header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-09-27 PROC 119

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. Welcome to meeting 119 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. This meeting is being held in public.

I already have two people who wish to speak. The standard line is that Elvis has left the room and Christopherson's on the bus. He will be here shortly.

For members' information, Greg Essensa, the Chief Electoral Officer of Ontario, has advised me that he's available to appear by video conference next week. We have therefore gone ahead and scheduled his appearance from 11a.m. to noon on Tuesday, October 2.

As well, a delegation from Kenya will be here at the end of October. They're related to broadcasting. They're going to want to meet with us. If they want to meet with us, I'll do what I always do with foreign delegations and have an informal meeting where anyone who wants to come can come.

Yes, Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Mr. Chair, we couldn't hear what was said about Mr. Essensa. Could you please repeat that part?

The Chair:

Greg Essensa, the Chief Electoral Officer of Ontario, has advised me that he's available to appear by video conference next week. I have therefore gone ahead and scheduled his appearance from 11 a.m. to noon on Tuesday, October 2.

We were doing the motion last week, and I had two people who had their hands up: Chris and Ruby.

Who wants to go first?

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

I just want to remind everyone that we have a motion on the table that we'd started debating a little bit.

Does everyone have a copy of the motion? It's being circulated. Perfect.

Now that the motion and the amendment to the motion have been distributed, I want to reiterate, and I think I took a fair amount of time last time explaining—

An hon. member: [Inaudible—Editor]

An hon. member: On division.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

We're on the amendment.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We are on the amendment, yes.

I think I took a fair amount of time explaining my reasoning for bringing the motion that I brought forth. After that, John made an amendment to that motion.

I just want to state again and remind you guys that we are not willing to make any amendments until we have set forth the dates for the study, a beginning date and an end date. We want to know when we can start clause-by-clause. Our proposed end date is October 16. Until we have that agreed to, we won't be entertaining any amendments.

I'll hand it over to Chris.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you, Ruby.

I'm just getting frustrated, and I know that a number of people on the committee are getting frustrated because it's just been delay after delay. I tip my hat to the Conservatives for their best attempts to make it look like they're not delaying things, but after submitting dozens of witnesses, many of whom had nothing to contribute, many of whom had no expertise.... I know one was convicted of a criminal offence and was proud of it; one witness they brought in to laugh at. We have no path forward.

This was a campaign commitment. I can appreciate that they may not want to see undone what was done by the Harper government in terms of the so-called Fair Elections Act. However, this was something that we promised the Canadian people we would do. We've heard from the chief electoral officer multiple times and even multiple times on the CEO report beforehand. He's come and testified on multiple occasions that this is a good bill. He has said that it's not a perfect bill, and I'll admit that.

It's time to go to clause-by-clause. There's time to improve the bill. We can make it better. We want to hear from the Conservatives. We want to hear from the NDP, but we have to move that forward. The Conservatives promised us. We had an agreement. As a lawyer, I know that an agreement to agree isn't an agreement, but we entered into a good faith agreement that the Conservatives would come up with a date to start clause-by-clause. We're still waiting for that, so again, there's more delay.

I expect that there's nothing further, that they will again try to rag the puck, drag out the clock and waste another day. It's time to move this forward. The chief electoral officer is here. We've even gone forward. I know that the Liberals would be willing to hear from the Chief Electoral Officer, which is another request. The Conservatives, in an effort to delay, try to make their requests seem reasonable. It's reasonable to hear from the chief electoral officer if he's available, even though we have invited this witness several times. He said that he wasn't available to attend. It was pushed and pushed that we needed to hear from this witness, that we couldn't possibly start until we heard from this witness. Well, we're hearing from this witness. Let's come up with a date.

We have a motion on the floor. The Conservatives are being unreasonable. It's time to push this forward. It's time to get things going. It's time to move things along because Elections Canada needs this to move forward.

I implore the members of the Conservative Party to cease the filibuster. Let's move on with this, and let's get this forward.

Thank you.

(1110)

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Just a word of warning to everybody. You really, really don't want to hear me if I haven't had my morning coffee, and this is the start for me. It's not that you don't want to hear me; it's just that you will have no idea what I'm saying and neither will I. Thank you.

We are, I believe, speaking to Mr. Nater's amendment to Ms. Sahota's motion. I believe that's correct.

Before I get into addressing it directly, I think it would be appropriate for me to respond a little bit to Mr. Bittle's commentary. I do object a bit. I say I object, but I want to be clear: I'm not objecting to Mr. Bittle's sincerity at anything he says; I object to some of the ostensible facts that I think he presented.

He said that some of the witnesses were not very good witnesses. He was harsher than that, a good deal harsher than that. They didn't have anything worthwhile to say, I think was the phrase he used. I don't think we ought to be saying that about our witnesses. At least, I would encourage colleagues, when they actually think that, and I have had that thought myself one or two times in the course of my 17 years here, but I hope I have always expressed that particular thought privately as opposed to publicly.

I actually thought the witnesses on the whole have been pretty good.

I think, as well, that with regard to inviting Mr. Essensa, I don't believe anyone can say there's been any nefariousness in our repeated efforts to get Mr. Essensa here. I think this is either our third attempt or our fourth attempt at that. He's a busy guy.

He was in the middle of an election campaign the first time we called. That's a good reason for a chief electoral officer not to be available. In the aftermath, they have recounts and all the other things that keep a chief electoral officer busy. This is a chief electoral officer for a jurisdiction that has a 100-odd seats in it. He is a busy person.

Most recently, he was quite specific as to why he was not available. He had a very specific reason. He didn't tell us what the meeting was, but he had something on his agenda that he couldn't get out of. We can all relate to that. We've all had those things.

We're finally inviting him back again, and he has accepted. One of our staff, Adam Church, who always has something intelligent to say on every subject, pointed out to me that maybe the reason Mr. Essensa never comes when we invite him is that we always invite him on 48 hours' notice. I kind of agree with that comment.

If you say to me that you're putting on a golf tournament on Saturday, no matter how good the cause is, well, it's Saturday. But if you say we have a golf tournament coming up next June, I'm much more available. Now, I may regret it later when I get there and say I could have used the Saturday for a camping trip. I actually don't like those charity golf tournaments that much.

(1115)

The Chair:

Mr. Reid, could you get to the point?

Mr. Scott Reid:

The real point I'm trying to get at here is that....

I had a subsidiary point about charity golf tournaments being nine holes instead of 18, because it takes up less of your day. I think that is something we could all learn from, especially because many of us are involved in organizing these things.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

Consider the prizes when you're considering which ones—

Mr. Scott Reid:

I used to do one myself at one point. To be honest, I actually found what happened was that most of the—

The Chair:

That is not really relevant.

Could we go to the point here?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Well, the point was to work back to Mr. Essensa, who I don't think was actually at a charity golf tournament. I think he had election-related business that he was dealing with. He will be here, showing that we were right to raise the issue.

This does actually bring us back very, very tightly....

I was going to get here anyway, by the way, Mr. Chair. I appreciate your desire to do things by the straightest path. I feel that sometimes it's important to provide full context. My goal is always to win over my colleagues to my point of view. I'm aware that the method of doing this that is most effective, when I am the person on the receiving end of a similar kind of attempt at persuasion, is to draw upon all the relevant and supporting facts, which is what I'm trying to do.

Mr. Essensa is the subject of Mr. Nater's amendment. Mr. Nater is suggesting that we change the wording of Ms. Sahota's main motion. Her motion reads as follows: That the Committee commence clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-76 on Tuesday, October 2, 2018 at 11:00 a.m.; That the Chair be empowered to hold meetings outside of normal hours to accommodate clause-by-clause consideration; That the Chair may limit debate on each clause to a maximum of five minutes per party, per clause; and,

When we return to the main motion, I'll want to dwell upon that point a little bit. It's not that I necessarily think there needs to be a change to the wording, but there just needs to be clarity as to what we mean by the permissive use of language in “may” as opposed to “must”.

She goes on to say the following in her motion: That if the Committee has not completed the clause-by-clause consideration of the Bill by 1:00 p.m. on Tuesday, October 16, 2018, all remaining amendments submitted to the Committee shall be deemed moved, the Chair shall put the question, forthwith and successively, without further debate on all remaining clauses and proposed amendments, as well as each and every question necessary to dispose of clause-by-clause consideration of the Bill, as well as questions necessary to report the Bill to the House and to order the Chair to report the Bill to the House as soon as possible.

When I look at this....

Well, you know what? I'll wait until we get to the main motion. I'll return to the amendment that Mr. Nater proposed. His proposal is that we amend it as follows. After the words “That the Committee”, the first three words of the first paragraph of the motion, we would add in the words “do not”. The motion would now read: “That the Committee do not commence clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-76”....

Hang on. I had my caret in the wrong spot here. The caret is the little thing that indicates where you've added some text in.

After “Bill C-76”, he adds in the words, “before the Committee has heard from the Chief Electoral Officer of Ontario”.

To be clear, the chief electoral officer of Ontario is available when?

The Chair:

At 11 o'clock on Tuesday.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

Obviously, this would require an adjustment. Assuming we accept this motion, we would have to begin at....

Sorry, is he appearing for one hour or two hours?

The Chair:

One hour.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The obvious way that one could accommodate this then is by putting this in.

I think Mr. Nater's amendment contemplates the removal of basically everything else, but I can imagine a situation in which what we do is insert the words. This is just theoretical, but we could say, “That the committee do not commence clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-76 before the committee has heard from the chief electoral officer of Ontario.”

We could then continue on with other things that are in the motion as it exists now. That's not how it's written now, but one could actually do that if one chose to. I do have some thoughts with regard to how that might look.

Mr. Chair, this is highly germane, because I'm contemplating the possibility of making a subamendment to that effect. One could, for example, simply have it continue on. You'd have to change the....

Well, here's the minimalist thing that you could do. I'm not sure that I actually advocate this, but you could say, “That the committee do not commence clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-76 before the committee has heard from the chief electoral officer of Ontario, and that the committee commence clause-by-clause consideration on”, and you can put the minimal time in, although I'm not sure I'm actually advocating this, “October 2, 2018 at noon.”

What I'm trying to do is—

(1120)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Just talk it through.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I don't want to move to a discussion of a subamendment unless I've thought it through carefully and made sure that it makes sense and deserves the attention of the committee.

Then it would continue on about operating outside the normal hours to accommodate clause-by-clause consideration, which can be incorporated regardless of when the start time is.

I would say that I think some people might have reservations about this without some kind of limitation as to what is meant by “outside of normal hours”. I suspect that you would find a greater willingness from members of all parties to accommodate “outside of normal hours” if it is on normal sitting days. It's one thing to sit late into the evening on a Tuesday or Wednesday, or even a Thursday. It's an entirely different matter to do so on a day of a week when people thought they were going to be in their constituencies. That would impose a considerable and unreasonable burden on members of the committee, so that's a relevant consideration.

“That the Chair may limit debate on each clause to a maximum of five minutes per party, per clause” means, effectively, 15 minutes. I suspect with regard to this one—and colleagues should listen to see if they agree with this—that a realistic guess is that if one party wants to extend the debate on some point, and it's only one party, we'll find actually that it isn't practised, and it won't be five minutes per party; it'll be five minutes and then no one else will take the time, so it's actually five minutes per clause.

I think you will find that there's actually a genuine concern over the wording of some clauses, which can happen with a technical bill like this one, especially if an amendment is being considered. We'll find that there will be some kind of indication, and I would want to suggest that in such a circumstance, if the chair senses that this is the case, then the chair exercise his discretion to allow on that particular clause a greater amount than five minutes per party.

The way you do it is to see the other parties are feeling about this, right? It's at the chair's discretion, so you could say, “Two of three want it; that's enough.” You could say, “No, I want to see, essentially, a consensus, unanimity.” That then becomes a kind of version of what we informally call “the Simms rule”, after our colleague who developed a way of getting around some of the highly formalistic restrictions that can exist here, as long as there was a will from all sides to do so. It didn't supersede the Standing Orders. It provided a bit of breathing room within the space of the Standing Orders that could be reimposed at any time by the simple expedient of any member of the committee saying, “We should be moving on here. We don't want to cede the floor that way.” That was very effective, and this could be effective, too. I actually think this is a pretty good clause.

Then there is the last part, moving to clause-by-clause for anything that's left by 1 p.m. on October 16. Presumably the point of doing it at that time is that we're just going through however many clauses we have left, and it takes a maximum of a minute each at that point, probably less actually, maybe 30 seconds each. We could go through relatively quickly so that we could, I think, be done by that evening.

This is the government's bottom line, isn't it? The government's bottom line ultimately is that it wants to have this thing moved by October 16. Presumably, if you're going through it at that speed, it's by October 16 at midnight. That's what the government is after.

The question is, given that, how important other things really are. The goal I would suggest is to have some kind of way that allows us to have witnesses such as Mr. Essensa and still come up with some kind of global list that the government move on.

(1125)



That's the direction in which I think I'd like to go with a subamendment. I think Mr. Essensa's testimony is great, so let's start. I'll make a simple subamendment to this effect, that we simply.... Hang on and let me see if this works: that the committee do not commence clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-76 before the committee has heard from the chief electoral officer of Ontario on Tuesday, October 2, 2018, at 11 a.m. I'm adding those words back in.

I wonder if I should deal with more than one topic at a time. Maybe I should just stop by putting those words in. Then I can come back once we've dealt with that and suggest a further one. If we adopt that, we can then come back and deal with a further subamendment that I'd like to consider, but I think if I get into too many things at once it will be a problem. What I'll do is put in that adjustment on the time at which he's coming, and then we'll go back to the main motion, or rather, to Mr. Nater's motion, and I'll have a further subamendment to suggest at that time.

The Chair:

We have a subamendment on the table to add to Mr. Nater's amendment the time of 11 a.m. on October 2.

Is there any debate on the subamendment?

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Mr. Chair, I want to begin by making a few comments in relation to what I've heard around the table thus far this morning.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

This is only on the subamendment.

Mr. John Nater:

It's germane to the subamendment as well, which does state that the chief electoral officer is joining us next Tuesday at 11 a.m. I'm looking forward to that. That is what I've been advocating for since the beginning of the study.

(1130)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I hope you have some amazing questions for him.

Ms. Ruby Sahota: Yes.

Mr. John Nater:

I wouldn't say “amazing”; I would say they're appropriate questions, questions that are directly related to this bill, particularly as they relate to third parties. That's a major component of this bill, and it's a major component of where the Liberals—provincially—went with their bill earlier this year, and the results of that election....

I couldn't not address the one comment made by Mr. Bittle about one particular witness, that we had the witness here just to laugh at. I don't accept that.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

But you laughed.

Mr. John Nater:

No. Actually, I wasn't here for that meeting. My daughter was born that week. I did, however, read the transcripts.

I believe the person in the comment was Mr. Turmel, who holds the record for running in the most elections. He hasn't won, but the interesting thing that came out of his testimony, actually, was a concrete comment. One was about the audit threshold. That was a worthwhile comment. His observation was that it doesn't take much to reach that audit threshold, and that if you're a minor candidate, an independent candidate, as he is, even though he often runs under the Pauper Party umbrella, that's a significant challenge.

To say that certain witnesses are here just to laugh at, I have a concern with that, and I don't think we need to be diminishing someone in that sense. I have to give credit to anyone who puts their name on a ballot, and for someone who has put their name on a ballot as much as Mr. Turmel has, I mean, credit where credit's due.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I thought it was Arthur Hamilton.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

He thinks there was a different witness.

Mr. John Nater:

Well, perhaps there were other witnesses as well. As I said, I did miss three meetings that week, I believe, when our daughter was born. I wasn't here, so I relied on the blues and the meeting transcripts at that point.

I'm going to make another comment for no apparent reason other than the fact that it's happening as we speak. The cabinet is currently meeting. I believe they meet until noon, so that's an observation that I'm just going to point out. The cabinet is currently meeting as we speak and, hopefully, there may be some information that comes out of that cabinet meeting when the time comes. That will be right around lunchtime. There might be a nice break at that point for a quick sandwich or something around then.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Do you think it will be in relation to third party...?

Mr. John Nater:

I wouldn't want to speculate what comes out of cabinet. I don't get invited to those meetings. I don't know why; I'd love to sit on all of them.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

We'll all go.

Mr. John Nater:

My invite must—

The Chair:

Okay, back to the amendment.

Mr. John Nater:

I think it is germane in the sense that we will wait with anticipation for that.

In relation to this, I think it's appropriate that we hear from the CEO of Ontario, and begin the process.

I don't think anyone wants to see us taking up time and wasting our time. There are other matters this committee needs to and ought to deal with.

An order of reference that has come to this committee is a prima facie question of privilege in the House related to Bill C-71. As we take up time with the study of this bill, that is a matter that is being pushed off. We do want to see that come before the committee. Within the House of Commons a question of privilege takes priority over all other matters of business. I believe the same ought to be true in committee, so I am eager to see that come before this committee within the foreseeable future.

Related to this committee study, we all received from the clerk a request to appear before this committee from the CNIB, the Canadian National Institute for the Blind. I think it's rather appropriate that we received this request when we did. As members know, this week and earlier last week, we were debating Bill C-81 in the House, known as the barrier-free Canada Act, the accessible Canada act. It was adopted yesterday in the House of Commons shortly after question period by unanimous consent, I believe. I wasn't in the House, but there were no bells, so I assume that either five members didn't stand or it was by unanimous consent. It was nice to see that bill go to committee. I think it's a worthwhile discussion we need to have, although I'm sure there are some concerns.

I think it's appropriate and germane that the debate was occurring when we did receive this request. I would hope that this would be something we might be able to accommodate before going to clause-by-clause.

Ms. Clarke, a government relations specialist from the CNIB, does request to appear specifically on Bill C-76. They mentioned they're celebrating 100 years in 2018. I think 2018 is a special year for 100th anniversaries. It's also the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I. I'm not positive, but I believe there was a connection to the CNIB's founding and those veterans coming home from the First World War with visual impairment because of the war. I do think it's appropriate that we hear from them.

One of the lines in the request.... As someone whose mother-in-law uses a wheelchair—she lost her right leg to amputation about 15 years ago following an automobile accident—I think applying a disability lens to legislation is important, particularly when we're talking about elections.

I was pleased with the efforts that Elections Canada made in the 2015 election to make voting locations accessible, or as accessible as possible, at least for those with mobility issues. There are other disabilities that are not necessarily always as—

(1135)

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, I don't mean to interrupt, but the subamendment is just adding a date to your amendment. Could you just comment on adding a date to your amendment?

Mr. John Nater:

Absolutely. I think it's germane, because it does put a date on when the CEO is attending. I think it's appropriate that at that time we hear from the CEO on the matter that is before this committee, which is, of course, Bill C-76.

I would leave it on the record and leave it on the table that we do have this request outstanding from the CNIB. I think it would be worthwhile to hear from the CNIB perhaps for the second hour, and perhaps from some other advocacy organizations related to those with disability issues. I think it's worthwhile. It think it's potentially beneficial.

On the subamendment and on what we're talking about, we're setting a date to hear from the Ontario chief electoral officer. My colleague Mr. Reid expressed his comments on the other components of the subamendment in terms of the effective time and location on motions. I think we will leave that to a further subamendment perhaps from colleagues or from colleagues across the way.

Specifically on the CEO, what we're looking at here is hearing from a gentleman who has experienced so many of these changes first-hand and recently. He has run an election very much based on certain amendments that we are now foreseeing in this piece of legislation.

The direction that was taken by the provincial Liberals in their 2016 amendments related very closely to some of the overlap we're seeing in Bill C-76—not identical—so we hear from the CEO next Tuesday at 11 a.m. and hear him talk about those amendments and where they have gone.

In particular, one of the things we've talked about at this committee on which they could comment exceptionally intelligently is what we're calling the register of future voters. The provincial government also made an effort to go down that route calling it a provisional voter register for those who are 16 and 17 years of age. It would be interesting to hear the comments from the CEO on how that has worked and how they have gone about doing that. Interestingly, in their case, a person who is not yet a voter who is under the age of 18 has the option to withdraw from the register at any point in time. I find that interesting that it's—

The Chair:

Mr. Nater. We're adding a date to your amendment. Are you in agreement with the subamendment?

Mr. John Nater:

I think it's germane that it reflects what he will talk about at that point in time.

The Chair:

Everyone has agreed that he's coming, so we can find that out then.

(1140)

Mr. John Nater:

I still think it's worthwhile to expand on what he will be talking about at that point in time. I think the future register of voters is something that is interesting.

On our side, we've expressed some concerns about privacy issues. I think we heard a guarantee from the Chief Electoral Officer last week that information would not be shared with parties. It will be for internal Elections Canada purposes only. I think that's a strong component.

We've heard comments before about whether or not parental consent might be required for those who are below a certain age. That's something to work out to ensure there are proper safeguards on that. The advantage that the CEO will be able to talk to when this is brought forward is how this will contribute to ensuring that those who are 16 and 17 are automatically added to the permanent register of electors of Ontario when they turn 18.

I think it's worthwhile to have that discussion and see how we can go about ensuring that those who are younger.... I remember hearing testimony during the electoral reform committee which said that, when you vote for the first time in your first available election, you are more likely to vote in elections after that. So having an elector vote for that first time when they turn 18 is worthwhile.

Certainly, many who are 18 are still in high school. Some will be in college and university. Depending on the date of an election and when the election falls within the four-year election cycle, they may be beyond that point and in the workforce, in trade school or in some other kind of establishment.

Ensuring that there are options to encourage voters to vote when that point in time comes I think is important. Hearing the chief electoral officer comment on that would be important, and hearing him comment on that at 11 a.m. until noon on October 2 of next week I think would be worthwhile. Interestingly, October 2 is the day after October 1, which is also National Seniors Day, which was something that our friend and colleague Alice Wong, former minister—

Sorry?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are you calling the CEO a senior?

Mr. John Nater:

No, not at all, but a senior is certainly someone—

Mr. Scott Reid:

Well maybe.... I have no idea. We'll find out when he gets here on October 2 at 11 a.m.

I could look it up before then.

The Chair:

Well, I guess it is relevant that October 1st comes before October 2nd then.

Are you saying you're in agreement with the subamendment?

Mr. John Nater:

Again, I think from the seniors perspective, something we need to consider, as well, is how teenagers—

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Yes, Chair.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

There are a lot of people on the list.

Mr. John Nater:

Oh, okay.

Well, do you know what, Chair? I do think there are others who want to specifically comment on adding this date, so perhaps I'll leave it to the next person on the list and come back and speak on a further intervention.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

On the subamendment, please be disciplined and comment on adding the date to the amendment, because that's all the subamendment is.

Is there further discussion?

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's good of you to stay in the real world.

The Chair:

We're ready to vote on the subamendment which would add the date to the amendment.

Are we not ready to vote? Are you going to speak?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

No, no, go ahead. Let's vote.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, I wonder, given the importance of this subamendment, if we could have a recorded vote.

The Chair:

We will have a recorded vote.

(Subamendment negatived: nays 5; yeas 4)

The Chair:

Now we're back to the amendment, and we have a speakers list.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Am I on it?

The Chair:

No.

Mr. Nater, it's on your amendment.

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, to clarify, we're moving back to the original amendment, which states that we will not move to clause-by-clause until such time that we hear from the chief electoral officer. Again, I go back to the importance of this. Until we've heard from the CEO of Ontario, whose amendments in 2016 were implemented in the election of June 2018...I can foresee amendments coming out of that. I can foresee changes to this legislation coming out of the CEO's testimony.

In the same way, we will be hearing from the minister later this afternoon, at which point I would hope she would be able to come before us and suggest where she sees that amendments are appropriate.

We're still very much at the point where we are close to clause-by-clause. I think we are exceptionally close to clause-by-clause, and I think we are eager to see that happen at the appropriate time. However, we haven't quite reached that point yet, because we need to hear the information that will be brought to us by Mr. Essensa, the chief electoral officer of Ontario, and by the minister herself when she comes before the committee this afternoon at 3:30.

When I was speaking to the subamendment, Chair, you were eager to see me move along from that, but we are back to the point where this is germane. We need to hear from the CEO before we move to clause-by-clause, because of the very specific and deliberate changes proposed by the Government of Ontario in 2016 and implemented in 2018.

What I find interesting, because our Conservative party in previous Parliaments implemented fixed election dates—

(1145)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

And then ignored it.

Mr. John Nater:

And then followed it in 2015—

An hon. member: On a fixed election date.

Mr. John Nater: Yes, on a fixed election date.

Mr. Scott Reid:

There may be a series of ironies relating to that.

Mr. John Nater:

Ironies abound in politics.

Mr. David Christopherson:

This political senior is going be reminding you that—

Mr. John Nater:

But not a senior who can be recognized with your youthful age there, Mr. Christopherson.

I'm not ready to recognize you on National Seniors Day quite yet, which again is on Monday, which will be—

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well done.

Mr. John Nater:

That's the day prior to October 2.

Interestingly, something that was foreseen in the Ontario reforms and that was not addressed in Bill C-76 in the federal legislation was changing the date of the fixed election date. Like the federal fixed election date, the provincial fixed election date was scheduled for the first Thursday in October, which in most cases would be immediately prior to Thanksgiving. Those hours and those dates were changed to the first Thursday in June. I'd be curious to hear from the chief electoral officer on why that change was made. What was it about October that wasn't appropriate? What made it more appropriate to move it to a June date?

Certainly at a federal level in the past there have been dates throughout the calendar year, including one in January 2006. I remember that the door-knocking in that campaign wasn't always the most enjoyable, but with a good toque it worked out. It would be interesting to hear from the CEO on what considerations went into that.

It would also be interesting to hear what considerations were made by the CEO in running an election in October versus June, and June versus October, particularly in terms of locations and having the availability of space. Whether it's early June or early October, schools—public schools, elementary schools, high schools—do have classes on Mondays and Thursdays. In either of those cases, whether it's a federal or provincial election, school is in session, so the availability of schools for those things isn't really affected in either case. I would be curious to hear about that, especially when we look at comments in terms of advance polling. In October with the Thanksgiving weekend, you do run into holidays from a federal perspective but not so much provincially. Again, you have the Victoria Day weekend, which falls a couple of weeks prior to the provincial fixed election date, which has an impact.

I'll go back to the timing and the consideration that has to be made. I can recall that in the 2005-06 election, the Elections Canada offices were open on Christmas Day for those who wanted to vote by special ballot. I think that's an interesting conundrum and an interesting challenge as well that we can foresee in Bill C-76 with the date of a maximum length of a writ period—in the case where a government in a minority situation falls at a certain point—whether it be in late November or into December, and how that overlaps with a holiday period. A Christmas election is a challenge.

Certainly, when Paul Martin called that election in December 2005, it was a significant time lag that allowed the CEO and—

(1150)

The Chair:

Mr. Nater, we're just deciding on whether the.... On your amendment on whether the chief electoral officer is coming, he's already coming. It's already a fait accompli.

Mr. John Nater:

Yes, but it leads into why he's coming prior to commencing clause-by-clause and what information we need to hear from him prior to going into clause-by-clause and prior to debating many of the amendments.

The Chair:

You can ask him that when he's here.

Mr. John Nater:

I'm looking forward to asking him, but I think it's worthwhile for those around the committee table to know why I feel it's so important to hear from the CEO prior to going to clause-by-clause. Certainly the timing and the fixed election dates play into that as well.

Another issue that was proposed in the 2006 reforms and then implemented was a modernization process. That is not foreseen in this current bill. It's not foreseen at this point in time, but I'd be curious to hear from the CEO on whether that's something we should be considering as an amendment within Bill C-76, and to hear about the successes or challenges there were with that, both in their by-elections and election period itself. I want to compare this with what was said by our Chief Electoral Officer about the importance of piloting proposals in by-elections before implementing them writ large. He suggested that when it came to poll books, he was not comfortable piloting that yet in by-elections, which are likely to happen this fall. That's unless we go into a snap general election this fall, which is always a possibility. At any rate, he wasn't prepared to do that.

I think that's an appropriate and diligent approach to that, because one does not want to pilot something that could have a significant concern. In the provincial example, I look forward to hearing from Mr. Essensa on how piloting the electronic tabulators in the provincial by-elections worked or was a challenge, and then how that rolled out into a general election. Certainly the by-election—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That's not even in our legislation.

Mr. John Nater:

No, but it's something we could consider as an amendment to the legislation to see where that heads. It's germane to what the CEO was talking about with regard to the poll book suggestion, which also isn't in legislation but does relate to the ability of Elections Canada to work into this process. Certainly they use the example of the Whitby—Oshawa by-election to run that. That was the first opportunity they had, and I believe it was relatively successful. I remember watching those results come in quite quickly, and then it was implemented in the election.

We noticed at the time, and certainly in the election, the speed with which that occurred, with relative success, but it would be interesting to hear from Mr. Essensa about what challenges they had, especially when using a private contractor to undertake that work. I believe Dominion Voting Systems was the entity. It has undertaken to do that. Dominion is certainly a well-known company across Ontario, running their elections at the municipal level. In my constituency, I have nine municipalities, and two county governments have undertaken work with Dominion for online and telephone voting, and have done so with general success in terms of municipal elections. Hearing from Mr. Esssensa on Tuesday about how that has been undertaken would, I think, be worthwhile.

Canadians are changing how they do business, how they do their banking and how they do their shopping. More and more often these are being done in a variety of ways, whether it's online or by telephone interaction and they are not necessarily going in person to do many of the tasks they did in the past. That's not the direction Elections Ontario has taken. They've taken an electronic tabulator, but it's certainly a step towards additional automation.

I look forward to hearing Mr. Esssensa comment on the labour side of things. Ensuring that there's an appropriate number of poll clerks and deputy returning officers at each polling station to effectively run an election is a challenge. I know in my constituency, in Perth—Wellington, we have an exceptionally low unemployment rate. Ensuring that we have enough people to fill the jobs that are available on a full-time basis is a challenge in itself, but filling those jobs in a short period of time is its own challenge. Despite the fact that the jobs are relatively well remunerated, it is difficult to find people to commit to what is a long day. Twelve hours of voting is one thing, but then there's the additional time to open and close the poll and tabulate the votes at the end. Finding an appropriate amount of labour to make that happen is a challenge. There's no question about that. Hearing from Mr. Essensa on how that has worked and what issues they've had in terms of implementing that would be germane and appropriate when that happens.

Another thing was foreseen. Again, this is not a matter that applies necessarily to a riding like mine, which is relatively rural, although we do have mid-sized urban areas. Stratford would be the largest city in my riding, at 32,000 people. All the others are smaller towns under 10,000. One of the challenges was the opportunity to attend multiple-residence buildings, such as condo buildings and apartment buildings, in smaller communities. I've never had a challenge entering those multi-unit buildings, but there are often challenges with that.

The provincial legislation saw the authority of the CEO to issue fines to the owners of these buildings if canvassers are denied access to them. It would be an interesting commentary to hear from the CEO as to whether that's something we should be foreseeing in the amendments to Bill C-76, to have some form of enhanced ability. Certainly the current legislation provides that candidates and their agents are permitted to attend multi-unit buildings, but being able to enter those or having some kind of fine or sanction for those buildings would be worthwhile.

We should have that conversation with Mr. Essensa to hear what his thinking is and whether that has been successful and whether or not he's had to use that power and authority that's been given to him. Therefore, I look forward to hearing that commentary on October 2, from 11 o'clock until noon when Mr. Essensa joins us.

(1155)



Another important observation that comes out of the provincial legislation on which I look forward to hearing from Mr. Essensa is the way in which the legislation itself affected the boundaries, especially when it came to representation in the north.

Mr. Chair, I don't need to tell you, from your perspective, that Yukon is significantly larger than a riding such as mine of 3,500 square kilometres, which I feel is large, certainly not in relation to yours but in relation to a Toronto riding or a Montreal riding, which is a number of subway stops or blocks, where certainly a different type of representation is needed.

In the provincial legislation, they foresaw how to make recommendations on their boundaries and suggested that an additional two electoral districts be added in the Ontario north. Certainly this isn't something that's foreseen within our legislation. Certainly when it comes to boundary commissions, I would suggest that we have taken great pains at the federal level to ensure that, in terms of the electoral district, the boundaries commissions are undertaken in a way that tries as much as possible to do so without political influence, which I think is appropriate. It provides the Speaker of the House of Commons with the authority to appoint certain members of those boundaries commissions to undertake that, but it could be something that we ask the CEO about in terms of the appropriateness of legislation enhancing the representation in rural and particularly northern communities.

As well, in this specific example, the Kenora—Rainy River and Timmins—James Bay ridings both had large indigenous populations, so the commentary at the time was that this would provide the additional opportunity for enhanced representation for indigenous communities. That is something again on which we could hear from the CEO in terms of whether that enhanced representation has been effective and whether he has some suggestions for our elections act at the federal level, ways in which we can ensure that indigenous community members are able to and have full participation in our electoral system. In this case, these ridings were of significant northern capacity. They were still very large areas but with a much smaller population than others would as well.

That brings me to one of the most important points that I really think we need to hear from the chief electoral officer of Ontario on, and that has to do with the way in which third parties operate within a federal system. We've gone through the election provincially with these changes in place, with these new limits, with the need to register. In fact, at the provincial level as well, third parties are now also required to register. We won't be hearing from municipal representatives, but it would be nonetheless worthwhile to consider that as we go about the commentary and the discussion on where we go.

The interesting component here is that third party influence on elections has, especially in the last two and a half years, become a major discussion point not only in Ontario, not only in Canada, but internationally. No one wants to see foreign influence, or undue foreign influence, at any level in any country. We do not need to have any commentary or even a hint of a hint that a foreign influence could be having a role in our election process. The ongoing discussion in the United States about the foreign influence from Russia on the 2016 presidential election is not a discussion we want to be having here. We need to ensure that our rules, our laws in Canada, are as strong and as strict as possible for us to ensure there is not that influence.

(1200)



Looking at the Ontario example, and looking at what I hope to hear from Mr. Essensa, it's specifically the way in which this third party rules, this third party process, was put in place during the election period and the time prior to the election period, as well. Currently in the federal legislation, there are different considerations, whether it's during the writ period, during the pre-writ period or not during the writ period, of the way in which third parties can operate.

What I find interesting from the provincial component and where Mr. Essensa will be able to provide pertinent commentary is that prior to the introduction of this piece of legislation, there was no limit on what could be spent on advertising before an election period. That's a concern. That's a concern when you have deep pockets that can influence an election by running ads and by paying for paid advertisers and paid workers during an election campaign and in the time prior to the writ period, as well.

When this change was implemented, the limit on third parties was a maximum of $100,000 during an election period, and no more than $4,000 within a specific electoral district. Even $4,000 in any given electoral district, I think, is high. Four thousand dollars' worth of advertising in any given riding could have a substantial impact, especially if we're not entirely clear where that funding is coming from and whether there is some foreign influence.

One of the things on which we heard testimony was the need for anti-collusion measures to ensure there's not a close association between multiple third parties. That's where my concern lies as well. If you have multiple third parties each running four thousand dollars' worth of ads in any given electoral district, you're looking at a major concern, especially when political parties are capped very stringently in terms of how much money they can spend in any given electoral district. Looking at the upcoming election, that's just shy of $100,000 in a given riding per registered candidate. That's a concern.

We should hear from Mr. Essensa in terms of how those limits were implemented and how they were enforced. I think that's one of the concerns we've heard from witnesses and from Canadians, as well: that it's well and good to have limits, to have limits on third parties, to have limits on foreign influence, but if it's not clear how these rules are enforced, if it's not clear that they can be enforced in some situations, then we have major concerns. To hear from Mr. Essensa, hear his commentary on exactly how that will be undertaken, I think, will be exceptionally interesting.

In the legislation prior to its introduction in 2016 and its implementation for 2018, there were no rules about whether third parties could collaborate on political advertising campaigns, and a very few of them working with political actors, to get around campaign finance regulations. That's a concern. Something I would be very intrigued to hear about from Mr. Essensa is whether he's aware of examples provincially, prior to the introduction of the bill, where political parties were working with third party organizations to coordinate a message, to coordinate a strategy in terms of working toward a common outcome, but in a way in which the campaign finance regulation was being subverted and people were getting around the rules.

(1205)



On the anti-collusion measures that are envisioned in the provincial legislation, I think it would be worthwhile to hear his commentary, and then hear suggestions about the way in which, at the federal level, when we are reviewing the amendments, we can work to ensure that we have strong anti-collusion measures, as well. No one wants to see a system in which political actors, parties or party candidates are working very closely with third parties to get around the spending limits and spending caps. I'll be intrigued to hear from Mr. Essensa in terms of where things can happen and where things can go from there, as well.

Most of us around this table at one time or another have been candidates for a nomination. We've had to run for the nominations for our specific parties and then win those nominations. Sometimes members are required to win multiple nominations as different elections come on. We've seen that in different political parties.

One of the things that I find intriguing with the provincial example is that prior to the changes, there were no limits on how much a person could give to a nomination contestant. Substantial amounts of money could go into a nomination contest and could effectively be used as advertising for a general election, but under the auspices of a nomination race. It allowed those running for nomination in political parties to substantially influence an election campaign prior to the actual election campaign simply by having a delayed nomination contest, especially in situations where there was a tight riding where that added spending limit could be done with no limits on either the contributions or the spending. Games could be played, but that was something that was cracked down on within the legislation that was foreseen.

Now individuals can only give up to $1,200 to association and nomination contestants of a party annually, aligning it with the amounts that can be given to a political party or to a nominated candidate. As for the amount of money the contestant can spend, that's been capped at 20% of the candidate's spending limit in an electoral district in the previous election. In a riding where there's about a $100,000 spending limit, which is generally about where spending limits are—a little less in some ridings and a little more in others, depending on the size and the population—you're looking at a $20,000 limit for a nomination contestant. Again, it's not an insignificant amount of money, but it's still substantial enough that you're looking at a way in which the money can be spent. However, it nonetheless affects how that is undertaken.

More generally, in terms of financing, again, something that Mr. Essensa can comment on, especially as it relates to our legislation, is the amount of money and how it is distributed to political parties. In one sense, the provincial government was behind us federally in terms of how parties are financed. Until very recently, corporations and unions could make political contributions. Certainly in Canada that practice has been banned for many years. Initially the limits were reduced under former prime minister Jean Chrétien, but certainly they were banned altogether as one of the first acts by former prime minister Stephen Harper when he took office in 2006. This certainly changed the ways that parties fundraise and the ways that parties finance their election campaigns. I think that's a worthwhile conversation that needs to be had.

I find it interesting that prior to that change provincially, an individual could donate as much as $33,250 in any given election year by making the changes throughout the different levels—to the party, to the electoral district, to the nominated candidate—in a particular by-election. There are these situations in which, in each case, they can be making these donations. Hearing from Mr. Essensa in terms of how that has come to play and how that has happened would be worthwhile.

(1210)



More generally as well, in terms of his contribution to our studies at hand, is the way in which funds are raised. We've certainly seen provincially what has been referred to as cash for access fundraisers. Provincial ministers were, at the time, given quotas of how much funding had to be raised in a certain time. These funds were raised by directly advocating and asking for contributions from those who may lobby or hope to do business with a provincial ministry.

The changes that were undertaken by the provincial government were what some would consider very strict, some would say draconian. Rather than addressing the problem of decision-makers being influenced by financial contributions, there was a movement to, effectively, ban all political actors from attending fundraisers, with few, if any, exceptions. This applied to pretty much anyone other than staff, which I found interesting. A chief of staff to a senior cabinet minister could attend, but a nominated candidate in a riding that is unlikely to go to a certain political party is banned from attending a fundraiser.

There's been interesting commentary on that. Interesting commentaries were that cardboard cutouts have been used in place of an actual member or minister attending a fundraiser.

(1215)

The Chair:

Mr. Nater—

Mr. John Nater:

It's germane to this topic at hand, because it talks more generally about ways in which funds are raised, whether it's through political parties or to third parties within this, and may provide Mr. Essensa, who's coming on October 2—

The Chair:

There are just a couple of things, Mr. Nater. First, I think that's related to another bill that we have discussed, so it's not as relevant. Second, I'm just curious. You began by outlining a lot of important work the committee has to get to. I'm wondering if you think that speaking ad nauseam for a witness to come, who's already agreed to come, and we're all agreed is coming, helps move us quickly toward that.

The other thing I'm getting confused about is that I thought we agreed on Tuesday to set a date to go to clause-by-clause. The committee members all agreed. I'm not sure how we didn't actually set a date.

Mr. John Nater:

That's certainly an interesting observation. It's important that we discuss this bill. It's important that we recognize, as well, that there are discussions happening on this bill, in places that are not in this committee. I think that a sign of good faith from all sides is, hopefully, forthcoming. We've been very clear on our side, to the minister directly, to the parliamentary secretary, of certain concerns we have, particularly as they relate to third party financing and foreign influence.

We do have a bill before the House of Commons—I believe it's Bill C-406—which directly deals with foreign influence. That's not dealt with as strongly as it should be in this bill.

We need that show of goodwill. There have been discussions going back and forth between our shadow minister and the minister for the past five to six days, since last week.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Do you know if they're on that subject matter?

Mr. John Nater:

I was not privy to those meetings, but I know those topics are going back and forth. I'm hopeful that perhaps the minister is currently in the cabinet meeting as we speak. I'm hopeful that perhaps there may be word sent down at some point that we could very much go ahead with where we're going. Certainly, from our side, we've expressed our concerns about where we stand on this bill.

We recognize that in this committee there are three of us. There are 96 or 97 of us in the House of Commons. In the same way, Mr. Christopherson is one on this committee, he's one of 44 in the House. We do not have a majority, as the government does. The government will pass its legislation, one way or another. It has the tools at its disposal to do so. We do not. We do not have those same tools. Our only tools are persuasive arguments that Mr. Reid and Ms. Kusie can make, mine being less persuasive, and the element of time. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

That's alright, you can continue. [English]

Mr. John Nater:

I was going to say something in French, but I'm not going to try it. I do not practise my French quite as—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I would like to make a one-minute rebuttal, and I'll give the floor back to you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

At least you are admitting it's a filibuster.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yesterday I reminded you that this motion I brought forward that you are making an amendment to probably seemed eerily familiar to yours. When passing Bill C-23, you brought forth a very similar bill. I have to remind you that at that time all other parties in Parliament had a lot of issues with many of the clauses in that piece of legislation, but none of it mattered.

Now we have support from three parties in the House on this piece of legislation, yet time and time again they've been stalling, and many tactics are being used on the other side. They've been stalling the bill from moving forward.

These types of motions are not unheard of. We've been given quite a lot of time. Previously, all that was given to clause-by-clause was 15 hours. I recall that only a few weeks were given at that time as well.

I just want to remind you, to refresh your memory on that notion.

I understand that you want to see the chief electoral officer of Ontario. As the chair has pointed out, the chief electoral officer is finally available, so we're all really excited to have the chief electoral officer here. We're not trying to withhold the knowledge and wisdom that he would bring in order to pass this legislation with appropriate amendments that might be needed. We're looking forward to that.

I hope that maybe we can vote on your amendment. Regardless of how the vote goes, we would still be seeing the chief electoral officer on Tuesday. We all look forward to that testimony. We all look forward for us to move forward to clause-by-clause, see this legislation through and give it the scrutiny that it deserves.

(1220)

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Ms. Sahota. I appreciate the commentary.

I do appreciate something more generally, Chair, and to the committee. I do think that this committee has operated very well. I think it will continue to do so, notwithstanding my extensive comments on the matter at hand.

I want to go back to the motion and to the amendment. My amendment does, no question, take out the drop-dead date of clause-by-clause of October 16, the date that we are to report back to the House. I appreciate very much the leniency provided to the chair through the motion that he may limit. I think that's something we are generally okay with.

There are going to be clauses that we are going to agree to and that we are all going to agree to, and they can be dealt with very quickly. I hope that we will come to an understanding informally. The term is gentlemen's agreement. I don't know if there's another way to say that, that's not....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's a handshake agreement.

Mr. John Nater:

It's a handshake agreement.

I hope that we can get to the point where there is a handshake agreement for certain clauses as they come up that we do away with....

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We still have to schedule clause-by-clause. I'm still waiting for the results of that.

Your handshake isn't worth that much right now.

Mr. John Nater:

I'm hoping we can get to a point where we can establish that as we go through.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm sure you are.

Mr. John Nater:

No one wants to be here until three in the morning, whether it's doing clause-by-clause or whether it's hearing me pontificate or hearing the—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Hey, he admits it.

Mr. John Nater:

Well, I have a lot to say sometimes.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

What about a wet handshake?

Mr. John Nater:

A wet handshake agreement? I'm not sure I've heard that phrase.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Where you spit on your hand and...?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

No, no, no. When you wash your hands and you're embarrassed to shake, but you have to shake.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It would be a good motion. It may be appropriate to go in camera at this point.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

No. It's like I have to shake their hand, but I just washed my hands, and I'm so embarrassed. That happens to me.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You know, if you were just in the washroom and it's not a wet handshake, that's even more alarming.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's true.

Mr. John Nater:

I blush very easily.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well, you wouldn't have liked the last Parliament.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

If you see me in the entrance of the bathroom going like this, you know what I'm doing. I'm trying to dry my hands.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

They have paper towels and those air things.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's right.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Those things aren't very good. The new ones from Dyson are great, but they don't have those here.

Mr. John Nater:

I think that when we start is very much an element of where we go behind the scenes. Certainly, we hope that perhaps by the conclusion of today's meeting we could have that clarity going forward. We may be able at that point to agree to the motion as written.

We'll put our cards on the table. If the discussions elsewhere go well, and if we can have some clarity, some definitive word from those elements who aren't in this room, I think we could very much go with what's written on this piece of paper, with the original motion. Provided that we hear from the CEO for Ontario on Tuesday, I see no reason why we wouldn't be able to, if there is clarity provided from those who are not in this room right now.

I look forward to hearing that. I haven't seen anyone rushing in with a sealed envelope, from upstairs or elsewhere, providing that certainty. I'll keep my eye on the door as we go through. Going on this motion from an opposition standpoint, at this point we are not comfortable with all of the provisions of the bill as they stand. I would like to see us—

(1225)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Take it up with clause-by-clause. Let's get to clause-by-clause.

Mr. John Nater:

We are not willing to do that if it's simply going to be an element of where all clauses presented by the New Democratic Party or the Conservative Party are dealt with out of hand without appropriate discussion or debate.

I would love to be able to conclude my comments and simply go to a vote on this with some reassurance from our friends upstairs, but that's simply not advisable at this point in time. We're not ready to get to that point yet, not until we've fully discussed the important motion that is before us as we speak.

Perhaps I should ask for clarity from the chair or the clerk. In terms of parties not represented on the committee, they are entitled to submit amendments. I believe some have been submitted. Under a guillotine motion such as this, where each party is provided five minutes per clause, are those parties that are represented in the House of Commons but do not have official party status or representatives on this committee permitted to participate in that five minutes? Perhaps I could have some clarity from the chair.

The Chair:

The question is, do the parties that are not represented use five minutes?

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

For the members of Parliament who don't belong to recognized parties, for amendments they've submitted, during clause-by-clause they would be given a short period of time at the discretion of the chair to present their amendments, but for the amendments presented by members belonging to a recognized caucus, they would not be able to participate in the debate, necessarily.

The Chair:

Unless they get unanimous consent from the committee.

Mr. John Nater:

That's an interesting element of this as well. I guess that goes with the territory of not having party status, but at the same time, they are permitted to introduce their amendments, which is the right of any parliamentarian within this place. I do appreciate that.

Chair, I know there are other people on the speaking list. I would like to take a brief pause from my comments and allow others to speak. Something may yet come to my mind, so I wouldn't mind being put back on the speaking list in case.

The Chair:

Okay. Mr. Bittle is next.

Stop eating.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I can't eat. There are no forks left.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid:

I just want to observe that there was never a fork shortage in the 41st Parliament. We had a stable Conservative majority government.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

It's belt tightening.

I'd like to thank Mr. Nater for his comments. I enjoyed his criticisms of meetings that he wasn't in attendance for and, again, it's ragging the puck, delaying it further and, again, here we are. We're an hour and a half into this with a promise that time would be set to start the next debate.

(1230)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It was two days ago.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

It was two days ago. There was a promise that we would hear from the minister and there was an agreement. A request was made by the opposition to hear from the minister as we start clause-by-clause. We're hearing from the minister this afternoon and we still don't have a date to start that.

They delayed the debate on wanting to hear from the CEO and explaining how great it would be to hear from the CEO for the province of Ontario. We want to hear from CEO from the province of Ontario.

We've been accommodating, but it's time to move on. As the CEO for Elections Canada said, this is a good bill. It's not a perfect bill, but we need to see the amendments. We need to get it forward and we need to get this done. Again, I call upon the Conservatives to stop this filibuster, and let's get going on this. The Canadian people expect us to debate this and to go to clause-by-clause and get this done.

Thank you.

The Chair:

So that people know who's on the speaking list, it's Ms. Sahota, Mr. Reid, Mr. Nater and Mr. Christopherson.

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

As I was saying yesterday, and going off what Chris is saying, our—I guess I shouldn't speak for everybody—my patience is starting to run a little thin. We keep hearing that yes, we're going to get to it, we're going to get to it, but we don't want to make any promises. I just don't understand what the holdup is about anymore.

We've pretty much created a large chunk of this legislation through the recommendations that were given to us by the Chief Electoral Officer. He had made, I believe, 130 recommendations and many of those, which are on ways to improve the functions of our democracy, are in this bill.

As my colleague Chris just pointed out, it may not be perfect, but the Chief Electoral Officer highly supports this bill. It's a non-partisan position. We had Elizabeth May in before committee. She's very supportive and wants to see this bill go forward. At the last committee meeting we had Nathan Cullen. We've heard from Mr. Christopherson before as well that he's kind of anxious and he's starting to wonder what's going on here as well and why we can't move forward with this. It seems awfully odd that we're not just plowing through. That may not be our style, but I feel as though we're being driven to a point where there's no reasonable explanations for delaying anymore.

We've heard from so many witnesses. We have accommodated with the chief electoral officer for Ontario. We're having the minister back on this issue. I find it hard to understand anymore why you require so much leeway, especially when I think Scott Reid likes to have it referred to as the so-called Fair Elections Act.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's right.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

When that was passed, there was no such leeway given, and there was a lot of opposition in Parliament to the so-called Fair Elections Act.

However, we've seen a very similar motion brought forward, with a start and end date, which seems to be problematic to the Conservatives for some odd reason. We're doing exactly what you would expect us to do, because this is how you used to function.

At this point, we haven't even been as.... We've given so much. We've given so much time. We've had every witness. I think you guys had a list of 200-some witnesses you wanted to bring forward, and we said go ahead. We said yes to every single witness. There were 50 witnesses who were available. Some had a lot of relevant testimony to share; some were maybe not so relevant.

It almost seems like we're going down this road where you want to hear from any person who has ever run in an election in their lifetime, because they may or may not, as Mr. Nater said, make one relevant point. That's just not how a committee can effectively function.

We can't function this way. We've been going in circles. This is the third time I think that we've been going in circles with this piece of legislation, and I am getting very dizzy. These are just delay tactics.

There may be other negotiations going on, as Mr. Nater keeps pointing out, but it will be interesting to see. All of the things that Mr. Nater keeps saying are of top interest to him may not even be what ends up coming out of the negotiation.

It leads me to further believe that these are all delay tactics and there's not a genuine desire to even hear from the chief electoral officer of Ontario, or a real genuine desire for any of the debate we're having right now. It's just a method of being able to get something else that may be of interest to the Conservatives.

That's fine. I mean, we are willing to play ball, but it seems like with that handshake agreement we made, there's no follow-through happening on the other side. It's about time that we get serious. We've been put here by our constituents to do work, not to filibuster and talk about irrelevancies.

I think we give a lot of leeway on this committee. What you may find relevant is not necessarily what I find relevant, but we've been giving that leeway so that you can hopefully get to that place where we can move forward in doing the good work that we've been elected to do.

There are a lot of amendments that you guys have brought forward. From what I've heard, I'm looking forward to seeing all of them. Some of them are quite good. I commend you for that. I commend everyone in all parties for bringing forward those amendments, but I think those amendments deserve some attention and time. We can only do that if you give us a start date, and so far we're having a problem even getting that, let alone an end date.

What is the holdup? Why do you find it so difficult to start the study, to start the examination of the legislation? Why is that so difficult? I can't understand that.

I know there are many tools that you also have in your tool box, and the delay that's being done up front could also be done later on down the road. That's not a choice that I guess you guys have made. It is just beyond me why we can't actually start.

You guys have a lot of good amendments. A lot of them are yours. Let's start talking about them. Maybe there are some changes that can be made, but you're not even allowing the good work that you've done to see the light of day and to have it discussed.

I know that Mr Christopherson is eager—the NDP is eager—for more people to have the ability to vote in this next election. A lot of people were disenfranchised by the so-called Fair Elections Act, and we want to allow those people to vote in this election. What's very concerning is that we've heard from the Chief Electoral Officer that the longer this takes, the harder that gets.

(1235)



Maybe that's the Conservatives' motive. Maybe you don't want to see everyone able to vote. Maybe you don't want people in remote communities, which is astonishing because I know that a lot of your MPs come from rural and remote areas where access to polls is difficult.

There are a lot of good things in this bill that will enable many people to participate in the democratic process. A lot of the rhetoric I've been hearing now and even in June has been about the protection of our democracy: “This is why we're filibustering and this is why we're holding things up because we are the protectors of our democracy. We are not going to allow this legislation to be pushed through because that's how democracy will be protected.” Meanwhile, this very piece of legislation is what will allow us to protect our democracy. It's very ironic. It seems as if the Conservatives are speaking out of both sides of their mouths when we talk about protecting democracy.

We thought the Chief Electoral Officer endorsed this piece of legislation. Previously, in the so-called Fair Elections Act, Bill C-23, the Chief Electoral Officer said that he certainly cannot endorse a bill that disenfranchises electors, cannot.

Mr. David Christopherson:

They didn't even consult him.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We've had him here so many times. I believe the Chief Electoral Officer just came before this committee for the fourth time since the bill has been presented. It's unbelievable to me that we're still sitting here talking in circles when you would have never given that leeway when you were in government. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

We're too nice. [English]

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes, we are too kind.

Maybe that kindness should come to an end. It's hard for me to say that but even Mr. Christopherson upholds and respects Parliament to the utmost, I believe, that Parliament should be supreme and Parliament should dictate what happens, even on getting invitations from that side.

Enough is enough now, and we need to call an end to this because do you know who suffers if we do not get this legislation passed? It's Canadians. That's who are going to lose out at the end of the day if we don't get going on this. Do you want to be responsible for allowing Canadians to not have access to the polls?

I guess they didn't care previously and so they don't care anymore.

(1240)

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, they didn't.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's about time that you look deep down and within yourselves and start caring about that. We need to make sure that the disabled, those who have challenges in presenting the type of IDs that are required and many other things that are in this piece of legislation, get an opportunity to elect their representatives just as every other Canadian does.

I know that people have probably heard the phrase, a Canadian is a Canadian is a Canadian. I do think that it's really important to make sure that all Canadians feel that way and they feel that no matter their socio-economic background, no matter where they were born or where they came from, if they are Canadian that they would get equal representation, that they would have equal access to the democratic process.

That is what we are taking away from them or we're continuing to allow to be taken away from them if we don't make some changes as soon as possible.

This is my last-ditch effort to appeal to the sensibilities on the other side, to start the study on this piece of legislation so we can get it back to the House.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If they're ready for a vote.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

They should be ready for a vote. We should vote on the amendments. We should vote on the main motion. Honestly, we're already at this point with the amendments; it seems a little ridiculous considering the chief electoral officer of Ontario will be appearing on Tuesday regardless.

I'd like to vote on the amendment. I'd like to even see John Nater call off the amendment because what's the point? We've all agreed already to see the chief electoral officer. Let's just get on with it. Let's vote.

What natural step would we have right after that anyway? It would be to get on with the legislation and start clause-by-clause.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's what they're afraid of.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

There's no need to be afraid.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Chair, it's been a while since I've used a point of order. How do I access a Simms protocol? Do I ask Scott if I can talk? Is that how that works?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Who's next on the list?

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'll be happy to cede my place to Mr. Christopherson and go on the list after him. That's not Simms protocol, that's—

Mr. David Christopherson:

That would be a Scott courtesy, a Reid courtesy.

Mr. Scott Simms:

The protocol was that if you had a point of clarification or if you had a question on something that was said, you ask the permission of the person who has the floor. They cede the floor to you for a reasonable amount of time and then it goes back to the person who had the floor.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Then can I—

The Chair:

You're switching with Mr. Reid.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'll say yes to that. I'd still like a quick question under the protocol.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Sure.

Mr. David Christopherson:

On the official opposition side, we have a mixture of members who were here last time and who are feeling somewhat sheepish about what was done with the unfair elections act. We have new members who don't have direct blood on their hands as a result of the last Parliament and are doing their very best to try to get over with the angels on the side of democracy. It seems to me, and I would seek your opinion, that as long as these new members, who I have great respect for, continue down this road of delay for no other reason than delay, they run the risk of being lumped in with those who have to carry the baggage of C-23. The political reality is they have this opportunity to draw a line in the sand and say, “That was them. That's not me. That's not what I believe in. My view of democracy is very different from that of C-23, and I'm going to use this opportunity with my vote, my decision and my interjections to make it clear that, while I respect my colleagues, I completely disagree. I accept that we need to take some of this ugliness out of there and get back to making our democracy and our process more democratic.”

Would you agree, Ms. Sahota, that some of our colleagues are maybe running that risk of losing that opportunity and that they may, if they don't play this right, end up having to carry C-23 on their back for the rest of their career when they do have this opportunity to make that line of demarcation? What are your thoughts on that?

(1245)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you for that question, Mr. Christopherson. I really appreciate that.

I have been thinking a lot about that because we pointed out last time that Mr. Reid and Blake Richards were on that committee. That's not to say they're not wonderful members and have not been working with this new committee for quite some time as well, but we have new members. We have Mr. John Nater and we have Ms. Kusie, who is the shadow minister. Is that what it's called?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I've heard both shadow minister and shadow cabinet minister.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

She does not seem to be all that mysterious. She came in, and after her victory speech, when being elected as vice-chair, she spoke quite clearly about her work as a bureaucrat, as a non-partisan for so many years, being able to get work done, and being able to do so in some not-so-friendly climates, in many places in the world where democracy is still struggling. It seems to me that democracy still struggles here a little bit, too, as we can see right now, but we're trying our best. When we have unjustifiable delays like this, and I would say that in this case they are definitely becoming unjustifiable, then I think they will be wearing it. They will be.

That fresh new attitude that I thought the new members were going to bring, they may not be living up to those expectations. Now some are newer than others, so I still have some hope that we're going to see a change, a willingness to co-operate when it comes to this piece of legislation. As I've said before, we've had 56 witnesses just on this piece of legislation. About 200 were put on witness lists, mostly from the Conservatives. Having called so many witnesses before this committee, it's interesting that when we had those witnesses here, they really did not show a desire to ask the hard-hitting questions. This leads me to think that perhaps there wasn't a serious intention behind calling all those witnesses to committee.

I would say, having seen that type of behaviour, that it's not a genuine use of this committee's time. We're wasting valuable resources. All the people who have to be here and the wonderful food that's provided to us, meeting after meeting, that all adds up.

Yes, Mr. Christopherson, I don't think we need to give the new members too much more time to prove themselves, to show that they're coming with a new attitude and a new spirit.

Mr. David Christopherson: Walk the walk.

Ms. Ruby Sahota: Yes. We want to see some action, and now is the time. I'm really hoping we can move forward with a start date for clause-by-clause today. We need to have something today. We should have been moving forward with this piece of legislation on Tuesday. Enough is enough. The minister will be appearing.

Quite honestly, I'm starting to think we shouldn't have any of that if we're not willing to move on with this piece of legislation. We have no stones left to turn over. I'm sure you'll find some, but I would request that you make sure we're not making a mockery out of the whole process and that it is coming from a place of genuine interest and concern. I've seen from the previous witnesses—and I think this is what Chris was alluding to—that at times it seemed like we were making a little bit of a mockery of this place.

As a new member of Parliament, you quickly start learning what this place is all about, and I do feel that we waste a lot of time up here. We do. There is a lot of learning that happens here. I think it's the most wonderful position, and I'm very fortunate to have it. I learned from the people who have been here longer than me, from various other resources that were provided and from the witnesses who come forward. I'd never have gained so much knowledge without this opportunity, but enough is enough. There's gaining knowledge and there's doing the work required of you as a parliamentarian, but there's also the disguise of doing good work while actually playing partisan games. I think right now we are in that territory, we're pretending not to stall, but all we're really doing is stalling for the sake of stalling.

Thank you.

Mr. David Christopherson: Hear, hear!

(1250)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Okay, next is Mr. Christopherson. You'll remember that in June we agreed the minister would come to start clause-by-clause, so we only have 10 minutes to sort things out. You're up.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Do you know what? My intervention basically allowed me to express myself. I don't want to slow it down any more than I need to in terms of the time I take. My position has been very clear, publicly and privately, to ministers, government members and opposition members. The entire world knows—anybody who cares—where the NDP, and me in particular as a member of this committee, are on this business.

I made it very clear from the outset of the Parliament. Just to get a little off my chest, I'm a little concerned. The government has to wear a little bit of the fact that we're so late in the day and something this important is still in front of us. I'll signal ahead of time because I don't play games—I'm not smart enough.

The minister is coming in and what I want to hear from the minister is that iron-clad guarantee from the government. I don't want to hear any nonsense about, well, it's up to the House leader. No, this is a government representative. I want to hear crystal clearly that this government is absolutely 100% committed to making sure that no matter what, with their majority government, this bill gets passed and we have an election that's a lot closer to the history and the proud traditions of Canada than the ugliness of C-23.

I've made it clear that I will support the government in getting that ugliness out. I will support them on any new progressive things and improvements they want to make. We will advocate for things that we care about, but at the end of the day the priority is to get a lot of the ugliness out of there. I will make a personal campaign commitment, since I'm going to be freed up, to do everything I can to make sure this country knows, if you fail to get this passed. This is big. We all, when we were on the opposition benches, got up and hollered from the rooftops that this is wrong. We had major reforms to our electoral process and the government of the day didn't even consult the Chief Electoral Officer.

I find it a bit rich when the current crop of official opposition members are slowing things down—why?—because they insist on hearing from a provincial chief electoral officer. That is rich. I understand the importance of that. I get that. I made it clear to the government members and people like Scott Reid who I have the utmost respect for, one of the people I respect the most in this entire Parliament, that my goal was not to drag them through the last election and the last Parliament.

However, there is a limit. When Mr. Reid or anybody else on the official opposition side get up on their hind legs and try to use the rhetoric of democracy and caring about voting as an excuse to slow down this process, which is meant to clean up that mess and that ugliness, I've reached my limit.

Very soon, it will be time for the official opposition to give themselves a serious shake and decide where they want to be on democracy. Do they really want to carry over the tradition and the reputation of the last Parliament? That's where they're heading. Or do they want to be able to put that behind them and maybe even say they were wrong and now see it differently? That's fine. We all understand politics, and those of us who want to get that through will let you get away with that.

What I am not going to do is sit here and quietly let the government continue to mishandle the timing and the process of this and so many democratic files. I have to say, you've been an absolute abysmal disappointment on this whole file. It's very disappointing with the promise that came in, and so many of you were so keen to do the right thing, and I know you were legitimate. We talked about these things in the beginning, and here we are a year out from the next election and one of the government's weakest files is on democratic reform.

The government has its share of responsibility for the mess we're in, trying to get this through in the dying months of this Parliament. Having said that, if the official opposition continues to do nothing but try to slow this down, to preserve the vote suppressing and anti-democratic clauses that were in C-23, then they are far more guilty than the government.

(1255)



At some point very soon, we all need to live up to our rhetoric. There's a lot of it around this table in terms of the holy grail of democracy, a lot of rhetoric and a lot of talk, but not a lot of action. Canadians expect this to be cleaned up for the next election. Things need to move more quickly here, so I am going to be calling on the government. If you have to use the heavyweight power of going to the House, then do it, but I say this as officially as I can and on a personal basis as a parliamentarian: Please do not, under any circumstance, allow this Parliament to expire without fixing our election system. It's broken.

We do a disservice to our international reputation. Many of you know that I do some democracy-building work internationally, and I am so proud to be able to be a Canadian, where we have one of the finest, most mature, fair democracies in the world. Bill C-23 hurt that. It damaged it and stained that. This is an opportunity to fix it, but it can't be missed.

I don't intend to have a lot of interventions along the way. There are progressive things that I want, but I am not going to hold up this process to fight for those. At the end of the day, I support the bill that the government has put forward. I do believe their heart is in the right place. I just wish they'd get their brain engaged and move the bill more properly through. It's shameful that something this important is still sitting here undone.

I just want to tie into Ruby's comments, and I truly will close with this. Most of the time, we do try to work together, and I enjoy this committee and the members who are on it. After you've been around long enough, yelling at the government and getting a headline loses its thrill. What's far more thrilling is to take all of us who are fighting in different corners and find a way in which we can come together. After a while, you find that this is really valuable and it gives you such fulfillment.

Carrot and stick, let's work together. We're all saying we want to make democracy better, so let's all try to work together. We're not doing that at this moment to get this through. That's the carrot. The stick is that, if this doesn't happen, there's going to be holy hell to pay and both the government and the official opposition are going to be held to account, not that we're all that pure but we don't have enough power to have an influence on this. I don't pretend we do, but I do have a big voice, a big mouth, and another year to go, and I'd much rather be using that to compliment the government and compliment the official opposition, especially new members such as Mr. Nater who I respect, who I think will be an excellent parliamentarian. I hope he's around for a long time. I want to be able to continue to say those things and say, “You know what? We were in the ditch, but we got out.”

I want to give you that credit. Conversely, if that credit is not deserved, I'm not that far from Sarnia. I can go visit that riding and I'll tell them what you did. I'll tell them the difference between your rhetoric and how you voted. I would much rather continue to say, “Mr. Nater is an example of how I feel good about the Canadian Parliament”, even though you're not of my party, as I step aside off the public stage.

I want to say that. I truly do, sir, but give me a reason. Don't continue playing this game. The time has come to stop and it's time to start acting like grown-ups.

Thank you, Chair.

(1300)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Do you want him to go to the wrong place? You'd better correct your riding there.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Oh, sorry, you're even closer.

Mr. John Nater:

I would welcome you for a cup of coffee.

Mr. David Christopherson:

My apologies for the riding mix-up.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can we get this to the vote?

The Chair:

There's only one minute left in our scheduled time. I'll leave the last word to Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Chair.

I appreciate the comments from Mr. Christopherson. I do. I appreciate where he comes from.

Very briefly, on his comment about timing, Bill C-33 was introduced in the House on November 24, 2016, almost 24 months ago. The government had time. A four-year mandate is a lot of time in which to move legislation forward. Here we are, literally in the last 12 months, or even less, because when we adjourn at the end of June, we are done until the election. We are literally in the last eight to 10 months of sitting, and we are dealing with a substantial piece of legislation.

That's unfortunate. It's a big bill. It has things we will support, and it has challenges we won't support. They are hills that we don't need to die on. We recognize that. We recognize that this is a bill that the government has introduced and that you have the numbers to go forward with it.

Mr. Chair, I will leave my comments there for now. I don't know what the protocol is, but I'll leave it to your good graces.

Mr. David Christopherson:

On a point of order, Chair, this is for you or the clerk.

When we meet later this afternoon with the minister, by unanimous consent, could we still put this motion in front of us and pass it today?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, we'll get it done.

The Chair:

Yes. The minister is supposed to begin the clause-by-clause. That was the agreement.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The way that was just described wouldn't get my consent. It was, “Can we agree to meet and discuss this motion and pass it today”. The last part of that is obviously problematic, “and pass it today”.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We could take it to a vote. How about that?

Mr. Scott Reid:

We're in the midst of discussing another motion, so we actually can't bring that to a vote. There is no objection to returning to the subject matter, but we're not agreeing to what amounts to—

The Chair:

—passing it now.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's right.

Mr. John Nater:

We adjourn the debate, and bring it back immediately following the minister. Is that...?

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's what I would suggest.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Procedurally, the simplest thing would be for the chair to simply.... I don't know if you can amend that meeting at this late date, but put out a new notice of an agenda, for a new....

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes. We can have a separate, stand-alone meeting, constituting the meeting and date. That's what I was seeking to do. I knew we could. I just wasn't sure about the mechanics. Unanimously, we can do just about anything except change the Constitution.

Mr. Scott Reid:

And even that....

Mr. David Christopherson:

That does require unanimity now.

The Chair:

We'll adjourn now, and carry on the discussion when we get back at 3:30 p.m.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Bienvenue à la 119e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Il s'agit d'une réunion publique.

Déjà deux personnes souhaitent prendre la parole. Comme on le dit habituellement, Elvis a quitté l'immeuble, et Christopherson est déjà à bord de l'autobus. Il sera ici sous peu.

À titre d'information pour les membres, Greg Essensa, le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario, m'a avisé du fait qu'il pourra comparaître par vidéoconférence la semaine prochaine. Nous sommes donc allés de l'avant et avons prévu sa comparution de 11 heures à midi le mardi 2 octobre.

De plus, une délégation du Kenya sera ici à la fin octobre. Ses membres sont liés au secteur de la radiodiffusion. Ils voudront nous rencontrer. Si c'est le cas, je ferai ce que je fais toujours avec les délégations étrangères et je tiendrai une rencontre informelle où pourront assister tous ceux qui le souhaitent.

Oui, monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Monsieur le président, nous n'avons pas pu entendre ce que vous avez dit au sujet de M. Essensa. Pourriez-vous s'il vous plaît répéter cette partie?

Le président:

Greg Essensa, le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario, m'a avisé du fait qu'il pourra comparaître par vidéoconférence la semaine prochaine. J'ai donc pris de l'avance et prévu sa comparution de 11 heures à midi le mardi 2 octobre.

Nous examinions la motion la semaine dernière, et deux personnes avaient levé la main: Chris et Ruby.

Qui veut commencer?

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

J'aimerais juste rappeler à tous que nous avons proposé une motion dont nous avons déjà un peu débattu.

Avez-vous tous une copie de la motion? On a fait circuler des exemplaires. Parfait.

Maintenant que la motion et que l'amendement de la motion présentée ont été distribués, j'aimerais rappeler... et je crois que j'ai pris un bon moment la dernière fois pour expliquer...

Un député: [Inaudible]

Un député: Avec dissidence.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Nous parlons de l'amendement.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui, c'est bien ça.

J'ai pris un bon moment la dernière fois pour expliquer ce qui m'amenait à présenter la motion. Après cela, John a proposé un amendement de la motion.

J'aimerais juste dire encore une fois et vous rappeler que nous ne sommes pas prêts à présenter des amendements avant que des dates pour l'étude aient été fixées, une date de début et une date de fin. Nous aimerions savoir quand nous pourrons commencer l'étude article par article. Notre date de fin proposée est le 16 octobre. Nous n'examinerons aucun amendement avant d'avoir convenu d'une date.

Je vais céder la parole à Chris.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Merci, Ruby.

Je commence à être frustré et je connais un certain nombre de personnes au Comité qui commencent à l'être, parce que ce n'est qu'un retard après l'autre. Je lève mon chapeau aux conservateurs qui ont fait de leur mieux pour donner l'impression qu'ils ne retardent pas les choses, mais après avoir proposé des dizaines de témoins, dont un grand nombre n'avaient rien à apporter, n'avaient aucune expertise... je sais qu'un témoin a été condamné pour une infraction criminelle et qu'il en était fier; qu'on a fait venir un témoin pour rire de lui. Nous ne voyons pas la lumière au bout du tunnel.

C'était un engagement électoral. Je peux comprendre qu'ils ne veulent pas que soit défait ce qui a été fait par le gouvernement Harper en ce qui concerne la prétendue Loi sur l'intégrité des élections. Toutefois, c'est quelque chose que nous avions promis aux Canadiens de faire. Nous avons plusieurs fois entendu le directeur général des élections, et même avant cela, nous l'avons entendu plusieurs fois parler du rapport du DGE. Il est venu et a dit à de multiples occasions qu'il s'agissait d'un bon projet de loi. Il a dit qu'il n'était pas parfait, et je vais le reconnaître.

Le temps est venu de faire l'examen article par article. Nous avons le temps d'améliorer le projet de loi. Nous pouvons le faire. Nous voulons entendre ce que les conservateurs ont à dire. Nous voulons entendre le NPD, mais nous devons travailler dans ce sens. Les conservateurs nous l'ont promis. Nous avions une entente. En tant qu'avocat, je sais qu'une entente future n'est pas une entente, mais nous avons conclu une entente de bonne foi selon laquelle les conservateurs proposeraient une date pour commencer l'étude article par article. Nous l'attendons toujours, donc encore une fois, ce sont plus de retards.

Je ne m'attends à rien d'autre; je m'attends à ce qu'ils tricotent avec la rondelle, qu'ils épuisent tout le temps disponible et qu'ils gaspillent une autre journée. Le temps est venu de faire avancer les choses. Le directeur général des élections est ici. Nous sommes même allés de l'avant. Je sais que les libéraux seraient prêts à entendre le témoignage du directeur général des élections, ce qui est une autre demande. Dans un effort pour retarder le processus, les conservateurs essaient de faire paraître leurs demandes raisonnables. C'est raisonnable d'entendre le directeur général des élections s'il est disponible, même si nous avons invité ce témoin plusieurs fois. Il a dit qu'il ne pouvait pas être présent. On a plusieurs fois insisté pour dire que nous devions entendre ce témoin, que nous ne pouvions absolument pas commencer avant de l'avoir entendu. Eh bien, nous entendons ce témoin. Trouvons maintenant une date.

Nous avons proposé une motion. Les conservateurs sont déraisonnables. Il est temps d'aller de l'avant. Il est temps de mettre les choses en branle. Il est temps de faire avancer les choses, parce qu'Élections Canada a besoin que les choses avancent.

Je supplie les membres du Parti conservateur de cesser de faire de l'obstruction. Avançons et faisons bouger les choses.

Merci.

(1110)

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Juste un mot d'avertissement pour tous. Vous ne voulez vraiment, mais vraiment pas m'entendre si je n'ai pas eu mon café du matin, et c'est le début pour moi. Ce n'est pas que vous ne vouliez pas m'entendre, c'est juste que vous n'aurez aucune idée de ce que je dis, et moi non plus. Merci.

Je crois que nous parlons de l'amendement de M. Nater par rapport à la motion de Mme Sahota. Je pense que c'est exact.

Avant que j'en parle directement, je jugerais approprié de répondre en partie au commentaire de M. Bittle. Je m'y oppose un peu. Je dis que je m'oppose, mais je tiens à être clair: je ne m'oppose pas à la sincérité de tout ce que dit M. Bittle; je m'oppose à certains des faits ostensibles qu'il a, je crois, présentés.

Il a dit que certains des témoins n'étaient pas de très bons témoins. Il a été plus dur encore, ma foi, beaucoup plus dur. Ils n'avaient rien d'utile à dire: je crois que c'est la phrase qu'il a utilisée. Je ne crois pas que nous devrions dire de telles choses au sujet de nos témoins. À tout le moins, j'encouragerais mes collègues à ne pas le faire, lorsqu'ils pensent réellement ces choses, et je les ai moi-même pensées une ou deux fois au cours de mes 17 ans ici, mais j'espère avoir toujours exprimé ces réflexions en privé, et non pas en public.

En réalité, je me suis dit que, dans l'ensemble, les témoins avaient été assez bons.

De plus, en ce qui concerne l'invitation de M. Essensa, je ne crois pas que quiconque puisse dire qu'on a fait preuve d'infamie dans nos efforts répétés pour faire venir M. Essensa. Je crois que nous en sommes à notre troisième ou quatrième tentative. C'est un homme occupé.

Il était au beau milieu d'une campagne électorale la première fois que nous l'avons invité. Cela explique bien pourquoi le directeur général des élections ne serait pas disponible. Après les événements, c'est le temps des recomptages et de toutes les autres choses qui gardent un directeur général des élections occupé. C'est un directeur général des élections pour une administration qui comporte une centaine de sièges. C'est une personne occupée.

Récemment, il a exprimé assez précisément pourquoi il n'était pas disponible. Il avait une raison très précise. Il ne nous a pas dit quelle était la réunion, mais il avait quelque chose de prévu dont il ne pouvait se sortir. Nous pouvons tous comprendre cela. Nous avons vécu ce genre de choses.

Nous l'invitons enfin à nouveau, et il accepte. Un des membres de notre personnel, Adam Church, qui a toujours quelque chose d'intelligent à dire sur chaque sujet, m'a fait remarquer que la raison pour laquelle M. Essensa ne vient jamais lorsque nous l'invitons, c'est que nous le faisons toujours avec un préavis de 48 heures. Je suis assez d'accord avec ce commentaire.

Si vous me dites que vous organisez un tournoi de golf samedi, si bonne que soit la cause, eh bien, c'est samedi. Mais si vous dites que nous avons un tournoi de golf en juin prochain, je suis beaucoup plus libre. Bon, je vais peut-être le regretter plus tard quand on y arrivera et dire que j'aurais pu faire un voyage de camping ce samedi-là. En fait, je n'aime pas vraiment ces tournois de golf de bienfaisance.

(1115)

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, pourriez-vous en venir au fait?

M. Scott Reid:

Là où je veux en venir, c'est que...

Je voulais souligner un point secondaire par rapport au fait que les tournois de golf de bienfaisance sont des neuf trous plutôt que des 18 trous, parce que cela prend moins de temps dans votre journée. Je pense que nous pourrions tous en tirer des enseignements, d'autant plus que bon nombre d'entre nous participons à l'organisation de ces choses.

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Imaginez les prix lorsque vous envisagez lesquels...

M. Scott Reid:

J'en ai déjà fait un moi-même. Pour être franc, j'ai découvert que ce qui se passait la plupart du...

Le président:

Ce n'est pas vraiment pertinent.

Pourrions-nous en venir au fait?

M. Scott Reid:

Eh bien, je voulais en revenir à M. Essensa, qui n'était pas, à mon avis, à un tournoi de golf de bienfaisance. Je crois qu'il devait s'occuper d'affaires liées aux élections. Il sera ici, ce qui montrera que nous avions raison de soulever la question.

Cela nous ramène en fait très étroitement...

En passant, j'allais en venir à mon point de toute façon, monsieur le président. Je reconnais votre désir de faire les choses en empruntant le chemin le plus direct. J'ai l'impression que c'est parfois important de fournir le contexte global. J'ai toujours pour objectif de rallier mes collègues à mon point de vue. Je sais que la méthode la plus efficace pour y arriver, lorsque je suis la personne qui est visée par ce même type de tentative de persuasion, c'est de s'appuyer sur tous les faits pertinents et les faits à l'appui, soit ce que j'essaie de faire.

M. Essensa est l'objet de l'amendement de M. Nater. Ce dernier propose que nous changions le libellé de la motion principale de Mme Sahota. Sa motion est ainsi libellée: Que le Comité entreprenne l'étude article par article du projet de loi C-76 le mardi 2 octobre 2018 à 11 heures; Que le président soit autorisé à tenir des réunions en dehors des heures normales pour permettre l'étude article par article; Que le président puisse limiter le débat sur chaque article à un maximum de cinq minutes par parti, par article; et

Lorsque nous reparlerons de la motion principale, je voudrai m'arrêter un peu plus sur ce point. Ce n'est pas que je croie nécessairement qu'il doive y avoir un changement du libellé, mais nous devons juste clairement exprimer ce que nous entendons par l'utilisation permissive du mot « puisse » plutôt que « doive ».

Dans sa motion, Mme Sahota poursuit ainsi: Que, dans l'éventualité où le Comité n'aurait pas terminé l'étude article par article du projet de loi avant 13 heures le mardi 16 octobre 2018, les amendements qui lui ont été soumis et qui restent soient réputés proposés, que le président mette aux voix immédiatement et successivement, sans plus ample débat, les articles et amendements qui restent, ainsi que toute question nécessaire pour disposer de l'étude article par article du projet de loi, et toute question nécessaire pour faire rapport du projet de loi à la Chambre et ordonner au président de faire rapport du projet de loi à la Chambre le plus tôt possible.

Lorsque j'examine cela...

Eh bien, vous savez quoi, je vais attendre que nous parlions de la motion principale. Je vais revenir à l'amendement proposé par M. Nater. il propose que nous modifiions la motion comme suit. Après les mots « Que le Comité », les trois premiers mots du premier paragraphe de la motion, nous devrions ajouter les mots « n'entreprennent pas ». La motion se lirait donc comme suit: « Que le Comité n'entreprenne pas l'étude article par article du projet de loi C-76 »...

Attendez une seconde. Mon signe d'omission n'était pas à la bonne place. Le signe d'omission, c'est la petite chose qui indique que vous avez ajouté du texte entre des parties.

Après « le projet de loi C-76, », il ajoute les mots: « avant que le Comité ait entendu le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario ».

À des fins de clarté, quand le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario sera-t-il disponible?

Le président:

À 11 heures, mardi.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Évidemment, cela nécessiterait une adaptation. En supposant que nous acceptions cette motion, nous devrions commencer à...

Excusez-moi, comparaît-il pour une ou deux heures?

Le président:

Une heure.

M. Scott Reid:

Le moyen évident d'en tenir compte, ce serait d'inclure ces mots.

Je crois que l'amendement de M. Nater envisage le retrait de tout le reste, essentiellement, mais je peux imaginer une situation où nous insérerions les mots. Je le dis juste de façon théorique, mais nous pourrions dire: « Que le Comité n'entreprenne pas l'étude article par article du projet de loi C-76 avant qu'il ait entendu le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario. »

Nous pourrions alors poursuivre avec d'autres choses figurant dans la motion telle qu'elle existe maintenant. Ce n'est pas rédigé comme ça en ce moment, mais on pourrait le faire si on le voulait. J'ai quelques idées par rapport à ce à quoi cela pourrait ressembler.

Monsieur le président, c'est tout à fait pertinent, parce que j'envisage la possibilité de proposer un sous-amendement en ce sens. Par exemple, on pourrait simplement faire en sorte qu'il continue. Il vous faudrait changer le...

Eh bien, voici la chose foncièrement minime que vous pourriez faire. Je ne suis pas sûr que je le préconiserais en réalité, mais vous pourriez dire: « Que le Comité n'entreprenne pas l'étude article par article du projet de loi C-76 avant qu'il ait entendu le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario et que le Comité entreprenne l'étude article par article le », et vous pouvez insérer l'heure minimale, même si je ne suis pas sûr que je le préconise en réalité, « le 2 octobre 2018 à midi. »

Ce que j'essaie de faire, c'est...

(1120)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Juste de tuer du temps.

M. Scott Reid:

Je ne veux pas me mettre à analyser un sous-amendement, à moins que j'y aie réfléchi soigneusement et que je me sois assuré qu'il est logique et mérite l'attention du Comité.

Puis, on dirait que l'on poursuivrait en dehors des heures normales de travail pour permettre l'étude article par article, ce qui peut être intégré, peu importe l'heure de début.

Je crois que certaines personnes pourraient avoir des réserves par rapport à cela, s'il n'y a pas une certaine limite quant à ce qu'on entend par « en-dehors des heures normales de travail ». Je suppose que vous constateriez une plus grande volonté de la part des membres de tous les partis d'envisager une période « en dehors des heures normales de travail » si celle-ci tombe durant les jours normaux des séances. C'est une chose de siéger tard le soir un mardi ou un mercredi, ou même un jeudi. C'est une chose complètement différente de le faire un jour de semaine lorsque les gens croyaient se trouver dans leur circonscription. Cela imposerait aux membres du Comité un fardeau important et déraisonnable, donc c'est une considération pertinente.

« Que le président puisse limiter le débat sur chaque article à un maximum de cinq minutes par parti, par article » signifie, en réalité, 15 minutes. Par rapport à cette proposition — et les collègues devraient écouter pour voir s'ils sont d'accord — je suppose qu'on pourrait dire, de façon réaliste, que si un parti souhaite prolonger le débat sur un certain point, et si ce n'est qu'un seul parti, nous verrions en réalité que cela n'est pas mis en pratique, et ce ne sera pas cinq minutes par parti; ce sera cinq minutes, puis personne d'autre ne prendra le temps, donc en réalité, c'est cinq minutes par article.

Je crois que vous constaterez en réalité une préoccupation véritable par rapport au libellé de certains articles, ce qui peut se produire avec un projet de loi technique comme celui-ci, surtout si un amendement est envisagé. Nous aurons une certaine indication, et je proposerais que, dans un tel cas, si le président a l'impression que c'est le cas, il exerce son pouvoir discrétionnaire pour permettre une durée supérieure à cinq minutes par parti pour cet article particulier.

Pour ce faire, il s'agit de voir comment les autres partis se positionnent par rapport à cela, n'est-ce pas? Cela relève du pouvoir discrétionnaire du président, et vous pourriez donc dire: « Deux partis sur trois le veulent; c'est suffisant. » Vous pourriez dire: « Non, j'aimerais voir, essentiellement, un consensus, l'unanimité. » Cela devient donc un genre de version de ce que nous appelons officieusement « la règle Simms », d'après notre collègue qui a découvert une façon de contourner certaines des restrictions très formelles qui existent, tant qu'il y a une volonté de la part de tous les partis de le faire. Cette règle ne l'emportait pas sur le Règlement. Elle laissait une certaine marge de manoeuvre dans le cadre du Règlement qui pourrait être réimposé à tout moment, simplement par un membre du Comité qui dirait: « Nous devrions poursuivre ici. Nous ne voulons pas céder la parole de cette façon. » C'était très efficace, et cela pourrait aussi être efficace. En réalité, je crois que c'est un assez bon article.

Enfin, il y a la dernière partie, soit passer à l'étude article par article pour tout ce qui reste avant 13 heures le mardi 16 octobre. On pourrait dire que le but de le faire à ce moment-là, c'est de passer simplement en revue tous les articles restants, et il faut à ce moment-là un maximum d'une minute par article, probablement moins en réalité, peut-être 30 secondes pour chacun. Nous pourrions le faire assez rapidement, de manière à avoir terminé, je crois, ce soir-là.

C'est le but ultime du gouvernement, n'est-ce pas? Son but ultime, c'est que les choses aient avancé d'ici le 16 octobre. On peut imaginer que, si on les passe en revue à cette vitesse-là, nous aurons terminé d'ici le 16 octobre à minuit. C'est ce que le gouvernement souhaite.

La question à se poser, dans ce cas, c'est quelle est l'importance réelle des autres choses. Je proposerais qu'on se fixe comme but de trouver une certaine façon qui nous permette de recevoir des témoins comme M. Essensa, tout en imaginant un certain type de liste globale qui servirait de repère au gouvernement.

(1125)



Je crois que c'est ce que j'aimerais faire grâce à un sous-amendement. Je pense que le témoignage de M. Essensa est une excellente chose, donc commençons sans plus tarder. Je vais proposer un sous-amendement simple en ce sens, que nous fassions simplement... une seconde, je dois voir si cela fonctionne: que le Comité n'entreprenne pas l'étude article par article du projet de loi C-76 avant qu'il ait entendu le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario le mardi 2 octobre 2018 à 11 heures. Je remets ces mots.

Je me demande si je devrais traiter plus d'un sujet à la fois. Je devrais peut-être juste cesser d'insérer ces mots. Je pourrai y revenir plus tard, une fois que nous aurons réglé cette question, et en suggérer un autre. Si nous adoptons ce sous-amendement, nous pourrons ensuite revenir nous occuper d'un autre sous-amendement que j'aimerais examiner, mais je crois qu'il y aura un problème si j'aborde trop de choses en même temps. Ce que je vais faire, c'est insérer la modification concernant l'heure à laquelle il vient, puis nous reviendrons à la motion principale, ou plutôt à la motion de M. Nater, et j'aurai un autre sous-amendement à proposer à ce moment-là.

Le président:

Nous avons une proposition de sous-amendement à ajouter à l'amendement de M. Nater quant à l'heure proposée le 2 octobre, soit 11 heures.

Quelqu'un veut-il débattre du sous-amendement?

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais commencer par formuler quelques commentaires liés à ce que nous avons entendu autour de la table jusqu'à présent.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Cela porte seulement sur le sous-amendement.

M. John Nater:

C'est pertinent pour le sous-amendement également, qui indique que le directeur général des élections se joindra à nous mardi prochain à 11 heures. J'attends cela avec impatience. C'est ce que nous préconisons depuis le début de l'étude.

(1130)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'espère que vous avez quelques questions incroyables pour lui.

Mme Ruby Sahota: Oui.

M. John Nater:

Je ne dirais pas « incroyables »; je dirais plutôt que ce sont des questions appropriées, des questions directement liées au projet de loi, particulièrement en ce qui concerne les tierces parties. C'est un élément majeur du projet de loi et cela constitue un élément majeur du projet de loi présenté plus tôt cette année par les libéraux — à l'échelon provincial —, et les résultats de cette élection...

Je ne pourrais pas faire fi du commentaire formulé par M. Bittle au sujet d'un témoin particulier, comme quoi nous aurions reçu le témoin ici simplement pour rire de lui. Je n'accepte pas cela.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Mais vous avez ri.

M. John Nater:

Non. En fait, je n'étais pas présent à cette réunion, car ma fille est née cette semaine-là. Toutefois, j'ai lu les transcriptions.

Je crois que la personne mentionnée dans le commentaire était M. Turmel, qui détient le record pour ce qui est de se présenter au plus grand nombre d'élections. Il n'a pas gagné, mais la chose intéressante qui est ressortie de son témoignage, c'était en réalité un commentaire concret. Celui-ci concernait le seuil de vérification. C'était un commentaire utile. Son observation, c'était qu'on n'a pas besoin de grand-chose pour atteindre ce seuil de vérification et que si vous êtes un candidat mineur, un candidat indépendant, comme lui, même s'il se présente souvent sous l'égide d'un parti pauvre, c'est un défi important.

J'ai une préoccupation par rapport au fait de dire qu'on invite certains témoins juste pour rire d'eux et je ne crois pas que nous ayons besoin de dénigrer quiconque en ce sens. Je dois reconnaître le mérite de tous ceux qui mettent leur nom sur un bulletin de vote, et une personne qui a mis son nom sur un bulletin de vote autant de fois que M. Turmel mérite le respect.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je croyais que c'était Arthur Hamilton.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il croit qu'il y avait un témoin différent.

M. John Nater:

Eh bien, il y avait peut-être d'autres témoins aussi. Comme je l'ai dit, j'ai raté trois réunions cette semaine-là, je crois, lorsque notre fille est née. Je n'étais pas là et je me suis donc fié aux bleus et aux transcriptions des réunions à ce moment-là.

Je vais dire autre chose pour aucune raison apparente, mis à part le fait que ça se produit au moment où on se parle. Le Cabinet est actuellement en réunion. Je crois que celle-ci doit durer jusqu'à midi, donc c'est une observation que je vais juste mentionner. Le Cabinet est en réunion au moment où on se parle, et j'espère que certains renseignements seront tirés de cette réunion du Cabinet lorsque le temps sera venu. Ce sera autour de midi. On pourrait prendre une pause à ce moment-là pour aller chercher rapidement un sandwich ou autre chose.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Croyez-vous que la réunion portera sur les tierces parties...?

M. John Nater:

Je ne formulerais aucune hypothèse sur ce qui pourrait sortir du Cabinet. Je ne suis pas invité à ce genre de réunions. Je ne sais pas pourquoi; j'adorerais y siéger.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Nous allons tous y aller.

M. John Nater:

Mon invitation doit...

Le président:

D'accord, revenons à l'amendement.

M. John Nater:

Je pense que c'est pertinent dans la mesure où nous attendrons cela avec impatience.

À ce propos, je crois qu'il est opportun d'entendre le DGE de l'Ontario et de commencer le processus.

Je ne crois pas que personne n'ait envie de nous voir accaparer du temps et gaspiller notre temps. Le Comité a d'autres affaires à gérer.

Un ordre de renvoi au Comité concerne, de prime abord, une question de privilège liée au projet de loi C-71. Pendant que nous prenons du temps pour étudier le projet de loi, cette affaire est repoussée. Nous voulons effectivement que cela soit présenté au Comité. À la Chambre des communes, la question de privilège l'emporte sur toutes les autres questions administratives. Je crois que cela devrait aussi s'appliquer au Comité, donc je suis impatient que cela soit présenté au Comité.

Par rapport à l'étude du Comité, nous avons tous reçu du greffier une demande de comparaître devant le Comité présentée par l'INCA, l'Institut national canadien pour les aveugles. Je crois que nous avons reçu cette demande à un moment assez opportun. Comme les membres le savent, cette semaine et plus tôt au cours de la semaine dernière, nous avons débattu en Chambre du projet de loi C-81, connu sous le nom de Loi visant à faire du Canada un pays exempt d'obstacles, la Loi canadienne sur l'accessibilité. Il a été adopté hier à la Chambre des communes, par consentement unanime, je crois, peu après la période de questions. Je n'étais pas à la Chambre, mais il n'y a pas eu de sonnerie, donc je présume que cinq membres ne se sont pas levés ou que ça a été adopté à l'unanimité. J'étais content de voir ce projet de loi se rendre au Comité. Je pense que c'est une discussion utile que nous devons tenir, même si je suis certain qu'elle donne lieu à quelques préoccupations.

À mon avis, il était opportun et pertinent que le débat se tienne lorsque nous avons reçu cette demande. J'aimerais que nous puissions en tenir compte avant de passer à l'étude article par article.

Mme Clarke, spécialiste des relations gouvernementales de l'INCA, demande à comparaître précisément par rapport au projet de loi C-76. Elle mentionne que l'Institut célèbre ses 100 ans d'existence en 2018. Je pense que 2018 est une année spéciale pour la célébration des 100e anniversaires. C'est aussi le centenaire de la fin de la Première Guerre mondiale. Je ne suis pas sûr, mais je crois qu'il y avait un lien entre la fondation de l'INCA et ces vétérans qui revenaient de la Première Guerre mondiale avec un trouble visuel dû à la guerre. Je crois que c'est une bonne chose que nous entendions ce qu'ils ont à dire.

Une des phrases dans la demande... En tant que personne dont la belle-mère utilise un fauteuil roulant — sa jambe droite a été amputée il y a environ 15 ans à la suite d'un accident d'automobile — je pense qu'il est important d'appliquer dans la loi la perspective des handicapés, particulièrement lorsque nous parlons d'élections.

J'ai été ravi des efforts faits par Élections Canada durant l'élection de 2015 pour rendre les bureaux de vote accessibles, ou aussi accessibles que possible, du moins pour ceux qui ont des problèmes de mobilité. Il y a d'autres handicaps qui ne sont pas toujours nécessairement aussi...

(1135)

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, je ne veux pas vous interrompre, mais le sous-amendement consiste seulement à ajouter une date à votre amendement. Pourriez-vous simplement vous prononcer sur l'ajout d'une date à votre amendement?

M. John Nater:

Absolument. Je pense que c'est pertinent, parce que cela fixe une date concernant la présence du DGE. Je pense qu'il est opportun que nous entendions à ce moment-là le DGE s'exprimer au sujet de la question qu'étudie le Comité, qui est, bien sûr, le projet de loi C-76.

Je dirais, aux fins du compte rendu et à l'intention des personnes présentes, que nous avons cette demande en attente de l'INCA. Je crois qu'il serait peut-être utile d'entendre l'INCA durant la deuxième heure et peut-être d'autres organisations de défense des droits liées aux personnes qui ont des problèmes de mobilité. Je pense que c'est utile et peut-être même avantageux.

En ce qui concerne le sous-amendement et ce dont nous parlons, nous fixons une date pour entendre le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario. Mon collègue M. Reid s'est exprimé par rapport aux autres éléments du sous-amendement qui touchent les heures et les lieux réels concernant les motions. Je pense que nous laisserons ces éléments dans un autre sous-amendement, qui serait peut-être proposé par des collègues de notre côté ou d'en face.

Précisément par rapport au DGE, ce que nous voulons ici, c'est entendre le témoignage d'un homme qui a connu un très grand nombre de ces changements directement et récemment. Il a dirigé une élection qui reposait beaucoup sur certains amendements que nous envisageons maintenant dans le présent projet de loi.

La direction qui a été prise par les libéraux provinciaux dans leurs amendements de 2016 était très étroitement liée à une partie du chevauchement que nous constatons dans le projet de loi C-76 — elle n'est pas identique — donc nous entendrons le témoignage du DGE mardi prochain à 11 heures, et il nous dira où ils en sont.

En particulier, l'une des choses dont nous avons parlé au Comité, et qu'il pourrait commenter de façon exceptionnellement intelligente, c'est ce que nous appelons le registre des futurs électeurs. Le gouvernement provincial a aussi fait un effort en ce sens, le désignant registre électoral provisoire pour ceux qui ont 16 et 17 ans. Il serait intéressant d'entendre les commentaires du DGE sur la façon dont ce registre a fonctionné et dont on a procédé. Fait intéressant, dans le cas de l'Ontario, une personne qui n'est pas encore un électeur et qui est âgée de moins de 18 ans a le choix de se retirer du registre à tout moment. Je trouve intéressant que ce soit...

Le président:

Monsieur Nater. Nous ajoutons une date à votre amendement. Êtes-vous d'accord avec le sous-amendement?

M. John Nater:

Je trouve pertinent que cela reflète ce dont il parlera à ce moment-là.

Le président:

Tout le monde s'est entendu pour dire qu'il viendra, alors nous pourrons le découvrir à ce moment-là.

(1140)

M. John Nater:

Je juge tout de même utile d'approfondir ce dont il parlera à ce moment-là. Je crois que le registre des futurs électeurs est une chose intéressante.

De notre côté, nous avons exprimé quelques préoccupations par rapport aux questions de protection des renseignements personnels. Je crois que nous avons entendu, la semaine dernière, une garantie de la part du directeur général des élections selon laquelle les renseignements ne seraient pas communiqués aux partis. Ils ne serviront qu'à des fins internes à Élections Canada. Je pense que c'est un élément fort.

Nous avons déjà entendu parler du fait de savoir si le consentement parental serait ou non exigé pour des personnes en deçà d'un certain âge. C'est quelque chose qu'on doit régler pour s'assurer qu'il y a des mesures de protection appropriées à ce sujet. L'avantage dont le DGE pourra parler, lorsque cette mesure sera présentée, c'est la façon dont cela va contribuer à faire ajouter automatiquement au registre permanent des électeurs de l'Ontario ceux qui ont 16 et 17 ans lorsqu'ils auront 18 ans.

Je crois qu'il est utile de tenir cette discussion et de voir comment nous pouvons nous assurer que ceux qui sont plus jeunes... Je me souviens d'avoir entendu un témoignage, durant les réunions du comité sur la réforme électorale, selon lequel, lorsque vous votez pour la première fois à votre première élection, vous êtes plus susceptible de voter dans des élections par la suite. C'est donc utile de permettre à un électeur de voter pour la première fois lorsqu'il a 18 ans.

Assurément, bon nombre des jeunes de 18 ans fréquentent toujours l'école secondaire. Certains seront au collège et à l'université. Selon la date d'une élection et lorsque l'élection tombe à l'intérieur d'un cycle électoral de quatre ans, ils auront peut-être dépassé ce stade et se trouveront sur le marché du travail, dans une école de métiers ou dans un certain autre type d'établissement.

Le fait de prévoir des options pour encourager les électeurs à voter le moment venu est une chose importante, à mon avis. Il serait capital d'entendre le commentaire du directeur général des élections à ce sujet, et ce, de 11 heures jusqu'à midi, le 2 octobre de la semaine prochaine. Fait intéressant, le 2 octobre suit directement le 1er octobre, qui est également la Journée nationale des aînés, quelque chose que notre amie et collègue Alice Wong, ancienne ministre...

Pardon?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dites-vous que le DGE est un aîné?

M. John Nater:

Non, pas du tout, mais un aîné est certainement une personne...

M. Scott Reid:

Eh bien peut-être... je n'en ai aucune idée. Nous le découvrirons lorsqu'il sera ici le 2 octobre à 11 heures.

Je pourrais le vérifier avant cette date.

Le président:

Eh bien, j'imagine que c'est donc pertinent que le 1er octobre précède le 2 octobre.

Dites-vous que vous êtes d'accord avec le sous-amendement?

M. John Nater:

Encore une fois, je crois que, du point de vue des aînés, quelque chose que nous devrions envisager également, c'est la façon dont les adolescents...

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Oui, monsieur le président.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il y a beaucoup de personnes sur la liste.

M. John Nater:

Oh, d'accord.

Eh bien, savez-vous quoi, monsieur le président? Je crois qu'il y a d'autres personnes qui veulent se prononcer précisément sur l'ajout de cette date, donc je vais peut-être céder la parole à la prochaine personne sur la liste et revenir plus tard parler d'une autre intervention.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Par rapport au sous-amendement, veuillez faire preuve de discipline et vous prononcer sur l'ajout de la date au sous-amendement, parce que c'est tout ce dont il est question.

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

M. David Christopherson:

C'est une bonne chose que vous soyez solidement ancré dans le monde réel.

Le président:

Nous sommes prêts à voter par rapport au sous-amendement, qui ajouterait la date à l'amendement.

Ne sommes-nous pas prêts à voter? Avez-vous parlé?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Non, non, allez-y. Votons.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, je me demande si, compte tenu de l'importance du sous-amendement, nous devrions tenir un vote par appel nominal.

Le président:

Nous tiendrons un vote par appel nominal.

(Le sous-amendement est rejeté par 5 voix contre 4.)

Le président:

Revenons maintenant à l'amendement, et nous avons une liste d'intervenants.

M. Scott Reid:

Suis-je sur la liste?

Le président:

Non.

Monsieur Nater, ça concerne votre amendement.

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, en guise d'éclaircissements, nous revenons à l'amendement original, selon lequel nous n'allons pas procéder à une étude article par article avant d'avoir entendu le directeur général des élections. Encore une fois, j'aimerais revenir sur l'importance de cette façon de faire. Avant que nous ayons entendu le DGE de l'Ontario, dont les amendements en 2016 ont été adoptés dans l'élection de juin 2018... je peux prévoir des amendements qui en découleront. Je peux prévoir des changements du projet de loi qui découleront du témoignage du DGE.

De la même manière, nous entendrons la ministre plus tard au cours de l'après-midi, et j'espère qu'elle pourra alors nous dire si elle juge les amendements appropriés.

Nous sommes encore vraiment tout près de l'étude article par article. Je crois que nous sommes exceptionnellement près de faire cette étude et impatients de voir cela se faire en temps opportun. Toutefois, nous n'y sommes pas encore arrivés, parce que nous avons besoin d'entendre les renseignements qui nous seront présentés par M. Essensa, le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario, et par la ministre elle-même lorsqu'elle comparaîtra devant le Comité cet après-midi, à 15 h 30.

Quand j'ai parlé du sous-amendement, monsieur le président, vous aviez hâte de me voir passer à autre chose, mais nous sommes revenus au point où nous disons que c'est pertinent. Nous devons entendre le DGE avant de pouvoir passer à l'étude article par article, en raison des changements très précis et délibérés proposés par le gouvernement de l'Ontario en 2016 et mis en oeuvre en 2018.

Ce que je juge intéressant, c'est que notre Parti conservateur, dans des législatures précédentes, a instauré des dates d'élection fixes...

(1145)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Et puis n'en a tenu aucun compte.

M. John Nater:

Puis les a respectées en 2015...

Un député: À une date d'élection fixe.

M. John Nater: Oui, à une date d'élection fixe.

M. Scott Reid:

Je sens qu'on ironise peut-être pas mal ici.

M. John Nater:

L'ironie abonde en politique.

M. David Christopherson:

L'aîné politique que je suis va vous rappeler que...

M. John Nater:

Mais pas un aîné qui peut être reconnu à votre jeune âge, monsieur Christopherson.

Je ne suis pas encore prêt à vous faire reconnaître comme aîné durant la Journée nationale des aînés, qui, je le répète, est lundi, jour qui...

Des députés: Ah, ah!

M. David Christopherson:

Bien joué.

M. John Nater:

C'est le jour qui précède le 2 octobre.

Fait intéressant, une chose prévue dans les réformes de l'Ontario et qui n'a pas été abordée dans le projet de loi C-76, dans la législation fédérale, c'est le changement de la date d'élection fixe. Comme la date d'élection fixe du fédéral, la date d'élection fixe du provincial devait être le premier jeudi d'octobre, date qui, dans la plupart des cas, précéderait immédiatement l'Action de grâce. Ces heures et ces dates ont été changées pour le premier jeudi de juin. Je serais curieux d'entendre le directeur général des élections nous dire pourquoi ce changement a été apporté. Qu'y avait-il en octobre qui n'était pas approprié? Qu'est-ce qui a fait que c'était plus approprié de déplacer l'élection à une date en juin?

Certainement, à l'échelon fédéral, dans le passé, il y a eu des dates tout au long de l'année civile, y compris une date en janvier 2006. Je me souviens que le porte-à-porte durant cette campagne n'était pas toujours la chose la plus agréable, mais si on frappait fort, ça fonctionnait. Il serait intéressant d'entendre le DGE nous dire quelles considérations sont entrées en jeu.

Il serait aussi intéressant d'entendre quels éléments ont été pris en considération par le DGE pour ce qui est de tenir une élection en octobre plutôt qu'en juin, et en juin plutôt qu'en octobre, particulièrement en ce qui concerne les bureaux et la disponibilité des locaux. Que ce soit au début juin ou au début octobre, les écoles — les écoles publiques, les écoles primaires, les écoles secondaires — ont des cours les lundis et les jeudis. Dans l'un ou l'autre de ces cas, que ce soit une élection fédérale ou provinciale, l'école est ouverte, donc la disponibilité des écoles pour ces choses n'est pas vraiment touchée. Je serais curieux d'en apprendre plus à ce sujet, tout particulièrement lorsque nous examinons les commentaires concernant le vote par anticipation. En octobre, avec la fin de semaine de l'Action de grâce, nous tombons bel et bien sur des congés, du point de vue fédéral, mais pas vraiment du point de vue provincial. Encore une fois, vous avez la fin de semaine de la fête de la Reine, qui tombe quelques semaines avant la date d'élection fixe provinciale, ce qui a des répercussions.

Je vais revenir au choix du moment et à ce qui doit être pris en considération. Je peux me rappeler que, durant l'élection de 2005-2006, les bureaux d'Élections Canada étaient ouverts le jour de Noël pour ceux qui souhaitaient voter par bulletin spécial. Je crois que c'est un dilemme intéressant et aussi un défi intéressant que nous pouvons entrevoir dans le projet de loi C-76 par rapport à la durée maximale d'une période électorale — dans le cas où un gouvernement en situation minoritaire tombe à un certain moment — que ce soit à la fin novembre ou au début décembre, et comment cela chevauche une période des fêtes. Tenir une élection à Noël, c'est un défi.

Certes, quand Paul Martin a demandé cette élection en décembre 2005, c'était un délai important qui a permis au DGE et...

(1150)

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, nous décidons seulement si le... Par rapport à votre amendement sur le fait de savoir si le directeur général des élections va venir, il vient déjà. C'est déjà un fait accompli.

M. John Nater:

Oui, mais cela nous amène à nous demander pourquoi il vient avant le début de l'étude article par article et quels renseignements nous devrons entendre de sa part avant de faire cette étude et de débattre de nombre des amendements.

Le président:

Vous pourrez le lui demander lorsqu'il sera ici.

M. John Nater:

Je suis impatient de le faire, mais je crois qu'il est utile, pour les membres du Comité, de savoir pourquoi je juge important d'entendre le DGE avant l'étude article par article. Assurément, le moment choisi et les dates d'élection fixes jouent également un rôle là-dedans.

Un autre élément qui a été proposé dans les réformes de 2006, puis mis en oeuvre, c'était un processus de modernisation. Cela n'est pas prévu dans le projet de loi actuel. Cela n'est pas prévu en ce moment, mais je serais curieux d'entendre le DGE nous dire si c'est quelque chose que nous devrions envisager comme amendement dans le projet de loi C-76 et de connaître les réussites ou les défis qui y étaient associés, tant durant les élections partielles que durant la période électorale même. J'aimerais les comparer avec ce que notre directeur général des élections a dit au sujet de l'importance de mettre à l'essai des propositions durant les élections partielles avant de les mettre en oeuvre de façon générale. Il a dit que, lorsqu'il était question des registres du scrutin, il n'était pas à l'aise de les mettre à l'essai au moment des élections partielles, qui devraient avoir lieu à l'automne, à moins que nous ne tenions une élection générale éclair à l'automne, ce qui est toujours une possibilité. Quoi qu'il en soit, il n'était pas préparé à faire cela.

Je pense que c'est une façon appropriée et diligente de faire, parce qu'on ne veut pas mettre à l'essai quelque chose qui pourrait soulever de grandes préoccupations. Dans l'exemple provincial, j'ai hâte d'entendre M. Essensa se prononcer sur la façon dont la mise à l'essai des tabulatrices dans les élections partielles provinciales a fonctionné ou a posé problème, puis comment cela a été déployé dans une élection générale. Assurément, l'élection partielle...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Cela n'apparaît même pas dans notre projet de loi.

M. John Nater:

Non, mais c'est quelque chose que nous pourrions envisager comme amendement du projet de loi pour voir où cela nous mène. C'est lié à ce que le DGE disait concernant la suggestion des registres du scrutin, qui ne figure pas non plus dans le projet de loi, mais se rattache à la capacité d'Élections Canada de l'intégrer dans ce processus. Assurément, ils utilisent l'exemple de l'élection partielle dans Whitby—Oshawa pour l'exécuter. C'était leur première occasion de le faire, et je crois que cela s'est relativement bien passé. Je me rappelle avoir vu ces résultats sortir assez rapidement, puis on les a mis en oeuvre lors des l'élection.

Nous avons observé, à l'époque, et certainement durant l'élection, la vitesse avec laquelle cela s'est produit, avec un succès relatif, mais il serait intéressant d'entendre M. Essensa nous parler des difficultés qu'ils ont rencontrées, particulièrement au moment de recourir à un entrepreneur privé pour faire ce travail. Je crois que l'entité était Dominion Voting Systems. Elle a entrepris de le faire. Dominion est certainement une entreprise bien connue en Ontario, qui organise les élections de la province à l'échelle municipale. Dans ma circonscription, j'ai neuf municipalités, et deux gouvernements de comté ont entrepris des travaux avec Dominion pour le vote en ligne et par téléphone, et ils l'ont fait avec un succès général au chapitre des élections municipales. Je crois qu'il serait utile d'entendre M. Essensa nous raconter, mardi, comment cela a été fait.

Les Canadiens changent leur façon de faire des affaires, de faire des opérations bancaires et de magasiner. De plus en plus souvent, les moyens utilisés pour le faire sont diversifiés, que ce soit en ligne ou par interaction téléphonique, et ils ne vont pas nécessairement en personne exécuter bon nombre des tâches qu'ils faisaient dans le passé. Ce n'est pas la direction qu'a prise Élections Ontario. L'agence a utilisé une tabulatrice, mais c'est assurément un pas en avant vers l'automatisation supplémentaire.

Je suis impatient d'entendre ce que M. Essensa a à dire par rapport à la main-d'oeuvre. Le fait de s'assurer qu'il y a un nombre approprié de greffiers du scrutin et de scrutateurs dans chaque bureau de vote pour diriger efficacement une élection constitue un problème. Je sais que, dans ma circonscription de Perth—Wellington, nous avons un taux de chômage exceptionnellement bas. Le fait de s'assurer d'avoir assez de gens pour pourvoir les postes qui sont offerts à temps plein représente un défi en soi, mais pourvoir ces postes durant une courte période est un tout autre défi. Malgré le fait que les emplois sont relativement bien rémunérés, il est difficile de trouver des gens qui veulent s'engager à l'égard d'une longue journée. Douze heures de vote, c'est une chose, mais il y a ensuite le temps supplémentaire pour ouvrir et fermer le bureau de scrutin et compiler les votes à la fin. C'est tout un problème de trouver le nombre approprié de travailleurs pour rendre cela possible. Ça ne fait aucun doute. Entendre M. Essensa nous expliquer comment cela a fonctionné et quels problèmes il a rencontrés sur le plan de la mise en oeuvre serait pertinent et approprié.

On a prévu une autre chose. Encore une fois, ce n'est pas une question qui s'applique nécessairement à une circonscription comme la mienne, qui se trouve en milieu relativement rural, même si nous avons des régions urbaines de taille moyenne. Stratford, avec ses 32 000 personnes, serait la plus grande ville de ma circonscription. Toutes les autres sont des petites localités de moins de 10 000 habitants. Une des difficultés tenait à la possibilité de rejoindre des immeubles à logements multiples, comme des immeubles en copropriété et des immeubles d'appartements, dans des petites collectivités. Je n'ai jamais eu de problème pour ce qui est d'entrer dans ces immeubles à logements multiples, mais d'autres défis sont associés à cela.

La législation provinciale a conféré au DGE le pouvoir d'émettre des contraventions aux propriétaires de ces immeubles si les solliciteurs s'y voyaient refuser l'accès. Il serait intéressant d'entendre de la bouche du DGE si c'est quelque chose que nous devrions prévoir dans les amendements du projet de loi C-76, c'est-à-dire une certaine forme de capacité améliorée. Assurément, la législation actuelle prévoit que les candidats et leur mandataire sont autorisés à se présenter dans les immeubles à logements multiples, mais il serait utile de pouvoir y entrer ou prévoir un certain type de contravention ou de sanction pour ces immeubles.

Nous devrions tenir cette conversation avec M. Essensa pour connaître son point de vue et savoir si cela s'est révélé un succès et s'il a dû ou non utiliser ce pouvoir et cette autorité qui lui ont été conférés. Par conséquent, je suis impatient d'entendre ce commentaire le 2 octobre, de 11 heures à midi, lorsque M. Essensa se joindra à nous.

(1155)



Une autre observation importante qui ressort de la législation provinciale au sujet de laquelle j'ai hâte de connaître le point de vue de M. Essensa, c'est la façon dont le projet de loi même a touché les frontières, particulièrement lorsqu'il s'agit de représentation dans le Nord.

Monsieur le président, je n'ai pas besoin de vous dire, de votre point de vue, que le Yukon est beaucoup plus grand qu'une circonscription comme la mienne qui fait 3 500 kilomètres carrés — ce que je trouve grand —, certainement pas par rapport à la vôtre, mais par rapport à une circonscription de Toronto ou de Montréal, qui n'est qu'à quelques arrêts ou pâtés de maisons d'un métro, où un type différent de représentation est assurément nécessaire.

Dans la législation provinciale, on a prévu la façon de formuler des recommandations par rapport aux frontières et proposé que deux circonscriptions additionnelles soient ajoutées dans le Nord de l'Ontario. Certes, ce n'est pas quelque chose qui est prévu dans notre projet de loi. Assurément, lorsqu'il est question des commissions de délimitation, je dirais que nous nous sommes donné beaucoup de mal, à l'échelon fédéral, pour nous assurer que, en ce qui concerne la circonscription, les commissions de délimitation visent le plus possible à échapper à toute influence politique, ce qui est opportun, à mon avis. Cela confère au Président de la Chambre des communes le pouvoir de nommer certains membres de ces commissions de délimitation pour entreprendre ce travail, mais ce pourrait être quelque chose à demander au DGE, en ce qui concerne le caractère approprié d'une législation qui rehausse la représentation dans les collectivités rurales et particulièrement nordiques.

De plus, dans cet exemple précis, les circonscriptions de Kenora—Rainy River et Timmins—James Bay comptaient toutes deux de grandes populations autochtones, et on disait donc, à l'époque, que cela fournirait une occasion de plus de représentation accrue des collectivités autochtones. Encore une fois, c'est quelque chose par rapport à quoi nous aimerions entendre le DGE: est-ce que la représentation accrue a été efficace et a-t-elle quelques suggestions pour notre loi électorale à l'échelon fédéral, des moyens nous permettant de nous assurer que les membres des collectivités autochtones peuvent participer pleinement à notre système électoral, et le font effectivement. Dans ce cas, ces circonscriptions avaient une grande capacité dans le Nord. Elles demeuraient tout de même de grandes régions, mais leur population était beaucoup plus petite que dans d'autres circonscriptions.

Cela m'amène à un des points les plus importants sur lesquels, à mon avis, nous devons vraiment entendre le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario, et cela concerne la façon dont les tiers fonctionnent au sein d'un système fédéral. Nous avons procédé à l'élection, à l'échelon provincial, avec ces changements en place, avec ces nouvelles limites et avec le besoin de s'inscrire. En fait, à l'échelon provincial aussi, les tiers sont maintenant tenus de s'inscrire. Nous n'allons pas entendre de représentants municipaux, mais il serait néanmoins utile d'en tenir compte, lorsque nous entendrons le commentaire et discuterons de notre orientation.

L'élément intéressant ici, c'est que l'influence de tiers sur des élections est devenue, particulièrement au cours des deux dernières années et demie, un sujet de discussion majeur, pas seulement en Ontario et au Canada, mais à l'échelle internationale. Personne ne veut voir d'influence étrangère ou d'influence étrangère indue à quelque niveau que ce soit au pays. Nous n'avons pas besoin d'entendre quoi que ce soit ni même d'avoir le moindre indice selon lequel une influence étrangère pourrait jouer un rôle dans notre processus électoral. La discussion continue aux États-Unis au sujet de l'influence étrangère de la Russie dans l'élection présidentielle de 2016 n'est pas une discussion que nous voulons avoir ici. Nous devons nous assurer que nos règles et nos lois au Canada sont aussi fortes et strictes que possible pour nous, afin de faire en sorte qu'il n'y ait pas d'ingérence.

(1200)



Si on regarde l'exemple de l'Ontario et ce que j'espère entendre de la bouche de M. Essensa, c'est précisément la façon dont ces règles de tiers, ce processus de tiers, ont été mis en place durant la période électorale et la période qui l'a précédée également. Actuellement, dans la législation fédérale, des considérations différentes, que ce soit durant la période électorale ou préélectorale, ou que ce ne soit pas durant la période électorale, régissent la façon dont les tiers peuvent fonctionner.

Ce que je juge intéressant par rapport à l'aspect provincial, et ce sur quoi M. Essensa sera en mesure de fournir un commentaire pertinent, c'est que, avant l'introduction du projet de loi, il n'y avait aucune limite quant à ce qui pouvait être dépensé en publicité avant une période électorale. C'est une préoccupation. C'est une préoccupation lorsque vous avez des poches profondes et pouvez influencer une élection, en publiant des annonces et en payant des publicitaires et des travailleurs durant une campagne électorale tout comme en période préélectorale.

Lorsque ce changement a été implanté, la limite imposée à des tiers était fixée à 100 000 $ durant une période électorale, et à pas plus de 4 000 $ au sein d'une circonscription particulière. Je crois que même 4 000 $ dans une circonscription donnée, c'est élevé. Quatre mille dollars de publicité dans toute circonscription donnée pourraient avoir des répercussions importantes, particulièrement si nous ne sommes pas bien certains de la provenance de ces fonds ni de l'existence d'une certaine influence étrangère.

Une des choses au sujet desquelles nous avons entendu des témoignages, c'était la nécessité d'adopter des mesures anticollusion pour faire en sorte qu'il n'y ait pas une association étroite entre de multiples tiers. C'est là mon inquiétude également. Si vous avez de multiples tiers qui publient chacun pour 4 000 $ d'annonces dans n'importe quelle circonscription donnée, vous êtes en proie à une grande préoccupation, surtout lorsque les partis politiques sont plafonnés de façon très stricte par rapport à l'argent qu'ils peuvent dépenser dans toute circonscription donnée. Si on regarde la prochaine élection, cela représente presque 100 000 $ dans une circonscription donnée par candidat inscrit. C'est une préoccupation.

Nous devrions entendre ce que M. Essensa a à dire par rapport à ces limites qui ont été instaurées et à la façon dont elles ont été appliquées. Je crois que c'est une des préoccupations que nous avons entendues de la part de témoins et de Canadiens également: que c'est très bien d'avoir des limites, d'imposer des limites à des tiers, d'imposer des limites relativement à une influence étrangère, mais si nous ne savons pas clairement comment ces règles sont appliquées ni comment elles peuvent l'être dans certaines situations, nous avons de graves préoccupations. Je crois qu'il serait exceptionnellement intéressant d'entendre le commentaire de M. Essensa sur la façon exacte dont cela sera entrepris.

Avant l'introduction de la législation, en 2016, et sa mise en oeuvre prévue pour 2018, il n'existait aucune règle concernant le fait de savoir si des tiers pouvaient collaborer dans le cadre de campagnes publicitaires politiques, et très peu d'entre eux travaillaient avec des acteurs politiques, pour contourner les règlements sur le financement des campagnes électorales. Voilà une préoccupation. Une chose sur laquelle je serais très intrigué d'entendre le point de vue de M. Essensa, c'est s'il connaît des exemples à l'échelon provincial, avant l'introduction du projet de loi, de cas où des partis politiques travaillaient avec des organisations tierces pour coordonner un message, une stratégie visant l'atteinte d'un résultat commun, mais d'une façon détournant la réglementation sur le financement des campagnes électorales, et si les gens contournaient les règles.

(1205)



Par rapport aux mesures anticollusion qui sont envisagées dans la législation provinciale, je pense qu'il serait utile d'entendre son commentaire, puis des suggestions concernant la façon dont, à l'échelon provincial, lorsque nous examinons les amendements, nous pouvons travailler pour nous assurer d'avoir de fortes mesures anticollusion également. Personne ne veut voir un système où les acteurs politiques, les partis ou les candidats des partis travaillent en étroite collaboration avec des tiers pour contourner les limites et les plafonds des dépenses. J'aimerais beaucoup connaître le point de vue de M. Essensa sur ce qui peut se produire et sur l'évolution des choses à partir de là aussi.

La plupart d'entre nous ici ont déjà été, à un moment ou à un autre, candidats à l'investiture. Nous avons dû briguer l'investiture de notre parti précis, puis la remporter. Parfois, des membres sont tenus de remporter plusieurs investitures, car plusieurs élections sont déclenchées. Nous avons vu cela dans différents partis politiques.

Une des choses qui m'intriguent avec l'exemple provincial, c'est que, avant les changements, il n'y avait aucune limite quant à ce qu'une personne pouvait donner à un candidat à l'investiture. Des sommes d'argent importantes pouvaient être consacrées à une course à l'investiture et être effectivement utilisées comme publicité pour une élection générale, mais sous les auspices d'une course à l'investiture. Cela a permis à ceux qui briguaient l'investiture dans des partis politiques d'avoir une grande influence sur une campagne électorale avant la tenue réelle de la campagne, simplement en retardant la course à l'investiture, particulièrement lorsque la situation dans une circonscription était serrée, où cette limite ajoutée des dépenses était imposée sans qu'il y ait de limites liées aux contributions ou aux dépenses. On pouvait jouer à des jeux, mais c'est quelque chose contre quoi on a sévi dans la législation prévue.

Maintenant, les particuliers ne peuvent donner qu'un maximum de 1 200 $ à des associations et à des candidats à l'investiture d'un parti chaque année, ce qui s'aligne sur les sommes qui peuvent être données à un parti politique ou à un candidat proposé. Pour ce qui est de la somme d'argent que le candidat peut dépenser, celle-ci a été plafonnée à 20 % de la limite de dépenses du candidat dans une circonscription au cours de l'élection précédente. Dans une circonscription où la limite des dépenses avoisine les 100 000 $, ce qui représente généralement les limites des dépenses — un peu moins dans certaines circonscriptions et un peu plus dans d'autres, selon la taille et la population —, cela veut dire une limite de 20 000 $ pour un candidat à l'investiture. Encore une fois, ce n'est pas une somme d'argent négligeable, mais ça demeure assez important pour qu'on cherche une façon de dépenser l'argent. Toutefois, cela touche la façon dont on procède.

De façon plus générale, en ce qui concerne le financement, encore une fois, une chose sur laquelle M. Essensa peut se prononcer, particulièrement par rapport à notre projet de loi, c'est la somme d'argent et la façon dont elle est distribuée à des partis politiques. D'une part, le gouvernement provincial nous a appuyés à l'échelon fédéral concernant la façon dont les partis sont financés. Jusqu'à tout récemment, les sociétés et les syndicats pouvaient faire des contributions politiques. Certes, au Canada, cette pratique a été bannie pendant de nombreuses années. Au départ, les limites ont été réduites, sous l'ancien premier ministre Jean Chrétien, mais elles ont assurément été complètement bannies dans le cadre d'une des premières lois adoptées par l'ancien premier ministre Stephen Harper, à son arrivée au pouvoir en 2006. Cela a certainement changé la façon dont les partis recueillent des fonds et financent leur campagne électorale. Je pense que c'est une conversation utile qui doit se tenir.

Je juge intéressant de constater que, avant ce changement apporté à l'échelon provincial, un particulier pouvait donner jusqu'à 33 250 $ pour toute année électorale donnée grâce à des changements dans l'ensemble des différents paliers — aux partis, à la circonscription, au candidat proposé — dans une élection partielle particulière. Ce sont des situations où dans chaque cas, on peut faire ces dons. Il serait utile d'entendre M. Essensa dire comment cela s'est joué et déroulé.

(1210)



De façon plus générale également, en ce qui concerne sa contribution à nos études, il y a aussi la question de savoir de quelle manière les fonds sont recueillis. Au provincial, nous avons certainement vu ce qu'on a appelé le financement donnant un accès privilégié. À l'époque, on imposait aux ministres provinciaux des quotas quant à la somme qui devait être accumulée durant une certaine période. On recueillait ces fonds en plaidant directement et en demandant des contributions à ceux qui faisaient peut-être du lobbyisme ou espéraient faire des affaires avec un ministère provincial.

Les changements qui ont été apportés par le gouvernement provincial ont tantôt été considérés comme très stricts, tantôt comme draconiens. Plutôt que de réagir au problème des décideurs qui sont influencés par des contributions financières, on a assisté à un mouvement visant à empêcher, en réalité, tous les acteurs politiques d'assister à des campagnes de financement, avec peu d'exceptions, voire aucune. Cela s'appliquait à presque tout le monde, mis à part les employés, ce que j'ai jugé intéressant. Le chef de cabinet d'un ministre de premier plan pouvait assister aux campagnes, mais un candidat proposé dans une circonscription qui est peu susceptible d'être remportée par un certain parti politique n'a pas le droit d'assister à une campagne de financement.

On a fait des commentaires intéressants à ce sujet, notamment que des doublures en carton ont été utilisées durant les campagnes de financement en lieu et place d'un membre ou d'un ministre réel.

(1215)

Le président:

Monsieur Nater...

M. John Nater:

Cela se rapporte au sujet à l'étude, parce que mes propos concernent de façon plus générale les façons dont on recueille des fonds, que ce soit par l'entremise des partis politiques ou de tiers, et cela pourrait fournir à M. Essensa, qui vient le 2 octobre...

Le président:

J'aimerais juste dire certaines choses, monsieur Nater. D'abord, je crois que c'est lié à un autre projet de loi dont nous avons parlé, donc ce n'est pas aussi pertinent. Ensuite, je suis curieux. Vous avez commencé par décrire une bonne partie du travail important que le Comité doit abattre. Je me demande si vous croyez que le fait de parler ad nauseam pour un témoin qui doit venir, qui a déjà accepté de venir et que nous avons tous convenu qu'il allait venir, nous aide à avancer plus rapidement à cet égard.

L'autre chose qui me rend perplexe, c'est que je croyais que nous avions convenu mardi de fixer une date pour procéder à l'étude article par article. Les membres du Comité ont tous accepté. Je ne suis pas sûr de savoir comment nous avons réussi, en réalité, à ne pas fixer de date.

M. John Nater:

C'est assurément une observation intéressante. C'est important de discuter du projet de loi. Il est important de reconnaître également les discussions qui se tiennent par rapport à ce projet de loi, dans des lieux qui sont à l'extérieur du Comité. Je pense qu'un signe de bonne foi, venant de tous les côtés, devrait s'en venir. Nous avons été très clairs de notre côté, devant la ministre directement, devant la secrétaire parlementaire, par rapport à certaines de nos préoccupations, particulièrement en ce qui touche le financement de tiers et l'influence étrangère.

Nous avons proposé un projet de loi à la Chambre des communes — je crois que c'est le projet de loi C-406 — qui traite directement de l'influence étrangère. Ce n'est pas abordé de façon aussi ferme que ça le devrait dans le projet de loi.

Nous avons besoin de cette marque de bonne volonté. Les pourparlers ont été constants entre notre ministre du cabinet fantôme et la ministre pendant les cinq à six derniers jours, depuis la semaine dernière.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Savez-vous s'ils se penchent sur cette question?

M. John Nater:

Je n'ai pas participé à ces réunions, mais je sais que ces sujets font l'objet de pourparlers. J'espère que la ministre assiste en ce moment à la réunion du Cabinet. J'espère qu'on pourra peut-être, à un certain moment, transmettre le message selon lequel nous pourrions très bien aller de l'avant. Assurément, de notre côté, nous avons exprimé nos préoccupations relativement à ce projet de loi.

Nous reconnaissons que, au Comité, nous sommes trois. Au total, 96 ou 97 d'entre nous se trouvent à la Chambre des communes. En même temps, M. Christopherson est un membre du Comité, et il est un député parmi 44 à la Chambre. Nous n'avons pas de majorité, contrairement au gouvernement. Celui-ci va adopter ses lois, d'une façon ou d'une autre. Il a à sa disposition les outils nécessaires pour le faire. Ce n'est pas notre cas. Nous n'avons pas ces mêmes outils. Nos seuls outils sont des arguments persuasifs que M. Reid et Mme Kusie peuvent proposer, les miens ne l'étant pas autant, et la question du temps. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

C'est bon, vous pouvez continuer. [Traduction]

M. John Nater:

J'allais dire quelque chose en français, mais je ne vais pas m'y risquer. Je ne pratique pas le français aussi souvent que...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'aimerais répliquer pendant une minute, et je vous redonnerai la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À tout le moins, vous admettez que c'est une obstruction.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Hier, je vous ai rappelé que cette motion que j'ai présentée et par rapport à laquelle vous proposez un amendement était étrangement semblable aux vôtres. Au moment de l'entrée en vigueur du projet de loi C-23, vous avez proposé un projet de loi très semblable. Je dois vous rappeler que, à l'époque, tous les autres partis au Parlement avaient beaucoup de réserves relativement à de nombreuses dispositions du projet de loi, mais rien de tout cela importait.

Trois partis à la Chambre nous appuient maintenant par rapport à ce projet de loi; pourtant, on continue sans cesse d'y faire obstruction, et les représentants de l'autre côté emploient de nombreuses tactiques. On a bloqué le projet de loi pour l'empêcher d'aller de l'avant.

Ces types de motions ne sont pas du jamais vu. On nous a donné beaucoup de temps. Auparavant, on ne nous accordait que 15 heures pour faire l'étude article par article. Je me souviens qu'on ne nous donnait que quelques semaines à l'époque aussi.

Je tenais à vous le rappeler, pour vous rafraîchir la mémoire à ce sujet.

Je crois savoir que vous voulez voir le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario. Comme le président l'a fait remarquer, le directeur général des élections est enfin disponible, donc nous sommes tous vraiment emballés de le recevoir ici. Nous n'essayons pas de refuser les connaissances et la sagesse qu'il apporterait afin qu'on puisse adopter ce projet de loi avec les bons amendements nécessaires. Il nous tarde de l'entendre.

J'espère que nous pourrons peut-être voter sur votre amendement. Peu importe l'issue du vote, nous verrions tout de même le directeur général des élections mardi. Nous sommes tous impatients d'entendre ce témoignage, d'aller de l'avant avec l'étude article par article, d'aller jusqu'au bout de ce projet de loi et de l'étudier minutieusement, comme il se doit.

(1220)

M. John Nater:

Merci, madame Sahota. Je vous remercie de votre commentaire.

Je suis reconnaissant par rapport à quelque chose de plus général, monsieur le président, et mesdames et messieurs. Je crois que le Comité a très bien fonctionné. Je pense qu'il va continuer de le faire, nonobstant mes nombreux commentaires sur la question à l'étude.

J'aimerais retourner à la motion et à l'amendement. Sans aucun doute, mon amendement élimine la date butoir du 16 octobre pour l'étude article par article, date à laquelle nous sommes censés faire rapport à la Chambre. Je suis très reconnaissant de la clémence accordée au président dans le cadre de la motion qu'il peut limiter. Je pense que c'est quelque chose sur quoi nous nous entendons généralement.

Il y aura des articles sur lesquels nous nous entendrons, et sur lesquels nous nous entendrons tous, et ceux-ci pourront être réglés très rapidement. J'espère que nous pourrons nous entendre de manière informelle. Le bon terme pour le dire, c'est l'engagement d'honneur. Je ne sais pas s'il y a une autre façon de le dire, qui ne soit pas...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est une entente à l'amiable.

M. John Nater:

C'est une entente à l'amiable

J'espère que nous pourrons conclure une entente à l'amiable pour certains articles, à mesure qu'on les étudie, pour que nous laissions tomber...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous devons encore prévoir l'étude article par article. J'attends toujours les résultats de cela.

Votre entente à l'amiable ne vaut pas grand-chose en ce moment.

M. John Nater:

J'espère que nous pourrons arriver à conclure une telle entente à mesure que nous avançons.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis sûr que vous l'espérez.

M. John Nater:

Personne ne veut être ici jusqu'à 3 heures du matin, que ce soit pour faire l'étude article par article ou pour m'entendre pontifier ou entendre le...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Hé, il l'avoue.

M. John Nater:

Eh bien, j'ai parfois beaucoup de choses à dire.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Et pourquoi pas une poignée de main mouillée?

M. John Nater:

Une entente de poignées de main mouillées? Je ne suis pas sûr d'avoir déjà entendu cela.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Lorsque vous crachez dans votre main et...?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Non, non, non. Lorsque vous vous lavez les mains et que vous êtes gêné de serrer des mains, mais que vous devez le faire.

M. Scott Reid:

Ce serait une bonne motion. Le huis clos serait peut-être opportun à ce moment-là.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Non. C'est que je dois lui serrer la main, mais que je viens de me laver les mains, et je suis vraiment gênée. Cela m'arrive.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous savez, si vous sortez de la salle de bain et que ce n'est pas une poignée de main mouillée, c'est encore plus alarmant.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C'est vrai.

M. John Nater:

Je rougis très facilement.

M. David Christopherson:

Eh bien, vous n'auriez pas aimé la dernière législature.

M. John Nater:

Merci.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Si vous me voyez faire ceci à l'entrée de la salle de bain, vous savez ce que je fais. J'essaie de me sécher les mains.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous savez, ils ont des serviettes en papier et ces appareils qui soufflent de l'air.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C'est exact.

M. Scott Reid:

Ces choses ne sont pas très bonnes. Les nouveaux appareils de Dyson sont excellents, mais il n'y en a pas ici.

M. John Nater:

Je crois que, lorsque nous commencerons, il sera vraiment important de savoir ce que nous faisons en coulisse. Assurément, nous espérons que, peut-être d'ici la conclusion de la réunion d'aujourd'hui, nous aurons certaines précisions quant à l'avenir. Nous pourrons peut-être alors accepter la motion telle qu'elle est rédigée.

Mettons cartes sur table. Si les discussions qui ont cours ailleurs se déroulent bien, et si nous pouvons obtenir certains éclaircissements, une certaine parole définitive de la part des gens qui ne sont pas ici présents, je crois que nous pourrions très bien accepter ce qui est écrit sur cette feuille de papier, avec les motions originales. À condition que nous entendions le DGE de l'Ontario mardi, je ne vois aucune raison pour laquelle nous ne serions pas en mesure de le faire, si on obtient des éclaircissements de la part de ceux qui ne sont pas présents en ce moment.

Je suis impatient d'entendre ces éclaircissements. Je n'ai vu personne se dépêcher d'apporter une enveloppe scellée, d'en haut ni d'ailleurs, pour fournir cette certitude. Je continue de jeter un oeil à la porte. Comme nous passons en revue cette motion du point de vue de l'opposition, nous ne sommes pas à l'aise, en ce moment, avec toutes les dispositions actuelles du projet de loi. J'aimerais nous voir...

(1225)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Discutons de l'étude article par article. Arrivons-en là.

M. John Nater:

Nous ne sommes pas disposés à le faire si, au final, tous les articles présentés par le Nouveau Parti démocratique ou le Parti conservateur vont être examinés puis rejetés du revers de la main sans discussion ni débat approprié.

J'aimerais beaucoup pouvoir conclure mes observations et simplement mettre cela aux voix en ayant une certaine assurance de la part de nos amis d'en haut, mais cela n'est simplement pas souhaitable en ce moment. Nous ne sommes pas encore prêts à le faire, pas avant que nous ayons analysé en long et en large la motion importante qui nous est présentée en ce moment.

Je devrais peut-être demander des précisions au président ou au greffier. Pour ce qui est des partis qui ne sont pas représentés au Comité, ils ont le droit de proposer des amendements. Je crois que certains amendements ont été présentés. Dans le cadre d'une motion de guillotine comme celle-ci, où chaque parti a cinq minutes par article, les partis représentés à la Chambre des communes, mais sans avoir de statut de parti officiel ou de représentants au Comité, sont-ils autorisés à participer à ces cinq minutes? Je pourrais peut-être obtenir quelques précisions de la part du président.

Le président:

Vous voulez savoir si les partis non représentés utilisent les cinq minutes?

Le greffier du comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

On accorderait aux députés qui n'appartiennent pas à des partis reconnus, par rapport aux amendements qu'ils ont proposés durant l'étude article par article, une brève période, à la discrétion du président, pour présenter leurs amendements, mais en ce qui concerne les amendements présentés par des membres qui appartiennent à un caucus reconnu, ces derniers ne seraient pas en mesure de participer au débat, nécessairement.

Le président:

À moins qu'ils obtiennent le consentement unanime des membres du Comité.

M. John Nater:

Voilà un autre élément intéressant. J'imagine que cela va de pair avec le fait de ne pas avoir de statut de parti, mais en même temps, ils sont autorisés à présenter leurs amendements, ce qui est le droit de tout parlementaire dans ces lieux. Je le reconnais.

Monsieur le président, je sais que d'autres personnes figurent sur la liste des intervenants. J'aimerais m'arrêter brièvement et permettre à d'autres de s'exprimer. Il y a peut-être autre chose qui me viendra à l'esprit, et je n'aurais donc pas d'objection à être remis sur la liste des intervenants, si tel est le cas.

Le président:

D'accord. M. Bittle est le suivant.

Cessez de manger.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je ne peux pas manger, il ne reste plus de fourchettes.

Des députés: Ah, ah!

M. Scott Reid:

Je tiens juste à faire observer qu'il n'y a jamais eu de pénurie de fourchettes durant la 41e législature. Nous avions un gouvernement majoritaire conservateur.

M. Chris Bittle:

Ce sont des mesures d'austérité.

J'aimerais remercier M. Nater de ses commentaires. J'ai bien aimé ses critiques de réunions auxquelles il n'a pas assisté, et, encore une fois, il se défile, retarde les choses encore et encore, et nous voilà. Nous avons promis il y a une heure et demie qu'une heure serait fixée pour le début du prochain débat.

(1230)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'était il y a deux jours.

M. Chris Bittle:

C'était il y a deux jours. On a promis que nous entendrions la ministre, et il y a eu une entente. L'opposition a demandé à entendre la ministre lorsque nous entamerions l'étude article par article. Nous entendrons la ministre cet après-midi, et nous n'avons toujours pas de date pour commencer l'examen.

Ils ont retardé le débat en disant vouloir entendre le DGE et ont expliqué combien il serait fantastique d'entendre le DGE de la province de l'Ontario. Nous voulons entendre le DGE de la province de l'Ontario.

Nous avons fait preuve de souplesse, mais c'est le temps de passer à autre chose. Comme le DGE d'Élections Canada l'a dit, c'est un bon projet de loi. Il n'est pas parfait, mais nous avons besoin de voir les amendements. Nous devons le faire avancer et faire ce travail. Encore une fois, j'exhorte les conservateurs à cesser cette obstruction. Poursuivons notre travail. Les Canadiens s'attendent à ce que nous débattions du projet de loi et que nous faisions l'examen article par article une fois pour toutes.

Merci.

Le président:

Pour que les gens sachent qui figure sur la liste des intervenants, ce sont Mme Sahota, M. Reid, M. Nater et M. Christopherson.

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

Comme je le disais hier et pour m'éloigner de ce que Chris dit, notre patience — je crois que je ne devrais pas parler pour tout le monde et dire plutôt « ma patience » — commence à s'effriter. Nous entendons constamment dire que oui, nous allons y arriver, mais nous ne voulons pas faire de promesses. Je ne comprends juste pas ce qui nous retarde.

Nous avons essentiellement créé une grande partie de ce projet de loi grâce aux recommandations qui nous ont été fournies par le directeur général des élections. Si je ne m'abuse, il avait présenté 130 recommandations, et bon nombre d'entre elles, qui proposent des moyens d'améliorer les fonctions de notre démocratie, apparaissent dans ce projet de loi.

Comme mon collègue Chris vient de le souligner, il n'est peut-être pas parfait, mais le directeur général des élections appuie largement ce projet de loi. C'est un point de vue non partisan. Nous avons reçu Elizabeth May au Comité. Elle est très en faveur du projet de loi et aimerait le voir aller de l'avant. Au cours de la dernière réunion du Comité, nous avons accueilli Nathan Cullen. Nous avons également entendu auparavant le témoignage de M. Christopherson, selon lequel il est un peu nerveux et commence à se demander ce qui se passe ici et pourquoi nous ne pouvons pas aller de l'avant. C'est vraiment curieux que nous n'ayons tout simplement pas décidé de passer à travers. Ce n'est peut-être pas notre style, mais je sens que nous sommes arrivés à un point où il n'y a plus d'explication raisonnable pour le retard.

Nous avons entendu un très grand nombre de témoins. Nous nous sommes organisés avec le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario. Nous recevrons de nouveau la ministre par rapport à cet enjeu. J'ai du mal à comprendre pourquoi vous exigez une si grande latitude, surtout lorsque je pense au fait que Scott Reid aime qu'on l'appelle la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est exact.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Lorsque cette loi a été adoptée, on n'a pas fourni autant de latitude, et on s'est beaucoup opposé au Parlement à la prétendue Loi sur l'intégrité des élections.

Toutefois, une motion très semblable a été proposée, avec une date de début et une date de fin, ce qui semble être problématique pour les conservateurs, pour quelque raison étrange. Nous faisons exactement ce que vous voudriez nous voir faire, parce que vous fonctionniez de la même manière auparavant.

À ce moment-ci, nous n'avons même pas été aussi... Nous avons énormément donné. Nous avons donné énormément de temps. Nous avons reçu tous les témoins. Je pense que vous aviez une liste d'environ 200 témoins que vous vouliez faire venir, et nous avons dit allez-y. Nous avons dit oui à chaque témoin. Au total, 50 témoins étaient disponibles. Certains avaient beaucoup de témoignages pertinents à livrer; d'autres témoignages n'étaient peut-être pas aussi pertinents.

On dirait presque que vous voulez entendre chaque personne qui s'est déjà présentée à des élections dans sa vie, parce qu'elle pourrait ou non, comme M. Nater l'a dit, soulever un point pertinent. Ce n'est juste pas la façon pour un comité de fonctionner efficacement.

Nous ne pouvons pas fonctionner ainsi. Nous tournons en rond. C'est la troisième fois, je crois, que nous tournons en rond avec ce projet de loi, et je deviens très étourdie. Ce ne sont que des tactiques dilatoires.

D'autres négociations se tiennent peut-être, comme M. Nater continue de le faire remarquer, mais ce sera intéressant à voir. Il se peut que toutes les choses d'intérêt primordial pour M. Nater ne finissent même pas par ressortir de la négociation.

Cela m'amène à croire également que ce sont toutes des tactiques dilatoires et qu'il n'y a pas de désir véritable d'entendre même le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario, ni de désir réel à l'égard de n'importe lequel des débats que nous tenons en ce moment. C'est juste une méthode pour obtenir autre chose qui pourrait intéresser les conservateurs.

C'est bon. Je veux dire, nous sommes prêts à jouer le jeu, mais on dirait qu'avec cette entente à l'amiable que nous avons conclue, il n'y a pas de mesure de suivi qui est prise de l'autre côté. Le temps est venu pour nous de prendre les choses au sérieux. Nous avons été choisis par nos électeurs pour faire le travail, pas pour faire de l'obstruction et parler de choses insignifiantes.

Je crois que nous donnons beaucoup de latitude au Comité. Ce que vous jugez pertinent n'est peut-être pas ce que je juge pertinent, mais on nous a accordé cette latitude de manière à ce que nous puissions aller de l'avant, en faisant le bon travail pour lequel nous avons été élus.

Vous avez proposé beaucoup d'amendements. Selon ce que j'ai entendu, je suis impatiente de les voir tous. Certains d'entre eux sont assez bons. Je vous en félicite. Je félicite tout le monde de tous les partis d'avoir proposé ces amendements, mais je crois que ceux-ci méritent une certaine attention et du temps. Nous ne pourrons y arriver que si vous nous donnez une date de début, et jusqu'ici, nous avons du mal à même obtenir cela, sans même parler d'une date de fin.

Qu'est-ce qui vous retient? Pourquoi trouvez-vous si difficile de commencer l'étude, l'examen du projet de loi? Qu'est-ce qui est si difficile? Je n'arrive pas à le comprendre.

Je sais que vous avez dans votre boîte à outils de nombreux outils, et le retard qui est occasionné dès le début pourrait également survenir plus tard. J'imagine que ce n'est pas un choix que vous avez fait. Je n'arrive juste pas à comprendre pourquoi nous ne pouvons pas commencer.

Vous avez proposé beaucoup de bons amendements. Beaucoup d'entre eux sont les vôtres. Commençons maintenant à en parler. Peut-être que certains changements pourront être apportés, mais vous ne permettez même pas au bon travail que vous avez fait de voir le jour et de faire l'objet de discussions.

Je sais que M. Christopherson a hâte —  le NPD a hâte — que plus de gens aient les moyens de voter au cours des prochaines élections. Beaucoup de gens ont été privés du droit de vote par la prétendue Loi sur l'intégrité des élections. Et nous voulons permettre à ces gens de voter à l'élection. Ce qui nous préoccupe vraiment, c'est que nous avons entendu le directeur général des élections dire que plus c'est long, plus cela devient ardu.

(1235)



C'est peut-être ce qui anime les conservateurs. Vous ne voulez peut-être pas que tout le monde soit en mesure de voter. Peut-être ne voulez-vous pas que les gens dans les collectivités éloignées puissent voter, ce qui est étonnant, parce que je sais que beaucoup de vos députés viennent de régions rurales et éloignées, où l'accès aux bureaux de vote est difficile.

Beaucoup de bonnes choses dans ce projet de loi vont permettre à de nombreuses personnes de participer au processus démocratique. Une bonne partie de la rhétorique que j'ai entendue maintenant, et même en juin, concernait la protection de notre démocratie: « C'est pourquoi nous faisons obstruction et retardons des choses, parce que nous sommes les protecteurs de notre démocratie. Nous n'allons pas permettre que ce projet de loi soit adopté à toute vapeur, parce que c'est ainsi que notre démocratie sera protégée. » Entre-temps, ce même projet de loi est ce qui nous permet de protéger notre démocratie. C'est très ironique. C'est comme si les conservateurs tenaient un discours contradictoire lorsque nous parlons de la protection de la démocratie.

Nous pensions que le directeur général des élections avait appuyé ce projet de loi. Précédemment, dans la prétendue Loi sur l'intégrité des élections, le projet de loi C-23, le directeur général des élections a dit qu'il ne peut certainement pas appuyer un projet de loi qui prive des électeurs du droit de vote. Il ne le peut pas.

M. David Christopherson:

Ils ne l'ont même pas consulté.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nous l'avons reçu ici à de nombreuses occasions. Je crois que le directeur général des élections a comparu devant le Comité pour la quatrième fois depuis la présentation du projet de loi. Il me semble incroyable que nous soyons encore ici à tourner en rond, alors que vous n'auriez jamais eu cette latitude lorsque vous étiez au gouvernement. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Nous sommes trop gentils. [Traduction]

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui, nous sommes trop gentils.

Peut-être que cette gentillesse devrait prendre fin. C'est difficile pour moi de le dire, mais même M. Christopherson soutient et respecte le Parlement au plus haut point. Je crois que le Parlement devrait être l'autorité suprême et qu'il devrait dicter tout ce qui se passe, même pour ce qui est d'obtenir des invitations de ce côté-là.

C'est assez. Nous devons mettre fin à cela, parce que savez-vous qui souffre si ce projet de loi n'est pas adopté? Ce sont les Canadiens. Ce seront eux qui perdront au change au bout du compte si nous ne faisons pas les choses. Voulez-vous être responsables de faire en sorte que les Canadiens n'aient pas accès aux bureaux de vote?

J'imagine qu'ils s'en fichaient auparavant et qu'ils n'y voient pas d'importance aujourd'hui.

(1240)

M. David Christopherson:

Effectivement.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il est à peu près temps que vous regardiez au plus profond de vous-même et commenciez à vous en soucier. Nous devons nous assurer que les personnes handicapées, celles qui éprouvent des difficultés pour ce qui est de présenter le type de carte d'identité qui est exigée et de nombreuses autres choses qui apparaissent dans ce projet de loi, aient l'occasion d'élire leurs représentants tout comme chaque autre Canadien.

Je sais que les gens ont probablement entendu la phrase un Canadien, c'est un Canadien. Je crois qu'il est vraiment important de s'assurer que tous les Canadiens se sentent ainsi et qu'ils sentent que, peu importe leur milieu socioéconomique, l'endroit où ils sont nés ou d'où ils viennent, s'ils sont Canadiens, ils devraient obtenir une représentation égale et avoir un accès égal au processus démocratique.

C'est ce que nous leur enlevons ou continuons de permettre si nous n'apportons pas quelques changements le plus tôt possible.

Il s'agissait de mon ultime effort pour en appeler aux sensibilités des gens de l'autre côté, pour commencer l'étude de ce projet de loi, afin que nous puissions le renvoyer à la Chambre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si les gens là-bas sont prêts à voter.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Ils devraient l'être. Nous devrions voter sur les amendements. Nous devrions voter sur la motion principale. En toute honnêteté, nous sommes déjà rendus là avec les amendements; c'est un peu ridicule, étant donné que le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario comparaîtra tout de même mardi.

J'aimerais voter sur l'amendement. J'aimerais même voir John Nater annuler l'amendement, parce que, à quoi bon? Nous avons tous déjà accepté de voir le directeur général des élections. Faisons-le tout simplement. Votons.

Quelle serait, de toute façon, la mesure naturelle à prendre après cela? Ce serait de poursuivre avec le projet de loi et de commencer l'examen article par article.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est ce qui leur fait peur.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nul besoin d'avoir peur.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, ça fait longtemps que j'ai invoqué le Règlement. Comment puis-je accéder à un protocole de Simms? Dois-je demander à Scott la permission de parler? Est-ce ainsi que cela fonctionne?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Qui est le prochain sur la liste?

Le président:

M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Je serai heureux de céder ma place à M. Christopherson et d'apparaître après lui sur la liste. Ce n'est pas le protocole de Simms, c'est...

M. David Christopherson:

Ce serait une courtoisie de Scott, une courtoisie de M. Reid.

M. Scott Simms:

Selon le protocole, si vous demandiez à obtenir une précision ou aviez une question par rapport à quelque chose qui avait été dit, vous demandiez la permission à la personne qui avait la parole. Elle vous cède la parole pour une période raisonnable, puis la parole lui revient.

M. David Christopherson:

Dans ce cas, puis-je...

Le président:

Vous changez de place avec M. Reid.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vais acquiescer à cela. J'aimerais tout de même poser une question rapide en vertu du protocole.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Bien sûr.

M. David Christopherson:

Du côté de l'opposition officielle, nous avons un mélange de membres qui étaient ici la dernière fois et qui se sentent en quelque sorte penauds par rapport à ce qui s'est fait avec la loi sur le manque d'intégrité des élections. Nous avons de nouveaux députés qui n'ont pas les mains tachées de sang en raison de la dernière législature et qui font de leur mieux pour se ranger du côté des anges de la démocratie. J'ai l'impression, et je vous demanderais votre avis, que tant et aussi longtemps que ces nouveaux députés, pour qui j'ai le plus grand respect, continuent d'occasionner des retards pour aucun autre motif que celui de retarder les choses, ils courent le risque d'être mis dans le même panier que ceux qui doivent porter l'opprobre du projet de loi C-23. La réalité politique, c'est qu'ils ont cette occasion de tracer une ligne dans le sable et de dire: « C'était eux. Ce n'est pas moi. Ce n'est pas ce en quoi je crois. Ma vision de la démocratie est très différente de celle du projet de loi C-23 et je vais saisir cette occasion avec mon vote, ma décision et mes interventions pour indiquer clairement que, bien que je respecte mes collègues, je suis tout à fait en désaccord. J'admets que nous devons éliminer certaines de ces manigances et nous remettre à assainir notre démocratie et nos processus. »

Seriez-vous d'accord, madame Sahota, pour dire que certains de nos collègues courent peut-être le risque de perdre cette occasion et qu'ils pourraient, s'ils ne jouent pas bien leurs cartes, finir par porter l'opprobre du projet de loi C-23 pour le reste de leur carrière, quand ils ont cette occasion de tracer cette ligne de démarcation? Qu'avez-vous à dire à ce sujet?

(1245)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci de poser cette question, monsieur Christopherson. Je vous en suis très reconnaissante.

J'ai beaucoup réfléchi à ce sujet, parce que nous avons souligné la dernière fois que M. Reid et Blake Richards faisaient partie de ce comité. Cela ne veut pas dire qu'ils ne sont pas des députés fantastiques et qu'ils ne travaillent pas avec le nouveau comité depuis assez longtemps aussi, mais nous avons de nouveaux membres. Nous avons M. John Nater et Mme Kusie, qui est la porte-parole de l'opposition. Est-ce comme ça qu'on le dit?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

J'ai entendu autant porte-parole de l'opposition que ministre du cabinet fantôme.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Elle ne semble pas être très mystérieuse. Elle est venue, et après son discours de victoire, lorsqu'elle a été élue vice-présidente, elle a parlé assez clairement de son travail en tant que bureaucrate, en tant que fonctionnaire non partisane depuis un si grand nombre d'années, et du fait d'être en mesure de faire le travail, et ce, dans des environnements parfois pas très amicaux, dans de nombreux endroits du monde où la démocratie continue d'être un défi. J'ai l'impression que la démocratie continue ici aussi d'être un défi, comme nous pouvons le voir en ce moment, mais nous faisons de notre mieux. Lorsque nous avons des retards injustifiables comme celui-ci, et je dirais que, dans ce cas-ci, ils deviennent assurément injustifiables, je crois qu'ils en porteront la responsabilité. Assurément.

Cette toute nouvelle attitude que je pensais voir les nouveaux membres afficher... ils ne sont peut-être pas à la hauteur de ces attentes. Certains sont plus nouveaux que d'autres, donc j'ai encore un peu espoir de voir un changement, une volonté de coopérer lorsqu'il s'agit de ce projet de loi. Comme je l'ai dit auparavant, nous avons reçu 56 témoins juste pour ce projet de loi. Environ 200 ont été mis sur des listes de témoins, principalement par les conservateurs. Comme on a invité un si grand nombre de témoins au Comité, il est intéressant de constater que, lorsque ces témoins étaient ici, ils ne manifestaient vraiment pas le désir de poser les questions percutantes. Cela m'amène à penser que l'invitation de tous ces témoins au Comité ne sous-tendait peut-être pas d'intention sérieuse.

Ayant vu ce type de comportement, je dirais que ce n'est pas une utilisation légitime du temps du Comité. Nous gaspillons des ressources utiles. Tous les gens qui doivent être ici et toute la nourriture fantastique qui nous est fournie, réunion après réunion, tout cela s'additionne.

Oui, monsieur Christopherson, je ne crois pas que nous ayons besoin de donner aux nouveaux membres beaucoup plus de temps pour faire leurs preuves, pour montrer qu'ils arrivent avec une nouvelle attitude et un esprit neuf.

M. David Christopherson: Pour joindre le geste à la parole.

Mme Ruby Sahota: Oui. Nous voulons voir de l'action, et c'est maintenant le temps. J'espère vraiment que nous pourrons aujourd'hui aller de l'avant avec une date de début pour l'étude article par article. Nous devons obtenir quelque chose aujourd'hui. Nous aurions dû aller de l'avant avec ce projet de loi mardi. Assez, c'est assez. La ministre va comparaître.

Bien franchement, je commence à me dire que nous ne devrions pas parler de tout cela si nous ne sommes pas prêts à aller de l'avant avec ce projet de loi. Nous avons épuisé toutes nos avenues de recherche. Je suis sûre que vous en trouverez, mais je vous demanderais de vous assurer de ne pas tourner en dérision le processus entier et de faire en sorte que vos interventions procèdent d'un intérêt et de préoccupations véritables. Selon ce que j'ai vu des témoins précédents — et je crois que c'est ce à quoi Chris faisait allusion — parfois, j'ai l'impression que nous tournions un peu en dérision cet endroit.

Lorsque vous êtes un nouveau député, vous commencez rapidement à comprendre les rouages de l'endroit, et j'ai l'impression que nous gaspillons beaucoup de temps ici. C'est un fait. On apprend ici beaucoup de choses. Je pense que c'est le meilleur endroit où être, et je suis très chanceuse de m'y trouver. J'ai appris des choses de gens qui sont ici depuis plus longtemps que moi, de diverses autres ressources qui ont été fournies et de témoins qui se présentent. Je n'aurais jamais acquis autant de connaissances sans cette occasion, mais c'est assez. C'est bien d'acquérir des connaissances, mais il faut aussi faire le travail qui est exigé de vous en tant que parlementaire, puis il y a aussi l'apparence de faire du bon travail, tout en jouant en réalité à des jeux partisans. Je pense que nous en sommes là: nous prétendons ne pas faire du surplace, mais ce que nous faisons vraiment, c'est retarder les choses juste pour le plaisir de les retarder.

Merci.

M. David Christopherson: Bravo!

(1250)

Le président:

Merci.

D'accord, le suivant est M. Christopherson. Vous vous rappellerez que, en juin, nous avons accepté que la ministre vienne commencer l'étude article par article, donc il ne nous reste que 10 minutes pour régler les choses. C'est à vous.

M. David Christopherson:

Savez-vous quoi? Mon intervention m'a essentiellement permis de m'exprimer. Je ne veux pas ralentir les choses plus qu'il faut pour ce qui est du temps que je prends. Ma position a été très claire, en public comme en privé, par rapport aux ministres, aux fonctionnaires et aux membres de l'opposition. Le monde entier sait — tout le monde qui s'y intéresse — où le NPD, et moi en particulier, en tant que membre du Comité, nous situons par rapport à ces questions.

J'ai exprimé cela très clairement dès le début au Parlement. Juste pour me vider le coeur, je suis un peu préoccupé. Le gouvernement doit un peu vivre avec le fait que la journée est très avancée et que nous devons encore régler quelque chose d'aussi important. Je vais le signaler à l'avance, parce que je ne joue pas de jeu — je ne suis pas assez intelligent pour le faire.

La ministre s'en vient, et ce que j'aimerais entendre de sa bouche, c'est cette garantie absolue de la part du gouvernement. Je ne veux pas entendre de balivernes au sujet de... eh bien, cela revient au leader à la Chambre. Non, c'est une représentante du gouvernement. Je veux entendre de façon très claire que le gouvernement est entièrement déterminé à s'assurer que, quoi qu'il arrive, avec son gouvernement majoritaire, ce projet de loi sera adopté et que nous aurons une élection qui est beaucoup plus près de l'histoire et des fières traditions du Canada que les manigances du projet de loi C-23.

J'ai exprimé clairement que je vais appuyer le gouvernement pour ce qui est d'éliminer ces manigances. Je vais appuyer toute nouvelle chose progressiste et amélioration qu'il souhaite apporter. Nous allons défendre les choses qui nous tiennent à coeur, mais, au final, la priorité, c'est d'éliminer une bonne partie des manigances. Je vais prendre l'engagement électoral personnel, puisque je vais être libéré, de faire tout mon possible pour m'assurer que notre pays est mis au courant, si vous n'arrivez pas à faire adopter ce projet de loi. C'est gros. Lorsque nous étions sur les banquettes de l'opposition, nous nous sommes tous levés et avons crié haut et fort que c'est mal. Nous avons apporté des réformes majeures à notre processus électoral, et le gouvernement en place n'a même pas consulté le directeur général des élections.

Je trouve un peu fort que la cuvée actuelle des membres officiels de l'opposition ralentisse les choses — pourquoi? — parce qu'elle insiste pour entendre un directeur général des élections provinciales. C'est fort. Je comprends l'importance de le faire. Je saisis cela. J'ai exprimé clairement aux membres du gouvernement et à des gens comme Scott Reid, pour qui j'ai le plus grand respect, une des personnes que je respecte le plus dans tout le Parlement, que mon but n'était pas de les traîner dans la dernière élection et la dernière législature.

Mais il y a des limites. Quand M. Reid ou qui que ce soit d'autre du côté de l'opposition officielle se dresse, se drape dans la rhétorique de la démocratie et se sert de sa préoccupation pour le processus électoral comme excuse pour ralentir nos travaux, qui visent à nettoyer ce gâchis et à éliminer ces manigances, j'ai atteint ma limite.

Très bientôt, l'opposition officielle devra se secouer énergiquement et décider où elle se situe quant à notre démocratie. Veut-elle vraiment maintenir la tradition et la réputation de la dernière législature? C'est là qu'elle s'en va. Ou veut-elle être en mesure de mettre cela derrière elle et peut-être même de dire qu'elle a eu tort et qu'elle voit maintenant les choses différemment? C'est bon. Nous comprenons tous la politique, et ceux d'entre nous qui veulent faire adopter cela vous laisseront vous en tirer.

Ce que je ne vais pas faire, c'est m'asseoir ici et laisser tranquillement le gouvernement continuer de mal gérer l'heure et le processus de la question qui nous occupe et d'un si grand nombre de dossiers démocratiques. Je dois dire que vous avez été une déception absolument profonde dans tout ce dossier. C'est très décevant, vu la promesse qu'on a faite, et vous étiez très nombreux à vouloir faire la bonne chose... Je sais que tout cela était légitime. Nous avons parlé de ces choses au début, et nous voici, un an avant la prochaine élection, et un des dossiers les plus faibles du gouvernement concerne la réforme démocratique.

Le gouvernement a sa part de responsabilité pour ce qui est du pétrin dans lequel nous nous trouvons, puisqu'il tente de faire adopter cela durant les derniers mois de la présente législature. Cela dit, si l'opposition officielle continue de ne faire rien d'autre que de ralentir le processus, de préserver l'élimination du vote et les dispositions antidémocratiques qui figuraient dans le projet de loi C-23, elle est beaucoup plus coupable que le gouvernement.

(1255)



Très bientôt, nous devrons tous nous montrer à la hauteur de nos discours. On le voit beaucoup ici en ce qui concerne le Saint Graal de la démocratie, beaucoup de rhétorique et beaucoup de discussions, mais peu d'action. Les Canadiens s'attendent à ce que cela soit réglé avant la prochaine élection. Les choses doivent bouger plus rapidement ici, donc je vais en appeler au gouvernement. Si vous devez utiliser le pouvoir d'un poids lourd pour aller à la Chambre, alors faites-le, mais je dis de façon aussi officielle que possible et de façon personnelle en tant que parlementaire: s'il vous plaît, ne permettez pas, dans aucune circonstance, à la législature de se dissoudre avant qu'on ait réglé notre système électoral. Il est brisé.

Nous ne rendrons pas service à notre réputation internationale. Bon nombre d'entre nous savent que je fais du travail d'instauration de la démocratie à l'échelle internationale, et je suis donc fier d'être Canadien, membre d'un pays qui a une des démocraties les plus remarquables, matures et justes au monde. Le projet de loi C-23 lui a fait du mal. Il l'a endommagée et tachée. C'est une occasion de régler les choses, mais on ne peut pas la rater.

Je n'ai pas l'intention d'intervenir souvent durant le processus. Il y a certaines choses progressistes que j'aimerais voir arriver, mais je ne vais pas retarder ce processus pour me battre pour elles. Au bout du compte, j'appuie le projet de loi que le gouvernement a déposé. Je crois que son coeur est à la bonne place. J'aimerais seulement qu'on fasse travailler les cerveaux et qu'on fasse avancer le projet de loi de façon plus appropriée. C'est honteux que quelque chose d'aussi important piétine encore.

J'aimerais faire un lien avec les commentaires de Ruby et je vais réellement terminer là-dessus. La plupart du temps, nous essayons de travailler ensemble, et j'aime le Comité et les membres qui en font partie. Lorsque vous êtes là depuis longtemps, le fait de crier à l'endroit du gouvernement et de faire les manchettes n'est plus aussi palpitant. Ce qui est beaucoup plus palpitant, c'est de rassembler toutes les personnes qui se battent dans des coins différents et de trouver une façon de collaborer. Après un certain temps, vous trouvez que c'est vraiment valable, et cela vous donne un grand sentiment de gratification.

Utilisons la carotte et le bâton; travaillons ensemble. Nous disons tous que nous voulons améliorer la démocratie, donc essayons de le faire tous ensemble. En ce moment, ce n'est pas ce que nous faisons pour faire adopter cela. C'est la carotte. Le bâton, c'est que, si cela n'est pas fait, ça va barder, et le gouvernement comme l'opposition officielle seront tenus responsables, non pas que nous soyons tous purs, mais nous n'avons pas assez de pouvoir pour influencer tout cela. Je ne prétends pas que ce soit le cas, mais j'ai une grande voix, je suis fort en gueule, et il me reste un an, donc j'aimerais beaucoup mieux utiliser ce temps pour complimenter le gouvernement et l'opposition officielle, particulièrement les nouveaux députés comme M. Nater, que je respecte et qui sera, à mon avis, un excellent parlementaire. J'espère qu'il restera longtemps. Je veux pouvoir continuer de dire ces choses, tout comme: « Vous savez quoi? Nous sommes dans le pétrin, mais nous allons nous en sortir. »

J'aimerais vous donner ce crédit. À l'inverse, si ce crédit n'est pas mérité, je ne suis pas bien loin de Sarnia. Je peux aller visiter cette circonscription, et je dirai aux gens ce que vous avez fait. Je leur ferai part de la différence entre votre rhétorique et la façon dont vous avez voté. J'aimerais beaucoup plus continuer de dire: « M. Nater est un exemple de ce pourquoi j'éprouve un bon sentiment à l'égard du Parlement canadien », même si vous n'êtes pas membre de mon parti, quand je m'écarterai de la scène publique.

Je tiens à dire cela. Je le veux vraiment, monsieur, mais donnez-moi une raison. Ne continuez pas de jouer ce jeu. C'est maintenant le temps d'arrêter et de commencer à agir comme des grandes personnes.

Merci, monsieur le président.

(1300)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Voulez-vous qu'il aille au mauvais endroit? Vous devriez corriger votre circonscription.

M. David Christopherson:

Oh, désolé, vous êtes encore plus près.

M. John Nater:

Je vous inviterais à prendre un café.

M. David Christopherson:

Mes excuses pour la confusion dans les circonscriptions.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pouvons-nous maintenant passer au vote?

Le président:

Il ne reste qu'une minute dans le temps prévu. Je vais laisser les derniers mots à M. Nater.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai aimé le discours de M. Christopherson. Vraiment. Je comprends ce qu'il veut dire.

Très rapidement, par rapport à son commentaire au sujet de l'heure, le projet de loi C-33 a été présenté à la Chambre le 24 novembre 2016, soit il y a presque 24 mois. Le gouvernement a eu le temps. Un mandat de quatre ans, c'est beaucoup de temps pour faire avancer un projet de loi. Or, nous voilà, littéralement au cours des 12 derniers mois ou encore moins, parce que lorsque nous ajournerons à la fin juin, nous aurons terminé jusqu'à l'élection. Nous siégeons littéralement pendant les huit à dix derniers mois et nous avons affaire à un projet de loi important.

C'est malheureux. C'est un gros projet de loi. Il comporte des choses que nous appuierons, ainsi que des défis que nous n'appuierons pas. Ce sont des collines sur lesquelles nous n'avons pas besoin de mourir. Nous le reconnaissons. Nous reconnaissons que c'est un projet de loi que le gouvernement a présenté et que vous êtes suffisamment nombreux pour le faire adopter.

Monsieur le président, c'est tout pour moi. Je ne connais pas le protocole, mais je m'en remets à vous.

M. David Christopherson:

J'invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président. C'est pour vous ou pour le greffier.

Lorsque nous rencontrerons la ministre plus tard au cours de l'après-midi, par consentement unanime, pourrions-nous tout de même présenter cette motion et l'adopter aujourd'hui?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, nous le ferons.

Le président:

Oui. La ministre est censée entamer l'étude article par article. C'était l'entente.

M. Scott Reid:

Je n'offre pas mon consentement par rapport à ce qu'on vient de décrire. On a dit: « Pouvons-nous convenir de nous rencontrer et d'aborder cette motion et de l'adopter aujourd'hui ». La dernière partie est de toute évidence problématique: « et de l'adopter aujourd'hui ».

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous pourrions procéder à un vote. Qu'en pensez-vous?

M. Scott Reid:

Nous sommes en train de parler d'une autre motion, donc nous ne pouvons pas soumettre celle-ci à un vote. Il n'y a pas d'objection pour revenir au sujet, mais nous ne nous entendons pas sur ce qui revient à...

Le président:

... l'adopter maintenant.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est exact.

M. John Nater:

Nous allons ajourner le débat et ramener la question immédiatement après la ministre. Est-ce...?

M. David Christopherson:

C'est ce que je suggérerais.

M. Scott Reid:

Sur le plan procédural, la chose la plus simple serait que le président... je ne sais pas si vous pouvez modifier cette réunion en cette date tardive, mais afficher un nouvel avis d'ordre du jour, pour une nouvelle...

M. David Christopherson:

Oui. Nous pouvons tenir une réunion indépendante distincte, fixer la réunion et la date. C'est ce que je cherchais à faire. Je savais que nous le pourrions. Je n'étais juste pas certain des formalités. Si nous obtenons le consentement unanime, nous pouvons faire pratiquement tout, sauf changer la Constitution.

M. Scott Reid:

Et même cela...

M. David Christopherson:

Pour cela, il faut l'unanimité.

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant suspendre nos travaux et nous poursuivrons la discussion à notre retour, à 15 h 30.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on September 27, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.