header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-09-24 INDU 127

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everybody.

Welcome to meeting number 127, where we're continuing our five-year review of the Copyright Act.

With us today, we have from the National Campus and Community Radio Association, all the way from my neck of the woods, Freya Zaltz, by video conference.

We have from the Canadian Association of Broadcasters, Nathalie Dorval, chair, board of directors; and Susan Wheeler, chair, copyright committee.

Finally, from Stingray Digital Media Group, we have Annie Francoeur, vice-president, legal and business affairs.

We were supposed to also have someone from Radio Markham York with us. However, challenges came up with the tornado that affected her ability to come here. Hopefully, we can maybe get her in at another time.

We're going to get started right into this after I introduce our newest member, Mr. David de Burgh Graham.

Ms. Zaltz, you have up to seven minutes.

Ms. Freya Zaltz (Regulatory Affairs Director, National Campus and Community Radio Association):

As you heard, my name is Freya Zaltz. I'm the regulatory affairs director for the National Campus and Community Radio Association. I also represent two additional associations, l'Association des radiodiffuseurs communautaires du Québec and l'Alliance des radios communautaires du Canada. These associations work to ensure stability and support for non-profit campus and community radio stations, and the long-term growth and effectiveness of the sector. Going forward, I will refer to the sector and the stations as C and C for campus and community. Together, the associations represent about 90% of the Canadian C and C sector, or 165 radio stations.

I'd like to tell the committee a little about the sector and how its stations are affected by copyright tariffs. I'll also emphasize the continuing importance of paragraph 68.1(1)(b) of the Copyright Act, which provides C and C stations with certainty and protection from some tariff increases that could impact their financial viability.

C and C radio stations reflect the diversity of the communities they serve. They are community owned, operated, managed and controlled, and some or all of their programming is produced by community volunteers. Being tied to communities so directly means that C and C stations produce programming that is rich in local information and reflection. They also present a wide variety of community perspectives, especially under-represented voices and content.

C and C stations in Canada provide their communities with access to local programming in more than 65 languages, including a number of indigenous languages. They provide an array of locally produced programming that reflects the linguistic duality of Canada and meets the needs of both French and English linguistic minority communities. They provide important community services.

The Canadian music industry and the public derive great benefit from the support that C and C broadcasters provide to Canadian artists as a result of their mandate to provide diverse content and exposure for new artists. Many successful Canadian artists owe their start to C and C radio. Because these stations focus on achieving their mandate rather than on generating profit, they can afford to take the risk of playing works by unknown artists who otherwise lack radio exposure.

One of the sector's concerns is ensuring that paragraph 68.1(1)(b) of the Copyright Act is preserved when the act is amended. That paragraph limits to $100 per year the fee that non-commercial radio stations must pay to the copyright collective Re:Sound for the rights associated with communicating to the public by telecommunication performers' performances of music works or sound recordings embodying such performers' performances within Re:Sound's repertoire, in other words, neighbouring rights.

Keeping that tariff and all others low is very important to stations in the C and C sector. Because they are non-profit, they have no stable sources of operational funding, and are usually under severe financial constraints. Some stations have tiny budgets, as small as $5,000 per year, and no paid staff whatsoever. Many already struggle to pay their expenses, and any additional tariff obligations, not matter how small, make them more vulnerable to closure due to insolvency.

Also, applicable tariffs have been steadily increasing in number and cost, and the tariff addressed by paragraph 68.1(1)(b) is only one of presently five tariffs that C and C stations must pay annually. This increase is due in part to listeners' expectations that they'll be able to access C and C stations' content via multiple platforms, including over the Internet. The costs of providing these services over multiple platforms, including the associated copyright tariffs, make it increasingly difficult for C and C stations to remain solvent.

In that vein, existing exceptions for ephemeral and internal copies should be retained for non-commercial uses, since non-profit broadcasters do not benefit financially from the use of copyrighted material.

Also, participating in Copyright Board proceedings and effective negotiations with copyright collectives requires resources and legal expertise, and for financial reasons the C and C sector has limited capability in these respects.

(1535)



It would, therefore, help the associations to simplify the board's procedures where possible. The board's 2013 Re:Sound tariff 8 decision suggests that it understands non-profit users' financial limitations perhaps better than the copyright collectives do, so moving to a private agreement model is not necessarily in the association's best interests.

The C and C sector understands that copyright tariffs are intended to compensate copyright holders for their use of the work. Since C and C stations don't derive any profit from such use, and since, instead, their goal is to increase the exposure and further the careers of Canadian and emerging artists, they believe there's value to copyright holders in keeping tariffs low for the C and C sector.

The associations, therefore, appreciate the protection that paragraph 68.1(1)(b) provides by limiting the cost and providing ongoing certainty for one of the many tariffs that C and C stations must pay. They ask that this committee keep these issues in mind when contemplating possible changes to the act in order to ensure that Canadians continue to reap the benefits of a strong C and C broadcasting sector.

In conclusion, I appreciate the opportunity to speak today, and I would be pleased to answer any questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to the Canadian Association of Broadcasters.

Ms. Dorval, you have the floor. You have up to seven minutes.

(1540)

[Translation]

Ms. Nathalie Dorval (Chair, Board of Directors, Canadian Association of Broadcasters):

Ladies and gentlemen, on behalf of the Canadian Association of Broadcasters, I want to thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss issues relating to copyright, which are integral to our businesses.[English]

Local broadcasting in our country provides entertainment, but it is also a critical source of news and information to Canadians from large urban centres with diverse ethnic populations to the most rural, remote and first nations communities.

From emergency alerting to local news in a variety of languages, radio connects communities. In fact, radio is one of the sole sources of local news and culture in rural and remote communities across Canada, many of which have already felt the sting of local newspaper and television closures.[Translation]

Radio also plays a key role in maintaining the health of the Canadian music eco-system. Not only is private radio the number one source for discovering Canadian music it is also the number one source of funding for the development, promotion and the export of Canadian musical talent.

Last year alone, private radio contributed $47 million in Canadian Content Development funding, the majority of which was directed to the country’s four largest music funding agencies: FACTOR, MusicAction, Radio Starmaker Fund and Fonds RadioStar. Those agencies provide critical support to Canadian music labels and artists to create, promote and export their music internationally and across our vast country.

We are proud of the role we have played in helping to create the vibrant and successful community of internationally successful music artists our country enjoys today.

Over and above this important role, radio also invests in broadcast talent at the local level, creating employment opportunities, enhancing creativity and bringing local content to people everywhere.

Finally, let's not forget that local radio serves as one of the key channels that local businesses use to market their products and services.[English]

We believe the Copyright Act, in its current form, strikes the very delicate balance of ensuring that artists are renumerated for their work while also ensuring that local radio has a reasonable and predictable copyright regime that reflects its continued investment in local communities and music artists. Indeed, section 68.1 of the act provides important support for local radio stations by mandating that radio will pay neighbouring rights of $100 on the first $1.25 million in revenue, and then paying a higher rate through a percentage of advertising revenue which is set by the Copyright Board of Canada. While the rate structure for neighbouring rights payment is subject to this special measure, as Parliament intended in 1998, the music industry still collects over $91 million in copyright payments from private radio each year.

If Parliament agrees to amend the Copyright Act by removing these exemptions, the primary beneficiaries will be the multinational record labels that are proposing it. Under the existing neighbouring rights regime, payments are allocated fifty-fifty between performers and record labels. Where the money flows from there is unclear, and worth further discussion before any amendments to the act should be contemplated.

What we do know from publicly available information is that Re:Sound, the copyright collective responsible for distributing neighbouring rights payments, takes 14% off the the top in administrative fees before anyone gets paid. Of the remaining amounts, the music industry has carefully concealed where that money might go. For example, in the English market, based on radio repertoire, we estimate that of the performers' share, after administration costs are deducted, 15% goes to international performers and 28% goes to Canadian performers. Of the labels' portion, no less than 41% goes to the multinational record labels, with Canadian labels receiving only about 2%. What this tells you is that multinational record labels will be the primary beneficiary of the proposed change to section 68.1, at the cost of local Canadian businesses.

The American labels are also asking you to change the definition of sound recording in the act to extract additional royalty payments from television broadcasters. In fact, the labels are attempting to squeeze out an additional payment for the use of music from broadcasters, distributors and digital platforms in a television program that has already been paid for up front by the producers of that program. Quite simply, they are asking us to pay twice for the same product, otherwise known as double-dipping.

(1545)

[Translation]

The current definition of “sound recording” is carefully worded to reflect the contractual realities of the audiovisual production sector. This was confirmed by the Supreme Court of Canada in a 2012 decision. Any consideration of adding new costs on conventional television broadcasters, or on the digital sector, should be rejected as it would diminish Canadian broadcasters’ ability to invest in Canadian productions by shifting more than $50 million into the hands of foreign owned corporations.[English]

Honourable members, the Canadian Association of Broadcasters respectfully urges the committee to reject any proposed amendment to the Copyright Act that would harm the Canadian broadcasting sector and jeopardize the important service that local broadcasters provide to Canadians.

I want to reiterate that the current legislation strikes the right balance between rights holders and local broadcasters, and that the proposal being advanced by the music industry risks coming at the expense of local programming and the valued and essential services that we provide to Canadians. [Translation]

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[English]

We're going to move to Stingray Digital Group.[Translation]

Ms. Francoeur, the floor is yours for seven minutes.

Ms. Annie Francoeur (Vice-President, Legal and Business Affairs, Stingray Digital Group Inc.):

Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen.

On behalf of Stingray Digital Group Inc., I would like to begin by thanking you for the invitation to participate in the discussions on the review of the Copyright Act, particularly with respect to music, the industry in which Stingray operates.

Founded in 2017, Stingray is a Canadian company headquartered in Montreal and currently employs 340 people in Canada. We distribute our services not only in Canada, but also abroad to approximately 400 million subscribers or households in 156 countries. We also serve 12,000 commercial clients in 78,000 locations.

For fiscal year 2018, approximately 47% of Stingray’s revenue comes from Canada. The more successful Stingray is abroad, the more Canadian artists benefit from the visibility abroad.

Stingray’s portfolio of services in Canada includes an audio music service called Stingray Music, which includes 2,000 channels dedicated to approximately 100 musical genres. Our services also include videos on demand, music videos, karaoke, concerts and a dozen linear audiovisual channels such as Stingray Classica, Stingray Festival 4K, Stingray Ambiance, and so on.

Our services are available on multiple digital platforms and through devices such as cable or satellite television, the Internet, mobile apps, video game consoles, in-flight or on-train entertainment systems, connected cars, WiFi systems such as Sonos, and so on.

More than 100 music experts from around the world are responsible for programming Stingray's various services and channels. This is one of the differences between Stingray and a number of other music service providers, which normally use algorithms to select the content they offer. Stingray's channel programming is also adapted to local markets and demographics.

Out of necessity, Stingray is also a technology company. Managing a large portfolio of digital assets and delivering the content across multiple platforms and markets requires Stingray to remain at the forefront of technology. The Stingray Group therefore invests several million dollars a year in research and development in order to remain competitive and retain its clients.

(1550)

[English]

Stingray is committed to encouraging Canadian talent and artists, and it participates actively in the development and promotion of Canadian content. During the last broadcast year, Stingray spent approximately $379,000 in Canadian content development initiatives, which include payments to Factor, Musicaction and the Community Radio Fund of Canada, but also awards at music events and festivals, artists' performance fees, workshops, educational sessions, etc.

In addition to such CCD initiatives, after Stingray's IPO in 2015, the CRTC approved the change in ownership and effective control of Stingray, but it required that Stingray pay tangible benefits corresponding to $5.5 million over a period of seven years. In addition to these regulatory obligations, Stingray also contributes voluntarily in many other ways to promote and develop Canadian artists.

Very recently, Stingray partnered with ADISQ to create a new music video channel made available through television operators in Canada, named PalmarèsADISQ by Stingray. Pursuant to Stingray's desire to invest in young talent, a portion of the profits generated by the channel will be invested in local music video production through existing third party funds like RadioStar.

Through this initiative, Stingray will finance the production of music videos broadcast on its channels, but it will also help develop the careers of up-and-coming Canadian and Quebec directors and artists. Each year, Stingray also gives certain amounts to events or partners involved with the development and promotion of Canadian talent. For example, Stingray has been a regular sponsor of panels at les Rencontres de l'ADISQ and other similar events.

Stingray also produces the PausePlay series, which consists of exclusive interviews and intimate performances of popular and emerging artists recorded live to promote their new albums or tours.

Such recordings are made available by Stingray on social media platforms and channels to offer important exposure for those artists. We also have a Stingray blog where we have editorial coverage on album reviews, concert reviews, etc.

With respect to the review of the Copyright Act, we respectfully submit that the Copyright Act should remain as is at this time. We do not believe that any amendments are necessary. We believe that the current Copyright Act establishes the right balance between the rights holders and users such as Stingray.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move right into questioning.

Mr. Longfield, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thanks, everybody, for your presentations today.

Thanks to the clerk for getting us a range of presenters covering different media styles and different sizes and types of businesses.

I want to try to get an idea first of all in terms of the National Campus and Community Radio Association. I've participated on the the University of Guelph station CFRU, on Open Sources, a local political commentary that's been going for about 15 years now. I'm just about to go on Zombie Jamboree. They've asked me to bring a Canadian playlist with me and discuss Canadian music. There's a lot of volunteer activity.

You mentioned in your presentation maintaining paragraph 68.1(1)(b). Was there a life before that? Was there a time when local campus radio stations weren't protected in a way that's being done right now through the exemptions?

Ms. Freya Zaltz:

I'm not familiar with the history of the act in detail, but my understanding is that neighbouring rights is a relatively new concept in Canada and that exemption was introduced at the same time as the neighbouring rights regime. I may be incorrect about that, but that's my basic understanding.

I don't think there was a neighbouring rights tariff prior to the introduction of that portion of the act. Certainly, campus and community radio stations were required to pay other tariffs prior to that, for example, to SOCAN. I don't think there was a tariff for neighbouring rights earlier. My understanding is that it was introduced in the late 1980s or early 1990s.

(1555)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you. The purpose of the question was to see if there was something to fall back to, that we had in place before and that might have been more successful than this. I think distinguishing the not-for-profit from the for-profit operations is something that is really worth consideration as we go forward, so thanks for putting that on the table.

I want to go to Ms. Dorval from the Canadian Association of Broadcasters.

I've spoken with local musicians in Guelph who have talked about the technology that's used to determine how songs are played and reimbursed and how it's really a sampling that's done versus having the technology taking the actual digital playlists and reimbursing against digital playlists.

Is your association either aware of or looking into a more accurate way of paying artists when their songs are being played?

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

My understanding is that more and more we are required to provide the list of artists that are played and that it is done in accordance with the songs that have actually been played, as opposed to samples.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

It sounds to me as if the technology is there and we aren't using it. Why aren't we?

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

We are using it.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

That's not what I heard.

Ms. Susan Wheeler (Chair, Copyright Committee, Canadian Association of Broadcasters):

We remit, as part of our remittances to the various collectives, the song list. It's captured through software that we use at the broadcast level. How it's then reallocated amongst the rights holders within the collective is not something we have any view into. That's something the collectives themselves would have to answer.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

There's possibly some transparency there at some level that we're not reaching, and that we could consider.

We've heard really the opposite testimony to what you've provided today, that the major beneficiaries of the current exemptions are the broadcasters that have multiple locations, and that instead of protecting small radio stations, as it was initially intended, we're now giving protection to large stations that have multiple locations across Canada.

Have you heard that argument? Is there something I'm not understanding there?

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

We've certainly heard this and we find it very interesting.

First of all, I think you must know that many of the radio stations that are under the CAB umbrella are small stations. Almost 60% of these stations are small stations.

As for the stations that are owned by bigger ownership groups, they still remain small stations, but they obviously benefit from being part of a larger constituency. What happens there is that when we talk before committees like this one, radio is seen to have a sole operation, which is the great support it gives to artists and the cultural sector, but when you look at a broader range, where radio really does very well, you see that it's one of the last media outlets to provide reliable and professional news and information to Canadians wherever they are.

Many newspapers have closed. OTA stations have closed. What happens is that larger groups that have larger stations subsidize the smaller stations of the group for them to be able to provide those broader services to Canadians, in addition to the great support for artists and the cultural sector.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

The struggle being that artists are having a declining revenue, of course, and stations are having an increasing revenue, and we're trying to square that situation.

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

Just to clarify, in terms of increasing revenues, radio has experienced four years of consecutive revenue declines. I think that may be also a miscommunication in terms of our—

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

If there's a graph you could provide the clerk so that we can include it in our study, that would be very helpful.

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

It would be my pleasure.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Very quickly, because I only have about 30 seconds left for Madam Francoeur, on the cost of streaming and how much artists get for streaming versus how much they get for radio broadcasting, do you have a comparison of that?

Ms. Annie Francoeur:

We do not, because all we know is how much we pay in royalties to collective societies or to the rights holders we have agreements with, but after that, in terms of how they allocate it to their members, we have no visibility on that.

(1600)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Okay. It seems like there's a possible inequity there if digital radio stations are paying a certain amount and digital streaming services are paying substantially less.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Lloyd for seven minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thanks for coming today, and my apologies for being late.

I appreciated your testimony today.

My first question is going to be for either you, Madam Dorval, or Ms. Wheeler, regarding costs within the industry over the past 20 years. Just in looking at inflation of 2%, costs go up. On the 1997 decision to have $100 for the first $1.5 million, would you say that legislating a fixed cost like that and not addressing it for over 20 years now may be something that could be looked at? Would there be a rate you could look at that you could say would be reasonable as a cost?

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

If I may offer a different perspective on this very good question, even if we were changing this amount, the end result is that very little is going to make it to the Canadian artists. What you've heard is from the U.S. multinational labels that are coming before you. They seem to be talking on behalf of artists, but really, in terms of what they're doing—I think you've been provided the graph—it's a money grab. Most of this money is going out of the country to international labels, and very little is remaining in the country for Canadian artists.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Why is that, though?

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

It's the way they distribute this money going forward. There is a fifty-fifty split between the record labels and the performers. On top of that, when they start, they deduct about 14% for admin fees. In the graph we've provided, you see that international performers get 15% of that, multinational labels get 41%, Canadian labels get 2%, and Canadian performers end up with 28%. Most of this is just leaving the country, while it's weakening smaller radio broadcasters and the broadcasting industry, which is providing other key services to Canadians across the country.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

That leads me into my next line of questioning. Some of our clerks have provided us with some excellent leads.

To start with, in regard to sound recordings and the exclusion of sound recordings from royalties, it seems that 44 countries include sound recordings in the royalties structure. Some of those countries are not outlier countries. They include the United Kingdom, France and Germany. The pattern I saw is that these countries aren't neighbours of the United States. Could you comment on how Canada's proximity to the United States maybe makes it necessary for us to have a unique system?

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

You're talking about the definitions of sound recording and television programming. We need to be very prudent when looking at this.

We are in a very complex copyright regime under the Canadian act. A great balance has been achieved. It's not a simple exercise. When you look at the regime in place, sound recordings in Canada are being cleared at the source. The producer goes to the artist, the songwriters and the label, and they clear that music up front. That's where we have a different regime; it's not being paid again when it's broadcast.

That's why we're saying if we were to keep maintaining this clearance at the source, and then pay back when we broadcast, we're going to be paying twice for the same input.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Yes, although countries such as France, the United Kingdom and Germany have this double-dipping, as you say. Rather, maybe they don't have the double-dipping, but they don't exclude sound recording. Can you give me a comparison of what it's like for somebody like your stakeholders in Germany? How has that impacted their industries?

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

Maybe we can go deeper to provide you additional information, but I am not familiar with the German or French regimes, so I wouldn't be able to answer that.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Delving deeper into my last question, is it our proximity to the United States, which is such a cultural behemoth, that requires us to have a more complex system than the European model?

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

I would just add that we already have a unique system here in Canada compared to the U.S., in the sense that radio broadcasters in the U.S. don't pay this tariff. Canadian broadcasters are actually paying multinational record companies for rights that aren't even recognized in their country of origin.

(1605)

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

How can we better compensate Canadian artists instead of these multinational artists, if this is an issue? What would be your recommendation for how we deal with that?

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

The appearance of Bryan Adams before you last week was really telling in terms of the different perspective you can get from an artist who's sitting before you and really speaks for himself. It's different from what you may hear from the record labels.

Maybe looking additionally at how this pie is already being distributed with the money that's already flowing in the system could be part of the answer.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

My next question will be for our community radio witnesses here, who have joined us over video feed.

You noted in your submission that you'd like the Copyright Board to be a simplified regime. It's easy to say you want it to be simpler, but in what ways should we recommend that it be simplified to help you out as an organization?

Ms. Freya Zaltz:

I would prefer to answer that question afterwards in writing, if I may.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Please follow up in writing.

Ms. Freya Zaltz:

The recommendations that the campus and community radio sector would make are mirrored in the recommendations that were contained in a report by the committee that was studying the Copyright Board in the last couple of years. There were some issues raised by all of the different stakeholders in that proceeding.

The campus and community radio sector didn't participate in that initial review process because we felt that all the concerns we could have raised had already been very ably raised by other groups. However, they were concerns with respect to timelines, how long the Copyright Board takes to initiate and conclude proceedings and to issue decisions, and other procedural matters. The procedures of the Copyright Board are not easily accessible by someone who doesn't have specialized legal training. It's difficult to understand the steps, follow what's going on and contribute what's required. Certainly it could be much more transparent and user-friendly in terms of how it operates.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Masse.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I'll continue with Ms. Zaltz.

I represent Windsor, Ontario, where the university campus and others have made significant investments in their broadcasting. What is generally happening with campuses and community broadcasters right now? Are we the exception, or has there been a bit of a renewal and continued interest and expression to develop it further than before?

Ms. Freya Zaltz:

Community radio is growing at a much faster rate than any other radio sector. The number of new licences issued to community radio stations is significant, particularly in recent years.

The issue is that there is no stable source of operational funding. There are grants available. Stations engage in fundraising initiatives. Some in larger communities are very successful. In the smaller communities, they have a harder time raising enough funds to operate a station. When they're associated with a university, they have the added support of infrastructure, premises, all sorts of utilities and whatnot that community stations have to pay for out-of-pocket.

I would say there is an increasing interest across the country in developing community radio stations, but we're also starting to see some close at a rate faster than we've ever seen them close before. All those that have closed have closed because they are unable to meet their expenses. They can't raise enough revenue. In some cases, because they can't afford to hire staff, their volunteers burn out and just don't have enough energy to continue operating the station.

The requirements that stations have to meet in terms of their CRTC licences do require a lot of ongoing supervision. There are significant amounts of paperwork, being cognizant of what's being played on air and calculating percentages. In some cases, this is very difficult for volunteer-only stations to do on a long-term, ongoing basis.

While we're seeing a definite increase in the interest in community radio across the country and in the number of groups that are applying for licences, we're also seeing more struggles to continue operating, particularly by the smaller stations.

(1610)

Mr. Brian Masse:

I know there's a big challenge with capital. That seems to be for improvements for the physical components necessary for upgrading and so forth. The big gap seems to be that it's only grant-based. The nominal revenues coming in keep operations going, but getting capital improvements is very difficult. Interest can grow but capital improvements are quite expensive.

Ms. Freya Zaltz:

That's true. Also, the funding that is available is usually project-based. It doesn't cover operating expenses at all except to the extent that they're associated temporarily with the completion of a project. Also, the infrastructure capital investments.... For example, as one of the presenters mentioned, the Community Radio Fund of Canada does provide project grants to stations, but it's not available for capital expenditures. If they need a new antenna, or a transmitter or studio equipment, they have to fundraise separately to pay for that.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

I'm going to move to our broadcasters. With regards to the content you're providing, you've noted the difference in terms of international markets and compensation. How would you compare the local news content, weather, sports and other things in your programming versus that of competitors, in terms of empirical data that you already have?

Is there a net benefit to those elements with regards to radio broadcasting differential? You've noticed a difference in terms of the payments going to the markets, but are you also providing an increased capacity of local news and other types of content?

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

We don't have any statistics to provide you at this time, but we can provide you with an analysis of our programming expenses.

I should note that overall, around 78% of radio's revenue goes to expenses. That would include programming production, technical, sales promotion and general admin. That's a very large portion of our revenues going to just day-to-day operations to keep the stations on the air and to offer the programming that you've referenced, including news and information programming.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I would be interested in following up there. Quite obviously there has been interest, not only in a community like mine that's on the border, in terms of ensuring Canadian content, but there's a public interest clause for that as well. I'm interested in the comparables, especially when you're talking about some of the expenses that are happening.

You mentioned, as well, that your American competitors do not have to pay the same fees. In a border community like mine, where we actually have Canadian content penetrating American markets, maybe you can tell me the disadvantage or advantage.

I'm curious. You've noted that there is a difference in terms of the encumbrances, but the airwaves compete on both sides of the Detroit River, and the regions are very lucrative markets, and very challenging markets too.

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

Absolutely. There would be a clear disparity there, in terms of the Detroit radio stations broadcasting into Windsor. They would not be paying neighbouring rights or performance rights to the artists for the music they play on the radio. Canadian broadcasters do pay that to artists who come from countries of origin that recognize that right, so non-U.S. performers.

(1615)

Mr. Brian Masse:

How does that relate to advertising revenue, and attracting advertisers and revenue coming into the station?

Is there a correlation there as well?

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

Certainly I think that has been an ongoing challenge with border stations. That isn't exclusive to copyright; it's a matter of having a different regulatory regime in place in the Canadian market than you have in the U.S. market. There are certain operational costs associated with that which won't have parity across the border.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Graham. You have seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.[Translation]

I will start with Ms. Dorval, and I will continue along the same lines as Mr. Masse's questions.

You say that the United States does not pay fees, that there is no such system. How is copyright managed in the United States for radio stations?

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

They do not pay for sound recordings, because they are related rights. This does not mean that they do not pay any copyright fees. This is the comparative measure we have used for this tariff, knowing that they have asked you to repeal the exemption provided for in section 68.1 of the act to increase those payments.

On the broader issue of the remuneration of copyright in the United States, I am not in a position to answer. [English]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What's the relationship between Ms. Zaltz and Ms. Dorval and these organizations? Is it close, between campus and community and commercial radio, or is there a lot of tension between the two sides?

Could either of you answer that?

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

To my knowledge, there is no tension between the two sides, even if we look at the francophone market, where Cogeco radio is helping the community station in Montreal.

I would say in the French market, I have not experienced or seen any tension there.

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

It would be the same in the English market.

We should note, too, that as part of our regulatory requirements, we direct a portion of our revenues to a C and C radio association.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mrs. Zaltz, do you have any comments?

Ms. Freya Zaltz:

Could I ask you to clarify?

Is there a specific aspect that you're referring to in terms of tension?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In terms of what you're doing here, I'm wondering if C and C radio and the commercial radio stations agree with each other, or if you find disagreements between your positions.

Ms. Freya Zaltz:

Thank you. As far as I can tell, our positions are complementary, as they often are on copyright tariff issues. I don't see any difference of opinion here.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This applies to all of you.

When you play music, how do you know which of the five different tariff systems you have to pay into, or maybe you're playing something that doesn't even apply to this, and how do you know?

Is there some way of very quickly telling which regime a piece of music is under?

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

We pay the five tariffs, and then it's redistributed by the collective that oversees these tariffs. However, we pay the five tariffs all the time.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You can play any music you want in confidence that it will be covered by one of those tariffs.

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

Yes. It's not one or the other tariff; we pay the five of them.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

What are they?

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

We pay SOCAN, Re:Sound, CONNECT, Artisti and SODRAC.

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

This is for a total of $91 million for private radio stations per year.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

With regard to the $100 that goes up to $1.25 million of revenue, if a company owns 20 different radio stations, and each one has its own call sign and is, effectively, a different station, is it revenue for the full company, or is each one of those radio stations administered separately for the $100?

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

It's on an individual market basis.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So, if a whole bunch of radio stations are each under the thresholds for the $100, then they don't have to pay a whole lot.

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

With regard to the particular Re:Sound tariff, they wouldn't. If their revenues are under $1.25 million, they'd only pay $100.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

With the rise of Internet radio, what are your ideas of how we address that? Anybody can set up a streaming service on their computer at home and they have an Internet radio station. They, obviously, don't pay into collectives. Is that something that has to be regulated, or are you saying that we should let that be as part of the organic Internet sphere?

(1620)

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

I'll defer to my colleague from Stingray, but my understanding is that Internet radio broadcasters do pay copyright. They would be required to pay copyright.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How enforceable is that?

Ms. Annie Francoeur:

I'm not sure I understand. Are we talking about services that would be illegal and not pay the royalty tariffs? [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Anyone can launch an Internet radio station. I can do it on my iPad in 30 seconds.

Ms. Annie Francoeur:

There would be a number of problems from the outset. Where did you get the content? Is it duly authorized? Are you paying the applicable fees? There are many things to consider before launching a music service.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

Ms. Annie Francoeur:

I was asking you the question to know whether we are talking about a service that's illegal or a service that does the right thing.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are there many illegal services, in your opinion?

Ms. Annie Francoeur:

I would not be able to tell you. I know that there are many people who use music illegally, from different points of view. Our group offers karaoke services, for example.[English]

There are so many karaoke companies that are not fully licensed or duly licensed, so we know for a fact that people are not using only content that is licensed. In terms of music streaming services, specifically, I wouldn't know.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fair enough.

Have you taken part in the Copyright Board reform consultations, and do you have any comments on the Copyright Board itself and how it works?

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

Obviously, there are things that can always be improved. As our colleague was saying, the length of time that the decision takes before it gets out and the retroactive portion that is applied on these tariffs that are usually always increasing is definitely an issue with regard to predictability of payment for the industry. That would certainly be something that we would look for an improvement on.

Ms. Annie Francoeur:

In terms of Stingray, we've been only very recently involved with the Copyright Board proceeding. So far it's going well, but our understanding is that the government is also reviewing and might allocate additional resources to the Copyright Board, which will, obviously, help the efficiency there.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We're going to move to Mr. Albas.

You have five minutes, please.

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

I'd like to thank all of our witnesses for taking the time to lend us their expertise here today.

I'd like to start with Ms. Dorval.

Ms. Dorval, you mentioned that many radio stations offer a lot of local content, particularly news, and I just want to reiterate how important that is in many parts of my riding. However, I will tell you that many newspaper editors tell me that they swear that they actually hear the pages of their newspapers turning, oftentimes, in some of those reports. I think that's just an old joke.

I would like to ask a couple of questions along the same lines as MP Lloyd.

The exemption, when it comes to royalties, has existed pretty much as it was first created in 1997. I know that there have been some witnesses who have said that it was meant to be temporary. I understand that your industry has said, “no, this was meant to be permanent”, but even in looking at it when it was put in place in 1997, I don't believe that there's any kind of inflationary clause that goes along with it. At the very least, to get to a proper parity today with purchasing power, it would be about $148.20—that's probably an imprecise calculation. At the very least, would you not agree that there should be an elevation so that this amount is honoured in purchasing power of 1997 with today?

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

I fully understand. Your point doesn't seem unreasonable, but again I would add that this is going to do very little to help the Canadian artists in our country because 60% of that money is going to flow out of the country.

Mr. Dan Albas:

How can you argue that paying in 1997 dollars, you would have been able to purchase more with that? I think that's a rather inane comment, madam. It should be that if something applies.... We do this with old age security and with many government programs to ensure that they are keeping up with it. Would you not agree that this, at the very least, would be fair and consistent with the act?

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

Yes, I guess that's why I'm saying that I don't think it's unreasonable. I think it's reasonable, but what I'm saying is that even if you do that, and it's a reasonable increase, very little of the result of that increase will end up in the end with the Canadian artist.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I recognize that point, but at the same time, really, $100, whether it be then or now, isn't a lot of money. Again, the idea is that, bit by bit, that loosens its ability to pay for something in today's dollars.

(1625)

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

Absolutely.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I would hope that we would find some agreement along those lines.

That being said, I'd like to ask the same question to the National Campus and Community Radio Association. Would that be an issue for your association: to have that at least brought up to a proper level of today?

Ms. Freya Zaltz:

It's a difficult position to be in because the campus and community radio sector strongly supports Canadian artists, particularly new and emerging artists, so we don't want to be in a position of taking money away from them. However, at the same time, non-profit stations just don't have any more money. Even if it were eminently fair to provide an increase in payment to those artists, the stations don't have the money to give to them. We're in a difficult position, then, because we have to kind of argue both things at the same time: that the artists should be properly compensated and that we can't afford to pay any more.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Well, if you can't find some agreement on literally paying dollar for dollar what it was meant to be in 1997, I find that the two positions are pretty far here, Mr. Chair.

I'll go back to the National Campus and Community Radio Association.

In your brief, you referred to a series of tariffs that small community and campus stations have to pay annually. Can you list the tariffs, their purposes and their amounts? Roughly what part of the annual budget for most of your members do you believe that would represent?

Ms. Freya Zaltz:

I would have to provide more detail to you in writing on that, given the number of stations we're talking about.

I can tell you what the five tariffs are, though. There is the performing rights tariff to SOCAN, which is at a rate of 1.9% of gross operating costs.

Then there are two tariffs that are paid to Re:Sound. One is for the one that we're talking about under paragraph 68.1(1)(b). Another is a streaming and webcasting tariff that's paid to Re:Sound. I think it would be more effective for me to provide the information about rates in writing.

The remaining two are to CMRRA and SODRAC. Those tariffs are currently the subject of a proceeding under the Copyright Board, so the rates are not resolved going forward. One is for mechanical rights, so for reproduction right of copyrighted material that stations use internally on hard drives, CDs and whatnot. Then the other is for online services. At this point, actually, the campus and community sector does not have a very clear idea of what sorts of rates we're even talking about for the online services because we have only begun to negotiate that.

The Chair:

If you would like to submit the accurate numbers and information to the clerk, that would be great. Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Sheehan.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

I'd like to echo everyone's comments that it's been great testimony for us to think about. We've heard some different testimony over time. One comment is from artists saying they are making less money than they ever have.

Here today we've heard some testimony that we should just leave things as is. Your suggestion is that if we change things, the international labels will make more money. How so? Explain in a little more detail how that works.

Listening to your testimony, I think Canadian radio does some intangible things. I wonder if you have any information about the exposure that Canadian artists receive through radio. Is there a value to it, whether they're up-and-coming or if they're from a certain genre, that sort of exposure and development?

We heard testimony about the radio starmaker fund, when someone is purchased and whatnot. In particular, do you have any statistics about how our Canadian artists might receive some sort of tangible financial benefit by being exposed on that?

Those are some of the things in my head, if someone would start with that.

(1630)

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

I'll try to take them one at a time. For the first one, distribution of that money with the record labels, we had to do an analysis of the songs that we play on the radio in our industry to try to understand how that money is being distributed within Re:Sound organizations. It's difficult for us to give you more than the breakdown that we've provided to you. We've been able to sort out through our own analysis of what's being played on the radio. It would be great for Re:Sound to come and explain how they distribute that money to the different components of their constituents.

In terms of exposure, because of the public policy of the CRTC, Canadian radio plays 35% of Canadian music in the English market, which is a direct exposure to Canadian artists. In the francophone market it's even higher. We have to play 65% of French vocal music, but 100% of that is not necessarily Canadian because we're allowed to play songs from France or Belgium. Most of it, close to 60%, is Canadian music. That gives you a sense of the exposure that Canadian artists get on radio.

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

In addition to the airplay, we often bring artists into our studios and allow them to talk about their new albums or their new projects. We also have spotlight initiatives when we invite our listeners and members of the community to come and benefit from a showcase of Canadian artists and maybe gain exposure to artists that they are not otherwise familiar with.

We see it as a symbiotic relationship, where we provide promotion and exposure for Canadian artists and help them to grow their careers, both here at home and then—through our direct financing or funding to agencies like Factor and starmaker fund —we give them access to monies that they would otherwise not have to be able to tour and make their records and manage their careers in a way that doesn't require them to have other outside distractions.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

That's helpful.

Help me understand this. What I'm having a bit of a problem with is that we have this chart that shows that Canadian labels are getting 2% and Canadian performers are getting 28%. It's showing that 70% of non-Canadians are getting a benefit under the current system, but you're saying don't change it. We're still only getting 30%, and you're saying it's going to be worse if we change it.

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

Oh no, actually, we're not saying “don't change this”. We're saying that maybe there's something that you should look into with that part of the issue. Even if you were changing the $100 on the first $1.25 million and making it more, it would end up there and that would flow out of the country.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

How would we change it to improve that particular piece of evidence?

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

You can't change it, because that is something that is contractually arrived at between the artist and their label. I think that's where you heard Bryan Adams earlier in this hearing—

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

He didn't testify here. He testified over there....

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

Oh yes, you're right. My apologies.

He talked about the contractual challenges that certain artists have when they're starting out. They don't have the contracting power to be able to arrange for things in a way that's as balanced as it might be now, once he has become Bryan Adams....

There was a very useful article recently about Spotify changing its business model, and it really reinforces the message we're trying to convey here. It talks about a traditional label deal. They have a pie chart that shows 41.6% going to the label, 48% going to Spotify and 10% going to the artist.

These are contractual arrangements that the labels have entered into with Canadian artists. It's not something that can be undone through a legislative regime. It's really something that is a business affair of theirs.

All we're saying is that under the copyright regime, if you change the amount that radio is paying out, the net beneficiaries, really, are the multinational record labels in the end. Yes, artists will get a bit more money, but the lion's share of that money will go out of Canada, at the expense of local broadcasters.

(1635)

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're going to move on to you, Mr. Chong. You have five minutes.

Hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, CPC):

Thank you to our witnesses for appearing.

I want to focus on radio and in particular on for-profit radio. I don't really want to focus on the not-for-profit community radio stations at this point.

In looking at the research that our analysts have pulled together, it's clear that your revenues are under pressure, both in radio and in television, but the operating margins seem to be holding fairly constant although there is a slight decrease in the operating margin for radio.

A pretty big landmark study by the C.D. Howe Institute about three years ago concluded that the value of the royalties that artists and multinationals and domestic rights holders should be getting is about two and a half times what actually is being paid out. The study concluded that for the year they analyzed, which was 2012, about $178 million was paid out in royalty revenues, but the actual value of the playing of these songs on radio was actually closer to $440 million. It concluded that there has to be a new way of looking at how these royalties are structured.

The author of the report, who is a professor emeritus of economics at the Université de Montréal, concluded that the amount of royalty revenues is not fair. I wonder if you could comment on that study or on the principle behind the study.

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

I have no direct knowledge of that study. I would say that we feel that the Copyright Act as it is today achieves the right balance. It is very easy to upset that balance. Obviously, you will probably always have one side that says they don't get enough and the other side that says they give enough. What's the right answer to that? We believe that the current act really achieves that. It was difficult to get there.

I think what we're saying is that you'll probably find one study that says something and another study that's going to say something else. I think we need to be really careful, because by pulling one thing on one side, we're affecting a whole ecosystem in the copyright regime that we have, and this might be very disruptive.

Hon. Michael Chong:

This was a pretty rigorous analysis, I think. It was done by an economics professor. He analyzed the amount of talk time on a radio station and the amount of music time. He took the last minute of each to analyze what actually would be the commercial value of talk versus music on a radio. Using standard methodology, he came up with the conclusion that the value of recorded music on private sector radio stations in Canada in 2012 was closer to $440 million of market value, but the royalties paid out were only $178 million.

It seems to me that this is something the committee has to look at. That's why I'm asking the question.

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

I won't purport to be an economist, but all of the radio tariffs are set by the Copyright Board. They're an economic tribunal, so that is their expertise. In terms of the tariffs the economist in question is looking at, if the standard methodology they're using is clearly not the standard methodology the Copyright Board is using, then perhaps that is where there may be some information missing and why they would arrive at two different quantums. The sole purpose and work of the Copyright Board is to arrive at the right rate for the input of music use.

(1640)

Hon. Michael Chong:

The author of this report is Marcel Boyer, professor emeritus. He wrote about this in The Globe and Mail at that time as well. He was quite critical of how the Copyright Board came up with its determination of what the royalties should be set at. His belief is that the Copyright Board needs to be restructured in order to ensure that artists are getting market value for the playing of their songs on for-profit commercial radio.

At any rate, I raise the point because I think it's relevant to the study we're having here. C.D. Howe is a pretty big organization. Usually its research is looked at by committees and people across the country.

I know there are two sides to every story. That's why I'm asking the question.

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

I can attest, having witnessed a number of Copyright Board proceedings, that there are volumes of economic analysis and data filed for each tariff proceeding, using real data in terms of the music that's played on radio and looking at the segments as well. It is a very thorough process and something that I guess would be done in that context as opposed to a legislative review.

Hon. Michael Chong:

I have one last quick question on what he recommended. He recommended that there be two types of royalty rates, one for terrestrial radio, or traditional radio, and another for Internet radio. These two technologies are very different. The costs of entry are quite different for commercial terrestrial radio. It's quite high to enter the marketplace, whereas anybody can set up an Internet radio station. He argued that because of that, royalty rates for terrestrial radio should be based on a percentage of revenues, and for Internet radio the royalty regime should be set on a per-play measure.

I want to get your thoughts on that kind of two-tiered system.

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

We don't represent any streaming or Internet radio broadcasters.

My colleague from Stingray may want to comment.

Ms. Annie Francoeur:

Well, we need to keep in mind that Stingray is a little bit different from other services. Most of our services are distributed through third parties such as the BDUs, so it's a little bit different in our case. Most of the streaming we do is made by subscribers to the TV service who are authenticated as Internet users through their mobile app or the web player.

So the situation is a little bit different. We do receive revenue from the BDUs for the TV service and apply it to the other platforms as well. The model developed by Mr. Boyer wouldn't necessarily apply to our case.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Ms. Caesar-Chavannes, you have five minutes.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Thank you to the witnesses.

To Stingray, can you explain a little bit more about it? Is it similar to a Spotify-type platform?

Ms. Annie Francoeur:

Not at all.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Okay.

Ms. Annie Francoeur:

Spotify is an on-demand service. Contrary to Spotify, Stingray tries to stay away from on-demand audio, on-demand service. We prefer to use the benefit of the statutory licence, whether it's in Canada or in the U.S. or in most jurisdictions where we distribute the service. The service is audio linear playlist with limited semi-interactive functionalities, depending on the market, depending on the statutory licences. But you cannot select the song that you want to listen to. It's not a Spotify, no.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

It's not a streaming service at all.

Ms. Annie Francoeur:

We are streaming, but it's not an on-demand streaming service like Spotify.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Okay.

You indicated that you'd like the Copyright Act to be left alone. Can you explain briefly your major impetus for wanting that to stay as is?

Ms. Annie Francoeur:

We believe that copyright, as it is now, works. We understand that the artists are complaining. We do believe that there are solutions that need to be put in place, but we don't believe that those solutions mean reviewing the Copyright Act.

Part of the solution is that—and this is something I will address tomorrow with the other committee—we believe that some of the use of music should be brought under the Broadcasting Act and should be regulated. For example, if you play a radio in your retail outlet, the radio station is subject to the minimum Canadian content requirement, the 35% that my colleague was explaining earlier.

If you use the services of a commercial background music supplier.... Stingray is one of the biggest music suppliers to commercial outlets in Canada. We're not subject to any Canadian content requirement. We can play whatever we want. We made a submission in front of the CRTC last February. We proposed that commercial background music suppliers be subject to the same Canadian content minimum requirement, so that if you use the Stingray service in a commercial outlet, you will be hearing the same type of Canadian content as if you play radio or if you listen to your TV channel in your home, because TV channels are also subject to the same Canadian requirements.

That's one example of our saying this is where we need to make sure that royalties are going to Canadian artists and that we hear Canadian artists, but not review the Copyright Act.

(1645)

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Does the NCRA or the CAB agree or disagree with Madame Francoeur, and what is your major impetus for your agreement or your disagreement with her analysis?

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

Do you mean with this last proposal?

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Yes.

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

I think we never had a chance to discuss it. This is new to us, but we think measures that would help Canadian artists are good. If regulation were to be put on background music suppliers to increase Canadian content, I don't think we would be opposed to that. I think we would support that measure.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

NCRA, do you have any comment?

Ms. Freya Zaltz:

We generally stay away from commenting on how other broadcasters and broadcasters in other sectors should be regulated and what they should be required or not required to pay, because it's outside our area of expertise and, in particular, because we operate on a not-for-profit basis. I'm sitting here as a volunteer. I have a day job that is not doing what I'm talking about right now. So my scope of knowledge is somewhat limited, and I do have to focus just on what I can say about our sector and not about the others. To some extent, our mandates overlap and we can talk a little about what we share and what we do that may affect each other in positive or negative ways; but in terms of a proposal, I would rather not comment at this stage.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

That's okay. Thank you.

The reason I asked this question is that we have different organizations sitting here, and it seems that, at the end of the day, all of you would like to see musicians get their fair share, for lack of a better term. But that goes with—if I'm hearing correctly—not making too many substantial changes to the act because, as you mentioned, Madame Dorval, if you pull on one side, the other side... There is an ecosystem. What then are the changes that are required, if any, to ensure that our musicians get their fair share?

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

As I said, maybe we have to look at it from a different viewpoint.

I said that Bryan Adams was before this committee, and he proposed something that is very different, something outside the box. That could probably be achieved through legislative changes or something different that has been proposed by the record labels, for example.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We're going to go to Mr. Masse. You have your two minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'm trying to get some timelines that we are crunching here. There's a good chance that by the time this committee gets a report done, and has handed it to the minister, and the minister gets the report back to Parliament....If the government actually wanted to introduce legislation, it could take some time. It may not happen before the next general election. My concern is that we have nothing.

Maybe starting with you Ms. Wheeler, and then finishing with our friends from Vancouver, what would be the top priority for things to be done, if you had one or two, really quickly? Or status quo, if that's what it is, because the parliamentary session is winding down.

(1650)

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

Yes, status quo would be our top priority, in terms of ensuring some predictability and stability for the local broadcast sector, which is undergoing a lot of change and challenges these days.

Ms. Annie Francoeur:

Same thing, status quo, in terms of the Copyright Act. We do believe that additional changes need to be made, but they would be outside the Copyright Act review.

Ms. Freya Zaltz:

I would say the same thing. With respect to the one section that I spoke about, obviously the sector would prefer to see that not change. I am unable to speak about other aspects of the act.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

We're at the end of our first round. We have some committee business to do at the end. We have time for about five minutes on each side.

Mr. Longfield.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thanks. I'll share my time with Mr. Lametti.

My frustration, I guess that's the word, is trying to find an equitable balance, where the creators of music can be paid for their creations and not be in poverty. They're either in poverty, or very successful; there seems to be no in-between.

It's frustrating to try to find the right suggestions, particularly where there are revenue streams that are outside....Possibly, the frustration today is that the revenue streams aren't in this room.

Could you comment on what we are missing, in terms of balance?

Ms. Dorval, do you have anything? I think radios are playing a key role, as you said, in local news and other services, advertising local businesses and keeping local economies going.

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

We really are big supporters of culture and Canadian artists. We are promoting them, paying royalties, contributing in content development every year. We are true supporters of Canadian artists.

It's a bit frustrating for us, too. As my colleague was saying, it's more of a contractual relationship. Artists who are at their debut are not going to have the bargaining power to possibly make a good deal with a record label. That's where it seems to be—

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Stuck.

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

Yes.

I don't really have an answer for you as to how we undo this thing.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

Mr. Lametti, over to you. [Translation]

Mr. David Lametti (LaSalle—Émard—Verdun, Lib.):

Thank you, everyone.

You have just described an ecosystem that has been more or less balanced since 1997 and to which you are able to adapt.

Are you concerned about the Supreme Court of Canada’s decision in Canadian Broadcasting Corp. v. SODRAC 2003 Inc.?[English]

Is this in the pipeline, is it something that you're worried about? It will have more of an impact on television, but is it something that might upset this ecosystem that you have described?

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

It was our understanding that's the decision dealing with the definition of sound recording.

Mr. David Lametti:

The Copyright Board is dealing with the tariff and it's actually moving through the legal process.

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

That's a tariff that has been filed before the Copyright Board for reproduction works for SODRAC. It did go to the Supreme Court and we will respect that. They decided that was the way that the act had to be interpreted, so there's going to be an additional tariff to be paid by broadcasters on reproductions that are made mostly in the francophone market.

It is what it is. We are part of an ecosystem. If that's what has been decided, we're going to go with it.

(1655)

Mr. David Lametti:

Okay.

Ms. Zaltz, do you have thoughts on that? You were the one who referred to SODRAC in an answer to one of your questions.

Ms. Freya Zaltz:

I'm not familiar with that particular decision or the impact that it would have on our sector. I'm not sure that it does have a significant impact. I would have to answer that question in writing.

Mr. David Lametti:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Lloyd, you have five minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I'll split my time with my colleague here.

I wanted to pick up on something when we had ended off with the community radio stations. Ms. Wheeler or Ms. Dorval, you might have more insight related to the two final tariffs that were listed that are paid. This would be the one to CMRRA and the SODRAC ones.

Could you describe what those tariffs are for, as exactly as you can? What are the purpose of those tariffs?

Ms. Nathalie Dorval:

CMRRA-SODRAC are tariffs that are paid for the reproduction of musical work when they are used on radio stations.

Ms. Annie Francoeur:

It goes to publishers, writers and composers who are the members of CMRRA-SODRAC.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

CMRRA is to what, specifically?

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

English.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Then SODRAC is for the francophone side.

How is that distinguished from the first tariff—for example, the performing rights or the Re:Sound rights? What's the distinction between those two things?

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

SOCAN is for the communication to the public by the composers and lyricists. Re:Sound is for the neighbouring rights—the performer and the owner of the sound recording, so the performer and the label. That's why it's split fifty-fifty. Then the CMRRA-SODRAC is the reproduction rights. That's when we take music from a digital service provider that is enabled by the labels and we download it to our hard drive. That triggers that reproduction right before we broadcast it for air.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thinking kind of big sky, policy-wise, is it necessary to have so many different tariff bodies? Is there some way it could be simpler? Could it be amalgamated and then provide the same benefits to the stakeholders? Would that help your business model?

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

Certainly it would help with the streamlining of our copyright liability. Right now, we have to defend ourselves or object to five different tariffs on a regular basis, sometimes without knowing what the rate is because of the length of the Copyright Board decisions. That certainly is an administrative challenge for us.

However, in fairness, they are separate rights recognized under the legislation. I have asked that question to our copyright council in the past. I've been told that to try to consolidate or unwind it would actually pull the strings that have been referenced earlier on in this committee appearance, and unravel certain fabric that has been woven together under this legislation.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

I'll pass it on to my colleague here.

Ms. Annie Francoeur:

If I may answer your question also.

Stingray does business outside of Canada and we've seen in many countries where some of the collectives have merged and represent both performance rights or communication rights and reproduction rights. It does help with the efficiency.

I can also tell you that it helps in terms of piracy. If it's easier to license a product, then there are fewer chances that you will have a lot of people going around and thinking that they are fully licensed. Not all people operate an illegal service knowingly. Some of them got a licence from SOCAN and from SODRAC and they think they are good to go but no, they're missing Connect or they're missing CMRRA. If everything were merged, or at least most of them were merged, it would make it easier for people.

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

I think there's a distinction between the administration of the right and the actual right in the legislation.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I would like to go back to the royalty exemption again. Once a station hits that $1.25 million, how does the process change in terms of paying the tariff?

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

We pay $100 on the first $1.25 million and then the Copyright Board sets a tariff for the revenue threshold over and above that amount.

(1700)

Mr. Dan Albas:

How many stations are over that cap?

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

We estimate that about 40% of our membership would be over that cap.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay, and roughly how much would they then be paying versus the other 60%?

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

On that particular tariff?

Mr. Dan Albas:

Yes.

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

I do not think we've broken that down. The tariff in itself generates $18 million. If you wanted to do the rough math that way, I'm not sure it would be accurate. We could look and try to provide that information for you. It is private because we're all competitors at the end of the day as part of an association.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Sure. Even if that information were to be aggregated...I don't want Ms. Zaltz being the only person who has homework.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for these very good questions. The whole point of this is to push a little back so that we get information that we can then put in our report and try to have a better understanding and come up with some good actionable recommendations.

Earlier, Ms. Wheeler, you propped up a chart. Could you submit that? We're not sure what that was. We don't have that.

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

We had one chart on radio and the actual neighbouring rights. I was referring to a recent article about Spotify changing its business model to benefit artists more directly by taking out the label relationship. I can certainly provide you with the reference to that.

The Chair:

The one with the two graphs on it?

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

Yes.

The Chair:

Yes that's the one. If you can forward that it would be good for us.

Ms. Susan Wheeler:

Absolutely. My pleasure.

The Chair:

On that note, I want to thank our witnesses for coming today all the way from British Columbia. Hopefully it's sunny over there today.

We're going to suspend for a couple of minutes then we're going to come back in camera to finish off our business.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

[Énregistrement électronique]

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous.

Bienvenue à notre 127e réunion. Nous poursuivons notre examen quinquennal de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Aujourd'hui, nous entendrons par vidéoconférence Freya Zaltz, de l'Association nationale des radios étudiantes et communautaires, qui se trouve tout là-bas dans mon coin de pays.

Nous accueillons, de l'Association canadienne des radiodiffuseurs, Nathalie Dorval, présidente du conseil d'administration, et Susan Wheeler, présidente du Comité du droit d'auteur.

Enfin, nous accueillons Annie Francoeur, vice-présidente, Affaires juridiques et commerciales au Stringray Digital Group.

Nous devions aussi recevoir une représentante de Radio Markham York, mais la tornade lui a causé des ennuis l'empêchant de se rendre. Nous espérons pouvoir l'entendre à un autre moment.

Nous allons nous lancer, mais je vais d'abord vous présenter notre nouveau membre, M. David de Burgh Graham.

Madame Zaltz, vous avez un maximum de sept minutes.

Mme Freya Zaltz (directrice des affaires réglementaires, Association nationale des radios étudiantes et communautaires):

Comme vous l'avez entendu, je m’appelle Freya Zaltz. Je suis directrice des affaires réglementaires de l’Association nationale des radios étudiantes et communautaires. Je représente deux autres associations, soit l’Association des radiodiffuseurs communautaires du Québec et l’Alliance des radios communautaires du Canada. Ces associations travaillent pour garantir la stabilité et le soutien des stations de radio étudiantes et communautaires, les radios e/c, sans but lucratif, ainsi que la croissance et l’efficacité à long terme du secteur. Ensemble, elles représentent environ 90 % du secteur des radios e/c, soit 165 stations.

J’aimerais dire quelques mots au Comité sur le secteur et sur la façon dont ces stations sont touchées par les tarifs liés au droit d'auteur. Je vais aussi souligner l’importance continue de l’alinéa 68.1(1)b) de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur, qui procure aux stations e/c une certitude et une protection contre la hausse de certains tarifs qui pourrait compromettre leur viabilité financière.

Les stations radio e/c reflètent la diversité des collectivités qu’elles desservent. Elles appartiennent aux collectivités et elles sont exploitées, gérées et contrôlées par ces dernières; les émissions sont réalisées en totalité ou en partie par des bénévoles des collectivités locales. Comme elles sont liées si directement à leurs collectivités respectives, les stations e/c offrent des émissions riches en idées et en information locales. Elles présentent aussi toute une gamme de points de vue communautaires, surtout ceux des groupes sous-représentés, et un contenu connexe.

Les stations e/c au Canada procurent à leurs collectivités un accès à des émissions locales dans plus de 65 langues, y compris un certain nombre de langues autochtones. Elles offrent aussi un éventail d’émissions réalisées à l’échelle locale qui reflètent la dualité linguistique du Canada et répondent aux besoins des collectivités francophones et anglophones minoritaires. Elles fournissent donc des services communautaires importants.

L’industrie canadienne de la musique et le public bénéficient beaucoup de l’appui que les radiodiffuseurs e/c fournissent aux artistes canadiens en raison de leur mandat qui consiste à offrir un contenu diversifié et à faire connaître les nouveaux artistes. De nombreux artistes canadiens prospères ont fait leurs débuts à la radio e/c. Comme les stations e/c cherchent d’abord à réaliser leur mandat plutôt qu’à faire des profits, elles peuvent se permettre de courir le risque de faire jouer des oeuvres d’artistes inconnus qu'on entend rarement à la radio.

Le secteur souhaite s'assurer du maintien de l’alinéa 68.1(1)b) de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur quand celle-ci sera modifiée. L’alinéa 68.1(1)b) limite à 100 $ par année le droit que les stations de radio non commerciales doivent verser à la société de gestion du droit d’auteur RÉ:SONNE relativement aux droits liés à la communication au public par télécommunication de prestations d’oeuvres musicales ou d’enregistrements sonores constitués de ces prestations faisant partie du répertoire de RÉ:SONNE.

Il est très important de maintenir ce tarif et tous les autres à un bas niveau pour les stations du secteur e/c, car ce sont des entités sans but lucratif qui n’ont pas de sources stables de financement opérationnel et qui sont habituellement assujetties à de rigoureuses contraintes financières. Certaines stations disposent d’un budget minuscule, dans certains cas de 5 000 $ par année, et n’ont aucun personnel rémunéré. Beaucoup se démènent déjà pour payer leurs dépenses, de sorte que l’ajout de n’importe quelle obligation tarifaire, même minuscule, les rendrait plus vulnérables à la fermeture pour cause d’insolvabilité.

En outre, le nombre et la valeur des tarifs applicables ont continué d’augmenter; le tarif dont il est question à l’alinéa 68.1(1)b) n'est qu'un des cinq tarifs actuels que les stations e/c doivent payer chaque année. Cette hausse est due en partie aux attentes des auditeurs qui veulent accéder au contenu de ces stations au moyen de multiples plateformes, y compris Internet. Vu le coût que cela entraîne, y compris les tarifs connexes liés au droit d’auteur, les stations e/c ont de plus en plus de mal à demeurer solvables.

Dans le même ordre d’idées, les exceptions actuelles établies pour les copies éphémères et internes doivent demeurer dans le cas des utilisations non commerciales, étant donné que les radiodiffuseurs sans but lucratif ne tirent aucun gain financier de la diffusion d’oeuvres protégées par le droit d’auteur.

En outre, pour participer aux délibérations de la Commission du droit d’auteur et négocier efficacement avec les sociétés de gestion du droit d’auteur, il faut des ressources et une expertise juridique; pour des raisons financières, le secteur e/c dispose de capacités limitées à ces égards.

(1535)



Par conséquent, la simplification des procédures de la Commission, quand c’est possible, serait utile aux associations. La décision prise par la Commission en 2013 au sujet du tarif 8 de Ré:Sonne porte à croire que la Commission comprend mieux les limites financières des utilisateurs sans but lucratif que les sociétés de gestion susmentionnées; le passage à un modèle d’accord privé n’est donc pas nécessairement dans l’intérêt des associations.

Le secteur e/c comprend que les tarifs liés au droit d’auteur ont pour objet de rémunérer les titulaires de droits d’auteur pour l’utilisation de leurs oeuvres. Comme les stations e/c ne tirent aucun profit d’une telle utilisation et que leur but est plutôt de faire connaître les oeuvres davantage et de stimuler la carrière d’artistes canadiens et en devenir, elles croient que les titulaires de droits d’auteur ont quelque chose à gagner si les tarifs perçus auprès du secteur e/c sont maintenus à un bas niveau.

Les associations apprécient donc la protection que l’alinéa 68.1(1)b) procure en limitant le coût et en engendrant une certitude permanente à l’égard d’un des nombreux tarifs que de nombreuses stations e/c doivent payer. Elles demandent aussi au Comité de se rappeler ces enjeux quand il envisagera d’apporter d’éventuelles modifications à la Loi, de manière que la population canadienne continue à profiter des avantages que procure un vigoureux secteur de la radiodiffusion e/c.

En terminant, je vous sais gré de m’avoir donné l’occasion de m’adresser à vous aujourd’hui, et je me ferai un plaisir de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à l'Association canadienne des radiodiffuseurs.

C'est à vous, madame Dorval. Vous avez un maximum de sept minutes.

(1540)

[Français]

Mme Nathalie Dorval (présidente, Conseil d'administration, Association canadienne des radiodiffuseurs):

Mesdames et messieurs, au nom de l'Association canadienne des radiodiffuseurs, je souhaite vous remercier de nous avoir donné l'occasion de comparaître devant vous aujourd'hui au sujet de questions de droits d'auteur qui sont au coeur de nos activités et qui en font partie intégrante.[Traduction]

Les radiodiffuseurs locaux dans notre pays fournissent des émissions de divertissement, mais ils sont également une source critique d’actualités et d’information pour les Canadiens et les Canadiennes, tant dans les grands centres urbains présentant une vaste diversité ethnique que dans les zones rurales, les régions éloignées et les collectivités des Premières Nations.

Qu’il s’agisse de messages d’alerte ou de nouvelles locales diffusés en diverses langues, la radio relie les collectivités du pays. De fait, la radio constitue l’une des dernières sources de nouvelles locales et d’information culturelle dans les collectivités rurales et éloignées du Canada, puisque bon nombre de ces dernières ont déjà subi les effets des fermetures de journaux locaux et de stations locales de télévision.[Français]

La radio joue également un rôle clé dans le maintien d'un écosystème vigoureux pour la musique canadienne. La radio privée est non seulement la première source de découverte de la musique canadienne, elle est aussi la première source de financement pour le développement, la promotion et l'exportation de talents musicaux canadiens.

L'année dernière seulement, la radio privée a contribué pour 47 millions de dollars au financement du développement de contenu canadien, dont la plus grande partie a été affectée aux quatre principales agences nationales de financement de la musique, soit FACTOR, Musicaction, Radio Starmaker Fund et le Fonds RadioStar. Ces agences fournissent aux maisons de disques et aux artistes canadiens un soutien primordial quant à la création, à la promotion et à l'exportation de leur musique à l'échelle internationale et dans l'ensemble de notre vaste pays.

Nous sommes fiers du rôle important joué par les radiodiffuseurs, qui ont largement contribué à créer une communauté vibrante d'artistes canadiens de la musique jouissant aujourd'hui de succès retentissants et qui sont reconnus internationalement.

En plus de ce rôle clé, la radio investit également dans les talents locaux et crée de nombreux emplois qui stimulent la créativité canadienne et assurent l'apport de contenu local dans toutes les régions.

Enfin, n'oublions pas que la radio locale demeure un canal privilégié afin que les entreprises locales commercialisent leurs produits et services.[Traduction]

Nous croyons que la Loi sur le droit d’auteur, dans sa forme actuelle, établit un juste équilibre entre la nécessité, d’une part, de veiller à ce que les artistes soient rémunérés pour leur travail et d’autre part, que la radio locale bénéficie d’un régime de droit d’auteur raisonnable et prévisible qui tienne compte de son investissement continu dans les collectivités et les artistes musiciens locaux. En fait, l’article 68.1 de la Loi fournit un soutien important aux stations de radio locales en exigeant des radiodiffuseurs qu'ils versent des redevances pour les droits voisins de 100 $ sur la première tranche de leurs recettes ne dépassant pas 1,25 million de dollars, puis un tarif plus élevé établi par la Commission du droit d’auteur sur les tranches de revenus additionnels. Bien que la structure des redevances de droits voisins soit assujettie à cette mesure spéciale, comme le Parlement l’entendait en 1998, l’industrie de la musique reçoit chaque année plus de 91 millions de dollars en droit d’auteur de la radio privée.

Si le Parlement accepte de modifier la Loi sur le droit d’auteur par la suppression de cette mesure, ce sont les maisons de disques multinationales qui la proposent qui en seront les premiers bénéficiaires. Selon le régime existant, les redevances de droits voisins sont partagées à parts égales entre les artistes-interprètes et les maisons de disques. La répartition des fonds au-delà de ce point n’est pas claire et devrait faire l’objet de discussions supplémentaires avant qu’on envisage d’apporter des modifications à la Loi.

Selon l'information publique, Ré:Sonne, la société de gestion collective du droit d’auteur qui est chargée de distribuer les redevances de droits voisins, prélève sur ceux-ci des frais administratifs de 14 % avant que quiconque reçoive quoi que ce soit, et l’industrie de la musique dissimule habilement où vont les sommes restantes. À titre d’exemple, sur le marché anglophone, en fonction du répertoire joué à la radio, nous estimons que les artistes-interprètes internationaux et les artistes-interprètes canadiens touchent 15 % et 28 %, respectivement, de la part revenant à l’artiste-interprète, après déduction des frais administratifs. Pour ce qui est de la part revenant à la maison de disques, les maisons de disques multinationales en reçoivent une part généreuse de 41 %, et les maisons de disques canadiennes, environ 2 % seulement. Comme ces chiffres l’indiquent, ce sont les maisons de disques multinationales qui bénéficieraient en premier lieu des modifications qui sont proposées à l’article 68.1, et ce, au détriment des entreprises locales canadiennes.

Les maisons de disques américaines vous demandent également de modifier la définition d’« enregistrement sonore » énoncée dans la Loi pour soutirer des télédiffuseurs des paiements de redevances supplémentaires. En fait, les maisons de disques tentent d’obtenir des paiements supplémentaires des télédiffuseurs, des distributeurs et des plateformes numériques pour l’utilisation de musique dans une émission télévisuelle à l’égard de laquelle les producteurs de l’émission ont déjà versé des redevances à la source. En termes clairs, elles nous demandent de payer deux fois le même produit, ce qui se traduit par une double rétribution.

(1545)

[Français]

La définition actuelle d'« enregistrement sonore » a été rédigée avec soin en fonction des réalités contractuelles dans le secteur de la production audiovisuelle, comme l'a confirmé la Cour suprême du Canada dans un arrêt rendu en 2012. Toute proposition visant l'imposition de nouveaux frais aux télédiffuseurs traditionnels ou au secteur numérique devrait être rejetée, car elle réduirait la capacité des télédiffuseurs canadiens d'investir dans des productions canadiennes par suite du transfert de plus de 50 millions de dollars à des sociétés étrangères.[Traduction]

L’Association canadienne des radiodiffuseurs prie respectueusement les distingués membres du Comité de rejeter toute modification proposée à la Loi sur le droit d’auteur qui nuirait au secteur canadien de la radiodiffusion et mettrait en péril le service important que les radiodiffuseurs locaux fournissent aux Canadiens et aux Canadiennes.

Je tiens à souligner à nouveau que la Loi actuelle établit un juste équilibre entre les titulaires de droits et les radiodiffuseurs locaux et que les propositions que met de l’avant l’industrie de la musique risquent d’opérer au détriment de la programmation locale et des services essentiels et précieux que nous fournissons aux Canadiens et aux Canadiennes. [Français]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Traduction]

Nous passons à Stingray Digital Group.[Français]

Madame Francoeur, vous avez la parole pour sept minutes.

Madame Annie Francoeur (vice-présidente, Affaires juridiques et commerciales, Groupe Stingray Digital Inc.):

Bonjour, mesdames et messieurs.

Au nom du Groupe Stingray Digital Inc., j'aimerais tout d'abord vous remercier de votre invitation à venir participer aux discussions relatives à la révision de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, plus particulièrement pour ce qui est en lien avec la musique, soit l'industrie dans laquelle évolue principalement Stingray.

Fondée en 2017, Stingray est une compagnie canadienne dont le siège social est à Montréal et qui emploie présentement 340 personnes au Canada. Nous distribuons nos services non seulement au Canada, mais également à l'étranger, à environ 400 millions d'abonnés ou de foyers dans 156 pays. Nous desservons également 12 000 clients dans 78 000 établissements commerciaux.

Pour l'année financière 2018, approximativement 47 % des revenus de Stingray proviennent du Canada. Plus Stingray a du succès à l'étranger, plus les artistes canadiens bénéficient de cette visibilité à l'étranger.

Le portfolio des services de Stingray offerts au Canada inclut un service de musique audio appelé Stingray Musique, qui comprend 2 000 chaînes consacrées à une centaine de genres musicaux. Nos services incluent également la vidéo sur demande, des vidéoclips, du karaoké, des concerts ainsi qu'une dizaine de chaînes audiovisuelles linéaires telles que Stingray Classica, Stingray Festival 4K, Stingray Ambiance, et ainsi de suite.

Nos services sont accessibles sur plusieurs plateformes numériques et par des appareils tels que la télévision par câble ou par satellite, Internet, les applications mobiles, les consoles de jeux vidéos, les systèmes de divertissement en vol ou en train, les voitures connectées, les systèmes WiFi comme Sonos, et ainsi de suite.

Plus de 100 experts de la musique partout dans le monde sont responsables de programmer les différents services et les chaînes de Stingray. C'est notamment ce qui distingue Stingray de plusieurs autres fournisseurs de services de musique, lesquels recourent normalement à des algorithmes pour sélectionner le contenu qu'ils offrent. La programmation des chaînes de Stingray est par ailleurs adaptée en fonction du marché local et de la démographie de ce marché.

Par nécessité, Stingray est aussi une compagnie de technologies. La gestion d'un catalogue important d'actifs numériques et la livraison de ce contenu sur diverses plateformes et dans différents marchés requièrent de Stingray qu'elle se maintienne au sommet et à l'avant-garde sur le plan des technologies. Le Groupe Stingray investit donc plusieurs millions de dollars par année en recherche et développement afin de demeurer compétitif et de retenir sa clientèle.

(1550)

[Traduction]

Stingray est résolu à encourager le talent et les artistes canadiens et participe activement au développement et à la promotion du contenu canadien. Au cours de la dernière année de diffusion, Stingray a consacré environ 379 000 $ à des initiatives de développement de contenu canadien, ce qui comprend des paiements à Factor, à Musicaction et au Fonds canadien de la radio communautaire, ou FCRC, mais aussi des sommes pour la remise de prix lors de spectacles et de festivals de musique, les cachets des artistes, la tenue d'ateliers et de séances éducatives, etc.

Il n'y a pas que les initiatives de DCC. Après le placement initial de titres de Stingray, en 2015, le CRTC a approuvé la modification de la propriété et du contrôle effectif de l'entreprise, mais a exigé qu'elle paye des avantages tangibles s'élevant à 5,5 millions de dollars sur sept ans. Outre ses obligations réglementaires, Stingray favorise également la promotion et le développement des artistes canadiens par l'intermédiaire de nombreuses autres initiatives, sur une base volontaire.

Tout récemment, Stingray a établi un partenariat avec l'ADISQ pour la création d'une nouvelle chaîne de vidéoclips appelée PalmarèsADISQ par Stingray, offerte au Canada par l'intermédiaire des télédiffuseurs. Étant donné la volonté de Stingray d'investir dans le jeune talent, une partie des profits de la chaîne seront investis dans la production de vidéoclips locale par l'intermédiaire de fonds de tierces parties comme RadioStar.

Dans le cadre de cette initiative, Stingray financera la production des vidéoclips diffusés sur ses chaînes tout en aidant les directeurs et artistes canadiens et québécois émergents dans leur carrière. Stingray finance chaque année des événements ou des partenaires qui participent au développement et à la promotion du talent canadien. À titre d'exemple, Stingray commandite régulièrement les Rencontres de l'ADISQ et d'autres activités semblables.

Nous produisons aussi la série PausePlay; il s'agit d'une série d'entrevues exclusives et d'enregistrements de spectacles privés d'artistes populaires et émergents pour promouvoir les nouveaux albums ou les tournées.

Afin d'offrir une grande visibilité à ces artistes, nous diffusons ces enregistrements sur les plateformes et les chaînes des médias sociaux. Nous avons aussi un blogue; nous y publions des critiques d'albums, de concerts, etc.

En ce qui concerne l'examen de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, nous proposons respectueusement de ne pas modifier cette loi pour le moment. Nous estimons qu'il n'est pas nécessaire de la modifier. Nous considérons que dans sa version actuelle, la Loi sur le droit d'auteur établit un équilibre adéquat entre les titulaires des droits et les utilisateurs comme Stingray.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons directement aux questions.

Monsieur Longfield, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci à tous de vos exposés.

Je remercie le greffier d'avoir invité les représentants de divers médias et d'entités diversifiées.

J'aimerais d'abord m'adresser à l'Association nationale des radios étudiantes et communautaires. J'ai participé à l'émission Open Sources, une tribune sur la politique locale diffusée depuis environ 15 ans sur CFRU, à l'Université de Guelph. Je vais bientôt participer à l'émission Zombie Jamboree. J'ai été invité à discuter de musique canadienne et je dois apporter une liste de lecture d'artistes canadiens. Il y a beaucoup d'activités bénévoles.

Dans votre exposé, vous avez mentionné l'alinéa 68.1(1)b). Comment était-ce auparavant? À une certaine époque, les stations de radio étudiante étaient-elles laissées sans protection, comparativement à celle qu'elles ont maintenant grâce aux exemptions?

Mme Freya Zaltz:

Je ne connais pas l'historique de la loi de façon détaillée, mais je crois comprendre que la notion de droits voisins est relativement nouvelle au Canada et que cette exemption a été adoptée au même moment que l'instauration du régime des droits voisins. Je pourrais me tromper, mais c'est ce que je comprends, essentiellement.

Je ne pense pas qu'il y avait un régime de redevances de droits voisins avant l'adoption de cette partie de la loi. Auparavant, bien sûr, les stations de radios étudiantes et communautaires devaient payer d'autres redevances, notamment à la SOCAN. Je ne pense pas qu'il y avait de régime de redevances de droits voisins avant cela. Je crois comprendre que cela remonte à la fin des années 1980 ou au début des années 1990.

(1555)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci. Ma question visait seulement à savoir s'il y a une solution plus efficace sur laquelle nous pourrions nous rabattre. Je pense qu'il convient de faire une distinction entre les activités sans but lucratif et à but lucratif. Je vous remercie de la réponse.

Je passe maintenant à Mme Dorval, de l'Association canadienne des radiodiffuseurs.

Les musiciens avec lesquels j'ai discuté, à Guelph, ont parlé des technologies qui servent au décompte, aux fins de rémunération. En réalité, il s'agirait d'un échantillonnage plutôt qu'une technologie permettant une rémunération en fonction de listes de lecture réelles.

Votre association connaît-elle ou recherche-t-elle une méthode plus précise pour la rémunération des artistes en fonction du nombre d'écoutes?

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Je crois savoir qu'on nous demande de plus en plus fréquemment de fournir la liste des artistes dont les oeuvres sont diffusées. Nous fournissons les données réelles sur le nombre d'écoutes des chansons; ce n'est pas un échantillonnage.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Selon ce que je comprends, la technologie existe, mais nous ne l'utilisons pas. Pourquoi pas?

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Nous l'utilisons.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Ce n'est pas ce que j'ai entendu.

Mme Susan Wheeler (présidente, Comité du droit d'auteurs, Association canadienne des radiodiffuseurs):

Nous fournissons la liste de lecture — établie à l'aide de logiciels lors de la diffusion — aux diverses sociétés de gestion collective au moment du versement des redevances. La répartition des redevances aux titulaires de droits membres de la société de gestion collective ne relève pas de nous. C'est à ces sociétés qu'il faut poser la question.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Il y a peut-être un manque de transparence sur ce plan, et nous devrions peut-être examiner la question.

Certains ont dit exactement le contraire de ce que vous affirmez aujourd'hui: les exemptions actuelles profiteraient essentiellement aux diffuseurs qui possèdent de nombreuses stations et qu'au lieu de protéger les petites stations de radio, comme prévu à l'origine, nous nous trouvons maintenant à protéger les grands diffuseurs qui ont un réseau de stations au Canada.

Avez-vous entendu cet argument? Y a-t-il quelque chose que je ne comprends pas?

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Oui, et nous trouvons cela très intéressant.

Premièrement, il faut savoir que beaucoup de stations membres de l'Association canadienne des radiodiffuseurs, près de 60 %, sont de petites stations.

Quant aux stations d'importants groupes de propriété, ce sont tout de même de petites stations, mais elles profitent évidemment des avantages d'une entité plus grande. On constate, lors de nos discussions avec des comités comme le vôtre, que la radio est perçue comme n'ayant qu'une seule fonction, qui est d'offrir un appui considérable aux artistes et à la culture. Toutefois, dans une perspective plus large, la radio donne des résultats remarquables, car il s'agit de l'un des derniers médias à diffuser des émissions de nouvelles et d'information fiables et professionnelles aux Canadiens, peu importe où ils habitent.

Beaucoup de journaux ont cessé leurs activités. Les stations directes ont fait de même. On constate que les importants groupes propriétaires de grandes stations subventionnent les petites stations du groupe pour qu'elles puissent offrir aux Canadiens une plus grande gamme de services, outre l'appui formidable qu'elles offrent aux artistes et au secteur de la culture.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Le problème, c'est que les revenus des artistes sont en baisse, bien sûr, tandis que ceux des stations augmentent. Nous tentons de rétablir l'équilibre.

Mme Susan Wheeler:

Je tiens à préciser, concernant l'augmentation des revenus, qu'en réalité, les revenus des stations de radio ont baissé quatre années consécutives. Je pense qu'il y a peut-être un manque de communication au sujet de notre...

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Si vous pouviez fournir au greffier un graphique que nous pourrions inclure dans notre étude, cela nous serait très utile.

Mme Susan Wheeler:

Avec plaisir.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Il me reste seulement 30 secondes, environ. Brièvement, madame Francoeur, avez-vous des données comparatives entre les redevances que reçoivent les artistes pour la diffusion en continu et celles pour la radiodiffusion?

Mme Annie Francoeur:

Non; nous connaissons uniquement les redevances versées aux sociétés de gestion de droits d'auteur ou titulaires de droits avec lesquels nous avons des ententes. Nous n'avons aucune idée de la répartition de ces fonds aux membres.

(1600)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Très bien. Il pourrait y avoir une iniquité à cet égard, si les stations de radio numériques paient un certain montant et que les services de flux numériques paient beaucoup moins.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Lloyd, pour sept minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Merci d'être venus aujourd'hui. Veuillez excuser mon retard.

Je vous remercie de votre témoignage.

Ma première question s'adresse soit à Mme Dorval, soit à Mme Wheeler. Elle porte sur les coûts au sein de l'industrie au cours des 20 dernières années. Il y a d'abord une hausse des coûts en raison de l'inflation de 2 %. En ce qui concerne la décision de 1997 d'exiger une redevance de 100 $ sur la première tranche de 1,5 million de dollars, diriez-vous qu'établir un coût fixe de ce genre dans la loi sans le réviser pendant plus de 20 ans est un aspect auquel il faut réfléchir? Quel serait un taux raisonnable, à votre avis?

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Permettez-moi d'examiner cette excellente question sous un angle différent. En fin de compte, les artistes canadiens recevraient seulement une petite part de ce montant, même s'il était modifié. Les commentaires que nous avons entendus à cet égard sont ceux de maisons de disques multinationales américaines qui ont comparu au Comité. Elles semblent parler au nom des artistes, mais essentiellement, elles ne font que leur soutirer de l'argent. Je pense qu'un graphique vous a été fourni. La majorité de cet argent se retrouve à l'extérieur du pays, aux mains des maisons de disques internationales, et il reste très peu d'argent au pays pour les artistes canadiens.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Pourquoi?

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Cela découle de la façon dont l'argent sera distribué à l'avenir. On parle d'un partage à parts égales entre les maisons de disques et les artistes. Il y a en outre une déduction de 14 % pour frais administratifs au début. Dans le graphique que nous avons fourni, vous verrez que le montant est réparti comme suit : 15 % pour les artistes internationaux; 41 % pour les maisons de disques multinationales; 2 % pour les maisons de disques canadiennes; 28 % pour les artistes canadiens. La majeure partie des fonds sort du pays; on se trouve ainsi à affaiblir les petits radiodiffuseurs et l'industrie de la radiodiffusion, qui offrent d'autres services importants aux Canadiens, partout au pays.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Cela m'amène à ma prochaine série de questions. Nos analystes nous ont fourni d'excellentes pistes.

Premièrement, en ce qui concerne les enregistrements sonores et leur exclusion du régime de redevances, il semble que 44 pays incluent les enregistrements sonores. On ne parle pas de pays marginaux; cela comprend le Royaume-Uni, la France et l'Allemagne. Je remarque que ce ne sont pas des pays voisins des États-Unis. À votre avis, la proximité du Canada avec les États-Unis rend-elle nécessaire l'adoption d'un système unique?

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Vous parlez des définitions d'« enregistrement sonore » et de « programmation télévisuelle ». Il convient de faire preuve d'une grande prudence.

La loi canadienne a créé un régime de droit d'auteur extrêmement complexe dans lequel un excellent équilibre a été établi. C'est un exercice difficile. Au Canada, aux termes du régime actuel, les redevances sur les enregistrements sonores sont payées d'entrée de jeu. Le producteur verse les redevances à l'artiste, à l'auteur-compositeur et à la maison de disques. Voilà ce qui distingue notre régime: il n'y a pas d'autres redevances au moment de la diffusion.

Voilà pourquoi nous disons que l'ajout de redevances à la diffusion, en plus des redevances déjà versées à la source, reviendrait à nous demander de payer deux fois le même produit.

M. Dane Lloyd:

En effet, même si d'autres pays comme la France, le Royaume-Uni et l'Allemagne ont un régime de double rétribution, comme vous dites. Or, ce n'est peut-être pas le cas, mais les enregistrements sonores ne sont pas exclus. Pourriez-vous faire une comparaison avec l'Allemagne et indiquer quelle serait la différence, pour vos membres? Quelle a été l'incidence sur leurs industries?

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Nous pourrions regarder cela de plus près pour vous fournir des renseignements supplémentaires, mais je ne connais pas les régimes allemands ou français. Je ne peux donc répondre à la question.

M. Dane Lloyd:

J'aimerais pousser ma dernière question un peu plus loin. Est-ce notre proximité avec les États-Unis, ce géant de l'industrie culturelle, qui rend nécessaire la mise en place d'un régime plus complexe que le modèle européen?

Mme Susan Wheeler:

J'ajouterais simplement que le Canada a déjà un système unique, comparativement aux États-Unis, en ce sens que les radiodiffuseurs américains n'ont pas à payer ces redevances. Dans les faits, les diffuseurs canadiens se trouvent à payer aux multinationales de l'industrie du disque des redevances pour des droits d'auteur qui ne sont même pas reconnus dans leur pays d'origine.

(1605)

M. Dane Lloyd:

Si cela pose problème, comment pouvons-nous accroître la rémunération des artistes canadiens, plutôt que les revenus des multinationales? Quelle solution recommandez-vous à cet égard?

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Le témoignage de Bryan Adams au Comité la semaine dernière a été très éloquent. Cela démontre le point de vue différent que peuvent avoir les artistes lorsqu'ils s'expriment en leur propre nom devant vous. Cela détonne par rapport aux propos des maisons de disques.

Un examen plus approfondi de la répartition actuelle des redevances pourrait faire partie de la solution.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Ma prochaine question s'adresse aux gens de la radio communautaire, qui participent par vidéoconférence.

Dans votre exposé, vous avez dit souhaiter la simplification du régime de la Commission du droit d'auteur. Il est facile de le dire, mais quelles mesures devrions-nous recommander en ce sens pour aider votre organisme?

Mme Freya Zaltz:

Si vous le permettez, je préférerais répondre à ces questions plus tard, par écrit.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Vous nous transmettrez une réponse écrite.

Mme Freya Zaltz:

Les recommandations du secteur des radios étudiantes et communautaires sont reflétées dans les recommandations présentées dans un rapport du Comité sur la Commission du droit d'auteur il y a quelques années. Les divers intervenants avaient fait part de leurs préoccupations dans le cadre de cet exercice.

Le secteur des radios étudiantes et communautaires n'a pas participé au processus d'examen initial parce que nous étions d'avis que nos préoccupations avaient déjà été soulevées par d'autres groupes. Toutefois, nous nous préoccupions de certains délais, du temps qu'il fallait à la Commission du droit d'auteur pour amorcer et conclure les procédures, et pour rendre une décision. Nous nous préoccupions aussi d'autres procédures de la Commission, qui ne sont pas facilement accessibles pour les gens qui n'ont pas de formation juridique spécialisée. Il est difficile de comprendre les étapes, de suivre ce qui se passe et de fournir ce qui est demandé. La Commission pourrait faire preuve d'une plus grande transparence et sa méthode de fonctionnement pourrait être plus conviviale.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est à M. Masse.

Vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je vais continuer avec Mme Zaltz.

Je représente la circonscription de Windsor, en Ontario, où les campus universitaires et autres ont investi massivement dans la radiodiffusion. Qu'est-ce qui se passe, de façon générale, avec les diffuseurs étudiants et communautaires à l'heure actuelle? Sommes-nous l'exception ou est-ce qu'il y a eu un certain renouvellement et un intérêt continu à l'égard du développement?

Mme Freya Zaltz:

La radio communautaire connaît une croissance beaucoup plus rapide que tous les autres types de radio. On a octroyé de nombreuses licences aux stations de radio communautaires, surtout au cours des dernières années.

L'enjeu, c'est qu'elles n'ont pas de source de financement opérationnel stable. Des subventions sont offertes. Les stations organisent des collectes de fonds. Certaines stations des grandes collectivités connaissent un franc succès. Dans les plus petites collectivités, elles ont plus de difficulté à amasser les fonds nécessaires à leur fonctionnement. Lorsqu'elles sont associées à une université, elles bénéficient des infrastructures, des lieux et de toutes sortes de services que les stations communautaires doivent payer de leur poche.

Je dirais qu'il y a un intérêt accru à l'égard du développement des radios communautaires au pays, mais de nombreuses stations doivent fermer leurs portes, à un rythme beaucoup plus rapide qu'avant. Toutes les stations qui ont fermé l'ont fait par manque de fonds. Elles n'ont pas suffisamment de revenus pour s'acquitter de leurs dépenses. Dans certains cas, comme elles ne peuvent pas engager de personnel, les bénévoles s'épuisent et n'ont plus assez d'énergie pour continuer à faire rouler la station.

Les exigences auxquelles doivent répondre les stations pour garder leur licence du CRTC nécessitent une supervision continue. Il y a beaucoup de formalités administratives; il faut savoir quelles chansons sont diffusées et calculer des pourcentages. Dans certains cas, il est très difficile pour les stations gérées par des bénévoles uniquement de s'acquitter de ces tâches de façon continue et à long terme.

Bien que l'intérêt à l'égard des radios communautaires soit accru et que le nombre de groupes qui présentent une demande de licence augmente, nous constatons aussi que les radios ont de plus en plus de difficulté à fonctionner, surtout les petites stations.

(1610)

M. Brian Masse:

Je sais que les besoins en capitaux représentent un défi important. Je pense notamment à l'amélioration des composantes physiques nécessaires à la mise à niveau. Ces stations misent uniquement sur les subventions, ce qui crée un énorme fossé. Les petits revenus de ces stations servent à maintenir les opérations, mais l'amélioration des immobilisations est très difficile. L'intérêt est peut-être accru, mais l'amélioration des immobilisations coûte assez cher.

Mme Freya Zaltz:

C'est vrai. Aussi, le financement est souvent offert en fonction des projets. Il ne vise pas du tout les dépenses de fonctionnement, sauf dans la mesure où elles sont associées temporairement à l'achèvement d'un projet. De plus, les investissements dans l'infrastructure des immobilisations... Par exemple, comme l'a fait valoir un témoin, le Fonds canadien de la radio communautaire offre des subventions aux stations pour réaliser certains projets, mais pas pour les dépenses d'immobilisation. Si les stations ont besoin d'une nouvelle antenne, d'un émetteur ou d'équipement de studio, elles doivent faire une collecte de fonds distincte.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

Je vais maintenant passer aux diffuseurs. En ce qui a trait au contenu offert, vous avez souligné les différences relatives aux marchés internationaux et à la rémunération. Comment compareriez-vous le contenu local, les nouvelles, la météo, les sports et autres à celui des compétiteurs? Avez-vous des données empiriques à ce sujet?

Y a-t-il un avantage net associé à ces éléments en ce qui a trait au différentiel de radiodiffusion? Vous avez remarqué une différence relative aux paiements destinés aux marchés, mais est-ce qu'il y a aussi une capacité accrue pour les nouvelles locales et d'autres types de contenu?

Mme Susan Wheeler:

Nous n'avons pas de statistiques à vous fournir pour le moment, mais nous pourrions vous transmettre une analyse de nos dépenses de programme.

J'aimerais souligner que, dans l'ensemble, environ 78 % des revenus des stations de radio visent les dépenses. Cela comprend la production d'émissions, la technique, la promotion des ventes et l'administration générale. Une très grande partie des revenus sert aux opérations quotidiennes, pour garder les stations en ondes et pour offrir la programmation à laquelle vous avez fait référence, notamment les nouvelles et l'information.

M. Brian Masse:

J'aimerais qu'on fasse un suivi à ce sujet. Il est évident que l'intérêt est là, non seulement dans les communautés comme la mienne qui se trouvent à la frontière — pour préserver le contenu canadien —, mais aussi ailleurs. L'intérêt public est grandissant. J'aimerais avoir des comparables, surtout en ce qui a trait aux dépenses dont vous parlez.

Vous avez aussi dit que vos concurrents américains n'avaient pas à s'acquitter des mêmes frais. Vous pourriez peut-être me parler des avantages ou des désavantages pour une communauté comme la mienne, où le contenu canadien peut pénétrer les marchés américains.

Je suis curieux. Vous avez dit que les engagements n'étaient pas les mêmes, mais la concurrence se livre des deux côtés de la rivière Detroit, et les régions représentent un marché très lucratif, mais aussi un grand défi.

Mme Susan Wheeler:

Tout à fait. Il y a une grande différence pour les stations de radio de Detroit qui diffusent à Windsor. Elles n'ont pas à payer les droits voisins ni les droits d'interprétation aux artistes qui tournent dans leurs stations. Les radiodiffuseurs canadiens doivent payer les droits aux artistes dont le pays d'origine reconnaît ces droits, donc aux artistes qui ne sont pas Américains.

(1615)

M. Brian Masse:

Quel est le lien avec les revenus publicitaires, les façons d'attirer les annonceurs et les revenus de la station?

Y a-t-il un lien?

Mme Susan Wheeler:

Je crois que c'est un défi continu pour les stations de radio situées à la frontière. Il n'est pas seulement question de droits d'auteur. Le régime réglementaire du Canada diffère de celui des États-Unis. Nous devons nous acquitter de certains coûts opérationnels que n'ont pas à payer les stations de radio de l'autre côté de la frontière.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est maintenant à M. Graham. Vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.[Français]

Je vais commencer par Mme Dorval, et je poursuivrai dans le même ordre d'idées que les questions posées par M. Masse.

Vous dites qu'on ne paie pas de droits aux États-Unis, qu'il n'y existe pas un tel système. Comment les droits d'auteur sont-ils gérés aux États-Unis en ce qui concerne les radios?

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Ils ne paient pas les enregistrements sonores, car ce sont des droits voisins. Cela ne veut pas dire qu'ils ne paient aucun droit d'auteur. C'est la mesure de comparaison que nous avons retenue pour ce tarif, sachant qu'ils vous ont demandé d'abroger l'exonération prévue à l'article 68.1 de la Loi pour faire augmenter ces paiements.

Pour ce qui est de la question plus large du paiement des droits d'auteur aux États-Unis, je ne suis pas en mesure de vous répondre. [Traduction]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quelle est la relation entre Mme Zaltz et Mme Dorval, et toutes ces organisations? Y a-t-il une relation étroite entre les radios étudiantes et communautaires, et la radio commerciale, ou est-ce qu'il y a des tensions entre les deux?

L'une d'entre vous pourrait-elle répondre?

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

À ma connaissance, il n'y a pas de tensions entre les deux, même que dans le marché francophone, le groupe radio Cogeco aide la station communautaire de Montréal.

Je dirais que dans le marché francophone, nous n'avons pas senti de tensions.

Mme Susan Wheeler:

C'est la même chose pour le marché anglophone.

Il importe aussi de souligner qu'en vertu de nos exigences réglementaires, nous affectons une partie de nos revenus à une association de radios étudiantes et communautaires.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Madame Zaltz, voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

Mme Freya Zaltz:

Est-ce que je peux vous demander de préciser votre question?

Lorsque vous parlez de tensions, pensez-vous à quelque chose en particulier?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je me demande si les stations de radio étudiantes et communautaires sont en accord avec les stations de radio commerciales ou si leurs positions sont divergentes.

Mme Freya Zaltz:

Merci. Pour autant que je sache, nos positions sont complémentaires, par exemple en ce qui a trait aux tarifs associés au droit d'auteur. Je ne vois pas de divergences d'opinions à ce sujet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ils s'appliquent à vous tous.

Lorsque vous diffusez la musique, comment savez-vous auquel des cinq tarifs vous devez vous conformer? Il se peut qu'aucun de ces tarifs ne s'applique aussi; comment faites-vous pour le savoir?

Y a-t-il une façon de savoir quel tarif s'applique à une chanson en particulier?

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Nous payons les cinq tarifs, puis l'argent est redistribué par le collectif qui les gère. Mais nous les payons tous les cinq, tout le temps.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous pouvez diffuser toutes les chansons que vous voulez, en sachant qu'elles seront visées par l'un ou l'autre de ces tarifs.

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Oui. Ce n'est pas l'un ou l'autre: nous payons les cinq.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Quels sont-ils?

Mme Susan Wheeler:

Nous payons la SOCAN, Ré:Sonne, CONNECT, Artisti et la SODRAC.

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Pour un total de 91 millions de dollars par année pour les stations privées.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En ce qui a trait aux 100 $ pour 1,25 million de dollars de revenus, si une entreprise est propriétaire de 20 stations de radio, et que chacune d'entre elles a son propre signal — et est une station de radio à part entière —, est-ce qu'on compte les revenus de toute l'entreprise ou ceux de chacune des stations de façon distincte?

Mme Susan Wheeler:

C'est en fonction du marché individuel.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Donc, si chacune des stations se trouve en deçà du seuil pour le 100 $, elles n'ont pas à payer grand-chose.

Mme Susan Wheeler:

En ce qui a trait au tarif de Ré:Sonne, non. Si leurs revenus sont inférieurs à 1,25 million de dollars, elles ne paient pas le 100 $.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

La radio diffusée sur Internet est de plus en plus populaire. Avez-vous des idées pour aborder cette question? N'importe qui peut offrir un service de diffusion en continu à partir de son ordinateur et donc avoir une station de radio. Ces gens ne versent évidemment pas d'argent aux collectifs. Est-ce qu'on devrait les réglementer ou les laisser faire, parce que ces radios font partie de la sphère Internet organique?

(1620)

Mme Susan Wheeler:

Je vais laisser ma collègue de Stingray répondre à cette question, mais selon ce que je comprends, les radiodiffuseurs sur Internet paient des droits d'auteur.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans quelle mesure est-ce applicable?

Mme Annie Francoeur:

Je ne suis pas certaine de comprendre. Est-ce qu'on parle de services illégaux et du non-paiement des tarifs de redevances? [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

N'importe qui peut créer une station radio Internet. Je peux le faire sur mon iPad en 30 secondes.

Mme Annie Francoeur:

Il y aurait plusieurs problèmes dès le départ. Où avez-vous pris le contenu? Est-il dûment autorisé? Payez-vous les tarifs applicables? Il y a beaucoup de choses à considérer avant de lancer un service de musique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Mme Annie Francoeur:

Je vous posais la question pour savoir si l'on parle d'un service qui serait illégal ou d'un service qui aurait fait les choses correctement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Y a-t-il beaucoup de services illégaux, d'après vous?

Mme Annie Francoeur:

Je ne serais pas en mesure de vous le dire. Je sais qu'il y a beaucoup de gens qui utilisent la musique de manière illégale, à différents points de vue. Notre groupe offre des services de karaoké, par exemple.[Traduction]

De nombreuses entreprises de karaoké n'ont pas toutes les licences nécessaires, alors nous savons pertinemment que les gens n'utilisent pas uniquement du contenu sous licence. En ce qui a trait aux services de diffusion de musique en continu de façon précise, je ne le sais pas.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Avez-vous participé aux consultations de la Commission du droit d'auteur sur la réforme? Avez-vous des commentaires à faire au sujet de la Commission en soi et de son fonctionnement?

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Bien sûr, on peut toujours améliorer les choses. Comme l'a dit notre collègue, les délais associés aux décisions et les tarifs rétroactifs qui augmentent sans cesse représentent un enjeu en matière de prévisibilité des paiements pour l'industrie. Ce serait un élément à améliorer.

Mme Annie Francoeur:

Stingray participe au processus de la Commission du droit d'auteur depuis peu. Jusqu'à maintenant, tout se passe bien, mais nous comprenons que le gouvernement procède actuellement à un examen et pourrait affecter des ressources supplémentaires à la Commission, ce qui la rendrait plus efficace, bien entendu.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous allons passer à M. Albas.

Vous disposez de cinq minutes. Allez-y.

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Je tiens à remercier tous nos témoins d'avoir pris le temps de nous transmettre leur expertise.

J'aimerais commencer avec Mme Dorval.

Madame, vous avez dit que de nombreuses stations de radio offraient beaucoup de contenu local, surtout des nouvelles, et je veux seulement réitérer l'importance de ce contenu dans plusieurs secteurs de ma circonscription. Toutefois, je vous dirais que de nombreux rédacteurs en chef me disent que les animateurs de radio lisent mot pour mot les articles de leurs journaux en ondes. C'est peut-être exagéré.

J'aimerais d'abord poser quelques questions qui font suite à celles de M. Lloyd.

L'exemption relative aux redevances existe depuis 1997. Je sais que certains témoins ont fait valoir qu'elle se voulait temporaire. Je comprends que votre industrie a dit qu'il s'agissait d'une exception permanente, mais je ne crois pas qu'elle soit associée à une clause inflationniste. Pour atteindre ne serait-ce que la parité avec le pouvoir d'achat, le montant devrait être de l'ordre de 148,20 $ environ... c'est probablement un calcul imprécis. Ne croyez-vous pas qu'on doive à tout le moins rajuster ce prix afin de refléter le pouvoir d'achat d'aujourd'hui, plutôt que celui de 1997?

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Je comprends tout à fait. Votre point ne semble pas déraisonnable, mais j'ajouterais que cela n'aidera pas vraiment les artistes canadiens, parce que 60 % de cet argent sortira du pays.

M. Dan Albas:

Comment pouvez-vous ne pas convenir qu'en payant en dollars de 1997, vous auriez été en mesure d'acheter davantage? Je crois que c'est un commentaire plutôt insensé, madame. Si quelque chose s'applique... Nous le faisons pour la Sécurité de la vieillesse et bien d'autres programmes gouvernementaux pour les ajuster. N'êtes-vous pas d'accord, à tout le moins, que ce serait juste et conforme à la loi?

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Oui, et c'est pourquoi j'ai dit que ce n'est pas déraisonnable à mon avis. Je pense que c'est raisonnable, mais, même si vous faites cela, même si vous procédez à une augmentation raisonnable, une très petite part restera en fin de compte dans les poches de l'artiste canadien.

M. Dan Albas:

Je comprends, mais en même temps, il faut dire que 100 $, que ce soit à l'époque ou maintenant, ne représentent pas beaucoup d'argent. Je le répète, graduellement, cela diminue la capacité de payer en dollars d'aujourd'hui.

(1625)

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Tout à fait.

M. Dan Albas:

J'espère que nous pouvons nous entendre là-dessus.

Cela dit, j'aimerais poser la même question à la représentante de l'Association nationale des radios étudiantes et communautaires. Est-ce que le fait de procéder à une augmentation jusqu'à au moins un montant approprié pour notre époque poserait un problème pour votre association?

Mme Freya Zaltz:

Nous sommes dans une position difficile, car le secteur des radios étudiantes et communautaires appuie entièrement les artistes canadiens, particulièrement les artistes émergents, alors nous ne voulons pas être dans une situation où nous leur enlevons de l'argent. D'un autre côté, les stations sans but lucratif n'ont pas l'argent nécessaire. Même si c'était éminemment juste d'accroître les paiements versés aux artistes, il demeure que les stations n'ont pas la capacité de payer davantage. Nous nous trouvons dans une situation difficile, car nous devons faire valoir les deux arguments en même temps, à savoir que les artistes devraient être rémunérés convenablement et que nous n'avons pas les moyens de payer davantage.

M. Dan Albas:

Eh bien, si vous ne pouvez pas payer en dollars d'aujourd'hui ce qui était versé en 1997, j'estime que les deux positions sont assez irréconciliables, monsieur le président.

Je vais m'adresser à nouveau à la représentante de l'Association nationale des radios étudiantes et communautaires.

Dans votre mémoire, vous mentionnez une série de tarifs que les petites radios étudiantes et communautaires doivent payer annuellement. Pouvez-vous nous dresser la liste de ces tarifs, nous dire à quelles sommes ils correspondent et nous expliquer à quoi ils servent? Pour la plupart de vos membres, quelle part du budget annuel ces tarifs représentent-ils approximativement?

Mme Freya Zaltz:

Je vais devoir vous transmettre davantage de détails par écrit, étant donné le nombre de stations dont il est question.

Par contre, je peux vous dire quels sont les cinq tarifs. Il y a les droits d'exécution payés à la SOCAN, qui correspondent à 1,9 % des dépenses brutes d'exploitation.

Il y a aussi deux tarifs payés à Ré:Sonne. Un de ces tarifs est payé en vertu de l'alinéa 68.1(1)b), et l'autre vise la diffusion en continu et sur le Web. Je crois qu'il serait plus efficace que je vous transmette par écrit l'information au sujet des taux.

Les deux autres tarifs sont versés à la CMRRA et à la SODRAC. Ces tarifs font actuellement l'objet d'un examen par la Commission du droit d'auteur, alors les taux qui s'appliqueront ne sont pas encore fixés. Il y a d'une part des droits de reproduction mécanique, c'est-à-dire de reproduction d'oeuvres protégées par le droit d'auteur que les stations utilisent à l'interne sur des disques durs, des CD, etc., et, d'autre part, des droits pour des services en ligne. Actuellement, les radios étudiantes et communautaires n'ont pas une idée très claire des taux qui s'appliqueront pour les services en ligne, car les négociations viennent à peine de commencer.

Le président:

Si vous pouviez transmettre les chiffres exacts et les renseignements au greffier, ce serait très bien. Je vous remercie beaucoup.

La parole est maintenant à M. Sheehan.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

À l'instar de tous les autres, je tiens à dire aussi que vos excellents témoignages nous donneront matière à réflexion. Nous avons entendu divers témoignages au fil du temps. Des artistes nous ont notamment affirmé que leur revenu actuel est le plus bas qu'ils ont jamais gagné.

Aujourd'hui, certains témoins nous ont conseillé de ne rien modifier. Selon vous, si nous changeons les choses, les maisons de disques internationales feront plus d'argent. Pourquoi? Pouvez-vous nous expliquer davantage ce raisonnement.

En écoutant vos témoignages, j'ai constaté que les radios canadiennes font des choses qui sont intangibles. Avez-vous des renseignements à nous fournir sur la visibilité dont les artistes canadiens bénéficient grâce à la radio. Est-ce que la radio a une valeur pour les artistes de la relève ou d'un certain genre musical lorsqu'il est question de se faire connaître?

Vous nous avez parlé du Fonds RadioStar pour les artistes qui sont choisis. Avez-vous des statistiques sur les artistes canadiens qui reçoivent des fonds parce que la radio a contribué à les faire connaître?

Voilà quelques-unes de mes questions. N'importe qui peut y répondre.

(1630)

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Je vais y répondre une à la fois. Pour répondre à votre première question, qui concerne le partage de l'argent avec les maisons de disques, je peux vous dire que nous avons procédé à une analyse des chansons diffusées à la radio par notre industrie pour comprendre comment l'argent est réparti au sein des entités liés à la société Ré:Sonne. Il nous est difficile de vous donner davantage de renseignements que la ventilation que nous avons fournie. Nous avons été en mesure d'établir cette ventilation à la suite de l'analyse que nous avons effectuée des chansons diffusées à la radio. Il serait bien que des représentants de la société Ré:Sonne viennent vous expliquer comment l'argent est réparti entre les différentes entités.

Pour répondre à votre deuxième question, je peux dire que les artistes canadiens se font connaître grâce aux stations de radio canadiennes, qui, en vertu de la politique du CRTC, doivent diffuser 35 % de musique canadienne dans le marché anglophone. Dans le marché francophone, le pourcentage est même plus élevé. Les stations de radio doivent diffuser 65 % de musique en français, mais il ne s'agit pas nécessairement que de musique canadienne, car elles sont autorisées à diffuser des chansons qui proviennent de la France ou de la Belgique. En majeure partie, près de 60 %, il s'agit de musique canadienne. Cela vous donne une idée de la mesure dans laquelle les artistes canadiens peuvent se faire connaître grâce à la radio.

Mme Susan Wheeler:

En plus de diffuser les chansons des artistes sur les ondes, nous accueillons souvent des artistes dans nos studios pour leur permettre de parler de leur nouvel album ou de leurs nouveaux projets. Nous mettons également en vedette des artistes lorsque nous invitons nos auditeurs et des membres de la communauté à assister à une représentation donnée par des artistes canadiens, ce qui permet de faire découvrir des artistes qui peuvent être méconnus du public.

Nous voyons cela comme une relation symbiotique lorsque nous faisons la promotion d'artistes canadiens pour les aider à progresser dans leur carrière au Canada. En outre, parce que nous finançons directement des organismes comme Factor et le Fonds RadioStar, nous permettons aux artistes d'avoir accès à du financement dont ils ne disposeraient pas autrement et qui leur permet d'effectuer des tournées, d'enregistrer des disques et de gérer leur carrière sans avoir d'autres préoccupations.

M. Terry Sheehan:

C'est très bien.

J'ai besoin que vous m'aidiez à comprendre. Ce qui me pose problème, c'est que nous avons un graphique qui montre que les maisons de disques canadiennes obtiennent 2 % et les artistes canadiens reçoivent 28 %. On voit que 70 % des entités étrangères obtiennent quelque chose en vertu du système actuel, mais vous nous dites de ne rien changer. Nous obtenons seulement 30 %, et vous dites que ce sera pire si nous apportons un changement.

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Oh non, nous n'avons pas dit que nous voulons le statu quo. Nous avons dit que vous devriez vous pencher sur cet élément du problème. Même si on augmente la somme de 100 $ pour le premier 1,25 million de dollars, cet argent sortirait du pays.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Quel changement pouvons-nous apporter pour améliorer les choses?

Mme Susan Wheeler:

Vous ne pouvez rien changer, car c'est un élément qui fait partie de l'entente conclue entre l'artiste et la maison de disques. Je crois que c'est à ce sujet que vous avez entendu Bryan Adams la semaine dernière...

M. Terry Sheehan:

Il n'a pas témoigné devant notre comité, c'était au Comité...

Mme Susan Wheeler:

Ah oui, vous avez raison. Pardonnez-moi.

Il a parlé des difficultés en matière de contrat auxquelles certains artistes sont confrontés lorsqu'ils commencent leur carrière. Ils n'ont pas le pouvoir nécessaire pour obtenir l'équilibre qu'il est possible d'avoir lorsqu'on devient aussi connu que Bryan Adams...

Un article très utile a été publié récemment à propos de Spotify, qui modifie son modèle d'affaires. Cet article renforce le message que nous essayons de transmettre. On y parle d'une entente classique avec une maison de disques. Il y a un diagramme circulaire qui montre que 41,6 % va à la maison de disques, 48 % à Spotify et 10 % à l'artiste.

C'est l'entente contractuelle que les maisons de disques ont conclu avec des artistes canadiens. Il n'est pas possible de modifier cela par voie législative. C'est quelque chose qui fait partie du modèle d'affaires.

Tout ce que nous disons, c'est qu'en vertu du régime de droits d'auteur, si vous modifiez le montant que les stations de radio versent, les bénéficiaires seront au bout du compte les maisons de disques internationales. Il est vrai que les artistes obtiendront un peu plus d'argent, mais la part du lion se retrouvera à l'extérieur du Canada, au détriment des radiodiffuseurs locaux.

(1635)

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

La parole est maintenant à M. Chong, pour cinq minutes.

L'hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, PCC):

Je remercie les témoins de comparaître.

J'aimerais me concentrer sur les stations de radio, particulièrement les stations de radio à but lucratif. Je ne veux pas vraiment m'attarder pour l'instant aux radios communautaires sans but lucratif.

J'ai examiné le document que nos analystes ont préparé, et j'ai constaté des difficultés au chapitre de vos revenus, tant dans le secteur de la radio que celui de la télévision, mais les marges d'exploitation semblent demeurer assez stables, quoique, dans le cas de la radio, on observe une légère diminution.

Une étude assez marquante, réalisée il y a environ trois ans par l'Institut C.D. Howe, a conclu que le montant des redevances que les artistes et les détenteurs de droits à l'étranger et au pays devraient obtenir s'établit à environ deux fois et demie la somme versée actuellement. Pour l'année examinée, 2012, environ 178 millions de dollars ont été versés en redevances, mais la valeur effective de la diffusion des chansons à la radio s'élevait en réalité à près de 440 millions de dollars. D'après cette étude, il faut établir un nouveau modèle pour les redevances.

L'auteur de l'étude, qui est professeur émérite d'économie à l'Université de Montréal, a conclu que le montant des redevances n'est pas équitable. J'aimerais obtenir vos commentaires au sujet de cette étude ou du principe qui sous-tend cette recherche.

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Je n'ai aucune connaissance directe de cette étude. Je dirais que, selon nous, la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, dans sa forme actuelle, établit un juste équilibre. Or, il est très facile de briser cet équilibre. De toute évidence, il y aura probablement toujours une partie qui affirme ne pas en avoir assez et une autre qui affirme en donner assez. Quelle est la bonne réponse à cela? Nous croyons que la loi actuelle permet vraiment d'atteindre un équilibre. Le chemin pour y arriver n'a pas été facile.

Là où nous voulons en venir, c'est que vous trouverez probablement une étude qui dit une chose et une autre qui dit autre chose. À mon avis, nous devons faire très attention, car en retirant une chose d'un côté, nous bouleversons tout un écosystème dans le régime de droit d'auteur qui est en place, et cela pourrait avoir un effet très perturbateur.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

C'était, je crois, une analyse très rigoureuse menée par un professeur d'économie. Il a analysé le temps de conversation sur les ondes d'une station de radio et le temps consacré à la diffusion de musique. Il a tenu compte de la dernière minute dans chacune de ces deux catégories pour analyser la valeur commerciale des conversations par rapport à celle de la musique à la radio. En utilisant une méthodologie standard, il a conclu que la valeur marchande de la musique enregistrée diffusée par les stations de radio du secteur privé au Canada, en 2012, se rapprochait davantage des 440 millions de dollars, mais que les redevances versées n'étaient que de 178 millions de dollars.

C'est là, me semble-t-il, un aspect que le Comité devra examiner. C'est pourquoi je pose la question.

Mme Susan Wheeler:

Je ne prétends pas être une économiste, mais tous les tarifs applicables à la radio sont fixés par la Commission du droit d'auteur. Il s'agit d'un tribunal économique, alors cela fait partie de son domaine de compétence. En ce qui concerne les tarifs examinés par l’économiste en question, si la méthodologie standard utilisée dans le cadre de l'étude n’est manifestement pas celle employée par la Commission du droit d’auteur, il se peut que certains renseignements soient manquants, et c'est ce qui pourrait expliquer pourquoi les deux aboutissent à deux résultats différents. Le seul objectif et le seul mandat de la Commission du droit d'auteur consistent à établir le bon taux pour l'utilisation de la musique.

(1640)

L'hon. Michael Chong:

L'auteur de ce rapport est Marcel Boyer, un professeur émérite. Il a également écrit sur le sujet dans le Globe and Mail durant la même période. Il avait vivement critiqué la façon dont la Commission du droit d’auteur déterminait les redevances à fixer. Selon lui, il faut restructurer la Commission du droit d’auteur afin de garantir que les artistes obtiennent une valeur marchande pour la diffusion de leurs chansons par les stations de radio commerciale à but lucratif.

En tout cas, je soulève la question parce que je pense que c'est pertinent pour l'étude dont nous sommes saisis. L'Institut C.D. Howe est une organisation assez importante dont les recherches sont habituellement examinées par des comités et des gens de tout le pays.

Je sais qu'il y a deux côtés à une médaille. C'est pourquoi je pose la question.

Mme Susan Wheeler:

Je peux attester, pour avoir moi-même assisté à plusieurs audiences de la Commission du droit d'auteur, qu'une foule d'analyses économiques et de données sont déposées dans le cadre de chaque instance tarifaire, et il s'agit de données réelles sur la musique diffusée à la radio, y compris les segments. C'est un processus très rigoureux, et je suppose que cela se ferait dans ce contexte plutôt que dans le cadre d'un examen législatif.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

J'ai une dernière petite question qui porte sur les recommandations du même auteur. Celui-ci a recommandé deux types de redevances, l’une pour la radio terrestre ou traditionnelle et l’autre pour la radio sur Internet. Ces deux technologies sont très différentes. Les coûts d'entrée sont assez différents pour la radio terrestre commerciale. Cela coûte cher d'entrer sur le marché, alors que n'importe qui peut créer une station de radio Internet. Voilà pourquoi, selon l'auteur, les redevances pour la radio terrestre devraient être basées sur un pourcentage des revenus et, dans le cas de la radio sur Internet, le régime de redevances devrait être établi selon un taux par écoute.

J'aimerais connaître votre avis sur ce genre de système à deux vitesses.

Mme Susan Wheeler:

Nous ne représentons aucun diffuseur dans le domaine de la transmission en continu ou de la radio Internet.

Ma collègue de Stingray aurait peut-être quelque chose à dire.

Mme Annie Francoeur:

Eh bien, nous devons garder à l'esprit que Stingray est un peu différent des autres services. La plupart de nos services sont distribués par des tiers, comme les entreprises de distribution de radiodiffusion ou EDR. C'est donc un peu différent dans notre cas. La plupart de nos services de diffusion en continu sont assurés par des abonnés au service de télévision qui sont authentifiés comme internautes au moyen de leur application mobile ou du lecteur Web.

La situation est donc un peu différente. Nous recevons des revenus de la part des EDR pour le service de télévision et nous nous en servons aussi pour les autres plateformes. Le modèle élaboré par M. Boyer ne s'appliquerait donc pas nécessairement à notre cas.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Caesar-Chavannes, vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Merci aux témoins.

En ce qui concerne Stingray, pouvez-vous nous en dire un peu plus à ce sujet? Est-ce semblable à une plateforme de type Spotify?

Mme Annie Francoeur:

Pas du tout.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

D'accord.

Mme Annie Francoeur:

Spotify est un service sur demande. Contrairement à Spotify, Stingray essaie d'éviter le service audio sur demande. Nous préférons miser sur les avantages de la licence légale, que ce soit au Canada, aux États-Unis ou dans la plupart des autres pays où nous distribuons le service. Il s'agit d'une liste de lecture audio linéaire, dotée de fonctionnalités semi-interactives limitées selon le marché, en fonction des licences légales. Mais vous ne pouvez pas sélectionner la chanson que vous souhaitez écouter. Ce n'est pas comme Spotify, non.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Ce n'est donc pas du tout un service de diffusion en continu.

Mme Annie Francoeur:

Nous faisons de la diffusion en continu, mais ce n'est pas un service sur demande comme Spotify.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

D'accord.

Vous avez dit que vous aimeriez que la Loi sur le droit d'auteur demeure intacte. Pouvez-vous expliquer brièvement la principale raison qui vous amène à penser ainsi?

Mme Annie Francoeur:

Nous estimons que le régime de droit d’auteur, dans sa forme actuelle, fonctionne bien. Nous sommes conscients que les artistes se plaignent. Nous croyons qu'il faut mettre en place des solutions, mais nous ne sommes pas d'avis que ces solutions impliquent une révision de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Une partie de la solution — et j'en parlerai demain devant l'autre comité — réside dans le fait que, selon nous, certaines utilisations de musique devraient être réglementées aux termes de la Loi sur la radiodiffusion. Par exemple, si vous jouez la radio dans votre commerce, la station de radio est assujettie à l'exigence de contenu canadien minimal, qui est de 35 %, comme l'expliquait ma collègue tout à l'heure.

Si vous utilisez les services d'un fournisseur de musique de fond commerciale... Stingray est l'un des plus grands fournisseurs de musique dans les commerces au Canada. Nous ne sommes soumis à aucune exigence de contenu canadien. Nous pouvons jouer ce que nous voulons. Nous avons d'ailleurs présenté un mémoire au CRTC en février dernier. Nous avons proposé que les fournisseurs de musique de fond commerciale soient assujettis à la même exigence de contenu canadien minimal, de sorte que si vous utilisez le service Stingray dans un établissement commercial, vous entendrez le même type de contenu canadien que si vous écoutiez la radio ou la télévision à la maison, car les chaînes de télévision sont également soumises aux mêmes exigences canadiennes.

Voilà un exemple de ce que nous disons, à savoir que c'est de cette façon que nous devons nous assurer que les redevances sont versées aux artistes canadiens et que leurs chansons sont entendues, au lieu de réviser la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

(1645)

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Est-ce que les représentantes de l'ANREC ou de l'ACR sont en accord ou en désaccord avec Mme Francoeur, et quelle est la principale raison pour laquelle vous souscrivez ou non à son analyse?

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Voulez-vous dire en ce qui concerne la dernière proposition?

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Oui.

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Je crois que nous n'avons jamais eu l'occasion d'en discuter. C'est nouveau pour nous, mais nous pensons que toute mesure pouvant aider les artistes canadiens est une bonne chose. Si des règlements devaient être imposés aux fournisseurs de musique de fond pour accroître le contenu canadien, je ne pense pas que nous nous y opposerions. Je crois que nous appuierions une telle mesure.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Qu'en pense la représentante de l'ANREC?

Mme Freya Zaltz:

Nous évitons généralement de commenter la façon dont les autres radiodiffuseurs et les diffuseurs d’autres secteurs devraient être réglementés et ce qu’ils devraient ou non être tenus de payer, car cela ne relève pas de notre domaine de compétence et, en particulier, parce que nous exerçons nos activités sans but lucratif. Je suis ici en tant que bénévole. Je travaille le jour dans un domaine qui n'a rien à voir avec ce dont je vous parle en ce moment. Mon champ de connaissances est donc quelque peu limité, et c'est pourquoi je dois me concentrer uniquement sur notre secteur, et non sur les autres. Dans une certaine mesure, nos mandats se chevauchent, et nous pouvons parler un peu de ce que nous avons en commun et de la façon dont nos activités respectives ont des effets positifs ou négatifs les unes sur les autres, mais en matière de proposition, je préfère ne pas faire de commentaires à ce stade-ci.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Ce n'est pas grave. Merci.

La raison pour laquelle j'ai posé cette question, c'est parce que différentes organisations sont réunies ici, et il semble qu'au bout du compte, chacune de vous aimerait que les musiciens obtiennent leur juste part, faute d'un meilleur terme. Mais cela rejoint — si je comprends bien — l'idée qu'il ne faut pas apporter trop de changements importants à la loi parce que, comme vous l'avez mentionné, madame Dorval, si vous tirez d'un côté, l'autre côté... Il y a un écosystème. Quels sont alors les changements nécessaires, le cas échéant, pour garantir que nos musiciens obtiennent leur juste part?

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Comme je l’ai dit, nous devons peut-être examiner la question sous un angle différent.

J'ai dit que Bryan Adams était venu témoigner devant votre comité, et il a proposé quelque chose de très différent, qui sort des sentiers battus. Cela pourrait probablement se faire au moyen de modifications législatives ou grâce à une autre solution proposée par les maisons de disques, par exemple.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Merci.

Le président:

La parole est maintenant à M. Masse. Vous avez deux minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'essaie d'obtenir un échéancier pour le travail que nous effectuons ici. Il y a de bonnes chances qu'au moment où le Comité aura terminé son rapport et l'aura remis au ministre pour qu'il en fasse rapport au Parlement... Si le gouvernement voulait vraiment présenter un projet de loi, le tout pourrait prendre un certain temps. Cela ne se produirait peut-être pas avant les prochaines élections générales. Ce qui m'inquiète, c'est que nous n'avons toujours rien.

On pourrait peut-être commencer par vous, madame Wheeler, puis terminer avec nos amis de Vancouver. Quelle serait la priorité absolue concernant les mesures à prendre, si vous deviez en choisir une ou deux, très brièvement? Ou il peut s'agir du statu quo, si c'est le cas, étant donné que la session parlementaire tire à sa fin.

(1650)

Mme Susan Wheeler:

Oui, le statu quo serait notre priorité absolue afin d'assurer une certaine prévisibilité et stabilité pour le secteur de la radiodiffusion locale, qui subit beaucoup de changements et de difficultés par les temps qui courent.

Mme Annie Francoeur:

Même chose: le statu quo en ce qui concerne la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Nous sommes d'avis que des changements supplémentaires s'imposent, mais ils ne s'inscriraient pas dans le cadre de la révision de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Mme Freya Zaltz:

Je dirais la même chose. En ce qui a trait à la disposition dont j'ai parlé, le secteur préférerait évidemment que cela ne change pas. Je ne peux pas me prononcer sur les autres aspects de la loi.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Nous avons presque terminé notre premier tour. Nous devrons nous occuper de quelques travaux du Comité à la fin de la séance. Il nous reste du temps pour des interventions d'environ cinq minutes de chaque côté.

Monsieur Longfield.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci. Je partagerai mon temps de parole avec M. Lametti.

Ma frustration, et je suppose que c'est le terme à employer, tient au fait que nous devons essayer d'établir un juste équilibre, de sorte que les créateurs de musique puissent être payés pour leurs créations et éviter ainsi de vivre dans la pauvreté. Ils sont soit pauvres, soit très prospères; on dirait qu'il n'y a rien entre les deux.

Il est frustrant d'essayer de trouver les bonnes suggestions, en particulier lorsqu'il existe des sources de revenus externes... La frustration aujourd'hui vient peut-être du fait que les sources de revenus ne sont pas représentées dans cette salle.

Pourriez-vous nous dire ce qui nous manque en ce qui concerne l'équilibre?

Madame Dorval, avez-vous quelque chose à dire? Je pense que les stations de radio jouent un rôle essentiel, comme vous l'avez dit, dans la diffusion de nouvelles locales et d'autres services, car elles assurent la promotion des entreprises locales et font rouler l'économie à l'échelle régionale.

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Nous sommes vraiment d'ardents défenseurs de la culture et des artistes canadiens. Nous en faisons la promotion, nous payons des redevances et nous contribuons chaque année au développement de contenu. Nous sommes de vrais partisans des artistes canadiens.

C'est un peu frustrant pour nous aussi. Comme ma collègue le disait, il s’agit plutôt d’une relation contractuelle. Les artistes qui font leurs débuts n'auront pas le pouvoir de négociation nécessaire pour conclure éventuellement une entente avantageuse avec une maison de disques. C'est là qu'ils semblent être...

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Coincés.

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Oui.

Je n'ai pas vraiment de réponse à votre question de savoir comment remédier à cette situation.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

Monsieur Lametti, c'est à vous. [Français]

M. David Lametti (LaSalle—Émard—Verdun, Lib.):

Merci à tous.

Vous venez de décrire un écosystème qui est plus ou moins équilibré depuis 1997 et auquel vous êtes en mesure de vous adapter.

La décision rendue par la Cour suprême du Canada dans l'affaire Société Radio-Canada c. SODRAC 2003 Inc. pourrait-elle vous inquiéter?[Traduction]

Est-ce quelque chose qui s'en vient et qui vous inquiète? Cette décision aura une plus grande incidence sur la télédiffusion, mais est-ce que cela pourrait perturber l'écosystème que vous avez décrit?

Mme Susan Wheeler:

D'après ce que nous avons cru comprendre, cette décision porte sur la définition d'enregistrement sonore.

M. David Lametti:

La Commission du droit d’auteur s’occupe du tarif, et ce, dans le cadre du processus judiciaire.

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Il s'agit d'un projet de tarif qui a été déposé devant la Commission du droit d'auteur pour la reproduction d'oeuvres pour la SODRAC. L'affaire a été renvoyée à la Cour suprême, et nous respecterons cela. Selon la décision rendue, c'est ainsi que la loi devrait être interprétée; par conséquent, les radiodiffuseurs devront payer un tarif supplémentaire pour les reproductions faites principalement dans le marché francophone.

Nous ne pouvons rien y changer. Nous faisons partie d'un écosystème. Si c'est ce qui a été décidé, nous allons l'accepter.

(1655)

M. David Lametti:

D'accord.

Madame Zaltz, avez-vous des réflexions à ce sujet? C'est vous qui avez parlé de la SODRAC en réponse à l'une des questions.

Mme Freya Zaltz:

Je ne connais pas cette décision précise ni ses répercussions possibles sur notre secteur. Je doute qu'elle ait une incidence importante. Je vais devoir répondre à cette question par écrit.

M. David Lametti:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Lloyd, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Je partagerai mon temps de parole avec mon collègue ici.

Je voulais revenir sur un point qui a été soulevé vers la fin de notre discussion concernant les stations de radio communautaires. Madame Wheeler ou madame Dorval, vous avez peut-être une meilleure idée des deux derniers tarifs qui ont été mentionnés, à savoir ceux versés à la CMRRA et à la SODRAC.

Pourriez-vous expliquer, le plus précisément possible, à quoi servent ces tarifs? Quels en sont les objectifs?

Mme Nathalie Dorval:

Les tarifs de la CMRRA-SODRAC sont payés par les stations de radio lorsqu'elles utilisent des reproductions d'œuvres musicales.

Mme Annie Francoeur:

Ils sont versés aux éditeurs, aux écrivains et aux compositeurs qui sont membres de la CMRRA-SODRAC.

M. Dane Lloyd:

La CMRRA correspond à quoi, précisément?

Mme Susan Wheeler:

Au côté anglophone.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Alors la SODRAC est pour le côté francophone.

Comment cela se distingue-t-il du premier tarif — par exemple, les droits d'exécution ou les droits de Ré:Sonne? Quelle est la distinction entre ces deux choses?

Mme Susan Wheeler:

La SOCAN sert aux compositeurs et aux paroliers à communiquer avec le public. Ré:Sonne se charge des droits voisins — l'interprète et le propriétaire du studio d'enregistrement, donc l'interprète et la maison de disques. Voilà pourquoi on les divise moitié-moitié. Ensuite, la CMRRA-SODRAC est responsable des droits de reproduction. C'est lorsque nous prenons la musique d'un fournisseur de services numériques autorisé par les maisons de disques et que nous téléchargeons la musique sur notre disque dur. Cela déclenche ce droit de reproduction avant la radiodiffusion.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Si on voit grand du côté des politiques, est-il nécessaire d'avoir autant d'organes de tarification? Y a-t-il moyen de simplifier les choses? Serait-il possible de les amalgamer et d'ensuite fournir les mêmes avantages aux parties prenantes? Cela serait-il utile à votre modèle d'affaires?

Mme Susan Wheeler:

C'est clair que cela nous aiderait à rationaliser notre responsabilité en matière de droit d'auteur. À l'heure actuelle, nous devons régulièrement nous défendre ou nous opposer à cinq différents tarifs, parfois sans connaître le taux en raison de la longueur des décisions de la Commission du droit d’auteur. Il est clair que cela est problématique pour nous sur le plan administratif.

Cependant, il faut dire qu'il s'agit de droits séparés reconnus par la loi. J'ai déjà posé cette question à notre Commission du droit d'auteur. On m'a dit que si on essayait de les consolider ou de les relaxer, on tirerait sur les fils auxquels on a fait allusion plus tôt et on déferait certains liens qui ont été tissés dans le cadre de cette loi.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

Je vais céder la parole à mon collègue.

Mme Annie Francoeur:

J'aimerais aussi répondre à votre question.

Stingray fait des affaires à l'extérieur du Canada, et nous avons vu bien des pays où certaines des sociétés de gestion ont fusionné et représentent tant les droits d'exécution ou de communication que les droits de reproduction. Cela permet d'accroître l'efficacité.

Je peux aussi vous dire que c'est utile côté piratage. S'il est plus facile de concéder une licence pour un produit, il y a donc moins de risques pour que bien des gens pensent qu'ils ont toutes les licences nécessaires. Ce n'est pas tout le monde qui gère sciemment un service illégal. Certaines personnes ont obtenu une licence de la SOCAN et de la SODRAC et pensent être en règle, mais non, il leur manque celle de Connect ou de la CMRRA. Si toutes ces sociétés étaient fusionnées, ou du moins si la plupart d'entre elles l'étaient, cela faciliterait la vie des gens.

Mme Susan Wheeler:

Je pense qu'il existe une distinction entre l'administration d'un droit et le droit réel prévu dans la loi.

M. Dan Albas:

J'aimerais revenir encore une fois à la dispense de payer des droits d'auteur. Dès qu'une station atteint les 1,25 million de dollars, comment le processus de paiement de tarif change-t-il?

Mme Susan Wheeler:

Nous payons 100 $ sur le premier 1,25 million de dollars et, ensuite, la Commission du droit d'auteur fixe un tarif pour le seuil de revenu supérieur à ce montant.

(1700)

M. Dan Albas:

Combien de stations ont dépassé ce plafond?

Mme Susan Wheeler:

Nous estimons qu'environ 40 % de nos membres l'auraient dépassé.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord, et combien paieraient-ils ensuite environ comparativement aux 60 % qui restent?

Mme Susan Wheeler:

Sur ce tarif en particulier?

M. Dan Albas:

Oui.

Mme Susan Wheeler:

Je ne pense pas que nous ayons fait la ventilation. Le tarif en lui-même génère 18 millions de dollars. Si vous vouliez faire les calculs approximatifs de cette façon, je ne suis pas certaine qu'ils seraient exacts. Nous pourrions voir s'il est possible de vous fournir cette information. Elle est privée parce que, au bout du compte, nous sommes tous des concurrents faisant partie d'une association.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord. Même si cette information était regroupée... Je ne veux pas que Mme Zaltz soit la seule personne à avoir des devoirs.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup pour ces très bonnes questions. L'idée de cet exercice est d'insister un peu pour obtenir de l'information que nous pouvons ensuite ajouter à notre rapport et essayer de mieux comprendre et de formuler de bonnes recommandations qui soient applicables.

Plus tôt, madame Wheeler, vous avez sorti un tableau. Pourriez-vous nous le remettre? Nous ne savons pas exactement ce dont il s'agissait. Nous ne l'avons pas.

Mme Susan Wheeler:

Nous avions un tableau sur les droits de radiodiffusion et les droits voisins réels. Je faisais allusion à un article récent dans lequel on disait que Spotify changeait son modèle d'affaires pour profiter aux artistes plus directement en éliminant le lien avec la maison de disques. Je peux certainement vous fournir la référence.

Le président:

Celui qui contenait deux graphiques?

Mme Susan Wheeler:

Oui.

Le président:

Oui, celui-là. Si vous pouviez nous le transmettre, cela nous serait utile.

Mme Susan Wheeler:

Absolument. Avec plaisir.

Le président:

Sur ce, je tiens à remercier nos témoins d'être venus de Colombie-Britannique. J'espère qu'il fait beau là-bas aujourd'hui.

Nous allons suspendre nos travaux pendant quelques minutes pour revenir ensuite les terminer à huis clos.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on September 24, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.