header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-09-26 INDU 128

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everybody. Welcome to another exciting meeting of the INDU committee while we continue our legislative review of the Copyright Act.

Today we have with us, from Teksavvy Solutions, Andy Kaplan-Myrth, vice-president, regulatory and carrier affairs; from BCE, Robert Malcolmson, senior vice-president, regulatory affairs, and Mark Graham, senior legal counsel; from Rogers Communications, David Watt, senior vice-president, regulatory, and Kristina Milbourn, director of copyright and broadband; and finally, from Shaw Communications, Cynthia Rathwell, vice-president, legislative and policy strategy, along with—he's not on our list—Jay Kerr-Wilson, legal counsel, Fasken.

Welcome.

Thank you, everybody, for coming today. Each group will have up to seven minutes to make their presentation and then we will get into our rounds of questioning.

We're going to get started right away with Teksavvy Solutions.

Mr. Kaplan-Myrth, you have up to seven minutes. Go ahead, please.

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth (Vice-President, Regulatory and Carrier Affairs, TekSavvy Solutions Inc.):

Good afternoon, Mr. Chair and committee members.

My name is Andy Kaplan-Myrth. I am VP, regulatory and carrier affairs at TekSavvy. I'd like to thank you for the opportunity to share our perspective and experience with the Copyright Act.

TekSavvy is an independent Canadian Internet and phone services provider based in southwestern Ontario and Gatineau. We've been serving customers for 20 years, and we now provide service to over 300,000 customers in every province. Over the years, we've consistently defended network neutrality and protected our customers' privacy rights, in the context of copyright and in other contexts.

TekSavvy is different from the other witnesses here today in two important ways, for the purposes of this review. First, while we take copyright infringement very seriously, we do not own media content that's broadcasted or distributed. We're appearing here as an Internet service provider and not as a content provider or rights holder.

Second, to provide services to most of our end-users, we build out our networks to a certain extent and then we use wholesale services that we buy from carriers to cover the last mile, to reach homes and businesses. Because of that wholesale services layer, things sometimes work very differently for us compared to for the incumbent ISPs.

I'm going to focus my comments today on two areas: First, notice and notice and our concerns with the way it currently works; and second, our opposition to proposals to block websites to enforce copyright.

I'll turn first to the notice and notice regime. When notice and notice first came into effect, TekSavvy expended significant resources to develop systems to receive and process notices. Maintaining those systems and hiring staff to process notices continues to be a challenge for a small ISP like TekSavvy. I'll get to our concerns, but I want to start by noting that, in principle at least, notice and notice is a reasonable policy approach to copyright infringement that balances the interests of both rights holders and end-users. At the same time, now that it's been in place for nearly four years, we can see that notice and notice needs some adjustments. We would recommend three tweaks to the current notice and notice regime.

First, a standard is needed to allow ISPs to process notices automatically in a way that's consistent with Canadian law. On average, we receive thousands of infringement notices per week. They come from dozens of companies and use scores of different templates, fewer than half of which can be processed automatically. In effect, notice forwarding is an expensive and difficult service that we provide to rights holders at no cost and for which we're expected to provide a 100% service level. That's not sustainable.

Infringement notices are emails that generally have a block of plain text followed by a block of code. Some senders use notices with a block of code that follows a Canadian standard, which contains all of the elements of the Copyright Act that allow us to forward those notices. If they have the code that follows the Canadian standard, those notices can be processed automatically, without the need for a human to actually open them and review the content.

However, many notices use code adapted from American copyright notices that don't include everything we require in the Canadian Copyright Act. Others are in plain text only; they have no code. When that happens, a human needs to actually read the text of the notice to confirm that it has the required content before it can be forwarded. Both of those notices have to be processed manually. That's work-intensive and slow—and realistically, it is not sustainable as volumes increase. If rights holders were required to use a Canadian notice standard, ISPs would be able to automatically process their notices and better handle a high volume of notices.

Second, a fee that ISPs could charge to process notices should be established. Currently there's essentially no cost for rights holders to send infringement notices. As long as they can send notices at no cost, then even if they get settlements from only a small number of end-users, there will be a business model for rights holders to send greater and greater volumes of notices. Rather, ISPs bear the cost for processing those notices and then answering the many customer questions they generate. Even a small fee would help to transfer the cost back to rights holders from ISPs and constrain the volume of notices. We already get thousands of notices per week. I expect larger ISPs get far more.

I'm not necessarily suggesting we need to reduce those numbers, but we need to create some economic pressure to prevent them from ballooning indefinitely. The Copyright Act already contemplates that a fee could be established, and we recommend that a fee be established to protect ISPs and end-users from being flooded with unlimited numbers of notices.

Third, infringement notices should not be able to contain extraneous content. Many infringement notices contain content that is intimidating to end-users or that can violate customer privacy. In some cases, they don't reference Canadian law at all.

Some notices include content that's more familiar from scams and spam: advertising for other services, settlement offers, or personalized links that secretly reveal information about the end-user to the sender. This puts ISPs in a difficult position, since we're required to forward notices to end-users, including whatever extraneous, misleading or harmful content may be included. This does not serve the purposes of the notice and notice regime, and we recommend that the content or form of notices be prescribed so they can contain only the elements they are required to contain.

Finally, turning briefly to site blocking, earlier this year a group of media companies proposed a new site-blocking regime to the CRTC aimed at policing copyright infringement. TekSavvy opposed that proposal at the CRTC, and we would oppose any similar proposal here. Simply put, such site blocking would be a violation of common carriage and network neutrality without being especially effective, all without any real urgent justification. TekSavvy strongly encourages you to oppose any such site-blocking proposals.

Thank you. I will be pleased to answer any questions.

(1535)

The Chair:

Excellent. Thank you very much.

We're going to move to BCE.

Mr. Malcolmson, you have up to seven minutes.

Mr. Robert Malcolmson (Senior Vice-President, Regulatory Affairs, BCE Inc.):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman and honourable committee members.

My name is Robert Malcolmson, senior vice-president of regulatory affairs at BCE. With me today is my colleague Mark Graham, senior counsel, legal and regulatory at BCE. We appreciate your invitation to provide Bell's views on how to maximize the benefits to Canadians and our economy through the review of the Copyright Act.

Bell is Canada's largest communications company, employing 51,000 Canadians and investing $4 billion per year in advanced networks and media content. These investments allow us to provide advanced communications services that form the backbone of Canada's digital economy. We are also a key supporter of Canada's cultural and democratic system, investing approximately $900 million per year in Canadian content and operating the largest networks of both TV and local radio stations in the country.

I think we bring a unique and balanced perspective to the issues you are considering. As a content creator and major economic partner with Canada's creative community, we understand the importance of copyright and effective remedies to combat piracy. As an Internet intermediary, we also understand the need for balanced rules that do not unduly impede legitimate innovation. I look forward to sharing this perspective with you today.

I'll begin with piracy. There is an emerging consensus among creators, copyright owners, legitimate commercial users and intermediaries that large-scale and often commercially motivated piracy operations are a growing problem in Canada. Piracy sites now regularly reach up to 15.3% of Canadian households through widely available and easy-to-use illegal set-top boxes. This is up from effectively zero five years ago.

In addition, last year there were 2.5 billion visits to piracy sites to access stolen TV content. One in every three Canadians obtained music illegally in 2016. Each of these measures has grown significantly over time. According to recent research conducted for ISED and Canadian Heritage, 26% of Canadians self-report as accessing pirated content online. TV piracy in Canada has an estimated economic impact in the range of $500 million to $650 million annually.

In the light of these concerning trends, we believe the most urgent task facing the committee in this review is to modernize the act and related enforcement measures to meet the challenges posed by global Internet piracy without unduly burdening legal businesses. To be clear, this does not mean targeting individual Canadians who are accessing infringing material. Rather, it means addressing the operators of commercial-scale copyright-infringing services. It is these large infringing operations that harm the cultural industries that employ more than 600,000 Canadians, account for approximately 3% of our GDP, and tell the uniquely Canadian stories that contribute to our shared cultural identity.

With this in mind we have four recommendations.

First, we recommend modernizing the existing the criminal provisions in the act. Criminal penalties for organized copyright crime are an effective deterrent that do not impact individual users or interfere with legitimate innovation.

Section 42 of the Copyright Act already contains criminal provisions for content theft undertaken for commercial purposes, but they have grown outdated. They deal with illegal copying, while modern formats of content theft rely on streaming. These provisions should be made technologically neutral so that they apply equally to all forms of commercial-scale content theft.

Second, we recommend increasing public enforcement of copyright. In jurisdictions such as the U.K. and the United States, law enforcement and other public officials are actively involved in enforcement actions against the worst offenders. The committee should recommend that the government create and consider enshrining in the act an administrative enforcement office and that it direct the RCMP to prioritize digital piracy investigations.

Third, we recommend maintaining the existing exemptions from liability related to the provision of networks and services in the digital economy. These exemptions protect service innovation without diluting the value of copyright.

Fourth and finally, we recommend considering a new provision that specifically empowers courts to order intermediaries to contribute to remedying infringements. This would apply to intermediaries such as ISPs, web hosts, domain name registrars, search engines, payments processors, and advertising networks. In practice this would mean that a new section of the Copyright Act would allow a court to issue an order directly to, for example, a web host to take down an egregious piracy site, a search engine to delist it, a payment processor to stop collecting money for it, or a registrar to revoke its domain.

(1540)



While financial liability for these intermediaries is not appropriate, they can and should be expected to take these reasonable steps to contribute to protecting the value of copyright, which is essential to a modern digital and creative economy.

Thank you for the opportunity to present our views. We look forward to your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Rogers Communications.

Mr. Watt, you have up to seven minutes.

Mr. David Watt (Senior Vice-President, Regulatory, Rogers Communications Inc.):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman and members of the committee.

My name is David Watt and I am senior vice-president, regulatory, at Rogers Communications. I am here with Kristina Milbourn, director of copyright and broadband at Rogers. We appreciate the opportunity to share our views with you today.

Rogers is a diversified Canadian communications and media company offering wireless, high-speed Internet, cable television, and radio and television broadcasting. We support a copyright act that takes a balanced approach to the interests of rights holders, users and intermediaries, thereby optimizing the growth of digital services and investments in both innovation and content. As a member of both the Canadian Association of Broadcasters and the Business Coalition for Balanced Copyright, we support their comments in this review.

When we appeared before this committee five years ago, we defended the notice and notice regime as a useful deterrent to copyright infringement occurring through the downloading of movies using BitTorrent protocols. Since then, Canadians have fundamentally changed the way they obtain and view stolen content. A November 2017 survey commissioned by ISED and Canadian Heritage found that Canadians are increasingly using streaming to view stolen content online. Sandvine, a Canadian company that conducts network analytics, reported that in 2017 roughly 15% of Canadian households were streaming stolen content using preloaded set-top boxes. These boxes access an IP address that provides the stream. While illegal downloading remains a major problem for rights holders, illegal streaming has become the primary vehicle by which thieves make the stolen content available. We need new tools in the act to combat this new threat to the rights holders and to our Canadian broadcasting system.

We have watched the rise of streaming stolen content with deepening concern. We have taken action using the existing remedies under the act, but these remedies are insufficient. We need new tools in the act to combat this new streaming threat. We recommend two amendments to the act that will make a difference.

First, the act should make it a criminal violation for a commercial operation to profit from the theft and making available of exclusive and copyrighted content on streaming services. In our experience, the existing civil prohibitions are not strong enough to deter this type of content theft.

Second, the act should allow for injunctive relief against all of the intermediaries that form part of the online infrastructure distributing stolen content. An example is a blocking order against an ISP requiring an ISP to disable access to stolen content available on preloaded set-top boxes.

This would be similar to action taken in over 40 countries, including jurisdictions such as the U.K. and Australia. The FairPlay coalition, of which Rogers is a participant, asked for this in its application to the CRTC filed earlier this year. This injunctive relief would serve to support and supplement that application.

In addition to these amendments addressing illegal streaming, we also have recommendations for improving the notice and notice regime. These proposals would protect Canadians against settlement demands and copyright trolling.

First, we fully support the government's position that future copyright notices must exclude settlement demands. We recommend that notice and notice provisions be amended to prohibit rights holders from making settlement demands in notices. We also recommend that the government prescribe, by regulation, the form and content of legitimate notices that an ISP would have to process under the act. A prescribed web form would prevent improper information from being entered into the notice.

Second, this is with reference to the case recently determined by the Supreme Court of Canada regarding reasonable costs of an order to disclose information, or a Norwich order. This order is the subsequent step after a notice and notice form has been sent out for those people who wish to pursue further action. The minister should set a rate per lookup and attach it as a schedule to regulations made under the act. Based on Rogers' costs, a rate of $100 per IP address would be appropriate. This approach would provide transparency to all those involved in Norwich order requests.

(1545)



These are our brief comments, and we'd be pleased to answer any questions you may have.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Finally, we're going to go to Shaw Communications.

Ms. Rathwell.

Ms. Cynthia Rathwell (Vice-President, Legislative and Policy Strategy, Shaw Communications Inc.):

Thank you.

Good afternoon Mr. Chairman and committee members.

My name is Cynthia Rathwell, vice-president, legislative and policy strategy at Shaw Communications. With me today is Jay Kerr-Wilson, a partner at Fasken, whose expertise is copyright law. We appreciate the opportunity to present Shaw's view on this review of the Copyright Act.

Shaw is a leading Canadian connectivity company that provides seven million Canadians with services that include cable and satellite television, high-speed Internet, home phone services and, through Freedom Mobile, wireless voice and data services.

Shaw expected to invest over $1.3 billion in fiscal 2018 to build powerful converged networks and bring leading-edge telecommunications and broadcasting distribution services to Canadians. Annually, as a content distributor, we pay tens of millions of dollars in royalties pursuant to Copyright Board-approved tariffs, over $95 million in regulated Canadian programming contributions, and approximately $800 million in programming affiliation payments, $675 million of which is paid to Canadian programming services with predominantly Canadian content.

Accordingly, Shaw understands and wishes to emphasize the importance of a copyright regime that balances the rights and interests of each component of the copyright ecosystem. This balance is central to Canada's interest in maintaining a vibrant digital economy.

Overall, our Copyright Act already strikes an effective balance, subject to a few provisions that would benefit from targeted amendments. Extensive changes are neither necessary nor in the public interest. They would upset Canada's carefully balanced regime, and jeopardize policy objectives of other acts of Parliament that coexist with copyright as part of a broader framework that includes the Broadcasting Act and the Telecommunications Act.

Proposals to increase the scope, and/or duration of existing rights, introduce new entitlements, or to narrow the scope of existing exceptions would increase the cost of digital products and services for Canadians; undermine investment, innovation and network efficiency; and impact Canadians' participation in the digital economy. Stakeholders who argue for new entitlements or limitations appear to seek a simplified response to global market developments that are impacting the production, distribution, consumption and valuation not only of copyrighted works but also of goods and services provided by many, if not most, industries. The responses of most businesses, including Shaw, to market disruptions have been to invest and innovate, diversify, and improve the quality of service and customer experience in order to compete. Fundamental changes in the digital marketplace cannot simply be offset by new legislative entitlements or protections.

Calls for new rights appear, in part, to be based on the suggestion that copyright is a tool for the promotion of cultural content. The Copyright Act is concerned with promoting efficient markets and supporting the creation of works but generally without regard to a creator's nationality or where the work was created. As a result, attempts to use copyright as a cultural policy instrument would undermine the achievement of domestic cultural policy objectives established by other statutes. A clear example of this is the Border Broadcasters, Inc.'s proposal for retransmission consent rights for broadcasters, which, it argues, would support the production of local programming. Shaw is strongly opposed to that proposal.

If adopted, it would disrupt carefully calibrated Canadian copyright and broadcasting policy. It would require Canadians to pay billions of dollars per year in new fees for the same services, a large part of which would flow to the U.S., while creating the potential for loss of access to programming, as well as service disruptions. These impacts would undermine the competitiveness of Canada's broadcasting industry, incenting subscribers to turn away from the Canadian broadcasting system, ultimately at the expense of the Broadcasting Act's objectives.

Canada's Copyright Act provides that services related to the operation of the Internet are exempt from copyright liability solely in connection with providing network services. It also provides that those furnishing digital storage space are exempt from liability in connection with hosted content.

As an Internet service provider, Shaw strongly submits that these exceptions should be maintained. ISPs benefiting from the network services exception are subject to obligations under the notice and notice regime, and protection is denied where a network is found to be enabling infringement. Furthermore, the hosting exception is not available with respect to materials that the host knows infringe copyright. That being the case, Canadian law strikes the correct balance between incenting investment in network services and ensuring that these services support the integrity of copyright.

Some stakeholders have also called for the narrowing or removal of existing exceptions, such as the technological processes exception, that enable end-users and service providers to employ innovative and efficient technologies to facilitate the authorized use of works. Shaw strongly believes that these exceptions represent a balanced approach that maximizes Canada's participation in the digital economy.

(1550)



While Shaw believes that the Copyright Act overall is well balanced, minor changes should be made to the notice and notice framework to curtail abuses, such as regulations mandating that notices be transmitted to ISPs electronically and in a prescribed form. This has already been discussed in detail today.

As well, Shaw submits that new measures are needed to enable creators to enforce rights against commercial-level online piracy. This will help ensure that rights holders receive fair remuneration and that networks are protected from malicious malware frequently associated with piracy sites. We therefore support an amendment to the Copyright Act's civil remedies to clarify the Federal Court's authority to order ISPs to block access to websites found to be infringing.

In conclusion, Canada's Copyright Act achieves an appropriate and thoughtful balance between creator, user, and intermediary interests, subject to the minor amendments that we've recommended. The extensive changes requested by various stakeholders would disrupt the achievement of policy objectives pursuant to the overall legislative framework governing copyright, broadcasting and telecommunications.

Thanks very much. We look forward to your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move right into our line of questioning.

We will be starting with you, Mr. Graham. You have seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I'll take them all. Thank you.

First off, Mr. Kaplan-Myrth, I'd like to ask if you could send us some of these notices you have received in the different formats so we can just get a taste of what kind of stuff comes in to you. It's a simple request. You can send those to the clerk in the future.

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

I'd be happy to send some version of them.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fine.

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Of course, they contain the personal information of end-users. We would sort of clean out the content, if that would be okay with you, and show you the variety of different notices that we get.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'd appreciate that.

For Bell and for Rogers, I'm just going to confirm for the record that you are members of FairPlay Canada. You support FairPlay Canada?

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

Yes, for Bell.

Mr. David Watt:

Yes, for Rogers.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Could either of you explain to me why the website is registered in Panama and hosted in the U.S.?

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

The FairPlay website...?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes. It just seems like an odd thing for a Canadian lobbying group to be registered in Panama and hosted in the U.S. I just want to put that on the record.

In FairPlay's submissions to the CRTC, they stated that existing law can be used to order a site blocking. If that's the case, why is there a request for law reform?

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

There are existing legal remedies to combat piracy through potentially getting a blocking order from a court. We've found through experience that those are ineffective.

Some of the reasons why they're ineffective are, generally speaking, that piracy operators operate anonymously, operate online and operate outside of Canadian jurisdiction. Those factors combined make it very difficult to use traditional remedies to enforce a court order against a defendant that is essentially either unknown or not findable. That's number one.

Number two, under the Telecommunications Act, as you probably know, there's a specific provision—section 36—which states that in order for an Internet service provider, an ISP, to have a role in the dissemination of content that it carries, it needs authorization from the CRTC. In a world where Internet service providers are blocking egregious piracy sites, you need the permission of the CRTC.

From the FairPlay coalition's standpoint, we went to the CRTC with that application under a specific provision of the statute. We're all saying that there are ways to perhaps improve the judicial process under the Copyright Act to effect a similar result so that piracy can be combatted on both fronts.

(1555)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Have Bell or Rogers attempted to get any of these orders to block sites?

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

We have certainly been to court trying to get injunctions against those who sell the set-top boxes that disseminate this content. My colleague may want to speak to how long and torturous that process is.

Even when you can actually find a defendant in Canada and get proof that the person is engaging in illegal conduct, it has taken us, I think, two years to shut down one particular defendant in Montreal. Imagine how difficult it is to tackle an offshore defendant.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Watt, do you have something to say?

Mr. David Watt:

I was going to say that exactly that situation has received a fair amount of press coverage. There have been various appeals and legal wranglings. It is shut down currently. However, we're still looking probably out a year before we actually go to trial in that particular case.

The current situation is simply too slow and too cumbersome. You have to effectively go and prove the case, and you have to then ask for a remedy to the particular problem, which is the second step.

We are proposing, with the injunctive relief, to have that up front. You still have to make a prima facie case, and a strong one, that there is an issue with the content that's being distributed by this commercial entity. That is really the only way that this type of theft is going to be combatted in a timely fashion. It is a very significant issue today, and a growing issue, and it's going to have serious ramifications for content creators around the world and content creators within Canada.

Mr. Mark Graham (Senior Legal Counsel, BCE Inc.):

I might add, just to put a couple of facts and figures around it, that I think these kinds of site blocking remedies are available through common law in other countries as well, like the U.K. However, they have still passed law reform to make injunctions directly available against the service providers.

I think the reason is that it's just not a practical solution for a rights holder to sue a website, successfully prosecute the entire case, try to enforce, fail to enforce, and then apply for a separate injunction only at that stage to get the site-blocking order. When you think about how easy it is for someone to then open a new website, that creates an imbalance in the legal remedies available.

I think the FairPlay coalition filed a legal opinion indicating that the timeline and cost were something in excess of two years and $300,000 for one order under the current system. What we're proposing is something that is a little more streamlined.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but the majority of countries that have these systems require a court order somewhere in the process. I don't believe the submissions from FairPlay requested a court order.

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

There are a variety of regimes around the world.

As Mark mentioned, I think there are 42 countries that have site blocking regimes of one form or another. Many of them do involve a court order; others are administrative regimes.

What we're proposing is an administrative regime through the CRTC under the Telecommunications Act, under an existing provision of that statute that would require us to go to them in any event. That's why we're there.

It is a quasi-judicial process in which an independent regulator, not an ISP, is making the determination as to which sites should or shouldn't be blocked. It is a process that has all of the usual checks and balances that one would expect through a judicial process.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have time for one last question, which will be for all of you.

What efforts have been made to identify the reasons behind piracy in the first place? It's very well to go after the pirating sites, but there is a consumer demand for it. Have we looked, for example, at the availability of Canadian content? If you're looking at any media market in Canada, there is much less available here than in pretty much any western country. Is that perhaps part of the problem?

(1600)

The Chair:

I'm sorry but I'm going to have to jump in on that one. You don't have any more time left. We can maybe come back to that question.

We are going to move to Mr. Albas.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I would like to thank all of the witnesses for coming in and sharing the views of their organization.

I'd like to start with TekSavvy.

Mr. Kaplan-Myrth, your presentation and that of the Canadian Network Operators Consortium, who came to this committee last week, made it very clear that smaller ISPs such as your own do not support the enhanced anti-piracy measures proposed by some of the other witnesses here. Why do you think there is such a divide between the two positions?

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Well, as I said by way of introduction, we are not rights holders. We're not media companies; we are just the Internet service providers. I think that if Internet service providers were very concerned about illegal content on our networks, we likely would not start with copyright. There is probably other more pressing illegal content on our networks, which might concern us much more which we may be talking about blocking or addressing in some way.

The reason we're talking about copyright is that the large ISPs in this country are mostly vertically integrated media companies as well, and they have interests on the media side.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Can you give us an example of the kinds of things you think we should be focused on, versus some of the other concerns?

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Well, I don't think we should be focused on blocking other content, because now we're running up against network neutrality in our common carriage roles.

My point is that if we were going to look at illegal content, we would be talking about terrorism content. You know, there are bad things out there.

We carry the bits, and we do that because we're common carriers. We carry the bits without looking at them. Just as you can pick up the phone and speak to another person and say whatever you want on that phone line and that phone company won't cut off your call because of the words that you say, we will carry the bits.

I think the large ISPs are preoccupied with copyright in particular, and website blocking to enforce copyright, because of their interests on their media sides.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I'll turn to Rogers, Bell or Shaw.

The Canadian Network Operators Consortium, of which TekSavvy is a member, in their testimony last week referred to large ISPs, like you, as being vertically integrated. Can you please describe what they meant by the term in relation to your business?

Mr. David Watt:

Certainly. A vertically integrated company, in our context, is one that owns content, and then as you go up, it is vertically integrated because that content is then distributed through the distribution arm, whether it be the wireless company or the cable company. It's vertically integrated in that sense. It goes up the chain. It's not a horizontal integration of a different service. It is a service that you own, which is then distributed by an entity that you own as well.

I will say, though, that it is essentially a red herring, the vertical integration argument. We are here today as content owners, and we have every right to protect the content we own. The CRTC in Canada has very strict rules, as Andy has mentioned, in terms of common carriage and net neutrality. There is no confusion in the sense that we are able to favour our content on our distribution arm. That's not the case. It is treated equally with the content of people who do not have a distribution arm.

I don't really understand the argument. I can see that the economic argument, you're saying, is possibly that you want to protect your content. You don't want that stolen. You want to have compensation for it. At the same time, when people are able to access the stolen content, they have less incentive to subscribe to your distribution arm. That's absolutely true. In terms of content, we have to protect that, and we have a commercial interest in having people stay connected to our cable arms. But the country also has an interest in having them stay connected to our distribution arms.

Rogers, in the terms of our cable distribution plan, contributes roughly just a little less than $500 million a year to the creation of Canadian content. People have focused on the 5% contribution to the media fund and the copyright payments that we make, but we also pay $500 million a year to Canadian programmers in affiliation fees. These are Discovery, TSN, Sportsnet, MuchMusic, and HGTV. Of that $500 million, on average 44% of every dollar of revenue of those programmers is spent on Canadian programming, so there are significant ramifications.

(1605)

Mr. Dan Albas:

While I totally appreciate the observation, Mr. Watt, I think we're starting to move away, because Ms. Rathwell said very clearly that this is about copyright. There are other regimes, and I think we're starting to tread into some others.

You did raise net neutrality specifically. In previous applications that FairPlay has put forward, it has said that the proposed site-blocking plan would not violate net neutrality. However, don't the principles of net neutrality currently prevent companies like yours from removing or throttling the sites yourselves?

Mr. David Watt:

Yes, they do, but the key point to remember is that net neutrality is the free flow of legal content. We're discussing illegal content here. In all legal content there's equal treatment of the bits, but with respect to illegal content over the web, that type of content is not accorded the same rights.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Would not requesting a government body to have the power to instruct, let's say, an action to take something down be precluded under net neutrality and appear to be a backdoor violation, though?

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

I don't think in any way, shape or form that would be a violation of net neutrality under a reasonable interpretation of what net neutrality is. As Mr. Watts said—and I think Minister Bains has said it himself—the concept of net neutrality is the free flow of legal content over the Internet. If a government body, for example, ordered someone to take down terrorist content, would that be a violation of net neutrality? I don't think anyone around this table would say so.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I would agree with you on that, but again—

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

Just let me finish.

If it can be proven that the content that's being disseminated on the Internet is illegal—i.e., stolen—I don't think it's unreasonable for a content provider, regardless of whether they are vertically integrated or not.... Quite frankly, this has nothing to do with vertical integration. It's about protecting Canada's cultural and content industries, which employ 630,000 Canadians and generate lots of legal revenue for the benefit of the country. I don't think in any way, shape, or form—

Mr. Dan Albas:

But again—

The Chair:

Thank you.

Sorry, but we're way over time. I'm sure we will be able to come back to that.

Mr. Masse, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for being here.

Mr. Kaplan-Myrth, I appreciate your presentation. Having a consistent mechanism is obviously something that should be done. This doesn't have to wait for this committee process to review something, send it to the minister and get back. It's a regulatory change that can and should take place, and I can't understand why it's so difficult to deal with.

I do want to deal with an issue, though. Piracy has been brought to our attention again. I live in an area that has had, over the years, everything from ONTV, which came from the United States, to smaller direct TV boxes for which program cards used to be used.

Obviously, Canadians are motivated to go to online privacy. Bell, Rogers, and Shaw, why do you think your own customers, who you supply service to, are choosing piracy options even through your own feed streams versus using the other services you offer? There needs to be a connection or a discussion about that, especially with Bell. You have noted 15% in your submission here. You're claiming it's $500 million to $650 million in lost revenue. Why do you think it is that your own customers are not choosing your own services and are instead deciding to go to piracy?

(1610)

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

I will start, and others may have comments.

I think some consumers have grown up in the age of the Internet where content is widely available for free online, and if they can access it, they don't give a second thought to whether they are accessing something that someone else owns a copyright on. It's available; they consume it.

Oftentimes critics of ours will say that if we made our Canadian content, for example, available at more reasonable prices, people would then consume it. They lay the problem at our doorstep.

I will give you a practical example. That's not the problem in our experience. There's a show called Letterkenny, which is an originally produced Canadian comedy that is very popular. It's available on our over-the-top platform CraveTV. I think all four seasons of it are available on Crave for a subscription price of $9.99 a month. If you want to consume Letterkenny legally, it costs you less than 30¢ an episode to get it.

We are making Canadian content available online the way people want to consume it and at reasonable prices, yet piracy continues to grow.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Quickly, Shaw and Rogers.

Ms. Cynthia Rathwell:

I would echo what Rob said. I think price is also a bit of a red herring. We offer various packages. We offer pick and pay. We've gone through a huge metamorphosis of our businesses over the last few years in terms of the way we address consumers, and we're making huge investments in networks and advanced platforms for the reception of advanced broadcasting services as well as world-class infrastructure for Internet.

There is the issue of a segment of the population who just want something for nothing. To go back to what we're producing, we're competing with a product that remains highly regulated, and notwithstanding that this is a copyright discussion, I echo the comments of all of the others at the table here, and it was in my opening remarks as well. What we do as a business is very intertwined with other policy objectives and it sustains the whole Canadian broadcasting system.

Mr. Brian Masse:

I want to get Mr. Watt in on this.

Maybe you can start. I would like to have an answer on this in the remaining time.

How would you rank your companies with regard to the CRTC's decision on skinny packages? I take the points you're making here, but I would like to get you to comment on the public record as to how you think your companies have behaved with the introduction of the CRTC skinny package to consumers.

There is an emergence of an illegal market in piracy, as you have raised here today, and I think it's a dual relationship that's going on here, so I would like to hear how you would rank your rollout of the skinny package as well as the previous....

Mr. David Watt:

For Rogers, I would rank our rollout of the skinny package as having been a success. We rolled it out on time, as required. It is now the foundational package of all of our cable TV packages.

We start with our starter package at $25. For Rogers, we include the “four plus one” U.S. signals in that $25 price point. It is the building block on which all of our packages with higher tiers are built. There is demand for it. People take the narrow package. The problem, though, even there, is that $25 is a bare-bones cost. It might recover the cost; it might not. It's on the edge. But you're having to compete, then, against IP streaming services. You'll see them out on street corners—$12.95 a month with 1,000 channels—and it's all content that has been stolen. Okay, it comes with a 20-second lag over the original feed, or the quality of it might be only 90% of ours, but that is very difficult to compete with. It is a price issue, and that's a problem we face.

Ms. Kristina Milbourn (Director, Copyright and Broadband, Rogers Communications Inc.):

I think the bind for the consumer needs to be borne in mind as well. In many instances, these pirates are operating with such impunity that they have storefronts available in shopping centres or kiosks in malls. Many times, people don't even realize that they're not transacting with a legitimate BDU provider. I think that's part of the growing cultural adoption of this type of streaming service, where it's not clear at all, at times, in the mind of the consumer, that they're doing anything wrong.

(1615)

Mr. Brian Masse:

I think just as importantly, though, if we're using the documents that have been submitted here today and the percentages that are being talked about, is that those are your family members, your neighbours, your friends, your co-workers. There's a motivational element here.

I don't know how much time I have left. If I have two minutes left, maybe I can use it later on for Bell and for—

The Chair:

You have no more time.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Maybe they can at least get on the record, because that's what I'm looking for—the roots of this.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll move to Mr. Sheehan for seven minutes.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Before I begin, I want to say that I'll be sharing my time with both Mr. Lloyd and Mr. Lametti.

I have a very quick question for you, Andy. It's basically a yes-or-no answer. Should ISPs be involved in some sort of remuneration for the content creator, the artist? We've heard testimony suggesting that they should be. Do you believe ISPs should be involved in some kind of tariff process?

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

I wish this were as simple as a yes-or-no answer. If I have to say yes or no, I will say no. I agree that from a policy perspective, it's a complicated question about the movement of content that was formerly broadcast onto the Internet. There are really interesting issues to explore there.

From our perspective, we actually have a bit of a unique take on this particular issue as a wholesale-based provider. The general argument, I think, is that Internet service providers benefit from the increased number of users who come over to them and use their networks to get this content that might have been on TV before or that they might have gotten on TV before. That may be true for incumbents who build networks and have economies of scale as more users join their networks—providing service to those users gets less expensive. That's not true for wholesale providers. We pay a fixed amount in tariffs for each user who joins our network.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

I know you're unique. I just wanted to get that on the record right now—we'll probably explore it a little more—and share my time with the other two.

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

I understand.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

I want to build on that from creator's point of view. We talk about balance, and yet the market isn't working for creators. We've had some solid testimony, and I've met with creators in my riding in Guelph. They say they're getting paid a fraction of what they used to be paid due to changes in technology. There are market changes for sure that are impacting.

During the testimony this afternoon, we heard about looking at the streaming services for pirated content. What about the streaming services for non-pirated content, streaming services from Netflix or YouTube? If there's some type of revenue opportunity through the ISP or through the vertical integration model, how could we look at this legislation to accommodate the new technologies around streaming services that would be fairer for the creators? I'm just putting it out there.

Andy, perhaps you could continue on, but let's also share the question with the larger integrated companies as well.

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

This is not really in TekSavvy's wheelhouse, as you know—

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Okay.

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

—but I'll take a crack at it based on what I know about the area, briefly.

It's really a question, when you look at those legitimate sites, about the licensing fees that have been negotiated and what they ultimately pass on to artists, whom you hear from. It's also a question, when you talk about a site like YouTube, of the enforcement that's on that site to try to prevent illegal content from being on it.

YouTube is usually held up as having fairly robust systems to police that sort of thing, so maybe we would talk about some other site. What you're really seeing, when you look at those legal sites, I think is a change in the balance of what those companies take and what they pass on to the artists.

(1620)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Right.

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

It's a bit of a different issue from pure piracy.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thanks.

I noticed some body language around this. Maybe you could put some verbal language onto the table.

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

I was trying to think of an answer.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Okay.

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

I think you've hit the nail on the head. In this day and age, when our regulated, linear ecosystem, which has been around forever, is now being—some would say overtaken—certainly diluted by over-the-top providers, how do we find a way, without unduly constraining the availability of that over-the-top content, to bring that into the system to the benefit of artists, creators, producers and broadcasters?

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Right.

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

That's certainly a live issue, I know.

The government has launched a legislative review of the Telecommunications Act and the Broadcasting Act, and that's actually one of the questions they've asked. They've asked, specifically, how we get non-Canadian online providers to contribute to our system

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Right.

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

There are many ways to do that. They could, for example, be required to contribute a percentage of their Canadian revenue to Canadian production. If you think about Netflix, I think they have close to seven million subscribers in Canada. They don't pay sales tax in Canada. They don't have employees in Canada, but they're taking a lot of revenue out of Canada.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Right, yes.

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

Would it be wrong to ask them to somehow contribute to our system? That's—

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I wonder whether the carriers can participate in some type of collection model.

Ms. Cynthia Rathwell:

Yes.

I just wanted to clarify something Rob was saying. I think there are a lot of things to be explored about the role of over-the-top services per se within the system. I also agree with Andy that, to a large extent, in terms of pure copyright, it's a matter of the contractual relationships they're entering into.

I know that a lot of Canadian producers are very happy with their relationships with Netflix, and that's to the consternation of some of the Canadian media companies that are competing for rights. I want to clarify, just for the record, that Shaw isn't a vertically integrated company when it comes to having media holdings, so I say that quite objectively. We have an affiliated company that's a separate, public company, which is Corus. We are a connectivity company.

Getting back to your question about whether or not there's a role for the intermediaries in supporting the artists or—I don't want to veer too far away here—Canadian content, I think from Shaw's perspective, it's very important to look at the genesis of the current exemptions in the common carrier idea that underlay ISPs. That was established, originally, in the Railway Act. That should continue, because we're trying to build out advanced networks across this country. Saddling ISPs with those sorts of support mechanisms for artists, in the context of either copyright or broadcasting, is something that Shaw wouldn't support.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I missed the last three words—would support or would not support?

Ms. Cynthia Rathwell:

Would not support.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to run out of time.

Mr. Lloyd, you have five minutes. Go ahead, please.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, everyone, for coming today.

My first question will be for you, Mr. Kaplan-Myrth. In Rogers' submission, they stated that, in the wake of the recent Supreme Court case, they think there should be a scheduled rate of $100 per IP address. I just want to get your comment on the sense of scale of that. What would that be to a smaller provider like TekSavvy? What would be the cost of the $100 scheduled lookup per IP address?

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

I don't know what went into deciding that particular rate for Rogers. That might be an appropriate rate for TekSavvy also. We may go back and look at it and see that it needs to be something else. We may be interested in exploring more the idea of a scheduled rate specifically for Norwich orders, which is what David was talking about, as opposed to passing on notice and notice.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

So you're saying that basically Rogers' recommendation of $100, which is the fee that they've estimated as their own personal fee for a Norwich order, is not something that you view as financially burdensome to a company like TekSavvy?

(1625)

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Sorry, I think that the proposal, if I'm not mistaken, is that service providers would be able to charge a $100 rate in order to respond to a Norwich order, in order to disclose the identity of an end-user when that end-user is being sued by a content provider.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Okay, so it's just not costing—

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

We would be charging that rate, and the question would be whether it's an appropriate rate.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

So you're basically saying you don't think that rate is too low, that it would be financially burdensome to your company to do all those things for that rate.

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

We have not gone back and looked at what that would be. It strikes me as probably a reasonable rate, or in the right range.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

I'm also glad there seems to be a lot of unanimity on this committee about standardizing notice and notice. Is there anything that you think would be going too far if we were to go in that direction to recommend standardization? Is there something that would be too far, that you think we should not consider, in terms of these recommendations on standardization?

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

I'm not sure what you mean by going too far. I think the standard form that uses code that we can process automatically, and that includes the content that's required to be included, would satisfy all of the requirements.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

It seems as though there's agreement on that, which is something that we rarely get on this committee.

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

Sorry, can I add to that, if you don't mind?

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Of course.

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

You asked what might go too far. Certainly, we're a supporter of getting rid of settlement demands coming to consumers. That's not appropriate. It should be written out of notices. But if you find yourself in a situation where you're sending a notice to someone who is illegally consuming a piece of Canadian content, for example, I'm not sure it would be such a bad thing, from a public policy standpoint, for the notice to say, “(a) you're consuming this content illegally and (b) there's another source of legal consumption, and here it is.”

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Okay.

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

That speaks to the questions you've been asking.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Yes. I'm glad that you spoke, because my next question is for you, Mr. Malcolmson.

In your statement, you said that you would like a technologically neutral model to go after Copyright Act infringements. Would you say that the act as it's written right now is too specific and that's why we haven't been able to deal with the problem of streaming?

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

The short answer is yes. I think the current provision speaks to copying, and so—

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Right now they don't have the provision to deal with streaming.

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

—streaming is arguably not caught.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Okay. So if we were to make it technologically neutral, you would recommend wording that makes it just cover everything?

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

Yes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Okay.

How much time do I have left?

The Chair:

You have thirty seconds.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

When we're talking about a criminal violation, organized copyright theft, what sorts of examples can you provide? What would be an example of an organized copyright threat?

Mr. Mark Graham:

I think the best examples are the illegal IPTV services, as they call them, that are sometimes being operated. Just to give you an example, these are people who set up 60 often fraudulently obtained TV receivers in basements across the country, upload all the channels to an illegal cable service, and then sell subscriptions to that service for $10 a month, composed entirely of stolen content, with not one dollar going to—

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Is it realistic for the government to catch these people? Is there realistic availability?

Mr. Mark Graham:

It is, in fact. Lots of them are being identified all the time by rights holders in the system, but we don't have the remedies available now to address this.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

Mr. David Watt:

If I could interject, that's exactly the intent of both the FairPlay application and the injunctive relief, that there would be an order to ISPs to block the IP address from which that stream is coming.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

I hoped I would get a follow-up, but—

The Chair:

You'll have time to come back.

Mr. David Watt:

That's the commercial entity that's doing it, not the end-user. It's the person who has the server with that IP address on it. It's to block that.

The Chair:

We're going to move on to Ms. Caesar-Chavannes.

You have five minutes.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Thank you.

Thank you to the witnesses who are here today.

Mr. Watt, you indicated that you've watched the rise in streaming of stolen content with deep concern. The remedies under the act, you mentioned, are insufficient. You provided some recommendations for amendments. My question is, in addition to amendments to the act, what new tools and technology are available to help with dispelling your concerns about streaming.

(1630)

Mr. David Watt:

In terms of the new tools and technologies, I think many of them exist today. The Sandvine analytics allow us to identify the high upstream loaders. As Mr. Graham mentioned, the question is, how do people obtain this content? They will literally set up 60 set-top boxes, tune one to each channel and then stream it 24 hours a day.

With the analytics, with the new technology, that is how we're able to identify those upstream streams that are sending traffic volumes, which really can only be when they're doing something of this nature.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Is there anybody else—TekSavvy, Shaw?

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

I'm just thinking about those high-upload sorts of streams. Service providers could cut off those users if they wanted to by publishing Internet traffic management policies, for which there's a framework through the CRTC. They would have to establish those guidelines and then enforce them. They can already do that on their own networks, as far as I know. It's certainly not a copyright policy issue.

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Thank you.

I'm sorry, Mr. Chair. I'm going to split my time with Mr. Lametti.

One of the main arguments made by opponents to the safe harbours in the act is a challenge to the “dumb pipe” theory. Can you describe the extent to which ISPs can identify the content of data they transmit?

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

I can answer that for TekSavvy, but I would be very interested to hear about it, as well, from carriers.

For us it largely depends on the platform and on what equipment we have in place. We can see whatever information the carriers give us. We're wholesale providers and so we largely rely on the carriers for information about the actual connection that our end-users have. Where that information is available to us, we would know the volume, how many gigabytes a person has downloaded in a certain period of time.

We could put equipment in place that would look into that content and find out what it is. We do not do that, so we have no visibility into the content of any end-user traffic. It goes further than that. It's not just content; it's what protocol is on the Internet. We just don't watch that or keep track of it, but there is equipment available, and we would be able to use that if we were interested in tracking that kind of information about our users.

Mr. David Watt:

Yes, there's the packet inspection equipment that is available to provide insight into what is buried in the packets, but effectively, we cannot use it to throttle or discriminate between the bits. It's really for informational purposes only.

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds.

Mr. David Lametti (LaSalle—Émard—Verdun, Lib.):

I've blanked as to whether Shaw is part of FairPlay. I just want to ask, generally, about FairPlay.

If, as you said, you are going after the big sites that are using disputable content, why do we need a separate body in order to adjudicate that? We have the Federal Court. Let's say we do something on injunctive relief, such that you could get an injunction. Why would we not use the Federal Court system, which has, I think, an impressive record on intellectual property and copyright, expertise on intellectual property, generally, and a strong record of fairness with respect to IP? Why would we create another body? Let me flip it around. We have notice and notice in Canada precisely to avoid the abuses of notice and takedown in the American system. Why would we want to potentially open up a system that's potentially open to abuse when we could use our Federal Court system?

(1635)

The Chair:

We're not going to have time to answer that, but we will be able to come back on the next round, so ponder your thoughts on that one.

We're going to move to Mr. Chong.

You have five minutes.

Hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to our witnesses for appearing.

It seems to me that this is a very similar problem to the one we have with all of these illegal phone calls purporting to come from CRA. Over the last number of years, tens of thousands of Canadians have been harassed by these calls. Over $10 million has been stolen from Canadians because of this, and there are really two ways to go about shutting this activity down. One is to block the phone numbers; the alternative is to shut down these call centres.

I don't think blocking the phone numbers is a realistic way of going about it, because anybody can get a burner cellphone and get a new phone number pretty quickly to restart the scam. Thus, shutting down these call centres is pretty important. Many of them are outside of the country, in places such as Mumbai, India. I think that's the solution to it.

Similarly, when we're looking at illegal set-top boxes or illegal streaming services, we can try to ban the sale of these illegal set-top boxes, but I don't think that's realistic. There's new technology, new hardware, new software coming along all the time. Open platforms such as Android allow people to produce these programs. I don't think that's the solution. Really, to me, it seems that the solution is to shut down the servers that are hosting this illegal streaming of content.

My first question is, where are most of these servers located, in Canada or outside of Canada?

I'll direct my questions to BCE.

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

Your analogy to call blocking and spam is apt.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Where are these servers located?

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

As Dave said, some of the servers that are feeding illegal set-top boxes are located domestically. Where they have been located domestically, we've pursued a judicial remedy.

The larger-scale operations, something such as The Pirate Bay, which is a well-known pirate stream available all over the world, are located offshore.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Where?

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

I don't know exactly. The Pirate Bay moves around. It has been in various jurisdictions.

Hon. Michael Chong:

What are the top two or three countries? With the call centres, we know that India is a huge problem, and the RCMP has been working with India and law enforcement authorities to shut this down.

Where are these streaming servers located?

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

My colleague might have some specific information for you.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Okay.

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

The point is that they are located offshore, and to Mr. Lametti's question, that makes it difficult to use traditional judicial remedies to find that defendant and enforce against them on an expedited basis and an effective basis.

Mr. Mark Graham:

We should take that away and provide some information that's more precise about where we're seeing them commonly.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Okay.

In your second recommendation, you're suggesting that we increase public enforcement of copyright, using domestic law enforcement agencies to actively pursue people infringing on copyright. The government announced some $116 million for a new national cybercrime unit run by the RCMP that will work with international law enforcement agencies to pursue these kinds of infractions. Are you suggesting that's not a good approach or that the government doesn't have them up and running yet or that another approach needs to be taken?

We're here to hear your suggestions on this.

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

It's a good initiative if it makes commercial copyright infringement a priority. That has always been the issue, that copyright infringement is lower down on the enforcement food chain. Given the scale it has grown to and given who's engaged in it, organized crime in some instances, if this initiative were to make it a priority, then it would be a useful tool and consistent with our recommendation.

Hon. Michael Chong:

There was a report this week in the news that the RCMP has fallen behind on the pursuit of digital criminals. It doesn't give us, at least me, great confidence that this issue is going to be dealt with expeditiously. With 15% of all people now getting their stuff through these set-top boxes, these cloned Android or other clone set-top boxes, I'm not sure we're going to be able to catch up to this emerging trend. It's all very concerning.

(1640)

Ms. Kristina Milbourn:

To that, I just want to add that, in order to engage the RCMP and to engage federal agencies, there has to be a very clear basis in law. We have spoken with the CBSA and the RCMP about this problem in particular. What we hear back from them is that they're not always clear that the jurisdiction exists for them to engage in this particular type of problem, just on the mechanics involved and distribution and the like. I think increased involvement by federal law enforcement is great, but it has to be buttressed by that criminal prohibition in the Copyright Act or in an act that makes it clear that they have the jurisdiction to investigate and to prosecute these crimes because they're against the law.

The Chair:

We're going to move to Mr. Jowhari.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thanks to the witnesses.

I want to pick up where some of my colleagues went to the edge and left it there. It's about tracking the content or identifying the content. I understand there's some technology available that would enable you to determine what the content is and what type of content is being used.

I want to start by asking the following question. Are there any instances where the ISP providers are legally obliged to monitor their services for the type of content that's going through what you call your "pipes”?

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

No. There's no specific content that we're required to track or log.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

What's your view?

Mr. David Watt:

It's the same answer.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Shaw has the same answer too. Okay.

Given the fact that there is technology available, can you give me a sense of how that technology can be used to track, in the case of offshore providers of illegal content, and what it is that stops us from blocking them, or stops you or your organization from blocking them? They wouldn't fall under our jurisdiction. Or am I simplifying this too much?

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

I think you're identifying the problem that we're confronting. As an ISP, we act as a carrier or a pipeline, so for us to be able to do something about the content that rides along that pipe, we need some form of authorization. So in the case—

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Do you really need that authorization if they're offshore and they're not within our jurisdiction?

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

Under the Telecommunications Act we would still need that authorization from the CRTC to essentially block that content.

If a pirate stream is coming from Romania, for example, and we could identify it and we just took it upon ourselves to block it, we would arguably be in breach of our common carrier requirements. That's why we're in front of the CRTC saying we know how to stop this but we want to stop it with authorization and through a proper process in which we're not making the decision, because we're criticized—we don't want to be seen as censors, as some have painted the FairPlay application. Through proper authorization and an independent body, they would say the content owner has proven its case that this content is being pirated from Romania, for example, and that the ISP could go ahead and block it.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Would that shorten the time and the cost you were talking about? You were talking about $300,000 and about two years to be able to get.... How much of that would get shortened with the suggestions that you have?

Can anybody answer?

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

I'll give you an example from our perspective. In our FairPlay application, we took a look at the costs of blocking through domain name servers, which is a common method of blocking, and it's infrastructure that is installed on every ISP system today. The estimated cost to do a block of one site is something in the range of $18 to $36, whereas we spend two years—

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

We have a technology through which we can identify the content, and based on the existing technological infrastructure that's there, it's going to cost us a maximum of $20 to be able to block, if we have the jurisdictional authorization that you're talking about.

(1645)

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

For that type of blocking, yes.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

That's for that type of blocking.

David.

Mr. David Watt:

I was just going to add, as well, that the reason for the desire for an order from the CRTC for the blocking would be that the order would apply to all ISPs. For example, to go back to the very start of the question, if one of us felt we were authorized to do this.... We're not, but if we went rogue and blocked that IP address, people who wanted to consume it would just switch to a different ISP within Canada, so we do want it to be an actual order that would apply to all service providers.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Andy, do you want to add something?

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Yes. There are various technical issues here. Without taking too long and going too far into the weeds, I'll say that this is a great example of why people call this sort of regime a slippery slope. If we start down this road of requiring blocking, we're going to run into one problem after another for which this is ineffective.

DNS blocking is a way of basically taking a phone number out of the phone book; it's disassociating the IP address from the domain name. It does not block access to the website. It doesn't stop end-users from using alternative DNS providers, which are provided by major companies, including Google. Many users use them because those DNS providers are sometimes faster than their own ISPs.

If we block using DNS blocking and remove those, then we're going to be back here five years from now talking about why we need to implement deep packet inspection, and five years after that, we're going to be talking about why we need to block VPNs. After that, you can bet that users are going to find other ways to circumvent each of these ways of blocking them.

What we need to do is protect the regime that we've had all along, which is common carriage. We carry the bits. We don't look at them. We don't judge them. We don't decide what to block.

Mr. David Watt:

Could I just make two points there? One, where this regime has been put in place, there's been a 70% to 90% reduction. We're not claiming that it's going to stop it all, but it has been effective in stopping the majority of the theft.

In terms of the slippery slope, we'd really like to deal with the issue today. That's all we can deal with. We need to deal with it first. If we come to a subsequent problem, we'll have to deal with it then, but there's no reason not to deal with the first problem because you think a second one may come along.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Thank you.

Mr. Chair, I want to thank you. You've been quite liberal with my time.

The Chair:

Are you calling me a Liberal? Thank you very much.

Mr. Masse, you have your two minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

I want Shaw and BCE, Bell, to get a chance to respond to the skinny package thing. I'm trying to understand and appreciate what's happening out there and what's motivating people. There has to be a symbiotic relationship here of some sort.

What are the tools? You're suggesting that it may not be price-driven, but I do want to hear from you in terms of your rollout of the skinny package and where you rank yourself in there. I've heard Mr. Watt's perceptions on that, so I'd like to hear from Shaw and Bell on the same thing.

Ms. Cynthia Rathwell:

Thanks.

I don't want to rank ourselves vis-à-vis our colleagues. I think we've done very well with the rollout of the skinny basic, and I think our customers have responded. It suits some of their needs. It's available, and it's the basis for all packages on which we build. Whether it goes to content packages or pick and pay from there, our subscribers are happy with it. We think the price is reasonable.

If we're talking about the attractiveness of “free”, I could turn for a second to an experience we had on the satellite side with the local television satellite service program. This was a benefit that we offered up to the CRTC to provide a package of free local signals to Canadians who had lost access to over-the-air transmission because of the digital transition. Their transmitters hadn't been converted to digital. We offered it to a maximum of 33,000 people, and 35,000 or more subscribed.

There was no way to scientifically monitor who was taking it. A lot of the people clearly were taking it from their cottage. A lot of them were taking it from areas where there were local signals available; they just wanted it for free. We continue to get calls that are beginning to express concern about the fact that this program is time-limited. It was for the duration of a licence. About seven years is what it's been offered for.

We're happy to have had that stopgap, but it was illustrative to us that free is very attractive. It's not matter of a failure of our skinny basic offering or our services.

(1650)

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you.

Mr. Malcolmson or Mr. Graham, do you want to add to that?

The Chair:

You will have time. We'll come back to that.

Mr. Brian Masse: Okay.

The Chair: This takes us to the end of the first round. We will have a second round. We'll be mindful of potential votes. If we have to cut it short to go for the votes, we will.

We'll start our second round with you, Mr. Graham. It's fine if you want to give it to Mr. Lametti.

You have seven minutes, Mr. Lametti.

Mr. David Lametti:

I want to pick up on that question again, though. I think you have to justify why we can't use the court system and why we need another body. If in fact you're going after, as you're saying, the really popular sites, why do we need to have a separate body when the court system, the Federal Court system in particular, could work in looking at injunctive relief?

You're not poor litigants. You have fairly good resources at your disposal. Why should we create another apparatus, which would then be open to abuse and open to influence, perhaps, by industry agencies like yours?

Mr. Mark Graham:

I'll start.

I think you mentioned when you were asking the question that maybe we could do something on the injunction. What we've requested in our remarks today is that injunctive relief directly against intermediaries in the Federal Court would be a significant help on this issue.

There are a few reasons why we thought about the CRTC for the FairPlay application. One is that the CRTC is often seen as more accessible, for smaller litigants in particular, which might include creators and rights holders, who can't as easily pursue something through a lengthy Federal Court process and are familiar with the CRTC. I think it's also more accessible for small ISPs who often appear before the CRTC and have expertise in that area. That's one reason.

The other reason is section 36 of the Telecommunications Act, which says that CRTC approval is required for a service provider to disable access to a piracy site. In the CRTC's view, that applies even if a court has ordered you to disable access.

If the situation is that you go to court and then you have to have a duplicative proceeding at the CRTC anyways, and given that what we're talking about is the management of the country's telecommunications networks and we have a regulator that's tasked with managing the regulation of those networks, it seemed appropriate to be there.

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

Mark gave an example of our collective attempt to shut down a pirate operating in Montreal, and it has been a two-year saga. It's been lots of money in terms of legal fees, and it still isn't where it should be.

The site-blocking application creates an accessible channel for content owners of all stripes to go and protect their content. Imagine if you're a small content creator or owner and you have to go to the Federal Court, and you have to spend two years litigating. You could spend on legal fees the full amount of revenue you're ever going to get from your show.

As Mark said, the idea of putting it in the hands of the CRTC, when we're going to have to go there anyway under the Telecommunications Act, made a lot of sense, from an accessibility, cost, and efficiency standpoint.

Mr. David Lametti:

Mr. Kaplan-Myrth, do you have any thoughts about that?

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Taking a step back, I feel that there are a few different ways we've talked about to address that possibly illegal infringing content: going after the boxes themselves, or the people distributing the boxes, or identifying where that content is being captured from a legitimate source and then uploaded onto the Internet. FairPlay gets at one part of that. Really, it's blocking access to a site, so that would maybe choke off how end-users using those boxes would connect to the uploaded streams.

There are different ways of addressing this. I think that FairPlay creates an extremely powerful tool for a particular group adjacent to the CRTC, which would maintain this list that end-users of sites would then not have access to. I think there are probably much less blunt ways to find the content that's being uploaded and use Federal Court processes to stop that, or choking it off in other places, without creating such a powerful tool that, I think, is very ripe for misuse.

(1655)

Mr. David Lametti:

Thank you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thanks.

I have a whole lot of questions and about three minutes to get through them all.

The Chair: Two minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: What's that?

The Chair:

You have two minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Oh, I'll talk even faster. Jesus.

To Rogers, you said you're here as a content owner, and I believe Bell would be here primarily as a content owner as well.

Of the large companies, who is here to defend the users of the Internet, as opposed to the content rights holder? Is there not a conflict between the two for you as a vertically integrated company?

Ms. Kristina Milbourn:

If I may, I think the second half of our request speaks to us being here as an ISP as well. Rogers was actually instrumental in driving forward the appeal, which was ultimately heard by the Supreme Court of Canada. It rendered a very favourable judgment, and I think TekSavvy would agree that it was quite consumer friendly.

From our perspective, we are a rights holder, of course, but we're also an ISP. I think based on our recent Supreme Court experience, we have a very, very balanced view of how to manage these intricate issues as they relate to piracy, not just from a rights holder perspective, but insofar as the ISP obligations are concerned, and moving down the line, the users.

Mr. Mark Graham:

I think we're here in both capacities as well, and that's why you've seen our recommendations focus on the operators of the large commercial-scale infringing piracy sites and not on any sorts of remedies that would impact end-users. I think enforcement against the illegal sites actually helps end-users, because those sites are a leading distributor of malware. Also, when people pirate the content, it increases costs to Canadians who access content through legal means. So, we think it supports both constituencies.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Reports indicated that Bell met with CRTC officials and pressured universities and colleges to support the application with regard to FairPlay Canada. Is that something we should be concerned about?

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

I think dialogue with regulator staff before an application is filed is entirely appropriate. In fact, it should be encouraged because it creates open dialogue with a regulator—whether it's for telecom, milk or bread—so that both parties can be informed. There's nothing inappropriate about that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

For universities and colleges—?

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

I think you said maybe that Bell pressured universities and colleges. I would disagree with you entirely. Again, when someone's filing an application with the CRTC seeking support for those who think it's a good idea, it's perfectly appropriate to reach out to potential supporters and say, "Hey, do you think this is a good idea, and if you do, would you support this at the CRTC?” All constituencies do that. Again, I think it's entirely appropriate and, in fact, should be encouraged.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a bunch more on net neutrality but I think I'm out of time.

The Chair:

You're out of time.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you for playing.

We're going to move to Mr. Albas.

You have seven minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I want to pick up on net neutrality for MP Graham.

I disagree with this, but I think it was very smart of many of you here today to lump your concerns in with the wider category of illegal activity. That may be categorically correct, but I think most people would hope, when an RCMP officer sees someone driving dangerously down the road, that he or she would immediately move to protect the public's interest. We would hope the officer would do this rather than stopping and saying that there is an illegally parked car to the side, and then going under a municipal bylaw while there is obviously a moving concern.

I think you're trying to protect the interests of your company, and that's totally noble. We need you to do that. However, again, you're protecting the rights of your companies versus the wider interests and rights of everyone when we talk about public safety and whatnot.

As far as net neutrality goes, I will tolerate child pornography, terrorism recruitment and those kinds of sites being taken down as a point, because it's practical and it must be done. On the flip side, I disagreed with the government of Quebec when it tried to shake down ISPs outside of its jurisdiction to basically force gaming sites to come under their umbrella, so they could collect more revenue. I think you can't equate the two.

You're asking for a quasi-judicial branch of the CRTC to basically streamline your applications because you believe it's illegal, yet when the RCMP or our security apparatus need to take something down, they have to go through a judicial process of approval, get warrants, etc., to have those things done. Why do you think your needs should be streamlined while those that are more subject to public concern, things like terrorism and child pornography, have to go through a series of checks and balances for which we know there is judicial review?

I'll start with Bell, because you guys had the last word on illegal.

(1700)

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

The proposal we filed, first of all, does contain a series of checks and balances so that the party that is subject to the potential blocking order has an opportunity to make representations, the party seeking the block has an opportunity to make representations, and ultimately, an independent body makes a recommendation to the CRTC and the CRTC decides.

Second, as we've said a couple of times, for an ISP to engage in blocking, they need the authorization of the CRTC. It's a statutory requirement. That's why we're going there. We're going to end up there in any event. We could go to court and then to the CRTC and have two different processes, but that seems to us not entirely efficient, again, especially for smaller content owners and providers.

Mr. Dan Albas:

The Shaw application to the CRTC specifically referenced that there's a lack of clarity as to what the Federal Court can rule on in this. Would that be an area we could look at as a way to have more oversight and clarity for your businesses, rather than going to a model whereby it goes to the front of the line in these kinds of cases, beyond those other cases of criminal activity?

Ms. Cynthia Rathwell:

Yes, we discussed the need for clarification, and I will let Jay speak to the particulars of how that might happen.

To answer Mr. Lametti's question earlier, Shaw wasn't a member and isn't a member of the FairPlay coalition, but we did file a supporting brief. The reason, consistent with what Mr. Malcolmson just said, is that we believe it's a quasi-judicial body with a due process that's adequate to the task of dealing with this kind of content.

Jay can speak more to the particulars of the sort of amendment that would be in order to clarify the Federal Court jurisdiction.

Mr. Jay Kerr-Wilson (Legal Counsel, Fasken Martineau, Shaw Communications Inc.):

There are two things that could be done to help speed up the process or make it more efficient using the Federal Court as a tool.

One is to clarify the court's powers to order the specific blocking of a URL or to de-index it from a search engine to avoid the jurisdictional fight of whether that's actually within the wide ambit of injunctive relief that the Federal Court can grant. So, make it explicit, specific and clear that it's within the Federal Court's powers, because the Federal Court is sometimes a little leery about granting injunctive relief, and you want to give it comfort that this is actually what Parliament intends.

The second thing, to the point that Bell raised, is that right now you have a regime in which even if the court orders all ISPs to block access to specific content, you then have to go to the CRTC to ask for permission to do what the court has told you to do, and there's no guarantee the CRTC is going to say yes. That could put carriers in a position where they're either in breach of the Telecommunications Act or in contempt of court. That can't be good public policy, no matter what you think of FairPlay or any other initiative. Surely the CRTC has to be told that it has to allow ISPs to satisfy an obligation pursuant to a court order. That just seems to be common sense.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I appreciate that intervention. It at least fills out some of my interest in that.

I'd like to go to Teksavvy. Mr Kaplan-Myrth, do you believe that site blocking suggestions are technically feasible? As you said earlier, if there is eventually a clampdown, users will change behaviours—for example, encryption, such that there will not even be an ability for you to identify the information that flows through. Do you think that's technically feasible if those kinds of techniques get used, where an ISP will have no way of knowing what content is being transferred through its lines?

(1705)

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Look, I don't think it's necessarily technically feasible for every ISP right now to do the kind of blocking that is already proposed. There was no description in the FairPlay application of what site blocking is. We hear a fair amount about DNS blocking, so if that's what blocking is at this stage.... You know, DNS is fairly common for ISPs to provide, but it wouldn't necessarily be required. Presumably, an ISP might configure all of its users' systems to go to a DNS server and then not have to maintain a DNS server. There's no requirement to provide a DNS server, so presumably that ISP wouldn't be able to block it. If there were a requirement to block it, I guess that would require putting a DNS server in place, making their end-users use it—I'm not sure that's a possibility—and blocking it.

So, that's just sort of the simplest case.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I thought it was part of Mr. Lametti's time that was used, because she said she'd like to answer Mr. Lametti, so I would like an extra minute, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

You will have time to come back. Be very quick now, please, but you will have one more chance.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Mr. Malcolmson, you also mentioned that, on the standardization of notice, you could say the content is a violation against a rights holder, but you would then direct someone to the appropriate content. To me, that sounds very self-interested, given the vertical integration of your company to be able to do that. Do you think that's really in the public interest, or should it just simply involve giving the person notice that the content is illegal?

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

I think it is in the public interest, whenever there's an opportunity, to let Canadians know there are legal sources of the same type of content that they're consuming illegally. Whether it's content from Bell, Rogers, BlueAnt or CBC, if I'm pirating Anne of Green Gables, it might be in the public interest for the consumer of Anne of Green Gables to know that it's also available on cbc.ca.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I think it's more probable that it would be Game of Thrones.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Can we move on now?

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Great.

Mr. Masse, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I saw the stuff on piracy that was presented, and it is really important for us to have the discussion here today. One of the reasons I was interested is that we have heard from artists and creators very explicitly that they're concerned about their future. I'm not sure that even resolving that is a silver bullet.

In the area I represent is a place called Sandwich Town. It's the oldest European settlement in Canada west of Montreal. It's where the War of 1812 was fought. It's where the Underground Railroad was. There were rum runners and a whole series of things. Today, though, it's challenged by economic poverty, the closure of schools, and pollution. It has one of the highest rates of poverty.

I tell you all of this because right next to Sandwich Town is the Ambassador Bridge. The Ambassador Bridge has about $1 billion of activity per day. About 35% of Canada's daily trade takes place in my riding. A private American citizen owns the Ambassador Bridge. It's right next to Sandwich Town. In fact, they actually bought up houses. They boarded them up and knocked them down. It's quite lucrative, though. Matty Moroun, who owns it, is in the top 40 billionaires in the United States, and a lot of economic activity takes place right next door.

Now we, on the other side of Sandwich Town, a new border crossing called the Gordie Howe bridge. You might have heard of it. I've spent 20 years of my life trying to get a new public crossing. It's about $4 billion to $6 billion. There is very little activity taking place in Sandwich Town from this. There are supposed to be community benefits, but we don't even know how much. Essentially, right now, it hasn't really done a whole lot for the area. We're still waiting.

In front of Sandwich Town is the Detroit River, and then we have what's called the Windsor Port Authority. The Windsor Port Authority is a multi-million dollar operation that's doing quite well on its own, but it also has this lucrative new border crossing that's going to be coming into place along with other extensive work. If the Ambassador Bridge gets to twin, which the government has provided them a permit to do, we'll receive a major economic benefit from them.

On the other side of Sandwich Town is a railway that goes to a Canadian salt mine and other operations. It's a multi-million dollar operation, but it's smaller than the others. It's not CP. It's not CN, but it's doing okay—the Essex Terminal Railway. In between all of this, what people have gotten from the multiple billions of dollars of activity around them is nothing. They have closed schools, closed businesses, and closed the post office, and they have the highest rates of poverty.

I have to say that this is what concerns me, and I feel the artists that we've heard from are in the same predicament.

Do you have any suggestions whatsoever, in the time remaining, for what you can do, other than just hoping royalties will roll in if you stop piracy, to help improve artists' compensation in Canada? Even if it's not within the jurisdiction of your own company, is there anything you can suggest to this committee?

I fail to see how ending piracy alone.... Is there something new or different? I'm open to suggestions. You may not want to answer—I don't know.

Mr. Chair, we heard about this when we did our travel, and I see that we're still going on about the same thing.

Is there anything that anybody here can offer for those individuals?

(1710)

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

I actually used to go to school in Windsor and I lived under the Ambassador Bridge. I took my family there to see where I lived in college and, of course, it was gone. There's not much left there.

In terms of suggestions we would make, as I said at the beginning, cultural industries actually employ 630,000 Canadians and contribute 3% to our GDP. They are playing their role in the employment of Canadians. To the extent that piracy, if you agree with our perspective, is undermining that system, certainly stopping piracy, constraining piracy and limiting it will help the existing ecosystem that employs Canadians and creates jobs. If I'm an artist creating content, if I'm the producer of Letterkenny, I certainly want to know that the government is trying to stop the leakage of my intellectual property outside of Canada and that I'm being fairly remunerated for what I've created.

I think stopping piracy isn't all about trying to help the vertically-integrated companies. That's not it at all. It's about protecting those who create our content and making sure they're paid for it.

Mr. David Watt:

I guess I would just echo a remark you made earlier—that is, that $900 million of Rogers' revenue was directed to Canadian content producers and creators.

Ms. Cynthia Rathwell:

I think that's consistent with the comments of Shaw.

I think just speaking at a very high level, there are myriad commercial relationships between artists and the different enterprises for whom they are producing content. At one level, it appears very simple to advocate the introduction of a new right to add to artists' income. We had some discussions about the sound recording right, and soundtracks, and it seemed like a simple fix. It's not really a simple fix. It would unsettle the broadcast industry in Canada and it would have impacts on the broadcasting system to do that in terms of cost. There are also direct relationships between the artist, in that case, and the producers of the recordings they're making.

So at a high level, it seems as though there may be simple fixes in copyright by creating new rights, but when you drill down on it, as David said and as we said, there's a very complex framework at both the public policy level and the commercial level.

From our perspective as a regulated broadcast distributor, we believe we make incredibly important contributions to the broadcasting system. As a telecom provider, we believe we meet public policy objectives. All of this comes together to help Canadian artists. Unfortunately, copyright isn't a terrific mechanism, from a national perspective, in terms of executing domestic cultural policy.

(1715)

Mr. Jay Kerr-Wilson:

Mr. Masse, I can actually give you a concrete proposal that tomorrow would put money into the hands of artists. Right now under the Copyright Act, when radio stations play sound recordings or the recordings are played in stores and restaurants, royalties are paid. Parliament has deemed that under the Copyright Act, the money is split fifty-fifty between the record company and the performer. Give 75% to the performer and 25% to the record company and you've immediately improved the lot of every performer.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you very much for your testimony.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We'll move to Mr. Longfield for five minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you for the time.

Thanks to all the presenters today. You're giving us very concrete suggestions for our study.

We haven't talked too much about the EU's recent copyright legislation, particularly around article 13. It was a controversy at the time and a controversy through the summer. It looks at the question of how we grab content on the way up onto your platforms—content from legal suppliers like YouTube and others—to make sure that copyright is being paid.

Have you reviewed that part of article 13? Is that something we need to be looking at in terms of our legislative review? We are competing against the EU.

Ms. Cynthia Rathwell:

I'm not an expert on international copyright developments, but I think Jay has a lot of experience in this area. I'll defer to him.

Mr. Jay Kerr-Wilson:

I'm not an expert on international copyright developments, but as I understand it, article 13 has not yet been implemented. There are still some negotiations that have to take place within the European structure. We don't know what the final version will look like. Basically, it puts the onus on platforms that have user-generated content uploaded to them—i.e., YouTube and Facebook. It's not on the ISP level. It's on the platform level. It says you need to have a system in place to try to prevent unauthorized uploads of content. YouTube already has a very robust system of content match.

Now, YouTube's problem, they say, is that right now, if they find unauthorized content, they let the rights holder either take it down or monetize it. They can say, “You can keep the money or we'll take it down.” Their complaint about EU's article 13 is that it looks as though it forces them to take it down, and it takes the monetization away.

Canada doesn't have the same framework. If YouTube is engaged in communication of public copyright-protected content for a commercial purpose, copyright in Canada applies. Royalties have to be paid or, if it's unauthorized, it has to be taken down.

It's not getting at the problem. This isn't going to put money in anyone else's hands. This is just a way of reducing the amount of unauthorized content available on the YouTube platform. YouTube already does that. So it's a bit of a solution in search of a problem, and it doesn't really translate to what we're—

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

If I may, my thinking on this is that the previous review, five years ago, tried to make this technology agnostic, and technology has changed. What hasn't changed is the flow of information. How it flows is.... You know, there will be different technology five years from now. But it seems to me that trying to capture the value stream and get the revenue out of that value stream is what article 13 does.

I'm not a lawyer, but some of you are. I know that you all have an interest in this. It would be going into your platforms, so it could affect your business model.

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

I'm not sure of the way the European model, as proposed right now, would go into an ISP's business model. It's targeted at platforms, not at hosting. We don't take the uploads and then host them somewhere in a way that we could take them down. Instead we're just kind of moving the bits from one place to another.

I would echo what Jay said. I don't think the Canadian framework needs an approach like that. Copyright applies to the content on those services that are doing business in Canada already.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

I'll turn it over to Terry.

Thank you.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you very much. We've covered a lot today, and I thank you for that testimony on a variety of subjects.

There's a subject we haven't touched on, but we've heard it in different parts of the country when we travelled, and we've heard different testimony on it. It goes to what Robert said about pirating, which is that some people just don't think that what they're doing is wrong. They're not educated. There are a bunch of institutions and different groups that are educating people about the infringement of copyright through piracy.

Is your group, are your companies, able to do or doing educational programming about large companies with access to a lot of people.

Don't spam them. We went through a whole bunch of testimony on that. Seriously, you do have different ways of communicating to the people. The government has a role to play in that, but it's just like anything, whether it's seat belts, drinking and driving, or texting. A a certain amount of education needs to happen with the people.

I'll start with Robert.

(1720)

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

I think you're right that education is a key component of making sure consumers understand the implications to the cultural industries of consuming illegal content. Certainly, I think we could collectively do a better job of educating Canadian consumers. I suggested that if in the notice and notice regime there were a copyright infringement notice sent to a Canadian who is consuming—perhaps unwittingly—copyright infringing content, a notice that made that Canadian citizen aware that there was another legal source to get that content that supports our domestic ecosystem, perhaps that could be a very personal and effective way of educating that particular consumer. That is one way it could be done.

The Chair:

We're way over time.

Mr. Albas, you have five minutes.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Thank you.

I actually would like to follow up on what Mr. Sheehan was asking, just in regard to the education side. I'd actually like to focus on whether or not your companies, respectively, on some of these new box technologies that are coming out, are spending time with the RCMP so that they understand what is illegal and what to look for, so that there can be national bulletins. Are you're working with different associations for police, so that they're advised that this is an issue?

Ms. Kristina Milbourn:

Yes. We actually met early on with the RCMP and the CBSA. We've gone back to the RCMP. Where I think they do have a role to play is where we see the unlawful decryption of satellite signals, because there's a very clear prohibition in the Radiocommunication Act that says you cannot decrypt a satellite signal. To the extent that this type of activity is occurring to help fund and fuel this unlawful industry, yes, I think there's a role to play.

We also note that this is not the only means by which this content is being acquired. I think, in part, what you see before you in our submissions is that we're asking for modern provisions that address what is actually occurring. We heard a little bit about this sort of set-top box organized element, which is the large-scale redistribution of content, none of which is authorized.

That, I would submit, is not an area where the RCMP can be helpful, because there's no clear prohibition that we can point to in either the Criminal Code or the Copyright Act that would allow them to take jurisdiction to open an investigation, even if they wanted to.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay.

Ms. Kristina Milbourn:

I don't know if Mark or Rob has anything to add. We have met with the police, and we're still here.

Mr. Dan Albas:

I think that's very helpful, because earlier Mr. Watt mentioned that the Criminal Code needing to be updated, so I want some specifics.

Mr. Malcolmson, do you want to jump in?

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

You asked what we've been doing in terms of educating enforcement agencies.

We've worked for the last year and a half with the CBSA to help them understand how many set-top boxes are being imported into Canada every day, because most of them are made outside of the country and are brought in over the border. We've pointed out to them that these imports are happening and that they might want to look at them and take enforcement action. It's an ongoing battle for us to get their attention, but hopefully we will.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Okay.

Mr. Robert Malcolmson:

We've talked to ISED about the boxes coming into the country and not being certified under the Radiocommunication Act, because there are spectrum issues around these boxes. We pointed out that they're not compliant with the Radiocommunication Act.

Again, we're continuing to fight that fight and to educate enforcement agencies that have the ability to do something.

(1725)

Mr. Dan Albas:

Mr. Kaplan-Myrth, you mentioned earlier that on the notice and notice regime, sometimes personal information will be sent, which may violate someone's privacy. You'd like to see those things replaced by a more standardized form that wouldn't allow that information to come to you in the first place. Is it because you're worried about liability if you put in notice and notice and inadvertently give information about someone to someone else? Is that the erroneous information you're talking about?

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

I'm sorry. There may have been some confusion about that. I was asked if I would provide samples of the notices that we receive, and I said that there is some personal information in those notices, so we may redact them before we provide them to the committee.

Mr. Dan Albas:

Oh, no, I'm not talking about that. You said that sometimes you'll receive information, and when you forward it to someone on notice and notice and it is extraneous to the requirements—

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

That's right.

Mr. Dan Albas:

—you could be liable for it. Is that what the concern is?

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

It's not that we're necessarily liable for it in any way, since we're required by law to pass it on. The sort of thing I'm talking about there is the personalized links that appear in those notices.

The notice we receive will tell the end-user to “click here to confirm that you have received this notice”, and then it will have a link. It's not just a link to a website; it's a link with variable tags that identify which notice it was. What it means is that when the end-user gets that notice and clicks the link, the sender now has the IP address and other information about the person's computer and browser that they can associate with that notice. They have information about the individual that they didn't have before.

By passing that on, we're making our end-users vulnerable in a way that doesn't feel like it serves the purposes of the notice-and-notice regime. The end-user, in turn, gets that message from TekSavvy or from the ISP, not from the rights holder. We write some information as sort of an envelope around the notice that explains to the user that it is not from us, that we are just passing it on, and that we're required to pass it on, and all that sort of information. But then we have to provide the notice as it's given to us, including advertising for a potential competitor of ours. That puts us in a difficult position, and it's completely extraneous information.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

For the last question, Mr. Graham, you have a hard two minutes. That's it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It will be easy to manage. Thank you.

Mr. Kerr-Wilson, I want to follow up on a comment you made earlier that the CRTC may not be inclined to follow a court order. Can I ask you to confirm your position that the CRTC would not be inclined to follow a court order?

Mr. Jay Kerr-Wilson:

Yes, of course. The CRTC actually issued a ruling. It was in the case that was referred to earlier in which the Quebec government had sought to require people to block access to gambling sites. The CRTC is very clear. It spelled out that even where there is a municipal order, a court order or some other judicial order, its approval is still required.

It said that in deciding whether it will approve, it will look at the telecom act objectives, which don't necessarily coincide with Copyright Act objectives or Criminal Code objectives. This is the CRTC that has said this; I'm not assuming that this is the case. The CRTC has been very explicit about this.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Mr. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Could I just jump in there? Perhaps ironically, the CRTC made that finding partly at the behest of large ISPs that at the time did not want to block gambling sites in Quebec and asked the CRTC to step in to assert its jurisdiction in that situation.

The Chair:

That's the two minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That finishes it up?

Thank you, guys.

The Chair:

On that note, I want to thank our guests for coming in today and for a lot of information. I don't envy our analysts. They have a lot of stuff to go through. That's why we have so many of them. We spared no expense.

Thanks very much to all of you for coming in today.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

[Énregistrement électronique]

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous. Je vous souhaite la bienvenue à une autre intéressante rencontre du Comité INDU, tandis que nous poursuivons notre examen législatif de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Nous recevons aujourd'hui Andy Kaplan-Myrth, vice-président, Affaires réglementaires et distributeurs de TekSavvy Solutions; Robert Malcolmson, premier vice-président, Affaires réglementaires, et Mark Graham, avocat-conseil principal, de BCE; David Watt, vice-président sénior, Application des règlements, et Kristina Milbourn, directrice, Droit d'auteur et large bande, de Rogers Communications; et enfin, Cynthia Rathwell, vice-présidente, Stratégie législative et politique, de Shaw Communications, ainsi que — il ne figure pas sur notre liste — Jay Kerr-Wilson, conseiller juridique, de Fasken.

Bienvenue.

Je vous remercie tous d'être venus aujourd'hui. Chaque groupe aura jusqu'à sept minutes pour présenter son exposé, puis nous passerons à nos périodes de questions.

Commençons tout de suite par TekSavvy Solutions.

Monsieur Kaplan-Myrth, vous avez jusqu'à sept minutes. Allez-y, s'il vous plaît.

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth (vice-président, Affaires réglementaires et distributeurs, TekSavvy Solutions inc.):

Bonjour, monsieur le président et mesdames et messieurs.

Je m'appelle Andy Kaplan-Myrth, je suis vice-président, Affaires réglementaires et distributeurs à TekSavvy. J'aimerais vous remercier de m'avoir fourni l'occasion de vous faire part de notre perspective et de notre expérience relativement à la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

TekSavvy est un fournisseur indépendant de services de télécommunications au Canada établi dans le Sud-Ouest de l'Ontario et à Gatineau. Nous servons les clients depuis 20 ans, et ils sont maintenant plus de 300 000 clients dans toutes les provinces. Au fil des ans, nous avons constamment défendu la neutralité du réseau et protégé les droits à la protection des renseignements personnels de nos clients, dans le contexte du droit d'auteur, notamment.

TekSavvy diffère des autres témoins qui sont ici aujourd'hui pour deux raisons importantes, aux fins du présent examen. D'abord, bien que nous prenions très au sérieux la violation du droit d'auteur, nous ne possédons pas de contenu média qui est diffusé ou distribué. Nous comparaissons ici en tant que fournisseur de services Internet, et non pas comme fournisseur de contenu ou titulaire de droits.

Ensuite, pour fournir des services à la plupart de nos utilisateurs finaux, nous développons nos réseaux jusqu'à un certain point, puis nous utilisons des services de gros que nous achetons à des transporteurs pour couvrir le dernier kilomètre, pour atteindre les foyers et les entreprises. Cette couche supplémentaire fait en sorte que les choses fonctionnent parfois très différemment pour nous, par rapport aux FSI titulaires.

Aujourd'hui, mes commentaires porteront sur deux domaines: dans un premier temps, le régime d'avis et avis et nos préoccupations par rapport à son fonctionnement actuel; dans un deuxième temps, notre opposition aux propositions voulant bloquer des sites Web pour faire appliquer le droit d'auteur.

Je vais d'abord m'intéresser au régime d'avis et avis. Lorsque ce régime est entré en vigueur, TekSavvy a consacré des ressources importantes pour développer des systèmes afin de recevoir et de traiter les avis. Le maintien de ces systèmes et l'embauche du personnel nécessaire pour traiter les avis continuent de présenter un défi pour les petits fournisseurs de services Internet comme TekSavvy. Je vais en venir à nos préoccupations, mais j'aimerais d'abord commencer par dire que, du moins en principe, le régime d'avis et avis est une approche stratégique raisonnable à l'égard de la violation du droit d'auteur qui équilibre les intérêts des titulaires de droits et des utilisateurs finaux. En même temps, maintenant qu'il existe depuis près de quatre ans, nous pouvons voir que le régime profiterait de quelques adaptations. Nous recommanderions trois modifications du régime d'avis et avis actuel.

Premièrement, on doit imposer une norme pour permettre aux FSI de traiter automatiquement les avis conformément à la législation canadienne. En moyenne, nous recevons, chaque semaine, des milliers d'avis de violation de dizaines d'entreprises qui font appel à des cotes provenant de modèles différents, dont moins de la moitié peuvent être traités automatiquement. En effet, la transmission des avis est un service coûteux et difficile que nous devons fournir gratuitement aux titulaires de droits, et ce, selon un niveau de service impeccable. Ce n'est pas viable.

Les avis de violation sont des courriels qui contiennent généralement un bloc de texte en clair suivi d'un bloc de code. Certains expéditeurs utilisent des avis avec un bloc de code qui respecte une norme canadienne et contient tous les éléments de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur qui nous permettent de transmettre ces avis. S'ils contiennent le code qui respecte la norme canadienne, ces avis peuvent être traités automatiquement, sans qu'il soit nécessaire qu'une personne en chair et en os aille les ouvrir et en examine le contenu.

Toutefois, de nombreux avis utilisent le code adapté des avis de droits d'auteur américains qui ne contiennent pas tout ce que nous exigeons dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur canadienne. D'autres ne sont écrits qu'en texte clair; ils ne renferment aucun code. Dans ces cas, une personne doit en réalité lire le texte de l'avis pour confirmer qu'il renferme bel et bien le contenu exigé avant qu'on puisse le transmettre. Ces deux types d'avis doivent être traités à la main. C'est un processus lent et qui exige beaucoup de travail — et de façon réaliste, il n'est pas viable à mesure que les volumes augmentent. Si les titulaires de droits devaient utiliser une norme sur les avis canadienne, les FSI seraient à même de traiter automatiquement leurs avis et de mieux gérer un volume élevé d'avis.

Deuxièmement, on devrait fixer des frais que les FSI pourraient facturer pour traiter les avis. Actuellement, il ne coûte essentiellement rien du tout aux titulaires de droits pour envoyer des avis de violation. Tant et aussi longtemps qu'ils peuvent envoyer des avis sans frais, même s'ils n'obtiennent des règlements que d'un petit nombre d'utilisateurs finaux, il y aura un modèle opérationnel permettant aux titulaires de droits d'envoyer de plus en plus d'avis. Les FSI doivent plutôt assumer le coût de traitement de ces avis, puis répondre aux nombreuses questions des consommateurs qu'ils suscitent. Même de faibles frais aideraient à transférer le coût assumé par les FSI aux titulaires de droits et à limiter le volume d'avis. Nous recevons déjà des milliers d'avis par semaine. Je m'attends à ce que les grands FSI en obtiennent beaucoup plus.

Je ne propose pas nécessairement de réduire ces chiffres, mais nous devons créer quelques pressions économiques pour empêcher qu'ils se gonflent indéfiniment. On envisage déjà, dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, l'établissement de frais, et nous recommandons l'établissement d'un tarif pour protéger les FSI et les utilisateurs finaux contre le torrent causé par un nombre illimité d'avis.

Troisièmement, les avis de violation devraient être exempts de contenu inapproprié. De nombreux avis de violation renferment du contenu qui est intimidant pour les utilisateurs finaux ou qui peut violer la protection des renseignements personnels des clients. Dans certains cas, ils ne renvoient pas du tout à la législation canadienne.

Certains avis comprennent du contenu qui s'apparente davantage aux techniques d'hameçonnage et aux pourriels: faire la promotion d'autres services, offrir des règlements ou proposer des liens personnalisés qui révèlent secrètement à l'expéditeur de l'information au sujet de l'utilisateur final. Cela met les FSI dans une position délicate, puisque nous sommes tenus de transmettre des avis aux utilisateurs finaux, y compris tout contenu inapproprié, trompeur ou nuisible qu'ils peuvent comprendre. Cela ne sert pas les buts du régime d'avis et avis, et nous recommandons que le contenu ou la forme des avis soient prescrits, de sorte qu'ils ne contiennent que les éléments qu'ils doivent contenir.

Enfin, pour parler brièvement du blocage de sites, plus tôt cette année, un groupe d'entreprises médiatiques a proposé au CRTC un nouveau régime de blocage de sites qui visait à assurer la surveillance de la violation du droit d'auteur. TekSavvy s'est opposé à cette proposition faite au CRTC, et nous nous opposerons de même ici à toute proposition semblable. Pour dire les choses simplement, le blocage de sites constituerait une violation du transport commun et de la neutralité du réseau sans se révéler particulièrement efficace, et tout cela, sans réelle justification urgente. TekSavvy vous encourage fermement à vous opposer à de telles propositions de blocage de sites.

Merci. Je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions.

(1535)

Le président:

Excellent. Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons maintenant à BCE.

Monsieur Malcolmson, vous avez jusqu'à sept minutes.

M. Robert Malcolmson (premier vice-président, Affaires réglementaires, BCE inc.):

Merci, monsieur le président et mesdames et messieurs.

Je m'appelle Robert Malcolmson et je suis premier vice-président, Affaires réglementaires, de BCE. Je suis accompagné aujourd'hui de mon collègue Mark Graham, avocat-conseil principal, Affaires juridiques et réglementaires, de BCE. Merci d'avoir invité Bell à offrir son point de vue sur les façons de s'assurer que la révision de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur profite au maximum aux Canadiens et à notre économie.

Plus grande entreprise de communications du Canada, Bell emploie 51 000 Canadiens et investit 4 milliards de dollars par année dans les réseaux évolués et le contenu média. Ces investissements nous permettent de fournir des services de communications de pointe qui constituent l'épine dorsale de l'économie numérique canadienne. Nous jouons également un rôle clé dans le soutien du système culturel et démocratique canadien, investissant quelque 900 millions de dollars par année en contenu canadien et exploitant les plus grands réseaux de stations locales de radio et de télévision au pays.

Je crois que nous avons une perspective unique et équilibrée sur les enjeux que vous étudiez. En tant que créateurs de contenu et partenaire économique majeur du milieu canadien de la création, nous comprenons l'importance du droit d'auteur et les moyens de lutter efficacement contre le piratage. Comme intermédiaire Internet, nous sommes également conscients de la nécessité d'établir des règles équilibrées qui ne freinent pas indûment l'innovation légitime. Je suis très heureux de vous présenter notre point de vue aujourd'hui.

Je vais commencer par le piratage. De plus en plus, les créateurs, les détenteurs de droits d'auteur, les utilisateurs commerciaux légitimes et les intermédiaires s'entendent pour dire que les activités de piratage de grande envergure et à des fins souvent commerciales constituent un problème croissant au pays. Les sites de piratage atteignent aujourd'hui jusqu'à 15,3 % des foyers canadiens par l'entremise de récepteurs illégaux que les Canadiens peuvent se procurer facilement et qui sont faciles d'emploi. Il y a cinq ans, ce taux était pratiquement nul.

De plus, l'année dernière, on a dénombré 2,5 milliards de visites sur des sites de piratage donnant accès à du contenu télévisuel volé, et le tiers des Canadiens se sont procuré de la musique illégalement en 2016. Ces chiffres ont considérablement augmenté depuis. Dans une récente étude menée pour ISDE et Patrimoine canadien, 26 % des Canadiens disent accéder à du contenu piraté en ligne. Au Canada, le piratage de contenu télévisuel aurait des répercussions économiques de l'ordre de 500 à 650 millions de dollars chaque année.

À la lumière de ces tendances préoccupantes, nous croyons que la tâche la plus urgente qui attend le Comité dans le cadre de cette révision est de moderniser la Loi et les mesures d'application qui s'y rattachent afin de faire face au problème que pose le piratage Internet à l'échelle mondiale sans imposer un fardeau indu aux entreprises légitimes. Entendons-nous bien: nous ne demandons pas de cibler les Canadiens qui accèdent à du contenu qui enfreint la Loi. Nous tenons plutôt à ce qu'on s'attaque aux exploitants de services qui violent le droit d'auteur à des fins commerciales. Ce sont ces activités illégales à grande échelle qui nuisent aux industries culturelles, lesquelles emploient plus de 600 000 Canadiens, représentent environ 3 % de notre PIB et proposent des productions présentant des histoires purement canadiennes qui contribuent à renforcer notre identité culturelle.

À la lumière de ces faits, nous avons quatre recommandations.

Premièrement, il faut moderniser les dispositions criminelles de la Loi. Les sanctions pénales en cas d'infraction systématique du droit d'auteur sont un moyen de dissuasion efficace sans répercussions sur les utilisateurs individuels ni sur l'innovation légitime.

L'article 42 de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur comporte déjà des dispositions criminelles pour le vol de contenu à des fins commerciales; toutefois, force est de constater qu'elles sont désuètes. Effectivement, elles ont pour objet la copie illégale, tandis que le vol de contenu repose de nos jours sur la diffusion en continu. Ces dispositions devraient être neutres sur le plan technologique, de manière à s'appliquer également à toutes les formes de vol de contenu effectué à une échelle commerciale.

Deuxièmement, il faut renforcer l'application publique de la Loi. Dans des pays comme le Royaume-Uni et les États-Unis, les organismes d'application de la loi et d'autres instances publiques participent activement à l'imposition de mesures coercitives contre les principaux contrevenants. Le Comité devrait recommander au gouvernement de prévoir dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur la création d'une agence administrative chargée de l'appliquer et de demander à la GRC d'accorder la priorité aux enquêtes relatives au piratage numérique.

Troisièmement, il faut maintenir les exemptions de responsabilité en vigueur liées à l'approvisionnement de réseaux et de services dans l'économie numérique. Ces exemptions protègent l'innovation des services sans atténuer l'importance du droit d'auteur.

Quatrièmement — et pour terminer —, il faut envisager l'élaboration d'une disposition qui donnerait aux tribunaux le pouvoir d'ordonner aux intermédiaires de contribuer à remédier aux violations. Cette disposition s'appliquerait aux intermédiaires comme les FSI, les hébergeurs Web, les registraires de noms de domaine ainsi que les fournisseurs de moteurs de recherche, de système de traitement de paiements et de réseaux publicitaires. En pratique, une nouvelle section dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur permettrait à un tribunal d'ordonner directement à un hébergeur Web de fermer un site de piratage particulièrement nuisible, à un fournisseur de moteurs de recherche de ne plus le répertorier, à un fournisseur de traitement de paiements de cesser de recueillir de l'argent pour ce site, ou à un registraire de lui retirer son nom de domaine.

(1540)



Il ne serait pas approprié d'imposer une responsabilité financière à ces intermédiaires, mais ils peuvent et doivent s'assurer de prendre des mesures raisonnables pour contribuer à la protection du droit d'auteur, qui est essentielle à une économie numérique et créative moderne.

Merci de nous avoir donné l'occasion de présenter notre point de vue. Nous restons à votre disposition pour répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Passons maintenant à Rogers Communications.

Monsieur Watt, vous avez jusqu'à sept minutes.

M. David Watt (vice-président sénior, Application des règlements, Rogers Communications inc.):

Monsieur le président et mesdames et messieurs, je vous remercie.

Je m'appelle David Watt et je suis premier vice-président, Affaires réglementaires, chez Rogers Communications. Je suis accompagné de Kristina Milbourn, directrice, Droit d'auteur et services à large bande, chez Rogers. Nous sommes heureux d'avoir l'occasion de vous faire part de notre point de vue aujourd'hui.

Rogers est une entreprise de communications et de médias canadienne diversifiée, qui offre des services sans fil, d'Internet haute vitesse, de télévision par câble, de radio et de télédiffusion. Nous appuyons une Loi sur le droit d'auteur qui adopte une approche équilibrée à l'égard des intérêts des titulaires de droits, des utilisateurs et des intermédiaires, optimisant ainsi la croissance des services numériques et des investissements dans l'innovation et le contenu. En tant que membre de l'Association canadienne des radiodiffuseurs et de la Business Coalition for Balanced Copyright, nous appuyons leurs commentaires dans le cadre de cet examen.

Lorsque nous avons comparu devant le Comité il y a cinq ans, nous avons défendu le régime d'avis et avis comme moyen de dissuasion utile contre la violation du droit d'auteur par le téléchargement de films à l'aide de protocoles BitTorrent. Depuis, les Canadiens ont fondamentalement changé leur façon d'obtenir et de visionner du contenu volé. Un sondage mené en novembre 2017 par ISDE et Patrimoine canadien a révélé que les Canadiens utilisent de plus en plus la diffusion en continu pour visionner du contenu volé en ligne. Sandvine, une entreprise canadienne qui effectue des analyses de réseau, a signalé qu'en 2017, environ 15 % des ménages canadiens diffusaient du contenu volé en continu au moyen de terminaux numériques préchargés. Ces terminaux accèdent à une adresse IP fournissant la diffusion en continu. Bien que le téléchargement illégal demeure un problème majeur pour les titulaires de droits, la diffusion en continu illégale est devenue le principal moyen permettant aux voleurs de vendre le contenu volé accessible. Nous avons besoin de nouveaux outils prévus par la Loi pour lutter contre cette nouvelle menace qui pèse sur les titulaires de droits et sur notre système de diffusion canadien.

Nous sommes de plus en plus préoccupés par la croissance de la diffusion en continu de contenu volé. Nous avons pris des mesures en utilisant les recours existants en vertu de la Loi, mais ces recours sont insuffisants. Nous avons besoin de nouveaux outils prescrits par la Loi pour lutter contre cette nouvelle menace qu'est la diffusion en continu. Nous recommandons d'apporter deux amendements à la Loi pour améliorer la situation.

Premièrement, la Loi devrait définir comme un acte criminel le fait, pour une entreprise commerciale, de tirer profit du vol de contenu exclusif et protégé par le droit d'auteur et de rendre ce contenu accessible sur les services de diffusion en continu. Selon notre expérience, les interdictions civiles actuelles ne sont pas assez sévères pour dissuader ce type de vol de contenu.

Deuxièmement, la Loi devrait prévoir une mesure injonctive contre tous les intermédiaires qui font partie de l'infrastructure en ligne distribuant du contenu volé. Par exemple, une ordonnance de blocage contre un FSI exigeant qu'il désactive l'accès au contenu volé au moyen de terminaux numériques préchargés.

Ce serait semblable aux mesures prises dans plus de 40 pays, y compris au Royaume-Uni et en Australie. La coalition Franc-Jeu, dont Rogers fait partie, en a fait la demande au CRTC plus tôt. Cette mesure injonctive appuierait et compléterait cette demande.

En plus de ces amendements visant la diffusion en continu illégale, nous proposons aussi des recommandations pour améliorer le régime d'avis et avis. Ces propositions protégeraient les Canadiens contre les demandes de règlement et les trolls de droit d'auteur.

Premièrement, nous appuyons entièrement la position du gouvernement selon laquelle les futurs avis de droit d'auteur doivent exclure les demandes de règlement. Nous recommandons que les dispositions relatives au régime d'avis et avis soient modifiées afin d'interdire aux titulaires de droits d'inclure des demandes de règlement dans les avis. Nous recommandons également que le gouvernement prescrive par règlement la forme et le contenu des avis légitimes qu'un FSI devrait traiter en vertu de la Loi. Le formulaire Web prescrit empêcherait la saisie de renseignements inappropriés dans l'avis.

Deuxièmement, en ce qui concerne la décision rendue récemment par la Cour suprême du Canada au sujet des coûts raisonnables d'une ordonnance de communication de renseignements, ou ordonnance de type Norwich, l'ordonnance est la mesure subséquente, après qu'un formulaire de régime d'avis et avis a été envoyé, pour les personnes qui souhaitent prendre d'autres mesures. Le ministre devrait fixer un tarif par recherche et l'annexer aux règlements adoptés en vertu de la Loi. Selon les coûts de Rogers, un tarif de 100 $ par adresse IP serait approprié. Cette approche assurerait la transparence de toutes les personnes participant aux demandes d'ordonnances de type Norwich.

(1545)



Voici nos brefs commentaires. Nous serons ravis de répondre à toutes vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Enfin, nous allons passer à Shaw Communications.

Madame Rathwell.

Mme Cynthia Rathwell (vice-présidente, Stratégie législative et politique, Shaw Communications inc.):

Merci.

Bonjour, monsieur le président et mesdames et messieurs.

Je m'appelle Cynthia Rathwell, je suis vice-présidente, Stratégie législative et politique, à Shaw Communications. Je suis aujourd'hui accompagnée de Jay Kerr-Wilson, associé chez Fasken, expert de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Nous sommes reconnaissants d'avoir l'occasion de vous présenter le point de vue de Shaw sur cet examen de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Shaw est une grande entreprise de connectivité canadienne qui fournit à sept millions de Canadiens des services qui comprennent le câble et la télévision par satellite, Internet haute vitesse et la téléphonie résidentielle et, au moyen de Freedom Mobile, des services de voix et de données sans fil.

Shaw avait prévu d'investir plus de 1,3 milliard de dollars au cours de l'exercice 2018 pour établir de puissants réseaux convergés et apporter aux Canadiens des services de télécommunications, de diffusion et de distribution de pointe. Annuellement, en tant que distributeur de contenu, nous versons des dizaines de millions de dollars de redevances, conformément aux tarifs approuvés par la Commission du droit d'auteur, plus de 95 millions de dollars en contributions réglementées pour les programmes canadiens et environ 800 millions de dollars en frais d'affiliation pour des programmes, dont 675 millions de dollars sont versés à des services de programmation canadiens ayant un contenu surtout canadien.

Par conséquent, Shaw comprend bien et souhaite mettre en lumière l'importance d'un régime de droit d'auteur qui équilibre les droits et les intérêts de chaque élément de l'écosystème du droit d'auteur. Cet équilibre est essentiel à l'intérêt du Canada pour ce qui est de maintenir une économie numérique dynamique.

Dans l'ensemble, notre Loi sur le droit d'auteur atteint un équilibre efficace, sous réserve de quelques dispositions qui profiteraient de modifications ciblées. Des changements majeurs ne sont ni nécessaires ni dans l'intérêt du public. Ils viendraient perturber le régime soigneusement équilibré du Canada et mettraient en péril les objectifs stratégiques d'autres lois du Parlement qui coexistent avec le droit d'auteur au sein d'un cadre élargi qui englobe la radiodiffusion et la Loi sur les télécommunications.

Les propositions visant à augmenter la portée ou la durée des droits existants, à introduire de nouveaux droits ou à diminuer la portée d'exceptions existantes augmenteraient le coût des produits et des services numériques pour les Canadiens; elles mineraient les investissements, l'innovation et l'efficacité des réseaux; et elles auraient une incidence sur la participation des Canadiens à l'économie numérique. Les intervenants qui défendent les nouveaux droits ou les nouvelles limites semblent chercher une réponse simplifiée à des percées sur le marché mondial qui touchent la production, la distribution, la consommation et l'évaluation, non seulement des oeuvres régies par le droit d'auteur, mais aussi des biens et des services offerts par de nombreuses industries, si ce n'est la plupart d'entre elles. La réponse de la plupart des entreprises aux bouleversements du marché, y compris Shaw, a été d'investir et d'innover, de se diversifier et d'améliorer la qualité des services et de l'expérience du consommateur afin d'être concurrentielles. Les changements fondamentaux apportés au marché numérique ne peuvent être simplement contrebalancés par de nouvelles protections ou de nouveaux droits législatifs.

Les demandes de nouveaux droits semblent reposer, en partie, sur la suggestion selon laquelle le droit d'auteur est un outil pour la promotion de contenu culturel. La Loi sur le droit d'auteur vise à faire la promotion de marchés efficaces et à soutenir la création d'oeuvres, mais généralement, sans égard à la nationalité du créateur ni au lieu de création de l'oeuvre. Par conséquent, les tentatives d'utilisation du droit d'auteur comme instrument de politique culturelle mineraient l'atteinte des objectifs nationaux en matière de politique culturelle établis par d'autres lois. Un exemple clair est la proposition de Border Broadcasters Inc. concernant les droits sur le consentement à la retransmission pour les radiodiffuseurs, qui soutiendrait, selon elle, la production de programmes locaux. Shaw s'oppose fermement à cette proposition.

Si elle est adoptée, elle viendrait bouleverser une politique canadienne du droit d'auteur et de la radiodiffusion soigneusement équilibrée. Elle obligerait les Canadiens à verser des milliards de dollars par année en nouveaux frais pour les mêmes services, dont une grande partie serait envoyée aux États-Unis, tout en créant la possibilité de perte d'accès aux programmes, ainsi que d'interruptions de service. Ces répercussions saperaient la compétitivité de l'industrie de la radiodiffusion du Canada et inciteraient les abonnés à s'éloigner du système de radiodiffusion canadien, au détriment des objectifs de la Loi sur la radiodiffusion.

Selon la Loi sur le droit d'auteur du Canada, les services liés à l'exploitation d'Internet sont exemptés de la responsabilité en matière de droit d'auteur uniquement en ce qui touche la prestation de services réseau. Elle prévoit également que ceux qui fournissent un espace d'entreposage numérique sont exemptés de la responsabilité associée à l'hébergement de contenu.

En tant que fournisseur de services Internet, Shaw est fermement convaincue que ces exceptions devraient être maintenues. Les FSI qui profitent de l'exception touchant les services réseau sont soumis à des obligations en vertu du régime d'avis et avis, et la protection est refusée lorsqu'un réseau est réputé faciliter la violation. Qui plus est, l'exception touchant l'hébergement n'est pas offerte pour les documents dont l'hôte sait qu'ils violent le droit d'auteur. Cela étant, le droit canadien trouve le juste équilibre entre l'encouragement des investissements dans les services réseau et le fait de s'assurer que ces services soutiennent l'intégrité du droit d'auteur.

Certains intervenants ont aussi demandé qu'on réduise ou retire les exceptions existantes, comme celles touchant les processus technologiques, qui permettent aux utilisateurs finaux et aux fournisseurs de services d'employer des technologies innovatrices et efficaces afin de faciliter l'utilisation autorisée des oeuvres. Shaw croit fermement que ces exceptions représentent une approche équilibrée qui optimise la participation du Canada à l'économie numérique.

(1550)



Même si Shaw croit que, dans l'ensemble, la Loi sur le droit d'auteur est bien équilibrée, on devrait apporter des changements mineurs au cadre du régime d'avis et avis afin de restreindre les abus, comme les règlements obligeant que les avis soient transmis aux FSI par voie électronique et sous la forme prescrite. Ces mesures ont déjà été analysées en détail aujourd'hui.

De plus, Shaw fait valoir que de nouvelles mesures sont nécessaires pour permettre aux créateurs de faire appliquer des droits contre le piratage en ligne à l'échelon commercial. Cela va permettre de s'assurer que les titulaires de droits reçoivent une juste rémunération et que les réseaux sont protégés contre les maliciels fréquemment associés aux sites de piratage. Nous appuyons donc une modification des recours civils de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur pour clarifier le pouvoir de la Cour fédérale d'ordonner aux FSI de bloquer l'accès aux sites Web réputés violer la Loi.

Pour terminer, la Loi sur le droit d'auteur du Canada atteint un équilibre approprié et réfléchi entre les intérêts du créateur, de l'utilisateur et des intermédiaires, sous réserve des modifications mineures que nous avons recommandées. Les changements majeurs demandés par divers intervenants viendraient nuire à l'atteinte des objectifs stratégiques, conformément au cadre législatif global régissant le droit d'auteur, la radiodiffusion et les télécommunications.

Merci beaucoup. Nous sommes impatients d'entendre vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Passons directement à notre période de questions.

Nous allons commencer par vous, monsieur Graham. Vous avez sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je vais toutes les prendre. Merci.

D'abord, monsieur Kaplan-Myrth, j'aimerais vous demander de bien vouloir nous envoyer certains de ces avis que vous avez reçus, dans les différents formats, de sorte que nous puissions obtenir un aperçu du type de choses que vous recevez. C'est une demande simple. Vous pourrez les envoyer au greffier dans l'avenir.

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Je serai heureux de vous en faire parvenir une version.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est très bien.

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Bien sûr, ils contiennent les renseignements personnels d'utilisateurs finaux. Nous devons d'abord nettoyer une partie du contenu, si cela vous va, et nous pourrons ensuite vous montrer l'éventail des différents avis que nous recevons.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous en serais reconnaissant.

En ce qui concerne Bell et Rogers, je veux juste confirmer, aux fins du compte rendu, que vous êtes des membres de Franc-Jeu Canada. Appuyez-vous Franc-Jeu Canada?

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Oui, pour Bell.

M. David Watt:

Oui, pour Rogers.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L'un d'entre vous pourrait-il m'expliquer pourquoi le site Web est enregistré au Panama et hébergé aux États-Unis?

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Le site Web de Franc-Jeu...?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui. Cela semble étrange qu'un groupe de pression canadien soit enregistré au Panama et hébergé aux États-Unis. J'aimerais juste le dire aux fins du compte rendu.

Dans le mémoire de Franc-Jeu présenté au CRTC, on affirme que la loi existante peut être utilisée pour ordonner un blocage de site. Si c'est le cas, pourquoi demande-t-on une réforme de la loi?

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Il existe des recours juridiques pour combattre le piratage, notamment grâce à l'obtention d'une ordonnance de blocage par un tribunal. Notre expérience nous a permis de constater que ces ordonnances sont inefficaces.

De façon générale, elles le sont parce que les pirates exercent leurs activités de façon anonyme, en ligne et à l'extérieur du territoire canadien. Mis ensemble, ces facteurs font en sorte qu'il est très difficile de se prévaloir des recours classiques pour faire appliquer une ordonnance du tribunal contre un défendeur qui est essentiellement inconnu ou introuvable. C'est la première chose.

La deuxième, c'est que, en vertu de la Loi sur les télécommunications, comme vous le savez probablement, il y a une disposition particulière — l'article 36 — selon laquelle, pour qu'un fournisseur de services Internet, un FSI, ait un rôle à jouer dans la diffusion du contenu qu'il transporte, il doit obtenir l'autorisation du CRTC. Dans un monde où les fournisseurs de services Internet bloquent les sites de piratage notoires, vous avez besoin de la permission du CRTC.

Du point de vue de la coalition Franc-Jeu, nous sommes allés voir le CRTC avec cette demande en vertu d'une disposition précise de la loi. Nous disons tous qu'il doit y avoir des moyens permettant d'améliorer le processus judiciaire, en vertu de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, afin de produire un résultat semblable, de sorte que le piratage puisse être combattu sur les deux fronts.

(1555)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Bell ou Rogers ont-ils tenté d'obtenir ces ordonnances pour bloquer les sites?

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Nous nous sommes certainement présentés devant les tribunaux pour essayer d'obtenir des injonctions contre les vendeurs des terminaux numériques qui diffusent ce contenu. Mon collègue voudra peut-être vous informer de la durée et de la complexité de ce procédé.

Même lorsque vous pouvez réellement trouver un défendeur au Canada et obtenir la preuve que la personne participe à une conduite illégale... il nous a fallu, je crois, deux ans pour interrompre les activités d'un défendeur en particulier à Montréal. Imaginez à quel point il doit être difficile de s'attaquer à un défendeur à l'étranger.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Watt, avez-vous quelque chose à dire?

M. David Watt:

J'allais dire que cette situation exactement a fait l'objet d'une couverture médiatique assez importante. Il y a eu divers appels et diverses querelles juridiques. Les activités sont interrompues en ce moment. Toutefois, nous devrons encore probablement attendre un an avant de pouvoir aller en justice pour ce cas particulier.

La situation actuelle est tout simplement trop lente et fastidieuse. En réalité, vous devez aller prouver le bien-fondé de la cause, puis demander un recours pour le problème particulier, qui est la deuxième étape.

Nous proposons de le faire d'emblée avec la mesure injonctive. Vous devez tout de même établir une preuve prima facie, et solide, qu'il y a un problème avec le contenu qui est distribué par cette entité commerciale. C'est vraiment la seule façon de lutter en temps opportun contre ce type de vol. C'est un enjeu très important aujourd'hui et de plus en plus fréquent, et il aura des ramifications importantes pour les créateurs de contenu du monde entier et du Canada.

M. Mark Graham (avocat-conseil principal, BCE inc.):

J'ajouterais, juste pour donner quelques faits et chiffres à ce sujet, que je crois que ces types de recours concernant le blocage de sites sont aussi offerts dans la common law d'autres pays, comme le Royaume-Uni. Toutefois, ces pays ont tout de même adopté une réforme du droit pour faire en sorte que les injonctions soient directement accessibles contre les fournisseurs de services.

Je pense que cela s'explique par le fait que ce n'est tout simplement pas une solution pratique pour les détenteurs de droits de poursuivre un site Web, d'intenter avec succès des poursuites contre l'affaire entière, d'essayer de faire appliquer les règles, d'échouer à les faire appliquer, puis de demander une injonction distincte seulement à cette étape pour obtenir l'ordonnance de blocage de sites. Lorsque vous songez à la facilité avec laquelle une personne peut ensuite ouvrir un nouveau site Web, on voit qu'il y a un déséquilibre dans les recours juridiques qui sont offerts.

Je crois que la coalition Franc-Jeu a présenté une opinion juridique indiquant que le délai et le coût dépassaient deux ans et 300 000 $ pour une ordonnance en vertu du système actuel. Ce que nous proposons est un peu plus rationalisé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Corrigez-moi si j'ai tort, mais la majorité des pays qui utilisent ces systèmes ont besoin d'une ordonnance du tribunal dans le cadre du processus. Je ne crois pas que, dans ses observations, Franc-Jeu ait demandé une ordonnance du tribunal.

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Il existe tout un éventail de régimes dans le monde.

Comme Mark l'a mentionné, je crois que 42 pays disposent de régimes de blocage de sites sous une forme ou une autre. Bon nombre d'entre eux supposent effectivement une ordonnance du tribunal; d'autres sont des régimes administratifs.

Ce que nous proposons, c'est un régime administratif appliqué par le CRTC, en vertu de la Loi sur les télécommunications, dans le cadre d'une disposition existante de cette loi qui nous obligerait à communiquer avec lui dans tous les cas. C'est pourquoi nous sommes ici.

C'est un processus quasi judiciaire dans le cadre duquel un organisme de réglementation indépendant, pas un FSI, prend la décision pour ce qui est de savoir quels sites devraient ou non être bloqués. C'est un processus qui comprend tous les freins et les contrepoids auxquels on s'attendrait dans le cas d'un processus judiciaire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai le temps de poser une dernière question, qui s'adressera à vous tous.

Quels efforts a-t-on déployés pour cerner les raisons qui sous-tendent le piratage en premier lieu? C'est très bien de poursuivre les sites de piratage, mais il y a des consommateurs pour ces sites. Avons-nous examiné, par exemple, l'accessibilité du contenu canadien? Si vous regardez n'importe quel marché de médias au Canada, vous y verrez beaucoup moins de contenu accessible que dans presque tous les pays occidentaux. Cela fait-il partie du problème?

(1600)

Le président:

Je suis désolé, mais je vais devoir intervenir. Il ne vous reste plus de temps. Nous pourrons peut-être revenir à cette question.

Nous allons passer à M. Albas.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais remercier tous les témoins d'être venus et de nous faire part du point de vue de leur organisation.

J'aimerais commencer par TekSavvy.

Monsieur Kaplan-Myrth, votre exposé et celui du Consortium des Opérateurs de Réseaux Canadiens, qui a comparu devant le Comité la semaine dernière, ont exprimé très clairement que les petits FSI comme le vôtre n'appuient pas les mesures améliorées antipiratage proposées par certains des autres témoins ici. Qu'est-ce qui explique une si grande division entre les deux positions, à votre avis?

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Eh bien, comme je l'ai dit dans mon introduction, nous ne sommes pas des titulaires de droits. Nous ne sommes pas des entreprises de médias; nous ne sommes que les fournisseurs de services Internet. Je pense que si les fournisseurs de services Internet étaient très préoccupés au sujet du contenu illégal sur nos réseaux, nous ne commencerions probablement pas par le droit d'auteur. Il y a probablement sur nos réseaux du contenu illégal plus pressant qui pourrait nous inquiéter beaucoup plus et que nous pourrions envisager de bloquer ou d'aborder d'une certaine façon.

La raison pour laquelle nous parlons du droit d'auteur, c'est que les grands FSI du pays sont les entreprises médiatiques qui sont aussi très intégrées verticalement, et elles ont des intérêts pour ce qui est des médias.

M. Dan Albas:

Pourriez-vous nous donner un exemple de ce sur quoi nous devrions nous focaliser par rapport à certaines des autres préoccupations?

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Eh bien, je ne crois pas que nous devrions nous focaliser sur le blocage d'autres contenus, parce que nous devons maintenant composer avec la neutralité du réseau, dans notre rôle d'entreprise de télécommunications.

Ce que je veux dire, c'est que si nous devions examiner le contenu illégal, nous devrions parler de contenu terroriste. Vous savez, il y a de mauvaises choses qui se disent.

Nous transportons les octets, et ce, parce que nous sommes des entreprises de télécommunications. Nous transportons les octets sans les examiner. Tout comme vous pouvez prendre le téléphone, parler à une autre personne et dire ce qu'il vous plaît sur cette ligne téléphonique, et l'entreprise téléphonique ne mettra pas fin à votre appel en raison des mots que vous dites, nous transportons les octets.

Je crois que les grands SFI se préoccupent tout particulièrement du droit d'auteur et du blocage de sites Web pour faire appliquer le droit d'auteur, en raison de leurs intérêts dans l'aspect médiatique des choses.

M. Dan Albas:

Je vais maintenant passer à Rogers, à Bell ou à Shaw.

Le Consortium des Opérateurs de Réseaux Canadiens, dont TekSavvy est membre, a dit la semaine dernière que les grands FSI, comme vous, étaient verticalement intégrés. Pourriez-vous s'il vous plaît décrire ce qu'ils voulaient dire par cela par rapport à votre entreprise?

M. David Watt:

Certainement. Une entreprise verticalement intégrée, dans notre contexte, est une entreprise qui possède du contenu, puis, à mesure que vous remontez la chaîne, elle est verticalement intégrée, parce que ce contenu est ensuite distribué au moyen de l'organe de distribution, que ce soit l'entreprise de télécommunications sans fil ou l'entreprise de câblodistribution. C'est verticalement intégré dans ce sens-là. Cela remonte la chaîne. Ce n'est pas une intégration horizontale d'un service différent, c'est un service que vous possédez, qui est ensuite distribué par une entité que vous possédez aussi.

Toutefois, je dirais que l'argument de l'intégration verticale est essentiellement un faux problème. Nous sommes ici aujourd'hui en tant que détenteurs de contenu et nous avons tout à fait le droit de protéger le contenu que nous possédons. Au Canada, le CRTC a des règles très strictes, comme Andy l'a mentionné, en ce qui concerne le transport général et la neutralité du réseau. Il n'y a pas de confusion selon laquelle nous sommes en mesure de favoriser notre contenu sur notre organe de distribution. Ce n'est pas le cas. C'est traité également avec le contenu des gens qui n'ont pas d'organe de distribution.

Je ne comprends pas vraiment l'argument. Je peux voir que l'argument économique, comme vous dites, c'est peut-être que vous voulez protéger votre contenu. Vous ne voulez pas qu'il soit volé. Vous voulez obtenir une rémunération en contrepartie. En même temps, lorsque les gens peuvent avoir accès au contenu volé, ils sont moins incités à s'abonner à votre organe de distribution. C'est tout à fait vrai. En ce qui concerne le contenu, nous devons le protéger et nous avons un intérêt commercial pour que les gens restent connectés à nos organes de câblodistribution. Mais le pays a aussi un intérêt pour ce qui est de garder les gens connectés à nos organes de distribution.

Rogers, dans les modalités de son plan de câblodistribution, contribue à peu près à hauteur d'un peu moins de 500 millions de dollars par année à la création de contenu canadien. Les gens se sont concentrés sur la contribution de 5 % au fonds des médias et sur les paiements de droits d'auteur que nous faisons, mais nous versons également 500 millions de dollars par année à des programmeurs canadiens en frais d'affiliation. Ce sont Discovery, TSN, Sportsnet, MuchMusic et HGTV. De cette somme, environ 44 % de chaque dollar de revenu de ces programmeurs est consacré à des programmes canadiens, donc il y a des ramifications importantes.

(1605)

M. Dan Albas:

Même si je suis bien content de l'observation, monsieur Watt, je pense que nous commençons à nous écarter du sujet, parce que Mme Rathwell a dit très clairement que c'est une question de droit d'auteur. Il y a d'autres régimes, et je crois que nous commençons à empiéter sur certains.

Vous avez soulevé précisément la question de la neutralité du réseau. Dans des demandes précédentes présentées par Franc-Jeu, on a dit que le plan proposé concernant le blocage de sites ne violerait pas la neutralité du réseau. Toutefois, les principes de la neutralité du réseau n'empêchent-ils pas actuellement les entreprises comme la vôtre de retirer vous-même les sites ou de les étrangler?

M. David Watt:

Oui, ils le font, mais ce qu'il faut se rappeler, c'est que la neutralité du réseau est la libre circulation du contenu légal. Nous parlons ici de contenu illégal. Dans tout le contenu légal, il y a un traitement égal des octets, mais en ce qui concerne le contenu illégal qui se retrouve sur le Web, ce type de contenu ne se voit pas accorder les mêmes droits.

M. Dan Albas:

Le fait de demander à un organisme gouvernemental d'avoir le pouvoir d'ordonner, par exemple, de retirer un contenu quelconque, ne serait-il pas interdit en vertu de la neutralité du Net? Cela ne s'apparenterait-il pas à une violation indirecte?

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Selon moi, il ne s'agirait absolument pas d'une violation, selon une interprétation raisonnable de la notion de neutralité du Net. Comme M. Watts l'a dit — et je crois que le ministre Bains l'a aussi mentionné — la notion de neutralité du Net concerne la libre circulation du contenu légal sur Internet. Si, par exemple, un organisme gouvernemental demande à quelqu'un de retirer du contenu terroriste, s'agirait-il d'une violation de la neutralité du Net? Je suis sûr que personne autour de la table n'affirmerait une telle chose.

M. Dan Albas:

Je suis assez d'accord avec vous à ce sujet, mais encore une fois...

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Permettez-moi de terminer.

Si on peut prouver que le contenu diffusé sur Internet est illégal — c'est-à-dire qu'il a été volé —, je ne crois pas qu'il soit déraisonnable pour un fournisseur de contenu, qu'il soit intégré verticalement ou non... Vous savez, franchement, tout ça n'a absolument rien à voir avec l'intégration verticale. On parle ici de protéger les industries culturelles et le contenu canadien. Ces industries emploient 630 000 Canadiens et génèrent beaucoup de revenus légaux qui sont bénéfiques pour le pays. Selon moi, il ne s'agit d'aucune façon...

M. Dan Albas:

Mais encore...

Le président:

Merci.

Je suis désolé, mais nous avons largement dépassé le temps alloué. Je suis sûr que nous pourrons y revenir.

Monsieur Masse, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci d'être là.

Monsieur Kaplan-Myrth, j'ai aimé votre exposé. Le fait de compter sur un mécanisme uniforme est évidemment quelque chose qu'on pourrait envisager. Il n'est pas nécessaire d'attendre le processus du Comité pour examiner quelque chose, en faire part au ministre et y donner suite. Il s'agit d'un changement réglementaire qu'on peut et qu'on devrait apporter, et je ne comprends pas pourquoi c'est si difficile à faire.

Je veux toutefois aborder une autre question. On a à nouveau porté à notre attention la question du piratage. Je vis dans une région où, au fil des ans, on a tout vu, d'ONTV, qui venait des États-Unis, aux petits décodeurs de Direct TV dans lesquels on insère des cartes programmées.

Évidemment, les Canadiens sont motivés par la confidentialité en ligne. Bell, Rogers et Shaw, pourquoi croyez-vous que vos propres clients, ceux à qui vous fournissez des services, choisissent des options piratées — même des options qui utilisent votre propre contenu — plutôt qu'utiliser d'autres services que vous offrez? Il faut faire un lien ici, ou discuter de tout ça, surtout dans le cas de Bell. Vous avez parlé de 15 %, ici, dans votre déclaration. Vous affirmez qu'on parle de perte de revenu de 500 à 650 millions de dollars. Pourquoi pensez-vous que vos propres clients ne choisissent pas vos services et décident plutôt d'opter pour le piratage?

(1610)

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Je vais commencer, et d'autres auront peut-être eux aussi des commentaires à formuler.

Selon moi, certains consommateurs ont grandi à l'ère d'Internet, où le contenu est en grande partie accessible gratuitement sur Internet, et, s'ils peuvent y avoir accès, ils ne se demandent pas s'ils consomment quelque chose sur lequel quelqu'un d'autre détient un droit d'auteur. Le contenu est là, ils le consomment.

Souvent, ceux qui nous critiquent diront que, si nous faisions du contenu canadien, par exemple, qui était accessible à des prix plus raisonnables, les gens le consommeraient. Ils nous rendent responsables du problème.

Je vais vous donner un exemple concret. D'après notre expérience, le problème n'est pas là. Il y a une émission appelée Letterkenny, une comédie canadienne originale qui était très populaire. L'émission est disponible sur notre plateforme de contournement, CraveTV. Je crois que les quatre saisons sont accessibles sur CraveTV pour 9,99 $ par mois. Si vous voulez regarder légalement Letterkenny, il vous en coûte moins de 30 ¢ par épisode.

Nous rendons du contenu canadien accessible en ligne de la façon dont les gens veulent le consommer et à des prix raisonnables, mais le piratage continue de croître.

M. Brian Masse:

Rapidement, Shaw et Rogers.

Mme Cynthia Rathwell:

Je suis d'accord avec ce que Rob a dit. Je crois aussi que la question du prix est un faux problème. Nous offrons divers forfaits. Nous offrons la possibilité de payer à la carte. Nous avons procédé à une importante métamorphose de nos activités au cours des quelques dernières années en ce qui concerne la façon dont nous interagissons avec nos clients et nous avons aussi fait des investissements massifs dans les réseaux et les plateformes avancés en ce qui a trait à la consommation de services de diffusion de pointe et la mise en place d'une infrastructure de classe mondiale pour Internet.

Il y a un problème au sein d'un segment de la population qui veut tout simplement du contenu gratuitement. Pour revenir à ce que nous produisons, nous livrons concurrence à un produit qui reste extrêmement réglementé et, malgré le fait qu'il s'agit d'une discussion sur le droit d'auteur, je me fais l'écho des commentaires de tous les autres témoins, ici, et c'est aussi quelque chose que j'ai dit dans ma déclaration préliminaire. Ce que nous faisons en tant qu'entreprise est indissociablement lié à d'autres objectifs stratégiques et à la survie de l'ensemble du système de radiodiffusion canadien.

M. Brian Masse:

J'aimerais savoir ce que M. Watt en pense.

Vous pouvez peut-être commencer. J'aimerais utiliser le temps qu'il me reste pour répondre à ma question.

De quelle façon classeriez-vous vos entreprises par rapport à la décision du CRTC en matière de petits forfaits? Je comprends ce que vous avez dit, ici, mais j'aimerais que vos commentaires figurent au compte rendu en ce qui concerne la façon dont, selon vous, vos entreprises réagiront à l'introduction par le CRTC des petits forfaits à l'intention des consommateurs.

On note l'émergence d'un marché illégal du piratage, comme vous l'avez mentionné, aujourd'hui, et je crois qu'il existe une double relation, ici, alors j'aimerais savoir de quelle façon vous classez votre mise en oeuvre des petits forfaits, comme pour la précédente...

M. David Watt:

Dans le cas de Rogers, je dirais que notre mise en oeuvre des petits forfaits est une réussite. Nous avons mis les choses en place à temps, comme on l'exigeait. Il s'agit maintenant du forfait de base de tous nos forfaits de télévision par câblodistribution.

Nous commençons avec notre forfait de départ à 25 $. Pour Rogers, nous incluons les « quatre chaînes américaines et une chaîne au choix » dans ce forfait à 25 $. C'est le forfait de base que les clients peuvent ensuite compléter avec nos forfaits supérieurs. Il y a une demande. Les gens prennent ce petit forfait. Le problème, cependant, c'est que, même là, 25 $, c'est le coût minimal. On pourra peut-être recouvrer les coûts, peut-être pas. C'est extrêmement serré. Cependant, il faut livrer concurrence aux services de diffusion en continu sur IP. On peut les voir au coin des rues — 12,95 $ par mois pour 1 000 chaînes — et il s'agit simplement de contenu volé. Bien sûr, il y a un décalage de 20 secondes comparativement au contenu original ou encore la qualité équivaut peut-être à seulement 90 % de la nôtre, mais c'est très difficile de livrer concurrence à ce genre de choses. C'est une question de prix, et c'est un problème auquel nous sommes confrontés.

Mme Kristina Milbourn (directrice, Droit d'auteur et large bande, Rogers Communications inc.):

Selon moi, il ne faut pas perdre de vue non plus la situation difficile dans laquelle le consommateur se retrouve. Dans de nombreux cas, ces pirates exercent leurs activités avec une telle impunité qu'ils ont des magasins ou des kiosques dans des centres commerciaux. Souvent, les gens ne savent même pas qu'ils ne font pas affaire avec une EDR légitime. Je crois que c'est là un des aspects de l'adoption culturelle en hausse de ce type de service de diffusion en continu, car le consommateur ne sait pas du tout, parfois, qu'il fait quelque chose de mal.

(1615)

M. Brian Masse:

Cependant, je crois que, ce qui est tout aussi important, si on utilise des documents qui ont été présentés ici aujourd'hui et vu les pourcentages dont on parle, c'est qu'on parle ici des membres de votre famille, de vos voisins, de vos amis, de vos collègues. Il y a un élément de motivation, ici.

Je ne sais pas combien de temps il me reste. S'il me reste deux minutes, je pourrai peut-être les utiliser plus tard, pour Bell et pour...

Le président:

Il ne vous reste plus de temps.

M. Brian Masse:

On peut peut-être au moins leur permettre de s'exprimer pour le compte rendu, parce que c'est ce que je cherchais à connaître... les racines du problème.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons passer à M. Sheehan, pour sept minutes.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Avant de commencer, je tiens à dire que je partage mon temps avec M. Lloyd et M. Lametti.

J'ai une question très rapide pour vous, Andy. Vous pouvez essentiellement répondre à ma question par oui ou par non. Les FSI devraient-ils participer d'une façon ou d'une autre à la rémunération des créateurs de contenu, les artistes? Certains témoins nous ont dit que ce devrait être le cas. Croyez-vous que les FSI devraient participer à une structure tarifaire quelconque?

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

J'aimerais bien que la réponse soit aussi simple qu'un oui ou un non. Si je dois dire oui ou non, alors je dirais non. Je reconnais que, du point de vue stratégique, c'est une question complexe qui concerne le transfert du contenu qui, anciennement, était télédiffusé, sur Internet. Il y a des enjeux vraiment intéressants auxquels on peut réfléchir à cet égard.

Nous avons un point de vue assez unique sur cette question en tant que fournisseurs grossistes. L'argument général, selon moi, c'est que les fournisseurs de services Internet profitent de l'augmentation du nombre d'utilisateurs qui se tournent vers eux et utilisent leur réseau pour obtenir le contenu qui, avant, était peut-être offert à la télévision ou qu'ils obtenaient, dans le passé, à la télévision. C'est peut-être vrai pour les entreprises qui bâtissent les réseaux et bénéficient d'économies d'échelle lorsqu'un plus grand nombre d'utilisateurs utilisent leur réseau, puisque fournir des services à ces utilisateurs devient moins onéreux. Ce n'est pas le cas pour les fournisseurs grossistes. Nous payons des tarifs fixes pour chaque utilisateur qui se joint à notre réseau.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Je sais que votre situation est unique. Je voulais tout simplement que ce soit dit pour le compte rendu maintenant — nous allons probablement approfondir un peu la question — et partager mon temps avec deux autres membres.

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Je comprends.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

J'aimerais poursuivre sur cette lancée en adoptant le point de vue des créateurs. Nous parlons d'équilibre et, malgré tout, le marché ne fonctionne pas pour les créateurs. Nous avons reçu des témoins solides et j'ai rencontré des créateurs de ma circonscription de Guelph. Ils disent qu'ils sont payés une fraction de ce qu'ils obtenaient avant en raison des changements technologiques. Il y a assurément des changements liés au marché qui ont une incidence.

Durant les témoignages, cet après-midi, on nous a parlé de scruter les services de diffusion continue à la recherche de contenu piraté. Qu'en est-il des services de diffusion en continu qui offrent du contenu non piraté, des services comme Netflix ou YouTube? Y a-t-il une possibilité de tirer des recettes par l'intermédiaire des FSI ou grâce au modèle d'intégration verticale? De quelle façon pourrait-on examiner le projet de loi afin de tenir compte des nouvelles technologies liées aux services de diffusion en continu de façon à ce que le système soit plus équitable pour les créateurs? C'est une question que je lance comme ça.

Andy, vous pourriez peut-être continuer de répondre, mais je pose aussi la question aux grandes entreprises intégrées.

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Ce n'est pas vraiment dans les cordes de TekSavvy, comme vous le savez...

M. Lloyd Longfield:

D'accord.

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

... mais je vais essayer de répondre rapidement à la lumière de ce que je connais du domaine.

Lorsqu'on regarde ces sites légitimes, c'est vraiment une question de droits de licence qui ont été négociés et ce qui, au bout du compte, est remis aux artistes, dont vous avez entendu parler. C'est aussi une question, lorsqu'on parle d'un site comme YouTube, des activités d'application de la loi réalisées sur ce site afin d'essayer d'empêcher la diffusion de contenu illégal.

On considère habituellement que YouTube a d'assez solides systèmes pour surveiller ce genre de choses, alors il faudrait peut-être parler d'autres sites. Selon moi, ce qu'on constate vraiment, lorsqu'on regarde tous ces sites légaux... Je crois qu'il y a un changement au chapitre de l'équilibre entre ce que ces entreprises conservent et ce qu'elles transfèrent aux artistes.

(1620)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Exactement.

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

C'est un enjeu un peu différent de la question du piratage pure et simple.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

J'ai remarqué un peu de langage non verbal à ce sujet de votre côté. Voulez-vous nous dire rapidement ce que vous en pensez.

M. Robert Malcolmson:

J'essayais de trouver une réponse.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

D'accord.

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Je pense que vous avez mis le doigt sur le problème. À une époque où notre éternel écosystème réglementé et linéaire est — certains diraient supplanté et je dirai pour ma part qu'il est assurément dilué — dilué, donc, par les fournisseurs de services par contournement, de quelle façon pouvons-nous trouver une méthode, sans restreindre indûment la disponibilité de ce contenu par contournement, pour intégrer tout ça dans notre système, et ce, au profit des artistes, des créateurs, des producteurs et des diffuseurs?

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Oui.

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Je sais que c'est bel et bien un problème réel.

Le gouvernement a entrepris un examen législatif de la Loi sur les télécommunications et de la Loi sur la radiodiffusion, et c'est en fait l'une des questions qui ont été posées. Les responsables ont demandé, précisément, de quelle façon on peut s'assurer que les fournisseurs de services en ligne non canadiens contribuent à notre système.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Exactement.

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Il y a de nombreuses façons de procéder. On pourrait, par exemple, leur demander d'affecter un pourcentage de leurs revenus canadiens à des productions canadiennes. Si on pense à Netflix, je crois que l'entreprise compte près de 7 millions d'abonnés au Canada, mais elle ne paie pas de taxes de vente canadiennes et ne compte pas d'employés au Canada tout en faisant beaucoup d'argent ici.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Oui, tout à fait.

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Serait-il inapproprié de lui demander de participer d'une façon ou d'une autre à notre système? C'est...

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je me demande si les fournisseurs pourraient participer à un modèle quelconque de collecte.

Mme Cynthia Rathwell:

Oui.

J'aimerais préciser un peu ce que Rob a dit. Je crois qu'il y a beaucoup de choses à évaluer au sujet du rôle des services par contournement en tant que tel dans le système. Je suis aussi d'accord avec ce qu'Andy a dit, soit que, dans une large mesure, lorsqu'on parle purement des droits d'auteur, c'est une question de relations contractuelles établies.

Je sais que beaucoup de producteurs canadiens sont très heureux de leur relation avec Netflix, ce qui provoque la consternation chez certaines entreprises médiatiques canadiennes qui lui font concurrence pour les droits. J'aimerais préciser, pour le compte rendu, que Shaw n'est pas une entreprise intégrée verticalement au chapitre du portefeuille médiatique, alors je parle de façon assez objective. Nous avons une entreprise affiliée et distincte, une entreprise publique, Corus. Nous sommes une entreprise de connectivité.

Pour revenir à votre question sur le rôle possible des intermédiaires à l'appui des artistes ou — je ne veux pas trop m'éloigner du sujet — du contenu canadien, je crois que, du point de vue Shaw, c'est très important d'examiner la genèse des exemptions actuelles touchant la notion d'entreprise de télécommunication sous-jacentes aux FSI. C'est quelque chose qui, à l'origine, a été établi dans la Loi sur les chemins de fer, et c'est une situation qu'il faut maintenir, parce que nous tentons de bâtir nos réseaux de pointe à l'échelle du pays. L'imposition aux FSI de ces genres de mécanismes de soutien des artistes — dans le contexte du droit d'auteur ou de la diffusion — est une option que Shaw ne soutiendrait pas.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Les trois derniers mots m'ont échappé. Que Shaw soutiendrait ou ne soutiendrait pas?

Mme Cynthia Rathwell:

Ne soutiendrait pas.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons manquer de temps.

Monsieur Lloyd, vous avez cinq minutes. Allez-y, s'il vous plaît.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à vous tous d'être là aujourd'hui.

Ma première question vous est destinée, monsieur Kaplan-Myrth. Dans le mémoire de Rogers, il est précisé que, à la lumière de la récente affaire devant la Cour suprême, l'entreprise croit qu'il devrait y avoir un tarif établi à 100 $ par adresse IP. J'aimerais tout simplement vous entendre sur l'ordre de grandeur d'une telle proposition. Qu'est-ce que cela signifierait pour un petit fournisseur comme TekSavvy? Quels seraient les coûts de ces frais prévus de 100 $ par adresse IP?

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Je ne sais pas ce qui a motivé l'établissement de ce taux précis pour Rogers. Ce montant serait peut-être aussi approprié pour TekSavvy. Il se peut que nous examinions tout ça pour ensuite constater qu'il faut opter pour autre chose. Nous aimerions peut-être évaluer davantage l'idée d'un taux établi pour les ordonnances de type Norwich, dont David parlait, plutôt que d'opter pour le régime d'avis et avis.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Vous dites donc, essentiellement, que la recommandation de Rogers d'établir un tarif de 100 $, les frais que l'entreprise a estimés pour elle-même relativement à une ordonnance de type Norwich, ne constituerait pas, selon vous, un fardeau financier pour une entreprise comme TekSavvy?

(1625)

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Je suis désolé, mais je crois que la proposition, si je ne me trompe pas, c'est que les fournisseurs de services pourraient exiger un tarif de 100 $ pour répondre à une ordonnance de type Norwich, visant la divulgation de l'identité d'un utilisateur final lorsque ce dernier fait l'objet d'une poursuite intentée par un fournisseur de contenu.

M. Dane Lloyd:

D'accord, alors il ne s'agit pas seulement des coûts...

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Nous facturerions ce tarif, et la question serait de savoir si c'est un montant approprié.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Donc, essentiellement, vous dites que ce taux n'est pas trop bas, que faire toutes ces choses à ce taux ne serait pas un fardeau financier pour votre entreprise.

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Nous n'avons pas réfléchi et examiné ce dont il serait question. Ça me semble à première vue un taux qui est probablement raisonnable ou qui est dans la bonne fourchette.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

Je suis aussi heureux de voir qu'il semble y avoir beaucoup de consensus au sein du Comité sur la normalisation du régime d'avis et avis. Selon vous, pourrait-on aller trop loin en décidant d'aller dans cette direction et de recommander la normalisation? Y a-t-il quoi que ce soit qui pourrait aller trop loin, quelque chose que, selon vous, nous ne devrions pas envisager, lorsqu'il est question de ces recommandations sur la normalisation?

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Je ne suis pas sûr de comprendre ce que vous voulez dire lorsque vous parlez d'aller trop loin. Je crois que le formulaire standard qui s'appuie sur un code que nous pouvons traiter automatiquement et qui englobe le contenu à inclure satisferait à l'ensemble des exigences.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Il semble y avoir un accord à cet égard, ce qu'on voit rarement au sein du Comité.

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Pardonnez-moi, si vous n'y voyez pas d'inconvénient, j'aimerais ajouter quelque chose à ce sujet.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Allez-y.

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Vous avez demandé ce en quoi consisterait aller trop loin. Assurément, nous sommes favorables à l'élimination des demandes d'arrangement envoyées aux consommateurs. Ce n'est pas approprié. C'est quelque chose qu'il faudrait retirer des avis. Cependant, si on se trouve dans une situation où on envoie un avis à quelqu'un qui consomme illégalement un élément de contenu canadien, par exemple, je ne suis pas sûr que ce soit une si mauvaise chose que ça, du point de vue de la politique publique, de dire dans l'avis : « a) vous consommez ce contenu illégalement et b) il y a une autre source de consommation légale, et la voici ».

M. Dane Lloyd:

D'accord.

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Cela répond aux questions que vous avez posées.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Oui. Je suis heureux que vous ayez pris la parole, parce que ma prochaine question vous est destinée, monsieur Malcolmson.

Dans votre déclaration, vous avez dit que vous aimeriez un modèle neutre d'un point de vue technologique pour lutter contre les infractions à la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Diriez-vous que le libellé actuel de la Loi est trop précis et que c'est la raison pour laquelle nous n'avons pas pu lutter contre le problème de la diffusion en continu?

M. Robert Malcolmson:

En un mot, oui. Je pense que la disposition actuelle parle de copies, et donc...

M. Dane Lloyd:

Actuellement, il n'y a pas de disposition concernant la diffusion en continu...

M. Robert Malcolmson:

La diffusion en continu n'est probablement pas visée.

M. Dane Lloyd:

D'accord. Donc, si nous adoptions une mesure neutre d'un point de vue technologique, vous recommanderiez un libellé permettant de tout couvrir?

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Oui.

M. Dane Lloyd:

D'accord.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Il vous reste 30 secondes.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Lorsque nous parlons d'une violation criminelle, de vol organisé de droits d'auteur, quel genre d'exemple pouvez-vous fournir? Pouvez-vous donner un exemple d'une menace organisée au droit d'auteur?

M. Mark Graham:

Selon moi, les meilleurs exemples sont les services illégaux de télévision sur IP, comme on les appelle, qui sont parfois offerts. Pour vous donner un exemple, il y a des gens qui installent 60 récepteurs de télévision, qui sont souvent obtenus frauduleusement, dans des sous-sols partout au pays. Ils téléchargent le contenu de tous les postes vers un service de câblodistribution illégal, puis vendent des abonnements à ce service 10 $ par mois. Tout le contenu est volé, et pas un seul dollar n'est versé...

M. Dane Lloyd:

Le gouvernement peut-il de façon réaliste arrêter ces gens? Est-ce vraiment possible?

M. Mark Graham:

Ce l'est, en fait. Bon nombre de ces personnes sont identifiées tout le temps par les détenteurs de droits du système, mais nous n'avons pas de recours actuellement pour nous y attaquer.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

M. David Watt:

Si vous me permettez de vous interrompre, c'est exactement l'intention de la demande de Franc-Jeu et de la mesure injonctive, soit qu'il y aurait une ordonnance obligeant les FSI à bloquer l'adresse IP d'où vient le flux.

M. Dane Lloyd:

J'avais espéré pouvoir poser une question complémentaire, mais...

Le président:

Vous aurez le temps d'y revenir.

M. David Watt:

C'est l'entité commerciale qui le fait, pas l'utilisateur final. C'est la personne qui possède le serveur qui héberge l'adresse IP. C'est pour bloquer ça.

Le président:

Nous allons passer à Mme Caesar-Chavannes.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.):

Merci.

Merci aux témoins d'être là aujourd'hui.

Monsieur Watt, vous avez mentionné avoir vu la montée de la télédiffusion en continu de contenu volé avec une profonde préoccupation. Vous avez mentionné que les recours en vertu de la loi sont insuffisants. Vous avez formulé certaines recommandations de modification. Ma question est la suivante : en plus des modifications de la Loi, quels nouveaux outils et nouvelles technologies sont accessibles pour nous aider à dissiper vos inquiétudes au sujet de la diffusion en continu?

(1630)

M. David Watt:

Pour ce qui est des nouveaux outils et des nouvelles technologies, je crois qu'il y en a beaucoup actuellement. Les analyses de Sandvine nous permettent d'identifier ceux qui téléchargent beaucoup de contenu en amont. Comme M. Graham l'a mentionné, la question consiste à savoir de quelle façon les gens obtiennent un tel contenu? Littéralement, ils installent 60 décodeurs, syntonisent un poste sur chacun puis diffusent en continu le contenu 24 heures sur 24.

Grâce aux analyses, grâce à la nouvelle technologie, c'est ainsi que nous pouvons identifier ceux qui téléchargent en amont de grandes quantités de données, des quantités qu'on peut seulement voir lorsque les gens font des choses de cette nature.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Quelqu'un d'autre? TekSavvy, Shaw?

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Je réfléchis tout simplement à ces genres de hauts débits de téléchargement en amont. Les fournisseurs de services pourraient couper l'accès à ces utilisateurs s'ils le voulaient en publiant des politiques sur la gestion du trafic Internet qui sont encadrées par le CRTC. Il faudrait établir ces lignes directrices, puis les appliquer. Les fournisseurs peuvent déjà le faire sur leur propre réseau d'après ce que j'en sais. Assurément, ce n'est pas un problème de politique sur le droit d'auteur.

Mme Celina Caesar-Chavannes:

Merci.

Je suis désolée, monsieur le président. Je vais partager mon temps avec M. Lametti.

L'un des principaux arguments formulés par ceux qui s'opposent aux mesures de protection dans la Loi consiste à remettre en question la théorie de « l'ensemble passif de câbles ». Pouvez-vous décrire la mesure dans laquelle les FSI peuvent connaître le contenu des données qu'ils transmettent?

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Je peux répondre à cette question pour TekSavvy, mais j'aimerais aussi bien savoir ce qu'ont à dire à ce sujet les entreprises de télécommunication.

Dans notre cas, cela dépend en grande partie de la plate-forme et de l'équipement que nous avons en place. Nous pouvons voir toute l'information que les entreprises de télécommunication nous donnent. Nous sommes des fournisseurs de gros alors nous nous appuyons en grande partie sur les entreprises de télécommunication pour obtenir de l'information sur les connexions réelles de nos utilisateurs finaux. Lorsqu'une telle information nous est fournie, nous pouvons connaître le volume, le nombre de gigaoctets qu'une personne a téléchargés durant une période donnée.

Nous pourrions mettre en place des pièces d'équipement permettant de regarder le contenu et de découvrir ce dont il s'agit. Nous ne le faisons pas, alors nous ne savons absolument pas quel est le contenu consulté et transmis par les utilisateurs finaux. Et ça va plus loin. Ce n'est pas seulement le contenu, c'est aussi une question du protocole sur Internet. Nous ne regardons pas ce dont il s'agit et nous n'en faisons pas le suivi, mais il y a de l'équipement qui existe et nous pourrions l'utiliser si nous voulions faire un suivi de ce genre d'information au sujet de nos utilisateurs.

M. David Watt :

Oui, on a accès à l'équipement d'inspection des paquets qui nous permet d'en connaître le contenu, mais, concrètement, nous ne pouvons pas étrangler les sites ou distinguer les octets. C'est quelque chose qu'on fait vraiment à des fins d'information seulement.

Le président :

Il vous reste 30 secondes.

M. David Lametti (LaSalle—Émard—Verdun, Lib.) :

J'ai oublié si Shaw fait partie de la coalition Franc-Jeu. Je veux poser des questions générales à ce sujet.

Si, comme vous l'avez dit, vous vous en prenez aux grands sites qui utilisent du contenu contestable, pourquoi faut-il une entité distincte pour évaluer tout ça? La Cour fédérale est là. Disons que nous voulons prendre une mesure injonctive, de façon à ce que vous puissiez obtenir une telle injonction : pourquoi ne pas utiliser le système de la Cour fédérale, qui, selon moi, a des antécédents impressionnants en matière de propriété intellectuelle et de droit d'auteur, une expertise sur la propriété intellectuelle et, de façon générale, une solide réputation d'équité en ce qui concerne la PI? Pourquoi créer un nouvel organisme? Permettez-moi de retourner la situation. Nous avons mis en place le système d'avis et avis au Canada précisément pour éviter le recours abusif au régime d'avis et retrait au sein du système américain. Pourquoi voudrions-nous créer, possiblement, un système pouvant faire l'objet de tels abus alors qu'on peut miser sur notre Cour fédérale?

(1635)

Le président :

Nous n'aurons pas le temps de répondre à cette question, mais on pourra y revenir durant le prochain tour, alors réfléchissez-y bien.

Nous allons passer à M. Chong.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

L'hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, PCC) :

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci aux témoins de leur comparution.

J'ai l'impression qu'il s'agit d'un problème très similaire à celui lié à tous les appels téléphoniques illégaux qui sont censés provenir de l'ARC. Au cours des dernières années, des dizaines de milliers de Canadiens ont été harcelés par ces appels. Plus de 10 millions de dollars ont été volés aux Canadiens par ce stratagème, et il y a vraiment deux façons de mettre fin à ces activités : d'un côté, on peut bloquer les numéros de téléphone et, de l'autre, fermer ces centres d'appels.

Je ne crois pas qu'il soit réaliste d'espérer bloquer les numéros de téléphone, parce que n'importe qui peut se procurer un téléphone cellulaire jetable et obtenir un nouveau numéro de téléphone très rapidement pour redémarrer l'escroquerie. Par conséquent, il est assez important de fermer les centres d'appels. Bon nombre d'entre eux sont situés à l'extérieur du pays, dans des endroits comme Mumbai, en Inde. Je crois qu'elle est là, la solution.

Dans un même ordre d'idées, lorsqu'il est question des décodeurs illégaux ou des services de diffusion en continu illégaux, nous pouvons essayer d'interdire la vente de ces décodeurs, mais je ne crois pas que ce soit une option réaliste. Il y a de nouvelles technologies, du nouveau matériel, de nouveaux logiciels qui apparaissent constamment. Des plates-formes ouvertes comme Android permettent aux gens de produire ces programmes. Je ne crois pas que la solution soit là. Vraiment, selon moi, la solution consiste à fermer les serveurs qui hébergent ses services illégaux de diffusion en continu de contenu.

Ma première question est donc la suivante : où sont situés la plupart de ces serveurs, au Canada ou à l'étranger?

Ma question est destinée aux représentants de BCE.

M. Robert Malcolmson :

Votre analogie avec le blocage des appels et les pourriels est appropriée.

L'hon. Michael Chong :

Où ces serveurs sont-ils situés?

M. Robert Malcolmson :

Comme Dave l'a dit, certains des serveurs qui alimentent les décodeurs sont situés au pays. Dans de tels cas, nous avons exercé des recours judiciaires.

Les opérations à plus grande échelle, comme Pirate Bay, un flux piraté bien connu accessible dans le monde entier, sont situées à l'étranger.

L'hon. Michael Chong :

Où?

M. Robert Malcolmson :

Je ne sais pas exactement. Pour ce qui est de Pirate Bay, les serveurs se déplacent. Leur présence a été constatée dans diverses administrations.

L'hon. Michael Chong :

Quels sont les deux ou trois principaux pays? Pour ce qui est des centres d'appels, nous savons que l'Inde est un endroit très problématique, et la GRC a travaillé en collaboration avec l'Inde et les autorités d'application de la loi pour mettre fin à ces activités.

Où ces serveurs de diffusion en continu sont-ils situés?

M. Robert Malcolmson :

Mon collègue a peut-être quelques renseignements précis pour vous.

L'hon. Michael Chong :

D'accord.

M. Robert Malcolmson :

Le point, c'est que s'ils sont situés à l'étranger, et pour revenir à la question de M. Lametti, il est difficile d'utiliser les recours judiciaires traditionnels pour trouver le défendeur et assurer une application rapide et efficace de la loi.

M. Mark Graham:

Nous prenons votre question en différé. Nous pourrons fournir plus tard des renseignements plus précis sur les endroits où ces serveurs se trouvent habituellement.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

D'accord.

Dans votre deuxième recommandation, vous suggérez d'accroître une application publique de la loi sur le droit d'auteur en misant sur les organismes d'application de la loi nationaux afin qu'ils poursuivent activement les personnes enfreignant les droits d'auteur. Le gouvernement a annoncé l'affectation de 116 millions de dollars à une nouvelle unité nationale de lutte au cybercrime gérée par la GRC qui travaillera en collaboration avec les organismes d'application de la loi à l'échelle internationale pour s'attaquer à ces genres d'infractions. Voulez-vous dire que ce n'est pas une bonne approche, que le gouvernement n'a pas encore mis tout ça en place ou qu'il faut adopter une autre approche?

Nous sommes ici pour entendre vos suggestions à ce sujet.

M. Robert Malcolmson :

C'est une bonne initiative si on fait de la violation commerciale du droit d'auteur une priorité. C'est quelque chose qui a toujours été problématique : la violation du droit d'auteur arrive loin dans la liste des priorités des organisations d'application de la loi. Vu l'ampleur du problème et le fait qu'il est de plus en plus marqué et vu aussi les personnes impliquées — le crime organisé, dans certains cas — si on faisait de cette initiative une priorité, alors ce serait un outil utile et conforme à notre recommandation.

L'hon. Michael Chong :

On a vu cette semaine aux actualités que la GRC a pris du retard dans la lutte contre les criminels numériques. Ce n'est pas le genre de nouvelle qui nous donne — du moins, pas à moi — la certitude qu'on s'attaquera à ce problème rapidement. Lorsqu'on sait que 15 % des gens obtiennent maintenant leur contenu au moyen de ces décodeurs, ces clones d'Android ou ces clones de décodeurs, je ne suis pas sûr qu'on pourra combler le retard relativement à cette nouvelle tendance. Tout ça est vraiment préoccupant.

(1640)

Mme Kristina Milbourn :

À ce sujet, je veux tout simplement ajouter que, pour assurer l'intervention de la GRC et des organismes fédéraux, la loi doit être très claire. Nous avons parlé à des responsables de l'ASFC et de la GRC au sujet de ce problème précis. Ce qu'on nous dit, c'est qu'ils ne sont pas toujours sûrs d'avoir la compétence nécessaire pour s'attaquer à ce genre de problèmes précis, simplement en ce qui concerne, entre autres, ce genre de mécanisme et ce genre de distribution. Je crois que c'est parfait que les organisations fédérales d'application de la loi participent davantage, mais il faut appuyer cette participation accrue par cette interdiction criminelle dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur ou grâce à une loi qui dit clairement que ces entités ont la compétence d'enquêter et d'intenter des poursuites relativement à ces crimes, parce que ce sont des gestes qui sont contraires à la loi.

Le président :

Nous allons devoir passer à M. Jowhari.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.) :

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci aux témoins.

J'aimerais revenir sur ce que certains éléments que mes collègues ont abordés pour ensuite les laisser en plan. Je veux parler du suivi du contenu ou de l'identification du contenu. Je sais qu'il y a certaines technologies qui vous permettraient de connaître le contenu et le type de contenu consommé.

Je veux commencer en posant la question qui suit : y a-t-il des situations où les FSI sont légalement obligés de surveiller leurs services pour connaître le type de contenu qui passe par ce que vous appelez vos « canalisations »?

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth :

Non. Il n'y a pas de contenu précis que nous devons surveiller ou consigner.

M. Majid Jowhari :

Quel est votre point de vue?

M. David Watt :

La même réponse.

M. Majid Jowhari :

Shaw a donné la même réponse aussi. D'accord.

Vu qu'une technologie existe, pouvez-vous me donner une idée de la façon dont elle peut être utilisée pour effectuer une surveillance — dans le cas des fournisseurs de contenu illégaux à l'étranger — et qu'est-ce qui nous empêche de les bloquer ou qu'est-ce qui empêche votre organisation de les bloquer? Ces gens ne relèvent pas de notre compétence. Ou est-ce que je simplifie trop les choses?

M. Robert Malcolmson :

Je crois que vous cernez le problème auquel nous sommes confrontés. En tant que FSI, nous agissons comme un transporteur ou un canal et donc, pour pouvoir faire quelque chose au sujet du contenu qui passe par ces canaux, eh bien, nous avons besoin d'une forme quelconque d'autorisation. Et donc, dans le cas...

M. Majid Jowhari :

Avez-vous vraiment besoin de cette autorisation si on parle d'entité à l'étranger qui ne relève pas de notre compétence?

M. Robert Malcolmson :

Au titre de la Loi sur les télécommunications, nous devons tout de même avoir une autorisation du CRTC pour ce qui revient essentiellement à bloquer le contenu.

Si un flux piraté vient de Roumanie, par exemple, et que nous pouvons l'identifier et que nous décidons par nous-mêmes de le bloquer, nous enfreindrions sans aucun doute les exigences associées à notre rôle d'entreprise de télécommunication. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous nous présentons devant le CRTC pour dire que nous savons de quelle façon arrêter tout ça, mais que nous voulons le faire avec une autorisation et en fonction d'un processus approprié dans le cadre duquel nous ne prenons pas la décision, parce qu'on nous critique. Nous ne voulons pas être considérés comme des censeurs, comme certains ont tenté de décrire la demande de Franc-Jeu. Grâce à une autorisation appropriée et en s'appuyant sur un organisme indépendant, les responsables pourraient dire que le propriétaire du contenu a prouvé que le contenu en question venant de Roumanie, par exemple, est piraté, puis le FSI pourrait aller de l'avant et le bloquer.

M. Majid Jowhari :

Une telle mesure permettrait-elle de raccourcir le temps et de réduire les coûts dont vous avez parlé? Vous avez parlé d'environ 300 000 $ et d'environ deux ans afin de pouvoir... Dans quelle mesure pourrait-on réduire tout ça en appliquant vos suggestions?

Quelqu'un peut-il répondre?

M. Robert Malcolmson :

Je vais vous donner un exemple de notre point de vue. Dans notre demande de la coalition Franc-Jeu, nous avons regardé les coûts liés au blocage au moyen des serveurs de noms de domaine, une méthode commune de blocage, dont l'infrastructure est installée dans les systèmes de chaque FSI aujourd'hui. Le coût estimé pour bloquer un site est d'environ de 18 à 36 $, tandis que nous passerons deux ans...

M. Majid Jowhari :

Nous possédons une technologie permettant de cerner le contenu et, grâce à l'infrastructure technologique déjà en place, il nous en coûtera un maximum de 20 $ pour pouvoir procéder au blocage, si nous avons l'autorisation juridictionnelle dont vous parlez.

(1645)

M. Robert Malcolmson :

Pour ce type de blocage, oui.

M. Majid Jowhari :

C'est pour ce type de blocage.

David.

M. David Watt :

J'allais tout simplement ajouter que la raison pour laquelle on désire obtenir une ordonnance du CRTC pour le blocage, c'est qu'un tel ordre s'appliquerait à tous les FSI. Par exemple, pour revenir à la question initiale, si l'un d'entre nous avait l'impression d'être autorisé à procéder ainsi... nous ne le sommes pas, mais si nous décidions d'y aller indépendamment et de bloquer l'adresse IP en question, les gens voulant consommer le contenu passeraient tout simplement à un FSI différent au Canada, alors nous voulons qu'il y ait une ordonnance s'appliquant à tous les fournisseurs de services.

M. Majid Jowhari :

Andy, voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth :

Oui. Il y a divers problèmes techniques, ici. Je ne veux pas prendre trop de temps et aller trop dans le détail, mais je dirais simplement que c'est un excellent exemple de la raison pour laquelle les gens parlent de pentes glissantes lorsqu'il est question de ce type de régime. Si nous allons en ce sens et que nous exigeons le blocage, nous allons rencontrer un problème après l'autre, et c'est la raison pour laquelle c'est inefficace.

Le blocage des services DNS est une façon, essentiellement, de retirer le numéro de téléphone de l'annuaire, c'est une façon de dissocier l'adresse IP du nom de domaine. On ne bloque pas ainsi l'accès au site web. Cela n'empêche pas l'utilisateur final d'utiliser un autre fournisseur de services DNS, qui sont fournis par de grandes entreprises, y compris Google. Beaucoup d'utilisateurs les utilisent parce que ces fournisseurs de services DNS sont parfois plus rapides que leur propre FSI.

Si nous procédons au blocage du service DNS et que nous les éliminons, alors nous reviendrons ici dans cinq ans et parlerons alors de la raison pour laquelle il faut mettre en place un système d'inspection approfondie des paquets, puis, cinq ans plus tard, nous reviendrons parler de la raison pour laquelle il faut bloquer les RPV. Et encore là, soyez assuré que les utilisateurs trouveront une nouvelle façon de contourner chacune de ces méthodes de blocage.

Ce que nous devons faire, c'est protéger le régime qui était là depuis le début, soit la distribution commune. Nous transportons les octets. Nous ne les examinons pas. Nous ne les jugeons pas. Nous ne décidons pas ce qu'il faut bloquer.

M. David Watt:

Pourrais-je faire deux observations? D'abord, là où ce régime a été mis en place, il y a eu une réduction de 70 à 90 %. Nous ne prétendons pas qu'il y mettra complètement fin, mais il a été efficace contre la majorité des vols.

En ce qui concerne les pentes glissantes, nous aimerions vraiment nous occuper de cette question aujourd'hui. C'est la seule question que nous pouvons traiter. Nous devons nous en occuper en premier. Si nous avons un problème subséquent, nous nous en occuperons, mais il n'y a aucune raison de ne pas régler un premier problème parce qu'un deuxième pourrait surgir.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Merci.

J'aimerais vous remercier, monsieur le président. Vous avez utilisé mon temps de manière assez libérale.

Le président:

Êtes-vous en train de m'appeler libéral? Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Masse, vous avez vos deux minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

Je souhaite que Shaw, BCE et Bell aient l'occasion de répondre à la question des petits forfaits. J'essaie de comprendre ce qui se passe de côté et ce qui motive les gens. Il doit y avoir une sorte de relation symbiotique.

Quels sont les outils? Vous laissez entendre que ce n'est peut-être pas axé sur les prix, mais j'aimerais avoir votre avis en ce qui concerne la mise en place de petits forfaits et savoir où vous vous situez dans le classement. Je connais les perceptions de M. Watt là-dessus, j'aimerais donc que Shaw et Bell s'expriment sur cette même question.

Mme Cynthia Rathwell:

Merci.

Je ne souhaite pas déterminer notre classement par rapport à nos collègues. Je pense que nous avons fait du très bon travail en mettant en place les petits forfaits de base, et je pense que nos clients ont répondu présents. Les forfaits conviennent à quelques-uns de leurs besoins. Ils sont disponibles, et sont la base de tous les forfaits que nous mettons sur le marché. Qu'il s'agisse de forfaits limités ou de services payants à la carte, nos abonnés en sont satisfaits. Nous pensons que le prix est raisonnable.

Si nous parlons de l'attrait de la « gratuité », j'aimerais parler une seconde de notre expérience concernant le programme de service satellite de la télévision locale. C'était un avantage que nous avons offert au CRTC afin de fournir un forfait de signaux locaux gratuits aux Canadiens qui avaient perdu l'accès à la transmission par la voie des ondes en raison de la transition vers le numérique. Leurs émetteurs n'avaient pas été convertis au numérique. Nous l'avons offert à un maximum de 33 000 personnes, et 35 000 abonnés de plus s'en sont prévalus.

Il n'y avait aucun moyen de contrôler scientifiquement qui captait ces signaux. Beaucoup de gens captaient clairement les signaux de leur maison de campagne. Beaucoup les captaient des zones où des signaux locaux étaient accessibles; ils voulaient simplement les avoir gratuitement. Nous continuons à recevoir des appels de gens qui commencent à s'inquiéter du fait que ce programme est limité dans le temps. Il devrait durer le temps de la licence. Le programme a été offert pour environ sept ans.

Nous sommes heureux d'avoir pu offrir cette solution provisoire, mais c'était pour nous l'illustration que la gratuité est attrayante, non pas de l'échec de notre offre de petits forfaits de base ou de nos services.

(1650)

M. Brian Masse:

Merci.

Monsieur Malcolmson ou monsieur Graham, voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose à cela?

Le président:

Vous aurez le temps. Nous y reviendrons.

M. Brian Masse: D'accord.

Le président: Cela nous amène à la fin du premier tour. Nous aurons un second tour. Nous serons attentifs à la possibilité d'un vote. Si nous devons nous interrompre pour aller voter, nous le ferons.

Nous commencerons notre second tour par vous, monsieur Graham. Je suis d'accord si vous voulez laisser la parole à M. Lametti.

Vous avez sept minutes, monsieur Lametti.

M. David Lametti:

Je souhaite pourtant revenir encore sur cette question. Je pense que vous devez expliquer pour quelle raison nous ne pouvons pas avoir recours au système judiciaire et pourquoi nous avons besoin d'une autre entité. Si vous ciblez en fait, comme vous l'avez mentionné, les sites très populaires, pourquoi auriez-vous besoin d'une entité distincte quand le système judiciaire, et le système de la Cour fédérale en particulier, vous permet de prendre des mesures injonctives?

Vous n'êtes pas des plaideurs modestes. Vous avez des ressources relativement importantes à votre disposition. Pourquoi devrions-nous créer un autre appareil, qui pourrait donner lieu à des abus et qui serait ouvert à l'influence d'organisations du secteur, peut-être de la vôtre?

M. Mark Graham:

Je vais commencer.

Je pense que vous avez mentionné, quand vous avez posé la question, que nous pouvions peut-être faire quelque chose avec l'injonction. Nous avons fait valoir aujourd'hui dans nos observations que les mesures injonctives prises directement contre les intermédiaires par la Cour fédérale pourraient être d'un grand secours pour ce dossier.

Quelques raisons nous ont amenés à penser au CRTC pour la demande de Franc-Jeu. L'une de ces raisons est que le CRTC est souvent considéré comme étant plus accessible, pour les petits plaideurs en particulier, ce qui inclurait les créateurs et les titulaires de droits, qui ne peuvent pas aussi facilement intenter des poursuites en s'engageant dans les longues procédures de la Cour fédérale et qui connaissent bien le CRTC. Je pense que c'est aussi plus accessible pour les petits FSI, qui comparaissent souvent devant le CRTC et qui ont des compétences dans ce domaine. C'est une des raisons.

L'autre raison a trait à l'article 36 de la Loi sur les télécommunications, qui mentionne qu'un fournisseur de services a besoin de l'approbation du CRTC pour bloquer l'accès à un site de piratage. De l'avis du CRTC, cela s'applique même si la Cour a ordonné de bloquer l'accès à ce site.

Si vous vous présentez devant un tribunal et que vous devez suivre la même procédure devant le CRTC de toute façon, et étant donné que nous parlons de la gestion des réseaux de télécommunications du pays et que nous avons un organisme de réglementation qui est chargé de la gestion de la réglementation de ces réseaux, il nous semblait approprié d'être ici.

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Mark a donné un exemple de nos efforts collectifs visant à faire fermer un site pirate en activité à Montréal, et cela a été une aventure de deux ans. Beaucoup d'argent a été dépensé en frais juridiques, et le problème n'a toujours pas été réglé comme il le fallait.

L'application de blocage de sites crée pour les propriétaires de contenu en tous genres un canal d'accès à partir duquel ils peuvent protéger leur contenu. Imaginez que vous êtes un petit créateur ou propriétaire de contenu et que vous devez comparaître devant la Cour fédérale et consacrer deux ans à un litige. Vous pourriez dépenser en frais juridiques l'intégralité des recettes que vous auriez tirées de votre émission.

Comme l'a dit Mark, l'idée de mettre tout cela entre les mains du CRTC était très logique d'un point de vue de l'accessibilité, du coût et de l'efficacité, puisque nous devons de toute façon nous y présenter, en raison de la Loi sur les télécommunications.

M. David Lametti:

Monsieur Kaplan-Myrth, avez-vous un avis sur cette question?

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Je fais un retour en arrière; je crois que nous avons invoqué différents moyens de régler le problème du contenu illégal possible: s'en prendre aux décodeurs ou aux personnes qui les distribuent ou trouver à partir de quel emplacement le contenu de source légitime a été saisi, puis téléchargé sur Internet. Franc-Jeu s'attaque à une partie du problème. Il bloque réellement l'accès à un site, ce qui empêcherait peut-être les utilisateurs finaux de ces décodeurs de se connecter aux flux téléchargés.

Il existe différentes manières de régler ce problème. Je pense que Franc-Jeu met en place un outil extrêmement puissant pour un groupe particulier rattaché au CRTC, qui tiendrait à jour cette liste à laquelle n'auraient pas accès les utilisateurs finaux des sites. Je pense qu'il existe probablement des méthodes beaucoup moins radicales pour trouver le contenu téléchargé et recours à la procédure de la Cour fédérale pour arrêter cela, ou empêcher le contenu d'apparaître ailleurs, sans avoir à créer un outil d'une telle puissance qui, je pense, ouvre la porte à des abus.

(1655)

M. David Lametti:

Merci.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

J'ai beaucoup de questions et environ trois minutes pour toutes les poser.

Le président: Deux minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Comment?

Le président:

Vous avez deux minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oh, doux Jésus, j'irai encore plus vite.

Je m'adresse à Rogers; vous avez dit que vous êtes ici en tant que propriétaire de contenu, et je crois que Bell serait ici principalement en tant que propriétaire de contenu lui aussi.

Parmi les grandes entreprises, qui est ici en tant que défenseur des utilisateurs d'Internet, plutôt qu'en tant que titulaires de droits sur le contenu? N'y a-t-il pas un conflit entre ces deux rôles, selon vous, en tant qu'entreprise verticalement intégrée?

Mme Kristina Milbourn:

Si je peux me permettre, je pense que la deuxième moitié de nos demandes témoigne du fait que nous sommes venus ici aussi en tant que fournisseur de services Internet. Rogers a en fait joué un grand rôle dans le déroulement de l'appel, qui a été au final entendu par la Cour suprême du Canada. Elle a rendu un jugement très positif, et je pense que TekSavvy conviendrait du fait que c'était assez favorable aux consommateurs.

Selon nous, nous sommes des titulaires de droits, bien sûr, mais nous sommes aussi des FSI. Je pense, d'après notre récente expérience devant la Cour suprême, que nous avons une façon très bien équilibrée de gérer ces questions complexes qui concernent le piratage, non seulement d'un point de vue de titulaires de droits, mais aussi pour ce qui est des obligations des FSI, et en aval, des utilisateurs.

M. Mark Graham:

Je pense que nous sommes ici à ces deux titres également, et c'est pour cette raison que, comme vous l'avez observé, nos recommandations étaient centrées sur les exploitants de sites illégaux de piratage à grande échelle, et non pas sur des remèdes quelconques qui auraient des répercussions sur les utilisateurs finaux. Je pense que des mesures d'exécution contre les sites illégaux aideraient les utilisateurs finaux, car ces sites sont les principaux distributeurs de logiciels malveillants. De plus, quand des gens piratent le contenu, cela fait augmenter les coûts pour les Canadiens qui accèdent au contenu par des moyens légaux. Nous pensons donc que cela aide les deux groupes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Des rapports ont indiqué que les responsables de Bell ont rencontré les responsables du CRTC et ont fait pression sur les universités et les collèges pour qu'ils appuient la demande de Franc-Jeu Canada. Devrions-nous nous en inquiéter?

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Je pense qu'il est tout à fait approprié de dialoguer avec le personnel de l'organisme de réglementation avant de présenter une demande. En fait, cette démarche devrait être encouragée, car elle permet de créer un dialogue ouvert avec un organisme de réglementation — que ce soit pour les télécommunications, pour du lait ou pour du pain — de sorte que les deux parties puissent être informées. Il n'y a rien d'inapproprié à faire cela.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pour les universités et les collègues...?

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Il me semble que vous avez dit que Bell aurait fait pression sur les universités et les collèges. Je ne suis pas du tout d'accord avec vous. Encore une fois, quand une personne présente une demande au CRTC et cherche des appuis auprès de ceux qui pensent que c'est une bonne idée, il est parfaitement approprié pour elle de communiquer avec les appuis possibles et de dire: « Hé, pensez-vous que ce soit une bonne idée et si c'est le cas, pourriez-vous appuyer ma demande auprès du CRTC? » Tous les groupes le font. Une fois de plus, je pense que c'est tout à fait approprié et, en fait, que cela devrait être encouragé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai beaucoup de choses à dire sur la neutralité d'Internet, mais je pense que je n'ai plus de temps.

Le président:

Votre temps s'est écoulé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci de jouer le jeu.

Nous allons à présent laisser la parole à M. Albas.

Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Je vais poursuivre sur la lancée de M. Graham sur la neutralité du Net.

Même si je ne suis pas d'accord, je trouve que c'était très futé de la part de beaucoup d'entre vous ici aujourd'hui de mettre vos préoccupations dans la même grande catégorie que les activités illégales. C'est peut-être correct du point de vue des catégories, mais disons qu'un agent de la GRC voit quelqu'un conduire dangereusement sur une route, je crois que la plupart des gens espéreraient qu'il intervienne immédiatement pour protéger l'intérêt public. Les gens espéreraient que l'agent fasse cette intervention au lieu de s'arrêter près d'un véhicule stationné illégalement sur le côté de la route, ce qui contrevient à un règlement municipal, alors qu'il y a un danger évident en mouvement.

Je crois que vous essayez de protéger les intérêts de votre entreprise, et c'est tout à votre honneur. C'est ce que nous attendons de vous. Cependant, encore une fois, vous invoquez la sécurité publique et le reste pour protéger les droits de vos entreprises au détriment des droits et des intérêts généraux du reste du monde.

À propos de la neutralité du Net, j'accepte que l'on ferme les sites de pornographie juvénile, de recrutement à des fins terroristes et les sites du même genre parce que c'est possible et que cela doit être fait. Par contre, je désapprouve la tentative du gouvernement du Québec de faire pression sur les fournisseurs de services Internet qui ne relèvent pas de sa compétence afin de pouvoir, essentiellement, imposer ses lois aux sites de jeu et ainsi augmenter ses recettes. Selon moi, les deux procédures ne sont pas équivalentes.

En gros, vous voulez qu'un organe quasi judiciaire du CRTC traite vos demandes plus rapidement lorsque vous croyez qu'il se passe des choses illégales, alors que, lorsque la GRC ou notre appareil de sécurité veut retirer du contenu, ils doivent suivre le processus judiciaire, obtenir une autorisation, des mandats, etc. avant de procéder. Pourquoi croyez-vous que le processus devrait être simplifié pour vos besoins, alors que lorsqu'il s'agit de contenu préoccupant pour le public, par exemple du contenu terroriste ou de la pornographie juvénile, il y a tout un ensemble de freins et de contrepoids assorti, nous le savons, d'un processus de contrôle judiciaire?

Je demanderais aux représentants de Bell de commencer, puisque vous êtes les derniers à avoir parlé du contenu illégal.

(1700)

M. Robert Malcolmson:

D'abord et avant tout, la proposition que nous avons déposée comprenait effectivement un ensemble de freins et de contrepoids permettant aux parties visées par une éventuelle ordonnance de blocage et à la partie qui a demandé le blocage de présenter des observations. Au bout du compte, un organe indépendant devra soumettre une recommandation au CRTC, à qui revient la décision.

Deuxièmement, comme nous l'avons dit deux ou trois fois, un fournisseur de services Internet a besoin de l'autorisation du CRTC pour bloquer un site. C'est prévu dans la Loi. Voilà pourquoi nous demandons cela, nous savons que c'est ce qui va arriver de toute façon. Nous pouvons nous rendre devant les tribunaux, puis devant le CRTC et suivre deux processus différents, mais cela ne nous semble pas très efficient, surtout, encore une fois, pour les petits propriétaires de contenu et les petits fournisseurs.

M. Dan Albas:

Dans la demande que Shaw a soumise au CRTC, il est spécifiquement question du manque de clarté relativement à la compétence de la Cour fédérale. Devrait-on se pencher sur cet enjeu afin d'améliorer la surveillance et la clarté, ce qui aiderait vos entreprises, au lieu d'adopter un modèle où on accorde la priorité aux cas de ce type, outre les autres cas d'activités criminelles?

Mme Cynthia Rathwell:

Oui, nous avons souligné qu'il faut plus de précisions, et je vais laisser Jay entrer dans le détail de ce qu'on pourrait faire.

Pour répondre à la question que M. Lametti a posée plus tôt, Shaw n'est pas et n'a jamais été membre de la coalition Franc-Jeu, même si nous avons déposé un mémoire pour l'appuyer, parce que, comme M. Malcolmson vient de le dire, nous croyons qu'il revient à un organe quasi judiciaire, s'appuyant sur une procédure établie, de s'occuper de ce genre de contenu.

Jay pourra vous parler des détails du genre de modification qui serait nécessaire pour clarifier la compétence de la Cour fédérale.

M. Jay Kerr-Wilson (avocat-conseil, Fasken Martineau, Shaw Communications inc.):

Il y a deux choses qu'on pourrait faire pour accélérer le processus ou le rendre plus efficient, et la Cour fédérale peut nous être utile à cet égard.

Premièrement, il faudrait clarifier la compétence du tribunal pour ordonner le blocage d'une adresse URL en particulier ou son retrait de l'index d'un moteur de recherche. On éviterait ainsi les conflits de compétence où on remet en question la vaste portée des injonctions que la Cour fédérale peut accorder. Donc, dites de manière explicite, précise et claire que la Cour fédérale a compétence pour agir ainsi, parce qu'elle est parfois un peu réticente à accorder une injonction. Il faut la rassurer, il faut lui confirmer que c'est bien la volonté du législateur.

Deuxièmement, par rapport au point que Bell a soulevé, dans le régime en vigueur, même si un tribunal ordonne à tous les fournisseurs de services Internet de bloquer l'accès à un type de contenu précis, il faut tout de même demander au CRTC l'autorisation d'appliquer la décision du tribunal, et rien ne garantit que le CRTC va acquiescer. Les distributeurs se retrouvent donc pris entre deux feux: soit ils enfreignent la Loi sur les télécommunications, soit ils se rendent coupables d'outrage au tribunal. Peu importe votre opinion sur Franc-Jeu ou sur n'importe quelle autre initiative, vous devez convenir que ce n'est pas une bonne politique publique. Clairement, il faut dire au CRTC qu'il doit permettre aux fournisseurs de services Internet de se plier aux exigences d'une ordonnance du tribunal. Il me semble que c'est tout simplement logique.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci de ce commentaire. Vous avez satisfait une partie de ma curiosité.

J'aimerais parler maintenant à TekSavvy. Monsieur Kaplan-Myrth, croyez-vous qu'il soit faisable, sur le plan technique, de mettre en oeuvre ce qui a été proposé par rapport au blocage de sites? Comme vous l'avez dit plus tôt, si on finit effectivement par sévir, les utilisateurs vont changer leurs habitudes. Par exemple, ils auront recours au cryptage, et vous ne serez même plus en mesure de décoder l'information qui circule. Croyez-vous que ce sera techniquement faisable, si ces autres techniques, qui empêchent les fournisseurs de services Internet de savoir quel contenu passe par leurs câbles, sont mises en oeuvre?

(1705)

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Écoutez, je ne crois pas qu'il soit présentement possible, d'un point de vue technique, pour tous les fournisseurs de services Internet de procéder au genre de blocage qui est proposé pour l'instant. La demande de Franc-Jeu ne donne aucune description de ce qu'on entend par « blocage de sites ». On entend beaucoup parler du blocage de DNS, de système de noms de domaine, alors si c'est ce qu'on entend par « blocage », présentement... Vous savez, il arrive couramment que les fournisseurs de services Internet fournissent un DNS, mais ce n'est pas nécessairement obligatoire. Un fournisseur de services Internet pourrait décider de configurer tous les systèmes de ses utilisateurs pour qu'ils pointent vers un serveur DNS, sans avoir à entretenir le serveur. Rien ne l'oblige à fournir un serveur DNS, alors il est à présumer que le fournisseur de services Internet ne pourra pas le bloquer. S'il y avait une exigence en ce sens, j'imagine que cela voudrait dire que les fournisseurs devraient mettre en place un serveur DNS, y diriger les utilisateurs finaux — et je ne sais même pas si c'est possible —, puis le bloquer.

Et ça, c'est le scénario le plus simple.

Le président:

Merci.

M. Dan Albas:

Mme Rathwell a dit qu'elle répondait à la question de M. Lametti, alors j'ai cru que cela serait compté avec son temps. J'aimerais une minute de plus, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Vous aurez l'occasion de poser d'autres questions. Je vous prierais d'être très rapide; vous allez pouvoir reprendre la parole.

M. Dan Albas:

Monsieur Malcolmson, à propos de la normalisation du régime d'avis, vous avez mentionné que, quand quelqu'un prétend qu'un certain contenu viole le droit d'auteur d'un titulaire, vous dirigez cette personne vers le contenu approprié. À mon avis, cette procédure est très intéressante pour votre entreprise, étant donné son intégration verticale. Croyez-vous que cela est dans l'intérêt du public, ou devrait-on se contenter de signaler à cette personne qu'elle télécharge du contenu illégal?

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Je crois que c'est dans l'intérêt public d'informer les Canadiens, chaque fois que c'est possible, qu'il existe des sources légales où ils peuvent se procurer le contenu qu'ils consomment illégalement. Que le contenu vienne de Bell, Rogers, BlueAnt ou la Société Radio-Canada, si je pirate la série Anne... la maison aux pignons verts, il est peut-être dans l'intérêt public que le consommateur sache que ce contenu est aussi accessible en ligne sur le site de Radio-Canada, cbc.ca.

M. Dan Albas:

Je crois que Le Trône de fer est davantage piraté, probablement.

Le président:

Merci.

Pouvons-nous passer à la prochaine personne?

M. Dan Albas:

Merci.

Le président:

Parfait.

Monsieur Masse, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai pris connaissance des exposés sur le piratage, et je crois qu'il est très important pour nous d'en discuter ici aujourd'hui. L'une des raisons pour lesquelles je me suis intéressé au sujet est que des artistes et des créateurs ont dit très explicitement qu'ils s'inquiètent de leur avenir. Je doute que tout s'arrange comme par magie même si nous réussissions à régler ce problème.

Dans ma circonscription, il y a une ville qui s'appelle Sandwich Town. C'est la plus vieille colonie européenne au Canada à l'ouest de Montréal. C'est là que la guerre de 1812 a été livrée. C'est là aussi que passaient le chemin de fer clandestin et la contrebande de rhum; il y a eu toutes sortes d'autres choses. Aujourd'hui, la ville a des problèmes à cause de la pauvreté, de la fermeture des écoles et de la pollution. Le taux de pauvreté y est parmi les plus élevés.

Je vous dis tout cela parce que juste à côté de Sandwich Town, il y a le pont Ambassador, dont les activités s'élèvent à 1 milliard de dollars par jour. Environ 35 % des échanges commerciaux quotidiens du Canada se font dans ma circonscription. Le pont Ambassador est la propriété d'un particulier américain. Il se trouve juste à côté de Sandwich Town. Cette personne y a même acheté des maisons pour les condamner, puis les démolir. Il fait tout de même beaucoup d'argent. Matty Moroun, le propriétaire, fait partie des 40 milliardaires les plus riches des États-Unis. Il y a énormément d'activité économique, juste à côté de la ville.

Il y a aussi un nouveau passage frontalier de l'autre côté de Sandwich Town, le pont Gordie-Howe. Vous en avez déjà peut-être entendu parler. J'ai passé 20 années de ma vie à essayer d'obtenir un nouveau passage pour le public. Cela représente environ de 4 à 6 milliards de dollars, mais il y a très peu d'activité à Sandwich Town malgré tout. Il est censé y avoir des avantages pour la collectivité, mais on est incapable de savoir dans quelle mesure. Pour l'instant, en résumé, il n'y a pas eu énormément d'avantages pour la région. Nous attendons encore.

Devant Sandwich Town, il y a la rivière Détroit, et il y a aussi l'Administration portuaire de Windsor, dont les activités se chiffrent à des millions de dollars. Tout va très bien pour elle, mais elle va bientôt avoir un nouveau passage frontalier lucratif, assorti d'autres travaux d'envergure. Si le pont Ambassador double son tablier, ce que le gouvernement a autorisé, il y aura d'importantes retombées économiques pour nous.

De l'autre côté de Sandwich Town, il y a un chemin de fer qui se rend à une mine de sel canadienne et à d'autres exploitations. Ses activités représentent des millions de dollars, mais il est de moindre importance. Ce n'est pas le CP ni le CN, mais l'entreprise, Essex Terminal Railway, s'en tire bien. Donc, au milieu de tout cela, les gens n'ont absolument rien obtenu des milliards de dollars d'activités autour d'eux. Les écoles ferment, les entreprises ferment, même le bureau de poste a fermé. Le taux de pauvreté y est des plus élevés.

Donc, voilà ce qui me préoccupe: j'ai l'impression que les artistes qui se sont exprimés sont dans la même situation.

Avez-vous des propositions à faire, dans le temps qui nous reste, quant aux mesures que vous pourriez prendre pour améliorer la rémunération des artistes, au lieu de simplement espérer que les redevances vont couler à flots si vous mettez un terme au piratage? Même si cela ne fait pas partie du mandat de votre entreprise, pourriez-vous recommander quelque chose au Comité?

Je ne vois pas comment le simple fait de mettre un terme au piratage... Y a-t-il quelque chose de nouveau ou de différent? Je suis ouvert à vos recommandations. Mais peut-être que vous préférez ne pas répondre, je ne sais pas.

Monsieur le président, c'est quelque chose dont nous avons entendu parler pendant les déplacements du Comité, et je constate que ce n'est pas toujours réglé.

Y a-t-il quoi que ce soit que les gens ici présents puissent offrir à ces personnes?

(1710)

M. Robert Malcolmson:

En fait, j'ai déjà fréquenté l'école à Windsor, et j'ai vécu sous le pont Ambassador. J'y ai emmené ma famille pour lui montrer où j'avais vécu pendant que j'étais au collège et, bien sûr, ce n'était plus là. Il ne reste plus grand-chose.

Quant aux suggestions que nous ferions, comme je l'ai dit au début, les industries culturelles emploient actuellement 630 000 Canadiens et contribuent à 3 % de notre PIB. Elles jouent un rôle au chapitre de l'emploi de Canadiens. Dans la mesure où le piratage, si vous êtes d'accord avec notre point de vue, nuit au système, le fait de mettre un terme au piratage, de le freiner et de le limiter aidera assurément l'écosystème existant qui emploie des Canadiens et crée des emplois. Si je suis un artiste créateur de contenu, si je suis le producteur de Letterkenny, je veux certainement savoir que le gouvernement essaie d'empêcher la fuite de ma propriété intellectuelle hors du Canada et que je suis rémunéré de manière équitable pour ce que j'ai créé.

Je crois que la lutte au piratage ne repose pas seulement sur le fait d'aider les entreprises intégrées verticalement. Ce n'est pas tout. Il faut protéger ceux qui créent notre contenu et s'assurer qu'ils sont rémunérés pour leur travail.

M. David Watt:

Je vais simplement répéter une remarque que vous avez formulée plus tôt, soit que, les 900 millions de dollars du revenu de Rogers sont destinés aux producteurs et aux créateurs de contenu canadien.

Mme Cynthia Rathwell:

Je pense que cela concorde avec les commentaires de Shaw.

De façon générale, je crois qu'il y a une myriade de relations commerciales entre les artistes et les différentes entreprises pour qui ils produisent du contenu. Dans un sens, il semble très facile de préconiser l'introduction d'un nouveau droit qui s'ajoute au revenu des artistes. Nous avons discuté du droit d'enregistrement sonore et des pistes sonores, et cela semblait être une solution toute simple. Ce n'est pas vraiment le cas. Cela troublerait l'industrie de la diffusion au Canada et aurait des répercussions sur les coûts liés au système de diffusion. Il y a également un lien direct entre l'artiste, en l'occurrence, et les producteurs des enregistrements qu'ils réalisent.

Donc, de façon générale, il semble que la création de nouveaux droits soit une solution simple au chapitre du droit d'auteur, mais lorsqu'on approfondit la question, comme David et nous-mêmes l'avons dit, il existe un cadre très complexe en matière de politique publique et de commerce.

En tant que distributeur de télédiffusion réglementé, nous croyons contribuer de manière considérable au système de diffusion. En tant que fournisseur de services de télécommunications, nous pensons respecter les objectifs de la politique publique. Tout cela contribue à aider les artistes canadiens. Malheureusement, d'un point de vue national, le droit d'auteur n'est pas un mécanisme très efficace sur le plan de la mise en oeuvre de la politique culturelle nationale.

(1715)

M. Jay Kerr-Wilson:

Monsieur Masse, je peux vous proposer concrètement que des fonds soient versés aux artistes à l'avenir. À l'heure actuelle, sous le régime de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, chaque fois qu'une station de radiodiffusion fait jouer un enregistrement sonore, ou que les enregistrements sont diffusés dans des magasins et des restaurants, des redevances sont payées. Le Parlement a jugé que, en vertu de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, l'argent est divisé à parts égales entre la maison de disques et l'artiste. Donnez 75 % à l'artiste et 25 % à la maison de disques, et vous améliorez immédiatement le sort de chaque artiste.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci beaucoup de votre exposé.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons écouter M. Longfield pendant cinq minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je vous remercie de votre temps.

Merci à tous les témoins d'aujourd'hui. Vous nous soumettez des suggestions très concrètes dans le cadre de notre étude.

Nous n'avons pas beaucoup parlé de la récente législation sur le droit d'auteur de l'Union européenne, particulièrement de l'article 13. Cela a fait l'objet d'une controverse à l'époque et durant l'été. La disposition porte sur la façon dont est saisi le contenu qui se rend jusqu'à vos plateformes — le contenu provenant de fournisseurs légaux, comme YouTube et d'autres — pour veiller à ce que le droit d'auteur soit versé.

Avez-vous examiné cette partie de l'article 13? Faut-il examiner la question dans le cadre de notre examen législatif? Nous rivalisons avec l'Union européenne.

Mme Cynthia Rathwell:

Je ne suis pas une experte quant à ce qui se passe sur la scène internationale au chapitre du droit d'auteur, mais je crois que Jay a beaucoup d'expérience à cet égard. Je lui renvoie la question.

M. Jay Kerr-Wilson:

Je ne suis pas un expert de l'évolution du droit d'auteur à l'échelle internationale, mais d'après ce que je comprends, l'article 13 n'est pas encore en vigueur. Des négociations doivent encore avoir lieu au sein de la structure européenne. Nous ne savons pas quelle sera la version définitive. Essentiellement, la responsabilité incombe aux plateformes sur lesquelles du contenu généré par les utilisateurs est téléversé, comme YouTube et Facebook. Cela ne revient pas au fournisseur de services Internet, mais bien à la plateforme. Selon la disposition, il faut mettre en place un système pour empêcher les téléchargements de contenu non autorisés. YouTube dispose déjà d'un système très rigoureux de correspondance de contenu.

D'après les responsables de YouTube, le problème est le suivant: à l'heure actuelle, s'ils trouvent du contenu non autorisé, ils laissent les titulaires des droits le retirer ou le monétiser. Ils peuvent dire: « Vous pouvez garder l'argent ou nous allons retirer le contenu. » Ce qu'ils reprochent à l'article 13 de l'Union européenne, c'est qu'il semble les forcer à retirer le contenu, et l'option de monétisation est éliminée.

Le Canada n'a pas le même cadre. Si YouTube prend part à des activités de transmission de contenu public protégé par les droits d'auteur à des fins commerciales, le droit d'auteur au Canada s'applique. Les redevances doivent être versées ou, si le contenu n'est pas autorisé, il doit être retiré.

Cela ne va pas au coeur du problème. Cela ne permettra pas de verser de l'argent à quiconque. C'est tout simplement une façon de diminuer la quantité de contenu non autorisé disponible sur la plateforme YouTube. Cette plateforme le fait déjà. C'est en quelque sorte une solution en quête d'un problème, et cela ne se transpose pas réellement à ce que nous...

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Si je puis me le permettre, je crois que l'examen précédent, il y a cinq ans, tentait de rendre cette technologie indépendante, mais la technologie a évolué. Ce qui n'a pas changé, c'est le flux d'information. Comment se fait la circulation... Dans cinq ans, la technologie sera différente. Mais il me semble que l'article 13 vise à refléter la chaîne de valeur et d'en faire sortir les revenus.

Je ne suis pas avocat, mais certains d'entre vous le sont. Je sais que vous vous intéressez tous à la question. Vos plateformes seraient touchées, et cela pourrait influer sur votre modèle d'affaires.

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Je ne suis pas certain que le modèle européen, comme il est présenté à l'heure actuelle, toucherait le modèle d'affaires d'un FSI. Il est axé sur les plateformes, pas sur l'hébergement. Nous ne prenons pas les téléchargements pour les héberger quelque part de manière à pouvoir les supprimer. Nous ne faisons que déplacer les bits d'un endroit à l'autre, en quelque sorte.

Je reviens sur ce qu'a dit Jay. Je ne pense pas que le cadre canadien ait besoin d'une approche comme celle-là. Le droit d'auteur s'applique au contenu hébergé par les services qui font déjà affaire au Canada.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je vais céder la parole à Terry.

Merci.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Merci beaucoup. Nous avons couvert beaucoup d'information aujourd'hui, et je vous remercie de ces témoignages sur divers sujets.

Il y a un sujet que nous n'avons pas abordé, mais nous en avons entendu parler dans différentes régions du pays lorsque nous avons voyagé, et nous avons entendu différents témoignages à cet égard. Cela concerne ce que disait Robert au sujet du piratage, soit que certaines personnes ne pensent tout simplement pas que ce qu'elles font est mal. Elles ne sont pas sensibilisées. Divers établissements et différents groupes sensibilisent les gens à l'égard de la violation du droit d'auteur par le piratage.

Votre groupe ou vos entreprises offrent-ils ou sont-ils en mesure d'offrir des programmes de sensibilisation concernant les grandes entreprises qui ont accès à un grand nombre de personnes?

Ne leur envoyez pas de pourriels. Nous avons entendu beaucoup de témoignages à cet égard. Sérieusement, il y a d'autres manières de communiquer avec les gens. Le gouvernement a un rôle à jouer à ce chapitre, mais c'est comme toute autre chose, qu'il s'agisse de ceintures de sécurité, d'alcool ou de texto au volant. Il faut éduquer les gens dans une certaine mesure.

Je vais commencer avec Robert.

(1720)

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Je pense que vous avez raison de dire que l'éducation est un élément clé pour nous assurer que les consommateurs comprennent les répercussions qu'a la consommation de contenu illégal sur les industries culturelles. Chose certaine, je crois que, collectivement, nous pourrions faire un meilleur travail d'éducation auprès des consommateurs canadiens. J'ai proposé que, si dans le régime d'avis et avis, un avis de violation du droit d'auteur était envoyé à un Canadien qui consomme — peut-être involontairement — du contenu portant atteinte au droit d'auteur, l'informant du fait qu'il existe une autre source légale pour obtenir ce contenu qui respecte notre écosystème national, ce serait peut-être un moyen très personnalisé et efficace de sensibiliser ce consommateur. C'est une façon de faire les choses.

Le président:

Nous avons largement dépassé le temps alloué.

Monsieur Albas, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dan Albas:

Merci.

En fait, j'aimerais faire suite à la question qu'a posée M. Sheehan, en ce qui concerne la sensibilisation. J'aimerais savoir si oui ou non vos entreprises, respectivement, passent du temps avec la GRC, concernant certaines de ces nouvelles technologies en boîte qui font leur apparition, afin de comprendre ce qui est illégal et ce qu'il faut chercher, de manière à publier des bulletins à l'échelle nationale. Travaillez-vous avec différentes associations de maintien de l'ordre, afin qu'elles sachent qu'il s'agit d'un problème?

Mme Kristina Milbourn:

Oui, nous nous sommes déjà entretenus avec la GRC et l'ASFC, et nous sommes retournés à la GRC. Je pense qu'elle a un rôle à jouer au chapitre du décryptage illégal de signaux transmis par satellite, car la Loi sur la radiocommunication interdit très clairement le décryptage d'un signal satellite. Dans la mesure où ce type d'activité contribue à financer et à alimenter cette industrie illégale, oui, je crois qu'il y a un rôle à jouer à cet égard.

Nous constatons également que ce n'est pas la seule manière d'acquérir ce contenu. Je crois que ce que vous pouvez voir dans notre mémoire, c'est que nous demandons des dispositions modernes qui reflètent la situation réelle. Nous avons un peu entendu parler de qui s'apparente à une boîte numérique, qui assure la redistribution à grande échelle du contenu, lequel n'est pas autorisé.

Je vous dirais que ce n'est pas un aspect à l'égard duquel la GRC peut être utile, car il n'y a pas d'interdiction claire dans le Code criminel ou la Loi sur le droit d'auteur qui lui permettrait d'exercer sa compétence pour ouvrir une enquête, même si elle le voulait.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord.

Mme Kristina Milbourn:

Je ne sais pas si Mark ou Rob ont quelque chose à ajouter. Nous avons rencontré des policiers, et nous sommes tout de même ici.

M. Dan Albas:

Je pense que c'est très utile, car plus tôt, M. Watt a mentionné que le Code criminel devait être mis à jour, j'aimerais donc obtenir quelques précisions.

Monsieur Malcolmson, voulez-vous vous lancer?

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Vous vouliez savoir ce que nous faisons pour sensibiliser les organismes d'application de la loi.

Au cours de la dernière année et demie, nous avons travaillé avec l'ASFC pour l'aider à comprendre combien de boîtes numériques sont importées au Canada chaque jour, car la plupart d'entre elles sont fabriquées à l'extérieur du pays et passent par la frontière. Nous lui avons signalé ces importations et lui avons dit qu'elle devrait se pencher sur la question et prendre des mesures pour appliquer la loi. Nous luttons sans cesse pour obtenir son attention, mais nous espérons y arriver.

M. Dan Albas:

D'accord.

M. Robert Malcolmson:

Nous avons parlé à ISDE au sujet des boîtes qui entrent au pays et qui ne sont pas certifiées en vertu de la Loi sur la radiocommunication, car ces boîtes soulèvent des préoccupations relatives au spectre. Nous avons fait remarquer qu'elles ne sont pas conformes à la Loi sur la radiocommunication.

Encore une fois, nous continuons de nous battre à cet égard et de sensibiliser les organismes d'application de la loi qui ont le pouvoir de faire quelque chose.

(1725)

M. Dan Albas:

Monsieur Kaplan-Myrth, vous avez dit plus tôt que, sous le régime d'avis et avis, des renseignements personnels seront parfois transmis, ce qui peut porter atteinte à la vie privée d'autrui. Vous aimeriez que l'on remplace cela par une façon de faire plus normalisée qui ne vous permettrait pas d'obtenir ces renseignements. Est-ce parce que vous craignez d'être tenu responsable si vous fournissez par inadvertance des renseignements personnels à quelqu'un d'autre sous le régime d'avis et avis? Est-ce les renseignements erronés dont vous parlez?

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Je suis désolé. Je pense qu'il y a eu confusion à cet égard. On m'a demandé si je pouvais fournir des échantillons d'avis que nous recevons, et j'ai dit que ces avis contenaient des renseignements personnels; nous devrons donc peut-être les caviarder avant de les fournir au Comité.

M. Dan Albas:

Ah non, je ne parle pas de ça. Vous avez dit que vous recevez parfois des renseignements, et que lorsque vous les transmettez à quelqu'un sous le régime d'avis et d'avis et que ce n'est pas lié aux exigences...

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

C'est exact.

M. Dan Albas:

... vous pourriez être tenu responsable. Est-ce ce qui vous préoccupe?

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Ce n'est pas que nous en sommes nécessairement tenus responsables, puisque nous sommes tenus par la loi de les transmettre. Ce dont je parle ici, c'est des liens personnalisés qui figurent dans ces avis.

L'avis que nous recevons demandera à l'utilisateur final de « cliquer ici pour confirmer la réception de l'avis », et c'est là qu'il y aura un lien. Ce n'est pas simplement un lien vers un site Web; c'est un lien qui comporte divers mots-clés permettant d'identifier l'avis. Cela veut dire que, quand l'utilisateur final obtient cet avis et clique sur le lien, l'expéditeur connaît alors l'adresse IP de la personne et d'autres renseignements au sujet de son ordinateur et du navigateur auquel il peut associer l'avis. Il possède des renseignements au sujet de cette personne qu'il n'avait pas auparavant.

En transmettant ces renseignements, nous rendons nos utilisateurs finaux vulnérables d'une manière qui ne sert pas le but poursuivi par le régime d'avis et avis. En retour, l'utilisateur final obtient un message de TekSavvy ou du FSI, mais pas du titulaire des droits. Nous inscrivons quelques renseignements dans l'avis pour expliquer à l'utilisateur que cela ne vient pas de nous, que nous ne faisons que transmettre le message, que nous sommes dans l'obligation de le faire, et tout ce genre de renseignements. Mais nous devons fournir l'avis tel qu'il nous a été transmis, y compris la publicité pour un de nos concurrents potentiels. Cela nous place dans une situation délicate, et ces renseignements sont tout à fait superflus.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Pour la dernière question, monsieur Graham, vous n'avez que deux minutes. C'est tout.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce sera facile à gérer. Merci.

Monsieur Kerr-Wilson, j'aimerais revenir sur un commentaire que vous avez fait plus tôt selon lequel le CRTC ne serait pas enclin à respecter une ordonnance du tribunal. Pouvez-vous nous confirmer votre position à cet égard?

M. Jay Kerr-Wilson:

Oui, bien sûr. Le CRTC a en fait rendu une décision. Elle concernait l'affaire à laquelle nous avons fait allusion plus tôt, où le gouvernement du Québec voulait obliger les gens à bloquer l'accès à des sites de jeu de hasard. Le CRTC est très clair. Il précise que, même lorsqu'il y a une ordonnance municipale, une ordonnance du tribunal ou une autre ordonnance judiciaire, son approbation est tout de même requise.

Pour déterminer s'il donne son approbation, il examinera les objectifs de la Loi sur les télécommunications, lesquels ne concordent pas nécessairement avec ceux de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur ou du Code criminel. C'est le CRTC qui a dit ça; je n'affirme pas que c'est le cas. Le CRTC a été très explicite à ce sujet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

M. Andy Kaplan-Myrth:

Puis-je intervenir? Ironiquement, le CRTC a formulé cette conclusion en partie à la demande des grands FSI qui, à l'époque, ne voulaient pas bloquer les sites de jeux de hasard au Québec et ont demandé au CRTC d'intervenir pour exercer sa compétence dans les circonstances.

Le président:

Les deux minutes sont écoulées.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est terminé?

Merci.

Le président:

Sur cette note, je tiens à remercier nos invités d'être venus aujourd'hui et de nous avoir fourni beaucoup de renseignements. Je n'envie pas le travail de nos analystes. Ils ont beaucoup de pain sur la planche. C'est pourquoi nous en avons tellement. Nous ne lésinons pas sur les coûts.

Merci à tous d'être venus aujourd'hui.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on September 26, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.