header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-10-01 INDU 129

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

I call the meeting to order.

It's another fine Monday afternoon here. Welcome to INDU, where we are continuing our study of the five-year legislative review of the Copyright Act.

Today, from Telus Communications, we have with us Ann Mainville-Neeson, vice-president, broadcasting policy and regulatory affairs, as well as Antoine Malek, senior regulatory legal counsel.

From Association québécoise de la production médiatique, we have Hélène Messier, president and chief executive officer; and Marie-Christine Beaudry, director, legal and business affairs, zone three. That's exciting, zone three.

From the Société professionnelle des auteurs et des compositeurs du Québec, we have Marie-Josée Dupré, executive director, by video conference from Montreal. Can you hear me?

Ms. Marie-Josée Dupré (Executive Director, Société professionnelle des auteurs et des compositeurs du Québec):

Yes, very well. [Translation]

The Chair:

Excellent.[English]

Finally, from Association des réalisateurs et réalisatrices du Québec, we have Gabriel Pelletier, president, and Mylène Cyr, executive director.[Translation]

I'll do my best.[English]

Before we get started, Mr. Albas, I believe you have a notice of motion you'd like to present.

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

Great. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I apologize to the witnesses, and I'll make this very quick.

Obviously this is very timely. I'd like to table a notice of motion.

It reads as follows: That, to assist in the review of the Copyright Act, the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology requests Ministers Freeland and Bains, alongside officials, to come before the committee and explain the impacts of the United-States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) on the intellectual property and copyright regimes in Canada.

Obviously this isn't something we can debate at this time. I do hope that members find it to be timely and that we can discuss this at an upcoming meeting.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we're going to go to presentations. Why don't we start with Telus Communications?[Translation]

Ms. Mainville-Neeson, you have seven minutes.

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson (Vice-President, Broadcasting Policy and Regulatory Affairs, TELUS Communications Inc.):

That's great. Thank you.[English]

Just for a change, I'll make my presentation in English, but I'm happy to respond to any questions in French or in English.

Good afternoon, and thank you on behalf of Telus Communications for the opportunity to appear before the committee.

My name is Ann Mainville-Neeson, and I'm vice-president of broadcasting policy and regulatory affairs at Telus. With me is Antoine Malek, senior regulatory legal counsel at Telus and an intellectual property lawyer.

Telus is a national communications company. Whether it's connecting Canadians through our wireless and wireline businesses or leveraging the power of digital technology to enhance the delivery of health care services, we are committed to connecting with purpose, positioning Canada for success in the digital economy and enhancing economic, educational and health outcomes for all.

We provide a wide range of products and services, including wireline and wireless telephony, broadband Internet access, health services, home automation and security, and also IPTV-based television distribution. In light of earlier testimony that you received from other TV service operators, it is relevant to note that unlike our main competitors, Telus is not vertically integrated, meaning that we do not own any commercial programming services. We are purely an aggregator and distributor of the best content there is to offer.

In striving to be an aggregator of choice and the place where Canadians go to access content, we listen to our customers and we are constantly looking for better ways to meet and anticipate their needs and desires. We know that innovation is essential to competing in the digital environment, where consumers have more choice than ever before. We believe that innovation is essential in keeping the Canadian broadcasting system, which is a major source of income for Canadian artists, healthy and competitive. Accordingly, our remarks today are focused on amendments that would foster innovation by promoting efficiency and by increasing the resiliency of the act in the face of rapid change.

I want to start with one of the areas where amendments enacted in 2012 fell a little short on the innovation front. In 2012, Parliament adopted exceptions that would provide users with the right to record a program for later viewing. This recording can be made on their own device or on a network storage space. When the recording is made in the cloud, it is referred to as a network personal video recorder—NPVR—or sometimes cloud PVR.

While the 2012 amendments were a step in the right direction, the statutory language contemplates a discrete recording for each user. As a result, an NPVR service provider like ourselves might need to store hundreds of thousands—even millions—of copies of the same recording, one for each user who initiates a recording. That kind of excessive duplication is unnecessarily inefficient and costly for the network operator, and creates no value for the rights holder.

Innovation dictates leveraging the benefits of network efficiency by sharing a single recording of a program among all the users who initiated a time-shifted recording of that particular program. Telus recommends that the act be amended to allow this to happen without any additional liability being incurred by the network operator.

Looking to the future and other ways that the act can more broadly foster innovation and be adaptable to technological change, Telus recommends that the risks associated with innovation in the face of statutory ambiguity be distributed more evenly between rights holders and innovators. Specifically, we propose some changes to the statutory damages regime in the act.

Under the current rules, the potential liability posed by statutory damages can be completely detached from either the actual harms suffered by rights holders or any profits derived from an infringement. We recommend that the courts be empowered in all cases to adjust statutory damage awards to align them with the circumstances of the infringement. The courts are already empowered to do this, but in limited circumstances only. Evidence of bad faith should be required to justify statutory damages if they're disproportionate to the infringement. By ensuring that the punitive aspect of these awards is applied only in cases where it is appropriate and desirable to do so, the Copyright Act would no longer be discouraging innovation.

I would now like to turn to the notice and notice regime.

First, Telus agrees with other ISPs who have presented before you that notice and notice is a reasonable policy approach to copyright infringement because it balances the interests of rights holders and users. We also agree with proposals to mandate the form and the content of notices, especially to require them to be machine-readable so that the processing can be as close to fully automated as possible.

(1535)



Telus also agrees with Minister Bains's earlier announcement that notices should not contain extraneous content, such as settlement demands, nor should they contain advertising on where to find legal content, as some have suggested. That is not the purpose of notice and notice.

Telus also echoes TekSavvy's proposal that ISPs be permitted to charge a reasonable fee for forwarding notices. This is not only a matter of fairness to ISPs, which are innocent third parties in copyright disputes; it would also address the potential for misuse of the regime. While the government has announced an intention to take steps to address misuse by prohibiting settlement demands, this doesn't address other forms of misuse, such as fraudulent notices or notices that include phishing links, which pose a security concern for consumers. Adding an economic cost to accessing the regime would go a long way towards minimizing its abuse.

Finally, Telus also proposes that the separate statutory damages provisions under notice and notice be amended to be harmonized with our proposals for amendments to the broader statutory damages regime under the act. Specifically, Telus proposes that under notice and notice, the courts should be given the discretion to lower a minimum award to ensure that it is proportional to any actual harm to rights holders, and that evidence of bad faith on the part of the non-compliant ISP be required to justify a disproportionate and punitive level of damages. Such an amendment would go a long way to helping ISPs deal with the significant and increasing costs that they are required to incur to help rights holders enforce their rights.

In closing, we thank the committee for its work in reviewing this important piece of legislation. Copyright is one of the key legal regimes that governs the digital markets of the modern economy, and we support its intent. In order to maximize the potential for Canada's digital economy, we believe the legislative framework must balance support for creators with the public interest in supporting innovation that leads to new technology and business possibilities for the benefit of all Canadians. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Association québécoise de la production médiatique. Madame Messier. [Translation]

Ms. Hélène Messier (President and Chief Executive Officer, Association québécoise de la production médiatique):

Good afternoon.

I'll be giving my presentation in French.

Mr. Chair, ladies and gentlemen, my name is Hélène Messier.

I am the president and chief executive officer of the Association québécoise de la production médiatique, or AQPM for short. Joining me is Marie-Christine Beaudry, director of legal and business affairs for Zone3.

Zone3 is one of the largest production companies in Quebec. It produces films, and its subsidiary Cinémaginaire recently produced the Denys Arcand film La chute de l'empire américain.

In the television arena, the company produces programs of all genres including series for youth like Jérémie, magazine programs such as Les Francs-tireurs and Curieux Bégin, variety shows such as Infoman and comedies such as Like-moi!

The AQPM brings together 150 independent film, television and web production companies, representing the vast majority of Quebec companies that produce audiovisual content for every screen in both French and English. The AQPM's members produce more than 500 films, television programs and webcasts watched by millions of people on every type of screen.

Our members are responsible for such film productions as the feature Bon Cop Bad Cop and Mommy—winner of the Jury Prize at the Cannes film festival and the César award for best foreign film—not to mention television programs La Voix, Fugueuse and the daily District 31, just to name a few. The commercial success of these productions is the envy of many.

In 2016-17, Canada's film and television production sector was valued at nearly $8.4 billion in total, generating more than 171,700 full-time equivalent jobs in both direct and indirect employment. Quebec's film and television production sector is worth $1.8 billion and generates 36,400 jobs.

We want to thank the committee for the opportunity to contribute to its statutory review of the Copyright Act. Although the AQPM is concerned about a number of issues including piracy and the extension of the private copying levy to audiovisual works, our remarks today will focus on audiovisual copyright ownership.

Determining who the creator of a sculpture or song is may be straightforward, but it's a whole other story when it comes to an audiovisual work, be it a television program, film or web content. The Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works gives countries freedom in establishing copyright ownership of cinematographic works.

In Canada, the identification process began in the early 1990s but has been delayed ever since, leaving Canadian legislation silent on the issue. As a result, only the courts are empowered to identify who the author of a cinematographic work is on the basis of facts specific to that work. With few documented cases, no clear rule has emerged.

Many countries have opted to set out in their legislation how the author of an audiovisual work is identified. Countries with similar copyright philosophies to Canada's—the U.S., the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand—have identified the producer as the sole copyright holder, with the exception of the United Kingdom, where both the producer and director are copyright owners.

Conversely, in Canada, not only are producers not recognized as copyright owners, but they are also forced to operate in an uncertain model when producing and using audiovisual works, managing all related risks. It is worth noting, though, that, in order to limit those risks, some clarification has been incorporated into collective agreements negotiated between unions, representing screenwriters, directors, music composers and performers, on the one hand, and the AQPM, representing producers, on the other. Generally speaking, the producer has rights and pays a fee or royalty for the use of those rights.

A question worth asking is whether “cinematographic work” is still the right designation for the wide range of audiovisual works dominating the sector today, including those intended for digital media. In the AQPM's view, the current definition of a cinematographic work is not technology-neutral since it refers to a traditional production technique—cinematography—as opposed to the actual work.

For that reason, the AQPM recommends that the new category “audiovisual work” be created. It would be defined as an animated sequence of images, whether or not accompanied by sound, and include cinematographic works.

(1540)



The next question that arises is who the copyright owner of an audiovisual work is. The answer lies in characterizing the work somehow. Is it a work in and of itself, or is it a collaborative work or compilation that brings together a number of underlying works? Does the script or music, for instance, represent a whole that cannot be separated, or do a number of separate works make up a whole that is more than the sum of its parts? Who owns the copyright as far as that whole is concerned?

The AQPM maintains that the producer's role in the creative process and making of an audiovisual work dictates the recognition of the producer's creative contribution to the work. This would make the producer the owner of the copyright in the audiovisual work, and all related rights, without penalizing the creators of the underlying works. In that case, it would be important to specify that a corporation could be the first owner of copyright in the audiovisual work.

Ms. Beaudry will now explain why the producer should hold all rights to the audiovisual work, right from its infancy.

(1545)

Ms. Marie-Christine Beaudry (Director, Legal and Business Affairs, Zone 3 , Association québécoise de la production médiatique):

Good afternoon.

Being the producer of a cinematographic work is a whole art unto itself.

The producer can be thought of as the conductor of the cinematographic or audiovisual work. The producer is the only one present from the beginning of the work's creation to its delivery, and even after, during its use or exploitation. The producer has total control over the funding and management of the project, as well as the creative elements.

Not only by securing the funding, but also by selecting the artists involved throughout the process, the producer determines, guides and influences the content of the audiovisual work, be it a magazine, talk show, variety program, documentary or drama.

What's more, the producer participates in the actual creation of the cinematographic work through day-to-day involvement in the creative development process. When all is said and done, the producer is the final decision-maker, all the while respecting the prerogatives of screenwriters and directors.

Depending on the type of production in question, be it a work of fiction, a variety program, the recording of a concert or a documentary, the involvement of the artists, screenwriters, directors and composers will vary.

The components of the work will also vary: original or existing music, original script or book adaptation, film footage, existing artwork or the creation of original art. The combinations are endless, and many are those who can claim to be the author of any one of the elements that make up an audiovisual work.

It is essential that the producer be able to hold all copyright in the audiovisual work with total certainty. Not only does the producer play a vital creative role, but they are also solely responsible for respecting contractual obligations to third parties, including financing partners and the production team.

At the end of the day, the producer alone assumes the risk for any budget overruns that occur during production of the audiovisual work. The producer's involvement is absolute.

Today, it is nearly impossible to produce a cinematographic work without relying on tax-credit-based funding. In granting federal tax credits for cinematographic works, the Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office, known as CAVCO, stipulates in the application guidelines for its film or video production services tax credit that the producer be sole owner of global copyright in the work for the purposes of its use. This appears in the copyright ownership section.

Furthermore, nearly all funds for cinematographic production in Canada, not to mention bank financing in some cases, require the producer to be accredited by CAVCO, meaning that the producer must adhere to the requirement in order to access funding for production. Any change to the Copyright Act that awards copyright ownership to a third party would run counter to these funding requirements and undermine Canadian film production.

Once the work is completed, it is also the producer who determines, funds and manages the exploitation of the cinematographic work. To that end, certain elements are contracted out to third parties all over the world. The producer may decide to work alone or to go through a distributor or distribution agent.

The ways in which a cinematographic work can be exploited or used are many, and they require a myriad of copyrights in the work. That may include the distribution of the work in existing markets here, at home, or in other jurisdictions, the sale of a format based on the work, the marketing of merchandise and so forth.

The Chair:

My apologies, but I have to interrupt. You've been speaking for almost 11 minutes. Could you please wrap it up?

(1550)

Ms. Hélène Messier:

Yes, of course.

We have repeatedly called for a solution to address the uncertainty surrounding an audiovisual work. Should the government decide not to adopt our solution, it would have to make sure that each category of creator listed in the Copyright Act was not considered to be in conflict with existing collective agreements. The government would also need a presumption of law, similar to France, whereby the producer receives an assignment allowing the exploitation of all the rights in the work.

Thank you.

The Chair:

I will now hand the floor over to Marie-Josée Dupré, from the Société professionnelle des auteurs et des compositeurs du Québec.

You may go ahead for seven minutes.

Ms. Marie-Josée Dupré (Executive Director, Société professionnelle des auteurs et des compositeurs du Québec):

Thank you.

Mr. Chair and members of the committee, thank you for inviting us to take part in these consultations.

My name is Marie-Josée Dupré, and I am the executive director of the Société professionnelle des auteurs et des compositeurs du Québec, better known as the SPACQ. Established 37 years ago, the SPACQ works to promote, protect and advance, in every possible way, the economic, social and professional interests of music creators—several thousand music writers across Quebec and French-speaking Canada.

The cultural sector is an important part of Canada's economy, but not all participants receive their fair share. Very often, music writers work in the shadows and are not necessarily feature artists. They are nevertheless the first link in a long chain of players, and usually the lowest paid.

I will now discuss the elements that are especially important in order for Canada to have copyright legislation that is simply adequate.

The first element is the duration of copyright. Further to yesterday's signing of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement, or USMCA, we were pleased to learn that Canada will extend copyright protection to 70 years after the death of the author, as is already the case in the countries who are our main trading partners.

All of our creators will now be treated equally. The Copyright Act, however, contains a large number of exceptions, so limiting the number, interpretation and scope of those exceptions will be essential to preserve any gains from extending copyright protection to 70 years after the author's death. It would be very unfortunate if an overly broad interpretation of the existing exceptions were to chip away at compensation for the use of works.

The second element is the responsibility of platforms when it comes to user-generated content. We applaud the European Parliament's recent majority decision on the responsibility of content-sharing platforms, requiring royalties to be paid to creators and rights holders. Again, I would point out that, up until last night, Canada was one of the few countries, if not only one, to view such sharing of works as being exempt from responsibility.

It's time that lawmakers revisit their position and adopt appropriate measures. In other words, it's time to hold companies like YouTube—not to get too specific—responsible for payment of adequate royalties, given the content distribution on their platforms.

The third element is the private copying regime. Introduced in 1997, the system allows Canadians to copy whatever music they please for personal use; in return, authors receive royalties for those copies. The levy is supposed to apply to all audio recording media usually used by consumers.

Parliament's intent was clearly to create a regime that was technology-neutral, meaning one that would not become obsolete simply because of media advances. Unfortunately, in 2012, the regime's application was limited to blank CDs, a now outdated medium. Consumers, however, continued to make just as many copies of music on other types of audio recording media, including tablets and cell phones, which are not subject to the regime. Because of this restriction, creators are losing tens of millions of dollars in royalties.

Fixing this problem is paramount. The Copyright Act must clearly stipulate that the regime applies to all audio recording media, and the term “medium” must be interpreted broadly enough to cover all existing and not-yet-discovered media.

It is worth noting that companies with which creators do business set out in their contracts the ability to disseminate and copy creators' works by every known and not-yet-known means. Conversely, Parliament has curtailed creator compensation by amending a regime that cannot keep pace with technological advancement.

In addition, as far as the Copyright Board of Canada is concerned, it is essential that the process be simplified and that decisions be made more quickly so that creators can receive adjusted compensation, increased to reflect the situations under consideration, and so that users know where they stand within a reasonable time frame.

Waiting years for decisions hinders the effective application of levies by copyright collectives, and this is a major irritant for users. Keep in mind that these long wait times can mean that the use of levies at the source and related challenges are no longer the same, given the pace of technological change.

(1555)



Above all, the government must ensure that the necessary resources are allocated to the board. As a result, the board will be more effective and will have a positive impact on both creators and consumer users.

In conclusion, the government must keep moving forward. It must recognize the value of the works used on a daily basis and ensure that the creators receive fair compensation. Otherwise, culture in general will suffer. Creators are at the heart of culture. Without creators, no content would be available.

Thank you for listening.

The Chair:

Thank you.

I'll now give the floor to Gabriel Pelletier, from the Association des réalisateurs et réalisatrices du Québec.

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier (President, Association des réalisateurs et réalisatrices du Québec):

I look forward to speaking to you, but I'll give the floor to Mylène Cyr.

The Chair:

You have seven minutes.

Ms. Mylène Cyr (Executive Director, Association des réalisateurs et réalisatrices du Québec):

Mr. Chair and committee members, the Association des réalisateurs et réalisatrices du Québec is very pleased to be appearing today to discuss this important review of the Copyright Act. My name is Mylène Cyr, and I'm the executive director of the association. I'm joined by Gabriel Pelletier, the president of the association.

The ARRQ is a professional union of freelance directors. It has over 750 members, who work mainly in French and in the film, television and web fields. Our association defends the professional, economic, cultural, social and moral interests and rights of all directors in Quebec. The negotiation of collective agreements with various producers in one step taken by the association to defend the rights of directors and ensure respect for their creation conditions.

I'd like to discuss some of the goals mentioned by Minister Bains and Minister Joly in their letter to the chair of this committee: How can we ensure that the Copyright Act functions efficiently ... and supports creators in getting fair market value for their copyrighted content? Finally, how can our domestic regime position Canadian creators ... to compete on and harness the full potential of the global stage?

As the Copyright Act stands, the determination of the creator of a work is primarily a question of fact. The act never specifies who the creator is. Film works, which are generally collaborative, are no exception. Canadian case law states that, if there are many candidates for the title of creator of the film work, the director and scriptwriter will generally be among them.

According to the principle issued by the Supreme Court, these creators clearly use their talent and judgment to create the film works. Under the act, the creators are the first owners of the copyright of the film works. However, certain sections of the act, in particular the sections that concern presumptions, generate some ambiguity in this area. This ambiguity prevents directors from obtaining fair market value for their rights. The SACD and SCAM brief states as follows: When SACD-SCAM tried to negotiate general licences for the benefit of directors with certain users of audiovisual works, the users refused to negotiate on the basis of the legal uncertainty. Directors currently do not receive all the compensation to which they are entitled for the use of audiovisual works.

Recently, in our collective agreement negotiations, an association of producers questioned the ownership of the rights of freelance directors to film works. The effects of this ambiguity are particularly significant in a context where the broadcasting market is constantly evolving and where the market value of copyright must be able to evolve with it. It's therefore essential to give the market a clear chain of title that can be negotiated at its fair value for creators.

We find that it would be appropriate, as part of the review of the act, to clarify any ambiguity concerning the status and rights of the director and scriptwriter when it comes to film works in Canada. The ARRQ is proposing a simple amendment to the act that does not call into question the principles of the act or the current method of compensation, but that would resolve any ambiguity regarding the rights of freelance directors. We're submitting an amendment of section 34.1, which introduces presumptions respecting the copyright ownership of film works for the director and scriptwriter as co-creators of the film works.

This proposal, which the ARRQ supports, has been agreed upon by the SARTEC, WGC and DGC artists' associations. It also fulfills the objectives of the SACD-SCAM collective society.

(1600)

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

Mr. Chair and committee members, my name is Gabriel Pelletier. I'm not only the president of the ARRQ, but I'm also a director.

I'm very pleased to finally be able to speak to you today. I've been waiting many years for this moment.

In 2000, I directed a film entitled La vie après l'amour, which won the Billet d'or for the highest box office revenue in Quebec. The film even came in second place in terms of box office revenue in Canada in general. Its commercial success was obviously very profitable for the companies that distributed the film and for my producer's company.

I remember quite well the royalty amount that I obtained for directing the film, in Canada, because it's easy to recall. It's a round number, and even a very round number. It's zero dollars and zero cents. For the six films that I had the opportunity to direct in my career, a number of which generated $1 million in revenue, I obtained the same amount for my rights as a director in Canada. Yet, I've had no difficulty obtaining royalties in other countries in the Francophonie. Canada is the only place where the ownership of my rights as a director is contested and where I'm not given my fair share. As a result of ambiguity in the Canadian legislation, the SACD, which represents my rights, can't negotiate with the companies that use my works.

I'm not the only person in this situation. This is the case for all francophone directors whom I represent. No one is calling into question the rights of the other artists whom we direct to create our films or television programs, such as music composers or actors, who obtain neighbouring rights. So why are we calling into question the director's rights? Can we really claim that Xavier Dolan, Philippe Falardeau or Léa Pool don't leave an original mark on their works? That would be dishonest.

Like my director colleagues in Quebec, I'm a freelance artist. We all must cope with job insecurity in an extremely competitive environment. We must develop ideas and projects, and then pitch them to producers and finally to investors.

Only a few of these projects see the light of day. In many cases, we must work at a second job to fulfill our financial obligations when we aren't working on a project. Ensuring fair compensation for the distribution of our works is the best way to give us the financial peace of mind needed to continue doing what we do best, which is creating new works.

This is how we can harness our full potential and become competitive on the domestic and global stage, as suggested by Minister Bains and Minister Joly.

Committee members, today you have the opportunity to rectify a situation that has been undermining the key creators of film works, the directors and scriptwriters, in the representation of their rights. By simply clarifying the act and without betraying the act's principles, you can help these creators effectively contribute to the Canadian creative economy, while strengthening that economy.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you for your presentations.

We'll start the question period.

Mr. Graham, you have seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Mr. Pelletier, I'd like to understand the “zero dollars” that you mentioned.

Could you explain the structure of a film crew and the distribution of revenue?

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

There are different ways for directors to make money from copyright. They make money either through collective agreements, when licences are granted to the producer, or through broadcasters, when the work is used. These are all secondary markets, for example, and the reruns on television or digital platforms, at this time.

For instance, the Directors Guild of Canada, or DGC, works on a front-end basis. In other words, its members receive payments in advance, whereas francophone directors are generally paid at the back end of the project. We're therefore paid when the work is used. However, since broadcasters have been challenging the directors' ownership of copyright, they have refused to negotiate royalties for directors when the work is used.

The reason is that, in the past, directors were employees of broadcasters. Under Canadian law, the first owners of copyright were the employers. However, our market has changed, and broadcasters have outsourced the production of works to production companies. From that point on, we should have been the owners of copyright. We were supposed to negotiate an arrangement, but the companies refused to do so.

(1605)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

Ms. Beaudry and Ms. Messier, would you like to respond?

Ms. Hélène Messier:

Yes.

We aren't taking into account the initial fee paid to directors, which includes part of their use rights. Directors are then entitled to a portion of the producer's revenue for their residual payments.

If the director doesn't receive any revenue, the reason is that the producer, at the start, doesn't receive any revenue. If the director receives a percentage of the fees collected by the producer for use of the work on other platforms, for example, but the producer doesn't receive any revenue, the amount will be reduced if the director receives 4%, 5% or 10% of the amount obtained by the producer. I'd say that this is also the producer's problem. However, the initial fee is still a considerable fee that includes the director's rights for the first uses.

Ms. Beaudry, do you have anything to add?

Ms. Marie-Christine Beaudry:

As producers, we have, for example, agreements with the SARTEC for scriptwriters. When the material is broadcast, scriptwriters receive from the SACD an amount that comes directly from the broadcasters.

In addition, the scriptwriters negotiated with us, the producers, the use and revenue from the use of the audiovisual work, and a right to access the economic life of the work. This means royalties of 4% or 5%, or on the basis of their specific negotiations with the producers.

The directors have the same right in our collective agreements where, according to the economic life of the work, they'll be associated with it. If the work is used elsewhere, they have access to royalties of 4%, 5% or more, depending on their direct negotiations with their producer. It's part of their collective agreement.

It must also be understood that there are different types of productions. In terms of audiovisual works, we're talking about both magazines and feature films. It's important to understand the wide range of situations that may arise when it comes to film works at this time. This must be kept in mind.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't have much time, Mr. Pelletier, but I think you would like to respond.

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

Yes.

I simply want to point out that, initially, the scriptwriters obtain the use rights. The SACD can negotiate rights for them because, traditionally, as I was saying earlier, they were originally freelancers, even for broadcasters.

Furthermore, Ms. Beaudry is confusing dramatic works and non-dramatic works. This is about dramatic works, and copyright applies differently. Our ability to negotiate is at stake. We give producers a licence to use the work. Once this is done, we obtain a share of the profits. However, as a result of the definition of profits, it's mathematically impossible to obtain royalties.

For example, the most popular film and biggest box office hit in Canada, Bon Cop Bad Cop, which you should all know, earned $8 million. Fifty per cent of the $8 million went to the theatre operators, which left $4 million. Between 25% and 30% went to the distributors. This left $1.5 million. In addition, since we're discussing profits, the film cost $5 million to produce. It's therefore impossible to obtain a share of the profits.

In other words, I'm asking today that creators be given the ability to negotiate.

(1610)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

I have only 30 seconds left, and I'd like to ask the people from Telus a question.[English] It's just to finish off.

What is Telus's position on FairPlay?

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

We supported the FairPlay proposal. We are not part of the coalition, but we did support the FairPlay application. The reason is that piracy is an important problem for Canada, and we believe as an ISP that we have a role to play and an ethical obligation, let's say, to ensure that piracy is addressed.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You weren't a member of FairPlay at the outset, so what caused a change of mind?

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

It wasn't a change of mind. It is simply that we are not vertically integrated. We are not the primary owners of rights, and therefore we supported separately.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

All right. Thank you.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Albas, for seven minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and I'd like to thank everyone here for their testimony today and for their expertise.

I'd like to start with Telus. I sincerely appreciate that you've brought up a number of small and reasonable requests. I think that basing it off some of the changes in the 2012 Copyright Modernization Act and getting feedback is very good. I appreciate that.

On your first recommendation regarding a single recording, would a single recording framework that is accessed by users, as you have recommended, align with the current laws around personal recordings and licences for on-demand services?

In my mind, a single copy saved on a server sounds more like a version of on-demand service rather than a personal recording.

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

It's all about who is making that recording.

On an NPVR it's no different from someone who has recorded on their device at home, on their home PVR, except for the network provider, since we are also providers of on-demand content; therefore, we negotiate those rights and we pay for those rights, but that's in order to offer the programs to people who have not recorded and who decide to look through our menu and access some of the great content that we have to offer. In the case of an NPVR, this is someone who has chosen to record something, and they are doing so in a general cloud space.

Operators of that cloud question why they should have that excessive duplication, with so many copies of the same thing being stored. It's also not ecologically friendly to have so much storage of the same things, so it's simply a back office request in order to streamline and have that single copy. Only those who have selected the record would have access to that single recording, and we would have the metadata and whatnot, other information to ensure that if someone started to record five minutes late, they would only access that program starting five minutes late.

Mr. Dan Albas:

The reason I ask is that these statutory reviews happen on a regular basis, although maybe not as quickly as some would want. However, that didn't quite answer the question, because, again, if you have one copy that's being passed out, it does sound like more of an on-demand service than like someone choosing to record something for their personal viewing later on.

Again, I just worry about some of the content holders who may form deals with Telus and other companies like yours, who may say you are violating the terms of the arrangement because it's less of a personal recording and more of an on-demand service.

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

That's why we want to limit our proposal to that personal relationship with the recording. It's so the person who makes that recording is the only person who can access that recording, as opposed to an on-demand service whereby anyone who wants to watch a program can access it, the difference being that we're not proposing that we as network operators simply record everything for later access by people who have recorders, nor do we propose that people be able to have indefinite amounts of storage so that the user ends up recording everything.

We are proposing essentially replicating the home PVR on a network, but streamlining it so that you don't have as much waste. Waste is not conducive to innovation.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you.

Your second recommendation specifically talks about strengthening innovation in Canada by allowing new technologies and services to come to the market without taking much of a risk, or a huge risk.

Can you give us some concrete examples of these new technologies and services that you have in mind?

(1615)

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

For example, there's the NPVR; for example, there are new business models, which, as we mentioned with respect to notice and notice.... I'm trying to think of innovation on a more general perspective, but when we talk about notice and notice, we'd like automation, and more automation leads to potential errors. The error rate can never be brought down to absolute zero, which means that we'd be taking that risk by putting more automation into our notice and notice regime or execution. We're exposing ourselves to that risk, which is unfortunate, because we are facing increasing costs and an increasing number of notices to forward.

Mr. Dan Albas:

We had testimony last week about more of a standardized notice and notice regime, as well as limiting what content can be included in that. You're in favour of that, then.

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Absolutely.

Mr. Dan Albas:

You also say that grossly disproportionate damages have been assessed. Can you give us a concrete example?

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

No, because in the instances of disproportionate damage, it's more about the risk of innovation not coming to market because of that fear, the idea being that under the act there is no limit.

It means that if we decide to implement something that ultimately ends up being non-compliant, something we implemented in good faith.... As we've heard from other testimony today or previously, applying and interpreting the Copyright Act is very complex, so the concern is more with that potential of people not bringing things to market because of the potential for great damages.

I'm not suggesting that this has actually occurred in the market, that there's an example of someone facing significant risk. Instead, it's the fact that things are not being brought to market at all, which is an even worse case for Canada.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I recognize the point.

Let's maybe talk about innovation that is happening right now. There is a considerable amount of innovation on online platforms—for example, YouTube and Twitch. A number of users have often said they are putting forward content in good faith and have still been hit with copyright infringement notices.

Do you see that space as one that the law needs to better manage?

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

It certainly is, on many fronts, whether you're looking at piracy or this notion that there are copyright infringement notices that are fraudulent or that are being abused for whatever reason, through phishing exercises, which cause security concerns. I think there are definitely concerns.

We receive hundreds of thousands of notices per month. Many of those may not be from actual copyright holders.

Mr. Dan Albas:

That would be one aspect. There are some people who are utilizing the notice and notice regime for their own nefarious ends. I think that's something we should take note of.

Again, I specifically referenced YouTube and Twitch. A lot of young people are using those platforms. A lot of not-so-young people, I would say, utilize those platforms. This is your chance to talk about the way the law operates in terms of that.

As an Internet service provider, do you have any insight as to where we can make that regime better?

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Well, as an Internet service provider, we're distributing the content. These services are being used by our customers, but we don't have insight as to what notices of infringement YouTube might be receiving. YouTube will also receive some notices of infringement, as would the ISP. I think your question is better directed at those particular platforms.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Angus.

You have seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Charlie Angus (Timmins—James Bay, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I want to thank the witnesses for their presentations. As a musician and writer, I fully understand the need to respect copyright and the important need for Parliament to implement legislation that will ensure a good environment for the creative community.

This subject requires me to be very clear, so I'll ask my questions in English.[English]

Madame Dupré, in terms of getting revenue streams for musicians and songs, you mentioned YouTube. What is the regime right now for collecting royalties from YouTube?

Ms. Marie-Josée Dupré:

I worked at SOCAN, the collective that manages the public performance of music. If I remember correctly, there are some licence fees that are paid by YouTube, but not necessarily for all of the user-generated content. These are experimental licences unless that has changed.

Right now, what we received as a decision from the European Parliament is that the statutes are voted on, and then each of the countries in the EU will have to make sure that they adjust their copyright acts so that all of these platforms have the obligation to pay licence fees. Even though the content is not theirs specifically, they have a responsibility as a broadcaster—I'm not using the right word—to make sure that they compensate the rights holders.

(1620)

Mr. Charlie Angus:

My hair is grey, and I'm old enough to remember that there were no glory years for musicians in copyright. We were always robbed.

One year I co-wrote the video of the year, and I told my wife, “This is our year, honey. We're going to get the big money”, because we were in heavy rotation. My cheque was $25.

At that time, the cable networks that were running TV shows claimed they were not making money off of them and that they were offering a service to musicians. SOCAN fought that, and we changed the legislation. Then of course, cable networks went out of business.

When YouTube started, everyone said, “Well, they just got started in a garage, and they're young upstarts.” Now they're part of the biggest corporate entity in the world, Google. Everybody I know shares music on YouTube. I live on YouTube.

SOCAN is able to go after hairstylists and little restaurants to pay copyright fees. Wouldn't it be better if we just had blanket copyright legislation so that for people who were posting songs or making videos out of songs, there was a blanket fee that could be distributed among artists, as we did with cable television and in other areas? Would that provide a guaranteed revenue stream for the use of music on YouTube?

Ms. Marie-Josée Dupré:

I don't know if they will be able to get that. YouTube and all the digital services like Spotify or Google have networks around the world. For each and every country, they need to get their licences according to what's played in their countries, although at some point in time they may think of getting multi-territory licensing. I think it has been discussed in the past, but right now that's why each and every country has to jump in and make sure they protect their own interests in terms of what's going on with the consumers from their country.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Thank you.

Madam Messier, there are a number of competing interests or potential interests in terms of production, and Mr. Pelletier, I'd be interested in your thoughts as well.

With regard the new NAFTA agreement to extend copyright to 70 years after death, I've talked to filmmakers who are very concerned. They don't know sometimes who controls the film they want to use historically. Sometimes they're held under large corporate licences and they become very expensive, and it's very difficult to be sure you're going to be able to say, “I have the copyright to a film” if you're using historic film when you don't know. Are you concerned that this will affect the ability of the Canadian creative community to produce new works based on historic film and images? [Translation]

Ms. Hélène Messier:

Given the current Canadian system, I think the lack of a definition of what constitutes a film or audiovisual work is the source of the problem. It's not easy at this time to determine the owner of the copyright. It's therefore difficult to calculate the term of the copyright, whether the length is 50 years or 70 years. This situation is causing issues.

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

I think that the ability to identify creators will help define the duration of their rights. It must be understood that, in Canada, copyright is associated with an individual and not a company. This is contrary to the United States, where the rights for commissioned works belong to companies. In Canada, the term of the copyright starts when the work is created by one or more individuals, and it continues until 50 years after their death.

(1625)

[English]

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Madame Mainville-Neeson, in terms of these notice and notice warnings that you're forced to send out all the time, I'm interested, because I got three of them this summer, three days in a row, for my apartment in Ottawa, where I hadn't been in a month. I didn't know if it was real. I don't know if somebody was trying to shake me down.

How are you able to ascertain accuracy when you're sending these out? I wasn't in my apartment for a month and nobody else was there, but I got three notices that I was apparently downloading films at my apartment. How do you separate consumers so that we can identify where serious piracy is taking place and where just maybe random algorithmic errors are taking place in terms of what they're tracking?

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

All we can do is verify the information that's provided to us by the rights holder. That includes the time, date and IP address of the downloads. When all that information is accurate, we forward the notice, and we're obligated to do so.

I can understand it's a concern for users, and that's why we want to ensure there are new provisions that ensure that we can at least weed out some of the more nefarious ones, but there will always be notices that are provided that.... It's supposed to serve an educational purpose, and sometimes it just doesn't hit that mark.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Yes.

Thank you.

The Chair:

We're going to move to Ms. Caesar-Chavannes.

You have seven minutes.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Thank you.

Ms. Mainville-Neeson, you said during your testimony that innovation is essential to keeping the industry healthy. While I appreciate that, I just wanted you to describe how this innovation disruption has affected the interests of copyright holders in the last 10 years.

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Innovation and disruption do go hand in hand. We certainly believe in balance. The idea is not to balance only in favour of network operators, for example, but rather to ensure that we have the right legislative framework in place to promote innovation to the benefit of rights holders. Good innovation should benefit all the users, including both the rights holders and the intermediaries, such as ISPs or TV service providers.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Has the Copyright Act restricted your ability at all to develop and continue to use current and emerging technology?

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Yes, it has. The examples we've provided were, for example, the NPVR, and other areas where we've been looking at different means of providing notices in order to attempt to address some of the concerns raised by Mr. Albas and Mr. Angus.

These are the types of things we're constantly looking at. The disproportionate and unbalanced sharing of risk between network operators and rights holders is working against innovation. We just don't bring things to market.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Last week we had some other ISPs here with us. I understand that you're not vertically integrated like some of your counterparts, such as Rogers and Bell. One main argument made by the opponents of the safe harbours provision in the act is to challenge the dumb pipe theory.

Can you describe the extent to which the ISPs can identify content in the data they transmit?

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

I think every ISP will have different means and different degrees of what's commonly called a deep packet inspection. Not all ISPs do that kind of work. To the extent that those vary in degrees, I would say that Telus is very much at the low end of that. There's very little ability to discover exactly what's being downloaded: a bit is a bit is a bit.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Is there no capacity for Telus to do that?

(1630)

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

I wouldn't say no capacity, but it's not an area that we've generally gone to at this point.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I will pass to Mr. Lametti. [Translation]

Mr. David Lametti (LaSalle—Émard—Verdun, Lib.):

My question is for the four of you.

Ms. Cyr and Mr. Pelletier, you're asking us to change the initial balance between the writers and the directors, and we have an ecosystem for films—

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

No.

Mr. David Lametti:

With your permission, I'll simply ask my question, and then you can answer.

There is an initial balance in that the author assigns his or her rights by contract when his film is being produced. Ms. Messier and Ms. Beaudry described that ecosystem well, where certain risks are taken, but not by the authors.

In your opinion, all four of you, is there an injustice there, and if so, where is it?

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

If I may—

Mr. David Lametti:

Just a moment, please.

Why change that ecosystem? Is it not in keeping with the risks that are taken? Is anyone underpaid? To us, from the outside, that ecosystem seems to function well enough. I'm thinking of Xavier Dolan or Atom Egoyan, and things seem to be going rather well for them in Canada.

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

I think your question is mainly for me, and I'd like to correct something: we don't want to change that ecosystem. Quite the opposite; we want to preserve it. At this time, authors give producers licences so that they may use their works. We don't want to change that.

We simply want to clarify the act to include a presumption of ownership. That means that absent contrary evidence like a contract with a producer or a claim to copyright by another creator, it is presumed that the scriptwriter and the director are at least authors of the work. That ambiguity needs to be cleared up in the act with regard to the presumption of ownership.

Under the act, the producer is presumed to be such if his name is mentioned in the credits. This wording, under the subtitle “Presumptions respecting copyright and ownership”, could lead people to believe that the producers are the authors. However, that is not the case, and nothing in Canadian jurisprudence states that producers are authors.

The authors are people who use their talents and their judgment to create dramatic works. I respect the work of producers, who take financial risks, but I don't think that creating a budget is equivalent to creating a work of art.

The current system works and we do not want to change it.

Mr. David Lametti:

Let us also hear from Ms. Messier or Ms. Beaudry.

Ms. Marie-Christine Beaudry:

First, I want to specify that when we talk about cinematographic works, we are talking about audiovisual works.

Mr. David Lametti:

Yes.

Ms. Marie-Christine Beaudry:

I hear my colleague talking about feature films alone, and I understand since he directs feature films. However, we are discussing many other things here such as televised magazines, variety programs or reality television shows. Often, there is no scriptwriter. There may also be other directors who come in at the end of the development of the work. I'm saying that to highlight the fact that there are different types of works, and let's not forget that all of them fall under the “audiovisual work” definition.

Often, the producer starts the development process, whether we're talking about a variety show or a drama program. In that last case, he will work with the author, of course, who will have rights from his script, since this will be a distinct cinematographic work and he will be able to exploit it on the publishing side. Producers do not necessarily have all those rights.

The producer takes part in the development of the work and there are discussions, exchanges. We're talking here about dramas, but think about variety shows or TV magazines; the producer knows what the broadcaster wants, and he is the one who stays in contact with the latter and pilots the development of that work.

The director comes into the process at the production stage. By establishing and negotiating the production budget, we determine the scope of the work and its category: long series, long series of 30 or 60 minutes, filmed outside or not, and so on. All of these decisions will relate to the very content of the work, to its vision.

To say today that we have no impact on the creation of the work would be totally false. In the case of a full-length film, I recognize that the development of the work may be somewhat different. However, that is not the case every time, and we cannot ignore and not mention the involvement of the producer in the creative process.

(1635)

Mr. David Lametti:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

May I clarify something?

The Chair:

Perhaps we could get back to it later, because we've gone past the allotted time.[English]

Mr. Chong, you have five minutes. [Translation]

Hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I have a question for the Société professionnelle des auteurs et des compositeurs du Québec.

The committee analysts did their work. According to Statistics Canada, music publishers' incomes in Canada increased from $148 million to $282 million between 2010 and 2015. That's a lot. During that same period, the average income of those who work full-time in the Canadian music industry increased for all occupations, except for that of Canadian and Quebec musicians and singers, whose average incomes went from $19,800 to $19,000; $800 less per year.

How do you explain that situation in Canada for that five-year period?

Ms. Marie-Josée Dupré:

In the music publishing world, there are big players like Universal, Sony, and Warner-Chappell, and other small and medium ones. These publishers sign contracts with several creators. I'm not talking here about singers, but songwriters.

The contracts songwriters sign force them to transfer ownership of their works to the publishers. It is common practice in Canada—and even elsewhere in the world—for a songwriter to assign ownership of his works, which then no longer belong to him or her, in exchange for remuneration. In Canada, 50% of that remuneration goes to the publisher, and the other half goes to the songwriter. If you are the sole songwriter, you receive all of that 50%, but if there are two or more of you, that figure goes down.

Companies can thus increase their assets and their capital, but in every instance, the songwriter sees 50% of his income go to the publisher. If he's fortunate enough to also be a singer, his record company will also provide remuneration, but once again, that is only a small percentage. Unfortunately, the monies generated are chopped up in this way.

It has been said repeatedly that royalties paid to songwriters for the online plays of their works have never offset the loss of income they used to get from the sale of their compact disks, since those royalties have been completely divided up in the same way. And so their incomes can only stagnate or decline, and they weren't all that great to begin with. If the songwriter is also a singer, he is then in another category and may make more. For the creators, however, that is the situation.

In the days of compact disks, each song brought in 10¢ for the songwriters. Thus, a 10-song album generated a dollar for the creators, and half of that went to the publisher or publishers, and the other half to the songwriter or songwriters. Someone is losing out from this shift, and clearly it is neither the publishers nor the companies, but the music creators who are forced to assign ownership of their rights and be satisfied with the meagre incomes they are given.

(1640)

Hon. Michael Chong:

In your opinion, what can be done to remedy this? It's a problem: the revenues of the big companies are increasing substantially, but those of the singers and musicians are falling drastically.

Ms. Marie-Josée Dupré:

Indeed.

We are currently looking at different entrepreneurship models. Many songwriters—many of whom are also singers nowadays—are turning to self-production in order to keep part of their rights and also earn as much money as possible.

Rather than transferring all of their rights, they give licences, but that practice is not yet current in the publishing world. As long as the situation does not change, the fate of songwriters will not truly improve.

However, as I said, if the private copy regime had evolved with technology, the millions of copies that are made on tablets and telephones, which have replaced the compact disk and the cassette—which were around when the regime was created—would generate more royalties, which would help the songwriters.

In the current state of affairs, you need millions of views or hits on YouTube or Spotify before you can generate royalties of $150. Where is justice in that for a music creator? Without their creative activity, no one would have had any work to develop. The singer is certainly important, but he or she would have had nothing to sing if the songwriter had not created the work. The producer of sound recordings could not have produced anything had the work not existed.

It seems people want to relegate the concept of creation to the back burner. For a 10-song album, only one dollar will be paid to the creator, despite a total sale price of $15, $16 or $20—albums may only cost between $10 and $15 these days, those that still sell. I'm sure we all agree that that is not enormous.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[English]

Mr. Longfield, you have five minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thanks, Mr. Chair. Thanks to Mr. Chong across the way. We are in neighbouring ridings.

You're on the same question I had, so thank you to the chair for giving us a little bit more time with that answer. I want to build on that a little more with Ms. Dupré.

I was at the Guelph Youth Music Centre yesterday. Sue Smith got an award. She got her name up on the wall of honour. She does a lot of instruction with youth in Guelph. She couldn't pay Pete Townshend's fees to do musicals, so she created musicals herself. She has created over 500 characters in many musicals over the years with the kids.

You touched on the up-and-coming writers and how they have to register their work. Could you expand on how easy or hard that is for them to do, thinking of Sue Smith's work?

Ms. Marie-Josée Dupré:

It is very hard to manage all the aspects of your career. Being a creator usually means that you're not necessarily an entrepreneur. However, you need to understand the meaning of all the contracts and the dealings you will have. You need to understand the impacts of all the dealings you will have with a record label and a music publisher, and they are mostly financial impacts. This is important.

At SPACQ, one of the goals we have is to help manage that aspect so that the young up-and-coming authors and composers can be more comfortable with all these aspects.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

If I could build on that towards.... You made a comment about the Copyright Board. I asked a few meetings back about decisions from the Copyright Board taking a long time. In your opinion, does it have to do with resources, or is it maybe because we're not clear enough with the legislation?

I also wanted to suggest that the composition of the board should include musicians or other performers so that we get their perspectives.

Could you comment a little bit more on the Copyright Board, please?

(1645)

Ms. Marie-Josée Dupré:

To have a musician or author or composer on the board is a very interesting idea. However, you still need to have someone who is professional and who knows the business almost inside out to make sure they can bring some perspective to the board and the decision.

As for the lengthy decision process, maybe there are some resources that are deficient. Also, I think it's the process itself. Evidence is submitted; then there's a delay, and then the other parties submit evidence. It's about building up cases, and it's taking time.

I used to work at SOCAN in the licensing department. I was not directly involved with the Copyright Board. I remember when the cable tariff was proposed in 1990 and was first approved in 1996. I think the first Internet tariff was proposed in 1996 and the first decision was in 2004.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Okay.

Ms. Marie-Josée Dupré:

It's really difficult for societies to make sure, and then you have to adjust to all the standards and stuff.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Right. It's going with the speed of business.

Thank you.

Mr. Pelletier, you made a comment that really piqued my interest. I was speaking with a filmmaker this weekend. He said that part of a film that used to be produced in Canada has now moved over to South Africa because of tax benefits. Then the rest of the film goes to Los Angeles, where some reworking is done, and then the finishing is done in Canada because of the tax benefits we have in Canada.

We're looking at copyright, but there's a bigger picture here of making money in Canada by being competitive and by providing whatever incentives.

Could you comment on the overall ecosystem we have?

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

In Canada, the nationality of the copyright lies with the nationality of the producer, but the copyright itself is with the author.

In the situation you're describing, I think it might be an American production, since you say some money is going to Los Angeles.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

That's right.

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

Then the copyright must lie with an American company, probably.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Okay. Thank you.

My five minutes are up.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Lloyd. You have five minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you for coming today. It's been very interesting, this whole study and having you here.

Mr. Pelletier, you said you're a producer?

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

I'm a director.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

You're a director. Okay, there was a little bit of miscommunication. I heard you say producer earlier, and you said you received zero royalties, so I was curious how that worked. Since you're a director—

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

No, I'm sure my producer receives some money—maybe not royalties, but....

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

If you're not given royalties, how are directors compensated?

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

We are paid a fee for our services originally, and we give out a licence for the original use of the film or television program. Then secondary use is where we have a problem getting paid.

An example is Xavier Dolan. If his film goes on television, he's not paid because he's represented by SACD. He's not paid as a director. He does—

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

What's an example of an original use and then a secondary use for television?

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

The original use would be in the theatres.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Okay.

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

Secondary uses are television or other platforms.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Then it would be basically like a book author: they get paid for the initial sale of the book, but if somebody sells it used, they're not getting paid for that.

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

Yes.

Directors whose works are sold outside the country—Xavier Dolan sells in France—get royalties.

(1650)

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

But just not in Canada.

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

Not in Canada.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I'm aware that actors—

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

In his case, he gets royalties as a director and as a scriptwriter, because he does both.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I'm aware that in the United States, actors are paid something and they're not called royalties. They're called residuals, I believe.

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

I'm sorry; where?

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

An actor in the United States, for example, gets paid a residual.

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

Yes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Any time there's a rerun, they get a cheque in the mail.

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

Yes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Is that currently the case in Canada? Do actors receive residuals?

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

Yes, it's the same way. That's why in my films or television—because I have done television as well—the actors I direct all get [Translation]

neighbouring rights.[English]

They do get paid. I'm the only one who doesn't get paid for secondary use.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

The artists who make the cinematic soundtracks are also telling us that they're not getting any royalties.

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

I'm not a musician, but they get reproduction rights and they do license their music to the director.

As I say, I'm paid for the original use for my services and the original licence, but it's collecting royalties for secondary uses that's a problem.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you. That's very illuminating.

My next questions are for Telus.

You're talking about PVRs. I've used a timed recording thing myself. I just want some clarification.

Every time an individual makes a recording, you maintain a copy of each individual's recording. What you would like this committee to recommend is that there would be just one recording that would be kept.

Is there a legal requirement that you are to keep every individual recording? Why should this committee recommend what you are asking?

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Under the act presently, in order to avoid liability as a network provider, we would have to store an individual copy. For each person who records, we store that individual copy.

We're suggesting that's extremely inefficient, and it would require excessive duplication of memory storage, which ultimately is not conducive to additional innovation, because it's costly—

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

What is the liability? Can you describe the nature of the liability?

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Yes, and I might ask Antoine to take that question.

Mr. Antoine Malek (Senior Regulatory Legal Counsel, TELUS Communications Inc.):

Yes, the issue is that the right belongs to the user. The user is making the recording but storing it on the network, and so they qualify for an exception that is commonly known as the time-shifting exception. The way it's written now, it's personal and based on your ability to create a discrete recording as though it were in your home or on your personal device. When you create it on the network, that doesn't change. You can't share it. It has to be used for your private purposes—

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

It would be massively beneficial if we were to recommend time-shifting rights for companies such as yourselves. That would massively increase your efficiency, because you wouldn't have to keep every different copy; you could keep one united copy.

Mr. Antoine Malek:

Yes. What we're asking is that if you have the one copy on the network and you can share that copy amongst users, it won't be considered a public communication but a private communication for private purposes, and that would bring it within that exception.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

My final question is on how that would impact the creators. Would it negatively impact the creators if we were to...?

Mr. Antoine Malek:

It wouldn't. No.

Years ago, we had the debate on whether we should allow exceptions to enable this, and we decided yes, but we did it inefficiently. Creators are not deprived of anything that they have currently.

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

We're not suggesting supplanting the whole video on demand mechanism. We are a video-on-demand provider, and we hope that people will continue to purchase things on video on demand as well.

With regard to the current right that exists for personal use to record, to the extent that it's more and more common to do so on a network rather than individual storage devices, we're merely suggesting that it be done efficiently.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Would it be cheaper?

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

For us, yes. We might pass those costs along.

The Chair:

I would like a little clarification.

At home, I have a PVR. I record everything, and I go home and watch it later. It's recorded on the hard drive; it's not recorded to the network.

(1655)

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Correct.

The Chair:

Then what are you referring to?

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

We're suggesting that transition, because there is the technology now for you to be able to record directly to the network. The technology is there, but the innovation to do so has been very slow to come to market because of the associated risk for the network provider.

We're suggesting that if there were changes to the act to make it such that we wouldn't incur additional liability, we would bring that innovation to the market.

With regard to your own storage space that you would normally have on your individual hard drive, imagine that you had that up in the cloud, except as the cloud operator, rather than having all of those individual storage spaces, which could mean so much storage....

Of course, there is a cost to that, not only for the the network provider but also from an environmental perspective. The storage space needs cooling and all kinds of electricity usage, so there are various elements of inefficiency here that we're trying to address.

All the things that you store on your own hard drive at home, you would store in the cloud. The cloud operator would then streamline things in the back office. You wouldn't even know. If you record, you retrieve it more or less in the same way. Whether or not it's on your personal drive or in the cloud, it would be seamless to you. On the network side, seamless to the consumer, the network operator would put things together and would not have to save millions and millions of copies of the same thing.

There are ways that we can ensure, with metadata and other information that's saved from someone's individual recording, that if they came in five minutes late or five minutes early—however people wish to record—we'd only be delivering what it is that they've recorded. This type of information can be saved without saving a whole new copy of the same thing.

The Chair:

Sorry; I have to clear this up in my own mind. What you're referring to sounds almost like a Netflix model.

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

No. Netflix is different.

Netflix is more like our video-on-demand service, where we have negotiated rights and you as an individual haven't decided to record something.

Under the current Copyright Act, you are entitled to record something on your own device or on a network. Netflix or our video-on-demand service is taking that obligation away from you and offering you a service. If you forget to record or you don't want to be bothered to pre-record things, we will offer you the service—access to this library of great content—whether it's through Netflix or the individual video-on-demand services.

The difference there is that those rights are negotiated with the rights holders, and they act independently from the current right that exists now. You still have that option to record on the cloud, whether it's on the cloud or on your own personal hard drive. Those things currently exist independently.

All we're asking is that in the back office of our network operations, we not be forced to do things in such an inefficient way that it makes the service way more costly than it needs to be.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're going to move to Mr. Jowhari. You have five minutes.

Sorry; I did take away your time.

Mr. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

That's okay.

Thank you, Mr. Chair. Thank you to the witnesses.

Going back along the same line, I do have a box and I do record various programs. I often go and see them, and I decide when to erase the film or program I was watching to clear space so I can save more.

Now, with what you're suggesting, NPVR on network, do we still have that option of being able to watch a selected few and then decide whether our storage size is going to be...and to be able to review it or see it as often as we want?

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Yes, it's absolutely intended that you would have some designated amount of storage space in the cloud that you chose to purchase in the same way that the box that you've chosen had a specific size of storage space for your PVR. You would have, in the network, a similar size so that you then choose to make space or not.

The back office elements that I'm talking about here are seamless to you. As a consumer, you would then choose to record certain things. After you've reached your limit, you choose to delete them or not, in order to make space for more, or you purchase more space. We'd be very happy if you purchased more space, but that would be a different business model.

It is certainly not our intention that you would have unlimited recordings simply because we have a more efficient back-end system.

(1700)

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

All we are doing is we are moving our storage into a cloud.

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Yes.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

We are saying we want this much storage, and we still select which program we want to record. All you're saying is, “Allow me to streamline my back office and I will provide one copy of that, so when you select, it's going to be there as a place holder rather than your having to copy....” Okay, I understand that.

Okay, I'll go back to Mr. Pelletier. I'm confused. There was some discussion around author, creator and producer.

Also, Madam Messier, you are trying to say, at least the way I understood it, that the producers really need to negotiate their own compensation, and if they don't negotiate, there is really nothing left for them to benefit from when it goes to a different platform. Did I miss something?

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

I was saying simply that we negotiate our rights and Mrs. Messier was saying that producers were authors, which I disagree with.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Then help me understand. It's a cryptic thing. [Translation]

Ms. Hélène Messier:

I'd like to speak for myself.

According to established practice, the director and the scriptwriter receive an initial fee for their services. Afterwards, they negotiate rights on the secondary uses of the work in the collective agreement or their contract.

I think Ms. Beaudry wanted to add something about a statement that was made earlier.

Ms. Marie-Christine Beaudry:

Yes.

For television, we pay royalties to the directors, even for the initial use. Those royalties come from the revenues we receive from the broadcasters. That is part of the basic licence that the directors give us. For television, it's a little different from what was explained about feature films.

It's important to emphasize that for feature films, the producer has investors, and the amounts he receives must first of all go to the distributors. The first revenues go to the distributors and to the venues that distribute the works. Afterwards, what the producer receives has to be given to the investors, such as the Canada Media Fund or Telefilm Canada.

When there is money left, it is shared between the screenwriters and the directors. It's a fact that the revenue generated by the producer will be given first to the granting organizations.

Mr. Gabriel Pelletier:

I would like to correct something.

In our collective agreement with the AQPM, directors do not receive royalties paid at the outset out of the funds that went into a production. Once the original broadcasting licence is given, there are royalties on subsequent sales.

In fact, it is the ARRQ that collects the royalties. Generally, there are returns on those when works are sold abroad.

Ms. Marie-Christine Beaudry:

With your permission, I'd like to correct something because I am currently working on this.

I'll give you the example of a program broadcast by CBC/Radio-Canada.

CBC/Radio-Canada acquired first-use rights for broadcasting programs or films on its airwaves—for subscription video broadcast on demand, SVOD, and for free video on demand. That is part of the initial licence and of the contract we have with the director.

However, a percentage is negotiated and remitted to the director out of any funds we receive from CBC/Radio-Canada, from either SVOD or free video on demand. We currently prepare distribution reports to that effect for the ARRQ. You may think that these are not very large amounts of money, but the producer himself does not receive enormous amounts either.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[English]

Mr. Angus, we'll go back to you for two minutes.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

Thank you.

I joined CAPAC when I was 17 and went on the road. That became SOCAN. I won't say how many years ago I did that. Over the years I've received revenues from television, book publishing and music, and I'm still involved.

I find the question with music, Madame Dupré, very interesting, because there have been some very good upsides from the digital revolution. The cost of recording dropped substantially. We used to spend almost all our money on lawyers' fees and we never saw a dime, because of all those recoupables they charged to our account. If the record companies didn't want to stock you, there went your product. Now you can stock it yourself online, so there's an upside.

The downside is the disappearance of live music across the country, with bands being told they have to use T-shirts to pay to tour now. Twenty years ago people would have laughed at that.

Then on the revenue streams, we've lost the private copying levy, the royalty mechanicals from radio, and musicians are suffering a continual drop in income. Now Spotify is the latest; there you get, I think, .0005¢ for every thousand plays or something.

I don't know of any other artists' sector that faces such uncertainty in its remuneration stream. There are good opportunities in the digital realm for musicians, but there are also still a lot of pitfalls. How would you describe the reality for working artists today in the music world? Where do we need to start finding some level of coherent remuneration?

(1705)

Ms. Marie-Josée Dupré:

Indeed the situation is not the best. Mostly, with the digital world, all the licence fees are now calculated per view. The number of views you need to reach to get some revenue is totally insane, but they see this as a one-on-one communication, as opposed to mass communication like radio and audiences at concerts and so on.

If the licence fees we get from those services are not adjusted to somewhat reflect what CDs used to be in the physical world, we'll never get there anyway. You said there was no live entertainment anymore. There still is, but people think that music is free. In a restaurant or a bar, they will pay for their food and beer, but when it comes to musicians, they say they're promoting them, so they shouldn't be paid for this. You just get the door and stuff like that. It's often the philosophy of free music.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

We felt the same with previous transitions. Radio did not want to pay for music. They said they were offering a service. Radio did pay—

Ms. Marie-Josée Dupré:

Yes.

Mr. Charlie Angus:

—and it transformed the recording industry. We saw that with cable television paying when they weren't going to pay. What is stopping us being able to establish credible, but not restrictive, copyright licensing agreements with organizations like Spotify, with YouTube? Is it that we need an international movement? It seems to me that we always find these technological barriers, and then we have to fight, and that's when artists get remunerated, but we haven't seen that move into this next realm yet.

Ms. Marie-Josée Dupré:

I don't know if any international move or coalition is possible.

As I said, there were talks some time ago about multi-territorial licensing. One digital service would get a licence from one collective. They would pay all the licence fees, and it would be distributed in the different societies and then obviously to the rights holder. Is this more efficient? Maybe it's a more efficient or easier process, but will we get more? What kind of value do we give...?

As you said, we don't physically distribute CDs anymore. All the costs have been reduced, but then there was no increase. I don't know how.... We will need some help from the different rights holders to stand together and make sure that they fight for their rights. I really don't have the solution to make sure that it goes back to 20 years ago, when everybody had a decent living as a musician. It's very difficult to think of any particular scheme that will be really efficient and [Translation]

profitable.

(1710)

[English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

That's the challenge of this committee: to try to come up with some credible solutions.

We're going to go to the last two questions at five minutes each.

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I'm going to pick up where I left off an hour ago with Telus on FairPlay. Is it okay to pursue users of the Internet without a court order?

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

We believe that the FairPlay application does provide for procedural fairness. That's what's really important. The court order process is simply to ensure that there is procedural fairness. We believe that there is certainly the possibility that you can create an independent agency that would provide that fair process.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You've harped quite a bit on the fact that Bell and Rogers are vertically integrated, and it's a concern that I share. I personally don't believe that companies should be media distributor, producer and Internet provider all at once, because I think there's a fundamental conflict of interest in those companies. Do you have any thoughts or comments on that and why Telus is not a vertically integrated company?

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Certainly we have expressed significant concerns with various elements of vertical integration, and it's more for another forum and another legislative review that is happening. We believe that the Broadcasting Act does need to be amended in order to be able to address the competitive issues.

Why is Telus not vertically integrated? Obviously, we'll all pursue our different strategies. We believe, since many years ago.... We want to unleash the power of the Internet and provide the best there is to offer. It's simply a question of strategy. To the extent that vertical integration can create some incentive and opportunities for anti-competitive conduct that can harm consumers, that issue needs to be addressed.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can you dive a bit more into how it harms consumers?

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

It's mostly from a broadcasting perspective. The broadcasting environment is such that we are required to offer the programming services that the vertically integrated companies own. They have every incentive to either foreclose competition by making certain services that are particularly popular unavailable to us—and we've had to fight through that with the CRTC in the past—or to increase their rivals' costs, such that for the wholesale rates that we would pay to offer the same programming services that they offer to their subscribers, we would have to pay more.

The rationale for doing that is clear. They want to raise our costs so that they can compete against us in various markets, not just in the broadcasting market but also in the various other ways that we compete, such as the wireless markets, the Internet space and television distribution. Also, of course, we all know that television is moving online. To the extent that you might say that Rogers Cable is not necessarily competitive with Telus in our markets, because we only offer TV in the west and in parts of Quebec, ultimately it does become competitive when they're offering their services online through, for example, Sportsnet Now, which is an over-the-top offering that can supplant your TV subscription.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Earlier we were talking about DPI, deep packet inspection. I used to work in the industry. Does it threaten net neutrality? What is Telus' position on net neutrality?

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Telus is a firm believer in net neutrality.

When I say we're a firm believer in net neutrality, I think a principle needs to be applied to some elements in such a way that it makes sense for consumers and for the country as a whole. Some elements—for example, security, privacy of information—are principles that sometimes compete with net neutrality. You need to have balance in applying all of these various principles, which are all equally important.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well, if you give yourselves the right as an industry to inspect packets, to inspect traffic and traffic shape and so forth, do you not then give yourselves an obligation to monitor that traffic? If illegal traffic were to go through it, wouldn't you then have an obligation to react to that, because you've now taken on that role of judge of the traffic, as opposed to being just a common carrier?

(1715)

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Traffic management practices are generally more commonly applied with respect to peak times and those types of things, as opposed to actually determining what kind of content is there or what kind of packets are being transmitted.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's my point. It's a very important difference to get out there.

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

It is. Certainly, I'm not suggesting that traffic management practices won't necessarily look at different types of content, but these are the types of practices that would be applied and reviewed by the CRTC.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you. I've already been cut off.

The Chair:

You're cut off now.

Now, for the final question of the day, we have Mr. Albas.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and again thank you to our witnesses today.

I'd like to go back to Telus, specifically since in your brief and in the subsequent discussion here today you talked a lot about notice and notice and what works in that regime and what doesn't seem to work.

I can appreciate when you say you have a lot of fraudulent notices or information that is incorrect but you have an obligation to pass it on. Do you have any hard data on how often you've received those? Is it one out of every 10, one out of 100, one out of every thousand?

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

First of all, we might not be able to detect the fraudulent notices at all, right? I wouldn't be able to give you a number on whether we are receiving them, but the potential is there. That's our concern, which is why establishing things like the content and the form of the notices is extremely important and may address that.

As for the notices that we receive that may be too old or may not include all the.... We do research to find if we have any uploads at this IP address, at this date and this time, and how many of those aren't.... We do the work, but it turns out that it doesn't appear to be one of our customers. That does happen a lot. That's the reason automation becomes so important. When you're looking at hundreds of thousands of notices a month, we certainly don't have time to inspect them all in any great detail.

Mr. Dan Albas:

We've heard suggestions from other ISPs around notice and notice, specifically about removing settlement offers and having a standardized form. We haven't heard yet about charging rights holders to forward those notices. Is Telus alone in wanting this change, or do you suspect that other companies would also desire to have it brought forward?

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

We heard TekSavvy suggest it when they appeared last week. We're not suggesting that it be a cost recovery mechanism but simply that it add some type of cost. That's unlike the Norwich orders, where you have to do additional work in order to be able to find additional information beyond the notice and notice work that's done. There you're talking about cost recovery, and that's what Rogers went to the Supreme Court and obtained the right to do. We certainly support that aspect of cost recovery.

On a notice and notice regime, I think that in order to best balance rights holders and the interests of the innocent third parties here, the ISPs, at least adding some cost—not necessarily a cost recovery, but some cost—will at the very least deter any nefarious use, whether it's fraudulent, whether it's phishing. We're talking about different types of regimes for notice and notice and an element of cost.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay.

Obviously, you viewed last week's meeting. In the meeting we also discussed the Federal Court's ability—not capacity, but ability—constitutionally to hear.... I shouldn't say “constitutionally”, but I mean its ability to rule on these matters. You may not be a part of the FairPlay coalition, but you do support it.

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Yes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Do you feel that the Federal Court right now does not have the clarity to be able to hear and to offer injunctive relief?

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

No, that's not our suggestion at all. We merely suggest that piracy needs to be addressed in many different fora.

The Federal Court is certainly one area; in fact, any court can hear matters of copyright infringement. We believe that they have that ability and they have the expertise. To the extent that court processes may take longer than an administrative process, we believe there may be value in having an additional opportunity for rights holders, another place for rights holders to go.

Piracy is something that needs to be fought on many fronts, in our view.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I appreciate that there are multiple different ways, but Shaw specifically cited that some clarification would be helpful. We're here not only to clarify things like notice and notice and whether it's reasonable to have a cloud-streaming, on-demand-like mechanism for some of the improvements that you want. However, specifically on the clarification at the Federal Court, do you think there is enough clarity right now?

(1720)

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

There's arguably never sufficient clarity, especially when it comes to copyright. I think that additional clarity could be useful. Is it absolutely necessary? Perhaps.

Mr. Antoine Malek:

I'll just add to that.

I think what you might be referencing is the point that was made about section 36 of the Telecommunications Act, which stipulates that the CRTC needs to approve any blocking of a website. There is that potential that you have, as an ISP, of a court order telling you to block a website, and yet you can't do that without the CRTC authorizing it first. Some clarity is needed there. Yes, we do agree with that.

If the role of the CRTC and how it interplays with a court order could be clarified, it would be helpful for ISPs.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you.

I will share my time.

The Chair:

Well, you had no time left, but go ahead.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have just a quick question. You talked about site blocking. How would you do it? You talked earlier about DNS blocking, which is a completely ineffective system, so I'm just curious.

Ms. Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Because we're not part of the FairPlay coalition, I don't think that we've really considered the various mechanisms for doing so. We've been speaking with our technical people, and there are various ways that have different pitfalls. Certainly over-blocking is a big concern. Blocking in the right way that actually is of value.... If we're only blocking something that can be easily overturned, then it's of no value.

It's a complicated question.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair enough. Thank you.

The Chair:

On that note, [Translation]

I thank you very much for all of your statements, interesting questions, and for your answers which were every bit as interesting. We have a lot of work ahead of us.[English]

Thank you very much, everybody. We are adjourned for the day.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

[Énregistrement électronique]

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte.

En ce beau lundi après-midi, je vous souhaite la bienvenue à cette nouvelle séance de notre comité. Nous allons poursuivre aujourd'hui notre examen quinquennal prévu par la loi de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Nous accueillons deux représentants de Telus Communications, soit Ann Mainville-Neeson, vice-présidente, Politique de radiodiffusion et Affaires réglementaires; et Antoine Malek, avocat-conseil principal, Affaires réglementaires.

De l'Association québécoise de la production médiatique, nous recevons Hélène Messier, présidente et directrice générale; et Marie-Christine Beaudry, directrice, Affaires juridiques et commerciales, Zone 3. Voilà qui est intéressant, Zone 3.

De la Société professionnelle des auteurs et des compositeurs du Québec, nous accueillons par vidéoconférence depuis Montréal Marie-Josée Dupré, directrice générale. Est-ce que vous m'entendez?

Mme Marie-Josée Dupré (directrice générale, Société professionnelle des auteurs et des compositeurs du Québec):

Oui, très bien. [Français]

Le président:

C'est parfait.[Traduction]

Sont également des nôtres Gabriel Pelletier, président, et Mylène Cyr, directrice générale, de l'Association des réalisateurs et réalisatrices du Québec.[Français]

J'essaie de faire du mieux possible.[Traduction]

Avant d'aller plus loin, je crois que M. Albas a un avis de motion qu'il aimerait nous soumettre.

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Excellent. Merci, monsieur le président.

Je prie nos témoins de m'excuser, mais je vais faire très rapidement.

Compte tenu des événements récents, j'aimerais déposer un avis de motion.

Je propose donc: Que, pour aider dans l'examen de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, le Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie demande aux ministres Freeland et Bains de venir devant le comité, accompagnés de fonctionnaires, pour expliquer les répercussions de l'accord États-Unis-Mexique-Canada (AEUMC) sur les régimes régissant la propriété intellectuelle et le droit d'auteur au Canada.

Nous ne pouvons bien évidemment pas débattre de cette motion aujourd'hui. J'ose espérer que mes collègues jugeront qu'elle tombe à point nommé et que nous pourrons en discuter lors d'une prochaine séance.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant aux exposés de nos témoins. Pourquoi ne pas débuter par les gens de Telus Communications?[Français]

Madame Mainville-Neeson, vous disposez de sept minutes.

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson (vice-présidente, Politique de radiodiffusion et Affaires réglementaires, Société TELUS Communications):

C'est parfait, je vous remercie.[Traduction]

Juste pour faire changement, je vais présenter mon exposé en anglais, mais je serai ravie de répondre à toutes vos questions dans l'une ou l'autre des deux langues officielles.

Bonjour à tous. Je vous remercie au nom de Telus Communications de nous donner l'occasion de comparaître devant le Comité.

Je m'appelle Ann Mainville-Neeson et je suis vice-présidente responsable de la politique de radiodiffusion et des affaires réglementaires pour Telus. Je suis accompagnée d'Antoine Malek, notre avocat-conseil principal spécialisé en propriété intellectuelle.

Telus est une entreprise nationale de communications. Qu'il s'agisse de brancher les Canadiens via nos réseaux sans fil et filaire ou d'améliorer la prestation des services de santé en misant sur la technologie numérique, nous sommes résolus à travailler avec des objectifs bien précis en tête. Nous voulons donner au Canada les moyens de prospérer au sein de l'économie numérique tout en offrant à tous de meilleures perspectives en matière de santé, d'éducation et d'économie.

Nous offrons une vaste gamme de produits et de services qui comprennent la téléphonie filaire et sans fil, l'accès à Internet à large bande, des services de santé, la domotique et la sécurité domiciliaire ainsi que la diffusion télé par Internet. Comme vous avez entendu précédemment les témoignages d'autres exploitants de services de télévision, il est bon de noter que Telus, contrairement à ses principaux compétiteurs, n'est pas une entreprise intégrée verticalement, en ce sens que nous ne possédons pas nos propres services de programmation commerciale. Notre entreprise s'emploie exclusivement à regrouper et à distribuer le meilleur contenu disponible.

Pour faire en sorte que les Canadiens se tournent vers nous lorsqu'ils veulent avoir accès à du contenu, nous sommes à l'écoute de nos clients et constamment à la recherche de moyens plus efficaces pour anticiper leurs besoins et leurs désirs, et y répondre à leur satisfaction. Nous savons à quel point l'innovation peut être essentielle pour soutenir la concurrence dans un environnement numérique où les consommateurs ont plus de choix que jamais auparavant. L'innovation est selon nous primordiale pour que le système canadien de radiodiffusion, une source importante de revenus pour les artistes de chez nous, demeure sain et concurrentiel. Nos remarques d'aujourd'hui viseront donc surtout à proposer des changements qui favoriseront l'innovation, une plus grande efficience et une meilleure capacité d'adaptation de notre loi dans un contexte où les choses évoluent rapidement.

Je vais d'abord vous parler de l'un des aspects au sujet desquels les modifications entrées en vigueur en 2012 n'ont pas suffisamment tenu compte de cette nécessité d'innover. Cette année-là, le Parlement a adopté des mesures prévoyant des exceptions conférant aux utilisateurs le droit d'enregistrer une émission pour la regarder plus tard. Ils peuvent effectuer cet enregistrement sur leur propre appareil ou en utilisant l'espace de stockage d'un réseau. On parle dans ce dernier cas d'un enregistrement numérique personnel en réseau ou en infonuagique.

Bien que les changements apportés en 2012 étaient un pas dans la bonne direction, il faut tout de même noter que le libellé prévoyait un enregistrement distinct pour chaque utilisateur. En conséquence, un fournisseur de services d'enregistrement numérique en réseau comme notre entreprise pourrait être tenu d'emmagasiner des centaines de milliers — voire des millions — de copies d'un même enregistrement, soit une copie pour chaque utilisateur qui a procédé à l'enregistrement. Un dédoublement excessif de la sorte est inefficient et coûteux pour l'exploitant de réseau sans pour autant procurer une valeur ajoutée au titulaire des droits.

Une démarche novatrice consisterait à optimiser l'efficience du réseau en partageant un seul et unique enregistrement d'une émission entre tous les utilisateurs qui l'ont enregistrée pour écoute en différé. Telus recommande que la Loi soit modifiée en ce sens sans que des responsabilités additionnelles n'incombent à l'exploitant du réseau.

Si l'on considère ce que l'avenir nous réserve et les autres mesures à prendre pour que la Loi puisse favoriser d'une manière générale l'innovation en suivant l'évolution des changements technologiques, Telus recommande que les risques associés à l'innovation en cas d'ambiguïté dans la Loi soient répartis plus équitablement entre les titulaires de droits et les innovateurs. Nous proposons plus précisément certains changements au régime de dommages-intérêts préétablis dans la Loi.

En vertu des dispositions en vigueur, les obligations pouvant découler des dommages-intérêts préétablis peuvent être déterminées sans tenir aucunement compte des torts causés aux titulaires de droits ou des profits tirés de la violation. Nous recommandons que les tribunaux soient habilités dans tous les cas à rajuster les dommages-intérêts préétablis pour tenir compte des circonstances particulières de l'infraction. Il est déjà possible pour les tribunaux de le faire, mais seulement dans certaines circonstances. Il faudrait que l'on puisse établir que l'on a agi de mauvaise foi pour justifier l'imposition de dommages-intérêts préétablis disproportionnés par rapport à la gravité de la faute. Si l'on pouvait ainsi s'assurer que des décisions punitives sont rendues uniquement dans les causes où il est approprié et souhaitable de le faire, la Loi sur le droit d'auteur cesserait d'être un contre-incitatif à l'innovation.

J'aimerais maintenant vous parler du régime d'avis et avis.

Disons d'entrée de jeu que Telus est d'accord avec les autres fournisseurs de services Internet qui ont comparu devant le Comité. Nous croyons nous aussi que le régime d'avis et avis représente une approche raisonnable à l'égard des violations du droit d'auteur, car elle tient compte tout autant des intérêts des titulaires de droits que de ceux des utilisateurs. Nous sommes également en faveur des propositions visant à imposer un format et un contenu pour ces avis en exigeant notamment qu'ils soient lisibles par machine de manière à ce que leur traitement puisse être automatisé dans toute la mesure du possible.

(1535)



Telus est également d'accord avec le ministre Bains qui annonçait que ces avis ne devaient pas renfermer de contenu superflu, comme des demandes de règlement, pas plus que de la publicité indiquant où trouver des renseignements d'ordre judiciaire, comme certains l'ont suggéré. Ce n'est pas à cela que doit servir le régime d'avis et avis.

Telus appuie en outre la proposition de TekSavvy voulant que l'on autorise les fournisseurs de services Internet à imposer des frais raisonnables pour la transmission de tels avis. Non seulement s'agit-il d'une question d'équité envers les fournisseurs de services qui sont des tiers innocents dans les différends concernant le droit d'auteur, mais c'est aussi un moyen de prévenir une éventuelle utilisation abusive du régime. Le gouvernement a dit vouloir prendre des mesures pour empêcher une utilisation inappropriée en interdisant les demandes de règlement, mais cela ne diminue en rien les risques d'utilisation abusive sous d'autres formes comme les avis frauduleux ou ceux renfermant des liens visant l'hameçonnage, ce qui est préoccupant du point de vue de la sécurité des consommateurs. L'imposition de frais pour l'accès au régime contribuerait grandement à minimiser les risques d'utilisation abusive.

Telus propose enfin que les dispositions distinctes prévoyant des dommages-intérêts préétablis dans le cadre du régime d'avis et avis soient modifiées dans le sens de ce que nous proposons pour ces mêmes dommages dans leur application plus générale en vertu de la Loi. Telus recommande à ce sujet que les tribunaux disposent de la latitude nécessaire pour adjuger moins que le montant minimum préétabli pour le régime d'avis et avis de telle sorte que les dommages-intérêts octroyés soient proportionnels aux torts causés aux titulaires de droits, et qu'une preuve de mauvaise foi de la part du fournisseur de services Internet fautif soit nécessaire pour justifier des dommages-intérêts dont le montant est disproportionné et punitif. Une modification semblable contribuerait grandement à aider les fournisseurs de services Internet à assumer les frais de plus en plus considérables qu'ils doivent engager pour aider les titulaires à faire valoir leurs droits.

En terminant, nous tenons à remercier le Comité pour les efforts qu'il déploie aux fins de l'examen de cette importante loi. La Loi sur le droit d'auteur est l'un des principaux outils législatifs à notre disposition pour voir au bon fonctionnement des marchés numériques au sein de l'économie moderne, et nous souscrivons à son intention. Pour que l'économie numérique canadienne puisse s'épanouir pleinement, nous avons besoin d'un cadre législatif fondé sur un juste équilibre entre le soutien à offrir aux créateurs et la nécessité d'appuyer l'innovation favorisant de nouvelles possibilités technologiques et commerciales au bénéfice de tous les Canadiens. Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à l'Association québécoise de la production médiatique. Madame Messier. [Français]

Mme Hélène Messier (présidente-directrice générale, Association québécoise de la production médiatique):

Bonjour.

Je vais m'exprimer en français.

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs, je m'appelle Hélène Messier.

Je suis la présidente-directrice générale de l'Association québécoise de la production médiatique, ou l'AQPM. Je suis accompagnée de Me Marie-Christine Beaudry, directrice des Affaires juridiques et commerciales pour la maison de production Zone3.

Zone3 est l'une des plus importantes entreprises de production du Québec. Elle oeuvre dans le domaine de cinéma, et sa filiale Cinémaginaire a produit récemment La chute de l'empire américain, un film réalisé par Denys Arcand.

En télévision, cette maison produit des émissions de tous genres, dont des séries jeunesse, comme Jérémie, des magazines, par exemple Les Francs-tireurs ou Curieux Bégin, des émissions de variété comme Infoman, ou des comédies, telles Like-moi!

L'AQPM regroupe 150 entreprises de production indépendante en audiovisuel qui produisent pour le cinéma, la télévision et le Web, soit la vaste majorité des entreprises québécoises produisant pour tous les écrans en langue française et en langue anglaise. Les membres de l'AQPM produisent plus de 500 films, émissions de télévision et émissions Web par année, qui sont toujours vus, sur tous les écrans, par des millions de spectateurs.

Pensons au long métrage Bon Cop Bad Cop, à Mommy, lauréat du Prix du Jury du Festival de Cannes et du César du meilleur film étranger, et des émissions comme La Voix, Fugueuse ou encore de la quotidienne District 31, pour n'en nommer que quelques-unes. Ce sont des succès d'auditoires qui font l'envie de plusieurs.

En 2016-2017, la production cinématographique et télévisuelle au Canada a représenté une valeur globale de près de 8,4 milliards de dollars, ce qui est la source directe et indirecte de plus de 171 700 emplois équivalents temps plein. Au Québec, l'ensemble de la production cinématographique et télévisuelle représente une valeur de 1,8 milliard de dollars, et cette industrie génère 36 400 emplois.

Nous remercions donc le Comité de nous offrir l'occasion de contribuer à son examen parlementaire de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Bien que plusieurs enjeux intéressent l'AQPM, comme le piratage et l'extension de la copie privée pour y inclure l'oeuvre audiovisuelle, notre intervention d'aujourd'hui portera essentiellement sur la question de la titularité des droits en audiovisuel.

En effet, s'il est aisé de déterminer qui est l'auteur d'une sculpture ou d'une chanson, il en est tout autrement pour une oeuvre audiovisuelle, qu'il s'agisse d'une émission de télévision, d'une oeuvre cinématographique ou d'une oeuvre conçue pour le Web. La Convention de Berne pour la protection des oeuvres littéraires et artistiques prévoit l'autonomie des pays pour établir la titularité des droits sur les oeuvres cinématographiques.

Au Canada, le processus d'identification a été amorcé au début des années 1990, mais il est reporté depuis. La législation canadienne est donc silencieuse à ce sujet. Conséquemment, seuls les tribunaux sont habilités à identifier les auteurs d'une oeuvre cinématographique donnée sur la base des faits propres à cette oeuvre. Peu de cas ayant été répertoriés, aucune règle claire ne s'en dégage.

Plusieurs pays ont choisi d'identifier l'auteur de l'oeuvre audiovisuelle dans leur législation nationale. Aux États-Unis, au Royaume-Uni, en Australie et en Nouvelle-Zélande — des pays ayant une philosophie de droit d'auteur analogue à celle du Canada —, on identifie le producteur comme étant le seul titulaire du droit d'auteur, à l'exception du Royaume-Uni, où les titulaires sont le producteur et le réalisateur.

Or, au Canada, non seulement les producteurs ne sont pas reconnus comme titulaires de droit mais, de surcroît, ils doivent produire et exploiter des oeuvres audiovisuelles sur la base d'un modèle incertain, et ils doivent gérer tous les risques qui en découlent. Notons toutefois qu'afin de limiter ces risques, certaines précisions ont été apportées dans le cadre des ententes collectives intervenues, d'une part, entre les syndicats qui représentent les scénaristes, les réalisateurs, les compositeurs de musique et les artistes-interprètes et, d'autre part, l'AQPM au nom des producteurs qu'elle représente. De manière générale, le producteur obtient des droits et paie des cachets ou des redevances pour l'utilisation de ces droits.

Il faut se demander si la catégorie « oeuvre cinématographique » est encore la dénomination appropriée pour inclure toute la réalité actuelle des oeuvres créées dans le secteur de l'audiovisuel, incluant celles créées pour les médias numériques. L'AQPM croit que, telle que définie, l'oeuvre cinématographique n'est pas technologiquement neutre car elle fait référence à des techniques traditionnelles de production, soit la cinématographie, plutôt qu'à l'oeuvre en soi.

C'est pourquoi nous recommandons que la catégorie « oeuvre audiovisuelle » soit créée et définie comme étant des séquences animées d'images, accompagnées ou non de son, à laquelle seraient assimilées les oeuvres cinématographiques.

(1540)



Se pose ensuite la question de l'identité des titulaires de droits de cette oeuvre audiovisuelle. Pour y répondre, on doit qualifier l'oeuvre. Est-ce une oeuvre en soi, ou bien s'agit-il d'une oeuvre de collaboration ou d'une compilation qui assemble plusieurs oeuvres sous-jacentes? Est-ce que le scénario ou la musique, par exemple, forment un tout indissociable, ou sont-ils plutôt des oeuvres distinctes qui font partie d'un tout plus grand que ses parties? Alors, qui est le titulaire des droits sur ce tout?

L'AQPM prétend que le rôle du producteur dans le processus de la création et de la confection d'une oeuvre audiovisuelle commanderait qu'on reconnaisse son apport créatif à l'oeuvre. Il serait ainsi le titulaire de droits sur l'oeuvre audiovisuelle, avec tous les droits qui en découlent, mais sans que soient pénalisés les créateurs des oeuvres sous-jacentes. Il conviendrait alors de préciser qu'une personne morale pourrait être le premier titulaire du droit d'auteur sur l'oeuvre audiovisuelle.

Me Beaudry va vous expliquer pourquoi pourquoi il est essentiel que le producteur soit titulaire de l'ensemble des droits sur l'oeuvre audiovisuelle dès ses premiers balbutiements.

(1545)

Mme Marie-Christine Beaudry (directrice, Affaires juridiques et commerciales, Zone 3, Association québécoise de la production médiatique) :

Bonjour.

Être producteur d'une oeuvre cinématographique, c'est tout un art!

Le producteur est le chef d'orchestre de l'oeuvre cinématographique, audiovisuelle, peut-on dire. Il est le seul à être présent du début de la création de l'oeuvre jusqu'à sa livraison finale, et même après, lors de l'exploitation de l'oeuvre. Il est le maître d'oeuvre du financement, de la gestion du projet, de même que de ses éléments créatifs.

En effet, tant par l'établissement du financement que par le choix des artisans qu'il engage au fur et à mesure du projet, le producteur détermine, oriente et influence le contenu de l'oeuvre audiovisuelle, qu'elle soit un magazine, un talk-show, une émission de variétés, un documentaire ou une dramatique.

Qui plus est, par son implication au jour le jour dans le développement créatif de l'oeuvre cinématographique, il participe à la création même de cette oeuvre. En dernier ressort, il est l'ultime décideur, tout en respectant, bien sûr, les prérogatives des scénaristes et des réalisateurs.

Selon le type de production, que ce soit une fiction, une émission de variétés, la captation d'un concert ou un documentaire, la nature de la participation des artisans, des scénaristes, des réalisateurs et des compositeurs sera différente.

Les composantes d'une oeuvre sont également variables: musique originale ou existante, textes originaux ou adaptation d'un livre, séquences d'archives, oeuvres d'art existantes ou création d'oeuvres originales. Les combinaisons sont infinies, et les personnes pouvant prétendre être l'auteur de l'un ou de l'autre des éléments composant une oeuvre sont nombreuses.

Le producteur doit pouvoir s'assurer de détenir, sans incertitude, tous les droits sur l'oeuvre audiovisuelle. Il joue non seulement un rôle créatif important, mais il est également l'unique responsable du respect des engagements contractuels à l'égard des tiers, dont ses partenaires financiers et l'équipe de production.

Enfin, c'est encore le producteur qui assume seul les risques de dépassements budgétaires qui pourraient survenir en cours de production de l'oeuvre audiovisuelle. Son implication est totale.

Aujourd'hui, il est presque impossible de produire une oeuvre cinématographique sans procéder à son financement par crédit d'impôt. Pour avoir accès au crédit d'impôt cinématographique fédéral, le Bureau de certification des produits audiovisuels canadiens, le BCPAC, exige d'ailleurs, dans ses lignes directrices sur le crédit d'impôt pour services de production cinématographique et magnétoscopique, que le producteur soit le titulaire exclusif du droit d'auteur mondial sur l'oeuvre aux fins de son exploitation. Dans la version anglaise, on parle de copyright ownership.

De plus, la presque totalité des fonds de financement de production cinématographique au Canada, de même que certains financements bancaires, exigent que le producteur soit accrédité par le BCPAC et, donc, qu'il respecte cette exigence comme condition pour le financement de la production de l'oeuvre. Tout changement à la Loi sur le droit d'auteur qui accorderait la titularité à un tiers serait en contradiction avec ces exigences de financement et fragiliserait la production canadienne cinématographique.

Une fois l'oeuvre produite, c'est également le producteur qui détermine, finance et gère l'exploitation de l'oeuvre cinématographique. Il sous-traite des éléments à des tiers à cet effet, et ce, partout dans le monde. Il peut choisir de procéder seul ou d'agir par l'intermédiaire d'un distributeur ou d'agents de distribution.

L'exploitation d'une oeuvre cinématographique a de multiples facettes exigeant une panoplie de droits à détenir sur l'oeuvre. Par exemple, il peut s'agir de la distribution de l'oeuvre elle-même dans les différents marchés existants ici ou dans d'autres territoires, de la vente d'un format basé sur l'oeuvre, de la commercialisation de produits dérivés...

Le président:

Je m'excuse, mais je dois vous interrompre. Vous avez pris presque 11 minutes pour faire votre présentation. Pourriez-vous la conclure, s'il vous plaît?

(1550)

Mme Hélène Messier:

Bien sûr.

Nous avons dit à plusieurs reprises que nous voulions régler cette question d'incertitude qui entoure l'oeuvre. Si le gouvernement décidait de ne pas retenir cette solution, il faudrait qu'il s'assure que chaque catégorie de créateurs inscrite dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur n'entrera pas en contradiction avec les conventions collectives existantes. Il devrait également y avoir une présomption légale, comme en France, selon laquelle il y a une cession en faveur du producteur pour lui permettre d'exploiter tous les droits sur son oeuvre.

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Je donne maintenant la parole à Mme Marie-Josée Dupré, de la Société professionnelle des auteurs et des compositeurs du Québec.

Vous disposez de sept minutes.

Mme Marie-Josée Dupré (directrice générale, Société professionnelle des auteurs et des compositeurs du Québec):

Je vous remercie.

Monsieur le président et membres du Comité, nous vous remercions de l'invitation à participer aux présentes consultations.

Je m'appelle Marie-Josée Dupré. Je suis la directrice générale de la Société professionnelle des auteurs et compositeurs du Québec, mieux connue chez nous sous SPACQ. Fondée il y a maintenant 37 ans, la SPACQ a pour but de promouvoir, de protéger et de favoriser de toutes les manières les intérêts économiques, sociaux et professionnels des créateurs de musique, soit plusieurs milliers d'auteurs et de compositeurs de musique du Québec et de la francophonie canadienne.

La culture occupe une part importante de l'économie canadienne, mais tous les acteurs n'y trouvent pas leur compte. Les auteurs-compositeurs travaillent très souvent dans l'ombre et ne sont pas nécessairement des têtes d'affiche reconnues. Ce sont pourtant eux qui forment le premier maillon d'une longue chaîne d'intervenants, mais ils sont souvent les moins bien rémunérés.

Voici les éléments qui retiennent particulièrement notre attention pour que le Canada ait une loi sur le droit d'auteur simplement adéquate.

Le premier élément est la durée du droit d'auteur. À la lumière de la conclusion, hier, de l'Accord États-Unis–Mexique–Canada, ou AEUMC, nous sommes heureux d'apprendre que le Canada portera la durée du droit d'auteur à 70 ans après la vie de l'auteur, comme c'est déjà le cas dans les pays qui sont nos principaux partenaires commerciaux.

Tous nos créateurs seront maintenant traités équitablement. Cependant, comme il existe déjà un grand nombre d'exceptions dans notre loi sur le droit d'auteur, il sera essentiel de garder une portée restrictive et limitative dans leur nombre et leur interprétation, afin de préserver le gain d'une prolongation de cette durée à 70 ans. Il serait effectivement dommage de voir s'éroder la rémunération liée à l'exploitation des oeuvres à cause d'une interprétation trop large des exceptions en place.

Le deuxième élément est la responsabilité des plateformes en matière de contenus générés par les utilisateurs. Nous saluons aussi la récente décision majoritaire du Parlement européen sur la responsabilité des plateformes de partage de contenus voulant qu'on paie des redevances aux créateurs et aux ayants droit. Encore une fois, le Canada, jusqu'à hier soir, était l'un des très rares pays, sinon le seul, à considérer cette forme de diffusion des oeuvres exempte de toute responsabilité.

Il est temps que le législateur revoie sa position et adopte les mesures qui s'imposent, à savoir responsabiliser les entreprises telles que YouTube — pour ne pas la nommer —, afin qu'elles paient des redevances appropriées, compte tenu de la diffusion de contenus sur leurs plateformes.

Le troisième élément est le régime de copie privée. Introduit en 1997, ce régime permet aux Canadiens de reproduire, pour leur usage personnel, le contenu musical de leur choix; en contrepartie, les auteurs perçoivent des redevances pour ces copies. Le régime est censé s'appliquer à tous les supports audio habituellement utilisés par les consommateurs pour reproduire des enregistrements sonores.

L'intention du Parlement était clairement de créer un régime qui soit technologiquement neutre, c'est-à-dire qui ne devienne pas obsolète simplement parce que les supports évoluent. Malheureusement, en 2012, l'application du régime a été restreinte aux seuls CD vierges, un support dont l'utilisation est maintenant en désuétude, alors que les consommateurs continuent à faire autant de copies de musique enregistrée sur d'autres types de supports, tels les tablettes et les téléphones, qui échappent au régime. Cette restriction prive d'ailleurs les créateurs de plusieurs dizaines de millions de dollars de redevances.

Il est impératif de remédier à cette situation en s'assurant que la Loi sur le droit d'auteur précise clairement que le régime doit s'appliquer à tous les supports et qu'on doit interpréter largement le mot « support » pour inclure tous les supports actuels et à découvrir.

D'ailleurs, il est intéressant de noter que les entreprises avec lesquelles transigent les créateurs utilisent, dans les libellés de leurs contrats, la capacité de diffuser et de reproduire les oeuvres de ces derniers par tous les moyens connus et à découvrir, alors que le législateur met un frein à la rémunération des créateurs en modifiant un régime qui ne peut suivre les développements technologiques.

Pour ce qui est de la Commission du droit d'auteur du Canada, je souligne, en complément de ce qui précède, qu'il est essentiel d'en arriver à un allégement des procédures et à des décisions plus rapides, afin de permettre aux créateurs de bénéficier d'une rémunération ajustée et majorée selon les situations sous étude, et du même coup, de permettre aux utilisateurs de savoir à quoi s'en tenir dans un laps de temps raisonnable.

Attendre des années avant que les décisions soient rendues ne permet pas une application efficace des tarifs par les sociétés de gestion, et c'est une grande source d'irritation pour les utilisateurs. Au surplus, ces longues périodes d'attente peuvent faire en sorte que les utilisations à la source de tarifs et les enjeux liés à celles-ci ne soient plus les mêmes, compte tenu de la vitesse de développement des technologies.

(1555)



Le gouvernement doit surtout voir à ce que les ressources nécessaires soient allouées à la Commission, qui pourra ainsi gagner en efficacité et avoir un impact positif autant sur les créateurs que sur les utilisateurs-consommateurs.

En conclusion, le gouvernement doit poursuivre sur sa lancée, à savoir reconnaître la valeur des oeuvres consommées et utilisées au quotidien et s'assurer que leurs créateurs bénéficient d'une juste rémunération. Autrement, c'est la culture en général qui y perdra. Les créateurs sont au coeur de la culture; sans eux, aucun contenu ne serait possible.

Je vous remercie de votre écoute.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je cède maintenant la parole à M. Gabriel Pelletier, de l'Association des réalisateurs et réalisatrices du Québec.

M. Gabriel Pelletier (président, Association des réalisateurs et réalisatrices du Québec):

Bien que j'aie hâte de m'adresser à vous, je vais passer la parole à Mme Mylène Cyr.

Le président:

Vous disposez de sept minutes.

Mme Mylène Cyr (directrice générale, Association des réalisateurs et réalisatrices du Québec):

Monsieur le président, chers membres du Comité, c'est avec grand plaisir que l'Association des réalisateurs et réalisatrices du Québec comparaît devant vous aujourd'hui pour s'exprimer sur cet important réexamen de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Je me nomme Mylène Cyr et je suis la directrice générale de l'Association. Je suis accompagnée du président, M. Gabriel Pelletier.

L'ARRQ est un syndicat professionnel de réalisateurs et de réalisatrices pigistes qui compte plus de 750 membres oeuvrant principalement en français dans les domaines du cinéma, de la télévision et du Web. Notre association défend les intérêts ainsi que les droits professionnels, économiques, culturels, sociaux et moraux de tous les réalisateurs et les réalisatrices du Québec. La négociation d'ententes collectives avec divers producteurs constitue l'une des démarches de l'Association pour ce qui est de la défense des droits des réalisateurs et du respect de leurs conditions de création.

Permettez-moi de souligner certains des objectifs exprimés par les ministres Bains et Joly dans leur lettre au président du présent comité: Comment pouvons-nous nous assurer que la Loi sur le droit d'auteur fonctionne efficacement [...] tout en aidant les créateurs à obtenir une juste valeur marchande pour leur contenu protégé par le droit d'auteur? Finalement, comment notre régime domestique peut-il positionner les créateurs [...] pour être compétitifs et maximiser leur potentiel sur la scène internationale?

Dans l'état actuel de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, la détermination de l'auteur d'une oeuvre est d'abord une question de faits, et en aucun cas la Loi ne précise qui est l'auteur. L'oeuvre cinématographique, qui est généralement une oeuvre de collaboration, ne fait pas exception. La jurisprudence canadienne précise que, s'il existe de nombreux candidats au titre d'auteur de l'oeuvre cinématographique, le réalisateur sera généralement du nombre, tout comme le scénariste.

Selon le principe émis par la Cour suprême, il ne fait aucun doute que ces auteurs exercent leur talent et leur jugement pour créer l'oeuvre cinématographique. En tant qu'auteurs, tel que prévu par la loi, ils sont les premiers titulaires des droits d'auteur dans l'oeuvre cinématographique. Pourtant, certains articles de la loi, notamment en ce qui a trait aux présomptions, créent une certaine ambiguïté à ce sujet. Dans le cas des réalisateurs, cette ambiguïté les empêche d'obtenir une juste valeur marchande pour leurs droits. Le mémoire de la SACD et de la SCAM précise ce qui suit: Lorsque la SACD-SCAM a tenté de négocier des licences générales pour le bénéfice des réalisateurs avec certains utilisateurs d’œuvres audiovisuelles, ceux-ci se sont appuyés sur ce flou juridique pour refuser de négocier. À l’heure actuelle, les réalisateurs ne reçoivent pas toute la rémunération à laquelle ils ont droit pour l’utilisation des œuvres audiovisuelles.

Encore récemment, dans nos négociations d'ententes collectives, une association de producteurs a mis en doute la titularité des droits des réalisateurs pigistes sur l'oeuvre cinématographique. Les effets de cette ambiguïté sont particulièrement importants dans un contexte où le marché de la diffusion est en évolution constante et où la valeur marchande des droits d'auteur doit pouvoir évoluer avec lui. Il est donc essentiel d'offrir au marché une chaîne de titres claire qui puisse être négociée à sa juste valeur pour les créateurs.

Nous sommes donc d'avis qu'il serait opportun, dans le cadre de l'examen de la Loi, d'apporter une précision qui corrigerait toute ambiguïté concernant le statut et les droits du réalisateur ainsi que du scénariste relativement à l'oeuvre cinématographique au Canada. L'ARRQ propose donc un amendement simple à la loi qui ne remet nullement en question ni les principes de la loi ni le mode de rémunération actuel, mais qui aurait l'avantage de corriger toute ambiguïté à l'égard des droits des réalisateurs pigistes. Nous vous soumettons en conséquence une modification de l'article 34.1, lequel introduit une présomption de propriété des droits d'auteur dans l'oeuvre cinématographique pour le réalisateur et le scénariste en tant que coauteurs de l'oeuvre cinématographique.

Cette proposition, à laquelle l'ARRQ est favorable, fait l'objet d'un consensus auprès des associations d'artistes suivantes: la SARTEC, la WGC et la DGC. Elle rejoint aussi les objectifs de la société de gestion collective SACD-SCAM.

(1600)

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Monsieur le président, chers membres du Comité, je m'appelle Gabriel Pelletier et non seulement je suis président de l'ARRQ, mais je suis aussi réalisateur.

Je suis extrêmement heureux de pouvoir enfin m'exprimer devant vous, aujourd'hui, car il y a de nombreuses années que j'attendais ce moment.

En l'an 2000, j'ai réalisé un film intitulé La vie après l'amour, qui a gagné le Billet d'or pour les recettes les plus élevées du cinéma québécois. Il a même atteint la deuxième place pour ce qui est des recettes réalisées dans tout le cinéma canadien. Son succès commercial a évidemment été très profitable pour les entreprises qui l'ont diffusé, ainsi que pour l'entreprise de mon producteur.

Quant à moi, je me souviens très bien du montant que j'ai obtenu pour mes droits d'auteur de réalisateur de ce film, au Canada, car c'est un montant dont il est facile de se souvenir. C'est un chiffre rond et même très rond: zéro dollar et zéro cent. Pour les six films que j'ai eu la chance de réaliser dans ma carrière, dont plusieurs ont atteint 1 million de dollars en recettes, j'ai obtenu le même montant pour mes droits de réalisateur au Canada. Pourtant, je n'ai aucune difficulté à me faire payer mes droits dans les autres pays de la Francophonie. Il n'y a qu'au Canada qu'on conteste la titularité de mes droits comme réalisateur et qu'on ne me donne pas ma juste part. À cause d'une ambiguïté dans la loi canadienne, la SACD, qui représente mes droits, n'a pas la capacité de négocier avec les entreprises qui exploitent mes oeuvres.

Je ne suis pas le seul à vivre cette situation. C'est le cas de tous les réalisateurs francophones que je représente. Personne ne conteste les droits des autres artistes que nous dirigeons pour créer nos films ou nos émissions de télévision, comme les compositeurs de musique ou les comédiens, qui obtiennent des droits voisins. Alors, pourquoi mettre en doute les droits d'auteur du réalisateur? Peut-on vraiment prétendre que les Xavier Dolan, Philippe Falardeau ou Léa Pool n'impriment pas une signature originale à leurs oeuvres? Il faudrait être de mauvaise foi.

Comme mes collègues réalisateurs et réalisatrices du Québec, je suis un artiste pigiste et chacun de nous doit composer avec la précarité d'emploi dans un milieu extrêmement compétitif. Il faut élaborer des idées et des projets, pour ensuite les défendre auprès des producteurs et, enfin, des investisseurs.

Une minorité de ces projets deviendront des réalisations. Nombre d'entre nous doivent donc recourir à un deuxième emploi pour répondre à leurs obligations financières quand ils ne sont pas en train de réaliser une oeuvre. Obtenir une juste rémunération pour la diffusion de nos oeuvres constitue la meilleure façon de nous donner la quiétude financière nécessaire pour continuer à faire ce que nous faisons le mieux: créer de nouvelles oeuvres.

C'est ainsi que nous pourrons maximiser notre potentiel et devenir compétitifs sur les scènes nationale et internationale, comme le suggèrent le ministre Bains et la ministre Joly.

Mesdames et messieurs membres du Comité, vous avez aujourd'hui l'occasion de corriger une situation qui affaiblit des créateurs incontournables de l'oeuvre cinématographique, les réalisateurs et les scénaristes, dans la représentation des droits qui leur reviennent. Par une simple clarification de la Loi et sans trahir ses principes, vous pourrez aider ces créateurs à contribuer efficacement à l'économie créative canadienne, tout en la consolidant.

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Je vous remercie tous de vos présentations.

Nous allons commencer la période de questions.

Monsieur Graham, vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Monsieur Pelletier, j'aimerais comprendre le « zéro dollar » dont vous avez parlé.

Pourriez-vous nous expliquer la structure de l'équipe d'un film et la répartition des revenus?

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

En fait, il y a différentes façons de monnayer les droits d'auteur pour les réalisateurs. C'est fait, soit par l'entremise des ententes collectives, quand on accorde des licences au producteur, soit par les diffuseurs lors de l'utilisation. Ce sont donc tous les marchés secondaires, par exemple, et les rediffusions à la télévision ou sur des plateformes numériques, à présent.

Disons que la Guilde canadienne des réalisateurs, la GCR, ou DGC en anglais, perçoit une avance de droit, c'est-à-dire que ses membres se font payer leurs droits à l'avance alors que, du côté des réalisateurs francophones, nous sommes plutôt payés à l'étape finale du projet. Nous sommes donc payés lorsqu'il y a utilisation. Toutefois, comme les diffuseurs contestent la titularité du droit d'auteur des réalisateurs, ils ont refusé de négocier des redevances pour les réalisateurs lors de l'utilisation.

La raison en est que, historiquement, les réalisateurs étaient des employés des diffuseurs; dans la loi canadienne, les premiers titulaires des droits d'auteurs étaient donc les employeurs. Cependant, notre marché a changé et les diffuseurs ont confié la production des oeuvres à des entreprises de production. À partir de ce là, la titularité de nos droits d'auteur aurait donc dû nous revenir. On devait négocier un arrangement, mais les entreprises ont refusé de le faire.

(1605)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Mesdames Beaudry et Messier, voulez-vous réagir à cela?

Mme Hélène Messier:

Oui.

On ne tient pas compte du cachet initial qui est versé au réalisateur et qui emporte quand même une partie de ses droits d'utilisation. Par la suite, en effet, le réalisateur à droit à une partie des revenus du producteur pour ses droits de suite.

S'il n'en reçoit pas, c'est parce que le producteur, au départ, n'en reçoit pas. Alors, s'il reçoit un pourcentage des droits perçus par le producteur pour l'utilisation, sur d'autres plateformes par exemple, mais que le producteur n'en reçoit pas, la somme va être réduite si le réalisateur reçoit 4 %, 5 % ou 10 % du montant perçu par le producteur. Je dirais que c'est aussi le problème du producteur, mais le cachet initial est quand même un cachet considérable qui emporte les droits du réalisateur pour les utilisations premières.

Madame Beaudry, voulez-vous compléter ma réponse?

Mme Marie-Christine Beaudry:

En tant que producteurs, nous avons, par exemple, des ententes avec la SARTEC pour les scénaristes, les auteurs de scénarios. Quand le matériel est diffusé, ceux-ci reçoivent de la SACD une somme qui provient directement des diffuseurs.

Par ailleurs, les scénaristes ont négocié avec nous, les producteurs, l'exploitation et les revenus d'exploitation de l'oeuvre audiovisuelle, un droit d'accès à la vie économique de l'oeuvre, alors des redevances de 4 %, 5 %, ou selon la négociation particulière qu'ils ont conclue avec les producteurs.

Les réalisateurs ont ce même droit dans nos ententes collectives où, selon la vie économique de l'oeuvre, ils vont être associés à cela. Si on exploite l'oeuvre ailleurs, ils ont accès à des redevances de 4 %, 5 % ou plus, selon la négociation qu'ils ont conclue directement avec leur producteur. C'est prévu dans leur entente collective.

Il faut aussi comprendre qu'il y a différents types de réalisation. Lorsque nous parlons d'oeuvres audiovisuelles, nous parlons autant de magazines que de longs métrages. Il faut comprendre la panoplie de situations qu'il peut y avoir lorsqu'il est question d'oeuvres cinématographiques, actuellement. Il faut garder cela en tête.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'ai pas beaucoup de temps, monsieur Pelletier, mais je crois que vous aimeriez réagir à cela.

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Oui.

Je voudrais simplement souligner que, d'abord, les scénaristes obtiennent des droits sur l'utilisation. La SACD est donc capable de négocier des droits pour eux parce que, traditionnellement, comme je le disais tout à l'heure, ils étaient des pigistes à l'origine, même pour les diffuseurs.

D'autre part, Mme Beaudry confond les oeuvres dramatiques et les oeuvres non dramatiques. Il est ici question des oeuvres dramatiques et les droits d'auteur s'appliquent différemment. En fait, c'est notre capacité de négocier qui est en cause. Nous accordons une licence d'exploitation aux producteurs. Cela fait, nous obtenons une participation aux profits. Cependant, en raison de la définition des profits, il est mathématiquement impossible d'obtenir des droits.

Par exemple, le film le plus populaire, qui a généré les plus grandes recettes au Canada, le film Bon Cop Bad Cop, que vous devez tous connaître, a rapporté 8 millions de dollars. Cinquante pour cent de ces 8 millions de dollars vont aux exploitants de salles, il reste donc 4 millions de dollars. De 25 à 30 % vont aux distributeurs. Il reste donc 1,5 million de dollars. Par ailleurs, puisqu'il est question de profits, le film a coûté 5 millions de dollars à produire. Il est donc impossible d'obtenir une part des profits.

Autrement dit, ce que je vous demande aujourd'hui, c'est de donner aux créateurs une capacité de négocier.

(1610)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Il ne me reste que 30 secondes, et j'aimerais poser une question aux gens de Telus.[Traduction]

C'est simplement pour conclure.

Quelle est la position de Telus concernant Franc-Jeu?

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Nous avons appuyé la proposition de Franc-Jeu. Nous ne faisons pas partie de la coalition, mais nous avons effectivement soutenu sa requête. Le piratage est un problème d'importance au Canada, et nous estimons avoir en tant que fournisseur de services Internet un rôle à jouer et l'obligation éthique, si je puis dire, de veiller à ce que l'on s'attaque à ce problème.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous ne faisiez pas partie de la coalition Franc-Jeu au départ. Alors, pourquoi avez-vous changé d'idée?

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Nous n'avons pas changé d'idée. C'est simplement dû au fait que nous ne sommes pas intégrés verticalement. Comme nous ne sommes pas les principaux titulaires des droits, nous offrons notre appui en dehors des cadres de la coalition.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Excellent. Merci.

Le président:

À vous la parole, monsieur Albas, pour les sept prochaines minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je veux également remercier tous nos témoins pour leur présence aujourd'hui et l'expertise dont ils nous font bénéficier.

Je vais d'abord m'adresser aux représentants de Telus. Je dois vous dire que j'apprécie le caractère raisonnable de vos recommandations. Je pense que c'est une excellente idée de s'appuyer sur certains des changements apportés via la Loi sur la modernisation du droit d'auteur de 2012 en obtenant la rétroaction nécessaire.

Pour ce qui est de votre première recommandation en faveur d'un enregistrement unique, est-ce qu'un cadre semblable permettant l'accès par les utilisateurs comme vous le recommandez serait conforme aux lois en vigueur concernant les enregistrements personnels et l'octroi de licences pour les services sur demande?

À mes yeux, une copie unique conservée sur un serveur est davantage assimilable à une forme de service sur demande qu'à un processus d'enregistrement personnel.

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Tout dépend de celui qui procède à l'enregistrement.

Lorsqu'on enregistre une émission sur un réseau, c'est exactement comme si on le faisait sur son propre appareil à la maison. La situation est différente pour le fournisseur de services réseau, car nous donnons également accès à du contenu sur demande. Dans ce cas particulier, nous négocions et payons les droits requis pour pouvoir offrir des émissions aux gens qui ne les ont pas enregistrées et décident de consulter notre menu pour sélectionner une partie de l'excellent contenu que nous mettons à leur disposition. Dans le cas de l'enregistrement numérique personnel en réseau, la personne a décidé d'enregistrer une émission qui se retrouve dans l'espace partagé sur le nuage.

Les exploitants de ce nuage se demandent pourquoi ce dédoublement inutile qui les oblige à conserver toutes ces copies d'un même enregistrement, d'autant plus que cette pratique est loin d'être écologique. C'est donc simplement une requête d'ordre administratif en vue de simplifier les choses en conservant une seule copie. Seuls ceux qui ont choisi d'enregistrer l'émission pourraient avoir accès à cette copie unique, et nous disposerions de toutes les métadonnées et les autres renseignements requis pour nous assurer par exemple qu'une personne qui aurait débuté l'enregistrement avec cinq minutes de retard n'ait accès à l'émission qu'à compter de ce moment-là.

M. Dan Albas:

Je pose la question parce que la fréquence établie par la loi pour ces examens n'est pas nécessairement suffisante aux yeux de certains. Vous ne m'avez toutefois pas vraiment répondu, car j'ai bien l'impression qu'une copie rendue ainsi accessible à tous correspond davantage à un service sur demande qu'à un système permettant à chacun d'enregistrer une émission pour la visionner ultérieurement.

Je m'inquiète simplement de ce qui pourrait arriver si des détenteurs de contenu ayant conclu une entente avec Telus ou d'autres entreprises comme la vôtre en venaient à soutenir que vous avez contrevenu aux modalités de cette entente en offrant un service sur demande, plutôt que la possibilité de faire des enregistrements personnels.

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

C'est justement la raison pour laquelle nous souhaitons limiter notre offre au lien personnel avec l'enregistrement. Ainsi, seule la personne qui a effectué l'enregistrement peut y avoir accès, contrairement à ce qui se passe avec un service sur demande où l'accès est ouvert à quiconque souhaite visionner une émission. Il faut savoir que nous n'allons pas, en tant qu'exploitant de réseau, enregistrer toutes les émissions afin que tous ceux qui ont des enregistreurs puissent y avoir accès par la suite, pas plus que nous allons permettre aux gens d'emmagasiner des quantités infinies d'émissions de telle sorte que les utilisateurs en viennent à enregistrer absolument tout.

Nous proposons essentiellement de reproduire sur un réseau le modèle de l'enregistrement vidéo maison. Nous voulons cependant rationaliser le tout de manière à minimiser le gaspillage. Le gaspillage n'est pas propice à l'innovation.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci.

Votre deuxième recommandation porte justement sur le renforcement de la capacité d'innovation au Canada en permettant la mise en marché à moindre risque de nouvelles technologies et de nouveaux services.

Pouvez-vous nous donner des exemples de nouveautés que vous envisagez du point de vue de la technologie et des services?

(1615)

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Il y a l'exemple de l'enregistrement vidéo personnel en réseau, et également celui des nouveaux modèles d'affaires, notamment en ce qui a trait au régime d'avis et avis dont nous avons parlé... J'essaie de voir quelles peuvent être les innovations de nature plus générale, mais je peux vous dire que nous voudrions que le système d'avis et avis soit automatisé, et toute automation est assortie d'un risque d'erreurs. Le taux d'erreur ne peut jamais être totalement nul, si bien que nous courrions un certain risque en automatisant davantage notre régime d'avis et avis. Nous devons malheureusement nous exposer à ce risque en raison des coûts plus élevés que nous devons engager et du nombre accru d'avis que nous devons transmettre.

M. Dan Albas:

Des témoins que nous avons reçus la semaine dernière préconisaient un régime d'avis et avis normalisé avec certaines restrictions imposées quant au contenu des avis. Je conclus donc que vous êtes favorable à cette proposition.

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Tout à fait.

M. Dan Albas:

Vous avez également indiqué que des dommages-intérêts exagérément disproportionnés ont été accordés. Pouvez-vous nous en donner un exemple concret?

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Je n'ai pas vraiment d'exemple de dommages-intérêts exagérés qui auraient été octroyés, mais il faut craindre l'absence de limites dans la loi à ce sujet qui peut susciter une crainte telle que certains ne mettront pas leur innovation sur le marché.

Je parle de ce qui peut arriver si l'on décide de mettre en marché, et ce, en toute bonne foi, une innovation qui se révélera en fin de compte non conforme... Comme vous l'ont dit d'autres témoins aujourd'hui ou lors de séances précédentes, l'interprétation et la mise en application de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur est un exercice très complexe. On s'inquiète donc plutôt du fait que certains pourraient renoncer à la mise en marché d'une innovation en raison du risque d'avoir éventuellement à verser des dommages-intérêts très élevés.

Je ne suis pas en train de dire qu'il s'est déjà produit quelque chose de semblable sur le marché ou que je pourrais vous citer l'exemple de quelqu'un devant composer avec des risques de cet ordre. Il faut plutôt constater que certaines nouveautés n'aboutissent carrément jamais sur le marché, un scénario encore plus néfaste pour le Canada.

M. Dan Albas:

Je vois bien ce que vous voulez dire.

Peut-être pourrions-nous parler des innovations qui ont cours actuellement. Il y a beaucoup d'innovations qui voient le jour sur des plateformes en ligne comme YouTube et Twitch. Il n'est pas rare que des utilisateurs affirment qu'ils mettent du contenu en ligne en toute bonne foi, mais reçoivent tout de même un avis de violation du droit d'auteur.

Considérez-vous que la loi devrait permettre de mieux gérer ces enjeux?

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

C'est certainement le cas, et ce, à bien des égards. Je pense qu'il y a vraiment tout lieu de s'inquiéter lorsqu'on considère les actes de piratage ou l'utilisation des avis de violation du droit d'auteur à des fins abusives, comme pour le hameçonnage, ce qui met en péril la sécurité.

Nous recevons chaque mois des centaines de milliers d'avis. Bon nombre d'entre eux ne viennent pas nécessairement de véritables titulaires de droits d'auteur.

M. Dan Albas:

Ce serait donc l'un des aspects à considérer. Nous devons ainsi tenir compte du fait que certains n'hésitent pas à se servir du régime d'avis et avis à des fins malveillantes.

Si j'ai parlé plus particulièrement de YouTube et de Twitch, c'est parce qu'un grand nombre de jeunes utilisent ces plateformes. Et beaucoup de moins jeunes également, je dois l'avouer. Vous avez maintenant l'occasion de nous dire dans quelle mesure vous jugez la loi efficace dans ce contexte.

En votre qualité de fournisseur de services Internet, pouvez-vous nous donner une meilleure idée des améliorations que nous pourrions apporter à ce régime?

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Eh bien, en tant que fournisseur de services Internet, nous sommes des distributeurs de contenu. Nos clients accèdent à ce contenu, mais nous ne savons pas vraiment quel genre d'avis de violation une entreprise comme YouTube peut recevoir. YouTube peut en effet recevoir des avis de violation, tout comme le fournisseur de services Internet. Je pense qu'il serait préférable que vous posiez la question directement à ces gens-là.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Angus.

Vous avez sept minutes. [Français]

M. Charlie Angus (Timmins—Baie James, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les témoins de leurs présentations. Comme musicien et auteur, je comprends bien la nécessité de respecter le droit d'auteur et l'importance que le Parlement mette en place une législation qui va assurer un bon environnement à la communauté des créateurs.

Ce sujet exige une grande précision, et je vais donc poser mes questions en anglais.[Traduction]

Madame Dupré, vous avez mentionné YouTube comme source de revenus possible pour les musiciens et les chansons. Quel est le régime en place pour la perception de redevances en provenance de YouTube?

Mme Marie-Josée Dupré:

J'ai travaillé à la SOCAN, le collectif qui gère la diffusion publique de la musique. Si mon souvenir est exact, il y a certains droits de licence qui sont payés par YouTube, mais pas nécessairement pour tout le contenu généré par les utilisateurs. Si les choses n'ont pas changé, il s'agit de licences expérimentales .

Nous avons reçu une décision à ce sujet en provenance du Parlement européen. Si le tout est confirmé, chaque pays de l'Union européenne devra modifier sa loi sur le droit d'auteur de manière à obliger toutes ces plateformes à payer des droits de licence. Même si le contenu ne leur appartient pas directement, elles sont tenues de s'assurer en tant qu'instances de diffusion que les titulaires de droits sont indemnisés.

(1620)

M. Charlie Angus:

J'ai les cheveux gris, et je suis assez vieux pour me rappeler que les musiciens n'ont jamais connu leur heure de gloire dans le monde du droit d'auteur. On nous a toujours volés.

Une année, j'ai coécrit la vidéo de l'année et j'ai dit à ma femme: « Cette année, c'est notre année, chérie. Nous allons faire de l'argent », parce que notre vidéo tournait beaucoup. J'ai reçu un chèque de 25 $.

À l'époque, les câblodistributeurs qui diffusaient les émissions de télévision prétendaient ne pas faire d'argent avec cela et déjà rendre service aux musiciens en diffusant leur vidéo. La SOCAN a contesté, et on a modifié la loi. Puis, bien sûr, les câblodistributeurs ont cessé leurs activités.

À l'arrivée de YouTube, tout le monde se disait que ce n'était qu'une petite entreprise fondée dans un garage, une jeune entreprise en démarrage. Aujourd'hui, la chaîne fait partie de la plus grande entreprise au monde, Google. Tout le monde que je connais partage de la musique sur YouTube. Je vis sur YouTube.

La SOCAN peut se faire insistante auprès des salons de coiffure et des petits restaurants pour qu'ils paient leurs droits d'auteur, mais ne serait-il pas mieux de nous doter d'une loi générale sur le droit d'auteur, de sorte que tous ceux qui publient des chansons ou qui font des vidéos à partir de chansons paient des frais généraux qui seraient redistribués aux artistes, comme on le faisait à l'époque de la câblodistribution, entre autres? Cela nous procurerait-il une source de revenus garantie pour l'utilisation de la musique sur YouTube?

Mme Marie-Josée Dupré:

Je ne sais pas si c'est possible. YouTube et tous les grands services numériques comme Spotify ou Google ont leurs réseaux partout dans le monde. Dans chaque pays, ils doivent obtenir une licence en fonction de ce qui y est diffusé, mais on peut s'attendre à ce qu'un moment donné, ils cherchent à obtenir des permis pour plus d'un territoire. Je pense que cela a déjà fait l'objet de discussions, mais à l'heure actuelle, c'est la raison pour laquelle chaque pays doit intervenir et veiller à protéger ses propres intérêts et ses propres consommateurs.

M. Charlie Angus:

Merci.

Madame Messier, il y a beaucoup d'intérêts divergents ou potentiels qui entrent en ligne de compte dans la production. J'aimerais savoir ce que vous en pensez. Monsieur Pelletier, j'aimerais savoir ce que vous en pensez aussi.

Concernant le nouvel ALENA, qui prolonge la protection du droit d'auteur jusqu'à 70 ans après la mort, j'en ai parlé avec des cinéastes qui sont très inquiets. Parfois, ils n'arrivent pas à déterminer qui possède les droits d'un film qu'ils voudraient utiliser à des fins historiques. Parfois, les films font l'objet de vastes licences commerciales qui coûtent très cher, si bien qu'il est très difficile d'être certain qu'on a payé les droits d'auteur pour tel film si l'on veut l'utiliser à des fins historiques, mais qu'on ne sait pas trop comment il est géré. Craignez-vous que cela empêche les créateurs canadiens de produire de nouvelles oeuvres sur la base de films et d'images historiques? [Français]

Mme Hélène Messier:

Étant donné le système canadien tel qu'il existe, je crois que l'absence de définition de ce qui constitue une oeuvre cinématographique ou audiovisuelle est la source du problème. Il n'est pas facile à l'heure actuelle de savoir qui est le titulaire du droit d'auteur. Il est donc difficile de calculer l'échéance de ce droit, et ce, que sa durée soit de 50 ou de 70 ans. Cette situation est problématique.

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Je pense que le fait de pouvoir identifier les auteurs va aider à définir l'échéance de leurs droits. Il faut comprendre qu'au Canada, le droit d'auteur est associé à un individu et non à une entreprise, contrairement aux États-Unis, où prévaut un système d'oeuvres sur commande dont les droits appartiennent aux entreprises. Au Canada, la durée du droit d'auteur débute lors de la création de l'oeuvre par un ou plusieurs individus, et se poursuit jusqu'à 50 ans après leur décès.

(1625)

[Traduction]

M. Charlie Angus:

Madame Mainville-Neeson, j'aimerais en savoir un peu plus sur le régime d'avis et avis qui vous force à envoyer constamment des avis, parce que j'en ai reçu trois cet été, trois jours de suite, à mon appartement d'Ottawa, où je ne suis pas allé pendant un mois. Je ne sais pas s'il y a quelqu'un qui essaie de me soutirer de l'argent.

Comment pouvez-vous attester de la véracité de l'information quand vous envoyez ce genre d'avis? J'ai été absent pendant un mois, et personne d'autre n'a habité mon appartement pendant ce temps, mais j'ai reçu trois avis selon lesquels j'y aurais téléchargé des films. Comment peut-on séparer les consommateurs, identifier les véritables pirates et les distinguer des victimes d'erreurs d'algorithmes, peut-être, dans les données de surveillance?

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Nous ne pouvons que vérifier l'information que nous transmettent les titulaires de droit. Elle comprend la date et l'heure des téléchargements, ainsi que l'adresse IP. Quand toute cette information est exacte, nous envoyons un avis, nous en avons l'obligation.

Je peux comprendre que ce soit une préoccupation pour les utilisateurs, et c'est la raison pour laquelle nous souhaitons l'ajout de nouvelles dispositions pour que nous puissions au moins écarter les signalements les plus malhonnêtes, mais il y aura toujours des avis qui seront envoyés qui... Ces avis sont censés avoir un but éducatif, mais parfois, on rate la cible.

M. Charlie Angus:

Oui.

Merci.

Le président:

Nous entendrons maintenant Mme Ceasar-Chavannes.

Vous avez sept minutes.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Merci.

Madame Mainville-Neeson, vous avez dit pendant votre témoignage que l'innovation était essentielle pour garder l'industrie en santé. J'en suis consciente, mais j'aimerais que vous me décriviez en quoi les bouleversements liés à l'innovation se répercutent sur le droit d'auteur depuis 10 ans.

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

L'innovation et les bouleversements vont de pair. Nous croyons résolument à l'équilibre. L'idée n'est pas de trouver un équilibre seulement en faveur des exploitants de réseaux, par exemple, mais plutôt de nous doter d'un cadre législatif qui favorise l'innovation à l'avantage des titulaires de droits. Tous les utilisateurs devraient bénéficier de l'innovation, les titulaires de droits comme les intermédiaires tels les fournisseurs de services Internet ou de télévision.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

La Loi sur le droit d'auteur vous limite-t-elle dans la mise au point de technologies et l'utilisation des technologies actuelles et émergentes?

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Oui. Nous avons donné l'exemple de l'enregistrement numérique personnel, qui est un exemple parmi d'autres qui nous a poussés à chercher des moyens différents d'émettre des avis en réponse aux préoccupations soulevées par M. Albas et M. Angus.

C'est le genre de choses auxquelles nous réfléchissons constamment. Il y a un déséquilibre dans le partage du risque entre les exploitants de réseaux et les titulaires de droits, qui freine l'innovation. Nous ne parvenons tout simplement pas à donner vie à nos idées sur le marché.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Nous avons reçu des représentants d'autres fournisseurs de services Internet la semaine dernière. Je comprends qu'il n'y a pas d'intégration verticale entre vous comme il y en a entre certains de vos homologues, comme Rogers et Bell. L'un des principaux arguments avancés par les intervenants qui s'opposent aux règles refuge de la loi est qu'il faut remettre en question la théorie de « l'ensemble passif de câbles ».

Pouvez-vous décrire dans quelle mesure les fournisseurs de services Internet peuvent déterminer le contenu des données qu'ils transmettent?

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Je pense que tous les fournisseurs disposent de différents moyens, à différents degrés, pour faire ce qu'on appelle communément l'inspection approfondie des paquets. Ce ne sont pas tous les fournisseurs qui le font. L'étendue de l'inspection varie, et je dirais que Telus est parmi les fournisseurs qui font l'inspection la moins approfondie. Nous avons très peu de moyens pour découvrir exactement ce qui est téléchargé. Techniquement, tous les bits se ressemblent.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Telus n'a-t-elle pas les moyens de le faire?

(1630)

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Je ne dirais pas qu'elle n'en a pas les moyens, mais ce n'est pas une chose que nous faisons, de manière générale, pour l'instant.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je vais céder la parole à M. Lametti. [Français]

M. David Lametti (LaSalle—Émard—Verdun, Lib.):

Ma question s'adresse à tous les quatre.

Madame Cyr et monsieur Pelletier, vous êtes en train de nous demander de modifier l'équilibre initial entre les auteurs et les réalisateurs, et nous avons un écosystème pour les films...

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Non.

M. David Lametti:

Si vous le voulez bien, je vais simplement poser ma question et vous pourrez réagir.

Nous avons un équilibre initial dans le sens où l'auteur cède ses droits par contrat lors du processus de production de son oeuvre cinématographique. Mmes Messier et Beaudry ont bien décrit cet écosystème où certains risques sont pris, mais pas par les auteurs.

Selon vous quatre, y a-t-il injustice et, le cas échéant, où se situe-t-elle?

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Si je peux me permettre... 

M. David Lametti:

Un instant, je vous prie.

Pourquoi changer cet écosystème? Est-ce qu'il ne reflète pas les risques qui sont pris? Est-ce que quelqu'un est sous-payé? Pour nous, de l'extérieur, cet écosystème fonctionne assez bien. Je pense à Xavier Dolan, ou encore à Atom Egoyan, et cela semble aller assez bien au Canada.

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Je crois que votre question s'adresse surtout à moi et j'aimerais apporter une correction: nous ne voulons pas changer cet écosystème. Au contraire, nous voulons le préserver. En ce moment, les auteurs accordent des licences aux producteurs afin que ceux-ci puissent exploiter les oeuvres. Nous ne voulons pas changer cela.

Nous voulons simplement clarifier la Loi pour qu'elle offre une présomption de propriété. Cela veut dire qu'en l'absence d'une preuve contraire comme un contrat avec un producteur ou la revendication du droit d'auteur par un autre créateur, il est présumé que le scénariste et le réalisateur sont au moins des auteurs de l'oeuvre. Il faut donc clarifier cette ambiguïté actuelle de la Loi en lien avec la présomption de propriété.

Selon la Loi, le producteur est présumé tel si son nom est indiqué au générique. Ce libellé, sous un intertitre qui se lit « Présomption de propriété », pourrait porter à croire que les producteurs sont des auteurs. Or ce n'est pas le cas, et rien dans la jurisprudence canadienne ne dit que les producteurs sont des auteurs.

Les auteurs sont des gens qui recourent à leurs talents et à leur jugement pour créer une oeuvre dramatique. Je respecte le travail des producteurs qui prennent des risques financiers, mais je ne pense pas que créer un budget équivaille à créer une oeuvre d'art.

Le système actuel fonctionne et nous ne voulons pas le changer.

M. David Lametti:

Laissons la parole également à Mme Messier ou à Mme Beaudry.

Mme Marie-Christine Beaudry:

D'emblée, je veux préciser que lorsque nous parlons d'oeuvres cinématographiques, nous parlons d'oeuvres audiovisuelles.

M. David Lametti:

Oui.

Mme Marie-Christine Beaudry:

J'entends mon collègue ne parler que de longs métrages, et je le comprends puisqu'il est réalisateur de longs métrages. Or il est aussi question ici de bien d'autres choses, dont des magazines télévisés, des émissions de variétés ou des téléréalités. Souvent, il n'y a pas de scénariste. Il peut aussi y avoir différents réalisateurs qui interviennent à la fin du développement de l'oeuvre. Je vous dis cela pour préciser les différents genres d'oeuvres qui existent et qui, ne l'oublions pas, tombent toutes sous la définition d'« oeuvre audiovisuelle ».

Bien souvent, c'est le producteur qui débute le processus de développement d'une oeuvre, que ce soit une émission de variétés ou une dramatique. Dans ce dernier cas, il le fera avec l'auteur, bien sûr, qui aura des droits sur son scénario, puisqu'il s'agit d'une oeuvre distincte de l'oeuvre cinématographique et qu'il va pouvoir l'exploiter en édition. Les producteurs n'ont pas nécessairement tous ces droits.

Dans le cadre du développement de l'oeuvre, le producteur participe à l'élaboration de cette oeuvre. Il y a des discussions, des échanges. Nous parlons ici de dramatiques, mais pensez aux émissions de variétés ou aux magazines télévisés: le producteur sait ce que le diffuseur veut, et c'est lui qui reste en contact et qui pilote d'une certaine façon le développement de cette oeuvre.

C'est à l'étape de la production qu'arrive le réalisateur. En établissant et en négociant le budget de production, nous allons déterminer l'ampleur de cette oeuvre et sa catégorie: série lourde, téléroman, d'une durée de 30 minutes ou de 60 minutes, tournée à l'extérieur ou non, et le reste. Toutes ces décisions touchent au contenu même de l'oeuvre, à sa vision.

Dire aujourd'hui que nous n'avons aucun impact sur la création de l'oeuvre serait donc totalement faux. Dans le cas d'un long métrage, je reconnais que l'élaboration de l'oeuvre peut différer quelque peu. Cependant, cela ne se produit pas dans tous les cas, et nous ne pouvons pas passer sous silence l'implication du producteur dans le processus de création.

(1635)

M. David Lametti:

Merci beaucoup.

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Puis-je apporter une précision?

Le président:

Nous y reviendrons peut-être plus tard, parce que nous avons dépassé le temps alloué.[Traduction]

Monsieur Chong, vous avez cinq minutes. [Français]

L'hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, PCC):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

J'ai une question à poser à la Société professionnelle des auteurs et des compositeurs du Québec.

Les analystes du Comité ont fait leur travail. Selon Statistique Canada, les revenus des éditeurs de musique au Canada ont augmenté de 148 à 282 millions de dollars entre 2010 et 2015. C'est beaucoup. Durant la même période, le revenu médian des travailleurs à temps plein dans l'industrie canadienne de la musique a augmenté dans tous les emplois, sauf pour les musiciens et les chanteurs canadiens et québécois, dont le revenu moyen a baissé de 19 800 $ à 19 000 $, soit 800 $ de moins par année.

Comment expliquez-vous cette situation au Canada pour cette période de cinq ans?

Mme Marie-Josée Dupré:

Chez les éditeurs de musique, il existe des acteurs importants comme Universal, Sony et Warner/Chappell, et d'autres, plus petits ou de taille moyenne. Ces éditeurs signent des contrats avec plusieurs créateurs. Je ne parle pas ici des interprètes ou des chanteurs, mais bien des auteurs-compositeurs.

Les contrats que les auteurs-compositeurs signent les obligent à céder la propriété de leurs oeuvres aux éditeurs. Il est pratique courante au Canada — et même ailleurs dans le monde — qu'un auteur-compositeur cède la propriété de ses oeuvres, qui cesseront alors de lui appartenir en contrepartie d'une rémunération. Au Canada, 50 % de la rémunération va à l'éditeur et l'autre moitié va à l'auteur-compositeur. Si vous êtes seul auteur-compositeur, vous obtenez la totalité des 50 %, mais cette proportion diminue si vous êtes deux ou plus.

Les compagnies sont donc à même d'augmenter leurs actifs et leur capital, alors que chaque fois l'auteur-compositeur, lui, va se faire prendre 50 % par l'éditeur. S'il a la chance d'être également interprète, sa compagnie de disques va s'occuper de lui, mais ne lui versera encore une fois qu'un petit pourcentage. Les revenus sont donc malheureusement morcelés de cette façon.

On a dit à de nombreuses reprises que les redevances aux auteurs-compositeurs liées à la diffusion de leurs oeuvres en ligne n'ont jamais réussi à compenser la perte de revenus tirés de la vente de leurs disques compacts, puisque ces redevances ont été totalement morcelées de la même façon. Leurs revenus ne peuvent donc que stagner ou diminuer, et ils n'étaient déjà pas faramineux au départ. Si un auteur-compositeur est aussi interprète, il tombe alors dans une autre catégorie et pourrait toucher davantage d'argent. Toutefois, pour les créateurs, c'est la situation qui prévaut.

À l'époque des disques compacts en boîtier, chaque chanson valait 10 sous à ses créateurs. Un album de 10 chansons rapportait donc un dollar pour sa création, dont une moitié allait à l'éditeur ou aux éditeurs, et l'autre à l'auteur-compositeur ou aux auteurs-compositeurs. Quelqu'un perd au change, et ce ne sont visiblement ni les éditeurs ni les compagnies, mais bien les créateurs de musique qui sont obligés, eux, de céder la propriété de leurs droits et de se contenter les maigres revenus qui leur sont consentis.

(1640)

L'hon. Michael Chong:

À votre avis, que peut-on faire pour régler cette situation? C'est un problème: les revenus des grandes compagnies augmentent substantiellement, mais ceux des chanteurs et des musiciens baissent beaucoup.

Mme Marie-Josée Dupré:

Effectivement.

Nous nous penchons actuellement sur différents modèles d'entrepreneuriat. De nombreux auteurs-compositeurs, dont beaucoup sont également interprètes de nos jours, se tournent vers l'autoproduction afin de conserver la plus grande partie de leurs droits et ainsi gagner le plus de revenus possible.

Au lieu de céder totalement ses droits, on octroie des licences, mais cette pratique n'est pas encore courante dans le milieu de l'édition. Tant que la situation ne changera pas, le sort des auteurs-compositeurs ne s'améliorera pas vraiment.

Par contre, comme je le mentionnais, si le régime de la copie privée avait évolué avec la technologie, les millions de copies qui sont faites sur les tablettes et les téléphones — qui ont remplacé le disque compact et la cassette, à l'époque de laquelle le régime avait été instauré —généreraient davantage de redevances, ce qui aiderait les auteurs-compositeurs.

Dans l'état actuel des choses, il faut des millions de visionnements ou d'écoutes sur YouTube ou Spotify avant de générer des redevances de 150 $. Où est la justice dans cela pour un créateur de musique? Sans son activité créatrice, personne n'aurait eu d'oeuvre à exploiter. L'interprète est important, certes, mais il n'aurait rien eu à chanter si l'auteur-compositeur n'avait pas créé d'oeuvre. Le producteur d'enregistrements sonores n'aurait quant à lui rien pu produire si l'oeuvre n'avait pas existé.

Il semble que l'on veuille reléguer la notion de création à l'arrière-plan. Pour un album de 10 chansons, on parle d'un seul dollar versé pour la création malgré un prix total de vente de 15 $, 16 $ ou 20 $ — les albums coûtent peut-être seulement entre 10 $ et 15 $ de nos jours, pour ceux qui se vendent encore. On s'entendra pour dire que cela n'est pas énorme.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. [Traduction]

Monsieur Longfield, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je remercie M. Chong, de l'autre côté. Nous sommes voisins de circonscriptions.

Vous avez posé la question que je voulais poser, donc je remercie le président de nous laisser un peu plus de temps pour creuser la réponse. J'aimerais que Mme Dupré nous en parle un peu plus.

Je suis allé au Guelph Youth Music Centre hier. Sue Smith y a reçu un prix, et son nom a été ajouté au tableau d'honneur. Elle enseigne à beaucoup de jeunes à Guelph. Elle ne pouvait pas payer les droits d'auteur de Pete Townshend pour réaliser des comédies musicales, donc elle en a créé elle-même. Elle a créé plus de 500 personnages de comédie musicale au fil du temps avec les jeunes.

Vous avez parlé un peu des auteurs en émergence et de tout ce qu'ils doivent faire pour faire reconnaître leurs oeuvres. Pouvez-vous nous décrire s'il est facile ou difficile pour eux de le faire, si vous pensez au travail de Sue Smith?

Mme Marie-Josée Dupré:

Il est très difficile de gérer tous les aspects de sa carrière seul. Les créateurs ne sont pas nécessairement de bons entrepreneurs. Ils doivent toutefois comprendre le sens des contrats et des transactions qui les touchent. Ils doivent comprendre l'effet de toutes les transactions entre eux et la maison de disques ou l'éditeur, et ce sont surtout des effets financiers. C'est important.

L'un de nos objectifs, à la SPACQ, c'est d'aider les créateurs à gérer cet aspect pour que les jeunes auteurs et compositeurs en émergence soient plus à l'aise avec tout cela.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Si vous me permettez d'aller un peu plus loin... Vous avez fait un commentaire sur la Commission du droit d'auteur. J'ai posé une question il y a quelques séances sur le temps que met la Commission du droit d'auteur pour rendre ses décisions. À votre avis, est-ce une question de ressources ou est-ce peut-être parce que notre loi n'est pas assez claire?

J'aimerais aussi recommander que des musiciens ou des artistes fassent partie de la Commission pour que leurs perspectives soient prises en compte.

Pouvez-vous nous parler un peu plus de la Commission du droit d'auteur, s’il vous plaît?

(1645)

Mme Marie-Josée Dupré:

Il serait très intéressant qu'un musicien, un auteur ou un compositeur siège à la Commission. Quoi qu'il en soit, encore faut-il que la personne soit un professionnel qui connaisse l'industrie presque de fond en comble pour pouvoir vraiment éclairer la Commission et ses décisions.

Pour ce qui est de la longueur du processus décisionnel, il y a peut-être un manque de ressources. Cela dit, je pense que c'est aussi en raison de la nature du processus lui-même. Une partie soumet ses documents, après quoi il y a un délai et les autres parties soumettent leurs documents. Il faut monter le dossier, et cela prend du temps.

J'ai déjà travaillé à la SOCAN, au département des licences. Je ne travaillais pas directement avec la Commission du droit d'auteur mais je me rappelle que la modification tarifaire proposée en 1990 n'a pas été approuvée avant 1996. Je pense que le tout premier tarif Internet a été proposé en 1996 et que la décision a été rendue en 2004.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

D'accord.

Mme Marie-Josée Dupré:

Il est très difficile pour les sociétés d'être certaines de prendre la bonne décision, puis il faut s'adapter à toutes les normes de l'industrie.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Oui. Il faut suivre le rythme de l'industrie.

Merci.

Monsieur Pelletier, vous avez fait une observation qui a vraiment piqué ma curiosité. Je parlais avec un cinéaste le week-end dernier, qui me disait qu'une partie d'un film devant être produite au Canada sera plutôt produite en Afrique du Sud, en raison des crédits d'impôt accordés là-bas. Le reste du film sera produit à Los Angeles, où se feront les retouches, puis toute la finition se fera au Canada, en raison des crédits d'impôt accordés ici.

Nous parlons aujourd'hui du droit d'auteur, mais il y a tout un portrait global à prendre en considération, il y a de l'argent à faire au Canada en étant concurrentiel et en offrant des incitatifs.

Pouvez-vous nous parler de notre écosystème en général?

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Au Canada, la nationalité du droit d'auteur dépend de la nationalité du producteur, mais c'est l'auteur lui-même qui bénéficie du droit d'auteur.

Dans la situation que vous décrivez, il s'agit probablement d'une production américaine, puisque vous affirmez qu'une partie de l'argent ira à Los Angeles.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

C'est juste.

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Alors le droit d'auteur devra probablement être attribué à une entreprise américaine.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

D'accord. Merci.

Mes cinq minutes sont écoulées.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Passons à M. Lloyd. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie d'être ici aujourd'hui. Toute cette étude et vos témoignages sont très intéressants.

Monsieur Pelletier, vous affirmez être producteur?

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Je suis réalisateur.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Vous êtes réalisateur. D'accord, il y a eu un petit problème de communication. Je croyais vous avoir entendu dire que vous étiez producteur, mais que vous ne receviez aucune redevance, donc j'étais curieux de comprendre pourquoi. Comme vous êtes réalisateur...

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Non, je suis certain que mon producteur reçoit de l'argent, peut-être pas des redevances, mais...

M. Dane Lloyd:

Si vous ne recevez pas de redevances, comment les réalisateurs sont-ils rémunérés?

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Nous recevons un cachet pour nos services, au départ, puis nous bénéficions d'une licence pour l'utilisation originale du film ou sa diffusion à la télévision. C'est pour les utilisations secondaires que nous avons du mal à être payés.

Prenons l'exemple de Xavier Dolan. Si son film est diffusé à la télévision, il ne sera pas payé, parce qu'il est représenté par la SACD. Il n'est pas payé pour son travail de réalisateur. Il...

M. Dane Lloyd:

Pouvez-vous nous donner un exemple d'utilisation originale, puis d'utilisation secondaire à la télévision?

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

L'utilisation originale serait la projection dans les salles de cinéma.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Très bien.

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Les utilisations secondaires sont les diffusions à la télévision ou sur d'autres plateformes.

M. Dane Lloyd:

C'est donc essentiellement comme pour l'auteur d'un livre: il sera payé pour la vente initiale du livre, mais pas pour la vente du livre usagé.

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Effectivement.

Les réalisateurs dont les oeuvres sont vendues à l'extérieur du pays — Xavier Dolan vend les siennes en France — touchent des redevances.

(1650)

M. Dane Lloyd:

Mais pas au Canada.

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Pas au Canada.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je sais que les acteurs...

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Xavier Dolan reçoit des redevances en tant que réalisateur et scénariste, parce qu'il fait les deux.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je sais qu'aux États-Unis, les acteurs reçoivent quelque chose, mais qu'il ne s'agit pas de redevances en tant que telles. Je pense qu'on les appelle des droits de suite.

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Je m'excuse, où?

M. Dane Lloyd:

Un acteur, aux États-Unis, par exemple, reçoit des droits de suite.

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Oui.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Chaque fois qu'un film est rediffusé, il reçoit un chèque par la poste.

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Oui.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Est-ce la même chose au Canada? Est-ce que les acteurs reçoivent des droits de suite?

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Oui, c'est la même chose. C'est la raison pour laquelle les acteurs qui jouent dans mes films ou mes séries, à la télévision, parce que je fais de la télévision aussi, reçoivent tous...[Français] des droits voisins.[Traduction]

Ils sont payés. Je suis le seul qui n'est pas payé pour les utilisations secondaires.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Les artistes qui produisent les trames sonores des films nous disent qu'ils ne reçoivent pas de redevances non plus.

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Je ne suis pas musicien, mais ils touchent des droits de reproduction, et le réalisateur doit payer une licence pour utiliser leur musique.

Comme je le dis, je suis payé pour l'utilisation originale de mes services et la licence originale, mais ce sont les redevances pour les utilisations secondaires qui posent problème.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci. C'est très éclairant.

Mes prochaines questions s'adressent aux représentants de Telus.

Vous avez parlé des enregistrements numériques personnels. J'ai déjà utilisé un enregistrement différé moi-même. Je voudrais seulement quelques précisions.

Chaque fois qu'une personne enregistre quelque chose, vous en conservez une copie. Vous aimeriez que ce comité recommande qu'il n'y ait qu'un enregistrement conservé.

Êtes-vous obligés par la loi de conserver tous les enregistrements personnels? Pourquoi le Comité devrait-il faire cette recommandation?

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

En vertu de la loi actuelle, pour éviter de s'exposer à des responsabilités, les fournisseurs de réseaux doivent en conserver une copie individuelle. Chaque fois qu'une personne enregistre quelque chose, nous en conservons une copie.

Nous croyons que c'est extrêmement inefficace et que cela nécessite une duplication excessive du stockage de mémoire, ce qui n'est pas très propice à l'innovation, parce que cela coûte cher...

M. Dane Lloyd:

Qu'entendez-vous par responsabilité? Pouvez-vous nous décrire la nature de cette responsabilité?

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Oui, et je demanderai à Antoine de répondre à cette question.

M. Antoine Malek (avocat-conseil principal, Affaires réglementaires, Société TELUS Communications):

Oui, le problème, c'est que le droit appartient à l'utilisateur. L'utilisateur fait un enregistrement, mais le conserve sur le réseau, ce qui le rend admissible à une exception qu'on appelle communément l'exemption pour l'écoute en différé. Selon le libellé actuel, il s'agit d'un enregistrement personnel. La personne peut donc créer un enregistrement discret, comme si elle enregistrait quelque chose chez elle ou sur ses appareils personnels. Quand l'enregistrement est créé sur le réseau, cela ne change pas. La personne ne peut pas le partager. Il doit être utilisé à des fins personnelles, privées...

M. Dane Lloyd:

Il serait extrêmement bénéfique que nous recommandions l'octroi de droits d'écoute en différé pour les entreprises comme la vôtre. Cela augmenterait énormément votre efficacité, parce que vous n'auriez pas besoin de conserver toutes les copies différentes, vous n'auriez qu'à en conserver une.

M. Antoine Malek:

Oui. Ce que nous demandons, c'est que les utilisateurs puissent partager une copie sur le réseau et que ce ne soit pas considéré comme une communication publique, mais comme une communication privée, de manière à ce que l'exception s'applique.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Pour terminer, j'aimerais vous demander quel en sera l'effet sur les créateurs. Subiront-ils un effet négatif si nous...?

M. Antoine Malek:

Non. Pas du tout.

Il y a des années, nous avions eu un débat afin de déterminer s'il y avait lieu de permettre des exceptions en ce sens, et nous avions décidé que oui, mais nous n'avons pas su le faire efficacement. Les créateurs ne seraient privés de rien qu'ils n'aient en ce moment.

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Nous ne recommandons pas le démantèlement de tout le mécanisme de vidéo sur demande. Nous sommes un fournisseur de vidéos sur demande, et nous espérons que les gens continueront d'acheter des vidéos sur demande.

Pour ce qui est du droit actuel concernant l'utilisation personnelle d'un enregistrement, comme il est de plus en plus commun que les gens utilisent un réseau plutôt qu'un appareil de stockage personnel, nous proposons essentiellement une façon de faire efficace.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

Le président:

Est-ce que ce serait plus abordable?

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Pour nous, oui. Nous pourrions refiler ces coûts aux consommateurs.

Le président:

J'aimerais vous demander une petite précision.

À la maison, j'ai un enregistreur numérique personnel. J'enregistre tout, je rentre chez moi et je regarde mes émissions plus tard. Elles sont enregistrées sur le disque dur et non sur le réseau.

(1655)

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

C'est juste.

Le président:

De quoi parlez-vous alors?

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Nous proposons cette transition, parce que la technologie vous permet désormais l'enregistrement direct sur le réseau. Mais l'innovation qui y a conduit a tardé à arriver sur le marché, en raison du risque qu'elle présentait pour le fournisseur de réseau.

Nous proposons la mise en marché de cette innovation si la loi était modifiée de manière à ne pas nous charger d'une responsabilité supplémentaire.

En ce qui concerne le propre espace de stockage dont vous disposeriez normalement sur votre disque dur individuel, supposez qu'il se trouve transporté dans le nuage, sauf qu'il appartiendrait à l'exploitant du nuage, dont l'espace, plutôt que d'être constitué de tous ces espaces individuels, pourrait être d'une capacité tellement grande...

Bien sûr, cela entraîne un coût, non seulement pour le fournisseur de réseau, mais aussi un coût pour l'environnement. Cet espace de stockage a besoin d'être refroidi et il consomme diverses formes d'électricité, ce qui introduit diverses inefficacités que nous essayons de corriger.

Tout ce qu'on stocke dans son disque dur, chez soi, pourrait l'être dans le nuage. L'exploitant du nuage pourrait ensuite rationaliser ce stockage dans l'arrière-guichet, à votre insu même. Vous récupérez plus ou moins intégralement votre enregistrement. Sur votre disque dur personnel ou dans le nuage, ce serait en douceur. L'exploitant du réseau, sans que le consommateur s'en aperçoive, rassemblerait les enregistrements, sans devoir en conserver les millions et millions de copies.

Grâce aux métadonnées et à d'autres renseignements sauvegardés à partir des enregistrements individuels de chacun, qui débutent cinq minutes trop tôt ou cinq minutes en retard — quelle que soit la durée souhaitée de l'enregistrement — nous pouvons assurer la fourniture de ce que chacun a enregistré. On peut sauvegarder ces renseignements dans devoir sauvegarder une copie entière nouvelle du même original.

Le président:

Désolé: j'ai besoin de vos lumières. Ce dont vous parlez ressemble presque à Netflix.

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Non. Netflix est différent.

Netflix ressemble davantage à notre service de vidéo à la demande, pour lequel nous avons négocié des droits, tandis que vous n'avez pas décidé d'enregistrer quelque chose.

Actuellement, la Loi sur le droit d'auteur vous autorise à enregistrer quelque chose sur votre propre appareil ou sur un réseau. Netflix ou notre service de vidéo à la demande vous dégage de cette obligation et vous offre un service. Si vous oubliez d'enregistrer ou si vous ne voulez pas être tracassé par les préparatifs de l'enregistrement, nous vous offrons le service — l'accès à cette riche vidéothèque — celle de Netflix ou des services individuels de vidéo à la demande.

La différence est que ces droits sont négociés avec les ayants droit, qui agissent indépendamment du droit en vigueur. Vous avez encore la possibilité d'enregistrement dans le nuage, que ce soit dans le nuage proprement dit ou sur votre propre disque dur. Ces modes coexistent de manière indépendante.

Nous demandons seulement de ne pas être obligés, dans l'arrière-guichet de nos opérations du réseau, à des procédés si inefficaces que le service en est rendu beaucoup plus coûteux que nécessaire.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Jowhari, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

Désolé; je vous ai pris de votre temps.

M. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Ça va.

Merci, monsieur le président. Je remercie aussi les témoins.

Dans le même ordre d'idées, j'enregistre divers programmes avec mon enregistreur. Je les regarde souvent et je décide du moment où je les efface pour me faire de la place pour d'autres enregistrements.

Maintenant, d'après ce que vous proposez, l'enregistreur numérique personnel en réseau, avons-nous toujours la possibilité de regarder quelques films ou programmes choisis puis de décider si notre capacité de stockage sera... et de pouvoir les revoir ou les regarder aussi souvent que nous le voulons?

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Oui, c'est absolument prévu de vous attribuer une capacité de stockage dans le nuage, que vous décideriez d'acquérir tout comme vous avez acquis telle capacité en achetant votre enregistreur. Vous auriez, dans le réseau, autant de capacité, que vous géreriez à votre guise.

Les éléments de l'arrière-guichet dont je parle sont invisibles. Après avoir enregistré des programmes et atteint votre limite, vous en effacez, pour faire de la place ou vous achetez plus de capacité, ce dont nous serions très heureux, mais ça correspondrait à un modèle commercial différent.

Nous n'avons certainement pas l'intention de vous accorder un nombre illimité d'enregistrements simplement parce que nous possédons un système dorsal plus efficace.

(1700)

M. Majid Jowhari:

Nous déplaçons simplement notre espace de stockage dans un nuage.

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Oui.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Nous disons vouloir posséder telle capacité de stockage et nous continuons de choisir les programmes que nous voulons enregistrer. Vous nous demandez de vous permettre de rationaliser le fonctionnement de votre arrière-guichet et nous promettez de fournir une copie de l'enregistrement. Quand nous choisirons l'enregistrement, il sera stocké là dans votre entrepôt; ce ne sera pas une copie en notre possession... D'accord. Je comprends.

Très bien. Je questionne maintenant M. Pelletier. Je suis confus. Il a été question de l'auteur, du créateur et du réalisateur.

De plus, madame Messier, vous essayez de dire, si, du moins, j'ai bien compris, que les réalisateurs ont vraiment besoin de négocier leur propre rémunération et que, sinon, il ne leur restera vraiment rien après le transfert sur une plateforme différente. Quelque chose m'a-t-il échappé?

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Je disais simplement que nous négocions nos droits, et Mme Messier disait que les réalisateurs étaient des auteurs, ce que je nie.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Alors, expliquez-moi. Je comprends mal. [Français]

Mme Hélène Messier:

J'aimerais parler pour moi-même.

Selon ce qui a été établi, le réalisateur comme le scénariste reçoivent un cachet initial pour leurs services. Par la suite, ils négocient des droits sur les utilisations secondaires de l'oeuvre dans l'entente collective ou leur contrat.

Je pense que Mme Beaudry voulait ajouter quelque chose à propos d'une affirmation qui a été faite tout à l'heure.

Mme Marie-Christine Beaudry:

Oui.

En télévision, je peux vous dire que nous versons des redevances aux réalisateurs, même dès la première utilisation. Ces redevances viennent de revenus que nous recevons des diffuseurs. Cela fait partie de la licence de base que les réalisateurs nous donnent. En télévision, c'est sûrement un peu différent de ce qu'on vous a expliqué au sujet du long métrage.

Il importe de souligner que dans le cas des longs métrages, le producteur a des investisseurs et que les sommes qu'il reçoit vont d'abord aux distributeurs. Les premiers revenus vont aux distributeurs et aux salles qui diffusent les oeuvres. Par la suite, ce que le producteur reçoit doit être remis aux investisseurs, tels que le Fonds des médias du Canada ou Téléfilm Canada.

Lorsqu'il reste de l'argent, il est alors partagé entre les scénaristes et les réalisateurs. C'est certain que les investisseurs ont un droit de priorité quant au retour d'argent sur les revenus réalisés par le producteur.

M. Gabriel Pelletier:

Je voudrais corriger quelque chose.

Dans notre entente collective avec l'AQPM, les réalisateurs ne reçoivent pas de redevances payées à l'origine sur tout ce qui a servi au financement d'une production. Une fois que la licence originale de diffusion a été faite, il y a des redevances sur les ventes successives.

En réalité, c'est l'ARRQ qui collecte les redevances. Généralement, c'est quand il y a des ventes à l'étranger qu'il y a des retours sur ces redevances.

Mme Marie-Christine Beaudry:

Si vous me le permettez, j'aimerais apporter une correction, parce que je travaille présentement à ce dossier.

Je vais vous donner un exemple d'émission qui est diffusée à Radio-Canada.

Radio-Canada a acquis comme première utilisation la diffusion de passes sur ses ondes, la diffusion en vidéo sur demande par abonnement, la VSDA, et en vidéo sur demande gratuite, la VSDG. Cela fait partie de la licence initiale, de la licence et du contrat que nous avons avec le réalisateur.

Or toute somme que nous recevons de Radio-Canada qui provient de la VSDA, par abonnement ou de la VSDG que nous recevions, comprend un pourcentage négocié avec le réalisateur et lui est remis. Actuellement, nous faisons des rapports de distribution à cet effet à l'ARRQ. Vous me direz que ce ne sont pas des sommes très importantes, mais le producteur lui-même ne reçoit pas énormément d'argent.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Traduction]

Monsieur Angus, vous avez deux minutes.

M. Charlie Angus:

Merci.

À mes 17 ans, j'ai adhéré à l'Association des compositeurs, auteurs et éditeurs du Canada Limitée et je suis parti en tournée. C'est devenu ensuite la Société canadienne des auteurs, compositeurs et éditeurs de musique. Je ne dirai pas à combien d'années ça remonte. Au fil des ans, j'ai reçu des revenus de la télévision, de la publication de livres et de musique, et ça continue.

La question qui se pose dans le cas de la musique est très intéressante, madame Dupré, parce que la révolution numérique a eu des conséquences très avantageuses. Le coût des enregistrements a considérablement diminué. Nous dépensions presque tout notre argent en honoraires d'avocat, sans en voir un sou, à cause de tous les frais récupérables qu'ils facturaient à notre compte. Si les sociétés d'enregistrement ne voulaient pas nous approvisionner, c'en était fait de notre produit. Maintenant, on peut stocker le produit soi-même en ligne. C'est donc un avantage.

L'inconvénient est la disparition de la musique en direct dans le pays, alors qu'on demande aux groupes musicaux de payer maintenant leurs tournées grâce à la vente de T-shirts. Il y a 20 ans, on en aurait ri.

Nous avons notamment perdu la source de revenus qu'étaient la redevance pour la copie privée, les redevances de la radiodiffusion. Les revenus des musiciens baissent sans cesse. Le dernier coup vient de Spotify, qui remet, je pense, cinq dix millièmes de cents pour chaque tranche de 1 000 écoutes ou quelque chose comme ça.

Je ne connais aucun autre secteur artistique qui affronte une telle incertitude de ses sources de revenu. De belles occasions s'offrent aux musiciens dans le monde numérique, mais il y a aussi encore beaucoup de pièges. Comment décririez-vous la réalité des artistes qui travaillent aujourd'hui dans le monde de la musique? Par où commencer pour trouver un certain niveau de rémunération cohérente?

(1705)

Mme Marie-Josée Dupré:

En effet, la situation n'est pas optimale. Dans le monde numérique, la plupart des droits se calculent maintenant d'après le nombre de visionnements. Le nombre nécessaire à un certain revenu est absolument démentiel, mais c'est considéré comme une communication un à un, par opposition à la communication de masse qu'offrent la radio et les concerts et ainsi de suite.

Si les droits de licence que nous retirons de ces services ne sont pas corrigés pour se rapprocher un peu de ce à quoi les CD ressemblaient dans le monde physique, nous n'y parviendrons jamais de toute manière. Vous avez dit qu'il n'y avait plus de spectacles en direct. Il y en a encore, mais les gens pensent que la musique, c'est gratuit. Dans un restaurant ou un bar, ils paient la nourriture et la bière, mais, pour ce qui concerne les musiciens, ils disent faire leur promotion, ce qui les dispense de les payer. On obtient seulement un droit d'entrée, ce genre de chose. C'est souvent la philosophie de la musique gratuite.

M. Charlie Angus:

Nous ressentions la même chose avec les transitions antérieures. La radio ne voulait pas payer la musique, prétendant qu'elle offrait un service. Elle a fini par payer...

Mme Marie-Josée Dupré:

Oui.

M. Charlie Angus:

... et ç'a transformé l'industrie de l'enregistrement. Nous l'avons vu quand la télévision par câble a payé alors qu'elle n'allait pas le faire. Qu'est-ce qui nous empêche de pouvoir établir des accords crédibles, mais non restrictifs, de gestion des droits d'auteur avec des organisations comme Spotify ou YouTube? Avons-nous besoin d'un mouvement international? Il me semble que nous butons toujours contre ces obstacles technologiques, puis nous devons les combattre et c'est à ce moment que les artistes se font rémunérer, mais ce n'est pas encore arrivé dans le système actuel.

Mme Marie-Josée Dupré:

J'ignore si un mouvement ou une coalition internationale est possible.

Comme je l'ai dit, il y a eu des discussions, il y a un certain temps, sur la gestion multiterritoriale des droits d'auteur. Un service numérique obtiendrait une licence d'un collectif. Il paierait tous les droits d'auteur. Et ce serait réparti entre les différentes sociétés, puis, manifestement, entre les ayants droit. Est-ce que c'est plus efficace? Peut-être, ou plus facile, mais obtiendrons-nous davantage? Quelle valeur accordons-nous...?

Comme vous l'avez dit, nous ne distribuons plus de CD. Tous les coûts ont été comprimés, puis il n'y a plus eu d'augmentation. J'ignore comment... Nous aurons besoin de l'aide des différents ayants droit pour nous unir et pour nous assurer qu'ils se battent pour leurs droits. Je n'ai vraiment pas de solution pour revenir à une situation analogue à celle d'il y a 20 ans, quand chaque musicien gagnait décemment sa vie. Il est très difficile de penser à un stratagème particulier qui sera vraiment efficace et[Français]payant.

(1710)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Voilà la difficulté pour notre comité: essayer de trouver des solutions crédibles.

Il reste deux intervenants qui ont droit à cinq minutes chacun.

Allez-y, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Je reprends là où j'en étais, il y a une heure, avec Telus sur FairPlay. Est-il admissible de poursuivre les utilisateurs d'Internet sans ordonnance judiciaire?

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Nous croyons que l'application FairPlay assure une certaine équité dans la marche à suivre. C'est ce qui est vraiment important. Le processus d'ordonnance vise simplement à assurer cette équité. Nous croyons qu'il est sûrement possible pour vous de créer un organisme indépendant qui assurerait ce processus équitable.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez particulièrement insisté sur l'intégration verticale de Bell et de Rogers, et je partage votre inquiétude. Personnellement, je ne crois pas que les compagnies doivent en même temps être distributeurs, producteurs de médias et fournisseurs d'Internet, à cause d'un conflit fondamental d'intérêts dans ces compagnies. Avez-vous une opinion ou des observations à ce sujet et une explication pour la non-intégration verticale de Telus?

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Il est sûr que nous avons exprimé des motifs importants d'inquiétude à l'égard des divers éléments de l'intégration verticale, et ça convient davantage à une autre tribune et à l'examen, actuellement, d'un autre projet de loi. Nous croyons que la Loi sur la radiodiffusion a besoin d'être modifiée pour répondre à ces problèmes de concurrence.

Pourquoi Telus n'est-il pas intégré verticalement? Manifestement, nous poursuivons tous nos stratégies différentes. Nous croyons depuis longtemps... Nous voulons libérer le pouvoir d'Internet pour offrir ce qu'il y a de mieux. Simple question de stratégie. Dans la mesure où l'intégration verticale peut favoriser et inspirer des conduites anticoncurrentielles nuisibles aux consommateurs, c'est un enjeu à clarifier.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pouvez-vous en dire un peu plus sur la nuisance pour les consommateurs?

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

C'est surtout du point de vue de la radiodiffusion. Ce milieu est tel que nous sommes tenus d'offrir les services de programmation que les sociétés verticalement intégrées possèdent. Tout les incite à asphyxier la concurrence, soit en bloquant certains services particulièrement en vogue à leurs rivaux — et il a fallu combattre leurs décisions devant le CRTC — soit en augmentant les coûts pour leurs rivaux, pour les obliger à payer davantage les prix en gros qu'ils verseraient pour offrir les mêmes services de programmation qu'eux offrent à leurs abonnés.

La logique de ce comportement est claire. Ils veulent relever nos coûts pour nous concurrencer sur divers marchés, pas seulement celui de la radiodiffusion, mais aussi sur les divers autres plans sur lesquels nous nous concurrençons, comme les marchés du sans fil, l'espace Internet et la distribution télévisuelle. De plus, bien sûr, nous savons tous que la télévision s'achemine vers un service en ligne. Dans la mesure où vous pourriez affirmer que le câblodistributeur Rogers ne concurrence pas nécessairement Telus sur nos marchés, parce que nous offrons seulement la télévision dans l'Ouest et dans certaines parties du Québec, il finit par le devenir quand il offre ses services en ligne par, par exemple, Sportsnet Now, qui est une offre de contournement qui peut supplanter votre abonnement télévisuel.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Plus tôt, nous parlions d'inspection approfondie des paquets, d'IAP. J'ai déjà travaillé dans l'industrie. Est-ce que ça menace la neutralité du réseau? Quelle est la position de Telus sur la neutralité du réseau?

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Telus croit fermement dans la neutralité du réseau.

En l'affirmant, je pense qu'il faut appliquer un principe à certains éléments pour que les consommateurs et l'ensemble du pays le comprennent. Certains principes, par exemple la sécurité, le caractère privé de l'information, font parfois concurrence à la neutralité du réseau. Il faut concilier les deux dans l'application des divers principes, qui sont tous également importants.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Eh bien, si vous donnez à votre secteur le droit d'inspecter les paquets, la circulation, la forme de la circulation et ainsi de suite, ne vous obligez-vous pas vous-mêmes à surveiller cette circulation? Si la circulation de transit était illégale, n'auriez-vous pas alors l'obligation d'y réagir, ayant désormais troqué le rôle d'entreprise de télécommunications contre celui de juge du trafic?

(1715)

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Les pratiques de gestion de la circulation s'appliquent généralement de façon plus commune aux périodes de pointe et à ce genre de choses, plutôt qu'à la détermination du contenu ou de la nature des paquets transmis.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est ce que je voulais faire valoir. C'est une différence très importante à apporter.

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Effectivement. Il est sûr que je ne laisse pas entendre que les pratiques de gestion de la circulation ne conduiront pas nécessairement à l'examen de différents types de contenu, mais l'application et l'examen de ces pratiques relèveraient du CRTC.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. On m'interrompt déjà.

Le président:

Vous l'êtes maintenant.

Entendons maintenant notre dernier intervenant, M. Albas.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je remercie également nos témoins d'aujourd'hui.

J'aimerais revenir aux témoins de Telus, d'autant plus que dans votre exposé et la discussion qui a suivi, vous avez abondamment parlé de l'avis et avis, et de ce qui fonctionne et ne semble pas fonctionner dans ce régime.

Je peux comprendre quand vous faites remarquer que les avis frauduleux ou les renseignements erronés abondent, mais que vous avez l'obligation de les transmettre. Avez-vous des données précises sur la fréquence à laquelle vous recevez ces avis? Est-ce 1 sur 10, sur 100, sur 1 000?

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Sachez tout d'abord que nous pourrions ne pas pouvoir détecter du tout les avis frauduleux. Je ne pourrais donc pas vous donner de chiffre sur le nombre d'avis, mais le potentiel est là. Voilà qui nous préoccupe. C'est pourquoi il est extrêmement important d'établir le contenu et la forme des avis, car cela pourrait résoudre le problème.

Pour ce qui est des avis que nous recevons qui sont peut-être trop anciens ou qui n'incluent peut-être pas tous les... Nous effectuons des recherches pour voir si nous avons des téléversements pour cette adresse IP, à telle date et à telle heure, afin de vérifier combien de ces avis ne sont pas... Nous faisons la vérification, mais, comme cela se produit fréquemment, il s'avère que la personne ne semble pas être un de nos clients. C'est la raison pour laquelle l'automatisation devient si importante. Quand on reçoit des centaines de milliers d'avis par mois, on n'a certainement pas le temps de tous les inspecter en détail.

M. Dan Albas:

Nous avons entendu des suggestions d'autres fournisseurs de services Internet au sujet des avis et avis; ils ont notamment proposé d'éliminer les offres de règlement et d'adopter un formulaire normalisé. Nous n'avons encore rien entendu à propos de l'imposition de frais aux titulaires de droit pour l'envoi de ces avis. Telus est-il le seul à souhaiter ce changement ou est-ce que d'autres compagnies désireraient également l'instauration de pareille mesure?

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Nous avons entendu TekSavvy le proposer lors de sa comparution la semaine dernière. Nous ne proposons pas d'instaurer un mécanisme de recouvrement des coûts, mais simplement d'ajouter une sorte de frais. C'est différent des ordonnances de type Norwich, lesquelles exigent des efforts supplémentaires pour pouvoir trouver des renseignements additionnels en plus du travail effectué pour les avis et avis. Là, on parle de recouvrement des coûts, et c'est à ce sujet que Rogers s'est adressé à la Cour suprême pour obtenir le droit d'imposer des frais. Nous appuyons certainement cet aspect du recouvrement des coûts.

Pour ce qui est d'un régime d'avis et d'avis, je pense que c'est une mesure qui permettrait de concilier les droits des titulaires et les intérêts des tierces parties innocentes, les fournisseurs de services Internet dans le cas présent. L'ajout de frais — pas nécessairement aux fins de recouvrement des coûts, mais des frais quelconques — découragera au moins les utilisations malveillantes, qu'il s'agisse de fraude ou d'hameçonnage. Nous parlons de divers types de régimes d'avis et d'avis et d'un élément de coût.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord.

À l'évidence, vous avez visionné la séance de la semaine dernière, au cours de laquelle nous avons aussi discuté du pouvoir — et non de la capacité — de la Cour fédérale d'entendre, en vertu de la Constitution... Je ne devrais pas dire « Constitution ». Je parle du pouvoir de la cour de rendre des décisions dans de telles affaires. Vous ne faites peut-être pas partie de la coalition Franc-Jeu, mais vous la soutenez.

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Oui.

M. Dan Albas:

Considérez-vous que la Cour fédérale ne dispose pas de la clarté nécessaire pour entendre ces causes et offrir une mesure injonctive?

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Non, ce n'est absolument pas notre avis. Nous considérons seulement qu'il faut s'attaquer au piratage dans de nombreux forums.

La Cour fédérale en est certainement un. En fait, tout tribunal peut entendre des affaires de violation du droit d'auteur. Nous sommes d'avis qu'ils possèdent le pouvoir et l'expertise nécessaires. Comme le processus judiciaire peut être plus long que le processus administratif, nous pensons que les titulaires de droit devraient avoir la possibilité de s'adresser à une autre instance.

Le piratage est un fléau qui doit être combattu sur plusieurs fronts, selon nous.

M. Dan Albas:

Je comprends qu'il existe bien des avenues différentes, mais Shaw a souligné que des éclaircissements seraient de mise. Nous ne sommes pas ici seulement pour faire la lumière sur des concepts comme celui d'avis et d'avis et pour déterminer s'il est raisonnable d'instaurer un mécanisme comme celui de l'écoute en continu sur le nuage ou le service sur demande pour apporter certaines des améliorations que vous souhaitez. En ce qui concerne précisément les éclaircissements à la Cour fédérale, pensez-vous que la situation soit suffisamment claire à l'heure actuelle?

(1720)

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

D'aucuns pourraient faire remarquer que les choses ne sont jamais assez claires, particulièrement dans le domaine du droit d'auteur. À mon avis, il serait utile que les choses soient plus claires. Est-ce absolument nécessaire? Peut-être.

M. Antoine Malek:

J'ajouterais quelque chose à ce sujet.

Je pense que vous faites peut-être référence à la remarque formulée sur l'article 36 de la Loi sur les télécommunications, lequel stipule que le CRTC doit approuver tout blocage de site Web. Un fournisseur de services Internet peut recevoir une ordonnance d'un tribunal lui indiquant de bloquer un site Web, mais il ne peut le faire sans l'autorisation préalable du CRTC. Il faudrait éclaircir la situation à cet égard. Oui, nous sommes tout à fait d'accord avec cela.

Il serait utile pour les fournisseurs de services Internet qu'on clarifie le rôle du CRTC et son interaction avec une ordonnance d'un tribunal.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci.

Je partagerai mon temps.

Le président:

Eh bien, votre temps est écoulé, mais allez-y.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'ai qu'une brève question. Vous avez parlé du blocage de site. Comment procéderiez-vous pour le faire? Vous avez parlé plus tôt du blocage du système de nom de domaine, un procédé complètement inefficace. Je suis donc un peu curieux.

Mme Ann Mainville-Neeson:

Comme nous ne faisons pas partie de la coalition Franc-Jeu, je ne pense pas que nous ayons réellement examiné les divers mécanismes de blocage. Nous avons discuté avec nos techniciens, et il existe diverses manières, qui présentent différents défauts. Le blocage excessif est certainement fort préoccupant. Le blocage approprié est effectivement utile, mais si on bloque quelque chose avec un mécanisme qui peut facilement être contourné, alors c'est un coup d'épée dans l'eau.

C'est une question complexe.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Fort bien. Merci.

Le président:

Sur ce,[Français] je vous remercie beaucoup de toutes vos présentations, de vos questions intéressantes et de vos réponses qui l'étaient tout autant. Nous avons beaucoup de travail en perspective.[Traduction]

Merci beaucoup à tous. La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on October 01, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.