header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-09-27 PROC 120

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, and welcome to the 120th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you so much, Mr. Chair.

I'd like to thank the minister for being here, and I apologize for interrupting before we begin, but we did have an agreement with the Conservatives that the minister would appear prior to clause-by-clause proceeding. We have a motion before this committee that needs to be finalized. It needs to be voted on, and I think we should take a moment. It won't take long. We've debated it all week.

The Conservatives have been ragging the puck. It's like a bad episode from the movie Groundhog Day, time after time, delay after delay, to prevent clause-by-clause from starting. The Canadian people want to see us bring this forward.

The CEO of Elections Canada said that this is a good bill. He said it's not a perfect bill, so let's get to clause-by-clause and make this bill better.

We have a motion before the committee. I don't want to take up any more time, but I think we should vote on that bill and get clause-by-clause started, and have a date set for the beginning and the end, and then we can quickly proceed to questioning the minister.

The Chair:

We'd have to vote on the amendment first.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Sorry, Mr. Chair. Am I mistaken about this? I think, and I might be mistaken, that procedurally this is not the same meeting.

I'm not sure if Mr. Bittle is moving a new motion that we not hear from the minister but instead move to the motion that was before the committee, or perhaps he is moving that we withdraw that motion. Procedurally, I'm just not sure how it works.

This meeting was not called to deal with that issue, the issue of the motion. It was called to hear from the minister. There was a separate meeting this morning, which has adjourned, and we had a discussion at the committee about calling a new meeting following this one, at which the minister would appear, at which we would deal with Ms. Sahota's motion, to which Mr. Nater had made an amendment. It seems to me that it's procedurally out of order to simply assert that we should be on that now. Although, as I say, it may be procedurally acceptable for Mr. Bittle to move such a motion.

I will just editorially say it strikes me as being bad form to do that, at this time. That's just an editorial, but I would like my procedural question answered.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Can I get a ruling on the question, please? There's no sense in my arguing something that I may have already won depending on the ruling. If you don't mind, I'll wait.

The Chair:

Okay, the clerk tells me that Mr. Reid is somewhat in order, but Mr. Bittle could propose a motion that we move onto discussion of the other motion. It's not debatable, and if that passed then we would move onto the discussion he's having.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm good.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Then I propose we do that, followed by having the minister speak.

The Chair:

Okay.

All in favour?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Could we have a recorded vote on this one, Chair?

The Chair:

We'll have a recorded vote.

(Motion agreed to: yeas 6; nays 3)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, I believe I am correct in assuming that at this point we are once again back to discussing not the motion but the amendment to the motion.

The Chair: Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid: Okay.

Are we at a point in the proceedings where I could speak to the amendment to the motion? Am I right that the speaking order was established? I guess it's only a convention, a best practice, that we—

The Chair:

You're the only person on the list, so you can go ahead.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right, in fact the speaking order that we had is gone and we don't go back to it. I think that's right.

I'm just trying to work out what it is, that's all.

The Chair:

Go ahead.

(1540)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Look, Mr. Chair, it's unfortunate that we're in the middle of a procedural discussion that we all assumed would be suspended for an hour while we heard from the minister.

This is a strong-arm tactic to keep us.... I'm not sure whether the government's point is that they don't want the minister to speak, or whether they want to teach us a lesson: You don't get to hear from the minister unless you just collapse like a house of cards. This is actually an offensive tactic.

If we have to, we can talk for some length of time and we can reschedule the minister's appointment.

I'm just going to take a moment to get out Ms. Sahota's motion, and I'm going to make a suggestion here. We're, of course, discussing the amendment to Ms. Sahota's motion.

Mr. David Christopherson:

On a point of order, Mr. Chair, could I, with respect, ask Mr. Reid if he would accept a Simms protocol question?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Of course.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Do you have any interest, and would it be helpful, if we agreed to flip the discussion, assuming that we're all wanting to do this? That's my assumption. We'll see.

Do we maybe want to hear from the minister, spend that time—because you rightly point out we could lose that—and flip this discussion to the hour after the minister is done?

I see some government members shaking their heads. You're going to have to give me a good reason why that's not a good idea, or I'm going to have to be concerned that Mr. Reid has a valid point and that you're playing some kind of game.

I don't think so. I didn't see it that way. I was part of agreeing to this, but I'm just offering this up because I think a valid point is being made. We could accomplish both by hearing from the minister now and then upon that adjournment, agreeing to spend another half-hour or hour to get that motion passed so that we can get on to the work.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm willing if we stick with the whole Simms protocol idea.

I don't know if the minister is familiar with the Simms protocol, but it was a good idea developed by Mr. Simms on a previous occasion.

I won't dwell on it but the question is, under the Simms protocol, can we get some feedback from the Liberals, without my ceding the floor, as to how they would feel about what Mr. Christopherson is suggesting?

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Mr. Christopherson, I understand where you're coming from, but where we're coming from is not from a place of wanting to delay this anymore. It's coming from a place of wanting to move forward.

We've been debating this motion, to begin clause-by-clause essentially, for some time—two full meetings. We could continue to do this after the minister speaks, but I'm afraid that we could continue to do this for several more meetings without ever getting to a point where we actually begin clause-by-clause on this legislation, which both you and I agree is so important to democracy and to Canadians.

That's why I really feel it's necessary to get to the vote on the motion. You weren't here one day when Nathan was filling in for you, but there was a handshake agreement made at that point, basically to get the minister to agree to come, so that immediately after we would start into clause-by-clause. However, there have been no reassurances given at all that there's any intention on the other side to begin studying the actual legislation.

At this point it seems like we keep bringing witnesses forward and keep bowing down to every demand that the Conservatives make. We've been very lenient and flexible, but we're not seeing it reciprocated. We're waiting and looking for an indication that clause-by-clause will begin.

Mr. David Christopherson:

May I ask one more question to Mr. Reid?

If we proceed the way we are right now, I could be wrong but my hunch is that the official opposition is not quite finished doing their talking. I understand what the government is doing. I think Mr. Reid is probably accurate, that you're using this as a bit of pressure to leverage the government to make a vote, but I don't think it's going to work.

I think what we're going to end up with is an hour-long discussion that eats up the time with the minister. We may or may not get the minister back. I suspect that's going to be difficult, thinking of the politics of this. I appreciate Ms. Sahota's response. That helps. I understand why you reacted the way you did.

My question to Mr. Reid would be, can we reasonably expect that we could come to a vote on the motion and amendment that we have been spending a great deal of time on? Can we have some assurance—if we heard from the minister, given a certain period of time, whether that's a half-hour, an hour, or whatever—of how much more you have to say?

I'm done talking on the motion and the amendment, and I suspect that the government is done. What we're looking at now is the official opposition. The question for us is, do you have legitimate concerns that you need a certain period of time to finish, or should we have good reason to suspect that all the official opposition is going to do is continue to delay thereby making it that much more difficult to get the bill passed?

It's a matter of trust here. I hear what the government is saying.

Mr. Reid, I think it's fair to say that we'd like to hear some assurance that we're not just setting this up so that you can filibuster, we don't hear from the minister, we don't get the vote and we just lose, lose, lose.

Again, if we are all trying to find a way through this together procedurally, it would be very helpful, sir, if you could give us a sense of what your intent would be vis-à-vis the time you would want, and when we could expect that we would actually have a vote.

(1545)

Mr. Scott Reid:

As you're aware, I'm no longer the shadow minister, as we call them now. I am just a foot soldier. That's actually a question that is best directed towards my colleague, who is just having some discussions right now.

While she gets prepared to answer to you, I will let the committee know that I propose the following regarding Ms. Sahota's motion. I won't read the whole thing, but it reads “That the Committee do not commence clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-76”....

I'm sorry. I'm reading it as amended by Mr. Nater, if you follow. As amended by Mr. Nater, it would read, “That the Committee do not commence clause-by-clause consideration of Bill C-76 before the Committee has heard from the Chief Electoral Officer of Ontario”.

I propose a subamendment, which states the following, “nor until the committee has heard from the Minister of Democratic Institutions for not less than 60 minutes”.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Why not flip that and say we will begin clause-by-clause after we've heard from so-and-so? That would be assurance. What you're doing is not assuring at all.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

If I may, the minister is more than willing to be here for 60 minutes and we're hearing from the Chief Electoral Officer from the Province of Ontario on Tuesday, so why are we still talking about this?

If we stopped talking, we could proceed. The minister is eager to answer questions, and if it's a matter of timing with the minister, I know we'd be willing to give up our slots so that the opposition is assured of the equivalent of what they had to get this over and done with.

It's just a matter of stopping talking. We've been discussing this. All of the parties positions have been on the record. You guys have eaten up the bulk of the debate talking about mostly nothing.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Be specific when you say, “You guys”.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Sorry, Mr. Christopherson, it's the Conservative Party. Thank you for the clarification.

It's time to move on.

Thank you.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm being told, “Be silent”. That's what we just heard from the parliamentary secretary: “Be silent or you don't get to get the minister.” That is genuinely offensive. Give up the only tools the opposition has at its disposal or they will withhold the minister.

This member, for all his self-righteousness, has now taken us 20 minutes into the hour we were supposed to get with the minister.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I've spoken for two minutes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

No, you're right.

Chris, we'll do whatever the hell you want. We'll just cave. We'll just collapse like a house of cards under your cheap trick—

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Just say it's a filibuster.

Mr. Scott Reid:

—which was announced without any warning. You're right. We'd be [Inaudible—Editor] asking the minister.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

A filibuster isn't a cheap trick...?

Mr. Scott Reid:

We have no sense of self-respect and, frankly, I'm just appalled at the fact that you would do this.

Now, I realize you didn't do it. You were told to do it—

Mr. Chris Bittle:

You're not told to continue to filibuster.

Mr. Scott Reid:

—but that doesn't change the fact that it's a cheap, cheesy trick.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

When's the filibuster going to end, Scott?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

He doesn't care. He's just a foot soldier.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Just a good soldier?

We can throw insults back and forth if you like.

(1550)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Man, you are the master of the insults in this committee.

Nobody holds a candle to you, Chris. My hat is off to you for your impressive [Inaudible—Editor].

The Chair:

Okay, guys. Let's bring some decorum back to this meeting.

Mr. Reid, you have the floor. We're on the amendment.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, thank you.

Apparently—thanks to this tactic from the Liberals—we won't be hearing from the minister. I apologize to the minister that she is forced to sit here while this is all going on.

I've been at meetings before where we've had the Chief Electoral Officer just sitting through this kind of thing. I can't even remember who was in government at that time.

Look, 20 minutes into what was supposed to be an hour from the minister, we are instead debating whether we are allowed to debate, whether we are allowed to seek amendments and whether we are simply to do as we are told, to be silent.

That's why I worded it as I did. Obviously, I wrote this on the spot: that we do not commence clause-by-clause consideration before the committee has heard from the Ontario CEO—which was the amendment to the initial motion—nor until the committee has heard from the Minister for Democratic Institutions for not less than one hour, which is to say getting the 40 minutes back, or the 30 minutes or whatever it is. That's not going to be acceptable. This is just a reasonable request, a problem that would not have arisen if the Liberals had not decided to pull this stunt right now.

The Chair: This is a seven-minute intervention.

Mr. Scott Reid: All right. Thank you very much.

I will stop there. I understand there's a list, and perhaps there'll be some Liberals who will be in a position to comment on that. As things stand now, the fastest resolution is for the Liberals to just drop their insistence that we debate this. We will be happy to suspend the debate, and we would hopefully be in a position to allow the minister to stay on a few minutes beyond her originally intended exit time.

The Chair:

Okay.

Now we've just proposed a subamendment that adds to the amendment, “nor until the Committee has heard from the Minister of Democratic Institutions for no less than one hour”.

I'll start a new list on the subamendment.

We'll have Mr. Nater, and then Ruby.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

Unless Ms. Sahota has something that would allow us to come to a conclusion on this, I'm willing to exercise the Simms protocol to allow her to speak first, provided that I am next on the list.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'll keep it shorter than I have in the last couple of meetings.

I do want to say officially what I was trying to interject and say earlier, which I probably shouldn't have done, but what's the logical next step?

I feel your subamendment to the amendment to the motion is a very negative one. It doesn't give the government any assurances that we'll move on to the next logical step after hearing from the minister or after hearing from the Ontario Chief Electoral Officer.

We've heard from—what is it again?—53 witnesses for this study, which we began on May 23. Numerous amendments have been proposed by all the parties. We have exhausted our witness list. You guys don't seem to be proposing any other ideas at this point that are going to improve this legislation, so it is just stall tactic after stall tactic. What is the next step?

We can hear from the minister. We've already scheduled the Ontario Chief Electoral Officer. The federal Chief Electoral Officer has been here four times, not including the report from the 2015 election that we went through with him, where he had 130 recommendations. I don't even know how many meetings we spent on that. We spent a chunk of this year on that.

We've done all that work. What is the next step? I want to hear a proposal from the other side, and I'd like the subamendment to be made positive so that, after hearing from the minister and after hearing from the witness we have on Tuesday, we are going to move into clause-by-clause. If we're not, then what next?

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'm eager to hear from the minister. The minister was scheduled to be here from 3:30 to 4:30. I would suggest that we table this motion for now. It would put this aside until we hear from the minister. What the minister tells us, I don't know. She doesn't share her speaking notes with me yet, but I'm sure she has a lot of insight that she's going to share with us.

We may be able to move forward on this in short order if we hear from the minister and then deal with this motion following her appearance in the next 34 minutes. If the government members are willing to table this motion until 4:31, we can come back to this motion and deal with it then.

I would move the debate be adjourned now, and I would be more than happy to begin this discussion again at 4:31 after we've heard from the minister.

(1555)

The Chair:

It's non-debatable, non-amendable, so we have to have a vote on whether to adjourn the debate. Does everyone understand the situation?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, let's have a recorded vote.

(Motion negatived: nays 6; yeas 3)

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'd like to be put back on the speakers list, please.

The Chair:

The debate is not adjourned.

We'll go on to the next speaker.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I have a question at this stage.

Mr. Nater, you were willing to move a motion that would have us pick up this discussion after, which is not unlike what we asked for earlier. I'm giving you all the room to talk as long as you want, but would you agree that once we entertain that debate, we don't rise from this meeting until we vote?

That way, if you want to filibuster for the next 10 hours, you can go for it. Nobody's being denied the right to speak and at the end of the day, the majority of the committee, which constitutes two out of the three parties here, get what we want, which is a vote.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have a point of order, Mr. Chair.

We're 30 minutes in. If we can inquire of the minister if she's in a position to stay an extra half-hour with us.... I don't want to force her to stay. If we don't come to any agreement at the end of that half-hour, but we have her here. We've already lost half her time doing this stuff. If things work out, we could have our hour of questions with her. I think that's a germane question.

Hon. Karina Gould (Minister of Democratic Institutions):

Yes, I'm always willing to come when the committee wants to hear from me.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay, thank you.

The Chair:

We're at Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay. That's fine.

Mr. Reid, you got the answer. I think it was a helpful answer. I certainly appreciate the minister's flexibility to help us do this as peacefully as we can but still get it done, so I come back to you, sir. Are you and your team open to the idea that we will return to this debate after we've heard one full hour from the minister, who has now graciously agreed to massage her schedule to allow all of us to have a full hour.

Do you agree that we will begin this discussion at the end of that hour and that this committee meeting will not end until we have a vote and that you will have all the time, hours, days, weeks, whatever you want, but at the end of you folks saying what you want to say, we get a vote? Do you agree with that?

Mr. Scott Reid:

First of all to be clear, the thought that I want days, hours, or God help us, weeks of sitting here debating this subamendment or anything else with this motion, trust me, that is not what I want.

I think you probably believe my sincere point.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I do believe that, but I'm more interested in hearing whether we're going to get a vote or whether you guys are going to drag this out and we're going to have to use the heavy hand of going back to the House and getting an order to hear, which I will be prepared to support if necessary. I'd much rather do this nice and friendly and give you the opportunity to take all the time you need to make all the points you feel you wish to.

(1600)

Mr. Scott Reid:

The brief answer, and it's also sincere, is that's actually not in my power. I don't have the power to say what.... How do you say you're willing to rise regardless, unless you say you're willing to concede everything on this? I'm trying to think of a way of answering you without—

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, you're trying to think of a way out of it because what you're trying to do is delay this and you're running out of runway. This game is over. Let's get this done, sir.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I understand why you'd say that, but that's actually not what I'm trying to do. What I'm trying to express is that.... I'm involved in similar negotiations right now with a local township, and it's the same sort of thing as well: “You must come to an agreement by this time, full stop, and if you don't come to an agreement by that time, then we just get our way.” I don't find that a very attractive position to be in, and essentially it's just a unilateral concession of surrender. At that level, the answer—

Mr. David Christopherson:

How so? You have all the time you want to say what you want. How is that surrender? You're going to lose the vote. You know that. The question is, how long are you going to avoid our having the right to vote?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I guess we can find out.

Mr. David Christopherson:

There are judges out there. They're called the public. This is a public meeting, and they're going to understand very clearly who's doing what and why.

The Chair:

David—

Mr. Scott Reid:

That is 100% true.

The Chair:

—just give Mr. Reid a chance to—

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, you're right.

The Chair:

—get more debate.

I have a question for you. The last time we were in such a situation where there was unlimited time, it went for weeks if not months.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, but I was wasn't part of that. Ninety per cent of that's gone if I shut up.

The Chair:

I don't think you should underestimate Mr. Nater and Mr. Reid and their expertise in that skill.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Give them a chance.

The Chair:

Are you proposing unlimited weeks and months of discussion?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Quite frankly, they have that right anyway. Once they take the floor they can filibuster. The difference is that we would agree not to adjourn and to continue with the meeting until such time as we have concluded everybody's remarks, which would allow us to continue to begin the work.

Remember, for anybody paying attention, all of this is about whether or not we start working. Work is when we look at the bill clause by clause. The government has put forward a bill that it, the Chief Electoral Officer and the NDP support, and that the former government members don't—the official opposition. That's fine. I want to make sure they have a right to say what they want. They say that's all they want and they don't want to have their right to speak extinguished. That's fair enough.

I'm offering them that opportunity, and all I'm asking is whether they will give us the assurance that once they're finished their comments that this meeting will still be in order, at which time we can vote. Then we can actually start the work. This isn't the work. This is preparing for the work. The work is the clause-by-clause. Let's get to it. I'm just trying to find a way.

Here's my concern, Mr. Reid. I don't play a lot of games. I'm not smart enough. I put things on the table because that's the only way I can be. I'm passionate about this file. If you have legitimate concerns, I want to hear them, but I also want to get to the point where we vote. What it's looking like to me, with great respect, is that you're dragging your heels and doing your best to slow things down.

I understand that tactic. Sometimes I can master it, but let's call it what it is and not keep pretending that this is about the rights of the official opposition members, because the fly in that ointment is me. If anybody is going to stand up and scream about a majority government ramming through changes to the electoral process.... Let's see. Do we have any history we can call back on as to what I might do if a majority government attempted that kind of thing? I think we can.

We're onside with this, so if you're not filibustering just to delay, then please offer a path or road map that protects the rights you want but let's us do the work we want. All we ask for, nicely to start, is a vote. All we want is a vote on the motion so that this debate ends at some point.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Let us vote so Canadians can vote. That's what I would say.

(1605)

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

First of all, I do not doubt that—

The Chair:

Mr. Reid, you happen to be next on the list.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Am I not on the list anymore?

The Chair:

Yes, you are now. It's you now. It was Mr. Christopherson on the list on the subamendment. Now you're—

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

You haven't officially ceded the floor yet.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Do you want me to hold the floor so you can do a Simms? Okay, I select the floor.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I want you to hold it just for a point of clarification so I can figure this out. You're asking that we go forward with a round with the minister. By round I mean an hour. Following that, we need to have a vote on his amendment.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's close. I was just saying we would all acknowledge that they're going to take whatever time they want to finish putting their remarks on the public record in front of the cameras, but the agreement here would be that this meeting doesn't adjourn. Do you remember the stunts the previous government pulled? They've used it before. There are ways you can keep a meeting going, and that is that the majority refuses to adjourn, so the meeting can keep going.

My point is that we would hear the one hour, move back to this motion, and stay in this meeting until such time as the speakers list is exhausted, which would be only Conservatives. I'm just seeking from them, do they agree that's fair? They'll be given all the time they want to speak after the minister, but we all agree that this meeting will not conclude formally until we've voted.

That may mean some of us having to stay around for a while. This is difficult on us and I'm asking a lot, but if there's a way to do this peacefully, that's best. I want to make sure we've exhausted every opportunity because Mr. Reid is one the most honourable members of this House, in my opinion. That doesn't mean he won't play political games, as I will when necessary and called upon, but in fairness and out of respect, if there are important things they want to say, let them say it, but when they're done let us have the vote we want.

I'm not even saying you're on side. I was putting it out there as a possible way that we could do that peacefully, because if we don't do this peacefully and if we can't get to clause-by-clause, I don't see how the government has any other choice except to go back to the House and get an order from the House, which we don't like to do. If necessary, given the importance of this bill in taking out the ugliness that's in there from the unfair elections act, I will stand in that chamber and support a motion that orders the House to start clause-by-clause. I don't want to do that any more than anybody else, so if my idea won't work—and that's fine, I don't say I have great ideas—somebody else put another idea on the floor.

There's one of two ways this gets done. We're all in agreement as to the process and then it unfolds that way, or we go to the House and they issue an order. But letting this not pass is not an option.

The Chair:

David would like to go on the Simms protocol.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, sir.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I wanted to let you get to your stopping point, but that's fine.

David, we had a commitment from them that we would have a date set on Tuesday, so why would their word be good today? Even if they agree to what you're suggesting, why should we take their word for it since they broke their word on Tuesday?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Because we would then be into an extraordinary situation whereby the House could be sitting at eight or nine o'clock tonight, midnight. For them to suddenly change gears after that, I suppose they could but—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You're getting more and more surrounded by Conservatives. I'm not sure they're ready to change gears.

Mr. David Christopherson:

This time, unlike the last Parliament, we get to do a lot of this stuff publicly. There is a judge out there. We have a chance to explain what's going on. You may be right, but, boy, do they really want to go down that road?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

They sure seem to.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm not so sure because this is all out in the open now. You can pull off that stuff a lot more easily when nobody is looking and nobody cares. It's moved now. This is now a big deal. I hear what you're saying. I think if we structure this the right way politically they shouldn't be able to do that even if structurally, legally, they could.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle, would like to speak on the Simms protocol.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

On the Simms protocol, very briefly, in terms of Mr. Christopherson's motion, I agree we want to get this done peacefully, but it still exists. They can continue to speak as long as they want. The minister has said she will testify whenever. We need to get this done. I agree with Mr. Graham that we've been playing this game now for months. I know Mr. Cullen has been here for most of the time during witnesses and during testimony and we're told one thing and then another thing happens.

We just want some finality to this. We want a date. We want a start and we want a finish. We want to get this done and bring this back to the House. I know the Conservatives believe it's far from a perfect bill. It's time to bring the amendments forward and it's time for them to put forward to the judges who are out there and say the reason why the government legislation is flawed and present their proposal to fix it. Now's the time to set that date because we have to move this forward.

(1610)

Mr. David Christopherson:

I hear you, Mr. Bittle, but here's how I'm looking at it—and I could be wrong. I'm looking at this politically and thinking that if this committee is still sitting two days from now around the clock, it'll have some 'splainin' to do. I don't think the Conservative position right now is tenable with the public, especially if we're willing to give them all the time in the world to say what they want. If they decide that they're going to try to make this a repeat of what we did with Bill C-23, they're missing one thing: The angels aren't on their side.

If they want to be seen defending keeping this committee and all its operations going for 24 hours a day, day after day, to stop us from voting, I have a hunch there are going to be a few people out in the public who are not going to be buying that argument. That's my bet. My political bet is that they can't sustain that. The reason we were able to sustain it with Bill C-23 was that we were on the side of the angels. What they were doing was so wrong, and the public knew it. When we went out to the public, my office was getting emails and texts saying, “Go get 'em.”

How many do you think they're going get for doing nothing but preventing us from voting? My political calculation is that we can withstand that better than they can.

The Chair:

The second speaker on the subamendment is Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Let me start by going back to something. I thought I was going to take the floor a while ago.

Mr. Christopherson just said that he's very passionate about this, that he doesn't play games and that he's not smart enough to play games. Two out of those three statements are true. He is very passionate. He doesn't play games, or at least not mind games or things that involve being dishonest. But as for the “I'm not smart enough” part, that is emphatically not true. Now that he's re-entering the private sector, it's time to stop saying bad things about his own intelligence. He should reflect in his comments the fact that he's smart.

Mr. David Christopherson:

What's your experience doing job interviews?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I don't know the details, but I'm just looking out for my friend.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I appreciate that, sir. You don't mind if I put belts and suspenders on too, though, do you?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I do not.

At this point, the subamendment that I put forward, when I put it forward, was meant simply to say that we should be doing what we actually had agreed to do, which was to have the minister first, and then go on. I had made the assumption that the chair would do what we had discussed just before one o'clock when we said that the chair could call a meeting afterwards, immediately afterwards if he saw fit, to move on to discussing Ms. Sahota's motion. Of course the end time of that—and we are all familiar with that in this committee—is as late as we want it to be or as early as we want it to be. That was the initial idea.

However, it's now 4:14 according to my watch, or my iPhone, and we've actually used up almost all of the time the minister originally had available. Now she has said that she's here for at least another half-hour. But to be fair to the minister, she's indicated that she could be here, if we asked her, until five. Who knows? Maybe it will go later than that, but we're actually getting to the point of the hour now where the minister changes. We've used up the time, or have come close to it, and now there's a reasonable expectation that we will actually add this in.

A sleight of hand on the part—and don't get me wrong; it was not procedurally invalid, but it was a change from what we had all thought was going to happen—of Mr. Bittle has caused this to occur. That's what I said in my initial response. I was angrier than I am wont to be, but I do get annoyed, angry, from time to time, as we all remember from the spring of 2017.

Now I've lost my train of thought. I was so busy reliving that moment.

This has happened because the government side has engineered this circumstance.

I remember now what I was going to say. Frankly, at this point, I'm just doing this out of a sense of self-respect. If I can be rolled over that easily, then how am I going to go home and look at myself in the mirror, for God's sake?

(1615)

Mr. David Christopherson:

You can do better than that. You're going to have to.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I actually can't do better than that. Perhaps someone more eloquent than me could do better than that.

I don't know why they did this. We'd be in the same position if we had heard from the minister, who is the most eloquent person they have on this subject. She's really well spoken, she knows her file, she has coherent things to say and she has always done a really effective job of articulating the government's position. It would be at exactly the same point procedurally, so I don't get why we didn't just move on to the discussion after, as opposed to before her presentation. I really don't get it.

Now we're in that position, I am prepared to speak to it and just say that this is actually a really reasonable subamendment. Everybody is familiar with the staff handing you amendments or subamendments that are meant to just keep the ball rolling, but in this case, this is the reasonable thing to ask for.

Ultimately, the government has this goal. It wants to get its legislation through this House by.... We would start clause-by-clause consideration of anything that's left at 1:00 p.m. on October 16. Even if we hadn't discussed any clauses at that point, the motion contemplates that we're done and it's out of here a few hours after that, so by the end of the day on October 16.

That's what the government is after. Everything else here is secondary. If that's the government's goal.... It's a complicated bill. Everybody concedes that. The minister has referred to it as generational change. I don't think that just means we're catching up on a generation of having neglected things. I think they mean this is meant to be change that will be here for a generation, until the minister's baby boy is able to vote and maybe even take a seat here.

It's a bill that the government has gone back on and made adjustments to. They have amendments of their own they've put in because they recognized their first draft was imperfect in a couple of ways. That's just what happens with large bills, so it doesn't make this bill stand out from the crowd of large bills, as these things go.

All we're looking for, in an environment where we are the minority—the government has more than half the votes and can do whatever it wants—is something that amounts to a guarantee that some of the amendments we're putting forward will actually get through. Now we are saying we want the government to express a willingness to us, in whatever way they want, to consider some of our amendments. There are no secrets here. Our amendments are already filed.

If we just agree to this, what happens is that we're not going to get any agreement on any of those amendments. We want their word.

By the way, speaking of people breaking their word and so on, I just want to say that what I'm doing here is indicating that we believe when the minister and the House leader give their word behind closed doors, it means something. We actually think they are honourable people, not just in the pro forma sense as when we talk of “my honourable colleague” or “the honourable minister”, but in the meaningful sense, the real sense. That's what we're after, and if we have to talk a fair length of time in order to obtain it—if we have to filibuster in order to obtain that—that's what we're after. It's not hard to understand. After this, they can push on and get the legislation by the proposed due date.

I've been clear in my previous remarks on this that the subsidiary components of Ruby's original motion are entirely reasonable: “That the Chair be empowered to hold meetings outside of normal hours to accommodate clause-by-clause consideration”. That is a very reasonable thing to do with a large bill when you're looking at a deadline that's really only two weeks out, and one of those is a break week.

(1620)



As for “That the Chair may limit debate on each clause to a maximum of five minutes”, I thought that was well worded too, in that it says “may” limit debate, not “must” limit debate. It's reasonable. That five-minute number is essentially reasonable. You can make a coherent argument on any point.

Also, if there's a genuine willingness to look at things.... For example, if there is an opposition amendment on a section or a clause where the government has indicated this—I'm not on the side that's administering anymore, but to the best of my knowledge they have not indicated this—or the government is willing to give its word that it will look at it, including, I need to be clear, not necessarily the wording we put out in our amendment but an adjusted wording to whatever amendment we propose.... On those ones, it would take more than five minutes, but there's flexibility for the chair. That's reasonable too.

I'm not even disputing the October 16 deadline, particularly given what we've heard from the Chief Electoral Officer, who is being extraordinarily helpful to us in laying out which things he can achieve and which things he can't achieve based upon a projected timeline in which the election still occurs in October 2019 as scheduled. The bill gets through the House and then the Senate and royal assent at some point in 2018.

All of these things are reasonable, but the one thing we have, the one tool at our disposal as an opposition party, is the ability to slow things down until we know that our amendments are being looked at. Look, we're not the government. We're not saying that all our amendments.... We're saying that we have some that are practical, businesslike ways of making this legislation better than the draft that is currently before the House. This would not be on the things that are the landmark issues of Bill C-23 from the last Parliament as opposed to this one, but on some really good practical ideas. That's all we're looking at. That's all we're asking for.

I'm glad I'm able to make this pitch while the minister is here. That discussion, which has to happen outside this chamber, is what we're after. That's how we would obtain it. I'm hopeful that we can get to that point.

I'm also hopeful that we can do it without me continuing to talk. I'll just find out if anybody else is on the speakers list, because I'm reluctant to surrender the floor if I know that there isn't someone else there.

The Chair:

That's a good point.

We have six minutes left. On the list on the subamendment after you, are Mr. Nater and then Mr. Graham.

Mr. Scott Reid:

All right. I will stop with that point. I really did want to make that point very strongly.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Chair.

Again, it's nice to have the minister here. I know that she was ready to provide her commentary and testimony and respond to questions. I still think it's unfortunate that we're not having that testimony and that discussion, because I truly was hoping—hope springs eternal—that that the minister would have been able to give us some indication in her comments about the direction she feels or sees that this legislation could take in terms of the amendments and the clause-by-clause.

It's pretty easy for us right here in the opposition, the three of us, to see that we are not going to get absolutely everything we want. We may not even get a majority of the things we want. We may get one or two clauses that we think are important.

(1625)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

We're in a minority.

Mr. John Nater:

Yes, we're in a minority.

We would hope that there could be some give-and-take, some discussion, and some willingness to have a discussion and have an agreement on certain important matters that we see within this bill. It's not a short bill. It's 246 pages long. There are 103 pages of explanatory notes. It's complicated. Clause-by-clause is important, and it will take some time. The proposal for limits on the discussion comes with the territory, and I acknowledge that.

I have to go back.... I'm not going to dwell on this. I'm just going to make the point. On the comment from Mr. Bittle of the Liberals that we should just stop talking, if that's the official PMO talking point, I think that's disappointing. I think that's too bad. Each of us has the right to make our views known, to make our comments and put them on the table.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I'm sure we shouldn't assume that part. That wouldn't be right.

Mr. John Nater:

No, we should not assume that, but I do think it's important. We're sent here and the voters will judge us, as Mr. Christopherson rightly pointed out. During the filibuster during the Standing Orders change, I quoted from the Anglican Book of Common Prayer to make the point that you don't enter into one of these things lightly. I was quoting from the marriage part of the Anglican Book of Common Prayer. You don't enter into a debate like this lightly. There are consequences.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I'm Anglican too. I didn't know you were.

Mr. John Nater:

I'm not Anglican. I'm Lutheran. I know random things, but a political scientist likened it to the Anglican Book of Common Prayer. I couldn't tell you who that was. I would have to go back to my notes to double-check that. I want to say first and foremost that we've missed the opportunity. The minister is here for another three minutes, and we've missed that opportunity. I think that's unfortunate.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You missed that opportunity.

Mr. John Nater:

We did miss that opportunity, absolutely, David. Our opposition missed that opportunity. Mr. Christopherson's party missed that opportunity. The government missed that opportunity. We as a committee missed that opportunity because this motion was brought forward at the beginning of the meeting. It was the right of the government to bring forward that motion, and that happened. We can't change that now.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: [Inaudible—Editor] two days ago.

Mr. John Nater: I do appreciate that I have the floor, Mr. Graham. If you want a Simms protocol, I'm always happy to yield the floor for a Simms protocol. The fact is that the minister has indicated she's willing to come back. I will take her at her word on that.

I have a great deal of respect for many Liberals, many on this committee and many who no longer sit in the House. One of those people I have a great deal of respect for is Stéphane Dion. Monsieur Dion said this: This bill comes after a long wait. It took the government two long years to introduce this bill, as though it cost the government a great deal to do so. This long wait was then followed by a suspicious haste to rush the bill through, to speed up the parliamentary process, as though the government had something to hide. It wants to rush through a 252-page bill that has to do with electoral democracy.

It's interesting that Mr. Dion said this during the debate on Bill C-23 because this is what happened with Bill C-33 tabled in November 2016, which was left unmoved, unloved on the Order Paper, and has never been debated at second reading. Then on April 30, towards the end of the spring sitting of Parliament, Bill C-76 is tabled. It is tabled, I would suggest, with some deal of haste, as Mr. Dion suggested with Bill C-23, and here we are. Here we are facing a guillotine motion with a hard end date. That's the right of the government to do so. That's the right of the committee to agree.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's a pretty severe term, “guillotine”.

Mr. John Nater:

I would say it's a parliamentary term, a guillotine motion.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It sounds so severe.

Mr. John Nater:

It does sound so severe, a closure motion, an end-date motion. It's a motion that has a set end date whereby this shall be debated and sent back to the House. Again, it's not that we're not willing to agree to the motion. If there's an indication from the government that they are willing to acknowledge some of our amendments to have that discussion, to have that commitment on the record that they are willing to entertain certain of our amendments, I would be happy to further this conversation. Unfortunately, I don't think we're there at this point.

Mr. Chair, I see that you're signalling me.

(1630)

The Chair:

The hour is up. Is it the will of the committee? We have a motion of adjournment on the floor. It's not debatable.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's not debatable. I can't debate this, but I think we should keep with the recorded votes.

(Motion agreed to: yeas 5; nays 4)

The Chair:

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour, et bienvenue à la 120e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je tiens à remercier la ministre de sa présence, et je m'excuse de vous interrompre avant que nous commencions, mais nous avions avec les conservateurs une entente selon laquelle la ministre allait comparaître avant l'étude article par article. Nous avons proposé une motion au Comité qu'il faut finaliser. Il faut la mettre aux voix, et je pense que nous devrions consacrer un moment à cela. Ce ne sera pas long. Nous en avons discuté toute la semaine.

Les conservateurs ne font qu'étirer le temps. C'est comme une mauvaise version du jour de la marmotte, jour après jour, retard après retard, le but étant de nous empêcher d'entreprendre l'étude article par article. Les Canadiens veulent que nous adoptions cela.

Le directeur général des élections a dit que c'est un bon projet de loi. Il a dit qu'il n'est pas parfait, alors faisons l'étude article par article pour l'améliorer.

Nous avons déposé une motion devant le Comité. Je ne veux pas prendre plus de temps, mais je pense que nous devrions mettre ce projet de loi aux voix et lancer l'étude article par article, et fixer une date pour le début et la fin, après quoi nous pourrons rapidement nous tourner vers la ministre.

Le président:

Il faudrait mettre l'amendement aux voix pour commencer.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Désolé, monsieur le président. Est-ce que je me trompe? Je me trompe peut-être, mais je pense que sur le plan de la procédure, ce n'est pas la même réunion.

Je ne sais pas trop si M. Bittle propose une nouvelle motion voulant que nous n'entendions pas la ministre et que nous adoptions plutôt la motion qui a été déposée devant le Comité, ou peut-être qu'il propose que nous retirions la motion. Sur le plan de la procédure, je ne sais vraiment pas comment cela fonctionne.

Cette réunion n'a pas été convoquée pour cette question, celle de la motion. Elle a été convoquée pour la comparution de la ministre. Il y a eu une réunion distincte ce matin, qui a été levée, et pendant laquelle nous avons parlé de convoquer une nouvelle réunion après celle-ci pour inviter la ministre à comparaître et pour traiter de la motion de Mme Sahota à laquelle M. Nater a proposé un amendement. J'ai l'impression qu'affirmer simplement que nous devrions nous consacrer à cela maintenant est irrecevable. Mais comme je l'ai dit, proposer une motion comme M. Bittle le fait est peut-être recevable.

Je vais simplement dire que, d'après moi, cela ne me semble pas la façon correcte de faire les choses, en ce moment. C'est mon opinion, mais j'aimerais obtenir une réponse à ma question de procédure.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Puis-je obtenir une décision sur cette question, je vous prie? Il est inutile que je discute d'une chose pour laquelle j'ai déjà raison, dépendant de la décision. Si cela ne vous dérange pas, j'attends la décision.

Le président:

D'accord. Le greffier me dit que M. Reid a raison dans une certaine mesure, mais que M. Bittle peut proposer une motion voulant que nous discutions de l'autre motion. La motion n'est pas sujette à débat, et si elle est adoptée, nous tiendrions la discussion qu'il veut.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est bon.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je propose donc que nous fassions cela et que nous entendions la ministre ensuite.

Le président:

D'accord.

Ceux qui sont pour?

M. Scott Reid:

Pouvons-nous tenir un vote nominal sur cette question, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Nous allons tenir un vote nominal.

(La motion est adoptée par 6 voix contre 3.)

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, je crois avoir raison de dire que ce que nous faisons maintenant, c'est discuter de l'amendement à la motion et non de la motion elle-même.

Le président: Oui.

M. Scott Reid: D'accord.

En sommes-nous au point de la procédure où je peux parler de l'amendement à la motion? Ai-je raison de dire que l'ordre des intervenants a été établi? Je pense bien que ce n'est qu'une convention, une meilleure pratique, de...

Le président:

Vous êtes la seule personne sur la liste, alors vous pouvez y aller.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui. En fait, la liste des intervenants que nous avions n'est plus, et nous n'y revenons pas. Je crois que c'est ainsi.

J'essaie juste de déterminer comment cela fonctionne. C'est tout.

Le président:

Allez-y.

(1540)

M. Scott Reid:

Écoutez, monsieur le président, il est malheureux que nous tenions une discussion d'ordre procédural alors que nous étions tous sûrs de la suspendre pour une heure afin d'entendre la ministre.

C'est une tactique d'intimidation qui vise à nous... Je ne sais pas si ce que veut le gouvernement, c'est que la ministre ne parle pas. Il cherche peut-être à nous donner une leçon. Vous n'entendrez pas la ministre à moins que vous vous écrouliez comme un château de cartes. C'est en fait une tactique insultante.

Si nous devons le faire, nous pouvons parler longtemps et remettre la comparution de la ministre à plus tard.

Je vais juste prendre un moment pour traiter de la motion de Mme Sahota, et je vais faire une suggestion. Bien sûr, nous discutons de l'amendement à la motion de Mme Sahota.

M. David Christopherson:

J'invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président. Puis-je demander, avec respect, à M. Reid s'il accepterait une question relevant du protocole Simms?

M. Scott Reid:

Bien sûr.

M. David Christopherson:

Accepteriez-vous, et serait-ce utile, que nous fassions la discussion après, à condition que nous soyons tous prêts à le faire? C'est ce dont je présume. Nous verrons.

Voulons-nous entendre la ministre, consacrer ce temps — car vous avez raison de dire que nous pourrions perdre cette occasion —, puis tenir cette discussion pendant une heure, après que la ministre aura terminé?

Je vois des députés du gouvernement qui secouent la tête. Vous allez devoir me donner une bonne raison pour dire que ce n'est pas une bonne idée. Sinon, je vais devoir m'inquiéter de ce que M. Reid a raison et que vous jouez à de petits jeux.

Je ne le pense pas. Ce n'est pas ainsi que j'ai perçu cela. Je faisais partie de ceux qui ont accepté cela, mais je propose cette solution, car je pense que c'est un point valable. Nous pourrions accomplir ces deux choses, soit entendre la ministre maintenant, puis quand c'est terminé, convenir de consacrer une autre demi-heure ou une heure à faire adopter cette motion, de sorte que nous puissions poursuivre le travail.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis d'accord si nous respectons l'idée du protocole Simms.

Je ne sais pas si la ministre connaît le protocole Simms, mais c'est une bonne idée que M. Simms a émise précédemment.

Je ne vais pas m'attarder là-dessus, mais ce que je veux qu'on me dise, c'est si, en application du protocole Simms, nous pouvons obtenir des réponses des libéraux au sujet de ce que M. Christopherson suggère sans que je sois obligé de renoncer à mon droit de parole.

Le président:

Madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Monsieur Christopherson, je comprends votre point de vue, mais ce que nous ne voulons pas, de notre côté, c'est de retarder cela encore plus. Nous voulons aller de l'avant.

Nous discutons de cette motion, pour essentiellement entreprendre l'étude article par article, depuis un bon bout de temps — deux réunions complètes. Nous pourrions continuer après que la ministre aura comparu, mais je crains que nous consacrions encore plusieurs réunions sans même en arriver au point où nous amorcerions en fait l'étude article par article de ce projet de loi, et vous conviendrez avec moi qu'il est très important pour la démocratie et pour les Canadiens.

C'est la raison pour laquelle j'estime vraiment nécessaire de mettre la motion aux voix. Vous étiez absent, une journée, et Nathan vous remplaçait, mais il y a eu une entente à l'amiable ce jour-là, en gros pour demander à la ministre de venir, de sorte que nous puissions immédiatement après entamer l'étude article par article. Cependant, l'autre côté ne nous a donné aucune raison de croire à son intention d'entreprendre l'étude du projet de loi.

En ce moment, on dirait que nous continuons de faire venir des témoins et que nous nous plions à toutes les demandes des conservateurs. Nous avons fait preuve de beaucoup d'indulgence et de souplesse, mais nous ne voyons pas la même chose en retour. Nous attendons et nous espérons un signe nous indiquant que l'étude article par article va commencer.

M. David Christopherson:

Puis-je poser une autre question à M. Reid?

Si nous procédons comme nous le faisons en ce moment, je pourrais me tromper, mais j'ai bien l'impression que l'opposition officielle n'a pas fini de parler. Je comprends ce que le gouvernement fait. Je pense que M. Reid a probablement vu juste et que vous utilisez cela pour faire un peu de pression sur le gouvernement pour obtenir un vote, mais je crois que cela ne fonctionnera pas.

Je crois que nous allons finir par avoir une discussion d'une heure qui va nous enlever du temps avec la ministre. Elle pourrait revenir, mais il se peut aussi qu'elle ne revienne pas. Je soupçonne que ce sera difficile, compte tenu de l'aspect politique de cela. Je remercie Mme Sahota de sa réponse. C'est utile. Je comprends maintenant votre réaction.

Ma question à M. Reid, est la suivante. Pouvons-nous raisonnablement nous attendre à ce que nous en venions à un vote sur la motion et sur l'amendement auxquels nous avons consacré énormément de temps? Pouvons-nous avoir l'assurance — si nous entendons la ministre — qu'après une période donnée de temps, que ce soit une demi-heure ou une heure, vous aurez dit ce que vous avez à dire?

J'ai assez parlé de la motion et de l'amendement, et je soupçonne que c'est également le cas du gouvernement. Nous attendons maintenant l'opposition officielle. La question que nous avons est la suivante. Avez-vous des préoccupations légitimes qui font que vous avez besoin d'une période donnée pour terminer? Devrions-nous plutôt avoir une bonne raison de soupçonner que tout ce que l'opposition officielle va continuer de faire, c'est retarder le travail de manière à rendre encore plus difficile l'adoption du projet de loi?

C'est une question de confiance. Je comprends ce que le gouvernement dit.

Monsieur Reid, je crois qu'on peut dire que nous aimerions avoir de votre part l'assurance que nous n'allons pas vous donner la chance de faire de l'obstruction, de faire en sorte que nous n'entendions pas la ministre, que nous n'obtenions pas le vote et que nous perdions sur toute la ligne.

Encore une fois, si nous essayons tous de trouver une issue procédurale, ce serait très utile, monsieur, mais vous devez nous donner une idée de vos intentions concernant le temps que vous voulez et concernant le moment où nous pouvons nous attendre à voter.

(1545)

M. Scott Reid:

Comme vous le savez, je ne suis plus le ministre du cabinet fantôme, comme nous le disons maintenant. Je ne suis qu'un fantassin. Il vaudrait mieux poser votre question à ma collègue, qui est en train justement de discuter.

Pendant qu'elle se prépare à vous répondre, je vais faire savoir au Comité que je propose ce qui suit, concernant la motion de Mme Sahota. Je ne vais pas lire tout au complet, mais cela se lit comme suit: « Que le Comité n'entreprenne pas l'étude article par article du projet de loi C-76... »

Je suis désolé. Je suis en train de lire la motion selon l'amendement de M. Nater, si vous suivez. Selon cet amendement de M. Nater, on dirait: « Que le Comité n'entreprenne pas l'étude article par article du projet de loi C-76 avant que le Comité ait entendu le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario. »

Je propose un sous-amendement qui ajouterait « ni pas avant que le Comité ait entendu la ministre des Institutions démocratiques pendant une période d'au moins 60 minutes ».

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pourquoi ne pas inverser cela et dire que nous allons entreprendre l'étude article par article après avoir entendu telle ou telle personne? Cela constituerait une assurance. Vous n'offrez aucune assurance.

M. Chris Bittle:

Permettez-moi de dire que la ministre est tout à fait prête à rester ici pour 60 minutes, et que nous allons entendre le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario mardi. Pourquoi donc continuons-nous de parler de cela?

Si nous arrêtions de parler, nous pourrions aller de l'avant. La ministre est impatiente de répondre aux questions, et si c'est une question de temps pour la ministre, je suis sûr que nous serions prêts à renoncer à notre temps pour que les gens de l'opposition soient assurés d'avoir l'équivalent de ce qu'il leur faut pour venir à bout de cela.

Il faut simplement arrêter de parler. Nous discutons de cela depuis un bon moment. Tous les partis de l'opposition se sont prononcés. Vous avez utilisé l'essentiel du temps de discussion à ne parler de presque rien.

M. David Christopherson:

Soyez précis, quand vous dites « vous ».

M. Chris Bittle:

Désolé, monsieur Christopherson, je parle du Parti conservateur. Merci de la demande d'éclaircissement.

Il est temps d'avancer.

Merci.

M. Scott Reid:

On me dit de me taire. C'est ce que le secrétaire parlementaire vient de nous dire: « Taisez-vous, ou vous n'aurez pas la ministre. » C'est véritablement insultant. Il faudrait renoncer aux seuls outils à la disposition de l'opposition, sans quoi la ministre ne comparaîtra pas.

Ce député, dans toute son arrogance, a pris 20 minutes sur l'heure que nous devions avoir avec la ministre.

M. Chris Bittle:

J'ai parlé deux minutes.

M. Scott Reid:

Non, vous avez raison.

Chris, nous allons faire ce que vous voulez. Nous allons juste céder. Nous allons nous écrouler comme un château de cartes à cause de votre petit tour de passe-passe…

M. Chris Bittle:

Dites simplement que vous faites de l’obstruction.

M. Scott Reid:

… dont nous n’avons pas été avertis. Vous avez raison. Nous [Inaudible] de demander à la ministre.

M. Chris Bittle:

Et l’obstruction, ce n’est pas un petit tour de passe-passe?

M. Scott Reid:

Nous n’avons aucun respect de soi, et franchement, je suis tout à fait consterné de voir que vous feriez cela.

Maintenant, je réalise que vous ne l’avez pas fait. On vous a dit de le faire…

M. Chris Bittle:

On ne vous dit pas de poursuivre l’obstruction.

M. Scott Reid:

… mais cela ne change rien au fait que c’est bas et quétaine.

M. Chris Bittle:

Quand l’obstruction va-t-elle cesser, Scott?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il s’en fiche. Il n’est qu’un fantassin.

M. Chris Bittle:

Juste un bon fantassin?

Vous pouvez nous insulter tant que vous le voulez.

(1550)

M. Scott Reid:

Vous êtes vous-même le maître en matière d’insulte, à ce comité.

Personne n'arrive à votre cheville, Chris. Je vous félicite bien bas de votre impressionnante [Inaudible].

Le président:

D'accord, tout le monde. Ramenons un certain décorum à cette réunion.

Monsieur Reid, vous avez la parole. Nous parlons de l'amendement.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, merci.

Apparemment — grâce à cette tactique des libéraux —, nous n'allons pas entendre la ministre. Je présente mes excuses à la ministre, parce qu'elle est obligée de rester assise là pendant tout ceci.

J'ai déjà assisté à des réunions où le directeur général des élections devait rester assis à attendre, pendant le même genre de chose. Je n'arrive même pas à me rappeler qui formait le gouvernement à l'époque.

Écoutez, 20 minutes de l'heure que nous devions avoir avec la ministre s'est écoulée, et nous continuons de discuter de la question de savoir si nous avons le droit de discuter, si nous avons le droit de demander des amendements et si nous devons tout simplement faire ce qu'on nous dit de faire, soit nous taire.

C'est la raison pour laquelle j'ai choisi cette formulation. J'ai rédigé cela sur le vif: que nous n'entreprenions pas l'étude article par article avant que le Comité ait entendu le directeur général des élections de l'Ontario — l'amendement à la motion initiale — ni avant que le Comité ait entendu la ministre des Institutions démocratiques pendant au moins une heure. Donc, finalement, récupérer les 40 minutes qui restent, ou 30 minutes, ce ne sera pas acceptable. C'est une demande raisonnable, et c'est un problème qui n'aurait pas émergé si les libéraux n'avaient pas décidé de se livrer à ce tour de passe-passe.

Le président: Vous avez droit à sept minutes.

M. Scott Reid:D'accord. Merci beaucoup.

Je vais m'arrêter ici. Je comprends qu'il y a une liste et qu'il y aura peut-être des libéraux qui seront en mesure de parler de cela. À la façon dont vont les choses, la solution la plus rapide serait que les libéraux cessent d'insister pour que nous discutions de cela. Nous serons ravis de suspendre le débat, et nous espérons être en position de permettre à la ministre de rester au-delà de l'heure qui était fixée pour son départ.

Le président:

D'accord.

Nous avons donc maintenant un sous-amendement qui a été proposé, soit « ni pas avant que le Comité ait entendu la ministre des Institutions démocratiques pendant au moins une heure ».

Je vais démarrer une nouvelle liste d'intervenants pour le sous-amendement.

Nous allons écouter M. Nater, puis Ruby.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

À moins que l'intervention de Mme Sahota nous permette de clore la discussion, je suis prêt à la laisser prendre la parole avant moi en application du protocole Simms, à condition que je sois le prochain intervenant.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je serai plus brève que je l'ai été durant les dernières séances.

Je tiens à dire officiellement ce que j'ai essayé de lancer plus tôt — je n'aurais probablement pas dû —, mais logiquement, quelle est la prochaine étape?

Je trouve votre sous-amendement à l'amendement à la motion très négatif. Il ne garantit pas du tout au gouvernement que nous passerons à la prochaine étape logique après avoir entendu le témoignage de la ministre ou celui du directeur général des élections de l'Ontario.

Nous avons reçu — combien encore? — 53 témoins pendant notre étude, que nous avons commencée le 23 mai. De nombreux amendements ont été proposés par tous les partis. Nous avons épuisé notre liste de témoins. À ce point-ci, vous ne semblez plus proposer d'idées qui nous permettront d'améliorer le projet de loi; vous ne faites qu'employer des tactiques dilatoires. Quelle est la prochaine étape?

Nous pouvons discuter avec la ministre. La visite du directeur général des élections de l'Ontario est déjà prévue. Nous avons reçu le directeur général des élections du Canada 4 fois, et en plus, nous avons examiné avec lui le rapport des élections de 2015, dans lequel il a fait 130 recommandations. Je ne sais même pas combien de séances nous avons consacrées à cela. Nous avons travaillé sur cela pendant une bonne partie de l'année.

Nous avons accompli tout ce travail. Quelle est la prochaine étape? Je veux entendre une proposition des députés d'en face. J'aimerais aussi que le sous-amendement soit modifié de façon à le rendre positif; je veux qu'il dise qu'après avoir reçu les témoignages de la ministre et du témoin que nous accueillerons mardi, nous passerons à l'étude article par article. Sinon, quelle est la prochaine étape?

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai hâte d'entendre ce que la ministre a à dire. Elle devait être ici de 15 h 30 à 16 h 30. Je propose que nous ajournions la motion, ce qui nous permettrait de mettre notre discussion de côté le temps de recevoir le témoignage de la ministre. Je ne sais pas ce que la ministre va nous dire. Elle ne me donne pas encore ses notes d'allocution, mais je suis certain qu'elle va nous transmettre plein de connaissances.

Nous pourrons peut-être faire avancer le dossier rapidement si nous discutons d'abord avec la ministre et si nous examinons la motion après sa comparution, dans 34 minutes. Si les députés du gouvernement sont prêts à ajourner la motion jusqu'à 16 h 31, nous pourrons en reprendre l'étude à ce moment-là.

Je propose l'ajournement du débat. Je serai ravi de reprendre la discussion à 16 h 31, après le témoignage de la ministre.

(1555)

Le président:

La motion d'ajournement du débat ne peut faire l'objet ni d'une discussion ni d'amendements; nous devons donc la mettre aux voix. Est-ce que tout le monde comprend la situation?

M. Scott Reid:

Je demande un vote par appel nominal, monsieur le président.

(La motion est rejetée par 6 voix contre 3.)

M. Scott Reid:

J'aimerais que mon nom soit remis sur la liste d'intervenants, s'il vous plaît.

Le président:

Le débat n'est pas ajourné.

Nous allons passer au prochain intervenant.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai une question.

Monsieur Nater, vous étiez prêt à proposer une motion pour que nous poursuivions la discussion après, ce qui ressemble à ce que nous avons demandé plus tôt. Je vous accorde tout le temps que vous voulez pour parler, mais s'il y a un débat, acceptez-vous que la séance ne soit pas levée avant qu'il y ait un vote?

Ainsi, si vous voulez faire de l'obstruction pendant les 10 prochaines heures, vous pourrez le faire. Personne ne se verra refuser le droit de parole, et à la fin, la majorité du Comité, qui est constituée de deux des trois partis, obtiendra ce qu'elle voudra: un vote.

M. Scott Reid:

J'invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président.

La séance a débuté il y a 30 minutes. Si nous pouvions demander à la ministre si elle peut rester avec nous pendant 30 minutes de plus... Je ne veux pas l'obliger à rester. Si nous ne parvenons pas à une entente dans les 30 prochaines minutes, mais elle est encore là. Notre discussion l'a déjà fait perdre la moitié de son temps. Si nous réussissons à régler le dossier, nous pourrions avoir notre période de questions d'une heure avec elle. Je pense que la question est pertinente.

L'hon. Karina Gould (ministre des Institutions démocratiques):

Oui, je suis toujours prête à venir lorsque le Comité veut discuter avec moi.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord, merci.

Le président:

La parole est à M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord, ça va.

Monsieur Reid, vous avez eu la réponse. Je trouve que c'est une réponse obligeante. Je remercie la ministre de faire preuve de souplesse pour nous aider à procéder d'une manière qui est pacifique, mais qui nous permet aussi de clore le dossier; je m'adresse donc à nouveau à vous, monsieur. Vos collègues et vous, êtes-vous prêts à revenir à la discussion après que nous aurons passé une heure avec la ministre, qui a gracieusement accepté d'altérer son horaire pour que nous puissions nous entretenir avec elle pendant une heure complète?

Acceptez-vous que nous commencions la discussion après l'heure passée avec la ministre et que la séance du Comité ne soit pas levée avant que nous ayons voté? Vous aurez tout le temps que vous voudrez — des heures, des jours, des semaines, comme vous voudrez —, mais une fois que vous aurez dit tout ce que vous aviez à dire, nous passerons au vote. Êtes-vous d'accord?

M. Scott Reid:

Tout d'abord, soyons clairs: passer des heures, des jours ou même des semaines assis ici à débattre du sous-amendement ou de la motion, croyez-moi, ce n'est pas ce que je veux.

Vous croyez sûrement que je suis sincère.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vous crois, mais je veux surtout savoir si nous pourrons voter ou si vous avez l'intention de faire de l'obstruction, ce qui nous forcera à demander à la Chambre de donner l'ordre de poursuivre. Je suis prêt à appuyer cette démarche au besoin, mais j'aimerais beaucoup mieux procéder gentiment et amicalement et vous donner la possibilité de prendre tout le temps dont vous avez besoin pour dire tout ce que vous pensez vouloir dire.

(1600)

M. Scott Reid:

La réponse courte et aussi sincère, c'est que je n'ai pas le pouvoir de faire cela. Je n'ai pas le pouvoir de dire que... Comment peut-on dire qu'on est prêt à lever la séance, peu importe ce qui arrive, à moins de dire qu'on est prêt à tout céder? J'essaie de trouver une façon de vous répondre sans...

M. David Christopherson:

Non, vous essayez de trouver une façon de vous en sortir parce que votre but est de prolonger le processus et vous ne trouvez plus de façons de le faire. La partie est terminée. Mettons-nous au travail, monsieur.

M. Scott Reid:

Je comprends pourquoi vous dites cela, mais ce n'est pas ce que je tente de faire. Ce que j'essaie de vous faire comprendre, c'est que... Je participe à des négociations semblables avec un canton en ce moment, et on nous dit à peu près la même chose: « Vous devez parvenir à un accord avant telle date, sinon nous obtiendrons simplement ce que nous voulons. » Je ne trouve pas cette position très enviable; c'est plutôt une capitulation unilatérale. La réponse...

M. David Christopherson:

Comment? Vous avez tout le temps que vous voulez pour dire ce que vous voulez. Dans quelle mesure est-ce une capitulation? Vous allez perdre le vote. Vous le savez. La question, c'est: pendant combien de temps allez-vous nous empêcher de voter?

M. Scott Reid:

Nous verrons, je présume.

M. David Christopherson:

Il y a des juges à l'extérieur: la population. Notre séance est publique. Ils vont très bien comprendre qui fait quoi et pourquoi.

Le président:

David...

M. Scott Reid:

C'est tout à fait vrai.

Le président:

... donnez à M. Reid la possibilité de...

M. David Christopherson:

Non, vous avez raison.

Le président:

... poursuivre la discussion.

J'ai une question pour vous. La dernière fois que nous nous sommes trouvés dans une situation où le temps était illimité, cela a duré des semaines, sinon des mois.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, mais je n'étais pas là. Si je me tais, vous pouvez enlever 90 % du temps.

Le président:

D'après moi, vous ne devriez pas sous-estimer la compétence de M. Nater et de M. Reid dans ce domaine.

M. David Christopherson:

Donnez-leur une chance.

Le président:

Proposez-vous un nombre illimité de semaines et de mois de discussion?

M. David Christopherson:

Franchement, c'est leur droit de toute façon. Une fois qu'ils prennent la parole, ils peuvent faire de l'obstruction. La différence, c'est que nous accepterions de ne pas lever la séance avant que tout le monde ait présenté ses remarques, ce qui nous permettrait de commencer à faire notre travail.

Si vous suivez, vous n'aurez pas oublié que nous faisons tout cela pour décider si nous allons commencer à faire notre travail. Notre travail, c'est l'étude du projet de loi article par article. Le gouvernement a déposé un projet de loi qui est appuyé par le directeur général des élections, le NPD et le gouvernement, mais pas par les députés de l'ancien gouvernement — l'opposition officielle. C'est correct. Je veux être certain de leur donner la possibilité de dire ce qu'ils ont à dire. Ils affirment que c'est tout ce qu'ils demandent et qu'ils ne veulent pas que leur droit de parole leur soit retiré. Soit.

Je leur offre cette possibilité et tout ce que je demande, c'est qu'ils nous promettent que lorsqu'ils auront fini de présenter leurs observations, la séance sera toujours en cours et nous pourrons voter. Ensuite, nous pourrons enfin commencer à faire notre travail. Ce que nous faisons maintenant n'est pas notre travail, c'est de la préparation. Notre travail, c'est l'étude article par article. J'essaie juste de trouver une façon de pouvoir nous y mettre.

Je vais vous dire ce qui m'inquiète, monsieur Reid. Je ne suis pas du genre à me livrer à des jeux; je ne suis pas assez intelligent pour cela. Je mets cartes sur table parce que c'est la seule façon pour moi d'agir. Ce dossier me tient à coeur. Si vous avez de réelles préoccupations, je veux les entendre, mais je veux aussi que nous passions au vote. À mes yeux, sauf votre respect, vous avez l'air de vous traîner les pieds et de faire tout ce que vous pouvez pour ralentir le processus.

Je comprends cette tactique. Je réussis parfois à la maîtriser, mais, appelons les choses par leur nom et arrêtons de faire semblant que cela concerne les droits des députés de l'opposition officielle parce que l'empêcheur de tourner en rond, c'est moi. S'il y a quelqu'un qui va s'opposer haut et fort à ce qu'un gouvernement majoritaire fasse adopter à toute vapeur des modifications au processus électoral... Voyons voir. Y a-t-il des précédents qui montrent ce que je pourrais faire si un gouvernement majoritaire tentait une chose pareille? Je pense que oui.

Nous sommes d'accord, donc si vous ne faites pas de l'obstruction dans le seul but de nous retarder, proposez une voie à suivre qui protège vos droits tout en nous permettant de faire le travail que nous voulons faire. Tout ce que nous demandons, d'abord gentiment, c'est qu'il y ait un vote. Tout ce que nous voulons, c'est que la motion soit mise aux voix pour que nous finissions par clore le débat.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Permettez-nous de voter pour que les Canadiens puissent voter. Voilà ce que je dirais.

(1605)

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Tout d'abord, je n'ai aucun doute que...

Le président:

Justement, monsieur Reid, vous êtes le prochain sur la liste.

M. Scott Reid:

Ne suis-je plus sur la liste?

Le président:

Oui, vous l'êtes maintenant. C'est votre tour. Il y avait M. Christopherson sur la liste d'interventions concernant le sous-amendement. Maintenant, vous...

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Vous n'avez pas encore officiellement cédé la parole.

M. David Christopherson:

Voulez-vous que je garde la parole pour que vous puissiez intervenir en vertu du protocole Simms? D'accord, je garde la parole.

M. Scott Simms:

Je veux que vous gardiez la parole juste pour donner une précision afin de m'aider à comprendre. Vous demandez que nous procédions à la période de questions avec la ministre. Par période de questions, je veux dire une heure. Après, nous devons mettre son amendement aux voix.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est presque cela. Je disais simplement que nous reconnaissons tous qu'ils vont prendre le temps qu'ils voudront pour finir de présenter leurs observations afin qu'elles figurent dans le compte rendu, mais l'entente serait que la séance ne serait pas levée. Vous rappelez-vous les combines du gouvernement précédent? Ce n'est pas la première fois qu'ils agissent ainsi. Il existe des façons de prolonger une séance; par exemple, la majorité des membres peut refuser que la séance soit levée.

Ce que je propose, c'est que nous recevions le témoignage pendant une heure, puis que nous revenions à la motion, et que la séance ne soit pas levée avant que tous les intervenants figurant sur la liste — qui seraient tous des conservateurs — aient eu leur droit de parole. Tout ce que je leur demande, c'est s'ils trouvent cette façon de procéder juste. Ils pourront parler pendant aussi longtemps qu'ils le voudront après le témoignage de la ministre, mais nous acceptons tous que la séance ne soit pas officiellement levée avant que nous ayons voté.

Cela pourrait vouloir dire que certains d'entre nous devront rester ici pendant quelque temps. Cette façon de faire est exigeante et j'en demande beaucoup, mais s'il est possible de procéder harmonieusement, c'est ce que nous devons faire. Je veux absolument que nous ayons considéré toutes les possibilités, car d'après moi, M. Reid est l'un des députés les plus honorables de la Chambre. Or, cela ne veut pas dire qu'il n'est pas prêt à se livrer à des jeux politiques, comme je le fais aussi au besoin, mais pour être juste et par respect, s'ils ont des choses importantes à dire, permettons-leur de les dire, mais lorsqu'ils auront fini, qu'ils nous laissent voter.

Je ne dis même pas que vous êtes d'accord. Je proposais cela comme solution pacifique parce que si nous n'arrivons pas à trouver une solution pacifique et si nous ne pouvons pas procéder à l'étude article par article, je ne vois pas ce que le gouvernement pourra faire d'autre que de demander à la Chambre de donner un ordre, et personne n'aime que les choses soient faites ainsi. Or, si c'est nécessaire, compte tenu de l'importance du projet de loi, qui retire les dispositions disgracieuses de la loi électorale injuste, je suis prêt à me lever dans la Chambre et à appuyer une motion qui nous obligera à commencer l'étude article par article. Je n'en ai pas plus envie que vous, donc si mon idée ne fonctionne pas — et ça va, je ne prétends pas avoir d'excellentes idées —, que quelqu'un d'autre fasse une proposition.

Il y a deux façons de procéder. Soit nous nous entendons sur la marche à suivre et les choses se passent ainsi, soit nous demandons à la Chambre de donner un ordre. S'arrêter ici n'est pas une option.

Le président:

David aimerait poursuivre sur la question du protocole Simms.

M. David Christopherson:

En effet, monsieur.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je voulais vous laisser terminer, mais cela va.

David, ils s'étaient engagés à fixer une date mardi. Pourquoi devrait-on se fier à leur parole aujourd'hui? Même s'ils acceptaient votre proposition, pourquoi devrions-nous les croire, puisqu'ils n'ont pas tenu parole mardi?

M. David Christopherson:

Parce que nous nous retrouverions alors dans une situation exceptionnelle où la Chambre siégerait à 20 ou 21 heures ce soir, voire jusqu'à minuit. Il faudrait qu'ils se ravisent soudainement. Je suppose que c'est possible, mais...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous êtes de plus en plus entouré par des conservateurs. Je ne suis pas certain qu'ils soient prêts à changer d'idée.

M. David Christopherson:

Cette fois, contrairement à la dernière législature, nous avons l'occasion de faire beaucoup de choses publiquement. On nous surveille. Nous avons l'occasion d'expliquer ce qui se passe. Vous avez peut-être raison, mais bon sang, veulent-ils vraiment aller là?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il semblerait que oui.

M. David Christopherson:

Je n'en suis pas si certain, car tout cela se fait maintenant au grand jour. On peut réussir ce genre de choses beaucoup plus facilement quand personne ne regarde et que tout le monde s'en fout. Une proposition a été faite. C'est du sérieux. Je comprends votre point de vue. Si nous structurons cela correctement, ils ne devraient pas en avoir la possibilité, sur le plan politique, à mon avis, même s'ils pourraient toujours le faire, sur le plan structurel ou légal.

Le président:

M. Bittle aimerait parler du protocole Simms.

M. Chris Bittle:

Très brièvement, par rapport au protocole Simms et à la motion de M. Christopherson, je conviens que nous voulons procéder dans l'harmonie, mais la motion est toujours là. Ils peuvent continuer d'en discuter tant qu'ils veulent. La ministre a indiqué qu'elle témoignera, peu importe quand. Il faut que cela se fasse. Je suis d'accord avec M. Graham: ce jeu dure depuis des mois déjà. Je sais que M. Cullen a assisté à la plupart des réunions pour entendre les témoins et participer aux délibérations. Or, on nous dit une chose, puis c'est tout le contraire qui se produit.

Nous voulons simplement que cela finisse. Nous voulons une date. Nous voulons un début et une fin. Nous voulons que ce soit réglé pour renvoyer cela à la Chambre. Je sais que les conservateurs estiment que le projet de loi est loin d'être parfait. Il est temps de présenter les amendements. Ils doivent maintenant s'adresser aux juges qui les observent et leur dire pourquoi la mesure législative du gouvernement comporte des lacunes et proposer des correctifs. Il est maintenant temps de fixer une date parce qu'il faut aller de l'avant.

(1610)

M. David Christopherson:

Je comprends ce que vous dites, monsieur Bittle. Voici comment je vois les choses, même si je pourrais me tromper. En regardant cela d'un point de vue politique, j'en viens à la conclusion que si le Comité siège encore dans deux jours, sans interruption, il y aura des explications à donner. Je ne pense pas que la position actuelle des conservateurs plaise au public, en particulier si nous sommes prêts à leur accorder tout le temps nécessaire pour dire ce qu'ils veulent. S'ils décident d'agir comme nous l'avons fait pour le projet de loi C-23, ils oublient une chose: les anges ne sont pas de leur côté.

S'ils veulent être perçus comme ceux qui défendent l'idée de poursuivre les travaux du Comité de façon ininterrompue 24 heures par jour, tous les jours, pour nous empêcher de voter, j'ai le sentiment que certains membres du public ne seront pas prêts à accepter leur point de vue. J'en fais le pari. Mon pari politique, c'est qu'ils ne pourront pas poursuivre ainsi longtemps. Si nous avons pu le faire dans le cas du projet de loi C-23, c'est que nous avions les anges de notre côté. Ce qu'ils faisaient était extrêmement mal, et le public le savait. Lorsque nous avons dénoncé la situation au public, mon bureau a reçu des courriels et des messages texte nous disant de ne pas lâcher le morceau.

Combien en recevront-ils d'après vous s'ils ne font que nous empêcher de voter? Selon mon calcul politique, nous avons plus d'endurance qu'eux.

Le président:

Le deuxième député souhaitant parler du sous-amendement est M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

J'aimerais d'abord revenir à quelque chose qui a été dit précédemment. Je pensais avoir la parole il y a un certain temps.

M. Christopherson vient de dire que cet enjeu lui tient à coeur, qu'il ne joue pas des jeux politiques et qu'il n'est pas assez intelligent pour jouer au plus fin. Deux de ces trois affirmations sont vraies. Il est très passionné. Il ne joue pas des jeux, ou du moins pas des guerres psychologiques teintées d'une quelconque malhonnêteté. Quant à l'affirmation selon laquelle il n'est pas assez intelligent, ce n'est absolument pas vrai. Maintenant qu'il retourne au secteur privé, il est temps pour lui d'arrêter de dénigrer sa propre intelligence. Ses commentaires devraient être le reflet de son intelligence.

M. David Christopherson:

Quelle expérience avez-vous des entrevues l'emploi?

M. Scott Reid:

Je ne connais pas les détails; je me porte simplement à la défense de mon ami.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vous en suis reconnaissant, monsieur. Cela ne vous dérange pas que je porte des bretelles en plus d'une ceinture, toujours?

M. Scott Reid:

Non.

Je dirais à ce moment-ci que le sous-amendement que j'ai présenté, au moment où je l'ai présenté, visait simplement à dire que nous devrions faire ce qui a été convenu, c'est-à-dire accueillir la ministre d'abord, puis aller de l'avant. J'avais supposé que le président ferait ce dont nous avions discuté juste avant 13 heures, lorsque nous avions dit que le président convoquerait une réunion par la suite, tout de suite après, s'il le souhaitait, pour discuter de la motion de Mme Sahota. Évidemment, comme nous le savons tous très bien, nous pouvons terminer à l'heure que nous voulons, que ce soit tôt ou tard. C'était l'idée de départ.

Toutefois, il est maintenant 16 h 14 à ma montre ou à mon iPhone, et nous avons utilisé presque la totalité du temps dont disposait la ministre initialement. Elle vient d'indiquer qu'elle restera ici pendant au moins une demi-heure. Je précise, pour être juste, que la ministre a indiqué qu'elle pourrait rester ici jusqu'à 17 heures, si nous lui demandions. Qui sait? La réunion finira peut-être plus tard, mais la ministre va bientôt partir. Nous avons écoulé le temps imparti, ou presque, et on peut maintenant s'attendre à ce que la réunion se prolonge.

Cela résulte d'un tour de passe-passe de M. Bittle. Ne vous méprenez pas; je n'ai pas dit que c'était une procédure invalide, mais ce n'était pas ce à quoi nous nous attendions tous. Voilà ce que j'ai dit dans ma réponse initiale. J'étais plus fâché que d'habitude, mais il m'arrive de temps à autre d'être contrarié et fâché. Nous nous souvenons tous du printemps de 2017.

Bon, j'ai perdu le fil. J'étais pris dans le souvenir de ce moment.

Tout cela s'est produit parce que le parti ministériel a créé cette situation de toute pièce.

Ah, cela me revient. Rendu là, honnêtement, je le fais seulement par sentiment de dignité. Si je m'en laisse imposer facilement, comment diable pourrais-je retourner à la maison et être capable de me regarder dans le miroir?

(1615)

M. David Christopherson:

Vous pouvez faire mieux que cela. Vous n'aurez pas le choix.

M. Scott Reid:

En réalité, je ne peux faire mieux. Une personne plus éloquente que moi pourrait peut-être y arriver.

Je ne sais pas pourquoi ils ont fait cela. Nous serions dans la même situation si nous avions entendu le témoignage de la ministre, qui est la personne la plus éloquente qu'ils aient pour discuter de ce sujet. Elle est très articulée, elle connaît son dossier, elle s'exprime de façon cohérente et elle a toujours su exprimer la position du gouvernement avec grande efficacité. Sur le plan de la procédure, nous en serions exactement au même point. Je ne comprends donc pas pourquoi nous n'avons pas simplement décidé de discuter après plutôt qu'avant son exposé. Je ne comprends absolument pas.

Voilà donc où nous en sommes; je suis prêt à en discuter. Je me contenterai de dire que ce sous-amendement est vraiment raisonnable. Tout le monde sait qu'il arrive qu'on présente des amendements ou des sous-amendements qui ne visent qu'à prolonger la discussion, mais dans ce cas, la demande est raisonnable.

En fin de compte, le gouvernement s'est fixé un objectif. Il veut que la mesure législative soit adoptée à la Chambre d'ici... Nous pourrions entreprendre l'étude article par article sur ce qu'il en restera à 13 heures, le 16 octobre. La motion précise que même si aucun article n'a fait l'objet de discussions, tout serait terminé et adopté quelques heures plus tard, donc le 16 octobre en fin de journée.

Voilà ce que souhaite le gouvernement. Tout le reste est secondaire. Si c'est l'objectif du gouvernement... C'est un projet de loi complexe; tout le monde en convient. La ministre a parlé d'un changement d'ordre générationnel. À mon avis, cela ne signifie pas que nous faisons du rattrapage après une génération de négligence. Je pense qu'ils considèrent cela comme un changement qui durera pendant une génération, jusqu'à ce que le fils de la ministre ait l'âge de voter et peut-être même de remporter un siège ici.

On parle d'un projet de loi que le gouvernement a réexaminé et corrigé. Le parti ministériel y a apporté des amendements parce qu'il reconnaissait que la première version comportait quelques imperfections. Cela arrive fréquemment dans le cas de projets de loi importants; celui-ci ne fait donc pas figure d'exception.

Tout ce que nous voulons, dans un contexte où nous sommes la minorité — le gouvernement a plus de la moitié des sièges et peut agir à sa guise —, c'est avoir une garantie quelconque que certains des amendements que nous proposons seront adoptés. Maintenant, nous voulons que le gouvernement exprime sa volonté, d'une façon ou d'une autre, d'étudier certains amendements. Nous n'avons rien à cacher; nos amendements sont déjà déposés.

Si nous acceptions ce qui est proposé, cela signifierait que nous n'aurions aucun accord pour quelque amendement que ce soit. Nous voulons qu'ils donnent leur parole.

En passant, parlant de gens qui manquent à leur parole, je précise que je tiens seulement à vous faire savoir que nous accordons une valeur à la parole donnée derrière des portes closes par la ministre et la leader du gouvernement à la Chambre. Nous avons la certitude que ce sont des personnes honorables, pas seulement dans le sens convenu lorsqu'on utilise des formules comme « honorable collègue » ou « honorable ministre », mais au sens propre. Voilà ce que nous voulons, et s'il faut que nous parlions pendant des heures pour l'obtenir, si nous devons faire de l'obstruction pour y parvenir, c'est ce que nous ferons. Ce n'est pas difficile à comprendre. Après, ils pourront aller de l'avant et faire adopter la mesure législative avant la date proposée.

Dans mon commentaire précédent à ce sujet, j'ai clairement indiqué que les éléments connexes de la motion initiale présentée par Ruby sont tout à fait raisonnables. Elle se lit comme suit: « Que le président soit autorisé à tenir des réunions en dehors des heures normales pour permettre l'étude article par article ». Dans le contexte d'un important projet de loi pour lequel le délai d'adoption n'est que dans deux semaines, dont une semaine de relâche, c'est tout à fait raisonnable.

(1620)



En ce qui concerne l'énoncé « que le président peut limiter le débat sur chaque article à un maximum de cinq minutes », je croyais qu'il était bien formulé aussi, car il précise que le président « peut », et non pas « doit », limiter le débat. C'est raisonnable. Cette limite de cinq minutes est raisonnable. On peut faire valoir un argument cohérent sur ce point.

De plus, si les gens sont véritablement disposés à examiner des questions... Par exemple, s'il y a un amendement de l'opposition qui vise une disposition ou une clause où le gouvernement a fait savoir qu'il l'examinerait — et je ne suis plus dans le parti au pouvoir, mais à ma connaissance, il ne l'a pas précisé —, ou si le gouvernement est disposé à donner sa parole qu'il l'examinera, mais je dois préciser que ce n'est pas forcément le libellé de notre amendement, mais une formulation ajustée de l'amendement que nous proposons... Il faudrait plus de cinq minutes pour étudier ces amendements, mais le président peut être flexible. C'est raisonnable aussi.

Je ne conteste même pas l'échéance du 16 octobre, plus particulièrement étant donné que nous avons entendu le témoignage du directeur général des élections, qui est d'une précieuse aide pour établir les objectifs qu'il peut atteindre ou pas, en fonction d'un délai prévu où les élections auront lieu en octobre 2019 comme prévu. Le projet de loi est étudié à la Chambre puis au Sénat et recevra la sanction royale au cours de l'année 2018.

Tous ces éléments sont raisonnables, mais l'outil que nous avons en tant que parti de l'opposition, c'est la capacité de ralentir les travaux jusqu'à ce que nous sachions que nos amendements seront examinés. Nous ne sommes pas le gouvernement. Nous ne prétendons pas que tous nos amendements... Nous disons que nous avons des façons pratiques et efficaces de rendre cette mesure législative meilleure que l'ébauche dont la Chambre est saisie à l'heure actuelle. L'examen ne porterait pas sur les points marquants du projet de loi C-23 de la dernière législature, mais sur d'excellentes idées pratiques. C'est tout ce que nous demandons.

Je suis content de pouvoir faire ses observations pendant que la ministre est ici. Cette discussion, qui doit avoir lieu en dehors de cette enceinte, est ce que nous voulons. C'est ainsi que nous pourrons atteindre notre objectif. J'espère que nous pourrons y parvenir.

J'espère également que nous pouvons le faire sans que je sois obligé de continuer de parler. Je vais me renseigner s'il y a un autre intervenant sur la liste, car je suis réticent à céder la parole si personne d'autre ne veut intervenir.

Le président:

C'est un bon point.

Il nous reste six minutes. M. Nater et M. Graham sont les intervenants qui figurent sur la liste pour prendre la parole sur le sous-amendement.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien. Je vais m'arrêter ici. Je tenais vraiment à faire valoir ce point très fermement.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

C'est un plaisir d'avoir la ministre parmi nous. Je sais qu'elle était prête à faire son exposé et son témoignage et à répondre aux questions. Je pense qu'il est regrettable de ne pas avoir ce témoignage et cette discussion, car j'espérais vraiment — l'espoir fait vivre — que la ministre aurait pu nous donner une idée de l'orientation que cette mesure législative pourrait prendre, d'après elle, pour ce qui est des amendements et de l'étude article par article.

Nous trois ici dans l'opposition pouvons facilement nous rendre à l'évidence que nous n'obtiendrons pas tout ce que nous voulons. Nous n'obtiendrons probablement pas la majeure partie de ce que nous demandons. Nous obtiendrons probablement une ou deux dispositions que nous jugeons importantes.

(1625)

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Nous sommes en situation minoritaire.

M. John Nater:

Oui, nous sommes minoritaires.

Nous aimerions qu'il y ait des compromis, des discussions et une certaine volonté à dialoguer et à nous entendre sur certaines questions importantes dans ce projet de loi. Ce n'est pas un petit projet de loi. Il compte 246 pages. Il y a 103 pages de notes explicatives. C'est compliqué. L'étude article par article est importante et prendra un certain temps. La proposition d'imposer des limites à la durée des discussions est tout à fait normale, et je le reconnais.

Je dois revenir... Je ne vais pas m'attarder là-dessus. Je vais seulement présenter l'argument. En réponse à l'observation de M. Bittle selon laquelle nous devrions tout simplement cesser toute discussion, si c'est l'argument officiel du Cabinet du premier ministre, alors c'est décevant. Je pense que c'est dommage. Chacun de nous a le droit de faire entendre ses opinions, de formuler ses observations et de les mettre sur la table.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je suis sûre que nous ne devrions pas tenir cela pour acquis. Ce ne serait pas juste.

M. John Nater:

Non, nous ne devrions pas tenir cela pour acquis, mais je pense que c'est important. Nous sommes élus ici et les électeurs nous jugeront, comme M. Christopherson l'a souligné avec raison. Durant l'obstruction lors du changement au Règlement, j'ai cité un passage de la Bible commune anglicane pour faire valoir qu'on ne doit pas prendre ces discussions à la légère. J'ai tiré ma citation dans la section de la Bible commune anglicane portant sur le mariage. On ne doit pas se lancer dans un débat comme celui-ci avec légèreté. Il y a des conséquences.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je suis anglicane. Je ne savais pas que vous étiez anglican aussi.

M. John Nater:

Je ne suis pas anglican. Je suis luthérien. Je connais des faits anodins, mais un politicologue a fait une comparaison avec la Bible commune anglicane. Je ne pourrais pas vous dire qui c'était. Il faudrait que je fouille dans mes notes pour vérifier. Je tiens à dire d'abord et avant tout que nous avons raté une occasion. La ministre est ici pour encore trois minutes, et nous avons raté une occasion. Je pense que c'est regrettable.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez raté cette occasion.

M. John Nater:

Nous avons bel et bien raté cette occasion, David. L'opposition a raté cette occasion. Le parti de M. Christopherson a raté cette occasion. Le gouvernement a raté cette occasion. Nous, au Comité, avons raté cette occasion, car cette motion a été présentée au début de la réunion. Le gouvernement avait le droit de présenter cette motion, ce qu'il a fait. Nous ne pouvons rien changer maintenant.

M. David de Burgh Graham: [Note de la rédaction: inaudible] il y a deux jours.

M. John Nater: Je suis ravi d'avoir la parole, monsieur Graham. Si vous voulez un protocole Simms, je me ferai toujours un plaisir de céder la parole. La ministre a fait savoir qu'elle serait prête à revenir. Je vais la croire sur parole.

J'ai énormément de respect pour de nombreux libéraux, dont bon nombre siègent à ce comité et bon nombre ne siègent plus à la Chambre. L'un d'eux que je respecte beaucoup est Stéphane Dion. M. Dion a fait la déclaration suivante: C'est un contexte de longue attente. Deux longues années se sont écoulées avant que le gouvernement soumette son projet de loi, comme s'il lui en coûtait tant de le faire. Ce fut une longue attente aussitôt suivie d'une précipitation suspecte. Le gouvernement s'empresse d'expédier le débat parlementaire, comme s'il avait quelque chose à cacher. Il veut faire adopter à la sauvette un projet de loi de 252 pages, qui porte sur la démocratie électorale.

Il est intéressant que M. Dion ait fait cette déclaration durant le débat sur le projet de loi C-23 car c'est ce qui s'est produit avec le projet de loi C-33 qui a été déposé en novembre 2016 et qui est resté au Feuilleton sans faire l'objet d'un débat à la deuxième lecture. Ensuite, le 30 avril, vers la fin des travaux du printemps au Parlement, le projet de loi C-76 a été présenté. Il a été déposé de façon précipitée, comme M. Dion l'a mentionné pour le projet de loi C-23, et voici où nous en sommes maintenant. Nous sommes aux prises avec une motion de guillotine assortie d'une date butoir fixe. C'est la prérogative du gouvernement. Le Comité a le droit d'accepter cela.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Le terme « guillotine » est assez fort.

M. John Nater:

L'expression « motion de guillotine » est une expression parlementaire.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Elle semble si catégorique.

M. John Nater:

C'est le cas, comme une motion de clôture, une motion de bâillon. C'est une motion qui doit être débattue et renvoyée à la Chambre avant une certaine date. Là encore, ce n'est pas que nous ne sommes pas disposés à approuver la motion. Si le gouvernement confirme qu'il est disposé à discuter de certains de nos amendements et à s'engager officiellement à envisager certains de nos amendements, je me ferai un plaisir d'approfondir la conversation. Malheureusement, je ne pense pas que nous en sommes là pour l'instant.

Monsieur le président, je vois que vous me faites signe.

(1630)

Le président:

L'heure est écoulée. Le Comité veut-il examiner la question? Nous sommes saisis d'une motion d'ajournement. Elle ne peut pas faire l'objet d'un débat.

M. Scott Reid:

Elle ne peut pas être débattue. Je ne peux pas en débattre, mais je pense que nous devrions procéder à un vote par appel nominal.

(La motion est adoptée par 5 voix contre 4.)

Le président:

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on September 27, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.