header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-03-10 OGGO 6

Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Tom Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan, CPC)):

Ladies and gentlemen, this is meeting number 6 of the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates. We are dealing with the supplementary estimates (C) for the Department of Public Works and Government Services, and Shared Services Canada.

We have the minister with us today, the Honourable Judy Foote, Minister of Public Services and Procurement.

Minister Foote, would you care to introduce the officials who are with you. Then we'd ask you to commence with your opening statement. Hopefully, it's no longer than 10 minutes.

Again, I remind all witnesses, ministers, and committee members that we are in a televised environment.

Minister, please go ahead.

Hon. Judy Foote (Minister of Public Services and Procurement):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. It's a pleasure to be here.

I'm going to ask my colleagues to introduce themselves.

Julie.

Ms. Julie Charron (Acting Chief Financial Officer, Finance and Administration, Department of Public Works and Government Services):

Thank you.

Good afternoon. My name is Julie Charron. I am the acting chief financial officer at Public Services and Procurement.

Mr. George Da Pont (Deputy Minister, Department of Public Works and Government Services):

Good afternoon. I'm George Da Pont, the deputy minister of Public Services and Procurement.

Mr. Ron Parker (President, Shared Services Canada):

I'm Ron Parker, the president of Shared Services Canada.

Ms. Manon Fillion (Director General and Deputy Chief Financial Officer, Corporate Services, Shared Services Canada):

I'm Manon Fillion, the DG of finance at SSC. Sorry, I was mixing French and English. I should have said it in French, but that's okay.

The Chair:

The floor is yours, Minister.

Hon. Judy Foote:

Thank you.[Translation]

Good afternoon to all members of the committee.[English]

I am honoured to be here and to have been named Minister of Public Services and Procurement. I look forward to establishing a constructive relationship with all of you on this committee.[Translation]

Thank you for inviting me to testify before your committee.[English]

Our Prime Minister has emphasized the importance of these committees, and I am committed to treating this committee with respect, given the important work that you will be doing. I look forward to working with all of you. Your work will be important in helping me advance the priorities set out in the mandate letter I received from the Prime Minister. I welcome our exchanges on these issues as we move forward.

Departmental officials and I are here today to answer your questions about the supplementary estimates (C) as well as the departmental performance reports for Public Services and Procurement Canada and for Shared Services Canada.

Public Services and Procurement Canada acts as government's principal treasurer, accountant, and real property manager. As the government's central purchasing agent, it buys everything from pencils to military equipment. It also supports our efforts to communicate with and provide services for Canadians in the official language of their choice.

Shared Services Canada was established to deliver one email system, consolidated data centres, reliable and secure telecommunications networks, and non-stop protection against cyber-threats. The department does this across 43 departments, 50 networks, 485 data centres, and 23,000 servers, all to make information more secure and easier for Canadians to access.

At the heart of both of these organizations is a commitment to service and an ongoing effort to operate more efficiently and cost effectively. A great deal of the work takes place behind the scenes, but that makes it no less vital. For instance, Public Services and Procurement Canada was directly involved in meeting our government's commitment to welcome 25,000 Syrian refugees. The department secured essentials like winter jackets, travel, housing, and food, while Shared Services provided necessary IT services and operational support.

Many of our key priorities were laid out in our mandate letter, including prioritizing the national shipbuilding strategy. Our government is renewing the Canadian Coast Guard fleet and outfitting the Royal Canadian Navy so it can operate as a true blue-water maritime force. Seaspan's Vancouver shipyards and Irving Shipbuilding in Halifax have invested millions of dollars to rebuild their facilities to allow them to build Canada's vessels efficiently. Work is well under way on the LEED projects, the offshore fisheries science vessel in Vancouver, and the Arctic offshore patrol vessels in Halifax. The shipbuilding strategy is good for Canada. It is creating jobs, building industrial capacity, and renewing the fleets. Canada has not built ships for a generation. That is why we have recently hired a shipbuilding expert to provide us with advice on all facets of shipbuilding.

We are also looking at ways to ensure more accurate planning and costing. The government is developing new costing methodologies to enable more precise budgeting forecasts. Going forward, we will be regularly refreshing our budgets and timelines so that we are not working with outdated costing.

We are determined to ensure that all of our activities are conducted as openly and transparently as possible. Canadians and stakeholders should be well informed of our shipbuilding plans, costs, progress, and challenges. Therefore, Canadians, journalists, and parliamentarians will receive regular updates on where we stand with our various shipbuilding projects.

We are committed to making progress in other areas as well. The Build in Canada innovation program bridges the pre-commercialization gap for the many Canadian businesses that have new and innovative products and technologies to sell. We will improve administration of the program so that matches between innovative companies and government testing departments are made much more quickly.

Departmental officials and I are partnering with suppliers and these key stakeholders to make it easier for Canadian companies to do business with the government. We are determined to simplify and better manage government procurement and to focus on practices such as green and social procurement that support our government's economic policy goals.

Improvements are also at the core of the work at Shared Services Canada, where modernizing the government's IT infrastructure is key to the digital array of information services that Canadians expect. Sixty legacy data centres have been consolidated into three enterprise-class data centres. This cuts costs, increases data security, and improves services to partner and client organizations.

(1535)



SSC plays a vital role in protecting our national cyber infrastructure and Canadians' data on all federal networks. Security has been upgraded through a new 24/7 security operations centre that monitors and responds quickly to cybersecurity incidents, reducing both the number of critical IT incidents and the time it takes to resolve them.

Both Public Services and Procurement Canada and Shared Services Canada are refining procurement. They are speeding up the process of informing industry of solicitations being tendered. This allows bidders more time to respond with innovative solutions that meet the government's needs.

Another example of innovation, modernization, and the future direction of government operations is the transformation of the Government of Canada's inefficient 40-year-old pay system.

The new pay system, called Phoenix, was implemented just two weeks ago, on February 24, and the first pay cycle has proven to be a success. So far, it covers 34 departments involving 120,000 employees. The remaining 67 departments are scheduled to come online soon.

The department is also pushing forward in real property management, design, and green construction. Public Services and Procurement Canada has been recognized for high-quality work in infrastructure projet planning, design, construction, and heritage expertise, and for other services to clients.

The Des Allumettes Bridge, which connects Ontario and Quebec near Pembroke, Ontario won a Canadian Institute of Steel Construction 2015 design award for excellence in steel construction. The Tunney's Pasture master plan received a national award for comprehensive planning-best practices, as well as a national award of merit for urban design. The James Michael Flaherty Building, at 90 Elgin Street, received a city of Ottawa award of merit in the Ottawa Urban Design Awards.

Public Services and Procurement Canada is also a world leader in sourcing property management services from the private sector. This approach has saved Canadian taxpayers about $700 million over the past two decades. It was one of the first organizations in Canada to commit to meeting the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, LEED, gold standard in new construction. Major renovations must meet the silver standard.

Nine of the ten new buildings constructed for the government across Canada in recent years are certified LEED gold. The tenth, 30 Victoria, across the river in Gatineau is LEED platinum, the highest level possible. This underscores our commitment to green, energy efficient buildings.

Construction work led by the department is happening around the country and generating important work for Canadians. Over the next two years, we anticipate major repair projects will be completed on several key assets. These include the Esquimalt graving dock in British Columbia and the Alexandra Bridge, which connects Ottawa and Gatineau, a few blocks from here. In addition, a new Government of Canada pay centre is currently under construction in Miramichi, New Brunswick under a lease contract arrangement.

Parts of Parliament Hill and the surrounding blocks are also undergoing significant renovations. The rehabilitation of the Sir John A. Macdonald Building has been completed. The revitalization of the Wellington Building is nearly finished. Work continues on the significant West Block rehabilitation project, as well as others. Committee members will be happy to know that each one is on time and on budget.

As part of my mandate, I have also been asked to undertake a review of Canada Post to ensure Canadians receive high-quality postal service at a reasonable price. The independent review will consider all viable options and provide Canadians with an opportunity to have a say in the decisions about Canada Post's future.

I am hoping that this committee will play an important role in the Canadian consultation process as we reach out to Canadians to get their feedback once a task force, that we will be putting in place, will have done its work. This is an important task and we are taking steps to ensure that we get the process right.

Turning now to the 2015 supplementary estimates (C), Public Services and Procurement Canada is seeking net funding of just over $83 million, increasing its approved funding to $3.22 billion.

This requested funding is needed mainly for the management of federal real property, the reconstruction of the Grande Allée Armoury in Quebec City, and the continuing rehabilitation of the Parliamentary precinct, as well as for fees that will allow Canadians to do business with the government using credit and debit cards.

The 2015-2016 supplementary estimates (C) for Shared Services Canada represents an increase of just over $54 million to $1.58 billion. The funding requested is needed mostly to enhance the Government of Canada network and cyber system security, to support the government response to the Syrian refugee crisis, and to offset the incremental costs of providing core information technology services to client departments and agencies.

(1540)



While we have made progress on several fronts, there is still much work to be done. Both departments will look for opportunities to better deliver programs and services and to improve results for Canadians through sound management. Overall, the keys to success are innovation, process-busting, and common-sense changes. I have confidence in the ability of the public service to embrace all three. Already I have met hundreds of dedicated, enthusiastic, and professional departmental employees in so many communities, and I intend to continue to do so. I know that we can work together to meet the expectations of Canadians.

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I'm happy to take the committee's questions.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister.

My understanding is that you are with us for one hour.

Hon. Judy Foote:

I am.

The Chair:

At 4:30 p.m., then, Minister, we'll break the proceedings to let you get on to your other ministerial duties.

We will go into a seven-minute round. The first questioner will be Mr. Drouin.

Mr. Francis Drouin (Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'd like to thank the minister and her department for being here today. I really appreciate you guys taking the time for us to pose some questions.

I'll get to the supplementary estimates soon, but I want to ask you a question, Minister, about your mandate letter. You were charged with modernizing procurement and making it more open and accessible to small and medium-sized enterprises. I am from Ottawa and the national capital region, and I do represent a lot of SMEs. It's important that they procure and do business with the government.

How will you modernize this so that SMEs can participate in the procurement process?

Hon. Judy Foote:

We have started already by having an extensive consultation process with small and medium-sized businesses, and industry generally. We have a supplier advisory group that we meet with on a regular basis. It's really important to engage them to find out what the barriers have been to small and medium-sized enterprises being successful in accessing government opportunities.

We are making sure that we take the time to reach out to all of those involved in industry, get their advice, and learn from them about how we can do things more efficiently and more effectively. We have been doing that throughout the department, again to focus on not just small and medium enterprises but industry overall. Government is a big business in the country, and we want to make sure everyone who can takes advantage of that because of the jobs that come with it and the opportunities that come for companies.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Great. Thank you.

Moving on to Shared Services, I know there have been some challenges.

I want to start by saying that I am a firm believer in the goals of Shared Services. In the supplementary estimates, you ask for $54 million for cybersecurity. What steps are being taken by SSC to ensure that we have a proper cybersecurity strategy? I remember a few years ago there was the Heartbleed problem, and then the problem at NRC. What is SSC doing to ensure that those kinds of situations don't happen again?

Hon. Judy Foote:

As you know, what we've attempted to do with an enterprise-wide system is not an easy task. It's fair to say that what we are doing is probably the largest undertaking in the country, in putting in place an enterprise-wide solution.

What we have to do is to look at where things have gone wrong and fix those. We're doing that. Those at Shared Services have undertaken to step back, evaluate the work that's been done to date, and on a go-forward basis find ways to ensure that any mistakes that happened in the past won't happen in the future. We're very cognizant of the responsibility we have from a cybersecurity perspective, working closely with Public Safety and security, working with our counterparts throughout government, to make sure that everything we possibly can do will be done to secure the security of our country and Canadians.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

That's great. Thank you.

I have one more question with regard to Shared Services. Does consolidating data centres make it easier to provide security with regard to cyber-threats? Other than saving costs, does that help prevent cyber-threats?

(1545)

Hon. Judy Foote:

Of course. The fewer avenues we have to ensure that we do get this right and that we have the types of services in place to respond quickly is important. When you're dealing with several entities, it becomes much more difficult. It makes a difference working closely with Public Safety and with other entities to ensure that we're of the same mind, and that we're working cohesively.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

That's great. Thank you.

I have one last request as a millennial. Many millennials were elected recently, and we have to fill out forms to get speakers, and we know how to do it. I always think about my father, so I'm not putting everybody else in the same boat. Minister Brison mentioned that he wants to hire more millennials as they come on board. I'm hoping that your department thinks of a strategy to ensure that millennials are well served and that perhaps they're more tech savvy.

Hon. Judy Foote:

I appreciate the comment. We are working very closely with Treasury Board through all of this, because of course we're very much partners in this enterprise. Absolutely, I'm there with Minister Brison in terms on who we need to be hiring, and to work with those who also have experience.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Thank you.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Did you care to cede your time to any other member?

Okay, Madam Ratansi, you have about a minute and a half.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi (Don Valley East, Lib.):

Minister, thank you for being here. You request a funding increase of $83 million for federal real property. You're also requesting $13.7 million in operating expenditures for the reinvestment of revenues.

First, how many real properties were been sold in the previous year, and what was the result of the sale? Second, there was an old practice of storing all our excess furniture in real estate. Is that practice still there? If we want to be efficient, that's really not good value for our real estate.

Hon. Judy Foote:

I'm going to turn to the deputy to address that in terms of the actual numbers.

Mr. George Da Pont:

We sold 21 for a total of about $10.3 million.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Okay, but my next question is, are we still using real estate to store excess furniture, which is probably useless?

Mr. George Da Pont:

I would hope not, but we certainly recognize that there are some issues in that area. There is also the issue of us having real estate and occupying buildings that are not completely full, while in the same communities we're leasing other space. One of our priorities, which touches very much on the point you raised, is to really try to maximize the use of our space. If we have half-empty buildings or buildings that are one-third empty and we're leasing elsewhere, we want to move people into those buildings, and maximize their use to reduce the costs. Similarly, if we're using space in a fashion that's not productive—and you gave us one example—then we're looking to phase that out. Space optimization is really a key priority of the real property area.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Da Pont.

We'll turn to Monsieur Blaney. [Translation]

Hon. Steven Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, CPC):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Madam Minister, welcome to the committee. It is a pleasure to have you here. I would also like to acknowledge the officials you have with you. You can count on robust and constructive opposition from our side, I hope, in the greater interest of Canadians. That is why we are all here for, after all.

Madam Minister, in your presentation, I liked your commitment to the shipbuilding strategy which, as you have recognized, is a major engine of job creation here, especially in Vancouver, Halifax and Lévis. I am also delighted that you intend to provide us with regular updates about the evolving costs and the progress of the projects. Canadians expect us to be sure that the contracts awarded by the Canadian government are completed on time because we are dealing with taxpayers' money and, of course, because we are in a competitive environment. We have been entrusted with a great responsibility.

My first question is about the shipbuilding strategy issue specifically.

After the election, I printed this passage from your election platform, your plan. You say that you want to strengthen the navy while complying with the requirements of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy. Of course, those are investments that will allow the navy to be operational, but that will also create jobs. Clearly, we want to create jobs in Canada.

I had the opportunity to tell you about an article about the tugboats, as they are called. It raised the possibility of having them built somewhere else. So, can you confirm this afternoon that the jobs will be created in Canada, as part of the shipbuilding strategy, as you committed to do?

(1550)

[English]

Hon. Judy Foote:

Thank you for the question.

Like you, I recognize the importance of the shipbuilding industry. We have not had a shipbuilding industry in this country for over 25 years, and we need to have one. We need to have a robust shipbuilding industry in our country. We need to respond to the needs of the navy and the Canadian Coast Guard. In having that robust shipbuilding industry, we need to involve companies throughout the country and in doing so create jobs. That's what this is about.

No decision has been made yet by the Department of National Defence with respect to the tugboats. We're very early in the planning stages for that. There was a competitive process that enabled the government of the day to come up with two centres of excellence, one in Halifax and one in Vancouver, which you already referred to. That doesn't preclude other shipyards from availing themselves of the opportunities, because there will be opportunities for smaller ships. While Halifax will be building combat ships, and Seaspan will be building non-combat ships, there will be other opportunities for companies throughout the country to avail themselves of and employ Canadians from coast to coast to coast.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Yes, and there are certainly many smaller shipyards throughout the country that have the capability to build those tugboats. My colleague, Mr. MacAulay, and I visited the designer of tugboats in Vancouver. I would argue this person is the best designer in the world. He's in Canada. We have the expertise.

Madam Minister, I was a little surprised that when it came time to hire an expert, you couldn't find any Canadians and went to hire a independent British consultant. Is there any reason why you chose not to rely on Canadian expertise in shipyards to advise you on moving forward with the strategy?

Hon. Judy Foote:

Allow me to repeat that we have not had a shipbuilding industry in this country for 20 to 25 years. We did look for a Canadian. There were Canadians who were working abroad, but in the interviews that were held, it became obvious from those who were doing the interview process that Mr. Brunton was highly qualified and came with shipbuilding experience. He's a rear admiral who is used to naval acquisitions. We wanted to get the best possible person and we did that. It was determined through all of the interviews that were held that he was the individual we should hire.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

In the mandate you have provided to this consultant, have you clearly specified that in his recommendations the ships would have to be built in Canada?

Hon. Judy Foote:

We will be looking to Mr. Brunton for advice, but clearly he knows that our goal is to build the shipbuilding industry in this country. We want to make sure that we get 100% Canadian profits for all ships that are built. He is well aware of that, just as we've indicated before. We're working closely with him, but our priority will always be to have ships built in the country.

We also have to bear in mind that we're talking about Canadian taxpayer dollars here. We want them to be spent effectively and efficiently. A number of factors come into play, but first and foremost are jobs for Canadians.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Absolutely. Regarding the taxpayer, you mentioned you would be willing to provide an update on the procurement process. When do you expect you will be able to provide this committee with the current status of the shipyard strategy either for the combat or the non-combat ships, the estimated costs, and the schedule for those ships?

(1555)

Hon. Judy Foote:

We're expecting to have our first report ready in the fall, and after that we'll be doing quarterly reports. Bear in mind that we are going down a different path in the shipbuilding strategy. We want to make sure that we get it right. We're doing consultations on an ongoing basis with industry. We will not preclude anything in how we're going to roll out the strategy, bearing in mind that we know that we already have the two centres of excellence. We know what we have committed to them to do. They're our partners in this process. We're looking at the fall for a complete report of where we are, and then we'll do quarterly reports.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Mr. Weir, you have seven minutes for questions and answers with the minister.

Mr. Erin Weir (Regina—Lewvan, NDP):

Thank you.

As the NDP critic for Public Services and Procurement Canada, it's great to have you here, Minister. I'd like to pick up on a point raised across the table about real property. A practice of the last Conservative government, and indeed the preceding Liberal government, was to sell off government buildings and then lease them back at much higher costs. I wonder whether the new government will continue that practice? Specifically, of the $32.8 million requested for increases in non-discretionary expenses associated with crown-owned buildings and leased space, how much of that is crown-owned buildings as opposed to leased space?

Hon. Judy Foote:

I'm going to ask the deputy to speak to those details.

Mr. George Da Pont:

In terms of the approach on buildings I think what you're referring to are situations when we are in buildings that are close to the end of their life and need very significant refurbishment. That's the bulk of what the real property folks deal with.

When buildings get to that situation, there's a cost-benefit analysis done, where we look at all the options: would it be better to sell the building, would it be better to invest and refurbish the entire building, would it be better to look at some public-private partnership to see if one could build a new building?

I think the approach is to look carefully at all the available options, look at which one has the best value for the taxpayer and still meets the needs of the public service, the people who will be working in those buildings.

The answer is different depending on that analysis.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Perhaps that should be the approach. I'm still wondering if there's a breakdown of that figure between crown-owned and leased buildings. The more general question is about the oft-taken approach of selling these assets for upfront cash, which might make the public finances look better, but cost taxpayers more in the long run.

Can we get some kind of commitment from the minister that this won't be the approach of this government?

Hon. Judy Foote:

Certainly it's not all about getting cash for the buildings. It's about looking at how the property will be used.

We're very conscious sometimes of the need to take a different approach and we have not ruled that out on a number of fronts within the department. We're reviewing all of the...whether it's real property, Canada lands, different entities within the department, and looking at different approaches to delivering on our mandate. Real property, of course, is one of them.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Another item in the estimates that relates to procurement is $61.8 million for a new bridge to replace the Champlain Bridge. The new government has indicated that it will remove the requirement from federal funding that infrastructure projects be conducted as public-private partnerships.

I'm wondering if you could update us on whether that has been done and whether it makes sense to push ahead with the new Champlain Bridge as a P3.

Hon. Judy Foote:

We are cognizant of a need to spend taxpayers' dollars as efficiently and as effectively as we possibly can. In looking at any new builds, we're bearing that in mind, so that as we go down the path of new builds we're looking at what the actual cost will be, what the best route to take is, and the signed contract for that particular bridge is a P3.

Mr. Erin Weir:

That's part of the reason I raised the topic.

Whether or not it's a P3, the bridge will require a large amount of steel. The Canadian steel industry is currently depressed, and I'm wondering if the new bridge will be built with Canadian-made steel, and also what type of fair wages policy if any will be applied for the workers engaged in that project?

(1600)

Hon. Judy Foote:

We're looking at optimizing the benefits for Canadians and for Canadian companies with everything we're doing. That is something we're undertaking to do as a department.

Mr. Erin Weir:

But on this specific construction project, which is a huge one, can you give any indication of whether it will be built with Canadian-made steel?

Hon. Judy Foote:

Have we funded the P3?

Mr. George Da Pont:

As the minister said, significant Canadian companies are part of the consortium that won the contract, so there will be very significant Canadian content. I would have to look into the question you raise about whether they intend to use Canadian steel because, off the top of my head, I don't have the answer to that. We'll undertake to send that afterwards.

Mr. Erin Weir:

I appreciate that.

I know your mandate letter speaks to a modernized fair wages policy, and I'm not sure exactly what that means. Will it be in effect for all the workers employed in building this new bridge?

Hon. Judy Foote:

That is the intention.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Can you tell us anything about what the policy will be?

Hon. Judy Foote:

What have we done?

Mr. George Da Pont:

In terms of the fair wages policy, under this contract and any other contract we enter into, anyone building in Canada has to comply with all federal and provincial legislation and meet all the existing requirements—

Mr. Erin Weir:

On complying with labour legislation, isn't it a fair wages policy? It used to be that if you wanted to bid on a federal construction project, you had to pay certain wage rates for different trades. The Conservatives eliminated that good policy. The new government has talked about bringing back some version of it. Will this be done?

Mr. George Da Pont:

And that's what I was explaining. At the moment that's the situation. There are no longer those provisions in contracts. I think the government is looking at the issue.

Mr. Erin Weir:

So we're not sure whether it will be applied to the new Champlain Bridge.

Hon. Judy Foote:

It may very well be, and a fair wages policy is part of the mandate letter. I guess we're not sure whether or not it's going to happen with this particular procurement, but it's certainly something that we're committed to do.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

We'll go now to Mr. Whalen.

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.):

There is a point of order. I believe it's Mr. Grewal.

The Chair:

I'm sorry.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

But I may jump in if he shares his time with me.

The Chair:

Mr. Grewal, you may concede any unused time you wish.

Mr. Raj Grewal (Brampton East, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you, Minister and your staff for coming today. We really appreciate it.

My question was going to be on the national shipbuilding procurement strategy, but my hon. colleague has had a detailed discussion on that, so I'll move on.

A lot of people in my riding, especially during the campaign, talked about Canada Post. A lot of these people work for Canada Post. A number of people were concerned about door-to-door delivery. The issue of an independent task force review of Canada Post has come up quite often in question period and in the media. Can you please update us on what's going on in that process?

Hon. Judy Foote:

We are determined to get this right and that means making sure that we find the right individuals to lead the task force. We know that there has been substantial work done in the past on Canada Post. Under the previous government, there was a five-point plan. We need to access all of the information that Canada Post has used in making its decisions. We want to have a more independent review than was done by Canada Post itself, but we also want access to information that Canada Post has gathered.

We want to hire the right individuals to make up the task force. These people will do the legwork to collect this research and determine whether or not there are other business lines that Canada Post can be engaged in. We need a consultation process with Canadians, but it would be very time-consuming for the committee to do this itself. For this reason, we'd like to have an independent task force undertake that work, co-operating with the secretariat out of the department. They would be able to provide you with all the information you need, if you think this is an appropriate exercise for the committee to undertake.

(1605)

Mr. Raj Grewal:

Thank you, Minister.

Throughout the campaign we talked about the shortage of affordable housing. I have the privilege of sitting on the finance committee, and we just went through pre-budget consultations. A lot of organizations across the country came and spoke about the importance of affordable housing.

Your mandate letter said that you're working with the Minister of Infrastructure on an inventory of all federally owned real estate, with a view to seeing what can be converted to affordable housing. I think this is a great use of government resources. Can you please give the committee an update on that process?

Hon. Judy Foote:

Interestingly enough, I attended a session on homelessness last night. Part of the discussion was on the availability of existing federal buildings and how we could make them available, instead of selling them for the maximum dollar, as was previously done. From this government's perspective, we have to have more of a social conscience. We need to recognize that there could be other uses for that property. In fact, what I said last night at this meeting was that anyone who's aware of excess federal government property should feel free to get in touch with the department. We can look at possible uses of that property, rather than trying to sell it off. A number of departments might have property that could be made available for social housing.

Mr. Raj Grewal:

Thank you, Minister.

You mentioned today the rehabilitation of the Sir John A. Macdonald Building and the Wellington Building. The key point I noted was that they're on time and on budget, which is very important. In the spirit of accountability and transparency, I would just ask that if these things change, you let the committee know so we can update Canadians if the budget changes. I worked in finance and I know that budgets can come and go, so I would request that you please update the committee if the numbers change.

I will now cede the remainder of my time to my colleague.

Hon. Judy Foote:

If I could speak to that one point, that is certainly what we have committed to do in terms of being open and transparent with respect to procurement to take the mystery out of it and to make sure that Canadians know exactly what is happening. It's the same with members of Parliament: we want you to know where we are. We want you to know if costs go up, as well. It's one thing to be on time and on budget, which is really good, but things do happen and we want to make sure that you're aware when they do.

Mr. Raj Grewal:

Thank you, Minister.

The Chair:

Mr. Whalen, you have about two minutes.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Thank you very much.

Just continuing along the line of questions regarding Canada Post, I have to say that in addition to issues about housing for seniors, questions about Canada Post were probably the second most frequent ones I had during the campaign. Every street had someone who was being affected by the reductions in service. Indeed, in the dying days of the campaign, Canada Post shut down door-to-door mail delivery in a couple of ridings in the country—St. John's East, St. John's South—Mount Pearl, and Charlottetown—only days before the Prime Minister stated that this practice should cease. Indeed, many of the complaints were from people who had legitimate concerns about the location of mailboxes.

I have a couple of questions on that. First, I didn't see anything in the estimates allocating any additional funding or allotments towards the task force. Is this being done under existing estimates or will it be in the next budget?

Second, will the task force reach out to Canadians who made complaints and find out if Canada Post, in response, kept pushing forward with bad ideas or if took those complaints seriously and addressed them properly rather than simply using them as an opportunity to punish the people of my riding?

Hon. Judy Foote:

Well, if they did it in your riding, they did it in mine too.

The cost of the task force will be covered by the department, as will be the secretariat out of the department. That's why you don't see additional requests for money. We will ask the task force to look at every possible decision made by Canada Post, and whether or not they responded to the complaints they received. That's all part and parcel of doing a complete independent review of Canada Post. Again, on a go-forward basis, they will make sure that if there are outstanding issues, those issues are addressed.

One of the issues we recognize, of course, is that Canada Post is an arm's-length corporation. In its operations, it does what it does because it has to be self-sustainable, and it will continue to have to be self-sustainable. At the same time, it delivers a service to Canadians from coast to coast to coast, and we want to make sure that this service will continue to be delivered. What that service will be will depend on what Canada Post can afford, because there will not be any money forthcoming from the government, as it is an arm's-length crown corporation. At the same time, we're expecting that the task force in its independent review will look at other avenues of business that could possibly be explored that will enable Canada Post to have more revenue to carry out its responsibility to deliver mail, or whatever else it intends to do or can do with the finances available to it.

(1610)

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

We're now going to a five-minute round, starting with Mr. McCauley.

Mr. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton West, CPC):

I'm going to give the first 30 seconds to my colleague here.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

For the record, I would just like to mention regarding the disposal of assets that the Canada Lands Company, which already exists, produces this. The goal is to work with the industry and work on a consultation-based approach in pursuing community-oriented goals, environmental stewardship, and heritage commemoration. I've worked with the Canada Lands Company for the last decade and they are very good at the disposal of land.

With that, I'll switch to Mr. McCauley.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Thank you, sir.

I just want to follow up on my colleague's questions regarding your mandate letter. I'm probably approaching it from a different point of view. Instituting a modern fair wage policy contradicts your comment about making procurement easier for Canadian companies to do business with the government. You will end up excluding a huge number of family businesses, small businesses, and those who are working at a different competitive level.

How far down the path have you gone so far with the fair wage policy? We hear again and again: consult with Canadians, consult, consult, consult, and then we'll consult more. Are we doing this process with small businesses, non-union businesses, to discuss this fair wage policy and how it will affect procurement and a fairness process?

Hon. Judy Foote:

The fair wage policy, of course, is something that would be looked at government-wide, not just through the Department of Public Services and Procurement Canada.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

The same comments apply government-wide. Thank you.

Hon. Judy Foote:

Having said that, it's something that we haven't engaged in at this point. It would be led by another agency of government. I would expect Treasury Board would be heavily involved in this.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

But it's in your mandate letter.

Hon. Judy Foote:

I expect it's in everybody's mandate letter.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I don't see it.

Hon. Judy Foote:

It's something we've been asked to look at, and we will look at it; but again, it would be government-wide.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Okay.

Are you committing to consult, consult, consult as we're hearing again, again, again?

Hon. Judy Foote:

Absolutely.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Perfect.

It sounds like you're not really far down the path of that right now.

Hon. Judy Foote:

Not right now.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I think I've maybe answered Mr. Weir's question.

Getting back to the shipbuilding, we've seen in several reports that you're considering sending south the weapons packaging, some of the high-tech stuff and the real value-added stuff, the real industry-creating part of the shipbuilding industry. I realize there's money involved and we need the best value. However, a big part of the NSPS was recreating this dead industry. You've said you're not going to preclude anything. But how far down the path has government gone on looking to send this business outside the country?

Hon. Judy Foote:

It is not our intention to send business outside the country. We are looking to make sure that work being done in Canada is of a high-tech nature, as well as any other opportunities that would become available.

We do realize we have to spend Canadian taxpayers' dollars wisely, but at the same time you bear in mind the trade-off in terms of the jobs that come with this.

It's a matter of consultation with industry, and we're doing that all the time, because they are our partners in this. So while we're the only—

(1615)

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I think the report said that from the tech side, they hadn't been consulted. They were taken a bit by surprise. Is that incorrect, then, maybe?

Hon. Judy Foote:

We've been consulting. I'm surprised to hear that. We've been consulting with the Canadian industry on all facets of procurement.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

I have one last question, because I'm almost out of time.

With Shared Services, I realize it's been a very difficult process, Mr. Parker, but I wonder if you could very briefly update us on where we are with it. What other resources do you need to get everything working properly? We saw recently that there was a plan to put in a server station at Trenton, but no one had discussed it with DND, and they're in dispute about it. How far down the road are we to getting all these issues fixed?

In the audit report, you were short about 800 people. Is it lack of skilled people, a shortage of people, or a myriad of issues? We obviously want it to succeed.

The Chair:

We're running out of time.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Answer in three seconds.

Mr. Ron Parker:

We're in the process, Mr. Chair, of looking at all of the assumptions underpinning the transformation plan and working towards putting forward a new, revised, and updated plan in the fall of this year.

The Chair:

Thank you so much, sir.

My list has Mr. Whalen next, for five minutes.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, everyone, for coming today.

I'll pick up again on the shipbuilding strategy. Many companies throughout Atlantic Canada are very encouraged by the independent process that allowed Irving Shipbuilding to win the award of the contract, and then there was silence, nothing. It almost feels as if the industry in Atlantic Canada, and indeed the country, on the shipbuilding side has atrophied after neglect. What is your department planning to do to move this file forward so that Canadians can get the ships built and the expected services delivered?

Hon. Judy Foote:

Actually, we're very happy with what's happening with the shipyard in Halifax and Seaspan in Vancouver. They have started on their first builds, and we're very impressed with what we're seeing. They have invested the money. On Seaspan's front, they invested their own money to upgrade their facility. Halifax has also invested a considerable amount of money to upgrade the facility there.

We're very pleased with what we're seeing. We also see a real opportunity there for employment and other companies. Right now, 300 companies have benefited from the work that has already taken place both in Halifax and in Vancouver, and those are companies throughout the country.

That will be part of our update when we give our quarterly updates. It will certainly be part of our fall update. You will be able to see exactly where the money's being spent, what companies are availing of opportunities through the shipbuilding industry, how many people are being employed, and the types of contracts they are getting.

You will see it isn't just windows and doors, as was suggested, but some high-tech work as well. It's important that we take advantage of every opportunity for Canadian companies to avail of the work and offer the jobs.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

It's great to hear that this is finally moving forward.

I'll go on to the issue of cybersecurity, and I thank Mr. Drouin for opening with his comments earlier.

From the perspective of the estimates process, it seems like quite a large increase is being request on that particular line item. I realize it's extremely important. I can't tell from the way the estimates are structured how much of the line item was dedicated to cybersecurity in the larger, whatever it is, $1.5 billion, or how much of that was cybersecurity before.

What does the department expect the rate of increase to be in the costs of cybersecurity protection efforts going forward? What can Canadians expect on that front? What is the delta we're currently looking at year over year in terms of increases in the costs of protecting our network infrastructure from cyberterrorism?

Mr. Ron Parker:

Mr. Chair, I'm afraid I don't have the year-over-year growth rates in front of me, but we would be happy to get the numbers for you. In terms of cybersecurity overall, I can tell you that there have been steady increments in recent years. This underscores the importance of cybersecurity overall.

As well, the department has stood up from within the overall allocation it receives. The security operation centre provides 24/7/365 monitoring of the perimeter of the attempts to penetrate the Government of Canada network. There have been very significant efforts since the creation of Shared Services to bring this forward and advance this initiative.

(1620)

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Along the same lines, having one network to protect makes it a little bit easier versus trying to protect 63, so we can see some real benefits from the strategy on that front. In terms of downtime when networks go down, there's a concern that, if the government network goes down, then it's not just one of 63 networks that has gone down; now everyone is down.

What types of efforts are being put into place, and from a budgetary perspective, how much effort are you devoting towards protecting our downtime? What sort of redundancy plans are being put in place? How much effort is going into making sure that uptime is maximized on this now-consolidated network?

The Chair:

You have 20 seconds.

Mr. Ron Parker:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The efforts are significant. We're moving from 50 siloed separate networks to one network. In the design of the network, we're paying very close attention to the redundancy and high availability of the network. That work is just starting. At this point, the contracts have been let to work on the new network, but it has not yet tangibly begun. The planning phase is under way. Those issues are front and centre. We look to have network availability that's very high.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Parker.

Mr. Blaney, you have five minutes, please.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Minister Foote, there was a troubling article in The Hill Times that Canada Post could be distributing material that is not complying with Canadian law—hate speech, and not really interesting attitudes toward minorities. Would you like to comment on this? Do you have any capability to ensure that Canada Post makes sure that the material it is distributing is complying with the law?

Hon. Judy Foote:

Thank you for the question.

I am aware of the situation. I too have issues with the information that's being distributed, so much so that we've asked for a legal opinion on the content, to see if there's any criminal aspect to it. I am concerned about the content.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Is there any mechanism to ensure that the material being distributed overall is in compliance with Canadian law?

Or is it more on a case-by-case basis when such a thing occurs?

Hon. Judy Foote:

That's right. That's why we've talked to Canada Post. My understanding is that the initial....

There was one instance where they had legal advice, and it wasn't an issue that would have them withdraw it. But now that there's another piece of literature that's being disseminated, there are concerns. I too have concerns with it, and we've asked for a legal opinion.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Okay. We certainly would like to be informed of your intention regarding this certainly regrettable course of action that has been undertaken.

Second, you mentioned that we would expect Immigration to be involved, but you mentioned that you were involved in the welcoming of Syrians. Can you explain more specifically what your involvement was, and how much was invested in that operation? Is it part of your estimates? Do you expect there will be growing costs, as there's an increasing number of Syrian refugees who will arrive? Especially in terms of training and housing, are you expecting any cost increases in that regard?

Hon. Judy Foote:

Yes. We have indicated that our request is in fact for more money to enable us to do more. Our job was actually in terms of procurement, and that was with winter jackets, housing, or anything that would be required to accommodate the refugees while they are here. We are expecting that we will need additional resources to be able to respond to more refugees coming to our country.

(1625)

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Okay.

My colleague has to leave, but I'd like him to be able to ask his last question before he does.

The Chair:

You have two minutes, Mr. McCauley.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Perfect. I'll ask very quickly.

You stated, and I was very pleased for the taxpayers about Canada Post, no other taxpayers' money from the government. I agree that they have to find new revenue streams to increase their service, but can we commit that they will not be moving into areas already well served by private companies, smaller companies, or using their inherent competitive advantage to drive out already operating small businesses and other private businesses?

Hon. Judy Foote:

Well, you know, there are some areas where Canada Post is already competitive with existing business. What we have to do, if we're going to deliver a service to Canadians, is find a way to do that. Again, Canada Post is a crown corporation and has to be self-sustainable. What other lines of business they'll be able to do, I don't know, but that's why we want to have a comprehensive, independent review, to see what the opportunities are.

I recognize the concern you raise in terms of competitiveness with small and medium-sized enterprises. I'm sure all of that will be factored into the review that's done.

Mr. Kelly McCauley:

Yes, but we would just like assurances that the big guy will not trample on small businesses that are already offering courier or other home delivery services right now.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

For the final five-minute round, we'll go to Monsieur Ayoub.

Mr. Ramez Ayoub (Thérèse-De Blainville, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.[Translation]

Madam Minister, ladies and gentlemen, thank you for joining us today.

I need some information specifically about the process involved in requesting additional funds.

Let me give you an example. You may possibly find others if you look around. The Quebec City Armoury, on the Grande Allée, was destroyed by fire in 2008. That is eight years ago now. I see that the first funds to rebuild it, some $72 million, were approved only last year. If you take away a year, it means that it took seven years before a decision was made to rebuild the famous Quebec City Armoury. I know the building well because it is located in an area I lived in as a child.

A year later, additional funds were requested. So I am trying to find out about the budget forecasting process that led to those funds being requested. We know what the Quebec City Armoury was and what it should be. One year later, which is not very long, why is there a request for a 30% increase over the amount of $72 million? Was the planning poor to start with? Why, one year later, do you as the new minister end up with this problem on your hands? [English]

Mr. George Da Pont:

That actually does come up from time to time, particularly when you're renovating buildings that have significant historical features that have to be preserved.

Obviously, we do inspections of the buildings as part of setting the initial estimates and we often engage third-party experts to do that. It's not unusual when you actually start the work and you begin taking out things and you discover things that did not come out in the initial inspection.

It's not that different from homeowners doing their own project and once they get into it you, they find there are things that they had not anticipated doing, so we do have that happen from to time.

When that happens, if it cannot be covered in the initial budget that was set, you would look at supplementary funding to cover it. That's often the explanation.

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

Is it reasonable to say that from time to time it would be 30% over budget?

Mr. George Da Pont:

Well— [Translation]

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

In all projects, there is always usually an amount identified as a contingency. My concern is that, a year later, there is request for an additional 30%. The project itself does not concern me because, of course, the Quebec City Armoury is a jewel that needs to be rebuilt. I do not know the details, but I am worried about the planning and about the fact that we have all this to deal with one year later.

(1630)

Mr. George Da Pont:

The last thing I would add is that sometimes work is distributed over two or three contracts. There is not one single contract for everything.[English]

In this case, this is a new contract. It's not an extension of a previous contract. It does go to finding things you didn't expect and basically having not just one contract for everything but contracts for different parts of the work. [Translation]

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

I am Syrian by origin and welcoming Syrians affects me somewhat.

Last year, the Liberal party wanted to bring in a certain number of Syrians. To start with, it was 10,000 Syrians, then another 15,000 were added for a total of 25,000. An additional amount of $5.4 million was requested to deal with the intake of those Syrians.

Will that amount be used now, or is it spread over a number of years? How is that additional amount broken down? [English]

The Chair:

A very short response, Minister.

Hon. Judy Foote:

In terms of the money we require, the request would be made through the immigration department. They would identify the number of refugees and then, based on our work with them, we would determine what costs we would incur to do more of what we've already done for the 25,000 who came.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Minister, I have the time as 4:32. You indicated you had to leave at approximately 4:30, so on behalf of the committee, we thank you for your attendance, and you are excused.

Hon. Judy Foote:

Thank you. I look forward to continuing to work with the committee, particularly on the Canada Post file. If that is something the committee feels is appropriate, then I would appreciate that.

The Chair:

Thank you, again, Minister.

For the benefit of committee members, I have two quick points. We'll find this becoming more commonplace as we go down the road with committee meetings, but normally, if we have meetings for two hours and there are two separate panels coming in, after the first panel is finished their presentations, wherever we are in the speaking order, we go back to the initial rotation.

However, after consultations with Madam Ratansi, and given the fact that we have a similar panel before us, we'll continue with the ongoing rotation, which means that the next question will be to Mr. Weir, for three minutes, and then we'll go back to the seven-minute round.

However, as I mentioned at the last meeting, we also have to allow at least 10 minutes toward the end of this meeting for a series of votes on the supplementary estimates (C). At approximately 5:20 I will adjourn our hearing from the witnesses and we'll go to the votes on the various supplementary estimates (C).

Mr. Weir, for three minutes, please, questions and answers combined.

Mr. Erin Weir:

I'd like to pick up on the point from across the table about the importance of affordable housing. This past week a troubling story emerged about the Government of Saskatchewan putting some homeless people on buses to British Columbia.

I wonder if the officials could provide some information about how quickly the federal government's proposed measures for affordable housing could be put in place in our province of Saskatchewan.

Mr. George Da Pont:

The role of our department in affordable housing will be a support role, but a very significant support role.

To date, we have a full inventory of buildings and structures that the department has, which have some potential for being turned over to affordable housing. That is feeding into work being led by CMHC, which is taking the broad policy lead across government because, as the minister mentioned, other departments have potential properties and structures that could be used. That is all feeding in and they're leading the development of an approach to strengthen affordable housing possibilities.

(1635)

Mr. Erin Weir:

Might I ask how many of those properties are in Saskatchewan?

Mr. George Da Pont:

I don't have that information, but I'll turn that over to my colleague, Kevin Radford, who heads up our real property area. He may or may not have it, and if he doesn't, we'll make that available.

Mr. Kevin Radford (Assistant Deputy Minister, Real Property, Department of Public Works and Government Services):

With respect to Saskatchewan specifically, we have provided a list of all of our properties that are up for disposal. We've categorized them by criteria: are they in an urban setting; are they in a rural setting; are they commercial; are they possibly residential, etc.?

The idea is that we take 30% of the holdings that we have and provide a mechanism, or at least a catalyst for other custodians of property, like the RCMP, National Defence, etc., to follow up pro forma to move the program and at least understand our asset base much more clearly.

Within that list, there certainly are some properties in Saskatchewan, and I would need to dig into those and provide them to you.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Yes, could you come back to the committee with that information?

There are also some items here that we're going to look into, around the use of Canadian-made steel in the Champlain Bridge replacement. That would be very interesting.

The Chair:

We'll go back to a seven-minute round and we'll start with Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

As a former technology journalist specializing in free and open-source software, I intend to get a bit into the weeds of Shared Services, so if there are any technical staff accompanying you I'd encourage them to move up to the table and identify themselves.

First of all, of the 23,000 servers across 485 data centres the minister referred to, how many of them run on open-source software? Are we exploring a significant migration away from proprietary software models toward open-source software options as you transition toward seven data centres? For example, on the Hill, I cannot use anything but Internet Explorer because we are told that it is the only browser that meets our security standards, which anyone who has been in the industry more than a few hours knows is kind of funny.

On the server side, the various flavours of Linux make very nice replacements for the various flavours of UNIX and Windows. I want to ensure that we're considering open-source software in a serious way, as we move forward.

Mr. Ron Parker:

I'm not a technologist, I'm afraid. I'll say that right up front. I'm going to ask the technology expert, Patrice Rondeau, to take on that question.

Mr. Patrice Rondeau (Acting Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Data Centers, Shared Services Canada):

Good afternoon, Mr. Chair.

Open source has been and continues to be an area that we focus our attention on when we have to expand our platform. Especially as part of the workload migration in moving from the older legacy environment to the new, we're looking at opportunities to exploit open source software.

On the data center side, we have 26,000 physical servers, but we have up to 74,000 OS instances, so we have virtual servers sitting on physical servers, and I would say that approximately 15% are running Linux.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What are the other 85% running, generally?

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

The remainder, you mean?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes. Are they legacy Unix systems or are we looking at Windows servers or some combination?

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

We're running Windows servers for a large percentage. We're running all flavours of Unix. We have HP-UX. We have IBM AIX. We have a lot of mainframe capability also. The larger departments still rely heavily on mainframe computers.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are we still using 32-bit signed integers to store time anywhere in government or are we going to be vulnerable to the Y2K38?

(1640)

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

I'm sorry. I didn't hear the question.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are we still using 32-bit signed integers to store dates anywhere in government or are we ready for the Y2K38 bug?

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

We're still using 32-bit machines, but mostly 64-bit machines, if that's what the question is.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's the question.

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

We still have a lot of RISC-based environments. We still run some Solaris, some HP-UX, and some IBM pSeries. What we inherited four or five years ago were all the flavours of probably every type of server and computer that existed at the time.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm always surprised to hear RISC still exists, but that's another story.

I am probably the only member of Parliament to have a PGP key, and I'm definitely the only member of Parliament to be in the Debian keyring. Will government employees be encouraged to adopt PGP key signatures, trust rings, or another cryptographic authentication system?

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

I cannot really respond to this question, but I can follow up and get back to the committee.

An hon. member: [Inaudible—Editor] what is it?

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Ramez Ayoub:

I'm looking for some translation here.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's not the kind of translation they can help us with.

PGP is “Pretty Good Privacy”. It's a fairly old standard, but it allows cryptographically signed or encrypted emails. It's something that I've used in the open-source community for many years.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

It's good privacy.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, it's pretty good privacy, implemented to the GNU privacy guard. It's a long thing.... But it's a very reliable and very well-known system outside of government in the technology community, and I would like to see it or some kind of variant used in government. It's another level of security to have PGP signed emails with a trust ring, where I've sign your key and you've signed my key.

I'd like to at least have the government explore that, if that's possible.

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

Okay. We can explore and get back to the committee.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When the response comes back, I'll translate it back for you, Mr. Blaney.

Mr. Ron Parker:

Mr. Chair, we'll come back with an explanation of what we do in terms of secure keys and that type of service, but I'll just note that Shared Services Canada does not provide services to the House of Commons.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No, that's fair, but this is government-wide. This is a lot of email accounts, a lot of servers, and a lot of systems.

Are we moving the government over to full IPv6 support across the network?

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

IPv6? I'm the data centre ADM at—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Then we can have a nice long conversation and nobody will have a clue as to what we're talking about.

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

No, no. I'm quite familiar with IPv6.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I know that you and I will.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

We have initiatives under way, mostly with our network area or our network branch. They've been implementing and looking at implementing IPv6, but I couldn't give you all the details. I would have to go back to our network branch specialists.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What kind of hardware are we running mostly? Do you know?

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

For network?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the network and the server side.

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

On the server side, we're running all existing hardware, probably from the last 15 years, that we have in our 400 or so data centres right now, but the newer platforms are mainly blade-type servers.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How much time do I have?

The Chair:

You have about 45 seconds.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. That's a little bit.

Out of morbid curiosity, perhaps, can I ask how many domain names we own as a government? Do you have any idea?

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

I couldn't respond. We have one main domain, which is “.ca”.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's CIRA. That's not us.

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

Yes, it's NFS. For a specific domain names count, I would have to check with our security person. Our network experts would probably be able to give you that count.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. I look forward to doing this again sometime. It's very interesting.

Mr. Patrice Rondeau:

Would you like us to go back?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Well, I believe my time is up.

The Chair:

Perhaps if you could get that information to the committee at a later date, that would be appreciated.

Now, speaking of someone who's still trying to figure out how a fax machine works, I'll turn the conversation over to Mr. Blaney for seven minutes.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. That's not to call me a dinosaur, but I appreciate that.

My question will be on the mandate letter, on the replacement of the CF-18s, and also on the parliamentary precinct rehabilitation program.[Translation]

I would like to have asked the minister some questions about the CF-18s. We are aware of the exceptional contribution that the fighters made to the mission against the so-called Islamic State. But we know that the CF-18s are reaching the end of their life. The minister's mandate letter calls for a process to replace the CF-18s. This afternoon, we heard that we will have an update about the shipbuilding strategy in November.

Can you give us an overview of this situation and tell us what are the next steps in replacing the CF-18s, a process that is already underway, and when those steps will be taken? Can you give me any information about that this afternoon?

(1645)

[English]

Mr. George Da Pont:

Thank you for the question. As you've noted, the government has made a commitment to replace the CF-18, and to make sure, obviously, that the air force has the plane it needs to do its job.

The department is working with the Department of National Defence to design, as the government committed to, an open and transparent competition process to replace the CF-18 fighter jets. That work is under way. I think an update will come at a point when the government has made a choice on how to proceed.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Okay. We're certainly looking forward to that.

If I bring you into the domain of the parliamentary rehabilitation program. I was pleased to see that the projects have been accomplished on time and on delivery. I understand that eventually we will have to leave Centre Block and move to East Block. Can you tell us when this will happen?

Mr. George Da Pont:

The intent is to vacate the Centre Block in 2018 and to move people into alternate locations while, obviously, the rehabilitation work is done in the Centre Block.

I'll turn to Rob Wright, who is the assistant deputy minister in charge of our parliamentary precinct. I'm sure he can provide you a little more detail, if you'd like, on where people are being moved.

Mr. Rob Wright (Assistant Deputy Minister, Parliamentary Precinct Branch, Department of Public Works and Government Services):

Absolutely. Thank you very much for the question.

The projects, as you noted, are all proceeding on time and on schedule. By 2018 a suite of five major projects will be completed, which will enable the Centre Block to be completely emptied, and for its restoration to begin.

Last year we completed the Sir John A. MacDonald facility, which provided new conference facilities for the Parliament of Canada. Within the next couple of months we will complete the Wellington Building at the corner of Wellington and Bank, which will allow MPs to be accommodated, and which is a critical part of being able to empty the Centre Block. As well, at the very end of 2017, we will complete the West Block and phase 1 of the visitor welcome centre. That will enable the chamber to be relocated from the Centre Block into the West Block, and all the legislative functions will take place in the West Block.

On the Senate side, we are rehabilitating the government conference centre, directly across from the Château Laurier. The Senate chamber and legislative functions will be relocated to the Government Conference Centre. The combination of these projects will enable the Centre Block to be completely emptied and its restoration to begin.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Following what took place and the fact that all the security services were grouped, has it had any impact on the design of the project?

Also, can you mention the visitors' centre and its impact on the parliamentary precinct and access to it, because this is certainly an issue that has generated some concern given what's been experienced.

Mr. Rob Wright:

Absolutely.

We work very closely with the new Parliamentary Protective Service, which was put in place last summer. I would note that prior to its creation, we worked very closely with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police as well as the security services of the Senate and the House of Commons.

In many respects, for us there has been little change. We've continued to work with the security forces as we had before. The design and construction of all these projects have adhered to the requirements that have been laid out by the RCMP as well as the Senate and House security forces and now we're working with the Parliamentary Protective Service.

(1650)

Hon. Steven Blaney:

So the visitor centre will be located on Wellington Street and prior to accessing the precinct, you would undergo some security check?

Mr. Rob Wright:

The visitor welcome centre, phase 1, will be located in-between the West Block and the Centre Block. You may note a large excavation in that area right now. That excavation is specifically for phase 1 of the visitor welcome centre. You will enter essentially from the east into the visitor welcome centre, phase 1, which will provide security screening before entering the West Block, as well as visitor greeting services.

When the Centre Block undergoes rehabilitation, the visitor welcome centre will be expanded to connect underground with the Centre Block and the West Block. So the visitor welcome centre will be largely underground and will provide a secure screening before entering into the main Parliament Buildings.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Thank you.

Mr. Chair, it would certainly be interesting to have a maybe more in-depth presentation of this important project and also the budgetary envelope.[Translation]

Thank you very much. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much for that answer, Mr. Wright. I know all parliamentarians are going to be very interested in the progress being made as we change Hill locations, particularly of the House of Commons.

We're now have seven minutes for Mr. Weir.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I think we have an all-party consensus at this committee about the need for greater clarity on the government's shipbuilding strategy.

I'd like to take up my colleague's line of questioning about aircraft procurement.

It was said that the government has committed to finding a replacement for the CF-18. I would note that the governing party also very clearly committed during the election campaign not to purchase the F-35. Yet it was recently revealed that the Government of Canada paid $45 million to remain part of the F-35 consortium and keep open the option of purchasing that aircraft.

I wonder if, from a public service perspective, you could confirm whether or not the F-35 is actively being considered in this procurement competition.

Mr. George Da Pont:

No, all I can confirm, as I said earlier, is that we are working with the Department of National Defence to develop an open competitive process, and when the government makes a decision it will obviously announce it.

In terms of one point you raised, participation in the joint strike fighter program, I think the important point to note is participation in the program does not commit anyone to purchasing the F-35.

Mr. Erin Weir:

I certainly take the point that it's not a commitment, although it does seem strange that a government would spend that much money if it didn't have much interest in buying the aircraft.

To ask the question a different way, it doesn't sound as though the F-35 has been excluded from the process at this point.

Mr. George Da Pont:

No, I think the main consideration is that by participating in the program, it provides the mechanism whereby Canadian companies can compete for contracts and become part of the supply chain for the F-35 process, which quite a number have already done.

I think significantly more money has been provided to Canadian companies under those contracts than the government has paid to be part of the program. However, if you are not paid up as part of the program, the companies in your jurisdiction can't compete. The important point is that it's a benefit and an opportunity for Canadian companies, but there's absolutely no commitment, no requirement, to purchase the F-35.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Understood.

To shift gears a little bit, in the estimates we also have Shared Services Canada seeking some funding for increased biometric screening at the Canadian border. I wonder what the rationale for that screening would be. Is it something we feel that we have to do as part of bilateral agreements with the United States, or is there another reason?

Mr. Ron Parker:

Mr. Chair, thank you for the question.

Our participation in this initiative, which is mainly the immigration department's responsibility, is to support the IT infrastructure side of this initiative.

In terms of the broader initiative, Graham, do you want to say something about the purpose?

(1655)

Mr. Graham Barr (Director General, Strategic Policy, Planning and Reporting, Shared Services Canada):

Sure. As Mr. Parker said, it's the Department of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship that's leading the initiative. More broadly, it's to expand the use of biometric screening to all travellers requiring visas who are seeking entry into Canada. Our responsibility is to provide the IT hardware, the servers and the storage, etc., and the software to support that activity.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Is that a totally new initiative for Shared Services Canada, or are you engaged in some biometric screening already?

Mr. Graham Barr:

Our role is to provide the IT infrastructure for it.

Mr. Erin Weir:

[Inaudible--Editor] bought an IT infrastructure for it already, or is this a new item?

Mr. Graham Barr:

It's not new. It's incremental.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Okay.

I guess another thing in the estimates I was interested in was the $5 million to remediate contaminated federal government sites. I'm just looking for some information on how many sites there might be, how contaminated they might be, and what the risk might be to public health?

Mr. George Da Pont:

I'll turn the details over again to my colleague Kevin Radford, but this is part of a long-standing program to remediate many contaminated sites across the country, and they vary from very large sites with significant problems to small sites throughout the country. A lot of the information is posted on websites, as to where the sites are and what's being cleaned up.

The funding for this happens on a regular basis in tranches of two or three years, usually. That's the way the funding has been going. The sites have been rated in terms of risk, and obviously the sites with the greatest risk are addressed first.

Kevin.

Mr. Kevin Radford:

Thank you, Mr. Chair, for the question.

I don't have much to add. Suffice it to say that there is a list, as my colleague George has mentioned, of decontaminated sites.

I will mention, though, that these decontaminated sites are part of our optional services that we provide to other departments. If the decontaminated site is on an air force base, it's part of National Defence. It's quite probable they could come to us and ask for our expertise, or if it's a property that's owned or run by another department, it's part of that suite of services that we offer. We bill those departments for our services.

Mr. Erin Weir:

Thank you.

Shared Services Canada is also seeking funding to help with the implementation of the government's response to the Syrian refugee crisis. There's no doubt that the government response to that crisis is a big initiative that has costs associated with it. I'm just wondering if you can zero in on the role that Shared Services Canada would play in that.

Mr. Ron Parker:

Mr. Chair, I'm happy to.

Our role is principally to supply the support tools necessary for the public service employees engaged in the initiative, such as mobile telephony and mobile laptops, and to help make sure the servers that support the initiative and the screening of the refugees are up and running on a very high availability basis. It's those types of services that we're providing through the funds we're requesting from Parliament in the supplementary estimates (C).

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Parker.

The final seven-minute round goes to Madame Ratansi.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you all for being here.

As I have been listening to your presentations and your responses, I am glad you are taking your role of due diligence and the minister's mandate very seriously and consulting so that we have the right answers.

The first thing I'd like are a few examples of how you are modernizing procurement and how are you making it simple. Everybody knows that government is a mammoth body. Sometimes they feel like it's an elephant that can't move. I come from Africa. Elephants move pretty fast, so I think they're being maligned for nothing.

Number one, could you just give me an example of how we simplify things? Then I'll ask the other questions.

Mr. George Da Pont:

I can give you several examples, and the general point you made is exactly the feedback that we've gotten from consultations with a very large number of companies, most of which are small and medium-sized companies, that do business with the Government of Canada. They've made the same point that you've made. It's complicated. It's difficult. It's more expensive than it needs to be.

We have worked with what we now call the “supplier advisory committee” and they've given us a list of quite a number of things they'd like to see as improvements to the procurement process. Some of them are under way and some of them are major initiatives that we need to tackle.

I'll give you an example. I think one of the number one things we heard was that the systems that we use when businesses go online to see what opportunities there might be, or to actually put bids in, are overly complicated. They're really archaic, they're old, and there are about 40-odd different systems that are used right now. One of our biggest initiatives is that we're looking at putting in place as quickly as we can what we call an “e-procurement package”, so we will have one system. It's off the shelf. It's proven. It's user-friendly and I think it will be one big simple improvement in companies' ability both to find opportunities and to put in bids. We've accelerated that project and we intend to have the system roll out in 2017-18.

If I go to the other end, we are looking at correcting a series of chronic administrative issues or problems. If someone puts in a bid and somehow a page gets lost—a minor administrative thing—they're rejected. We're looking at putting in place a series of those administrative fixes so that as long as it doesn't affect, obviously, the critical points and are not changing the bid in any way or affecting price or content, they can repair that.

Another significant refinement will be our initiative to simplify our contracts, which are very complicated and often out of proportion to the value of the actual expenditure. Obviously, if you're replacing the Champlain Bridge, a multi-billion dollar project, you would expect a big, complicated contract. Of course you would. But ours are overly complicated, so we're looking at an initiative to simplify our contracting and are aiming at the same rough timeframe of 2017-18 for that. So those are three specific examples.

(1700)

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

That's good. I'm sure all of us as MPs have small and medium-sized enterprises in our ridings. Do you have any idea how many small enterprises have succeeded in bidding?

I remember my days from 2004 to 2011 when I was on this committee and addressed the same problems. Has there been any solution? We have too many small businesses telling us that they cannot get government contracts. If you don't have figures in front of you, that's okay. You can supply those to us.

Mr. George Da Pont:

I actually do have figures in front of me and I think it's 80%. Eighty per cent of the contracts basically do go to small and medium-sized businesses, so they are very successful in an aggregate sense. Now that's 80% of the contracts. That's not 80% of the value of procurement. I want to make sure that this distinction is recognized.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

I quite concur with you, because I do not think that the small and medium-sized enterprises have the capacity to bid on large contracts.

Mr. George Da Pont:

Yes.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

We have been talking about Canada Post and how consultation is taking place and we get people who want the service and Canada Post employees who are talking about new ways of doing business. So my next question is, have you any idea when the task force is going out there to consult and get answers?

Mr. George Da Pont:

I really can't add anything to the comments the minister has already made on Canada Post.

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Okay, fair enough.

My third question is this. I see that PWGS is transferring $19.6 million and $4.4 million to the Canada Revenue Agency and the Communications Security Establishment respectively for underutilization of the rent. I can see that you have a large real property database. How do you decide which stock will go to social housing, and what are some of the challenges that you will face when you transfer stock to social housing? Are there any buildings containing asbestos? Who will be responsible for those costs when the stock is converted to social housing?

(1705)

The Chair:

Mr. Da Pont, we only have about 20 seconds.

Mr. George Da Pont:

Then I'll give you a 20-second answer. I think you've already flagged in your question that some of the significant challenges are that many of these properties might well need investments, repairs, and conversions to be suitable for social housing. That really would be the biggest challenge when the opportunities are there.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, sir.

We're down to our last two five-minute question and answer sessions. Then we'll excuse our witnesses as we go into voting on supplementary (C)s.

The first five-minute question and answer period is for Monsieur Blaney. [Translation]

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

My question is about replacing the visitors' centre at Vimy.

The veterans have reached an agreement with what was formerly Public Works and Government Services Canada so that a new visitors' centre will be built for the 150th anniversary of Canada and the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge. The present centre is run-down and completely inadequate.

I was wondering if it is possible to have an update on that.

Can you confirm that the visitors' centre at Vimy will be operational on June 9, 2017? [English]

Mr. George Da Pont:

Again, thank you for the question. Actually, I received an update on that a few weeks ago, and at that time it was on schedule.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Okay. Is it possible to get the pricing, because I believe there's a partner, the Vimy Foundation. Is that correct?

Mr. George Da Pont:

Again, I'll ask Kevin Radford.

Mr. Kevin Radford:

Yes, we can provide the costing data, etc. Actually, George is being modest. He asks me for an update every Monday morning on this particular project, so we provide an update and it is, so far, on schedule.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

It's on schedule. That's good to know.

You referred to the Champlain Bridge. This is a very important project, and again I believe you are on track. Can you provide us with an update as well on this very important project for the Montreal and south shore region?

Mr. George Da Pont:

The one thing I should say that I probably should have said in my initial response, which I'm sure you know, is that the overall responsibility for that project is with Transport and Infrastructure; it is not with our department. We've worked with and supported them very closely on handling all of the contracting aspects of that. For instance, in response to the question on steel, I will have to go back to them for the information, but I do know that, again, it's part of the regular updating I get, and it is on its projected schedule. [Translation]

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Thank you.[English]

Were you involved in the tender process for the Champlain Bridge and, if so, since it's the will of the new government not to have the toll system, is it having an impact on the mandate or the modifications of the project?

Should I ask that of you or Transport maybe?

Mr. George Da Pont:

I think the question is better asked to Transport, because it is a policy question around tolls.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Okay. Good.

You mentioned—and maybe this will be a more interesting question—that you were proud of this new pay system, Phoenix. It seems like I didn't notice—I still get my due—but is it working well?

Mr. George Da Pont:

I think you've answered the question. If you had noticed, I think we would be having a much more difficult discussion at this committee.

Hon. Steven Blaney: Good.

Mr. George Da Pont: I think people often say that in government you can't effectively manage big projects. I want to say that this was an enormous project of consolidating pay administration that was divided among every department and agency in government. Consolidating it into a pay centre in Miramichi and at the same time introducing a new system that automates a fair bit of the work should be significant improvements.

I think people sometimes underestimate how challenging managing projects of that size and that nature are. I'm not going to declare victory yet, but we went through the first pay period this week, and it worked very well. I'd feel a little more comfortable going through at least one or two more pay periods before I crack the champagne open, but I do want to say that I think this has been a remarkable job by the team that has worked on that in our department and in other departments. The fact that you didn't notice a difference is exactly what we were aiming for.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Good.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

Thank you.

(1710)

The Chair:

Our final five-minute question-and-answer session will be led by Monsieur Drouin.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I just have one comment. Before I said that millennials were tech savvy. We're not tech savvy like Mr. Graham over here is.

I have just one more comment before I go on to questions. I want to thank Mr. Blaney for being passionate about defending shipbuilding jobs in Canada. I hope he looks to have her platform. I am reading with interest how in budget 2010 the Conservative government had announced a 25% tariff reduction to allow imports of vessels into Canada so shipowners could buy vessels abroad, thereby not protecting Canadian jobs. I hope he shares the same passion that he had back in 2010.

Hon. Steven Blaney:

We called it free trade.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

I have a question for Shared Services. This has to do with PSPC now. How is SSC managing the transition between legacy technologies and their related contracts and new technologies and their contracts? Just as one example, I know PWGSC or PSPC is managing some of the older contracts, legacy contracts like NESS.

I am asking because some companies are finding themselves in limbo. They are awaiting a new procurement vehicle. SSC wants to buy new technology, but it can't because it doesn't have the procurement vehicle. Is there a strategy you have adapted towards transition? I know we won't be talking about this in five years, because everything will be resolved, but in the meantime, is there a strategy that's being applied?

Mr. Ron Parker:

Absolutely. The procurement instruments have been developed, and as of September 1 last year, the remainder of the national standing offers moved over to Shared Services Canada. We are operating on the basis of that, taking the orders from the departments to fulfill their needs. So the instruments are there, and they're working very effectively.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Pardon my ignorance; I was in a campaign.

Mr. Blaney was mentioning the Vimy monument. He said it was on time and on budget. When exactly is it going to be completed?

Mr. Kevin Radford:

Unfortunately, I don't have that specific information with me, but it's something we can certainly provide for you. I just didn't bring the data with me. I apologize.

Mr. George Da Pont:

I can supply the actual date.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Okay. It's just that the 150th anniversary is coming up.

Mr. George Da Pont:

Obviously it will be in time for the 150th anniversary, but I've forgotten the specific date.

Mr. Kevin Radford:

Or there will be a new ADM of real property here the next time.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Francis Drouin:

I wanted to ask another question for the benefit of the committee. I know that SSC is working on the ETI initiative in the data centres, but what other initiatives is SSC working on as well?

Mr. Ron Parker:

Those are very large initiatives to start with. But there's also a network initiative related to consolidating the 50 siloed networks down into one network for the Government of Canada. Those three projects comprise work that is of an unprecedented scale in terms of the transformation. We also undertake many projects on behalf of the partners, our clients. Whether it's the biometrics project or other projects that are in the portfolio, we're involved in practically every initiative a department undertakes that involves IT infrastructure. There's a big suite of projects that are running for the RCMP, DND, or whichever department. There are literally hundreds of projects there.

(1715)

Mr. Francis Drouin:

I know a few years ago there were a few orders in council, and then you guys were responsible for the workplace technology initiative, and applications were still with Treasury Board. Is that still the case today, or are you guys completely responsible for everything related to IT?

The Chair:

Mr. Parker.

Mr. Ron Parker:

I couldn't hear the question.

Mr. Graham Barr:

No, Shared Services Canada is not responsible for the applications.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. That takes us to the end of our five-minute round.

Gentlemen and ladies, I thank you on behalf of all committee members for your appearances here today. The information that you have provided committee members has been very helpful and informative. Thank you again for taking time out to visit us today, and we hope to be talking with you again sometime in the upcoming years.

Yes, Mr. Drouin, go ahead.

Mr. Francis Drouin:

Mr. Chair, I hope the whole committee will wish the deputy minister a happy retirement, which he announced last week. You share my comments.

The Chair:

Thank you for your years of service.

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

Mr. George Da Pont:

Thank you very much. I will certainly miss these appearances.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

To those officials who had to deliver answers in very constrained timelines, I thank you for your economy of words.

We will wait a few moments while our witnesses depart the table. In the interim, I will advise committee members that over the break week I will be asking the clerk to send out a communiqué indicating what we will be doing at the following Thursday's meeting. If we are able to bring in a group of witnesses to deal with some of the work identified by the subcommittee on agenda, we will have a full meeting. If not, then we will have a subcommittee meeting, but it will be during that time frame, between 3:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m., on Thursday, March 24.

Now we have votes before us, lady and gentlemen. These are on the supplementary estimates (C).

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi:

Where are the votes? Did I go and do something funny with my papers?

The Chair:

I will be verbally going through them and asking for either your approval or your non-approval.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Mr. Chair, which document in SharePoint should I open? I closed SharePoint by accident. Could somebody point me to the information?

The Chair:

That's fine. Basically, all I will be doing is asking you verbally, for example, shall vote 1c under Privy Council carry?

You have all seen the estimates, so you have a determination now whether you want to approve them, amend them, or negative them. We will be going through that process verbally and asking for your show of hands.

Unless anyone wants a recorded vote, I will just be asking for yeas or nays. PRIVY COUNCIL ç Vote 1c—Program expenditures..........$3,644,076

(Vote 1c agreed to) PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION ç Vote 1c—Program expenditures..........$1

(Vote 1c agreed to) PUBLIC WORKS AND GOVERNMENT SERVICES ç Vote 1c—Operating expenditures..........$72,238,881 ç Vote 5c—Capital expenditures..........$40,231,331

(Votes 1c and 5c agreed to) SHARED SERVICES CANADA ç Vote 1c—Operating expenditures..........$20,712,999 ç Vote 5c—Capital expenditures..........$12,326,933

(Votes 1c and 5c agreed to) TREASURY BOARD SECRETARIAT ç Vote 1c—Program expenditures..........$43,981,086 ç Vote 20c—Public service insurance..........$469,200,000

(Votes 1c and 20c agreed to)

The Chair: Finally, shall the committee request the chair to report the supplementary estimates back to the House tomorrow?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Thank you very much.

Ladies and gentlemen, I think we've completed that. Thank you very much. I appreciate all your efforts.

Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Tom Lukiwski (Moose Jaw—Lake Centre—Lanigan, PCC)):

Mesdames et messieurs, bienvenue à la 6e séance du Comité permanent des opérations gouvernementales et des prévisions budgétaires. Elle est consacrée au Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) sous les rubriques Travaux publics et Services gouvernementaux ainsi que Services partagés Canada.

Nous accueillons la ministre des Services publics et de l'Approvisionnement, l'honorable Judy Foote.

Madame la ministre, voudriez-vous nous présenter vos adjoints? Vous pourrez ensuite nous faire votre déclaration préliminaire, en essayant de la limiter à 10 minutes.

Encore une fois, je rappelle à tous les participants, ministres, témoins et membres du Comité, que la séance est télévisée.

Madame la ministre, vous avez la parole.

L’hon. Judy Foote (ministre des Services publics et de l'Approvisionnement):

Merci, monsieur le président. Quel plaisir d'être ici!

Je vais demander à mes adjoints de se présenter.

Julie.

Mme Julie Charron (dirigeante principale des finances par intérim, Direction générale des finances et de l'administration, ministère des Travaux publics et des Services gouvernementaux):

Merci.

Bonjour. Je suis Julie Charron, dirigeante principale des finances par intérim à Services publics et Approvisionnement.

M. George Da Pont (sous-ministre, ministère des Travaux publics et des Services gouvernementaux):

Bonjour. Je suis George Da Pont, sous-ministre à Travaux publics et Services gouvernementaux.

M. Ron Parker (président, Services partagés Canada):

Je suis Ron Parker, président de Services partagés Canada.

Mme Manon Fillion (directrice générale et adjointe au dirigeant principal des finances, Services ministériels, Services partagés Canada):

Je suis Manon Fillion, directrice générale des finances à Services partagés Canada.

Le président:

Madame la ministre, vous avez la parole.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Merci.[Français]

Bonjour à tous les membres du Comité.[Traduction]

Je suis honorée d'être ici et d'avoir été nommée ministre des Services publics et de l'Approvisionnement. Je suis impatiente d'établir avec tout le comité une relation constructive.[Français]

Je vous remercie de m'avoir invitée à venir témoigner devant votre comité.[Traduction]

Notre premier ministre a mis l'accent sur l'importance de ces comités, et je suis déterminée à traiter ce comité avec respect, vu l'important travail que vous accomplirez. Je suis impatiente de travailler avec vous tous. Votre travail sera important afin de m'aider à faire progresser les priorités établies dans la lettre de mandat que j'ai reçue du premier ministre. Je discuterai avec plaisir de ces enjeux avec vous.

Mes adjoints et moi sommes ici pour répondre à vos questions sur le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) et sur les rapports ministériels sur le rendement de Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada ainsi que de Services partagés Canada.

Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada agit à titre de trésorier principal, de comptable et de gestionnaire immobilier du gouvernement. Organisme central d'achat du gouvernement, il achète tout, des crayons au matériel militaire. Il appuie également nos efforts visant à communiquer avec les Canadiens et les Canadiennes et à leur offrir des services dans la langue officielle de leur choix.

Services partagés Canada a été mis sur pied pour unifier le système de courriel, regrouper les centres de données ainsi qu'assurer des réseaux de télécommunications fiables et sûrs et une protection de tous les instants contre les cybermenaces. Le Ministère réalise ses activités dans 43 ministères, 50 réseaux, 485 centres de données et 23 000 serveurs, dans le but de rendre l'information plus sûre et plus accessible pour les Canadiens.

Ces deux organisations sont dévouées au service et elles déploient des efforts continus pour fonctionner de manière plus efficiente et rentable. Une grande partie de leurs travaux est réalisée en arrière-plan, mais ces activités n'en sont pas moins essentielles. Par exemple, Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada a participé directement à la concrétisation de l'engagement que le gouvernement a pris pour accueillir 25 000 réfugiés syriens. Il s'est procuré des nécessités comme des manteaux d'hiver, des services de transport, de l'hébergement et de la nourriture, alors que Services partagés Canada s'est chargé d'offrir les services de technologie de l'information et le soutien opérationnel nécessaires.

Bon nombre de nos priorités clés ont été énoncées dans notre lettre de mandat, y compris la Stratégie nationale en matière de construction navale. Notre gouvernement s'affaire à renouveler la flotte de la Garde côtière canadienne et à armer la Marine royale canadienne en véritable flotte de haute mer. Les chantiers navals Seaspan, à Vancouver, et Irving Shipbuilding, à Halifax, ont investi des millions pour reconstruire leurs installations afin d'être en mesure de bâtir les navires du Canada de manière efficace. Les travaux avancent bien dans le cadre de projets d'avant-plan, c'est-à-dire le navire hauturier de sciences halieutiques, à Vancouver, et les navires de patrouille extracôtiers et de l'Arctique, à Halifax. La stratégie de construction navale est avantageuse pour le Canada. Elle crée des emplois, bâtit la capacité industrielle et renouvelle les flottes. Le Canada n'a pas construit de navires depuis une génération. C'est pourquoi nous avons récemment retenu les services d'un expert en la matière, pour nous conseiller sur tous les aspects de cette industrie.

Nous étudions aussi des manières d'assurer une planification et un établissement des coûts plus justes. Le gouvernement élabore de nouvelles méthodes d'établissement des coûts pour permettre les prévisions budgétaires plus précises. À l'avenir, nous examinerons régulièrement nos budgets et nos échéances pour nous assurer que nous ne travaillons pas en fonction de renseignements désuets sur les coûts.

Nous sommes déterminés à nous assurer que toutes nos activités sont réalisées de manière aussi transparente que possible. La population canadienne et les joueurs du secteur devraient être bien informés de nos plans, des coûts, des progrès réalisés et des défis en matière de construction navale. Par conséquent, la population canadienne, les journalistes et les parlementaires seront régulièrement informés sur l'avancement des divers travaux.

Nous sommes déterminés à réaliser aussi des progrès dans d'autres domaines. Le Programme d'innovation Construire au Canada comble les lacunes à l'étape de la précommercialisation pour les nombreuses entreprises canadiennes qui ont des technologies et des produits nouveaux et innovants à vendre. Nous améliorerons l'administration du Programme, pour que les jumelages entre les entreprises innovantes et les ministères effectuant les essais se fassent plus rapidement.

Les fonctionnaires et moi-même travaillons en partenariat avec les fournisseurs et les principaux joueurs du secteur pour faciliter, pour les entreprises canadiennes, la façon de faire affaire avec le gouvernement. Nous sommes déterminés à simplifier et à mieux gérer les approvisionnements gouvernementaux ainsi qu'à nous concentrer sur des pratiques telles que les approvisionnements écologiques et sociaux, qui appuient les objectifs de la politique économique de notre gouvernement.

Les améliorations sont aussi à la base des travaux réalisés à Services partagés Canada, où la modernisation de l'infrastructure de technologie de l'information du gouvernement est essentielle à l'offre numérique de renseignements et de services auxquels la population canadienne s'attend. En tout, 60 centres de données ont été regroupés dans trois centres de données d'entreprise, ce qui permet de réduire les coûts, d'accroître la sécurité des données et d'améliorer le service offert aux organisations partenaires et clientes.

(1535)



Services partagés Canada joue un rôle primordial dans la protection de notre infrastructure cybernétique nationale et des données de la population canadienne qui sont hébergées dans tous les réseaux fédéraux. La sécurité a été accrue, grâce à un nouveau centre des opérations de sécurité, qui, en permanence, surveille les incidents liés à la cybersécurité et y répond rapidement, ce qui réduit le nombre d'incidents informatiques critiques et le temps requis pour les résoudre.

Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada ainsi que Services partagés Canada participent tous les deux à l'amélioration des approvisionnements. Leurs efforts permettent d'accélérer le processus visant à informer l'industrie lorsque des appels d'offres sont diffusés. Ainsi, les soumissionnaires ont plus de temps pour proposer des solutions innovantes, adaptées aux besoins du gouvernement.

La transformation du système de paie, inefficace et vieux de 40 ans, du gouvernement du Canada constitue un autre exemple d'innovation, de modernisation et d'orientation vers l'avenir des opérations gouvernementales.

Le nouveau système Phénix a été mis en oeuvre il y a à peine deux semaines, le 24 février, et le premier cycle de paie a été un succès. Jusqu'ici, le système est utilisé pour 34 ministères, soit 120 000 employés. Les 67 autres ministères s'ajouteront bientôt.

Le Ministère réalise également des progrès en matière de gestion immobilière, de conception et de construction écologiques. Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada a été reconnu pour son travail novateur et de grande qualité dans la planification de projets d'infrastructures, son expertise en matière de conception, de construction et de conservation du patrimoine et d'autres services qu'il fournit aux clients.

Le pont des Allumettes, qui relie l'Ontario et le Québec, près de Pembroke, en Ontario, s'est vu attribuer le Prix d'excellence 2015 de la construction en acier par l'Institut canadien de la construction en acier. Le Plan directeur pour le pré Tunney a reçu le prix pour les pratiques exemplaires - planification détaillée et un prix national d'excellence en urbanisme. L'édifice James-Michael-Flaherty, du 90, rue Elgin, s'est vu accorder un prix d'excellence dans le cadre du Prix de l'esthétique urbaine d'Ottawa, remis par la ville d'Ottawa.

Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada est également un chef de file mondial en matière d'impartition de services de gestion immobilière au secteur privé. Cette approche a permis d'économiser 700 millions de dollars aux contribuables canadiens au cours des deux dernières décennies. Le Ministère a également été l'une des premières organisations au Canada à s'engager à obtenir la certification Or de la Norme Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, ou LEED, pour ses nouveaux immeubles. Les grands travaux de rénovation doivent obtenir la certification Argent.

Au cours des dernières années, neuf des dix nouveaux immeubles construits pour le gouvernement dans l'ensemble du Canada ont obtenu la certification LEED Or. Le dixième, au 30 de la rue Victoria, à Gatineau, en face d'Ottawa, a reçu la certification Platine, la plus élevée possible. Ces réalisations mettent en lumière notre engagement envers les immeubles écologiques et écoénergétiques.

Des travaux de construction dirigés par le Ministère sont réalisés dans l'ensemble du pays et génèrent d'importants emplois pour la population canadienne. Au cours des deux prochaines années, nous prévoyons de grands travaux de réparation, notamment de la cale sèche d'Esquimalt , en Colombie-Britannique, et du pont Alexandra, entre Ottawa et Gatineau, à quelques rues d'ici. De plus, un nouveau centre de paie du gouvernement du Canada est en construction, à Miramichi, au Nouveau-Brunswick, dans le cadre d'un contrat de location.

Des parties de la Colline du Parlement et des environs sont également visées par d'importants travaux de rénovation. La réhabilitation de l'édifice Sir-John-A.-Macdonald est maintenant terminée et la revitalisation de l'édifice Wellington est presque terminée. Les travaux se poursuivent dans le cadre d'un important projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice de l'Ouest, entre autres. Les membres du Comité seront heureux de savoir que chacun de ces projets respecte les délais et le budget.

Dans le cadre mon mandat, on m'a également demandé d'entreprendre un examen de Postes Canada pour veiller à ce que la population canadienne reçoive des services postaux de qualité, à prix raisonnable. Cet examen indépendant vise à étudier toutes les options viables et à offrir à la population canadienne l'occasion d'avoir son mot à dire sur l'avenir de Postes Canada.

J'espère que votre comité jouera un rôle important dans la consultation prochaine du public canadien, qui commencera dès qu'un groupe de travail, que nous créerons, aura terminé sa mission. Il s'agit d'une tâche importante, et nous prenons les mesures nécessaires pour établir le bon processus.

Parlons maintenant du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) 2015-2016. Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada sollicite un financement net d'un peu plus de 83 millions de dollars, ce qui fera passer son financement approuvé à 3,22 milliards.

Ce financement demandé est requis principalement pour la gestion de biens immobiliers fédéraux, la reconstruction du manège militaire de la Grande Allée, à Québec, la poursuite des travaux de réhabilitation de la Cité parlementaire et les frais engagés afin de permettre aux Canadiens et aux Canadiennes de faire affaire avec le gouvernement au moyen de cartes de crédit et de débit.

Le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C) 2015-2016 pour Services partagés Canada représente une augmentation d'un peu plus de 54 millions, ce qui fait passer son financement à 1,58 milliard. Le financement demandé est principalement requis pour améliorer la sécurité des réseaux et des systèmes informatiques du gouvernement du Canada, appuyer la réponse du gouvernement du Canada à la crise des réfugiés syriens et compenser les coûts supplémentaires de la prestation de services de technologies de l'information de base aux ministères et organismes clients.

(1540)



Bien que nous ayons fait de grands progrès à plusieurs égards, nous avons encore beaucoup de travail à accomplir. Les deux ministères chercheront les possibilités d'améliorer la réalisation des programmes et la prestation des services afin d'offrir de meilleurs résultats à la population canadienne au moyen d'une saine gestion. Dans l'ensemble, les clés du succès sont l'innovation, la refonte des processus et des changements inspirés par le gros bon sens. Je suis persuadée que notre fonction publique est capable d'adhérer à ces trois principes. J'ai déjà rencontré des centaines d'employés dévoués, enthousiastes et hautement qualifiés de ces ministères dans de si nombreuses collectivités, et j'ai l'intention de continuer. Je sais que nous pouvons collaborer pour répondre aux attentes de la population canadienne.

Merci, monsieur le président. Je serai heureuse de répondre aux questions du comité.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre.

Si j'ai bien compris, vous restez avec nous encore une heure.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Effectivement.

Le président:

Eh bien, à 16 h 30, nous interromprons la séance pour vous laisser aller à vos autres tâches ministérielles.

Chaque intervenant a droit à sept minutes. Le premier est M. Drouin.

M. Francis Drouin (Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie la ministre et ses adjoints d'être ici. Je vous suis vraiment reconnaissant du temps que vous nous accordez pour vous questionner.

Avant d'en venir bientôt au Budget supplémentaire des dépenses, je tiens à vous poser une question sur votre lettre de mandat. On vous a chargée de moderniser les achats et d'ouvrir davantage le processus aux PME. Je viens d'Ottawa et de la région de la capitale nationale et je représente beaucoup de PME. Les achats et la clientèle du gouvernement sont importants pour elles.

Comment se fera la modernisation, sous votre houlette, pour que les PME puissent en retirer quelque chose?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Nous avons déjà commencé par un vaste processus de consultations auprès des PME et de l'industrie en général. Nous rencontrons régulièrement un groupe consultatif de fournisseurs. Il est vraiment important de les amener à découvrir les obstacles qui ont entravé les PME et les ont empêchées de profiter des occasions offertes par l'État.

Nous nous assurons de bien prendre le temps d'atteindre tous les industriels, d'obtenir leur avis et d'en tirer les leçons nécessaires à une plus grande efficacité de notre part. C'est ce que nous avons fait dans tout le ministère, encore une fois pour nous concentrer non seulement sur les PME, mais sur l'ensemble de l'industrie. L'État est une grosse entreprise au pays, et nous voulons que chacun puisse en profiter, en raison des emplois qui en découlent et des occasions offertes aux entreprises.

M. Francis Drouin:

Excellent. Merci.

En ce qui concerne Services partagés Canada, j'éprouve des difficultés.

D'abord, je crois fermement en ses objectifs. Dans le budget supplémentaire des dépenses, vous demandez 54 millions pour la cybersécurité. Quelles mesures prend-il pour s'assurer que sa stratégie de cybersécurité convient? Je me souviens du problème de la faille Heartbleed, il y a quelques années, puis du problème survenu au Conseil national de recherches Canada. Que fait Services partagés pour en éviter la répétition?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Comme vous le savez, nous avons entrepris une tâche difficile, avec un système à l'échelle de l'organisation. Il est juste de dire que notre projet est probablement le plus ambitieux au pays, la mise en place d'une solution applicable à l'ensemble de l'organisation.

Nous devons d'abord localiser puis résoudre les problèmes qui sont survenus. C'est ce que nous faisons. Les fonctionnaires de Services partagés ont décidé de faire une pause, d'évaluer le travail réalisé jusqu'ici, puis, dorénavant, de trouver des moyens pour éviter de répéter les erreurs du passé. Nous connaissons très bien nos responsabilités en matière de cybersécurité, en ce qui concerne une collaboration étroite avec Sécurité publique, avec nos homologues dans toute l'administration fédérale, pour tout faire pour assurer la sécurité de notre pays et des Canadiens.

M. Francis Drouin:

Excellent. Merci.

J'ai encore une question sur Services partagés. Est-ce que la fusion des centres de données facilite la protection contre les cybermenaces? À part les économies, est-ce qu'elle aide à prévenir les cybermenaces?

(1545)

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Bien sûr. Il est important pour nous d'avoir le moins de terrain à couvrir pour savoir que nous sommes sur la bonne piste et que nous avons prévu les types de services qui permettront de réagir vite. Plus on est nombreux, plus c'est difficile. C'est vraiment un gros changement que de collaborer étroitement avec Sécurité publique et d'autres entités pour faire corps avec eux, être à l'unisson.

M. Francis Drouin:

Excellent. Merci.

Je fais partie de la génération Y et j'ai une dernière demande à formuler. Beaucoup de nouveaux élus appartiennent à cette génération, et nous devons remplir des formulaires pour obtenir des haut-parleurs, et nous savons comment faire. Je pense toujours à mon père. Je ne mets donc pas tout le monde dans la même galère. Leministre Brison a manifesté son intention d'embaucher plus de personnes de cette génération, à mesure qu'il en arrivera. J'espère que votre ministère songe à une stratégie pour bien les accueillir. Peut-être qu'ils sont mieux calés en technologie.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Je vous suis reconnaissante de vos observations. Nous collaborons étroitement avec le Conseil du Trésor, pour tous ces détails, parce que, bien sûr, nous sommes vraiment des partenaires dans cette entreprise. Je suis en communication avec le ministre Brison sur le genre d'employés que nous avons besoin d'embaucher et en ce qui concerne le travail avec ceux qui ont aussi de l'expérience.

M. Francis Drouin:

Merci.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Avez-vous prévu de céder une partie de votre temps à un collègue?

D'accord. Madame Ratansi, vous disposez d'une minute et demie.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi (Don Valley-Est, Lib.):

Je vous remercie de votre présence, madame la ministre. Vous demandez une augmentation de 83 millions de dollars pour les biens immobiliers fédéraux. Vous demandez également 13,7 millions de dollars au titre des dépenses de fonctionnement aux fins d'un réinvestissement des revenus.

Premièrement, combien de biens immobiliers ont-ils été vendus au cours de la dernière année, et combien ces ventes ont-elles rapporté? Deuxièmement, le gouvernement avait l'habitude d'utiliser des biens immobiliers pour entreposer l'ensemble du mobilier inutilisé. Est-ce toujours le cas? Si nous voulons être efficaces, cette utilisation de nos biens immobiliers n'est pas judicieuse.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Je vais demander au sous-ministre de répondre à cette question en vous donnant les chiffres exacts.

M. George Da Pont:

Nous avons vendu 21 biens immobiliers; ce qui nous a rapporté environ 10,3 millions de dollars.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

D'accord, mais j'ai aussi demandé si nous continuons d'utiliser des biens immobiliers pour entreposer du mobilier, qui est probablement inutile?

M. George Da Pont:

J'espère que non, mais nous sommes certes conscients qu'il y a des problèmes à cet égard. Un autre problème est que, dans une même localité, nous possédons et nous occupons des immeubles qui ne sont pas entièrement occupés alors que nous louons des locaux dans d'autres immeubles. L'une de nos priorités, qui est étroitement liée au point que vous avez soulevé, est d'essayer de maximiser l'utilisation des locaux. Si nous possédons des immeubles où la moitié ou le tiers des locaux sont vides et que nous louons des locaux ailleurs, il faut alors amener des gens dans ces immeubles de façon à maximiser leur utilisation pour réduire les coûts. De même, si notre utilisation des locaux n'est pas efficace — vous nous en avez donné un exemple — alors nous allons remédier à ce problème. L'optimisation de l'espace est véritablement une priorité dans le domaine de la gestion des biens immobiliers.

Le président:

Je vous remercie beaucoup, monsieur Da Pont.

La parole est maintenant à M. Blaney. [Français]

L'hon. Steven Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre, je vous souhaite la bienvenue au Comité. C'est un plaisir de vous recevoir ici. Je tiens également à saluer les fonctionnaires qui vous accompagnent. Vous pouvez compter sur une opposition constructive et robuste de notre part, je l'espère, dans l'intérêt supérieur des Canadiens. Nous sommes d'ailleurs tous ensemble ici pour cette raison.

Madame la ministre, dans votre présentation, j'ai aimé votre engagement envers la stratégie navale qui, vous l'avez reconnu, est un important moteur de création d'emplois ici, notamment à Vancouver, à Halifax et aussi à Lévis. Également, je me réjouis que vous ayez l'intention de nous fournir des mises à jour régulières de l'évolution des coûts et de l'avancement des projets. Les Canadiens s'attendent à ce que nous nous assurions que les contrats donnés par le gouvernement canadien sont faits dans les délais prévus, puisqu'il s'agit de l'argent des contribuables et que, bien sûr, nous sommes dans un environnement compétitif. C'est une responsabilité importante qui nous est confiée.

Ma première question porte précisément sur cet enjeu de la stratégie navale.

Après l'élection, j'ai imprimé cet extrait de votre plateforme électorale, de votre plan. Vous dites que vous souhaitez renforcer la marine tout en respectant les exigences de la Stratégie nationale d'approvisionnement en matière de construction navale. Ce sont bien sûr des investissements qui vont permettre à la marine de fonctionner, mais également de créer des emplois. Évidemment, nous voulons créer des emplois ici, au Canada.

J'avais eu l'occasion de vous faire part d'un article concernant les navires d'escorte, les tugboats comme on les appelle. On y évoquait la possibilité de les faire construire à l'extérieur. Alors, cet après-midi, pouvez-vous nous confirmer que les emplois seront créés au Canada, dans le cadre de la stratégie navale, conformément à votre engagement?

(1550)

[Traduction]

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Je vous remercie pour votre question.

Comme vous, je reconnais l'importance de l'industrie de la construction navale. Cette industrie bat de l'aile au pays depuis plus de 25 ans, alors il faut faire quelque chose. Nous avons besoin d'une solide industrie de la construction navale au Canada. Nous devons répondre aux besoins de la marine et de la Garde côtière. Pour bâtir une solide industrie, nous devons faire participer des entreprises de partout au pays, ce qui permettra de créer des emplois. C'est véritablement ce qu'il faut faire.

Le ministère de la Défense nationale n'a encore pris aucune décision en ce qui concerne les remorqueurs. Nous en sommes au tout début de la planification. Un processus concurrentiel a permis au gouvernement de l'époque de mettre sur pied deux centres d'excellence, un à Halifax et l'autre à Vancouver, comme vous l'avez mentionné. Cela n'empêche pas d'autres chantiers navals de profiter des occasions qui s'offriront, car il y en aura pour la construction de plus petits navires. Même si des bâtiments de combat seront construits à Halifax et que l'entreprise Seaspan construira des navires non destinés au combat, des occasions s'offriront à des compagnies de partout au Canada, qui pourront embaucher des Canadiens d'un bout à l'autre du pays.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Oui, et il existe certainement de nombreux chantiers navals de plus petite taille qui sont en mesure de construire ces remorqueurs. Mon collègue, M. MacAulay, et moi-même avons rencontré le concepteur des remorqueurs à Vancouver. Je dirais qu'il s'agit du meilleur concepteur au monde. Il habite au Canada. Nous avons de l'expertise au pays.

Madame la ministre, j'ai été un peu étonné de constater que, lorsqu'est venu le temps d'embaucher un expert, vous n'avez pu trouver aucun Canadien et vous avez engagé un consultant britannique indépendant. Y a-t-il une raison pour laquelle vous n'avez pas choisi un expert canadien en matière de chantiers navals pour vous conseiller en ce qui a trait à la stratégie?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Permettez-moi de répéter que l'industrie de la construction navale au Canada bat de l'aile depuis les 20 à 25 dernières années. Nous avons essayé de choisir un Canadien. Il y avait des Canadiens qui travaillaient à l'étranger, mais lors des entrevues, il est apparu évident que M.  Brunton était très compétent et qu'il possédait de l'expérience dans le domaine. Il est un contre-amiral qui connaît bien le domaine des acquisitions de fournitures navales. Nous voulions choisir le meilleur candidat possible et c'est ce que nous avons fait. Parmi toutes les personnes que nous avons rencontrées, nous avons déterminé que M. Brunton était la personne que nous devions embaucher.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Dans le mandat que vous lui avez remis, avez-vous clairement précisé que les navires devront être construits au Canada?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Nous allons demander conseil à M. Brunton, qui sait très bien que notre objectif est de favoriser la croissance de l'industrie canadienne de la construction navale. Nous voulons nous assurer que le Canada profite pleinement de la construction de chaque navire. Il le sait très bien, comme nous l'avons déjà mentionné. Nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec lui, mais notre priorité sera toujours de nous assurer que les navires seront construits au pays.

Nous devons aussi garder en tête qu'il s'agit de l'argent des contribuables canadiens. Nous voulons que cet argent soit dépensé à bon escient. Un certain nombre de facteurs entrent en jeu, mais d'abord et avant tout, nous voulons créer des emplois pour les Canadiens.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Tout à fait. S'agissant des contribuables, vous avez mentionné que vous seriez disposés à faire le point sur le processus d'acquisition. Quand pensez-vous être en mesure de faire le point à l'intention du comité sur la stratégie en matière de construction navale en ce qui concerne les bâtiments de combat ou les navires non destinés au combat, les coûts estimés et l'échéancier prévu pour la construction de ces navires?

(1555)

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Nous prévoyons diffuser notre premier rapport à l'automne, et par la suite, nous publierons des rapports trimestriels. Il faut garder en tête que nous prenons une orientation différente dans le cadre de la stratégie en matière de construction navale. Nous ne voulons pas faire fausse route. Nous menons régulièrement des consultations auprès de l'industrie. Nous ne voulons rien exclure en ce qui concerne les modalités de mise en oeuvre de la stratégie. Nous savons que nous avons déjà deux centres d'excellence et que nous avons pris des engagements envers eux. Ils sont nos partenaires dans ce processus. Nous nous attendons à diffuser à l'automne un rapport complet sur l'état d'avancement, et ensuite nous publierons des rapports trimestriels.

Le président:

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre.

Monsieur Weir, vous disposez de sept minutes pour poser vos questions à la ministre.

M. Erin Weir (Regina—Lewvan, NPD):

Je vous remercie.

En tant que porte-parole du NPD en matière de services publics et d'approvisionnement, je suis ravi que vous soyez parmi nous, madame la ministre. J'aimerais revenir sur un point soulevé par un député d'en face au sujet des biens immobiliers. Le gouvernement conservateur précédent et le gouvernement libéral avant lui avaient l'habitude de vendre des immeubles appartenant à l'État pour ensuite les louer à un coût beaucoup plus élevé. Je me demande si le nouveau gouvernement continuera à faire de même? Précisément, j'aimerais savoir quelle proportion des 32,8 millions de dollars demandés au titre des dépenses non discrétionnaires liées aux immeubles appartenant à l'État et à des locaux loués sera affectée aux immeubles de l'État par rapport aux espaces loués?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Je vais demander au sous-ministre de répondre à cette question.

M. George Da Pont:

En ce qui concerne les immeubles, je crois que vous voulez parler des immeubles qui sont pratiquement désuets et qui nécessitent d'importantes rénovations. C'est surtout ce à quoi sont confrontées les personnes qui gèrent les biens immobiliers.

Dans le cas des immeubles désuets, une analyse de rentabilité est effectuée, dans le cadre de laquelle nous examinons toutes les options: vendre l'immeuble, investir pour rénover l'immeuble ou envisager un partenariat public-privé pour la construction d'un nouvel immeuble.

Je crois qu'il faut examiner soigneusement toutes les options pour évaluer laquelle est la plus profitable pour le contribuable et répond le mieux aux besoins de la fonction publique, car ce sont les fonctionnaires qui travailleront dans ces immeubles.

La réponse diffère selon le résultat de l'analyse.

M. Erin Weir:

C'est sans doute l'approche à adopter. Je me demande encore quelle proportion de cette somme est consacrée aux immeubles appartenant à l'État par rapport aux locaux loués. La question plus générale concerne l'approche qui a été souvent adoptée, c'est-à-dire vendre les immeubles pour obtenir de l'argent comptant, ce qui paraît bien sur le plan des finances publiques, mais qui, à long terme, coûte plus cher aux contribuables.

La ministre peut-elle s'engager à ne pas adopter cette approche?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Il est certain que l'idée n'est pas seulement d'obtenir de l'argent comptant en vendant des immeubles. Il faut examiner l'usage qu'on fera des immeubles.

Nous sommes très conscients qu'il faut parfois adopter une approche différente et nous en tenons compte dans plusieurs domaines au sein du ministère. Nous examinons toutes... qu'il s'agisse des biens immobiliers, des terres du Canada, des différentes entités au sein du ministère, nous examinons différentes façons de nous acquitter de notre mandat. C'est ce que nous faisons bien entendu dans le domaine des biens immobiliers.

M. Erin Weir:

La somme de 61,8 millions de dollars pour un nouveau pont Champlain constitue un autre poste budgétaire lié aux acquisitions. Le nouveau gouvernement a fait savoir qu'il supprimera l'obligation d'avoir recours à un partenariat public-privé dans le cadre de projets d'infrastructure.

Pouvez-vous nous dire si cela a été fait et s'il est logique d'aller de l'avant avec la construction du nouveau pont Champlain dans le cadre d'un PPP.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Nous sommes conscients de la nécessité de dépenser l'argent des contribuables aussi efficacement que possible. Dans le cas de nouveaux ouvrages, nous gardons cela en tête tout en examinant le coût réel et la meilleure option. Dans le cas du pont Champlain, on a conclu un PPP.

M. Erin Weir:

C'est pourquoi j'ai soulevé ce sujet.

Qu'il s'agisse ou non d'un PPP, la construction du pont nécessitera l'utilisation d'une grande quantité d'acier. L'industrie sidérurgique canadienne traverse une période difficile, alors je me demande si le nouveau pont sera construit avec de l'acier produit au Canada, et j'aimerais aussi savoir quel type de politique de rémunération équitable, le cas échéant, s'appliquera aux travailleurs qui participeront au projet.

(1600)

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Nous veillons à ce que les Canadiens et les entreprises canadiennes profitent le plus possible de chaque projet. C'est ce que nous cherchons à faire au ministère.

M. Erin Weir:

D'accord, mais dans le cas de ce projet de construction en particulier, qui est un projet de grande envergure, pouvez-vous nous dire si on utilisera de l'acier produit au Canada?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Avons-nous établi le financement du PPP?

M. George Da Pont:

Comme la ministre l'a dit, un grand nombre d'entreprises canadiennes font partie du consortium qui a obtenu le contrat, alors il est certain que le contenu canadien sera très important. Je vais devoir m'informer pour répondre à votre question concernant l'utilisation d'acier produit au Canada, car je n'ai pas cette information. Nous allons faire en sorte de vous fournir cette réponse ultérieurement.

M. Erin Weir:

Je comprends.

Je sais que votre lettre de mandat fait mention d'une politique moderne de rémunération équitable, mais je ne sais pas exactement ce que cela signifie. Est-ce qu'elle s'appliquera à tous les travailleurs embauchés pour la construction de ce nouveau pont?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

C'est ce qui est prévu.

M. Erin Weir:

Pouvez-vous nous parler de cette politique?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Qu'avons-nous fait?

M. George Da Pont:

En vertu de la politique de rémunération équitable, que ce soit pour ce contrat ou n'importe quel autre contrat, toute entreprise qui entreprend des travaux de construction au Canada doit respecter la législation fédérale et provinciale et toutes les exigences en vigueur...

M. Erin Weir:

Lorsqu'on respecte la législation du travail, ne doit-on pas appliquer une politique de rémunération équitable? Auparavant, lorsqu'on voulait soumissionner pour un projet de construction fédéral, on devait respecter certains taux de rémunération pour différents métiers. Les conservateurs ont aboli cette bonne politique. Le nouveau gouvernement a parlé de mettre en place une certaine version de cette politique. Est-ce qu'il le fera?

M. George Da Pont:

C'est ce que j'ai expliqué. Actuellement, les contrats ne contiennent plus ce genre de dispositions. Je crois que le gouvernement se penche là-dessus.

M. Erin Weir:

Alors nous ne savons pas si la politique sera appliquée dans le cadre de la construction du nouveau pont Champlain.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Elle pourrait très bien l'être. La lettre de mandat fait état d'une politique de rémunération équitable. Nous ne savons pas exactement si elle sera appliquée dans le cadre de ce projet en particulier, mais je peux vous dire que nous sommes résolus à la mettre en application.

M. Erin Weir:

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre.

La parole est maintenant à M. Whalen.

M. Nick Whalen (St. John's-Est, Lib.):

J'invoque le Règlement. Je crois que c'est au tour de M. Grewal.

Le président:

Pardonnez-moi.

M. Nick Whalen:

Je peux prendre la parole ensuite s'il accepte de partager son temps de parole avec moi.

Le président:

Monsieur Grewal, vous pouvez céder une partie de votre temps de parole.

M. Raj Grewal (Brampton-Est, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président, et je remercie la ministre et les fonctionnaires d'être venus aujourd'hui. Nous vous en sommes reconnaissants.

Ma question devait porter sur la stratégie nationale d'approvisionnement en matière de construction navale, mais mon collègue en a discuté en détail, alors je vais passer à un autre sujet.

Bien des gens dans ma circonscription, particulièrement durant la campagne, ont parlé de Postes Canada. Un bon nombre d'entre eux travaillent pour Postes Canada. Beaucoup de personnes sont préoccupées par la livraison du courrier à domicile. La question d'un examen de Postes Canada par un groupe de travail indépendant est revenue souvent sur le tapis durant la période des questions et dans les médias. Pouvez-vous nous dire où nous en sommes dans ce processus?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Nous sommes déterminés à bien faire les choses, ce qui signifie que nous devons trouver les bonnes personnes pour former ce groupe de travail. Je sais que bien des choses ont été faites en ce qui concerne Postes Canada. Sous le gouvernement précédent, un plan en cinq points a été mis en oeuvre. Nous devons obtenir toute l'information que Postes Canada a utilisée pour prendre ses décisions. Nous voulons un examen plus indépendant que celui qui a été effectué par Postes Canada, mais nous voulons aussi obtenir l'information que cette société a rassemblée.

Nous voulons embaucher les bonnes personnes pour composer le groupe de travail. Ces personnes s'occuperont de recueillir cette information et de déterminer s'il y a d'autres secteurs d'activités auxquels Postes Canada pourrait s'intéresser. Nous devons entreprendre des consultations auprès des Canadiens mais le comité ne peut s'en charger seul, car ce processus lui prendrait beaucoup de temps. C'est pour cette raison que nous aimerions confier cette tâche à un groupe de travail indépendant. Il pourrait vous fournir toute l'information dont vous avez besoin, si vous estimez que le comité devrait se pencher là-dessus.

(1605)

M. Raj Grewal:

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre.

Tout au long de la campagne, nous avons parlé de la pénurie de logements abordables. J'ai le privilège de siéger au Comité des finances, qui vient de procéder à des consultations prébudgétaires. Un grand nombre d'organismes de partout au pays sont venus nous parler de l'importance des logements abordables.

Dans votre lettre de mandat, on mentionne que vous collaborez avec le ministre de l'Infrastructure pour dresser l'inventaire de tous les biens immobiliers appartenant au gouvernement fédéral dans le but de voir lesquels peuvent être convertis en logements abordables. Je crois qu'il s'agit d'une excellente utilisation des ressources gouvernementales. Pouvez-vous dire au Comité où vous en êtes rendus dans ce processus?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Justement, j'ai assisté hier soir à une séance sur l'itinérance. On a discuté notamment de la possibilité de mettre à la disposition de la collectivité des immeubles fédéraux plutôt que de les vendre pour en retirer le plus d'argent possible, comme c'était le cas auparavant. Notre gouvernement est d'avis qu'il faut avoir une plus grande conscience sociale. Nous devons penser qu'il peut y avoir d'autres utilisations pour les biens immobiliers. En effet, j'ai dit hier soir lors de la réunion que quiconque constate qu'un bien immobilier fédéral est excédentaire ne devrait pas hésiter à communiquer avec le ministère. Nous pouvons envisager d'autres utilisations possibles plutôt que d'essayer de le vendre. Un certain nombre de ministères possèdent peut-être des immeubles qui pourraient être convertis en logements sociaux.

M. Raj Grewal:

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre.

Vous avez parlé aujourd'hui de la réfection de l'édifice Sir John A. Macdonald et de l'édifice Wellington. J'ai remarqué que ces projets de réfection respectent l'échéancier et le budget, ce qui est très important. Par souci de responsabilité et de transparence, je vous demanderais d'aviser le Comité de tout changement concernant le budget pour que nous puissions en informer les Canadiens. J'ai travaillé dans le domaine des finances et je sais que les budgets sont souvent touchés, alors je vous demande de bien vouloir informer le Comité s'il y a des changements à cet égard.

Je vais maintenant céder le reste de mon temps de parole à mon collègue.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Si je peux me permettre, j'aimerais dire, au sujet de ce dernier point, que nous nous sommes engagés à être ouverts et transparents en ce qui concerne les processus d'acquisition afin que les Canadiens sachent exactement ce qui se passe. Il en va de même avec les députés: nous voulons que vous sachiez où nous en sommes. Si les coûts augmentent, nous voulons que vous soyez au courant. Il est très bien de respecter l'échéancier et le budget, mais des changements peuvent survenir et nous voulons nous assurer que vous en soyez informés.

M. Raj Grewal:

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre.

Le président:

Monsieur Whalen, vous avez deux minutes.

M. Nick Whalen:

Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Pour continuer dans la même veine au sujet de Postes Canada, je dois dire que, mis à part les logements pour les aînés, Postes Canada est probablement le deuxième sujet dont on m'a le plus souvent parlé durant la campagne. Dans chacune des rues, quelqu'un était touché par les réductions de service. En effet, vers la fin de la campagne, Postes Canada a mis fin à la livraison du courrier à domicile dans quelques circonscriptions du pays — St. John's-Est, St. John's-Sud-Mount Pearl et Charlottetown — quelques jours à peine avant que le premier ministre déclare que cette initiative devrait être abandonnée. Un grand nombre des plaintes étaient formulées par des gens qui s'inquiétaient à juste titre de l'endroit où se trouvaient les boîtes aux lettres.

J'ai quelques questions à vous poser à ce sujet. Premièrement, je n'ai vu dans le budget aucun fonds supplémentaire destiné au groupe de travail. Utilise-t-on des fonds du budget actuel ou est-ce que cela va figurer dans le prochain budget?

Deuxièmement, est-ce que le groupe de travail s'adressera aux Canadiens qui ont formulé des plaintes pour savoir si Postes Canada a persisté à aller de l'avant avec de mauvaises idées ou si la société a pris ces plaintes au sérieux et y a répondu correctement plutôt que de simplement y réagir en punissant les gens de ma circonscription?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Eh bien, s'ils l'ont fait pour votre circonscription, ils l'ont fait pour la mienne aussi.

Les coûts rattachés au groupe de travail, et au secrétariat, seront couverts par le ministère. C'est pour cette raison qu'il n'y a pas de demande de fonds supplémentaires. Le groupe de travail aura le mandat de vérifier toutes les décisions prises par Postes Canada, sans exception, et de voir si la société a donné suite ou non aux plaintes qu'elle a reçues. Tout cela fera partie intégrante d'un examen indépendant exhaustif de Postes Canada. Désormais, on veillera à ce qu'aucune situation problématique ne soit laissée en suspens et à ce que solutions soient appliquées.

Nous devons bien sûr reconnaître que Postes Canada est une société sans lien de dépendance. Elle doit mener ses activités de manière à s'autosuffire, et cela va rester ainsi. Il n'en demeure pas moins qu'elle offre un service aux Canadiens d'un bout à l'autre du pays, et nous voulons nous assurer qu'elle continuera de le faire. Le service offert est tributaire des moyens financiers de Postes Canada, parce que le gouvernement n'injectera pas de fonds supplémentaires dans ses activités, puisqu'il s'agit d'une société d'État indépendante. Nous nous attendons cependant à ce que le groupe de travail explore d'autres avenues dans son examen indépendant pour permettre à Postes Canada de toucher des revenus supplémentaires, et ainsi de s'acquitter de ses responsabilités liées à la distribution du courrier, ou de toute autre tâche que lui permettrait son statut financier.

(1610)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Nous passons maintenant à des tours de cinq minutes, en commençant par M. McCauley.

M. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton-Ouest, PCC):

Je vais laisser les 30 premières secondes à mon collègue.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Je veux simplement souligner au passage, concernant l'aliénation des biens, que c'est ce que fait la Société immobilière du Canada, une entité déjà en place. L'objectif est de travailler avec l'industrie selon une approche consultative en vue d'établir des cibles axées sur la collectivité, d'assurer une intendance environnementale et de préserver le patrimoine. Je collabore avec la Société immobilière du Canada depuis une dizaine d'années, et je peux vous assurer qu'elle excelle dans l'aliénation de terrains.

Là-dessus, je cède la parole à M. McCauley.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Merci, monsieur.

Je veux revenir à la question de mon collègue concernant votre lettre de mandat. Peut-être que je vois les choses d'un autre oeil. L'objectif de mettre en oeuvre un régime moderne de justes salaires détonne avec votre commentaire selon lequel vous souhaitez faciliter le processus d'approvisionnement pour les entreprises canadiennes qui veulent faire des affaires avec le gouvernement. Au bout du compte, vous allez exclure énormément d'entreprises familiales, de petites entreprises, et ceux qui ne peuvent pas se mesurer à la concurrence des grandes entreprises.

Où en êtes-vous avec la politique des justes salaires? Nous l'entendons sans arrêt: il faut consulter les Canadiens, consulter, consulter, consulter, et les consulter encore. Est-ce qu'on donne voix aux petites entreprises, aux entreprises non syndiquées, dans ce processus, et est-ce qu'on leur permet de s'exprimer sur la politique des justes salaires et les répercussions qu'elle aura sur l'approvisionnement et le processus d'équité?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

La politique des justes salaires est l'affaire de l'ensemble du gouvernement, pas seulement du ministère des Services publics et de l'Approvisionnement.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Ma question s'applique à l'ensemble du gouvernement. Merci.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Cela dit, nous n'avons pas encore entamé ce processus. L'exercice sera mené par un autre organisme du gouvernement. Je m'attends à ce que le Conseil du Trésor soit une figure de proue dans ce dossier.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Mais c'est dans votre lettre de mandat.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

J'imagine que c'est dans la lettre de mandat de tous les ministres.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Je ne le vois pas.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

On nous a demandé de nous pencher sur la question, et nous allons le faire; mais encore là, c'est l'affaire de l'ensemble du gouvernement.

M. Kelly McCauley:

D'accord.

Est-ce que vous vous engagez à consulter, consulter, consulter, comme on nous le répète encore et encore?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Absolument.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Parfait.

Il semble qu'il n'y ait pas encore eu beaucoup de progrès de ce côté.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Pas pour l'instant.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Je crois que cela répond à la question de M. Weir.

Pour revenir à la construction navale, différentes sources indiquent que vous envisagez envoyer au Sud l'empaquetage des armes, les activités de haute technologie et les vraies choses à valeur ajoutée, ce qui est réellement à la base d'une industrie dans ce secteur. Je comprends que de l'argent est en jeu et que nous devons obtenir le meilleur rapport qualité-prix. Cependant, la Stratégie nationale d'approvisionnement en matière de construction navale visait principalement à raviver cette industrie à la dérive. Vous avez dit ne vouloir exclure aucune possibilité. Mais est-ce que le gouvernement a déjà entrepris des démarches pour exporter ces activités?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Nous n'avons pas l'intention d'exporter des activités. Nous voulons que le travail effectué au Canada soit du travail hautement technologique, et pouvoir saisir toute autre occasion qui s'offrirait à nous.

Nous sommes conscients que nous devons dépenser l'argent des contribuables judicieusement, mais nous devons aussi tenir compte des retombées en fait de création d'emplois.

Il s'agira de consulter l'industrie, et nous sommes en consultation constante avec elle, parce que nous travaillons en partenariat. Alors, tandis que...

(1615)

M. Kelly McCauley:

Je crois avoir lu que pour le volet technologique, l'industrie n'avait pas été consultée. Les joueurs de l'industrie ont été pris un peu de court par cette nouvelle. Ce n'est donc pas le cas?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Nous avons mené des consultations. Je suis étonnée d'entendre cela. Nous avons consulté l'industrie sur tous les volets de l'approvisionnement.

M. Kelly McCauley:

J'ai une dernière question, parce que le temps me presse.

Monsieur Parker, je sais que le processus avec Services partagés a été très compliqué, mais j'aimerais que vous nous disiez où en sont les choses en ce moment. De quoi auriez-vous besoin pour que tout fonctionne correctement? Nous avons appris récemment qu'on prévoyait installer un serveur à Trenton, mais que personne n'en avait discuté avec le ministère de la Défense nationale, qui s'objecte au projet. Sommes-nous en voie de régler tous les problèmes qui subsistent?

Le rapport d'audit indiquait qu'il manquait 800 personnes. Y a-t-il une pénurie de travailleurs qualifiés, un manque d'employés, ou une myriade de problèmes? Nous voulons évidemment que tout cela fonctionne.

Le président:

Le temps nous presse.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Une réponse en trois secondes.

M. Ron Parker:

Monsieur le président, nous examinons toutes les hypothèses qui sous-tendent le plan de transformation et nous travaillons à la mise en oeuvre d'un nouveau plan, révisé et mis à jour, pour l'automne de cette année.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur.

Le prochain intervenant sur ma liste est M. Whalen, pour cinq minutes.

M. Nick Whalen:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Merci à vous tous de votre présence aujourd'hui.

Je veux moi aussi revenir à la stratégie de construction navale. Bien des entreprises du Canada atlantique sont très encouragées par le processus indépendant qui a permis à Irving Shipbuilding de remporter le contrat. Cependant, cela a été suivi d'un silence radio. C'est à croire que l'industrie au Canada atlantique s'est atrophiée après avoir été ainsi négligée. Que prévoit faire votre ministère pour faire progresser ce dossier, de façon à ce que les navires soient construits et les services attendus offerts?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

En fait, nous sommes très satisfaits de ce qui se passe au chantier naval de Halifax et à celui de Seaspan, à Vancouver. Les premiers ouvrages ont été entrepris, et nous avons été très impressionnés par ce que nous avons vu. L'argent a été investi. Du côté de Seaspan, l'entreprise a investi de sa propre poche pour rénover ses installations. D'importantes sommes ont aussi été investies à Halifax pour améliorer les installations là-bas.

C'est très encourageant ce qui se passe en ce moment. Nous croyons aussi que cela pourra permettre à d'autres entreprises de créer de l'emploi. À l'heure actuelle, 300 entreprises ont tiré profit des travaux en cours à Halifax et à Vancouver, et ce sont des entreprises de partout au pays.

Nous allons faire le point là-dessus, entre autres, dans notre mise à jour trimestrielle. Nous allons certainement en parler dans notre mise à jour de l'automne. Vous pourrez voir exactement comment l'argent a été dépensé, quelles compagnies bénéficient des occasions offertes par l'industrie de la construction navale, combien on emploie de personnes, et quels types de contrats sont accordés.

Vous constaterez qu'il ne s'agit pas que de portes et de fenêtres, comme on l'a laissé entendre, mais aussi d'activités hautement technologiques. Il est important de saisir toutes les occasions qui permettront aux entreprises canadiennes d'obtenir des contrats et d'offrir des emplois.

M. Nick Whalen:

Je suis très heureux de savoir que les choses ont fini par bouger.

J'aimerais parler de la cybersécurité, et je remercie M. Drouin d'avoir entamé la discussion sur ce sujet plus tôt.

Du point de vue du processus budgétaire, il semble y avoir une assez grande augmentation des crédits demandés à cet égard. Je comprends que c'est extrêmement important. D'après la façon le budget est structuré, je ne peux pas voir quel était le montant attribué à la cybersécurité avant, si c'était 1,5 milliard de dollars ou autre.

À quoi s'attend le ministère en ce qui a trait à la hausse future des coûts liés à la cybersécurité? À quoi doivent s'attendre les Canadiens de ce côté? À quoi correspond la hausse année après année des coûts rattachés à la protection de notre infrastructure de réseau contre le cyberterrorisme?

M. Ron Parker:

Monsieur le président, je crains de ne pas avoir l'augmentation annuelle sous les yeux, mais je pourrai certainement trouver ces données pour vous. Pour ce qui est des dépenses générales liées à la cybersécurité, je peux vous dire qu'elles ont connu une hausse stable au cours des dernières années. Cela souligne l'importance de la cybersécurité de façon générale.

Le ministère a su optimiser les crédits qui lui sont accordés. Le centre des opérations de sécurité est en fonction 24 heures sur 24, 7 jours sur 7, toute l'année. Il assure la surveillance du périmètre des tentatives d'accès au réseau du gouvernement du Canada. Des efforts considérables ont été déployés depuis la création de Services partagés pour faire avancer cette initiative.

(1620)

M. Nick Whalen:

Dans le même ordre d'idées, il est un peu plus facile de protéger un seul réseau que d'en protéger 63, alors nous sommes conscients des avantages que présente cette stratégie. Mais quand il est question de panne, si le réseau du gouvernement flanche, c'est tout le monde qui est touché, par seulement les utilisateurs d'un des 63 réseaux.

Quelles sont les mesures prises à cet égard et, sur le plan budgétaire, que faites-vous pour éviter les temps d'arrêt? Quels types de plans de redondances sont mis en place? Que fait-on pour s'assurer qu'on maximise le temps exploitable sur le nouveau réseau consolidé?

Le président:

Vous avez 20 secondes.

M. Ron Parker:

Merci, monsieur le président.

De nombreux efforts sont déployés en ce sens. Nous passons d'une cinquantaine de réseaux en silo à un seul. La conception du réseau accorde beaucoup d'importance aux redondances et la grande disponibilité du réseau. Les travaux ne font que commencer. À ce stade-ci, les entreprises retenues ont pu toucher au nouveau réseau, mais rien n'est officiellement démarré. La phase de planification est en cours. Ces questions sont au coeur de cet exercice. Nous prévoyons mettre en place un réseau offrant une très grande disponibilité.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Parker.

Monsieur Blaney, vous avez cinq minutes, s'il vous plaît.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre Foote, un article troublant a été publié dans le The Hill Times, à l'effet que Postes Canada allait distribuer du matériel qui contrevient aux lois canadiennes — des propos haineux, et du matériel très peu indulgent envers les minorités. Pourriez-vous commenter cela? Avez-vous le pouvoir de vous assurer que Postes Canada ne distribue que du matériel qui est conforme à la loi?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Merci de me poser la question.

Je suis au courant de la situation. Je suis moi-même contrariée par l'information distribuée, à un point tel que nous avons sollicité des conseils juridiques à ce sujet, pour savoir si le tout constituait une infraction criminelle. Le contenu de ces messages me préoccupe.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Y a-t-il des mécanismes en place pour s'assurer que le matériel distribué est conforme aux lois canadiennes?

Ou y va-t-on plutôt au cas par cas quand de telles choses se produisent?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

C'est exact. C'est pourquoi nous nous sommes adressés à Postes Canada. Si je ne me trompe pas, la première chose...

Il est arrivé que Postes Canada demande un avis juridique au sujet d'un envoi, mais rien ne justifiait de le retirer. Mais maintenant qu'un autre document est distribué, on s'inquiète. Cela me préoccupe moi aussi, et nous avons demandé des conseils juridiques à ce sujet.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

D'accord. Nous aimerions être informés de votre intention concernant ce regrettable incident.

En outre, vous avez mentionné que vous vous attendez à ce que le ministère de l'Immigration soit mis à contribution, mais vous avez aussi dit que votre ministère participait à l'accueil des réfugiés syriens. Pouvez-vous nous dire plus précisément de quelle manière vous y avez participé et combien a été investi dans ce projet? Est-ce que ces sommes sont incluses au budget? Prévoyez-vous une augmentation des coûts? Est-ce qu'on va accueillir plus de réfugiés syriens? Notamment en ce qui concerne la formation et l'hébergement, prévoyez-vous une augmentation des dépenses à cet égard?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Oui. Notre demande vise en fait à obtenir plus de fonds pour en faire plus à cet égard. Notre travail consistait à assurer l'approvisionnement, qu'on parle de manteaux d'hiver, de logements ou de tout ce dont pourraient avoir besoin les réfugiés à leur arrivée. Nous prévoyons avoir besoin de ressources supplémentaires pour répondre aux besoins des autres réfugiés qui viendront s'établir chez nous.

(1625)

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

D'accord.

Mon collègue doit partir, alors j'aimerais lui permettre de poser une dernière question avant qu'il s'en aille.

Le président:

Vous avez deux minutes, monsieur McCauley.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Parfait, je serai très bref.

Vous avez dit, et j'étais très heureux de l'entendre, que le gouvernement ne donnerait pas plus de l'argent des contribuables à Postes Canada. Je suis d'accord pour dire que la société doit trouver d'autres sources de revenus pour lui permettre d'accroître ses services, mais pouvons-nous nous assurer qu'elle n'empiétera pas sur des secteurs déjà très bien desservis par les entreprises privées, les petites entreprises, ou qu'elle ne se servira pas de son avantage concurrentiel pour éliminer les petites entreprises et les autres entreprises privées déjà établies?

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Eh bien, vous savez, Postes Canada est déjà en concurrence avec les entreprises privées pour certains services. Si le mandat est d'offrir un service aux Canadiens, il faut trouver un moyen d'y arriver. Je répète que Postes Canada est une société d'État et qu'elle doit s'autosuffire. Je ne sais pas vers quels autres secteurs elle pourra se tourner, et c'est pour cette raison que nous voulons d'un examen exhaustif indépendant, pour voir quelles sont les possibilités.

Je comprends vos inquiétudes concernant la concurrence avec les petites et moyennes entreprises. Je suis persuadée que l'examen tiendra compte de tout cela.

M. Kelly McCauley:

Oui, mais nous aimerions avoir l'assurance que le géant ne va pas piétiner les petites entreprises qui offrent uniquement des services de messagerie ou de livraison à domicile.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Pour la dernière série de questions de cinq minutes, la parole est à M. Ayoub.

M. Ramez Ayoub (Thérèse-De Blainville, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.[Français]

Madame la ministre, messieurs et madame, merci d'être avec nous aujourd'hui.

J'ai besoin d'information surtout sur le processus qui mène à demander des fonds supplémentaires.

Je vais prendre un exemple. On en retrouve peut-être de semblables quand on fait le tour. Le Manège militaire de Québec, dans la Grande-Allée, a passé au feu en 2008. Cela fait maintenant huit ans. Je vois que les premiers fonds pour sa reconstruction, d'un montant de 72 millions de dollars, ont été adoptés seulement l'année dernière. Si l'on soustrait une année, c'est donc dire qu'on a pris sept ans avant de prendre une décision pour refaire le fameux Manège militaire de Québec. Je connais bien ce bâtiment, puisqu'il se trouve dans la région où j'ai habitée pendant toute mon enfance.

Un an plus tard, on demande des fonds supplémentaires. Je cherche donc à savoir quel est le processus de prévisions budgétaires ayant mené à la demande de ces fonds. On sait ce que le Manège militaire de Québec était et ce qu'il devra être. Pourquoi, un an plus tard, ce qui n'est pas très long, on demande une augmentation de 30 % de la somme de 72 millions de dollars? Y a-t-il eu une mauvaise planification au départ? Pourquoi se retrouve-t-on, un an plus tard, avec ce problème qui vous retombe entre les mains en tant que nouvelle ministre? [Traduction]

M. George Da Pont:

C'est quelque chose qui peut arriver, surtout quand on rénove des immeubles qui possèdent d'importantes caractéristiques historiques à préserver.

Évidemment, pour établir les premières estimations, nous procédons à l'inspection des immeubles, et il arrive souvent que nous engagions des spécialistes indépendants pour cela. Il n'est pas inhabituel qu'on découvre en cours de route des choses que l'inspection n'avait pas permis de détecter avant le début des travaux.

La même chose arrive aux propriétaires qui entreprennent un projet et qui se butent à des imprévus. C'est donc quelque chose qui peut se produire de temps à autre.

Quand c'est le cas, si les dépenses excèdent ce qui avait été prévu au budget initial, nous devons demander des fonds supplémentaires. C'est souvent ce qui explique de telles demandes.

M. Ramez Ayoub:

Est-ce raisonnable de dire qu'il arrive de temps à autre de dépasser le budget de 30 %?

M. George Da Pont:

Eh bien... [Français]

M. Ramez Ayoub:

D'habitude, dans toutes les propositions, il y a toujours un pourcentage prévu justement pour les imprévus. Ma préoccupation est que, un an plus tard, on demande 30 % de plus. Ce n'est pas le projet en lui-même qui me préoccupe, car effectivement le Manège militaire de Québec est un joyau à reconstruire. Je ne connais pas les détails, mais je suis préoccupé par la planification et par le fait qu'on se retrouve un an plus tard avec tout cela.

(1630)

M. George Da Pont:

La dernière chose que j'ajouterais est qu'il arrive parfois qu'on répartisse les travaux sur deux ou trois contrats. Ce n'est pas un seul contrat pour tout. [Traduction]

Dans ce cas-ci, c'est un nouveau contrat. Ce n'est pas une prolongation de contrat. C'est attribuable à des circonstances inattendues et, en gros, à la conclusion de différents contrats, pas d'un seul, pour différents aspects du travail. [Français]

M. Ramez Ayoub:

Je suis d'origine syrienne et la question de l'accueil de Syriens me touche un peu.

L'année dernière, le Parti libéral voulait accueillir un certain nombre de Syriens. Au départ, il était question d'accueillir 10 000 Syriens, puis on en a ajouté 15 000 de plus, pour un total de 25 000. Un montant de 5,4 millions de dollars supplémentaires est demandé pour faire face à l'accueil de ces Syriens.

Ce montant servira-t-il maintenant ou s'étale-t-il sur plusieurs années? Quelle est la ventilation de ce montant supplémentaire? [Traduction]

Le président:

Veuillez répondre très brièvement, madame la ministre.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Pour obtenir le financement dont nous avons besoin, une demande serait présentée par l'entremise du ministère de l'Immigration. Le ministère établirait le nombre de réfugiés, et, en fonction du travail que nous aurons accompli ensemble, nous déterminerions ensuite ce qu'il faudrait dépenser pour en faire davantage, pour dépasser le nombre de 25 000 réfugiés que nous avons déjà fait venir.

Le président:

Merci, madame la ministre.

Madame la ministre, il est 16 h 32. Vous avez dit que vous devez partir vers 16 h 30. Au nom du Comité, je vous remercie donc de votre participation. Vous pouvez partir.

L’hon. Judy Foote:

Merci. J'ai hâte de continuer de travailler avec le Comité, surtout dans le dossier de Postes Canada. Si le Comité pense que c'est pertinent, je lui en serais reconnaissante.

Le président:

Merci encore, madame la ministre.

Dans l'intérêt des membres du Comité, j'ai deux brèves questions à aborder. Nous verrons que cela deviendra de plus en plus fréquent à mesure que nous tiendrons des séances, mais, normalement, lorsque nous avons une séance de deux heures et que deux groupes distincts de témoins comparaissent, après avoir entendu le premier groupe, nous reprenons l'ordre d'intervention initial, peu importe où nous étions rendus.

Toutefois, après avoir consulté Mme Ratansi, et compte tenu du fait que nous avons un groupe de témoins similaire devant nous, nous allons reprendre où nous étions rendus, ce qui signifie que M. Weir sera le prochain à intervenir, pour trois minutes. Nous reviendrons ensuite aux questions de sept minutes.

Cela dit, comme je l'ai mentionné à la dernière séance, nous devons également réserver au moins 10 minutes à la fin de la présente séance pour une suite de votes portant sur le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C). Vers 17 h 20, je mettrai fin à notre discussion avec les témoins, et nous passerons aux différents votes portant sur le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C).

Monsieur Weir, vous avez trois minutes pour poser vos questions et entendre les réponses.

M. Erin Weir:

J'aimerais revenir au point soulevé par mon collègue d'en face à propos de l'importance du logement abordable. La semaine dernière, un article troublant a été publié au sujet du gouvernement de la Saskatchewan qui enverrait des sans-abri par autobus en Colombie-Britannique.

Je me demande si les témoins pourraient fournir certains renseignements sur la rapidité avec laquelle les mesures proposées par le gouvernement fédéral pourraient être mises en place dans notre province, la Saskatchewan.

M. George Da Pont:

Dans le dossier du logement abordable, notre ministère jouera un rôle de soutien, qui sera néanmoins très important.

Pour l'instant, nous avons l'inventaire complet des immeubles et des infrastructures du ministère qui pourraient être transformés en logements abordables. Cet inventaire contribue au travail dirigé par la SCHL, qui est responsable de la politique dans l'ensemble de l'administration, car, comme l'a dit la ministre, d'autres ministères ont des propriétés et des structures qui pourraient être utilisées. Tout cela apporte une contribution, et la SCHL dirige l'élaboration d'une approche visant à accroître les possibilités en matière de logement abordable.

(1635)

M. Erin Weir:

Puis-je demander combien de ces propriétés se trouvent en Saskatchewan?

M. George Da Pont:

Je n'ai pas cette information, mais mon collègue, Kevin Radford, qui dirige notre Direction générale des biens immobiliers, pourrait répondre. Il a peut-être ce chiffre. Sinon, nous vous le ferons parvenir.

M. Kevin Radford (sous-ministre adjoint, Direction générale des biens immobiliers, ministère des Travaux publics et des Services gouvernementaux):

À propos du cas précis de la Saskatchewan, nous avons fourni une liste de toutes nos propriétés disponibles. Nous les avons classées en fonction de critères: sont-elles situées dans un milieu urbain ou rural; s'agit-il d'immeubles commerciaux ou résidentiels; et ainsi de suite?

L'idée est de prendre 30 % de nos avoirs et de mettre en place un mécanisme, ou du moins un catalyseur visant d'autres gardiens de propriétés, comme la GRC, la Défense nationale et ainsi de suite, afin de donner suite à notre démarche dans le but de faire avancer le programme et d'avoir ne serait-ce qu'une bien meilleure idée de ce que sont nos immobilisations.

Il ne fait aucun doute que certaines propriétés figurant sur cette liste sont en Saskatchewan. Il faudrait que j'examine la liste pour vous dire lesquelles.

M. Erin Weir:

Oui, pourriez-vous fournir cette information au Comité?

Nous nous pencherons également sur certaines questions liées à l'utilisation d'acier canadien pour le remplacement du pont Champlain. Ce serait très intéressant.

Le président:

Nous allons reprendre les interventions de sept minutes en commençant par M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

En tant qu'ancien journaliste spécialisé en technologie, plus précisément en logiciels libres avec code source ouvert, j'ai l'intention de m'aventurer un peu dans les méandres de Services partagés. Par conséquent, si des techniciens vous accompagnent, je les encourage à se manifester et à prendre place à la table.

Tout d'abord, parmi les 23 000 serveurs répartis dans 485 centres de données auxquels la ministre a fait allusion, combien y en a-t-il qui fonctionnent au moyen d'un logiciel libre? Dans le cadre de votre transition vers sept centres de données, observe-t-on une migration des logiciels privés vers des logiciels libres? À titre d'exemple, sur la Colline, je peux seulement utiliser Internet Explorer étant donné que c'est le seul navigateur conforme à nos normes de sécurité, ce qui est plutôt drôle pour quiconque à travailler dans l'industrie plus que quelques heures.

Pour ce qui est des serveurs, les diverses possibilités offertes par Linux sont intéressantes pour remplacer le système UNIX et Windows. À l'avenir, je veux être certain que l'on envisage sérieusement les logiciels libres.

M. Ron Parker:

Je regrette, mais je ne suis pas technologue. Je le dis d'emblée. Je vais demander à notre spécialiste de la technologie, Patrice Rondeau, de répondre à cette question.

M. Patrice Rondeau (sous-ministre adjoint principal par intérim, Centres de données, Services partagés Canada):

Bon après-midi, monsieur le président.

Lorsqu'il s'agit d'élargir notre plateforme, nous concentrons notre attention sur les logiciels de code source libre. Dans le cadre de la migration des tâches vers un nouvel environnement, nous examinons les possibilités d'exploiter des logiciels libres.

Au Centre de données, on compte 26 000 serveurs physiques, mais jusqu'à 74 000 systèmes d'exploitation, ce qui signifie que des serveurs virtuels sont embarqués dans des serveurs physiques. Je dirais qu'approximativement 15 % de ces serveurs exécutent Linux.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En général, quel système d'exploitation exécutent les autres serveurs, qui représentent une portion de 85 %?

M. Patrice Rondeau:

Le reste des serveurs, vous voulez dire?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui. S'agit-il d'anciens serveurs Unix, de serveurs Windows ou d'une combinaison?

M. Patrice Rondeau:

Dans une large mesure, il s'agit de serveurs Windows. On utilise tous les types de serveurs Unix, entre autres HP-UX et IBM AIX. De plus, on trouve encore de nombreux ordinateurs centraux surtout dans les grands ministères.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Utilise-t-on encore des nombres entiers signés de 32 bits pour mettre en mémoire des données temporelles à l'échelle du gouvernement ou allons-nous être vulnérables au bogue de l'an 2038?

(1640)

M. Patrice Rondeau:

Désolé. Je n'ai pas entendu la question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Utilise-t-on encore des nombres entiers signés de 32 bits pour stocker des données temporelles au gouvernement ou sommes-nous prêts à faire face au bogue de l'an 2038?

M. Patrice Rondeau:

On utilise encore des ordinateurs de 32 bits, mais surtout de 64 bits, si c'est ce que vous demandez.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'était effectivement ma question.

M. Patrice Rondeau:

Il y a encore de nombreux environnements où dominent les ordinateurs à jeu d'instruction réduit, ou RISC. On utilise encore certaines versions des systèmes Solaris, HP-UX et série p d'IBM. Il y a quatre ou cinq ans, nous avons hérité de probablement toutes les versions de chaque type de serveurs et d'ordinateurs qui existaient à l'époque.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis toujours étonné d'entendre dire qu'il y a encore des ordinateurs RISC, mais c'est un autre sujet.

Je suis probablement le seul député à la Chambre des communes à avoir une clé de chiffrement PGP et je suis certainement le seul à faire partie de l'infrastructure à clé publique Debian. Incitera-t-on les fonctionnaires à adopter des signatures PGP, des réseaux de confiance ou un autre système d'authentification cryptographique?

M. Patrice Rondeau:

Je ne peux pas vraiment répondre à cette question, mais je peux me renseigner et fournir l'information au Comité.

Une voix: [Inaudible] Qu'est-ce que c'est?

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Ramez Ayoub:

J'aimerais avoir une traduction.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce n'est pas la traduction qui peut aider dans ce domaine.

PGP correspond à la norme de cryptage assez ancienne « Pretty Good Privacy » qui permet d'envoyer des courriels signés et codés de façon numérique. Il s'agit d'un outil que j'utilise depuis des années dans la communauté à source ouverte.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Il s'agit d'un bon outil de protection.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, c'est un outil de protection assez fiable, mis en oeuvre dans l'application d'encryptage GNU. L'histoire est longue... Il suffit de dire qu'il s'agit d'un système externe très fiable et très bien connu utilisé par la communauté technologique à l'extérieur du gouvernement. J'aimerais qu'on utilise ce logiciel au niveau gouvernemental ou à tout le moins une variante. Il est souhaitable que les courriels soient signés et codés conformément à la norme PGP dans un réseau de confiance auquel les utilisateurs accèdent avec la clé d'un autre utilisateur.

J'aimerais que le gouvernement envisage cette possibilité.

M. Patrice Rondeau:

D'accord. Nous pouvons nous renseigner et informer le Comité du résultat de nos recherches.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Lorsque nous aurons une réponse, je vous expliquerai de quoi il s'agit, monsieur Blaney.

M. Ron Parker:

Monsieur le président, nous fournirons une explication en ce qui concerne les clés d'encryptage et ce genre de service, mais je tiens à préciser que Services partagés Canada ne fournit pas de services à la Chambre des communes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non. Ça me convient, mais cela concerne l'ensemble du gouvernement. Il y a un grand nombre de comptes de courriels, de serveurs et de systèmes.

Entend-on mettre en place dans l'ensemble du réseau gouvernemental le protocole Internet version six, appelé IPv6?

M. Patrice Rondeau:

IPv6? À titre de sous-ministre adjoint principal, je suis responsable du Centre des données à...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous pouvons donc avoir une longue et intéressante conversation sans que personne ne comprenne de quoi nous parlons.

M. Patrice Rondeau :

Non, ce n'est pas le cas. Je connais bien le protocole IPv6.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je sais que vous et moi le connaissons.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Patrice Rondeau :

Des initiatives sont actuellement en cours, principalement en ce qui concerne les réseaux, entre autres à la Direction générale. Le protocole IPv6 a été mis en oeuvre dans certains réseaux et on envisage sa mise en oeuvre dans d'autres, mais je ne peux vous fournir de détails à ce sujet. Je dois me renseigner auprès de nos spécialistes des réseaux à la Direction générale.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quel genre de matériel est principalement utilisé à l'heure actuelle? Le savez-vous?

M. Patrice Rondeau:

Pour les réseaux?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pour les réseaux et les serveurs.

M. Patrice Rondeau:

Pour ce qui est des serveurs, on utilise tout le matériel informatique existant, qui date probablement des 15 dernières années et qui se trouve dans nos quelque 400 centres de données. Cependant, les nouvelles plateformes sont surtout des serveurs lame.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Il vous reste environ 45 secondes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. C'est assez court.

Puis-je demander, par curiosité malsaine peut-être, combien de noms de domaines possède le gouvernement. Avez-vous une idée?

M. Patrice Rondeau:

Je ne saurais vous répondre, mais il y a entre autres le nom de domaine « .ca ».

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce domaine relève de l'ACEI. Ce n'est pas le gouvernement.

M. Patrice Rondeau:

Effectivement. Il s'agit du serveur de fichiers réseau. Pour pouvoir vous donner le nombre précis de noms de domaine, je dois consulter le responsable de la sécurité au ministère. Nos experts réseau pourraient probablement vous fournir cette information.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. J'ai hâte de refaire cet exercice que j'ai trouvé fort intéressant.

M. Patrice Rondeau:

Aimeriez-vous que nous revenions sur quelque chose?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je crois que mon temps de parole est écoulé.

Le président:

Nous apprécierions que vous fournissiez au Comité l'information demandée.

Je cède maintenant la parole à une personne qui se demande encore comment fonctionne le télécopieur. Monsieur Blaney, vous disposez de sept minutes.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Merci, monsieur le président. Vous m'avez presque qualifié de dinosaure, mais ce n'est pas grave.

Ma question porte sur la lettre de mandat, plus précisément sur le remplacement des CF-18 et sur les travaux de réhabilitation de la Cité parlementaire. [Français]

J'aurais aimé poser des questions à la ministre au sujet des CF-18. Nous sommes conscients de la contribution exceptionnelle que les avions de chasse ont apportée à la mission de lutte conte le soi-disant État islamique, mais nous savons que ces avions de chasse arrivent à la fin de leur vie. Or, dans la lettre de mandat de la ministre, il est prévu d'enclencher un processus de remplacement des avions CF-18. Nous avons appris, cet après-midi, que nous aurons une mise à jour de la stratégie navale en novembre.

Êtes-vous en mesure de nous donner un état de la situation et de nous dire quelles sont les prochaines étapes du processus de remplacement des CF-18, qui est déjà en cours, et à quel moment elles seront enclenchées? Êtes-vous en mesure de me donner des informations à ce sujet cet après-midi?

(1645)

[Traduction]

M. George Da Pont:

Je vous remercie de votre question. Comme vous l'avez indiqué, le gouvernement s'est engagé à remplacer les CF-18 de toute évidence pour que l'aviation canadienne dispose des appareils dont elle a besoin pour s'acquitter de sa tâche.

Les fonctionnaires de mon ministère collaborent avec leurs pendants de la Défense nationale pour élaborer, comme le gouvernement s'est engagé à le faire, un appel d'offres ouvert et transparent pour le remplacement des chasseurs CF-18. Le travail est déjà amorcé à cet égard. Je crois que le gouvernement fera le point sur ce dossier lorsqu'il aura arrêté son choix sur une formule en particulier.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

D'accord. Il va sans dire que nous sommes impatients d'en savoir davantage.

Je passe maintenant aux travaux de réhabilitation de la Cité parlementaire. J'ai été ravi de constater que, jusqu'ici, les travaux ont été exécutés dans le respect des délais et des devis. Si je ne m'abuse, nous devrons à un moment donné quitter l'édifice du Centre pour nous installer dans l'édifice de l'Est. Pourriez-vous nous dire quand ce déménagement aura lieu?

M. George Da Pont:

On prévoit libérer l'édifice du Centre en 2018 pour y effectuer les travaux nécessaires. Les occupants seront temporairement installés à divers endroits.

Je me tourne vers Rob Wright qui est le sous-ministre adjoint responsable de la Cité parlementaire. Si vous le souhaitez, il peut certainement vous fournir plus de détails au sujet des endroits où seront temporairement installés les occupants de l'édifice du Centre.

M. Rob Wright (sous-ministre adjoint, Direction générale de la Cité parlementaire, ministère des Travaux publics et des Services gouvernementaux):

Absolument. Je vous remercie beaucoup de votre question.

Comme vous l'avez indiqué, les projets vont bon train dans le respect des échéanciers. D'ici 2018, cinq grands projets seront achevés, ce qui permettra de complètement libérer l'édifice du Centre pour y commencer les travaux prévus.

L'an dernier, la conclusion des travaux à l'édifice Sir John A. MacDonald a permis de mettre à la disposition du Parlement du Canada un nouvel espace pour les conférences. Au cours des prochains mois, la réhabilitation de l'édifice Wellington, à l'angle des rues Wellington et Bank, sera achevée. Cela permettra d'y accueillir les députés, une condition essentielle pour libérer les locaux de l'édifice du Centre. De plus, à la toute fin de 2017, les travaux à l'édifice de l'Ouest et la phase 1 du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs seront terminés. À ce moment-là, la Chambre pourra emménager dans l'édifice de l'Ouest où se dérouleront toutes les activités législatives.

Pour ce qui est du Sénat, nous procédons actuellement à la réhabilitation du Centre de conférences du gouvernement situé directement en face du Château Laurier. Les travaux du Sénat et toutes les activités législatives qui y sont liées se dérouleront au Centre de conférences du gouvernement. L'achèvement de ces deux projets permettra de libérer complètement l'édifice du Centre pour y débuter les travaux de réhabilitation.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Les événements qui sont survenus et le regroupement des services de sécurité ont-ils eu une incidence sur le projet de réhabilitation?

Pourriez-vous également parler du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, notamment de son importance dans la Cité parlementaire et de la façon d'y accéder? Il va sans dire que ces questions suscitent certaines préoccupations étant donné ce qui s'est passé.

M. Rob Wright:

Absolument.

Nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec le Service de protection parlementaire qui a été mis sur pied l'été dernier. Auparavant, nous collaborions de très près avec la Gendarmerie royale du Canada de même qu'avec les services de sécurité du Sénat et de la Chambre des communes.

À maints égards, il n'y a pas eu beaucoup de changements en ce qui nous concerne. Nous continuons de collaborer avec les forces de sécurité comme auparavant. La conception et la réalisation de tous ces projets se font dans le respect des exigences énoncées par la GRC et par les forces de sécurité du Sénat et de la Chambre des communes et, dorénavant, par le Service de protection parlementaire.

(1650)

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Si j'ai bien compris, le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs sera situé sur la rue Wellington et les visiteurs seront soumis à une vérification de sécurité avant de pouvoir entrer dans la Cité parlementaire.

M. Rob Wright :

La phase 1 du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs sera située entre l'édifice de l'Ouest et l'édifice du Centre. Dans le moment, on peut voir une profonde excavation à cet endroit. C'est le site réservé à la phase 1 du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs dont l'accès sera situé à l'Est. On y effectuera les vérifications de sécurité nécessaires avant de permettre aux visiteurs d'entrer dans l'édifice de l'Ouest et d'aller aux services d'accueil.

Pendant les travaux de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre, le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs sera agrandi par un passage souterrain qui reliera l'édifice du Centre et l'édifice de l'Ouest. À ce moment-là, le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs sera en grande partie souterrain et on y effectuera les vérifications de sécurité avant de laisser les visiteurs entrer dans les principaux édifices du Parlement.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Merci.

Monsieur le président, je serais fort intéressé à avoir une présentation plus détaillée sur cet important projet et sur l'enveloppe budgétaire correspondante.[Français]

Merci beaucoup. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup de votre réponse, monsieur Wright. Je sais que tous les parlementaires, particulièrement ceux qui siègent à la Chambre des communes, seront très intéressés de suivre l'évolution des travaux, notamment au moment des déménagements sur la Colline.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Weir qui dispose de sept minutes.

M. Erin Weir:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je pense que le Comité en est arrivé à un consensus général quant à la nécessité d'avoir des précisions sur la stratégie du gouvernement en matière de construction navale.

À l'instar de mon collègue, j'aimerais moi aussi poser des questions sur l'acquisition d'aéronefs.

On a dit que le gouvernement s'est engagé à trouver un appareil de remplacement pour les CF-18. Je note que le parti au pouvoir a aussi promis très clairement pendant la campagne électorale de ne pas acheter de F-35. Or, il a récemment été révélé que le gouvernement du Canada avait versé 45 millions de dollars pour continuer à faire partie du consortium des F-35 et pour garder l'option d'achat de cet aéronef.

Dans l'optique de la fonction publique, pouvez-vous dire si, dans le cadre de cet appel d'offres, on envisage toujours l'acquisition de F-35.

M. George Da Pont:

Non. Comme je l'ai indiqué plus tôt, tout ce que je peux dire c'est que nous collaborons avec le ministère de la Défense nationale pour préparer un appel d'offres ouvert. Par ailleurs, il va sans dire que lorsque le gouvernement aura pris une décision, il en fera l'annonce.

J'estime important de préciser que la participation au programme des avions de combat interarmées dont vous avez fait mention n'oblige pas à faire l'acquisition de F-35.

M. Erin Weir:

Je comprends fort bien qu'il n'y a pas d'engagement. Néanmoins, il semble étrange qu'un gouvernement dépense autant d'argent s'il n'est absolument pas intéressé à faire l'acquisition de cet aéronef.

Si on envisage les choses sous un angle différent, on peut dire que, pour l'instant, les F-35 ne semblent pas avoir été exclus du processus d'appel d'offres.

M. George Da Pont:

Non. Je crois que le gouvernement tient compte du fait que sa participation au programme permet aux entreprises canadiennes d'obtenir des contrats et de faire partie de la chaîne d'approvisionnement pour la fabrication des F-35. D'ailleurs, bon nombre de nos entreprises en ont profité.

À mon avis, ces contrats ont rapporté nettement plus d'argent aux entreprises canadiennes que ce qu'il n'en a coûté au gouvernement pour participer au programme. D'autre part, si un État ne paie pas pour participer au programme, les compagnies qui se trouvent sur son territoire ne peuvent faire des soumissions dans le cadre d'appels d'offres. Il est important de souligner que la participation du gouvernement offre un avantage et des possibilités aux entreprises canadiennes et qu'elle n'entraîne aucune obligation ou exigence en ce qui concerne l'acquisition de F-35.

M. Erin Weir:

J'ai bien compris.

Pour passer à un autre niveau, dans le budget des dépenses, Services partagés Canada demande un financement pour accroître les activités de contrôle biométrique à la frontière canadienne. J'aimerais connaître la raison qui sous-tend l'accroissement de ces activités de contrôle. Le Canada estime-t-il qu'il s'agit d'une obligation qui lui incombe en vertu des accords bilatéraux qu'il a conclus avec les États-Unis ou y a-t-il une autre raison?

M. Ron Parker:

Monsieur le président, je vous remercie de la question.

Notre participation à cette initiative, qui relève principalement du ministère de l'Immigration, vise à appuyer l'infrastructure TI.

Par ailleurs, j'invite mon collègue Graham Barr à vous dire quelques mots au sujet de l'objectif général de cette initiative.

(1655)

M. Graham Barr (directeur général, Politique stratégique, planification et établissement de rapports, Services partagés Canada):

Avec plaisir. Comme M. Parker l'a indiqué, c'est le ministère de l'Immigration, des Réfugiés et de la Citoyenneté qui dirige l'initiative. Grosso modo, elle vise à soumettre dorénavant à un contrôle biométrique tous les voyageurs qui ont besoin d'un visa pour entrer au Canada. Il nous incombe de fournir entre autres le matériel informatique, les serveurs et les dispositifs de stockage de même que les logiciels pour appuyer ces activités.

M. Erin Weir:

S'agit-il d'une initiative totalement nouvelle à Services partagés Canada ou le ministère fait-il déjà du contrôle biométrique?

M. Graham Barr:

Notre rôle est de fournir l'infrastructure TI nécessaire.

M. Erin Weir:

[Inaudible] A-t-on déjà fait l'acquisition d'une infrastructure TI pour le contrôle biométrique ou s'agira-t-il d'une nouveauté?

M. Graham Barr:

Ce n'est pas une nouvelle activité. Il s'agit plutôt d'un accroissement.

M. Erin Weir:

D’accord.

Un autre point m’intéresse dans le Budget principal des dépenses, je veux parler de la somme de 5 millions de dollars destinée à assainir les sites contaminés du gouvernement fédéral. J’aimerais avoir de l’information sur le nombre de sites que cela pourrait représenter, leur degré de contamination et les risques qu’ils peuvent présenter pour la santé publique?

M. George Da Pont:

Je vais laisser mon collègue Kevin Radford vous donner plus de détails, mais cette mesure fait partie du programme permanent que nous avons pour assainir les nombreux sites contaminés qu’il y a dans tout le pays. Cela va de très grands sites où les problèmes sont majeurs à de tout petits sites. Pas mal d’informations sont affichées sur les sites Web, concernant la localisation des sites et les substances faisant l’objet du nettoyage.

Le financement se fait régulièrement, habituellement sur deux ou trois ans. C’est de cette manière que nous procédons. Les sites sont classés selon le degré de risque, les plus contaminés étant traités en priorité.

Kevin.

M. Kevin Radford:

Merci de la question, monsieur le président.

Je n’ai pas grand-chose à ajouter, sinon qu’il existe, comme l’a dit mon collègue Georges, une liste de sites contaminés.

Je mentionnerai toutefois que la décontamination fait partie des services facultatifs que nous offrons à d’autres ministères. Si le site contaminé se trouve sur une base aérienne, c’est la Défense nationale qui s’en charge. Le ministère ferait probablement appel à notre expertise. Si la propriété appartient à un autre ministère où est exploité par ce dernier, nous avons toute une gamme de services disponibles. Nous facturons nos services au ministère concerné.

M. Erin Weir:

Merci.

Services partagés Canada veut en outre faire financer les mesures prises par le gouvernement face à la crise des réfugiés syriens. Il ne fait aucun doute qu’il s’agit là d’une énorme initiative qui a des coûts. Pourriez-vous parler du rôle que Services partagés Canada jouerait dans ce dossier?

M. Ron Parker:

Avec plaisir, monsieur le président.

Notre rôle consiste essentiellement à offrir aux fonctionnaires les outils dont ils ont besoin pour mettre en œuvre l’initiative. Nous leur offrons par exemple des services de téléphonie mobile et des ordinateurs portables. Nous nous assurons que les serveurs utilisés à cette fin, notamment pour contrôler les réfugiés, fonctionnent à très haute disponibilité. Voilà le type de services que nous offrons grâce au crédit demandé au Parlement dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C).

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Parker.

Le dernier tour de sept minutes revient à Mme Ratansi.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à tous d’être venus.

En entendant vos exposés et les réponses que vous avez données, je me félicite de vous voir prendre avec diligence et sérieux votre rôle et le mandat du ministre, en menant les consultations appropriées afin d’avoir les bonnes réponses.

J’ai bien aimé les quelques exemples que vous avez donnés de la façon dont vous modernisez l’approvisionnement en le simplifiant. Nous savons tous que le gouvernement est un mastodonte, qui ne se déplace pas facilement. Venant d’Afrique, je sais par contre que les éléphants se déplacent très vite et je pense donc qu’on les décrie à tort.

Pouvez-vous me donner tout d’abord un exemple de la façon dont on simplifie les procédures? Je vous poserai ensuite d’autres questions.

M. George Da Pont:

Je peux vous en donner plusieurs. Le commentaire d’ordre général que vous avez fait est exactement celui que font les très nombreuses entreprises que nous consultons, qui sont pour la plupart des petites et moyennes entreprises qui font affaire avec le gouvernement du Canada. Elles disent exactement la même chose que vous, à savoir que faire affaire avec le gouvernement fédéral est compliqué, difficile et plus coûteux que cela ne devrait l’être.

Nous travaillons avec ce que nous appelons désormais le « comité consultatif des fournisseurs » qui nous a fourni toute une liste des améliorations qu’il voudrait voir apporter au processus d’approvisionnement. Certaines de ces améliorations sont en cours, mais il y a aussi de grandes initiatives à entreprendre.

Je vais vous en donner un exemple. On nous a dit notamment que les systèmes que les entreprises utilisent en ligne pour consulter les possibilités de contrats, ou même pour soumettre des propositions, sont beaucoup trop compliqués. Ils sont vraiment archaïques, dépassés, et on utilise actuellement une quarantaine de systèmes différents. L’une de nos plus grandes initiatives est de mettre sur pied le plus rapidement possible ce que nous appelons un dossier d’approvisionnement en ligne, de façon à n’avoir qu’un seul système. C’est un matériel standard qui a fait ses preuves. Il est facile d’utilisation et, à lui seul, facilitera la consultation des débouchés et la présentation de soumissions. Nous avons accéléré le projet qui devrait être déployé en 2017-2018.

À l’autre bout du spectre, nous essayons de régler toutes sortes de problèmes administratifs chroniques. Si quelqu’un présente une soumission, par exemple, et qu’une page du document se perd — ce qui n’est pas grave au plan administratif —, sa soumission est rejetée. Nous envisageons donc de mettre en place une série de correctifs administratifs qui n’influeront évidemment pas sur des éléments critiques tels que le prix ou le contenu de la soumission.

Un autre perfectionnement majeur portera sur la simplification des contrats, qui sont très compliqués et souvent hors de proportion avec les dépenses engagées. S’il s’agit par exemple de remplacer le pont Champlain, qui est un projet de plusieurs milliards de dollars, on s’attend évidemment à un contrat énorme et compliqué, cela va de soi. Mais nos propres contrats sont beaucoup trop compliqués. Nous envisageons donc de les simplifier et visons à cette fin le même calendrier de 2017-2018. C’étaient là trois exemples précis.

(1700)

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

C’est très bien. Nous avons certainement tous, en tant que députés, des petites et moyennes entreprises dans nos circonscriptions. Avez-vous une idée du nombre de petites entreprises dont la soumission a été retenue?

Je me rappelle la période de 2004 à 2011, pendant laquelle je siégeais à ce comité et m’attelais au même genre de problèmes. Avons-nous trouvé une solution? Trop de petites entreprises nous disent qu’elles n’arrivent pas à obtenir des contrats du gouvernement. Si vous n’avez pas de chiffres sous la main, vous pouvez nous les communiquer ultérieurement.

M. George Da Pont:

En fait j’ai un chiffre, il s’agit d’un pourcentage de 80 %. Autrement dit et de façon générale, 80 % des contrats sont essentiellement attribués à des petites et moyennes entreprises. Il s’agit évidemment de 80 % des contrats et non 80 % de la valeur des achats. Je tenais à faire cette distinction.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Je suis bien d’accord avec vous, car je ne pense pas que les petites et moyennes entreprises aient la capacité de soumissionner pour des gros contrats.

M. George Da Pont:

Oui.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Nous avons parlé de Postes Canada et des consultations qui se tiennent à son sujet. Des gens veulent le maintien du service et les employés de la société parlent de nouveaux modes d’affaires. Je vous demande donc si vous savez à quel moment le groupe de travail va commencer les consultations et recevoir des réponses?

M. George Da Pont:

Je n'ai vraiment rien à ajouter aux commentaires qu'a fait le ministre au sujet de Postes Canada.

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Très bien.

Ma troisième question porte sur TPSGC qui transfère les montants de 19,6 millions et 4,4 millions de dollars respectivement à l’Agence du revenu du Canada et au Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications pour loyers sous-utilisés. Je vois que vous avez une très grande base de données sur les biens immobiliers. Sur quels critères décidez-vous que des biens immobiliers serviront au logement social et quels défis devez-vous relever en l’occurrence? Est-ce que certains immeubles contiennent de l’amiante? Qui assume les coûts de la conversion de ces immeubles?

(1705)

Le président:

Il ne vous reste qu’à peu près 20 secondes, monsieur Da Pont.

M. George Da Pont:

Je vous donnerai donc une réponse en 20 secondes. Vous laissiez déjà entendre dans votre question que la conversion de ces immeubles en logements sociaux présente de nombreux défis par rapport aux investissements et aux réparations. C’est justement les problèmes que nous devons régler quand ces possibilités de conversion se présentent.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur.

Nous en arrivons à nos deux dernières questions et réponses de cinq minutes. Nous libérerons ensuite nos témoins pour voter sur le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C).

La première période de questions et réponses de cinq minutes revient à M. Blaney. [Français]

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Ma question porte sur le remplacement du centre des visiteurs de Vimy.

Les anciens combattants ont conclu une entente avec ce qui était anciennement Travaux publics et Services gouvernementaux Canada afin que, lors du 150e anniversaire du Canada et du 100e anniversaire de la bataille de la crête de Vimy, un nouveau centre des visiteurs soit construit. Le présent centre est vétuste et tout à fait inadéquat.

Je me demandais s'il était possible d'avoir une mise à jour à ce sujet.

Êtes-vous en mesure de nous confirmer que le centre des visiteurs de Vimy sera fonctionnel le 9 juin 2017? [Traduction]

M. George Da Pont:

Merci de votre question. En fait, on m’a communiqué une mise à jour il y a quelques semaines et le projet progresse comme prévu.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Bien. Est-il possible d’en connaître le prix, parce que je crois qu’un partenaire, je veux parler de la Fondation Vimy, est associé au projet, n’est-ce pas?

M. George Da Pont:

Je vais encore demander à Kevin Radford de vous répondre.

M. Kevin Radford:

Oui, nous pouvons vous fournir des données sur les coûts, entre autres. En fait, Georges est trop modeste. Tous les lundis matin, il me demande un bilan du projet, que nous lui fournissons, et jusqu’à maintenant, les travaux avancent comme prévu.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

C’est bon à savoir.

Vous avez parlé du pont Champlain. C’est un projet très important et, lui aussi, il avance comme prévu. Pouvez-vous nous donner un bilan sur ce projet très important pour Montréal et la Rive Sud?

M. George Da Pont:

Ce que j’aurais dû vous dire d’emblée, mais vous le savez sans doute, c’est que globalement, le projet relève de Transports et Infrastructure, qui est un autre ministère. Nous l’avons aidé pour tout ce qui concerne les contrats. En réponse à la question sur l’acier, par exemple, je vous fournirai ultérieurement de l’information à ce sujet, mais je sais que cette question fait partie des mises à jour régulières que je reçois et que les travaux avancent comme prévu. [Français]

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Merci.[Traduction]

Avez-vous été associé au processus d’appel d’offres pour le pont Champlain et, dans l’affirmative, est-ce que le fait que le nouveau gouvernement ne veut pas de péage a des conséquences sur le mandat?

Pouvez-vous répondre ou dois-je m’adresser au ministère des Transports?

M. George Da Pont:

Je pense qu’il vaudrait mieux poser la question à ce ministère, dont relèvent les politiques de péage.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Bon, d'accord.

Vous trouverez peut-être cette autre question plus intéressante, vous avez mentionné que vous étiez fier du nouveau système de rémunération Phénix. Je ne m’en suis pas rendu compte — je reçois toujours mon salaire —, mais est-ce que ce système fonctionne bien?

M. George Da Pont:

Je pense que vous avez répondu à la question. Si vous aviez remarqué quelque chose, je crois que notre discussion d’aujourd’hui serait beaucoup plus difficile.

L'hon. Steven Blaney: Bon.

M. George Da Pont: On dit souvent que le gouvernement n’est pas capable de bien gérer de grands projets. Je tiens à dire qu’il s’agissait d’un énorme projet visant à consolider l’administration de la paye, dont se chargeaient auparavant chaque ministère et chaque agence. Le fait de regrouper les services dans un seul centre de rémunération situé à Miramichi et de mettre en même temps sur pied un nouveau système automatisant diverses fonctions devraient entraîner d’importantes améliorations.

On sous-estime quelquefois la difficulté de gérer des projets de cette envergure et de cette nature. Il n’est pas encore temps de crier victoire, mais nous sommes passés sans encombre à travers la première période de rémunération et tout a bien marché. Je préfère attendre encore au moins une ou deux périodes avant de sabrer le champagne. Je tiens toutefois à souligner le travail remarquable qu’a accompli l’équipe composée d’agents de notre ministère et d’autres ministères. Le fait que vous n’ayez rien remarqué est exactement ce que nous attendions.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Bon.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Merci.

(1710)

Le président:

Notre dernière période de questions et réponses de cinq minutes revient à M. Drouin.

M. Francis Drouin:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je n’ai qu’un commentaire. J’ai dit que la génération du millénaire était férue de technologie. Mais nous ne le sommes pas autant que M. Graham.

Je ferai un autre commentaire avant de passer aux questions. Je tiens à remercier M. Blaney qui défend avec passion les emplois dans le domaine de la construction navale au Canada. J’espère qu’il cherchera à obtenir sa plate-forme. J’ai trouvé intéressant que, dans le budget de 2010, le gouvernement conservateur ait annoncé une réduction tarifaire de 25 % sur les importations de navires au Canada. Cela aurait permis aux armateurs d’acheter des navires à l’étranger et les emplois canadiens n’auraient pas été protégés. J’espère qu’il a la même passion qu’en 2010.

L'hon. Steven Blaney:

Nous l'appelons le libre-échange.

M. Francis Drouin:

J’ai une question pour Services partagés, qui concerne le Comité des programmes et de planification stratégique. Comment Services partagés gère-t-il la transition entre les technologies existantes et les nouvelles technologies, ainsi que les contrats qui y sont associés? Pour ne citer qu’un exemple, je sais que TPSGC ou le Comité des programmes et de planification stratégique gère certains des anciens contrats comme celui des Services de soutien de l'équipement de réseau .

Je pose la question parce que certaines entreprises se retrouvent dans l’incertitude. Elles attendent un nouveau mécanisme d’approvisionnement. Services partagés souhaite acheter une nouvelle technologie, mais il ne peut pas le faire sans mécanisme d’approvisionnement. Avez-vous mis au point une stratégie pour la transition? Je sais que dans cinq ans on n’en parlera plus, que tout sera réglé, mais pour l’instant, y a-t-il une stratégie en place?

M. Ron Parker:

Absolument. Les instruments d’approvisionnement ont été mis au point et depuis le 1er septembre dernier, les offres à commandes nationales restantes sont passées à Services partagés. Nous prenons en charge les commandes des ministères afin de répondre à leurs besoins. Par conséquent, les instruments sont là et fonctionnent très bien.

M. Francis Drouin:

Pardonnez mon ignorance, j’étais en campagne.

M. Blaney a mentionné le monument de Vimy. Selon lui, le projet progresse selon le calendrier et les budgets prévus. Quand exactement sera-t-il terminé?

M. Kevin Radford:

Malheureusement, je n’ai pas cette information sous la main et je vous prie de m’en excuser, mais nous pouvons certainement vous la communiquer.

M. George Da Pont:

Je peux vous donner la date exacte.

M. Francis Drouin:

D’accord. C’est simplement que le 150e anniversaire approche.

M. George Da Pont:

Évidemment, ce sera terminé à temps pour le 150e anniversaire, mais j'ai oublié la date précise.

M. Kevin Radford:

Ou il y aura un nouveau sous-ministre adjoint de la Direction générale des biens immobiliers ici la prochaine fois.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Francis Drouin:

J'aimerais poser une autre question pour la gouverne du Comité. Je sais que Services partagés Canada travaille sur l'ITSC dans les centres de données, et j'aimerais connaître d'autres initiatives sur lesquelles travaille Services partagés Canada.

M. Ron Parker:

Ce sont d'entrée de jeu des initiatives de très grande envergure. Néanmoins, il y a aussi une initiative concernant la consolidation des 50 réseaux en vase clos en un seul réseau pour le gouvernement du Canada. Ces trois projets représentent un travail sans précédent en matière de transformation. Nous réalisons également de nombreux projets au nom de nos partenaires et de nos clients. Il peut s'agir d'un projet de biométrie ou d'autres projets qui relèvent de notre portefeuille, mais nous participons à pratiquement toute initiative ayant trait à l'infrastructure des TI qu'un ministère entreprend. Il y a une vaste gamme de projets en ce qui concerne la GRC, le MDN ou d'autres ministères. Il y a littéralement des centaines de projets.

(1715)

M. Francis Drouin:

Je sais qu'il y a quelques années il y a eu quelques décrets et que vous étiez chargés de l'initiative concernant les appareils technologiques en milieu de travail, mais le Conseil du Trésor était encore responsable des demandes. Est-ce encore le cas aujourd'hui ou êtes-vous complètement responsables de tout ce qui touche les TI?

Le président:

Monsieur Parker, allez-y.

M. Ron Parker:

Je n'ai pas réussi à entendre la question.

M. Graham Barr:

Non. Services partagés Canada n'est pas responsable des demandes.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Voilà qui conclut notre série de questions de cinq minutes.

Mesdames et messieurs, je vous remercie au nom de tous les membres du Comité de votre présence ici aujourd'hui. Les renseignements que vous nous avez fournis ont été très utiles et très instructifs. Merci encore une fois d'avoir pris le temps de venir nous voir aujourd'hui, et nous espérons avoir l'occasion de vous reparler au cours des prochaines années.

Oui, monsieur Drouin. Allez-y.

M. Francis Drouin:

Monsieur le président, je crois que l'ensemble du Comité aimerait souhaiter au sous-ministre une merveilleuse retraite, dont il a fait l'annonce la semaine dernière. Je sais que vous êtes du même avis.

Le président:

Merci de vos années de service.

Des voix: Bravo!

M. George Da Pont:

Merci beaucoup. Je vais certainement m'ennuyer de témoigner devant vos comités.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Je remercie de leur concision les représentants qui ont dû donner des réponses très brèves.

Nous attendrons quelques instants pour donner le temps à nos témoins de quitter la table. Entre-temps, je vous informe qu'au cours de la semaine de relâche je vais demander au greffier de vous envoyer un communiqué concernant ce que nous ferons à l'occasion de la prochaine réunion du jeudi. Si nous sommes en mesure d'avoir un groupe de témoins pour traiter des travaux retenus par le Sous-comité du programme, nous aurons une réunion en bonne et due forme. Autrement, nous aurons une réunion du Sous-comité à cette occasion, soit le jeudi 24 mars de 15 h 30 à 17 h 30.

Mesdames et messieurs, passons maintenant aux crédits. Il s'agit du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (C).

Mme Yasmin Ratansi:

Où sont les crédits? Est-ce que j'ai égaré quelque chose dans mes documents?

Le président:

Je vais les passer en revue de vive voix et vous demander si vous les approuvez ou si vous ne les approuvez pas.

M. Nick Whalen:

Monsieur le président, quel document SharePoint devrais-je ouvrir? J'ai fermé SharePoint par accident. Quelqu'un pourrait-il m'indiquer où se trouve l'information?

Le président:

Ce n'est pas un problème. En gros, je vais simplement vous demander de vive voix si, par exemple, le crédit 1c sous la rubrique Conseil privé est adopté.

Vous avez tous vu le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses. Vous devez donc maintenant décider si vous voulez approuver, modifier ou réduire les crédits. Ce processus se fera de vive voix, et le vote se fera à main levée.

À moins que l'un d'entre vous demande un vote par appel nominal, je vais simplement demander qui dit oui et qui dit non. CONSEIL PRIVÉ ç Crédit 1c — Dépenses de programme..........3 644 076 $

(Le crédit 1c est adopté.) COMMISSION DE LA FONCTION PUBLIQUE ç Crédit 1c — Dépenses de programme..........1 $

(Le crédit 1c est adopté.) TRAVAUX PUBLICS ET SERVICES GOUVERNEMENTAUX ç Crédit 1c — Dépenses de fonctionnement..........72 238 881 $ ç Crédit 5c — Dépenses en capital..........40 231 331 $

(Les crédits 1c et 5c sont adoptés.) SERVICES PARTAGÉS CANADA ç Crédit 1c — Dépenses de fonctionnement..........20 712 999 $ ç Crédit 5c — Dépenses en capital..........12 326 933 $

(Les crédits 1c et 5c sont adoptés.) SECRÉTARIAT DU CONSEIL DU TRÉSOR ç Crédit 1c — Dépenses de programme..........43 981 086 $ ç Crédit 20c — Assurance de la fonction publique..........469 200 000 $

(Les crédits 1c et 20c sont adoptés.)

Le président: Enfin, la présidence doit-elle faire rapport demain à la Chambre du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses?

Des voix: D'accord.

Le président: Merci beaucoup.

Mesdames et messieurs, je crois que nous avons terminé. Merci beaucoup. Je vous suis reconnaissant de vos efforts.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on March 10, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.