au lieu de voter de 9 heures à 21 heures, les gens ont pu voter de 9 heures à 20 heures. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Le pourcentage des votes par anticipation de 2018 a-t-il été plus élevé que celui de 2014?

(1150)

[Traduction]

M. Greg Essensa:

Nous avons constaté une hausse marquée. Plus de 780 000 personnes ont voté par anticipation lors des cinq journées prévues à cette fin. En 2014, il y avait eu 640 000 personnes. C'est une hausse solide, qui s'explique par divers facteurs. Les élections avaient lieu au printemps et les journées étaient plus longues. Les élections ontariennes ont suscité beaucoup d'intérêt vu les changements survenus au sein de certains partis politiques. Elles ont aussi beaucoup retenu l'attention des médias. Le vif intérêt manifesté à l'égard des élections s'est traduit par une participation accrue. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

À titre informatif, quel pourcentage des électeurs se sont prévalus de leur droit de vote en 2018, en Ontario? [Traduction]

M. Greg Essensa:

Nous avons eu un taux de participation de 58 %, ce qui signifie que tout juste un peu plus de 5,7 millions d'Ontariens se sont prévalus de leur droit de vote. C'est une augmentation d'environ 7,5 % par rapport à 2014. Nous avons connu une hausse vigoureuse de la participation électorale. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Avez-vous pu rejoindre facilement les jeunes de 25 ans et moins? Tantôt, on a beaucoup parlé des médias sociaux. Avez-vous utilisé différentes façons de rejoindre les 25 ans et moins? [Traduction]

M. Greg Essensa:

Tout à fait. Nous avions un programme de mobilisation et de sensibilisation très dynamique. Il y a 50 campus collégiaux et universitaires et nous étions présents partout. Nous sommes allés sur les campus six mois avant les élections dans le cadre de campagnes de préinscription. Nous avons aussi lancé un outil d'inscription en ligne. Près d'un million de personnes l'ont utilisé pour vérifier si elles figuraient sur la liste ou non.

Nous avions demandé à l'Assemblée législative de l'Ontario de déclarer mars Mois de l'inscription des électeurs et nous avions prévu un vaste programme de sensibilisation. Nous sommes retournés sur les 50 campus collégiaux et universitaires dans le cadre de campagnes de sensibilisation et d'inscription. Nous y sommes aussi allés une troisième fois durant la période électorale. Nous avons offert à un grand nombre de jeunes la possibilité de voter par anticipation, sans compter les efforts d'inscription.

Nous sommes en train d'analyser les chiffres actuellement, notamment ceux concernant les 18 à 24 ans. Nous nous attendons, dans cette tranche d'âge, à une hausse du taux de participation aux dernières élections. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Vous dites avoir fait beaucoup d'efforts pour inciter les jeunes des universités et des collèges à aller voter. Avez-vous utilisé d'autres façons pour rejoindre ces jeunes, par exemple les médias sociaux? [Traduction]

M. Greg Essensa:

Nous avons lancé une vaste campagne dans les médias sociaux, que nous avons amorcée il y a deux ans. Je crois fermement qu'il nous faut multiplier nos communications, en particulier dans les médias sociaux, sur nos comptes Facebook, Twitter et Instagram. Nous voulions être la ressource factuelle en ce qui a trait aux élections. Nous voulions attirer quiconque se posait des questions — qui peut voter, où, quand et comment — vers notre site Web. Nous souhaitions que les gens obtiennent auprès de nous l'information factuelle qu'ils cherchaient. Nous avons amorcé nos campagnes dans les médias sociaux il y a deux ans. Nous publiions des gazouillis deux fois par semaine. Il s'agissait parfois de messages anodins, mais qui disaient de s'adresser à nous pour savoir qui a le droit de vote. Nous avons publié des gazouillis sur le vote par bulletin de vote spécial. Au cours de ces deux années, nous avons régulièrement augmenté la fréquence de nos publications. Nous nous sommes servis de cette tribune pour transmettre l'information pertinente à tous. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Je vous remercie. [Traduction]

Le président:

Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Nous redonnons la parole à M. Nater.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je poursuis sur le sujet de la participation des jeunes aux élections. L'Ontario a créé un registre provisoire des électeurs pour les jeunes de 16 et 17 ans. Ceux-ci peuvent retirer leur nom n'importe quand. Je voudrais en savoir davantage sur le succès de ce registre provisoire, sur le nombre de gens inscrits et sur le nombre de retraits. Quelles protections en matière de vie privée et de renseignements personnels le registre offre-t-il? Qui a accès au registre? Des gens de l'extérieur d'Élections Ontario y ont-ils accès?

M. Greg Essensa:

Je veux mentionner une ou deux choses. Les changements contenus dans le projet de loi 45 nous ont permis d'établir un registre des futurs votants à l'intention des jeunes de 16 et 17 ans. Nous avons collaboré avec nos équipes responsables de la sensibilisation. Nous avons travaillé de concert avec CIVIX et réalisé d'autres initiatives d'information.

Je crois savoir qu'un peu plus de 1 200 noms figurent dans notre registre des jeunes de 16 et 17 ans. C'est un registre totalement distinct du Registre permanent des électeurs et l'accès est rigoureusement contrôlé. Nous ne communiquons aucun renseignement à qui que ce soit et les jeunes sont tout à fait libres de faire enlever leur nom du registre.

Lorsqu'un jeune atteint l'âge de 18 ans, son nom est automatiquement transféré dans le Registre permanent des électeurs, mais nous communiquons alors avec lui et il lui est possible de se retirer du registre s'il le souhaite. Je n'ai pas les chiffres exacts avec moi, mais je ne crois pas que le nombre de retraits soit très élevé.

(1155)

M. John Nater:

Y a-t-il une disposition d'inscription automatique pour les jeunes qui atteignent l'âge de 18 ans, mais dont le nom ne figure pas dans le registre provisoire?

M. Greg Essensa:

Non. C'est l'un des écueuils que tous les administrateurs d'élections... J'en ai discuté en long et en large avec Élections Canada. La manière traditionnelle d'inscrire une personne qui vient d'avoir 18 ans dans nos registres, c'est en se fiant aux renseignements de l'Agence du revenu du Canada, aux renseignements sur les véhicules automobiles ou aux renseignements sur la santé. Or, la difficulté à laquelle nous nous heurtons tous, c'est que ces renseignements ne sont pas aussi à jour que nous le souhaiterions. Nous avons du mal à inscrire toutes les personnes de 18 à 24 ans dans le registre et à communiquer avec elles.

M. John Nater:

L'un des aspects dont j'entends parler de temps à autre est celui de l'accessibilité. Lors des dernières élections provinciales, il y a eu des efforts concertés pour que les lieux de vote soient accessibles aux Ontariens vivant avec un handicap, qu'il s'agisse d'un problème de mobilité ou d'autres handicaps moins visibles.

J'aimerais savoir s'il a été ardu d'assurer l'accessibilité des lieux de vote, surtout dans les petites localités rurales et éloignées. Par ailleurs, on dirait qu'il y a moins de lieux de vote qu'auparavant. Est-ce que cela est lié directement aux problèmes d'accessibilité?

M. Greg Essensa:

Dans la province, nous devons nous conformer à la Loi sur les personnes handicapées de l'Ontario. Chaque lieu de vote doit respecter certaines normes.

Élections Ontario doit souvent, notamment dans les régions rurales dont vous avez parlé, atténuer les problèmes d'accessibilité. Il nous arrive fréquemment d'installer des rampes temporaires. Nous pouvons offrir un soutien en matière d'infrastructures à un endroit en particulier si cet endroit est le seul que nous pouvons utiliser dans une localité. Nous consacrons beaucoup de ressources afin de rendre accessibles bon nombre de lieux de vote. Dans certains cas, il est carrément impossible, vu la nature du bâtiment, d'assurer l'accessibilité et nous sommes forcés de chercher des solutions de rechange.

C'est rare, toutefois. C'est plus fréquent dans les régions rurales de l'Ontario, où le nombre d'emplacements utilisables à des fins électorales est limité.

M. John Nater:

Lorsqu'on parle de candidats, de campagnes et de partis politiques, fournit-on des ressources ou des remboursements aux candidats qui prennent des mesures pour rendre leur bureau de campagne plus accessible ou leur site Web plus convivial pour les personnes qui vivent avec un handicap? Y a-t-il des remboursements ou des ressources qui leur sont offerts?

M. Greg Essensa:

Ce n'est pas prévu actuellement dans les lois de l'Ontario.

M. John Nater:

Merci.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci.

Il reste deux minutes. Les libéraux acceptent-ils de les accorder à M. Cullen?

Un député: Absolument.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Voilà un bel exemple de collaboration entre partis.

J'aimerais poser une brève question au sujet de la subvention par vote. Depuis combien de temps est-elle en vigueur en Ontario, et a-t-on évalué son incidence sur les activités de financement des partis et sur le rayonnement auprès de l'électorat? Prévoyez-vous mener une étude d'impact ou si cela ne concerne pas votre bureau?

M. Greg Essensa:

Nous allons assurément réaliser une étude d'impact après ces élections.

Il s'agissait du premier cycle électoral où nous avions une subvention accordée en fonction du nombre de voix obtenues. Lorsque le gouvernement a décidé d'interdire les dons des sociétés et des syndicats dans le cadre du projet de loi 2, il a en quelque sorte établi la subvention par vote en contrepartie. Cette subvention est remise tous les trois mois à chacun des partis politiques.

Cela dit, nous devrons effectuer une analyse comparative des sommes qui ont été recueillies après l'élimination des dons des sociétés et des syndicats. Lorsque j'ai comparu dans le cadre de l'étude du projet de loi 2, j'avais fait quelques observations à ce sujet. Entre 2011 et 2014, près de 50 millions des 98 millions de dollars recueillis par les partis provenaient des entreprises et des syndicats, alors cela représentait un peu plus de la moitié. La subvention par vote ne remplace pas totalement cette somme.

(1200)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non.

M. Greg Essensa:

Nous allons évaluer dans quelle mesure les partis ont réussi à amasser des fonds depuis l'élimination des dons des sociétés et des syndicats, de même que l'incidence de la subvention par vote sur leurs capacités de dépenses.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je présume que cette étude sera rendue publique.

M. Greg Essensa:

Oui, absolument.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si vous pouvez transmettre une copie de ce rapport au Comité, cela nous aiderait énormément.

Savez-vous à quel moment vous publierez cette étude?

M. Greg Essensa:

Ce ne sera pas avant le mois de mars. Nous sommes en plein processus d'évaluation.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Excellent. Merci.

Le président:

Je vous remercie infiniment d'avoir témoigné devant le Comité. Vous avez répondu à nos nombreuses questions. Nous vous en sommes très reconnaissants. L'information que vous nous avez fournie est très pertinente pour notre étude.

M. Greg Essensa:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant suspendre nos travaux quelques minutes avant d'entamer la prochaine heure.



(1205)

Le président:

Nous reprenons la 121e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. La séance est publique.

On m'a demandé de distribuer les amendements. Acceptez-vous que le greffier législatif vous remette les amendements qu'il a reçus?

Un député: Seulement les meilleurs...

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Je n'y vois pas d'inconvénient.

Le président:

Êtes-vous d'accord?

Des députés: Oui.

Le président: D'accord. Nous allons les distribuer tout de suite.

M. Scott Reid:

Évidemment, une question s'impose: avons-nous une copie dans les deux langues officielles?

Oui. Très bien.

Le président:

Nous considérons que c'est la date butoir pour proposer des amendements, mais il sera toujours possible d'en présenter de nouveaux.

Nous reprenons le débat sur la motion concernant la planification de l'étude article par article du projet de loi C-76, les sous-amendements et les amendements.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, si vous n'y voyez pas d'inconvénient, j'aimerais amorcer le débat, et je crois qu'il serait plus logique de le faire dans le cadre d'un rappel au Règlement.

Le président:

Allez-y.

M. Scott Reid:

Le libellé de la motion initiale se lisait comme suit: Que le Comité entreprenne l’étude article par article du projet de loi C-76 le mardi 2 octobre 2018, à 11 heures; Nous avons déjà dépassé la période prévue.

Le président:

Nous devons donc modifier la motion.

M. Scott Reid:

Absolument.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'allais faire une proposition à cet effet.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pour que ce soit plus logique, je proposerais que le Comité entreprenne l’étude article par article du projet de loi C-76 le jeudi 4 octobre, à 11 heures.

Le reste de la motion demeurerait le même.

M. Scott Reid:

Quelles sont les règles pour apporter un tel changement? Faut-il le consentement unanime, étant donné qu'il s'agit d'un amendement à la motion?

Le président:

Ce serait la façon la plus simple.

Y a-t-il consentement unanime pour procéder ainsi?

M. Scott Reid:

J'aimerais savoir ce qu'en pensent mes collègues...

Le président:

Évidemment, nous ne pouvons pas entreprendre une étude article par article à une date antérieure.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Ici, on n'approuverait pas la motion. On approuverait tout simplement le changement de date pour que la motion soit plus logique et n'affiche plus une date antérieure.

Le président:

Est-ce que tout le monde s'entend pour dire qu'il s'agit d'un amendement favorable à la motion?

M. John Nater:

Non, je ne suis pas d'accord.

Le président:

D'accord.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Dans ce cas, je vais officiellement proposer un amendement à ma motion.

M. Scott Reid:

Je sais ce que Ruby tente de faire ici, et je considère que c'est raisonnable. En principe, j'ai invoqué le Règlement, mais si elle peut expliquer exactement ses intentions, je pense que cela pourrait m'éclairer et peut-être même mettre un terme au rappel au Règlement.

Nous pourrions ajouter une disposition « Reid » au protocole « Simms » selon laquelle quiconque peut intervenir pour régler une question, même dans le cadre d'un rappel au Règlement, afin de mettre les choses en contexte.

(1210)

M. Scott Simms:

Vous avez donc besoin d'une permission, n'est-ce pas?

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Y fait-on mention de l'obstruction?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Le rappel au Règlement portait précisément là-dessus. Par conséquent, la question serait réglée et nous n'aurions plus besoin d'en discuter...

M. Scott Reid:

Exactement.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

... si la motion initiale était modifiée.

Je propose donc cet amendement à la motion initiale. Le début de ma motion demeure inchangé, mais je propose de modifier la date pour qu'on y lise: le jeudi 4 octobre.

Le président:

Malheureusement, nous devons d'abord examiner le sous-amendement à l'amendement, ensuite l'amendement, et finalement votre amendement.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Puis mon amendement.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Pour revenir au rappel au Règlement... c'était très utile ce que vous avez dit, soit dit en passant.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je vous en prie.

M. Scott Reid:

Selon la procédure, on peut procéder de différentes façons. Tout d'abord, on pourrait modifier la motion actuelle. C'est ce que Ruby a proposé de faire, et cela ne peut se faire que par le consentement unanime.

Ensuite, on pourrait tout simplement retirer la motion initiale. Je ne suis pas certain si c'est la bonne chose à faire.

Enfin, nous devons tout de même tenir compte du fait qu'il s'agit d'un sous-amendement.

Il y a eu la motion initiale, et il y a eu...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

[Inaudible] un sous-amendement.

M. Scott Reid:

Tout à fait, mais on peut quand même s'en sortir en respectant la procédure.

L'amendement visait à ce que le Comité n'entreprenne pas l'étude article par article du projet de loi C-76 le mardi 2 octobre 2018, à 11 heures.

La première motion aurait été absurde et sans intérêt en raison de la date antérieure qui y était inscrite. Étant donné qu'on parle ici de ne pas faire quelque chose à un moment dans le passé, je pense qu'il conviendrait d'adopter cet amendement.

Enfin, pour ce qui est de mon sous-amendement à l'amendement, la suite se lisait comme suit: avant que le Comité ait entendu le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario « ni avant que le Comité ait entendu la ministre des Institutions démocratiques pendant au moins une heure ».

Je vais m'arrêter ici.

Le président:

D'accord.

Madame Sahota, votre nom figure sur la liste des intervenants.

Vous débattez du sous-amendement de M. Reid à l'amendement.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Suis-je sur la liste pour aujourd'hui ou sur la liste précédente?

Le président:

Vous pouvez y aller tout de suite.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Si, au départ, j'avais la main levée, c'était pour prendre la parole en premier afin de proposer une modification à ma motion initiale. Ainsi, on ne se serait pas retrouvé avec une motion qui ne tient pas debout. Voilà pourquoi j'avais la main levée.

Le président:

D'accord.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Cela a déjà été dit.

Le président:

Il n'y a donc plus de noms sur la liste.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Maintenant, il faut déterminer si la motion est recevable, étant donné qu'on parle d'une date antérieure.

La motion est-elle recevable?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je propose de mettre le sous-amendement aux voix.

M. John Nater:

Pouvons-nous poursuivre le débat sur une motion qui ne tient pas debout, comme on l'a mentionné, étant donné la date qui y est inscrite?

Je m'en remets au président pour nous dire ce qu'il en est.

M. Scott Reid:

Il faut se rappeler que l'amendement proposé fait en sorte que la motion est maintenant logique. On ne peut pas s'entendre pour ne pas faire quelque chose à une date antérieure. Ce n'est pas logique. Ce n'est pas pour cette raison que cet amendement a été proposé, mais il a tout de même cet effet.

Le président:

Il y a le sous-amendement, puis l'amendement, et enfin la motion initiale qui peut être modifiée, si le Comité le souhaite.

M. John Nater:

À ce moment-là, je vais...

Le président:

Nous sommes saisis du sous-amendement de M. Reid à votre amendement.

M. John Nater:

Je vais parler du sous-amendement.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Encore une fois, je remercie le Comité de me donner l'occasion de m'exprimer. C'est toujours un plaisir de pouvoir discuter de cette motion et du sous-amendement que mon distingué collègue a proposé.

Chose certaine, l'un des éléments de l'amendement de M. Reid a été abordé, c'est-à-dire la comparution du directeur général des élections de l'Ontario. Honnêtement, j'ai trouvé son témoignage intéressant, intrigant et fascinant. Il a abordé un certain nombre de questions qui, selon moi, sont liées au projet de loi dont nous sommes saisis. Il a donné des exemples à l'échelle provinciale, qu'il s'agisse du financement par des tiers, du Registre électoral provisoire ou, plus généralement, de la technologie, qui n'est pas directement prévue dans ce projet de loi, mais sur laquelle le directeur général des élections du Canada s'est prononcé, particulièrement en ce qui concerne les registres de scrutin électroniques, la façon dont on a utilisé cette technologie au niveau provincial, de même que les difficultés que notre directeur général des élections, M. Perrault, connaît à l'échelon fédéral lorsqu'il s'agit de la mettre en oeuvre d'une manière professionnelle et adéquate.

Dans son témoignage la semaine dernière, il a indiqué qu'il ne serait pas en mesure de mettre cette technologie à l'essai dans le cadre des élections partielles qui devraient avoir lieu cet automne. À l'heure actuelle, il y a un siège vacant dans York—Simcoe, depuis dimanche, dans Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands et Rideau Lakes, dans Outremont, de même que dans la circonscription de M. Di Iorio. J'ai cru remarquer que M. Di Iorio se trouvait toujours sur le site Web. Je ne sais pas à quel moment sa démission entrera en vigueur. Je croyais qu'il avait démissionné au printemps dernier, mais cela ne semble pas être le cas puisqu'il est toujours sur le site Web. Donc, il y aura probablement une élection partielle là-bas, ainsi que dans Burnaby—Douglas, qui se nomme actuellement Burnaby-Sud, si je ne me trompe pas.

Ces élections partielles sont certainement l'occasion de mettre à l'essai cette technologie. Toutefois, selon ce que j'ai compris — et à juste titre —, le directeur général des élections n'est pas prêt à s'engager dans cette voie s'il n'est pas entièrement convaincu que la technologie a été éprouvée et qu'elle est prête à fonctionner. Ce matin, le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario nous a dit avoir fait l'essai des registres de scrutin électroniques dans Whitby—Oshawa lors de l'élection partielle, puis à l'échelle de la province en juin dernier, et l'expérience s'est avérée positive.

Son témoignage a aussi été très pertinent pour ce qui est de la technologie et de la façon dont elle est mise en oeuvre. Ceux d'entre nous qui vivent dans des régions rurales ou éloignées — la mienne est certainement plus rurale qu'éloignée — savent qu'il y a des problèmes liés à la connectivité et à l'utilisation de nouvelles technologies, que ce soit les registres de scrutin électroniques ou les tabulatrices... J'ai eu la chance d'utiliser cette technologie durant la course à la chefferie du Parti conservateur en mai 2017. Je crois qu'il s'agissait de la même entreprise et de la même technologie. On aurait dit de vieux télécopieurs.

Un député: [Inaudible]

M. John Nater: Cela concerne le témoignage du directeur général des élections de l'Ontario, dont...

(1215)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela n'a rien à voir avec le sous-amendement.

M. John Nater:

... il est question dans le sous-amendement. Par conséquent...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

[Inaudible]

M. John Nater:

Je vous remercie, Monsieur Graham, pour cette observation.

Lorsque j'étais scrutateur, cette technologie était utilisée dans le bureau de scrutin dont j'étais responsable près de Fergus, en Ontario. Même dans cette région relativement bien établie, il y avait des problèmes de connectivité au réseau WiFi, en utilisant le modem, au point où il a fallu changer d'endroit pour avoir accès à une connexion. Il y a donc cette difficulté à surmonter.

J'ai trouvé particulièrement intéressant d'entendre le directeur général des élections dire ce matin que 90 % des électeurs ont voté dans des endroits qui utilisaient cette technologie, alors que 50 % des endroits l'utilisaient. Cela tient certainement compte de bon nombre des problèmes auxquels sont confrontées les régions. Lorsqu'on se penche sur le dépouillement du scrutin, la façon dont les votes ont été compilés et la vitesse à laquelle on a dépouillé les résultats dans la grande majorité des circonscriptions, on constate que cette technologie fonctionne. En revanche, nous avons attendu un certain temps pour ce qui est des endroits qui utilisaient la méthode traditionnelle de dépouillement des bulletins de vote en papier. Je pense que c'est assez révélateur de l'efficacité de cette technologie. Chose certaine, ce qu'il nous a dit au sujet des taux de réussite — entre 99,4 % et 99,6 % pour ce qui est de la connectivité tout au long de la journée — est positif, intéressant et très encourageant.

Chaque fois qu'il est question de nouvelles technologies, que ce soit au sein du Comité ou de la population en général, on craint toujours le risque d'intrusion. Le système qui a été mis en place, comme le directeur général des élections l'a mentionné ce matin, est en fait une technologie vieille de plus de 30 ans, alors ce n'est pas comme s'il s'agissait d'une nouveauté; c'est plutôt qu'on l'utilise dans un nouveau domaine.

Toutefois, la possibilité d'utiliser cette technologie tout en conservant les bulletins de vote en papier est intéressante.

(1220)

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, je vous rappelle que le sous-amendement porte strictement sur la comparution de la ministre, alors vos arguments ne devraient servir qu'à justifier pourquoi, à votre avis, la ministre devrait comparaître ou non.

M. John Nater:

Tout à fait, monsieur le président. Je tâcherai de circonscrire mes réflexions à l'avenir. Je croyais que le sous-amendement visait à la fois la comparution du directeur général des élections de l'Ontario et de la ministre.

Je suis désolé, monsieur le président.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Elle a déjà eu lieu.

M. John Nater:

C'est intéressant. Nous avons bien aimé entendre le témoignage du directeur général des élections.

Désormais, j'estime qu'il est essentiel que nous entendions la ministre avant de procéder à l'étude article par article. Je me réjouissais de la comparution de la ministre devant le Comité jeudi, à 15 h 30. Malheureusement, il y a eu un changement à l'horaire.

Ce qui m'a vraiment frustré, c'est que le gouvernement a laissé entendre que le témoignage de la ministre était en quelque sorte un cadeau que le gouvernement faisait à l'opposition, alors que ce n'est absolument pas le cas. Ce n'est pas du tout un privilège. D'ailleurs, on a clairement indiqué dans leur lettre de mandat que la ministre et ses collègues du Cabinet doivent se mettre à la disposition des comités. J'espère que la ministre comparaîtra de nouveau devant le Comité avant que nous procédions à l'étude article par article pour que nous puissions discuter de certains amendements.

Je sais que le greffier distribuera les amendements qui ont été proposés par les divers partis, et je crois savoir qu'il y en a plusieurs du gouvernement, de l'opposition et du troisième parti, et possiblement du Parti vert et du Bloc, bien que je n'en sois pas certain. Je sais toutefois que Mme May a proposé des amendements.

Selon moi, avant d'examiner les articles un à un — en sachant que nous aurons accès aux amendements proposés au cours des prochains jours —, il est important que nous ayons la possibilité de parler avec la ministre. Nous devons connaître l'approche que le gouvernement veut adopter et savoir quels sont les amendements qu'elle juge acceptables ou non. Je pense qu'il serait utile qu'elle puisse comparaître devant le Comité à un moment donné. En fait, j'estime que ce serait bénéfique.

Évidemment, tous les membres du Comité s'intéressent à ce dossier, car nous siégeons au comité chargé d'examiner le projet de loi, mais elle, en tant que ministre responsable, a tout intérêt à comparaître et à nous indiquer l'orientation du gouvernement dans ce dossier. Je suis conscient, certes, que nous ne serons peut-être pas d'accord sur tous les amendements qu'elle propose ni sur tous les amendements proposés par le NPD ou le Parti vert, mais nous aurons au moins une idée de l'orientation qu'elle souhaite prendre.

Personnellement, je serais curieux de voir quels amendements elle serait prête à accepter en ce qui concerne les tiers. J'aimerais donc lui demander si elle accepterait de renforcer davantage certaines dispositions à cet égard... À la lumière des observations formulées par le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario au sujet des tiers, je serais intrigué de savoir si elle serait disposée à renforcer certaines de ces dispositions, en particulier — et encore une fois, cela se rapporte à la controverse qui a éclaté au sud de la frontière — concernant l'influence et l'ingérence étrangères. Aucun d'entre nous ne veut aborder la question de l'ingérence russe et des fausses nouvelles.

De toute évidence, je pense aussi que la majeure partie de la population, à l'exclusion peut-être de quelques personnalités américaines influentes, croit qu'il y a eu ingérence dans ces élections. J'aimerais savoir ce que compte faire la ministre pour calmer les inquiétudes légitimes des députés — de tous les partis — quant à l'ingérence étrangère dans le cadre des prochaines élections. Je pense qu'il y a lieu de se le demander.

Je serais curieux de savoir si elle partage l'avis du directeur général des élections de l'Ontario concernant l'obligation pour les tiers de déclarer la provenance de tous les dons, qu'il s'agisse d'une source canadienne ou étrangère ou d'une combinaison des deux. Je crois qu'il serait bon de savoir si la ministre serait favorable à un relèvement des normes en matière de rapport et à des mécanismes de reddition de comptes qui empêcheraient les entités d'utiliser des fonds étrangers lors des élections canadiennes.

De plus, je pense qu'il vaudrait la peine d'interroger la ministre sur le rôle du vérificateur général. J'ai trouvé intéressant que le directeur général des élections mentionne le fait que le vérificateur général effectue un examen des dépenses gouvernementales pendant la période préélectorale. C'est une façon intéressante de procéder.

(1225)



Que je sache, le vérificateur général n'a pas ce rôle au niveau fédéral. J'aimerais savoir ce que la ministre en pense, et si elle serait disposée à confier un rôle de vérification au vérificateur général ou à une autre entité semblable, peut-être au directeur général des élections ou à quelqu'un d'autre qui n'est pas directement lié aux élections, pour examiner la publicité faite par le gouvernement pendant les périodes électorale et préélectorale.

D'ailleurs, le projet de loi prévoit un plafond de dépenses qui est imposé aux partis politiques en période préélectorale. J'aimerais que la ministre nous dise si elle serait disposée à harmoniser les périodes de publicité fédérale, de même que les annonces et les déplacements des parlementaires et des ministres qui pourraient être perçus comme étant liés aux élections. J'aimerais savoir si la ministre serait prête à examiner ce genre de fonction.

Somme toute, j'avais l'impression que la ministre était disposée à tenir ces discussions. Chose certaine, elle s'est présentée en personne jeudi, à 15 h 30. Elle a assisté à toute la réunion qui s'est déroulée à l'édifice du Centre. Elle avait des notes. On peut donc imaginer qu'elle était prête à témoigner et à répondre aux questions du Comité.

Malheureusement, ce n'est pas ce qui s'est passé. Une motion a été présentée en début de réunion, avant même que la ministre puisse témoigner, et elle a fait l'objet d'un débat qui a duré toute la réunion. Il s'agissait de la motion de guillotine dont nous sommes actuellement saisis. La motion initiale, je suppose, consistait à relancer le débat sur cette motion plutôt que de le faire après le témoignage de la ministre. C'est dommage. Comme je l'ai dit, je ne pense pas que la comparution d'un ministre devrait être perçue comme un cadeau ou un privilège qui est accordé aux comités seulement si nous convenons d'une motion de programmation ou d'une motion de guillotine. Je ne crois pas que ce soit approprié, surtout lorsqu'on lit les lettres de mandat des ministres qui mettent l'accent sur leur comparution devant les comités.

Avant d'aller plus loin, j'aimerais que la ministre nous parle de ses efforts visant à mettre sur pied un registre électoral provisoire semblable à celui qui a été mis en place en Ontario. Le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario avait des commentaires favorables à ce sujet. Il a donné l'exemple d'un registre facultatif. Dans notre cas, il s'agissait d'un registre automatique. Dans les deux cas, il est possible de se retirer du registre à tout moment. J'aimerais savoir ce que la ministre pense de ces deux stratégies et laquelle convient le mieux au niveau fédéral.

Du point de vue des provinces, le directeur général des élections, M. Essensa, a indiqué que le registre comptait plus ou moins 1 200 personnes. Cela me semble très peu, compte tenu de la population de l'Ontario et du nombre de jeunes de 16 et 17 ans qui y vivent, d'autant plus que la grande majorité des jeunes de cet âge fréquentent actuellement l'école secondaire et se trouvent donc dans une institution publique facilement accessible au directeur général des élections ou à un fonctionnaire électoral. Ce chiffre est très bas. J'aimerais avoir l'avis de la ministre à ce sujet. Le directeur général des élections semblait indiquer qu'il y avait très peu de gens qui s'étaient retirés du registre. Je pense que c'est positif. J'aimerais savoir si la proportion serait la même si le registre était obligatoire ou automatique.

Cela nous amène à parler de la protection de la vie privée. J'ai été heureux d'apprendre du directeur général provincial que ces données sont protégées au sein d'Élections Ontario. Elles ne sont pas communiquées aux partis politiques. Elles ne sont pas transmises à des tiers ni à personne d'autre à l'extérieur d'Élections Ontario. Je pense qu'il est toutefois important de nous assurer que des dispositions semblables sont en place.

(1230)



À l'échelle fédérale, l'ancien ministre par intérim, M. Brison, a lui-même indiqué à la Chambre que cette information ne serait pas communiquée à qui que ce soit en dehors d'Élections Canada. C'est rassurant, mais nous devons tout de même nous assurer que c'est bel et bien le cas.

Par conséquent, lorsque les gens atteignent l'âge de 18 ans et deviennent admissibles à voter, leurs noms sont ajoutés à la liste électorale permanente et, à ce moment-là, les électeurs inscrits ont le droit de voter aux élections fédérales. Ces renseignements seraient strictement transmis aux acteurs du processus politique concernés.

D'ailleurs, à ce sujet, M. Cullen a soulevé la question des règlements et des règles régissant la protection de la vie privée, et de la façon dont nous nous y prenons pour relever les défis liés à la protection des données personnelles et de l'information. Certes, ce projet de loi contient des mesures qui visent à assurer cette protection, mais, après avoir entendu différents témoins, différents experts, il appert que ses dispositions ne vont pas assez loin. J'aimerais que la ministre me dise si elle a changé d'avis sur la façon dont le projet de loi s'attaque aux problèmes liés à la protection de la vie privée.

J'aimerais que la ministre nous dise, lorsqu'elle comparaîtra — et je l'espère bien —, si elle estime que la loi fédérale sur la protection des renseignements personnels, la LPRPDE, s'applique entièrement à ces acteurs du processus politique, ou si seulement certains aspects pourraient être appliqués au processus. Lors de leur comparution, le directeur général des élections et le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée ont tous deux fait des recommandations précises au sujet de la protection de la vie privée et des renseignements personnels. J'estime que le Comité devrait en discuter avec la ministre et lui demander si elle acceptera ou non les recommandations de ces commissaires, ou si elle a une autre proposition à faire à cet égard.

Certes, la loi prévoit que les partis auront une politique de protection de la vie privée qui fera l'objet d'une surveillance de la part du directeur général des élections. Ce processus est valable et constitue un bon point de départ. La ministre devra nous dire, lors de sa comparution devant le Comité, si elle veut maintenir cette politique à long terme.

Une autre question qu'il sera bon de soulever auprès de la ministre concerne les dispositions anti-collusion que le gouvernement provincial a mises en oeuvre. J'ai été encouragé d'entendre qu'il y avait des allégations — je ne devrais pas dire encouragé d'entendre des allégations. Je devrais plutôt dire que j'ai été encouragé d'entendre comment le directeur général des élections a donné suite aux allégations de collusion entre les acteurs politiques, entre les tiers et comment on a enquêté sur ces cas.

Je serais curieux de savoir si la ministre serait disposée à renforcer et à mettre en oeuvre de solides dispositions anti-collusion dans la loi fédérale pour s'assurer que les tiers et les acteurs politiques n'essaient pas de contourner les règles et les limites prévues dans la loi pour influencer indûment les élections.

À cet égard, le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario a donné l'exemple du plafond des dépenses, qui est fixé à 500 $ en Ontario, et du défi de l'imposer dans un environnement numérique. Nous pourrions aller un peu plus loin et examiner la publicité de façon plus générale.

(1235)



Il est difficile de maintenir un registre des publicités en ligne — qu'il s'agisse de publicités sur Facebook, Instagram, Twitter ou de bannières publicitaires traditionnelles — ou de savoir combien de fois elles sont apparues. À moins que vous ou quelqu'un associé à la campagne les ayez vues de vos propres yeux, on peut difficilement trouver en ligne un rapport de sa présence. Qui plus est, ce genre de publicité ne s'affiche pas pour tout le monde, selon les paramètres de la publicité en question.

Sur Facebook, par exemple, elles ciblent parfois les gens qui aiment une certaine page, dont le compte Facebook a enregistré certaines pages qui ont été aimées; on peut donc voir une publicité ou non selon ces facteurs-là.

Si j'ai aimé le Parti conservateur du Canada sur Facebook, si j'ai aimé Andrew Scheer sur Facebook, ou encore le Parti libéral ou les néo-démocrates...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Peut-être avez-vous perdu la raison.

M. John Nater:

Ça s'applique à tous les politiciens.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous avez probablement raison.

M. John Nater:

Disons qu'il y a de bonnes chances que ceux qui aiment Andrew Scheer, le Parti conservateur ou autre entité affiliée ne verront pas les publicités néo-démocrates ou libérales. Si on cherche à savoir exactement où va l'argent qu'on a dépensé, il faut pouvoir être en mesure de voir les publicités de ses propres yeux. Lorsque la ministre comparaîtra devant le Comité, il faudra absolument discuter des moyens de renforcer ces mécanismes, surtout en ce qui a trait aux tiers.

Pour ce qui est des acteurs politiques, je dirais que le régime de divulgation d'information est plutôt musclé. La Loi électorale du Canada nous oblige à faire rapport de toutes nos dépenses et de toutes nos contributions. C'est comme cela qu'on fonctionne. Il y a toujours des difficultés, mais pour être conforme à la loi et aussi aux fins de remise des dépenses électorales, toute somme qu'un parti politique dépense en publicités sur Facebook ou autre doit être déclarée.

Un tiers parti qui n'est pas obligé de s'enregistrer, cependant, n'aura pas les mêmes exigences; il faut que nous ayons une conversation avec la ministre sur les façons de répondre à ces préoccupations, surtout dans le milieu numérique.

Je ne prétends pas avoir de solution magique à ces problèmes. Il y a certes diverses options qui s'offrent au Comité, et j'ai hâte de prendre connaissance des amendements que proposeront les divers partis politiques; peut-être y en a-t-il que nous pourrions adopter qui nous permettraient d'atteindre cet objectif et qui feraient en sorte que les règles régissant les tiers tiennent compte de la publicité numérique et prévoient des solutions aux problèmes qu'elle présente. Une option possible serait d'exiger la divulgation en temps réel de toutes les dépenses effectuées par les tiers, qu'elles s'élèvent à 1 $, 500 $ ou 5 000 $. En fait, le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario affirme qu'il serait plus facile pour lui d'établir un seuil de 3 000 $ ou 5 000 $, ou bien un seuil de zéro dollars; selon lui, avec un seuil de 500 $, on serait finalement obligé de prendre une décision plus ou moins arbitraire, ce qui rendrait la situation plus difficile à évaluer.

J'estime qu'il faudra avoir une conversation avec la ministre sur cette grande question, sur les façons de réagir aux nouvelles technologies et aux nouvelles formes de communication qui n'intervenaient pas traditionnellement dans les élections. Je suis un jeune député, mais j'ai passé ma vie à organiser des campagnes électorales et je me souviens très clairement qu'à l'époque, la publicité se faisait généralement à la radio et à la télévision; dans les petites localités, on en passait dans les hebdomadaires ou la presse locale. Il était très facile de déterminer qui avait acheté la publicité, quelle campagne était responsable, car le tout était autorisé par un représentant officiel. C'est comme ça que ça se passait auparavant, dans les campagnes traditionnelles.

Dans cette nouvelle ère, il est plus difficile de se faire une idée précise des publicités qui apparaîtront dans les flux de chacun. Il y a moyen de voir les pages individuelles et les publicités qu'elles génèrent, mais aux yeux des électeurs, des particuliers, des Canadiens, il n'est pas toujours évident de savoir d'où viennent ces publicités et qui est-ce qu'elles ciblent.

Je signalerais cependant que, sauf erreur, je pense qu'il est possible de cliquer sur l'onglet « à propos » pour connaître quelles publicités sont générées par quelles pages, mais on n'en sait pas plus sur les entités qui ont autorisé la publicité et celles qui l'ont financée. Il n'est pas toujours évident de savoir exactement de qui il s'agit, surtout sur une page Facebook. Si c'est la page Facebook « John Nater, député », on n'aurait pas tort de supposer que cette page Facebook est associée à John Nater, ou John Nater du Parti conservateur; il y aurait une indication quelconque.

(1240)



En ce qui nous concerne, c'est avec les tiers que les choses se compliquent, et c'est là qu'il nous faut plus de clarté et de direction. Si la campagne « les amis de John Nater » avait une page Facebook, il serait plutôt difficile d'identifier qui sont les amis de John Nater, exactement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

De façon générale?

M. John Nater:

Oui, de façon générale.

M. Scott Reid:

On a tous été confrontés à ce problème à un moment donné.

M. John Nater:

Il est vrai qu'il n'est pas toujours facile de savoir qui sont ses amis, en politique.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est vraiment triste, John.

M. John Nater: Je plaisante.

M. Scott Reid:

Il y a de quoi nous faire pleurer. C'est très inattendu.

M. John Nater:

Le fait est qu'il nous faut des précisions de la part du ministère et de la ministre quant à la marche à suivre. N'importe qui peut créer une page Facebook et lui donner un nom. J'ai donné « les amis de John Nater » en guise d'exemple, mais ce pourrait être une page Facebook du nom de « Canadiens pour un environnement sain », « Canadiens pour le renforcement du commerce international » ou « Canadiens pour la vigueur du secteur secondaire ». Il n'y a pas de limite aux pages Facebook que l'on peut créer. C'est pourquoi, dans un dossier comme celui-ci, il faut s'assurer de communiquer avec le milieu des médias sociaux.

Les sociétés de médias sociaux ont, elles, pris des mesures proactives pour s'assurer que les comptes clairement frauduleux, ou robots comme on les appelle, sont éliminés au fur et à mesure. On les élimine, mais il y a des limites à ce qu'on peut faire. Lorsque la ministre comparaîtra devant le Comité, il faudra qu'elle nous parle de son plan et de sa stratégie, ainsi que des options envisagées pour répondre au problème.

On parle de Facebook et de Twitter; ce sont les principaux mécanismes. Ce matin, le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario a affirmé entretenir des relations de travail positives avec ces entreprises. Et c'est ce qu'elles sont: des entreprises.

J'ai hâte que la ministre nous parle des efforts qu'elle a entrepris en vue de nouer des liens avec Facebook et Twitter et travailler avec elles afin de déterminer les prochaines étapes, que l'on choisisse une approche volontaire ou bien une approche réglementaire ou législative. Il faudra aussi savoir si tout pourra être prêt à temps pour les prochaines élections ou bien s'il faudra attendre celles d'après, en 2023. Je suppose que ce pourrait être la prochaine étape.

Je pense qu'il faut vraiment que la ministre vienne nous parler de la marche à suivre. Nous avons tous entendu parler de ce qui s'est passé avec Cambridge Analytica, du forage de données qui a eu lieu dans d'autres pays, mais je suis convaincu qu'il serait intéressant pour nous d'entendre la perspective de la ministre sur les prochaines étapes qu'il faudra suivre dans ce grand dossier.

Je répète que lorsque nous prendrons connaissance des diverses propositions d'amendement mises de l'avant par tous les partis à la Chambre ainsi que par les représentants élus appartenant à des formations politiques n'ayant pas nécessairement le statut officiel à la Chambre, nous serons en mesure de déterminer s'il y en a qui s'intéresseraient éventuellement aux progrès technologiques de l'ère numérique.

Le corollaire, c'est l'application du règlement, qui présente tout un défi. Le défi est encore plus grand en l'occurrence, puisque c'est généralement dans la foulée d'une élection qu'on peut déterminer la conformité au règlement. S'il s'avère qu'il y a eu des dépenses excessives, que certaines entités n'étaient pas bien enregistrées, ou qu'il y a eu influence étrangère, il est très difficile de remédier à tout cela après le fait. Le Comité a déjà entendu des témoins faire valoir ce même argument, qui revient d'ailleurs dans plusieurs plateformes et sur plusieurs forums. La capacité d'assurer en temps réel la conformité au règlement est une question à laquelle le Comité doit s'attaquer.

Autrement, il y a très peu de mesures correctives qui s'offrent à nous après le fait, après la tenue d'une élection. S'il faut attendre que tous les partis politiques soumettent toute la paperasse nécessaire et tous les états financiers vérifiés dans la foulée d'une campagne électorale, cela peut prendre plusieurs mois avant qu'Élections Canada ne fasse une détermination d'infraction. Il faut que l'on parle des pouvoirs à attribuer, soit au directeur général des élections, soit au commissaire aux élections.

(1245)



Tout cela n'est qu'un des grands enjeux, mais je pense que les Canadiens se soucient également beaucoup de la sécurité et du respect de la vie privée. Dans l'ensemble, nous voulons nous assurer que l'information personnelle que nous confions à Élections Canada ou aux partis politiques est protégée.

Le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario nous a dit qu'il n'y a pas vraiment d'indication que ce genre d'interférence ou de menace existe. J'ai trouvé ça intéressant, mais surtout, j'ai retenu ce qu'il a dit par la suite, comme quoi il y aurait eu des tentatives ratées d'accéder à l'information. Ils est rassurant d'apprendre qu'elles n'ont pas réussi, mais il demeure qu'il y a eu des tentatives.

J'ai été réconforté d'apprendre que l'information avait ensuite été communiquée à l'entité concernée, le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, ou CST. Je pense qu'il vaut la peine d'essayer de déterminer d'où provenaient ces menaces. Je dirais que c'est une bonne chose que les structures et mécanismes en place en Ontario étaient suffisamment robustes pour contrer la menace.

Je serais curieux de savoir si la ministre connaît des cas précis de menaces contre l'information du gouvernement fédéral, que ce soit au sein d'Élections Canada lui-même, des partis politiques — leurs appareils, leurs bases de données — ou de toute autre entité à l'échelle fédérale qui, de part sa nature même, aurait accès aux données personnelles des électeurs canadiens.

Je sais que tous les partis politiques ont accès aux listes d'électeurs de tous les Canadiens ayant le droit de vote. Cette information est communiquée à Élections Canada par diverses sources, notamment l'Agence du revenu du Canada. Comme il s'agit de l'agence responsable de veiller à ce que les Canadiens paient leurs impôts, on s'attendrait à ce que son information soit exacte, mais ce n'est pas toujours le cas. J'aimerais donc poser les questions suivantes à la ministre: comment faire pour dresser un plan? Quelles suggestions a-t-elle pour faire en sorte que l'information communiquée à Élections Canada par des entités comme l'Agence du revenu du Canada soit exacte? Comment s'y prendrait-elle pour s'assurer que seules les personnes qui y ont droit puissent voter dans les élections?

Dans chacune de nos circonscriptions, nous avons des exemples d'électeurs qui n'auraient pas produit leur déclaration de revenu à temps et qui ont parfois eu des problèmes parce qu'ils étaient inscrits à la mauvaise adresse ou sous un autre nom; cette information se retrouve dans les bases de données de l'ARC et elle est ensuite communiquée à Élections Canada. J'ai connaissance d'au moins deux exemples dans ma circonscription de personnes qui, selon l'information de l'ARC, étaient décédées. Si de telles erreurs sont ensuite communiquées à Élections Canada, cela pourrait poser problème le jour du scrutin. Si nous avions un processus d'établi, nous pourrions régler ce genre de problème en temps opportun.

Tout électeur étant admissible au vote pourrait se rendre au scrutin le jour des élections et prouver son identité et être ajouté à la liste des électeurs sur-le-champ, mais il n'est pas évident de prévoir toute cette information-là à ce moment-ci.

(1250)

M. Nathan Cullen:

J'invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Avant de passer au rappel au Règlement, je tiens à informer le Comité du nombre d'amendements qui ont été présentés. Je viens de recevoir le document du greffier, vous devrez le recevoir bientôt. Les libéraux ont présenté 66 amendements; les conservateurs en ont présenté 204; les néo-démocrates, 29; le Parti vert, 17; et le Bloc, deux.

Monsieur Cullen, vous invoquiez le Règlement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Le Bloc me déçoit. Il ne présente que deux amendements. A-t-il fait un effort?

Il s'agit d'un petit rappel, et je sais qu'il concerne des gens qui sont à la table et d'autres qui ne le sont pas. À un moment donné, vu le nombre d'amendements, ce projet de loi devra faire l'objet d'un travail de fond. Je ne me souviens pas avoir vu un projet de loi auquel tous les partis veulent apporter autant d'amendements.

À l'évidence, d'après le témoignage que nous avons entendu à cet égard — le dernier, si je ne m'abuse —, il y a énormément de travail à faire.

Il semble y avoir des pierres d'achoppement, surtout entre les libéraux et les conservateurs, au sujet des dépenses préélectorales et quelques autres facteurs. Ce sont des préoccupations légitimes dont il faudra discuter. Nous étudions certains amendements qui concernent la protection de la vie privée et les médias sociaux, et à mon avis, les témoignages militent en faveur de ceux-ci.

Pour ce qui est du processus parlementaire, j'invite le gouvernement et l'opposition officielle à s'entendre sur certains points, et à se presser pour le faire, afin que nous puissions avoir une certaine forme de processus à étudier. Comme l'a dit le directeur général des élections, son bureau s'est préparé en vue d'apporter certains changements. Plus nous prendrons de temps, moins il sera possible d'en apporter, même si tous les partis autour de la table sont d'accord pour le faire.

Je suis entièrement d'accord pour que M. Nater et les autres utilisent les privilèges accordés pour mettre de la pression sur un projet de loi en utilisant du temps, mais je n'ai toujours pas l'impression que le gouvernement ou l'opposition officielle... J'invite tout particulièrement mes collègues au sein du gouvernement à déterminer quelles sont les pierres d'achoppement. S'il n'est pas possible de trouver une solution, insistez. Je vois poindre des sourires, mais à un moment donné, il faut prendre une décision quant à ce que vous voulez accomplir avec ce projet de loi et à quelle vitesse vous voulez que ce soit fait. Il y a des aspects déplaisants, mais nécessaires si vous voulez aboutir. Les néo-démocrates veulent que le projet de loi soit adopté, certes, avec d'importants amendements, mais nous voulons que celui-ci soit adopté.

Je présente mes excuses à M. Nater concernant son observation...

(1255)

M. John Nater:

Pas du tout.

M. Nathan Cullen:

... cependant, le fait de repasser chaque fois par le même processus, à chaque réunion, n'est aucunement productif et la pression n'est pas suffisante pour modifier la voie sur laquelle nous sommes en ce moment.

J'essaie d'être équitable. Chacun a un rôle à jouer. Ma foi, il ne sert à rien de se réunir si nous nous bornons à faire la même chose. Tant qu'à tenir des réunions, ayons un dialogue productif sur les différends entourant la forme que devrait prendre le projet de loi. Voilà pourquoi nous sommes là.

Voilà, monsieur le président, et ce n'était pas un rappel au Règlement.

Le président:

D'accord, je vous remercie.

Si l'obstruction se poursuit, j'en viendrai peut-être à dire qu'il est 4 heures.

Quoi qu'il en soit, monsieur Nater, poursuivez.

M. John Nater:

Je vois, monsieur le président, qu'il est presque 13 heures.

Continuerons-nous après 13 heures?

Le président:

À 13 heures, je demanderai au Comité s'il souhaite continuer après l'heure prévue.

M. John Nater:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Il reste environ quatre minutes.

M. John Nater:

D'accord. Je vous remercie monsieur le président. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Je pense que l'observation de M. Cullen est édifiante. Il revient à tous les partis politiques de voir s'ils peuvent trouver un terrain d'entente. Il se peut que nous soyons d'accord pour être en désaccord sur certains points, mais en accord sur d'autres: quelles seront les prochaines étapes et quelle sera l'orientation des quelques rencontres au cours des prochains jours. Je tiens compte aussi des commentaires du greffier et des renseignements qui nous ont été fournis.

Pour ce qui est du nombre d'amendements proposés par chaque parti politique, les conservateurs en ont présenté 204, ce qui m'apparaît être un bon nombre. Il me semble qu'il montre bien le rôle de l'opposition officielle dans l'étude des mesures législatives. Je trouve intéressant et révélateur — et en corrélation directe avec le présent amendement — que le gouvernement ait présenté 66 propositions d'amendement à sa propre mesure législative.

Il m'apparaît on ne peut plus pertinent dans le contexte du sous-amendement d'entendre la ministre au sujet des 66 amendements proposés par le parti au pouvoir et de voir sur quoi portent ces amendements. Il faudrait savoir pourquoi le gouvernement considère que la version initiale du projet de loi ne convient pas dans 66 cas; quels sont les éléments de fond et quels sont les amendements mineurs ou ceux d'ordre administratif; si les changements sont de nature grammaticale, s'il s'agit de corrections de fautes d'orthographe ou de chiffres dans un projet de loi. Dans ces derniers cas, il s'agit plutôt de points d'ordre administratif et il me semble que tous les projets de loi présentés passent par là.

Dans le cas des éléments de fond, toutefois, pourquoi exactement a-t-on pris cette décision? Est-ce pour tenir compte des témoignages que nous avons entendus au Comité, d'un changement d'avis, d'un changement d'orientation décidé par le gouvernement ou est-ce sans lien avec ces aspects, à moins que la décision découle plutôt des événements actuels, de ce qui s'est produit entre la présentation du projet de loi et de la situation où nous nous trouvons aujourd'hui, le 2 octobre, près de cinq mois après la présentation initiale du projet de loi. Écouter la ministre parler de ces 66 amendements et nous expliquer ce qui motive ceux-ci également...

Lors de la lecture article par article, le gouvernement aura la majorité pour adopter l'un ou l'autre, ou la totalité des 66 amendements. Par ailleurs, il lui sera également possible d'adopter ou non les 204 amendements des conservateurs, les 29 amendements du NPD, les 17 amendements du Parti vert et les 2 amendements du Bloc. Je présume qu'il y aura des chevauchements parmi ces amendements et parmi les points d'intérêt. Il s'agira de choisir lesquels...

Je suis désolé, monsieur le président.

(1300)

Le président:

Nous en sommes à l'heure prévue. Le Comité souhaite-t-il poursuivre la réunion? [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Je propose que la réunion soit ajournée. [Traduction]

Le président:

Personne ne souhaite poursuivre la réunion? D'accord.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on October 02, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.