header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-09-25 PROC 118

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. Welcome to the 118th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

Welcome, Mr. Cullen. Welcome, Ms. May. It's great to have you here.

We will continue on Bill C-76, an act to amend the Canada Elections Act and other acts and to make certain consequential amendments.

We're pleased to be joined by Stéphane Perrault, Canada's Chief Electoral Officer. He is accompanied by Anne Lawson, deputy chief electoral officer, regulatory affairs; and Michel Roussel, deputy chief electoral officer, electoral events and innovation.

For the information of members, we invited the Chief Electoral Officer of Ontario to appear today, but he declined due to prior commitments.

Thank you for coming. You probably have better attendance than some of us; you've been here lots of times. It's great to have you back.

Mr. Perrault, we'll let you make some opening remarks, and then we'll go on to some questions.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault (Chief Electoral Officer, Elections Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

It's always a pleasure to be here and to support the work of the committee. Hopefully this morning my colleagues and I will be of assistance to the committee as it reviews Bill C-76.

I don't have any written remarks. I would like, though, to briefly touch upon three points before turning to questions.

The first point relates to the importance of this bill, in particular for the next election. The second point touches upon a technical amendment, which I did not bring to the attention of the committee when I last appeared, so I want to bring it to your attention. The third point relates to the work that we need to do to prepare the implementation of this bill and to be ready for the next election, as well as how that fits into the work of this committee, and of the Senate, of course.

On the importance of the bill, again, I don't want to repeat what I've said. Overall this is, in my view, a very strong bill, albeit not a perfect one. I've made some recommendations to improve that bill.

What I would say, though, is that the bill brings some long-term benefits to the electoral process, and it brings some much-needed short-term remedies to some of the concerns that many share regarding the integrity of the electoral process. Of course, that's a very important part of our mandate.

For the next election, given the environment, I very much look forward to having this legislation passed. It includes measures to deal with third parties and foreign influence. It also includes measures to deal with cyber-attacks and disinformation. It is an important piece of legislation from that perspective.

Also, it significantly reinforces the powers of the commissioner in terms of his investigations, so, from an integrity point of view, I think it's important to have this bill passed. [Translation]

If there is one area where the bill failed, it is privacy. The parties are not subjected to any kind of privacy regime. I have pointed this out in the past and I want to mention it again today. The Privacy Commissioner has talked about it, and we are in agreement on this issue. I simply wanted to reiterate that this morning, without going into detail.

As for the technical amendment I talked about, the committee unanimously approved a recommendation that had been made by my predecessor. The recommendation pertained to situations where, as required under the Parliament of Canada Act, a by-election must be held late in the election cycle, shortly before a fixed-date election. It was agreed that it was inadvisable in such cases to hold a by-election, because these elections are generally cancelled when a general election is held. The committee had unanimously approved that recommendation, and the government agreed.

The bill includes a provision on this matter. Unfortunately, as it is currently drafted, in the case of a vacancy, a government could decide not to hold a by-election during the last nine months of the cycle, and on top of that, there would be an additional period of six months less a day. Thus, there could be a period of 15 months less a day without a by-election to fill a vacancy. I am pretty sure that was not the intention of our recommendation, nor is it what the committee or the government wants.

I noticed the flaw this summer. We brought it to the government's attention, but my role is to report to the committee. If you would like us to propose some new phrasing to correct the problem, I would be happy to do so. [English]

The last point I want to touch upon relates, as I said, to preparation for implementing Bill C-76 and our readiness efforts, and how that fits with the work that Parliament needs to do.

As you know, I would have liked this bill to have been passed last spring. It would have given us more time to work toward its implementation.

When I met this committee, I indicated that we would need to start the summer, first of all, by having a two-track approach to the training and the guidebooks for poll workers so we're prepared. We have prepared guidebooks on the current legislation, as well as the potentially amended legislation. We have not printed that material, of course, and we may adjust it further as the committee and Parliament do their work. However, that's been done.

The other part, and perhaps the more challenging part, relates to the IT systems. The bill would affect, at a minimum, 20 of our IT systems, some in small ways and some in large ways. What I said last spring was that we would spend the summer completing the work that we have to do on our side with our systems, and then start in the fall to look at the coding for the new system changes for Bill C-76. That's largely what we've done.

As you may recall, I indicated that we were then building a new, much more secure data centre, which is really the bedrock of our election delivery. That data centre has been built successfully and we've done the migration. It was scheduled for September 1. We did it on September 15, so it was a two-week delay, which is not bad. We're fine-tuning that, but it's going quite well. We still have a bit of IT work to do, but overall we are progressing well.

We now turn our attention to this bill. We will need a window to do some of that coding and then some of that testing. The coding window is, essentially, between October 1 and early December, when the House rises. That's when we need finality, basically, in terms of how this bill will impact our systems, because after that we go through a very rigorous testing in January, and then we do bug fixing. Then we roll out the systems in a field simulation in March.

That's our timeline to make sure that everything works well for this election. That may be useful for the committee to understand in terms of the time that we need.

I have one more point, which is not directly related to Bill C-76. Perhaps if there's time at the end I'd like to come back to it. That's the issue of electronic poll books, which we have discussed before this committee a number of times. There were some changes just last week in our plans in that regard. If there are questions I'll be happy to answer them, and perhaps at the end, if there's time, I could speak to the changes that we're making to that project.

(1110)

The Chair:

Maybe you should do that now, if you could do it briefly.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Sure. You will recall—and some of you here were not members of this committee—that over the last couple of years we talked about introducing electronic poll books, which is not electronic voting and it's not electronic tabulation, but it's essentially the electronic lists and the poll books that assist the poll workers in processing voters.

We planned to do that because it improves the integrity of the record-keeping. It reduces the errors and speeds up the process, especially at advanced polls. It's one of several ways in which we're improving services for the future.

We've seen that kind of technology being used increasingly at provincial levels. In order to roll that out for the next election, I need to be satisfied that the systems meet the highest standards in terms of security. You will remember that the Communications Security Establishment Canada issued a report in 2017 saying that the threat to elections is highest at the federal level, and that's not surprising. Our standards are commensurate to that threat, and we've been working with them to set those standards.

In order to roll out that technology at the next general election in any significant way, I need to be ready to pilot that technology in by-elections this fall. Last week, despite a lot of hard work that has gone into this, I was not satisfied that the technology was sufficiently secure and mature to be rolled out in a by-election. So, it will not be piloted in a by-election.

I remain absolutely convinced that this is the way of the future, but it will happen only if and when I'm satisfied that it is robust and flawless. Those are the conditions under which we set out to do this project, and those are the conditions under which we are pursuing that project.

This has implications for the general election in terms of the rollout. We planned to roll out that technology in 225 advanced polls. That will not happen.

Will we do some testing in some polls? I think we still have to explore that. I am still committed to the future of that vision in terms of serving electors and assisting poll workers, but I have to be satisfied, at this point in time, a year ahead of the election, that it will succeed and that it meets the highest standards; and at this point I don't have that degree of assurance. So I have pulled the plug on this for the by-elections. That will have impacts for the general election.

It has no bearing on this bill, but the bill does provide long-term flexibility to better leverage that technology. The bill and that project have some connection and, as I said, I remain convinced of a future. It just has to be ready, to be safe and flawless, as I said.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[Translation]

We will now move on to questions and comments.

Mr. Simms, go ahead. [English]

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you to our guests. I have a very important question off the top. How was your summer?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The summer was hot.

Mr. Scott Simms:

All right.

There are two overarching issues I wanted to deal with when it comes to the time complexity of going through with the major measures. One was with the commissioner moving office, as well as administrative penalties. I'll get to that in a moment.

First, I want to follow up on some of what you said: October to December, that is the window that is required for the coding mechanism. Are you confident that within that window you can get that done and ready for the next election?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I am confident that within that window I can get that done, yes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

But you need to start in October.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I do need that.

Mr. Scott Simms:

And starting in the new year would not be advantageous.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Once we do the coding, then we do what we call “user acceptance” testing. The users of the system test it. Once that is done, we integrate that into the other system. Then we do a second round of testing. That has to take place in January.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay. Thank you.

Now, poll books are also very interesting. Thank you for bringing that up as well.

I'm glad we dealt with that at the beginning, Mr. Chair. Thank you.

You talked about the future, improving integrity, and all that stuff. I won't reiterate what you said. Unfortunately, you won't be able to test-run it through the by-elections that are coming up soon. You said it's not mature enough yet, at this point.

Once you have this and are confident to test it, wouldn't you require the approval of both houses to do that?

(1115)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I do not, because it does not detract from the rules in the act. It is currently allowed. It provides for mechanisms of crossing names on a list, or writing down names of people who need to register at the polls. Everything that they would be doing using the poll book would be in accordance with the rules, even under the current legislation, notwithstanding Bill C-76.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you very much for that. I appreciate the clarification.

Let me go back now to the other two issues. First, the commissioner: this was a huge issue for us in Bill C-23. We thought that the commissioner being taken out of the building, the atmosphere, of Elections Canada head office and brought over to the Director of Public Prosecutions was a flaw. We thought it was flawed because they weren't surrounded by the information they needed to do a proper investigation—ROs across the country and all the information coming in from across the country. It must be very hard to be in touch with all ridings across the country if you're out at DPP.

However, in this bill, are you satisfied with the move? I believe you said you were. As well, what will be the relationship now between the commissioner and the Director of Public Prosecutions?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

In terms of the bill, as I've said before, I think it's a good change. We're not physically moving yet. Whether or not that'll happen, we'll see down the road, but we are legally becoming one team—again, with the continued very clear separation and independence of the commissioner in terms of how he conducts his investigations. I want to reassure everybody on that. That line remains a firm line.

What it does facilitate is a better understanding of how we interpret the legislation and the challenges we have when we provide guidance to parties and candidates. Most importantly, there's the exchange of information on political financing—for example, the returns and so forth. It makes for an easier working relationship.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Right. So for any investigation that's going on, can the returning officers and any other pertinent election officers from the past election be brought in, such as poll clerks or deputy returning officers?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Quite frankly, it's mostly been with headquarters in terms of having access to the register information and having access to the political financing information. That's the key. That's the most volume. That's the centre of it.

In terms of his relationship with the DPP, I think I'd rather let him speak to that. There is a change in the bill, if I'm not mistaken, that he would have the power to lay charges.

Mr. Scott Simms: Right. That's one I want to get to.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault: Then the DPP would continue to carry the prosecution. The DPP would continue to have responsibility for actually conducting the prosecution, but the commissioner would be the one deciding whether to lay charges or not.

Mr. Scott Simms:

And the Director of Public Prosecutions goes forward with that charge to see it to its end.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Correct. I believe he would have the authority to drop the charges, but that's quite unusual.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I believe Ms. Lawson is agreeing with you.

I just quickly want to go to administrative penalties, because I think this is long overdue. I think we've taken it upon ourselves to do this. I'm not patting us on the back here; I'm just saying that it was recommended by you over a period of time to keep it out of criminal prosecution, obviously.

Are you satisfied with what's in the bill, in the sense that there are some sections in here...? Obviously, you have a maximum fine of $1,500, or, if it's a corporation entity, up to $5,000. But there's also something in there that if you go beyond sections 363 and 367, which talk about contributions or contribution limits, then you can go even further and charge even more if the contribution in question is substantial.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Simms: But this is not part of criminal prosecution.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault: This is something that Elections Canada would not administer. It would be the commissioner who would administer that. He would exercise the discretion in that regard.

The important point is not so much the amount. The vast majority of non-compliance under this act is regulatory and of a fairly minor nature. They need to be sanctioned in some way, but they do not warrant the criminal process. There's an imbalance between the nature of the conduct, mostly by campaigns and volunteers, and the nature of the penalty in the criminal context. So that's a major improvement to the bill.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I agree that it's not the amount, but there's a lot of judgment being imposed here as to how much it should be, and so on and so forth. Don't you find this to be overly prescriptive?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

No. We can revisit that in the future, but I believe that's the right approach to begin with. If I'm not mistaken, if the penalty is over $1,500, there is a power for an appeal to be made to the Chief Electoral Officer to review.

(1120)

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay.

I have about 20 seconds left. I'm going to throw up a general question. If you can answer it very quickly, I'd be highly impressed.

The future electors, the registry, how are you doing with that?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Actually building the registry is not that complicated. A registry of people is a registry. Mr. Roussel will correct me if I go wildly off on this, but fundamentally this is not a challenge from the point of view of the creation of a registry. The challenge will be to bring people on board. The level of effort that we will deploy before the election will be limited because of the time we have. We will be focusing mostly on 17-year-olds who will be turning 18, and over time we'll build that, but the actual creation of the registry is not a sophisticated undertaking.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Simms.

Now we'll go to Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Again, thank you to Mr. Perrault and our guests for joining us today. It's always nice to hear from our CEO and get comments from Elections Canada.

If I have time at the end, I'm going to leave my last minute or so to Ms. May, if that's acceptable to the committee.

I just wanted to touch on a couple of things you mentioned during your comments, and then I also had a question about your perspective on the Ontario changes, if you want to give some thought to that. We hoped to have the CEO of Ontario here. It may not happen before we complete our work with this bill, but we would like some perspective from you on that as well. I'll get to that as we go on.

You mentioned 20 or so IT systems that Elections Canada will have to update and change to implement this bill. You'll certainly appreciate the testing that must be undertaken whenever you do anything with IT systems. I know in government we've seen far too many examples of IT systems gone awry throughout my short tenure here. I'm curious whether those 20 IT systems are prioritized: those that must be updated in order to fully implement this bill versus those that may be left until after the 43rd election, or is it a case that all 20 must be updated at the same time? Is there some prioritization there?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolutely. That's the analysis that was conducted over the course of the summer. I'll give you an example. Some components of systems we will not touch in the short term, but we will in the longer term. For example, the system for the third party reports is being changed considerably. We can publish a PDF version of a third party report online. It will be searchable, but you would search within the report and you'd have to search another report if you wanted to do cross-references for contributions, for example. Down the road, we absolutely want to have a more useful tool, a more powerful tool, whereby people can search databases and not just within returns. So we've had to make that compromise to make sure the other changes are done in time.

I have other examples, but yes, that's the kind of analysis we've done to make sure we can deliver this bill, even if a better version of some of the systems is coming after the election.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you very much.

Now, as you know, this bill has a somewhat unusual coming into force provision: six months or a written indication from the CEO. I think Parliament Hill has a rumour mill that is in full swing 365 days a year. There's always the implication that there may be a spring election or a snap election at some point. If an election is called in the spring, and this bill passes by December, say, is there a date throughout the spring where you would not go ahead with the coming into force provision within that six-month window? Is there a drop-dead date? I guess that is what I'm asking.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Well, let me backtrack a little. I want to reassure Canadians and MPs here that we are always ready to deliver the last election. Whenever we work on improvements, whether it's within the boundaries of the law as it exists or other legislation, we always have an election that's sort of ready. That's the election we use for by-elections. That's the set of services and tools we use for by-elections between general elections until we improve systems and make tweaks, in some cases, and they're tested and rolled out. So we cascade the improvements.

In terms of this bill, as I said, our target for readiness to deliver the election is April. It's not September; it's April. Before that, we have an election in the works, which is the last election, and we're working on improvements for this election. But to meet the April target, we need to do some testing, starting in January. That was my point. There's a certain amount of runway that you want to be prudent about when you make those kinds of changes.

(1125)

Mr. John Nater:

Over the summer, you gave an interview on Power and Politics, and you mentioned the importance of multi-party consensus on a bill such as this. Is that still your view?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It's always been my view that electoral legislation benefits from cross-party support. That's why I was reluctant in the spring to say, “What is the drop-dead date?” I am quite frankly stretching it. I was hoping for an April or spring piece of legislation. I'm doing my best to accommodate the work of Parliament to work together and improve this legislation.

Mr. John Nater:

I'd like to move on to questions about Ontario elections. As you know, there was an election in June. They undertook a fairly extensive update of their elections law, including rules specifically related to third parties.

I'm curious to have your thoughts on that legislation in terms of how it was rolled out, how it may have been implemented during the election campaign, and then any lessons learned you may be able to apply to this. That's my last question. After that Ms. May will have the last word.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I thought you were going to go into the technology aspect of the Ontario election.

Mr. John Nater:

We can go into that in the future. We have questions about that too.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

On the third party, there was some catching-up to do. The third parties had had a very significant impact in Ontario provincial elections in the past, due to the high number of unions in particular. They had to do some catching-up.

The assessment of those rules is something that takes a bit of time. I have not had the chance to speak to Mr. Essensa on how satisfied he is with how the rollout went. I'll reserve comment on that, because I would want to speak to him first. I have not heard any major concerns.

I believe the proposals in this bill are important—that they expand considerably. What we've seen in the past is that third parties in Canada no longer just advertise. It appears they do various kinds of campaigning. It's important to expand the regime to make sure it covers this and tries to provide a level playing field that includes more than advertising.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. May, you have one minute.

Ms. Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, GP):

Thank you very much. Thanks, John.

I haven't addressed you since your official designation as our Chief Electoral Officer. I want to congratulate you personally. I think you're a wonderful choice.

I'm very worried about timelines. I would have liked to see C-33 move ahead when it was at first reading in December 2016. Now we have C-76. I generally support this legislation. It's in the House. We're going to go to clause-by-clause soon, and then it goes to the Senate and royal assent.

I know you're doing a lot of due diligence preparedness as though this was going to become the law, but I'd like you to give us a sense of when royal assent is necessary so that you can actually be ready for an election in the fall, assuming we stick to our fixed election date under the legislation and don't have a snap election. What's the drop-dead date for royal assent?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Answering that question is not as straightforward as it seems. As I said, my concern is having a fixed IT environment in December, so that we can complete the system changes. Not everything in this legislation affects our IT systems, though. I'm reluctant to say that the Senate should not contemplate any changes past December, but we have to be careful as to what those changes are and whether they would impact our systems.

Sometimes the changes may impact the need to do some public awareness. I'm thinking about third parties. It's a major change to how they operate. Some of the new rules contemplate that they will have to report back on earnings and contributions moving backwards.

It's very difficult to turn around on a dime and try to educate the world about the pre-writ spending limits for third parties when they're not really part of this conversation. They're not in the House and they are not necessarily aware that these changes are coming. It's not just the IT systems. It's a nuanced answer that I'm giving here.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll now go on to Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

Thank you, Chair.

Welcome.

You painted a scenario in the spring, in which delays would restrict what you could implement. In other words, there is some sort of a shopping list that comes out of a bill like C-76, and the longer it takes to be passed, presumably the less you can actually implement for the next election. Is that a fair thing to say?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

A fair amount of discretion is given to the Chief Electoral Officer in this legislation. I've said that I will not be able to leverage some of that discretion to improve services in the next election. I could give you an example.

(1130)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We're almost two years past when C-33 was first introduced. Imagining a scenario in which this bill had passed in the spring, is it fair to say you would have had that discretion and would have likely implemented all the aspects of C-76?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Bill C-33 was much narrower in scope. It did not provide a whole lot of discretion to the Chief Electoral Officer, so what I'm looking at are largely mandatory aspects, and I have no issue with those. There was some discretion but not a whole lot. For example, they were talking about the possibility of doing mobile advance polls for remote communities.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That has implications for our systems and for the planning of the polls, so we were not going to leverage that for the next election, at least not in a significant way.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right. So that would be an example of how the delay in this legislation.... I represent, as you know, a vast rural constituency. Mobile advance polls would help enfranchise those electors who face multiple barriers to getting out to the polls. That will not happen for 2019, or it will happen in a limited way.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

In a very limited way.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay.

I want to move on to some of the changes we hope to see. You've recommended in the past that political parties fall under privacy legislation. Is that correct?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's correct.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What kinds of information do political parties gather about Canadians?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's a good question. I don't know the full answer to that question.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Do you have any suspicions? Would you like us to tell you?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

You may know better than I do. I'm sure you do.

We do provide, as you know, lists of electors to parties, which have some tombstone information, but parties typically, certainly the larger parties—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is “tombstone information” an industry term, or is that your own? It's pretty dark.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It's basically name and address information, and, if I'm not mistaken, date of birth.

Mr. Michel Roussel (Deputy Chief Electoral Officer, Electoral Events and Innovation, Elections Canada):

No, it doesn't have the date of birth. That's on the—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So it's name and address. The parties would go further, of course. In the maybe noble experience of trying to identify and speak to voters specifically, we would collect things like voting preference in previous elections and the current one, if we know it, and certainly gender, religious affiliation, and income, if we're able to identify that. We're restricted, but we attempt to buy datasets about the shopping behaviours of Canadians.

Would it be fair to say that an ambitious political party, an aggressive social media-campaigning type party would have quite a bit of specific information about individual Canadians?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That also includes information as to whether they vote and how regularly they vote, so it is fairly significant.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is the kind of information that Canadians wouldn't necessarily want out in the public or hacked by somebody looking to do harm.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

At a minimum, we want to have some safeguards around how that information is managed.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What kind of safeguards do we have right now?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We don't know, basically. The only safeguards that exist legally are the ones in the Canada Elections Act, which says that the parties cannot use the data Elections Canada provides except for a federal electoral purpose, which is fairly soft criteria. It has nothing to say about the other information, however, and once our information is commingled with other information, it's hard to say whether it's our information or somebody else's.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Sure. It's what they call in the industry “data rich”, where a profile is not just about a group of voters but about specific individual voters. The recent report by CSE pointed out that there are vulnerabilities within the software systems that exist in Canada.

All political parties—which, as a country, we support through very generous tax rebates—use some of that money to collect data. That's a well-known fact all across the political spectrum. They gather information on Canadians, individually and collectively, and yet are not restricted or required to keep that information safe under the law.

Is anything I've said wrong so far?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

From a policy point of view, everything's wrong, but from a legal point of view, it's all correct.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Oh, oh! I may in fact take that quote. That's a good one.

You've recommended, as have we and others—including, I believe, the ethics committee of the House of Commons—that parties fall under the Privacy Act. Bill C-76 would be that opportunity to improve our security and privacy regime when it comes to Canadians.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolutely. I think the time has come for that, and privacy commissioners around the country are of the same view.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We've seen other countries go through this. Political parties have had their databases hacked by foreign governments—by hacktivists, as they call themselves—and there have been breaches in France, in the U.S., and in the UK.

Is that all fair to say?

(1135)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It's correct. Also, other countries do regulate the data holdings of parties, and parties are able to function under a set of rules. Even here in Canada, in British Columbia, the provincial-level parties operate under the privacy rules.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

My last set of questions is about social media and ads being purchased by third parties or political parties. Obviously, social media has a great influence right now. Do you believe it should be forced to identify who purchased the ads? It's like someone taking out an ad in The Globe and Mail about an issue in the election.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I'll expand a bit on that, if I may. The whole notion of fairness, which is so critical to our electoral process, has moved away from a largely financial perspective of a level playing field to a perspective of being concerned about the ethics of behaviour, especially with the use of social media.

I think we need to look at the notion of electoral fairness in a broader way, and that needs to include greater transparency on how data is used on social media and who purchases it.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Some things, such as ads or misinformation, get propagated even down to the level of algorithms, because we know that those algorithms can be manipulated to bring forward neo-Nazi propaganda, as we saw in the U.S. We saw disinformation about the last campaign.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Yes, I'm not an expert on the algorithms.

I do note that the bill does have some measure in terms of disinformation. It's not that it does not have any measures, but I do think it could go further.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Now we'll go on to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

I'll echo Ms. May's comment and congratulate you for no longer being acting CEO.

On Sunday, I had the opportunity to vote in the advanced polls in the Quebec election. I went there with my wife and my daughter, who's four years old. There was a whole polling booth for the children where they had to vote on issues, even if they couldn't read, and then they gave them a tattoo saying, “I voted!” My daughter can't read yet, but she still wears it proudly. We can't wash it off. She won't let us.

My question is, within the law and within the act, what powers do you have to educate, especially minors, in that way? Could we, federally, do that kind of thing?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Yes, we could. I think there are rules around who gets to attend the polls, but I think we've been flexible in those rules for children in the past. We do allow toddlers at the polls.

I do find that exercise by the DGEQ very interesting. I'm looking at it carefully. We will not roll that out for the next election, but it's a nice way of bringing children in contact with the electoral process.

We currently have a full mandate to educate those under 18. We are using that mandate. Last week I was in Halifax, in Dartmouth, and launched our new civic education tools for teachers to use with teenagers in Canada.

So, we do have a mandate in that regard, and we think that's an important part of our mandate.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

You mentioned that there could be up to 15 months with no by-election taking place. Just for my own clarity, what are the mechanics of that? There are nine months when you don't have to have a by-election. What are the other six months?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The Parliament of Canada Act says that a by-election has to be called between 11 days after the CEO receives the warrant from the Speaker and 180 days. That's the outer limit, the six-month period. Then it has to be called. That's the current rule.

What that causes, as you know, is late vacancies triggering mandatory by-elections very late in the cycle. The bill contemplates not to have by-elections in the nine months that precede a fixed-date election. However, as drafted, it means that potentially a vacancy could occur less than six months—six months minus a day—before that nine-month period, and then be carried into the nine-month zone of no by-election.

That was not our intent. I don't think it was this committee's intent. The intent was that if there was a vacancy in the nine months, then a by-election would not be called. We wait for the fixed-date election—not nine months plus six. Everybody was on the same page in terms of the intent, but the drafting doesn't get us there.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I understand your point. Thank you for that.

I have more of a philosophical question. I'm not sure what the answer would be, but I'll leave it to you.

Is the structure of Elections Canada and the Elections Act strong enough to survive a partisan appointment to your job?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I'm sorry, a partisan appointment to...?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If your successor is a partisan appointment for some reason or other, are the structures strong enough to survive that?

(1140)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The premise of that question is one that I just don't accept. I do think Parliament has in the past a long tradition, and traditions are very strong.

But let's accept it just for the sake of argument. What I can tell you is that there's a very strong culture at Elections Canada of non-partisanship and strict rules about activities that Elections Canada staff and field staff can and cannot do. That's embedded in the agency's DNA, so to speak.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate that.

One of the most important changes coming in this bill is vouching. We're going to bring back vouching, a little better than it was under Bill C-23, and restore the use of the voter information card.

How long will it take you to set those up to make sure they're in place? Are those things that can be done fairly quickly, or are they in danger if there's a delay?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

This is largely a matter of training, of having the proper manuals in place and making adjustments to the format of the voter information card. All of that can be done, and the work on that has been prepared.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, thank you.

I'm done.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Oh, great.

Indeed, I forgot that last time, but congratulations on the new position, sir. It's well deserved. Congratulations to you all.

I want to go back to the public education aspect of this new bill, because it seems to me that we're returning to what was before Bill C-23, several years ago. I forget the actual date.

Nevertheless, in it you talk about public education. Proposed subsection 18(1), the new amendment to the Canada Elections Act, says that the CEO's outreach activities may target groups of electors that are “most likely to experience difficulties in exercising their democratic rights.”

Can you give us more detail about that and explain it to us? Is this overly prescriptive, or does it build in the flexibility you need?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think it is flexible.

It's our role to identify voters who face challenges, and we know who these are. These are young Canadians, Canadians with disabilities and new Canadians. We need to focus our attention there.

There are two angles to this. One is focusing our attention to make sure that these groups have the right information about how to exercise their right to vote, how to register, when to vote and so forth.

The civic education question is a much broader question. It used to be a broad mandate. It was restricted in 2014 to pre-18-year-olds, basically to non-voters.

The bill proposes to remove that barrier so we don't have to worry about what age group we're dealing with when we're talking about the importance of democracy and of voting. We can have products and activities that deal with that, including, for example, groups of students that may have 18-year-olds. We don't have to cut back on our activities because it may hit some older population.

However, that's different from the voter information campaign, which is really the factual approach to understanding the mechanics of voting.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Does this fall in line with the recommendation labelled as A5 from your CEO report following the 42nd general election? It noted, “While civic education for youth is obviously important”—which was contained within Bill C-23 at the tail end of deliberations—“it is not less important for electors who lack the basic knowledge about democracy.”

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Now, who is our target audience?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It can include, for example, new Canadians. There's a broader audience than just youth, so that's the point of this amendment. It was made on the recommendation of the former chief electoral officer, and we're happy to see that in the legislation.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we'll go to Mrs. Kusie. [Translation]

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Perrault, thank you for being here today.[English]

This is only my third week on the file, so this is all very new for me. I'm still learning about the bill.[Translation]

After attending a meeting with the minister yesterday, I still have a few questions regarding two parts of the bill.[English]

The first question is in regard to Canadians abroad. Can you please elaborate on the current process that Canadians abroad must use to vote in Canadian elections?

Of course, this piece is very important for us as part of the legitimacy of the electorate of Canada. I would like to know specifically what Canadians are required to do when they would like to cast a vote in an election at present.

(1145)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

At present, Canadians abroad need to register. We have an international register of Canadians abroad, and they need to make an application. We maintain that register on an ongoing basis. When people apply, they need to prove their citizenship with a passport. We essentially require evidence of citizenship when you are abroad, for natural and obvious reasons.

In general, under the current rules, Canadians abroad can vote if they've been residing abroad for less than five years and intend to return to Canada. These are two of the basic criteria. There are other exceptions for military, for example, or foreign affairs.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

How do you prove intention to return?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It's merely a declaration. There's no way to prove it apart from the declaration, which we take in good faith. The return may not materialize, but the point is that at the time of making the application, a person must have the intention to return.

We keep information about those Canadians, and when they're getting closer to the five-year point, or the “anniversary date” as we call it, we ask them whether they've returned to Canada at some point to reside here, which ensures that they are not unnecessarily removed from the international register. If they don't respond or have not returned to Canada, they are taken off that register after the five-year period currently stipulated in the act.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Do you have concerns regarding how the bill is structured with respect to the changes in those requirements? Do you see any problem with the changes?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

This is largely a key policy decision, to expand the right to vote. I do not stand against that. This is a matter before the courts as well.

From a logistics point of view, we can handle the regime as it is proposed in Bill C-76, so people would be voting at their former place of residence in Canada. We would no longer require an intention to return to Canada. We would no longer track how long they've been away from Canada.

We do not expect a huge number of voters. We've done a number of different extrapolations, and we'll see how that goes. Our expectation is that there will be roughly 30,000 voters from abroad. We have the capacity to handle much more. If I'm not mistaken, we had 11,000 foreign voters in the last election, and we expect it to reach about 30,000.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

There is no necessity to demonstrate the intention to return. What would be the requirement for last place of residency? How would they demonstrate that?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It would be the information we had on the register when they were registered in Canada, or some information they would provide to us.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

What information is required for them to register? Would that include a utility bill, for instance, or is it only what they vouched as their last place of residence? Is there a declaration as well?

Ms. Anne Lawson (Deputy Chief Electoral Officer, Regulatory Affairs, Elections Canada):

I'd have to look it up, but I don't think proof is required.

Michel, do you know the answer?

Mr. Michel Roussel:

No. If the elector is on the register of electors, he or she may have appeared on our voters list through our administrative sources in the past.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay. We're not certain they're going to return, and we're not entirely certain where they may have potentially resided last, but we'll be confident they are Canadian citizens. They are still required to present a piece of information, like a passport. Having served as a consular officer for 15 years in the foreign service, I certainly have confidence in that aspect. They will have to provide a piece of identification that indicates they are Canadian citizens. Is that correct?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Yes, that's a requirement we impose based on the powers we have in the act. We want to make sure we have proof of citizenship.

In terms of the register of electors and the location of individuals, as my colleagues have indicated, if they've been previously registered—and there are many ways to be registered in Canada—they may have had to demonstrate their registration, or we may have that information from a provincial or municipal election. There are different ways to be identified under the current rules with respect to residing in a particular location in Canada, and they would not be able to change that.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[Translation]

I will now give the floor to Ms. Lapointe.

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I am really happy to be here today. This is the first time I will be asking questions at this committee.

For information purposes, I was wondering how many times you have come to give evidence on Bill C-76.

(1150)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

This is the third time. Actually, the last time I appeared officially was regarding this bill. Obviously, when I was appointed, I was asked quite a few questions about Bill C-76. We had already started covering this ground and, a few weeks later, I appeared officially to speak to this bill. So today is the third time.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay, thank you.

Bill C-76 deals with campaign spending limits. It will affect the parties, as well as associations. I wonder if you could provide some more details on this, especially since this is a very hot topic in the bill.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

There have been a number of changes to spending limits, and the impact of these changes is going to be rather complex.

I would say that third parties are going to be affected the most. First of all, some limits are being imposed on third parties before the election and others during the election. Also, the kinds of activities covered will go beyond simple advertising. It will now cover partisan activities and polls. In addition, third parties will have to produce various reports. They have a fundamentally new system, compared to what they had in the past. The limits are going to increase. The current legislation talks about $150,000, but once the amount is indexed, it amounts to about $350,000, if I'm not mistaken, in the case of a general election. That amount is going up to $1 million, but that will include activities that were not regulated in the past.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Are you talking about political parties?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I am still talking about third parties. That applies to third parties.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

There are two important changes that apply to political parties.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Who would be a third party? Can you give me an example?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

A third party is basically someone who is not a party, candidate or riding association. It could be any ordinary citizen, union, or special interest group.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It is usually people who might want—

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

—to influence people on one side or the other.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Exactly.

A regime for third parties already exists, but it will be much more comprehensive and complex, I must say.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

We were just talking about social media. That is where these people can be very active.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Yes, they can be very active on social media. On the other hand, it is important to separate advertising from what is known as organic content on social media. In the case of advertising, whether by a third party, a candidate or a party, they must identify themselves. There are disclosure obligations that apply to social media. That already exists under the current legislation. Under the new provisions, this is going to extend to a period of time before the election campaign. That said, with respect to social media, other elements apply to everyone, such as misinformation.

As for political parties, there are new spending limits set for a specific period before the election campaign. We talked about this last time. These limits will apply beginning at the end of June, if I'm not mistaken, and will apply until the election is called, in an election year. That is new.

There are also measures to ensure that political parties are reimbursed for election expenses related to making their material accessible to people with disabilities. The reimbursement limits are being increased to encourage political parties to convert their existing material into accessible material. This is a new category of reimbursement for party expenses.

In regards to candidates, they have no spending limits before an election is called. They are not subject to that. However, there is a whole new series of rules regarding specific spending that used to be considered personal spending. I am referring to spending related to the need for care related to a disability, whether it is people who support them or for child care. The purpose is to give candidates access to more resources. It will also help them pay for certain litigation expenses they may incur dealing with Elections Canada or the commissioner, in the event of non-conformity or extensions. This will now be separate from the usual political contribution rules. The regime is therefore becoming a little more complex for candidates, but they are not subject to any limits during the period before the election is actually called.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you.

With respect to the question my colleague, Mrs. Kusie, asked earlier, you spoke about Canadians who live outside the country. How many people are we talking about?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We do not know, exactly.

(1155)

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Would it be 1 million, 500,000, 200,000?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think it's closer to 2 million.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

This includes everyone who works abroad, from the second they plan on returning to Canada. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we will go to Mrs. Kusie. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

It's already done? I had another question. [English]

The Chair:

I'm sorry.[Translation]

Mrs. Kusie has the floor.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[English]

My next question is with regard to the youth registry.

In your opinion, are there proper controls or protective measures being put in place to ensure that the information is not shared with third parties?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Yes. That's a good question. It's a concern that's been voiced about the register of pre-voters.

This is information that is going to be retained exclusively by Elections Canada and not given to the parties or the candidates. We are keeping that information, so that we can move them to the register when they are 18, if that's their wish.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you.

In addition, we certainly have some concerns with regard to parental controls for both 14- and 15-year-olds. We're concerned with parents providing consent for their youth to be placed on the registry. Do you have any examples of other registries, at home or internationally, where individuals as young as 14 and 15 have been permitted to sign up to the registry? Were there any security concerns with regard to this?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I would be happy to get back to you with that information. I don't believe we have it here.

We know that a number of provinces have registers of pre-voters. The age group may vary, with 16- or 14-year-olds. There's some variance there. I'd be happy to come back with some information on the rules, especially regarding 14- and 15-year-olds and whether there are consent requirements.

As you know, the government bill has taken the approach that 14- and 15-year-olds are able to consent to their inclusion in the pre-register. If that's something you want to consider changing, of course, that's your role.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you.

In the spring, one witness mentioned that, although the proposed legislation prevents foreign entities from financing third parties for their advertising efforts or their partisan activity, in its present state the bill “would allow third parties to avoid the disclosure requirements of the act altogether if they simply chose not to register during an election period.”

Do you foresee this to be a problem in future Canadian elections, if the legislation is passed in its current form?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I don't think any legislation can deal with the fact that some people may decide either not to register or register under a false identity, which of course would be an offence. They may be caught and there is always the potential for an investigation. The regime has to assume a certain degree of compliance, beyond which things turn to enforcement. Maybe I don't understand the question.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

No, you actually sound like a Conservative, Monsieur Perrault. This is similar to our thinking with regard to Bill C-71 and its approach that criminals don't register. Please, continue.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's true of any entity. Parliament sets out an obligation to report, register and disclose, but if those obligations are not met, there are sanctions and investigations to pursue that. That's the way the system operates. I don't know if there's any way around this.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you.

Will the government be able to effectively enforce rules upon third parties that don't register during an election period? Based on your testimony, I'm hearing that it's yes, but not really.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think that's for the commissioner to answer. The commissioner's work is based on complaints, and the timeliness of complaints is critical. If there's timely information, it helps them to move much more quickly. I think this bill would improve his capacity to investigate by providing the power to compel testimony. That's a very important tool.

He has testified before about the challenges of international enforcement. These are not new, and they are not unique to elections. International enforcement is a challenge. This doesn't mean it's not possible, but it is always a challenge.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

My last question is largely based on personal interest. If Bill C-76 is passed as it is right now, do you see the potential for any activity similar to what we saw in the last U.S. election with regard to foreign interference?

(1200)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I would say that the bill provides a number of tools to address that. When we think about a foreign state trying to interfere in domestic elections, a sanction in provincial court may not be all that relevant to it. However, those offences give rise to the power to obtain search warrants and production orders, so they're important to empower the investigation.

At the end of the day, whether it's through international diplomacy or supported by investigation, that's how these interventions are addressed, and there are measures in this bill that reinforce the capacity to investigate. I do think it's an important improvement. That's why I said, at the outset, that it's important for this bill to pass before the next election.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we'll go back to Madame Lapointe. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

How much time do I have?

The Chair:

You have five minutes.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mrs. Kusie briefly talked about educating new voters. You also spoke about new Canadians, or new arrivals. How would your plan to explain how they can exercise their right to vote be different from your plan for people who are newly registered on the voters list?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's something we're exploring right now. We know that our provincial colleagues are also looking at new Canadians and elections. We're trying to better co-ordinate our methods for educating them. There are elections at the federal and provincial levels, and some newcomers find this process difficult to navigate. The provinces and the federal government must first co-ordinate how they interact with new Canadians.

Furthermore, we are targeting groups that work with new Canadians. In many cases, these groups are helping newcomers find housing or language assistance. There is nothing about participating in elections. These groups do, however, build trust with newcomers. If we work with these groups and give them the tools to educate new Canadians, it will be easier for us to reach these newcomers.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Have you observed whether new Canadians from certain countries were more reluctant to vote?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I do not have any studies indicating that people from a particular country have more fears about democracy. As far as I know, our office does not have this kind of information.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay.

Earlier you were talking about 14- to 16-year olds. We must educate them on democracy and ensure that they will vote.

When can you educate them and how will you do it?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

They are the ones who will decide whether to vote. However, it is certainly important to educate them.

Young adults who are 18 to 24 years old when they vote for the first time tend to become lifelong voters. We talk about encouraging young people to vote, but we are essentially creating tomorrow's voters. We want these individuals to vote their whole lives, and not only when they are 18 years old. Conversely, those who do not vote when they are young adults will not vote when they are 40 or 60. There is a critical period.

We think it's too late to start focusing on them if they're 18 or 19 years old and it's their first time voting. We think we should start working with them in grade 9 or 10, when they are between 14 to 17. This is the ideal age. It's possible to start earlier, but there is a critical stage.

Teachers from across the country have developed the tools we have access to, so that they can be included in all of the provincial curricula, whether or not these curricula include civic education courses. These exercises give students a chance to explore on their own what civic engagement and voting mean. We do not tell them what to do or how to act. We encourage them to explore and think. We believe that this method will pique their interest. Unless they're interested, young people will not use the information we give them when they turn 18. We must therefore start by getting them interested, and then educating them, so that they become lifelong voters.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Have you seen a difference between those who were educated on the democratic process or who got involved when they were in grade 9 or 10, which would be the equivalent of 4th or 5th year of high school in Quebec? Were they more likely to exercise their right to vote?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We don't have any way to assess that.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

This should be assessed.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We're currently exploring how we assess, which is important. We are investing time and energy, and we want to know whether it has an impact. We are looking at whether it will be possible to measure this impact.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

On another note, I'd like to know whether there's a way to educate Canadians in general about potential fraudulent phone calls or misleading advertisements on social media. Have you found a way to combat this?

(1205)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Yes. This is a multi-faceted issue and it is very important to us. Making sure that Canadians do not get false information on the electoral process—whether it is misinformation or inadvertently incorrect information—is at the core of what we do. We will start by launching an information campaign shortly before the election.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Do you mean before June?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We'll start with registration, in the spring. The campaign will evolve as the election period moves forward. We are getting information out all kinds of ways. That is the first thing.

We will also have an awareness campaign regarding social media and the misinformation or incorrect information they contain.

Lastly, we'll monitor the situation. This applies across the board, but we'll have tools to monitor what's being said on social media. We want to be able to see whether false information is circulating, especially with respect to the voting process, and then intervene to correct that information.

Those are the main tools we plan on using.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Okay, the last person on our scheduled round is Mr. Cullen, for three minutes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you, Chair.

Forgive me if you've answered this already. Has Elections Canada sought any legal advice in terms of the restrictions on the pre-writ period as to their ability to withstand a charter challenge?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That is not our role, so we—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Wouldn't you be a litigant in such a challenge, though?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Normally, our role in litigation is to be as neutral as possible, so we inform the court and the parties how we administer the rules. In terms of whether they are constitutionally valid or not, the Department of Justice has a role to play. Others may agree or disagree and litigate that, but we are an agent of Parliament. So if Parliament decides to enact a particular rule, it's not for us to challenge Parliament in that regard.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I didn't mean the question in that sense. You are our in-house election experts. There's a natural tension within, say, the question of speech and fairness that you talked about earlier. Do we allow rules that allow groups or people with more money to have more speech than others, thereby making the determination for voters in an election seem unfair? Let me put it this way: Has the government sought any advice through you as to what that limit should be in terms of money, how long the pre-writ should be and so on?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's not the kind of advice we would provide normally. They have their own lawyers for that. What I see as my role is that I won't cast it in charter language or provide specific advice to this committee or to Parliament. When I see concerns of fairness, when I see concerns that the regulator burden may be too much—which may have charter implications, of course—I tend to raise it in those terms.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

So the fact that you haven't raised them yet, does that mean...?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

When we discussed the third party rules, I said that this is not an airtight regime, but how far can you go? There's a point when you need to consider freedom of speech. I also raised the point that the rules for third parties provide quite an extensive regulatory burden compared to that imposed on parties and candidates. So I leave that for the committee—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Sorry, would you describe the burden as higher on third parties than it is on political parties and candidates?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolutely, because they need to do a report when they register—parties do that as well—but they also need to do a report pre-writ, and they need to do a report on September 15 with fixed-date elections. Parties don't do reports, just in the beginning of the electoral period, and candidates don't have to do that either.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

As it's described right now, the burdens placed on those in civil society who would fall into this third party regime are more onerous than those we place upon ourselves as political parties and candidates. Is that fair?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

In some respects, yes, but not in every respect.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

In terms of the money—because we've asked the government where the figure came from, where the pre-writ time came from—are there any indications as to the source of those? Is it that other similar democracies use such a limit in terms of money and time?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I don't know the nature of the inquiries done by the government policy advisers. On the length of the pre-writ period, I did say that I was happy to see that it existed but in a relatively short period. I would be more concerned, both from a charter point of view and from a balanced point of view, if you had long pre-writ spending limits. Then you risk creating a situation where the government could spend on advertising but not the parties. By having a short pre-writ period, essentially in the summer prior to the fixed-date election, soon thereafter the government's rules on advertising kick in, and perhaps that will be addressed. So there's a bit of balance there that you can achieve with a short pre-writ period.

(1210)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Essentially, a new law like this one would restrict, in this case, opposition parties from advertising in a zone in which the government was still permitted to advertise and promote certain policies. I'm trying to understand the scenario you're describing.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I'm saying that this law has a pre-writ limit that is sufficiently short so that it minimizes that concern.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right. The concern exists but perhaps it's been minimized.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Correct.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'll just step back for my final moment here to the responsibility of social media agencies. I want to get this testimony right, both with respect to ads—using the social media platforms and the search engine platforms—and how certain news is brought forward, particularly on the search side of things. Do you have any concerns? This bill does not address much of that at all. The way Canadians receive their news now is not how they did 30 years ago, and the algorithms built into the search engines and the social media searches have a bias built within them. I don't mean that in a negative way, but certain news is going to come to me that isn't going to come to you or to another Canadian.

Do you think there needs to be more understanding of how that all works, for us as legislators and for you as somebody who runs our elections?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolutely. However, this goes well beyond the issue of elections. It's a much larger problem than elections. It's a problem of great magnitude, and we've seen it in other countries, like Burma, where some terrible things have been happening because social media is basically the only way they get their news. There are some biases, as you say.

It's a very large problem. It's one that needs to be taken seriously, but it goes well beyond the electoral mandate.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We've finished our regular round. Does anyone have any urgent questions before we go into our other business?

Mr. Simms, go ahead.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I want to follow up on what Mr. Cullen talked about. In the context of social media, I think the question is very pertinent to this, in the sense of how people get their news. Now it comes from different channels, and obviously.... It's not so much different channels as the fact that, as Mr. Cullen pointed out, the news you get isn't the same news I have access to. It may be based on usage. It may be based on past searches and so on.

Clause 61 talks about publishing false statements to affect election results. What's captured in here, obviously, is misinformation about citizenship, place of birth, education, professional qualifications and that sort of thing. It's just outright lying about another individual. How does this capture some of what Mr. Cullen is talking about, when it comes to social media? How are you going to police this in the new realm of social media?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think Mr. Cullen's concern was much broader than that.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Sure. I'm trying to be more precise here.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

This is prohibiting a narrow scope of disinformation.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes, but the arena is quite large.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It is quite large. I invite anyone who's interested to read the report of the U.K. House of Commons Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee. On July 24, they published the first interim report on disinformation and fake news. It canvasses some of these issues and makes some recommendations.

One of the areas we need to look at down the road is bringing a bit more transparency into the ads that are being posted on social media. Who is behind those ads?

We already have some rules. Perhaps they can be improved over time. As I said, it's a complex issue and it goes beyond elections. Committees often do good work, and this is an example. I invite you to have a look at it.

Mr. Scott Simms:

We've practically launched into a whole other study here. Nevertheless, I want to feel that there's a level of confidence that you can exercise some of your concerns about false statements during an election, in either the pre-writ or the writ period.

(1215)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

My main responsibility is to make sure Canadians don't receive false information about when and how to register and vote. That's the core of my mandate.

Then there are a number of offences that are either currently in the act or in the bill, such as creating fake websites that pretend to be a candidate or a party. I've recommended that Elections Canada be included in that list as well. It's not currently in the bill. This was in my list of recommendations when I appeared in the spring.

These are additional tools that the commissioner would then use for enforcement. I'll be focusing on the information about the process. He will be focusing on whether there is disinformation that may fall into one of the prohibited categories, either in the current law or in the bill.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Cullen, go ahead.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I just want to ask a quick question on that. Is it not an offence to create a fake Elections Canada website?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

There's currently a personation offence that was created in 2014. The commissioner has raised the concern that the personation offence may not be drafted in a way that would sufficiently clearly capture a fake Elections Canada website or document, or that of a party or a candidate. We've made a recommendation to include that.

In the recommendations report, we only spoke about parties and candidates, for a reason that escapes me. It's obviously a mistake on our part. We did not include Elections Canada. When I appeared last time, I suggested that we be included in that list.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Let's add you to the list.

You used the word “transparency”, which hits it on the head when we're talking about the social media aspect. I, or a third party, could take out an ad in the Toronto Star saying that Scott Simms is a terrible human being—truth in advertising in this case, so let's use a better example—

Mr. Scott Simms:

You've been reading my Facebook.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Mr. Bittle is an awful person, and he cheated on his taxes.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

How did you find out?

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Well, we now know this.

Is that an offence under the current rules?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Under the current rules, there's an antiquated provision about publishing false information about the character of an individual, but you also need to prove that it's with the intent of affecting the elections result, which is always a high—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right, “and don't vote for him in October”....

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Yes, and that is often not there.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

They don't trip that particular wire, so is just saying really awful, untruthful things about somebody, or about a party, during an election or pre-writ legit? Do you have to see that through civil court?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Well, it's a difficult line of business you're in.

The regulation of truth on the Internet—and you talked about the charter earlier—is something that is hugely challenging.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I understand. I guess I'm imagining scenarios, and I want to see if there's any distinction in rules that we have on the books for so-called traditional media versus social media.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

On that point, there is no distinction, and there shouldn't be, in terms of the content.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We had Twitter testify before us. They said that some of their ads are purchased anonymously, and that tracing back those ads is something they're not interested in.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

But that's not about content. I am concerned about that, and I do think there should be some transparency about purchasing ads. If it's regulated advertising, there should be a tag line.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Just to get that testimony clear, this is both for so-called traditional media, for which there is a tag line, and social media, for which in some cases there is not.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault: That's correct.

Mr. Nathan Cullen: Do you think it should be both, across the board?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Well, there is currently a requirement. It doesn't matter—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is this even for social media?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It's even for social media. The distinction on social media is organic content versus advertising. If you have your own Facebook page and you're saying things about your opponent on that Facebook page, that's not advertising; that's just your—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

What if I'm paying to boost that page, if I'm paying to boost that search? Do you see where the grey...?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault: Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen: Sure, it's not going to be an official party website attacking another person, but it wouldn't be hard to believe that either someone internally or an external actor could go after a government or an individual by using a surrogate and paying Facebook or Twitter to do it so that it shows up in our feeds over and over again.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's correct. If they're not running afoul of the specific prohibitions that we have in the act and it's not advertising per se—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We can't capture that, yet it has the same effect as advertising.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolutely.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Should we?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think that's where we hit difficult spots in terms of the balance of how far we regulate people posting their own views on the Internet.

(1220)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I understand that, but this is not somebody posting their own views. These are coordinated efforts we've seen out of Russia and other places, and it feels like we're kind of sleepwalking a bit into this thing. We have recent and meaningful examples of partner democracies in which there has been a coordinated non-paid advertising attack on certain candidates or parties.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Let me nuance what I just said. The bill we have before Parliament does include rules for campaigning partisan activities that go beyond advertising, so partisan activities would be regulated, but it doesn't mean that the content is prohibited.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

It would be regulated.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It would be regulated as part of the spending limits. It's part of how it's funded. Where does the money go to pay for that? It cannot be funded by foreign funds. If it is, then that's an offence, and the commissioner may investigate that.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's if it's partisan, if it's pointing at a political party.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's if it's promoting or opposing, yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I'm not suggesting this is easy or casual or light, but the threat has been identified by our own spy agencies, and we look through Bill C-76 to ask how we are addressing the threat. This is at the core of our democracy and is influencing voters. I'm not saying it's easy. If it were easy, we would already have done it. We have just not caught up to the sophistication of those who are looking to influence and, in some cases, corrupt our elections.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think it's a challenge that every democracy is facing. We've certainly been following the discussions around the world—in Europe, in the United States, and in the U.K. around Brexit. Nobody has a silver bullet for that, so there are a range of measures.

One of the things they are concerned about in the U.K. is foreign funding of third parties. One of the recommendations they're making is to create a contribution limit, simply because it's harder for a foreign entity to sprinkle money around in small amounts and not be caught, rather than giving a large amount.

Well, we already have that in Canada. They're also recommending tag lines, but we have that in Canada as well. We already have a number of measures that other countries are looking into—which doesn't mean we have all the answers. It means that we are struggling to find the right balance and exploring that. I think the bill has a number of measures in there.

On our side, we have been collaborating and coordinating our work with security agencies, security partners in Canada: the Communications Security Establishment, CSIS, PCO security, and the RCMP. Starting this fall, we're doing round table exercises to look at various scenarios—working, of course, with the current legal framework.

It's a whole-of-society challenge, however. This is not something that one entity—be it Elections Canada, CSE, or CSIS—can tackle. I suspect we'll be struggling with that for a little while.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid has the last intervention.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you.

I enjoyed the last exchange. I always appreciate the naive optimism of my colleague from northern British Columbia, who has floated the hopeful thought that the Chief Electoral Officer will be able to solve the problems associated with untrue things being said on the Internet. Once he's done that, I would appreciate his conveying a message to Ukrainian supermodels that I'm not actually interested in dating them and that they can stop sending me information about how to contact them.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid: I probably shouldn't have shared that information.

A previous committee that both Mr. Cullen and I served on was the electoral reform committee, and we had some fascinating testimony. Mr. Cullen will remember this. We were in Vancouver at the time, and we had an American expert on how elections can be interfered with. I forget the name of the professor, but she made the observation that when a well-funded foreign actor interferes—it could be the Russian government, the Chinese government, or maybe a non-state actor who is willing to flout our laws—it's not with the goal of electing candidate X or candidate Y; it is with the goal of making it unclear whether whoever wins has legitimate authority to govern.

This was an argument against electronic voting. If it's no longer clear whether candidate X or candidate Y actually won, if it's no longer clear whether that person has a clear mandate, then they've done their job. That was one of the things that made us decide not to go for electronic voting, which, as you mentioned, is not the same thing as the vote tabulation you're proposing to do.

In looking at your mandate, I don't believe it is trying to resolve the problem of fake news on the Internet. I don't know if anybody can do that. Culturally, I think maybe we have to learn to just do fact-checking on our own, as if we're going through a cultural learning process in that regard. It seems to me that the real danger, from your perspective, is somebody illegally personating Elections Canada and advising people to go to the wrong voting stations, or telling them that the voting times have been changed. I can imagine a number of other things where the true information you're trying to convey is replaced with untrue information, or alternatively, someone is trying to prohibit the true information that you are mandated to provide—how to vote, where to vote, what the voting times are, how you can have access if you are a person who has a disability, and so on.

I just wanted to hear you indicate whether you feel that more needs to be done, or whether you feel that you have the tools you need to make sure those dangers are being minimized at this point, not perfectly but to the extent realistically possible.

(1225)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

If I may, I have two points on that. On the fact-checking, it's a very important point. There, I have the tools. One of the things I said we will be doing is have an online repository of all our communications, so that people—including the media and the parties—can check if they're not sure whether something is coming from Elections Canada. It will be on our website. You talked about fact-checking. We need to be the authoritative source, and all of our communications will be transparent. I have invited parties to do the same, because if somebody is passing a message on your behalf as a candidate, and it's not you, you may want to be able to point to your website and say, “Here are my communications.” There, I think I have the tools.

I think the point that you mentioned about foreign interference is very important, and this is in the Communications Security Establishment report. Foreign interference is not necessarily about changing the results; it's about sowing doubt as to the results, sowing doubt as to the integrity, and showing that they can play with the integrity of the process, not necessarily changing anything.

That's where I am concerned with the bill as it stands today, and I did make a recommendation in that regard. There is an important provision in the bill that names a new offence, essentially, of cyber-interference with systems that are used in the conduct of an election. However, it requires a demonstration of an intent to affect the result of the election, and that may not be at all the intent. I think that's not adequate. We need that provision to be broader. There is no legitimate excuse.

Mr. Scott Reid:

If it was “to subvert or change the outcome of the election” or “to delegitimize the result”, would that cover your concern?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

When I last appeared, I made a recommendation. My view is that if there's no lawful excuse for interfering with a computer used in the delivery of the election, that should be the end of the case made by the Crown. There is no good reason to interfere with a computer unless you're the maintenance person and there's a lawful excuse to be in that system. If you don't belong there, that should be enough to complete the offence.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for coming. It's been very helpful to get more questions out.

We'll suspend for a few minutes while we change the witness, and then we'll finish our business.



(1235)

The Chair:

Good afternoon. Welcome back to the 118th meeting of the committee.

For members' information, we are in public.

You'll recall that at the last meeting we decided on a date to commence clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-76. I open the floor.

Ruby, go ahead.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

To say 118 meetings doesn't do us justice. Unfortunately, some of our meetings were prolonged.

I'd like to start by proposing a motion to advance the legislation for which we just had the Chief Electoral Officer here, Bill C-76 and, where appropriate, to propose and approve amendments.

The motion that I propose is this: That the Committee commence clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-76 on Tuesday, October 2, 2018 at 11:00 a.m.; That the Chair be empowered to hold meetings outside of normal hours to accommodate clause-by-clause consideration; That the Chair may limit debate on each clause to a maximum of five minutes per party, per clause; and, That if the Committee has not completed the clause-by-clause consideration of the Bill by 1:00 p.m. on Tuesday, October 16, 2018, all remaining amendments submitted to the Committee shall be deemed moved, the Chair shall put the question, forthwith and successively, without further debate on all remaining clauses and proposed amendments, as well as each and every question necessary to dispose of clause-by-clause consideration of the Bill, as well as questions necessary to report the Bill to the House and to order the Chair to report the Bill to the House as soon as possible.

I'd like to comment on the motion a bit and explain where it's coming from.

In the discussion with the CEO today, it was brought up by the Conservatives that whatever legislation comes forward, when it affects our elections, we should have cross-party support. I would like to point out that we had Elizabeth May here with us today. She put on the record that she is supportive of Bill C-76. We know that the NDP is supportive of Bill C-76. Of course, the Liberals in this committee are extremely supportive of the bill.

The Chief Electoral Officer has been here three times prior to this, regarding this study of the legislation, not to mention the report of the Chief Electoral Officer that we spent numerous hours on. I believe he's probably been here 30 or 40 times on the recommendations. He was here every single day, in his capacity as acting chief electoral officer, to guide us through all of the recommendations that were made.

I also want to give a bit of background as to how we got here.

On May 23, Bill C-76 was given second reading in the House and referred to committee, so on May 23 this bill came before us. As of September 17, the committee had held seven meetings and heard from 56 witnesses on the study of the bill. We had all parties submit hundreds of names of witnesses, and many witnesses declined to appear. The list was quite exhaustive—basically anyone who had any kind of opinion, even down to those who had just run in the various elections, to come before this committee and present. Therefore, we've exhausted quite a bit of our witness testimony here, and of course the person with the most knowledge on the subject matter, the Chief Electoral Officer, has been here several times.

I'd also like to point out that the Harper government's so-called Fair Elections Act made it harder for Canadians to vote and easier for people to evade our elections laws. The Globe and Mail even said, “This bill deserves to die.” The Chief Electoral Officer has also been quoted—

(1240)

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm assuming that your reference is not to this bill, but to that bill.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'm referring to Bill C-23, the Fair Elections Act.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. I didn't want you to get left there saying something that you weren't trying to say.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you. I appreciate that.

Bill C-76 has revised a lot of Bill C-23, which was passed in 2014. I will give some context regarding why we are up against some opposition.

The Chief Electoral Officer at the time when Bill C-23 was passed was quoted as saying, “I certainly can’t endorse a bill that disenfranchises electors.” The government was encouraged, through the many recommendations, to improve and modernize its election law so that more people could vote.

There are many reasons why this legislation has been brought forward, and we've done so in a way where we've continued to work with the Chief Electoral Officer. A lot of the recommendations that have come from the experience of the 2015 election have been inserted into this legislation.

In order to repeal and improve laws to modernize our elections, it was necessary to bring Bill C-76 forward. I know the NDP has been quite eager, like us, to move this legislation through, but many obstacles have gotten in our way. Perhaps some members don't want those disenfranchised by the previous bill, Bill C-23, to participate in this election.

However, I have to point out that although we have a strong democracy, one of the most stable in the world, we have seen, through the recommendations brought forward to us, that there are a lot of improvements to make. A lot of damage was done through Bill C-23, the so-called Fair Elections Act, which has to be corrected.

After the 2015 election, the Chief Electoral Officer made about 130 recommendations on ways to improve how our democracy functions. We did a careful study of those recommendations through consideration by this parliamentary committee and by both houses. We also received input from several experts across the country. After all of that work, the government proposed Bill C-76, the elections modernization act.

As we just heard from the Chief Electoral Officer, this act is really necessary. It's essential that they have this in their hands come October.

Although certain people around this table may feel that the motion I'm bringing forward is halting democracy, I would argue that it's the complete opposite. There is a vital need to modernize our Elections Act and repeal some of the things that have disenfranchised people from voting and completely participating in our democracy. We need to do this as soon as possible so that it can take effect for the next election. To the point that Nathan brought up, the longer we take, the more we lose and the more Canadians lose.

Bill C-76 would make it easier for Canadians to vote, and it would make elections easier to administer and protect. It would also protect Canadians from organizations and individuals seeking to unduly influence their vote. However, as Nathan discussed, we know there are forces beyond this act that we need to further discuss and study. I would propose that at a future date we do all of that and bring all of the necessary actors to help make our democracy even safer. But this bill is a really good start toward doing the things the Chief Electoral Officer has found to be necessary.

One party has stalled us time and time again. We've seen it for several months now. There is an unwillingness to move forward. The government has been given a mandate by the people to move legislation, and although I'm not saying by any means that the committee process is not important, we have seen practices such as this in the past, and in particular when it came to Bill C-23.

(1245)



If I may remind the committee—some of the members are here, actually. Scott Reid is here, and Blake Richards used to be here, before the House rose for the summer. They were both involved with this committee when Bill C-23 was passed. At that time—I believe it was in the spring of 2014—a very similar motion was brought forward in order to pass Bill C-23 through committee. There was a start date proposed; there was an end date proposed.

If I may, I will read an excerpt from the committee blues at that time. It was moved by the member Tom Lukiwski and the motion that was moved at that time was: That the Committee, in relation to its Order of Reference from the House concerning C-23, An Act to amend the Canada Elections Act and other Acts and to make consequential amendments to certain Acts, initiate a study on this legislation, which will include the following: That the Committee, as per its usual practice, hear witnesses to be determined by the Committee at a later date; That the Committee shall only proceed to clause-by-clause consideration of this bill after these hearings have been completed, provided that clause-by-clause consideration shall be concluded no later than Thursday, May 1, 2014 and, if required, at 5:00 p.m., on that day, all remaining amendments shall be deemed moved, and the Chair shall put the question, forthwith and successively, without further debate, on all remaining clauses and amendments submitted to the Committee, as well as each and every question necessary (i) to dispose of clause-by-clause consideration of the Bill, (ii) to report the Bill to the House, and (iii) to order the Chair to report the Bill to the House as early as possible.

It's interesting. At that point, all of the Conservative members, including Scott Reid and Blake Richards, who used to be on this committee, voted in favour of this motion. Right now, in the last few meetings, I've heard some outrage that we can't possibly be thinking about a start date or an end date by any means, that this is not fair and we need to give the committee time.

I would argue that this committee has been given a lot of time. We have essentially adopted a lot of what the CEO has said, and we have spent several meetings on that previously in this committee, not to mention the 53 witnesses we've heard from already, after the legislation was brought to this committee. We've given it ample consideration, so I think it's time that we pass this legislation and allow Canadians to access their right to vote. We need to make sure that we bring forward the important amendments, and the Conservatives have definitely done so. They've brought hundreds of amendments forward. We'd like to get to work on those amendments and begin the clause-by-clause.

Just to reiterate, my motion was that we start the clause-by-clause on October 2. May I also remind the Conservatives that at the meeting we had last Thursday, there was a commitment made that we would start clause-by-clause earlier than that. September 27 was the commitment that was made at that time, so we're allowing for even more flexibility, in order to start by October 2 and then have everything completed by October 16.

Hopefully, when I give up my spot as a speaker after this, I'm not going to hear the type of outrage that we heard last time, because the Conservatives in this committee are quite familiar with this and did exactly the same thing when they brought their so-called Fair Elections Act.

The Chair:

Are you finished?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Sahota.

Now we'll go to Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I'm good, thanks. That pretty much covers it.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, go ahead.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Chair.

I'm not sure Mr. Simms has ever said so little in an intervention before.

(1250)

Mr. Scott Simms:

Not since my divorce proceedings....

Mr. John Nater:

Yes, that was discussed at the last meeting, I believe, between you and Mr. Christopherson.

I want to say thank you to Ms. Sahota for bringing forward the motion and laying it out. I think it's beneficial when we have our cards on the table and we know what's being discussed so that we can start from the starting point.

I would ask that we have that motion circulated as quickly as possible, so that we have it in written form. I have the gist of it, though, and I do appreciate where that's coming from.

I might begin with a bit of an interesting point, that when Bill C-23 was brought before the committee, the actual date for reporting back to the House was set by Her Majesty's loyal opposition, at the time, so the voting date actually reflected the views of the opposition. Perhaps we could have some agreement on that as well, when the time comes.

I also want to say that, on our side, there are discussions going on, and I appreciate that. I know Mrs. Kusie and Ms. Jordan have had worthwhile conversations, as well as conversations with the minister's office. I think that's a positive development, and I appreciate that. We will be hearing from the minister, I believe, on Thursday at at 3:30, so I look forward to hearing about any undertakings she may have from that standpoint.

I want to go back, though, to a conversation that I brought up at the last couple of meetings about witnesses, in particular the Ontario Chief Electoral Officer. In June, we had the CEO come within days of the Ontario provincial election, in the midst of voter recounts and returning the writs. There is no question that it was a challenge getting him here at that point in time.

As a committee, we cannot compel the testimony of the Chief Electoral Officer. He is an officer of the Ontario legislative assembly, and we cannot compel testimony from an officer of a parliament or a legislature. Obviously, we cannot force Mr. Essensa to come. We can double-check.

My understanding is that we cannot compel, but I don't think he's showing an unwillingness to come. My understanding is that it is a challenge with scheduling. I would still like to hear from him at some point prior to clause-by-clause. I hope he can come at our regularly scheduled time on Thursday. I believe that is when the clerk is hoping that will happen. I'm optimistic and hopeful that this can be achieved. The changes that have been implemented in Ontario do reflect some of the challenges and issues we are debating here, so I think the ability to hear about their successes and challenges on this bill is worthwhile.

I'm not going to express outrage—Ms. Sahota did mention that—but I will point out some concerns that I don't think are insurmountable. I think this committee has worked well in the past. I believe the motion says, “the Chair may”, not “the Chair shall”, so there is that discretion.

I was not a member of the committee at the time, but a year and a half ago, we had our little.... I don't want to call it a filibuster; I think it was just an extensive discussion. I guess that was back in the spring of 2017.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

There have been a couple.

Mr. John Nater:

I want to point out that we did establish the Simms protocol, thanks to the member for Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame...or just Newfoundland and Labrador. I do appreciate the nice long titles. Perth—Wellington is nice and short. I can remember it.

I do appreciate that and I hope that there would be a similar type of discretion and debate allowed, arbitrarily limiting it to five minutes for all clauses. Hopefully there will be some discussion there, because there are going to be certain clauses that we can deal with in 30 seconds. Hopefully by that point we will have some commitments among those of us around the table that certain clauses will be passed or rejected fairly quickly. I think there will be certain clauses that, when we come to them, will need a little more fulsome debate. We may not agree on the outcome, but hopefully we can get to the point where we can agree to disagree on certain points and go forward.

I accept where the Chief Electoral Officer was coming from this morning. He and his organization, I believe, have done exceptional work since the last election, to be frank, and prior to that. I appreciate his comments that they're always ready to run an election based on the rules that are in place, based on the last election and using the by-elections as an outcome. I expect that we'll likely have some by-elections this fall. I don't foresee those going past the new year.

It's disappointing, but we can understand where he was coming from in terms of the poll books. It's disappointing in the sense that it would have been nice to have that in. It's certainly understandable that we do not want Elections Canada going ahead with an experiment in the middle of a campaign where things like that are at issue. I do appreciate that, but as we go forward, outside of the context of this particular bill, things like the poll books and making the process that much easier are there and can be undertaken.

We did discuss Bill C-23 a bit. I have what I think was a very interesting quotation about Bill C-23: When time restrictions are placed on committees so there is a drop-dead time and when five o'clock comes around all questions are put, we do a disservice in the terms of the principle of democracy at the committee level by not allowing for debate and questions and answers.

Does anybody know who said that? It was Kevin Lamoureux. I always appreciate Kevin's sage wisdom and sage advice.

(1255)

Mr. Scott Simms:

So do we. He's a member of the committee.

Mr. John Nater:

He is a member of the committee, a non-voting member. In the time I've been here, I haven't seen him, but I know he does have a heavy workload in the House itself—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

—to keep the status quo.

Mr. John Nater:

I know he does yeoman's work in the House itself.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Several yeomen's work....

Mr. John Nater:

Several yeopeople's work.... I don't know what the gender-neutral terms is, but I do appreciate people who take up that burden.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Well, we certainly appreciate Kevin.

Mr. John Nater:

I do appreciate people who take up that burden, because it is heavy.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

He is the member most knowledgeable.

Mr. John Nater:

On this issue, we may agree or disagree on different clauses, but I do think this committee has worked well. I am proposing an amendment related specifically to the Ontario CEO. Again, I don't have the exact wording of the motion, so hopefully we can work it out with the government in terms of the actual wording.

I move: That the motion be amended a) by adding after the words "That the Committee" the following: "do not"; and, b) by replacing the words after "of Bill C-76" with the words: "before the Committee has heard from the Chief Electoral Officer of Ontario".

Again, I hope this shows a willingness to move on with clause-by-clause and work together with the committee, but I would like to have the Chief Electoral Officer of Ontario join us for a discussion. If that can be done Thursday morning, hopefully that will be a mission accomplished. We'd have the minister in the afternoon, and then I believe the date that was proposed was October 2 or October 4.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It was October 2.

Mr. John Nater:

It would be October 2, next Tuesday, that we would begin the clause-by-clause, prior to Thanksgiving.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Do you agree to the rest of the motion?

Mr. John Nater:

Well, I think that's going to be discussed.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Oh.

Mr. John Nater:

I think we should give credit where credit's due. I think people are discussing this at levels that aren't in this room right now, so there will be additional discussion held.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I just have a quick response to that.

We've had the Ontario Chief Electoral Officer.... We've invited him, how many times now? It's been three or four times. He was on the original list as well.

The Chair:

It was four times.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Four times that person has not been available. I don't see what we would gain, necessarily, from having him that we couldn't get by doing some research on our own time.

Also, it's really not reassuring that it's not the only demand you have, and you're not willing to accept the rest and begin clause-by-clause by a certain date either. It would be a lot more reassuring if that was your request, having stated that you're in agreement with the rest of the motion and that was the one thing. As it seems that's not the case, I don't see why we would accept that amendment at this time.

(1300)

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Ms. Sahota. I do appreciate that.

My concern has been.... I brought this up prior to the summer recess, and at the last meeting as well. I think that we have a perfect case study of a provincial election, with Ontario, Canada's largest province in terms of population, having undergone an election campaign with some of the changes, or related to the changes foreseen in this bill.

My major concern is being able to hear from the CEO of Elections Ontario, or potentially some of his senior officials, if he is unable to attend.

Chair, I see it is 1:01. I don't know if you'd like me to continue or if it's the will of the committee that we adjourn until Thursday morning, or what the will of the committee is. I leave it in your hands, Chair.

The Chair:

I have a question for you. Your amendment is not time-limited, so if the person is not available for three years, it would never come forward. Are you going to propose a time limit?

Mr. John Nater:

I'd be open to an amendment for that. I don't know what an appropriate direction would be. I don't get the sense that.... I did look to the clerk and staff first. If he's saying, “I'm not going to come”, then we have to deal with that, but if there is a willingness to come and it's just working around a time that we can get him here by video conference or by some alternative....

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

May I clarify something for you, Mr. Chair?

I don't think there is any willingness on this side to even entertain this amendment unless the rest of the motion is considered. They have to be willing to approve the rest of the motion for us to consider it, even if maybe we are compelling that witness to come, or whatever. We're not going to entertain it otherwise.

The Chair:

Okay. I need the committee's permission for what they want to do, because we're past the time.

For your information, the clerk doesn't think there is any reason in the rules why we couldn't compel the person, just so you know that.

I need the committee's will on whether or not to continue.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

No, we will not continue if the rest of the motion is not adopted.

Mr. Scott Reid:

May I say something?

If someone made a motion to adjourn, we could find out whether the committee wants to adjourn or not. Could I give that a try?

I move that we adjourn.

The Chair:

Okay. A motion to adjourn is not debatable.

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: We're adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

[Énregistrement électronique]

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour, et bienvenue à la 118e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Bienvenue, monsieur Cullen. Bienvenue, madame May. Je suis content de vous voir.

Nous poursuivons notre étude du projet de loi C-76, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada et d’autres lois et apportant des modifications corrélatives à d’autres textes législatifs.

Nous avons le plaisir d'accueillir Stéphane Perrault, directeur général des élections du Canada. Il est accompagné d'Anne Lawson, sous-directrice générale des élections, Affaires régulatoires, et de Michel Roussel, sous-directeur général des élections, Scrutins et innovation.

Pour la gouverne des membres, nous avions aussi invité le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario à comparaître aujourd'hui, mais il a dû refuser en raison d'un conflit d'horaire.

Merci d'être ici aujourd'hui. Vous êtes des habitués de notre comité; en fait, vous avez probablement pris part à plus de réunions que certains d'entre nous. Nous sommes heureux de vous accueillir à nouveau.

Monsieur Perrault, je vous laisse faire votre présentation, puis nous passerons aux questions.

M. Stéphane Perrault (directeur général des élections, Élections Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président.

C'est toujours un plaisir de comparaître devant vous et de contribuer aux travaux du Comité. J'espère que mes collègues et moi saurons être utiles au Comité dans le cadre de son étude du projet de loi C-76.

Je n'ai pas de notes écrites. Je voudrais toutefois aborder trois points avant de passer aux questions.

Mon premier point porte sur l'importance de ce projet de loi, surtout pour les prochaines élections. Le deuxième point concerne un amendement technique que je n'ai pas porté à l'attention du Comité la dernière fois que j'ai comparu. Je vais donc vous en parler aujourd'hui. Le troisième point est lié au travail de préparation qui doit être fait avant la mise en oeuvre du projet de loi et d'ici les prochaines élections, et en quoi ce travail touche les délibérations de votre comité, et du Sénat évidemment.

Pour ce qui est de l'importance du projet de loi, je ne vais pas répéter ce que j'ai déjà dit. À mon sens, il s'agit d'un projet de loi très solide dans l'ensemble, mais pas parfait. J'ai fait des propositions en vue de l'améliorer.

Je soulignerais, par contre, que le projet de loi apporterait des améliorations à long terme au processus électoral ainsi que des solutions à court terme grandement nécessaires pour aborder certaines préoccupations qu'ont bien des gens à propos de l'intégrité de ce processus. C'est un aspect très important de notre mandat, bien entendu.

Je souhaite ardemment que le projet de loi soit adopté pour les prochaines élections, compte tenu de la situation. Il contient des mesures qui traitent des tierces parties et de l'influence étrangère. Il renferme également des dispositions concernant la lutte contre les cyberattaques et la désinformation. De ce point de vue là, c'est une mesure législative importante.

Il renforce aussi beaucoup les pouvoirs du commissaire en ce qui concerne les enquêtes. Sur le plan de l'intégrité, j'estime donc qu'il est souhaitable que ce projet de loi soit adopté.[Français]

S'il y a un point qui fait défaut dans le projet de loi, c'est bien la protection de la vie privée. Les partis ne sont pas assujettis à un régime de protection des renseignements personnels. Je l'ai mentionné par le passé et je le mentionne de nouveau aujourd'hui. Le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée l'a mentionné, et nous sommes du même avis sur cette question. Je le répète simplement ce matin, sans aller plus loin.

Au sujet de l'amendement technique dont j'ai parlé, le Comité a approuvé à l'unanimité une recommandation qui avait été faite par mon prédécesseur. Cette recommandation visait les situations où il y a obligation, en vertu de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada, de tenir une élection partielle tard dans le cycle électoral, juste avant une élection à date fixe. On avait convenu qu'il n'était pas souhaitable, dans de tels cas, d'avoir une élection partielle, car une telle élection est généralement annulée par la tenue de l'élection générale. Le Comité avait approuvé cette recommandation à l'unanimité, et le gouvernement était d'accord.

Le projet de loi contient une disposition qui traite de cette question. Malheureusement, étant donné la manière dont elle est rédigée, un gouvernement pourrait, en cas de vacance, ne pas tenir d'élection partielle dans les neuf derniers mois du cycle, mais à cette période s'ajouteraient les six mois moins un jour qui précèdent. Il pourrait donc y avoir jusqu'à 15 mois moins un jour sans qu'il y ait d'élection partielle pour combler une vacance. Je suis convaincu que ce n'était pas l'intention de notre recommandation, ni du Comité, ni du gouvernement.

J'ai constaté cette lacune cet été. Nous l'avons portée à l'attention du gouvernement, mais mon rôle est de faire rapport au Comité. Si vous voulez que nous proposions un libellé pour remédier à ce problème, cela me fera plaisir de le faire.[Traduction]

Le dernier point que je voulais aborder concerne les préparatifs de la mise en oeuvre du projet de loi C-76 et nos efforts en ce sens, et ce que cela signifie pour le Parlement et ses travaux.

Vous savez déjà que j'aurais souhaité que le projet de loi soit adopté le printemps dernier. Nous aurions alors eu plus de temps pour préparer sa mise en oeuvre.

Quand j'ai comparu devant votre comité, j'ai indiqué que nous devions commencer l'été en adoptant une approche sur deux fronts concernant la formation des préposés au scrutin et les manuels qui leur sont destinés, pour que nous soyons prêts. Nous avons préparé des manuels en fonction de la loi actuelle et sur la loi telle qu'elle pourrait être modifiée. Ces documents n'ont pas été imprimés, évidemment. Nous les adapterons en fonction des résultats des travaux du Comité et du Parlement. Cela dit, cette étape est faite.

L'autre aspect, qui est sans doute le plus complexe, est celui des systèmes informatiques. Le projet de loi aurait des répercussions, certaines mineures et certaines majeures, sur au moins 20 de nos systèmes. J'ai dit le printemps dernier que nous allions passer l'été à faire ce qu'il fallait de notre côté pour adapter nos systèmes informatiques, puis, à l'automne, que nous commencerions à examiner le codage en fonction des changements requis par le projet de loi C-76. C'est, en gros, ce que nous avons fait.

Vous vous souviendrez peut-être que j'avais expliqué à ce moment-là que nous étions en train de construire un nouveau centre de données à sécurité accrue, qui sera le centre névralgique de nos opérations lors des élections. Ce centre a été construit et la migration a été effectuée. La migration était prévue pour le 1er septembre, mais elle a finalement eu lieu le 15, donc avec deux semaines de retard, ce qui n'est pas si mal. Nous en sommes encore à mettre la dernière main à la transition, mais tout se passe bien. Il reste encore un peu de travail informatique à faire, mais dans l'ensemble le projet avance bien.

Notre attention se porte maintenant sur le projet de loi. Nous aurons besoin d'une fenêtre pour le codage et les tests. Pour le codage, la fenêtre est essentiellement du 1er octobre au début décembre, lors de l'ajournement de la Chambre. C'est à ce moment-là que nous devons savoir exactement quelles répercussions le projet de loi aura sur nos systèmes, parce qu'ensuite, en janvier, nous procéderons à une sérieuse batterie de tests, puis il faudra régler les problèmes découverts. Ensuite, le système sera déployé et il y aura une simulation en mars.

Voilà donc quel est notre calendrier pour faire en sorte que tout aille bien lors des prochaines élections. Il est sans doute utile pour le Comité d'être conscient du temps dont nous avons besoin.

J'aurais une dernière chose à ajouter, qui n'est pas directement liée au projet de loi C-76. J'y reviendrai peut-être à la fin s'il reste du temps. Cela concerne les registres de scrutin électroniques, dont nous avons déjà discuté au Comité à plusieurs reprises. Nos plans à ce sujet ont été quelque peu modifiés la semaine dernière. Si vous avez des questions là-dessus, j'y répondrai avec plaisir. S'il reste un peu de temps à la fin, j'aborderai les changements que nous avons faits à ce projet.

(1110)

Le président:

Vous devriez peut-être le faire maintenant, si vous pouvez être bref.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

D'accord. Vous vous souviendrez — même si certains d'entre vous n'étaient pas membres du Comité à ce moment-là — que nous parlons depuis deux ans de l'utilisation de registres de scrutin électroniques. Il ne s'agit pas du vote électronique ni de tabulation électronique; il s'agit plutôt des listes et des registres électroniques qui aident les préposés au scrutin à faire voter les électeurs.

Nous souhaitions passer à des registres de scrutin électroniques pour améliorer l'intégrité de la tenue des dossiers, puisque cela réduit le nombre d'erreurs et accélère le processus, surtout aux bureaux de vote par anticipation. C'est un des nombreux outils que nous voulons utiliser pour améliorer les services au fil du temps.

Les technologies de ce genre sont de plus en plus utilisées à l'échelon provincial. Pour commencer à utiliser un tel système d'ici les prochaines élections, je devrai être pleinement convaincu qu'il satisfait aux normes de sécurité les plus élevées. Vous vous souvenez que, dans son rapport de 2017, le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications Canada avait dit que les menaces contre le système électoral étaient plus élevées au palier fédéral, ce qui n'est guère surprenant. Nos normes doivent être à la hauteur de la gravité de la menace, et nous travaillons avec le Centre pour établir ces normes.

Donc, pour commencer à utiliser ce système d'ici les prochaines élections, je dois être prêt à le mettre à l'essai lors des élections partielles de cet automne. La semaine dernière, malgré tout le travail acharné qui a été fait, je n'étais pas entièrement satisfait de la sécurité et de la maturité du système pour autoriser son utilisation lors d'une élection partielle. Cela n'aura donc pas lieu.

Je demeure convaincu qu'il s'agit de la voie à suivre pour l'avenir, mais nous ne franchirons pas ce pas tant que je n'aurai pas l'assurance que le système est absolument sans faille. C'était une condition de base du projet, et nous continuons de la respecter pendant son exécution.

Cette situation a une incidence sur la prochaine élection générale. Nous voulions que ce système soit en place dans 225 bureaux de vote par anticipation. Ce ne sera pas le cas.

Pourrons-nous le mettre à l'essai dans certains bureaux de vote? C'est une possibilité que nous pouvons envisager. Je demeure résolu à poursuivre cette vision d'avenir pour mieux servir les électeurs et aider les préposés, mais à ce moment-ci, à un an des élections, je dois avoir la conviction que c'est un système qui fonctionne et qui satisfait aux normes les plus élevées. Je n'ai pas ce niveau de confiance à ce point-ci. J'ai donc refusé que ce nouveau système soit mis à l'essai lors des élections partielles. Cela aura une incidence sur la prochaine élection générale.

Cela ne change rien au projet de loi, mais, à long terme, ce dernier offre la souplesse nécessaire pour faire bon usage de cette technologie. Le projet de loi et ce projet ont donc un certain lien entre eux. Je demeure convaincu, comme je l'ai dit, que c'est la voie de l'avenir, mais il faut que le système soit prêt, sûr et sans faille.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Français]

Nous passons maintenant à la période des questions et commentaires.

Monsieur Simms, vous avez la parole. [Traduction]

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à nos invités. J'ai une question très importante à poser d'entrée de jeu. Comment s'est passé votre été?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il a fait chaud.

M. Scott Simms:

Bien.

Il y a deux enjeux globaux que je veux aborder en ce qui concerne la complexité liée à mise en oeuvre des principales mesures en raison du facteur temps. Le premier est le changement d'organisation du commissaire, et l'autre est le régime de sanctions administratives. J'y reviendrai dans un instant.

Tout d'abord, je veux revenir sur ce que vous avez dit à propos de la fenêtre pour le codage, qui est d'octobre à décembre. Pensez-vous pouvoir y arriver à l'intérieur de cette fenêtre et être prêt pour les prochaines élections?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

J'ai bon espoir d'y arriver, oui.

M. Scott Simms:

Mais vous devez commencer dès octobre.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est tout à fait exact.

M. Scott Simms:

Attendre au début de l'année ne serait pas une bonne idée.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Une fois le codage terminé, nous faisons ce qu'on appelle des tests d'acceptation par les utilisateurs. Les utilisateurs mettent le système à l'essai. Après cette étape, il faut faire l'intégration dans l'autre système, puis une deuxième batterie de tests. Cela doit avoir lieu en janvier.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord, merci.

Ce que vous avez dit à propos des registres de scrutin était très intéressant. Merci de nous en avoir parlé.

Je suis content qu'on ait abordé le sujet au début, monsieur le président. Merci.

Vous avez parlé de l'avenir, de l'amélioration de l'intégrité et de tout ce genre de chose. Je ne vais pas répéter ce que vous avez dit. Malheureusement, vous ne pourrez pas mettre le nouveau système à l'essai pendant les élections partielles qui auront lieu très bientôt. Vous avez dit que le système n'est pas prêt.

Une fois qu'il sera prêt et que vous serez assez confiant pour l'essayer, aurez-vous besoin de l'approbation des deux chambres?

(1115)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Non, parce que cela ne va pas à l'encontre des dispositions de la loi. C'est permis. La loi permet des mécanismes tels que rayer des noms sur une liste ou écrire le nom des personnes qui doivent être inscrits aux bureaux de vote. Tout ce qui serait fait à l'aide des registres de scrutin serait conforme aux règles, même en vertu de la loi actuelle, si on fait abstraction du projet de loi C-76.

M. Scott Simms:

Je vous remercie de ces clarifications.

J'aimerais revenir sur deux autres points. Premièrement, il y a la question du commissaire, qui nous a beaucoup dérangés dans le projet de loi C-23. Selon nous, c'était une erreur de déplacer le commissaire de l'administration centrale d'Élections Canada, de le sortir de cet édifice et de ce milieu pour le transférer au Bureau du directeur des poursuites pénales. Nous étions d'avis qu'on faisait fausse route, car on le privait des renseignements nécessaires pour mener une enquête adéquate, en l'éloignant des directeurs de scrutin et de toutes sortes d'informations provenant de partout au pays. Il est sans doute très ardu d'être en contact avec toutes les circonscriptions du pays lorsqu'on est au Bureau du directeur des poursuites pénales.

Êtes-vous satisfait des changements proposés dans le projet de loi à l'étude? Je crois vous avoir entendu dire que oui. Parlez-nous aussi de la nouvelle relation entre le commissaire et le directeur des poursuites pénales.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Pour ce qui est du projet de loi, comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, il s'agit d'un changement favorable. Nous n'avons pas encore déménagé, mais — que cela se produise ou non, nous le verrons plus tard — la séparation demeure très nette et le commissaire continue à mener ses enquêtes de manière indépendante. Je tiens à rassurer tout le monde à cet égard. La distinction demeure très claire.

Les choses sont plus faciles, dans la mesure où on comprend mieux la façon d'interpréter la loi et les difficultés rencontrées lorsque des directives sont transmises aux partis et aux candidats. Surtout, il y a l'échange de renseignements sur le financement politique, par exemple les remises et ainsi de suite. La relation de travail s'en voit facilitée.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord. Dans le cadre des enquêtes en cours, peut-on faire appel à un directeur de scrutin ou à un autre fonctionnaire électoral d'une élection antérieure, comme un greffier de scrutin ou un scrutateur?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Bien franchement, c'est surtout l'administration centrale qui est concernée par l'accès aux renseignements du registre et aux renseignements sur le financement politique. Cela représente l'essentiel. Le plus gros du volume est là. C'est le coeur de l'affaire.

Pour ce qui est de sa relation avec le directeur des poursuites pénales, je préfère le laisser en parler. Si je ne me trompe pas, le projet de loi prévoit de lui confier le pouvoir de déposer des accusations.

M. Scott Simms: Oui. C'est un point que je souhaite aborder.

M. Stéphane Perrault: Le directeur des poursuites pénales conserve la responsabilité d'intenter une poursuite, mais il reviendrait au commissaire de décider de porter des accusations ou non.

M. Scott Simms:

Et c'est au directeur des poursuites pénales d'exercer les poursuites et de les mener à terme.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Exact. Je crois qu'il serait autorisé à les laisser tomber, quoique cela se produit assez rarement.

M. Scott Simms:

Mme Lawson semble être d'accord avec vous.

Je veux aborder rapidement la question des sanctions administratives, qui s'imposent depuis longtemps, selon moi. Nous avons pris les choses en main à cet égard. Je ne cherche pas à nous vanter, mais je dis simplement que vous les recommandiez depuis un certain temps, afin d'éviter les procédures criminelles, évidemment.

Est-ce que le contenu du projet de loi vous satisfait, dans le sens où il renferme des articles...? Bien entendu, il y a l'amende de 1 500 $ ou de 5 000 $, s'il s'agit d'une entité constituée. Il est aussi prévu que si on enfreint les articles 363 ou 367, qui traitent des contributions et des plafonds, les amendes peuvent être encore plus lourdes si la contribution est considérable.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Oui.

M. Scott Simms: Mais cela ne fait pas partie des poursuites pénales.

M. Stéphane Perrault: Ce genre de dossier n'est pas administré par Élections Canada, mais par le commissaire, qui est alors appelé à exercer son pouvoir de discrétion.

Ce n'est pas le montant qui importe. La grande majorité des infractions à la loi sont relativement mineures et de nature réglementaire. Elles doivent être punies d'une certaine façon, mais elles ne méritent pas des poursuites criminelles. Il y a un écart entre la nature des fautes — commises en grande partie par le personnel de campagne et des bénévoles — et la nature des sanctions au pénal. Il s'agit donc d'une amélioration importante de la loi.

M. Scott Simms:

Je conviens que ce n'est pas le montant qui compte. Toutefois, on ne laisse pas beaucoup de marge de manoeuvre quant à la détermination du montant, et ainsi de suite. Ne trouvez-vous pas le projet de loi trop prescriptif?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Non. Le tir pourra être corrigé éventuellement, mais je crois que c'est la bonne approche par laquelle commencer. Si je ne m'abuse, il est possible de faire appel et demander un contrôle auprès du directeur général des élections si l'amende dépasse 1 500 $.

(1120)

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord.

Il me reste environ 20 secondes. Je vais y aller d'une question très générale. Si vous arrivez à donner une réponse succincte, je serai très impressionné.

Comment les choses se passent-elles, en ce qui concerne les futurs électeurs, le registre?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

En fait, la création du registre n'est pas un projet compliqué. Un registre reste un registre. M. Roussel me corrigera si j'ai tort, mais, essentiellement, la construction du registre n'est pas un défi en soi. La difficulté consiste à attirer les gens. Les efforts que nous déploierons à cet égard seront limités par le temps dont nous disposerons avant les élections. Nous concentrerons nos efforts en grande partie sur les personnes de 17 ans qui sont sur le point d'avoir 18 ans et poursuivrons nos efforts à partir de là. La création du registre en tant que tel n'est pas une entreprise complexe.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Simms.

La parole est à vous, monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Encore une fois, je remercie M. Perreault et nos invités de leur présence aujourd'hui. Il est toujours bon d'avoir des nouvelles du directeur général des élections et d'Élections Canada.

S'il me reste du temps, j'aimerais partager la dernière minute de mon temps de parole avec Mme May si le Comité n'y voit pas d'inconvénient.

J'aimerais revenir sur quelques points que vous avez évoqués. J'aimerais aussi connaître votre opinion sur les changements en Ontario, si vous le voulez bien. Nous espérions nous entretenir avec le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario. Il est possible que cela ne se produise pas avant la fin de l'étude du projet de loi. Nous aimerions connaître votre opinion à ce sujet. J'y reviendrai un peu plus tard.

Vous avez mentionné qu'Élections Canada devra mettre à jour et modifier une vingtaine de systèmes informatiques pour la mise en oeuvre du projet de loi à l'étude. Vous savez sans doute que des mises à l'essai sont toujours nécessaires dans de telles circonstances. J'ai trop vu de projets informatiques dérailler au gouvernement durant ma courte carrière à titre de député. Je me demande si un ordre de priorité a été établi parmi ces 20 systèmes informatiques. Y en a-t-il qu'il faut moderniser pour la pleine mise en oeuvre du projet de loi et d'autres dont la mise à jour peut être effectuée après la tenue des 43es élections, ou faut-il tous les mettre à jour en même temps? Existe-t-il un ordre de priorité?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Oui, absolument. Nous avons mené cette analyse au cours de l'été. Voici un exemple. Certaines composantes des systèmes ne seront pas modifiées tout de suite, mais nous y viendrons à plus long terme. Entre autres, des modifications substantielles sont apportées au système pour les rapports des tiers. Il est désormais possible de publier en ligne une version PDF d'un rapport. Ce format se prête à des recherches, mais dans un seul rapport à la fois, et il faut consulter un autre rapport pour faire des références croisées avec d'autres contributions, par exemple. Éventuellement, il sera nécessaire de disposer d'un outil plus puissant et plus utile, pour faire des recherches non pas seulement à l'intérieur d'un rapport, mais aussi dans une base de données. Il nous a fallu faire des compromis pour faire en sorte que d'autres modifications soient faites à temps.

Il y a d'autres exemples, mais, oui, nous avons mené ce genre d'analyses. Nous avons fait le nécessaire pour assurer la mise en oeuvre du projet de loi, quitte à attendre après les élections pour offrir une meilleure version de certains systèmes.

M. John Nater:

Merci beaucoup.

Comme vous le savez, le projet de loi renferme une disposition d'entrée en vigueur plutôt inhabituelle, soit six mois, à moins d'un avis écrit publié par le directeur général des élections. Sur la Colline du Parlement, les rumeurs vont toujours bon train. On insinue sans cesse que des élections surprises pourraient être annoncées, au printemps ou à un autre moment. Si le projet de loi est adopté en décembre et que des élections sont déclenchées au printemps, disons, y a-t-il une date à laquelle dans cette période de six mois vous refuseriez de publier un avis pour l'entrée en vigueur de la loi? En fait, je vous demande s'il y a une date ultime.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Permettez que je fasse un peu marche arrière. Je tiens à rassurer les Canadiens et les députés ici présents que nous sommes toujours prêts à organiser des élections semblables aux dernières. Lorsque nous élaborons des améliorations, que celles-ci cadrent dans la loi telle qu'elle existe ou dans d'autres mesures législatives, nous sommes toujours prêts en quelque sens à organiser des élections. Nous employons alors les procédures des élections partielles. Il s'agit d'un ensemble de services et d'outils que nous utilisons pour les élections partielles entre les élections générales, jusqu'à ce que nous puissions améliorer les systèmes électoraux ou les arranger un peu, dans certains cas, et les évaluer et les mettre en oeuvre. Donc, nous mettons peu à peu en oeuvre les améliorations.

En ce qui concerne ce projet de loi, comme je l'ai dit, notre objectif de préparation pour organiser des élections est le mois d'avril. Ce n'est pas septembre, c'est avril. Avant cela, nous avons les procédures d'élections — des dernières élections — que nous améliorons pour les prochaines. Cependant, pour réaliser l'objectif d'avril, nous devons effectuer certains tests, à partir de janvier. C'est ce que je voulais dire. Il faut y aller prudemment, au début, quand nous mettons en oeuvre ces genres de changements.

(1125)

M. John Nater:

Pendant l'été, vous avez accordé une entrevue à l'émission Power and Politics, et vous avez parlé de l'importance d'avoir le consensus de tous les partis dans le cas d'un projet de loi comme celui-ci. Êtes-vous toujours de cet avis?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

J'ai toujours été d'avis que la législation électorale bénéficie de l'appui de tous les partis. C'est pourquoi j'ai hésité à demander, au printemps, quelle était la date butoir. Bien franchement, il commence à être presque trop tard. J'espérais que le projet de loi serait adopté en avril ou au printemps. Je fais de mon mieux pour accommoder le Parlement et collaborer pour améliorer cette mesure législative.

M. John Nater:

J'aimerais passer aux questions portant sur les élections en Ontario. Comme vous le savez, il y a eu des élections en juin. La province a entrepris une mise à jour considérable de sa loi électorale, notamment des règlements concernant les tiers.

Je serais curieux de savoir ce que vous pensez de cette loi, notamment de sa mise en oeuvre et de comment elle aurait pu être mise en œuvre pendant la campagne électorale. Enfin, en avez-vous tiré des leçons que vous pourrez appliquer à la situation actuelle? C'est ma dernière question. Ensuite, Mme May aura le dernier mot.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je croyais que vous alliez aborder l'aspect technologique des élections de l'Ontario.

M. John Nater:

Nous pourrons aborder ce sujet à l'avenir. Nous avons aussi des questions là-dessus.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Concernant les tiers, il y avait du rattrapage à faire. Par le passé, les tiers ont eu un impact considérable sur les élections provinciales de l'Ontario, en raison du nombre élevé de syndicats, en particulier. Il y avait donc du rattrapage à faire.

L'évaluation de ces règles est une chose qui nécessite un peu de temps. Je n'ai pas eu l'occasion de discuter avec M. Essensa de son niveau de satisfaction de la mise en oeuvre. Je m'abstiendrai de commenter cela, car je voudrais lui en parler d'abord. Je n'ai pas entendu de grandes préoccupations.

Je crois que les dispositions contenues dans le projet de loi sont importantes — qu'elles accomplissent beaucoup. Ce qu'on a constaté dans le passé est que les tierces parties font plus que de la simple publicité. Il semblerait qu'elles font toutes sortes d'activités liées aux campagnes électorales. C'est important d'élargir le régime pour veiller à ce qu'il couvre ces activités et essaie de garantir que les règles du jeu soient égales pour tous, et cela inclut bien plus que la publicité.

Le président:

Merci.

Mme May, vous avez une minute.

Mme Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, PV):

Merci beaucoup. Merci, John.

Je n'ai pas eu l'occasion de vous parler depuis que vous avez reçu votre désignation officielle de directeur général des élections. Je tiens à vous en féliciter en personne. Je pense que vous allez vous acquitter de ce rôle avec brio.

Je me préoccupe grandement des échéanciers. J'aurais aimé voir le projet de loi C-33 progresser lorsqu'il en était à l'étape de la première lecture, en décembre 2016. Nous avons maintenant le projet de loi C-76. Dans l'ensemble, j'appuie ce projet de loi. La Chambre en est saisie, et nous ferons bientôt une étude article par article. Ensuite, il sera renvoyé au Sénat avant la sanction royale.

Je sais que vous faites preuve de beaucoup de diligence raisonnable dans vos préparations, pour prévoir le moment où il deviendra loi, mais j'aimerais vous demander de nous donner une idée de quand la sanction royale sera nécessaire pour dire que vous pourrez en fait être prêt à organiser des élections à l'automne, en supposant que nous gardons la date d'élections fixée aux termes du projet de loi et que nous n'ayons pas des élections surprises. Quelle serait alors la date butoir pour recevoir la sanction royale?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

La réponse à cette question n'est pas aussi simple que cela pourrait avoir l'air. Comme je l'ai dit, ma préoccupation est d'avoir un environnement de TI fixe en décembre, pour que nous puissions procéder aux changements. Mais nos systèmes de TI ne sont pas touchés par tous les aspects de ce projet de loi. J'hésite à dire que le Sénat ne devrait plus y apporter de changements après décembre, mais nous devrons être prudents avec ces changements et la façon dont ils pourraient affecter nos systèmes.

Parfois, les changements impliquent que nous devons sensibiliser le public. Je pense aux tiers. Cela changera grandement leur façon de fonctionner. Certains nouveaux règlements prévoient qu'ils devront faire rapport de leurs gains et de leurs contributions, de façon rétroactive.

C'est très difficile d'apporter des changements du jour au lendemain et d'essayer de sensibiliser le monde aux limites des dépenses préélectorales pour les tiers, alors qu'ils ne font pas vraiment partie de la conversation. Ils ne sont pas à la Chambre; ils ne sont pas nécessairement conscients des changements à venir. Il ne s'agit donc pas seulement des systèmes de TI. Je vous ai donné une réponse nuancée.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le Président.

Bienvenue.

Au printemps, vous avez présenté un scénario des délais qui affecteraient ce que vous pourriez mettre en oeuvre. En d'autres mots, il y a comme une liste d'achats qui ressort d'un projet de loi comme le C-76, et plus il prend du temps avant d'être adopté, moins vous pourrez mettre en oeuvre ses dispositions avant les prochaines élections. Est-il juste de dire cela?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ce projet de loi offre une assez large discrétion au directeur général des élections. J'ai déjà dit que je ne pourrai pas exploiter cette discrétion pour améliorer les services lors des prochaines élections. Je pourrais vous donner un exemple.

(1130)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Cela fait presque deux ans depuis la présentation du projet de loi C-33. Si l'on imagine le scénario dans lequel ce projet de loi a été adopté au printemps, est-ce juste de dire que vous auriez eu suffisamment de discrétion et que vous auriez mis en oeuvre toutes les dispositions du projet de loi C-76?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

La portée du projet de loi C-33 était beaucoup plus restreinte. Il n'offrait pas beaucoup de discrétion au directeur général des élections. Donc, il s'agissait surtout de dispositions obligatoires, et je n'ai aucun problème avec celles-là. Le projet de loi a prévu une certaine discrétion, mais pas beaucoup. Par exemple, on parlait de la possibilité d'avoir des bureaux de vote itinérants pour les votes par anticipation, dans les collectivités éloignées.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Cela aurait une incidence sur nos systèmes et sur la planification des votes, donc, nous n'allions pas en tirer parti pour les prochaines élections — du moins, pas de façon significative.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord. Ce serait donc un exemple de la manière dont les délais... Comme vous le savez, je représente une vaste circonscription rurale. S'il y avait des bureaux de scrutin par anticipation mobiles, les électeurs qui doivent surmonter de multiples obstacles pourraient plus facilement exercer leur droit de vote, mais il n'y en aura pas en 2019, ou très peu.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Très peu.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord.

J'aimerais maintenant parler des changements que nous aimerions voir. Vous avez déjà recommandé que les partis politiques soient assujettis aux lois sur la protection des renseignements personnels, c'est exact?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Quels renseignements les partis politiques recueillent-ils au sujet des Canadiens?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est une bonne question, à laquelle je n'ai toutefois pas de réponse complète.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Avez-vous une idée? Voulez-vous vous risquer?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Vous le savez probablement mieux que moi; assurément, en fait.

Comme vous le savez, nous fournissons les listes électorales aux partis, et on y trouve de l'information immuable, mais en général, les partis, du moins les gros partis...

M. Nathan Cullen:

« Information immuable »: c'est un terme en usage dans le milieu ou vous venez de l'inventer? Ça ne dit pas grand-chose.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il s'agit en fait du nom, de l'adresse et, si je ne m'abuse, de la date de naissance.

M. Michel Roussel (sous-directeur général des élections, Scrutins et innovation, Élections Canada):

Pas la date de naissance, non; elle se trouve plutôt...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Le nom et l'adresse, donc. Les partis vont plus loin, évidemment. Pour identifier les électeurs et s'adresser directement à eux — tâche noble s'il en est —, ils veulent connaître les préférences de chacun aux dernières élections et aux élections en cours, si cette information est connue. On parle aussi du sexe, de la confession religieuse et du revenu des gens, dans toute la mesure du possible. Nous sommes limités, mais nous tâchons de consigner les habitudes de magasinage des Canadiens dans nos banques de données.

Serait-il exact d'affirmer que, si un parti était particulièrement ambitieux et menait une campagne énergique sur les médias sociaux, il pourrait obtenir énormément de renseignements sur les électeurs?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolument, y compris le fait de savoir s'ils votent, et à quelle fréquence.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pourtant, les Canadiens ne souhaitent pas nécessairement que ces renseignements deviennent publics ou se retrouvent entre les mains d'un pirate informatique ou d'une personne malveillante.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il faudrait à tout le moins des balises pour encadrer la manière dont cette information est consignée et employée.

M. Nathan Cullen:

En quoi consistent ces balises à l'heure où on se parle?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

On l'ignore, à vrai dire. Légalement, les seules balises qui existent sont celles qui figurent dans la Loi électorale du Canada, qui dit que les partis ne peuvent pas utiliser les données qui leur sont fournies par Élections Canada sauf dans le cadre d'un scrutin fédéral. C'est plutôt vague, comme critère. Il n'est aucunement question des autres renseignements. Or, à partir du moment où nos données se mêlent à celles obtenues autrement, c'est difficile de les départager.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Évidemment, dans le jargon, on dit d'un profil qu'il est « riche » quand il permet d'obtenir le portrait non seulement d'un groupe d'électeurs, mais de chacune des personnes qui le composent. Selon le rapport publié dernièrement par le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, les logiciels vendus au Canada comportent des failles.

Tous les partis politiques — qui, au Canada, profitent de très généreux dégrèvements fiscaux — utilisent une partie de l'argent qu'ils reçoivent pour recueillir des données. C'est très connu et tout le monde dans le milieu vous le dira. Ils recueillent de l'information sur les Canadiens, individuellement et collectivement, mais rien dans la loi ne les oblige à en assurer la sécurité.

Jusqu'ici, il y a quelque chose qui cloche dans ce que je viens de dire?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Politiquement parlant, tout cloche, mais d'un point de vue juridique, tout est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Oh, oh! Excellente réponse. Je crois que je vais la retenir.

Vous avez recommandé — comme d'autres, y compris nous-mêmes et, je crois, le comité de l'éthique de la Chambre des communes — que les partis politiques soient assujettis à la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels. Le projet de loi C-76 nous permettrait justement d'améliorer la sécurité et de mieux protéger les renseignements personnels des Canadiens.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je suis d'accord. Je crois que le moment est venu, et les commissaires à la protection de la vie privée de partout au pays sont du même avis.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'autres pays sont déjà passés par là. Les banques de données de certains partis politiques ont été piratées, et il y a aussi eu des fuites en France, au Royaume-Uni et aux États-Unis.

Est-ce exact?

(1135)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Tout à fait. Certains pays réglementent aussi les archives de données des partis, qui doivent suivre une série de règles bien précises. C'est aussi vrai ici, au Canada: en Colombie-Britannique, les partis politiques sont assujettis à la réglementation sur la protection des renseignements personnels.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ma dernière série de questions porte sur les médias sociaux et sur les publicités achetées par des tiers et par des partis politiques. Je ne crois pas avoir besoin de préciser que, de nos jours, les médias sociaux ont énormément d'influence. Selon vous, devrait-on les obliger à divulguer qui achète les publicités qu'ils diffusent? Ce n'est pas différent d'une publicité électorale dans le Globe and Mail, après tout.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

J'aimerais vous donner un peu plus de contexte, si vous permettez. Alors qu'au départ, la notion de justice, qui joue un rôle fondamental dans le processus électoral canadien, était surtout d'ordre financier — l'argent ne devait permettre de n'avantager personne —, elle englobe aujourd'hui l'éthique et les comportements, surtout à l'ère des médias sociaux.

Selon moi, la notion de justice dans le contexte électoral doit être prise dans un sens assez large. La manière dont les données sont achetées et utilisées sur les médias sociaux doit être plus transparente.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Certaines publicités véhiculant de la fausse information réussissent à s'infiltrer jusque que dans les algorithmes. Or, on sait que les algorithmes peuvent être manipulés de manière à favoriser la propagande néonazie, comme c'est arrivé aux États-Unis pendant la plus récente campagne électorale.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je ne suis pas un spécialiste des algorithmes.

Je sais qu'il est un peu question de désinformation dans le projet de loi. Je ne le nie pas, mais j'aurais aimé qu'il aille plus loin.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le Président.

Le président:

Passons maintenant à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je tiens d'abord à faire écho aux propos de Mme May et à vous féliciter moi aussi pour la fin de votre intérim.

Dimanche, je suis allé voter par anticipation aux élections québécoises. J'étais accompagné de ma femme et de ma fille de 4 ans. Une fausse urne avait été installée pour les enfants, qui étaient appelés à se prononcer sur une foule de sujets, même ceux qui ne savent pas encore lire. On leur donnait ensuite un tatouage disant « J'ai voté! ». Ma fille ne sait pas encore lire, mais elle arbore fièrement son tatouage et refuse qu'on le lui efface.

La loi vous permet-elle ce genre d'initiative visant à sensibiliser la population, et particulièrement les jeunes? Pourrait-on faire la même chose au fédéral?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Bien sûr. Il y a des règles qui dictent qui peut s'approcher des urnes, mais elles ont toujours été appliquées assez largement dans le cas des enfants. Les électeurs peuvent par exemple amener les tout-petits avec eux.

Je trouve l'initiative du directeur général des élections du Québec très intéressante. Je suis le tout, de très près. Nous ne pourrions pas faire la mettre en oeuvre à temps pour le prochain scrutin, mais c'est une façon sympathique d'établir un premier contact entre les enfants et le processus électoral.

Nous avons déjà le mandat de sensibiliser les jeunes de moins de 18 ans, et ce mandat est très vaste. La semaine dernière, je me suis rendu à Halifax et à Dartmouth pour le lancement de nos nouvelles ressources d'éducation civique, que les profs pourront utiliser avec les adolescents du Canada.

Alors oui, nous avons le mandat d'instruire les jeunes. Cette mission constitue un pan important de notre mandat.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Vous disiez que la période sans élections partielles pourrait atteindre 15 mois. J'aimerais que vous m'expliquiez comment vous arrivez à ce chiffre. Le projet parle de neuf mois. D'où viennent les six autres?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

La Loi sur le Parlement du Canada prévoit qu'une élection partielle doit être déclenchée entre le 11e et le 180e jour suivant la réception du bref par le directeur général des élections. C'est le plus loin qu'on peut aller: six mois; après, il doit y avoir une élection. C'est la règle actuellement.

Le problème, c'est lorsqu'un siège devient vacant à la toute fin du cycle. Techniquement, il faut quand même tenir une élection partielle. Le projet de loi propose de lever cette exigence en précisant qu'il n'y aurait jamais d'élections partielles dans les neuf mois avant les élections à date fixe. Or, selon le libellé actuel, il se peut qu'un siège devienne vacant moins de six mois — six mois moins un jour, par exemple — avant le début de la période de neuf mois. Ces six mois s'ajouteraient alors aux neuf prévus dans le projet de loi.

Ce n'était pas le but recherché, et ce n'est pas non plus ce que souhaite le Comité, j'en suis persuadé. Au fond, ce que tout le monde veut, c'est qu'il n'y ait pas d'élections partielles dans les neuf mois précédant les élections générales, mais pas six de plus. Tout le monde veut la même chose, mais de la façon dont le texte est rédigé, ce n'est pas ce qui va arriver.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends votre point; merci pour les éclaircissements.

J'ai une question un peu plus philosophique. Je ne sais quelle sera la réponse, mais je vais vous laisser y répondre.

Est-ce que la structure d'Élections Canada et de la Loi électorale est suffisamment solide pour survivre à une nomination partisane à votre poste?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je suis désolée, à une nomination partisane où?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si, pour une raison ou une autre, la personne qui vous remplacera était nommée de façon partisane, est-ce que les structures sont assez solides pour y survivre?

(1140)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je n'accepte pas la prémisse de cette question. Je crois que les traditions du passé du Parlement sont très bien ancrées.

Pour le bien du débat, faisons comme si c'était possible. Je peux vous dire qu'Élections Canada a une culture bien établie de non-partisanerie, ainsi que des règles strictes quant aux activités que le personnel d'Élections Canada et le personnel sur le terrain peut ou ne peut pas faire. C'est inscrit dans l'ADN de l'agence, pour ainsi dire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends.

Un des changements les plus importants qu'apporte ce projet de loi est la possibilité d'avoir recours à un répondant. Nous allons ramener cette possibilité, en améliorant ce qui était prévu à ce sujet dans le projet de loi C-23, et nous allons rétablir l'utilisation de la carte d’information de l’électeur.

Combien vous faudra-t-il de temps pour mettre en oeuvre ces deux mesures? Est-ce quelque chose qui peut être fait assez rapidement ou y aura-t-il des risques advenant des retards?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est surtout une question de formation; il faut que les guides adéquats soient mis en place et que des ajustements soient apportés à la carte d’information de l’électeur. Tout cela peut être fait et le travail requis a déjà été préparé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord, je vous remercie.

J'ai terminé.

M. Scott Simms:

Parfait.

En passant, j'ai oublié de le faire la dernière fois, mais je voulais vous féliciter pour votre nouveau poste, Monsieur. C'est bien mérité. Félicitations à vous tous.

Je veux revenir sur la question de l'éducation populaire dans le cadre de ce nouveau projet de loi, car j'ai l'impression qu'on revient à la situation qui prévalait avant le projet de loi C-23, il y a plusieurs années. Je ne me souviens pas de la date exacte.

Enfin, dans le projet de loi, il est question d'éducation populaire. Dans le paragraphe 18(1) qui est proposé, on modifierait la Loi sur les élections du Canada afin de préciser que les activités d'information du DGE pourront cibler les groupes d'électeurs qui sont « susceptibles d’avoir des difficultés à exercer leurs droits démocratiques ».

Pouvez-vous donner des précisions à ce sujet et nous expliquer en quoi cela consiste? Le libellé est-il trop restrictif ou y a-t-il toute la flexibilité dont vous avez besoin?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je crois qu'il y a suffisamment de flexibilité.

Notre rôle est de cerner les électeurs qui ont des difficultés et ces groupes sont bien connus. Il y a les jeunes Canadiens, les Canadiens handicapés et les nouveaux Canadiens. C'est sur ces groupes qu'il faut axer nos efforts.

Il y a deux facettes à cette question. D'abord, il faut veiller à ce que ces groupes disposent des bonnes informations concernant la façon d'exercer leur droit de vote et de s'inscrire, le moment où a lieu le vote, etc.

La question de l'éducation civique est beaucoup plus large. Auparavant, le mandat lié à cette question était très étendu. Il a été resserré en 2014 pour ne cibler que les jeunes de moins de 18 ans, soit ceux qui n'ont pas encore obtenu le droit de vote.

Le projet de loi propose de supprimer cette limite afin que nous n'ayons plus à nous soucier du groupe d'âge qui est ciblé lorsque nous parlons de l'importance de la démocratie et de l'exercice du droit de vote. Nous pourrons ainsi préparer de la documentation et des activités qui portent sur ces questions et qui s'adresseront, par exemple, à des groupes d'élèves qui pourraient compter des jeunes de 18 ans. Nous ne serons plus forcés de laisser tomber certaines activités, parce que des jeunes plus âgés pourraient se trouver dans le groupe ciblé.

Cependant, cela est différent des programmes d'information des électeurs, dont l'objet est de présenter des faits pour faciliter la compréhension de la mécanique liée à l'exercice du droit de vote.

M. Scott Simms:

Est-ce que cela se rapporte à la recommandation A5 du rapport du DGE présenté à la suite de la 42e élection générale? Le rapport mentionnait: « Certes, l'éducation civique des jeunes est importante [...] », comme il en avait été question dans le cadre du projet de loi C-23, à la toute fin des délibérations, « [...] mais elle ne l'est pas moins pour les électeurs qui ont une connaissance limitée des rudiments de la démocratie ».

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Oui.

M. Scott Simms:

Maintenant, qui est le public cible?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il comprend notamment les nouveaux Canadiens. Le public cible ne se limite pas aux jeunes, c'est l'objectif de cette modification. C'était une recommandation du précédent directeur général des élections et nous sommes ravis de voir qu'on en a tenu compte dans le projet de loi.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Kusie. [Français]

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Perrault, merci d'être ici aujourd'hui.[Traduction]

C'est seulement la troisième semaine que je travaille à ce dossier, alors tout est encore nouveau pour moi. Je suis encore en train d'assimiler le contenu du projet de loi. [Français]

Après avoir assisté à une réunion avec la ministre hier, j'ai encore quelques questions à propos de deux parties du projet de loi.[Traduction]

La première question concerne les Canadiens à l'étranger. Pouvez-vous expliquer le processus qu'ils doivent suivre présentement pour voter lors des élections au Canada?

Évidemment, cette question est très importante pour nous en ce qui concerne la légitimité de l'électorat du Canada. Je voudrais savoir ce que les Canadiens doivent faire exactement à l'heure actuelle pour pouvoir voter lors des élections.

(1145)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Présentement, les Canadiens à l'étranger doivent s'inscrire. Nous avons le Registre international des électeurs à l'étranger et les Canadiens doivent faire une demande pour y figurer. La maintenance de ce registre se fait de façon continue. Lorsqu'une personne fait une demande, elle doit prouver sa citoyenneté au moyen de son passeport. Nous exigeons une preuve de citoyenneté pour les personnes qui se trouvent à l'étranger, pour des raisons évidentes et naturelles.

En règle générale, sous le régime actuel, les Canadiens à l'étranger peuvent voter s'ils habitent à l'étranger depuis moins de cinq ans et qu'ils ont l'intention de revenir au Canada. Ce sont les deux critères fondamentaux. Il existe des exceptions, notamment pour les militaires ou pour les gens qui travaillent pour les affaires étrangères.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Comment fait-on pour prouver qu'on a l'intention de revenir au pays?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il s'agit d'une simple déclaration. Il n'existe pas d'autre moyen de le prouver à part une déclaration, que nous acceptons de bonne foi. Il est possible que la personne ne revienne jamais, mais, lorsqu'elle présente sa demande, la personne doit avoir l'intention de revenir.

Nous conservons des renseignements au sujet de ces personnes et, à l'approche de la limite des cinq ans, la « date anniversaire » comme on l'appelle, nous leur demandons si elles sont revenues vivre au Canada, afin d'éviter que leur nom soit retiré du Registre international. Si, après la période de cinq ans prévue dans la loi actuellement, une personne n'est pas revenue au pays ou si elle n'a pas répondu à nos demandes, son nom est retiré du Registre.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Est-ce que les changements à ces exigences prévus dans le projet de loi vous inquiètent? Ces changements vous posent-ils problème?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il s'agit d'une décision stratégique visant à étendre le droit de vote. Je ne m'y oppose pas. La question est présentement devant les tribunaux.

D'un point de vue logistique, nous sommes en mesure de nous adapter au régime prévu au projet de loi C-76, qui prévoit que les gens voteront dans la dernière circonscription où ils ont résidé au Canada. Les gens ne seraient plus tenus d'affirmer leur intention de revenir au Canada et nous ne garderions plus de renseignements sur la durée de leur séjour à l'étranger.

Nous ne nous attendons pas à ce que cela représente un nombre élevé d'électeurs. Nous avons fait différentes simulations et nous verrons comment cela se traduit sur le terrain. D'après nos estimations, il devrait y avoir environ 30 000 électeurs à l'étranger. Nous pourrions en accommoder beaucoup plus. Si je ne me trompe pas, il y avait 11 000 électeurs à l'étranger lors des dernières élections et nous nous attendons à ce qu'il y en ait environ 30 000.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il n'y a plus l'exigence d'affirmer son intention de rentrer au pays. Quelle serait l'exigence concernant le dernier lieu de résidence? Comment fait-on pour prouver cela?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il s'agit des informations qui figuraient au Registre lorsque la personne était inscrite au Canada ou de tout renseignement que la personne nous a communiqué.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Quels sont les renseignements demandés pour s'inscrire? Est-ce que ce pourrait être une facture de service public, par exemple, ou est-ce qu'il ne s'agirait que des renseignements que la personne a donnés pour indiquer son dernier lieu de résidence? Y a-t-il aussi une déclaration?

Mme Anne Lawson ( sous-directrice générale des élections, Affaires régulatoires, Élections Canada):

Je devrais vérifier, mais je ne crois pas qu'une preuve soit exigée.

Michel, avez-vous la réponse?

M. Michel Roussel:

Non. Si le nom de la personne figure au registre des électeurs, il aura peut-être été présent sur notre liste des électeurs auparavant par l'entremise de nos sources administratives.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord. Nous ne savons pas s'ils reviendront au pays un jour et nous ne savons pas avec certitude quel était leur dernier lieu de résidence, mais nous avons la certitude que ce sont des citoyens canadiens. Ils doivent produire une pièce d'identité comme un passeport. J'ai moi-même été agente consulaire pendant 15 ans pour le Service extérieur, alors j'ai confiance en cet élément. Ils devront fournir une pièce d'identité qui montre qu'ils sont citoyens canadiens. C'est exact?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Oui, c'est une exigence que nous imposons en vertu des pouvoirs que nous confère la loi. Nous voulons nous assurer d'avoir une preuve de citoyenneté.

Pour ce qui est du registre des électeurs et de leur lieu de résidence, comme mes collègues l'ont indiqué, s'ils ont déjà été inscrits à la liste — et il y a beaucoup de façons de s'y inscrire au Canada —, ils peuvent déjà avoir été contraints d'en attester, ou nous pouvons déjà détenir cette information des listes électorales provinciales ou municipales. Il y a différentes façons de s'identifier selon les règles actuelles, pour prouver qu'on réside à un certain endroit au Canada, et cela ne pourra pas être changé.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Français]

Je vais maintenant céder la parole à Mme Lapointe.

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je suis vraiment contente d'être ici aujourd'hui. Ce sont les premières questions que je vais poser au sein de ce comité.

À titre d'information, j'aimerais savoir combien de fois vous êtes venu témoigner au sujet du projet de loi C-76.

(1150)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est la troisième fois. À vrai dire, officiellement, ma dernière comparution était au sujet de ce projet de loi. Évidemment, lors de ma nomination, plusieurs questions sur le projet de loi C-76 m'ont été posées. On avait déjà commencé à couvrir le terrain et, quelques dizaines de jours plus tard, j'ai comparu officiellement à propos du projet de loi. C'est donc la troisième fois aujourd'hui.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord, merci.

Le projet de loi C-76 traite des limites des dépenses électorales. Cela touche les partis, de même que les associations. J'aimerais que vous nous donniez plus de détails là-dessus, étant donné que c'est tout de même un point très chaud du projet de loi.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il y a plusieurs changements apportés aux limites des dépenses, et les effets de ces changements sont assez complexes.

Je dirais que les entités les plus touchées sont les tiers. D'abord, il y a des limites imposées aux tiers avant le scrutin et d'autres pendant le scrutin. Ensuite, le type d'activités couvert ira au-delà de la simple publicité; cela couvrira maintenant les activités partisanes et les sondages. De plus, les tiers devront produire différents rapports. Ils ont un régime fondamentalement nouveau, comparativement à ce que l'on connaissait par le passé. Les limites vont augmenter. La loi actuelle parle de 150 000 $, mais, une fois le montant indexé, cela équivaut à environ 350 000 $, sauf erreur, dans le cas d'une élection générale. Ce montant va augmenter à 1 million de dollars, mais cela inclut des activités qui, par ailleurs, n'étaient pas réglementées auparavant.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Parlez-vous des partis?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je parle toujours des tiers. Cela vaut pour les tiers.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Pour les partis politiques, il y a deux changements importants.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Qu'est-ce qui pourrait constituer un tiers? Donnez-moi un exemple.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Un tiers, c'est essentiellement quiconque ne constitue ni un parti, ni un candidat, ni une association de circonscription. Cela peut être M. ou Mme Tout-le-Monde, un syndicat, un groupe d'intérêts quelconque.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ce sont des personnes qui peuvent vouloir...

Mme Linda Lapointe:

... influencer les gens d'un côté ou de l'autre.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Exactement.

Il existe déjà un régime pour les tiers, mais il sera beaucoup plus complet et complexe, je dois le dire.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Nous parlions justement des médias sociaux, tantôt. C'est là que ces gens peuvent être très actifs.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ils peuvent y être très actifs, en effet. Par contre, pour ce qui est des médias sociaux, on doit distinguer la publicité de ce que l'on appelle le contenu organique. Quand on fait de la publicité, qu'on soit un tiers, un candidat ou un parti, on doit présenter qui l'on est. Il y a donc des obligations de divulgation qui touchent les médias sociaux. Cela existe déjà dans la loi actuelle. Selon les nouvelles dispositions, cela va s'étendre à une certaine période précédant la période électorale. Cela dit, à propos des médias sociaux, il y a d'autres éléments qui touchent tout le monde, comme la désinformation.

Quant aux partis politiques, il y a de nouvelles limites aux plafonds fixés pour une période déterminée précédant la période électorale. Nous en avons parlé la dernière fois. Ces limites commencent à être appliquées à la fin juin, sauf erreur, et sont appliquées jusqu'au déclenchement de l'élection, au cours d'une année d'élection à date fixe. C'est nouveau.

Il existe aussi des mesures prévoyant le remboursement de dépenses effectuées par les partis en vue de rendre leur matériel accessible aux personnes handicapées. On augmente donc les seuils de remboursement pour encourager les partis politiques à transformer leur matériel existant en matériel accessible. C'est une nouvelle catégorie de remboursement des dépenses des partis.

En ce qui concerne les candidats, ils n'ont pas de limites de dépenses avant le déclenchement de l'élection. Ils ne sont pas assujettis à cela. Il y a cependant toute une nouvelle série de règles concernant certaines dépenses qui étaient autrefois considérées comme des dépenses personnelles. Je pense aux dépenses découlant du recours à des soins pour palier un handicap, qu'il s'agisse de gens qui les appuient ou de garde d'enfant. Le but est de permettre aux candidats d'avoir accès à plus de ressources. Cela vise également à leur permettre de financer certains litiges qu'ils pourraient avoir avec Élections Canada ou le commissaire, s'il y avait des cas de non-conformité ou des prorogations de délai. Ce sera maintenant séparé des règles habituelles en matière de contributions. Le régime devient donc un peu plus complexe pour les candidats, mais ceux-ci ne sont pas assujettis à des limites pendant la période précédant le déclenchement d'une élection.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Merci.

En réponse à la question posée par ma collègue Mme Kusie tout à l'heure, vous avez parlé des Canadiens qui vivent à l'extérieur du pays. Quel nombre de personnes cela peut-il représenter?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Nous ne le savons pas avec exactitude.

(1155)

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Est-ce 1 million, 500 000, 200 000?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je pense que c'est plus près de 2 millions.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Cela comprend toutes les personnes qui travaillent à l'étranger, du moment qu'elles pensent revenir au Canada. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Passons maintenant à Mme Kusie. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

C'est déjà terminé? J'avais une autre question. [Traduction]

Le président:

Je suis désolé.[Français]

La parole est à Mme Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.[Traduction]

Ma prochaine question porte sur le registre des jeunes.

À votre avis, mettons-nous en place des mesures de contrôle ou de protection appropriées pour veiller à ce que l'information ne soit pas communiquée à de tierces parties?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Oui. C'est une bonne question. C'est une inquiétude qui a été exprimée à l'égard du registre des préélecteurs.

Cette information restera exclusive à Élections Canada, elle ne sera remise ni aux partis ni aux candidats. Nous garderons cette information pour nous, dans le but d'inscrire ces personnes au registre quand elles auront 18 ans, si elles le souhaitent.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci.

Nous avons aussi quelques inquiétudes à l'égard du contrôle parental pour les jeunes de 14 et 15 ans. Nous nous questionnons sur le fait que les parents doivent donner leur consentement pour que leurs jeunes soient inscrits à la liste. Avez-vous des exemples de registres des futurs électeurs, ici ou dans d'autres pays, qui permettent à des jeunes de si peu que 14 et 15 ans de s'inscrire eux-mêmes? Y a-t-il des problèmes de sécurité qui ont été relevés?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je serai heureux de vous faire parvenir l'information. Je ne crois pas l'avoir avec moi aujourd'hui.

Nous savons qu'il y a des registres des préélecteurs dans certaines provinces. L'âge limite peut varier entre 14 et 16 ans. Il y a des variations. Je pourrai vous faire parvenir de l'information sur ces règles, surtout sur les 14 et 15 ans, et vous dire s'ils doivent obtenir le consentement parental.

Comme vous le savez, le gouvernement a déterminé, dans son projet de loi, que les jeunes de 14 et 15 ans peuvent consentir eux-mêmes à s'inscrire au registre des futurs électeurs. Si c'est une chose que vous souhaitez changer, c'est, bien sûr, votre rôle.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci.

Au printemps, un témoin a mentionné que bien que le projet de loi empêche les entités étrangères de financer des tierces parties à des fins de publicité ou d'activités partisanes, le projet de loi, dans sa forme actuelle, « permettrait à des tierces parties de se soustraire complètement aux obligations de divulgation de la loi si elles choisissent simplement de ne pas s'inscrire au registre pendant une période électorale ».

Vous attendez-vous à ce que cela constitue un problème lors des futures élections canadiennes, si le projet de loi est adopté dans sa forme actuelle?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je crois qu'aucun projet de loi ne pourra empêcher que certaines personnes décident de ne pas s'inscrire ou de s'inscrire sous une fausse identité, même si bien sûr, cela constituerait une infraction. Les coupables peuvent se faire prendre, et il y a toujours la possibilité de mener enquête. Le régime doit présumer d'un certain degré de conformité, après quoi il faut s'en remettre à l'application de la loi. Peut-être que je ne comprends pas bien la question.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Non, vous parlez comme un conservateur, monsieur Perrault. Cela me rappelle notre perception du projet de loi C-71 et de son approche selon laquelle les criminels ne s'inscrivent pas. Veuillez continuer.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est vrai pour n'importe quelle entité. Le Parlement établit l'obligation de déclaration, d'enregistrement et de divulgation, mais si l'entité ne respecte pas ces obligations, elle s'expose à des enquêtes et à des sanctions. C'est ainsi que le système fonctionne. Je ne sais pas si on peut faire autrement.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci.

Le gouvernement pourra-t-il faire appliquer efficacement les règles aux tierces parties qui ne s'inscrivent pas au registre pendant une période électorale? D'après votre témoignage, je comprendrais que oui, mais pas vraiment.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je crois qu'il revient au commissaire de répondre à cette question. Son travail se fonde sur les plaintes, et le moment auquel elles sont déposées est déterminant. Si l'information nous parvient rapidement, l'enquête peut avancer bien plus vite. Je pense que ce projet de loi améliorerait son aptitude à enquêter grâce aux ordonnances de témoignage. C'est là un outil très important.

Il a déjà témoigné de la difficulté de faire appliquer les lois internationales. Ce n'est rien de nouveau, ni rien d'unique aux élections. L'application du droit international est toujours un casse-tête. Cela ne signifie pas que c'est impossible, mais c'est toujours difficile.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je vous poserai une dernière question, principalement par intérêt personnel. Si le projet de loi C-76 était adopté dans sa forme actuelle, croyez-vous que le genre d'activité observé pendant les dernières élections américaines, l'ingérence étrangère, pourrait se produire ici?

(1200)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je dirais que le projet de loi prévoit un certain nombre d'outils pour contrer ce genre de menace. Si un État étranger essayait de s'ingérer dans des élections nationales, il ne semblerait pas très opportun de recourir aux sanctions d'un tribunal provincial. Cependant, ce genre d'infraction fait intervenir le pouvoir d'obtenir des mandats de perquisition ou des ordonnances de production, soit des outils importants pour favoriser l'enquête.

En fin de compte, que la démarche passe par la diplomatie internationale ou une enquête, c'est la façon dont ce genre d'intervention est contrée, et il y a des mesures dans ce projet de loi qui renforcent notre capacité d'enquêter. Je pense que c'est une amélioration importante. C'est la raison pour laquelle j'ai dit d'emblée qu'il importe que ce projet de loi soit adopté avant les prochaines élections.

Le président:

Merci.

Revenons à Mme Lapointe. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

De combien de temps est-ce que je dispose?

Le président:

Vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Merci de me le préciser, monsieur le président.

Mme Kusie a abordé brièvement la façon de sensibiliser les nouveaux électeurs. Vous avez aussi parlé des néo-Canadiens, c'est-à-dire des nouveaux arrivants. J'aimerais savoir en quoi la manière de vous y prendre pour leur expliquer la façon dont ils peuvent exercer leur droit de vote serait différente de votre façon de procéder dans le cas des personnes nouvellement inscrites sur la liste électorale.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Nous sommes en train d'explorer cela. Nous savons que nos collègues des provinces s'intéressent aussi aux nouveaux Canadiens dans le dossier des élections. Nous essayons de mieux coordonner nos méthodes pour les informer. En effet, il y a les niveaux fédéral et provincial, et certains nouveaux arrivants ne s'y retrouvent pas très bien. Il faut d'abord que les provinces et le gouvernement fédéral coordonnent leurs façons d'interagir avec les nouveaux Canadiens.

En outre, nous ciblons des groupes qui interviennent auprès de nouveaux Canadiens. Dans bien des cas, il s'agit de groupes qui les aident à trouver du logement ou qui les aident sur le plan linguistique, donc rien qui ne concerne leur participation aux élections. Ces groupes établissent cependant un lien de confiance avec les nouveaux arrivants. En travaillant avec ces groupes et en leur fournissant des outils pour informer les nouveaux Canadiens, nous sommes en mesure de rejoindre ces derniers plus facilement.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Avez-vous remarqué si les nouveaux Canadiens provenant de certains pays étaient plus réticents à aller voter?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je ne dispose d'aucune analyse me permettant de dire que des ressortissants en particulier ont plus de craintes vis-à-vis de la démocratie. À ma connaissance, notre bureau ne dispose pas d'une telle analyse.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord.

Vous parliez tantôt des jeunes de 14 à 16 ans. Il faut les sensibiliser à la démocratie et s'assurer qu'ils iront voter.

Quand pouvez-vous les sensibiliser et comment vous y prendrez-vous?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Pour ce qui est d'aller voter, ce sera à eux d'en décider. Par contre, il est certainement important de les sensibiliser.

Les jeunes qui sont âgés de 18 à 24 ans au moment où ils votent pour la première fois auront tendance à voter tout au long de leur vie. On parle d'inciter les jeunes à aller voter, mais il s'agit en fait de bâtir l'électorat de demain. On cherche à ce que ces personnes aillent voter tout au long de leur vie, et pas seulement à l'âge de 18 ans. En revanche, ceux qui ne votent pas dès qu'ils sont de jeunes adultes ne seront pas des électeurs à 40 ans ni à 60 ans. Il y a une période critique.

Nous pensons qu'il est trop tard pour commencer à s'intéresser à eux s'ils ont 18 ou 19 ans et que c'est leur première participation à l'élection. Nous pensons qu'il faut travailler avec eux dès la 9e ou la 10e année, lorsqu'ils ont entre 14 et 17 ans. C'est un âge propice. Il est possible de le faire plus tôt, mais il y a un âge critique.

Ce sont des professeurs provenant de partout au pays qui ont élaboré les outils dont nous disposons, de façon à ce qu'ils puissent être inclus dans tous les programmes scolaires des provinces, que ceux-ci comportent ou non des cours d'éducation civique. Ces exercices permettent aux élèves d'explorer eux-mêmes des questions liées à la participation civique et à la démocratie. Nous ne leur disons pas quoi faire ni comment se comporter; nous les amenons à explorer et à réfléchir. Nous pensons que, de cette façon, leur intérêt peut être touché. Il faut savoir que les jeunes ne vont pas se servir de l'information que nous leur fournissons lorsqu'ils ont 18 ans si, à la base, ils ne sont pas intéressés. Il faut donc commencer par les intéresser, pour ensuite les informer, de façon à ce qu'ils soient des électeurs tout au long de leur vie.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Avez-vous vu une différence chez ceux qui avaient été informés sur le processus démocratique ou qui s'étaient engagés à cet égard lorsqu'ils étaient en 9e ou en 10e année, ce qui équivaut à la 4e ou la 5e année du secondaire au Québec? Exerçaient-ils davantage leur droit de vote?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Nous n'avons pas de mesures à ce sujet.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Il faudrait mesurer cela.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Nous sommes en train d'explorer nos mesures. C'est un aspect important. Nous investissons des efforts et de l'énergie, et nous voulons savoir si cela a une incidence. Nous sommes en train de déterminer comment il sera possible de mesurer cette incidence.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Dans un autre ordre d'idées, j'aimerais savoir s'il y a une façon de sensibiliser les Canadiens en général à d'éventuels appels téléphoniques frauduleux ou à des publicités trompeuses sur les médias sociaux. Avez-vous élaboré une méthode pour contrer cela?

(1205)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Oui. Cet enjeu comporte plusieurs facettes. Il est très important pour nous. S'assurer que les Canadiens ne reçoivent pas de fausse information sur le processus électoral est au coeur de notre mandat, qu'il s'agisse de désinformation ou d'information erronée par mégarde. D'abord, nous allons lancer une campagne d'information. Celle-ci va débuter un peu avant l'élection.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Voulez-vous dire avant juin?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Nous allons commencer par l'enregistrement, au printemps. La campagne va évoluer au fur et à mesure que la période électorale va avancer. Nous produisons de l'information de toutes sortes de façons. C'est la première des choses.

Par ailleurs, nous allons faire de la sensibilisation relativement aux médias sociaux et à la désinformation et l'information erronée qu'ils contiennent.

Enfin, nous allons exercer une surveillance de l'environnement. Cela va s'appliquer un peu partout, mais nous disposerons d'outils qui nous permettront de suivre ce qui se dit dans les médias sociaux. Nous voulons ainsi pouvoir déterminer si de fausses informations circulent, particulièrement en ce qui a trait au processus de vote, et intervenir par la suite pour corriger l'information.

Ce sont là les principaux outils que nous prévoyons utiliser.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Très bien, la dernière personne inscrite à la liste, pour ce tour-ci, est M. Cullen, qui dispose de trois minutes.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Pardonnez-moi si vous avez déjà répondu à cette question. Élections Canada a-t-il demandé un avis juridique concernant les restrictions applicables pendant la période préélectorale et les chances qu'elles résistent à une contestation fondée sur la Charte?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ce n'est pas notre rôle, donc nous...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ne seriez-vous pas partie au procès en cas de contestation du genre?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Normalement, notre rôle, dans un litige, consiste à être le plus neutre possible, donc nous serions là pour informer le tribunal et les parties de la façon dont nous administrons les règles. Concernant la constitutionnalité ou non de ces règles, c'est le ministère de la Justice qui a un rôle à jouer. Vous pouvez être en accord ou en désaccord avec moi, mais nous sommes un agent du Parlement. Donc si le Parlement décide d'adopter une règle, ce n'est pas à nous de contester sa décision.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ce n'était pas le sens de ma question. Vous êtes nos spécialistes internes des élections. Il y a des tensions naturelles entre la liberté d'expression et l'équité, comme vous nous l'avez déjà expliqué. Devons-nous autoriser des règles qui accordent davantage la parole aux groupes ou aux personnes les mieux nantis et ainsi prendre une décision qui semblerait injuste pour les électeurs? Permettez-moi de présenter ma question sous un autre angle. Le gouvernement vous a-t-il demandé votre avis sur les limites à établir à l'égard de l'argent, sur la durée de la période préélectorale, etc.?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ce n'est pas le genre d'avis que nous donnons habituellement. Ils ont leurs propres avocats. Je considère ne pas avoir pour rôle de présenter mon point de vue de la perspective de la Charte ou de fournir des conseils ciblés à ce comité ou au Parlement. Quand je crains des problèmes d'équité ou quand je crains que le fardeau réglementaire soit trop lourd — et ce peut être pour des raisons liées à la Charte, bien sûr —, j'ai tendance à les présenter sous cet angle.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Donc le fait que vous n'ayez pas émis de réserves signifie-t-il...

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Quand nous avons discuté des règles sur les tierces parties, j'ai dit que ce n'était pas un régime hermétique, mais jusqu'où peut-on aller? À partir d'un certain seuil, il faut tenir compte de la liberté d'expression. J'ai également souligné que les règles touchant les tierces parties créent un fardeau réglementaire assez lourd, comparativement aux règles imposées aux partis et aux candidats. Je laisse donc au Comité...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je m'excuse, diriez-vous que ce fardeau est plus lourd pour les tierces parties que pour les partis politiques et les candidats?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolument, parce qu'elles doivent faire une déclaration lorsqu'elles s'inscrivent — comme les partis, certes —, mais qu'elles doivent aussi déclarer leurs activités en période préélectorale, en plus de présenter un rapport le 15 septembre en raison des élections à date fixe. Les partis n'ont pas à présenter ce genre de rapport, en tout début de période électorale, et les candidats n'ont pas à le faire non plus.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ainsi, selon ce que vous décrivez, le fardeau imposé aux membres de la société civile assujettis à ce régime sur les tierces parties serait plus lourd que celui imposé aux partis politiques et aux candidats? Est-ce ce que vous dites?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

À certains égards, en effet, mais pas pour tout.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Pour ce qui est de l'argent — parce que nous avons demandé au gouvernement d'où viennent ces chiffres, d'où vient la durée de la période préélectorale —, en connaissez-vous la source? Y a-t-il d'autres démocraties semblables à la nôtre qui imposent le même genre de limites de temps et d'argent?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je ne suis pas au courant des vérifications faites par les conseillers stratégiques du gouvernement. Concernant la durée de la période préélectorale, j'ai déjà dit que je suis content qu'elle soit établie, mais qu'elle soit relativement courte. Je serais plus inquiet, du point de vue de la Charte comme d'un point de vue général, si les dépenses étaient limitées pendant une longue période préélectorale. On risquerait alors de créer une situation dans laquelle le gouvernement pourrait dépenser en publicité, mais pas les partis. En limitant ainsi la période préélectorale essentiellement à l'été précédant les élections à date fixe, les règles du gouvernement sur la publicité commenceront à s'appliquer juste après, et ce sera peut-être corrigé. Il y a donc une forme d'équilibre possible quand la période préélectorale est courte.

(1210)

M. Nathan Cullen:

En gros, une nouvelle loi de la sorte restreindrait le pouvoir des partis de l'opposition, dans ce cas-ci, de diffuser des publicités pendant que le gouvernement a toujours la permission de faire la promotion de certaines politiques. J'essaie de bien comprendre le scénario que vous décrivez.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je dis que la période préélectorale établie dans ce projet de loi est suffisamment courte pour réduire cette préoccupation.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vois. Cela demeure une préoccupation, mais elle est peut-être moindre.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Exactement.

M. Nathan Cullen:

J'aimerais terminer cette série de questions par une réflexion sur la responsabilité des entreprises de médias sociaux. Je veux que nous fassions bien la lumière tant sur les annonces (dans les médias sociaux comme dans les moteurs de recherche) que sur certaines nouvelles, particulièrement en ce qui concerne les moteurs de recherche. Avez-vous des préoccupations à cet égard? Il n'en est pas question du tout dans le projet de loi. Les Canadiens ne reçoivent plus leurs nouvelles de la même façon qu'il y a 30 ans, et les algorithmes intégrés aux moteurs de recherche et aux médias sociaux comportent des biais. Je ne le dis pas de façon négative, mais il s'avère que je vais voir certaines nouvelles que vous ne verrez peut-être pas ou qu'un autre Canadien ne verra peut-être pas.

Croyez-vous qu'il nous faut mieux comprendre comment tout cela fonctionne, et je parle autant de nous, les législateurs, que de vous, qui administrez nos élections?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolument. Cependant, cela va bien au-delà de la question des élections. C'est un problème bien plus vaste que les élections. C'est un problème immense, qui se pose dans d'autres pays aussi, comme la Birmanie, où des choses terribles se passent parce que les médias sociaux sont essentiellement la seule source de nouvelles. Ils comportent des biais, comme vous le dites.

C'est un très grave problème, qui doit être pris au sérieux, mais qui va bien au-delà du mandat électoral.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous avons terminé nos séries de questions régulières. Est-ce que quelqu'un a des questions urgentes à poser avant que nous changions de sujet?

Monsieur Simms, allez-y.

M. Scott Simms:

J'aimerais poursuivre dans la même veine que M. Cullen. Dans le contexte des médias sociaux, je pense que la question est très pertinente, qu'il faut nous demander comment la population reçoit ses nouvelles. Les sources ont changé maintenant, et évidemment... Ce n'est pas tant que les sources ont changé, mais le fait que les nouvelles que vous recevrez ne seront pas les mêmes que celles que je recevrai, comme M. Cullen l'a expliqué. Tout dépend de la consommation de chacun. Tout dépend des recherches antérieures de chacun, entre autres.

On parle, à l'article 61, de la publication de fausses déclarations qui pourraient influencer les résultats d'une élection. De toute évidence, on parle ici de désinformation sur la citoyenneté, le lieu de naissance, l'éducation, les qualifications professionnelles et ce genre de choses. Il s'agit ici de mensonges purs et simples sur une autre personne. Comment cela s'applique-t-il à ce dont M. Cullen nous parlait et aux médias sociaux? Comment surveillerez-vous tout cela à l'ère des médias sociaux?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je pense que la préoccupation de M. Cullen est plus vaste encore.

M. Scott Simms:

Bien sûr. J'essaie d'être plus précis.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Cet article interdit une forme très particulière de désinformation.

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, mais le terrain est très vaste.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il est très vaste. J'invite quiconque s'intéresse à la question à lire le rapport du comité de la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni sur les communications numériques, la culture, les médias et le sport. Le 24 juillet dernier, il a publié son premier rapport provisoire sur la désinformation et les fausses nouvelles. Il présente quelques-uns de ces enjeux et quelques recommandations.

Nous devrons trouver des moyens d'ajouter un peu plus de transparence aux publicités diffusées dans les médias sociaux. De qui viennent-elles?

Nous avons déjà quelques règles. Elles pourront peut-être être améliorées avec le temps. Comme je l'ai dit, c'est un problème complexe, qui va bien au-delà des élections. Les comités font souvent du bon travail, et c'en est un exemple. Je vous invite à vous pencher sur la question.

M. Scott Simms:

Nous nous lançons pratiquement dans une toute autre étude. Quoi qu'il en soit, je veux sentir qu'il y a un certain niveau de confiance que vous pourrez exercer vos pouvoirs afin de prévenir les fausses déclarations pendant une élection, en période préélectorale ou électorale.

(1215)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ma principale responsabilité est de veiller à ce que les Canadiens ne reçoivent pas de fausses informations sur le moment et la façon de s'inscrire à la liste électorale et de voter. C'est l'essentiel de mon mandat.

Il y a ensuite un certain nombre d'infractions sous le régime de la loi ou du projet de loi, notamment en ce qui concerne la création de faux sites Web qui prétendent faire la promotion d'un candidat ou d'un parti. J'ai recommandé qu'Élections Canada figure aussi à la liste. Ce n'est actuellement pas le cas dans le projet de loi. Cela faisait partie de ma liste de recommandations quand j'ai comparu au printemps.

Ce sont là d'autres outils que le commissaire pourra utiliser pour faire appliquer la loi. Je me concentrerai sur l'information concernant la procédure. Il se concentrera sur les risques de désinformation qui pourraient entrer dans l'une des catégories d'interdiction, sous le régime de la loi actuelle ou du projet de loi.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Cullen, on vous écoute.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je veux simplement poser une question rapide à ce sujet. La création d'un faux site Web d'Élections Canada ne constitue-t-elle pas une infraction?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il y a actuellement une infraction de supposition de personne qui a été créée en 2014. Le commissaire a soulevé la préoccupation selon laquelle l'infraction de supposition de personne n'est peut-être pas rédigée d'une manière suffisamment claire pour englober un site Web ou un document frauduleux d'Élections Canada, d'un parti ou d'un candidat. Nous avons formulé une recommandation pour inclure ces éléments.

Dans le rapport de recommandations, nous ne mentionnons que les partis et les candidats, pour une raison qui m'échappe. C'est manifestement une erreur de notre part. Nous n'avons pas inclus Élections Canada. Lorsque j'ai comparu la dernière fois, j'ai suggéré de l'inclure à la liste.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ajoutons votre organisme à la liste.

Vous avez utilisé le terme « transparence », qui constitue le coeur du problème lorsque nous parlons des médias sociaux. Une tierce partie ou moi-même pourrions prendre une publicité dans le Toronto Star dans lequel on dit que Scott Simms est un être humain épouvantable — ce serait de la publicité honnête dans ce cas-ci, alors utilisons un meilleur exemple...

M. Scott Simms:

Vous avez lu ma page Facebook.

M. Nathan Cullen:

M. Bittle est un être horrible qui a menti sur sa déclaration de revenus.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Comment l'avez-vous su?

M. Nathan Cullen:

Eh bien, nous le savons maintenant.

S'agit-il d'une infraction en vertu des règles actuelles?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

En vertu des règles actuelles, il y a une disposition rétrograde sur la publication de faux renseignements à propos du caractère d'une personne, mais on doit également prouver que c'est aussi dans le but d'altérer les résultats des élections, ce qui est toujours un...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Exact, « et ne votez pas pour lui en octobre »...

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Oui, et ce n'est souvent pas là.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ils ne tirent pas sur ce fil-piège particulier; ils ne font que dire des choses atroces et mensongères à propos d'une personne ou d'un parti pendant une campagne électorale ou en période préélectorale? Devez-vous vous adresser aux tribunaux civils?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Eh bien, vous êtes dans un secteur d'activité difficile.

La réglementation de la vérité sur Internet — et vous avez mentionné la charte plus tôt — est extrêmement difficile.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je comprends. J'imagine des scénarios, et je veux voir s'il y a une distinction dans les règles existantes pour les médias soi-disant traditionnels par opposition aux médias sociaux.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Sur ce point, il n'y a aucune distinction, et il ne devrait pas y en avoir, pour ce qui est du contenu.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Des représentants de Twitter ont comparu devant nous. Ils ont dit que certaines de leurs publicités sont achetées de façon anonyme et qu'ils ne s'intéressent pas à en retracer les auteurs.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Mais il ne s'agit pas du contenu. Cela me préoccupe, et je pense qu'il devrait y avoir un certain niveau de transparence dans l'achat de publicités. Dans le cas d'une publicité réglementée, il devrait y avoir un titre d'appel.

M. Nathan Cullen:

À titre de précision, c'est tant pour les médias soi-disant traditionnels, où il y a un titre d'appel, que pour les médias sociaux, où il n'y en a parfois pas.

M. Stéphane Perrault: C'est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen: Pensez-vous que ce devrait être pour les deux, de façon globale?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Eh bien, il y a actuellement une exigence. Il importe peu...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce même pour les médias sociaux?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est même pour les médias sociaux. La distinction sur les médias sociaux, c'est qu'il y a du contenu vivant par opposition à de la publicité. Si vous avez votre propre page Facebook et que vous écrivez des choses au sujet de votre adversaire sur votre page, ce n'est pas de la publicité; c'est seulement votre...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Qu'en est-il si je paie pour relancer cette page, pour relancer cette recherche? Voyez-vous où est la zone grise...?

M. Stéphane Perrault: Oui.

M. Nathan Cullen: Ce ne sera certainement pas un site Web d'un parti officiel qui s'en prend à une autre personne, mais il serait difficile de croire qu'un intervenant à l'interne ou à l'externe puisse s'attaquer à un gouvernement ou à une personne en utilisant un prête-nom ou en payant Facebook ou Twitter pour le faire afin que la publicité s'affiche sur notre fil d'actualité à répétition.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est exact. S'ils ne vont pas à l'encontre des interdictions précises prévues dans la loi, et ce n'est pas de la publicité à proprement parler...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous ne pouvons pas inclure cet élément, même si l'incidence est la même qu'avec la publicité.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolument.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Devrions-nous le faire?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je pense que c'est là où nous avons abordé les points difficiles pour ce qui est d'établir l'équilibre pour déterminer la mesure dans laquelle nous réglementons les gens qui affichent leurs opinions personnelles sur Internet.

(1220)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je comprends cela, mais ce n'est pas une personne qui affiche ses opinions personnelles. Ce sont des efforts concertés qui ont été déployés en Russie et ailleurs, et j'ai l'impression que nous avançons à tâtons en quelque sorte dans ce dossier. Il y a eu récemment des exemples concrets de démocraties partenaires où une attaque coordonnée non payée a ciblé certains candidats ou partis.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Permettez-moi d'apporter une nuance à ce que je viens de dire. Le projet de loi dont le Parlement est saisi n'inclut pas de règles pour les activités partisanes de campagne qui vont au-delà de la publicité, alors les activités partisanes seraient réglementées, mais cela ne veut pas dire que le contenu est interdit.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il serait réglementé.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Il serait réglementé dans le cadre des limites de dépenses. C'est en partie la façon dont c'est financé. Où l'argent est-il investi pour payer pour cela? Ce ne peut pas être financé par des fonds étrangers. Le cas échéant, c'est une infraction, et le commissaire peut faire enquête.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est s'il y a partisanerie et qu'un parti politique est visé en particulier.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est si le contenu fait la promotion d'un parti ou s'y oppose, oui.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je ne suis pas en train de dire que c'est une situation facile, banale ou anodine, mais la menace a été décelée par nos propres organismes d'espionnage, et nous examinons le projet de loi C-76 pour déterminer comment nous controns la menace. Cela est au coeur de notre démocratie et influence les électeurs. Je ne dis pas que c'est facile. Si c'était le cas, nous l'aurions déjà fait. Nous n'avons pas réussi à nous mettre au diapason de la sophistication de ceux qui cherchent à influencer nos électeurs et, dans certains cas, à les corrompre.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je pense que c'est un défi auquel toutes les démocraties font face. Nous suivons certainement les discussions dans le monde — eu Europe, aux États-Unis et au Royaume-Uni avec le Brexit. Personne n'a une solution miracle, alors il y a une gamme de mesures.

L'un des sujets de préoccupation au Royaume-Uni est le financement étranger de tierces parties. L'une des recommandations consiste à créer un plafond de cotisation, simplement parce qu'il est plus difficile pour une entité étrangère de distribuer de l'argent en petites quantités et de ne pas se faire attraper, plutôt que de verser une somme importante.

Eh bien, nous avons déjà cette situation au Canada. Des titres d'appel sont recommandés, mais on en a déjà au Canada. Nous avons déjà un certain nombre de mesures que d'autres pays sont en train d'examiner — ce qui ne signifie pas que nous avons toutes les réponses. Cela signifie que nous avons du mal à trouver le juste équilibre et à étudier la question. Je pense que le projet de loi renferme un certain nombre de mesures.

De notre côté, nous collaborons et coordonnons nos travaux avec les organismes de sécurité, nos partenaires en matière de sécurité au Canada: le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, le SCRS, les services de sécurité du BCP et la GRC. Cet automne, nous effectuons des exercices pour examiner divers scénarios — en tenant compte du cadre juridique actuel, bien entendu.

C'est un défi qui touche l'ensemble de la société cependant. Ce n'est pas un problème qu'une entité — que ce soit Élections Canada, le CST ou le SCRS — peut régler. J'ai l'impression que nous serons aux prises avec ce problème pendant un certain temps.

Le président:

M. Reid est le dernier intervenant.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci.

J'ai bien aimé le dernier échange. Je suis toujours ravi de voir l'optimisme naïf de mon collègue du Nord de la Colombie-Britannique, qui a exprimé le voeu pieu que le directeur général des élections sera en mesure de régler les problèmes associés aux faussetés qui sont affichées sur Internet. Lorsqu'il aura réglé le problème, je lui serais reconnaissant de transmettre le message aux mannequins ukrainiennes que je ne suis pas intéressé à les fréquenter et qu'elles peuvent maintenant cesser de m'envoyer des renseignements sur la façon de les contacter.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid: Je n'aurais probablement pas dû communiquer cette information.

À un comité précédent auquel M. Cullen et moi-même avons siégé, le Comité sur la réforme électorale, nous avons entendu des témoignages fascinants. M. Cullen se souviendra de ce que je m'apprête à vous dire. Nous étions à Vancouver à l'époque et nous entendions le témoignage d'une experte américaine sur la façon dont il est possible de s'ingérer dans des élections. Son nom m'échappe, mais elle a signalé que lorsqu'un intervenant étranger doté d'un bon financement s'immisce dans les élections — ce pourrait être le gouvernement russe, le gouvernement chinois ou peut-être un acteur non étatique qui est disposé à faire fi de nos lois —, ce n'est pas dans le but d'élire un candidat X ou Y; c'est dans le but de semer de la confusion entourant la capacité du candidat élu d'avoir l'autorité légitime de gouverner.

C'était un argument pour s'opposer au vote électronique. S'il n'est plus tout à fait clair que c'est le candidat X ou le candidat Y qui a bel et bien remporté les élections, s'il n'est plus tout à fait clair que cette personne a un mandat clair, alors ces gens ont accompli leur mission. C'était l'un des élément qui nous a amenés à ne pas adopter le scrutin électronique, ce qui, comme vous l'avez mentionné, n'est pas la même chose que le comptage des votes que vous proposez de faire.

Je regarde votre mandat, et je ne crois pas qu'il vise à essayer de régler le problème des fausses nouvelles sur Internet. Je ne sais pas si quelqu'un peut le faire. Sur le plan culturel, je pense que nous devons peut-être apprendre à vérifier les faits par nous-mêmes, comme si nous nous engagions dans un processus d'apprentissage culturel. Il me semble que le véritable danger, d'après vous, c'est qu'une personne prétend illégalement être un agent d'Élections Canada et avise les gens de se rendre aux mauvais bureaux de scrutin ou leur dit que les heures du scrutin ont changé. Je peux imaginer un certain nombre d'autres situations où les vraies informations que vous tentez de communiquer sont remplacées par de faux renseignements, ou encore, une situation où une personne tente d'empêcher les vraies informations dont vous avez le mandat de fournir — la façon de voter, le lieu du scrutin, l'horaire du scrutin et la façon dont on peut accéder au bureau de vote si vous êtes une personne handicapée, etc.

Je voulais simplement savoir si vous estimez qu'il reste encore beaucoup à faire ou si vous croyez avoir tous les outils nécessaires pour vous assurer que ces dangers sont réduits au minimum pour le moment, pas complètement, mais dans la mesure du possible.

(1225)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Si vous me le permettez, j'ai deux points à soulever à ce sujet. La vérification des faits est un élément très important. J'ai les outils qu'il faut. J'ai dit notamment que nous créerons une base de données en ligne de toutes nos communications, pour que les gens — y compris les médias et les partis — puissent vérifier s'ils ne sont pas certains que des renseignements proviennent d'Élections Canada. Ce sera sur notre site Web. Vous avez parlé de la vérification des faits. Nous devons être la source faisant autorité, et toutes nos communications seront transparentes. J'ai invité les partis à faire de même, car si une personne véhicule un message au nom d'un candidat, et que ce n'est pas vous, vous voudrez sans doute vous rendre sur votre site Web et indiquer, « Voici mes communications ». À ce chapitre, je pense avoir les outils.

Je pense que le point que vous avez mentionné à propos de l'ingérence étrangère est très important, et c'est dans le rapport du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications. L'ingérence étrangère ne vise pas forcément à altérer les résultats. Ces malfaiteurs cherchent à semer le doute concernant les résultats ou l'intégrité et à montrer qu'ils peuvent jouer avec l'intégrité du processus, sans nécessairement changer quoi que ce soit.

C'est ce qui me préoccupe avec le projet de loi dans sa forme actuelle, et j'ai formulé une recommandation en ce sens. Le projet de loi renferme une disposition importante qui mentionne une nouvelle infraction, à savoir l'interférence informatique dans les systèmes qui sont utilisés dans la tenue d'élections. Il faut toutefois démontrer qu'il y a une intention d'influer sur les résultats des élections, et ce n'est peut-être aucunement le but visé. Je pense que cette disposition n'est pas adéquate. Il faut l'élargir. Il n'y a aucune excuse légitime.

M. Scott Reid:

Si c'est pour saboter ou altérer le résultat des élections ou pour déligitimiser le résultat, est-ce votre préoccupation?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Lorsque j'ai comparu la dernière fois, j'ai formulé une recommandation. J'estime qu'il n'y a aucune excuse légitime pour s'introduire dans un système informatique dans le cadre de la tenue d'élections, et la Couronne devrait terminer son plaidoyer en invoquant cet argument. Il n'y a aucune raison valable d'interférer avec un ordinateur, à moins d'être le responsable de l'entretien et d'avoir une excuse légitime pour entrer dans le système. Si vous n'êtes pas censé avoir accès au système informatique, cet argument devrait suffire pour démontrer qu'une infraction a été commise.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup d'être venus. Il nous a été très utile de poser plus de questions.

Nous allons suspendre la séance quelques minutes pendant que nous accueillons les prochains témoins, puis nous terminerons nos travaux.



(1235)

Le président:

Bon après-midi. Bon retour à la 118e réunion du Comité.

Pour la gouverne des membres, je vous signale que la séance est publique.

Vous vous souviendrez qu'à la dernière réunion, nous avons décidé d'entreprendre l'étude article par article du projet de loi C-76. Je vais céder la parole aux membres.

Ruby, on vous écoute.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

On ne nous rend pas justice en disant que c'est la 118e réunion. Quelques-unes de nos réunions ont malheureusement été prolongées.

J'aimerais tout d'abord proposer une motion pour faire avancer la mesure législative sur laquelle nous venons d'entendre le témoignage du directeur général des élections, le projet de loi C-76 et, s'il y a lieu, pour proposer et approuver des amendements.

La motion que je propose est la suivante: Que le Comité entreprenne l'étude article par article du projet de loi C-76 le mardi 2 octobre 2018 à 11 heures; Que le président soit autorisé à tenir des réunions en dehors des heures normales pour permettre l'étude article par article; Que le président puisse limiter le débat sur chaque article à un maximum de cinq minutes par parti, par article; et Que, dans l'éventualité où le Comité n'aurait pas terminé l'étude article par article du projet de loi avant 13 heures le mardi 16 octobre 2018, les amendements qui lui ont été soumis et qui restent soient réputés proposés, que le président mette aux voix immédiatement et successivement, sans plus ample débat, les articles et amendements qui restent, ainsi que toute question nécessaire pour disposer de l'étude article par article du projet de loi, et toute question nécessaire pour faire rapport du projet de loi à la Chambre et ordonner au président de faire rapport du projet de loi à la Chambre le plus tôt possible.

Je veux aussi fournir un peu de contexte et expliquer comment nous en sommes arrivés là.

Dans le cadre de la discussion que nous avons eue avec le PDG aujourd'hui, les conservateurs ont signalé que peu importe la mesure législative qui est proposée, lorsque nos élections sont touchées, nous devrions avoir l'appui de tous les partis. J'aimerais souligner qu'Elizabeth May était des nôtres aujourd'hui. Elle a dit aux fins du compte rendu qu'elle appuie le projet de loi C-76. Nous savons que le NPD appuie le projet de loi C-76. Bien entendu, les libéraux au Comité appuient sans réserve le projet de loi.

Le directeur général des élections est venu ici à trois reprises avant aujourd'hui pour discuter du projet de loi à l'étude, ainsi que du rapport du directeur général des élections auquel nous avons consacré de nombreuses heures. Je crois qu'il a comparu ici 30 ou 40 fois pour discuter des recommandations. Il était ici chaque jour, dans son rôle de directeur général des élections par intérim, pour nous guider dans l'examen de toutes les recommandations qui ont été formulées.

Je veux également vous expliquer brièvement comment nous en sommes arrivés là.

Le 23 mai, le projet de loi C-76 a fait l'objet d'une deuxième lecture à la Chambre et a été renvoyé au Comité, si bien que nous avons été saisis du projet de loi le 23 mai dernier. Au 17 septembre, le Comité avait tenu sept réunions et entendu 56 témoins dans le cadre de l'étude du projet de loi. Tous les partis ont présenté des centaines de noms de témoins, dont bon nombre ont refusé de comparaître. La liste était très exhaustive — essentiellement tous ceux ayant une opinion, même des candidats qui se sont présentés aux diverses élections, étaient invités à témoigner devant le Comité. Par conséquent, nous avons entendu de nombreux témoignages, et bien entendu, la personne la mieux informée sur le sujet, le directeur général des élections, a comparu à plusieurs reprises.

J'aimerais également souligner que la soi-disant Loi sur l'intégrité des élections du gouvernement Harper a fait en sorte qu'il soit plus difficile pour les Canadiens de voter et plus facile pour les malfaiteurs de se soustraire à nos lois électorales. Le Globe and Mail a même dit, « Ce projet de loi mérite d'être rejeté ». Le directeur général des élections a même été cité...

(1240)

M. Scott Reid:

Je présume que vous faites référence non pas à ce projet de loi-ci, mais plutôt à celui adopté à ce moment-là.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je parle du projet de loi C-23, la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. Je ne voulais pas que les gens puissent croire que vous parliez d'autre chose que ce dont vous souhaitiez traiter.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci. Je vous en suis reconnaissante.

Le projet de loi C-76 apporte de nombreuses modifications aux mesures prévues dans le projet de loi C-23 qui a été adopté en 2014. Je vais vous donner un aperçu des éléments au sujet desquels nous ne sommes pas nécessairement d'accord.

Au moment de l'adoption du projet de loi C-23, le directeur général des élections de l'époque avait déclaré qu'il lui était impossible d'appuyer un projet de loi qui priverait des électeurs de leur droit de vote. Ses nombreuses recommandations ont ensuite incité le gouvernement à améliorer et moderniser sa loi électorale de telle sorte qu'un plus grand nombre d'électeurs puissent exercer leur droit.

De nombreux facteurs nous ont donc amenés à proposer cette nouvelle loi, le tout, en collaboration constante avec le directeur général des élections. Bon nombre des recommandations découlant de l'expérience des élections de 2015 ont été intégrées à ce projet de loi.

Pour abroger certaines mesures législatives et en améliorer d'autres afin de moderniser notre processus électoral, il a fallu proposer le projet de loi C-76. Je sais que le NPD est tout à fait déterminé, tout comme nous le sommes, à progresser vers l'adoption de cette mesure législative, mais nous nous heurtons à de nombreux obstacles. Il est possible que certains membres du Comité ne souhaitent pas voir ceux qui ont été privés de leur droit de vote par le projet de loi précédent, le C-23, le retrouver grâce à celui-ci.

Quoi qu'il en soit, il y a un constat que je me dois de faire. Bien que nous puissions compter sur une démocratie en santé, parmi les plus stables de la planète, nous avons pu constater, à la faveur des recommandations qui nous ont été adressées, que bien des choses peuvent être améliorées. Une grande partie des dommages ont été causés par le projet de loi C-23, la prétendue Loi sur l'intégrité des élections, et il faut apporter les correctifs nécessaires.

Après les élections de 2015, le directeur général des élections a formulé quelque 130 recommandations quant aux moyens à prendre pour améliorer le fonctionnement de notre démocratie. Nous avons étudié avec soin ces recommandations dans le cadre des travaux de ce comité parlementaire et des deux chambres. Plusieurs experts canadiens nous ont, en outre, fait part de leurs observations. C'est à l'issue de tout ce processus que le gouvernement a pu proposer le projet de loi C-76, la Loi sur la modernisation des élections.

Comme le directeur général des élections vient de nous le dire, cette loi est vraiment nécessaire. Il est en outre essentiel que l'on puisse amorcer sa mise en oeuvre dès le mois d'octobre.

Bien que certaines personnes ici présentes puissent croire que ma motion va à l'encontre de la démocratie, je dirais que c'est tout à fait le contraire. Il est primordial de moderniser notre loi électorale en abrogeant certaines des dispositions qui empêchent les gens d'exercer leur droit de vote et de participer ainsi pleinement à notre démocratie. Nous devons agir aussi rapidement que possible de telle sorte que les nouvelles mesures puissent entrer en vigueur à temps pour les prochaines élections. Comme le disait Nathan, plus nous y mettons de temps, plus nous risquons d'en sortir perdants, et il en ira de même pour tous les Canadiens.

Le projet de loi C-76 fera en sorte que les Canadiens pourront voter plus facilement et que l'administration et la protection de notre processus électoral deviendront plus faciles. On mettra en outre les Canadiens à l'abri des organisations et des individus qui s'efforcent d'influencer indûment leur vote. Malgré tout, comme Nathan le soulignait, il y a des forces qui s'exercent au-delà du champ d'application de cette loi et qui nécessiteront une étude plus approfondie. Je proposerais donc que nous procédions éventuellement à une étude de la sorte en nous assurant le concours de tous les intervenants requis pour rendre notre processus démocratique encore plus sûr. Reste quand même que ce projet de loi est un excellent point de départ pour apporter les améliorations jugées nécessaires par le directeur général des élections.

Il y a un parti qui s'emploie à faire de l'obstruction systématique. Voilà plusieurs mois déjà que nous pouvons observer ce phénomène. On veut empêcher le dossier de progresser. Le gouvernement a reçu des citoyens le mandat d'adopter une nouvelle loi et, sans vouloir affirmer, d'aucune manière que le processus d'examen en comité n'a pas son importance, je vous dirais que ce n'est pas la première fois que nous sommes témoins de manoeuvres semblables. Ce fut le cas notamment lors de l'étude du projet de loi C-23.

(1245)



J'aimerais rafraîchir la mémoire de certains de mes collègues. Je pense notamment à Scott Reid qui est des nôtres aujourd'hui ainsi qu'à Blake Richards qui siégeait avant l'ajournement d'été. Ils étaient tous deux membres de ce comité lors de l'adoption du projet de loi C-23. À l'époque — je crois que c'était le printemps 2014 — une motion très semblable a été proposée pour permettre l'adoption du projet de loi C-23 en comité. On prévoyait une date de début et une date de fin pour l'étude article par article.

Si vous me le permettez, je vais vous lire un extrait des délibérations du Comité à l'époque. C'est le député Tom Lukiwski qui a alors proposé la motion suivante: Que, relativement à son ordre de renvoi de la Chambre concernant le projet de loi C-23, Loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada et d'autres lois et modifiant certaines lois en conséquence, le Comité entreprenne une étude du projet de loi comportant ce qui suit: Que le Comité, comme il en a l'habitude, entende des témoins sur lesquels le Comité arrêtera son choix ultérieurement; Que le Comité ne procède à l'étude article par article qu'une fois la comparution des témoins terminée, et que l'étude article par article ne se prolonge pas au-delà du jeudi 1er mai 2014 et, s'il y a lieu, qu'à 17 heures ce jour-là, le reste des amendements soient réputés être proposés et que le président mette aux voix sur-le-champ et successivement, sans autre débat, le reste des articles et amendements soumis au Comité ainsi que toute question nécessaire pour (i) disposer de l'étude article par article du projet de loi; (ii) faire rapport du projet de loi à la Chambre et (iii) demander au président de faire rapport du projet de loi à la Chambre le plus tôt possible.

Voilà qui est intéressant. À l'époque, tous les membres conservateurs du Comité, y compris Scott Reid et Blake Richards, ont voté en faveur de cette motion. Voici maintenant que j'ai pu entendre au cours des dernières séances certains exprimer leur indignation en affirmant qu'il était impossible d'imposer de quelque manière que ce soit une date de début ou une date butoir, que cela n'était pas équitable et qu'il fallait accorder davantage de temps au Comité.

Je dirais que ce comité a déjà eu amplement de temps. Nous avons adopté bon nombre des recommandations du directeur général des élections, et nous y avons consacré plusieurs séances, sans compter les 53 témoins que nous avons entendus depuis que le Comité a été saisi de ce projet de loi. Nous en avons déjà fait un examen approfondi, si bien que j'estime qu'il est grand temps que ce projet de loi soit adopté de telle sorte que les Canadiens aient pleinement accès à leur droit de vote. Nous devons veiller à faire en sorte que les amendements jugés importants puissent être proposés, et les conservateurs n'ont certes pas manqué de le faire. Ils sont à l'origine de centaines d'amendements. Nous aimerions pouvoir amorcer l'analyse de ces amendements et l'étude article par article.

Je vous rappelle que ma motion propose que l'on commence l'étude article par article le 2 octobre. J'aimerais rappeler également aux conservateurs que nous nous étions engagés lors de la séance de jeudi dernier à débuter cette étude encore plus tôt que cela, soit le 27 septembre. Nous nous montrons donc encore plus souples en proposant que l'on commence le 2 octobre pour que tout soit terminé au plus tard le 16 octobre.

En cédant la parole au prochain intervenant, j'espère bien que nous n'aurons pas droit aux mêmes propos indignés que l'on nous a servis la dernière fois, car je rappelle aux membres conservateurs de ce comité que c'est une façon de faire qu'ils connaissent très bien, car ils ont agi exactement de la même manière pour l'adoption de la prétendue Loi sur l'intégrité des élections.

Le président:

Vous avez terminé?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui. Merci.

Le président:

Merci, madame Sahota.

Nous passons à M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Je n'ai rien à ajouter, merci. Je pense que l'on a fait pas mal le tour du sujet.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, à vous la parole.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai l'impression que c'est peut-être l'intervention la plus brève de la carrière de M. Simms jusqu'à maintenant.

(1250)

M. Scott Simms:

La plus brève depuis mes procédures de divorce...

M. John Nater:

Oui, je crois d'ailleurs que vous en avez discuté lors de notre dernière séance avec M. Christopherson.

Je veux remercier Mme Sahota d'avoir présenté cette motion et de nous en avoir exposé les détails. Il est bien que chacun mette ainsi cartes sur table de manière à ce que tous puissent intervenir en sachant à quoi s'en tenir exactement.

Je demanderais à ce que la version écrite de cette motion puisse être distribuée aussi rapidement que possible afin que nous puissions prendre connaissance de son libellé. J'en ai toutefois bien saisi l'essentiel et je sais tout à fait où l'on veut en venir.

J'aimerais tout d'abord apporter une précision intéressante. Lorsque notre comité a été saisi du projet de loi C-23, la date où l'on devait faire rapport du projet de loi à la Chambre a été fixée par l'opposition loyale de Sa Majesté à l'époque. Les points de vue de l'opposition ont donc été pris en compte pour déterminer la date de mise aux voix. Le moment venu, peut-être pourrions-nous essayer de nous entendre à ce sujet également cette fois-ci.

Je veux aussi souligner que nous sommes tout à fait conscients des discussions qui sont en cours par ailleurs. Je sais notamment que Mmes Kusie et Jordan ont eu des échanges fort intéressants et qu'il y a eu aussi des conversations avec le cabinet de la ministre. J'y vois un pas dans la bonne direction. Si je ne m'abuse, nous entendrons le témoignage de la ministre jeudi à 15 h 30, et j'ai grand-hâte de voir quelles mesures elle envisage dans ce contexte.

J'aimerais toutefois revenir à un débat que j'ai engagé au cours de nos dernières séances concernant les témoins, et tout particulièrement le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario. En juin dernier, nous l'avions convoqué quelques jours à peine après les élections dans sa province, soit en plein coeur de la période de recomptage des suffrages et de retour des brefs électoraux. Il est bien certain que ce n'était pas le meilleur moment pour qu'il puisse se rendre disponible.

Notre comité ne peut pas obliger le directeur général des élections à témoigner. C'est un agent de l'Assemblée législative de l'Ontario, et nous ne pouvons pas forcer un agent d'un parlement ou d'une assemblée législative à témoigner devant nous. De toute évidence, nous ne pouvons pas rendre obligatoire la comparution de M. Essensa.

On peut toujours vérifier, mais, selon moi, nous ne pouvons pas le forcer à comparaître. Je ne crois toutefois pas qu'il s'agisse de mauvaise volonté de sa part. Je pense plutôt que c'est attribuable à un horaire trop chargé. J'aimerais tout de même que nous puissions l'entendre avant d'amorcer l'étude article par article. J'espère qu'il pourra comparaître lors de notre séance régulière de jeudi. Je pense que c'est ce que notre greffier espère pouvoir obtenir. J'ai bon espoir que cela puisse se concrétiser. Comme les changements apportés en Ontario visaient une partie des difficultés et des enjeux dont nous discutons ici, il serait bon que l'on puisse nous parler des bons résultats obtenus et des obstacles auxquels nous pourrions nous heurter avec ce projet de loi.

Je ne vais pas exprimer mon indignation — contrairement à ce que craignait Mme Sahota — mais je vais tout de même souligner quelques préoccupations qui ne m'apparaissent toutefois pas insurmontables. Je pense que notre comité a toujours fait du bon travail. Étant donné que la motion indique « Que le président puisse limiter », et non « Que le président limite », je crois qu'il y a une certaine latitude possible.

Je n'étais pas membre du Comité à l'époque, mais il y a eu certaines manoeuvres il y a un an et demi... Je ne veux pas parler d'obstruction systématique. Disons plutôt que c'était simplement une discussion particulièrement approfondie. Je crois que c'était au printemps 2017.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il y en a eu quelques-unes.

M. John Nater:

Je veux souligner que nous avons mis en application le protocole Simms, grâce au député de Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame... ou simplement de Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador. J'aime bien ces longs titres élégants. Perth—Wellington c'est bien aussi et c'est très court. Je ne risque pas de l'oublier.

J'apprécie que l'on se montre ainsi conciliant et j'ose espérer que l'on offrira une telle latitude en permettant les échanges nécessaires. On propose de limiter arbitrairement le débat à un maximum de cinq minutes pour chaque article, et je souhaite bien qu'il sera possible d'en discuter. En effet, nous devrions parvenir à nous entendre suffisamment bien entre nous pour que certains articles puissent être adoptés ou rejetés assez rapidement. Dans certains cas, ce sera une affaire de 30 secondes à peine. Je crois par ailleurs que d'autres articles exigeront un débat un peu plus approfondi. Nous ne nous entendons peut-être pas au sujet de la conclusion, mais j'espère bien que nous pourrons convenir d'aller de l'avant en permettant à ce que certains désaccords puissent être exprimés.

J'ai très bien compris la perspective exprimée par le directeur général des élections ce matin. De concert avec son organisation, il a accompli un travail exceptionnel depuis les dernières élections, et même auparavant, pour dire les choses bien franchement. Il nous disait que son organisation était toujours prête à tenir une élection en fonction des règles en vigueur lors des élections précédentes et en s'appuyant sur la tenue d'élections partielles. Je prévois que des élections partielles auront lieu cet automne. Je ne crois pas que l'on attendra la nouvelle année pour ce faire.

Je trouve cela décevant, mais je peux comprendre sa décision concernant les registres de scrutin électroniques. Il aurait été bien que l'on puisse commencer à utiliser ces registres. Il est tout à fait compréhensible que l'on ne souhaite pas voir Élections Canada mettre à l'essai des outils semblables en plein coeur d'une campagne. Je le comprends parfaitement, mais nous ne devons pas perdre de vue, en dehors du contexte de ce projet de loi, ces moyens à notre disposition, comme les registres de scrutin électroniques, pour faciliter grandement le processus électoral.

Nous avons abordé brièvement la question du projet de loi C-23. J'ai ici une citation que je trouve fort intéressante concernant ce projet de loi: Lorsque les comités sont soumis à des échéances rigides qui font qu'à 17 heures, par exemple, toutes les questions sont mises aux voix, quoi qu'il advienne, la démocratie est mal servie. Il n'est pas démocratique de refuser aux membres d'un comité la possibilité de débattre des amendements, de poser des questions et d'obtenir des réponses.

Est-ce que quelqu'un sait qui a dit cela? C'est Kevin Lamoureux. J'ai toujours apprécié la grande sagesse et les conseils judicieux de Kevin.

(1255)

M. Scott Simms:

Nous aussi. Il est d'ailleurs membre du Comité.

M. John Nater:

Il est effectivement membre sans droit de vote du Comité. Depuis que j'en fais partie, je ne l'ai jamais vu, mais je sais qu'il a une lourde charge de travail à la Chambre elle-même...

M. Nathan Cullen:

... pour préserver le statu quo.

M. John Nater:

Je sais qu'il accomplit un travail de titan à la Chambre elle-même.

M. Scott Reid:

Le travail de plusieurs titans...

M. John Nater:

Le travail de plusieurs titans en effet, mais j'apprécie toujours que des gens acceptent de s'acquitter de ces tâches-là.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Il est bien certain que nous apprécions Kevin à sa juste valeur.

M. John Nater:

Je suis reconnaissant aux gens qui s'occupent de ces choses-là, car c'est un lourd fardeau.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est le député qui s'y connaît le mieux.

M. John Nater:

Pour revenir à la question qui nous préoccupe, il est possible que nous ne soyons pas nécessairement d'accord au sujet des différents articles, mais je crois que ce comité a toujours fait du bon travail. Je propose un amendement concernant tout particulièrement le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario. Comme je n'ai toujours pas le libellé exact de la motion, j'espère bien que nous pourrons nous entendre à ce sujet avec nos collègues du parti gouvernemental.

Je propose: Que la motion soit modifiée a) par adjonction après les mots « Que le comité » de ce qui suit: « n'entreprenne pas »; et b) par substitution à tous les mots après les mots « du projet de loi C-76 » des mots « avant que le comité ait entendu le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario ».

J'espère encore une fois que cela témoigne bien de notre volonté d'aller de l'avant avec l'étude article par article et de conjuguer nos efforts à ceux des autres membres du Comité. Je tiens toutefois à ce que le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario puisse venir discuter de ces enjeux avec nous. Si cela pouvait être chose possible jeudi matin, on pourrait dire mission accomplie. Nous recevrions ensuite la ministre dans l'après-midi, et je crois que la date proposée était le 2 ou le 4 octobre.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'était le 2 octobre.

M. John Nater:

Ce serait le 2 octobre, mardi prochain, que nous amorcerions l'étude article par article, soit avant l'Action de Grâce.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Êtes-vous d'accord avec le reste de la motion?

M. John Nater:

Cela reste à discuter.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oh!

M. John Nater:

Je pense que nous ne devons pas négliger de tenir compte du fait qu'il y a des gens qui discutent de ces questions à des niveaux qui ne sont pas représentés ici. C'est un autre élément à prendre en considération.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'aimerais juste répondre brièvement.

Nous avons invité le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario à combien de reprises déjà? Je pense que c'est trois ou quatre fois. Il figurait d'ailleurs sur notre liste initiale de témoins.

Le président:

C'est quatre fois.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est à quatre reprises que cette personne n'a pas pu se rendre disponible. Je ne vois pas ce que sa comparution pourrait nécessairement nous apprendre de plus que ce que nous pourrions découvrir par d'autres moyens.

En outre, il n'est guère rassurant de vous voir exprimer cette exigence sans être disposé à accepter le reste de la motion pour que nous puissions entreprendre l'étude article par article à une date précise. Je serais nettement plus à l'aise si vous formuliez cette requête après avoir indiqué être d'accord avec ce que prévoit le reste de la motion. Comme il ne semble pas que ce soit le cas, je ne vois pas pour quelle raison nous appuierions un tel amendement à ce moment-ci.

(1300)

M. John Nater:

Merci pour cette réponse, madame Sahota.

Il y a une chose qui m'inquiète... J'en ai parlé avant la pause estivale ainsi que lors de notre dernière séance. Je crois que nous avons là un exemple parfait pour guider notre étude. Une campagne électorale a été tenue en Ontario, la province la plus peuplée au Canada, après que l'on y ait apporté des changements semblables, ou tout au moins apparentés, à ceux proposés dans ce projet de loi.

Je juge prioritaire que nous puissions entendre le témoignage du directeur général des élections de l'Ontario, ou peut-être de ses plus proches collaborateurs, s'il ne lui est pas possible de comparaître.

Monsieur le président, je constate qu'il est 13 h 01. Je ne sais pas si vous voulez que je poursuive ou si c'est la volonté du Comité que nous interrompions nos travaux jusqu'à jeudi matin. J'ignore ce que le Comité souhaite faire. Je vous laisse tirer les choses au clair, monsieur le président.

Le président:

J'ai une question pour vous. Votre amendement ne précise aucune limite de temps de telle sorte que si la personne en question n'est pas disponible au cours des trois prochaines années, on ne pourra jamais aller de l'avant avec le projet de loi. Comptez-vous proposer une telle limite?

M. John Nater:

Je suis prêt à entendre une proposition d'amendement à ce sujet. Je ne sais pas comment il est préférable de procéder. Je n'ai pas l'impression que... Je m'en remets un peu à notre greffier et au personnel. S'il répond carrément, qu'il ne va pas comparaître, alors nous devrons voir ce qu'il convient de faire, mais s'il est disposé à témoigner et qu'il s'agit seulement de trouver le moment propice, nous pourrions songer à la vidéoconférence ou à un autre moyen...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Puis-je préciser une chose à votre intention, monsieur le président?

Il n'est aucunement question de notre côté d'accepter cet amendement tant que le reste de la motion est remis en cause. Il faudrait qu'ils approuvent le reste de la motion pour que nous considérions cet amendement, même si cela pouvait exiger par exemple que nous obligions ce témoin à comparaître. Sans cela, nous n'allons même pas envisager l'amendement.

Le président:

D'accord. Comme nous avons dépassé l'heure prévue, je dois m'enquérir de la volonté du Comité pour la suite des choses.

À titre d'information, je vous indique que notre greffier ne croit pas qu'il existe quelque règle que ce soit nous empêchant de forcer la comparution d'une personne.

Je dois maintenant savoir si vous voulez que nous poursuivions la discussion.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Non, nous n'allons pas continuer si le reste de la motion n'est pas adopté.

M. Scott Reid:

Puis-je intervenir?

Si quelqu'un proposait une motion d'ajournement, nous pourrions savoir si le Comité souhaite poursuivre ou non. Est-ce que je peux essayer?

Je propose l'ajournement.

Le président:

D'accord. Une motion d'ajournement ne peut pas faire l'objet d'un débat.

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on September 25, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.