header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-10-16 PROC 125

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good afternoon. Welcome to the 125th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

Emmanuel Dubourg and Vance Badawey, welcome back.

Martin Shields, welcome to PROC.

In addition to the officials from the Privy Council, Jean-François Morin and Manon Paquet, we have Elections Canada officials with us on very short notice: Anne Lawson, who is the Deputy Chief Electoral Officer, Regulatory Affairs, who's been here many times during the discussions; and Trevor Knight, Senior Counsel, Legal Services.

Thank you both for being here on such short notice. It's amazing. You're always helpful here. I'm sure we'll have some technical questions for you.

In a moment, we will continue with clause-by-clause study on Bill C-76, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act and other acts and to make certain consequential amendments, but first we're going to deal with something regarding clause 331.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Chair, I just want to advise the committee that based on the decisions we made this morning, we will be withdrawing amendments CPC-145 and CPC-189.

The Chair:

Amendments CPC-145 and CPC-189 are withdrawn.

Ms. Lawson, just for curiosity's sake, while people are making their notes, this has nothing to do with anything we're going to debate now, but have we ever had a polling station with more than 10 polling divisions in it?

Mr. Trevor Knight (Senior Counsel, Legal Services, Elections Canada):

It's not very common, but yes, we have.

The Chair:

Thank you.

(On clause 191)

The Chair: We're going to start by having John Nater introduce one of the new Conservative clauses, reference number 10008652.

Can you explain this to us?

Mr. John Nater:

This basically clarifies accounting procedures after the election has closed in terms of the ballot boxes.

The Chair:

In what way?

Mr. John Nater:

It's a housekeeping amendment.

The Chair:

What does it do?

Mr. John Nater:

Basically, each ballot box is closed and then you do the counting. It's just a clarification. When you have multiple polls at a single station, each box gets closed individually and carried off.

The Chair:

Are there any comments from anyone not in the Conservative Party? I'm including the officials.

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

I'm sorry I'm late. Can I get an update on which number we're on?

The Chair:

We're on clause 191.

We've also withdrawn amendments CPC-145 and CPC-189 because of decisions we made this morning.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay, CPC-189 is much further down the list. I'm following now.

The Chair:

Do the officials have any comment on this proposed amendment?

Mr. Nater, while people are thinking, do you want to say again what this amendment does that's not done already in the act?

Mr. John Nater:

Sure. Basically, when you have multiple ballot boxes or multiple stations at a single location, it just clarifies “Immediately after the close of a polling station”, in respect of “each ballot box”. It's just clarified in that measure. On page 100, line 16, of the actual bill, we're adding that in.

Currently it says: Immediately after the close of a polling station, an election officer who is assigned to the polling station shall count the votes

We're just saying, at the close of “each ballot box”.

The Chair:

This is a technical amendment, so Elections Canada, feel free to make any comments.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Chair, this is through you to Elections Canada.

First of all, thank you for making yourselves available. Some of these are, obviously, policy debates that we're dealing with as a committee, which we're not asking you or the Privy Council officials to weigh in on. Some of them are just logistical questions. Many of us have been involved in many elections, but not on your side of things, managing the election.

My question on this one, in terms of what John has suggested, is about the practical ability to do what's being proposed under this amendment. Again, I'm not passing judgment as to its merit but its functionality.

Do you understand what's being proposed, and if so, is it practical?

Maybe Mr. Morin wants to comment as well.

Mr. Jean-François Morin (Senior Policy Advisor, Privy Council Office):

I have a question for Mr. Nater.

I'm sorry. I know it's not usual for witnesses to ask questions.

The Chair:

Go ahead. He needs the practice.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I need a clarification on the amendment.

Am I correct in understanding that the effect of this amendment would be to require that, in the absence of candidates or representatives, at least two electors attend each ballot box?

Mr. John Nater:

No, that's the next one, amendment CPC-69.

Why don't I read what it says in the bill now and what is being proposed?

The Chair:

Yes, go ahead.

Mr. John Nater:

Currently, the bill says: 283(1) Immediately after the close of a polling station, an election officer who is assigned to the polling station shall count the votes in the presence of

We're proposing that it read: 283(1) Immediately after the close of a polling station, in respect of each ballot box established at the polling station, an election officer who is assigned to the polling station shall count the votes in the presence of

We are just clarifying that where there is a polling location with multiple polls, each box shall—

The Chair:

Mr. Morin.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Thank you, Mr. Nater. I understand that, but at proposed paragraph 283(1)(b) in this proposed section in the bill, there is the part you are proposing to change, which adds “in respect of each ballot box”. Then we go to proposed paragraph (b), which currently says: (b) any candidates or their representatives who are present or, if no candidates or representatives are present, at least two electors.

Is it, then, your understanding that at least two electors, in the absence of candidates or representatives, would need to attend the counting of the votes for each ballot box in a polling station?

(1540)

Mr. John Nater:

What we're saying is that there would be two witnesses for each ballot box rather than for each location. The first part comes into play as well, but in the top part we're just clarifying that it's “each ballot box”, and then (a) and (b) would apply to that.

That's as clear as mud.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Thank you.

Unless I'm contradicted by my colleagues here, within the modernization of the voting initiative proposed by the Chief Electoral Officer, this would include an additional burden of finding at least two electors to stay for the entirety of the counting of the votes. This is just a practical comment on the effect of this amendment.

The Chair: Does Elections Canada want to chime in on that?

Ms. Anne Lawson (Deputy Chief Electoral Officer, Regulatory Affairs, Elections Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. We're very happy to be here today, and we're always responsive to your request to appear before this committee.

I will say, however, that not having expected to be here for clause-by-clause, we have not had a chance to review all of these amendments. We're looking at them as we're here and are trying to understand them and react.

I'm still not sure that I fully understand the import of this amendment. It doesn't strike us off the top as being a problem, in the sense that we are obviously going to count all of the ballot boxes at the polling station regardless. I'm not sure whether this is meant to add a burden or whether it is just to clarify that each ballot box needs to be properly counted.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Having the presence of two electors is what's being proposed. Is there a circumstance in which ballots can be counted without a representative from the parties or an elector present? Could it be just Elections Canada's officials alone?

Ms. Anne Lawson:

It could not be, currently.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So that scenario doesn't happen?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Correct me if I'm wrong, as I'm saying this from memory, but I think this was a change brought by Bill C-23. Prior to Bill C-23, there was a maximum of two electors who could attend the vote in the absence of representatives, but we'd have to confirm that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I wonder whether we can circle back to this one, to allow Elections Canada some time to go through it. Would that be helpful? Is it consequential, Chair? I know we sometimes pause amendments to give witnesses a moment to collect thoughts.

The Chair:

Is it okay with the committee?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It is unless there is a sequence that puts us off.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

Yes, I think it's fine. I don't think it's consequential.

Mr. John Nater:

The next amendment we'd have to hold off on as well, then, because they tie together.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is that CPC-71?

The Chair:

Is it amendment CPC-69?

We did CPC-69.

We'll stand down clause 191 with all of its amendments. We'll come back to the clause later.

Is that okay with the committee?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Just don't forget.

The Chair:

We'll try to do it at the end of the meeting today.

(Clause 191 allowed to stand)

The Chair: Okay, we have new clause 191.1, which is CPC-72.

The vote on CPC-72 applies to CPC-73, which is on page 129 and CPC-75, on page 130, and CPC-78, on page 135, as they are linked by the concept of the ballot reconciliation report.

Can I have the introduction of CPC-72? It's on page 125.

(1545)

Mr. John Nater:

Mr. Chair, this goes along with the reconciliation report when you're having multiple ballot boxes at a single polling station. In the traditional past each ballot box has been its own polling station and now we're going to have multiple ballot boxes at a single location. This is providing a reconciliation report for each of those locations.

The Chair:

Officials, this is one you've had.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is a scenario in which we have multiple ballot boxes within one polling place. We're now calling it “polling place”. You want a reconciliation of the entire polling place done at the end of each voting day, where traditionally it was just each individual polling....

The Chair:

Okay.

In the past, let's say, we had five lineups. They'd each have their ballot box and you could only vote at your lineup. Now you can have five lineups but people can vote at any of them. You could still have five ballot boxes.

This amendment does what to that?

Mr. John Nater:

It's a reconciliation for it, so that the number of ballots that are present in the boxes reconciles with the number of ballots that are issued for each poll.

The Chair:

Okay. I understand—

Mr. John Nater:

It's a multiple-table situation.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Does the CEO not already have discretion to figure out how to do this without having it so prescriptively assigned to him?

Mr. John Nater:

We want to ensure that there is a reconciliation report that is provided to parties. I think this information is important.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can the CEO collect information, though?

The Chair:

Mr. Morin.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Under section 283 of the Canada Elections Act currently, the deputy returning officer shall establish the statement of the vote on the form that is prescribed by the chief electoral officer. Bill C-76 would remove the mention of the “deputy returning officer” and would change it to “election officer”, as we've discussed on a few occasions.

The statement of the vote needs to say how many ballots were received at the beginning of the day, how many unused ballots are remaining at the end of the day, and how many electors voted. Eventually, the results are reported on the statement of the vote.

As I mentioned yesterday, the Chief Electoral Officer still has a requirement under section 533, I think, of the Canada Elections Act, to report the results of the vote by polling division. This is one of the reasons that election officers will have to write the polling division number at the back of the ballot when each elector votes. Under his power to prescribe forms, the chief electoral officer will likely prescribe a form for the statement of the vote that will allow the votes for each ballot box for each polling division to be recorded. Then these numbers will be amalgamated also for the polling station.

In the end, remember that the chief electoral officer always has to report results by polling division, so results will always be available by polling division. Even if the ballots for a single polling division are deposited in, for example, 10 different ballot boxes at a polling station, these results will be combined at the end of the polling day to make sure that the results are available for each polling division.

Was that clear?

The Chair:

Trevor or Anne, did you want to add anything?

Ms. Anne Lawson:

No. What was just described is absolutely correct. The statement of the vote provides the reconciliation currently and it will continue to do that under any new system. Even if we're having several polling divisions at the polling station, the statement of the vote is what provides that reconciliation at the end of the day. As my colleague said, the vote would continue to be reported by the PD, the polling division, as required under the law.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Where in Bill C-76 is that guaranteed?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It's actually in the Canada Elections Act itself. It's not in the bill. It's a provision that is not being affected by the bill.

Ms. Anne Lawson:

The statement of the vote is in the bill, in regard to section 287.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I mean the requirement to publish the results by polling division.

(1550)

Mr. John Nater:

It's counted by polling division. What we're looking for here is the reconciliation by polling division.

I'm curious, perhaps through Elections Canada, what assurances Parliament can be provided that with this vote, at any table model, there will be a reconciliation of the votes cast with the ballots issued. What assurances can we be provided of that?

Mr. Trevor Knight:

The statement of the vote will require a reconciliation for the entire polling station, so the entire school gym. To feed into that, there would need to be documentation to ensure from each count that there is a reconciliation. That isn't provided in itself, but the statement of the vote is there for the purposes of reconciling for the whole polling station.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The question sounds as though this is maybe additive in terms of more accounting and clarity. What we don't want to do is make things so burdensome as to affect the process of counting, reconciling and then announcing voting at any point.

The Chair:

It sounded as though you said to me it's already done. This doesn't add anything.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I think it is at a broader level.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, it's at a broader level.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What I'm hearing John suggest is that it's also reconciled at a more narrow level. Is that right?

Mr. John Nater:

Exactly.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Then does that become overly onerous for Elections Canada simply to be able to count, reconcile and then produce daily results?

Ms. Anne Lawson:

I'm not sure how to answer that question exactly. We're talking about the future, so we don't have forms developed at the moment. There's no question that these prescribed forms will be developed to enable what you're describing, which Trevor described, which is a proper count that's reconciled at the polling station level with the granularity that comes from having all of the ballots with their individual polling division numbers on them. As Jean-François said, that granularity will allow for the reporting by the polling division level.

The act provides a framework for that to happen necessarily, in and of itself. There's a certain amount of flexibility allowed for the Chief Electoral Officer to determine how that happens, but that's true in many other places in the act where the CEO is asked to prescribe forms to enable certain things to happen.

The Chair:

Let's vote on new clause 191.1, which is amendment CPC-72. That also applies to CPC-73, CPC-75 and CPC-78.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(On clause 192)

The Chair: We will go to clause 192 and amendment LIB-22, which was consequentially already passed. Wait a minute. No.

Sorry. We will go on to discuss LIB-22.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This is a simple amendment to make sure that if a ballot does not have the poll number on the back, it is not rejected on that basis alone. That's a sensible amendment. It would be a tragedy to lose a vote for that.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 192 as amended agreed to on division)

(On clause 193)

The Chair:

We go to amendment CPC-73.

Stephanie.

Mr. John Nater:

We've already done that one.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's right. We did. This is consequential to CPC-72.

The Chair:

It was defeated.

(Clause 193 agreed to on division)

(On clause 194)

The Chair: There was an amendment, CPC-74, but it was consequential to CPC-71. If we're standing clause 191, we will stand this clause too.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes.

The Chair:

We're going to stand this clause because it's consequential to the other clause we stood down. We need to do the other clause before we can do this clause.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are there others that this affects too?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Seventy-nine.

The Chair:

Okay, so we'll skip that for a little while but come back to it later this afternoon.

(Clause 194 allowed to stand)

(On clause 195)

The Chair: Amendment CPC-75 was consequential to CPC-72, which was defeated, so that doesn't pass.

Does clause 195 carry as presented?

(1555)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Clause 195 is agreed to on division, and clause 196 can carry with us.

(Clause 195 agreed to on division)

(Clause 196 agreed to)

(On clause 197)

The Chair:

We have amendment CPC-75.1.

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, that clause talks about the early counting of advance ballots. We just put a minimum number of votes required to allow that to happen. I know in the last election that happened from time to time, the reason being there was a large turnout for advance voting. This just provides a number to go with that and then there are the other provisions it's applied to. I believe there are four provisions.

The Chair:

Are you saying they can count before the poll is closed—

Mr. John Nater:

Yes, including—

The Chair:

—if there are more than 500 votes?

Mr. John Nater: Yes.

The Chair: Whereas before, the authority there was to count before the poll closed, but there wasn't a number? Is that—

Mr. John Nater:

I believe so.

Perhaps our Elections Canada officials can speak to this.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. John Nater:

There was an adaptation of the act to allow this to happen in the most recent election. I believe the number that was based on was 500. Perhaps Elections Canada could help us with that.

Ms. Anne Lawson:

I myself was trying to remember the number, and unfortunately I don't have the adaptation in front of me, so I can't answer this specific question. I don't think we'd take any position on the policy around this issue.

The Chair:

Right now, the Chief Electoral Officer can start counting at the advance poll, but there's no number to prescribe when he could start. This would prescribe when they could start, basically.

Mr. Morin.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Actually, the act doesn't allow for it currently. The Chief Electoral Officer used his power under section 17 of the Canada Elections Act to adapt the act for the last general election.

Bill C-76 would make it an official rule that the counting of the vote for advance polling can begin one hour before the close of polling on polling day. Traditionally, when this power has been used, it has been when a large number of ballots were cast at the advance polls. I think that one of the rationales for this was that when the results of the votes are made public on election night, often the results for the advance polling stations come out very late because the vote was longer and the number of votes was much higher.

That being said, on page 104 of the bill, in lines 17 to 19 in English, the returning officer can only count the vote at an advance polling station if he “has obtained the Chief Electoral Officer's prior approval” for doing so.

This is an authorization by the Chief Electoral Officer, and the counting is done in accordance with the Chief Electoral Officer's instructions, so this gives flexibility to the Chief Electoral Officer to determine which advance polling stations should see the counting of the vote begin in advance of closing.

The Chair:

So the present situation is that the Chief Electoral Officer can decide when to allow advance polling up to an hour before. This amendment says he can't do it until there are 500 votes cast.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Exactly. This amendment would restrict it to cases where the number of votes cast is at least 500.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

My esteemed colleague behind me, Mr. Church, provided me the adaptation from Elections Canada from the last election.

Subsection 289(4) states: Despite subsection (3), where more than 500 votes have been cast at an advance polling station, the returning officer may authorize the count of the votes cast at the advance poll to begin 2 hours before the close of the polling stations on polling day.

This amendment is consistent with Elections Canada's adaptation from the last election, in terms of the 500 number.

(1600)

The Chair:

Is that what they did with their discretion at the last election?

Mr. John Nater:

That was the adaptation, yes.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

I don't understand why we're interfering in the discretion of the Chief Electoral Officer. It seems redundant.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I wouldn't say it's interfering. It's making it consistent with his adaptation in the last election. Consistency is always a strong point when you're dealing with elections. You want predictability.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Could the Conservatives introduce their amendment CPC-76, please.

Mr. John Nater:

This is consistent with the previous amendments that we stood down. It talks about the number of witnesses to observe the count.

This replaces proposed paragraph 289(4)(d), talking about those advance ballots being counted prior to the polls closing. This is similar to the amendment we stood down a few minutes ago, about having the presence of at least two witnesses to observe the count.

The Chair:

This basically says, then, that there have to be at least two witnesses at every ballot box that's counted.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's the same as before.

The Chair:

What did we do before?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We stood it down.

The Chair:

We didn't get to it?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, we were waiting to hear how onerous this would be. We were giving Elections Canada a little bit of time.

Mr. John Nater:

Mr. Chair, it wouldn't make sense for us to move forward with this amendment if we didn't move.... We wouldn't want a different procedure for these counts versus counts that would occur on election day. Perhaps, then, if it's okay with the committee, we'll come back to this one as well.

The Chair:

Yes, we'll stand down this whole clause, with the exception of the amendment we've defeated.

(Clause 197 allowed to stand)

(On clause 198)

The Chair: We have amendment LIB-23, which may be presented.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The actual amendment looks simple, but it allows Elections Canada to send bingo sheets to the parties and candidates within six months of the election, which is useful data to have electronically, I think. When I was a staffer I had contracts to enter bingo sheets, and it took a hell of a long time as a campaign staffer. I think it's useful to have them electronically.

The Chair:

It allows what, then?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It allows automatic transfers.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Instead of having to go and get the boxes at Elections Canada two weeks after the election and then spend your weekends entering bingo sheets manually, it would have that information sent to all the parties and candidates.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It makes sense.

The Chair:

Is there any other discussion?

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: There was an amendment CPC-78, but it was consequential to amendment CPC-72.

(Clause 198 as amended agreed to)

(Clauses 199 to 204 inclusive agreed to)

(On clause 205)

The Chair: There is proposed amendment CPC-79. We're going to stand it down, because it's linked to the other three that we stood down already. We'll come back to it.

(Clause 205 allowed to stand)

(On clause 206)

The Chair: We're going to discuss amendment LIB-24.

There are some ramifications here. The vote on LIB-24 also applies to amendments LIB-25 on page 139, LIB-43 on page 269, and LIB-59 on page 316, as they are linked together by the definition of “online platforms”.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's just adding a definition clause into the act to be able to know what social media advertising is. It's pretty flat.

(1605)

The Chair:

Are you introducing the clause for the Liberals?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No. I'm giving pre-emptive commentary.

The Chair:

Ruby.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

I guess Mr. Cullen doesn't find the amendment very exciting, but it's very necessary.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's electrifying.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's very necessary. I am defining “online platform” in the act, so that we know, going forward with the other sections, how it's defined.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 206 as amended agreed to)

The Chair: There's a new clause 206.1 proposed in amendment NDP-17. You should know that the vote on this also will be applied to amendments NDP-18, NDP-20, and NDP-25.

Perhaps Mr. Cullen could describe what this amendment does.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is one hell of an amendment, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

It's bringing some excitement.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, let's liven this one up.

This is the proposed section that we heard about from multiple witnesses concerning the rules that apply for the so-called traditional media when someone, a third party or a political party, takes out an ad, requiring them to identify themselves. Social media have not had these rules applied to them in previous elections, and the application has been inconsistent.

Particularly, the threat to our elections is that people are able to propagate either vote enhancement ads—trying to get someone on an issue or a candidate voting for something—or suppression ads, which we saw actually much more of in the Brexit example, in which people were able to push voters against an idea or voting a certain way, all the while not identifying themselves and identifying who paid for the ad.

It's fundamental to our democracy that when someone pays for ad space—and there are some deep resources on some of these issues among some of these parties—they should simply identify themselves. This does this in the clearest way we could find.

As you noted, Mr. Chair, the application of this goes to other aspects, because it affects other parts of advertising: the pre-election advertising, which is taken care of in amendment NDP-18; and third party advertising, which is in amendment NDP-20, doing the exact same thing: having to identify yourself.

There are other amendments coming, I think Liberal amendments, concerning a repository of ads, so that the social media companies have to keep the ads on hand for some period of time.

The Chair:

You're saying basically that if someone advertises in a newspaper, they have to say who they are, but if they advertise on Facebook, they don't have to.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes. If the Liberal Party takes out an ad saying “we're wonderful”, paid for by them, as you well know, or if a registered third party advertiser takes out an ad on the radio, they, too, have to identify themselves. The traditional media, from my understanding—I could be wrong—have to keep a repository of the those ads, which can be then sought back.

The effects of these things are not always identified by voters immediately. If they think there is a problem or something suspicious, it's often even after the election has happened, and you have to be able to go back to this.

I don't believe any of these sections creates such a repository, but I think it is coming.

The Chair:

Could I get comments from Elections Canada or the PCO?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Section 320 of the act, which is not open in the bill, is the one being considered by the amendment now before us. Section 320 already requires that the candidate or registered party publishing election advertising insert a mention that the message has been authorized.

To the extent possible, the Canada Elections Act and the bill before us have been drafted with the idea of technological neutrality. We try as much as possible not to identify different media of communication, because we want the rules to be applicable as broadly as possible.

When he testified before you just a few weeks ago, Mr. Cullen, you asked the Chief Electoral Officer a question regarding the application of section 320. You asked him whether it was already applicable to the Internet. My understanding is that he said yes.

The risk, when we start to identify various media in the act, is that doing so will raise questions about the applicability of the rule to other forms of communication.

(1610)

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, but we're not going to identify people standing on roofs and yelling as another form of communication.

We just went through and identified what social media is within the act. It seemed.... I understand what you're saying, and I don't recall that testimony being that clear, but I'll refer back to it in terms of the Chief Electoral Officer saying that definitely. It seemed to me that much of the testimony we received was that there were in fact two standards; that's why we just went though and defined what a social media platform is.

If all this does is alert the social media, especially not the very largest ones.... I think Facebook, Twitter and those ones already have policies in hand and are preparing them for the next election; they've told us such. But I think some of the smaller ones, maybe less known.... Also, we have triggers that are in amendments that are coming. Myspace I think really needs to get their game going—

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen: —because they're losing share.

I don't see a harm in naming this, particularly to alert those new forms of media, which an increasing number of Canadians get much of their media consumption from these days.

The Chair:

We have a big list, but before I go to it, you're basically saying that all the advertising, no matter where they do it, is covered, and you want to alert social media especially.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, I'm inclined to support it. Perhaps Elections Canada could provide us an interpretation.

A Facebook post or a tweet that's not boosted or is not promoted with dollar figures is simply a Facebook post that I or someone on my campaign team puts out and wouldn't be captured under this. This would just be paid advertising.

Ms. Anne Lawson:

That's correct.

Mr. John Nater:

Okay. If I send out a tweet, I don't have to use my precious characters to say “authorized by the official agent for John Nater”. That's my only concern, and I think that's good.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I actually forget....

The Chair:

Okay. We'll go to Ms. Sahota first and then to Mr. Graham.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I have a question for Mr. Cullen.

In the amendment, you're requiring political parties to be clear and to label their advertising as having been done by them.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's right.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

You're saying in the specification that you want to alert social media to this. Is that why you want to do this?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This would be so that social media doesn't accept ads that.... It goes on through NDP-17, NDP-18 and NDP-20 to capture the full range of who would be buying ads. It's that a social media platform.... Again, the large ones I'm actually not as preoccupied by; I think they have entire legal departments. It's the smaller ones. If the smaller ones accept money to boost an ad and to place an ad on social media that's going to pop up on a news aggregator—if National Newswatch suddenly has ads popping up—and if they don't seek identification of who paid for the ad, they're in violation of the act itself.

This one covers off parties. The next one does third parties in the pre-election. The third one does third parties in the general election. It's just trying to let people know, because we've seen some variance on this—and that's a kind word for it—especially on third party advertising when they're using social media to boost.

What we've heard from witnesses is that there is the ability to use the algorithms to hyper-target voters, and the effect of those ads is much greater than what was taken out in the Toronto Star 20 years ago and said that so-and-so was a great candidate. These are extremely hyper-targeted AI ads that get right into the heart and mind of a voter on the issues they're motivated by. They're powerful. I guess that's what we heard through testimony. This is about identifying when that ad comes to a voter why it's coming to them and who paid for it. I think it's very important for that to come across.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

My amendment LIB-25 also deals with creating a regime where there would be a reporting requirement for these platforms so that the platforms will then be aware and the public will also be aware that certain parties are advertising on certain platforms, and how much, and what they're doing with boosting and all of those things.

I think that would probably essentially cover this, because I think what you're trying to do is that you're taking on the responsibility of the party, which already is responsible for putting that tag line on all advertising as is. Right now, they already have this obligation. There's nothing to say that this obligation doesn't exist for social media. It exists for everything, like we've just heard. Are you trying to transfer some of that obligation onto the social media platform that they're putting it on rather than on the advertiser?

(1615)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's so that social media is simply aware if they receive any ad that doesn't come with the tag line as to who paid for it that they're part of violating the act, whether it's seen by accepting it so much or how that violation would work, who gets penalized for it—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Are newspapers and other forms penalized? Are they a part of the—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's an interesting question. If the Star runs a bunch of ads that are political in nature and doesn't identify who paid for them, I'm not sure who takes the hit. Is it the newspaper or is it the person who bought the ad? I'm not sure how the law works right now. Thankfully, I haven't had any personal experience with that.

I see what you're saying. The slight difference is—because we've looked at your amendment, of course—is that you start to get into where the triggers are. I think we have to have a discussion about that.

Again, I can see some very targeted social media platforms that don't have a high number of visitations but have great effect, because they're targeting into the 25 swing ridings that parties have identified into the 25% of swing voters. Sure they get 40,000 hits that week, but the 40,000 are incredibly effective over a much larger site that is scatter shooting across the Internet.

That's a second debate that we'll get to, but this one is very particular: Identify the ad, whether it's coming from parties, third parties; pre-election period, pre-writ or writ period. If you don't, you're in violation.

Again, I actually don't know who gets hammered if that rule is broken currently.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I think it's the party.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It's the party.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is it the third party as well?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes.

Well, there are other amendments we will come to regarding third party advertisement tag line requirements. But in this case, in the case of proposed new section 320, that would be the candidate or the registered party or their agents who fail to identify themselves.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

To finish this circle, then, the media itself, whether it's traditional media or social media, don't face a consequence for having accepted political ads without—

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

No.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Wow.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: You guys remember to [Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. Nathan Cullen: Did we get to you?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You guys collectively remembered my question, so I'll give you that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We prefer mind melding here at committee.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We've been too long together, Nathan.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So that's the amendment.

We tried to keep them.... I mean, we broke them into parts; yours is more coalesced. But we tried to keep it very straight in asking that the identification be clear, and clear across social media platforms, which we just defined one amendment ago.

The Chair:

Not to comment on this particular amendment, but any time you do legislation, when it's a broad coverage and you do a specific one, you then run the danger of giving an excuse to those who aren't in the specific—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Again, I hear that, but we did just go through and define what social media platforms are. It seems like a natural extension. I'm sure someone is inventing right now, or has already invented, the next new social media thing that doesn't exist on computers and transfers directly into our minds.

However, until we are aware of it, if the elections commissioner has the broad power, great, if we identify social media.... As we heard again from witnesses, the power of these is not what we're used to when it comes to political advertising. It's just not the same animal.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I know I'm beating the same drum, but what we risk are clever lawyers and those afterwards, when they're trying to defend themselves—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

[Inaudible—Editor] on social media.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes.

You're going to have them argue that the other platforms, if they do violate...by saying, “Oh, it doesn't really matter, they're just concerned about this area.” They've specifically said that you have to have a tag line for social media, but we've never defined that you have to have it for any of the other specific platforms.

That's what I think the chair is getting at. We may make it seem that this is more important than the other ones, and then violators for the other ones maybe don't get in as much trouble. So to keep it consistent—

The Chair:

Let's hear from Mr. Morin.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm trying to think of what these other things—

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

For the sake of debate, I would just like to add that the definition of "online platform" that was just adopted following Ms. Sahota's amendment would not apply to this section here, because we are not using that exact expression.

With regard to the risk that I was referring to earlier, this amendment would add the following proposed text to existing section 320: The authorization shall also be clearly visible in all election advertising messages transmitted by means of the Internet or any other digital network.

What I meant by saying that we were trying to craft the legislation in a technologically neutral way is that by saying here that this tag line should be clearly visible when it is transmitted by the Internet, it raises the issue that if we just post signs on the street, then they don't have to be clearly visible on that sign; they can be written in font 1.1, and we'll need a magnifying glass to read it. Right?

(1620)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Does that work?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I'm sorry?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Does that work? That's a really innovative idea.

The Chair:

Your suggestion is that it's already covered globally, and that this could be problematic if it were....

You're not as enthusiastic about this.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

When we state one rule for one specific media, and when we interpret the law in the aftermath, it always raises the question that if Parliament was that specific for a specific media, well, maybe they thought the others were not important, or that a different rule would apply to other media. That's the concern I was trying to convey earlier.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

In terms of the definition piece, Chair, at the very end, where we seek a definition, we could simply modify this to include reference back to Ruby's definition that we just passed for social media platforms, if that's the concern. When we drafted this, we didn't have that, so it was impossible to make them sync.

I mean, I'm not going to die on this hill. If we think we're getting to something that will effectively do what we want it to do, then let's get at it. I remain a bit concerned, though. I like discretionary powers for Elections Canada, but I just don't know—no offence, present company included—if we've kept pace with the effectiveness.

Let's put it this way: The British and the Americans absolutely did not keep pace with the effectiveness of dark money and advertising on the social media platforms that had demonstrable effect on the outcomes of their most recent votes. I would be encouraged, but a little surprised, if Elections Canada were so much dramatically better than their British or American counterparts. I know we all share information. The effort here is to become more and more transparent with the messages Canadians are getting, pre-writ and writ, on what we generally refer to as social media platforms, as defined by Ruby earlier.

The Chair:

This particular one is specifically the parties and the candidates, right?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's right, but again, the three of them hang together.

The Chair:

Right.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, I appreciate Mr. Cullen's suggestion. Perhaps we could work the definition from Ms. Sahota into this. I'd be happy with that, but I don't really want the committee to waste its time redrafting that if it's something that's not acceptable.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We've had the discussion. Folks can weigh in on it, and like it or not like it. Then we can move on.

If folks are going to like it, then I would suggest kind of a weird vote where this conditionally passes and we do include the definition of social media platform that the committee just passed.

Does everyone understand what I'm suggesting?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes: online platforms.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Correct: online platforms. Thank you.

The Chair: Okay?

Mr. Nathan Cullen: Yup.

The Chair:

Is it okay to vote on this?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Sure.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

That is applied to NDP-18, NDP-20 and NDP-25. That was a new clause, so that particular new clause does not exist now.

Clause 207 has no amendments.

(Clause 207 agreed to on division)

(Clause 208 agreed to)

The Chair: New clause 208.1 is being proposed. LIB-25 is consequential to LIB-24, which passed. New clause 208.1 has already passed because it's consequential.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: There are no amendments to clauses 209 and 210.

(Clauses 209 and 210 agreed to)

(On clause 211)

The Chair: There's amendment CPC-80.

If the Conservatives could explain this amendment, that would be great.

(1625)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Essentially, it's clarifying that multi-riding opinion polls cannot be released on election day when voting is open in any of the regions polled. I think that's fairly clear in terms of the possibility of the polls influencing voters as they go to polls within the regions that have been polled.

I just think this type of influence is something we don't want to see within our electoral system. I'll leave it at that.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm just trying to understand the scale.

Is this within an electoral riding? Is this in the neighbouring area? You refer to “geographical areas”. What do you mean? Do you mean one riding over?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I would say more than one riding.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

If the Scarborough polls were coming in, would you want to limit the release of Scarborough North before Scarborough East is finished and reported? All their polls are closing at the same time.

Mr. John Nater:

It's basically any polls or any ridings where the—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's polls relative to the region.

Mr. John Nater:

—surveys happen. If there was a certain poll in Scarborough South—is there a Scarborough South?—and Scarborough—Guildwood was still open, you couldn't release that poll on election day in that riding if they were surveyed from that riding, where the sample was taken from.

The Chair:

[Inaudible—Editor] Nathan said on the same day, at the same time.

Mr. John Nater:

Yes, but you couldn't release a poll.

If you had a regional poll with multiple ridings, you wouldn't be able to release that poll on election day. It's similar to how you can't release other national polls on election day.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm sorry. I misunderstood. I thought this was a vote count of some kind.

Mr. John Nater:

No.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is just public opinion polls.

Thank you.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's not a counted poll. It's an opinion poll.

The Chair:

It's a public opinion poll.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So you can't put a public opinion poll out into a region on voting day.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's correct.

You can't when the voting is open, not until after the region's polls have closed.

Mr. John Nater:

Exit polls would be an example, which we don't do as much here in Canada. You wouldn't want to have an exit poll released before that riding is closed.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Got it.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In talking about surveys and polls, XKCD had a great comic about 12 years ago saying that the area code of your phone number indicated where you lived in 2006. When you're doing surveys, it can be anywhere in the country now. The numbers no longer have any geographic coordination.

Mr. Morin, what is the effect of this in real terms? It seems that it would be exceptionally difficult to figure out what's going on in this circumstance.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

My understanding of this motion is that really it would apply only to opinion polls for which the target population was located across provincial boundaries, between the maritime provinces and Quebec and then between British Columbia and the rest of the country, because if you look at section 128 of the Canada Elections Act.... That's the current section. It's not in the bill. It's not being amended by the bill. That's the provision that provides for hours of voting on polling day. Canada has had staggered voting times for quite a long period now. Most polling stations in the Atlantic region close at the same time, and then all polling stations from Quebec to Alberta close at the same time, and then British Columbia closes, I think, half an hour later.

I'm sorry, Mr. Chair, I don't know exactly when Yukon closes. I think Yukon closes with British Columbia.

(1630)

The Chair:

That's another reference to the most beautiful riding in the country.

This is basically so you can't release polls on election day that are in that area, right?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes. That's how someone could potentially influence voters who had not yet voted within the region. Again, when you take away the logistics of it, I think the intent is pretty clear.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

But it says from which the sample of respondents was drawn, not where it was intended to be drawn. If you called somebody in B.C., you just messed up your whole thing if you're in New Brunswick. You don't know where they're coming from. That's why I said it's an enforcement nightmare.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, but it's not fair if there's a poll in Scarborough that is released as the results for Canada, and it could potentially affect the electors in Skeena—Bulkley Valley, for example.

The Chair:

Is there a reason you just didn't say, “no surveys allowed on election day anywhere in Canada for anything”?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I'm not sure why we didn't. Well, surveys are used for a number of reasons, so perhaps there would be situations where surveys would be useful on election day, or I guess not in contravening the tampering of public opinion, but this is not the case here, so....

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

It may be an interesting conundrum here, but I want to point out that, as the bill stands now on page 108 it says: 328 (1) No person shall cause to be transmitted to the public, in an electoral district on polling day before the close of all of the polling stations in that electoral district, the results of an election survey that have not previously been transmitted to the public.

When it says in here “in an electoral district”, a conundrum could be that a national survey could be released in Perth—Wellington once the polls have closed, but the polls in B.C. have not yet closed.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's what I just said.

Mr. John Nater:

That's the conundrum of it as it is written right now. I'm happy to release any polls in Perth—Wellington if....

The Chair:

Do the election officials have any comments on this?

Mr. Trevor Knight:

No, I don't think we have any comments on this.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Then what is not clear? It's your concern about....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Honestly, I fail to see the purpose of this in reality. I understand in theory, but in reality I see this as a pain in the butt to enforce, and it doesn't really accomplish anything. That's the short version. I appreciate what you're trying to do, but I don't really agree with it.

The Chair:

Right now, Mr. Nater, you're saying that a national poll could be released in Perth—Wellington and then someone could transmit it to B.C.

Mr. John Nater:

In theory, as it's written.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

In theory, that's true.

Mr. John Nater:

With social media, it's pretty easy to transfer information.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, when you put it that way, it could be very consequential. I know Mr. Cullen is very interested in broad-sweeping, large-platform consequences, as we have seen in other locations in the world. I hear what you're saying about the enforcement, but I just think about how influential it could be for any party.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, if that line you read was just applied, that you couldn't put out any surveys on election day until all the polls in Canada were closed, would that close the loophole?

Mr. John Nater:

I would say so, yes.

The Chair:

If there is no further discussion on this particular amendment, we'll go to a vote.

(1635)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I want it recorded just for future fun, so if something happens where an opinion poll is released and we see broad-sweeping consequences, we can see if this ever mattered.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Okay, and some opinion polls can't be released, as Mr. Nater outlined.

(Amendment negatived: nays 5; yeas 4 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 211 agreed to on division [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clauses 212 and 213 agreed to)

The Chair: Amendment CPC-81 proposes new clause 213.1.

Just so you know, the vote on this will also apply to CPC-147 on page 271 of the amendments, as they are linked by reference.

Also, if this amendment is adopted, LIB-47 cannot be moved, as CPC-147 and LIB-47 amend the same line.

Do you want to introduce this, Stephanie?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This was apparently Professor Pal's suggestion to extend TV, radio and publication price protection rules to social media advertising.

Perhaps our witnesses could clarify the protection rules that are in place presently for TV, radio and publications. I'm assuming that they are not.... Most probably it has something to do with their being static throughout election periods, perhaps, so that they're not inflated, and this would extend to social media as well.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

It's the idea that in a radio ad you can't charge a Conservative Party or a Liberal Party more or less based on which political party it is. That has to be offered at the same rate, at the lowest possible rate available, as follows: a rate for an advertisement in a periodical publication published or distributed and made public in the period referred to in paragraph (a) that exceeds the lowest rate charged by the person for an equal amount of equivalent advertising space in the same issue of the periodical, publication or in any other issue of it that is published or distributed and made public in that period.

It has to be the same rate, the same lowest possible rate, within that publication.

The Chair:

What are you reading from?

Mr. John Nater:

This is from the actual Canada Elections Act, not Bill C-76. It's the Canada Elections Act for that provision. It's basically that for social media there can't be a differential pricing. It's applying to that the same rules for the lowest rates for radio and TV, so you're not going to have the phenomenon where certain entities may be getting preferable rates that aren't available to the rest.

The Chair:

Anne?

Ms. Anne Lawson:

I'm just nodding in agreement. That's correct.

The Chair:

This would be a useful amendment to extend the equality to social media, basically. Is that what you're proposing, Stephanie?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes. I think it's very forward thinking. Could we perhaps get some commentary from the government as to what they make of this?

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I don't have much in the way of commentary. I don't remember hearing much in the way of evidence on this. Are there differential rates? Have we talked with the social media companies about this? Is it enforceable?

(1640)

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

This again is from Professor Michael Pal's testimony before our committee back in June. I believe he's from the University of Ottawa. He made a recommendation similar to this and said that there should be an equivalent provision within the Elections Act dealing with social media versus the rules we have in place for radio, TV and print advertising.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Are there different rates, though? Can I get a rate that's different from Nathan's?

Mr. John Nater:

Well, I think that for a lot of the issues, for anyone who's ever posted a Facebook ad, there are different rates depending on how you boost and what your geographical area is. If you have someone boosting in certain areas, it's going to be different from boosting in other areas.

It's an equivalent rate, so that you're not going to be charged more based on any arbitrary factors.

The Chair:

It would still be equal for everyone. If you boost—

Mr. John Nater:

Potentially, but—

The Chair:

—differently, you get a different rate.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but traditionally it was applied to newspapers and radio to not give preference to a party over another.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Exactly.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The question is, is there a similar application that needs to happen with social media? A social media company of any description could simply just like someone better and give a party preferential pricing. Am I right in that assumption? I'm thinking that none of us—

Ms. Anne Lawson:

I'm sorry. We don't have anything to offer on that in response to that question.

Mr. Nathan Cullen: Okay.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I think this might have been a better question when Facebook and Twitter were here, because it's the algorithm. I'm always happy to bring them back. We had fun.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm sure they'd be happy to come back.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Yes. We only threatened to summons them once—or twice, maybe.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Twice.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I understand what it's getting to, but just in terms of its being an effective law.... For Facebook, Twitter and social media, it's an algorithm that's determining the price we pay. It's not the role in terms of the others.... You call up your ads manager, and your ads manager is your buddy, and he or she is going to give you a better rate, and that—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

But why not?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

You can't adjust the algorithm anytime you want.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The paying I've seen is that a number of clicks-through and whatnot is the charge, but if somebody, for political reasons, said, “I'm going to charge this party half the cost for a click-through of this party”, I don't know why that couldn't be done. There's nothing—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Then why write the algorithm?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Well, that's another topic.

If we're ill-equipped for this, imagine how ill-equipped we are for talking about algorithms here. We've made it illegal for The Globe and Mail to charge preferential pricing. I think there's a natural extension to say that we should make that similarly true for Twitter—not the formula they use to charge; it's just so their formula during election and pre-writ is consistent.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, just to clarify for the committee, this is the testimony we heard from Professor Pal on this subject: Second-last, on social media platforms, there is a new offence in the bill in terms of how social media platforms or advertising platforms generally should not be able to sell space to foreign entities. I think that's a very positive move. I would just draw the committee's attention to the current rules in the Elections Act that are imposed on TV broadcasters. They cannot charge more than the lowest basically available rate to any political party seeking to advertise. What this effectively means is that it gives political parties a right to have advertising time at a reasonable rate, but it also means that the same rate has to be charged to all political parties. Political advertising is now happening to a great extent on Facebook. There is nothing in the current Elections Act or in Bill C-76 that would prevent Facebook, through what they call their “ad auction system”, from charging differential rates to different political parties. The current rule for broadcasters is in the Elections Act for a reason. There's no principled reason why that shouldn't also apply to social media advertisers, which may have commercial interests at heart when they're making decisions about their algorithms.

That was a recommendation he made and I think it—

The Chair:

Who made that recommendation?

Mr. John Nater:

That was Professor Michael Pal from Ottawa U.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You can ask Mr. Morin for his comment. He has his hand up anyway.

The Chair:

Mr. Morin.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I just have a few comments.

First of all, I recognize that section 348 of the act currently provides what it does for broadcasting and published advertisement, and you are right in saying that this doesn't apply to social media. As I was explaining earlier, this is very media specific and therefore, it doesn't apply to the media that aren't included in that.

My second comment is that I'm clearly not an expert in how social platforms charge their clients for their various ads, but one thing I would like to counter is the argument that there is nothing in the Canada Elections Act that regulates how parties are charged for their media placements on online platforms. My colleague Trevor will be able to correct me if I'm wrong, because I haven't worked in this specific area for a long time, but if a specific online platform were to sell its advertisement space for a price below the commercial value of that advertisement space, that would constitute a non-monetary contribution to the political entity, which would already be illegal in the act.

In many of these cases, my understanding is that the price of media placements on online platforms varies according to a kind of auction mechanism. My understanding is also that this auction mechanism is fine, to the extent that, for example, the CPC or the Liberals are not specifically advantaged or specifically disadvantaged by the algorithm. To the extent that the same algorithm is applied to all political entities that take part in this auction, and the fact that they are a specific political entity does not have the affect of reducing the price, then I don't see specific problems in terms of political financing rules.

(1645)

The Chair:

Before we go back to Mr. Graham, you said if the price was lower, but if Facebook didn't like the Liberals and it charged them twice as much as everyone else, that would not be caught in the act as it now stands.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

Yes, that's just what I was going to add. Depending always on the circumstances, there may be a contribution, and there could potentially be a contribution to multiple parties. But I think it is a different situation where it's an over-contribution and you're giving a lower price to one party. If you don't like another party and you're overcharging them, that's sort of the cost of doing business with that other party. There would be no illegal contribution there.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Wouldn't charging the other more make it an illegal contribution to the other ones he charged the regular price?

Mr. Trevor Knight:

The way the definition of “commercial value” is in the act, it's the lowest price charged by that provider in similar circumstances, essentially. If the provider charges parties A, B and C a low price, and then charges party D a higher price, they haven't really made a contribution to A, B and C; they've just overcharged party D. So there's no illegal contribution.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I see. As you see this amendment, is it enforceable?

Mr. Trevor Knight:

I can't really speak to the enforcement side of the act. The commissioner of Canada elections would do the enforcement.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

In terms of the enforcement, there would have to be invoices from the company. Whether it's Facebook, Twitter or some other social media platform, there have to be invoices provided to those who have purchased the advertising, so there is a way to determine that.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

My esteemed colleague Mr. Church did point out that the Liberals are providing additional resources to the commissioner of elections to go out and get that information, so he would be well established to have those resources to do so.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Would they include a [Inaudible—Editor] surcharge? Is that an option?

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. John Nater:

That's a supplemental.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Supplemental?

The Chair:

Potential new clause 213.1 is created by CPC-81. The results of this vote will apply to CPC-147. If it passes, LIB-47 cannot be moved because it deals with the same line.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clauses 214 to 216 inclusive agreed to)

The Chair: Amendment CPC-82 proposes new clause 216.1.

Stephanie.

(1650)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I think it's pretty straightforward. It requires the CRTC to report to Parliament on its administration of the voter contact registry after each election. If we are going to enact the voter contact registry, then we probably should have a report on the administration of the registry.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

As we know from this committee, everything for which the CEO is responsible he reports to Parliament and eventually to this committee. There are certain things for which the CRTC is responsible, but the CRTC is not required to report on that after an election. This would be consistent with reporting requirements of both the CEO, which are already in there, and the CRTC as well. For example, in respect of the voter contact registry, which has been an issue in the past, the CRTC would be required to report to Parliament and then eventually to this committee.

The Chair:

Do the officials have any comments?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The motion is pretty straightforward. It's really a policy decision.

The Chair:

It's a policy as to whether we ask someone else to report the same as Elections Canada. You do confirm, however, that those people don't have to report at the moment.

Ms. Anne Lawson:

Yes, I can confirm that, and I can also indicate that when we did the recommendations report with the previous chief electoral officer we consulted with the CRTC and presented on their behalf certain recommendations respecting these portions of the act. However, they certainly had no obligation themselves to come forward with a report.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

If consultation happened in the past, it's better to receive one consolidated report, keeping in mind the global aspects of the election and what happened. It seems to be cleaner, easier and better to have one report from the Chief Electoral Officer.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

For me, the only thing to wrap up is that there's no requirement that the CRTC report. This would have a requirement, so....

The Chair:

We're ready to vote on CPC-82 to require the CRTC to report to Parliament, which would create a new clause 216.1.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clauses 217 to 221 inclusive agreed to)

The Chair: Does anyone need a five-minute break? Maybe we'll wait a few minutes, because supper is coming at five. Maybe we can make the break long enough so that people will take a look at those four clauses we stood down. We'll come back to them right after the break.

We'll go a little bit farther.

(On clause 222)

The Chair: This is a complicated one. The vote on LIB-26 will apply to LIB-27 on page 149, LIB-29 on page 174, LIB-33 on page 201, LIB-37 on page 229, LIB-44 on page 272, LIB-46 on page 277, LIB-50 on page 283, LIB-56 on page 308, and LIB-59 on page 311, as they are linked together by the same new division 0.1 on the use of foreign funds by third parties.

Also, if LIB-26 is adopted, CPC-95 on page 175 and CPC-96 on page 176 cannot be moved as they amend the same line as LIB-29, which was a consequence to LIB-26.

CPC-108 on page 202 and CPC-109 on page 203 similarly cannot be moved, as they amend the same lines as LIB-33, which was also consequential to LIB-26.

Does anyone need any of that repeated? There are a lot of consequences to this vote.

Can someone present LIB-26? Mr. Graham.

(1655)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The proposed division prevents foreign funding of partisan activities, whether during the election or not, and defines third party activity outside of the election period for the purposes of this prohibition. It's a fairly straightforward change to make.

The Chair:

Mrs. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I'd like to ask the officials to imagine a hypothetical situation where a foreign entity donates $1 million to a Canadian organization to help with its administration costs, and the organization, which has raised money to cover these costs, suddenly finds itself with an extra $1 million available to campaign in Canada.

Would this type of foreign funding and interference remain legal with this amendment?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

This question is addressed by amendment LIB-27. Amendment LIB-27 defines advertising....

The Chair:

What are the consequential motions?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The two substantive provisions are found at proposed sections 349.02 and 349.03.

Proposed section 349.02 prohibits the use of funds for a partisan activity, for advertising or for an election survey if the source of the funds is a foreign entity.

Then, proposed section 349.03 provides for anti-circumvention provisions and states: No third party shall (a) circumvent, or attempt to circumvent, the prohibition under section 349.02; or (b) act in collusion with another person or entity for that purpose.

Of course, every question is a question of fact, and it's very difficult to assess a specific situation in the void, but the question you've raised about the commingling of money could potentially constitute an “attempt to circumvent” in cases where it is quite obvious that the money was received for this purpose and that it replaced Canadian funds that were diverted to the third party's expenses.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

However, the Liberal amendments do not address the specific logistics that would absolutely ensure this does not occur. Take the possibility of segregated bank accounts, for example, for advertising versus administrative costs. The amendments say that you shouldn't do this, that this is bad, but with the legislation as it stands the mechanisms are not in place to ensure that it will not occur.

(1700)

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

You're right. It's a prohibition, and there is no specific reporting requirement between election periods. However, other provisions that are included in part 17 of the act on third parties require that all contributions be reported on when the third party meets the threshold in their first financial report after that and all contributions since the day after the previous general election.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I think the official touched on this. I would highlight the fact that there doesn't seem to be a clear way to distinguish between funds that have been commingled within an organization. I think that's a concerning observation.

The minister was questioned about this as to whether or not there should be a segregated bank account at all points throughout the process, so that only funds that have gone into a separate segregated bank account where that amount can be traced to a Canadian source.... The minister wasn't eager to do that.

I just throw that out as an observation again. Determining where there has been commingling of funds is not very ascertainable with the way things are here, rather than having a tangible way such as segregated bank accounts throughout the process, whereby every dollar can be traced back to Canadian sources.

The Chair:

Mrs. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

As well, I mentioned yesterday the absence of “disclosure at any time for any purpose”. It's not present within this. Again, while we can state, “No, it's bad and you shouldn't do this”, there are not the mechanisms within the bill to ensure that this does not occur. We don't believe that there are enough safeguards for Canadians and for the electoral system to absolutely ensure that these circumventions do not occur.

The Chair:

Does this hurt that any or is this just not included?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's just not included. It's omitted.

The Chair:

This doesn't hurt that any. It just doesn't go as far as you want.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, it's not far enough.... It's kind of empty, very honestly, Mr. Chair, in terms of an obligation to the Canadian people.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

I would just mention that even in Ontario's municipal election law if you want to set yourself up as a third party to participate in a municipal election in a tiny municipality of a couple of thousand people, you have to set up a separate bank account. If it's being done and it's managed right at that level, it's not clear why it's not needed to protect this here as well.

The Chair:

Was it proposed anywhere in any of the amendments by anybody?

Is there any further discussion on this amendment? We'll break as soon as we finish this one item.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There's motivation.

The Chair:

My understanding is that this doesn't hurt the accountability, but it doesn't go far enough in your view.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's correct.

The Chair:

We'll vote on LIB-26, which is one of the amendments to clause 222.

I'm going to read the ramifications again because I made a slight inaccuracy the first time I read it. The vote on this applies to LIB-27, LIB-29, LIB-33, LIB-37, LIB-44, LIB-46, LIB-50, and LIB-56.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: Bingo.

The Chair: It does not, as I implied earlier, apply to LIB-59 because that has already been passed.

Also, if this passes, CPC-95 and CPC-96 cannot be moved, as it amends the same line as LIB-29, and CPC-108 and CPC-109 cannot be moved because they amend the same line as LIB-33, which would be approved consequentially here.

There is a request for a recorded vote on LIB-26.

(Amendment agreed to: yeas 9 ; nays 0 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Just so people know what we're going to do as soon as we come back, we stood down clauses 191, 194, 197 and 205. We'll go back to them, and then we will go back to finish clause 222 because that was only the first amendment under clause 222.

We won't take a very long break because we don't want to be here late in the week.



(1720)

The Chair:

People are having far too much fun. We have to get back to work.

(On clause 191)

The Chair:

We're going back to clause 191, and we'll just revisit the first amendment, which is a new CPC amendment that is referenced in the top left corner as number 10008652.

Stephanie, do you want to reintroduce it so people remember what we were talking about?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

In regard to the inverted polling station and polling division relationship, Mr. Nater has a clearer understanding of this issue than I do on the specifications in regard to the amendment.

John, would you mind doing this?

Mr. John Nater:

This relates back to the vote at any table concept, and it's basically clarifying that, when something happens, it happens at each ballot box. There are amendments that flow from that for the other sub points to that.

I talked briefly offline with Ms. Lawson. I'm not going to speak for her.

Ms. Lawson, I'll allow you to offer your observations rather than trying to speak on someone's behalf, which always gets people into trouble.

Ms. Anne Lawson:

My understanding currently of the Bill C-76 provision that we're looking at is that it requires the count of votes to take place in the presence of candidates and their representatives or, if none of them are present, in the presence of at least two electors.

In our understanding, that would apply to the count across the polling station, meaning with respect to each box at the polling station. In our view, the existing provisions already, I think, provide what seems to be of concern, which is that the count takes place in front of witnesses. All of the counting that takes place by election officers is done in the presence of witnesses.

So I'm not sure that what is being proposed is necessary. I don't have an objection to it, either. I think it's something we can certainly work with if it's felt to be important, but in our view, already the intent of that provision is for the count to take place witnessed.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Now we go to CPC-69.

Mr. Nater, do you want to present this?

Mr. John Nater:

Following that, this is part (b). Currently it says: any candidates or their representatives who are present or, if no candidates or representatives are present, at least two electors.

We are proposing the following: (b) at least two candidates or their representatives who are present, at least one elector if only one candidate or representative is present or at least two electors if no candidates or representatives are present.

The Chair:

Elections Canada or Monsieur Morin.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I am just afraid there might be a drafting mistake in the motion. The list of persons who are there are the only persons who can be present during the count, so at least two candidates or their representatives who are present, then at least two electors if no candidates or representatives are present, but in the middle, there is at least one elector, but if one candidate or representative is present... Sorry, it's a logical test, but the way it is worded, it seems like that candidate or representative who is present cannot be present because....

You know, it should say, “if only one candidate or representative is present, that candidate or representative and at least one elector”.

This is a technical comment on the drafting of the motion.

(1725)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Is it not to ensure there are two people present and not just the candidate, and that if the candidate is not there, that there...? It seems to me, from the wording, that it's to ensure that two people are there for the count.

Is that your reading of it, John? That is clearly not specified in the bill as it stands, so we are suggesting this amendment, it would seem to me.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham and then Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Just for reference, the largest poll in my riding is the size of Lebanon and has a population of 500. How are we going to make sure that people actually show up for that count?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Realistically, are they all in one current poll?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

A lot of them are, but the point is, if you're not allowed to count until two people show up, how are you going to compel two random people to show up at the poll for the count? You're requiring a minimum of two people, which is a weird thing to do.

Mr. John Nater:

That's already in the act. It already requires two people.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Then why are we doing this?

Mr. John Nater:

It's if there's only one scrutineer present, then two electors, two witnesses....

The Chair:

Mrs. Kusie, you were going to say something.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

So is a scrutineer...a candidate is present, and then...?

The Chair:

Sorry, could you explain again what the act says now and what the new thing would be?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes. Obviously, two people need to be present. That's evident.

The Chair:

That's there already.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes. Presently who is eligible?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Currently, Bill C-76 would provide that if one candidate or one representative of a candidate is present, the vote can begin in the presence of that person, but also in the presence of multiple candidates and representatives.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Oh, I see.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

This would require at least two candidates or at least two representatives or at least two electors, and then there is the little drafting issue I noticed regarding the presence of only one scrutineer or one candidate.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It seems reasonable to me that a second witness would be required when only one candidate is represented. Are you indicating that a second witness is present at all times anyway, for all counts? Is that what you're saying?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Sorry, no.

Currently, Bill C-76 requires the presence of at least one candidate or one representative, and if only one is present, then the vote can begin without the presence of other electors.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay.

The Chair:

Did you just say that one candidate alone is all that would need to be at a count to start counting?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Currently, under Bill C-76, yes.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It seems like a reasonable safeguard to me to ensure that a second witness is there.

John, did you want to add something?

The Chair:

Mr. Nater and then Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. John Nater:

Mr. Morin, you mentioned there could be a drafting error in the amendment. What would you propose to change to correct what you see as a flaw there? I read it one way, but I can certainly appreciate that others might come from a different direction.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Maybe I can speak with the legislative clerk and come up with a written solution if you want. I just think that if there is only one candidate, you should mention that this representative should also be present in addition to the elector. That's it.

The Chair:

Right now you could start with one person, and this amendment is suggesting you need two. Is that the guts of the amendment?

(1730)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

I already got looked over twice—boy oh boy.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson: You've probably answered the question, so forgive me, but I need clarity. If the language were fixed so that it made sense the way you were looking at it, are you in favour of it or not? Provide an argument.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I'm only here to give technical information to the committee, of course, so I wouldn't tell you if I'm in favour of it or not.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We'll ask Anne. Anne would help me.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Those are policy discussions.

Ms. Anne Lawson:

No, I'm not going to tell you whether I'm in favour of it or not. It's something we could administer, so we don't object to it.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's what I wanted to hear, whether it's a problem. Is it duplicating things? We'll do the voting. I have the hands, but I'm looking for the brains.

You're okay with it if the language is fixed and it's consistent with everything else. Is that what I'm hearing?

Ms. Anne Lawson:

Yes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

If we cleaned up the language, they would be supportive, in which case I have no reason to oppose it. We'd be in favour if it's cleaned up.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Mr. Christopherson, maybe you missed that part of the meeting, but we are representatives of the Privy Council Office. They are from Elections Canada.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes. I realized that there was a line there that I didn't quite see.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson: That's why I immediately jumped over to Anne, who has a little more latitude to express opinions.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

So I—

Mr. David Christopherson:

You're being very wise. I don't want to hear your opinion. I do want to hear hers.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I will let Elections Canada make their comments, but we're—

Ms. Anne Lawson:

Just to be clear, my only views are about the administration of the act, not about my personal preference in favour of an amendment or not.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Of course.

The Chair:

Mr. Morin, did you want to say more?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I was just going to say that if the committee wants to agree to this motion, then yes, there is a mistake that would need to be corrected, but I don't have a specific view on the outcome of this motion.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Fair enough. That's good.

Thanks, Chair.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Again, I don't want to waste any more time than we have to. If the government is open to this, we'll take the time and fix that mistake. If not, let's vote it down and carry on.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Where are you guys?

Mr. John Nater:

Blink twice.

A voice: [Inaudible—Editor]

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson:

We know you're alive. Now tell us what you're thinking.

The Chair:

Right now there has to be one elector present to open a box. Would the effect of this amendment be that two electors would have to be present, basically?

Mr. John Nater:

If there is one candidate present, they need a second.

Mr. David Christopherson:

No.

Mr. John Nater:

That's if there's only one. You always need at least two people. You couldn't have just the NDP represented there. You'd need a second elector.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, but you don't need to have two candidates.

Mr. John Nater:

No, no.

Mr. David Christopherson: Okay.

Mr. John Nater: That's the option. You can begin the count with two candidates or two scrutineers.

The Chair:

So the question for the government is that if you're interested, we'll amend it. If you're not, we'll just vote.

Do you want to go to the vote?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You can defeat it as amended, if you want.

Mr. John Nater:

Let's not waste any more time.

The Chair:

Okay. We will vote on CPC-69.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Now we'll go to CPC-70. This is still on clause 191.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

John, would you like to speak to it?

Mr. John Nater:

We'll withdraw this amendment.

The Chair:

You don't need to withdraw it. You just don't present it.

Mr. John Nater:

We won't present it.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Okay.

Now we're on CPC-71. Just so people know the ramifications, the vote on this will also apply to CPC-74, which is on page 129, and CPC-79, which is on page 136, as they are linked by the concept of the number of votes.

Go ahead and present CPC-71, Mr. Nater.

(1735)

Mr. John Nater:

For this one, I would seek some clarification from Elections Canada in terms of how they will go about tallying the polling divisions with a vote at any table model, which is kind of what we're talking about in this amendment here.

Could you provide some clarity?

Ms. Anne Lawson:

As you know, we are not proceeding at the next election with a vote at any table model. That means the finer points of issues such as what the prescribed forms will look like, or how to count the votes in that situation, haven't been determined.

What I can say is that there is no question the statement of the vote, which requires the consolidation or the full count to be recorded and reconciled, as I was saying earlier, among all of the different polling divisions, continues to apply. We will develop procedures to make sure that this reconciliation takes place.

I'm not sure if I'm answering the question.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, can you explain what this amendment does, in simple English?

Mr. John Nater:

Basically, what is currently noted is to make a note on the tally sheet beside the name of the candidate for whom the vote is cast with the purpose of arriving at the total number of votes cast for each candidate. We're proposing to change it to make a note on the tally sheet in respect of each polling division assigned to the polling station beside the name of the candidate for whom....

It's going back to the multiple table vote at any table who wanted the tallies for each individual polling division that's happening at that location.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's not doing anything.

Mr. John Nater:

It will for the next election. We're doing the legislation now.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We're getting it approved, but not for this election?

Mr. John Nater:

It will be after the next election, so let's deal with it now rather than coming back.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I want to underscore, since I've been here from the beginning of this process, that I'm just finding out now—because my friend Nathan is the lead on this—that the idea of walking in the efficiencies....

We had a whole presentation on it a long time ago on how this was going to make it easier for voters. It was going to make it easier for Elections Canada. It was going to give us faster results. It was going to save money. If I'm wrong, I'm going to give the time to the government to tell me how I'm wrong, but my understanding is that because the government dragged its heels in getting this bill properly through the process with a strong majority government, we can't have it for this election. The best we can do is for the next one. That's better than nothing, but it does again underscore the ineptitude of the government on a file that it said was a major platform plank.

The Chair:

Is there any more debate on CPC-71?

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I would like to speak to that point.

The CEO was here and talked about the issue with respect to the procurement of poll books, which the CEO didn't feel was secure, so it was an issue related to procurement at Elections Canada.

Mr. David Christopherson:

When did we find that out?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

When the CEO was here last.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Was that recently?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

He has been here a lot.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It was last week or two weeks ago.

Mr. David Christopherson:

My point is it doesn't change the fact how late it was in the process. I'm sure that had we given them enough lead time, they could have done something about this. This is a big deal, and it has to be emphasized that the reason this is being done the way it's being done is that the government screwed up the file.

The Chair:

Is there further debate on CPC-71?

Mr. John Nater:

I would like to remind the committee that it is specifying that when we're voting at the table, it's for each division within that location.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Is that consistent with everything else that's being proposed by Elections Canada?

Ms. Anne Lawson:

I'm sorry, I'm not sure. Was what consistent? Is it the amendment?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, the amendment.

Ms. Anne Lawson:

The amendment provides more specificity. We were looking for flexibility in terms of figuring out exactly how we would deliver on the issue. We wanted to make sure that all the votes were properly counted and recorded appropriately by polling divisions, as well as by polling stations. As we were discussing earlier reports, the votes need to be reported at the PD level and that continues in the act.

It's also clear at a polling station that the statement of the vote needs to tally up all the votes in an effective way, indicating if there were several different boxes, and how those boxes together would makeup the full total in the polling station.

That's absolutely the way we will proceed. The very specific mechanics of how that will be done, with which forms and in which manner, we haven't yet made those decisions, because we haven't been required to for the next election. I'm sure that when we do move forward with vote at any table, the Chief Electoral Officer would be very happy to come back to this committee and explain in great detail how he's going to be proceeding with all of the different mechanics that will be necessary to put in place at that time.

(1740)

Mr. David Christopherson:

That makes sense. I hear what Mr. Nater is saying, but there is an argument, through you, Chair, that we have the benefit of Elections Canada thinking this through, and having a chance to get the results of this last election and then come to the committee.

Mr. Nater, I don't see the benefit to Parliament jumping ahead to a level of specificity when their thinking, Elections Canada, and they're our partners in this, that they would like the time to do that.

My first gut reaction is we're jumping ahead with a level of specificity that is not necessary and may not necessarily be helpful.

Mr. Chair, if we could do a version of the Simms protocol, perhaps Mr. Nater could respond, if you're open to that, Chair.

The Chair:

All right.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Chair, and thank you, Mr. Christopherson.

My thinking is that when we're dealing with the act now, we can deal with some of these issues. Perhaps I pride myself with more information as well. Perhaps, Ms. Lawson, this is jumping ahead a little bit as Mr. Christopherson noted, but in envisioning the vote at any table method, when would the results from a polling division be provided?

Would that be something that's available on election night, which is what we would like to see with this amendment, or is that something we're going to see some months later when all the final reports come back to the parties?

Again, we're jumping ahead.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes.

Mr. John Nater:

Our preference would be to see that information on election night, but....

Ms. Anne Lawson:

We're stumbling because, of course, it will be available locally. We're going to have the results as quickly as we can on election night. As to how we're going to publish them and how quickly that's going to happen, I guess you are, unfortunately, jumping a little bit ahead of where we are in terms of the mechanics and the logistics of the count.

It could be by box, if you like, or it could be by polling division. We could have layers of counting, because we may use boxes that combine votes from various polling divisions. We may count per box, then rationalize per polling division, and then rationalize per polling station. There are some sequences.

Obviously throughout, we will make sure that all of it is traceable and there's integrity connected to the count. But exactly how that's going to go, in what sequence, and when precisely we will have all the different tallies that are involved, I can't answer.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Since I still have the floor, I'll wrap up by saying that I have great respect for Mr. Nater. He's not one to play games. But it does seem to me that common sense—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

[Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. David Christopherson:

Sorry?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's a joke.

Mr. David Christopherson:

—would dictate that slowing down a tad, knowing there's going to be a full report to the next Parliament, hopefully with lots of time to consider the matter.... I would be opposed to jumping ahead. I think the intent is good, but I it's too much specificity at this time. We should leave the latitude to Elections Canada to come to the next Parliament with those details, Chair.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Is there any further debate on this amendment?

Let's go to a vote on CPC-71, which also applies to CPC-74 and CPC-79, as they are linked by the concept of number of votes.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 191 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Now we're going to jump ahead to the next clause we skipped, which is clause 194. CPC-74 was consequential to the one we just voted down, so there are no amendments now to clause 194.

(Clause 194 agreed to)

(On clause 197)

The Chair: Now we'll jump ahead to clause 197.

We're starting with CPC-75.1. Do we vote on that?

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

I think it was already defeated.

The Chair:

The first amendment on that one was defeated.

We'll go to CPC-76. Perhaps the Conservatives could introduce that amendment.

(1745)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Amendment CPC-76 is to ensure a second witness for ballot counting where only one candidate is represented. Did we not just go through this?

Mr. John Nater:

This is for a different.... I think we did this for the—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Advance polls?

Mr. John Nater:

—advance polls that are happening before polls have closed. It's similar to what we said earlier.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes.

Mr. John Nater:

Frankly, if it wasn't accepted for election night, we don't need to waste any more time debating this one.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

No.

Mr. John Nater:

Let's have the vote and carry on.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

We're going on to CPC-77. This also applies to CPC-146, which you can find on page 268, as they are linked together by reference. Perhaps the Conservatives could introduce CPC-77 and explain briefly what it does.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I think it's similar to the previous amendment that we proposed, but a lot simpler. This establishes a prohibition on sharing of advance poll results before polls close on election day, with the possibilities for influence being obvious.

The Chair:

Is it because of the new provision to count earlier, before the polls are closed?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That would certainly have an effect, yes.

The Chair:

This amendment says you can't share the results. You can actually now count advance polls an hour before the polls close, so this prohibits polling stations from sharing that result with people.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is that not always there?

The Chair:

Mr. Morin.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I would encourage you to look at page 94 of the bill, line 14, in English. There's already a prohibition related to the secrecy of the vote: “Every person present at a polling station or at the counting of the votes shall maintain the secrecy of the vote”.

Then, on page 95, at line 1 in both English and French, it says, “No person shall, at the counting of the votes, attempt to obtain information or communicate information obtained at the counting as to the candidate for whom a vote is given in a particular ballot or special ballot.”

The provision that talks about the secrecy of the vote is sufficient to cover this issue.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Again, I believe the provisions that were cited just now apply to the marking of the ballot at the time the ballot's marked, not necessarily to the counting itself, as happens here before the polls actually close. This is a bit of an anomaly in terms of vote counting. You typically don't count votes until polls are closed. In this case, with these advance polls, you count them before a poll has closed.

The provisions cited are for when a ballot is being marked. This is for an actual counting of the vote, not secrecy.

The Chair:

Mr. Morin, can you confirm that?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

There's already also another prohibition at subsection 289(3) in the bill, page 104, line 10.

The Chair:

The part you read didn't have any limitations such as Mr. Nater just suggested, did it?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Sorry. In the provision itself, which allows the counting of the vote at an advance polling station one hour before the close of the votes, there is already an obligation to make sure that the counting of the vote is done in a manner that ensures the integrity of the vote.

I would think this provision is sufficient to cover this proposal.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

If we agree to this, there's another amendment that it would be an offence if you were to break your confidentiality on this. Obviously, this one goes with the one that we'd vote on later.

Also, citing the previous things, if we rely only on the secrecy of the vote, where is the point at which someone is relieved of that duty of secrecy? Reading the other points you cited, conceivably it would follow that that person is now almost bound for life, whereas here it's clearly stated that once the voting is closed, then you can be relieved of that responsibility of secrecy.

Based on what was cited earlier, there is no provision for that relief of secrecy, which is obviously not the intent. Going back, you can call this redundant if you like, but a certain level of specificity is needed. When you're counting votes an hour before polls close in an electoral district, having it clearly stated that thou shalt not be releasing these numbers before polls close is important.

Then, of course, our further amendment 140-something, to make it an offence, I think is a worthwhile endeavour.

(1750)

The Chair:

Can you reread that very first one you read, where you said it's already protected?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I'm at page 94 of the bill, subsection 281.6(1), “Every person present at a polling station or at the counting of the votes shall maintain the secrecy of the vote.”

I would posit that this secrecy obligation lasts a lifetime. Of course that's not to the extent that official results have been made public. However, if an elector were able to be identified during the count of the votes, of course the person noticing that would be bound to secrecy for an extended period.

The Chair:

He did say it includes the counting, which you had suggested earlier it didn't.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. David Christopherson:

They wouldn't be bound for life, because it's not a secret once it's made public.

The Chair:

Are we ready to vote on this? Do people know what the issue is?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I think half the stuff we've already done.

The Chair:

We're going to vote on amendment CPC-77, and the result of this vote will also apply to CPC-146.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 197 agreed to on division)

The Chair: We're going to jump ahead to clause 205. There was amendment CPC-79 but it was consequential to CPC-71.

(Clause 205 agreed to on division)

The Chair: That's good catching up.

(On clause 222)

The Chair: Now we will go back. I think we've done everything now. We're at clause 222. We've done the first amendment. There are two more amendments, starting with CPC-83.

Would the Conservatives introduce that amendment.

Mr. John Nater:

This is referring to opinion polling in the pre-writ and election period. This kind of gets to the heart of the idea that if you do a poll on June 28, it will guide your work on July 2. Basically, it captures that you are paying in advance for the information you're going to be using during the writ period. This section specifically refers to public opinion polling, so it captures polls that are done immediately prior to a writ or pre-writ period, which will be used for the purposes of the writ or the pre-writ period. It captures those expenses.

The Chair:

Are you adding something to the expenses?

Mr. John Nater:

We are, effectively. It's including this expense within the writ and the pre-writ period.

The Chair:

That's for a public opinion poll.

Mr. John Nater:

That would be used during the writ and pre-writ period, yes.

The Chair:

That's during the writ or pre-writ?

Mr. John Nater:

Yes. That deals with both time frames.

Mr. David Christopherson:

When you say “use”, do you mean use only publicly or use internally or use in any way?

Mr. John Nater:

I mean use it as an expense. So if your work as a political entity is being guided, it would be used for that.

(1755)

Mr. David Christopherson:

If I understand correctly then, you're suggesting there may be a loophole such that a day or two before the writs drop you could do a poll, and even though it was done before the writ, it's as valuable a couple of days later as it would be if you'd done it during that writ early.

Mr. John Nater:

If you've identified—

Mr. David Christopherson:

That seems to make good sense.

Ms. Lawson, is there any reason why we wouldn't want to go down this road?

Ms. Anne Lawson:

I guess my only question would be that polls in preparation for either of those periods would become part of what would need to be reported. It's not entirely clear to me how we draw the line. That's just a remark.

Mr. David Christopherson:

The concept I like. It looks like a bit of a loophole, especially for those who have more money than others. Do a nice, fresh poll the day before the writs drop and it's as valuable to you in your strategizing three or four days later as it would be if you did it the day of and used it for strategizing.

If I'm understanding correctly, this closes off a potential loophole vis-à-vis expenditures that we intend to capture during the writ period but because of the nature of the details, it would technically be outside.

If I'm understanding this right, Mr. Nater is suggesting that ought to be captured as part of an election expense since they would be using it as part of their intel in devising their strategies. It seems to me this makes good sense, that it is not partisan, and that it is a good closing of a loophole.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Using intel as part of your strategy, I presume, also counts for many previous elections. How far back does this cover?

Mr. Morin, how do you interpret this legally in preparation for either of those periods?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

This is in fact the difficulty, and I think this explains why this period, during the pre-election period and entering the election period, was chosen. It's because surveys can be conducted at all times in between election periods and they are all potentially used for the preparation of the strategy towards the next election period.

The way Bill C-76 is drafted currently brought much certainty as to which election surveys would be counted or not.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

As this amendment reads, how far back would it capture?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It includes the day after the previous election period, potentially.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Anything that anybody spends preparing for the next election could theoretically be captured by this.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Potentially.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

[Inaudible—Editor] is preparing for the next election. That's....

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's a good point.

Mr. John Nater:

At the same time, all of our expenses are audited as well. There's going to be a difference between a public opinion poll authorized three days after the election versus one three days before. It falls to the auditor. As entities, we are all audited to determine and to ensure that we're properly reporting. I think the information that's garnered three days before a writ period or a pre-writ period.... It's logically going to follow that that's going to be used directly for those expenses.

Mr. David Christopherson:

In the absence of those words, I could see David's point. You go all the way back to the beginning and I don't think anybody's suggesting that.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

If I may add, however, this specific provision applies to surveys conducted by third parties. It doesn't apply to political parties. During the pre-election period, only the partisan advertising expenses are being monitored for political parties, and of course, during the election period it's all election expenses. The definition of election survey is not relevant for political parties in this context. By extending the period, it would also mean that we would try to regulate third parties outside of the election and the pre-election period. As you know, third parties are everybody else but candidates and political parties, so that would potentially have a high reach on organizations that are quite active on —

(1800)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Would Nanos' weekly tracking that they publish on an ongoing basis during the entire period fall into this?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I'm sorry, I cannot answer that specific question.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think that's the problem, that we can't answer these specific questions. It's troublesome for me.

Thank you.

Mr. David Christopherson:

If I may speak, Chair, your point is well taken. I like the idea, but the devil is in the details and we don't even have the details. The devil's having a field day. I think it's best we not pass this.

The Chair:

Are there any further comments?

Mr. John Nater:

Can we have a recorded vote?

The Chair:

Yes. We'll have a recorded vote on CPC-83.

(Amendment negatived: nays 6; yeas 3 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Welcome, Ms. O'Connell. I didn't even see you there.

She's so quiet.

Ms. Jennifer O'Connell (Pickering—Uxbridge, Lib.):

I blend into the chair.

The Chair:

We'll go to amendment CPC-84.

Mr. Nater, are you going to present this?

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Chair, and welcome Ms. O'Connell. It's nice to see a voting parliamentary secretary on this committee. I thought the Liberals did away with that but....

The act deals with the definition of “partisan activity”. This amendment removes provincial political parties from an exemption. As the act is written, provincial political parties can engage in partisan activity in terms of hosting rallies. This amendment would take out that exemption.

The Chair:

Are you talking about a certain period?

Mr. John Nater:

I believe this is during the writ and pre-writ period. The way the current bill is written, an exemption is provided for what we'd consider partisan activity by provincial political parties—to host rallies on behalf of federal parties.

The Chair:

Oh, I see. Okay.

Mr. John Nater:

This would take out that exemption so a provincial party couldn't do that.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Mr. John Nater:

Of course, it includes doing all the corollary stuff with that, such as making phone calls, advertising, and so on and so forth.

The Chair:

Is everyone ready to go to the vote?

Mr. John Nater:

I am going to ask for a recorded vote.

(Amendment negatived: nays 6; yeas 3 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

Shall clause 222 as amended carry?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It was amended?

The Chair:

It was amended by LIB-26.

(Clause 222 as amended agreed to on division)

(On clause 223)

The Chair: LIB-27 was the first amendment but that was passed as consequential to LIB-26.

It's great that we have Ms. May here, who can introduce amendment Parti vert-5.

Ms. Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, GP):

Thank you.

This amendment is to amend in clause 223 one line only, with one clear purpose only. It speaks to some of the concerns explained by Professor Pal from the University of Ottawa law school when he was here, namely, that the situation has changed since the hearing of the Harper case back in 2004. His point was that between fixed election dates and the impact of social media buys, the kind of latitude required to protect freedom of speech doesn't need to be as high as $700,000 in a pre-writ period for third party groups.

The point was that you can target more, and you can spend more directly. You know when the election is going to be. To restrict the impact of big money, my amendment would change the total amount of third party expenses from $700,000 to $300,000. I'm just reflecting on his testimony where he was saying that this really is a lot of money to spend in a pre-writ period. I know it's down to $700,000, but I would hope that the committee would consider reducing it to $300,000.

In the real world, that's a lot of money from a third party group in a pre-writ period.

(1805)

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I think it is a reasonable amendment and something that we as the official opposition will be supporting. Putting it in more reasonable terms is important. We don't want to see undue influence from third parties who may be exercising that. With inflation, it actually works out to about a million bucks. A million dollars is a lot of money. Going with the more reasonable amount is something we will support.

The Chair:

Sorry, what did you say added up to a million?

Mr. John Nater:

In the bill it's listed at $700,000, but it's an inflationary indexed amount from 2000, I believe—

The Chair:

Oh, right.

Mr. John Nater:

—and so it works out to about a million dollars in current dollars.

The Chair:

I don't imagine the officials have any comments on a policy decision.

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Mr. Chair, I sympathize and I guess I would philosophically agree, but I want to consider the potential charter issues that may arise.

We're already dealing with one charter issue—limiting the amount that a group can spend. The argument for placing a reasonable limit on that charter right becomes weaker the more we decrease that fund. So I'm concerned that lowering it too much will lead to charter issues.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

[Inaudible—Editor] establishing money as speech, thank goodness. I don't follow that. Are you saying they're additive, that if we have a pre-election restriction on what a third party can say and spend, and if we then restrict the spending too much, those two things together make for a stronger charter challenge? I assume that's where you're saying the challenge is coming from.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I don't know.... Neither of us is a constitutional lawyer, but I disagree. I think if we're trying to level the playing field and have equal voices represented in the conversation. As Elizabeth said, the amount of money you have to spend to get your message out now, with the tools that are available now, is less than it was, ironically. The price of entry has dropped—

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

—in terms of influence, because you can target the voters you want rather than just having blanket ads through radio, television, or newspapers. I'm strongly supportive of this.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

We will vote on PV-5.

Mr. John Nater:

I'd like a recorded vote.

(Amendment negatived: nays 5; yeas 4 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

We're still on clause 223. We're good to go on to CPC-85. If CPC-85 is adopted, CPC-86 and PV-7 cannot be moved because they amend the same line.

Would someone introduce CPC-85.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This is similar to the last one in that it is for third parties capturing, as a pre-election expense, any opinion poll prior to the pre-election period that is used to shape pre-election activities. This is just taking our previous amendment and attempting to apply it to third parties as well. I think we've had a theme of consistency for all players and all stakeholders, and I think that this amendment follows suit.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

To ensure that we can still vote on those other amendments, I propose a subamendment, that amendment CPC-85 be amended by deleting paragraphs (b) to (d).

(1810)

The Chair:

There's a subamendment to eliminate paragraphs (b), (c) and (d).

Mr. John Nater:

Which would then allow us to vote on—

The Chair:

Then it wouldn't be on the same line as the other ones, so it would allow us to then consider CPC-86.

(Subamendment agreed to)

The Chair: The subamendment has passed. Now, we're on what's left of the amendment, which is everything except paragraphs (b), (c) and (d).

Mr. John Nater:

I think we've discussed this elsewhere.

The Chair:

We already discussed this.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I object for the same reasons that I did the previous ones.

The Chair:

Let's go for a vote on CPC-85 as amended.

(Amendment as amended negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We'll go to PV-6, which was consequential to PV-3, so we don't have to discuss that.

Then we'll go to CPC-86, which we can discuss now because of the amendment to CPC-85.

Would someone introduce the amendment.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Essentially, this is just calling for tougher anti-collusion definitions.

I think that this is a theme we've seen from us as the opposition within the bill. While we certainly agree with the spirit of many of the components of the bill, we don't always feel confident in the—I would say, up to this point—the mechanisms but here, specifically, in the definitions. We would like to see the definition of anti-collusion established more clearly to allow for more clarity and therefore, hopefully, better enforcement.

The Chair:

Is there further discussion on CPC-86?

Do the officials have any comments?

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm just trying to understand this amendment. My understanding was that it was trying to restrict third parties from sharing surveys and whatnot with other third parties and political parties. Have I got that right or wrong?

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Nathan, can you repeat that?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes. I understood that this amendment, CPC-86, was trying to restrict the sharing of surveys and other information between third parties and also from third parties to political parties.

Mr. John Nater:

Exactly. Currently as it is, it's a one-way street. Here we make it a two-way street: third parties to political parties, political parties to third parties. It kind of strengthens the....

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

In that vein, sometimes third parties, and they might be anti-poverty groups or they might be pro-business groups. They've conducted a survey amongst their members. The Canadian Chamber of Commerce does this a lot. They share that information with us, trying to influence us, but also trying to inform us of what their members are thinking.

Would we see that as somehow anti-democratic or buying undue influence? I don't know. Of course there are examples where they don't, but generally groups try to share them as widely as possible. They're incentivized to do so. They can gather information in ways that a pollster or we, as political parties, can't. Is it not worthwhile and valuable?

The Chair:

Is there further discussion on CPC-86?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I agree with Nathan's point.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes. In agreement with Nathan, I think this would criminalize the usual communications between civil society and potential candidates.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I just think we need to step back. This is more about circumventing spending limits. This is what we're looking at here: using third parties, including back and forth, to basically circumvent spending limits, rather than—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Do you mean parties circumventing the limits?

(1815)

Mr. John Nater:

Parties, and it's vice-versa as well.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Sort of outsourcing polling...?

Mr. John Nater:

Outsourcing polling to third parties, and in our amendment we say vice-versa as well.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Chair, could I ask Monsieur Morin to weigh in on this? Thank you.

The Chair:

Monsieur Morin.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Mr. Chair, the provision found at subsection 349.3(1) was designed in an one-way stream for two reasons, one of them being that of course if it's only a matter of information and ideas, well, political parties are there to collect these ideas and represent a large segment of the population in their attempt to represent them. But also if we're talking more here about the provision of resources, for example, an advertising campaign that has been designed by the third party, then it would be considered a non-monetary contribution to the party and it would already be prohibited by provisions of part 18 on political financing.

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, can I follow up on it?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. John Nater:

Just to clarify, then, if a third party were to share information with a political party and that would then shape its advertising campaign, would that be captured in the act? Is that what you're saying? The polling information that's been conducted by a third party is then shaping the advertising campaign for a political party. Would that be captured within the act?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

As a non-monetary contribution?

Mr. John Nater:

As anything. Would it be considered collusion or is it...?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

If it's a product or service that fits the definition of a non-monetary contribution, then it would clearly be considered a non-monetary contribution. Of course only individuals can provide these contributions to registered entities, and only to the limit that is prescribed by part 18. So, yes, it would be covered.

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'll just make a distinction, then. Just to pick an example, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce comes to each of us, provides very expensive surveying of its members. That information then helps parties craft particular messaging, whether it's advertising or policy and platform messaging. Could that be deemed under the current provisions or these changes as a non-monetary contribution? To go out and do that surveying yourself would be incredibly expensive, yet it also performs this public education role that civil society is trying to do.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

This is civil society so to the extent that they are only reaching out to various political parties in an attempt to influence the parties' policies, I think it would probably be acceptable. Elections Canada's auditors would need to look into that.

There is also a regime where political parties can ask for guidelines under the Canada Elections Act so that is clearly a question that could be clarified sometime in the future. What I was referring to was more the case of a third party that would provide a ready-to-use product or service to one specific party for the purpose of helping that specific party.

Do you have comments on the concept of non-monetary contributions?

Ms. Anne Lawson:

No.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

I guess it would depend on the facts. The obvious case would be a survey that a polling company normally would sell being given to a political party. That would clearly be a non-monetary contribution.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That happens, doesn't it?

No, but it's available to all parties. An environmental group comes forward and they've hired Ipsos or someone to go out and survey feelings on climate change. That survey is then made available to all parties, or maybe not all parties but some, which then influences the way.... We're dealing with this act, but we're now just asking about the way things happen. Focus group work, messaging, all of that stuff, it's not hidden. This is a thing that happens quite frequently.

Would you deem that to be a non-monetary contribution?

Mr. Trevor Knight:

Under the current act, if a good or a service is provided to a party for less than its commercial value, you have to ask if it's free, but if it's free to everyone, then it's not a contribution.

(1820)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So that's the way third parties get around this. They have to make it available to everybody, a service like a polling or a bit of research.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay. That's curious.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

—or they can just make the information public.

Ms. Anne Lawson:

Exactly.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

A typical case is a third party that would want to influence parties. They could have a web page that is focused on a particular issue and include a lot of data, including survey data.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

That would be completely acceptable.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

—as long as it's either shared with all parties or shared publicly.

But if a third party were to say they were only providing this to you, for whatever reasons, then they'd trigger the non-monetary contribution.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I just want to step back and look back to the collusion element in this amendment. What we're really talking about is using third parties to get around some spending limits.

A group like Canada 2020, for example, which conducts—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

[Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. John Nater:

If they conduct extensive public opinion surveys, which are again extremely valuable, and are able to get around the pre-writ spending, would something like that be captured in this amendment, or in the bill as it sits?

Is the effort to get around the spending cap by having a group like Canada 2020 do the work and provide that information captured within this? We're looking specifically at the spending limit side of things and the collusion.

Mr. Trevor Knight:

The section we're dealing with, proposed section 349.3, isn't so much about the spending, the collusion to avoid spending limits, although that may be the motivation for the sharing. It talks about no third party, no registered party, acting in collusion in order to influence the third party in what it does, under the current one. The amendment then would expand that to influence the registered party, as you say, making it a two-way street.

In terms of the question you asked, I think that with collusion under the current act, there are already provisions talking about non-monetary contributions under the current act and avoiding the spending limit under the current act. I think those would be relevant to that.

This is more directed at a specific thing, influencing how the third party acts.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I have one final point.

Right now, if Canada 2020 tells the Liberal Party, “We're going to advertise on X, and you can advertise on Y and Z.” Then the reverse, the Liberal Party tells Canada 2020 it's advertising on Y and Z, and they can advertise on X. One way is collusion; one way is not collusion. Within our amendment, both ways are collusion.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

Mr. John Nater:

I would like a recorded vote.

(Amendment negatived: nays 5; yeas 4 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

Next is amendment PV-7.

Ms. May

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Mr. Chair, my intention with amendment PV-7 is to extend the prohibitions on foreign money for political party or third party messaging not just in the pre-writ period but at all times.

I know there are other amendments to the same effect, and some of them were ahead of this amendment. I'm afraid, being in and out, I'm not quite certain how my amendments survive at this point, but I'm hoping to tighten up the rules so there's no foreign money or third party political messaging influenced by foreign money at any time, not just pre-writ.

Mr. John Nater:

I support Ms. May's sentiments. Anything we can do to get foreign money out of our elections, we're going to support. We'll be voting in favour of the amendment.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a question for Mr. Morin.

Have we already achieved this with some of the other amendments we've brought forward?

(1825)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It was the same.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If we've already done it, we don't need to do it again.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

I'm not sure.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's why I'm asking him.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes and no.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I thought we were the politicians.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

The new division 0.1 of part 17 of the act would prohibit all third parties, including foreign third parties, from using foreign money for the purpose of partisan activities, advertising and election surveys. What the provision that has been carried already does not do is prohibit a foreign third party from incurring some expenses outside of the election and of the pre-election period, but in order to incur these expenses, it would always need to fund these expenses with Canadian money. That's the difference.

We are prohibiting all third parties from using foreign money at all times for partisan activities, advertising and election surveys, but foreign third parties would still be able to incur some of these expenses outside of the election and pre-election period, but they will always need to fund themselves from a Canadian source. They could receive contributions, for example, from a Canadian source, and have some activities outside of the election and pre-election period.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

Mr. John Nater:

I would like a recorded vote.

(Amendment negatived: nays 5; yeas 4 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

Next is amendment CPC-87.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Bear with me. I'm going to flip around a little bit to try to explain this.

What we're dealing with here is the definition of a third party. We're making a relatively minor change, but I just want to explain it in two ways.

Line 16 is being amended. It currently refers to a third party being a corporation or entity. Proposed subparagraph 349.4(2)(b)(ii) says: (ii) it was incorporated, formed or otherwise organized outside Canada; and

We're changing it slightly to say: (ii) it was incorporated, formed or otherwise organized outside Canada, or it was incorporated, formed or otherwise organized in Canada but no person who is responsible for it is a person described in any of subparagraphs (c)(i) to (iii); and

Proposed subparagraphs (c)(i) to (iii) refer to basically being a Canadian, a permanent resident or someone residing in Canada. We discussed this somewhat differently a little earlier on. We were saying that if there's been an organization, a third party, formed within Canada and no one responsible for this organization lives in Canada, is a Canadian, or is a permanent resident, we would like to see that excluded.

We'll do anything we can to strengthen our election laws against foreign entities influencing Canada. I hope I explained it. It deals with two sections, but I think what we're trying to get at is fairly clear. If there's an entity set up solely for the purpose of influencing an election, with no one running it who has a connection to Canada, we'd like to see this banned.

The Chair:

So, if a guy comes up from New Mexico, sets up an organization, sets his office up, and there are no Canadians involved, you want to make sure that's not allowed.

Mr. John Nater:

Unless he resides in Canada, has Canadian citizenship or is a permanent resident. If he's setting up an entity, but is not physically here or physically involved, I think that's clearly an issue of foreign influence.

The Chair:

You mean a numbered company or something.

Mr. John Nater:

Yes, exactly.

The Chair:

Are there any comments from the officials?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes.

We discussed a similar motion in the context of proposed part 11.1 earlier, the prohibitions related to voting. The comments I made at the time still stand.

This would extend the regime to some Canadian entities, even if they are not managed or directed by Canadians. These entities still have a legal existence in Canada.

(1830)



It's a policy decision.

I'm not saying yes or no. I'm just saying that this would also cover this other category of Canadian entities.

The Chair:

Before you go, Mr. Cullen, do you want to ask your question, Mr. Graham? [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I would like to understand why the French version is so different from the English version.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

It's simply that in English each paragraph breaks down the elements separately.[English]An example would be, “(c) If the third party is a group, no person who is responsible for the group” is blah, blah, blah.[Translation]

In the French version, everything is included in a single paragraph. It's just a matter of legislative drafting. There is no difference between the two in terms of content.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm wondering about the scenario that we have, and I may understand the amendment wrong.

We have an established business or non-profit in Canada. It does work in Canada, but the director or owner is a non-resident. Under this provision, I would imagine that they would be banned from participating.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This is political activity from a third party.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You can understand that.

Mr. John Nater:

Yes, I can see where you're coming from.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

All of us have residents in our ridings who have been 20, 30 or 40 years in the country. They run small businesses, or they run an NGO.

Mr. John Nater:

Let's go back to the previous subparagraph, so proposed subparagraph 349.4(2)(b)(i). It says, “it does not carry on business in Canada, or its only activity carried on in Canada”.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

If they can trigger that one, than the rest of it....

Mr. John Nater:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That was my question, Do any of these trigger and then they're out, or...?

Mr. John Nater:

No.

If it's “carry on business” as a normal practice in Canada—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's not “and, in addition, must be a Canadian citizen”.

Mr. John Nater:

Correct.

That's my interpretation. I could be wrong, but Mr. Church is nodding at me.

If I have the blessing of the church....

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Separation of church and state.

Mr. John Nater:

What we're getting at is those who are set up solely for the purpose of influencing an election, but if it's something that operates on an ongoing basis as a business or as an entity outside of an election period, that's not going to be captured in it.

The Chair:

If there is no further discussion on this, are we ready to vote?

Mr. John Nater:

I would like a recorded vote.

(Amendment negatived: nays 6; yeas 3 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair:

There are only 18 more amendments to this clause, so we'll keep going.

Mr. John Nater:

We're flying.

The Chair:

We're on amendment CPC-88.

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, we're going to withdraw this amendment.

The Chair:

Are you not bringing amendment CPC-88 forward?

Mr. John Nater:

We'll instead move the one that was added.

The Chair:

We have a new amendment from the Conservative Party. It's reference number 10008250, presented by Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

This is just banning foreign influence at all times.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It prohibits foreign third party activity at all times.

The Chair:

It's banning third party—

Mr. John Nater:

It's foreign.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's banning foreign third party activity at all times.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This was in the supplementary package, right?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's correct.

The Chair:

It has 8250 at the end.

Can I get a comment from the officials on this? It's banning foreign third party activity at all times.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

This would be doing exactly that. I'm not commenting on the policy here, but from a drafting perspective, I think we would still have some hurdles to go over. This motion would reframe the definition of pre-election period.

Sorry, I'm looking at the French version and I'm trying to translate into English at the same time in my head. I should just look at the English version.

Partisan advertising and partisan advertising expenses are also defined terms. Partisan advertising is advertising that is done during the pre-election period itself. If you were to go ahead with this motion, I think there would need to be a little bit more work to make it work here as intended. As I mentioned earlier, the new division 0.1 would not prohibit foreign entities from incurring expenses outside of the election and the pre-election period, but it would also need to fund them exclusively using funds of Canadian origin.

(1835)

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

As the bill is right now, a foreign third party can spend all the money but it has to be raised within Canada. Is that right?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes. As the bill is written now, as amended by earlier motions, foreign third parties cannot incur any of the following expenses during the pre-election period. When we get to the other division or section of part 17, there is an equivalent provision for expenses incurred during the election period.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Again, a foreign third party can spend only money that was raised within Canada.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes, but during these two periods they cannot incur any expenses for these purposes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Under this amendment they can't, but I'm talking about the bill as it sits unamended right now.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

A foreign third party can raise and spend money but only if it's raised in Canada.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes, and only if it's incurred outside of the election and pre-election period.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This would say, across the board, forget it. It wouldn't matter where you raised the money or when you planned to spend it; a foreign third party could not spend money.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

They could not spend money for these purposes, yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen: Yes.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

Okay. We'll vote on this amendment

Mr. John Nater:

Let's go with a recorded vote.

The Chair:

We'll have a recorded vote on the CPC amendment with the reference number of 10008250.

(Amendment negatived: nays 5; yeas 4 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Since CPC-89 was withdrawn, we will now go to CPC-90. If CPC-90 is adopted, LIB-28 cannot be moved, as they amend the same line.

Would the Conservatives present amendment CPC-90.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Essentially, we are requiring more than the third party's name in its identification in ads, as recommended by the commissioner of Canada elections. We're also asking that we get its telephone number, its civic address or Internet address.

As I said, this was recommended by the commissioner of Canada elections.

(1840)

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

All three parties have submitted something similar in regard to this, so we're proposing an amendment, which I believe has been circulated already.

No, it hasn't been circulated already.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Liar.

Voices: Oh, oh!

A voice: Fake news.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

A liar, yes; I'll go home and think about what I did.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'll never trust you again, Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I can be excused now.

I'll ramble on a little bit and say that the attempt was to take a bit of what everyone was saying and try to include it in the provision.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That was a ramble?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Well, I thought they'd.... I'm sorry.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm still waiting. I'm looking for a ramble here. This is disappointing, Chris. I thought you had it in you.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I clearly failed on this entire exercise. I apologize.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It was a Bittle ramble.

Mr. Nathan Cullen: It was a “bamble”.

A voice: [Inaudible—Editor]

Mr. Chris Bittle: Thank you. That's very kind.

Mr. Scott Reid: I like your shirt too, by the way. It's very refreshing. I've been waiting to say that all evening. I don't want you to go home not knowing how much I appreciate your shirt.

Mr. Chris Bittle: Thank you.

I'm feeling the love in the committee, and I appreciate that.

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

You're my neighbour.

Mr. Chris Bittle: Yes. Thank you.

The Chair:

Is this an amendment to CPC-90 or is it a replacement of CPC-90?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We could maybe pause and consider something else.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

It's a subamendment.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Chair, we'll withdraw CPC-90 if this is—

Mr. John Nater:

No.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Are we not withdrawing CPC-90? Okay.

Mr. John Nater:

It's a subamendment.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

You're subamending it.

Mr. John Nater:

I'm not. Mr. Bittle is.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Mr. Bittle is subamending it with this.

Got it. Thank you.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Well, we can live with it.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

That's a glowing endorsement from Mr. Reid. Thank you.

The Chair:

The first vote will be on the subamendment that's just been presented.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Can we get a quick explanation of it?

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle, what—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Do you mean of the subamendment? I gave my explanation already. It was a recommendation of the commissioner to provide more information.

The Chair:

And the change you made was...?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

The change was just to include what all parties were discussing and—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

The telephone number, the Internet address, and so on.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, “in a manner that is clearly visible or otherwise accessible”. I assume that “otherwise accessible” is for things in an audio format or something like that.

The Chair:

Let's vote on the subamendment to CPC-90.

(Subamendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Amendment as amended agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Now LIB-28 cannot be moved, so we'll go to—

Mr. Nathan Cullen: Aw.

The Chair: Just for that, Cullen, NDP-18 was next, but it's consequential to NDP-17.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, don't remind me. It's a good one.

The Chair:

We can discuss NDP-19—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is exciting.

The Chair:

—which you might present at this moment.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is about the repository—it's always such a strange word to used in this conversation—a place to hold ads. That would be with the Chief Electoral Officer. It has to go to the Chief Electoral Officer within 10 days of transmission.

I don't think we have a clause in this—maybe later on—that allows for the length it needs to be held for, by law; I think there is one later on, but it's escaping me right now. Something about collating it is very important as well.

I think that LIB-25.... I'd have to refer to it exactly. Similar to what we just did, we're trying to get at a very similar purpose, which is to have a collection of the ads that have been used, partisan advertising that's been used, and have that maintained by the Chief Electoral Officer. It seems like a good spot to have it. You have to get it to them within 10 days.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't understand. Right now, we're requiring the platforms themselves to retain these ads. Is that correct?

(1845)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's for everything, for third party and the rest.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Do you think it's necessary for...?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think we've met the objective of what we're trying to do with that. I take your point.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It's only that we're relying on them to do it as opposed to having—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

They'll be in violation if they're not.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Imagine that. It can happen.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, very much so. You're requiring everybody to turn everything over to Elections Canada. It's the same standard, really, though.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

To the Chief Electoral Officer, yes?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

Do you have any comments, Mr. Morin?

The Chair:

Monsieur Morin.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Mr. Chair, this amendment would add two new subsections to section 349.5 of the bill, which currently requires third parties to add a tag line on their partisan advertising messages.

I would like to point out that in part 17 of the act, third parties are defined very broadly. Some obligations under the act apply to all third parties and some other obligations apply only to those third parties who reach certain thresholds.

For example, for the pre-election period and the election period, the registration threshold with Elections Canada is set at $500. A third party, which means basically any Canadian citizen, except the candidate or a political party, who makes a partisan advertising message, even if that person has not reached their registration threshold of $500, would then need to send a copy of the advertising message to Elections Canada within 10 days of its transmission.

I think this covers a much broader group of third parties than other provisions of the act do.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's correct. That's what we're hoping to do.

The Chair:

I guess you're not saying whether that's good or bad.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Of course I won't tell you that, Mr. Chair.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Mr. Chair, if I may, I will not weigh in on the debate, but I will just explain what the thresholds are.

They are the same in both the pre-election and election periods. For up to $500, the third party doesn't have to register with Elections Canada. For higher than $500, they have to register with Elections Canada, open a bank account and then present a financial statement after the election. If during the pre-election period or the election period they reach the $10,000 threshold—either $10,000 in contributions or $10,000 in partisan advertising expenses, election advertising expenses, partisan activity expenses or election survey expenses—then they have to provide one preliminary....

What do we call that?

Ms. Manon Paquet (Senior Policy Advisor, Privy Council Office):

The word is "interim".

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

They have to provide a first interim financial return upon reaching that threshold, then a second interim financial return on September 15 during a fixed election year. Then there is one other Liberal motion that would also impose a third interim financial report three weeks before polling day and a fourth interim financial report one week before polling day.

This is the kind of reporting scheme that applies currently under the act and under Bill C-76.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How onerous is the financial report? If you spend $600, you send the receipt and you're done, right?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

[Inaudible—Editor] reporting's very difficult if you only—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's not a 25-page form to declare your $600.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I haven't looked at the form recently, but the bank account requirement would apply to every third party that reaches $500.

Ms. Anne Lawson:

Yes.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Yes, the bank account requirement would apply to every third party that reaches the $500 threshold. So, there are a few associated costs with being a third party that is required to register.

(1850)

The Chair:

Would this reduce it even if it was $10?

Mr. Cullen, go ahead.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

No. The reporting requirements aren't affected by this.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I'm not saying that the reporting requirements are affected by this. I'm just saying that even below the $500 threshold every single person in Canada incurring any, even minimal, partisan advertising expense—and then there's an associated provision during the election period for election advertising expenses—would be required to provide it to the Chief Electoral Officer within 10 days.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right. So, all the reporting requirements exceeding $500 or $10,000 are extraneous to this. What this is talking about is if somebody says they want to put a $300 ad in their local newspaper, or they want to buy three hundred dollars' worth of Facebook ads to target a particular group of voters, they have to send a copy of that to Elections Canada. That's what this amendment says.

The trick is that, with the previous amendments that the Liberals moved and passed, there are triggers at which the social media companies, as a company, have to start reporting, and it's three million views a month, I believe. It's a relatively high bar. You could very much imagine smaller platforms—more political platforms—that are exclusively political and targeted, would never get near three million views. If someone advertises on those and the ad is never triggered, it is never recorded or held by that...there's no responsibility to hold that ad. You could have fake news under a bit of a subversive campaign going on, and any of those ads would not be required to be captured by that platform company, nor if this fails then we just wouldn't have any repository at all.

So, you're a candidate in an election and someone's running all this advertising through social media networks that are not three million views a month, of which there are many more than there are that exceed three million views a month, and your ads would simply be.... You could micro-target them and you know how much you could get for $500 on a social media ad, especially the smaller ones. You could get lots saying Ruby's a terrible person, just to pick an example.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a question for Ms. Lawson.

Is there anywhere right now that Elections Canada is required to hold on to advertising or anything as it's going on? Is there any other point that something like this exists? Is there any precedent for this?

Ms. Anne Lawson:

No, there's nothing currently that would create this type of repository.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So, we would never send you a copy of our campaign signs for you to hold in escrow, or....

Ms. Anne Lawson:

As you know, there is a lot of reporting that goes on and the repository, in a certain sense, of all the reports that are tabled and filed. Those have to be put online, but not advertising, per se.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I don't imagine them sending out election campaign four-by-fours to Elections Canada saying, “This is my election sign.” This is overwhelmingly digital, and so Elections Canada keeps a digital copy of the ad.

I think this has two effects. One, if people know they have to deposit those with Elections Canada, maybe it keeps some folks away from doing the darker side of politics.

Two, if something does go wrong, or an election is held in some controversy, we're able to pull back the ads that were run in that campaign, or by that social media agency, or by that person in this case, and say that there was a coordinated effort amongst 40 people within this riding to all spend $450 on the same ad, but nobody has the repository as it is right now. So, you just had $4,500 coordinated out into targeted social media, as long as the company doesn't have three million views a month. That's the way to get around it and it's a relatively significant loophole, as opposed to me doing my ad, pressing send, Canada Elections...that's the law. It requires Elections Canada to hold it.

The Chair:

Ms. Lawson.

Ms. Anne Lawson:

I just want to make one point about the way this is currently worded. It's not only digital or electronic, so it would cover posters that are made in people's windows or other types of advertising that cost under $500.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Fair enough.

I assume just about every piece of advertising we make, posters and everything else, exists in digital form. Maybe somebody's hand-painting posters and sticking them up in their window. I guess that's lower on my concern list.

The Chair:

Mr. Morin.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I was going to raise the same issue as Ms. Lawson.

I don't want to turn myself into the legal counsel for this committee. I'm not providing legal advice in any way, shape or form.

I would just encourage members of this committee to think about the free speech provisions in the charter and the impact of a rule that would require every single citizen posting partisan advertising messages to report to a government agency on those messages during the pre-election period.

(1855)

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is not a speech issue.

I don't think millions of Canadians take out election advertising. Maybe I'm wrong. Maybe our citizenry is out there buying social media ads like crazy and this is going to be very onerous. I haven't personally experienced it, but maybe others have.

I'm sorry. I appreciate the witness's comments, but it is not a speech prohibition to send in an ad. If you're willing to participate and buy advertising in a Canadian election, you are participating. This provides no limitation of speech, no way.

The Chair:

We'll vote on NDP-19.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Keep in mind that we've spent way more than 15 minutes on this particular clause, so let's try to go a little quicker.

We're moving to PV-8.

Ms. May

Ms. Elizabeth May:

I'll be as brief as I can, Mr. Chair.

This may seem a bit ironic as in my last intervention I was pointing out....

What third party groups have testified to this committee, particularly Fair Vote Canada, is that having a threshold of $500, which then requires registering immediately as a third party and all of the other obligations, was a quite low threshold. Réal Lavergne pointed out in his testimony before committee that in the Prince Edward Island referendum, the threshold was $500.

Prince Edward Island is a very small jurisdiction in terms of population and media reach. If their spending threshold was $500, the suggestion I'm making in this amendment is that the national threshold should be $2,500, which is a more reasonable threshold to imagine for anyone with plans to impact a national campaign, and $500 in a single electoral district. It's to reduce an onerous burden on particularly all volunteer groups having a very small foray into election activities.

That's a brief explanation. I know you'll be wanting to move on, but I'm happy to answer questions.

The Chair:

If there are no comments, we'll go to the vote on PV-8.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We're moving to CPC-91.

Would someone introduce this amendment.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This amendment is similar to our previous amendment allowing early registration for pre-election and election periods, but again, applicable here to third parties.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Mr. John Nater:

Yes, Chair.

As it stands, you cannot register until the pre-writ period starts. If you're intending to spend money, if you're intending to be involved in the process, let's let them start on it early and get registered rather than forcing them to wait until the pre-writ period starts. I think this is a logical time period to allow this.

The Chair:

If there is no discussion, we'll vote on CPC-91.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: On CPC-92, go ahead Mrs. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This is adding a geographical catchment area to opinion poll disclosures for third parties.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's similar to what we discussed a while ago. It seems a hopelessly impractical requirement, so I can't support it for that reason.

(1900)

The Chair:

We'll go to a vote on CPC-92.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Now, out of your new package of amendments, go to CPC reference number 9964802. CPC can present this amendment.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Chair, it's seven o'clock. It's been a long day. It seems longer still with the six amendments I see ahead.

What would you suggest we try to get through?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can I suggest we try to get through clause 223 and call it a night then?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay.

This will establish political contribution limits for third parties that are consistent with those for political parties.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Just to clarify as well, this is part of a series of amendments. It would then apply to several other ones. It is about bringing in similar rules for contributions as those governing political parties, for example in terms of amounts and how they're obtained. This one specifically deals just with the loan side of things, but there are other ones for contributions, so we need to look at this as a whole with all the other ones: 114.1, 115.1, 154, 161 and 169. If we defeat this one, we defeat all those as well.

I'm just making the point that if we want to bring this within the entire regime of political contributions that political parties have to comply with, there are multiple amendments that we need to do as one. If we vote against this one, they're all gone.

The Chair:

If there is no further discussion, we'll vote on the new CPC-9964802.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We're on amendment CPC-94.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

This is a fun little amendment.

As luck would have it with this bill, if an election were to be called after June 30 but not on the fixed election date, for example, if it were to be held one week prior, the entire regime just disappears when it comes to third party pre-writ spending.

This amendment allows that the pre-writ period still exists and you have to follow the rules and report accordingly, even if the election isn't held on the fixed election date. If the Prime Minister decides to call the election any time before October 21, 2019 but after the pre-writ period happens, it allows the reporting regime to stay in place.

The Chair:

Could I get the election officials to comment on that, saying that there's no pre-writ or anything if the election is called not on the fixed election date?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

I don't disagree with you, but this motion would only apply on two occasions. It would apply if the government were to fall after a non-confidence motion in the House of Commons after the beginning of the pre-writ period, which would have been a very long minority government, or if the prime minister of the day were to convince the governor general to dissolve Parliament after the beginning of the pre-election period but before the beginning of the window between 50 days and 37 days before polling day, which would allow a polling day to occur on the day set in accordance with the act.

So, yes, if a prime minister were to recommend to the governor general that such an election be called earlier but after the beginning of the pre-writ period, this motion would allow the third party reporting regime to stand.

(1905)

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

I just want to put on the record that there would be no convincing required to convince the governor general. The governor general accepts the advice of the prime minister of the day. There's no convincing the governor general of a Crown prerogative. I just want to put that on the record that the prime minister can request the dissolution of Parliament, and the governor general will.

The Chair:

Well, I would challenge that, but that's not what we're talking about.

I had an order here. Mr. Bittle and then Ms. May.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I appreciate the Conservatives bringing this forward. We're bringing forward amendments that relate to this topic, and two new reporting intervals for third party will apply in those amendments regardless of whether or not there's a fixed election date. We'll be opposed to this one, but in the same spirit, there will be further amendments to address the same issue.

The Chair:

Ms. May.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

I guess that would address my concern. Even if it's an extremely rare possibility, there's no point leaving a gap in the legislation of something that we think is unlikely.

Legislation should work even in the most unlikely of circumstances. I'm not a voter on this committee, obviously, but as long as you're satisfied that what you're proposing deals with, as brilliantly explained by John, his fun little amendment. If your fun little amendment will do what his fun little amendment does, you're good.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I promise no fun.

Mr. John Nater:

There's nothing precluding this amendment that we're aware of. If there is an amendment, we'll look at it.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Otherwise I think we should wait. You guys should pass that one.

The Chair:

We will vote on CPC-94.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: LIB-29 has passed because it was consequential to LIB-26. That also means CPC-95 and CPC-96 can't be moved, so we'll go to CPC-97.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

This is for third parties. It's the Chief Electoral Officer's recommendation for an anti-circumvention provision concerning foreign contributions.

The Chair:

People should know that the vote on this will apply to CPC-149, which is on page 276, as they are linked together by reference.

Is there discussion on CPC-97?

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Chair.

Perhaps to our officials, LIB-30 is a similar amendment. Would you be able to identify what the key differences are between CPC-97 and LIB-30, just so we have an idea when we're voting on this one?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

If this passes, that wipes out LIB-30, doesn't it?

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but at page 124 of the bill, line 7, I think that proposed section 349.95 has been repealed by another Liberal provision.

(1910)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Just so you know, we're not planning to move amendment LIB-30.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You're not moving LIB-30, so this would be a stand-alone. Then, what it's trying to do, this is not the commingling money, this is just preventing somebody from circumventing the intention of the bill to not have foreign money influence the election.

Am I right, John? That seems like a good idea.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Again, I think it outlines the definition of the actions of collusion, again, not with the specific actions for completely avoiding it, as we've discussed in detail earlier. I think it provides a more clear definition.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Mr. Chair, am I right in thinking that amendment LIB-29 was carried as a result of either amendments LIB-27 or LIB-26 being carried?

The Chair:

It was carried because LIB-26 passed.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Okay, amendment LIB-29 deleted from the bill proposed section 349.95.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is recreating it.

Mr. Jean-François Morin:

Is it?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

If we deleted a section of the bill and now we have an amendment reintroducing a proposed section, but differently....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No, it refers to a proposed section that no longer exists. That's all.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right, because it's not a stand-alone proposed section.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So this should be cancelled by consequence.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right, so that might be something that I'm not sure we can handle. If what the Conservatives are trying to do in their amendment is to strengthen the proposed section, which was eliminated three or five votes ago—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's a house of cards.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

House of Cards is a great show—a little dark.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes, very dark.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

But it's not as dark as the reality.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. John Nater:

At the same time, the amendment deals with proposed section 349.95.

The Chair:

You're not bringing forward LIB-30, right?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's right. LIB-30 is withdrawn.

The Chair:

It will not be brought forward.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

CPC-97 is the last amendment we have to deal with for the clause.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

[Inaudible—Editor] If the amendment can just stand on its own, even if the proposed section has been deleted, then that happens. I'm not sure if the language does support it.

The Chair:

If the proposed section has been deleted, the amendment becomes inadmissible, but as Mr. Nater said, part of this amendment does not deal with the proposed section that's been deleted.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right.

Mr. John Nater:

That reference could be fixed at report stage as well.

The Chair:

We'll just get our legislative clerk to give us a ruling here.

Mr. Philippe Méla (Legislative Clerk):

You give the rulings.

The Chair:

I give the rulings; you just tell me what to say.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The veil has been opened. Oh, great Oz!

The Chair:

I would encourage everyone tomorrow to skip caucus and get a good sleep so we can go really late tomorrow night.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I thought that was why we were starting at nine, to skip caucus so we can come back here.

The Chair:

Because we're only meeting four hours tomorrow night, seriously, be prepared. If you have the energy to stay a bit longer, we can get some more done tomorrow night.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We just have to see if we can get through this all.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I don't know if we can get a resolution on this tonight. I don't want to put our clerk under pressure. It's a tricky thing we're asking for.

The Chair:

That's his job.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Remind me never to work for you, Chair.

The Chair:

He likes the pressure. It's good training.

Do you think I'm letting you out of here after spending an hour on one clause?

(1915)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I think 55 minutes was spent on my amendment. Come on.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I heard it's a five-minute rule.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

An hon. member: That will make—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Yes, definitely.

If the Liberals are planning to vote against this suggestion, then why go through the exercise of our poor clerk trying to make all this reconcile?

The Chair:

Is that okay?

Mr. John Nater:

I'd like a recorded vote.

The Chair:

We'll have a recorded vote on CPC-97, which also applies to CPC-149.

(Amendment negatived: nays 5; yeas 4 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 223 as amended agreed to on division)

The Chair: Thank you, everyone.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you to our witnesses for coming on short notice and staying so late.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you, Anne and Trevor, for coming back. We missed you.

The Chair:

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Bienvenue à la 125e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Emmanuel Dubourg et Vance Badawey, je vous souhaite à nouveau la bienvenue.

Martin Shields, bienvenue au Comité de la procédure.

En plus des représentants du Bureau du Conseil privé, Jean-François Morin et Manon Paquet, nous accueillons à très court préavis des représentants d'Élections Canada: Anne Lawson, sous-directrice générale des élections, Affaires régulatoires, qui est revenue souvent ici durant les discussions; et Trevor Knight, avocat principal, Services juridiques.

Merci à vous deux d'être ici à si court préavis. C'est incroyable. Votre présence est toujours utile. Je suis sûr que nous aurons quelques questions techniques à vous poser.

Dans un instant, nous poursuivrons notre étude article par article du projet de loi C-76, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada et d'autres lois et apportant des modifications corrélatives à d'autres textes législatifs. Mais d'abord, commençons par régler une chose qui concerne l'article 331

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais juste informer les membres du Comité que, à la lumière des décisions que nous avons prises ce matin, nous retirerons les amendements CPC-145 et CPC-189.

Le président:

Les amendements CPC-145 et CPC-189 sont retirés.

Monsieur Lawson, juste par curiosité, pendant que les personnes prennent leurs notes, cela n'a rien à voir avec ce dont nous débattrons maintenant, mais avons-nous déjà eu un bureau de scrutin comptant plus de 10 sections de vote?

M. Trevor Knight (avocat principal, Services juridiques, Élections Canada):

Ce n'est pas très courant, mais oui, nous en avons déjà eu un.

Le président:

Merci.

(Article 191)

Le président: Pour commencer, nous allons demander à John Nater de présenter un des nouveaux articles des conservateurs dont le numéro de référence est le 10008652.

Pouvez-vous nous l'expliquer?

M. John Nater:

Essentiellement, cet article clarifie les procédures comptables après la clôture de l'élection en ce qui concerne les urnes.

Le président:

De quelle façon?

M. John Nater:

C'est un amendement d'ordre administratif.

Le président:

Et que fait-il?

M. John Nater:

Essentiellement, chaque urne est fermée, puis vous procédez au dépouillement. C'est juste une clarification. Lorsque vous avez plusieurs bureaux de vote dans un seul bureau de scrutin, chaque urne est fermée individuellement, puis emportée.

Le président:

Quelqu'un qui n'est pas du Parti conservateur a quelque chose à dire? J'inclus les représentants.

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

Excusez-moi de mon retard. Pouvez-vous me dire à quel numéro nous sommes rendus?

Le président:

Nous sommes rendus à l'article 191.

Nous avons également retiré les amendements CPC-145 et CPC-189 en raison des décisions prises ce matin.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord, l'amendement CPC-189 est beaucoup plus loin sur la liste. Je vous suis maintenant.

Le président:

Les représentants ont-ils des commentaires sur cet amendement proposé?

Monsieur Nater, pendant que les gens réfléchissent, voulez-vous répéter ce que fait cet amendement qui ne figure pas déjà dans la Loi?

M. John Nater:

Bien sûr. Essentiellement, lorsque vous avez plusieurs urnes ou bureaux de vote dans un seul bureau de scrutin, l'article clarifie juste « ment du scrutin, pour chaque urne ». C'est juste précisé dans cette mesure. Nous ajoutons cela à la ligne 16 de la page 100 du projet de loi en tant que tel.

En ce moment, l'article est ainsi libellé: Dès la clôture du scrutin, un fonctionnaire électoral affecté au bureau de scrutin procède au dépouillement du scrutin

Nous disons seulement dès la clôture de « chaque urne ».

Le président:

Il s'agit d'un amendement technique, donc les représentants d'Élections Canada, n'hésitez pas à vous prononcer à ce sujet.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Monsieur le président, je m'adresse à Élections Canada par votre entremise.

D'abord, je vous remercie d'avoir fait le nécessaire pour vous joindre à nous. De toute évidence, certains de ces amendements suscitent des débats politiques que nous devons tenir en tant que Comité, dans lesquels nous ne vous demandons pas, à vous ni aux représentants du Conseil privé, d'intervenir. Certains d'entre eux ne sont que des questions d'ordre logistique. Bon nombre d'entre nous avons participé à de nombreuses élections, mais pas du même côté des choses que vous, c'est-à-dire la gestion de l'élection.

Ma question sur cet amendement, liée à ce que John a dit, concerne la capacité pratique de faire ce qui est proposé en vertu de cet amendement. Encore une fois, je me prononce non pas sur son bien-fondé, mais plutôt sur sa fonctionnalité.

Comprenez-vous ce qui est proposé et, le cas échéant, est-ce pratique?

M. Morin voudra peut-être aussi dire quelque chose.

M. Jean-François Morin (conseiller principal en politiques, Bureau du Conseil privé):

J'ai une question pour M. Nater.

Je suis désolé, je sais que ce ne sont habituellement pas les témoins qui posent les questions.

Le président:

Allez-y. Il a besoin de se pratiquer.

Des députés: Ha, ha!

M. Jean-François Morin:

J'ai besoin d'une précision par rapport à l'amendement.

Ai-je bien compris que cet amendement aurait pour effet d'exiger que, en l'absence de candidats ou de représentants, au moins deux électeurs soient présents à chaque urne?

M. John Nater:

Non, cela concerne le prochain amendement, soit le CPC-69.

Pourquoi est-ce que je ne lis pas ce que le projet de loi dit maintenant et ce qui est proposé?

Le président:

Oui, allez-y.

M. John Nater:

En ce moment, le projet de loi dit ceci: 283(1) Dès la clôture du scrutin, un fonctionnaire électoral affecté au bureau de scrutin procède au dépouillement du scrutin en présence, à la fois:

Nous proposons qu'il soit ainsi libellé: 283(1) Dès la clôture du scrutin, un fonctionnaire électoral affecté au bureau de scrutin procède au dépouillement du scrutin, pour chaque urne installée au bureau de scrutin, en présence, à la fois:

Nous précisons seulement que, lorsqu'il y a un lieu de scrutin où se trouvent plusieurs bureaux de vote, chaque urne doit...

Le président:

Monsieur Morin.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Merci, monsieur Nater. Je comprends, mais à l'alinéa 283(1)b) proposé dans cet article du projet de loi, on retrouve la partie que vous souhaitez changer, qui ajoute « pour chaque urne ». Puis, nous allons à l'alinéa b) proposé, qui dit actuellement ceci: b) des candidats ou représentants qui sont sur les lieux ou, en l'absence de candidats ou de représentants, d'au moins deux électeurs.

Vous comprenez donc qu'au moins deux électeurs, en l'absence de candidats ou de représentants, devraient procéder au dépouillement du scrutin pour chaque urne dans un bureau de scrutin?

(1540)

M. John Nater:

Ce que nous disons, c'est qu'il y aurait deux témoins pour chaque urne plutôt que pour chaque lieu. La première partie entre aussi en jeu, mais dans la partie supérieure, nous clarifions seulement que c'est « chaque urne », puis les alinéas a) et b) s'appliqueraient à cela.

C'est clair comme de la vase.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Merci.

À moins que mes collègues disent le contraire, dans le cadre de la modernisation de l'initiative sur le vote proposée par le directeur général des élections, cela imposerait un fardeau supplémentaire pour trouver au moins deux électeurs qui pourraient rester pour toute la durée du dépouillement du scrutin. C'est juste un commentaire pratique sur l'effet de cet amendement.

Le président: Les représentants d'Élections Canada veulent-ils intervenir à ce sujet?

Mme Anne Lawson (sous-directrice générale des élections, Affaires régulatoires, Élections Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président. Nous sommes très heureux d'être ici aujourd'hui et nous nous adaptons toujours quand vous nous invitez à comparaître devant le Comité.

Toutefois, je dirai que, comme nous n'avions pas prévu d'être ici pour l'étude article par article, nous n'avons pas eu l'occasion d'examiner tous ces amendements avant maintenant, et nous essayons de les comprendre et d'y réagir.

Je ne suis toujours pas certaine de bien comprendre la portée de cet amendement. Nous ne voyons spontanément pas de problème, en ce sens que nous allons évidemment dépouiller toutes les urnes du bureau de scrutin, de toute façon. Je ne suis pas sûre de savoir si cet amendement vise à ajouter un fardeau ou à simplement clarifier que chaque urne doit être dépouillée convenablement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ce que nous proposons, c'est que deux électeurs soient présents. Peut-il arriver que des urnes soient dépouillées sans qu'un représentant des partis ou qu'un électeur soit présent? Pourrait-il y avoir seulement des représentants d'Élections Canada?

Mme Anne Lawson:

En ce moment, cela n'arriverait pas.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Donc ce scénario ne se produit pas?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Corrigez-moi si j'ai tort, puisque je le dis de mémoire, mais je crois que c'est un changement qui a été apporté par le projet de loi C-23. Avant ce projet de loi, un maximum de deux électeurs pouvait assister au vote en l'absence de représentants, mais il nous faudrait confirmer cela.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je me demande si nous pourrions revenir sur cet amendement, pour donner aux représentants d'Élections Canada un certain temps pour le passer en revue. Cela serait-il utile? S'agit-il d'un amendement corrélatif, monsieur le président? Je sais que nous interrompons parfois les amendements pour donner aux témoins un moment pour réfléchir.

Le président:

Les membres du Comité sont-ils d'accord?

M. Nathan Cullen:

À moins qu'une séquence nous déplaise.

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Oui, je pense que c'est bon. Je ne crois pas que ce soit un amendement corrélatif.

M. John Nater:

Nous devrons également retarder l'étude du prochain amendement, parce qu'ils sont rattachés.

M. Nathan Cullen:

S'agit-il de l'amendement CPC-71?

Le président:

S'agit-il de l'amendement CPC-69?

Nous avons étudié l'amendement CPC-69.

Nous allons remettre à plus tard l'article 191 avec tous ses amendements. Nous y reviendrons plus tard.

Les membres du Comité sont-ils d'accord?

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Il ne faut juste pas oublier.

Le président:

Nous essaierons de le faire à la fin de la réunion aujourd'hui.

(L'article 191 est réservé.)

Le président: D'accord, nous avons un nouvel article 191.1, qui est l'amendement CPC-72.

Le vote sur l'amendement CPC-72 s'applique à l'amendement CPC-73, à la page 129, à l'amendement CPC-75, à la page 130, et à l'amendement CPC-78, à la page 135, puisqu'ils sont liés par le concept du rapport de rapprochement des bulletins de vote.

Pouvez-vous me donner l'introduction de l'amendement CPC-72? Elle se trouve à la page 125.

(1545)

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, cela va de pair avec le rapport de rapprochement lorsque vous avez plusieurs urnes dans un seul bureau de scrutin. Dans le passé, chaque urne était son propre bureau de scrutin, et nous aurons maintenant plusieurs urnes dans un seul lieu. Cela fait en sorte qu'on doit fournir un rapport de rapprochement pour chacun de ces lieux.

Le président:

Mesdames et messieurs les représentants, c'est un scénario que vous avez connu.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est un scénario où nous avons plusieurs urnes dans un seul lieu de scrutin. Nous l'appelons maintenant « lieu de scrutin ». Vous voulez qu'un rapprochement de tout le lieu de scrutin soit fait à la fin de chaque jour de scrutin tandis que, dans le passé, c'était juste pour chaque bureau de vote individuel...

Le président:

D'accord.

Dans le passé, disons que nous avions cinq files. Chacune avait son urne, et vous ne pouviez voter que dans votre file. Maintenant, vous pouvez avoir cinq files, mais les gens peuvent voter dans n'importe laquelle d'entre elles. Vous pourriez encore avoir cinq urnes.

Comment cet amendement vient-il changer cela?

M. John Nater:

Il s'agit de faire un rapprochement, donc le nombre de bulletins de vote qui sont présents dans les urnes correspond au nombre de bulletins de vote qui sont émis pour chaque bureau de vote.

Le président:

D'accord. Je comprends...

M. John Nater:

C'est une situation qui touche plusieurs tables.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le DGE n'a-t-il pas déjà le pouvoir discrétionnaire d'imaginer une façon de faire sans qu'on lui attribue la tâche de façon si prescriptive?

M. John Nater:

Nous voulons nous assurer qu'un rapport de rapprochement est fourni aux partis. Je pense que cette information est importante.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le DGE peut-il recueillir de l'information, toutefois?

Le président:

Monsieur Morin.

M. Jean-François Morin:

En ce moment, en vertu de l'article 283 de la Loi électorale du Canada, le scrutateur doit établir le relevé du scrutin sur le formulaire prescrit par le directeur général des élections. Le projet de loi C-76 viendrait éliminer la mention du « scrutateur » et la changerait pour « fonctionnaire électoral », comme nous en avons parlé à quelques occasions.

Le relevé du scrutin doit indiquer combien de bulletins ont été reçus au début de la journée, combien il reste de bulletins inutilisés à la fin de la journée et combien d'électeurs ont voté. Au final, les résultats sont reportés sur le relevé du scrutin.

Comme je l'ai dit hier, le directeur général des élections a toujours l'obligation, en vertu de l'article 533 de la Loi électorale du Canada, je crois, de déclarer les résultats du scrutin par section de vote. C'est une des raisons pour lesquelles les fonctionnaires électoraux doivent écrire le numéro de la section de vote à l'arrière du bulletin quand chaque électeur vote. En vertu de son pouvoir de prescrire des formulaires, le directeur général des élections va probablement prescrire un formulaire pour le relevé du scrutin qui permettra la consignation des bulletins de vote pour chaque urne de chaque section de vote. Puis, ces chiffres seront également compilés pour le bureau de scrutin.

Au final, rappelez-vous que le directeur général des élections doit toujours rendre compte des résultats par section de vote, et les résultats seront donc toujours disponibles par section de vote. Même si les bulletins pour une seule section de vote sont déposés, par exemple, dans 10 urnes différentes dans un bureau de scrutin, ces résultats seront combinés à la fin du jour du scrutin pour qu'on s'assure que les résultats sont disponibles pour chaque section de vote.

M'avez-vous bien compris?

Le président:

Trevor ou Anne, souhaitiez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

Mme Anne Lawson:

Non. Ce qu'on vient de décrire est tout à fait exact. Le relevé du scrutin fournit actuellement le rapprochement et il continuera de le faire en vertu de tout nouveau système. Même si nous avons plusieurs sections de vote au bureau de scrutin, le relevé du scrutin est ce qui fournit le rapprochement au bout du compte. Comme mon collègue l'a dit, le vote continuerait d'être déclaré par la section de vote, comme la loi l'exige.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Où cela est-il garanti dans le projet de loi C-76?

M. Jean-François Morin:

En réalité, cela se retrouve dans la Loi électorale du Canada elle-même. Ce n'est pas dans le projet de loi. C'est une disposition qui n'est pas touchée par le projet de loi.

Mme Anne Lawson:

Le relevé du scrutin apparaît dans le projet de loi, relativement à l'article 287.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je parle de l'obligation de publier les résultats par section de vote.

(1550)

M. John Nater:

Le dépouillement est fait par section de vote. Ce que nous voulons obtenir ici, c'est le rapprochement par section de vote.

Je suis curieux, et c'est peut-être Élections Canada qui pourra me répondre: j'aimerais savoir comment on peut garantir au Parlement que, avec ce vote, dans tous les modèles de table, on fera un rapprochement du suffrage exprimé avec les bulletins émis. Comment peut-on garantir cela?

M. Trevor Knight:

Le relevé du scrutin nécessitera un rapprochement pour tout le bureau de scrutin, donc le gymnase d'école au complet. Pour ce faire, on devrait prévoir une documentation afin qu'on s'assure qu'un rapprochement est fait pour chaque dépouillement. Ce n'est pas prévu en soi, mais le relevé du scrutin existe aux fins du rapprochement de tout le bureau de scrutin.

M. Nathan Cullen:

La question donne l'impression qu'on vient peut-être ajouter plus de processus comptables et de clarté. Ce que nous ne voulons pas faire, c'est rendre les choses à un tel point lourdes qu'elles vont nuire au processus du dépouillement, du rapprochement, puis de l'annonce des voix à un moment donné.

Le président:

J'ai cru que vous m'aviez dit qu'on le faisait déjà. Cela ne vient rien ajouter.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je crois que c'est à un niveau plus large.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, c'est à un niveau plus large.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si je comprends bien ce que John dit, on fait aussi un rapprochement à un niveau plus restreint. Est-ce exact?

M. John Nater:

Exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Dans ce cas, le fardeau lié simplement au fait de dépouiller les voix, de faire le rapprochement puis de produire des résultats quotidiens ne devient-il pas trop lourd pour Élections Canada?

Mme Anne Lawson:

Je ne sais pas comment bien répondre à cette question. Nous parlons de l'avenir, donc nous n'avons pas de formulaires élaborés en ce moment. Il ne fait aucun doute que ces formulaires prescrits seront élaborés pour faciliter ce que vous décrivez, ce que Trevor a décrit, soit un dépouillement approprié qui est rapproché à l'échelon du bureau de scrutin, avec le niveau de détail que suppose le fait qu'on inscrive sur tous les bulletins de vote leur numéro individuel de section de vote. Comme Jean-François l'a dit, ce niveau de détail va permettre la déclaration par section de vote.

En soi, la Loi offre un cadre pour que cela soit nécessairement fait. On prévoit une certaine marge de manoeuvre pour que le directeur général des élections puisse déterminer comment c'est fait, mais c'est vrai à de nombreux autres endroits dans la Loi, où on demande au DGE de prescrire des formulaires afin que certaines choses se produisent.

Le président:

Passons au vote par rapport au nouvel article 191.1, qui est l'amendement CPC-72. Il s'applique également aux amendements CPC-73, CPC-75 et CPC-78.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(Article 192)

Le président: Nous passerons à l'article 192 et à l'amendement LIB-22, qui a déjà été adopté de façon corrélative. Attendez un instant. Non.

Désolé. Nous allons examiner l'amendement LIB-22.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il s'agit d'un amendement simple pour qu'on s'assure que, s'il n'y a pas de numéro de bureau de vote à l'arrière d'un bulletin de vote, ce dernier n'est pas rejeté pour ce seul motif. C'est un amendement logique. Ce serait une tragédie de perdre une voix pour cela.

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 192 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 193)

Le président:

Nous passons à l'amendement CPC-73.

Stephanie.

M. John Nater:

Nous l'avons déjà fait.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C'est exact. Nous l'avons fait. C'est un amendement corrélatif à l'amendement CPC-72.

Le président:

Il a été rejeté.

(L'article 193 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 194)

Le président: Il y a eu un amendement, le CPC-74, mais il était corrélatif à l'amendement CPC-71. Si nous reportons l'étude de l'article 191, nous reporterons également l'étude de cet article.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui.

Le président:

Nous allons reporter l'étude de cet article, parce qu'il est corrélatif à l'autre article que nous avons réservé. Nous devons examiner l'autre article avant d'examiner celui-ci.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Y a-t-il d'autres articles qui sont également touchés?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

L'article 79.

Le président:

D'accord, nous allons donc sauter cet article pour un moment, mais nous y reviendrons plus tard au courant de l'après-midi.

(L'article 194 est réservé.)

(Article 195)

Le président: L'amendement CPC-75 était corrélatif à l'amendement CPC-72, qui a été rejeté, donc il n'est pas adopté.

L'article 195 est-il adopté tel que présenté?

(1555)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

L'article 195 est adopté avec dissidence et l'article 96 peut être adopté pour nous.

(L'article 195 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(L'article 196 est adopté.)

(Article 197)

Le président:

Nous avons l'amendement CPC-75.1.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, cet article concerne le dépouillement précoce des bulletins de vote par anticipation. Nous venons d'imposer un nombre minimal de bulletins de vote requis pour que cela se produise. Je sais que, durant la dernière élection, ça se produisait à l'occasion, car il y avait une forte participation au vote par anticipation. Cela fournit seulement un chiffre pour qu'on aille de l'avant, puis il y a d'autres dispositions auxquelles c'est appliqué. Je crois qu'il y en a quatre.

Le président:

Dites-vous qu'ils peuvent commencer le dépouillement avant la clôture du scrutin...

M. John Nater:

Oui, y compris...

Le président:

... s'il y a plus de 500 votes?

M. John Nater: Oui.

Le président: Tandis qu'auparavant, on avait le pouvoir de faire le dépouillement avant la clôture du bureau de scrutin, mais il n'y avait pas de chiffre? Est-ce...

M. John Nater:

Je le crois.

Peut-être que nos représentants d'Élections Canada peuvent en parler.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. John Nater:

On a adapté la Loi pour pouvoir le faire dans la plus récente élection. Je crois qu'on s'était fondé sur le chiffre 500. Peut-être que les représentants d'Élections Canada pourraient nous aider.

Mme Anne Lawson:

J'essayais moi-même de me rappeler le chiffre, et malheureusement, je n'ai pas l'adaptation devant moi, donc je ne peux pas répondre à cette question précise. Je ne crois pas que nous prendrions position par rapport à la politique entourant cette question.

Le président:

En ce moment, le directeur général des élections peut commencer le dépouillement au scrutin par anticipation, mais il n'y a pas de chiffre qui prescrit le moment où il peut le faire. Cela prescrirait à quel moment il peut le faire, essentiellement.

Monsieur Morin.

M. Jean-François Morin:

En réalité, la Loi ne permet pas cela en ce moment. Le directeur général des élections a utilisé le pouvoir qui lui est conféré en vertu de l'article 17 de la Loi électorale du Canada pour adapter la Loi durant la dernière élection générale.

Le projet de loi C-76 officialiserait la règle selon laquelle le dépouillement du vote pour le scrutin par anticipation peut commencer une heure avant la clôture du scrutin le jour du scrutin. Par le passé, quand ce pouvoir a été utilisé, un grand nombre de bulletins de vote avaient été déposés dans les bureaux de scrutin par anticipation. Je pense qu'une des justifications tenait au fait que, lorsque les résultats du scrutin sont rendus publics le soir de l'élection, souvent, les résultats des bureaux de scrutin par anticipation sortent très tard, parce que le vote a été long et que le nombre de votes était bien supérieur.

Cela dit, à la page 104 du projet de loi, aux lignes 19 à 21, le scrutateur peut seulement dépouiller les bulletins de vote dans un bureau de vote par anticipation s'il « a obtenu une approbation préalable du directeur général des élections » pour ce faire.

C'est une autorisation fournie par le directeur général des élections, et le dépouillement est fait conformément à ses instructions, donc cela procure une certaine latitude au directeur général des élections pour déterminer dans quels bureaux de scrutin par anticipation le dépouillement des votes devrait commencer avant la clôture.

Le président:

Donc, en ce moment, le directeur général des élections peut décider quand autoriser le vote par anticipation jusqu'à une heure avant. En vertu de cet amendement, il ne peut le faire que lorsque 500 votes sont exprimés.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Exactement. Dans le cadre de cet amendement, cela serait limité aux cas où le nombre de votes exprimés est d'au moins 500.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Mon cher collègue derrière moi, M. Church, m'a fourni l'adaptation d'Élections Canada de la dernière élection.

Le paragraphe 289(4) est ainsi libellé: Malgré le paragraphe (3), lorsque plus de 500 votes ont été exprimés dans un bureau de vote par anticipation, le directeur du scrutin peut autoriser que le dépouillement de ces votes commence deux (2) heures avant la fermeture des bureaux de scrutin, le jour du scrutin.

Cet amendement est conforme à l'adaptation d'Élections Canada de la dernière élection, en ce qui concerne le chiffre 500.

(1600)

Le président:

Est-ce ce qu'ils ont fait avec leur pouvoir discrétionnaire durant la dernière élection?

M. John Nater:

C'était l'adaptation, oui.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Je ne comprends pas pourquoi nous interférons avec le pouvoir discrétionnaire du directeur général des élections. Cela me semble redondant.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Je ne dirais pas qu'il s'agit d'interférence. Il s'agit de le rendre conforme à son adaptation de la dernière élection. La conformité est toujours un élément fort lorsque vous traitez des élections. Vous voulez une certaine prévisibilité.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Les conservateurs pourraient-ils présenter leur amendement CPC-76, s'il vous plaît.

M. John Nater:

C'est conforme aux amendements précédents que nous avons réservés. Cela concerne le nombre de témoins nécessaires pour assister au dépouillement.

Cet amendement remplace l'alinéa 289(4)d) proposé, où on parle de ces bulletins de vote par anticipation qui sont dépouillés avant la clôture des bureaux de scrutin. Cela ressemble à l'amendement que nous avons réservé il y a quelques minutes, concernant la présence d'au moins deux témoins pour surveiller le dépouillement.

Le président:

Essentiellement, cela dit qu'il doit y avoir au moins deux témoins dans le cas de chaque urne.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est la même chose qu'avant.

Le président:

Qu'avons-nous fait avant?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous l'avons réservé.

Le président:

Nous ne l'avons pas examiné?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, nous attendions de savoir à quel point ce processus serait lourd. Nous donnions à Élections Canada un peu de temps.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, il ne serait pas logique pour nous d'aller de l'avant avec cet amendement si nous n'allions pas proposer... Nous ne voulons pas une procédure différente pour ces dépouillements par rapport à des dépouillements qui sont faits le jour de l'élection. Si le Comité est d'accord, nous pourrions peut-être revenir également sur celui-ci.

Le président:

Oui, nous allons réserver tout cet article, à l'exception de l'amendement que nous avons retiré.

(L'article 197 est réservé.)

(Article 198)

Le président: L'amendement LIB-23 peut être présenté.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'amendement proprement dit paraît simple, mais il permet à Élections Canada d'envoyer des cartes de bingo aux partis et aux candidats dans les six mois suivant l'élection, et ce sont, à mon avis, des données utiles à avoir sous forme électronique. Lorsque j'étais employé, j'avais des contrats pour entrer des cartes de bingo, et cela prenait énormément de temps comme employé de campagne. Je crois que c'est utile de les avoir sous forme électronique.

Le président:

Dans ce cas, qu'est-ce que l'amendement permet?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il permet les transferts automatiques.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Plutôt que d'aller chercher les urnes au bureau d'Élections Canada deux semaines après l'élection, puis de passer vos fins de semaine à entrer manuellement des cartes de bingo, cette information serait envoyée à tous les partis et les candidats.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est logique.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions?

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Il y avait un amendement CPC-78, mais il était corrélatif à l'amendement CPC-72.

(L'article 198 modifié est adopté.)

(Les articles 199 à 204 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

(Article 205)

Le président: On propose l'amendement CPC-79. Nous allons le réserver, parce qu'il est lié aux trois autres amendements que nous avons déjà reportés. Nous y reviendrons.

(L'article 205 est réservé.)

(Article 206)

Le président: Nous allons examiner l'amendement LIB-24.

Il y a ici quelques ramifications. Le vote par rapport à l'amendement LIB-24 s'applique à l'amendement LIB-25, à la page 139, à l'amendement LIB-43, à la page 269, et à l'amendement LIB-59, à la page 316, puisqu'ils sont liés par la définition de « plateformes en ligne ».

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cet amendement ajoute juste une disposition interprétative à la Loi afin qu'on soit en mesure de savoir ce qu'est la publicité sur les médias sociaux. C'est assez ennuyeux.

(1605)

Le président:

Présentez-vous l'article pour les libéraux?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non. Je fais un commentaire préventif.

Le président:

Ruby.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Je crois que M. Cullen ne trouve pas l'amendement très enthousiasmant, mais c'est très nécessaire.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est électrisant.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est très nécessaire. Je définis la « plateforme en ligne » dans la Loi, de sorte que nous sachions dans l'avenir, avec les autres articles, comment c'est défini.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions?

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 206 modifié est adopté.)

Le président: Il y a un nouvel article 206.1 proposé dans l'amendement NDP-17. Vous devez savoir que le vote par rapport à cet article sera également appliqué aux amendements NDP-18, NDP-20 et NDP-25.

Peut-être que M. Cullen pourrait décrire ce que fait cet amendement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est tout un amendement, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Il apporte un vent d'enthousiasme.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, égayons un peu les choses.

Il s'agit de l'article proposé dont plusieurs témoins nous ont parlé; il concerne les règles qui s'appliquent aux prétendus médias traditionnels lorsqu'une personne, un tiers ou un parti politique place une annonce, ce qui les oblige à s'identifier. Ces règles n'ont pas été appliquées aux médias sociaux durant les élections précédentes, et l'application a été incohérente.

La menace qui pèse tout particulièrement sur nos élections, c'est que des gens soient en mesure de diffuser des annonces sur la bonification des votes — essayer de faire parler une personne d'un enjeu ou d'amener un candidat à voter pour quelque chose — ou les annonces faisant la promotion de la suppression, que nous avons d'ailleurs beaucoup plus vues dans l'exemple du Brexit, où des gens ont été en mesure de pousser les électeurs à se ranger contre une idée ou à voter d'une certaine façon, tout en ne s'identifiant pas ou en n'identifiant pas la personne ayant payé l'annonce.

Il est fondamental pour notre démocratie que, lorsqu'une personne paye un espace publicitaire — et de grandes ressources sont consacrées à certains de ces enjeux au sein de certains de ces partis —, elle devrait simplement s'identifier. Cet amendement le permet de la façon la plus claire possible.

Comme vous l'avez souligné, monsieur le président, l'application de cet amendement touche d'autres aspects, parce qu'il joue sur d'autres parties de la publicité: la publicité préélectorale, dont on tient compte dans l'amendement NDP-18; et la publicité des tiers, qui figure dans l'amendement NDP-20, font exactement la même chose: vous devez vous identifier.

D'autres amendements à venir, des libéraux, je crois, concernent un répertoire des annonces, de sorte que les entreprises de médias sociaux soient obligées de conserver les annonces pendant une certaine période.

Le président:

Vous dites essentiellement que si une personne fait une publicité dans un journal, elle doit dire qui elle est, mais si elle le fait sur Facebook, elle n'a pas à le faire.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui. Si le Parti libéral fait paraître une annonce qui dit « nous sommes fantastiques », qui est payée par lui, comme vous le savez bien, ou si un tiers publicitaire enregistré fait diffuser une annonce à la radio, il doit aussi s'identifier. Les médias traditionnels, selon ma compréhension — je pourrais avoir tort —, doivent conserver un répertoire de ces annonces, qu'on peut ensuite consulter.

Les effets de ces choses ne sont pas toujours immédiatement reconnus par les électeurs. S'ils croient qu'il y a un problème ou quelque chose de suspect, c'est souvent même après l'élection, et vous devez être en mesure d'y revenir.

Je ne crois pas qu'un de ces articles crée un tel répertoire, mais je pense que cela s'en vient.

Le président:

Pourrais-je obtenir des commentaires d'Élections Canada ou du BCP?

M. Jean-François Morin:

L'article 320 de la Loi, qui n'est pas ouvert dans le projet de loi, est examiné par l'amendement qui nous est présenté. L'article 320 prévoit déjà que le candidat ou le parti enregistré qui fait faire de la publicité électorale doit indiquer dans la publicité que le message a été autorisé.

Dans la mesure du possible, la Loi électorale du Canada et le projet de loi que nous étudions ont été rédigés de façon à préserver la neutralité technologique. Nous essayons le mieux possible de ne pas nommer de médias de communication différents, car nous voulons que les règles s'appliquent le plus largement possible.

Lorsqu'il a témoigné devant vous il y a juste quelques semaines, monsieur Cullen, vous avez posé au directeur général des élections une question concernant l'application de l'article 320. Vous lui avez demandé s'il s'appliquait déjà à Internet. Je crois qu'il a répondu oui.

Lorsque nous commençons à nommer divers médias dans la Loi, le risque, c'est que cela soulève des questions au sujet de l'applicabilité de la règle à d'autres formes de communication.

(1610)

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, mais nous n'allons pas dire que les gens qui crient sur les toits représentent une autre forme de communication.

Nous avons juste parcouru la Loi et reconnu ce que sont les médias sociaux au sens de la Loi. Il semble... Je crois comprendre ce que vous dites et je n'ai pas souvenir que ce témoignage était si clair, mais je vais m'y reporter pour voir si le directeur général des élections a effectivement dit cela. Il me semble qu'il y avait en fait deux normes dans une bonne partie du témoignage que nous avons entendu; c'est pourquoi nous venons de parcourir la Loi et avons défini ce qu'est une plateforme de médias sociaux.

Si tout cela a pour résultat d'alerter les médias sociaux, particulièrement ceux qui ne comptent pas parmi les plus grands... je pense que Facebook, Twitter et ceux-là ont toujours des politiques en main et les préparent en vue de la prochaine élection; c'est ce qu'ils nous ont dit. Mais je crois que certains des plus petits, peut-être moins connus... De plus, nous avons des éléments déclencheurs qui se trouvent dans les amendements qui s'en viennent. À mon avis, Myspace doit vraiment se faire connaître...

Des députés: Ha, ha!

M. Nathan Cullen: Parce que l'entreprise perd des parts de marché.

Je ne vois pas de mal à les nommer, particulièrement pour alerter ces nouvelles formes de médias, d'où un nombre accru de Canadiens obtiennent une bonne partie de leur consommation médiatique ces jours-ci.

Le président:

Nous avons une longue liste, mais auparavant, vous dites essentiellement que toute la publicité, peu importe où elle est faite, est couverte, et vous voulez tout spécialement alerter les médias sociaux.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, je serais porté à l'appuyer. Peut-être que les représentants d'Élections Canada pourraient nous fournir une interprétation.

Un message sur Facebook ou un gazouillis qui n'est pas renforcé ou promu par de l'argent est simplement un message sur Facebook qu'une personne de mon équipe électorale ou moi-même affiche et qui ne serait pas visé par cette disposition, qui s'appliquerait seulement à de la publicité payée.

Mme Anne Lawson:

C'est exact.

M. John Nater:

D'accord. Si je publie un gazouillis, je n'ai pas besoin d'utiliser mes précieux caractères pour dire « autorisé par le représentant officiel de John Nater ». C'est ma seule préoccupation, et je pense que c'est bon.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En fait, j'oublie...

Le président:

D'accord. Nous allons passer d'abord à Mme Sahota, puis à M. Graham.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'ai une question pour M. Cullen.

Dans l'amendement, vous exigez des partis politiques qu'ils soient clairs et qu'ils étiquettent leurs publicités comme ayant été faites par eux.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est exact.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous dites dans la spécification que vous voulez alerter les médias sociaux à cet égard. Est-ce pourquoi vous voulez le faire?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ce serait pour que les médias sociaux n'acceptent pas des annonces qui... Cela s'inscrit dans les amendements NDP-17, NDP-18 et NDP-20 pour saisir la totalité des personnes qui achèteraient des annonces. C'est une plateforme de médias sociaux... Encore une fois, les grands médias sociaux ne me préoccupent pas vraiment; je pense qu'ils ont des services juridiques complets. Ce sont les petits. Si les petits acceptent de l'argent pour maximiser une annonce et afficher une annonce sur les médias sociaux qui va apparaître sur un agrégateur de nouvelles — si soudainement, des annonces apparaissent sur le site National Newswatch — et s'ils ne demandent pas à ceux qui ont payé l'annonce de s'identifier, ils contreviennent à la loi elle-même.

Cet amendement touche les partis. Le prochain concerne les tiers durant la période préélectorale. Le troisième a trait aux tierces parties dans l'élection générale. J'essaie juste de renseigner les gens, parce que nous avons vu quelques écarts à cet égard — et c'est un mot gentil pour le dire — tout particulièrement en ce qui concerne les publicités des tiers lorsqu'ils utilisent des médias sociaux pour les renforcer.

Ce que des témoins nous ont dit, c'est qu'on a la capacité d'utiliser les algorithmes pour cibler à l'extrême des électeurs, et l'effet de ces annonces est beaucoup plus grand que celui d'une annonce publiée dans le Toronto Star il y a 20 ans, où on disait qu'un tel était un excellent candidat. Ce sont des annonces extrêmement ciblées utilisant l'intelligence artificielle qui frappent directement le coeur et l'esprit d'un électeur par rapport aux enjeux qui le motivent. Elles sont puissantes. Je crois que c'est ce que nous avons entendu dans le cadre des témoignages. Il s'agit de reconnaître, lorsque cette annonce est présentée à un électeur, pourquoi elle arrive vers lui et qui a payé pour elle. Je crois que c'est très important que cela soit clair.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Mon amendement LIB-25 concerne également la création d'un régime en vertu duquel il y aurait des exigences redditionnelles imposées à ces plateformes, de façon à ce que les responsables sachent, tout comme le public, que certains partis font de la publicité sur certaines plateformes — et dans quelle mesure — tout en sachant ce qu'ils font pour accroître la visibilité ou je ne sais quoi d'autre.

Selon moi, on pourrait, essentiellement, couvrir tout cela, parce que je crois que ce que vous essayez de faire, c'est d'assumer la responsabilité du parti, qui est déjà responsable d'ajouter un tel titre d'appel sur toutes les publicités. Actuellement, les partis ont déjà cette obligation. Rien n'indique que cette obligation ne s'applique pas dans le cas des médias sociaux. Elle s'applique dans tous les cas, comme on vient de l'entendre. Essayez-vous de transférer une partie de cette obligation aux plateformes de médias sociaux que les partis utilisent plutôt que d'en tenir l'annonceur responsable?

(1615)

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est tout simplement pour que les médias sociaux sachent que, s'ils reçoivent une publicité qui n'est pas assortie d'un titre d'appel précisant qui a payé l'annonce, ils participent à la violation de la Loi, qu'il s'agisse de l'accepter ou qu'il soit plutôt question de la façon dont la violation fonctionnerait, de qui serait pénalisé...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Est-ce que les journaux et les autres formes de médias seraient pénalisés? Font-ils partie de...

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est une question intéressante. Si le Star diffuse un ensemble de publicités de nature politique sans préciser qui les a payées, je ne sais pas qui en subit les conséquences. Est-ce le journal ou la personne qui a acheté la publicité? Je ne sais pas exactement de quelle façon la Loi fonctionne actuellement. Heureusement, ce n'est pas le genre d'expériences personnelles que j'ai eues.

Je comprends ce que vous dites. La légère différence, c'est — parce que nous avons examiné votre amendement, bien sûr —, eh bien, c'est lorsque vous commencez à parler des éléments déclencheurs. C'est quelque chose dont, selon moi, nous devons discuter.

Encore une fois, je pense à des plateformes de médias sociaux très ciblées qui n'ont pas un grand nombre de visites, mais qui peuvent avoir un grand effet, parce qu'elles ciblent les 25 circonscriptions girouettes que les partis ont cernées et les 25 % d'électeurs indécis. Bien sûr, ces plateformes obtiennent 40 000 visites la semaine en question, mais ces 40 000 visites sont extrêmement efficaces comparativement à ce qu'on peut voir sur un beaucoup plus grand site qui adopte une approche éparpillée un peu partout sur Internet.

C'est là un deuxième débat que nous aurons, mais c'est un enjeu très précis: identifier la publicité, qu'elle vienne des partis ou de tierces parties, qu'elle paraisse en période préélectorale, avant ou pendant la période électorale. Si ce n'est pas fait, c'est contre la loi.

Encore une fois, je ne sais pas, actuellement, qui se fait taper sur les doigts si cette règle est brisée.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je crois que c'est le parti.

M. Jean-François Morin:

C'est le parti.

M. Nathan Cullen:

La tierce partie aussi?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui.

Eh bien, il y a d'autres amendements qui seront proposés concernant les exigences en matière de titres d'appel pour la publicité faite par des tiers. Cependant, dans ce cas-ci, dans le cas du nouvel article 320 proposé, il s'agirait du candidat, du parti enregistré ou des agents qui ont omis de s'identifier.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pour boucler la boucle, alors, les médias en tant que tels, qu'il s'agisse des médias traditionnels ou des médias sociaux, n'ont pas à subir les conséquences d'avoir accepté des publicités politiques sans...

M. Jean-François Morin:

Non.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Génial.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Vous vous souvenez de [Inaudible]

M. Nathan Cullen: Est-ce qu'on vous a piqué au vif?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Tous ensemble, vous vous êtes souvenus de ma question, c'est déjà ça.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous préférons lire les pensées des gens ici, au Comité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous travaillons ensemble depuis trop longtemps, Nathan.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est donc l'amendement.

Nous avons essayé de les garder... Vous savez, nous les avons divisés en parties, le vôtre est plus englobant. Cependant, nous avons essayé de garder les choses très claires en demandant une identification claire, et ce, sur toutes les plateformes de médias sociaux, ce que nous venons de définir à l'amendement précédent.

Le président:

Je ne veux pas formuler de commentaire sur cet amendement précis, mais chaque fois qu'on s'occupe d'un projet de loi, lorsqu'on ratisse large et que vous proposez quelque chose de précis, vous courez le risque de donner une excuse à ceux qui ne se soucient pas de la précision...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Encore une fois, je comprends, mais nous venons de passer par là et de définir en quoi consistent les plateformes de médias sociaux. Il s'agissait selon moi d'un prolongement naturel. Je suis sûr que quelqu'un est déjà en train d'inventer — ou l'a déjà fait — le prochain média social qui n'existera même pas sur ordinateur et dont l'information sera transférée directement dans notre esprit.

Cependant, tant que nous ne savons pas... si le commissaire aux élections a un plus vaste pouvoir, c'est parfait, si nous cernons des médias sociaux... Encore une fois, comme les témoins l'ont dit, le pouvoir de ces entités est différent de ce à quoi nous sommes habitués en matière de publicité politique. C'est une tout autre histoire.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je sais que je tape sur le même clou, mais ce que nous risquons de voir, c'est des avocats astucieux et ceux qui suivront, lorsqu'ils tenteront de se défendre eux-mêmes...

M. Nathan Cullen:

[Inaudible] sur les médias sociaux.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui.

Vous les verrez faire valoir que les autres plateformes, si elles contreviennent... en disant: « Oh, ce n'est pas vraiment grave, elles ne visent que telle ou telle région. » On a dit précisément qu'il faut inclure un titre d'appel pour les médias sociaux, mais on n'a jamais dit qu'il faut avoir un tel titre d'appel dans le cas aussi de toutes les autres plateformes précises.

Selon moi, c'est là que le président essaie d'en venir. On pourrait donner l'impression que c'est plus important dans ce cas-ci que dans les autres cas, et alors les contrevenants qui utilisent les autres plateformes n'auront peut-être pas autant de problèmes. Par conséquent, pour que ce soit uniforme...

Le président:

Écoutons ce que M. Morin a à dire.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J'essaie de voir quelles seraient ces autres choses...

M. Jean-François Morin:

Aux fins du débat, j'aimerais tout simplement ajouter que la définition de « plateforme en ligne » qui vient d'être adoptée conformément à l'amendement de Mme Sahota ne s'appliquerait pas au présent article, parce que nous n'utilisons pas cette expression précise.

Pour ce qui est du risque dont j'ai parlé tantôt, le présent amendement aurait pour effet d'ajouter le libellé proposé suivant à l'article 320 actuel: L'autorisation doit en outre être clairement visible dans tout message de publicité électorale diffusé sur Internet ou tout autre réseau numérique.

Ce que je voulais dire lorsque j'ai affirmé que nous tentons de concevoir un texte législatif neutre du point de vue technologique, c'est qu'en affirmant ici que le titre d'appel doit être clairement visible dans tout message publicitaire diffusé sur Internet, on s'expose à la possibilité problématique que, si des gens affichent tout simplement des pancartes dans la rue, cela signifie que le titre d'appel n'a pas à être clairement visible sur de telles affiches. On peut alors utiliser la taille de police 1.1, et il faudra une loupe pour lire l'autorisation. Non?

(1620)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce que cela fonctionne?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Pardon?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce que cela fonctionne? C'est une idée vraiment novatrice.

Le président:

Vous dites que c'est déjà prévu de façon générale et que ce pourrait être problématique si on...

Vous n'êtes pas aussi enthousiaste à ce sujet.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Lorsqu'on énonce une règle pour un média précis et que, une fois la loi adoptée, on l'interprète, cela soulève toujours la question suivante: si le Parlement a parlé de façon aussi pointue d'un média précis, eh bien, peut-être croyait-il que les autres médias n'étaient pas aussi importants ou qu'une règle différente s'applique aux autres médias. C'est la préoccupation que j'essayais de faire valoir tantôt.

M. Nathan Cullen:

En ce qui concerne la définition, monsieur le président, à la toute fin, lorsque nous cherchons une définition, nous pourrions tout simplement apporter une modification pour inclure une référence à la définition des plateformes de médias sociaux de Ruby qui vient d'être adoptée, si c'est une préoccupation. Au moment de la rédaction, nous n'y avions pas accès, alors il était impossible de les harmoniser.

Vous savez, je n'en ferai pas une question de vie ou de mort. Si nous croyons pouvoir en arriver à quelque chose qui sera conforme à ce que nous voulons faire, allons-y. Je reste un peu préoccupé, cependant. J'aime bien l'idée de donner des pouvoirs discrétionnaires à Élections Canada, mais, je ne sais pas — sans vouloir n'offenser personne, y compris les personnes ici présentes —, si nous avons suivi le rythme du point de vue de l'efficacité.

Disons les choses ainsi: les Britanniques et les Américains n'ont absolument pas suivi le rythme en ce qui a trait à l'efficacité de l'argent noir et de la publicité sur les plateformes de médias sociaux, des facteurs qui ont eu un effet manifeste sur les résultats des plus récentes élections. Je serais encouragé, mais un peu surpris, si Élections Canada s'en sortait beaucoup mieux que ses homologues britanniques et américains. Je sais que nous nous communiquons tous de l'information les uns aux autres. L'effort, ici, c'est de devenir de plus en plus transparent en ce qui concerne les messages communiqués aux Canadiens, en période préélectorale et en période électorale, sur ce qu'on appelle généralement les plateformes de médias sociaux, comme Ruby les a définies tantôt.

Le président:

Dans le cas qui nous occupe, on parle précisément des partis et des candidats, n'est-ce pas?

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est exact, mais, encore une fois, les trois sont indissociables.

Le président:

D'accord.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, j'apprécie la suggestion de M. Cullen. Nous pourrions peut-être intégrer la définition de Mme Sahota ici? Je serais heureux de procéder de cette façon, mais je ne veux pas vraiment que le Comité perde son temps à reformuler tout cela, si c'est quelque chose qui n'est pas acceptable.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous en avons discuté. Les gens peuvent intervenir et y être favorables ou non. Puis, nous passerons à autre chose.

Si on aime l'idée, alors je suggérerais un vote un peu bizarre en vertu duquel la motion sera adoptée sous condition, et nous inclurons la définition de plateforme de médias sociaux que le Comité vient d'adopter.

Est-ce que tout le monde comprend ma suggestion?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui: plateformes en ligne.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est exact: plateformes en ligne. Merci.

Le président: D'accord?

M. Nathan Cullen: Oui.

Le président:

Êtes-vous d'accord pour voter là-dessus?

M. Chris Bittle:

Bien sûr.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Le vote s'appliquait aux amendements NDP-18, NDP-20 et NDP-25. Il s'agissait d'un nouvel article, alors ce nouvel article n'existe pas.

L'article 207 ne fait l'objet d'aucun amendement.

(L'article 207 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(L'article 208 est adopté. )

Le président: Un nouvel article 208.1 est proposé. L'amendement LIB-25 est corrélatif à l'amendement LIB-24, qui a été adopté. Le nouvel article 208.1 a déjà été adopté parce qu'il est corrélatif.

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Il n'y avait pas d'amendement aux articles 209 et 210.

(Les articles 209 et 210 sont adoptés.)

(Article 211)

Le président: On a maintenant l'amendement CPC-80.

Si les conservateurs veulent bien expliquer cet amendement, ce serait parfait.

(1625)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Essentiellement, l'amendement vise à préciser que les sondages d'opinion multi-circonscriptions ne peuvent pas être publiés le jour des élections lorsque les bureaux de scrutin sont ouverts dans n'importe laquelle des régions sondées. Je pense qu'on peut comprendre facilement la possibilité que les sondages influent sur les électeurs qui se rendent aux bureaux de scrutin lorsque leur région a été sondée.

Je crois tout simplement que ce type d'influence n'est pas quelque chose que nous voulons voir dans notre système électoral. Je vais en rester là.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J'essaie tout simplement de comprendre la portée de l'amendement.

Parle-t-on au sein d'une circonscription électorale? Est-ce plutôt dans la région voisine? Vous parlez de « secteurs géographiques ». Que voulez-vous dire? Vous voulez dire la circonscription d'à côté?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je dirais qu'il s'agit de plus d'une circonscription.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si les résultats du sondage de Scarborough entraient, voudriez-vous limiter la communication des résultats à Scarborough Nord avant que tout soit terminé et les résultats déclarés dans Scarborough Est? Tous les bureaux de scrutin ferment en même temps.

M. John Nater:

On parle essentiellement de n'importe quel bureau de scrutin ou de toute circonscription où...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

On parle de sondages liés à une région.

M. John Nater:

... les sondages sont réalisés. Si un sondage quelconque est réalisé dans Scarborough Sud — y a-t-il un Scarborough Sud? — et que les bureaux de Scarborough-Guildwood étaient encore ouverts, on ne pourrait pas communiquer les résultats du sondage le jour de l'élection dans cette circonscription si des gens avaient été sondés dans la circonscription en question, l'endroit d'où provient l'échantillon.

Le président:

[Inaudible] Nathan a dit le même jour, en même temps.

M. John Nater:

Oui, mais on ne pourrait pas communiquer les résultats d'un sondage.

Si on réalise un sondage régional incluant plusieurs circonscriptions, on ne pourrait pas communiquer les résultats du sondage le jour de l'élection. C'est un peu comme pour les sondages nationaux dont on ne peut pas communiquer les résultats le jour des élections.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je suis désolé. J'avais mal compris. Je pensais qu'on parlait d'une forme de décompte des votes.

M. John Nater:

Non.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il s'agit simplement de sondages d'opinion publique.

Merci.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Ce n'est pas un décompte des votes: c'est un sondage d'opinion.

Le président:

C'est un sondage d'opinion publique.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Donc, on ne peut pas communiquer les résultats d'un sondage d'opinion publique dans une région le jour du vote.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C'est exact.

On ne peut pas le faire lorsque les bureaux de scrutin sont ouverts. Il faut attendre la fermeture des bureaux de scrutin dans la région.

M. John Nater:

Les sondages à la sortie des bureaux de scrutin pourraient être un exemple, mais c'est quelque chose que nous ne faisons pas beaucoup au Canada. On ne voudrait pas communiquer les résultats d'un tel sondage avant la fin du vote dans la circonscription visée.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je comprends.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Parlant de sondages et d'enquêtes, XKCD a produit une très bonne bande dessinée il y a environ 12 ans, où on disait que l'indicatif régional du numéro de téléphone des gens indiquait là où ceux-ci vivaient en 2006. Lorsqu'on mène des sondages de nos jours, les gens peuvent être n'importe où au pays. Les numéros ne sont plus associés à des zones géographiques.

Monsieur Morin, quel sera l'effet de l'amendement, concrètement? J'ai l'impression qu'il serait exceptionnellement difficile de comprendre ce qui se passe dans une telle situation.

M. Jean-François Morin:

D'après ce que je comprends de la motion, elle s'appliquerait vraiment aux seuls sondages d'opinion pour lesquels la population cible se trouve au-delà des frontières provinciales, entre les provinces des Maritimes et le Québec, et entre la Colombie-Britannique et le reste du pays, parce que si on regarde l'article 128 de la Loi électorale du Canada... C'est l'article actuel. Ce n'est pas dans le projet de loi. Ce n'est pas modifié par le projet de loi. C'est la disposition qui établit les heures de vote le jour du scrutin. Le Canada mise sur des heures de vote décalées depuis très longtemps maintenant. La plupart des bureaux de vote de la région de l'Atlantique ferment en même temps, puis tous les bureaux de vote du Québec à l'Alberta ferment tous en même temps. Et pour terminer, les bureaux de la Colombie-Britannique ferment, si je ne m'abuse, 30 minutes plus tard.

Je suis désolé, monsieur le président, mais je ne sais pas exactement quand les bureaux ferment au Yukon. Je crois que les bureaux du Yukon ferment en même temps que ceux de la Colombie-Britannique.

(1630)

Le président:

Encore une référence à la plus belle circonscription du pays.

Essentiellement, l'objectif, c'est d'interdire la communication des résultats de sondages menés dans une région précise le jour des élections. C'est exact?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui. C'est de cette façon qu'une personne pourrait influer sur des électeurs qui n'ont pas encore voté dans la région. Encore une fois, quand on laisse tomber les questions logistiques, l'intention de l'amendement est, à mon avis, assez claire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mais l'amendement précise « d'où provient la population de référence ». Si on appelle quelqu'un en Colombie-Britannique, on gâche tout le processus si on est au Nouveau-Brunswick. On ne sait pas d'où les gens viennent. C'est la raison pour laquelle j'ai dit que c'était un cauchemar en matière d'application de la loi.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, mais ce n'est pas juste si un sondage est réalisé à Scarborough et que les résultats sont communiqués comme étant les résultats à l'échelle du Canada; ces résultats pourraient possiblement influer sur le choix des électeurs à Skeena-Bulkley Valley, par exemple.

Le président:

Y a-t-il une raison pour laquelle vous n'avez pas tout simplement dit « aucun sondage permis le jour du scrutin n'importe où au Canada pour quelque raison que ce soit »?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je ne sais pas exactement pourquoi on ne l'a pas fait. Vous savez, les sondages sont utilisés pour un certain nombre de raisons différentes, alors il y aurait peut-être des situations où des sondages pourraient être utiles le jour des élections ou, j'imagine, il y a peut-être des situations où les sondages pourraient ne pas viser la modification de l'opinion publique, mais ce n'est pas le cas ici, alors...

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Il y a peut-être un problème intéressant, ici, mais je veux souligner que le libellé actuel du projet de loi, à la page 108 est le suivant: 328(1) Il est interdit à toute personne de faire diffuser dans une circonscription, le jour du scrutin avant la fermeture de tous les bureaux de scrutin de celle-ci, les résultats d’un sondage électoral qui n’ont pas été diffusés antérieurement.

Lorsqu'on dit, ici, « dans une circonscription », le problème qui pourrait survenir est le suivant: les résultats d'un sondage national pourraient-ils être communiqués à Perth-Wellington une fois les bureaux de scrutin fermés, même si ceux de la Colombie-Britannique sont encore ouverts?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C'est ce que je viens de dire.

M. John Nater:

C'est le problème du libellé actuel. Je suis tout à fait ouvert à l'idée de communiquer les résultats de sondages réalisés à Perth-Wellington si...

Le président:

Les fonctionnaires électoraux ont-ils des commentaires à formuler à ce sujet?

M. Trevor Knight:

Non. Je ne crois pas que nous ayons des commentaires à formuler à ce sujet.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Mais alors, qu'est-ce qui n'est pas clair? Ce qui vous préoccupe...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Honnêtement, je ne vois pas très bien quel est l'objectif. Je comprends ce que vous dites en théorie, mais, dans la réalité, je vois là une disposition qui sera extrêmement difficile à appliquer et qui n'accomplira pas grand-chose. C'est la version courte. Je comprends ce que vous essayez de faire, mais je ne suis pas vraiment d'accord.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, vous dites que, actuellement, les résultats d'un sondage national pourraient être communiqués à Perth-Wellington, puis quelqu'un pourrait transmettre l'information en Colombie-Britannique.

M. John Nater:

En théorie, telle que la Loi est rédigée.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

En théorie, c'est vrai.

M. John Nater:

Grâce aux médias sociaux, il est assez facile de transmettre de l'information.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, quand vous le dites de cette façon, ce pourrait avoir d'importantes conséquences. Je sais que M. Cullen s'intéresse beaucoup aux conséquences de grande envergure liées aux grandes plateformes, comme on l'a vu à d'autres endroits dans le monde. Je comprends ce que vous dites au sujet de l'application de la loi, mais je pense seulement à l'impact que tout cela pourrait avoir sur n'importe quel parti.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, si l'extrait que vous venez de lire était tout simplement appliqué, soit qu'on ne peut pas communiquer les résultats de sondages le jour des élections tant que tous les bureaux de scrutin au Canada ne sont pas fermés, éliminerait-on ainsi l'échappatoire?

M. John Nater:

Je dirais que oui.

Le président:

S'il n'y a pas d'autres interventions sur cet amendement, nous passerons au vote.

(1635)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je veux un vote enregistré, seulement pour le plaisir, de façon à ce que, si un sondage d'opinion est communiqué à l'avenir et que la communication des résultats a d'importantes conséquences, nous saurons si le vote avait été important.

Merci.

Le président:

Et les résultats de certains sondages d'opinion ne peuvent pas être communiqués, comme M. Nater l'a indiqué.

(L'amendement est rejeté par 5 voix contre 4. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 211 est adopté avec dissidence. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(Les articles 212 et 213 sont adoptés.)

Le président: L'amendement CPC-81 propose le nouvel article 213.1.

À titre d'information, le vote sur cet amendement s'appliquera aussi à l'amendement CPC-147 à la page 271 des amendements, puisqu'ils sont liés par renvoi.

De plus, si cet amendement est adopté, l'amendement LIB-47 ne peut pas être proposé, puisque les amendements CPC-147 et LIB-47 visent la même ligne.

Voulez-vous présenter l'amendement, Stephanie?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il semble que c'était la suggestion de M. Pal d'étendre les règles de protection des prix de la télévision, de la radio et des publications aux médias sociaux.

Nos témoins pourraient peut-être préciser quelles sont les règles de protection actuelles pour la télévision, la radio et les publications. J'imagine qu'elles ne sont pas... c'est probablement pour s'assurer que les prix restent les mêmes tout au long d'une période électorale, de façon à ce qu'on ne puisse pas les gonfler, et les protections s'appliqueraient aussi aux médias sociaux.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

C'est l'idée que, lorsqu'on fait une annonce à la radio, on ne peut pas facturer plus ou moins au Parti conservateur ou au Parti libéral en fonction du parti politique qui veut faire de la publicité. Les services doivent être offerts au même taux, au plus bas taux possible, comme suit: pour une annonce dans une publication périodique éditée ou distribuée et rendue publique pendant la période mentionnée à l’alinéa a), un tarif supérieur au tarif le plus bas qu’il fait payer pour un emplacement équivalent d’une annonce semblable dans le même numéro ou dans tout autre numéro de cette publication, éditée ou distribuée et rendue publique pendant cette période.

Il faut le faire au même tarif, le tarif le plus bas, dans cette publication.

Le président:

Que lisez-vous?

M. John Nater:

Je cite la Loi électorale du Canada en tant que telle, pas le projet de loi C-76. C'est la disposition de la Loi électorale du Canada. On dit essentiellement que, dans le cas des médias sociaux, on ne peut pas adopter une grille tarifaire différentielle. Il faut appliquer les mêmes règles liées au tarif le plus bas que celles qui visent la radio et la télévision; on ne se retrouvera donc pas avec la situation où certaines entités peuvent obtenir des taux préférentiels auxquels les autres n'ont pas accès.

Le président:

Anne?

Mme Anne Lawson:

Je hoche la tête parce que je suis d'accord. C'est exact.

Le président:

Ce serait un amendement utile que d'étendre essentiellement cette garantie d'égalité aux médias sociaux. C'est ce que vous proposez, Stephanie?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui. Selon moi, c'est très avant-gardiste. Le gouvernement pourrait peut-être nous dire ce qu'il en pense?

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je n'ai pas grand-chose à ajouter à ce sujet. Je ne me souviens pas d'avoir entendu beaucoup de données probantes à ce sujet. Y a-t-il des taux différents? A-t-on parlé à des entreprises des médias sociaux à ce sujet? Est-ce quelque chose qu'on peut appliquer?

(1640)

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Encore une fois, cela vient du témoignage de M. Michael Pal, qui a comparu devant le Comité en juin. Je crois qu'il vient de l'Université d'Ottawa. Il a formulé une recommandation similaire à celle-ci et affirmé qu'il devrait y avoir une disposition équivalente dans la Loi électorale concernant les médias sociaux à la lumière des règles en place pour la publicité à la radio, à la télévision et dans les publications imprimées.

M. Chris Bittle:

Mais y a-t-il des taux différents? Puis-je obtenir un taux différent de celui de Nathan?

M. John Nater:

Eh bien, je crois que, pour beaucoup d'enjeux différents, quiconque a déjà affiché une publicité sur Facebook sait qu'il y a des taux différents selon la façon dont on veut accroître la visibilité et en fonction de la zone géographique cernée. Si une personne veut accroître sa visibilité dans certaines zones, le prix sera différent de si elle le faisait dans d'autres régions.

C'est un taux équivalent, alors une personne ne se verra pas facturer un montant plus élevé en fonction de facteurs arbitraires.

Le président:

Ce serait tout de même égal pour tout le monde. Si on maximise...

M. John Nater:

Peut-être, mais...

Le président:

... la visibilité différemment, le taux est différent.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Corrigez-moi si je me trompe, mais, traditionnellement, la disposition s'appliquait aux journaux et à la radio afin qu'ils n'accordent pas une préférence à un parti plutôt qu'à un autre.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Exactement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

La question est la suivante: faut-il appliquer quelque chose de similaire dans le cas des médias sociaux? Une entreprise de médias sociaux quelle qu'elle soit pourrait simplement préférer une personne à une autre et donner à un parti un taux préférentiel. Est-ce que je me trompe? Je me dis qu'aucun d'entre nous...

Mme Anne Lawson:

Je suis désolée. Nous n'avons rien à dire à ce sujet.

M. Nathan Cullen: D'accord.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Selon moi, c'est une question qu'il aurait fallu poser lorsque les représentants de Facebook et Twitter étaient ici, parce que c'est une question d'algorithme. Je suis toujours heureux de leur demander de revenir. Nous avions eu du plaisir.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je suis sûr qu'ils aimeraient revenir.

Des députés: Ha, ha!

M. Chris Bittle:

Oui. Nous avons seulement menacé de les convoquer une ou deux fois, peut-être.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Deux fois.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je comprends où on veut en venir, mais je me demande si ce peut être une loi efficace. Pour Facebook, Twitter et les médias sociaux, c'est toujours des algorithmes qui déterminent le prix qu'il faut payer. Ce n'est pas le rôle par rapport aux autres... Vous appelez votre directeur de la publicité, et il se trouve que ce dernier est votre ami et il vous donnera un meilleur tarif, et c'est...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Mais, pourquoi pas?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

On ne peut simplement pas modifier des algorithmes quand on veut.

M. Nathan Cullen:

La structure tarifaire que j'ai vue, c'est qu'on est facturé en fonction du nombre de clics publicitaires et je ne sais trop quoi d'autre, mais si quelqu'un, pour des motifs politiques, dit: « je vais demander à ce parti la moitié du coût pour chaque clic publicitaire », je ne vois pas pourquoi c'est une situation qui ne pourrait pas se produire. Il n'y a rien...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Mais alors, pourquoi écrire l'algorithme?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Eh bien, c'est un autre sujet.

Si nous sommes mal outillés pour parler de ça, imaginez à quel point nous sommes mal outillés pour parler des algorithmes. Nous avons fait en sorte qu'il est illégal pour le Globe and Mail de facturer des tarifs préférentiels. Je crois qu'on doit tout naturellement élargir la disposition et dire que la même chose s'applique pour Twitter. Je ne parle pas de la formule qui est utilisée pour la facturation; il faut simplement que la formule soit uniforme durant des élections et en période préélectorale.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, pour que les choses soient bien claires au sein du Comité, voici ce que M. Pal avait à dire à ce sujet: En avant-dernier lieu, il y a une nouvelle infraction prévue dans le projet de loi visant à empêcher les plateformes de médias sociaux ou de publicité en général de vendre des espaces publicitaires à des entités étrangères. Je pense que c’est une mesure très positive. J’aimerais attirer l’attention du Comité sur les règles actuelles de la Loi électorale qui sont imposées aux télédiffuseurs. Ils ne peuvent pas exiger davantage que le taux le plus bas qui soit pour un parti politique qui cherche à faire de la publicité. Dans les faits, cela signifie que les partis politiques ont le droit d’avoir du temps de publicité à un taux raisonnable, mais cela signifie également que le même taux doit être facturé à tous les partis politiques. Il y a désormais beaucoup de publicité politique sur Facebook. Il n’y a rien dans la Loi électorale actuelle ou dans le projet de loi C-76 qui empêcherait Facebook, par ce que cette entreprise appelle son « système d’enchères publicitaires », d’imposer des taux différents à différents partis politiques. La règle actuelle pour les diffuseurs figure dans la Loi électorale pour une bonne raison. Il n’y a aucune raison de principe pour laquelle cela ne devrait pas s’appliquer aussi aux annonceurs des médias sociaux, qui peuvent avoir des intérêts commerciaux lorsqu’ils prennent des décisions au sujet de leurs algorithmes.

C'est la recommandation qu'il a formulée, et je crois que...

Le président:

Qui a formulé cette recommandation?

M. John Nater:

M. Michael Pal de l'Université d'Ottawa.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous pouvez demander à M. Morin ce qu'il en pense. Il a levé la main de toute façon.

Le président:

Monsieur Morin.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je veux tout simplement formuler deux ou trois commentaires.

Tout d'abord, je reconnais que l'article 348 de la Loi prévoit actuellement ce qu'il en est de la publicité radiodiffusée et publiée. Vous avez aussi raison de dire que l'article ne s'applique pas aux médias sociaux. Comme je l'expliquais précédemment, c'est une question liée très précisément à la nature des médias et, par conséquent, l'article ne s'applique pas aux médias qui n'y sont pas inclus.

Mon deuxième commentaire, c'est que je ne suis de toute évidence pas un expert de la façon dont les plateformes sociales facturent leurs clients pour les diverses publicités qui paraissent, mais la chose que j'aimerais contredire, c'est l'argument selon lequel il n'y a rien dans la Loi électorale du Canada qui régit la façon dont les partis sont facturés pour les publicités qui paraissent dans les plateformes en ligne. Mon collègue Trevor me corrigera si j'ai tort, parce que je n'ai pas travaillé dans ce domaine précis depuis longtemps, mais, si une plateforme en ligne précise devait vendre de l'espace publicitaire à un tarif inférieur à la valeur commerciale de cet espace publicitaire, une telle pratique constituerait une contribution non monétaire à l'entité politique en question, ce qui est déjà illégal dans la Loi.

Dans bon nombre de ces cas, je crois savoir que le prix des placements médiatiques sur les plateformes en ligne varie selon un genre de mécanisme d'enchères. Je crois aussi savoir que ce mécanisme d'enchères fonctionne bien, dans la mesure où, par exemple, le PCC ou les libéraux ne sont pas précisément avantagés ou précisément désavantagés par l'algorithme. Dans la mesure où le même algorithme est utilisé pour toutes les entités politiques qui participent à l'enchère — et le fait qu'il soit question d'entités politiques précises n'a pas pour effet de réduire les prix —, alors je ne vois pas de problème précis lié aux règles de financement politique.

(1645)

Le président:

Avant de revenir à M. Graham... vous avez parlé du fait que le prix soit plus bas, mais si Facebook n'aime pas les libéraux et leur compte deux fois plus cher que les autres, une telle pratique ne serait pas visée par le libellé actuel de la Loi.

M. Trevor Knight:

Oui, c'est ce que j'allais justement ajouter. Toujours selon les circonstances, il pourrait y avoir contribution et peut-être même contribution à de multiples partis. Cependant, je crois que c'est une situation différente lorsqu'on parle d'une surfacturation et qu'un parti profite d'un prix inférieur. Si vous n'aimez pas un autre parti et que vous le surfacturez, c'est un peu le coût de faire des affaires avec cet autre parti. Il ne s'agirait pas là d'une contribution illégale.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le fait de surfacturer un parti ne reviendrait-il pas contribuer de façon illégale aux autres partis auxquels on facture le tarif régulier?

M. Trevor Knight:

Vu la définition de « valeur commerciale » dans la Loi, on parle, essentiellement, du prix le plus bas exigé par le fournisseur dans des circonstances similaires. Si le fournisseur facture aux partis A, B et C un prix bas, puis facture un prix plus élevé au parti D, il n'a pas vraiment versé une contribution aux partis A, B et C, et il a tout simplement surfacturé le parti D. Il ne s'agit donc pas d'une contribution illégale.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends. D'après vous, cet amendement est-il applicable?

M. Trevor Knight:

Je ne peux pas vraiment vous parler de l'aspect d'application de la Loi. C'est le commissaire aux élections fédérales qui s'occuperait de l'application de la loi.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Pour ce qui est de l'application de la loi, il faudrait que l'entreprise produise des factures. Que ce soit Facebook, Twitter ou une autre plateforme de médias sociaux, il doit y avoir des factures fournies à ceux qui ont acheté la publicité, et il y a donc une façon de déterminer ce qu'il en est.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions?

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Mon estimé collègue, M. Church, a souligné le fait que les libéraux fournissent des ressources supplémentaires au commissaire des élections afin qu'il aille chercher l'information en question, et il serait donc bien placé, avec ces ressources, pour le faire.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce que tout ça inclurait un [Note de la rédaction: inaudible] surfacturation? Est-ce une option?

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. John Nater:

C'est une question complémentaire.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est une question complémentaire?

Le président:

Le nouvel article 213.1 potentiel est créé par l'amendement CPC-81. Les résultats du vote s'appliqueront à l'amendement CPC-147. En cas d'adoption, l'amendement LIB-47 ne peut pas être proposé parce qu'il concerne la même ligne.

(L'amendement est rejeté [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(Les articles 214 à 216 inclusivement sont adoptés.)

Le président: L'amendement CPC-82 propose la création du nouvel article 216.1.

Stephanie.

(1650)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je pense que c'est assez simple. Il faut que le CRTC produise un rapport au Parlement sur la façon dont il a administré le Registre de communications avec les électeurs après chaque élection. Si nous voulons adopter le Registre de communication avec les électeurs, nous devrions probablement demander la production d'un rapport sur son administration.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Comme nous le savons en raison des travaux du Comité, tout ce dont le DGE est responsable doit faire l'objet d'un rapport au Parlement, puis, au bout du compte, au Comité. Il y a certaines choses dont le CRTC est responsable, mais il n'a pas à produire de rapports à ce sujet après des élections. La mesure serait conforme aux exigences en matière de production de rapports du DGE — qui sont déjà établies — et du CRTC, aussi. Par exemple, en ce qui a trait au Registre de communication avec les électeurs, qui a causé des problèmes dans le passé, le CRTC devrait produire un rapport à ce sujet au Parlement, et, éventuellement, au Comité.

Le président:

Les représentants ont-ils des commentaires à formuler?

M. Jean-François Morin:

La motion est assez simple. C'est vraiment une décision stratégique.

Le président:

C'est une politique visant à demander à une autre entité de produire des rapports comme on le demande à Élections Canada. Confirmez-vous, cependant, que ces gens n'ont pas à présenter de rapport en ce moment?

Mme Anne Lawson:

Oui, je peux vous le confirmer, et je peux aussi dire que, quand nous avons produit notre rapport assorti de recommandations en collaboration avec l'ancien directeur général des élections, nous avons consulté le CRTC et présenté en son nom un certain nombre de recommandations relativement à ces portions de la Loi. Cependant, le CRTC n'est assurément pas obligé de produire un rapport.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Si des consultations ont eu lieu dans le passé, c'est préférable de recevoir un seul rapport consolidé qui tient compte de l'ensemble des aspects des élections et de tout ce qui est arrivé. Selon moi, il est plus simple, plus clair et plus approprié de recevoir un seul rapport du directeur général des élections.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

À mon avis, la seule chose à conclure, c'est que le CRTC n'a aucune obligation redditionnelle. On prévoirait ici une exigence, alors...

Le président:

Nous sommes prêts à voter sur l'amendement CPC-82 pour exiger du CRTC qu'il fasse rapport au Parlement et qui aurait pour effet de créer le nouvel article 216.1.

(L'amendement est rejeté. (Voir le Procès-verbal])

(Les articles 217 à 221 inclusivement sont adoptés)

Le président: Quelqu'un a-t-il besoin d'une pause de cinq minutes? Nous attendrons peut-être quelques minutes, parce que le souper arrive à 17 heures. Nous pourrions peut-être faire une pause assez longue pour que les gens puissent examiner les quatre articles que nous avons réservés. Nous y reviendrons tout de suite après la pause.

Nous allons aller un peu plus loin.

(L'article 222)

Le président: C'est un article complexe. Le vote sur l'amendement LIB-26 s'appliquera à l'amendement LIB-27, à la page 149, à l'amendement LIB-29, à la page 174, à l'amendement LIB-33, à la page 201, à l'amendement LIB-37 à la page 229, à l'amendement LIB-44, à la page 272, à l'amendement LIB-46, à la page 277, à l'amendement LIB-50, à la page 283, à l'amendement LIB-56, à la page 308, et à l'amendement LIB-59, à la page 311, puisque tous ces amendements sont liés par la même nouvelle section 0.1 sur l'utilisation de fonds de l'étranger par des tiers.

De plus, si l'amendement LIB-26 est adopté, les amendements CPC-95, à la page 175 et CPC-96, à la page 176, ne peuvent pas être proposés puisqu'ils modifient la même ligne que l'amendement LIB-29, qui est corrélatif à l'amendement LIB-26.

Dans un même ordre d'idées, les amendements CPC-108, à la page 202, et CPC-109, à la page 203, ne peuvent pas être proposés puisqu'ils modifient les mêmes lignes que l'amendement LIB-33, qui était aussi corrélatif à l'amendement LIB-26.

Quelqu'un a-t-il besoin que je répète? Ce vote a de nombreuses conséquences.

Quelqu'un peut-il présenter l'amendement LIB-26? Monsieur Graham.

(1655)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La section proposée empêche le financement étranger d'activités partisanes, que ce soit ou non durant les élections en plus de définir la notion d'activité d'un tiers pendant toute autre période que la période électorale aux fins de l'interdiction. C'est un changement assez facile à apporter.

Le président:

Madame Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

J'aimerais demander aux fonctionnaires d'imaginer une situation hypothétique où une entité étrangère donnerait 1 million de dollars à une organisation canadienne pour l'aider à assumer ses frais d'administration, et l'organisation, qui a recueilli des fonds pour couvrir ces coûts, se retrouve soudainement avec 1 million de dollars excédentaires disponibles pour faire campagne au Canada.

Est-ce que ce type de financement étranger et d'ingérence resterait légal malgré l'amendement?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Cette question est abordée par l'amendement LIB-27. L'amendement LIB-27 définit la publicité...

Le président:

Quelles sont les motions corrélatives?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Les deux dispositions de fond se trouvent aux articles 349.02 et 349.03 proposés.

L'article 349.02 proposé interdit l'utilisation des fonds provenant d'une entité étrangère à des fins d'activité partisane, de publicité ou de sondage électoral.

Ensuite, l'article 349.03 proposé prévoit des dispositions anticontournement et est ainsi libellé: II est interdit au tiers: a) d'esquiver ou de tenter d'esquiver l'interdiction prévue par l'article 349.02; b) d'agir de concert avec d'autres personnes ou entités en vue d'accomplir un tel fait.

Bien entendu, toute question en est une de fait, et il est très difficile d'évaluer une situation particulière dans le vide, mais la question que vous avez soulevée au sujet du mélange d'argent pourrait peut-être constituer une « tentative d'esquiver » dans les cas où il est très évident que l'argent a été reçu à cette fin et qu'il a remplacé des fonds canadiens qui ont été détournés pour couvrir les dépenses du tiers en question.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Toutefois, les amendements libéraux ne prévoient pas la prise de mesures logistiques qui nous permettraient d'être tout à fait certains que cette situation ne se produira pas. Prenez la possibilité de comptes bancaires distincts, par exemple, pour la publicité et pour les frais d'administration. Selon les amendements, on ne devrait pas faire cela, c'est mal, mais, selon le libellé actuel du projet de loi, les mécanismes permettant de s'assurer que cette situation ne se produira pas ne sont pas en place.

(1700)

M. Jean-François Morin:

Vous avez raison. Il s'agit d'une interdiction, et aucune exigence redditionnelle particulière n'est prévue entre les périodes électorales. Toutefois, d'autres dispositions incluses dans la partie 17 du projet de loi, qui portent sur les tiers, exigent que toutes les contributions soient déclarées lorsque le tiers atteint le seuil dans le premier rapport financier qu'il produit après cela, lequel doit aussi faire état de toutes les contributions versées depuis le lendemain des dernières élections générales.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Je pense que le représentant a abordé cette question. Je soulignerais le fait qu'il ne semble pas y avoir de moyen qui permette de faire clairement la distinction entre les fonds qui ont été mélangés à l'intérieur d'une organisation. Je pense qu'il s'agit d'une observation préoccupante.

On a demandé à la ministre s'il devrait y avoir un compte bancaire distinct à toutes les étapes du processus, de sorte que seuls les fonds qui ont été versés dans ce compte, où il est possible d'établir un lien entre la somme en question et une source canadienne... La ministre n'était pas enthousiaste à cette idée.

Je ne fais que lancer cette idée en guise d'observation, encore une fois. Dans la situation actuelle, on ne peut pas déterminer avec une grande certitude s'il y a eu mélange de fonds, comme on pourrait le faire si on disposait d'un moyen concret, comme des comptes bancaires distincts tout au long du processus, grâce auxquels on pourrait établir un lien entre chaque dollar et une source canadienne.

Le président:

Madame Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

En outre, j'ai mentionné hier l'absence de « divulgation en tout temps et pour toutes les fins ». Cela n'est pas prévu dans le projet de loi. Encore une fois, même si nous pouvons déclarer: « Non, c'est mal, et vous ne devriez pas faire cela », le projet de loi ne prévoit aucun mécanisme permettant de s'assurer qu'une telle situation ne se produira pas. Nous ne croyons pas qu'il prévoie suffisamment de mesures de protection pour les Canadiens et pour le système électoral, qui nous permettraient d'être tout à fait certains que ces contournements ne se produiront pas.

Le président:

Cette situation nuit-elle à l'interdiction totale, ou bien n'est-elle tout simplement pas incluse?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Elle n'est tout simplement pas incluse. Elle est omise.

Le président:

Elle ne nuit donc pas à l'interdiction totale. C'est seulement que la disposition ne va pas aussi loin que vous le voulez.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, elle ne va pas assez loin... elle est vide, en quelque sorte, bien franchement, monsieur le président, pour ce qui est de créer une obligation envers les Canadiens.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Je mentionnerai simplement que, même dans la loi qui régit les élections municipales en Ontario, si on veut se désigner en tant que tiers afin de participer à des élections dans une toute petite municipalité de deux ou trois cents personnes, il faut établir un compte bancaire distinct. On le fait et on le gère directement à cet échelon; je ne comprends pas vraiment pourquoi ce n'est pas nécessaire afin d'assurer cette protection ici également.

Le président:

Cette idée a-t-elle été proposée où que ce soit dans un quelconque amendement présenté par qui que ce soit?

Y a-t-il d'autres éléments à aborder au sujet de cet amendement? Nous allons faire une pause bientôt, dès que nous aurons terminé la discussion sur ce point.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Voilà une motivation.

Le président:

Je crois savoir que cette disposition ne nuira pas à la responsabilisation, mais elle ne va pas assez loin, de votre point de vue.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C'est exact.

Le président:

Nous allons mettre l'amendement LIB-26 aux voix; il compte parmi ceux qui touchent l'article 222.

Je vais lire les répercussions de nouveau, car ma première lecture contenait une légère inexactitude. Le vote à cet égard s'appliquera aux amendements LIB-27, LIB-29, LIB-33, LIB-37, LIB-44, LIB-46, LIB-50 et LIB-56.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Bingo.

Le président: Comme je l'ai laissé entendre plus tôt, il ne s'applique pas à l'amendement LIB-59 parce qu'il a déjà été adopté.

En outre, si cet amendement est adopté, les amendements CPC-95 et CPC-96 ne pourront pas être présentés, car ils modifient la même ligne que l'amendement LIB-29, et les amendements CPC-108 et CPC-109 ne pourront pas être proposés non plus parce qu'ils modifient la même ligne que l'amendement LIB-33, qui serait approuvé en conséquence.

On demande un vote par appel nominal à l'égard de l'amendement LIB-26.

(L'amendement est adopté par 9 voix contre 0. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Simplement pour que les gens sachent ce que nous allons faire dès notre retour: nous avons reporté l'examen des articles 191, 194, 197 et 205. Nous y reviendrons, puis nous terminerons l'étude de l'article 222, car ce n'était que le premier amendement lié à cet article.

Nous ne ferons pas une pause très longue, car nous ne voulons pas être ici tard dans la semaine.



(1720)

Le président:

Les gens s'amusent beaucoup trop. Nous devons nous remettre au travail.

(Article 191)

Le président:

Nous allons revenir à l'article 191, et nous reverrons seulement le premier amendement, qui est un nouvel amendement du Parti conservateur et qui porte le numéro 10008652, lequel figure dans le coin supérieur gauche.

Stephanie, voulez-vous le présenter de nouveau afin que les gens se souviennent de ce dont nous parlions?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

En ce qui concerne le lien inversé entre les bureaux de scrutin et la section de vote, M. Nater comprend mieux que moi cette question du point de vue des particularités relatives à l'amendement.

John, est-ce que ça vous embêterait de le faire?

M. John Nater:

Cet amendement nous ramène à la notion du vote à n'importe quelle table; il clarifie essentiellement le fait que, lorsque quelque chose se produit, cela touche chaque urne. Des amendements découlent de celui-ci et visent d'autres sous-questions à ce sujet.

J'ai tenu une brève discussion officieuse avec Me Lawson. Je ne parlerai pas en son nom.

Maître Lawson, je vais vous permettre de présenter vos observations au lieu de tenter de parler au nom de quelqu'un, ce qui cause toujours des ennuis aux gens.

Mme Anne Lawson:

À ce que je crois comprendre actuellement de la disposition du projet de loi C-76 que nous étudions, elle exige que le dépouillement du scrutin ait lieu en la présence de candidats et de leurs représentants ou, si aucun d'entre eux n'est présent, en la présence d'au moins deux électeurs.

Selon notre interprétation, cette disposition s'appliquerait au dépouillement effectué dans l'ensemble du bureau de scrutin, c'est-à-dire au dépouillement de chaque urne. De notre point de vue, les dispositions existantes exigent déjà que le dépouillement ait lieu devant des témoins, ce qui — selon moi — semble être votre préoccupation. Tous les dépouillements qui sont effectués par des membres du personnel de scrutin ont lieu en la présence de témoins.

Alors, je ne suis pas certaine que l'amendement proposé soit nécessaire. Je ne m'y oppose pas non plus. Je pense qu'il s'agit de quelque chose avec quoi nous pouvons certainement travailler, s'il est jugé important, mais, à notre avis, l'intention que le dépouillement ait lieu devant des témoins existe déjà.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres éléments à aborder?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous passons maintenant à l'amendement CPC-69.

Monsieur Nater, voulez-vous le présenter?

M. John Nater:

Voici ensuite l'alinéa b). Actuellement, il est ainsi libellé: des candidats et représentants qui sont sur les lieux ou, en l’absence de candidats ou de représentants, d’au moins deux électeurs.

Nous proposons le libellé suivant: b) soit d'au moins deux candidats ou représentants qui sont sur les lieux, soit d'au moins un électeur si un seul candidat ou représentant est sur les lieux, soit d'au moins deux électeurs en l'absence de candidats ou de représentants.

Le président:

Je cède la parole aux représentants d'Élections Canada ou à M. Morin.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je crains simplement que le libellé de l'amendement puisse être erroné. Les personnes énoncées dans la liste sont les seules à pouvoir être sur les lieux durant le dépouillement, alors, au moins deux candidats ou leurs représentants qui sont sur les lieux, puis au moins deux électeurs, si aucun candidat ni représentant n'est sur les lieux, mais, au milieu, il y a au moins un électeur. Toutefois, si un candidat ou un représentant est sur les lieux... Désolé, il s'agit d'un critère logique, mais la façon dont il est formulé donne l'impression que le candidat ou le représentant qui est sur les lieux ne peut pas l'être parce que...

Vous savez, il devrait être ainsi libellé: « soit d'un candidat ou représentant et d'au moins un électeur si un seul candidat ou représentant est sur les lieux ».

Il s'agit d'un commentaire d'ordre technique sur le libellé de l'amendement.

(1725)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Ne vise-t-il pas à garantir que deux personnes sont sur les lieux, pas seulement le candidat, et que, si le candidat n'est pas sur les lieux, que...? Il me semble, d'après le libellé, qu'il vise à garantir que deux personnes sont sur les lieux pour le dépouillement.

S'agit-il de votre interprétation du libellé, John? Ce n'est manifestement pas précisé dans la version actuelle du projet de loi, alors nous proposons cet amendement, il me semble.

Le président:

M. Graham, puis M. Christopherson.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Simplement en guise de référence, le plus important bureau de scrutin de ma circonscription est associé à un territoire de la taille du Liban et d'une population de 500 personnes. Comment allons-nous nous assurer que les gens se présentent pour assister à ce dépouillement?

M. Scott Reid:

Soyons réalistes, sont-ils tous dans un bureau de scrutin actuel?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Beaucoup d'entre eux le sont, mais, là où je veux en venir, c'est que, si on n'a pas le droit d'effectuer le dépouillement avant que deux personnes se présentent, comment va-t-on inciter deux personnes au hasard à se présenter au bureau de scrutin pour le dépouillement? Vous exigez un minimum de deux personnes, ce qui est bizarre.

M. John Nater:

C'est déjà prévu dans la loi. Elle exige déjà la présence de deux personnes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Alors, pourquoi faisons-nous cela?

M. John Nater:

C'est que, si un seul agent électoral est sur les lieux, puis deux électeurs, deux témoins...

Le président:

Madame Kusie, vous alliez dire quelque chose.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Ainsi, un agent électoral est sur les lieux, ainsi qu'un candidat, et puis...?

Le président:

Désolé, pourriez-vous nous expliquer encore une fois ce que prévoit actuellement la loi et ce que prévoit la nouvelle disposition?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui. Évidemment, deux personnes doivent être sur les lieux. C'est évident.

Le président:

C'est déjà prévu.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui. Actuellement, qui est admissible?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Actuellement, le projet de loi C-76 prévoit que, si un candidat ou le représentant d'un candidat est sur les lieux, le dépouillement peut commencer en la présence de cette personne, mais aussi en la présence de plusieurs candidats et représentants.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oh, je vois.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Cet amendement exigerait la présence d'au moins deux candidats ou représentants ou d'au moins deux électeurs, puis il y a le petit problème de libellé que j'ai remarqué concernant la présence d'un seul agent électoral ou candidat.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

À mes yeux, il semble raisonnable qu'un deuxième témoin soit requis lorsqu'un seul candidat est représenté. Voulez-vous préciser qu'un deuxième témoin doit être sur les lieux en tout temps, de toute manière, pour tous les dépouillements? Est-ce là ce que vous affirmez?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Désolé, non.

Actuellement, le projet de loi C-76 requiert la présence d'au moins un candidat ou représentant, et, si un seul est sur les lieux, le dépouillement peut commencer sans la présence d'autres électeurs.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord.

Le président:

Venez-vous tout juste d'affirmer qu'il ne faudrait qu'un seul candidat pour qu'un dépouillement puisse commencer?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Actuellement, sous le régime du projet de loi C-76, oui.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il me semble que le fait d'assurer la présence d'un deuxième témoin est une mesure de protection raisonnable.

John, vouliez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

Le président:

M. Nater, puis M. Christopherson.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur Morin, vous avez mentionné que le libellé de l'amendement pourrait contenir une erreur. Que proposeriez-vous de modifier afin de corriger ce que vous considérez comme une lacune dans le libellé? Je l'interprète d'une manière, mais je peux certainement comprendre que d'autres pourraient avoir un point de vue différent.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Peut-être que je pourrais parler avec le greffier législatif afin de trouver une solution écrite, si vous le voulez. Je pense seulement que, s'il n'y a qu'un seul candidat, vous devriez mentionner que ce représentant devrait également être présent, en plus de l'électeur. C'est tout.

Le président:

Actuellement, on pourrait commencer en présence d'une seule personne, et cet amendement propose qu'il en faille deux. Est-ce là l'essentiel de l'amendement?

(1730)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

On m'a déjà coupé la parole deux fois... ma foi du bon Dieu.

Des députés: Ha, ha!

M. David Christopherson: Vous avez probablement répondu à la question, alors, pardonnez-moi, mais j'ai besoin de précisions. Si le libellé était corrigé de manière à ce qu'il soit logique, selon votre interprétation, seriez-vous en faveur de l'amendement ou non? Formulez un argument.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je ne suis là que pour donner des renseignements d'ordre technique au Comité, bien entendu, alors je ne vous dirai pas si je suis en faveur de l'amendement ou non.

M. David Christopherson:

Nous allons poser la question à Anne. Elle va m'aider.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Ce sont des discussions stratégiques.

Mme Anne Lawson:

Non, je ne vous dirai pas si je suis en faveur de l'amendement ou non. C'est quelque chose que nous pourrions appliquer, alors nous ne nous y opposons pas.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est ce que je voulais entendre; je voulais savoir s'il pose problème. Crée-t-il des chevauchements? Nous allons procéder au vote. J'ai les mains, mais je cherche les cerveaux.

L'amendement vous va si le libellé est corrigé et qu'il correspond à tout le reste. Est-ce que je comprends bien?

Mme Anne Lawson:

Oui.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Si nous corrigions le libellé, ils seraient favorables à l'amendement, auquel cas je n'ai aucune raison de m'y opposer. Nous serions en faveur de l'amendement, si son libellé est corrigé.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez peut-être manqué cette partie de la séance, mais nous sommes des représentants du Bureau du Conseil privé. Ils sont d'Élections Canada.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui. Je me rends compte du fait qu'il y avait là une ligne que je n'avais pas vraiment vue.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. David Christopherson: Voilà pourquoi je suis immédiatement passé à Anne, qui a un peu plus de latitude pour exprimer des opinions.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Alors, je...

M. David Christopherson:

Vous faites preuve d'une grande sagesse. Je ne veux pas entendre votre avis. Je veux connaître le sien.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je laisserai les représentants d'Élections Canada formuler leurs commentaires, mais nous...

Mme Anne Lawson:

Je préciserais simplement que mes seuls points de vue concernent l'application de la Loi, pas ma préférence personnelle en faveur d'un amendement ou non.

M. David Christopherson:

Bien entendu.

Le président:

Monsieur Morin, vouliez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

M. Jean-François Morin:

J'allais simplement dire que, si le Comité veut accepter cet amendement, alors, oui, il contient une erreur qu'il faudrait corriger, mais je n'ai pas de point de vue particulier sur son résultat.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien. C'est parfait.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Encore une fois, je ne veux pas perdre plus de temps que nécessaire. Si le gouvernement est ouvert à cela, nous prendrons le temps de corriger cette erreur. Sinon, mettons l'amendement aux voix et poursuivons.

M. David Christopherson:

Où êtes-vous?

M. John Nater:

Clignez deux fois des yeux.

Une voix: [Inaudible]

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. David Christopherson:

Nous savons que vous n'êtes pas mort. Maintenant, dites-nous ce que vous pensez.

Le président:

Pour l'instant, il doit y avoir un électeur sur les lieux pour que l'on puisse ouvrir l'urne. L'amendement ferait-il en sorte qu'il faille que deux électeurs soient sur les lieux, essentiellement?

M. John Nater:

Si un candidat se trouve sur les lieux, il en faut un deuxième.

M. David Christopherson:

Non.

M. John Nater:

C'est s'il n'y en a qu'un. Il faut toujours qu'il y ait au moins deux personnes. Il ne pourrait pas y avoir qu'un représentant du NPD sur les lieux. Il faudrait un deuxième électeur.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, mais il n'est pas nécessaire que ce soit deux candidats.

M. John Nater:

Non, non.

M. David Christopherson: D'accord.

M. John Nater: C'est l'option. On peut commencer le dépouillement en présence de deux candidats ou de deux agents électoraux.

Le président:

Alors, voici ce que nous disons au gouvernement: si vous le souhaitez, nous allons modifier l'amendement. Sinon, nous allons simplement le mettre aux voix.

Voulez-vous procéder au vote?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous pourrez le rejeter une fois modifié, si vous le voulez.

M. John Nater:

Ne perdons pas plus de temps.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous allons mettre l'amendement CPC-69 aux voix.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous allons maintenant passer à l'amendement CPC-70. Il porte encore sur l'article 191.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

John, voudriez-vous en parler?

M. John Nater:

Nous allons retirer cet amendement.

Le président:

Vous n'êtes pas obligé de le retirer. Ne le présentez tout simplement pas.

M. John Nater:

Nous ne le présenterons pas.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

D'accord.

Nous abordons maintenant l'amendement CPC-71. Simplement pour que les gens connaissent les répercussions: le vote à cet égard s'appliquera également aux amendements CPC-74 — qui est à la page 129 — et CPC-79 — qui est à la page 136 —, car ils sont liés par la notion du nombre de votes.

Allez-y, et présentez l'amendement CPC-71, monsieur Nater.

(1735)

M. John Nater:

Dans ce cas-ci, je demanderais des précisions aux représentants d'Élections Canada en ce qui concerne la façon dont ils procéderont au comptage des voix pour chaque section de vote selon un modèle de vote à n'importe quelle table, et c'est en quelque sorte de cela qu'il est question dans cet amendement.

Pourriez-vous fournir des précisions?

Mme Anne Lawson:

Comme vous le savez, aux prochaines élections, nous n'appliquerons pas un modèle de vote à n'importe quelle table. Cela signifie que les détails comme l'aspect que prendront les formulaires réglementaires ou la façon dont les votes seront comptés dans cette situation n'ont pas encore été réglés.

Ce que je peux dire, c'est qu'il ne fait aucun doute que le relevé du scrutin, qui exige que le dépouillement complet soit consigné et fasse l'objet d'un rapprochement — comme je le mentionnais plus tôt — entre les diverses sections de vote, continuera d'être utilisé. Nous élaborerons des procédures permettant de nous assurer que ce rapprochement a lieu.

Je ne suis pas certaine de bien répondre à la question.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, pouvez-vous nous expliquer l'effet de cet amendement, en termes simples?

M. John Nater:

Essentiellement, ce qui est actuellement mentionné, c'est qu'il faut inscrire une note sur la feuille de pointage, à côté du nom du candidat pour qui la personne a voté, dans le but d'arriver au nombre total de votes en faveur de chaque candidat. Nous proposons de modifier la disposition afin qu'une note soit inscrite sur la feuille de pointage en ce qui concerne chaque section de vote rattachée au bureau de scrutin, à côté du nom du candidat pour qui...

Il s'agit d'un retour au scrutin à plusieurs tables, à toute table qui voulait obtenir le décompte pour chacune des sections de vote à l'endroit en question.

M. David Christopherson:

Il n'a aucun effet.

M. John Nater:

Il en aura un aux prochaines élections. Nous élaborons le projet de loi maintenant.

M. David Christopherson:

Nous le faisons approuver, mais pas en vue des élections à venir?

M. John Nater:

Ce sera après les prochaines élections, alors réglons la question maintenant plutôt que d'y revenir.

M. David Christopherson:

Je veux souligner, puisque je suis là depuis le début du processus en cours, que je viens tout juste de découvrir — parce que mon ami Nathan est le responsable à cet égard — que l'idée de promouvoir les gains d'efficience...

Tout un exposé a été fait à ce sujet, il y a longtemps, pour expliquer comment cela allait faciliter la tâche aux électeurs. Cela devait faciliter la tâche à Élections Canada, nous procurer des résultats plus rapidement et nous faire économiser de l'argent. Si je me trompe, je vais donner au gouvernement le temps de me dire en quoi j'ai tort, mais je crois savoir que, comme il a traîné les pieds pour ce qui est de faire suivre adéquatement le processus au projet de loi et qu'il est un gouvernement fortement majoritaire, nous ne pourrons pas faire appliquer cette disposition du projet de loi en vue des élections à venir. Le mieux que nous puissions faire, c'est en vue des suivantes. C'est mieux que rien, mais cela souligne encore une fois l'inaptitude du gouvernement à l'égard d'un dossier qu'il avait affirmé être un élément majeur de sa plateforme.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres choses dont on veut débattre au sujet de l'amendement CPC-71?

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je voudrais aborder cette question.

Le DGE était là et a abordé la question concernant l'achat de registres de scrutin, qu'il estimait ne pas être assez sécuritaires, alors il s'agissait d'un problème lié aux approvisionnements à Élections Canada.

M. David Christopherson:

Quand avons-nous appris cela?

M. Chris Bittle:

La dernière fois que le DGE a comparu.

M. David Christopherson:

Était-ce récemment?

M. Chris Bittle:

Il a participé à beaucoup de séances.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'était la semaine dernière ou il y a deux semaines.

M. David Christopherson:

Là où je veux en venir, c'est que cela ne change pas le fait que c'était très tard dans le processus. Je suis certain que, si nous avions accordé un délai d'exécution suffisant aux responsables, ils auraient pu faire quelque chose à ce sujet. Il s'agit d'un élément important, et il faut souligner que la raison pour laquelle on procède ainsi, c'est que le gouvernement a mal géré le dossier.

Le président:

Y a-t-il autre chose dont on veut débattre au sujet de l'amendement CPC-71?

M. John Nater:

Je voudrais rappeler au Comité qu'il précise que, lorsque l'on vote à la table, c'est pour chaque section de l'endroit en question.

M. David Christopherson:

Est-ce que cela correspond à tout le reste qui est proposé par Élections Canada?

Mme Anne Lawson:

Je suis désolée, je n'en suis pas certaine. De quoi parlez-vous? Est-ce de l'amendement?

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, l'amendement.

Mme Anne Lawson:

L'amendement fournit davantage de précisions. Nous souhaitions obtenir une plus grande marge de manœuvre pour ce qui est de découvrir exactement comment nous allions régler le problème. Nous voulions nous assurer que tous les votes étaient comptés adéquatement et consignés de façon appropriée par sections de vote, de même que par bureaux de scrutin. Comme nous discutions de rapports antérieurs, les votes doivent être déclarés à l'échelon des sections de vote, et cela se poursuit dans le projet de loi.

Il est également clair qu'à un bureau de scrutin, le relevé du scrutin doit compter tous les votes d'une manière efficace et indiquer s'il y avait plusieurs urnes distinctes et comment, ensemble, ces urnes constituent la totalité du bureau de scrutin.

C'est tout à fait ainsi que nous allons procéder. Nous n'avons pas encore décidé de la façon précise dont nous procéderons, sous quelles formes et de quelle manière, car on ne nous a pas obligés à le faire en vue des prochaines élections. Je suis certaine qu'au moment où nous irons de l'avant avec le vote à n'importe quelle table, le directeur général des élections sera très heureux de revenir comparaître devant le Comité pour expliquer de façon très détaillée comment il procédera à la mise en place des divers mécanismes qui seront nécessaires à ce moment-là.

(1740)

M. David Christopherson:

C'est logique. Je comprends le point de M. Nater, mais il y a un argument que vous avez présenté, monsieur le président, selon lequel nous avons l'avantage d'avoir Élections Canada qui se penche sur la question, et que nous avons la chance d'obtenir les résultats de la dernière élection et d'ensuite nous réunir.

Monsieur Nater, je ne vois pas l'avantage de voir le législateur aller de l'avant et régler des détails si précis alors qu'Élections Canada, notre partenaire, souhaite avoir le temps nécessaire pour le faire.

Ma première réaction a été de penser que nous nous dépêchions à régler des détails extrêmement précis alors que ce n'est ni nécessaire ni utile.

Monsieur le président, si nous pouvions appliquer une version du protocole Simms, peut-être que M. Nater pourrait répondre, si vous y êtes favorable.

Le président:

Je suis d'accord.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à vous, monsieur Christopherson.

Je suis d'avis qu'actuellement, lorsque nous nous occupons du projet de loi, nous pouvons également être en mesure de régler certains de ces problèmes. Peut-être que j'éprouve une grande fierté à avoir plus de renseignements. Peut-être, monsieur Lawson, que nous précipitons un peu les choses, comme M. Christopherson l'a souligné, mais en ce qui trait à la méthode du vote, à n'importe quelle table, à quel moment les résultats d'une section de vote pourraient-ils être disponibles?

Pourraient-ils l'être le soir de l'élection, ce que nous souhaitons obtenir avec cet amendement, ou le seraient-ils quelques mois plus tard lorsque les partis auront accès aux rapports finaux?

Encore une fois, nous sautons des étapes.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui.

M. John Nater:

Nous préférerions avoir accès à ces renseignements le soir de l'élection, mais...

Mme Anne Lawson:

Nous hésitons parce que, bien entendu, ces renseignements seront disponibles à l'échelle locale. Nous obtiendrons les résultats le plus vite possible le soir de l'élection. Quant à la façon dont nous allons les publier et à la vitesse à laquelle cela va se faire, j'estime que vous, malheureusement, sautez des étapes par rapport à où nous en sommes au chapitre du fonctionnement et de la logistique pour le dépouillement.

Cela pourrait se faire par urne, si vous le désirez, ou bien par section de vote. Nous pourrions avoir plusieurs étapes de dépouillement, puisque nous pourrions utiliser des urnes qui contiennent des votes provenant de plusieurs sections de vote. Nous pourrions dépouiller chaque urne, puis rassembler les résultats par section de vote, puis par bureau de vote. Il y a quelques options.

Évidemment, nous allons nous assurer de la traçabilité et de l'intégrité du dépouillement à chaque étape. Par contre, je n'ai aucune idée de la façon dont cela va se passer, et du moment précis où nous allons avoir accès à ces résultats.

M. David Christopherson:

Puisque j'ai encore la parole, je vais conclure en disant que j'ai un grand respect pour M. Nater. Il ne tente pas de jouer au plus fin. Pourtant, il me semble tout de même que le bon sens...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

[Inaudible]

M. David Christopherson:

Pardon?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C'est une blague.

M. David Christopherson:

... voudrait que nous ralentissions un peu, sachant qu'un rapport complet sera publié lors de la prochaine législature. Espérons que nous aurons beaucoup de temps pour considérer la chose... Je serais contre le fait que nous sautions des étapes. Je pense que l'intention est bonne, mais j'estime que c'est trop de détails pour le moment. Nous devrions laisser la liberté à Élections Canada de venir nous présenter ces détails lors de la prochaine législature, monsieur le président.

Merci.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions relatives à cet amendement?

Passons au vote sur l'amendement CPC-71. Le vote s'applique également aux amendements CPC-74 et CPC-79, puisqu'ils sont liés par la notion du nombre de votes.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 191 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Nous allons maintenant passer au prochain article que nous avons sauté, l'article 194. L'amendement CPC-74 découle de celui que nous venons de rejeter; il n'y aura donc pas d'amendement à l'article 194.

(L'article 194 est adopté.)

(Article 197)

Le président: Nous allons maintenant passer à l'article 197.

Nous allons commencer par l'amendement CPC-75.1. Tenons-nous un vote à cet égard?

Le greffier du comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

Je crois qu'il a déjà été rejeté.

Le président:

Le premier amendement relatif à celui-là a été rejeté.

Nous allons passer à l'amendement CPC-76. Peut-être que les conservateurs pourraient le présenter.

(1745)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

L'amendement CPC-76 garantit la présence d'un deuxième témoin pendant un dépouillement lorsqu'un seul candidat est représenté. Ne vient-on pas tout juste d'en parler?

M. John Nater:

C'est pour un autre... Je crois que nous l'avons fait pour...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Le vote par anticipation?

M. John Nater:

... les votes par anticipation qui ont lieu avant la fermeture des bureaux de vote. C'est similaire à ce dont nous avons parlé plus tôt.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui.

M. John Nater:

Honnêtement, si cela n'a pas été accepté pour le soir de l'élection, il est inutile d'en discuter.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Non.

M. John Nater:

Passons au vote et poursuivons.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Nous allons passer à l'amendement CPC-77. Le vote s'applique également à l'amendement CPC-146, que vous pouvez trouver à la page 268, puisqu'ils sont liés par renvoi. Peut-être que les conservateurs pourraient présenter l'amendement CPC-77 et nous expliquer brièvement son effet.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

J'estime qu'il est similaire au précédent amendement que nous avons proposé, mais qu'il est bien plus simple. Il interdit la divulgation des résultats du vote par anticipation avant la fermeture des bureaux de vote le jour d'élection en raison des possibilités d'influence évidentes.

Le président:

Est-ce en raison de la nouvelle disposition voulant que le dépouillement ait lieu plus tôt, avant la fermeture des bureaux de vote?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Cela entraînera certainement des répercussions, oui.

Le président:

Cet amendement prévoit que vous ne pouvez divulguer les résultats. Vous pouvez par contre maintenant effectuer le dépouillement du vote par anticipation une heure avant la fermeture des bureaux de vote; cela empêche donc les bureaux de vote de divulguer ces résultats au public.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce n'était pas déjà en vigueur?

Le président:

Monsieur Morin.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je vous incite à jeter un coup d'oeil à la page 94 de ce projet de loi, à la ligne 15, en français. Il y a déjà une interdiction relative au secret du vote: « Toute personne présente à un bureau de scrutin ou au dépouillement du scrutin doit garder le secret du vote. »

Puis, à la page 95, à la ligne 1 en anglais et en français, il est écrit: « Il est interdit à toute personne pendant le dépouillement du scrutin de chercher à obtenir quelque renseignement ou à communiquer un renseignement alors obtenu au sujet du candidat pour lequel un vote est exprimé dans un bulletin de vote ou un bulletin de vote spécial en particulier. »

La disposition qui traite du secret du vote est suffisante en ce qui a trait à cet enjeu.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Encore une fois, j'estime que les dispositions qui viennent d'être mentionnées s'appliquent au marquage d'un bulletin au moment où cela est fait, pas nécessairement au dépouillement lui-même, qui se produit dans ces cas précis avant la fermeture des bureaux de vote. Il s'agit d'une anomalie en ce qui concerne le dépouillement des votes. Les votes ne sont généralement pas dépouillés avant la fermeture des bureaux de vote. Dans le cas du vote par anticipation, le dépouillement a lieu avant la fermeture des bureaux de vote.

Les dispositions mentionnées s'appliquent aux cas où un bulletin a été marqué. Cela concerne le dépouillement des votes, et non pas le secret de vote.

Le président:

Monsieur Morin, pouvez-vous confirmer cela?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Il y a déjà une autre interdiction au paragraphe 289(3) du projet de loi, à la page 104, ligne 9.

Le président:

La partie que vous avez lue ne comportait pas de restrictions comme celles que M. Nater a suggérées, n'est-ce pas?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Pardon. Dans la disposition elle-même, qui permet le dépouillement des votes à un bureau de vote par anticipation une heure avant la fermeture des bureaux de vote, il y a déjà une obligation de faire en sorte que le dépouillement des votes soit fait de façon à assurer l'intégrité du vote.

J'estime que cette disposition englobe suffisamment cette proposition.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Si nous nous entendons là-dessus, il faudrait adopter un autre amendement selon lequel toute personne qui brise la confidentialité à ce sujet commet une infraction. Certainement, cet amendement serait lié à celui que nous allons mettre aux voix plus tard.

De plus, pour revenir sur ce qui a été dit, si l'on se base uniquement au secret du vote, à quel moment une personne est-elle libérée de cette obligation? En lisant les autres points que vous avez mentionnés, on croirait qu'il en découle que cette personne y est assujettie à vie, alors qu'ici il est clairement mentionné que lorsque le bureau de vote est fermé, vous êtes relevé de cette responsabilité de garder le secret du vote.

Si on se fie à ce qui a été mentionné plus tôt, il n'y a aucune disposition relative à la fin à l'obligation de garder le secret du vote, et ce n'est certainement pas l'intention de la loi. Vous croyez peut-être que je répète ce qui a déjà été dit, mais un certain degré de détail est nécessaire. Lorsque vous dépouillez les votes une heure avant la fermeture des bureaux de vote dans une circonscription, il est important qu'il soit clairement mentionné qu'on ne doit pas divulguer les chiffres avant la fermeture des bureaux de vote.

Alors, notre prochain amendement, qui porte le numéro 140 et quelques constitue une infraction, vaut la peine d'être adopté.

(1750)

Le président:

Pouvez-vous relire la toute première disposition que vous avez lue, lorsque vous avez mentionné que cette protection existe déjà?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je suis à la page 94 de ce projet de loi, au paragraphe 281.6(1): « Toute personne présente à un bureau de scrutin ou au dépouillement du scrutin doit garder le secret du vote. »

Je dirais que cette obligation en matière de confidentialité dure toute une vie. Bien entendu, il ne s'agit pas des résultats officiels qui sont rendus publics. Cependant, si un électeur pouvait être identifié pendant le dépouillement des votes, la personne qui le remarque est alors astreinte au secret pour une période prolongée.

Le président:

Il a bien dit que cela comprenait le dépouillement, alors que vous avez laissé entendre plus tôt que ce n'était pas le cas.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. David Christopherson:

Les personnes n'y seraient pas astreintes pour la vie, puisque ce n'est plus un secret lorsque c'est rendu public.

Le président:

Sommes-nous prêts à passer au vote à ce sujet? Est-ce que tout le monde connaît bien la question?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je crois que la moitié des points ont déjà été abordés.

Le président:

Nous allons passer au vote sur l'amendement CPC-77, et le résultat de ce vote s'appliquera également à l'amendement CPC-146.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal ])

(L'article 197 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Nous allons maintenant passer à l'article 205. Il y avait l'amendement CPC-79, mais il découlait de l'amendement CPC-71.

(L'article 205 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: C'est du bon rattrapage.

(Article 222)

Le président: Nous allons maintenant revenir un peu en arrière. Je crois que tout est terminé pour le moment. Nous sommes à l'article 222. Nous en avons terminé avec le premier amendement. Il reste deux amendements de plus, à commencer par l'amendement CPC-83.

Les conservateurs peuvent-ils nous présenter cet amendement?

M. John Nater:

Il concerne les enquêtes par sondage effectuées pendant les périodes préélectorale et électorale. Cela est directement lié au fait que si un sondage est réalisé le 28 juin, il va orienter vos travaux le 2 juillet. De façon générale, il vise le fait que vous payez à l'avance pour les renseignements que vous allez utiliser pendant la période électorale. Cette disposition porte spécifiquement sur le sondage d'opinion publique, et concerne donc les sondages qui sont effectués immédiatement avant les périodes préélectorale et électorale et qui seront utilisés durant ces mêmes périodes. Cela concerne ces dépenses.

Le président:

Ajoutez-vous quelque chose aux dépenses?

M. John Nater:

Oui, effectivement. Ces dépenses sont incluses dans les périodes préélectorale et électorale.

Le président:

C'est pour un sondage d'opinion publique.

M. John Nater:

Qui serait utilisé durant les périodes préélectorale et électorale, oui.

Le président:

Pendant la période préélectorale ou électorale?

M. John Nater:

Oui, cela concerne les deux périodes.

M. David Christopherson:

Quand vous dites « utiliser », s'agit-il d'une utilisation publique, interne ou de n'importe quel type d'utilisation?

M. John Nater:

Je veux dire l'utiliser à titre de dépense. Donc, si vos activités à titre d'entité politique sont orientées par les résultats, ce serait utilisé à cette fin.

(1755)

M. David Christopherson:

Donc, si je comprends bien, vous laissez entendre qu'il y a possiblement une faille qui permettrait d'effectuer un sondage un jour ou deux avant le déclenchement des élections, et que, même si ce sondage est mené avant le déclenchement, les résultats seraient aussi valables quelques jours plus tard que si ce sondage avait été mené au début de la période électorale.

M. John Nater:

Si vous avez cerné...

M. David Christopherson:

Cela semble plein de bon sens.

Maître Lawson, y a-t-il une raison pour laquelle nous ne ferions pas cela?

Mme Anne Lawson:

Je crois que le seul point que je soulèverais, c'est que ces sondages menés en préparation de l'une ou l'autre de ces périodes seraient visés par l'obligation de déclaration. À mes yeux, la façon dont nous établirons la limite n'est pas très claire. C'est un simple commentaire.

M. David Christopherson:

J'aime le concept. Cela ressemble un peu à une faille, en particulier pour ceux qui ont plus d'argent que les autres. Il s'agit tout simplement de mener un tout nouveau sondage le jour précédant l'annonce des élections, et les résultats vous seront aussi utiles pour établir votre stratégie trois ou quatre jours plus tard que si vous aviez mené ce sondage le jour de l'annonce des élections dans le même but.

Si je comprends bien, cela permet d'éliminer une faille possible relativement aux dépenses que nous souhaitons recenser durant la période électorale, mais qui, en raison de détails techniques, ne seraient pas liées à la période visée.

D'après ce que je comprends, M. Nater laisse entendre qu'il faudrait recenser cette dépense dans les dépenses électorales, puisque les partis utiliseraient les résultats comme renseignements servant à élaborer leurs stratégies. Cette proposition me semble très sensée, tout en n'étant pas partisane, et c'est une bonne façon d'éliminer une faille.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le fait d'utiliser des renseignements dans l'élaboration de votre stratégie s'applique aussi, je présume, aux nombreuses élections antérieures. Combien d'années antérieures seraient visées?

Monsieur Morin, quelle interprétation en faites-vous sur le plan juridique dans un contexte de préparation pour l'une ou l'autre de ces périodes?

M. Jean-François Morin:

C'est, de fait, la difficulté, et, selon moi, cela explique pourquoi cette période, soit la période préélectorale et celle du début de la période électorale, a été choisie. C'est parce qu'on peut mener des sondages à n'importe quel moment entre les périodes électorales, et que les résultats de ces sondages peuvent tous être utilisés pour préparer une stratégie en vue de la période électorale suivante.

Dans sa forme actuelle, le projet de loi C-76 apporte beaucoup de précisions quant aux sondages électoraux qui seraient pris en compte.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Selon le texte de cet amendement, jusqu'où remonte-t-on en matière de sondage?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Cela inclut possiblement le jour suivant la période électorale précédente.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Toute dépense encourue par qui que ce soit en vue des élections suivantes pourrait être visée par cette disposition, en théorie.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Possiblement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

[Note de la rédaction: inaudible] sert à la préparation en vue de l'élection suivante. C'est...

M. David Christopherson:

C'est un bon point.

M. John Nater:

Toutefois, toutes nos dépenses font aussi l'objet d'un audit. Il y aura des différences dans les résultats obtenus à la suite d'un sondage de l'opinion publique autorisé trois jours après une élection par rapport à ceux obtenus à la suite d'un sondage mené trois jours avant. Il appartient au vérificateur de trancher. Toutes les entités font l'objet d'un audit qui sert à vérifier et à assurer la conformité de leurs déclarations. À mon avis, les renseignements recueillis trois jours avant une période électorale ou une période préélectorale... En toute logique, ce sera ce qui est utilisé directement qui fera partie de ces dépenses.

M. David Christopherson:

S'il n'y a pas ces mots, je peux comprendre le point soulevé par David. Il faut remonter jusqu'au début, et je ne crois pas que cela fasse partie des propositions.

M. Jean-François Morin:

J'ajouterais, toutefois, que cette disposition en particulier s'applique aux sondages menés par des tiers. Elle ne s'applique pas aux partis politiques. Pendant la période préélectorale, seules les dépenses de publicité partisane font l'objet d'une surveillance en ce qui concerne les partis politiques, et, bien entendu, pendant la période électorale, ce sont toutes les dépenses électorales. La définition de sondage électoral n'est pas pertinente pour les partis politiques dans ce contexte. Le fait d'étendre la période signifierait aussi que nous essayons de réglementer les activités des tiers en dehors des périodes électorale et préélectorale. Comme vous le savez, par tiers, on entend tout le monde sauf les candidats et les partis politiques, donc cela pourrait possiblement toucher largement les organisations qui sont très actives en ce qui concerne...

(1800)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les enquêtes hebdomadaires menées par Nanos et publiées de façon continue pendant toute la période seraient-elles visées?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je suis désolé, je ne suis pas en mesure de répondre à cette question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je crois que c'est le problème, c'est-à-dire que nous ne pouvons répondre à ces questions particulières. Je trouve cela troublant.

Merci.

M. David Christopherson:

Si je peux m'exprimer, monsieur le président, je prends bonne note de votre point. J'aime l'idée, mais les choses se compliquent quand on entre dans les détails, et nous n'avons même pas les détails. Nous aurions fort à faire pour étudier ces questions de façon exhaustive. Je crois que c'est préférable de ne pas adopter cet amendement.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

M. John Nater:

Pouvons-nous tenir un vote par appel nominal?

Le président:

Oui. Nous allons procéder au vote par appel nominal sur l'amendement CPC-83.

(L'amendement est rejeté par 6 voix contre 3. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Bienvenue, madame O'Connell; je ne vous avais pas vue.

Elle est tellement discrète.

Mme Jennifer O'Connell (Pickering—Uxbridge, Lib.):

Je me fonds dans le décor.

Le président:

Nous allons passer à l'amendement CPC-84.

Monsieur Nater, voulez-vous le présenter?

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président, et bienvenue, madame O'Connell. Je suis ravi de voir une secrétaire parlementaire ayant le droit de voter dans ce comité. Je croyais que les libéraux avaient éliminé cela, mais...

Le projet de loi contient une définition d'« activité partisane ». Cet amendement élimine l'exception qui s'applique aux partis politiques provinciaux. Dans sa forme actuelle, le projet de loi permet aux partis politiques provinciaux de mener des activités partisanes, c'est-à-dire d'organiser des rassemblements. Cet amendement éliminerait cette exception.

Le président:

S'agit-il d'une période en particulier?

M. John Nater:

Je crois que cela vise les activités menées pendant les périodes électorale et préélectorale. Selon le libellé actuel, le projet de loi prévoit une exemption pour ce que nous pourrions considérer être des activités partisanes menées par des partis politiques provinciaux, lesquels pourraient tenir des rassemblements pour les partis fédéraux.

Le président:

Ah, je vois. Très bien.

M. John Nater:

Cet amendement éliminerait cette exception afin qu'un parti politique provincial ne puisse pas faire ce genre d'activité.

Le président:

Quelqu'un souhaite-t-il en débattre?

M. John Nater:

Bien entendu, toutes les activités connexes sont aussi visées, comme les appels téléphoniques, la publicité, et ainsi de suite.

Le président:

Sommes-nous tous prêts à voter?

M. John Nater:

Je propose de tenir un vote par appel nominal.

(L'amendement est rejeté par 6 voix contre 3. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

L'article 222 modifié est-il adopté?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il a été modifié?

Le président:

Oui, par l'amendement LIB-26.

(L'article 222 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 223)

Le président: L'amendement LIB-27 était le premier, mais il était corrélatif à l'amendement LIB-26.

Nous sommes heureux de la présence de Mme May, qui pourra présenter l'amendement PV-5.

Mme Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, PV):

Merci.

Cet amendement vise à modifier une ligne seulement de l'article 223, et n'a qu'un but précis. Il découle des préoccupations soulevées par M. Pal, professeur à la faculté de droit de l'Université d'Ottawa, lors de son témoignage devant ce comité, notamment à l'égard du fait que la situation a changé depuis l'affaire Harper, qui remonte à 2004. Il a fait valoir que, si l'on tient compte des élections à date fixe et des résultats des achats publicitaires dans les médias sociaux, la marge de manoeuvre nécessaire pour protéger la liberté d'expression n'a pas besoin d'être aussi élevée que les 700 000 $ de dépenses effectuées par des tiers pendant une période préélectorale.

L'argument tient au fait qu'il est possible de cibler davantage l'audience et de dépenser d'une façon plus directe. Nous savons quand auront lieu les prochaines élections. Afin de limiter l'effet des grosses contributions financières, l'amendement que je propose modifierait le montant total des dépenses effectuées par des tiers en le faisant passer de 700 000 $ à 300 000 $. Je m'appuie simplement sur son témoignage dans lequel il a souligné qu'il s'agissait vraiment d'une importante somme d'argent à dépenser dans une période préélectorale. Je sais que le montant a été réduit à 700 000 $, mais j'ose espérer que le Comité acceptera de l'abaisser à 300 000 $.

Dans les faits, il s'agit de beaucoup d'argent dépensé par un tiers pendant une période préélectorale.

(1805)

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Je suis d'avis qu'il s'agit d'un amendement raisonnable et que nous serons disposés à l'appuyer, à titre d'opposition officielle. Il est important de fixer des montants plus raisonnables. Nous ne souhaitons pas voir des tiers exercer une influence indue. Si l'on tient compte de l'inflation, cela équivaut à environ un million de dollars. C'est beaucoup d'argent. Nous allons appuyer le montant plus raisonnable proposé.

Le président:

Je suis désolé, qu'est-ce qui équivaut à un million de dollars?

M. John Nater:

Dans le projet de loi, le montant est fixé à 700 000 $, mais il est indexé selon l'inflation depuis 2000, si ma mémoire est bonne...

Le président:

Ah, d'accord.

M. John Nater:

... donc cela équivaut à environ un million de dollars, en dollars d'aujourd'hui.

Le président:

Je ne crois pas que les fonctionnaires aient des commentaires quant à une décision relative aux politiques.

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Monsieur le président, je comprends et je suis d'accord d'un point de vue philosophique, mais je souhaite examiner les questions relatives la Charte qui pourraient être soulevées.

Nous touchons déjà une question liée à la Charte en limitant le montant qu'un groupe peut dépenser. L'argument qui milite en faveur de l'établissement d'une limite de façon raisonnable à l'égard de ce droit protégé par la Charte s'affaiblit à mesure que nous diminuons le montant maximal. Je crains que, si nous l'abaissons trop, cela puisse créer des problèmes touchant la Charte.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

[Note de la rédaction: inaudible] faire équivaloir de l'argent à l'expression, Dieu merci. Je ne comprends pas. Voulez-vous dire que cela s'additionne, que si nous imposons une limite sur ce qu'un tiers peut dire et les dépenses qu'il peut faire en période électorale, et que si nous imposons en plus une limite trop importante quant aux dépenses, que ces deux choses réunies renforcent une contestation fondée sur la Charte? Je présume que vous croyez qu'une contestation découlerait de ces limites.

M. Chris Bittle:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je ne sais pas... Aucun d'entre nous n'est un juriste en droit constitutionnel, mais je ne suis pas d'accord. À mon avis, nous tentons d'uniformiser les règles du jeu et d'atteindre un équilibre quant aux voix qui se feront entendre. Comme Elizabeth l'a mentionné, la somme qu'il faut dépenser pour faire entendre un message de nos jours, compte tenu des outils qui sont accessibles maintenant, est plus petite qu'avant, ce qui est paradoxal. Le prix pour participer, pour ainsi dire, a diminué...

Mme Elizabeth May:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

... pour ce qui est de l'influence, parce qu'il est possible de cibler les électeurs que l'on souhaite joindre, plutôt que de faire des campagnes de publicité générales à la radio, à la télévision ou dans les journaux. J'appuie fortement cette modification.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

Nous allons passer au vote portant sur l'amendement PV-5.

M. John Nater:

Je propose le vote par appel nominal.

(L'amendement est rejeté par 5 voix contre 4. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Nous poursuivons l'étude de l'article 223. Nous en sommes à l'amendement CPC-85. Si cet amendement est adopté, les amendements CPC-86 et PV-7 ne pourront pas être proposés, parce qu'ils modifient la même ligne.

Quelqu'un peut-il présenter l'amendement CPC-85?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Cet amendement est semblable au précédent, car il a pour but que les tiers tiennent compte, dans leurs dépenses préélectorales, de tout sondage sur l'opinion publique mené avant la période préélectorale dont les résultats sont utilisés pour orienter les activités préélectorales. Il s'agit simplement d'appliquer aussi aux tiers l'amendement précédent. Je crois que nous suivons le thème de la cohérence pour tous les acteurs et les intervenants, et je suis d'avis que cet amendement est fidèle à ce thème.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Pour nous assurer de pouvoir voter sur les autres amendements, je propose un sous-amendement, soit que l'amendement CPC-85 soit modifié par suppression des alinéas b) à d).

(1810)

Le président:

Il y a un sous-amendement pour éliminer les alinéas b), c) et d).

M. John Nater:

Ce qui nous permettrait alors de voter sur...

Le président:

Il n'irait pas dans le même sens que les autres, donc cela nous permettrait de nous pencher sur l'amendement CPC-86.

(Le sous-amendement est adopté.)

Le président: Le sous-amendement est adopté. Maintenant, nous allons aborder ce qu'il reste de l'amendement, soit tout, sauf les alinéas b), c) et d).

M. John Nater:

Je pense que nous en avons parlé ailleurs.

Le président:

Nous en avons déjà discuté.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis contre, pour les mêmes raisons que j'ai évoquées précédemment.

Le président:

Passons au vote sur l'amendement CPC-85 modifié.

(L'amendement modifié est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous allons passer à l'amendement PV-6, qui découle de l'amendement PV-3, nous n'avons donc pas à en débattre.

Puis, nous allons passer à l'amendement CPC-86, dont nous pouvons discuter maintenant en raison de la modification de l'amendement CPC-85.

Quelqu'un pourrait-il présenter l'amendement?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Essentiellement, il réclame simplement des définitions plus strictes en matière de lutte contre la collusion.

Je pense que c'est l'un des thèmes que nous avons abordés, en qualité d'opposition, en ce qui a trait au projet de loi. Même si nous sommes tout à fait d'accord avec l'esprit de nombreux éléments du projet de loi, nous ne sommes pas toujours convaincus — je dirais jusqu'à maintenant — des mécanismes, mais dans ce cas-ci, plus précisément, des définitions. Nous aimerions que les définitions concernant la lutte contre la collusion soient établies plus clairement pour en accroître la clarté et, par conséquent, nous l'espérons, favoriser une meilleure application.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions sur l'amendement CPC-86?

Les fonctionnaires ont-ils des observations à formuler?

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J'essaie seulement de comprendre l'amendement. Si j'ai bien compris, il veut empêcher les tiers d'échanger des sondages et autres choses avec d'autres tiers et avec des partis politiques. Est-ce bien cela?

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Nathan, pouvez-vous répéter cela?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui. Je crois comprendre que l'amendement CPC-86 vise à empêcher l'échange de sondages et d'autres renseignements entre des tiers de même qu'entre des tiers et des partis politiques.

M. John Nater:

Exactement. À l'heure actuelle, les choses ne fonctionnent que dans un sens. Nous voulons qu'il y ait une relation de réciprocité: des tiers aux partis politiques, et des partis politiques aux tiers. En quelque sorte, cela renforce...

M. Nathan Cullen:

À ce sujet, les tiers sont parfois des groupes de lutte contre la pauvreté ou des groupes en faveur des entreprises. Ils ont réalisé des sondages auprès de leurs membres. La Chambre de commerce du Canada le fait beaucoup. Elle nous transmet les renseignements, tente de nous influencer, mais elle essaie également de nous dire ce que pensent ses membres.

S'agirait-il en quelque sorte d'une pratique antidémocratique ou d'un abus d'influence? Je ne sais pas. Bien sûr, il y a des cas où les groupes ne les transmettent pas, mais de façon générale, ils essaient de les communiquer au plus grand nombre possible. Ils sont incités à le faire. Ils peuvent rassembler des renseignements d'une manière que les sondeurs ou nous-mêmes, en tant que partis politiques, ne pouvons pas. Cette pratique n'est-elle pas intéressante et utile?

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions au sujet de l'amendement CPC-86?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis d'accord avec le point que soulève Nathan.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui. Je suis d'accord avec Nathan; je crois que cela criminaliserait les communications habituelles entre les représentants de la société civile et les candidats potentiels.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Je pense que nous devons simplement prendre du recul. Il s'agit plutôt de contournement du plafond des dépenses électorales. C'est ce que nous examinons actuellement: le recours à des tiers, y compris les échanges réciproques, essentiellement pour contourner les plafonds de dépenses électorales, plutôt que...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Voulez-vous dire que les tiers contournent les limites?

(1815)

M. John Nater:

Les tiers, et l'inverse est vrai également.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Une sorte d'impartition des sondages?

M. John Nater:

L'impartition des sondages à des tiers, et dans notre amendement, nous parlons de l'inverse également.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur le président, puis-je demander à M. Morin de se prononcer sur la question? Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Morin.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Monsieur le président, la disposition qui figure au paragraphe 349.3(1) a été conçue dans un seul sens pour deux raisons, l'une d'elles étant bien sûr que, si ce n'est qu'une question de renseignements et d'idées, les partis politiques sont là pour recueillir ces idées et tenter de représenter une grande proportion de la population. En outre, si nous parlons plutôt de la fourniture de ressources, par exemple, une campagne publicitaire conçue par un tiers, cela serait considéré comme une contribution non monétaire au parti et ce serait déjà interdit par les dispositions de la partie 18 sur le financement politique.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, puis-je poursuivre sur cette question?

Le président:

Oui.

M. John Nater:

Simplement pour préciser les choses, si un tiers en venait à échanger des renseignements avec un parti politique et que cela orientait ensuite sa campagne publicitaire, cette pratique serait-elle visée par la loi? Est-ce ce que vous dites? Les renseignements provenant des sondages réalisés par un tiers façonnent par la suite la campagne publicitaire d'un parti politique. Cette pratique serait-elle visée par la loi?

M. Jean-François Morin:

À titre de contribution non monétaire?

M. John Nater:

À n'importe quel titre. Serait-ce considéré comme de la collusion ou est-ce...?

M. Jean-François Morin:

S'il s'agit d'un produit ou d'un service qui correspond à la définition d'une contribution non monétaire, ce serait évidemment considéré comme une contribution non monétaire. Bien sûr, seuls des particuliers peuvent offrir ces contributions à des entités enregistrées, et seulement dans les limites prévues à la partie 18. Donc, oui, ce serait visé par la loi.

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vais simplement établir une distinction. Pour prendre un exemple, la Chambre de commerce du Canada s'adresse à chacun d'entre nous et nous fournit un sondage très coûteux réalisé auprès de ses membres. Ces renseignements aident ensuite les parties à élaborer un message particulier, que ce soit à l'aide d'une publicité, d'une politique ou d'une plateforme. En vertu des dispositions actuelles ou de ces changements, cela pourrait-il être considéré comme une contribution non monétaire. Ce serait extrêmement coûteux de rencontrer les gens et de réaliser ce sondage vous-même, pourtant, on remplit aussi la fonction de sensibilisation du public que la société civile essaie d'assumer.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Il est question de la société civile, donc dans la mesure où on ne communique qu'avec divers partis politiques pour tenter d'influencer leurs politiques, je pense que ce serait probablement acceptable. Il faudrait que les vérificateurs d'Élections Canada se penchent sur la question.

Il existe également un régime selon lequel les partis politiques peuvent demander des lignes directrices en vertu de la Loi électorale du Canada; il s'agit donc d'une question qui pourrait manifestement être clarifiée à l'avenir. Je parlais plutôt du cas où un tiers fournirait un produit prêt à l'emploi ou un service à un parti en particulier pour l'aider.

Avez-vous des commentaires quant au concept de contributions non monétaires?

Mme Anne Lawson:

Non.

M. Trevor Knight:

Je pense que cela dépendrait des faits. Un exemple flagrant pourrait être celui d'une entreprise qui donne un sondage à un parti politique au lieu de le lui vendre, comme elle le ferait normalement. Ce serait assurément une contribution non monétaire.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce que cela arrive?

Non, mais c'est accessible à tous les partis. Un groupe environnemental se présente et dit avoir embauché Ipsos ou quelqu'un pour réaliser un sondage sur l'opinion des gens quant au changement climatique. Ce sondage est ensuite mis à la disposition de tous les partis, ou peut-être pas tous, mais certains d'entre eux, ce qui a une incidence sur la façon... Nous sommes en train d'examiner la loi, mais nous commençons à peine à nous demander comment se passent les choses. Le travail des groupes de consultation, les messages et toutes ces choses, ce n'est pas un secret. Tout cela se produit assez fréquemment.

Diriez-vous qu'il s'agit d'une contribution non monétaire?

M. Trevor Knight:

D'après la loi actuelle, si un bien ou un service est offert à un parti à un prix inférieur à sa valeur commerciale, il faut demander si c'est gratuit, mais si c'est gratuit pour tout le monde, alors ce n'est pas une contribution.

(1820)

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est ainsi que s'y prennent les tiers pour contourner le problème. Elles doivent rendre un service comme un sondage ou de la recherche accessible à tout le monde.

M. Trevor Knight:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord. C'est curieux.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Jean-François Morin:

... ou elles peuvent simplement rendre l'information publique.

Mme Anne Lawson:

Exactement.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Un bon exemple est celui d'un tiers qui souhaite influencer les partis. Il pourrait avoir une page Web qui porte sur un enjeu particulier et qui comporte beaucoup de données, y compris des données de sondage.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Ce serait tout à fait acceptable.

M. Nathan Cullen:

... dans la mesure où ces renseignements sont communiqués à tous les partis ou rendus publics.

Mais si un tiers disait vouloir fournir des renseignements à vous uniquement, peu importe la raison, cela constituerait alors une contribution non monétaire.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

J'aimerais simplement revenir en arrière et me pencher sur l'élément concernant la collusion dans l'amendement. Ce dont il est réellement question, c'est de recourir à des tiers pour contourner certains plafonds de dépenses électorales.

Un groupe comme Canada 2020, par exemple, qui mène...

M. Nathan Cullen:

[Note de la rédaction: inaudible]

M. John Nater:

Si le groupe effectue de nombreux sondages d'opinion publique, qui, je le répète, sont extrêmement utiles, et qu'il est capable de contourner le plafond de dépenses préélectorales, est-ce qu'une telle pratique serait visée par l'amendement, ou par le projet de loi dans sa forme actuelle?

Les efforts déployés pour contourner le plafond des dépenses électorales en demandant à un groupe comme Canada 2020 de faire le travail et de fournir les renseignements sont-ils visés par l'amendement? Nous étudions précisément le plafond de dépenses électorales et la collusion.

M. Trevor Knight:

L'article que nous examinons, l'article 349.3 proposé, ne porte pas vraiment sur les dépenses, la collusion pour contourner les limites de dépenses, même s'il peut s'agir du motif de la communication. L'article actuel ne parle pas de tiers ou de partis enregistrés ni d'agissement de connivence pour influencer le tiers dans son travail. L'amendement inclurait aussi l'influence d'un parti enregistré, comme vous dites, pour en faire une voie à double sens.

Quant à la question que vous avez posée, en ce qui concerne la collusion en vertu de la loi actuelle, je pense qu'il y a déjà des dispositions portant sur les contributions non monétaires et le contournement des limites de dépenses. Je crois que ces dispositions seraient pertinentes à cet égard.

Cela concerne davantage un aspect particulier, soit influencer la manière dont les tiers agissent.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

J'aimerais soulever un dernier point.

À l'heure actuelle, si Canada 2020 dit au Parti libéral: « Nous allons faire de la publicité sur X, et vous, vous pouvez en faire sur Y et Z. » Puis l'inverse, le Parti libéral dit à Canada 2020 qu'il fait de la publicité sur Y et Z, et que ce dernier peut en faire sur X. Dans un sens, c'est de la collusion, dans l'autre, ce n'en est pas. D'après votre amendement, c'est de la collusion dans les deux cas.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions?

M. John Nater:

J'aimerais demander un vote par appel nominal.

(L'amendement est rejeté par 5 voix contre 4. [Voir le Procès-verbal ])

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant passer à l'amendement PV-7.

Madame May.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Monsieur le président, avec l'amendement PV-7, nous voulons que les interdictions d'utiliser des fonds de l'étranger pour financer des messages de partis politiques ou de tiers ne s'appliquent pas seulement durant la période préélectorale, mais en tout temps.

Je sais qu'il y a d'autres amendements à cet effet, et certains d'entre eux ont été présentés avant celui-ci. Comme je dois m'absenter souvent, j'ai bien peur de ne pas savoir si mes amendements vont être adoptés à cette étape-ci, mais j'espère resserrer les règles de sorte qu'il n'y ait en aucun temps de fonds de l'étranger ni de messages politiques de tiers influencés par des fonds de l'étranger, pas seulement durant la période préélectorale.

M. John Nater:

Je partage les sentiments de Mme May. Toutes les mesures que nous pouvons prendre pour éliminer les fonds de l'étranger de nos élections, nous les appuierons. Nous allons voter en faveur de l'amendement.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une question pour M. Morin.

Avons-nous déjà fait cela pour certains des autres amendements que nous avons présentés?

(1825)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C'était la même chose.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si nous l'avons déjà fait, nous n'avons pas besoin de le refaire.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Je ne suis pas certaine.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est pourquoi je lui pose la question.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui et non.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je croyais que nous étions les politiciens.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. Jean-François Morin:

La nouvelle section 0.1 de la partie 17 de la loi interdirait à tous les tiers, y compris les tiers étrangers, d'utiliser des fonds de l'étranger pour des activités partisanes, de la publicité ou des sondages électoraux. Ce que la disposition qui a déjà été adoptée ne fait pas, c'est d'interdire à un tiers étranger d'engager des dépenses en dehors de la période électorale et de la période préélectorale, mais pour engager ces dépenses, il aurait toujours besoin de les financer avec de l'argent canadien. C'est là la différence.

Nous interdisons à tous les tiers d'utiliser des fonds de l'étranger en tout temps pour des activités partisanes, de la publicité et des sondages électoraux, mais les tiers étrangers pourraient tout de même engager certaines de ces dépenses en dehors de la période électorale ou préélectorale, mais ils auraient toujours besoin de se financer à partir d'une source canadienne. Ils pourraient recevoir des contributions, par exemple, d'une source canadienne, et organiser des activités en dehors de la période électorale ou préélectorale.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions?

M. John Nater:

J'aimerais demander un vote par appel nominal.

(L'amendement est rejeté par 5 voix contre 4. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Le prochain amendement est le CPC-87.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Je vous demande d'être patients. Je vais sauter d'un sujet à l'autre pour essayer d'expliquer cela.

Ce qui nous occupe ici, c'est la définition d'un tiers. Nous apportons un changement relativement mineur, mais j'aimerais l'expliquer de deux façons.

La ligne 16 est modifiée. Elle fait actuellement référence à un tiers qui est une société ou une entité. L'alinéa 349.4(2)b) se lit comme suit: b) [...] constituée, formée ou autrement organisée ailleurs qu'au Canada [...]

Nous y apportons une légère modification pour dire ce qui suit: (i) elle est constituée, formée ou autrement organisée ailleurs qu'au Canada et elle n'exerce pas d'activités commerciales au Canada ou ses seules activités au Canada, pendant une période préélectorale, consistent à exercer une influence sur un électeur pendant cette période afin qu'il vote ou s'abstienne de voter ou vote ou s'abstienne de voter pour un candidat donné ou un parti enregistré donné à la prochaine élection, (ii) elle est constituée, formée ou autrement organisée au Canada et aucun des responsables n'a la citoyenneté canadienne ou le statut de résident permanent au sens du paragraphe 2(1) de la Loi sur l'immigration et la protection des réfugiés ou ne réside au Canada;

L'alinéa c) proposé renvoie essentiellement au fait d'être un Canadien, un résident permanent ou un résident au Canada. Nous en avons parlé de manière quelque peu différente plus tôt. Nous disions que, si une organisation ou un tiers formés au Canada dont aucun des responsables ne vit au Canada, est un Canadien ou a le statut de résident permanent, nous voudrions qu'ils soient exclus.

Nous ferons tout notre possible pour renforcer nos lois électorales et empêcher des entités étrangères d'influencer le Canada. J'espère que cette explication vous satisfait. Il est question de deux articles, mais ce que nous essayons de faire est assez clair. Si une entité est créée uniquement dans le but d'influencer une élection et que la personne responsable n'a aucun lien avec le Canada, nous voudrions qu'elle soit bannie.

Le président:

Donc, si quelqu'un arrive du Nouveau-Mexique, crée une organisation, ouvre son bureau et qu'aucun Canadien ne prend part aux activités, vous voulez vous assurer que cela soit interdit.

M. John Nater:

À moins que la personne réside au Canada, ait la citoyenneté canadienne ou le statut de résident permanent. Si la personne crée une entité, mais qu'elle n'est pas physiquement ici ou qu'elle n'interagit pas physiquement, je pense qu'il s'agit clairement d'un problème d'influence étrangère.

Le président:

Vous voulez dire une société à dénomination numérique ou quelque chose du genre?

M. John Nater:

Oui, exactement.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires de la part des fonctionnaires?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui.

Nous avons discuté plus tôt d'une motion semblable dans le contexte de la partie 11.1 proposée, au sujet des interdictions liées au vote. Les commentaires que j'ai formulés à ce moment-là sont toujours valables.

Ainsi, le régime s'étendrait à certaines entités canadiennes, même si elles ne sont pas gérées ou dirigées par des Canadiens. Ces entités ont tout de même une existence juridique au Canada.

(1830)



C'est une décision stratégique.

Je ne dis pas oui ou non. Je dis seulement que cela couvrirait également cette autre catégorie d'entités canadiennes.

Le président:

Avant que M. Cullen parte, voulez-vous poser votre question, monsieur Graham? [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aimerais comprendre pourquoi la version française est tellement différente de la version anglaise.

M. Jean-François Morin:

C'est simplement qu'en anglais, chaque alinéa découpe les éléments dans des paragraphes distincts.[Traduction]Voici un exemple: « c) s'agissant d'un groupe, aucun responsable du groupe [...] », ainsi de suite. [Français]

Dans la version française, tout est inclus dans un seul et même paragraphe. C'est seulement une question de rédaction législative. Il n'y a pas de différence entre les deux quant au contenu.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord, merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je m'interroge au sujet du scénario actuel, et je comprends peut-être mal l'amendement.

Nous avons une entreprise ou une organisation sans but lucratif établies au Canada. Elles exercent leurs activités au Canada, mais leur directeur ou le propriétaire n'a pas le statut de résident. En vertu de la disposition, j'imagine qu'elles n'auraient pas le droit de participer.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il s'agit d'activité politique d'un tiers.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous pouvez comprendre cela.

M. John Nater:

Oui, je vois où vous voulez en venir.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Dans nos circonscriptions, nous avons tous des résidents qui ont passé 20, 30 ou 40 ans au pays. Ils exploitent de petites entreprises ou dirigent des ONG.

M. John Nater:

Revenons à l'alinéa b) proposé dans le projet de loi. Il dit: « [...] elle n'exerce pas d'activités commerciales au Canada ou ses seules activités au Canada [...] ».

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si ce seul critère est satisfait, le reste...

M. John Nater:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'était ma question: « Est-ce qu'il suffit qu'un de ces critères soit appliqué pour qu'elle soit exclue, ou...? »

M. John Nater:

Non.

Si elle « exerce ses activités » comme pratique courante au Canada...

M. Nathan Cullen:

On ne dit pas que le responsable doit en plus avoir la citoyenneté canadienne.

M. John Nater:

C'est juste.

C'est mon interprétation. Je me trompe peut-être, mais M. Church me fait un signe de la tête.

Si j'ai la bénédiction de l'église...

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il faut établir une distinction entre l'Église et l'État.

M. John Nater:

Ce que nous voulons dire, c'est que les organisations créées uniquement dans le but d'influencer une élection, mais qui exercent leurs activités en tant qu'entreprise ou en tant qu'entité de façon continue en dehors de la période électorale ne sont pas visées par la disposition.

Le président:

Si personne n'a quoi que ce soit d'autre à ajouter, pouvons-nous passer au vote?

M. John Nater:

Je voudrais que ce soit un vote par appel nominal.

(L'amendement est rejeté par 6 voix contre 3. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président:

Il ne reste plus que 18 amendements à cet article, nous allons donc continuer.

M. John Nater:

Nous avançons.

Le président:

Nous sommes rendus à l'amendement CPC-88.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, nous allons retirer cet amendement.

Le président:

N'allez-vous pas présenter l'amendement CPC-88?

M. John Nater:

Nous allons plutôt présenter celui qui a été ajouté.

Le président:

Nous avons un nouvel amendement du Parti conservateur. C'est l'amendement portant le numéro de référence 10008250 présenté par M. Nater.

M. John Nater:

Il consiste simplement à bannir en tout temps l'influence étrangère.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il interdit les activités des tiers étrangers en tout temps.

Le président:

Il interdit les tiers...

M. John Nater:

Les tiers étrangers.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il interdit les activités des tiers étrangers en tout temps.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela se trouve dans la liasse supplémentaire, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C'est exact.

Le président:

Le numéro se termine par 8250.

Les fonctionnaires ont-ils un commentaire à faire? Il est question d'interdire les activités des tiers étrangers en tout temps.

M. Jean-François Morin:

C'est précisément ce qu'il ferait. Je n'ai pas de commentaires à faire au sujet de la politique, mais du point de vue de la rédaction, je crois que nous aurons tout de même certains obstacles à surmonter. La motion modifierait la définition de la période préélectorale.

Je suis désolé, je regarde la version française et j'essaie de la traduire en anglais dans ma tête en même temps. Je devrais simplement regarder la version anglaise.

La publicité partisane et les dépenses de publicité partisane sont également des termes définis. La publicité partisane est celle qui se déroule pendant la période préélectorale. Si vous allez de l'avant avec la motion, je pense qu'il faudrait la retravailler un peu pour qu'elle s'applique comme prévu. Comme je l'ai mentionné plus tôt, la nouvelle section 0.1 n'interdirait pas aux entités étrangères d'engager des dépenses en dehors de la période électorale ou de la période préélectorale, mais elles devraient aussi recourir à un financement qui vient exclusivement de sources canadiennes.

(1835)

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Selon le libellé actuel du projet de loi, un tiers étranger peut dépenser tout l'argent, mais l'argent doit avoir été amassé au Canada. C'est exact?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui. Selon la formulation actuelle du projet de loi, sa version modifiée par les motions antérieures, il est interdit aux tiers étrangers d'engager certaines dépenses pendant la période préélectorale. Si on consulte l'autre section ou article de la partie 17, on trouve une disposition équivalente à propos des dépenses engagées durant la période électorale.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je le répète, les tiers étrangers ne peuvent dépenser que l'argent qu'ils ont amassé au Canada.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui, mais durant ces deux périodes, ils ne peuvent engager aucune dépense à ces fins.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Selon l'amendement, ils ne peuvent pas, mais je parle du projet de loi dans sa forme non modifiée.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Un tiers étranger peut amasser et dépenser de l'argent, seulement si l'argent a été amassé au Canada.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Oui, et seulement si les dépenses ont été engagées en dehors de la période électorale ou préélectorale.

M. Nathan Cullen:

De façon générale, cela voudrait dire qu'il ne faut pas y penser. Peu importe où il a amassé l'argent ou à quel moment il prévoit le dépenser, un tiers étranger ne pourrait pas dépenser d'argent.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Il ne pourrait pas dépenser d'argent à ces fins, c'est exact

M. Nathan Cullen: Oui.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions?

D'accord. Nous allons voter sur l'amendement.

M. John Nater:

Je demande un vote par appel nominal.

Le président:

Nous allons procéder à un vote par appel nominal sur l'amendement CPC dont le numéro de référence est le 10008250.

(L'amendement est rejeté par 5 voix contre 4. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Puisque l'amendement CPC-89 a été retiré, nous allons passer à l'amendent CPC-90. Si l'amendement CPC-90 est adopté, l'amendement LIB-28 ne peut être proposé, car il modifie la même ligne.

Les conservateurs peuvent-ils présenter l'amendement CPC-90?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Essentiellement, nous exigeons qu'un tiers ne s'identifie pas seulement à l'aide de son nom dans des publicités, comme l'a recommandé le commissaire aux élections fédérales. Nous demandons qu'il indique également son numéro de téléphone, son adresse municipale ou son adresse Internet.

Comme je l'ai dit, cette recommandation a été faite par le commissaire aux élections fédérales.

(1840)

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Les trois partis ont présenté quelque chose de semblable à cet égard, donc nous proposons un amendement, qui, je crois, a déjà été distribué.

Non, il n'a pas déjà été distribué.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Menteur.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

Une voix: Fausses nouvelles!

M. Chris Bittle:

Je suis un menteur, oui; je vais rentrer à la maison et réfléchir à ce que j'ai fait.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je ne vous ferai plus jamais confiance, monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je peux quitter la salle.

Je vais divaguer un peu et dire que l'idée était d'inclure un peu tout ce qui s'était dit dans la disposition.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'était une divagation?

M. Chris Bittle:

Eh bien, j'ai pensé... Je suis désolé.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J'attends toujours. J'attends la divagation. C'est décevant, Chris. Je pensais que vous pourriez faire mieux.

M. Chris Bittle:

J'ai clairement échoué sur toute la ligne. Je vous prie de m'excuser.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'était une divagation à la Bittle.

M. Nathan Cullen: C'était une « bivagation ».

Une voix: [Note de la rédaction: inaudible]

M. Chris Bittle: Merci. C'est très gentil.

M. Scott Reid: Au fait, j'aime bien votre chemise aussi. C'est très rafraîchissant. J'ai attendu toute la soirée pour le dire. Je ne veux pas que vous rentriez chez vous sans savoir à quel point je la trouve belle.

M. Chris Bittle: Merci.

Je ressens de l'amour au sein du Comité et j'en suis reconnaissant.

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Vous êtes mon voisin.

M. Chris Bittle: En effet. Merci.

Le président:

S'agit-il d'une modification ou d'un remplacement de l'amendement CPC-90?

M. Nathan Cullen:

On pourrait peut-être faire une pause et envisager autre chose.

M. Chris Bittle:

C'est un sous-amendement.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Monsieur le président, nous allons retirer l'amendement CPC-90 si c'est...

M. John Nater:

Non.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Ne retirons-nous pas l'amendement CPC-90? D'accord.

M. John Nater:

C'est un sous-amendement.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Vous en faites un sous-amendement.

M. John Nater:

Ce n'est pas moi. C'est M. Bittle.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

M. Bittle fait un sous-amendement avec cela.

J'ai compris. Merci.

M. Scott Reid:

Eh bien, nous pouvons vivre avec cela.

M. Chris Bittle:

Il s'agit là d'une approbation élogieuse de la part de M. Reid. Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Le premier vote portera sur le sous-amendement qui vient juste d'être présenté.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pouvez-vous l'expliquer rapidement?

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle, quel...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Voulez-vous parler du sous-amendement? Je l'ai déjà fait. C'était une recommandation du commissaire de fournir plus d'informations.

Le président:

Et le changement que vous avez apporté, c'était...

M. Chris Bittle:

Le changement consistait simplement à inclure ce dont toutes les parties discutaient et...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Le numéro de téléphone, l'adresse Internet, et ainsi de suite.

M. Scott Reid:

Effectivement, « d'une façon qui soit raisonnablement visible ou autrement accessible ». Je suppose que « autrement accessible » concerne ce qui est en format audio ou quelque chose comme ça.

Le président:

Votons sur le sous-amendement de l'amendement CPC-90.

(Le sous-amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'amendement modifié est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: À présent, l'amendement LIB-28 ne peut pas être proposé, nous allons donc passer à...

M. Nathan Cullen: Ah!

Le président: Justement pour cette raison, monsieur Cullen, l'amendement NDP-18 était le prochain, mais il est corrélatif à l'amendement NDP-17.

M. Nathan Cullen:

En effet, ne me le rappelez pas. C'est très bien.

Le président:

Nous pouvons discuter de l'amendement NDP-19...

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est palpitant.

Le président:

... que vous pourriez présenter maintenant.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il s'agit des archives — c'est toujours un mot étrange à utiliser dans cette conversation— ; un endroit où conserver les publicités. Cela relèverait du directeur général des élections. Les publicités doivent être remises à ce dernier dans les 10 jours suivant leur diffusion.

Je ne crois pas que nous ayons un article dans ce projet de loi — peut-être plus loin — qui prévoit la durée pendant laquelle on doit les conserver en vertu de la loi; je crois qu'il y en aura un plus loin, mais cela m'échappe en ce moment. Il est également très important de prévoir une façon de les rassembler.

Je pense que l'amendement LIB-25... je dois m'y référer exactement. Comme nous venons de le faire, nous essayons d'atteindre un objectif très semblable, qui est d'avoir un recueil des publicités qui ont été utilisées, y compris les publicités partisanes, et de faire en sorte qu'elles soient conservées par le directeur général des élections. Il s'agit d'un bon endroit. On doit les lui faire parvenir dans un délai de 10 jours.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne comprends pas. À l'heure actuelle, nous exigeons que les plateformes conservent elles-mêmes ces publicités. Est-ce que c'est exact?

(1845)

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est pour tout, pour les tiers et les autres.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pensez-vous que c'est nécessaire pour...?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je pense que nous avons atteint l'objectif que nous nous étions fixé. Je comprends ce que vous dites.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est seulement que l'on compte sur eux pour le faire plutôt que d'avoir...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ils seront en infraction s'ils ne le font pas.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pensez-y. Cela peut arriver.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est très vrai. Vous exigez que tout le monde remette tout à Élections Canada. Il s'agit, en réalité, de la même norme.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Au directeur général des élections, n'est-ce pas?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

Avez-vous des commentaires, monsieur Morin?

Le président:

Monsieur Morin.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Monsieur le président, cet amendement ajouterait deux nouveaux paragraphes à l'article 349.5 du projet de loi, lequel exige actuellement que les tiers ajoutent leur nom à leurs messages de publicité partisane.

J'aimerais souligner que, dans la partie 17 de la loi, les tiers sont définis de façon très large. Certaines obligations prévues par la loi s'appliquent à tous les tiers, et d'autres ne s'appliquent qu'aux tiers qui atteignent certains seuils.

Par exemple, pour la période préélectorale et la période électorale, le seuil pour devoir s'enregistrer à Élections Canada est fixé à 500 $. Un tiers, c'est-à-dire essentiellement tout citoyen canadien, à l'exception du candidat ou d'un parti politique, qui diffuse un message de publicité partisane, même si cette personne n'a pas atteint le seuil d'enregistrement de 500 $, devrait alors envoyer une copie du message de publicité à Élections Canada dans les 10 jours suivant sa diffusion.

Je pense que cela vise un groupe de tiers beaucoup plus large que ce que prévoient d'autres dispositions de la loi.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est exact. C'est ce que nous espérons faire.

Le président:

Je suppose que vous ne dites pas si c'est bon ou mauvais.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Bien sûr, je ne vous dirai pas ça, monsieur le président.

Des députés: Ha, ha!

M. Jean-François Morin:

Monsieur le président, si vous me le permettez, je n'interviendrai pas dans le débat, mais je vais simplement expliquer quels sont les seuils.

Ils sont les mêmes en période préélectorale et en période électorale. Jusqu'à concurrence de 500 $, le tiers n'a pas à s'enregistrer auprès d'Élections Canada. Pour les montants supérieurs à 500 $, ils doivent s'enregistrer auprès d'Élections Canada, ouvrir un compte bancaire et présenter un état financier après l'élection. Si, pendant la période préélectorale ou la période électorale, ils atteignent le seuil de 10 000 $ — soit en contributions ou en dépenses de publicité partisane, de publicité électorale, d'activités partisanes ou de sondage électoral —, ils doivent alors fournir un rapport financier préliminaire...

Comment est-ce qu'on dit déjà?

Mme Manon Paquet (conseillère principale en politiques, Bureau du Conseil privé):

On dit « provisoire ».

M. Jean-François Morin:

Ils doivent fournir un premier rapport financier provisoire lorsqu'ils atteignent ce seuil, puis un deuxième le 15 septembre au cours d'une année électorale déterminée. Puis, il y a une autre motion libérale qui imposerait également que l'on fournisse un troisième rapport financier provisoire trois semaines avant le jour du scrutin ainsi qu'un quatrième une semaine avant le jour du scrutin.

C'est le genre de système de production de rapports qui s'applique actuellement en vertu de la Loi et du projet de loi C-76.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans quelle mesure le processus de production de rapports financiers est-il lourd? Si vous dépensez 600 $, vous envoyez le reçu et le tour est joué, non?

M. Nathan Cullen:

[Note de la rédaction: inaudible] ... la production de rapports est très difficile si vous ne...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il ne s'agit pas d'un formulaire de 25 pages pour déclarer vos 600 $.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je n'ai pas regardé le formulaire récemment, mais l'exigence relative au compte bancaire s'appliquerait à chaque tiers qui atteint 500 $.

Mme Anne Lawson:

Effectivement.

M. Jean-François Morin:

En effet, l'exigence relative au compte bancaire s'appliquerait à chaque tiers qui atteint le seuil de 500 $. Il y a donc quelques coûts associés au fait d'être un tiers qui est tenu de s'enregistrer.

(1850)

Le président:

Est-ce que ce serait réduit, même s'il s'agissait de 10 $?

Monsieur Cullen, allez-y.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Non. Cela n'a pas d'incidence sur les exigences relatives à la production de rapports.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je ne dis pas que cela a une incidence sur les exigences relatives à la production de rapports. Je dis simplement que, même en deçà du seuil de 500 $, toute personne au Canada qui engagerait des dépenses de publicité partisane, même minimes — et puis il y a une disposition connexe pendant la période électorale pour les dépenses de publicité électorale —, serait tenue de les fournir au directeur général des élections dans un délai de 10 jours.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord. Ainsi, toutes les exigences relatives à la production de rapports pour les montants dépassant 500 $ ou 10 000 $ ne s'appliquent pas. Ce dont il s'agit, c'est que, si quelqu'un dit qu'il veut mettre une annonce de 300 $ dans son journal local ou qu'il veut acheter pour 300 $ de publicités sur Facebook pour cibler un groupe particulier d'électeurs, il doit en envoyer une copie à Élections Canada. C'est ce que dit cet amendement.

Le problème, c'est que, avec les amendements précédents que les libéraux ont proposés et adoptés, il y a des seuils pour lesquels les médias sociaux, en tant qu'entreprises, doivent commencer à produire des rapports, et il s'agit de trois millions de vues par mois, je crois. La barre est placée relativement haute. On pourrait très bien imaginer des plateformes plus petites — des plateformes plus politiques —, qui sont exclusivement politiques et ciblées, qui ne seraient jamais près d'atteindre trois millions de vues. Si quelqu'un fait de la publicité sur ces plateformes, et que la publicité n'atteint jamais le seuil, elle n'est jamais enregistrée ni conservée par... il n'y a aucune responsabilité de conserver cette publicité. Vous pourriez vous retrouver avec de fausses nouvelles diffusées dans le cadre d'une campagne quelque peu subversive, et la plateforme n'aurait jamais à conserver ces publicités; si rien n'est fait, nous n'aurions tout simplement pas d'archives du tout.

Donc, vous êtes candidat à une élection, et quelqu'un diffuse toute cette publicité sur les réseaux sociaux qui n'atteignent pas trois millions de vues par mois, lesquels sont beaucoup plus nombreux que ceux qui dépassent trois millions de vues par mois, et vos publicités seraient simplement... Vous pourriez les microcibler et vous savez ce que vous pourriez obtenir pour 500 $ en publicités sur les médias sociaux, surtout les plus petits. Beaucoup pourraient affirmer que Ruby est quelqu'un d'horrible, pour ne citer qu'un exemple.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une question pour Me Lawson.

À l'heure actuelle, y a-t-il des endroits où Élections Canada est tenu de conserver la publicité ou quoi que ce soit d'autre? Y a-t-il d'autres raisons pour lesquelles quelque chose comme ça existe? Y a-t-il un précédent à cet égard?

Mme Anne Lawson:

Non, il n'y a actuellement rien qui créerait ce type d'archives?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous ne vous enverrions donc jamais de copie de nos affiches électorales pour que vous les placiez en dépôt, ou...

Mme Anne Lawson:

Comme vous le savez, il y a beaucoup de rapports produits, et on archive, en quelque sorte, tous les rapports qui sont déposés. Il faut les mettre en ligne, mais pas la publicité en soi.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je ne les imagine pas envoyer le quatre par quatre de la campagne électorale à Élections Canada en disant: « Voici mon affiche électorale. » La grande majorité des publicités sont numériques, et Élections Canada en conserve donc une copie numérique.

Je pense qu'il y a deux effets à cela. Premièrement, si les gens savent qu'ils doivent déposer ces publicités auprès d'Élections Canada, cela les empêchera peut-être de passer du côté plus sombre de la politique.

Deuxièmement, si quelque chose tourne mal, ou si une élection est controversée, nous pouvons sortir les publicités qui ont été diffusées pendant cette campagne, ou par une entreprise de médias sociaux, ou par une personne dans le cas présent, et dire qu'il y a eu un effort coordonné parmi 40 personnes dans la circonscription pour dépenser chacune 450 $ pour la même publicité, mais, comme c'est le cas actuellement, personne ne dispose d'archives. Par conséquent, vous pouvez vous retrouver avec un montant coordonné s'élevant à 4 500 $ dépensé dans des médias sociaux ciblés, tant que les entreprises en question n'atteignent pas les trois millions de vues par mois. C'est la façon de contourner le problème et c'est une brèche relativement importante, par rapport à un particulier faisant sa publicité, l'envoyant lui-même; Élections Canada... c'est la loi. Elle exige qu'Élections Canada les conserve.

Le président:

Maître Lawson.

Mme Anne Lawson:

Je voulais simplement parler de la formulation actuelle. Il ne s'agit pas seulement de la publicité numérique ou électronique, mais l'amendement couvrirait les affiches placardées dans les fenêtres des gens ou d'autres types de publicité qui coûtent moins de 500 $.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord.

Je suppose que chaque publicité, chaque affiche et tout ce que nous créons existent sous forme numérique. Peut-être que quelqu'un fait ses propres affiches à la main et les placarde dans sa fenêtre. J'imagine que cela figure dans le bas de la liste de mes préoccupations.

Le président:

Monsieur Morin.

M. Jean-François Morin:

J'allais soulever la même question que Mme Lawson.

Je ne veux pas me faire le conseiller juridique du Comité. Je ne fournis pas de conseils juridiques de quelque façon que ce soit.

J'encouragerais simplement les membres du Comité à penser aux dispositions sur la liberté d'expression de la Charte et à l'effet qu'aurait une règle qui exigerait que chaque citoyen qui publie des messages de publicité partisane les signale à un organisme gouvernemental pendant la période préélectorale.

(1855)

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il ne s'agit pas d'une question de liberté d'expression.

Je ne crois pas que des millions de Canadiens font de la publicité électorale. J'ai peut-être tort. Il est possible que nos citoyens achètent comme des fous des publicités dans les médias sociaux et que cela sera très lourd. Ce n'est pas mon cas personnellement, mais peut-être que d'autres l'ont vécu.

Je suis désolé. Je comprends les commentaires du témoin, mais il ne s'agit pas d'une interdiction de la libre expression que de publier une publicité. Si vous êtes prêt à acheter de la publicité pendant une élection canadienne, vous participez au processus électoral. Cela ne limite aucunement la liberté d'expression.

Le président:

Nous allons voter sur l'amendement NDP-19.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Gardez à l'esprit que nous avons passé beaucoup plus que 15 minutes sur cet article en particulier, alors essayons d'avancer un peu plus rapidement.

Nous passons à l'amendement PV-8.

Madame May.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Je serai aussi brève que possible, monsieur le président.

Cela peut sembler un peu ironique, car dans ma dernière intervention, je soulignais...

Ce que des groupes tiers ont affirmé devant le Comité, particulièrement le Mouvement pour la représentation équitable au Canada, c'est qu'une limite de 500 $, au-delà de laquelle il faut s'enregistrer immédiatement comme tiers et respecter toutes les autres obligations, était une limite assez basse. Réal Lavergne a souligné, pendant son témoignage devant le Comité, que la limite était de 500 $ pour le référendum de l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard.

L'Île-du-Prince-Édouard est une très petite administration pour ce qui est de la population et de la portée médiatique. Si la limite de dépenses était de 500 $, je propose, pour cet amendement, que la limite nationale soit de 2 500 $, ce qui est plus raisonnable pour quiconque planifie de participer à une campagne nationale, et il s'agirait de 500 $ pour une seule circonscription. Il faut réduire le fardeau qui pèse particulièrement sur tous les groupes bénévoles qui jouent un très petit rôle dans les activités électorales.

C'est une brève explication. Je sais que vous voulez passer à autre chose, mais je suis heureuse de répondre aux questions.

Le président:

S'il n'y a pas de commentaires, nous allons passer au vote sur l'amendement PV-8.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous passons à l'amendement CPC-91.

Quelqu'un pourrait-il le présenter?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

L'amendement est similaire à l'amendement que nous avons déjà présenté qui permet une inscription précoce pour les périodes préélectorale et électorale, mais, encore une fois, il s'applique aux tiers.

Le président:

Quelqu'un veut-il intervenir à ce sujet?

M. John Nater:

Oui, monsieur le président.

Selon le libellé actuel, vous ne pouvez pas vous enregistrer avant le début de la période préélectorale. Si vous avez l'intention de dépenser de l'argent et de participer au processus, il faut que vous puissiez vous enregistrer tôt au lieu d'être forcé d'attendre le début de la période préélectorale. Je crois qu'il s'agit d'une période logique pour permettre cela.

Le président:

S'il n'y a pas de débat, nous allons passer au vote sur l'amendement CPC-91.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Pour ce qui est de l'amendement CPC-92, allez-y, madame Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

L'amendement ajoute un secteur géographique aux communications de sondages d'opinion pour les tiers.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est similaire à ce dont nous avons discuté il y a quelque temps. Il semble que ce soit une exigence complètement irréalisable, par conséquent, je ne peux pas appuyer cet amendement.

(1900)

Le président:

Nous allons passer au vote sur l'amendement CPC-92.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Maintenant, dans votre nouvelle série d'amendements, allez à l'amendement CPC dont le numéro de référence est 9964802. Le Parti conservateur peut présenter cet amendement.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Monsieur le président, il est 19 heures. La journée a été longue. Elle semble encore plus longue lorsque je vois les six autres amendements sur lesquels nous devons voter.

Que proposez-vous que nous tentions d'examiner?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Puis-je proposer que nous essayions d'examiner l'article 223 et que nous levions la séance par la suite?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord.

L'amendement établira pour les tiers des limites de contributions politiques qui sont cohérentes avec celles des partis politiques.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Juste pour apporter également une précision, l'amendement fait partie d'une série d'amendements. Il s'appliquerait ensuite à plusieurs autres. Il s'agit d'imposer des règles pour les contributions similaires à celles auxquelles sont assujettis les partis politiques, par exemple, en ce qui concerne les montants et la façon dont ils sont obtenus. Cet amendement traite particulièrement des prêts, mais il y en a d'autres pour les contributions, alors nous devons l'examiner conjointement avec les autres articles: 114.1, 115.1, 154, 161 et 169. Si nous rejetons cet amendement, nous rejetons également tous les autres.

Je dis seulement que, si nous voulons qu'il s'applique à l'ensemble du régime de contributions politiques que doivent respecter les partis politiques, nous devons adopter de nombreux amendements avec celui-ci. Si nous votons contre cet amendement, nous rejetons tous les autres.

Le président:

Si personne n'a quoi que ce soit d'autre à ajouter, nous allons voter sur le nouvel amendement CPC-9964802.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous passons maintenant à l'amendement CPC-94.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Il s'agit d'un petit amendement amusant.

Il se trouve que, avec ce projet de loi, si une élection était déclenchée après le 30 juin, mais pas à la date fixe des élections, par exemple, si elle avait lieu une semaine avant, l'ensemble du régime disparaît lorsqu'il s'agit des dépenses préélectorales des tiers.

L'amendement permet de conserver la période préélectorale, et vous devez suivre les règles et produire des rapports en conséquence, même si l'élection n'est pas tenue à la date fixe des élections. Si le premier ministre décide de déclencher une élection n'importe quand avant le 21 octobre 2019, mais après la période préélectorale, cela permet au régime de production de rapports de demeurer en place.

Le président:

Puis-je demander aux représentants d'Élections Canada de donner leur avis sur le fait qu'il n'y a pas de période préélectorale si l'élection n'est pas déclenchée à la date fixe des élections?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Je ne suis pas en désaccord avec vous, mais cette motion s'appliquerait seulement dans deux cas. Elle s'appliquerait si le gouvernement devait tomber à la suite d'une motion de défiance à la Chambre des communes après le début de la période préélectorale, ce qui aurait été un très long gouvernement minoritaire, ou si le premier ministre du moment convainquait le gouverneur général de dissoudre le Parlement après le début de la période préélectorale, mais avant le début de la période allant de 50 à 37 jours avant le jour de l'élection, ce qui permettrait de fixer le jour de l'élection au moment prévu conformément à la loi.

Alors, oui, si un premier ministre recommandait au gouverneur général qu'une telle élection soit déclenchée plus tôt, mais après le début de la période préélectorale, cette motion permettrait au régime de production de rapports des tiers de demeurer en place.

(1905)

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Je tiens simplement à indiquer, pour le compte rendu, que le premier ministre n'aurait pas à convaincre le gouverneur général. Le gouverneur général accepte le conseil du premier ministre du moment. On n'a pas à convaincre le gouverneur général d'une prérogative de la Couronne. Je veux seulement préciser, pour le compte rendu, que le premier ministre peut demander la dissolution du Parlement et que le gouverneur général acceptera sa demande.

Le président:

Eh bien, je contesterais cela, mais ce n'est pas ce dont nous parlons.

J'avais un ordre ici. M. Bittle et ensuite Mme May.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je comprends que les conservateurs présentent cet amendement. Nous proposons des amendements à ce sujet, et deux nouvelles périodes de production de rapports s'appliqueront dans ces amendements, peu importe qu'il y ait ou non une date fixe des élections. Nous nous opposerons à cet amendement, mais dans le même esprit, il y aura d'autres amendements qui porteront sur la même question.

Le président:

Madame May.

Mme Elizabeth May:

J'imagine que cela répond à ma préoccupation. Même s'il s'agit d'une possibilité extrêmement rare, il est insensé de laisser une lacune dans la loi relativement à quelque chose qui, selon nous, est peu probable.

La loi devrait s'appliquer même dans les circonstances les plus improbables. Je ne vote pas dans le Comité, évidemment, mais du moment que vous êtes convaincu que ce que vous proposez porte sur la même chose que, comme l'a brillamment expliqué John, son petit amendement amusant. Si votre petit amendement amusant vise la même chose que le sien, vous aurez bien fait votre travail.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je ne promets rien d'amusant.

M. John Nater:

À notre connaissance, rien n'empêche l'adoption de cet amendement. S'il y a un amendement, nous l'examinerons.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Autrement, je crois que nous devrions attendre. Vous devriez adopter celui-là.

Le président:

Nous allons voter sur l'amendement CPC-94.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: L'amendement LIB-29 a été adopté parce qu'il était corrélatif à l'amendement LIB-26. Cela signifie également que les amendements CPC-95 et CPC-96 ne peuvent pas être présentés, alors nous allons passer à l'amendement CPC-97.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il porte sur les tiers. C'est une disposition anti-contournement concernant les contributions étrangères, recommandée par le directeur général des élections.

Le président:

Les gens devraient savoir que le vote sur cet amendement s'appliquera à l'amendement CPC-149, qui se trouve à la page 276, car ils sont liés par le numéro de référence.

Y a-t-il un débat au sujet de l'amendement CPC-97?

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Peut-être pour nos fonctionnaires, l'amendement LIB-30 est un amendement similaire. Seriez-vous en mesure de nous dire quelles sont les principales différences entre les amendements CPC-97 et LIB-30, seulement pour que nous ayons une idée de ce sur quoi nous votons?

M. Nathan Cullen:

S'il est adopté, l'amendement CPC-97 annule l'amendement LIB-30, n'est-ce pas?

M. Jean-François Morin:

Corrigez-moi si j'ai tort, mais à la ligne 7 de la page 124 du projet de loi, je crois que l'article 349.95 proposé a été abrogé et remplacé par une autre disposition du Parti libéral.

(1910)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À titre indicatif, nous ne planifions pas de présenter l'amendement LIB-30.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous ne présentez pas l'amendement LIB-30, alors il s'agirait d'un amendement distinct. L'amendement ne vise pas le mélange d'argent, c'est seulement pour empêcher une personne de contourner l'intention du projet de loi qui est d'éviter que de l'argent étranger influence l'élection.

N'est-ce pas, John? Cela semble une bonne idée.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Encore une fois, je crois qu'il donne la définition des actes de collusion, non pas d'actes précis pour le contournement complet, comme nous en avons discuté en détail plus tôt. Je pense qu'il fournit une définition plus précise.

Le président:

Oui.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Monsieur le président, ai-je raison de croire que l'amendement LIB-29 a été adopté à la suite de l'adoption des amendements LIB-27 ou LIB-26?

Le président:

Il a été adopté en raison de l'adoption de l'amendement LIB-26.

M. Jean-François Morin:

D'accord, l'amendement LIB-29 a supprimé l'article 349.95 proposé du projet de loi.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela le recrée.

M. Jean-François Morin:

Vraiment?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Si nous supprimons un article du projet de loi et que nous avons maintenant un amendement qui réintroduit un article proposé, mais différemment...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non, il fait référence à un article proposé qui n'existe plus. C'est tout.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord, parce qu'il ne s'agit pas d'un article proposé distinct.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Alors, par conséquent, l'article devrait être supprimé.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord, alors je ne suis pas certain que ce soit quelque chose dont nous pouvons nous occuper. Si ce que les conservateurs tentent de faire dans leur amendement, c'est de renforcer l'article proposé, qui a été éliminé il y a trois ou cinq votes...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

On se croirait dans House of cards.

M. Nathan Cullen:

House of Cards est une excellente émission de télévision — un peu sombre.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui, très sombre.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Mais elle n'est pas aussi sombre que la réalité.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. John Nater:

En même temps, l'amendement porte sur l'article 349.95 proposé.

Le président:

Vous ne présentez pas l'amendement LIB-30, n'est-ce pas?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est exact. L'amendement LIB-30 est retiré.

Le président:

Il ne sera pas présenté.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'amendement CPC-97 est le dernier que nous devons examiner pour l'article.

M. Nathan Cullen:

[Note de la rédaction: inaudible] Si l'amendement peut être présenté seul, même si l'article proposé a été supprimé, alors c'est ce qui se produit. Je ne suis pas certain que le libellé le soutient.

Le président:

Si l'article proposé a été supprimé, l'amendement devient inadmissible, mais comme l'a dit M. Nater, une partie de l'amendement ne porte pas sur l'article proposé qui a été supprimé.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord.

M. John Nater:

Cette référence pourrait également être réglée à l'étape du rapport.

Le président:

Nous allons simplement demander au greffier législatif de nous donner des instructions.

M. Philippe Méla (greffier législatif):

C'est vous qui donnez les instructions.

Le président:

Je donne les instructions, dites-moi seulement quoi dire.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. Nathan Cullen:

Le voile a été levé. Oh, c'est le grand magicien d'Oz!

Le président:

J'encourage tout le monde à ne pas assister au caucus demain et à bien dormir afin que nous puissions travailler très tard demain soir.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je croyais que c'était la raison pour laquelle nous commencions à 9 heures, pour ne pas assister au caucus afin de pouvoir revenir ici.

Le président:

Comme notre réunion ne dure que quatre heures demain soir, sérieusement, soyez prêts. Si vous avez assez d'énergie pour demeurer un peu plus longtemps, nous pourrons examiner d'autres amendements demain soir.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il nous reste à voir si nous pouvons tout faire.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je ne sais pas si nous pouvons prendre une résolution à ce sujet ce soir. Je ne veux pas exercer de la pression sur notre greffier. Ce que nous demandons est quelque chose de délicat.

Le président:

C'est son travail.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. Nathan Cullen:

Rappelez-moi de ne jamais travailler pour vous, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Il aime la pression. C'est une bonne formation.

Croyez-vous que je vais vous laisser partir après avoir passé une heure sur un article?

(1915)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je crois que nous avons passé 55 minutes sur mon amendement. N'exagérez pas.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai entendu qu'il s'agissait d'une règle de cinq minutes.

Des députés: Ha, ha!

Un député: Cela fera...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oui, certainement.

Si les libéraux prévoient voter contre cette proposition, alors pourquoi demander à notre pauvre greffier d'essayer de trouver une solution acceptable pour tous?

Le président:

Est-ce que cela vous convient?

M. John Nater:

J'aimerais avoir un vote par appel nominal.

Le président:

Nous allons tenir un vote par appel nominal sur l'amendement CPC-97, qui s'applique également à l'amendement CPC-149.

(L'amendement est rejeté par 5 voix contre 4. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 233 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Merci à tous.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Je remercie nos témoins d'être venus malgré le court préavis et d'être restés avec nous aussi tard.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci, Anne et Trevor, d'être revenus. Vous nous avez manqué.

Le président:

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on October 16, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.