header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-09-20 PROC 117

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning, and welcome to the 117th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. This is primarily a committee business meeting, but we have a couple of elections to do first.

I'll turn it over to the clerk to run our election for a vice-chair.

The Clerk of the Committee (Ms. Angela Crandall):

Pursuant to Standing Order 106, the first vice-chair is a member of the official opposition.

I'm now ready to receive motions for the position of first vice-chair.

Mr. Reid, go ahead.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

After giving this long thought, and considering the available candidates, and also the instructions from our whip—

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid: —I have come to the conclusion that the stars have aligned for the most competent and best candidate, and also the one the whip would like to see, and therefore I nominate Stephanie Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

Does it have to be seconded before I make a speech?

The Clerk:

Are there any further nominations?

The Chair:

There's time for a half-hour speech.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I'm very happy to be here. I'm very honoured to have the role of shadow cabinet member for democratic institutions.

I'm sure many of you know.... Actually, I would not expect that.[Translation]

I say this because I served on the Standing Committee on Official Languages with Ms. Lapointe. We have a history together. After that, I served with Mrs. Jordan.[English] That was through Status of Women, so it's very nice to see some familiar faces in the room.

Previous to my life as a parliamentarian, I was a diplomat for 15 years. I was very fortunate to have postings both in established and in developing democracies. I've seen the government hold democracy to account, as well as the potential negative pathways that this can take in the world, which we have definitely seen in the region of the Americas, where I primarily did my diplomatic career, but also other places abroad. It's really an honour to receive this position.

It's exciting for me as well because the minister and I have a lot in common. We're both young mothers, like Ruby. Each of the three of us has one son. That's something very exciting for us, but also our love for the Americas, of course, given the minister's charitable work abroad, where she met her husband, I understand. We both hablar español as well, so maybe we'll have some preguntas en español on the next occasion when she visits us. That probably won't happen, considering we keep things in both official languages here.

It's definitely an honour to be here. For the record, and regarding past vice-chair appointments, I will say that I am pro-democracy. I hope no one has a problem with that.

That's a joke.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I did not know this. I don't know why this wasn't shared with me before I made the nomination.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's a terrible habit I have, turning tragedy into comedy.

Anyway, it's a pleasure to be here. Thank you very much, Scott and the committee, for your confidence in me. I look forward to this being a lot of fun. Procedure and processes, of course, are the basis of good society: peace, order and good government as we know it. As such, I'm very happy to be here.

I happily accept the nomination, and I ask for your support.

Thank you.

The Clerk:

Is it the pleasure of the committee to adopt the motion?

(Motion agreed to)

The Clerk: I declare the motion carried, and Mrs. Kusie duly elected first vice-chair of the committee.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

It was eerily similar to a Venezuelan election.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, that's right. Exactly.

My first act is not really democratic.

Mr. Scott Reid:

To be fully parallel, I would have to beat up John as the alternative candidate.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

While I look away....

Mr. Scott Simms:

John, my sincere apologies.

The Chair:

We also have to appoint a new chair of the Subcommittee on Private Members' Business.

David, go ahead.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I nominate Madame Lapointe.

I don't want the job.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's quite an endorsement.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

There are no other possibilities.

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair:

Okay, we'll move on to committee business.

Chris, go ahead.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

I know we ran into some stumbling blocks back in June, but moving forward—and I appreciate everyone's desire to move this forward—one item that I would like to discuss is amendments on the bill.

I don't believe we received the package. My understanding is that the opposition has put in their amendments on the bill. That being said, we do have some further amendments on the bill that we would like to put in. Many of them are technical amendments from Elections Canada. Others are amendments that address some of the concerns that have been raised by the opposition. Even though there was a deadline in the past, it might just be easier if we all had a package, rather than the government bringing amendments from the floor.

We would request a new deadline, and that amendments be submitted by Monday, September 24, at noon. That would permit the clerk to get out the package of amendments as soon as possible.

The Chair:

Is there any objection to that?

Mr. Scott Reid:

We just need a second to chat among ourselves.

The Chair:

Okay.

(1105)

(1115)

The Chair:

Let's have some discussion on the amendment.

Mr. Nater, go ahead.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

First of all, it's great to see Mr. Christopherson. On behalf of our corner of the caucus, thank you for your years of service. I think it's unfortunate that you're going to be leaving in an election, but I want to publicly say how much we like having you. We look forward to next year, when we will still have your guidance and expertise.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you. That's very nice of you.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Mr. Bittle, for bringing forward that suggestion.

For the most part we are okay with that. I think we can get the amendments we have. I don't expect we'll have many more than have already been submitted. I would be more comfortable if we kept that as a somewhat soft deadline because I think it's still worthwhile for us to hear from the Ontario chief electoral officer. They had their election in June. They were not able to come in June, obviously, because of the election, so they declined at that point. If we could hear from the CEO of Ontario next week, as well as perhaps the federal Chief Electoral Officer and the minister, we could go from there. There may be amendments that may come out of those witnesses, but I think that would be a solid starting point for us to move forward with this if that would be acceptable.

The Chair:

Mrs. Kusie, go ahead.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I'd like to recognize that I did express to the minister in our meeting on Tuesday our interest in hearing from the Ontario electoral officer. She is aware I have concerns with regard to the application of the provincial legislation to the federal legislation.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, are you suggesting that we have all the amendments except for the ones that could result from those witnesses?

Mr. John Nater:

Yes. I don't know what they would say or what has developed over the summer. We'll take anything we have now and put it in, and anything that comes afterwards we will have in due course.

The Chair:

David, go ahead.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't have a huge problem with that, as long as we can.... If we start clause-by-clause on October 2, I'd be okay with having those witnesses before then.

I don't have a problem with the witnesses, but I'd like to get clause-by-clause started on September 27, if we can.

Mr. David Christopherson:

David, you just gave two different dates.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think Thursday afternoon is the easier one.

I can move the motion.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Do you guys mind if we wait for a second?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Angela, are you running the whole government? Everywhere I go, you're there.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I'd like to verify the reason for the Thursday date, because there already was an agreement that the minister come back and testify before clause-by-clause. The minister is available to testify Thursday, September 27, at 3:30. That would be the start of clause-by-clause.

Mr. John Nater:

Are we really starting clause-by-clause at 4:30 on a Thursday afternoon?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

That would be the—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The official start would be the minister coming.

Mr. Scott Reid:

If there's some way of structuring that so it's not leading us down the position of starting at 4:30 on Thursday, if that is within the realm of possibility, that would certainly warm the cockles of my heart a little bit as I plan that particular weekend.

(1120)

Mr. David Christopherson:

We want to keep them warm.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I think we need another moment to discuss this.

The Chair:

We'll just suspend for a couple of minutes.

(1120)

(1200)

The Chair:

Welcome back, folks.

David, I understand you're going to clarify the motion that you're proposing.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, I'd like to offer a compromise motion to at least get things started here.

Are you ready to listen to my motion? I'll try to read it at other people's speed for you.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Human speed....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I move that the committee invite the chief elections officer and the chief elections officer of Ontario to appear for one hour each on Tuesday, September 25, 2018; and invite Minister Gould to appear from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, September 27, 2018, on Bill C-76, and start clause-by-clause on Tuesday, October 2, 2018, at 11 a.m.

The Chair:

Is there any discussion?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, I appreciate the generous sentiment that this would be at other people's speed.

I have, “That the committee invite the CEO and the Ontario CEO....” Could we try getting that repeated?

The Chair:

Say it again, David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Faster or slower?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, slower....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That the committee invite the chief elections officer and the chief elections officer of Ontario—

I'm watching for your cue, Scott, to see if you're keeping up.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Was that on Thursday?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

—to appear for one hour each on Tuesday, September 25, 2018; and invite Minister Gould to appear....

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm actually trying to skip the connecting words. Is Minister Gould on Thursday or Tuesday?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It was Thursday.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, September 27, 2018, on Bill C-76.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's the 27th. Okay.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

And then we start clause-by-clause on Tuesday, October 2, 2018, at 11 a.m.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It starts the next Tuesday, essentially, October 2.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I do have that. I didn't have all the connecting words, but I have the—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I can give you some more connecting words, if you'd like.

Mr. Scott Reid:

No, it's okay.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, go ahead.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Chair.

I appreciate the Liberals, this government, putting out their motion and where they want to see this going.

I would amend the motion by deleting all the words after the words “on Bill C-76”.

I think that a reasonable approach at this point would be to go forward with hearing from the witnesses next week in good faith. I think it's truly acknowledged here that there are discussions and negotiations happening on amendments at levels that aren't currently in this room, so I think providing this change—accepting the witnesses—would be a reasonable compromise and a reasonable ability to move forward on this.

Let's look back a bit at where we've been. The bill itself came forward on April 30, I believe, which was the last day that the Chief Electoral Officer said he could implement something. I haven't seen where the government is willing to amend. I haven't seen where they're willing to accept amendments from the opposition—or the third party for that matter, the NDP.

Before we agree to move into a clause-by-clause situation, I think we need to have some reassurance from the government that what we're looking at and what we really want to see is there. That's the amendment I would move to the motion. Yes, as an opposition we are willing to move forward. We're willing to hear the witnesses and we're willing to have that discussion about going into clause-by-clause once we've heard from the minister on Thursday. At this point, this would be the approach I would take.

(1205)

The Chair:

On the amendment, we have Mr. Reid, Mr. Bittle, Mrs. Kusie, and then Ms. Sahota and Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I can always read it again.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I could have taken more time to read the connecting words. Where do the words “in Bill C-76” occur? Is it at the very beginning?

Mr. John Nater:

It's after the appearance of the minister.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you want me to send it to you?

Mr. John Nater:

Do we have a written copy?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: I just have it on my iPad.

The Chair:

Come on, you guys, let's get on with it.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Essentially, John, what you're trying to do is remove the words dealing with clause-by-clause starting on October 2 at 11 a.m., and you're proposing instead....

Mr. John Nater:

I would just delete that part.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay, right. But the logic is that this allows us to be in a position where we actually have some ability to get the amendments that we'd like to see considered properly. Once you get the programming motion, the practical result is that a government with a majority need not take into account the concerns of opposition parties. And this is our worry with this motion.

You may recall that a version of this writ large was our concern with the adoption of programming motions in general when that issue arose in March 2017. At the time, we felt that the only leverage the opposition ever has in a majority government would be gone. You can expect that this will be the general response we're always going to have to programming motions of this nature, that they take away the ability to say we have concerns. Let's take that into account.

I know the idea is that majority governments have the will of Parliament, the majority of members, behind them. But sometimes it's an elected dictatorship. That's not what Canada is. It's what an unhappy caricature of Canadian politics would be if someone gets a majority and that's the end. You essentially have a four-year Stalin. That's actually not what the Canadian system is. The opposition has a chance to slow things down in order to get its perspective heard and implemented. This forces the government to make some compromises in which they'll take into account the proposals and amendments that the opposition might have. If we do this, that's gone.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You were here in the last Parliament, weren't you?

(1210)

Mr. Scott Reid:

No, no. To respond—

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm sorry to interject. I can only take so much of this.

Mr. Scott Reid:

To respond to David's point, it's actually a valid point. This is a feature we see in majority governments regardless of their partisan stripe. It is a temptation all majority governments fall into. As much as I would like to be able to say this, I would not argue that the Harper government was the one exception to the long history of majority government behaviour in Canadian history. I think that, on that point, we're actually—

Mr. David Christopherson:

I think they set some records that they have to carry around.

Mr. Scott Reid:

But these problems could have been and would have been that much worse if the opposition had not had the ability to engage in the kinds of activities that oppositions normally engage in with majority governments, if those had been stripped away. You can see that there were tools there, which remain in place today, that are of use to oppositions. On that point, I think we're probably on the same page.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Sorry, I shouldn't have interrupted. I want to apologize.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's okay.

That is the point here. Once we accept the programming motion, which is what this is, everything else doesn't matter. All we want on this side is a chance to find some way of adopting a motion that allows us to move forward with some assurance that the specific concerns that our party has articulated are going to be incorporated.

Right now, we don't know what amendments are being considered by the government. We don't know if they take into account our concerns. We don't know if opposition amendments would be considered. They normally are not considered in a majority government. That's a statement of fact. But in a minority Parliament, what typically happens is that you need the support of at least one opposition party. David and I were both present through several minority Parliaments.

What happens is that you actually have to stop and show your cards to each other to form a coalition for the purpose of this particular bill. You have to say, look, here are the amendments we want. The other side says, we're willing to give you some of that and not other things, and you have a discussion about that. It happens in a way that produces a piece of legislation that perhaps is not the government's absolute ideal. It's certainly not the opposition's ideal, but it actually is something closer to that centre that is presumably the thing we search for in a Parliament.

After all, the name "Parliament" comes from the French parlement, which indicates à parler, to speak to each other, to seek compromise. This is what we hope to achieve on this bill, particularly since I don't believe.... I was the critic or shadow minister, as we call it, to this minister for the first part of her career, and in between my tenure and that of Stephanie, it was Blake Richards. None of us, the three of us, thought that she is an inherently unreasonable or inflexible person. I thought, on the contrary, that she is practical and willing to look for solutions that would incorporate the concerns of all parties.

I would add that this is not something unique to the minister. Seeking a compromise that involves suggestions from all sides is something that is also felt and supported by our Chief Electoral Officer, Stéphane Perrault, who indicated that....

My point, as well as I can express it, and I believe Mr. Genuis can express it even more fully, is that—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Why do the Conservatives hate democracy?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Conservatives love democracy.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's an abusive relationship.

Mr. Scott Reid:

A party that has been in opposition for more than half of its history is very concerned about the aspect of democracy that relates to procedural fairness for opposition parties. That's just a feature and reality of this.

Look, in our system we all want to be in opposition some of the time. We need to take great care to make sure that in the moments when we are in government, especially a majority government, we do not forget that we may find ourselves back on the Speaker's left-hand side and in opposition, which is a concern that I think Mr. Christopherson is expressing: that the government of which I was a member may have forgotten this, may not have given it adequate regard. He may very well have a point. It's certainly the case that we want to make sure this government does not forget it.

(1215)

The Chair:

Are you, then, supporting the amendment?

Mr. Scott Reid:

As you can tell from the nature of the remarks I'm making, I'm generally supportive of the tenor and direction of the amendment.

I want to urge all members of this committee to consider being supportive of this amendment, just as I want them to be supportive of the actual amendments to the bill that my party is proposing. We need to have some kind of assurance that those will be taken into account.

I'm aware that amendments proposed by opposition parties are not normally accepted by governments in committee. It requires some kind of behind-the-scenes negotiation between the minister or those who work for her and our shadow minister, and likewise with the House leaderships. These things always have a number of different players.

We have to allow this to happen. A programming motion shuts it down. That's the thing we're trying to avoid.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid, we have a long list here. Do you have any new point to add here?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm in the process of making points, but I think it's not unreasonable to think that I should not move from any of the specific points that I've enumerated in my discussion until I'm certain they have been fully grasped by those who are not necessarily persuaded, but who certainly are potentially the targets of persuasion.

That essentially is the point concerning the motion. It is that we simply remove the part that says that clause-by-clause starts on October 2.

It is entirely conceivable—and this is something that I have not said at this point, Mr. Chair—that once we've had the opportunity to negotiate and be more certain of this position, be more certain that what we are being offered represents a genuine opportunity to present our amendments, we will be happy to return to a date that allows the expeditious adoption of the bill.

The bill, as you can imagine, seems more desirable to us if it has some amendments that reflect our concerns. Our willingness to move forward with it, not merely to start the process of dealing with clause-by-clause but to finish it, would therefore be greatly sped up if we had that kind of assurance.

The way this place works, and we all know this—those who have been around for a while certainly know it, and those of us who are new to the place are rapidly finding out—is that the rules allow things to grind along extraordinarily slowly when we're not talking to each other behind the scenes. As a result, when we think there's potential for a compromise, we have the practice of dealing behind the scenes to work out what that compromise might be.

That is, for example, why we have House leaders' meetings every Monday afternoon.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There does have to be a willingness to compromise.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, there does have to be a willingness to compromise. That's part of the point, David, of saying that I don't sense an unreasonableness on the part of the minister, quite the contrary.

I have to be careful of what I say about her. I've said some really nice things about her. She could practically write an entire campaign brochure saying, “Here's what the Conservatives think about me. Vote for me.” I may live to regret that. I don't mind her winning a second term; I just don't want her coming back and congratulating me and saying, “I couldn't have done it without you, Scott.” That would be very upsetting.

The way compromises work is that they are worked out behind the scenes. Each side has to express what its own bottom line is. Then they have to go back, and there's a chain of command that is not that fast, but it works. It speeds things up. Every side has to be respectful of the privacy of such negotiations, of course, because as we all know, politics is a bit like making sausages. Nobody wants to see sausages being made.

These are just reasonable positions, so we hope that we can get that. My sense today is that the new parliamentary secretary came with what amounted to an opening bid in those negotiations. We're simply responding to that opening bid. It would not be reasonable for anyone who has been around here for a while to expect that one accepts that opening bid at face value or as the fallback position. We no more assume that of her than she does of us, or the reverse. We are simply trying to work toward a situation in which the folks who are not present in this room right now, but who ultimately make the decisions, have a chance to talk to each other either directly or through us, or whatever happens to work, in order that we can actually have a discussion that winds up moving toward the adoption of this bill, amended in some form.

I can say definitively that nobody thinks the bill in its present form is ideal. The government doesn't think so; it has some suggested amendments of its own. I should be careful of what I say here, because I don't actually know this for a fact. I certainly know what the sources are and their concerns. I know for a fact that the CEO expressed some concerns and had some suggestions. I'm sure that's the source of some of those concerns. I would expect that, as is typical, they would have some concerns based on the fact that the draftspeople don't always get everything exactly right. You have to make technical corrections for that. Those are two sources.

It may also be the case that they've made some calculations that some of what they were proposing—it is, after all, a very large bill, on many subjects—in one or another of those subject areas may well be other than the ideal proposal, from a policy point of view. For whatever reason, those calculations would be based upon....

They have a series of changes they themselves want to make. It goes without saying that the opposition has its own reservations. We want to make sure that either their amendments take into account the kinds of things that we have in our amendments, or that they will take some of our amendments. They can propose them as government amendments—we don't care—but they should actually make sure that these things are given a real chance.

That's not something that will be negotiated in the process of going through clause-by-clause. That's not what happens once you're in that process. Once you're in that process, each amendment is voted up or down on a party-line vote. That is just what happens.

(1220)



I'm sure if I go back I'll find an exception to that somewhere, but I can't think of an exception to that in my own parliamentary experience, which is pretty long at this point. Giving our people the chance to work this out between each other is what I'm trying to do right now. It's why I'm taking such pains to be as thorough as possible in the remarks that I deliver to you today.

The minister and shadow minister have just come back into the room, so it is conceivable that they will want to share further information with us.

Would it be unreasonable, Mr. Chair, to ask if the committee would be willing to give a brief suspension while we do that?

The Chair:

Make it very brief, though. We can't take too long.

We'll suspend for a couple of minutes.

(1220)

(1240)

The Chair:

We're un-suspended, I hope for the last time.

I understand we have some sort of agreement here. Does someone want to say what it is?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have a substantial number of additional comments to make, some of which I know you'll find absolutely riveting.

I suppose I would, with great reluctance, be willing to surrender the floor to the parliamentary secretary, Ms. Jordan, but I don't want to rush her, so I'll just give it a second and continue to say that, while we're waiting....

Sorry, it's going to be Mr. Graham, I guess.

I'm just going to talk until I get a signal that this is all sorted out.

The Chair:

Are you ready?

Mr. Graham, go ahead.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Please hold. Your call is important to us.

Mr. David Christopherson:

This would be a lot harder to take if I thought it was coming back with more to study.

(1245)

Mr. John Nater:

You can always change your mind.

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, no. I already got my guy lined up. He'd assassinate me.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I will have a revised version of my motion available in just a second.

The Chair:

Okay.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Get the typing fingers ready.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I am withdrawing my previous motion and reissuing it with some changes. It's easier than doing amendments, so keep your original text. It's not that far off.

I'll read it once, and then I can read it again more slowly for you, Scott, if you'd like. I move that the committee invite the chief elections officer and the chief elections officer of Ontario to appear for a total of 90 minutes on Tuesday, September 25, 2018, and decide on the date to commence clause-by-clause at that meeting; and invite Minister Gould to appear from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, September 27, 2018 on Bill C-76.

I'm ready to read it again more slowly as you type.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I got most of it. Basically, what it boils down to is 90 minutes for the two CEOs, followed by—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's a total of 90 minutes—

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's a total of 90 minutes, sorry.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

—not 90 minutes each, unless you really want a really long meeting.

Mr. Scott Reid:

No, none of us wants that.

And at that meeting....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

At that meeting we'll decide on the date to commence clause-by-clause.

We are agreeing that we will come up with a date at that meeting, and there won't be any more not deciding. Does that sound decisive?

Mr. Scott Reid:

When does Minister Gould appear before the committee?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

As before, the minister will appear from 3:30 to 4:30 on the Thursday.

Mr. Scott Reid:

All right.

The Chair:

Is there any more discussion on the motion?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes. I just have one point of clarification.

I'd like to ensure that this will be the end of our witnesses. There will be no further sudden asks for another witness. These CEOs will finish our witness list on the study.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion on the motion?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Just give us a second to figure this out.

It's the end of the witnesses—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We're asking for your gentleman's agreement on that. The motion does not include it.

An hon. member: A gentleperson's agreement.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: Thank you. Yes, it's a gentleperson's agreement, or a diplomat's agreement.

The Chair:

Do you need further discussion on the motion?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Sorry, give us time. Nobody talk while I'm—

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid: I won't be part of the decision-making, but you'll all agree that I am by far the most entertaining person on this side.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Chair, we'll have to discuss this. I can't agree to it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are you prepared to continue past 1 o'clock to get it finished?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I don't know if that will be necessary. I don't think it will take that long to discuss.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate that.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I think we can quickly discuss that and come to an agreement, or not, amongst ourselves. I'll report back in—

(1250)

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have a one o'clock meeting myself, so I would like to....

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie: Okay.

A voice: You should be voting on the motion—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie: Yes, let's vote on the motion, not the gentleman's agreement part.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Where's the list right now?

The Chair:

It's long.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Who's next?

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle is next.

Scott, I don't think I'd worry about preparing your speech.

Is there any further discussion on the motion?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes. We don't foresee the need for further witnesses, at this point.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm glad to hear that. That's all I was asking.

The Chair:

Can we vote?

(Motion agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well, that was easy.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

Is there any further business?

A motion to adjourn has been presented.

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

[Énregistrement électronique]

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Bienvenue à la 117e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Cette séance sera consacrée principalement aux travaux du Comité, mais nous devons procéder d’abord à quelques élections.

Je vais céder la parole à la greffière afin qu’elle mène l’élection de notre vice-président.

La greffière du comité (Mme Angela Crandall):

Conformément à l’article 106 du Règlement, le premier vice-président doit être un député de l’opposition officielle.

Je suis maintenant prête à recevoir les mentions pour le poste de premier vice-président.

Monsieur Reid, allez-y

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Après avoir réfléchi longuement, examiné les candidatures possibles et également tenu compte des instructions de notre whip…

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid: …, je suis parvenu à la conclusion que les planètes se sont alignées pour me permettre de présenter la candidature de la personne la plus compétente et la plus appropriée pour ce poste, ainsi que celle que le whip souhaitait voir dans ce poste. Par conséquent, je propose la candidature de Stephanie Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

La motion doit-elle être appuyée avant que je fasse un discours?

La greffière:

Avez-vous d’autres candidatures à proposer?

Le président:

Nous avons le temps d’entendre un discours d’une demi-heure.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je suis très heureuse d’être ici. J’ai l’honneur d’assumer le rôle de membre du cabinet fantôme pour les institutions démocratiques.

Je suis sûre que bon nombre d’entre vous savent… En fait, je ne m’attendrais pas à ce que vous le sachiez.[Français]

Je dis cela parce que j'ai siégé au Comité permanent des langues officielles avec Mme Lapointe. Nous avons une histoire semblable. Après cela, j'ai siégé avec Mme Jordan. [Traduction]

C’était au sein du Comité de la condition féminine. Il est donc très plaisant d'apercevoir quelques visages familiers dans la salle.

Avant de devenir une parlementaire, j’ai été diplomate pendant 15 ans. J’ai eu la chance d’obtenir des affectations au sein de démocraties établies et de démocraties en développement. J’ai vu le gouvernement demander des comptes à des démocraties, et j’ai également observé dans le monde les voies potentiellement négatives dans lesquelles les démocraties peuvent s’engager, ce que nous avons assurément constaté dans la région des Amériques, là où ma carrière diplomatique s’est principalement déroulée. C’est vraiment un honneur d’être nommée à ce poste.

De plus, cette situation est exaltante pour moi parce que la ministre et moi avons de nombreux points en commun. Nous sommes toutes deux de jeunes mères, tout comme Ruby. Chacune de nous trois a un fils, ce qui est emballant, mais nous partageons certes aussi une passion pour les Amériques, compte tenu des activités caritatives que la ministre a exercées à l’étranger. C’est d’ailleurs là-bas qu’elle a rencontré son époux, je crois. Nous pouvons aussi hablar español toutes les deux. Par conséquent, nous lui poserons peut-être quelques preguntas en español la prochaine fois qu’elle nous visitera. Cela ne se produira probablement pas, étant donné que nous délibérons ici dans les deux langues officielles seulement.

C’est assurément un honneur d’être ici. Pour le compte rendu, je tiens à préciser, en ce qui concerne les anciennes nominations au poste de vice-président, que je suis pour la démocratie. J’espère que cela ne pose pas de problèmes à personne.

Je plaisante évidemment.

M. Scott Reid:

Je ne savais pas cela. J’ignore pourquoi on ne m’a pas informé de cela avant que je propose cette candidature.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

J’ai la très mauvaise habitude de plaisanter à propos de situations tragiques.

De toute manière, je suis heureuse d’être ici. Je remercie infiniment Scott et les membres du Comité de la confiance qu’ils m’accordent. Je me réjouis à la perspective de bien m’amuser dans ce poste. Les procédures et les processus sont, bien entendu, les fondements de toute bonne société. Ils mènent à la paix, l’ordre et une bonne gouvernance, tels que nous les connaissons. Cela dit, je suis très heureuse d’être ici.

J’accepte avec plaisir cette nomination, et je vous demande de m’accorder votre appui.

Merci.

La greffière:

Plaît-il au Comité d’adopter la motion?

(La motion est adoptée.)

La greffière: Je déclare la motion adoptée et Mme Kusie dûment élue première vice-présidente du Comité.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci beaucoup.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Cela ressemblait étrangement à des élections vénézuéliennes.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, c’est exact.

Ma première mesure n’est pas vraiment démocratique.

M. Scott Reid:

Pour que ce soit complètement symétrique, il faudrait que je tabasse John, l’autre candidat potentiel.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Pendant que je ferme les yeux...

M. Scott Simms:

Je vous présente toutes mes excuses, John.

Le président:

Nous devons également nommer un nouveau président du Sous-comité des affaires émanant des députés.

David, allez-y.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je propose la candidature de Mme Lapointe.

Je ne veux pas de ce poste.

M. Scott Simms:

C’est tout un appui que vous lui donnez.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Il n’y a aucune autre possibilité.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président:

D’accord, nous allons maintenant passer aux travaux du Comité.

Chris, allez-y.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Je sais que nous avons rencontré quelques obstacles en juin dernier mais, pour faire avancer les choses — et je sais gré à tous de leur désir de faire avancer les choses —, j’aimerais discuter des modifications à apporter au projet de loi.

Je ne crois pas que nous ayons reçu l’ensemble des modifications. Je crois comprendre que l’opposition a présenté ses amendements au projet de loi. Cela dit, il y a d’autres amendements au projet de loi que nous aimerions proposer. Bon nombre d’entre eux sont des modifications techniques émanant d’Élections Canada. D’autres modifications répondent à certaines des préoccupations exprimées par l’opposition. Même si une échéance a été fixée dans le passé, le processus serait peut-être plus aisé si nous disposions tous de l’ensemble des modifications, au lieu de forcer le gouvernement à prendre la parole pour présenter ses amendements.

Nous demanderions une nouvelle échéance qui indiquerait que les amendements doivent être présentés avant midi, le lundi 24 septembre. Cela permettrait au greffier de distribuer les ensembles de modifications le plus tôt possible.

Le président:

Quelqu’un voit-il une objection à cela?

M. Scott Reid:

Nous avons simplement besoin que vous nous accordiez une minute pour discuter entre nous.

Le président:

D'accord.

(1105)

(1115)

Le président:

Discutons maintenant de l’amendement.

Monsieur Nater, allez-y.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Premièrement, c’est bon de revoir M. Christopherson. Au nom des députés de notre coin du caucus, je vous remercie de vos longues années de service. Il est triste que vous nous quittiez lors de la prochaine élection, mais je tiens à déclarer publiquement la mesure dans laquelle nous valorisons votre présence. Nous avons hâte à l’année prochaine, alors que nous pourrons encore bénéficier de vos conseils et de vos compétences.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci. C’est très aimable de votre part.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur Bittle, d’avoir présenté cette suggestion.

Nous l’approuvons en grande partie. Je pense que cela nous permettra de présenter les amendements que nous avons. Je ne m’attends pas à ce que nous en ayons beaucoup plus que ceux que nous avons déjà présentés. Je préférerais que l’échéance demeure légèrement souple, car, à mon avis, il vaudrait encore la peine que nous entendions le directeur général des élections (DGE) de l’Ontario. Ils ont mené leurs élections en juin dernier. Pour cette raison, ils n’ont évidemment pas été en mesure de comparaître ce mois-là. Ils ont refusé l'invitation que nous leur avons fait parvenir à ce moment-là. Si nous pouvions entendre le DGE de l’Ontario la semaine prochaine, et peut-être le directeur général des élections du Canada et la ministre, nous pourrions procéder à partir de là. Des amendements pourraient découler de ces témoignages mais, selon moi, si cette idée vous convient, ce serait un point de départ solide qui nous permettrait d’aller de l’avant relativement à ce projet de loi.

Le président:

Madame Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je dois souligner que j'ai indiqué à la ministre lors de notre rencontre de mardi que nous souhaitions entendre le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario. Elle est consciente de mes préoccupations relativement à l'application de la loi provinciale dans le contexte de la loi fédérale.

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, êtes-vous en train de nous dire que nous avons déjà tous les amendements retenus à l'exception de ceux qui pourraient être proposés à la suite de l'audition de ces témoins?

M. John Nater:

Oui. Je ne sais pas ce qu'ils auraient à nous dire ou comment les choses ont évolué dans le courant de l'été. Nous prendrons ce que nous avons actuellement en y ajoutant tout ce qui sera proposé par la suite dans les délais prescrits.

Le président:

David, à vous la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela ne me pose pas vraiment problème pour autant qu'il nous soit possible de... Si nous débutons l'étude article par article le 2 octobre, je serais d'accord pour que nous recevions ces témoins auparavant.

Je n'ai pas d'objection à ce que nous convoquions ces témoins, mais j'aimerais dans la mesure du possible que nous puissions débuter l'étude article par article le 27 septembre.

M. David Christopherson:

David, vous venez de nous donner deux dates différentes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je crois que ce serait plus facile jeudi après-midi.

Je peux présenter la motion.

M. Scott Reid:

Seriez-vous d'accord pour que nous patientions un instant?

M. David Christopherson:

Angela, est-ce vous qui dirigez l'ensemble du gouvernement? Toutes les fois que je me retrouve quelque part, vous êtes là.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je veux m'assurer que l'on comprend bien pourquoi on propose le jeudi, car il était déjà convenu que la ministre allait comparaître de nouveau avant l'étude article par article. La ministre est disponible pour témoigner le jeudi 27 septembre à 15 h 30. C'est à ce moment-là que l'on pourrait amorcer l'étude article par article.

M. John Nater:

Allons-nous vraiment commencer l'étude article par article à 16 h 30 un jeudi après-midi?

M. Chris Bittle:

Ce serait...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'étude commencerait officiellement avec la comparution de la ministre.

M. Scott Reid:

Y a-t-il une façon d'aménager tout cela pour que nous n'ayons pas à débuter à 16 h 30 le jeudi. Si cela pouvait être chose possible, je me sentirais certes beaucoup mieux dans ma planification du week-end qui suivra.

(1120)

M. David Christopherson:

Nous voulons que vous vous sentiez le mieux possible.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je pense que nous devons prendre encore un moment pour en discuter.

Le président:

Nous allons nous interrompre quelques instants.

(1120)

(1200)

Le président:

Nous voilà de retour.

David, je crois que vous allez nous fournir des précisions sur la motion que vous proposez.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, j'aimerais offrir une solution de compromis pour que nous puissions tout au moins mettre le processus en branle.

Êtes-vous prêts à entendre ma motion? Juste pour vous, je vais tenter de la lire à la vitesse des gens normaux.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

À vitesse humaine...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je propose que le Comité invite le directeur général des élections et le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario à comparaître pendant une heure chacun le mardi 25 septembre 2018; que l'honorable Karina Gould soit invitée à comparaître de 15 h 30 à 16 h 30 le jeudi 27 septembre 2018 au sujet du projet de loi C-76; et que le Comité commence l'étude article par article du projet de loi le mardi 2 octobre 2018 à 11 heures.

Le président:

Quelqu'un veut en débattre?

M. Scott Reid:

Oui. Je remercie mon collègue d'avoir exprimé aussi généreusement son intention de nous lire sa motion à vitesse normale.

J'ai eu le temps de noter « Que le Comité invite le DGE et le DGE de l'Ontario... » Auriez-vous l'obligeance de répéter?

Le président:

Veuillez lire à nouveau votre motion, David.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Plus rapidement ou plus lentement?

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, plus lentement...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Que le Comité invite le directeur général des élections et le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario...

J'attends votre signal, Scott, pour m'assurer que vous suivez bien.

M. Scott Reid:

Était-ce le jeudi?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

... à comparaître pendant une heure chacun le mardi 25 septembre 2018; et que la ministre Gould soit invitée à comparaître...

M. Scott Reid:

J'essaie de sauter les mots charnières. Est-ce que la ministre Gould est convoquée le jeudi ou le mardi?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est le jeudi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est de 15 h 30 à 16 h 30 le jeudi 27 septembre 2018 au sujet du projet de loi C-76.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est le 27. D'accord.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

Et que le Comité commence l'étude article par article le mardi 2 octobre 2018 à 11 heures.

M. Scott Reid:

On commencerait donc le mardi suivant, soit le 2 octobre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est noté. Je n'avais pas tous les mots charnières, mais j'ai le...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je peux vous la répéter au complet, si vous voulez.

M. Scott Reid:

Non, ce n'est pas nécessaire.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, nous vous écoutons.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vois bien où les libéraux veulent en venir en présentant cette motion à titre de parti gouvernemental.

Je proposerais un amendement pour que soient supprimés tous les mots qui suivent « au sujet du projet de loi C-76 ».

Je pense qu'il serait tout à fait raisonnable pour nous d'entendre d'abord ce que vont nous dire nos témoins de la semaine prochaine dans le cadre d'une démarche de bonne foi. Je crois que nous sommes bien conscients qu'il y a des discussions et des négociations au sujet des amendements à des échelons qui ne sont pas représentés ici, si bien que l'acceptation de ce changement — et des témoins proposés — représenterait un compromis raisonnable dans nos efforts pour faire progresser ce dossier.

Essayons de voir comment nous en sommes arrivés là. Si je ne m'abuse, le projet de loi a été déposé le 30 avril, soit la date limite indiquée par le directeur général des élections pour qu'il puisse mettre en oeuvre quelque proposition que ce soit. Je n'ai pas pris connaissance des amendements que le gouvernement est prêt à apporter. Je ne sais pas au sujet de quels aspects il est disposé à accepter les amendements mis de l'avant aussi bien par l'opposition que par le troisième parti, le NPD.

Avant que nous acceptions de passer à l'étude article par article, je pense qu'il faudrait que le gouvernement nous assure que les changements que nous préconisons sont bel et bien pris en considération. C'est donc l'amendement que je souhaiterais que l'on apporte à cette motion. Dans notre rôle d'opposition, nous sommes effectivement disposés à aller de l'avant. Nous désirons entendre ces témoins et pouvoir discuter par la suite de la possibilité d'entreprendre l'étude article par article une fois que nous aurons entendu la ministre jeudi. Ce serait l'approche que je recommanderais pour l'instant.

(1205)

Le président:

Pour débattre de l'amendement, nous avons M. Reid, M. Bittle, Mme Kusie puis Mme Sahota et M. Christopherson.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je peux toujours lire à nouveau ma motion.

M. Scott Reid:

J'aurais dû prendre plus de temps pour noter tous les mots. À quel endroit l'expression « au sujet du projet de loi C-76 » apparaît-elle? Est-ce au tout début?

M. John Nater:

C'est après la comparution de la ministre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que vous voulez que je vous l'envoie?

M. John Nater:

Vous en avez une copie papier?

M. David de Burgh Graham: Je l'ai seulement sur mon iPad.

Le président:

S'il vous plaît, messieurs, nous devons commencer la discussion.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous voudriez en fait, John, que l'on supprime le passage ayant trait à l'étude article par article à compter du 2 octobre à 11 heures, et vous proposez plutôt...

M. John Nater:

Je veux juste que l'on supprime cette partie.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord, je vois. Il s'agit de nous permettre d'avoir l'occasion de proposer les amendements que nous souhaiterions voir être dûment pris en considération. Une fois qu'une motion relative au déroulement de nos délibérations est adoptée, il en résulte en pratique qu'un gouvernement majoritaire n'a plus à tenir compte des préoccupations des partis d'opposition. C'est justement ce qui m'inquiète au sujet de la motion proposée ici.

Vous vous souviendrez peut-être que nous avions exprimé nos préoccupations concernant l'adoption de motions de programmation d'une manière générale lorsque cette question a été soulevée en mars 2017. Nous estimions à ce moment-là que cela nous ferait perdre l'unique levier à la disposition de l'opposition dans un contexte de gouvernement majoritaire. Vous pouvez vous attendre à ce que nous réagissions toujours de cette manière aux motions semblables qui nous privent de la possibilité d'exprimer nos réserves. Je vous prierais d'en tenir compte.

Je sais que l'on soutient que les gouvernements majoritaires peuvent s'appuyer sur la volonté du Parlement et de la majorité des députés. On se retrouve cependant parfois avec une véritable dictature élue. Cela n'a rien à voir avec le Canada. On fait une bien mauvaise caricature de la politique canadienne en affirmant qu'à partir du moment où un parti obtient la majorité, tout est réglé. C'est comme si l'on mettait un Staline au pouvoir pour un mandat de quatre ans. Ce n'est pas comme ça que fonctionne le régime canadien. L'opposition doit avoir la possibilité de ralentir les choses pour que son point de vue puisse être entendu et que des ajustements soient faits en conséquence. On oblige ainsi le gouvernement à faire certains compromis en tenant compte des amendements et autres propositions de l'opposition. En adoptant une motion comme celle-ci, on perd cette possibilité.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous étiez bien là pendant la législature précédente?

(1210)

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, mais...

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis désolé de vous interrompre, mais il y a quand même des limites à ce que je suis disposé à entendre.

M. Scott Reid:

En fait, David n'a pas tort. C'est une caractéristique des gouvernements majoritaires, peu importe le parti au pouvoir. Tous les gouvernements majoritaires succombent à cette tentation. J'aimerais beaucoup pouvoir vous dire que le gouvernement Harper a été l'exception dans la longue liste de gouvernements majoritaires qui ont eu un comportement semblable dans l'histoire canadienne, mais je dois avouer que ce n'est pas le cas. Je pense que nous avons en fait en la matière...

M. David Christopherson:

Je crois que les conservateurs ont établi certains records qui continuent de les hanter.

M. Scott Reid:

Il faut toutefois dire que la situation aurait été encore beaucoup plus problématique si l'on avait empêché l'opposition de jouer le rôle qui est normalement le sien. Il y avait alors des outils qui sont toujours en place aujourd'hui, dont l'opposition peut se servir. Nous sommes sans doute d'accord à ce sujet.

M. David Christopherson:

Désolé, je n'aurais pas dû vous interrompre. Je vous prie de m'en excuser.

M. Scott Reid:

Il n'y a pas de problème.

C'est ce que je veux faire valoir ici. Si nous adoptons cette motion visant à déterminer le déroulement de nos délibérations, car c'est bel et bien ce dont il s'agit, tout le reste devient sans importance. Nous souhaiterions de ce côté-ci pouvoir trouver une façon d'adopter une motion nous permettant d'aller de l'avant en nous garantissant dans une certaine mesure que les préoccupations exprimées par notre parti seront prises en compte.

Pour l'instant, nous ne savons pas quels amendements le gouvernement compte proposer. Nous ne savons pas non plus si nos réserves sont prises en considération. Nous ignorons si les amendements de l'opposition seront retenus. Ils sont normalement rejetés lorsque le gouvernement est majoritaire. C'est un fait. En revanche, un gouvernement minoritaire doit généralement obtenir le soutien d'au moins un parti de l'opposition. David et moi avons d'ailleurs connu plusieurs législatures où le gouvernement était minoritaire.

Il faut alors marquer un temps d'arrêt et mettre ses cartes sur la table afin de former une coalition pour pouvoir faire adopter un projet de loi. Vous devez indiquer quels amendements vous voulez proposer. L'autre parti vous répond qu'il est prêt à accepter quelques-uns de vos amendements, et les négociations s'enclenchent. On se retrouve ainsi avec une nouvelle loi qui ne correspond pas nécessairement à ce que le gouvernement espérait dans l'absolu. C'est assurément la même chose du point de vue de l'opposition, mais on se rapproche alors du juste milieu que nous sommes censés rechercher au sein d'un Parlement.

Comme son nom l'indique, le Parlement devrait être une institution où tout le monde se parle à la recherche de compromis. C'est ce que nous espérons réaliser pour ce projet de loi, d'autant plus que je ne crois pas... J'ai été porte-parole de l'opposition ou, comme on dit, ministre du cabinet fantôme, pendant la première portion de la carrière de cette ministre. Entre mon mandat et celui de Stephanie, il y a eu aussi Blake Richards qui a joué ce rôle. Aucun de nous trois n'a eu l'impression que la ministre était une personne foncièrement déraisonnable ou inflexible. Je la considérais bien au contraire comme quelqu'un qui avait l'esprit pratique et la volonté de chercher des solutions tenant compte des préoccupations de tous les partis.

J'ajouterais que la ministre n'est pas la seule à penser de cette manière. La recherche de compromis fondé sur les suggestions des différentes parties en cause est également l'avenue privilégiée par notre directeur général des élections, Stéphane Perrault, qui a indiqué que...

Ce que je veux dire, et je crois que M. Genuis pourrait l'exprimer encore mieux que moi, c'est que...

M. David Christopherson:

Comment se fait-il que les conservateurs détestent autant la démocratie?

M. Scott Reid:

Les conservateurs adorent la démocratie.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est une relation de maltraitance.

M. Scott Reid:

Un parti qui a été dans l'opposition pendant plus de la moitié de son histoire est tout à fait conscient de l'importance de l'équité des procédures pour les partis de l'opposition. C'est un aspect incontournable de toute démocratie.

Dans notre régime, nous nous retrouvons tous dans l'opposition à un moment ou un autre. Pendant les périodes où nous formons le gouvernement, surtout s'il est majoritaire, nous devons faire bien attention de ne pas oublier que nous pourrions retourner un jour sur les banquettes à la gauche du Président, soit dans l'opposition. Monsieur Christopherson faisait justement valoir que le gouvernement dont je faisais partie avait peut-être négligé de tenir suffisamment compte de cette réalité. Il est fort possible qu'il ait raison. Je peux vous assurer que nous tenons à faire le nécessaire pour que le gouvernement actuellement au pouvoir ne l'oublie pas.

(1215)

Le président:

Pouvez-vous nous dire alors si vous appuyez cet amendement?

M. Scott Reid:

Comme vous avez pu le déduire à la lumière de mes observations, je serais plutôt favorable à la teneur de cet amendement et aux objectifs qu'il vise.

J'enjoins tous les membres du Comité à bien vouloir envisager la possibilité de l'appuyer, et d'appuyer également les amendements au projet de loi lui-même que mon parti propose. Il faut que nous puissions avoir bon espoir que nos propositions seront considérées.

Je sais bien que les amendements proposés par les partis de l'opposition ne sont pas habituellement acceptés par le gouvernement en comité. Il faut qu'il y ait des négociations en coulisse entre la ministre ou ses collaborateurs et notre ministre du cabinet fantôme, de même qu'entre les leaders à la Chambre. Différents intervenants ont leur mot à dire dans ces dossiers.

Nous devons faire en sorte que cela soit possible. La motion de programmation proposée aurait l'effet contraire. C'est ce que nous essayons d'éviter.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, il y a plusieurs de vos collègues qui souhaiteraient parler. Avez-vous d'autres arguments à faire valoir?

M. Scott Reid:

C'est exactement ce que je suis en train de faire. Je me crois cependant tout à fait justifié de penser qu'il me faut continuer à insister sur les points déjà avancés dans mon argumentation tant que je ne serai pas certain qu'ils ont été bien saisis par tous ceux qui ne sont pas nécessairement convaincus, mais que je peux certes essayer encore de convaincre.

C'est l'essentiel de l'amendement proposé concernant cette motion. Nous voulons simplement que l'on supprime la portion indiquant que l'étude article par article débutera le 2 octobre.

Il est tout à fait concevable — et c'est un aspect que je n'ai pas encore abordé, monsieur le président — qu'à partir du moment où nous aurons pu négocier pour mieux savoir à quoi nous en tenir, et que nous aurons ainsi l'assurance d'avoir véritablement la possibilité de présenter nos amendements, nous serons heureux de revenir à une date permettant l'adoption rapide du projet de loi.

Comme vous pouvez vous l'imaginer, le projet de loi nous apparaîtrait plus acceptable si l'on prenait en compte certains des amendements reflétant nos préoccupations. Avec une assurance de la sorte, nous serions nettement plus enclins à aller de l'avant pour non seulement amorcer le processus d'étude article par article, mais aussi le mener à terme.

Comme nous le savons tous — aussi bien ceux qui sont là depuis longtemps que les autres qui le découvrent rapidement —, les règles de notre institution font en sorte que les choses peuvent évoluer vraiment très lentement en l'absence de discussions en coulisse. Ainsi, lorsque nous avons l'impression qu'un compromis est possible, nous avons pris l'habitude de nous rencontrer en coulisse pour en négocier les détails.

C'est par exemple la raison pour laquelle les leaders à la Chambre se réunissent tous les lundis après-midi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il faut qu'il y ait une volonté de faire des compromis.

M. Scott Reid:

Il faut effectivement qu'il y ait une volonté en ce sens. C'est d'ailleurs un peu pour cela, David, que j'indiquais que la ministre ne m'apparaît pas déraisonnable, bien au contraire.

Je dois être prudent dans mes commentaires au sujet de la ministre. J'ai déjà eu de très bons mots à son égard. Elle pourrait presque publier une brochure électorale intitulée « Voici ce que les conservateurs pensent de moi. Votez pour moi. » Il est possible que je regrette un jour ces commentaires. Je n'ai rien contre l'idée qu'elle obtienne un deuxième mandat; je ne veux tout simplement pas qu'elle vienne me féliciter par la suite en me disant qu'elle n'y serait pas parvenue sans mon aide. Voilà qui serait vraiment déconcertant.

Les compromis sont toujours négociés en coulisse. Chaque parti doit indiquer le résultat qu'il souhaite obtenir en bout de ligne. Chaque représentant doit ensuite faire rapport à ses collègues en suivant la chaîne de commandement, ce qui peut exiger un certain temps. Mais ça fonctionne. On peut ainsi accélérer les choses. Chaque parti doit bien sûr respecter le caractère confidentiel de ces négociations car, nous le savons tous, faire de la politique, c'est un peu comme fabriquer des saucisses. Personne ne veut voir comment on s'y prend pour y arriver.

Nos revendications sont raisonnables et nous espérons que l'on y donnera suite. J'ai l'impression que la nouvelle secrétaire parlementaire est arrivée aujourd'hui avec ce qu'on pourrait qualifier de proposition de départ pour ces négociations. Nous sommes simplement en train de répondre à cette proposition. Tous ceux qui sont ici depuis suffisamment longtemps savent très bien que l'on ne va pas accepter d'emblée cette proposition initiale tout en la considérant comme la position de repli du gouvernement. Nous ne nous attendons pas à ce qu'elle le fasse, et l'inverse est également vrai. Nous essayons seulement de mettre en place les conditions nécessaires pour que des gens qui ne sont pas présents aujourd'hui, mais qui auront en fin de compte à trancher, aient la chance de discuter entre eux, que ce soit directement ou par notre entremise, ou par quelqu'autre moyen que ce soit, de telle sorte que nous puissions progresser vers l'adoption de ce projet de loi dans la forme qu'il aura une fois tous les amendements considérés.

Je suis persuadé que personne ne pense que le projet de loi dans sa forme actuelle ne comporte aucune lacune. Ce n'est certes pas l'avis du gouvernement, car il a lui-même proposé des amendements. Il faut que je fasse bien attention à ce que j'avance, car je n'en ai pas été informé officiellement. Je sais certes d'où peuvent venir ces amendements et les préoccupations dont ils émanent. Je sais par exemple que le directeur général des élections a exprimé certaines réserves et formulé des suggestions. Je sais que c'est la source de certaines de ces inquiétudes. Comme c'est toujours le cas, on voudra apporter des corrections de forme, car il arrive que les rédacteurs fassent légèrement fausse route. Voilà donc deux sources possibles.

Il se peut également qu'une analyse plus approfondie ait révélé que certaines des propositions — il s'agit après tout d'un projet de loi très important qui porte sur une variété de sujets — sont loin d'être irréprochables du point de vue stratégique, et ce, pour un motif ou un autre selon l'angle adopté pour l'analyse.

Il y a différents changements que les libéraux souhaiteraient eux-mêmes apporter. Il va sans dire que l'opposition a ses propres réserves. Nous voulons nous assurer que les amendements des libéraux tiennent compte des éléments qui se retrouvent dans les nôtres, ou encore qu'ils acceptent d'adopter certains de nos amendements. Ils peuvent proposer la même chose sous la forme d'un amendement du gouvernement — peu importe —, mais ils doivent s'assurer que ces considérations sont bel et bien prises en compte.

Ce n'est pas quelque chose que l'on pourra négocier une fois le processus d'étude article par article mis en branle. Ce n'est pas comme ça que les choses se passent. Une fois l'étude entreprise, chaque amendement est adopté ou rejeté en suivant la ligne de parti. On ne peut pas dire le contraire.

(1220)



Je suis certain que si je cherche un peu, je trouverai une exception quelque part, mais il n'y en a aucune de ma propre expérience parlementaire qui me vienne à l'esprit, et je suis là depuis déjà bien longtemps. J'essaie de donner la chance à tous d'y voir clair. C'est la raison pour laquelle je me démène autant pour être le plus rigoureux possible dans mes observations d'aujourd'hui.

La ministre et le contre-ministre viennent de reparaître dans la pièce, donc on peut présumer qu'ils ont de nouveaux renseignements pour nous.

Serait-il déraisonnable, monsieur le président, de demander au Comité si nous pouvons nous arrêter brièvement pour recevoir l'information?

Le président:

Vous devrez être très bref, toutefois. Nous ne pouvons pas prendre beaucoup de temps.

Nous suspendrons la séance quelques minutes.

(1220)

(1240)

Le président:

La séance reprend, et j'espère que c'était la dernière interruption.

Je comprends que nous avons une forme d'entente. Est-ce que quelqu'un veut nous expliquer ce qu'il en est?

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai un nombre assez important de nouvelles observations à faire, et il y en a certaines que vous trouverez sûrement captivantes.

Je suppose que je serai prêt, bien que je n'en aie vraiment pas envie, à céder la parole à la secrétaire parlementaire, Mme Jordan, mais je ne veux pas la presser, donc je prendrai quelques secondes pour continuer de dire que pendant que nous attendons...

Je m'excuse, c'est M. Graham qui prendra la parole, je suppose.

Je continuerai simplement de parler jusqu'à ce qu'on me fasse signe.

Le président:

Êtes-vous prêt?

Monsieur Graham, allez-y.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Veuillez garder la ligne. Votre appel est important pour nous.

M. David Christopherson:

Ce serait beaucoup plus difficile à prendre si je pensais revenir pour en avoir encore plus à étudier.

(1245)

M. John Nater:

Vous pouvez toujours changer d'avis.

M. David Christopherson:

Non, non. J'ai déjà envoyé quelqu'un à la ligne de front. Il m'assassinerait.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aurai une version révisée de ma motion dans une seconde.

Le président:

D'accord.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Préparez-vous à transcrire tout cela.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je retire ma motion précédente et en soumets une nouvelle version modifiée. Ce sera plus simple que d'y apporter des modifications, donc gardez votre texte original. La nouvelle motion n'est pas très différente.

Je vais vous la lire une fois, après quoi je pourrai la relire plus lentement pour vous, Scott, si vous le souhaitez. Je propose que le Comité invite le directeur général des élections du Canada et le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario à comparaître pendant 90 minutes le mardi 25 septembre 2018; que le Comité détermine au cours de cette réunion la date à laquelle il commencera l'étude article par article et que la ministre Gould soit invitée à comparaître de 15 h 30 à 16 h 30 le jeudi 27 septembre 2018 au sujet du projet de loi C-76.

Je suis prêt à la relire plus lentement pendant que vous la transcrivez.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai capté l'essentiel. En gros, il s'agit de prévoir 90 minutes pour les deux DGE, puis...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il s'agit d'un total de 90 minutes.

M. Scott Reid:

Un total de 90 minutes, je m'excuse.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il ne s'agit pas de leur accorder 90 minutes chacun, à moins que vous souhaitiez tenir une très longue séance.

M. Scott Reid:

Non, personne ne souhaite cela.

Et lors de cette séance...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous déterminerons lors de cette réunion la date à laquelle commencera l'étude article par article.

Nous convenons d'en déterminer la date à cette réunion, mais nous ne déciderons rien d'autre. Est-ce que cela semble clair?

M. Scott Reid:

Quand la ministre Gould comparaîtra-t-elle devant le Comité?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comme prescrit dans la motion précédente, la ministre comparaîtra le jeudi, de 15 h 30 à 16 h 30.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien.

Le président:

Voulez-vous discuter davantage de la motion?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui. J'aurais simplement une chose à préciser.

J'aimerais m'assurer que ce seront nos derniers témoins. Il n'y aura pas d'autre demande soudaine pour faire comparaître d'autres témoins. Ces DGE seront les derniers témoins de notre liste pour cette étude.

Le président:

Voulez-vous discuter davantage de la motion?

M. Scott Reid:

Donnez-nous seulement une seconde pour bien comprendre.

Ce seront les derniers témoins...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous vous demandons votre accord entre gentilhommes. Ce n'est pas inscrit dans la motion.

Un député: Un accord entre gentilles personnes.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Merci. Oui. Votre accord entre gentilles personnes ou un accord diplomatique.

Le président:

Voulez-vous discuter davantage de la motion?

M. Scott Reid:

Je m'excuse, laissez-nous un peu de temps. J'aimerais que personne ne parle pendant que je...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid: Je ne participerai pas à la décision, mais vous conviendrez tous que je suis de loin la personne la plus divertissante de ce côté.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Monsieur le président, nous devrons en discuter. Je ne peux pas donner mon accord à cela.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Êtes-vous prête à siéger au-delà de 13 heures pour que nous puissions nous entendre?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je ne sais pas si ce sera nécessaire. Je ne crois pas qu'il nous faille autant de temps pour en discuter.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous en remercie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je pense que nous pouvons en discuter rapidement et nous entendre, ou non, entre nous. J'en ferai rapport...

(1250)

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai moi-même une autre réunion à 13 heures, donc j'aimerais...

Mme Stephanie Kusie: D'accord.

Une voix: Vous devriez demander le vote sur la motion...

Mme Stephanie Kusie: Oui, votons sur la motion et laissons tomber l'accord entre gentilhommes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Où en sommes-nous rendus sur la liste?

Le président:

La liste est longue.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Qui est le prochain?

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle est le prochain.

Scott, je ne crois pas qu'il vaille la peine de préparer votre discours.

Voulez-vous toujours discuter de la motion?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui. Nous ne voyons pas la nécessité de convoquer d'autres témoins à ce stade-ci.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis bien content de l'entendre. C'est tout ce que je demandais.

Le président:

Pouvons-nous passer au vote?

(La motion est adoptée. [Voir le procès-verbal])

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Facile.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Y a-t-il autre chose?

Une motion est présentée pour la levée de la séance.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on September 20, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.