header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-03-10 PROC 12

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Members, I'm going to uncharacteristically start on time so that we don't lose any questioning time with the minister, so that we get her full hour.

This is meeting number 12 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs for the first session of the 42nd Parliament. The meeting is being held in public, and it's being televised.

Pursuant to an order adopted by the committee on February 4, we have with us today the Minister for Democratic Institutions, the Honourable Maryam Monsef, to speak and answer questions about the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments. The minister is accompanied by Ian McCowan, deputy secretary to the cabinet, legislation and House planning and machinery of government, Privy Council Office.

In our second hour we will be talking about the witness list and the caucus reports on family-friendly Parliament.

Thank you, Minister, for coming. I know there is great anticipation of having you here to talk about the new Senate process. We'll start right away so that we get the full amount of questioning in. I'll let you do your opening statement.

Thank you.

Hon. Maryam Monsef (Minister of Democratic Institutions):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, committee members.

What an honour it is to be here with you today on this traditional territory of the Algonquin peoples. We talked about this last night. Had it not been for all the ways in which settlers like me were welcomed to this land, we would not have succeeded individually or collectively.

As you mentioned, Mr. Chair, I have the great privilege of being accompanied by Mr. Ian McCowan.

As Minister for Democratic Institutions, I have a mandate to deliver on the government's commitment to strengthen the openness and fairness of our democratic institutions. This committee—your committee—plays an important role in delivering on this commitment. I sincerely believe that it can lead the way in elevating the tone and the conduct of how we represent ourselves in committees, in the House, and to our constituents, and how we deliberate on the issues that matter most to Canadians.

As part of my mandate, I have the lead role in all matters relating to the development and implementation of the process with respect to the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments. Think of me as the custodian of the process. I can answer any questions you may have about its establishment, including the advisory board's terms of reference and the criteria being used to assess candidates.

The advisory board is an independent, arm's-length body. As such, I am not in a position to speak on their behalf.

As many of us agree, the Senate plays an important role in our democratic system; however, its legitimacy has suffered because of the partisan nature of the appointment system. It has become a place where political ties are often perceived as being more important than the best interests of Canadians. The new merit-based process to advise the Prime Minister on Senate appointments was designed to remove that partisan element and to help reinvigorate the Senate.

Before getting into the details of the process, I think it's important to have an understanding of the four principles that reinforce its legitimacy and effectiveness.

First, the process recognizes the important role that the Senate has in providing sober second thought and regional representation, as well as representation for minorities. Second, the process respects the constitutional framework by maintaining the Governor General's power to appoint senators on the advice of the Prime Minister. Third, the process includes elements to promote transparency and accountability, including public merit-based criteria for Senate nominees, public terms of reference for the advisory board, and public reporting on the process itself. Fourth, the process is designed to select Senate nominees who can conduct themselves in an independent, non-partisan fashion.

Canadians have asked for change, yes, but they do not wish our government to enter into constitutional negotiations. This new process delivers on that. The government is also fully confident that the new process respects our constitutional framework.

The key component of the new process is the independent advisory board, which has a mandate to provide the Prime Minister with non-binding merit-based recommendations on Senate appointments. The advisory board consists of five members: a federal chair and two other permanent federal members, whom you have met, and two ad hoc provincial members from each of the provinces or the territories where vacancies exist.

You've met the chair of the advisory board, Ms. Huguette Labelle. She has been recognized many times for her senior leadership roles in public service, and her years of experience do provide her with a solid basis to meet the challenges of leading the advisory process. You may also be interested to know that she brings with her a depth of knowledge on matters related to transparency as past chair of Transparency International.

Professor Daniel Jutras and Dr. Indira Samarasekera have been here before.

All of the advisory board members are impressive. I could take all of the time we have here together talking about each one of them individually, but what I want to leave you with is the confidence that they represent a range of experiences, from all walks of life, whether it's education, constitutional law, science, medicine, or the arts.

(1105)



There are two phases to the process we have introduced. In the transitional phase, which is well under way, the advisory board is responsible for providing the Prime Minister with a shortlist for five vacancies in three provinces: two in Manitoba, two in Ontario, and one in Quebec. In this phase the advisory board was mandated to consult with a wide variety of groups, including indigenous, linguistic, minority, and ethnic communities; provincial, territorial, and municipal organizations; labour organizations; community-based groups; arts councils; and provincial and territorial chambers of commerce.

The idea was to allow the board to hear from a diverse range of individuals and bring forward a list that includes people from a diversity of backgrounds and experiences, but also with knowledge of the Senate. The permanent phase will begin shortly after the completion of the transitional phase and the appointments of the first five senators. In the permanent phase, the remaining vacancies will be filled from the seven provinces where vacancies currently exist.

In the permanent phase all Canadians will be able to apply directly for appointment to the Senate. Let me tell you a bit about the criteria. In both phases the advisory board will assess potential candidates on the basis of transparent, merit-based criteria. These criteria are public. They include the following: candidates—and I believe you have the criteria—must have a record of achievement and leadership either in service to their community, the public, their profession, or their field of expertise; candidates will need to possess outstanding and proven personal qualities in terms of public life, ethics, and integrity; candidates are expected to have an ability to bring a perspective and contribution to the work of the Senate that is clearly independent and non-partisan; and candidates must have demonstrated an understanding of the Senate's role in our constitutional framework, including the role of the Senate as an independent body of sober second thought, the role it plays in regional representation, and the representation it provides to minorities.

These criteria will be applied in a way that respects the importance of gender balance and Canada's diversity in the selection process. The public criteria will provide an important framework for the entire process both in terms of ensuring that candidates of the highest standard are selected, but also to allow Canadians to hold us accountable to this process.

I'd now like to talk about our commitment to carry out an open and transparent process. As I mentioned earlier, one of the foundational principles of this process is the importance of transparency and accountability. In that context each step of the process has been designed to be as open and transparent as possible. The merit-based criteria for Senate nominees was published online so that all Canadians could see the qualifications and skill sets that the advisory board has been using to assess candidates.

When the advisory board was appointed, the government published the terms of reference setting out the board's mandate. The advisory board itself established a public website calling for nominations during the transitional phase and has reached out broadly to consult with organizations.

The permanent phase of the advisory process will feature an open application process to which any qualified Canadian can submit an application. There is a requirement that the advisory board provide us with a report on their activities after each cycle of appointments. I believe this is an unprecedented level of openness in a process that has been previously shrouded in secrecy.

That said, in order to attract the best and brightest candidates a degree of confidentiality is required in order for the process to succeed, just as is the case with any other job competition. We want to ensure that all qualified individuals from diverse backgrounds have the confidence to put their names forward without fearing that at the end of the process their names or other personal information will be publicized. It's for that reason that the names of unsuccessful candidates will not be received.

(1110)



I'm happy to answer any questions that you may have. I had three lines to read, yet the chair has waved and said the time is up.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Mr. Chair, on a point of order, I think we can extend the minister the necessary time to read the remaining three lines. I think we should extend that obvious courtesy.

The Chair:

Okay, you can do your three lines.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

What a good man you are, sir.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Hold that thought.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

To conclude, I am confident that the advisory process will help to reinvigorate the Senate in a way that reinforces its fundamental role in our parliamentary system, while reducing partisanship.

I look forward to working with your committee, not only on Senate reform but also on the government's various mandates to strengthen our democracy and restore the public's trust in our institutions. We all have a role to play in setting a positive tone for that debate.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to the honourable member, who is also my critic.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Now we're going to the first round of seven-minute questioning or comments, and we'll start with Madam Petipas Taylor.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

First and foremost, Minister Monsef, thank you for taking the time to meet with our committee today. We recognize that you're extremely busy, and on such short notice you made the time. We appreciate your presentation and your willingness to meet and answer our questions.

The first question I have is that you've indicated that you're the custodian of the process. I'm wondering if you or the advisory board has had the opportunity to meet with the provinces regarding the actual process that's in place right now.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

It's a great pleasure to be here. I've been looking forward to this.

When we began setting out the framework for this process, we decided that an important hallmark would be that for the first time provinces would be included in this conversation. To that end, I reached out to my colleagues in Ontario, Quebec, and Manitoba. We asked each province to provide us with a list of five individuals who would represent their respective provinces on the ad hoc committee for the provinces with the vacancies.

We had very productive conversations, and in the end I was pleased to receive names from Ontario and Quebec. After the process was wrapped up, in terms of filling those seats on the advisory board, we asked all three provinces to provide us with feedback on how we can improve the transitional process as we turn it into a permanent base. We look forward to continuing that collaboration.

(1115)

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Have you received any feedback from the province regarding those consultations that you had with them?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

All three provinces were thrilled that we were having this conversation and we were engaging on the Senate appointment process. The feedback that we've received from all three will be given serious consideration as we move forward to enhance the permanent phase, if that need be.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

I have one last question, because I'm sharing my time with Ms. Sahota.

Could you perhaps speak to us about the present process and how it compares to the past or previous process?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

I'm sure that we join many Canadians who are curious about what the process was in governments past. The difference here is that there is a process and that the process is public. Whether it's the criteria on which we're asking the advisory board to assess potential candidates, or their terms of reference, or the report that the advisory board will release after the process is wrapped up, all of this is out there. It is open for the public's review.

The reason is that we feel it's important to enhance Canadians' trust and confidence in this institution. One of the best ways we can do that is to include Canadians in the process instead of attempting to do this behind the curtain.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Thank you very much.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you for being with us here today, Minister. We've been looking forward to your visit.

You have touched upon this quite a bit, but why in your opinion does this government feel that this process is the preferred process and will actually work, in comparison to the previous process that we don't know much about?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

We believe that the establishment of the advisory boards and framework we have outlined, in itself, is a huge success. We are attempting something that hasn't been done before, and we recognize that it's a challenge. But mostly in this there's a great deal of opportunity. We are confident it will work because we have received positive feedback from Canadians. We're confident it will work because we have received positive feedback from some senators already.

Some people in this room were at the parliamentary consultation I hosted, and the feedback I received there, whether it was from members of Parliament or senators across party lines, included that confidence we were aiming for, that level of trust we were hoping to increase. That's already happening. I look forward to having those first five appointed. I believe their merits and their qualifications and their contributions will speak for themselves.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

You spoke about the background of some of the permanent federal members that came before this committee, and how they're diverse. But in particular, could you give us an example of what kinds of qualities you were looking for in these permanent members and also in the ad hoc members? You were saying that you asked the provinces to present you five from which you would chose two. How did you make that narrowing down of whom you would choose to put on the...?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

The criteria that the Prime Minister and the Governor in Council took into consideration when appointing the advisory board members are very much in line with the criteria we've asked the advisory board to use to assess potential Senate candidates. We were looking for individuals who were demonstrating and had demonstrated leadership and service to their communities. We were looking for individuals who had been accountable to their stakeholders. We were looking for individuals who understood the importance of the Senate within our constitutional framework and recognized the role the Senate plays in providing that sober second thought as an upper chamber.

We were looking for people who could demonstrate the ability to conduct their work in an independent and non-partisan fashion. We were looking for people who have done their work and have worked throughout their lives demonstrating those personal qualities around ethics and integrity. We also wanted to make sure that the different ranges of experiences and backgrounds that are reflected within Canadian society would be reflected within the advisory board. We are happy to say we believe we have achieved that.

(1120)

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Sahota.

Now we'll go to Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you, Minister. It's a pleasure to have you here. I miss our question period exchanges in the House of Commons. I thought we were like the Disraeli and Gladstone of the 42nd Parliament or maybe the Churchill and Lady Astor or the Archy and Mehitabel. It was a pleasure while it lasted.

I had a series of three questions that I think are so closely related that it is more logical for me to ask them as a chunk, rather than separately. Regarding the advisory boards and the lists that they have been compiling, when you and Mr. LeBlanc appeared before the Senate rules committee, he indicated that the advisory boards needed some extra time, just a couple of extra weeks.

My first question therefore is this. Have the lists yet been submitted to the Prime Minister?

The second question I have is on the decision regarding the phase one process to send out nomination forms as well as applications. Was that made by the government or was it made by the advisory boards?

Thirdly, Myriam Bédard, who serves as a Quebec member on one of the advisory boards, the one dealing with Quebec, indicated that about 100 requests for nominations had been sent out. Is that more or less a standard number for all three of the provinces, and how many of those came back? How many actual nominations were received? How large a pool were you dealing with in the end, or was the advisory board dealing with?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

I thank the honourable member for his question.

I do miss our back-and-forth in the House of Commons, and I will take this opportunity to point out that the process is completely in your hands, sir, so whenever you're ready to come back to our back-and-forth in the House of Commons...I impatiently await it. I do appreciate the opportunity to have this conversation with you here today.

To your question, I want to make it very clear that the independent, arm's-length nature of the advisory board, as you can all appreciate, makes it so that I have not been involved in the consultations they've had. I have not seen any of the lists they've received, or the lists that are being recommended, or where the lists are at, for that matter.

What I do know is that, recognizing that this particular group of Canadians put quite a bit on the line to be part of something that has not been done before, we wanted to provide them with the right tools and the right capacity to do that work. They're in the process of carrying out the transitional phase of the process. Once that phase has wrapped up, they will be providing us, you, and all Canadians with a report on how the process went, who they reached out to, and so on and so forth.

On the application process and the forms, the independent advisory board independently chose to take that route, because they must have felt that it was the right thing to do. I don't have any more details about numbers or where their process and outreach is at. All I can tell you is that I join you in also impatiently awaiting the list and any reports they may have about the process.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

Just for the benefit of other members here, this is why we want to get the members of the advisory board back again. It was an issue that Mr. Chan spoke at length about in regard to why we don't want them back again, saying that we can get this information from the minister.

It turns out that the questions I've raised here, which are the same ones I raised to members of the advisory board and which were found to be out of order, are precisely the ones that can only be addressed if you guys on the Liberal side do not attempt to prevent us from bringing them back again. Otherwise, we get no transparency or openness at all.

My next question for you, Minister, is on what you indicated to the media on February 1. I'm quoting here from a Joan Bryden article, which says that Minister Monsef says she's “not ready to commit” to a categorical rejection of a referendum on electoral reform. From your previous answers and Minister LeBlanc's previous comments, I had a sense that you hadn't shut the door completely.

Under what circumstances would we get a categorical yes or no from the government to a referendum on electoral reform?

(1125)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

On a point of order, Mr. Chair, I don't think this is relevant. We've called in the minister to discuss the appointments process. We have only one hour in which to get answers to a lot of important questions that Mr. Reid has wanted answered for a long time. I believe we should continue staying within the mandate that we've asked her in on.

The Chair:

Minister, it's up to you whether you want to respond. You were only called here on the Senate. It's fair if you only want to answer on that.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

It's just like old times, Mr. Chair.

Let me go back to your earlier comments. From what I understand, the advisory board members were asked to appear before this committee so that you could assess their qualifications to determine whether or not they were the right people to be leading this process. I hope that, to that end, your questions and curiosity have been satisfied.

Your committee is the master of its own destiny, but rest assured that one of the aspects around transparency and openness within this process is the fact that there will be a report, which will include the answers to the questions that we all have about how this process went. Let's wait for that report.

As for the familiar question you've asked, as I have shared in the House, with the media, and during our one-on-one conversations, the process will engage Canadians in a meaningful and inclusive conversation about how we may enhance our electoral system so that those who are not currently engaged feel that they have a voice and that they have a place within this place and within the decisions that we make as a government. It is too early to prejudge the outcome of that process—

Mr. Scott Reid:

What I'm asking you is, what criteria will you use when it is no longer too early? At some point it won't be too early, but none of us know what the criteria are that you will be using. It's hard, given the fact the Chief Electoral Officer has just prepared a report, released I believe it was yesterday or the day before, stating he will need extra time to deal with the referendum process. He'll also need extra time to deal with any electoral boundary redistribution that might occur as a result of this process.

Effectively as you take more time, you start precluding options. It's not hard to design a system so that only one option is left, which just happens to be the one your Prime Minister has indicated he prefers.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Point of order....

Mr. Scott Reid:

My concern is that we get an answer as to what your criteria would be.

The Chair:

Okay. Before you do the point of order, the time is up, so maybe it's not necessary.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I still think it's necessary to have a ruling on that point of order I made previously. If we continue in this fashion the time is going to be up pretty soon, and we're not going to get to the relevant matter we've called the minister here on.

The Chair:

I'll leave it to the minister as to whether she wants to answer questions on things that she wasn't called here for. It's up to the members how they want to use their questioning time.

We'll move on to Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Chair.

Minister, thank you very much for your appearance.

If I may, I'd like to begin on a personal note, not necessarily a political one. I want to say, Minister, that you're not of my political party, you're the opposite gender to me, you're one-half my age, yet I want you to know how proud I am to see you sitting there as a minister for Canada because to me it's not just a success story for the Liberals. I think Canada gets to claim part of the success. You're a symbol of how Canada works. I'm incredibly proud we have a country that would have someone with your background arrive in that chair as our minister and I wish you all the best, on a personal basis.

Some hon. members: Hear, hear!

(1130)

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Thank you.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Now I will give you the ultimate respect and treat you the same as I would any other minister, and you would expect no less.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

I expect nothing less, sir.

Mr. David Christopherson:

First of all, this whole charade is something that we in the NDP aren't buying into. By way of visualizing, I would say that if we were starting with a blank slate and saying to the people of Canada, “We'll select your government by an appointment process and they'll be your representatives for law-making”, there would be a revolution. We don't do that.

What we did say was that we'll split the decision-making for laws into two parts. You get to elect one part, but for the other one we still stay in the dark ages and appoint. That's still the way we view this. It's legal, but it does not have legitimacy in the eyes of the Canadian people. In this day and age the fact that a vote in the upper House, because there are fewer of them than us, is worth more than that of an MP is nothing short of disgraceful as we present ourselves to the world as a mature democracy.

Having said that, it is still there and this process is there and we have to deal with it. You mention on page three of your remarks, Minister, there were at least four criteria that you'll be looking for. What I would like to know is, what are the assurances and guarantees in those new transparent criteria that would guarantee the likes of a Senator Duffy and a Senator Brazeau would not happen again?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Through you, Mr. Chair, thank you to the honourable member for his kind remarks. I do appreciate them. I recognize what a privilege it is to be here. What woman in my lineage could ever have dreamed of being in this place? It's one of the reasons why, every time I'm asked to appear before a committee, every time I'm asked to rise in the House to answer a question, I consider it a great honour. It's why I take my role as custodian of this process so seriously.

When we were developing our platform as a party, the now Prime Minister spent three years speaking and listening to Canadians, to experts, to different groups, to academics. When we developed our policy plank around a more open and transparent government, we heard loud and clear from Canadians that the Senate does need to change, that despite the good work of senators for generations, the effectiveness of the Senate has been hampered by the perception of partisanship.

We also heard loud and clear from Canadians that they do not want us to bring about change that would include a protracted constitutional debate. Canadians want us to focus on their issues—growing the economy, the environment and climate change, addressing the issues around missing and murdered indigenous women and girls. The process we have introduced takes into account the constitutional framework that we need to be working within.

The processes that we've outlined, the accountability and the transparency that's embedded in it, the wide range of organizations and individuals who will be consulted, who will be asked to put their names forward—all of these will lead to a stronger and a more effective Senate. In just a few weeks, in just a few months, any Canadian who meets the constitutional requirements may put their name forward to be considered for appointment to the Senate.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You're right, Minister—and anybody who buys a lottery ticket also stands to be a multimillionaire by the end of the week. It sounds good in theory.

I didn't hear anything that really answered my question. The reality is that we've just gone from an appointment process to a more expanded appointment process, where other appointed people will now decide who the appointed people will be. The fact is that when we get a bad one.... Bad MPs get elected, but there's a mechanism to get rid of them. It's called an election. With senators, we're stuck with them until they're 75 years old.

With respect, Minister, I don't see anything in this criteria that will prevent the likes of another Senator Duffy or another Brazeau or, for some Liberal balance, a Mac Harb to still find their way into the Senate. It's still unaccountable and it's still unacceptable.

I want to pursue a couple of other things. Correct me if I'm wrong, Minister, but I believe you mentioned that you had received names for appointees to be on the selection committee from every province. What about Manitoba? Did you have names submitted from Manitoba?

(1135)

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Let me go just back to your previous—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Not too far back, Minister. My time is tight.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

No, not too far back, but you thought I didn't answer your question.

Dear sir, you began your line of questioning by congratulating me on finding myself in this place. This is Canada, and if somebody like me can get herself elected in Canada, if somebody like me can be appointed to the Prime Minister's cabinet in Canada, then in this country anything is possible.

I want to leave that piece with you—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Don't kid yourself. You got there because of the power of election, Minister, with respect, and not because you knew somebody.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

—because this is the spirit in which this new process is designed as well.

I'm looking, and the Prime Minister is looking, to bring more people like Senator Chaput to the Senate. We're looking for more Roméo Dallaires. We're looking for more Serge Joyals. We are looking for individuals like those who are in that chamber, who have been in that chamber before, to join their ranks.

That's the place we're coming from.

Mr. David Christopherson:

What about John and Jane Smith? You give all these great luminaries. We're ordinary people. You're ordinary people. I'm ordinary people. We got here through an election. This process will not put ordinary people in the Senate. If anything, they'll be tokens.

The Chair:

Thank you, David and Minister.

The time is up for this round. We will now go to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

We're going from one David to another.

Mr. Chair, I'll be sharing my time with my old boss, the former critic for democratic reform, Scott Simms.

I want to address a little bit what I think is the very important role of the Senate. For me the Senate is actually a very valuable institution, and I think it's very important to this country to have a body of people who do not have to worry about their next job and the next election, so they can make what I call a sober second decision, regardless of alcohol, David. It's not that kind of sober. That's a joke.

The Constitution mandates that the Senate exist. We can't get around that without having a wonderful big constitutional debate, which we've had many of in this country and we've all very much enjoyed. I wonder if you could talk about the importance of the Constitution in this process and how we're managing to stay within the boundaries of it while making a real, significant change to the Senate that will change how we get there.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Mr. Chair, we are confident that this new process works within the parameters of the Constitution and the Supreme Court ruling. I'm surrounded by bright individuals who assure me that we are. We've maintained the Prime Minister's and the Governor General's independence in that process. The changes we have introduced don't change what's already there in terms of constitutional requirements; they only enhance the criteria. The process of appointments is a public, transparent, and merit-based one. I believe that is where the greatest amount of change is coming from, and we will be able to see that in the calibre of the individuals who are appointed.

I understand that you folks have a lot of fun around this table and that this particular conversation is one you've had before.

Ian, would you like to share your thoughts around this particular piece?

Mr. Ian McCowan (Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet, Legislation and House Planning and Machinery of Government, Privy Council Office):

As I think the minister indicated, the proposal was developed very much bearing in mind the Supreme Court of Canada's decision in the Senate reference case. A number of important markers were laid down there and that's very much a part of the framing of the proposals in question.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How much time do I have?

The Chair:

You've spent two minutes and 43 seconds.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't want to take too much of Scott's time, because he's a good speaker.

We hear a lot that the Senate should be either elected or abolished. Do you see any value to having an elected Senate? For me, if you have an elected Senate, it has to assert its role and it has to assert its purpose, and therefore, it becomes a competition rather than a complement to the House of Commons. Do you agree with that view of the Senate?

(1140)

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

I come from a place where the democratic institutions that we have here are dreamed of, are longed for. While what we have is great, it could be so much better and while we will be bringing about various reforms, there are some core foundational aspects of our current system that we would do well to maintain, including that particular role the Senate plays as a body to provide that independent sober second thought without having to worry about the next election.

I want to talk about ordinary people being part of this process, because I think that's very important. Ordinary people may not have the appetite that we do to find the means and the courage to run for public office. How many people applied for the job that you and I have? Not very many people find compelling the process of going through a campaign. We're going to open it up to all Canadians so that even those who do not find it exciting to run for an elected position may be included in this process.

Mr. David Graham:

Thank you for your leadership on this.

I'll give it over to Scott.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Thank you, Minister. It's good to see you again.

Every time we engage in this argument, we always come around to the names of the people who are, I'll say, at the base degrees, according to their behaviour, being said in this place.

I'm not looking directly at you, sir. I'm just waxing on metaphorically. You just happen to be in the line of sight.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I am just wondering where this is going.

Mr. Scott Simms:

We know the names that were already brought up, the Brazeaus of the world, the Mac Harbs of the world, these people.

Let's take a moment and talk about the people who have done really good stuff. Let's talk about, as the minister pointed out, Roméo Dallaire. Let's talk about Hugh Segal, who has done tremendous work. Let's talk about Michael Kirby, whose reports on health have been cited in institutions across this country, all of them. They started out as ordinary, David. They started out as ordinary people who did extraordinary work, and continue to do extraordinary work in all these places.

What I would say to people.... This process is something that goes that way.

In the last election—I'll get to my question—we had three options on the table, one of which we are talking about here right now. Another one included an election of the Senate, and the third required abolishing.

Now, in April 2014, the Supreme Court was quite clear as to what you desired. The opposition never reached out to any of the provinces to either elect it or abolish it, not one. It became a Twitter campaign with #disingenuous. I am a little upset about this, because I thought the whole thing was disingenuous. The plan was not thought out right.

This plan.... I'll get to my question now. When it came out that we would do this appointment process, there were a lot of people who criticized us and said, but you too need to open up the constitution in order to do this process. However, that is not the case, is it, Minister?

The Chair:

You have 15 seconds, Minister.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

No, it is not.

The Chair:

That's close enough.

We'll now go on to Mr. Richards.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Minister, I appreciate your being here today. I am glad that you were able to make this a priority in your schedule, to be at this committee, finally.

I'll start with a question. I assume you would agree with the statement that the ability of Canadians to cast their vote and to have their voices heard in an election is an important part of democracy.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Is that your question?

Mr. Blake Richards:

I assume you would agree with that statement.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

I think more Canadians should be voting.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, great. I am glad to hear that you think that's an important value in our democracy because 309,587 Albertans had a chance to cast their vote for a man named Mike Shaikh, in Alberta, to be their senator when the next Senate vacancy comes up. This follows in a long history. In 1989, Stan Waters was elected by the people of Alberta, and appointed to the Senate in 1990.

Then, in 1998, Bert Brown and Ted Morton were chosen by Albertans but unfortunately ignored by the Liberal governments of the day. Then, in 2004, we had Bert Brown, who was elected and then appointed to the Senate in 2007, and then Betty Unger, who was appointed in 2012. In 2012, we had another senatorial selection process in Alberta, and the winner of that process was Doug Black, who was appointed in 2013. Then, Scott Tannas was appointed later in 2013.

The next vacancy that appears in the Senate for Alberta should be filled by Mike Shaikh. As I said, he was elected by over 309,000 Albertans, which, I would point out, is more votes than all the members of this committee, combined, received in the last election.

We have certainly heard—in your indication at the Senate committee, and when I asked your parliamentary secretary in the House of Commons—that somehow there is a belief that this isn't merit-based.

I would have to ask, how do you not see 300,000 Albertans choosing someone to be their senator, in a legitimate senatorial selection process, as merit-based? How is it that you could tell Albertans, those 309,000 people who voted for Mike Shaikh, that their opinions aren't based on merit, that their vote for him isn't merit-based? I just don't understand that.

(1145)

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Let's start with first premise, that neither you, nor I, nor anyone else in this room has the constitutional prerogative that the Prime Minister has to advise the Governor General on whom to consider for the Senate positions. That is the first place that we are going to come from.

Second, I am sure Mr. Shaikh is an exceptional Canadian who has contributed to the province of Alberta in extraordinary ways, and I congratulate him. The next opening, the vacancy for Alberta, is going to be in 2018, I believe. The process that we have introduced will allow for any Canadians, ordinary Canadians who have done extraordinary things in their lives, to put their name forward for consideration for the Senate.

This means that people who do not have the means to engage in what can be an expensive election campaign are included in this process. This means that individuals who may not have the desire that you and I had to knock on doors to get elected are included in this process.

We are opening up this process to all Canadians in just a matter of weeks. I look forward to Mr. Shaikh and anyone else from Alberta putting their name forward for consideration by the advisory board and the Prime Minister.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I appreciate the answer, but it isn't about Mike Shaikh; it's about Albertans. It's about their choice. It's about their right to democratically select the people they've chosen. That's something that's been respected by past prime ministers. It's really unfortunate that this current Prime Minister will not be respecting that.

Let me move on, though, because I don't sense I'll get a different response about the idea of the importance of democratic election and the disrespecting of Albertans.

You mentioned in your opening remarks about Ontario and Quebec, that you've had a list of names come forward. You didn't mention Manitoba, which is also, of course, on there. Obviously, their government indicated that they weren't interested in being a part of the process. I guess I want to ask two things. First of all, how were the two advisory board members for Manitoba selected, given that Manitoba was not interested in being a part of the process? Also, have you received a list from Manitoba and, if not, when do we expect to receive that list? Why the delay?

The Chair:

Just give a brief answer, Minister.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

I had very productive and positive conversations with my colleagues in Manitoba, and I understand and respect their reasons for not being able to participate in the transitional phase, but I do look forward to working with them on this file and other files moving forward.

As we indicated at the outset of this process, in the event that a province or territory was not able to participate in the appointment of ad hoc members to the board, we would proceed to appoint individuals, and we did. We found two exceptional Manitobans, and these two incredible women are serving their province well. We're pleased to hear from the leadership in Manitoba that they approve of the choice as well.

(1150)

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

We'll now move on to Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Minister Monsef, for coming before this committee. I also want to thank you for your hard work and dedication to improving Canadians' confidence in our democratic institutions.

Before I begin with my questions, I noted that you didn't get a chance to answer the question from my colleague Mr. Simms about the Constitution. So, if you wish, I can give you a few moments to answer that question before I begin with mine.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

We are confident that this process respects the constitutional framework. In fact, I would like to assure everyone in this room and those watching this that all our decisions as a government are guided by the Constitution and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. We respect our democratic institutions, including the Supreme Court of Canada. It's refreshing to see that we are all on the same page.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you.

I'd like to talk a little bit about how you view this process improving the way the Senate functions in its committees and improving the collegiality, independence, and non-partisanship of the Senate. As we know, traditionally the Senate has always been viewed as being more collegial, and senators do not always wear their political party hat. In recent years that's diminished somewhat.

But this is a process that has never before been seen in terms of selecting senators. Already the Prime Minister has made Liberal senators independent and not subject to party discipline. With the new senators coming in, who will also be independent, not subject to party discipline, and not appointed solely at the discretion of the Prime Minister without consultation, how do you see that improving and elevating the tone of the debate in the Senate?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Thank you for your question. The tone is an important measure of success on its own.

Before I go into this in any further detail, it's important to recognize that we, as the lower chamber, have certain limits we work within when it comes to our relationship within the Senate. The Senate's own rules, the way they operate within their committees, their own conduct, and their own activities are up to them. They are not for us to dictate.

Where we are able to make a difference is within an appointments process that puts merit ahead of patronage and that opens it up to all Canadians, so that people who may have never been considered for these positions can begin to be considered and can reflect Canada's diversity in the process.

Also, we believe that reducing partisanship and encouraging independence will mean that senators will feel more confident and comfortable to serve the best interests of Canadians, as opposed to any political party. I think that's a huge win for Canadian democracy.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I'd like to pick up on your comments about the diversity because we all know that public policy benefits when there are more voices at the table with different life experiences and with different backgrounds. This is a process in which, as you mentioned in the criteria, we'll be able to bring in people who have different kinds of experiences that they bring to the table and different perspectives. Is that something you also see improving the debate in the Senate?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

I firmly believe that when you bring people from different walks of life around a table to make decisions on behalf of Canadians from all walks of life then the tone, the nature of the debate, the amount of deliberation, and the different perspectives that may not have been included in the past will all be present, and the end result will be better outcomes for Canadians in terms of policies and programs we implement.

I'm proud to be part of the government that recognizes that. I am proud to serve a Prime Minister who appreciates that. He not only has a commitment to all Canadians that will incorporate gender, linguistic, ethnic, and cultural diversity in his appointments to cabinet, but he demonstrates that with a gender-balanced cabinet.

One of the criteria we've asked the advisory board to be especially mindful of, and something the Prime Minister will give serious attention to when making his recommendations to the Governor General, is just that. We know that when you add women and when you bring people from different cultural groups into conversations we have in this House, and in the other House, it can only lead to better outcomes for Canadians. That's one way we can lead the world in terms of how a strong democracy can function. I think that's our responsibility as Canadians as well.

(1155)

The Chair:

I will now go to Mr. Schmale for a five-minute round.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you very much, Minister. It's great to see you again. For those who don't know, we share a geographical boundary and we share Peterborough County. I look forward to continuing to work on the various issues together on that, and it's great to see you in this capacity.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Thank you, sir.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

It's very nice to see you.

Something you said piqued my interest. You had mentioned about the process for some people possibly being appointed to the Senate, but before that for the current system of being elected, where you run for nominations and then you go to the general election, you said some people might be a little disheartened by going through that whole process of meeting the people who get to elect them and appoint them to a legislative body.

I thought that was interesting because as we know in the Senate—as Mr. Christopherson and Mr. Reid pointed out many times—there are fewer of them and they have more power than the House of Commons.

I see a quote here from Emmett Macfarlane, who was the original designer of this process you're using, who said, “Serving in the Senate should be the result of answering a call, not making a call”.

I put two and two together. Why is it easier for them to go through this process of just putting a letter to the Prime Minister asking for an appointment, rather than knocking on the doors, listening to people, and meeting the constituents you are hoping to represent?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Hear, hear!

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

Firstly, I'd like to thank the honourable member for his leadership around raising awareness for ALS. The work you're doing with our colleague Greg Fergus is admirable and I thank you for that. I look forward to serving the people of Peterborough—Kawartha with you.

No Canadian will be able to write a letter to the Prime Minister and be appointed to the Senate. That's actually not how this process works out. Canadians will be able to apply, and there will be an advisory board—independent, at arm's length—that will assess the qualifications of these individuals and make non-binding recommendations to the Prime Minister.

It's not just that people are going to write a letter to the Prime Minister and hope he'll say yes. That may have been the old way, but it's certainly not the way we're moving forward.

I believe that being able to participate in an election, especially as a candidate, is a great privilege, and I have a lot of respect for the process itself; but this process is meant to be inclusive, and it's meant to work within the constitutional framework. In that spirit of inclusion, let's take a moment to reflect. I know many of us have not had a chance to do that, because we have all hit the ground running since October 19.

Let's think about how expensive an election campaign is. Let's think about what a privilege it is for us, as able-bodied individuals, to be able to go out and to knock on doors and to walk door-to-door and to be standing on our feet at various events. Let's take a moment to reflect on what a great privilege that is, and let's recognize that not everyone has the means to participate in what can be an expensive election campaign, and let's recognize that not everyone has the physical capacity to go out and to knock on doors.

That does not mean that individuals who cannot do either of those things are not connected to their communities, are not serving the best interests of their regions. What this process is doing is opening it up and creating a level playing field within the constitutional framework that will allow all Canadians from all backgrounds, from various socio-economic statuses, and with various disabilities, exceptionalities, and abilities to put their names forward to the Senate for consideration. I think that is something we can all be tremendously proud of.

(1200)

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I would say that everyone has the same opportunity with selling memberships. That doesn't cost anything and that is part of the process.

What I've noticed here also is that we've talked about a lot of transparency and openness, which is great. You changed the process, but when I look at this I see that all you did was basically put in another level of the decision-making process. The names being submitted to this advisory panel are being kept in secret, and the names selected to go to the Prime Minister are being chosen in secret.

Rather than just the people in the Prime Minister's Office making that decision or finding the names, you've given everyone the ability to apply, which is a good thing. However, we don't know who has applied, what the names are, or who is being considered. If the Prime Minister selected this person, then who are the others who didn't get selected, and why?

In my opinion, that's just another level and it's done behind the curtain. I think someone says it isn't, but I don't see anything more than that you get to apply. What is different? What is being done in front of the curtain?

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

What is being done is this. In the past there would not have been a conversation like this by this committee about the Senate appointments process, because frankly, in the past there was not a process that was open in any way to the public. With the greatest of respect, this is more change and more of an improvement than any other process that has existed before in the past around appointments to the Senate.

I challenge you to reflect on where the process was when the former government appointed nearly 60 senators. This is that difference.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Respectfully, Madam Minister, I disagree. We had an election in Alberta.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

The difference here is that the criteria that individuals are being assessed against are based on merit and not political patronage.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I would also argue that there are a number of senators with very extensive resumés.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Schmale. We're over our time.

Thank you very much, Minister, for coming. I'm sure we'll have future conversations.

Hon. Maryam Monsef:

I would, if I could.

Thank you very much. Thanks for your good work.

The Chair:

We'll suspend for a few minutes.

(1200)

(1205)

The Chair:

This is a very productive working committee. We'd like to get lots done, so I'm calling us back so we don't socialize too much.

We have two really important things we have to do on our family-friendly report. One is the caucus reports and the other is the witnesses. We can decide later whether we go in camera for the witnesses, which we normally do. However, I suggest we do the caucus reports first because the NDP whip is here to present the NDP caucus report, and I think she'd prefer to do that so she can carry on with her other duties.

(1210)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is that in public or in camera?

The Chair:

She has no problem with being in public.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay, fine.

The Chair:

Does anyone have any problem with being in public for the caucus report?

Some hon. members: No.

The Chair: In deference to the whips, I know you're very busy. Maybe if it's okay with the committee we could let you go first. [Translation]

Ms. Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet (Hochelaga, NDP):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair. I am very grateful.

I will read my report in French.

We in the NDP decided to work on several fronts simultaneously to improve work-life balance. My team and I, as whip, have worked to establish certain things that would improve the lives of MPs. We have already achieved some things, and others are under way. Therefore, I will talk about what we have done and what is still to come.

I, along with Theresa Kavanagh, met with the Speaker of the House and Mr. Marc Bosc. We had several requests to make of them and received a really good response from them. The Speaker of the House has been very co-operative, and I am very happy. They agreed to most requests.

We have taken a number of steps and more are under way. One of these efforts relates to parking and reserved areas for pregnant women and young families. Three spaces have already been reserved: one at the back of the Centre Block, one in the Confederation Building and one in the Justice Building. They have already been identified with proper signage. That is one of the things we have accomplished.

There are also issues with day care. For example, day care does not accept babies under 18 months. Also, there is a problem when parents want to leave their children only part of the time. This problem has no easy solution, but in the meantime, the HR people said they would help young parents find a nanny for their babies. There is help on that front too.

We also made an important request, specifically for a room dedicated to parents of young children. We are very pleased to have received a positive response in this regard, and a room has been reserved on the 6th floor of the Centre Block. The room is not finished yet, but it will be. There will be a playpen or a crib where children can sleep, a changing table, a refrigerator, a microwave and a high chair. The room will also have a workspace for parents during the debates in the House.

Although these initiatives were undertaken by the NDP, all this is for the parents from all parties. Obviously, if there are six parents who want to share a room, it may be necessary to go back to the Speaker of the House to see whether it would be possible to get more space, but for now, this room will be very useful.

We also discussed how to address the same needs in the West Block. At some point, we will leave the Centre Block and the House will sit in the West Block. Keep in mind that we should have the same amenities in the West Block while Parliament is sitting. When we return to the Centre Block, we will take the time to plan all of this on a better scale, as we also mentioned to the Speaker and to Mr. Bosc.

We discussed many other things, for example, the availability of healthy snacks after cafeterias in other buildings close. At the Confederation Building and the Justice Building, there are vending machines where you can buy chips or that kind of snack, but that is not the best food for a breastfeeding mother or a pregnant woman. We should therefore ensure that healthy food is available. That will be good for everyone, not just for parents.

We also asked for high chairs for young babies. Those in the parliamentary restaurant, for example, are not suitable for a 6-month baby, who may fall down. Therefore we need high chairs that are better suited to small babies.

We also noted that at the Confederation Building, on the side where the buses arrive, the access provided for people with disabilities or those pushing a stroller is closed after 8 p.m. As a result, parents with strollers or people in wheelchairs who come through that side do not have the access they need to enter the building. They would have to go through the front, which has only stairs, so that does not work. There is no intercom, either. We told the Speaker about this.

There should also be a crosswalk at the Confederation Building. We have a reserved space, but there is no crosswalk at the side door that I just mentioned. There are many cars going by at that location and that is dangerous.

(1215)



Lastly, we confirmed with the Speaker of the House that the votes that take place right after question period are very popular with young families because that compresses the working hours. Parents do not have to leave and then return to work later in the evening.

That completes my report. As you can see, these are practical things to ensure the well-being of parents and children on a daily basis. I am delighted that this worked out so well and that we had such a positive response from the Speaker of the House. [English]

The Chair:

Just for the minutes, it was Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet, the whip for the NDP, giving this report.

We'd also like to welcome Sheila Malcolmson to the rest of the committee meeting.

I don't know if anyone had any questions, or anyone else from the NDP wanted to add to that before we go to the other parties.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I might suggest, by way of proceeding, that we hear from the other two caucuses and then throw it open to see how much we line up and whether there are any discrepancies, in which case then we would want to talk those through.

The Chair:

Does that sound good?

Some hon. members: Yes.

The Chair: Okay, let's go to the Conservatives.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'll be fairly brief.

Our caucus found it quite difficult, given the depth and breadth of the proposals that are out there, including that we heard some new suggestions and ideas in the report that the NDP whip just gave, to be able to provide a lot of opinion on proposals that I think are quite extensive and varied, I guess we'll say. Obviously there are a lot of factors in those that we haven't had a look at yet. With some of them, there's obviously a lot of cost that could be involved. There are unintended consequences that could be involved.

I think our caucus needs to have the committee narrow down a bit more what some of the proposals might be or what sorts of areas the proposals might be in, before we could give a lot of feedback in a lot of areas.

I think the one thing that was quite clear in our caucus was the idea that's been discussed quite heavily and has been in the media quite a bit, which is the idea of members not sitting on Fridays. It was something that our caucus certainly didn't feel it could support.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Sorry, was that could or couldn't support?

Mr. Blake Richards:

We couldn't support that.

Whether it be in the name of family friendly or any other rationale that might be given, anything that would remove the accountability of the government to the House of Commons is something we wouldn't entertain or support. That would be one lens with which we would look at everything. If it's something that would appear to remove the accountability of the government in the House of Commons, that would certainly be off the table for us.

But with regard to other things, we would want to have a bit more information as to what avenue the committee is looking to go and get some sense from experts on what the costs might be, what some of the unintended consequences might be, and other implications to the proposals. There are a wide variety of things that have been mentioned and thrown out there.

I think it might be best if the committee tried to narrow things down a bit more before we could really provide more input.

The Chair:

Okay.

Ms. Vandenbeld from the Liberals.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Thank you very much.

We actually delved into this quite deeply. In fact, we conducted a survey of all of our caucus members with quite a good response, so a lot of the numbers that I'm about to talk about are actually very indicative.

There's a lot of anecdotal discussion going on and there are people who say that it doesn't really affect all that many people because how many of us have kids anyway? We decided to actually look at the numbers and find out how much this affects caucus members. I will go through some of the results of the survey because it is actually very revealing and indicative, and it could inform the work of this committee.

On the number of children, we asked MPs how many children they had. Of the MPs that responded, 78% are parents and 17% said they did not have children. Another 10% said that they were expecting children or were planning to have children in the future. The reason that adds up to 105% is because 5% of those who already have children also said that they were planning to have more children. This means that 10% of our caucus could very well have children during the period that they are here as members of Parliament.

As far as the ages, 47% of the MPs who responded had children younger than the age of 16. That's about half of those 78% who have dependent children, young children that need more care. On the number of children, 39% have two children, 14% have only one child, 17% of our caucus have three children, and another 6% have more than four children.

Anecdotally, I spoke to one of my colleagues who has six children. He lives in a rural and very remote area, and he spoke about the difficulties that he's having, particularly if he wants to bring his family here to Ottawa. It uses pretty much all of his travel points just to bring them one time. I think there is an appetite for families that are larger to have some kind of accommodation, so they can actually bring some of their children to Ottawa from time to time.

Interestingly, almost 6% of caucus said they were expecting children. That is something that is self-identified, but about 60% of our caucus responded to the survey. That's something quite indicative. Another 5% are preparing to have children, so that would indicate that it would be imminent.

When we looked at some of the other questions regarding child care, 89% agreed that day care services should be more flexible. With regard to whether or not day care should be moved to Centre Block, or in the case where we might be sitting to West Block, 80% of the respondents said that the day care should be in the same building where members spend most of their time. Right now, that would mean Centre Block and moving to West Block when the chamber is in West Block. My understanding is that right now the day care is near the Justice or Confederation Building. That's quite a distance if somebody wants to go down and see their child.

There was also quite a bit of discussion about the flexibility of the day care in terms of the hours of the day care and also the fact that you can't use it intermittently. For that family of six who comes here, and might only be here for one sitting week and then home again for three weeks, that family can't avail themselves of the day care because the day care is only available to those who are there on a permanent basis. This was something that generated quite a bit of discussion. The day care should reflect the reality of the lives of members of Parliament.

I would like to indicate that we only surveyed members of Parliament. We didn't survey staff and, of course, for staff some of the answers might be different. As we go on in this study, it will be very important that we also get the opinions of staff and try to perhaps do almost a similar kind of survey among some of the staff because they're here in Ottawa all the time. That would be very different.

(1220)



One of the things that came up when were talking about an inclusive Parliament and work-life balance is the fact that there are dietary restrictions. I'm very pleased that my colleague from the NDP mentioned this as one of the barriers. We did include a question on this in our survey. It turns out that 8% of our caucus has food allergies of some sort.

I won't go into every single one. We have the percentages for the lactose-free and low cholesterol ones and all of those. I think the big ones are that 8% are some form of vegetarian, either vegan or vegetarian—that's as a category combined—another 3% are kosher, and another 7% are halal. Our hours often are incredibly long, and we can't leave the committee room, and we can't leave the chamber if we're on House duty, so the only food that's available may or may not be.... This goes to the inclusivity of Parliament.

Moving on to the issue of chamber reform, a majority of the caucus, when asked the simple “yes or no” question—I know that our committee has actually delved into this in a lot more detail than just yes or no—in discussing the Friday sittings, about three-quarters of the caucus said we should eliminate Friday sittings. Now, they haven't had the benefit of the discussion about parallel chambers or alternate methods, but what is interesting about this is that the exact same number—76%—said that we need to replace that lost time elsewhere.

I think that's very important to note. There was almost 100% agreement among those who thought that we should compress the workweek or find some way to eliminate Fridays, but that we need to not have less sitting time. We broke that down a little as well. Fifty per cent agreed that we need to add extra time on the days other than Fridays.

In the discussion on this, a lot of people were talking about starting at nine o'clock instead of 10 o'clock on other days of the week, or even trying to add, you know, two days...we talked about the dual sittings in one day and other possibilities like that. But there was a general perspective that caucus members and the government need to have the time to get our agenda through, to get legislation through, and there was virtually no appetite for eliminating Fridays and not making up those hours somewhere else. Twenty per cent said they would support extra sitting days. I think that's also indicative.

Just anecdotally, I did speak to some of the older members of our caucus, who said that a day that starts at 7 a.m. or 8 a.m. to begin preparing and then goes until nine o'clock or 10 o'clock at night is actually very difficult for some of the older members, whereas some of the younger members were saying that they need to be home in their constituencies to do the work there and be with family. They would rather sit those long, long days on Monday through Thursday. This is a much more complex topic than it looks at first. Then, interestingly, 30%—almost one third of our caucus—said they support both adding extra time to other days and adding extra sitting days. There's quite a bit of support for maybe changing the way that the calendar is set up, but not necessarily for any one way that has been proposed.

There were a number of comments. We had an open section in the survey. By the way, if any of the other caucuses would like a copy of what our survey questions were, I'd be happy to give them to you—not necessarily all the replies—if you wanted to survey your own caucuses or even the staff. There were several comments.

(1225)

The Chair:

If you send that to the clerk, she'll distribute it.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Okay, thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

On the chamber reform, there are a number of open comments. There were dozens, and I'm not going to go through every single one, but there were quite a few comments that talked about heckling and even applause. The idea was that we could actually make Parliament more friendly, more amicable, if there were less heckling. This particularly came from a number of women's caucus members. I think the reason for that, of course, is that we want to attract more people to Parliament, and seeing that kind of behaviour is not something that entices a lot of women or a lot of other individuals to run for office or to become members of Parliament.

Certainly, we've all had the case where we've had school groups who are looking at the behaviour in the House, and this is something their own teachers don't want their students to be learning. At one point Samara was doing a Twitter chat, and there was a 13-year-old girl in the lobby—the daughter of one our members—and I asked her what she thought about it. She said, “Well, if I tried to do this in my school, my teacher would dock me marks.” So I think this is just in terms of the lessons we're showing to the young people who might aspire to politics. Actually, there were quite a few comments about the decorum, the heckling, the game-playing, and the posturing.

But the one that surprised me a little bit was the applause. There were quite a few people who said we could save a lot of time if we didn't do standing ovations every time somebody spoke, with whom we agreed, and particularly in question period, where we regularly see that we're going over time. That's something that I actually see as a positive thing, but if it's something that's taking away from our work, that was certainly something that was brought up.

Video conferencing technology was brought up both in the discussions we've had in caucus and also in the comments. I think there was a lot of support for the idea that, you know, we're all sitting around the table right here. If one of us had something, an emergency with our family or something very important in our constituency.... I know a number of my colleagues who are women had to fly back to their ridings to do International Women's Day events on Tuesday and then fly back. In fact, one colleague said her flight was at something like six o'clock right after the House adjourned. Then she flew home, did a 7 a.m. event, then did another one at 9 a.m., and then went straight to the airport to fly back in time for question period. People do have to be away. With the committees, there's no reason why we wouldn't be able to have video conferencing. We allow the witnesses to video conference, but we're not allowing our own committee members to video conference.

That was something about using technology more, the recognition that this institution is still working exactly the same way it did 150 years ago. That was a time when, if you wanted to come and have a talk with one of our colleagues, you actually had to get on a train and come to Ottawa and then spend the time here. Today, we can have a teleconference in which all of us could be in completely different parts of the country.

There was a strong sense that we need to modernize Parliament. Most businesses, certainly when I was working internationally.... At the United Nations, I had staff on five continents and we were able to function predominantly through Skype, and we were functioning as a coherent group and knew each other as if we were sitting side by side. That was probably the largest one, and I do know that there was a draft report of an all-party women's caucus that talked a lot about the use of technology. So that would be something I think we could delve into.

Then, there were a number of suggestions about improving technology on the Hill, including the idea of electronic voting. But notably, 63% of our caucus members believe that you have to be here in person to vote. Then there was another 30% or so who said you can use technology. If you're on the Hill somewhere, you can vote, but you have to be somewhere in the Parliamentary precinct. So for instance, if a young mother is with her child but she's at least here in Ottawa in the Parliamentary precinct, there might be a mechanism of voting that way.

Then of course, the votes after question period was another one that came up. I know we've been doing that.

(1230)



I want to specify, Mr. Chair, that none of these things affect me. In some ways I'm the ideal spokesperson for this because my stepdaughter is grown up. I don't have dependent children, and I live in Ottawa. My home is a 15-minute drive from here unless there's snow or traffic. In most circumstances it's a 15-minute drive. I'm not speaking to this because of any personal interest.

I think it was indicative that some of my caucus colleagues didn't want to speak publicly. They only wanted to speak privately about this or through the anonymous survey because they felt if they were to raise this kind of issue they would somehow be seen as lesser or not wanting to do their work. There were a number of people that responded privately to the survey, but didn't want to say it publicly.

I agree with some of the comments that came up through the NDP, as well as about the sixth floor and things like that.

I don't want to take too much of the committee's time. We went to a lot of effort to put together this report, and I think it was worth it to be able to go into it in some detail.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Briefly I would thank everybody for their feedback.

I'm going to ask our whip to give her thoughts.

I have a couple of things. We're clearly going to run into a problem on the Friday thing because your caucus was overwhelmingly interested, even though the time would be made up. Ours overwhelmingly was not interested, mostly because of the trade-off. When they started looking at losing constituency weeks, or sitting later, or the whole idea of compressing two days into one, all are more problematic to our caucus than being here on the Fridays. That could be a major area of disagreement.

Another thing I want to mention is a personal thing. Under the issue of security we haven't yet had a chance to talk about the green bus system. The last government all but decimated the green bus system. It's inefficient and costs all kinds of productivity. We've had to change the hours of committees meetings because it takes so darn long to get around. The one I want to raise in particular in this context is that one hour after the House is done, the buses stop. There are an awful lot of us that are still meeting in Centre Block, in East Block. Not so much for myself, but I'm thinking of others walking around at 10 or 11 o'clock at night and even ordinary MPs walking around. Being on the bus is the first casual bit of security that's there. Without the buses it means at 10 o'clock at night you have MPs wandering around on Parliament Hill. It's not the greatest kind of safety, not to mention for women or others who may feel particularly vulnerable being out in the dark that late at night, or not to mention people who have any kind of a disability. The older I get, I get more and more of them. It's a long walk from the East Block all the way down to the parking lot.

There are a whole host of issues. I'm hoping at some point the government will indicate they're reviewing that whole system. It all started with a cost-saving measure and they laid off droves of the drivers. That's what led to cutbacks in the service. It's not efficient. It doesn't serve members or staff well. I do hope the new government is going to undertake a review of that green bus system to make it the system it should be.

Chair, I'd like to ask my whip to maybe provide a couple of comments as to what she has heard.

Thank you.

(1235)

The Chair:

Go ahead. [Translation]

Ms. Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

There is something that has often emerged in the NDP talks. Whatever decision is taken on work-life balance, we must take into account not only the needs of members, but also those of all the people working with us, namely our teams, our assistants and the House staff. That is very important.

Ms. Vandenbeld's report made me think of something about travel points, for example for the children. There are also people who bring someone with them to help care for their children, such as a grandmother, aunt, sister, brother, or someone else. For now, it is not possible to make the travel points system more flexible in order to help families. [English]

The Chair:

Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Perhaps I can respond to Mr. Christopherson's comment.

First of all, about the Fridays, there really wasn't consensus. I think our committee has quite a bit of latitude—particularly for those who have a lot of travel time, such as our chair—because we didn't really come to a consensus. As well, the yes-no question didn't delve into a lot of the things we've been discussing in the committee.

An issue that came up amongst the women was I think very telling. One woman said that she could see, once she got here, that she could trade her Fridays, and that we're not always on House duty. Often on Thursday evenings she's able to go home, because there are people like me who are quite happy to take on the Fridays. She said she hadn't known that before she ran. In fact once she gave up running for the nomination because she had young children and didn't want to be away five days a week. Had she known she'd maybe be able to get home on Thursday nights and sometimes maybe come in a little later on Mondays, she said it might have actually changed her decision at that time during that election cycle.

We're all here, and we know how it all works, but we can't forget the deterrent effect on a lot of people with young families and on a lot of women when we're looking at the Friday sittings. We haven't come to any conclusion on that, but I think it's something that's certainly worth considering.

(1240)



With regard to the security, I'm actually very pleased you brought that up. One thing I noted when we had the security officials here the other day was the discussion about constituencies and the fact that there's nothing provided for residences. As an Ottawa MP, obviously I'm a lot easier to follow home from Parliament, for instance, or something like that; that line isn't as blurred. For instance, some of my colleagues who don't have security alarm systems in their homes are installing very expensive alarm systems solely because of the nature of their public responsibilities. These are things that haven't been discussed, to my knowledge.

From a woman's perspective, I'm walking down to the parking lot quite often late at night. As you said, we have meetings that go till 10 o'clock or 11 o'clock sometimes, and I'm walking to that parking lot, getting in my car, and then driving home. I think the issue of security could very well be one of those topics that we should come up with, both because we are the committee that is responsible for the estimates for the security service but also because of the family-friendly Parliament. It can be a tremendous deterrent to you as a woman who wants to run if you are concerned about your security, especially if there are people out there—there always are—who may not necessarily be pleased with what you're doing and who take that out on you in certain ways as a public official. I think it's something that probably affects women predominantly, a little bit more than men.

I think it definitely would be something to add to our study on inclusive Parliament. Thank you for bringing it up

Mr. David Christopherson:

Excellent. Thank you for the feedback.

The Chair:

David, if nothing has been done on the buses, you might also bring it up when we do main estimates. Maybe you can warn the Speaker in advance that you'll be bringing it up so that they have an answer.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes. I was hoping for a chance to shoehorn it in the other day, but it seemed kind of small compared with what we were dealing with.

But I appreciate that. Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I'm not sure if this is germane to the conversation, and maybe everyone realizes this, but I think it bears repeating. When we get elected, we have one fundamental choice of either living here or living in the riding. When it comes to the Friday situation, I'm sure many of those with families here would opt to sit on Friday to avoid the compressed time.

In our decision, we should be careful that we don't put the people who decide to bring their families to Ottawa in a precarious situation. It could very much do that, even though the numbers may be overwhelming that most families live in the ridings, for whom that Friday option would be good.

I would think the first place to start would be to find out where most of the MPs live and move your regulations and your rules and your changes around that.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David Graham:

I think that when it comes to Friday sittings, we're going to have to defend our position on it to all our caucuses and all our colleagues, whichever way we go. There's not an obvious answer. Whether we say we're going to keep them or we're going to toss them, we're going to have to defend it, and it's going to be a challenge, with a lot of arguments to be had on that.

I want to make sure that we don't fall into the Michael Chong trap of using legislation to solve problems that could be solved through whips' offices. If it can be solved with House duties, great, let's look at that as the new, clear option to go farther than that.

On the buses, I really want the buses to talk to us eventually. We can make buses better, more accessible, with more efficient routes, instead of going all the way up to the parking lot and all the way back. I ran into Senator Nancy Greene Raine the other day at an event at Mont Tremblant, and she chastised me for even considering using the buses. That's a whole other point, but I'll leave that there.

I'm very much looking forward to tackling the bus issue head on. We have other options too. Why don't the buses run to the airports on Monday mornings and Thursday nights? There are so many things that we could explore that we should be exploring.

The Chair:

I'm careful not to participate in debates, but I wanted to make a point. I've traded off on my Friday sittings this year, so that's not the issue, but the issue is the votes Thursday night. As you know, it takes me about 12 to 14 hours to get back to my riding, and if there's a vote on Thursday night, I can't get back on Thursday. Whether or not there's a Friday sitting, I'm travelling all day on Friday, anyway.

Are there any more comments?

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I was getting a bit worried that we wouldn't be able to get to other matters. I still have a motion on the floor regarding bringing back the members of the advisory committees. I hope we'll be able to get to that and perhaps have a vote on it today.

On this subject, the Thursday matter is a really good one. I think it can be dealt with by a separate change to the standing orders to move it. Am I right that if it was moved to right after question period on Thursdays that would be okay from your perspective? You, arguably, have the biggest travel problem of anybody here, so your answer would be good.

(1245)

The Chair:

Yes, that would be a lot better.

It changes all the time.

Ms. Vandenbeld, and then Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I wanted to respond to Mr. Reid's point. Sometimes it's not pre-scheduled votes, but the possibility of dilatory motions or unexpected things, and for that reason a certain number of MPs often have to be within 15 minutes of the Hill.

I know that when we have the late show, we can go on autopilot. There are ways that we could perhaps accommodate that, even on a Friday, by assuring that it's.... I know that the issue of quorum is in the Constitution, so it's not likely that our committee is going to be addressing the possibility of reducing quorum, but it could mean going on autopilot more often whereby, on a Friday, you know there will not be a vote when you suddenly need to bring back a number of MPs into the House for an unexpected vote. I think that's more the case.

Since I've been here, we haven't had a pre-scheduled vote on a Thursday night, but there's still a requirement for us to have House duty and to be present. I know a number of my colleagues have told me about that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Anita's quite right. It's a point that I hadn't taken into consideration.

What tends to happen with Thursday votes is not that they happen, but parties play this game of threatening each other, so you're not sure up until the last moment whether or not it's going to happen.

I'm not trying to deal with that gamesmanship. Something in a rule change would do it.

The Chair:

As you say, the rules could be changed. We've done it for Fridays. There are no votes on Fridays.

Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I just wanted to point out that I think it would be very useful if Anita would hand over that survey. Perhaps the Conservatives especially could take that survey, because we haven't been able to get much feedback from them, and they have a lot of members in the House. It's important to make sure we know how their members feel, because I'm starting to feel that perhaps at times, as Anita was saying, some of the members would be more willing to participate anonymously to say how they feel, and that they are not willing to do so out of fear of being chastised or looked down upon for not wanting to work hard enough, though that's surely not the case.

We're already seeing articles in which the media is spinning this as us wanting to work less. We just want to figure out how we can get good representation in this House and not have certain people discouraged from running in elections. That's something we were talking about with the minister, that so many people want to represent and take a lot of pride in representing their people. We want to make sure we get a good balance of those people. I personally have talked to a lot of Conservatives who have strong views on family-friendly politics and who do want to see certain areas of change. That might not necessarily mean the Fridays or whatever.

At some point, Mr. Richards was saying they definitely don't want to see us removing accountability, but I don't know where that's coming from because I don't think in all our discussions we ever talked about removing any sort of accountability. We'll still be having question period and we're still trying.... I think there is pretty much a consensus, according to the feedback we have so far, that we don't want to eliminate hours; we just want to figure out how we can schedule our days to accommodate people's needs.

I needed to say that. I really urge everybody to get involved in this important discussion. We have the opportunity in this Parliament to make some changes so that we can see better representation in the future, and if we don't take that seriously now, then quite frankly, all our parties are going to suffer. I don't see this as just a Liberal problem. I'm sure in the NDP and the Conservatives you want to attract a greater variety of people from different backgrounds into your caucuses, so I think we should take this exercise seriously and put some effort into it and make sure everybody is consulted within the caucuses, because I have talked to people on all sides of the parties and there are a lot of opinions. I'm not saying we're all going to come to one conclusion, but the thoughts deserve to be represented.

(1250)

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I know there's been a suggestion that we go back to the motion, but I have to say that I am kind of anxious for us to get at the witness list simply because we need to start scheduling those things. They take a lot of time. This thing's already getting a bit unfocused, so I really think if we're going to keep this file moving in a timely way, Chair, that we need to get those witnesses nailed down and get the clerk coordinating them.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Can I just make a suggestion now, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Obviously we don't have a lot of time left today to really have much of a discussion here anyway. I have a list of names we as a group are suggesting for witnesses. Maybe it would be better if everyone submitted their names, and the clerk could then send those around. I know there were some sent around. I don't know who suggested them. We would obviously add some to that list. Maybe we could have it sent around again. We just received it late yesterday. It might be good for all members to have a chance to look over the list and see what they think of the various suggestions. Then we can have a proper, fully informed discussion about them the next time we have a chance, which I hope will be at the next meeting. I don't know what we have scheduled.

The Chair:

We had the deadline of last...whatever it was, and we have a list here, which we'll distribute, but if you have more, we'll take those suggestions and we can add them. Everybody can have the list we have so far with everything up to today.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm not looking to pick a fight here, but part of the business was witness lists, so it kind of surprises me.... It almost seems as though they're not ready. I don't know why they're not ready. We are, and I get the sense the government is. This is not new. I don't know what the problem is.

The Chair:

And there's a—

Mr. David Christopherson:

I have to share the concern. You start to wonder whether or not all three parties are as engaged in moving forward in this as we put forward. I'll just leave that there.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I just want to quickly respond to that.

Obviously we all have an intention to try to move forward and look at this in a full manner. It's just that obviously having just seen some of these lists, we haven't really had a chance to clearly look at them. It's not that anyone is trying to delay anything. I would like to see us get there.

We have seven minutes or so left in the meeting. If we want to start the discussion, I guess that's okay, but I do think that there's a pressing time demand on Mr. Reid's motion as well. We've indicated in the motion he has that we would see them at the committee before the end of March. It seems to me the government is trying to stall and delay that, but I think we need to move forward with that. I think that actually takes precedence here.

The Chair:

There's one thing I'd like to decide on quickly. The Chief Electoral Officer could come on May 3 or 5, which is a long way from now, but to give them the time to plan does anyone have any problem with us picking one of those two dates?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Do we have work plans, current work plans?

The Chair:

There's nothing for May.

Mr. David Christopherson:

In the absence of a work plan, what do we have scheduled around that, Chair?

The Chair:

Around that time...?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes.

The Chair:

Right now, it's open. We're going to do our report and stuff.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay, so what are you suggesting, Chair?

The Chair:

It's either one of those days, Tuesday or Thursday.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'll move the Tuesday then just to give us a focus.

The Chair:

That is moved by David, May 3.

Is anyone opposed to that?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, I just want to confirm that we're not going to find that we're restricted in what we're allowed to ask the.... For every witness who has come here, every single question I ask or almost every single question, I am being told it's not permissible to ask this question and the witness is only here to talk about one thing not the other thing. I assume we get to ask him about everything or do the Liberals have plans to shut that down too?

The Chair:

Mr. Reid, you've been here long enough to know that when we give the notice of meeting, it says what the person is called here for and that's what you should respect.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's why I'm asking it about this.

The Chair:

This particular person has offered to come and report on the election, an informal briefing.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Does that mean that it is your intention to rule out of order questions dealing with the statement he made yesterday regarding the timeline issues he would have with regard to implementing new electoral systems because of the fact that it involves electoral boundaries or redistribution, and the potential for the timelines that are involved in having a referendum should one occur? Would that be considered out of order or would that be considered permissible to ask?

(1255)

The Chair:

Go ahead on a point of order, Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Before you answer that, can I provide some input because that's pretty important?

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that's one of the agents of Parliament, and if so, normally the experience is that there's a broad breadth of questions you can ask because they're answerable to Parliament, not to government. If you deny parliamentarians an opportunity to ask any question.... They're pretty sharp. They'll tell you pretty quick whether that's germane to the points they're raising.

I wanted to jump in, Chair, and just caution that I would be very surprised and have a bit of a problem if you were to rule that ahead of time you were going to start contracting the questions that we can ask an agent of Parliament. To me, that's really starting to speak to the rights and privileges of members and the separation between Parliament as the legislative arm and government, which is the executive arm.

The Chair:

This is a briefing. We haven't called them. They're offering us a briefing and we were supposed to have it today but we postponed it. Other than that, I had no thoughts on it.

So we'll do that May 3.

The other thing I asked you to think about for this meeting was that letter, which you now have, from the Speaker—

No, you haven't got it yet.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, we have two minutes left. We have time to have a vote on bringing back the members of the advisory committee to answer the questions that were ruled as being out of order at our previous meetings. These are questions that are absolutely germane to their mandate and to the oversight we practise on their mandate, and on the minister, and on the portfolio of democratic renewal, and they are questions that the minister now confirmed today she could not answer.

The sole reason that was given by Arnold Chan for saying that the government did not want to pursue this and this was all unnecessary—I think actually it was the main reason given by Mr. Graham as well—was that the minister could answer these questions, something that she confirmed today she cannot do. This is information to which she is not privy. Therefore, I would like us to go back to this.

The Liberals could talk it out if they want to spend two minutes doing it, but it would be nice to get a vote. This was a motion to bring them back before the end of March. We are not going to be back in this place, if I'm not mistaken, until March 22, thus the reason for the urgency to vote this up or down today.

The Chair:

I'm happy to go to this in a minute, but we have to decide what we're doing. There are two days before Easter break. The first one is budget day, and we've agreed to meet that day. The second day is the Thursday before Good Friday, and the House leaders have not yet decided whether that will be a Friday-type schedule.

Mr. David Christopherson:

They have.

The Chair:

Well, I haven't been told.

If it is a Friday-type schedule, then we wouldn't have our meeting, but if it's not, we would have our regular meeting.

Mr. David Christopherson:

My understanding is that the decision was made that the Thursday would be treated like a Friday.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Oh, I don't know.

Mr. Scott Simms:

According to the calendar it is a regular Thursday.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

It would be like a regular Thursday, so we would be having a meeting that day.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Apparently that's not finalized. They're kicking that around. I thought that was finalized. We do it quite frequently.

The Chair:

Minimally, we have to decide what we're doing on the Tuesday when we come back. We haven't decided that yet, unless we do these witness lists, which we obviously haven't had time to do today.

Does it sound good to do the witness list?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Okay, so the day we come back we'll do the witness lists.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Do we have any estimates pending?

The Chair:

We have main estimates, yes. We need two hours for that. We need one for the House estimates and then the other for the Elections Canada estimates. We could do one hour on witnesses and one hour on one of those main estimates, if you want.

Which main estimate would you like to do?

Mr. Scott Reid:

[Inaudible—Editor] this out so it can't be done?

The Chair:

No, I'm going to get to that in a second. We need to know what we're doing when we come back.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

Actually, just to inform, my understanding is that on budget day on March 22 there wouldn't be any rooms available because of all the lock-ups. Have you confirmed a room for that day? There may be trouble.

The Chair:

There wouldn't be any here but I'm sure there are rooms all over Parliament.

We have a room, yes.

(1300)

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

We have a room. Okay, sorry, I just wanted to double-check.

The Chair:

Would someone suggest an estimate, either House or—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Chair, wouldn't it make sense to tie the elections to the visit of the Chief Electoral Officer? Quite frankly, Mr. Reid, that should even open up a further broadening of questions you can ask under that ambit.

The Chair:

The Tuesday we come back, the first hour we'll do the witness list; the second hour will be the House estimates. Is everyone agreed?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Now we'll go to Mr. Reid's motion. Go ahead.

Mr. Scott Reid:

In practice, if adopted, this motion would mean we'd be inviting the witnesses to come on the Thursday of the week we come back after the break because that is the only remaining day in March. I'd just like to get a vote on this. The motion is: That the federal members of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments be invited to appear before the Committee before the end of March 2016, to answer all questions relating to their mandate and responsibilities.

I've already explained why I think that's important.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Isn't there a speakers list?

The Chair:

There is, but we're also at one o'clock, so I need permission from committee to extend the hours if you want to go on.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld:

I can't. No, we have other commitments.

The Chair:

There is no permission to go on.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Let the record show that the government side is clearly trying to block this motion from moving forward.

The Chair:

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Mesdames et messieurs, contrairement à mon habitude, je vais commencer à l'heure. Ainsi, nous disposerons de l'heure entière pour poser des questions à la ministre.

Il s'agit de la 12e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre de la première session de la 42e législature. Cette séance est publique et télévisée.

Conformément à un ordre adopté par le Comité le 4 février, nous accueillons aujourd'hui la ministre des Institutions démocratiques, l'honorable Maryam Monsef, qui prendra la parole et répondra à des questions au sujet du Comité consultatif indépendant des nominations au Sénat. La ministre est accompagnée de M. Ian McCowan, sous-secrétaire du Cabinet, Législation et planification parlementaire et Appareil gouvernemental du Bureau du Conseil privé.

Pendant la deuxième heure, nous parlerons de la liste de témoins et des rapports des caucus visant à faire du Parlement un lieu plus adapté aux besoins des familles.

Je vous remercie de votre présence, madame la ministre. Le Comité était impatient de vous entendre au sujet du nouveau processus au Sénat. Nous commencerons immédiatement, afin de pouvoir profiter de tout le temps prévu pour les questions. Je vous invite à faire votre déclaration préliminaire.

Je vous remercie.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef (ministre des Institutions démocratiques):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les membres du Comité.

C'est un honneur de nous rassembler ici, sur le territoire traditionnel des Algonquins. Il en a été question hier soir. En effet, n'eût été la façon dont les immigrants comme moi ont été accueillis sur ce territoire, nous n'aurions pas pu réussir de façon individuelle ou collective.

Comme vous l'avez dit, monsieur le président, j'ai le grand privilège d'être accompagné de M. Ian McCowan.

À titre de ministre des Institutions démocratiques, j'ai le mandat de mettre en oeuvre l'engagement du gouvernement à renforcer l'ouverture et l'équité des institutions démocratiques canadiennes. Le Comité — votre Comité — joue un rôle important pour ce qui est de donner suite à cet engagement. Je crois sincèrement qu'il peut montrer la voie pour ce qui est d'améliorer le ton de nos délibérations et notre conduite générale en comité, à la Chambre lorsque nous représentons nos électeurs et lorsque nous débattons des enjeux qui importent le plus aux Canadiens.

Dans le cadre de mon mandat, je suis responsable au premier plan de toutes les questions liées à l'élaboration et à la mise en oeuvre du processus concernant le Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations du Sénat. Je suis pour ainsi dire la dépositaire du processus. Je peux répondre à toutes les questions que vous pourriez me poser sur sa mise en place, notamment en ce qui concerne le mandat du comité consultatif et les critères pour évaluer les candidats.

Le comité consultatif est un organe indépendant et autonome. Par conséquent, je ne suis pas en mesure de parler en leur nom.

Le Sénat joue un rôle important dans notre système démocratique, nous sommes nombreux à en convenir. Toutefois, la légitimité de cette institution a souffert de la nature partisane du système de nomination. II s'agit maintenant d'un lieu où les liens politiques sont souvent perçus comme étant plus importants que l'intérêt supérieur des Canadiens. Le nouveau processus de nomination fondé sur le mérite visant à conseiller le premier ministre sur les nominations au Sénat a été conçu pour éliminer cet aspect partisan et aider à revigorer le Sénat.

Avant d'entrer dans les détails du processus, je crois qu'il est important de bien comprendre les quatre principes qui contribuent à renforcer sa légitimité et son efficacité.

Premièrement, le processus reconnaît le rôle important du Sénat pour ce qui est de fournir un second examen attentif et d'assurer la représentation des régions et des minorités. Deuxièmement, le processus respecte le cadre constitutionnel en gardant en place le pouvoir du gouverneur général de nommer des sénateurs sur avis du premier ministre. Troisièmement, le processus comporte des éléments visant à favoriser la transparence et la responsabilité, notamment des critères fondés sur le mérite pour les personnes nommées au Sénat, un mandat public pour le comité consultatif et la présentation de rapports publics sur le processus. Quatrièmement, le processus est conçu de façon à permettre la sélection de candidats sénatoriaux capables de se comporter de façon indépendante et non partisane.

Les Canadiens ont demandé des changements, mais ils ne souhaitent pas que notre gouvernement entreprenne des négociations constitutionnelles. Ce nouveau processus répond à ces attentes. Le gouvernement a également la ferme conviction que le nouveau processus respecte notre cadre constitutionnel.

Le comité consultatif indépendant représente la principale composante du nouveau processus. Il a pour mandat de formuler des recommandations non contraignantes et fondées sur le mérite au premier ministre en regard des nominations au Sénat. Le comité consultatif est composé de cinq membres: un président et deux autres membres permanents, nommés par le gouvernement fédéral et deux membres temporaires de la province ou du territoire où un siège est pourvu.

Vous avez eu l'occasion de rencontrer la présidente du comité consultatif, Mme Huguette Labelle. Elle a été maintes fois reconnue pour son leadership aux niveaux supérieurs de la fonction publique, et ses années d'expérience lui donnent une base solide pour relever les défis associés à la direction du processus consultatif. Je vous signale qu'elle possède par ailleurs une connaissance approfondie des questions liées à la transparence en tant qu'ancienne présidente de l'organisme Transparency International.

Le professeur Daniel Jutras et la Dre Indira Samarasekera ont également comparu devant votre Comité.

Tous les membres du comité consultatif sont impressionnants. Je pourrais consacrer tout le temps que nous avons ensemble à vous parler de chacun d'eux, mais s'il y a une chose que j'aimerais que vous reteniez, c'est que leur expérience touche tous les milieux, de l'éducation aux arts en passant par le droit constitutionnel, la science et la médecine.

(1105)



Le processus que nous avons présenté comporte deux phases. Dans le cadre de la phase de transition, qui est bien entamée, le comité consultatif a la responsabilité de fournir au premier ministre une courte liste de candidatures pour cinq sièges vacants associés à trois provinces: deux sièges au Manitoba, deux en Ontario et un au Québec. Pendant cette phase, le comité consultatif avait le mandat de consulter une vaste gamme de groupes, y compris des collectivités autochtones, linguistiques, minoritaires et ethniques, des organisations provinciales, territoriales et municipales, des organisations du travail, des groupes de service communautaires, des conseils des arts et des chambres de commerce provinciales ou territoriales.

L'objectif était de permettre au comité d'entendre tout un éventail de personnes et de présenter une liste comprenant des personnes issues de différents milieux et ayant des expériences diversifiées, ainsi qu'une connaissance du Sénat. La phase permanente commencera à la fin du processus de transition, après la nomination des cinq premiers sénateurs. Dans le cadre de cette phase, les sièges vacants seront pourvus pour les sept provinces parmi lesquelles il y a des sièges libres actuellement.

Au cours de la phase permanente, tous les Canadiens auront la possibilité de présenter directement leur candidature pour le Sénat. Parlons maintenant des critères. Dans les deux phases, le comité consultatif évaluera les candidats à l'aide de critères transparents fondés sur le mérite. Ces critères sont publics. Ils comprennent — si je ne m'abuse, vous en avez une copie — les éléments suivants: avoir un excellent bilan en matière de réalisations et de leadership, soit dans le cadre de services communautaires, de services au public, ou dans leur profession ou domaine d'expertise; posséder des qualités personnelles exceptionnelles et attestées en ce qui touche à la vie publique, à l'éthique et à l'intégrité; apporter un point de vue et une contribution clairement indépendants et non partisans aux travaux du Sénat et montrer une compréhension de la fonction du Sénat dans notre cadre constitutionnel, y compris son rôle comme organe indépendant qui offre un second regard attentif et son rôle dans la représentation des régions et des minorités.

Ces critères seront appliqués au processus de sélection d'une façon qui respecte l'importance de l'égalité entre les sexes et de la diversité du Canada. Les critères publics offrent un cadre important pour l'ensemble du processus, autant pour assurer la sélection de candidats du plus haut niveau que pour permettre aux Canadiens de nous tenir responsables à l'égard du processus.

J'aimerais maintenant parler de notre engagement à mener à terme un processus ouvert et transparent. Comme je l'ai mentionné précédemment, l'importance de la transparence et de la responsabilisation est l'un des principes à la base du processus. Dans ce contexte, chaque étape a été conçue pour être aussi ouverte que possible. Les critères fondés sur le mérite pour les candidats au Sénat ont été publiés en ligne, afin que tous les Canadiens puissent voir les compétences que le comité consultatif devra évaluer.

Le gouvernement a publié le mandat du comité consultatif lorsque celui-ci a été nommé. Ce dernier a lui-même créé un site Web public pour demander les mises en candidature pendant la phase de transition et a largement consulté des organisations.

La phase permanente du processus consultatif offrira un processus ouvert, permettant à tout Canadien qualifié de présenter sa candidature. Le comité consultatif doit diffuser un rapport public sur ses activités après chaque cycle de nomination. Je crois qu'il s'agit là d'un niveau d'ouverture sans précédent dans un processus qui était auparavant mené dans le plus grand secret.

Cela dit, afin d'attirer les meilleurs candidats, un certain niveau de confidentialité est nécessaire pour assurer le succès du processus, comme dans le cas de toute autre procédure d'emploi. Nous souhaitons nous assurer que toutes les personnes qualifiées de divers horizons aient suffisamment confiance pour présenter leur candidature, sans crainte qu'à la fin du processus, leur nom ou leurs renseignements personnels ne soient rendus publics. C'est pour cette raison que le nom des candidats qui ne seront pas choisis ne sera pas divulgué.

(1110)



Je suis maintenant heureuse de répondre à vos questions. Il me restait trois lignes à lire, mais le président a fait signe que le temps prévu est écoulé.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Monsieur le président, j'invoque le Règlement. Je crois que nous pouvons accorder à la ministre le temps nécessaire pour lire les trois dernières lignes. Il me semble que c'est la moindre des choses.

Le président:

D'accord, vous pouvez lire les trois lignes.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Vous êtes bien aimable, monsieur.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Ne l'oubliez surtout pas.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

En conclusion, je suis persuadée que le processus consultatif permettra de revigorer le Sénat d'une façon qui renforcera son rôle fondamental dans notre démocratie parlementaire tout en réduisant la partisanerie.

Je me réjouis à la perspective de travailler avec votre Comité, non seulement sur la réforme du Sénat, mais aussi sur la poursuite d'autres engagements du gouvernement en vue de renforcer notre démocratie et de rétablir la confiance de la population à l'égard de nos institutions. Nous avons tous un rôle à jouer afin de donner un ton constructif à ce débat.

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Je remercie le député, qui est aussi le porte-parole des conservateurs à l'égard de mon portefeuille.

Le président:

Merci, madame la ministre.

Nous entamons la première série de questions ou de commentaires d'une durée de sept minutes. Nous commencerons avec madame Petitpas Taylor.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Tout d'abord, madame la ministre Monsef, je vous remercie d'avoir pris le temps de rencontrer le Comité aujourd'hui. Nous savons que vous êtes extrêmement occupée, mais vous avez pris le temps de venir, malgré fort peu de préavis. Nous vous savons gré de votre présentation et de votre volonté à venir répondre à nos questions.

Voici ma première question. Comme vous nous l'avez indiqué, vous êtes la dépositaire du processus. Je me demande si vous ou le comité consultatif avez eu l'occasion de rencontrer les provinces au sujet du processus en place à l'heure actuelle.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Je suis ravie d'être ici. J'étais impatiente de comparaître.

Au départ, lorsque nous avons défini le cadre dans lequel s'inscrirait le processus, nous avons décidé qu'il se distinguerait en faisant, pour la première fois, une place aux provinces dans les discussions. À cette fin, j'ai communiqué avec mes collègues en Ontario, au Québec et au Manitoba. Nous avons demandé à chaque province de nous fournir une liste de cinq personnes qui représenteraient leur province respective au comité ad hoc pour les provinces ayant des sièges à pourvoir.

Nous avons eu des conversations fructueuses, et je me suis réjouie de recevoir des noms de l'Ontario et du Québec. Au terme du processus, après avoir désigné les membres du comité consultatif, nous avons demandé aux trois provinces de nous faire part de leurs suggestions pour améliorer le processus transitoire, avant de le rendre permanent. Nous espérons poursuivre cette collaboration.

(1115)

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Les provinces vous ont-elles envoyé des suggestions au sujet des consultations que vous avez tenues avec elles?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Les trois provinces étaient enchantées de discuter avec nous et de participer au processus de nomination au Sénat. Avant de passer à la phase permanente, nous examinerons attentivement leurs suggestions afin d'améliorer le processus, si besoin est.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Voici ma dernière question, car je partage mon temps avec Mme Sahota.

Pourriez-vous nous parler du processus actuel, et nous dire en quoi il se distingue de l'ancien?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Je suis convaincue que le processus suivi par les anciens gouvernements suscite la curiosité de nombreux Canadiens. La différence est qu'il y a maintenant un processus et que celui-ci est public. Qu'on pense au mandat des membres du comité consultatif, aux critères que nous leur avons demandé de suivre pour évaluer le potentiel des candidats ou au rapport que le comité consultatif présentera à la fin du processus, tout est public. Le processus se déroule ouvertement; il est soumis à l'examen du public.

Il en est ainsi parce que nous croyons qu'il est important d'accroître la confiance des Canadiens dans cette institution. L'un des meilleurs moyens d'y arriver est d'engager les Canadiens dans le processus, plutôt que d'agir derrière des portes closes.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Je vous remercie.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Je vous remercie de votre présence parmi nous, madame la ministre. Nous étions impatients de vous entendre.

Vous avez abordé beaucoup d'aspects. À votre avis, pourquoi le gouvernement considère-t-il que le processus retenu est le bon et qu'il sera efficace, contrairement à l'ancien processus, dont nous ne savons pas grand-chose?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

La mise en place des comités consultatifs et le cadre que nous avons défini sont déjà, à notre avis, une grande réussite. Nous tentons de faire quelque chose d'inédit; nous savons que c'est un défi. Mais surtout, nous y voyons toutes sortes de possibilités. Nous estimons que le processus fonctionnera, car nous avons déjà reçu des commentaires positifs de la part des Canadiens de même que des sénateurs.

Il y a des gens dans la salle qui ont assisté à la consultation parlementaire que j'ai organisée. Dans les observations que m'ont faites les députés et les sénateurs — tous partis confondus —, il y avait la confiance que nous recherchions, le niveau de confiance que nous espérions accroître. Nous en sommes déjà là. J'attends avec impatience la nomination de ces cinq premiers sénateurs. Je crois que leurs qualités et leurs compétences ainsi que leur apport seront éloquents.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous avez présenté un bref profil de certains des membres fédéraux permanents qui ont comparu devant notre Comité et mis en lumière leur diversité. Pourriez-vous nous dire plus précisément quelles qualités vous souhaitiez trouver chez les membres permanents et les membres temporaires du comité consultatif? Vous dites avoir demandé aux provinces de vous présenter cinq candidats, puis avoir choisi deux personnes dans cette liste. Quels critères ont guidé votre choix?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Les critères sur lesquels le premier ministre et le gouverneur en conseil se sont fondés pour nommer les membres du comité consultatif sont semblables à ceux que le comité consultatif emploiera, à son tour, pour évaluer les candidatures au Sénat. Nous cherchions des gens qui se distinguent par leur leadership et leur service à la collectivité. Nous cherchions des gens qui respectent leurs engagements, des gens qui comprennent le rôle important que joue le Sénat dans notre cadre constitutionnel, notamment à titre de Chambre haute et de Chambre de second examen objectif.

Nous cherchions des gens qui sauraient accomplir leur travail de façon indépendante et non partisane. Nous cherchions des gens qui, tout au long de leur vie et dans leur travail, ont fait preuve d'éthique et d'intégrité. Nous tenions aussi à ce que la composition du comité reflète la grande diversité d'expériences et d'antécédents présents dans la société canadienne. Nous pensons y être parvenus, et cela nous ravit.

(1120)

Le président:

Je vous remercie, madame Sahota.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Je vous remercie. Madame la ministre, c'est un plaisir de vous avoir parmi nous. Les échanges que nous avions pendant la période des questions de la Chambre des communes me manquent. Nous étions, je crois, les Disraeli et Gladstone de la 42e législature, ou peut-être Churchill et lady Astor, ou encore Archy et Mehitabel. J'aimais bien nos échanges.

J'ai trois questions, mais elles sont à ce point interreliées qu'il m'apparaît plus logique de les poser ensemble que séparément. Elles portent sur les comités consultatifs et les listes qu'ils ont dressées. Quand M. LeBlanc a comparu avec vous devant le Comité sénatorial du Règlement, il a déclaré que les comités consultatifs auraient besoin de quelques semaines de plus.

Voici donc ma première question: les listes ont-elles déjà été soumises au premier ministre?

Ma deuxième question porte sur le processus choisi pour la première phase, qui repose sur l'envoi de formulaires de nominations et de demandes. Cette façon de faire a-t-elle été choisie par le gouvernement ou par les comités consultatifs?

Troisièmement, Myriam Bédard, membre du comité consultatif du Québec, a dit qu'une centaine de demandes de nominations avaient été envoyées. En a-t-on envoyé un nombre semblable dans chacune des trois provinces? Combien de formulaires ont été retournés? Combien de nominations a-t-on reçues? À la fin de ce processus, le comité consultatif disposait-il d'un vaste bassin de candidats potentiels?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Je remercie le député de sa question.

Nos échanges à la Chambre des communes me manquent, à moi aussi. Il n'en revient qu'à vous de les reprendre, monsieur, quand vous serez prêt à recommencer... J'attends ce moment avec impatience. Je me réjouis que nous ayons l'occasion de converser aujourd'hui.

Pour répondre à votre question, je tiens d'abord à dire très clairement que je n'ai pas participé aux consultations du comité consultatif, car il s'agit d'un comité indépendant. Je n'ai pas vu les listes qu'il a reçues ni la liste des candidats recommandés. Je ne sais pas non plus où en est le processus.

Je peux toutefois vous dire que, comme ce groupe de Canadiens s'attaquait à une tâche considérable, jamais accomplie auparavant, nous tenions à lui fournir les outils et les ressources nécessaires à son travail. Le comité travaille actuellement à la phase de transition. Quand elle sera terminée, le comité produira un rapport pour nous dire — à nous, à vous et aux Canadiens — comment le processus s'est déroulé, à qui le comité s'est adressé, et ainsi de suite.

Pour ce qui est des formulaires et du processus de nomination, c'est le comité consultatif qui a décidé, de manière indépendante, de fonctionner ainsi, probablement parce que cette méthode lui semblait la plus appropriée. Je n'ai pas de détails concernant le nombre de demandes ni l'état d'avancement du processus. Je peux simplement vous dire que j'ai hâte, comme vous, de voir la liste, de même que le compte rendu du comité à propos du processus employé.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Mes collègues voient-ils, maintenant, pourquoi il serait important d'entendre de nouveau les membres du comité consultatif? M. Chan a soutenu, dans un long discours, qu'il ne serait pas nécessaire de les réinviter puisque la ministre pourrait répondre à nos questions.

Il semble pourtant que, pour obtenir réponse aux questions que je viens de poser — qui ont été jugées irrecevables quand je les ai posées aux membres du comité consultatif — il faudra que les députés libéraux ne nous empêchent pas de réinviter ces gens. Sinon, la transparence et l'ouverture brilleront par leur absence.

La prochaine question que j'aimerais vous poser, madame la ministre, porte sur une déclaration que vous avez faite aux médias le 1er février. On peut lire, dans un article de Joan Bryden, que la ministre Monsef n'est « pas prête à garantir » qu'il n'y aura pas de référendum sur la réforme électorale. D'après vos réponses précédentes et les observations du ministre LeBlanc, vous n'avez pas complètement rejeté l'idée d'un référendum.

Dans quelles circonstances le gouvernement indiquera-t-il, de façon claire et nette, s'il y aura ou non un référendum sur la réforme électorale?

(1125)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Monsieur le président, j'invoque le Règlement. Cette question ne m'apparaît pas pertinente. Nous avons invité la ministre à venir nous parler du processus de nomination. Nous disposons d'une heure seulement pour obtenir réponse aux nombreuses questions importantes que M. Reid pose depuis longtemps. Nous devrions nous en tenir au sujet de discussion prévu, je crois.

Le président:

Madame la ministre, vous pouvez choisir de répondre ou non. Comme nous vous avons invitée pour parler du Sénat, vous pouvez choisir de vous en tenir à ce sujet.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Cela me rappelle le bon vieux temps, monsieur le président.

Permettez-moi de revenir à ce qui a été dit plus tôt. Si je comprends bien, les membres du comité consultatif ont été invités à comparaître devant ce Comité pour que vous puissiez évaluer leurs compétences et voir s'ils semblaient aptes à mener le processus de nomination à bien. J'espère qu'ils ont su répondre à vos questions et satisfaire votre curiosité.

Votre Comité est maître de ses activités. Je tiens toutefois à vous assurer qu'étant donné l'importance accordée à la transparence du processus et à l'ouverture, le comité consultatif produira un rapport dans lequel nous trouverons les réponses à nos questions sur le déroulement du processus. Attendons de voir le rapport.

Quant à votre question à propos d'un éventuel référendum, comme je l'ai déjà dit à la Chambre, dans les médias et pendant des discussions individuelles, nous emploierons un processus qui permettra aux Canadiens de participer à une conversation approfondie et inclusive sur les façons d'améliorer notre système électoral. Ainsi, les personnes qui ressentent actuellement peu d'intérêt pour la vie démocratique pourront sentir qu'elles ont un rôle à jouer ici au Parlement et dans les décisions du gouvernement. Il est trop tôt pour prédire le résultat de ce processus...

M. Scott Reid:

Pourriez-vous me dire quels critères vous emploierez quand il ne sera plus « trop tôt »? À un moment donné, il ne sera plus trop tôt, mais nous n'avons aucune idée des critères que vous utiliserez à ce moment-là. C'est une situation difficile. Le directeur général des élections a publié, hier ou avant-hier, un rapport indiquant qu'il lui faudra plus de temps pour voir au processus référendaire, et qu'il lui faudra aussi plus de temps si ce processus entraîne une redistribution des circonscriptions.

Dans les faits, plus vous attendez, plus vous limitez les options possibles. Vous pourriez facilement faire en sorte qu'il reste une seule option, qui serait, par le plus grand hasard, celle que le premier ministre a dit préférer.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'invoque le Règlement...

M. Scott Reid:

Il faudrait vraiment savoir quels seront vos critères.

Le président:

Très bien. Avant de passer au recours au Règlement, je dois souligner que le temps est écoulé. Votre recours n'est peut-être plus nécessaire.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il m'apparaît encore important que vous preniez une décision au sujet du recours au Règlement que j'ai présenté plus tôt. Si la discussion continue ainsi, la ministre n'aura pas le temps de nous parler du sujet pour lequel nous l'avons invitée.

Le président:

Je laisse à la ministre le soin de décider si elle souhaite répondre à des questions sur d'autres sujets. Les membres du Comité peuvent utiliser leur temps de parole comme ils l'entendent.

Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez la parole.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre, je vous remercie de votre présence parmi nous.

Je commencerai par une observation personnelle plutôt que politique. Madame la ministre, nous représentons des partis différents, nous sommes de sexes différents et vous avez la moitié de mon âge, mais je tiens à vous dire toute ma fierté de vous voir ici aujourd'hui à titre de ministre du Canada, car votre réussite ne rejaillit pas seulement sur les libéraux: elle fait aussi honneur au Canada. Votre exemple illustre ce qui distingue notre pays. Je suis immensément fier que, dans notre pays, une personne qui a eu votre parcours puisse se retrouver assise ici en tant que ministre. Je vous souhaite, à titre personnel, la meilleure des chances.

Des voix: Bravo!

(1130)

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Je vous remercie.

M. David Christopherson:

Et maintenant, pour vous montrer toute mon estime, je vous traiterai comme je traiterais n'importe quel autre ministre, ce que vous êtes en droit d'attendre.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Je n'en attends pas moins de vous, monsieur.

M. David Christopherson:

Tout d'abord, le NPD n'est vraiment pas convaincu par la charade actuelle. À titre de comparaison, imaginons ce qui se passerait si on repartait de zéro et qu'on disait aux Canadiens: « Nous procéderons par nominations pour décider qui fera partie du gouvernement et vous représentera pendant le processus d'élaboration des lois ». Ils se révolteraient! Évidemment, nous ne procédons pas ainsi.

Par contre, nous avons décidé de répartir entre deux groupes le processus décisionnel relatif aux lois. Les Canadiens élisent l'un des groupes, mais l'autre fonctionne par nominations, comme à l'âge des ténèbres. C'est ainsi que le NPD voit la situation. Cette façon de faire est légale, certes, mais elle n'a aucune légitimité aux yeux de la population canadienne. Il est honteux qu'à l'heure actuelle le vote d'un sénateur ait, en fait, plus de valeur que celui d'un député, les sénateurs étant moins nombreux. C'est une honte pour un pays qui se présente, sur la scène internationale, comme une démocratie mûre.

Cela dit, le Sénat existe toujours, ce processus existe encore, et nous devons composer avec tout cela. À la troisième page de vos observations, madame la ministre, vous mentionnez au moins quatre critères dont vous tiendrez compte. J'aimerais savoir ceci: comment ces nouveaux critères transparents garantissent-ils qu'on ne se retrouvera pas avec un autre sénateur Duffy ou un autre sénateur Brazeau?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Par votre entremise, monsieur le président, je remercie le député de ses observations bienveillantes. Je lui en suis très reconnaissante. Je suis consciente qu'il s'agit d'un privilège d'être ici. En effet, quelle femme de ma lignée aurait pu rêver se retrouver un jour dans ma position? C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles, chaque fois que je suis convoquée à un comité, chaque fois que je dois répondre à une question à la Chambre, je considère qu'il s'agit d'un grand honneur. Voilà pourquoi je prends mon rôle de gardienne du processus aussi sérieusement.

Lorsque mon parti élaborait sa plateforme, l'actuel premier ministre a passé trois ans à consulter et à écouter les Canadiens, les experts, divers groupes, ainsi que des universitaires. Lorsque nous avons élaboré notre politique de gouvernement ouvert et transparent, les Canadiens nous ont dit clairement que le Sénat doit changer, que, malgré le bon travail des sénateurs depuis des générations, l'efficacité du Sénat est entravée par la perception de partisanerie.

Les Canadiens nous ont également dit clairement qu'ils ne veulent pas que nous apportions des changements qui nécessiteraient un long débat constitutionnel. Les Canadiens veulent que nous concentrions nos efforts sur ce qui les préoccupe: la croissance de l'économie, l'environnement et les changements climatiques, les femmes et les filles autochtones disparues et assassinées. Le processus que nous avons instauré tient compte du cadre constitutionnel à l'intérieur duquel nous devons travailler.

Les processus que nous avons énoncés, la reddition de comptes et la transparence qui en font partie intégrante, le vaste éventail d'organismes et de particuliers qui seront consultés et invités à poser leur candidature: tout cela mènera à un Sénat plus fort et plus efficace. D'ici quelques semaines ou quelques mois seulement, tout Canadien qui répond aux exigences constitutionnelles pourra soumettre sa candidature pour être nommé au Sénat.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous avez raison, madame la ministre. De même, quiconque achète un billet de loterie court la chance de devenir multimillionnaire d'ici la fin de la semaine. En théorie, c'est bien beau.

Je n'ai pas vraiment entendu de réponse à ma question. Nous sommes passés d'un processus de nomination à un processus de nomination élargi, où d'autres personnes nommées décideront maintenant qui seront les personnes nommées. Mais qu'arrive-t-il lorsque nous sommes aux prises avec une mauvaise nomination? De mauvais députés se font élire, mais il existe un mécanisme pour s'en défaire. Cela s'appelle une élection. Par contre, une fois qu'un mauvais sénateur est nommé, nous sommes pris avec lui jusqu'à ce qu'il atteigne l'âge de 75 ans.

Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, madame la ministre, je ne vois rien dans ce critère qui empêchera un autre Duffy ou un autre Brazeau ou, nommons un libéral pour être plus juste, un autre Mac Harb de se retrouver au Sénat. Il n'y a toujours aucune reddition de comptes et c'est toujours aussi inacceptable.

J'aimerais toucher un ou deux autres points. Corrigez-moi si je me trompe, madame la ministre, mais je crois que vous avez mentionné que vous avez reçu de chaque province une liste de candidats pour faire partie du comité de sélection. Qu'en est-il du Manitoba? Le Manitoba a-t-il soumis des noms?

(1135)

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Permettez-moi de revenir sur votre question précédente...

M. David Christopherson:

Ne retournez pas trop loin en arrière, madame la ministre. Mon temps est compté.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Non, je ne reviendrai pas trop loin en arrière. Mais vous estimez que je n'ai pas répondu à votre question.

Cher monsieur, vous avez commencé votre série de questions en me félicitant de ma nomination. Nous sommes au Canada, et si quelqu'un comme moi peut se faire élire au Canada et se faire nommer au Cabinet du premier ministre du Canada, alors tout est possible en ce pays.

Je tenais à vous dire cela...

M. David Christopherson:

Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, madame la ministre, ne vous méprenez pas. Vous êtes là où vous êtes grâce au pouvoir de l'élection, et non parce que vous connaissiez la bonne personne.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

... car c'est également l'esprit dans lequel ce nouveau processus est conçu.

Je cherche, ainsi que le premier ministre, à faire venir plus de gens tels que la sénatrice Chaput au Sénat. Nous recherchons plus de Roméo Dallaire et de Serge Joyal. Nous recherchons des personnes comme celles qui sont à la Chambre, ou qui en ont déjà fait partie pour se joindre à eux.

C'est cela notre idée.

M. David Christopherson:

Qu'en est-il de monsieur et madame Tout-le-monde? Vous parlez de toutes ces sommités. Nous sommes des gens ordinaires. Vous et moi sommes des gens ordinaires. Nous sommes parvenus ici grâce à une élection. Ce processus ne nommera pas de gens ordinaires au Sénat, sinon pour la forme.

Le président:

Merci, David. Merci, madame la ministre.

Le temps est écoulé pour la série de questions. Nous passons maintenant à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Nous passons d'un David à un autre.

Monsieur le président, je vais partager mon temps de parole avec mon ancien patron, l'ancien porte-parole en matière de réforme démocratique, Scott Simms.

J'aimerais parler un peu du rôle très important, selon moi, du Sénat. À mon avis, le Sénat est une institution fort précieuse et je crois qu'il est très important que ce pays ait une entité constituée de personnes qui n'ont pas à craindre pour leur emploi et leur réélection, de sorte qu'elles puissent prendre ce que j'appelle une seconde décision objective. En anglais, on dit sobre, mais cela n'a rien à voir avec l'alcool, David. Je blague.

La Constitution rend obligatoire l'existence du Sénat. Nous ne pouvons y échapper à moins de tenir un gros et fantastique débat constitutionnel, comme il s'en est déjà vu plusieurs en ce pays, au grand plaisir de tous. Je me demande si vous pourriez parler de l'importance de la Constitution dans ce processus et de comment nous arrivons à demeurer à l'intérieur de ses limites tout en apportant un changement réel et significatif au Sénat, ou plutôt à la façon d'y être nommé.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Monsieur le président, nous sommes convaincus que ce nouveau processus fonctionne à l'intérieur des paramètres de la Constitution et de la décision de la Cour suprême. Je suis entourée de personnes brillantes qui m'assurent que c'est le cas. Nous maintenons l'indépendance du premier ministre et du gouverneur général dans ce processus. Les changements que nous avons apportés n'ont pas d'incidence sur les exigences constitutionnelles; nous avons simplement amélioré les critères. Le processus de nomination est public, transparent et fondé sur le mérite. Je crois que cela résume le gros du changement apporté, et le calibre des personnes nommées nous permettra d'en constater le résultat.

Je crois comprendre que vous vous amusez beaucoup à ce comité et qu'il s'agit là d'un sujet dont vous avez déjà parlé.

Ian, aimeriez-vous vous faire part de vos réflexions sur ce point?

M. Ian McCowan (sous-secrétaire du Cabinet, Législation et planification parlementaire et appareil gouvernemental, Bureau du Conseil privé):

Comme l'a indiqué la ministre, je crois, la proposition a été élaborée en gardant à l'esprit la décision de la Cour suprême du Canada à l'égard du renvoi concernant le Sénat. Un certain nombre d'indicateurs importants ont été énoncés et cela fait partie intégrante du cadre des propositions en question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Vous avez écoulé 2 minutes et 43 secondes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne veux pas trop empiéter sur le temps de Scott, car c'est un bon intervenant.

Nous entendons dire abondamment que le Sénat devrait être élu ou aboli. Voyez-vous un avantage à avoir un Sénat élu? D'après moi, un Sénat élu devrait affirmer son rôle et ses fonctions et, par conséquent, il rivaliserait avec la Chambre des communes plutôt que d'en être le complément. Êtes-vous d'accord avec moi?

(1140)

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Je viens d'un endroit où l'on rêve d'avoir des institutions démocratiques comme les nôtres. Ce que nous avons est excellent, mais ce pourrait être beaucoup mieux. Tandis que nous apportons diverses réformes, nous aurions intérêt à maintenir certains aspects fondamentaux du système actuel, notamment le rôle particulier du Sénat d'offrir un second examen objectif sans avoir à s'inquiéter de la prochaine élection.

J'aimerais parler de la participation des gens ordinaires au processus, car je crois que c'est très important. Les gens ordinaires n'ont peut-être pas l'appétit que nous avons pour trouver les moyens et le courage de se porter candidat à une charge publique. Combien de gens ont postulé pour l'emploi que vous et moi occupons? Peu de gens trouvent attirant le processus de mener une campagne. Nous allons ouvrir le processus à tous les Canadiens de sorte que même ceux qui ne trouvent pas excitante l'idée de se porter candidat à un poste élu puissent y être inclus.

M. David Graham:

Merci de votre leadership dans ce dossier.

Je cède la parole à Scott.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Merci, madame la ministre. Il est bon de vous revoir.

Chaque fois que nous nous engageons dans ce dialogue, nous en venons toujours, à la base, aux noms de certaines personnes, en raison de leur comportement.

Je ne vous regarde pas directement, monsieur. Je parle métaphoriquement. Vous vous trouvez tout simplement dans mon champ de vision.

M. Scott Reid:

Je me demande simplement où vous voulez en venir.

M. Scott Simms:

Nous connaissons les noms qui ont déjà été mentionnés, les Brazeau et Mac Harb de ce monde.

Prenons un instant pour parler des gens qui ont fait vraiment du bon travail. Parlons, comme la ministre l'a suggéré, de Roméo Dallaire. Parlons de Hugh Segal, qui a fait un travail extraordinaire. Parlons de Michael Kirby, dont les rapports sur la santé sont cités dans les établissements partout au pays, sans exception. Ces gens étaient à l'origine des gens ordinaires, David. Ce sont des gens ordinaires qui ont fait un travail remarquable et qui continuent de faire un travail remarquable dans tous ces endroits.

Je dirais aux gens que ce processus va dans ce sens.

Aux dernières élections, et j'arrive à ma question, trois options nous étaient offertes: celle dont nous parlons ici en ce moment, l'élection du Sénat et l'abolition du Sénat.

Cela dit, en avril 2014, la Cour suprême était plutôt catégorique à l'égard de vos souhaits. L'opposition n'a mobilisé aucune des provinces pour élire ou abolir le Sénat. C'est devenu une campagne sur Twitter avec le mot-clic #duplicité. J'en suis légèrement choqué, car je crois que toute cette histoire fait preuve de duplicité. Le plan n'a pas été bien pensé.

Ce plan.... et j'arrive à ma question. Lorsque le processus de nomination a été annoncé, beaucoup de gens nous ont critiqués, affirmant que nous aussi, nous devions ouvrir la Constitution pour mettre en oeuvre ce processus. Or, ce n'est pas le cas. N'est-ce pas, madame la ministre?

Le président:

Vous avez 15 secondes, madame la ministre.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Non, ce n'est pas le cas.

Le président:

Cela suffit.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Richards.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre, je vous remercie de votre présence aujourd'hui. Je suis content que vous ayez enfin pu accorder la priorité au Comité dans votre horaire.

Je vais commencer par une question. Je présume que vous êtes d'accord pour dire que la capacité des Canadiens d'exercer leur droit de vote et d'avoir voix au chapitre dans une élection est une partie importante de la démocratie.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Est-ce votre question?

M. Blake Richards:

Je présume que vous appuyez cet énoncé.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

J'estime que les Canadiens devraient voter en plus grand nombre.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord, c'est bien. Je suis ravi d'entendre que vous estimez qu'il s'agit d'une valeur importante dans notre démocratie parce que 309 587 Albertains ont eu la chance de voter pour un homme nommé Mike Shaikh, en Alberta, pour qu'il les représente en tant que sénateur lorsque le prochain siège vacant au Sénat sera comblé. Cela est conforme à une longue tradition. En 1989, Stan Waters a été élu par les gens de l'Alberta, puis, en 1990, il a été nommé au Sénat.

Ensuite, en 1998, Bert Brown et Ted Morton ont été choisis par les Albertains, mais malheureusement, le gouvernement libéral de l'époque n'en a pas tenu compte. Puis, en 2004, Bert Brown, a été élu, pour ensuite être nommé au Sénat en 2007, suivi de Betty Unger, qui a été nommée en 2012. En 2012, un autre processus de sélection sénatoriale a eu lieu en Alberta, et la personne retenue a été Doug Black, qui a été nommé en 2013. Enfin, Scott Tannas a été nommé plus tard en 2013.

Le prochain siège vacant au Sénat pour l'Alberta devrait être conféré à Mike Shaikh. Comme je l'ai dit, il a été élu par plus de 309 000 Albertains, ce qui, je ferai remarquer, représente plus de voix qu'en ont cumulé collectivement les membres du présent comité aux dernières élections.

Certes, comme vous l'avez indiqué au comité sénatorial, et comme votre secrétaire parlementaire l'a indiqué en réponse à ma question à la Chambre des communes, certains croient que cette façon de faire n'est pas fondée sur le mérite.

Je dois demander: comment pouvez-vous ne pas percevoir comme étant fondé sur le mérite le choix d'une personne par 300 000 Albertains dans le cadre d'un processus de sélection sénatoriale légitime? Comment pouvez-vous dire à ces 309 000 Albertains qui ont voté pour Mike Shaikh, que leur opinion et leur vote ne sont pas fondés sur le mérite? Je ne comprends tout simplement pas cela.

(1145)

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Commençons par le premier principe, selon lequel ni vous ni moi ni quiconque en cette salle n'a la prérogative constitutionnelle qu'a le premier ministre de conseiller le gouverneur général à savoir qui considérer pour les postes au Sénat. C'est le premier principe duquel nous partons.

Deuxièmement, je suis certaine que M. Shaikh est un Canadien exceptionnel qui contribue de manière extraordinaire à la province de l'Alberta, et je l'en félicite. La prochaine ouverture, le prochain siège vacant pour l'Alberta se libérera en 2018, si je ne m'abuse. Le processus que nous avons instauré permettra à tous les Canadiens, des Canadiens ordinaires qui ont fait des choses extraordinaires dans leur vie, de poser leur candidature pour une nomination au Sénat.

Cela signifie que les gens qui n'ont pas les moyens de s'engager dans ce qui peut se révéler une campagne électorale onéreuse sont inclus dans ce processus. Cela signifie que les personnes qui n'ont peut-être pas le désir que vous et moi avons eu de frapper aux portes pour nous faire élire sont incluses dans ce processus.

D'ici quelques semaines seulement, nous ouvrirons le processus à l'ensemble des Canadiens. Je suis impatiente de voir M. Shaikh et n'importe qui d'autre de l'Alberta soumettre leur candidature au comité consultatif et au premier ministre.

M. Blake Richards:

Je vous remercie de votre réponse, mais cela n'a rien à voir avec Mike Shaikh; cela a à voir avec les Albertains, avec leur choix, avec leur droit de choisir démocratiquement leur représentant. Les anciens premiers ministres respectaient cela. Il est vraiment malheureux que le premier ministre actuel ne respectera pas ce choix.

Passons à la prochaine question, car je doute que j'obtiendrai une réponse différente au sujet de l'importance de l'élection démocratique et de l'irrespect des Albertains.

Dans votre exposé, vous avez indiqué que vous aviez reçu une liste de noms de l'Ontario et du Québec. Vous avez omis le Manitoba, qui a pourtant aussi un siège au comité. De toute évidence, le gouvernement manitobain a indiqué qu'il n'était pas intéressé à faire partie du processus. Je suppose que j'ai deux questions. Premièrement, comment ont été choisis les deux représentants du Manitoba au sein du comité consultatif, puisque le Manitoba n'a pas voulu participer au processus? Deuxièmement, avez-vous reçu une liste du Manitoba et, dans la négative, quand vous attendez-vous à la recevoir? Pourquoi ce retard?

Le président:

Répondez brièvement, madame la ministre.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

J'ai eu des entretiens très productifs et positifs avec mes collègues du Manitoba, et je comprends et respecte les raisons pour lesquelles ils ne peuvent pas participer à la phase de transition. Cela dit, je suis impatiente de collaborer avec eux dans ce dossier ainsi que dans d'autres dossiers à l'avenir.

Comme nous l'avons indiqué au début du processus, dans le cas où une province ou un territoire ne pouvait participer à la nomination des membres spéciaux du comité, nous nous chargerions de les nommer, et c'est ce que nous avons fait. Nous avons trouvé deux Manitobaines exceptionnelles, et ces deux femmes incroyables servent bien leur province. Nous sommes ravis d'entendre que les dirigeants du Manitoba approuvent également ce choix.

(1150)

Le président:

Merci, madame la ministre.

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre, d'être venue devant le Comité. Je vous remercie également de votre travail et de votre dévouement pour améliorer la confiance des Canadiens envers nos institutions démocratiques.

Je constate que vous n'avez pas eu la chance de répondre à la question de mon collègue M. Simms au sujet de la Constitution. Alors, si vous le souhaitez, je peux vous donner un moment pour y répondre avant de poser mes questions.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Nous sommes convaincus que le processus respecte le cadre constitutionnel. D'ailleurs, je tiens à assurer à chacun ici présent ainsi qu'aux téléspectateurs que toutes nos décisions en tant que gouvernement sont guidées par la Constitution et la Charte des droits et libertés. Nous respectons nos institutions démocratiques, y compris la Cour suprême du Canada. Il est réconfortant de voir que nous sommes tous sur la même longueur d'onde.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci.

J'aimerais savoir comment, selon vous, ce processus améliorera le fonctionnement des comités du Sénat ainsi que la collégialité, l'indépendance et l'impartialité du Sénat. Comme nous le savons, traditionnellement, le Sénat a toujours été perçu comme étant plus collégial, et les sénateurs comme ne suivant pas toujours la ligne de leur parti politique. Or, ces dernières années, cela a quelque peu diminué.

Ce processus de sélection des sénateurs est du jamais vu. Déjà, le premier ministre a rendu les sénateurs libéraux indépendants et non assujettis à la discipline de parti. Les nouveaux sénateurs qui seront prochainement nommés seront également indépendants, non assujettis à la discipline de parti, et ne seront pas nommés seulement à la discrétion du premier ministre sans consultation. Selon vous, en quoi cela améliorera-t-il et rehaussera-t-il le ton du débat au Sénat?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Merci de votre question. Le ton est en soi un important indicateur de réussite.

Avant d'aller dans les détails, il est important de reconnaître que nous, la Chambre basse, travaillons à l'intérieur de certaines limites pour ce qui est de notre relation avec le Sénat. Le Sénat est maître de ses propres règles, du fonctionnement de ses comités, de sa conduite et de ses propres activités. Nous n'avons pas le pouvoir de les leur dicter.

Ce que nous pouvons faire, c'est créer un processus de nomination qui accorde la préséance au mérite plutôt qu'au favoritisme et l'ouvrir à tous les Canadiens, de sorte que des gens qui n'auraient peut-être pas été considérés pour ces postes puissent l'être et que le processus puisse ainsi refléter la diversité du Canada.

En outre, nous croyons que réduire la partisanerie et encourager l'indépendance signifiera que les sénateurs auront plus confiance et seront plus à l'aise de servir le meilleur intérêt des Canadiens, plutôt que ceux d'un parti politique. Je crois que c'est là une grande victoire pour la démocratie canadienne.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

J'aimerais revenir sur vos observations concernant la diversité, car nous savons tous que la politique publique en bénéficie lorsque les voix sont nombreuses à la table et qu'elles reflètent différentes expériences de vie et divers horizons. Comme vous l'avez mentionné en parlant des critères, le processus nous permettra d'aller chercher des gens qui possèdent différents genres d'expériences de vie et différentes perspectives. Est-ce là une autre chose qui, selon vous, améliorera le débat au Sénat?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Je crois fermement que, lorsque l'on rassemble des gens de divers horizons pour prendre des décisions au nom des Canadiens de tous les horizons, alors le ton, la nature du débat, la longueur des délibérations en sont rehaussés, et les différentes perspectives qui n'étaient peut-être pas incluses par le passé sont tous présentes, ce qui produit de meilleurs résultats pour les Canadiens, c'est-à-dire que nous mettons en oeuvre de meilleurs programmes et de meilleures politiques.

Je suis fière de faire partie d'un gouvernement qui reconnaît cela. Je suis fière de servir un premier ministre qui en est conscient. Non seulement il a promis aux Canadiens qu'il tiendrait compte de la diversité hommes-femmes, linguistique, ethnique et culturelle dans les nominations à son Cabinet, il l'a prouvé en nommant un Cabinet équilibré hommes-femmes.

L'un des critères auquel nous avons demandé au comité consultatif de porter une attention particulière, et une chose à laquelle le premier ministre accordera une attention sérieuse lorsqu'il formulera ses recommandations au gouverneur général, c'est justement cela. Nous savons que lorsque nous ajoutons des femmes et que nous incluons des gens de divers groupes culturels dans les dialogues que nous tenons à la Chambre et dans l'autre endroit, cela ne peut qu'améliorer les résultats pour les Canadiens. Voilà une façon dont nous pouvons être un chef de file mondial en montrant comment une démocratie forte peut fonctionner. Je crois également qu'il s'agit de notre responsabilité en tant que Canadiens.

(1155)

Le président:

Je vais maintenant donner la parole à M. Schmale pour une série de questions de cinq minutes.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre. Il est bon de vous revoir. Pour ceux qui ne le savent pas, nous partageons une frontière et nous partageons le comté de Peterborough. Je suis impatient de continuer de collaborer avec vous dans les divers dossiers qui nous intéressent, et il est bon de vous voir dans ces fonctions.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Merci, monsieur.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je suis ravi de vous voir.

Vous avez dit quelque chose qui a piqué ma curiosité. En parlant d'élections, vous avez dit que certaines personnes peuvent être découragées à l'idée de rencontrer l'électorat, les personnes qui peuvent les élire à un corps législatif.

J'ai trouvé cela curieux parce que nous savons que les sénateurs, comme l'ont mentionné maintes fois MM. Christopherson et Reid, sont moins nombreux et possèdent plus de pouvoirs que les députés de la Chambre des communes.

Emmett Macfarlane, le concepteur à l'origine du processus que nous utilisons, a dit: « Servir au Sénat devrait être le résultat d'un appel auquel on répond, et non d'un appel que l'on fait. »

J'ai fait le rapprochement. Pourquoi est-il plus facile pour les aspirants sénateurs de présenter une lettre au premier ministre réclamant une nomination plutôt que de frapper aux portes, d'écouter les gens et de rencontrer les citoyens qu'ils espèrent représenter?

M. David Christopherson:

Bravo!

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Premièrement, j'aimerais remercier le député de son leadership en vue de sensibiliser le public à la SLA. Le travail que vous faites avec votre collègue Greg Fergus est admirable et je vous en remercie. Je suis impatiente de servir les gens de Peterborough—Kawartha avec vous.

Nul Canadien ne pourra écrire une lettre au premier ministre et être nommé au Sénat. Ce n'est pas ainsi que le processus fonctionne. Les Canadiens pourront poser leur candidature, et un comité consultatif indépendant évaluera leurs qualifications et formulera des recommandations non exécutoires au premier ministre.

Les gens ne vont pas simplement écrire une lettre au premier ministre et espérer qu'il dise oui. Cela a peut-être déjà fonctionné ainsi, mais ce n'est certainement pas ainsi que cela va fonctionner à l'avenir.

J'estime que le fait de pouvoir participer à une élection, surtout en tant que candidat, est un grand privilège, et j'ai beaucoup de respect pour le processus en soi. Or, ce processus se veut inclusif et doit respecter le cadre constitutionnel. Dans cet esprit d'inclusion, prenons un instant pour réfléchir. Je sais que beaucoup d'entre nous n'en avons pas eu l'occasion, parce que c'est la course folle depuis le 19 octobre.

Pensons à combien peut coûter une campagne électorale. Pensons au privilège que nous avons, en tant que personnes non handicapées, de pouvoir sortir et faire du porte-à-porte et de pouvoir nous tenir debout à divers événements. Prenons un instant pour réfléchir à ce grand privilège et reconnaître que ce n'est pas tout le monde qui a les moyens de participer à une campagne électorale potentiellement dispendieuse, que ce n'est pas tout le monde qui a la capacité physique de faire du porte-à-porte.

Cela ne signifie pas que les personnes qui ne peuvent pas faire ces choses ne sont pas liées à leur communauté, qu'elles ne servent pas le meilleur intérêt de leur région. Le processus est ouvert et crée des règles du jeu équitables à l'intérieur du cadre constitutionnel. Il permettra à tous les Canadiens de tous les horizons, de divers statuts sociéconomiques et ayant divers handicaps, qualités exceptionnelles et capacités de poser leur candidature pour une nomination au Sénat. Je crois que nous pouvons tous être extrêmement fiers de cela.

(1200)

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je dirais que tous ont la même chance pour la vente de cartes de membre. Cela ne coûte rien et cela fait partie du processus.

Je remarque que nous parlons beaucoup de transparence et d'ouverture, ce qui est bien. Vous avez changé le processus, mais au fond, tout ce que vous avez fait, c'est d'ajouter un autre processus décisionnel, à un autre niveau. Les noms qui sont présentés à ce comité consultatif sont gardés secrets et ceux qui sont présentés au premier ministre le sont aussi.

Vous donnez la chance à tous ceux qui sont admissibles de présenter leur candidature plutôt que de laisser le Cabinet du premier ministre prendre cette décision ou proposer des noms, ce qui est une bonne chose. Toutefois, nous ne savons pas qui a présenté sa candidature, quels sont les noms ou quelles sont les personnes envisagées pour les nominations. Si le premier ministre choisit une telle personne, alors quelles sont les autres qui n'ont pas été choisies et pourquoi ne l'ont-elles pas été?

À mon avis, ce n'est qu'un niveau de plus et la décision se prend en coulisse. On dit que ce n'est pas le cas, mais je ne vois pas d'autre chose que la possibilité de présenter sa candidature. En quoi est-ce différent? Qu'est-ce qu'on fait en avant du rideau?

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Voici ce qu'on fait. Par le passé, il n'y aurait pas eu de conversation comme celle-ci avec le comité au sujet du processus de nomination au Sénat, parce que pour être franche, le processus n'était pas du tout ouvert au public. Soit dit avec le plus grand respect, ce processus apporte plus de changements et d'améliorations que tout autre processus de nomination au Sénat.

À quoi ressemblait le processus lorsque le gouvernement précédent a nommé près de 60 sénateurs? Voilà la différence.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, madame la ministre, je ne suis pas d'accord. Nous avons tenu des élections en Alberta.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

La différence, c'est que les critères d'évaluation se fondent sur le mérite et non sur le favoritisme politique.

M. Jamie Schmale:

J'ajouterais que plusieurs sénateurs affichent un impressionnant curriculum vitae.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Schmale. Nous n'avons plus de temps.

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre, de votre présence. Je suis certain que nous aurons d'autres conversations à ce sujet.

L’hon. Maryam Monsef:

Je le ferais si je le pouvais.

Merci beaucoup. Merci de votre bon travail.

Le président:

Nous allons suspendre la séance pour quelques minutes.

(1200)

(1205)

Le président:

Notre comité est très productif. Nous avons beaucoup à faire, alors nous allons reprendre.

Nous avons deux points très importants à examiner pour notre rapport sur la Chambre des communes propice à la vie de famille: les observations des caucus et la liste des témoins. Nous pourrons décider plus tard si nous parlerons des témoins à huis clos, ce que nous faisons habituellement. Toutefois, je propose d'entendre les observations des caucus en premier parce que la whip du NPD est ici pour présenter le rapport de son caucus et je crois qu'elle préfère procéder ainsi pour qu'elle puisse ensuite s'acquitter d'autres tâches.

(1210)

M. Scott Reid:

Est-ce en public ou à huis clos?

Le président:

Elle ne voit pas d'inconvénient à faire cela en public.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Le président:

Voyez-vous un inconvénient à ce que le rapport du caucus soit présenté en public?

Des voix: Non.

Le président: Par égard pour les whips — je sais que vous êtes très occupés —, si le Comité accepte, nous pourrions vous entendre en premier. [Français]

Mme Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet (Hochelaga, NPD):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président. Je vous en suis très reconnaissante.

Je vais lire mon rapport en français.

Au NPD, nous avons décidé de travailler sur plusieurs fronts en même temps pour améliorer la conciliation travail-famille. Mon équipe et moi, en tant que whip, avons travaillé à établir certaines choses qui amélioreraient la vie des députés. Nous avons déjà accompli certaines choses et d'autres sont en cours. Je vais donc vous parler de ce que nous avons fait et de ce qui s'en vient.

J'ai rencontré, en compagnie de Theresa Kavanagh, le Président de la Chambre et M. Marc Bosc. Nous avions plusieurs demandes à leur faire et ils ont eu une très bonne réaction. Il y a une très bonne collaboration de la présidence de la Chambre, et j'en suis fort heureuse. Ils ont acquiescé à la plupart des demandes.

Plusieurs démarches ont été entreprises et d'autres s'en viennent. L'une d'elles concerne le stationnement et les espaces réservés aux femmes enceintes ou aux jeunes familles. Trois espaces ont déjà été réservés: un à l'arrière de l'édifice du Centre, un à l'édifice de la Confédération et un à l'édifice de la Justice. Ils ont déjà été désignés à l'aide de vignettes. C'est l'une des choses que nous avons accomplies.

Il y a aussi des problèmes liés à la garderie. Par exemple, elle n'accepte pas les bébés de moins de 18 mois. De plus, quand les parents veulent laisser leurs enfants à temps partiel seulement, c'est un problème. Ce problème est difficile à résoudre, mais entretemps, les gens des ressources humaines ont dit qu'ils aideraient les jeunes parents à trouver une nounou pour les bébés. Il y a de l'aide de ce côté-là aussi.

Nous avons aussi fait une demande importante, à savoir une salle dédiée aux parents de jeunes enfants. Nous sommes très heureux d'avoir eu une réponse positive à cet égard. Une salle a donc été réservée au 6e étage de l'édifice du Centre. Elle n'est pas encore aménagée, mais cela viendra. Il y aura un parc ou une couchette pour que l'enfant puisse dormir, une table à langer, un frigo, un micro-ondes et une chaise haute. Il y aura aussi un espace de travail pour le parent pendant les débats de la Chambre.

Même si c'est le NPD qui a fait ces démarches, tout cela s'adresse aux parents de tous les partis. Évidemment, s'il y a six parents pour partager une pièce, il faudra peut-être retourner voir la présidence de la Chambre pour voir s'il serait possible d'obtenir plus d'espace, mais pour l'instant, c'est une pièce qui sera bien utile.

Nous avons aussi discuté des mêmes besoins dans l'édifice de l'Ouest. À un moment donné, nous allons quitter l'édifice du Centre et la Chambre siégera dans l'édifice de l'Ouest. Il ne faut pas oublier qu'il devra y avoir les mêmes aménagements dans l'édifice de l'Ouest lorsque le Parlement y siégera. Quand nous reviendrons à l'édifice du Centre, ce sera le moment de planifier ce genre de choses à une meilleure échelle. Nous l'avons aussi mentionné au Président de la Chambre et à M. Bosc.

Nous avons discuté de plein d'autres choses, par exemple de l'accès à des collations saines après la fermeture des cafétérias dans les autres bâtiments. À l'édifice de la Confédération et à l'édifice de la Justice, il y a des machines distributrices où l'on peut acheter des croustilles ou des aliments de ce genre, mais pour une maman qui allaite ou qui est enceinte, ce n'est pas la meilleure nourriture qui soit. Il faudrait donc s'assurer qu'il y a de la nourriture saine. Ce sera bon pour tout le monde, et pas seulement pour les parents.

Nous avons aussi demandé des chaises hautes pour les jeunes bébés. Celles dans le restaurant du Parlement, par exemple, ne sont pas adaptées à un bébé de 6 mois, qui pourrait en tomber. Nous avons donc besoin de chaises hautes mieux adaptées pour les petits bébés.

Nous avons aussi noté que, à l'édifice de la Confédération, sur le côté, là où les autobus arrivent, l'accès prévu pour les gens ayant un handicap ou qui ont une poussette est fermé après 20 heures. Donc, les parents avec une poussette ou les personnes en fauteuil roulant qui arrivent sur le côté n'ont pas d'accès pour entrer. Il faudrait qu'ils passent par l'avant, où il y a seulement des escaliers, ce qui ne fonctionne pas. Il n'y a pas d'interphone non plus. Nous l'avons souligné au Président.

Il faudrait aussi qu'il y ait un passage pour piétons à l'édifice de la Confédération. Nous avons un espace réservé, mais à la porte de côté dont je viens de parler, il n'y a pas de passage pour piétons. Il y a beaucoup de voitures qui y circulent et c'est dangereux.

(1215)



Voici la dernière chose. Nous avons confirmé au Président de la Chambre que les votes qui ont lieu tout de suite après la période des questions sont très populaires auprès des jeunes familles, parce que cela concentre les heures de travail. Les parents ne sont pas obligés de partir et de revenir travailler plus tard en soirée.

Cela complète mon rapport. Comme vous le voyez, ce sont des choses concrètes pour assurer le bien-être des parents et des enfants au jour le jour. Je suis très heureuse que cela ait aussi bien fonctionné et que nous ayons eu un aussi bon accueil de la part du Président de la Chambre. [Traduction]

Le président:

Pour le procès-verbal, c'était Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet, whip du NPD, qui présentait le rapport.

Nous souhaitons également la bienvenue à Sheila Malcolmson pour le reste de la réunion du Comité.

Je ne sais pas si vous aviez des questions ou si quelqu'un d'autre du NPD voulait ajouter quelque chose avant que nous passions aux autres partis.

Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez la parole.

M. David Christopherson:

Je propose d'entendre les deux autres caucus d'abord puis de voir si nous sommes d'accord ou s'il y a des divergences. Dans ce cas, nous pourrions en discuter.

Le président:

Est-ce que cela vous va?

Des voix: Oui.

Le président: D'accord, passons aux conservateurs.

M. Blake Richards:

Je vais être assez bref.

Étant donné l'étendue et la profondeur des propositions et comme nous avons entendu de nouvelles suggestions et idées dans le rapport de la whip du NPD, notre caucus a eu beaucoup de difficulté à émettre une opinion sur les propositions qui sont plutôt considérables et variées, disons. De toute évidence, il y a de nombreux facteurs que nous n'avons pas encore étudiés. Certains entraîneraient des coûts importants. Il pourrait y avoir des conséquences imprévues.

Notre caucus souhaiterait que le Comité précise les propositions ou les domaines avant d'émettre des commentaires.

Nous avons beaucoup entendu parler, notamment dans les médias, de la possibilité de ne pas siéger le vendredi. Une chose est claire: notre caucus n'appuierait pas une telle idée.

M. David Christopherson:

Désolé, vous avez dit que vous appuyez cette idée ou non?

M. Blake Richards:

Nous ne pourrions pas appuyer cette idée.

Que ce soit au nom de la famille ou pour toute autre raison, nous n'accepterions pas une mesure qui éliminerait la responsabilité du gouvernement envers la Chambre des communes. C'est dans cette optique que nous aborderions toutes les questions. Si une mesure semble éliminer la responsabilité du gouvernement envers la Chambre des communes, nous ne l'accepterons pas.

Mais en ce qui a trait aux autres propositions, nous aimerions avoir plus de renseignements sur la démarche du Comité et obtenir l'avis d'experts sur les coûts, sur les conséquences imprévues et sur d'autres répercussions des propositions. On a dit beaucoup de choses et lancé de nombreuses idées.

Je crois qu'il vaudrait mieux que le Comité précise certaines choses avant que nous fassions d'autres commentaires.

Le président:

D'accord.

La parole est maintenant à Mme Vandenbeld du Parti libéral.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous avons étudié la question en profondeur. Nous avons réalisé un sondage auprès des membres du caucus et avons obtenu un bon taux de participation. Les chiffres dont je vais vous parler sont donc assez représentatifs.

On discute beaucoup de la question de façon anecdotique et certaines personnes disent qu'elle ne touche pas beaucoup de monde parce que peu d'entre nous ont des enfants. Nous avons décidé d'examiner les chiffres pour voir dans quelle mesure cela touche les membres de notre caucus. Je vais passer en revue les résultats de notre sondage parce que je crois qu'ils sont très révélateurs et représentatifs et qu'ils pourraient orienter les travaux du Comité.

Nous avons demandé aux députés combien d'enfants ils ont. Parmi les députés qui ont répondu au sondage, 78 % sont des parents, 17 % n'ont pas d'enfant et 10 % ont dit qu'ils attendaient un enfant ou qu'ils voulaient en avoir. La raison pour laquelle on arrive à 105 % est que 5 % des gens qui ont des enfants ont également dit qu'ils voulaient en avoir d'autres. Cela signifie que 10 % des membres de notre caucus pourraient avoir des enfants au cours de leur mandat.

En ce qui a trait à l'âge, 47 % des députés qui ont répondu au sondage ont des enfants de moins de 16 ans. Donc, environ la moitié des 78 % ont des enfants à charge, de jeunes enfants qui ont besoin de plus de soins. En ce qui a trait au nombre d'enfants, 39 % des répondants ont deux enfants, 14 % en ont un, 17 % en ont trois et 6 % en ont plus de quatre.

Soit dit en passant, j'ai parlé à un de mes collègues, qui a six enfants. Il vit dans une région rurale et très éloignée et il m'a parlé des difficultés auxquelles il est confronté, surtout lorsqu'il est question de faire venir sa famille à Ottawa. Il utilise presque tous ses points de voyage pour une seule visite. Je crois que les chefs de grandes familles souhaiteraient avoir droit à certains accommodements, de sorte qu'ils puissent faire venir leur famille à Ottawa de temps en temps.

Fait intéressant, près de 6 % des membres du caucus ont dit qu'ils attendaient un enfant. Il s'agit d'une déclaration volontaire, mais environ 60 % des membres du caucus ont répondu au sondage. Cela donne une bonne idée. De plus, 5 % des membres se préparent à avoir des enfants, alors cela devrait être imminent.

En ce qui a trait aux autres questions sur les services aux enfants, 89 % des répondants étaient d'avis que les services de garde devraient être plus souples. Lorsqu'on leur a demandé si la garderie devait être déplacée dans l'édifice du Centre ou dans l'édifice de l'Ouest si c'est là que nous siégerons, 80 % des répondants ont fait valoir que la garderie devait être dans l'édifice où les députés passent la majeure partie de leur temps. À l'heure actuelle, cela signifie l'édifice du Centre. Lorsque la Chambre siégera dans l'édifice de l'Ouest, ce sera dans cet édifice. D'après ce que je comprends, la garderie se situe près de l'édifice de la Justice ou de l'édifice de la Confédération. C'est plutôt loin pour ceux qui veulent aller voir leurs enfants.

On a aussi beaucoup parlé de la souplesse d'utilisation de la garderie, notamment des heures d'ouverture et du fait qu'il est impossible de l'utiliser de façon intermittente. La famille de six qui vient ici une semaine puis retourne chez elle trois semaines ne peut pas utiliser les services de la garderie parce qu'ils sont offerts de façon permanente seulement. Cette question a suscité de nombreuses discussions. La garderie devrait s'adapter à la réalité des députés.

Je souligne que nous avons uniquement sondé les députés. Nous n'avons pas sondé le personnel. Leurs réponses seraient peut-être différentes. Il sera très important d'obtenir l'opinion des membres du personnel au fil de cette étude, peut-être par l'entremise d'un sondage similaire, parce qu'ils sont à Ottawa en permanence. Ce serait très différent.

(1220)



Les restrictions alimentaires ont été soulevées dans le cadre de la discussion sur un Parlement inclusif et la conciliation travail-famille. Je suis très heureuse que ma collègue du NPD en ait fait part à titre d'obstacle. Nous avons posé une question à ce sujet dans notre sondage. Parmi les membres de notre caucus, 8 % ont des allergies alimentaires.

Je ne passerai pas en détail chacune d'elles. Nous avons les pourcentages pour les personnes intolérantes au lactose, celles qui ont un régime faible en cholestérol, etc. Je crois que les plus importants sont les suivants: 8 % des répondants sont végétariens ou végétaliens, 3 % suivent un régime casher et 7 % suivent un régime halal. Nous travaillons pendant de très longues heures et nous ne pouvons pas quitter la salle de comité ou la Chambre si nous y siégeons, donc les seuls aliments disponibles peuvent être ou ne pas être... Cela revient au caractère inclusif du Parlement.

En ce qui a trait à la réforme de la Chambre, lorsqu'on leur a demandé de répondre par oui ou par non à la question — je sais que le Comité en a discuté plus en détail —, la majorité des membres du caucus, soit environ les trois quarts, ont répondu qu'ils souhaitaient éliminer la séance du vendredi. Ils n'ont pas pu discuter des chambres parallèles ou d'autres méthodes, mais ce qui est intéressant est que le même nombre de personnes — 76 % — a dit qu'il fallait rattraper le temps perdu d'une autre façon.

Je crois que c'est très important. La presque totalité des personnes qui étaient d'avis qu'il fallait comprimer la semaine de travail ou trouver une façon d'éliminer les vendredis a dit qu'il ne fallait pas réduire le nombre d'heures de travaux parlementaires. Nous avons décomposé ces chiffres également. La moitié des répondants étaient d'avis qu'il fallait siéger plus longtemps les autres jours.

Lors des discussions à ce sujet, de nombreuses personnes parlaient de commencer à 9 heures plutôt qu'à 10 heures les autres jours de la semaine ou même d'ajouter deux jours... Nous avons parlé de tenir deux séances en une journée et d'autres possibilités du genre. Mais de façon générale, les répondants étaient d'avis que les membres du caucus et le gouvernement avaient besoin de temps pour faire avancer le programme et adopter les lois, et presque personne ne souhaitait éliminer les vendredis sans rattraper le temps ailleurs. Parmi les répondants, 20 % souhaitaient ajouter des jours de séance. Je crois que ces chiffres sont représentatifs également.

En passant, j'ai parlé aux députés plus âgés de notre caucus, qui disaient trouver très difficile de commencer la journée à 7 ou 8 heures et ne finir qu'à 21 ou 22 heures. Les députés les plus jeunes, quant à eux, disaient qu'ils devaient retourner dans leur circonscription pour y travailler et voir leur famille. Ils préféreraient siéger très longtemps du lundi au jeudi. C'est un sujet beaucoup plus complexe qu'il n'en a l'air. Fait intéressant, 30 % des répondants — près du tiers de notre caucus — ont dit qu'ils souhaitaient à la fois allonger les autres journées et ajouter des jours de séance supplémentaires. L'idée de modifier le calendrier a reçu passablement d'appui, mais pas nécessairement selon les façons qui ont été proposées.

Nous avons reçu plusieurs commentaires. Le sondage comportait une section ouverte. En passant, si les autres caucus souhaitent obtenir une copie du sondage, je serai heureuse de la leur donner — sans leur donner toutes les réponses — pour qu'ils sondent leurs membres ou leur personnel. Il y a eu plusieurs commentaires.

(1225)

Le président:

Si vous la remettez à la greffière, elle leur transmettra.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

D'accord, merci beaucoup, monsieur monsieur le président.

Nous avons reçu de nombreux commentaires au sujet de la réforme de la Chambre. Il y en a des dizaines et je ne vais pas les passer un par un, mais de nombreux commentaires portaient sur le chahutage et même sur les applaudissements, l'idée étant que le Parlement serait beaucoup plus convivial et amical s'il y avait moins de chahutage. Ce sont surtout des femmes qui ont fait ce commentaire. Nous voulons attirer plus de gens au Parlement et je crois que ce genre de comportement n'incite pas les femmes ni d'autres gens à se porter candidats ou à devenir députés.

Nous avons reçu des groupes d'étudiants, qui observent le comportement des députés de la Chambre, et ce n'est pas le genre de comportement encouragé par les professeurs. Samara a organisé une discussion sur Twitter. Il y avait une fille de 13 ans dans l'antichambre — la fille d'un de nos membres — et je lui ai demandé ce qu'elle en pensait. Elle m'a dit: « Si j'essayais de faire cela à mon école, mon professeur m'enlèverait des points. » Je crois que cela revient à ce qu'on veut enseigner aux jeunes qui songent à la politique. En fait, nous avons reçu de nombreux commentaires sur le décorum, le chahutage, les stratagèmes et les manoeuvres politiques.

Les commentaires sur les applaudissements m'ont quelque peu surprise. Plusieurs personnes ont fait valoir que nous gagnerions du temps si nous cessions d'ovationner les gens chaque fois qu'ils parlaient pour leur montrer notre appui, surtout pendant la période des questions, puisque nous dépassons souvent le temps prévu. Je pensais que c'était quelque chose de positif, mais cela peut nous empêcher de faire notre travail. Ce point a donc été soulevé.

L'utilisation de la téléconférence a été soulevée dans les discussions du caucus et dans les commentaires du sondage. Beaucoup de gens appuient cette idée. Nous sommes tous assis autour d'une table ici. Si l'un d'entre nous avait une urgence familiale ou quelque chose de très important à faire dans sa circonscription... Je sais que nombre de mes collègues féminines ont dû se rendre dans leur circonscription pour célébrer la Journée internationale de la femme mardi puis revenir ici. En fait, une de mes collègues a dit que son vol était à 18 heures, tout juste après l'ajournement de la Chambre. Elle s'est rendue dans sa circonscription ce soir-là et le lendemain, elle a participé à un événement à 7 heures puis à un autre à 9 heures et s'est rendue directement à l'aéroport pour revenir ici à temps pour la période des questions. Les gens doivent s'absenter. Rien n'empêcherait les comités de tenir des réunions par téléconférence. Nous permettons aux témoins de le faire, mais nous ne permettons pas à nos membres d'avoir recours à la téléconférence.

On a parlé de mieux utiliser les technologies et on a fait valoir que cette institution fonctionnait exactement de la même façon qu'il y a 150 ans. À une certaine époque, si l'on voulait parler à l'un de nos collègues, on devait prendre le train et venir à Ottawa. Aujourd'hui, nous pouvons organiser une téléconférence et nous réunir même si nous sommes dans des régions opposées du pays.

Les gens sont convaincus qu'il faut moderniser le Parlement. La plupart des entreprises... Lorsque je travaillais à l'étranger... Aux Nations unies, mon personnel se trouvait sur les cinq continents et nous communiquions principalement par Skype. Nous formions un groupe cohérent et nous nous connaissions comme si nous avions été côte à côte. C'était probablement le plus important, et je sais qu'un rapport provisoire préparé par un caucus de femmes abordait la question de la technologie. Nous pourrions donc fouiller cette question.

Nous avons aussi reçu plusieurs suggestions sur la façon d'améliorer la technologie sur la Colline, notamment par l'entremise du vote électronique. Or, 63 % des membres de notre caucus croient qu'il faut tenir le vote en personne, tandis que 30 % des membres croient que nous pourrions avoir recours à la technologie pour voter. Si vous êtes sur la Colline quelque part, vous pouvez voter, mais vous devez être dans la Cité parlementaire. Donc, par exemple, si une jeune mère s'occupe de son enfant, mais qu'elle est à Ottawa, dans la Cité parlementaire, un mécanisme pourrait lui permettre de voter.

Bien sûr, on a parlé des votes après la période des questions. Je sais que c'est ce que nous faisons.

(1230)



Je tiens à préciser, monsieur le président, qu'aucune de ces questions ne me touche personnellement. Je suis en quelque sorte la représentante idéale pour cela parce que ma belle-fille est adulte. Je n'ai pas d'enfant à charge et j'habite à Ottawa. À moins d'une tempête ou d'un bouchon de circulation, je suis chez moi en 15 minutes. Je n'évoque pas ces questions par intérêt personnel.

Certains de mes collègues du caucus ne voulaient pas parler de ces questions en public, et cela est révélateur. Ils voulaient seulement en parler en privé ou par l'entremise d'un sondage anonyme parce qu'ils craignent d'être perçus comme étant inférieurs ou comme des gens qui ne veulent pas travailler. Plusieurs personnes ont répondu au sondage en privé, mais ne voulaient pas en parler publiquement.

J'approuve certains commentaires du NPD, notamment au sujet de la salle du sixième étage.

Je ne veux pas prendre trop de temps. Nous avons beaucoup travaillé à la préparation de ce rapport et je crois qu'il était important de l'examiner en détail.

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez la parole.

M. David Christopherson:

Rapidement, je veux remercier tous les intervenants de leurs commentaires.

Je vais demander à notre whip de nous faire part de son point de vue.

J'aimerais aborder certains points. Nous allons avoir un problème avec le vendredi, parce que votre caucus était grandement intéressé à éliminer ce jour de séance, même s'il fallait rattraper le temps. Le nôtre n'était pas intéressé à l'éliminer, surtout à cause du compromis qu'il faudrait faire. L'idée de perdre des semaines dans leur constitution, de siéger plus tard ou de faire deux journées dans une, tout cela était plus problématique pour les membres de notre caucus que d'être ici le vendredi. Ce pourrait être la source d'un grand désaccord.

Je voulais aussi parler de quelque chose de personnel. En ce qui a trait à la sécurité, nous n'avons pas encore eu la chance de discuter du système d'autobus verts. Le gouvernement précédent a pratiquement décimé ce système. Il est inefficace et coûteux en terme de productivité. Nous avons dû modifier les heures de réunion des comités parce que les déplacements prennent beaucoup trop de temps. Le point que je veux soulever dans ce contexte, c'est qu'une heure après que la Chambre s'arrête, il n'y a plus d'autobus. Un grand nombre d'entre nous sont toujours en réunion dans l'édifice du Centre ou dans l'édifice de l'Est. Ce n'est pas tant pour moi, mais je pense aux autres qui doivent se déplacer à pied à 22 ou 23 heures. L'autobus nous offre un peu de sécurité. Sans les autobus, les députés se déplacent à pied sur la Colline tard le soir. Ce n'est pas très sécuritaire, surtout pour les femmes ou pour d'autres personnes qui ne sont pas à l'aise d'être dehors à cette heure, sans oublier les personnes handicapées. Plus je vieillis, plus je trouve cela difficile. La marche entre l'édifice de l'Est et le stationnement est longue.

Il y a toutes sortes d'enjeux. J'espère qu'à un moment donné, le gouvernement reverra ce système. Tout a commencé avec des mesures de réduction des coûts. On a congédié de nombreux chauffeurs, ce qui a entraîné une diminution du service. Il n'est pas efficace. Il ne dessert pas bien les députés ou le personnel. J'espère que le nouveau gouvernement reverra le système d'autobus verts pour qu'il remplisse sa mission.

Monsieur le président, je demande à ma whip de nous faire part de ce qu'elle a entendu.

Merci.

(1235)

Le président:

Allez-y. [Français]

Mme Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Il y a quelque chose qui est souvent ressorti dans les pourparlers du NPD. Quelle que soit la décision prise concernant la conciliation travail-famille, il faut prendre en compte non seulement les besoins des députés, mais également ceux de tous les gens qui travaillent avec nous, c'est-à-dire nos équipes, nos adjoints et le personnel de la Chambre des communes. C'est très important.

Le rapport de Mme Vandenbeld m'a fait penser à quelque chose au sujet des points de voyage, par exemple pour les enfants. Il y a aussi des gens qui amènent avec eux quelqu'un pour les aider à s'occuper des enfants, par exemple une grand-mère, une tante, une soeur, un frère ou autre. Pour l'instant, il n'est pas possible de rendre le système de points de voyage plus flexible pour aider les familles. [Traduction]

Le président:

Madame Vandenbeld, vous avez la parole.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je peux répondre au commentaire de M. Christopherson.

Tout d'abord, en ce qui a trait au vendredi, il n'y avait pas vraiment de consensus. Je crois que le Comité jouit d'une certaine latitude — surtout ceux qui ont de longs déplacements à faire, comme notre président — parce que nous ne sommes pas arrivés à un consensus. De plus, comme la réponse à cette question était « oui » ou « non », elle n'a pas permis d'aborder les sujets qui ont été étudiés par le Comité.

J'ai trouvé un point soulevé par certaines femmes très révélateur. Une femme a dit qu'elle a réalisé une fois arrivée ici qu'elle pouvait échanger ses vendredis et que nous n'étions pas toujours de service à la Chambre. Elle peut souvent rentrer à la maison les jeudis soir parce qu'il y a des gens comme moi qui sont heureux de siéger les vendredis. Elle a dit qu'elle ne savait pas cela avant de se porter candidate. En fait, elle a déjà abandonné l'idée de se présenter aux élections parce qu'elle avait de jeunes enfants et ne voulait pas être à l'extérieur cinq jours sur sept. Si elle avait su qu'elle pouvait rentrer chez elle les jeudis soir et parfois arriver un peu plus tard les lundis, elle aurait peut-être décidé de se présenter aux élections à cette époque.

Nous sommes tous ici et nous savons comment le tout fonctionne, mais il ne faut pas oublier l'effet dissuasif que cela a sur les jeunes familles et sur beaucoup de femmes, quand on pense aux séances du vendredi. Nous n'avons pas encore tiré de conclusion à cet effet, mais je crois qu'il faut en tenir compte.

(1240)



Je suis très heureuse que vous ayez soulevé la question de la sécurité. Lorsque des responsables de la sécurité ont comparu devant nous l'autre jour, j'ai constaté que rien n'était prévu pour les résidences des députés dans les circonscriptions. Comme je suis députée de la région d'Ottawa, il est évidemment beaucoup plus facile de me suivre du Parlement à la maison. Les choses ne sont pas aussi floues. Par exemple, certains de mes collègues ont dû faire installer chez eux des systèmes d'alarme très coûteux simplement en raison de la nature de leurs responsabilités publiques. À ce que je sache, les questions de ce genre n'ont pas fait l'objet de discussions.

En tant que femme, je dois très souvent marcher jusqu'au terrain de stationnement tard le soir. Comme vous l'avez dit, je participe parfois à des réunions qui se terminent à 22 ou 23 heures, puis je me rends à pied jusqu'au terrain de stationnement, je monte dans ma voiture et je rentre chez moi. Je pense que nous pourrions certainement discuter de la question de la sécurité, parce que notre comité est responsable du budget des dépenses des services de sécurité et que nous souhaitons que le Parlement encourage la vie de famille. Il est fort probable qu'une femme qui craint pour sa sécurité renonce à se lancer en politique. Il y aura toujours des gens qui, mécontents des décisions des titulaires d'une charge publique, chercheront à leur faire savoir d'une manière ou d'une autre. Je pense que cette situation touche probablement surtout les femmes;les hommes sont un peu moins touchés.

Je pense que cette question pourrait certainement être ajoutée à notre étude sur un Parlement inclusif. Je vous remercie de l'avoir soulevée.

M. David Christopherson:

Excellent. Je vous remercie de vos commentaires.

Le président:

David, si aucune mesure n'a été prise au sujet des autobus, vous pourriez aussi soulever cette question lorsque nous étudierons le Budget principal des dépenses. Vous pourriez aussi avertir le Président de la Chambre de votre intention de soulever cette question afin que nous puissions obtenir une réponse.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui. J'espérais avoir l'occasion de glisser un mot à ce sujet l'autre jour, mais cela me semblait peu important par rapport à l'ensemble de la question dont nous sommes saisis.

Je vous remercie de ces observations.

Le président:

Monsieur Simms, vous avez la parole.

M. Scott Simms:

Je ne suis pas sûr que mes commentaires se rapportent à ce débat, et il se peut que tout le monde en soit déjà conscient, mais je pense qu'il vaut la peine de le répéter. Lorsque nous sommes élus, nous devons prendre une décision fondamentale: vivre ici ou dans notre circonscription. Je suis sûr que bon nombre des députés ayant une famille préféreraient siéger le vendredi afin d'éviter de se faire imposer un horaire comprimé.

En prenant une décision, nous devrions éviter de mettre dans une situation précaire les députés qui choisissent d'installer leur famille à Ottawa. Cela pourrait se produire, quoique la très grande majorité d'entre eux souhaitent peut-être ne pas siéger le vendredi parce que leur famille habite dans leur circonscription.

Je pense que nous devrions d'abord déterminer si la famille de la plupart des députés vit à Ottawa ou dans la circonscription, puis établir des règles ou les modifier en conséquence.

Le président:

Vous avez la parole, monsieur Graham.

M. David Graham:

Pour ce qui est des séances du vendredi, nous allons devoir défendre notre position auprès de nos caucus et de nos collègues. Il n'y a pas de réponse évidente. Que nous décidions de conserver ou d'éliminer les séances du vendredi, nous allons devoir défendre notre position. Ce sera très exigeant, et il y aura beaucoup d'arguments, d'un côté comme de l'autre.

Selon moi, nous devons éviter de suivre l'exemple de Michael Chong, qui préconise le recours à des mesures législatives pour régler des problèmes qui pourraient être résolus par les bureaux des whips. Tant mieux si cette question peut être réglée dans le cadre des fonctions de la Chambre, et profitons-en pour aller encore plus loin au moyen de cette nouvelle option sans ambiguïté.

Pour ce qui est des autobus, j'aimerais bien que les responsables de ce service viennent discuter avec vous. Nous pouvons rendre plus accessible le service des autobus et en améliorer les itinéraires, plutôt que d'être obligés de faire le trajet à pied entre le terrain de stationnement et le Parlement. Lors d'une activité organisée au Mont-Tremblant l'autre jour, j'ai croisé la sénatrice Nancy Greene Raine. Elle m'a réprimandé parce que je songeais à prendre l'autobus. C'est un tout autre sujet, et je n'en dirai pas plus là-dessus pour l'instant.

J'ai bien hâte d'examiner directement la question des autobus. D'autres options s'offrent aussi à nous. Pourquoi les autobus ne desservent-ils pas l'aéroport le lundi matin et le jeudi soir? Nous pourrions et devrions examiner un très grand nombre de questions.

Le président:

Je prends soin de ne pas participer aux débats, mais j'aimerais simplement faire une observation. Cette année, je me suis arrangé pour ne pas avoir à siéger le vendredi. Toutefois, ce qui me pose problème, ce sont les votes le jeudi soir. Comme vous le savez, il me faut de 12 à 14 heures pour me rendre dans ma circonscription. Par conséquent, s'il y a un vote le jeudi soir, je dois remettre mon départ au lendemain. Qu'il y ait une séance ou non le vendredi, je dois tout de même voyager pendant toute cette journée.

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

Monsieur Reid, vous avez la parole.

M. Scott Reid:

Je commençais à craindre que nous ne puissions nous pencher sur d'autres questions. Je compte toujours présenter une motion visant à demander aux membres du comité consultatif de comparaître de nouveau devant nous. J'espère que nous pourrons discuter de cette motion et voter sur celle-ci aujourd'hui.

Cela dit, la question concernant les travaux du jeudi est tout à fait pertinente. Je pense qu'il serait possible de la régler en apportant un changement au Règlement. Seriez-vous d'accord pour que, le jeudi, les votes aient lieu après la période des questions? Comme aucun député ne doit autant voyager que vous pour se rendre dans sa circonscription, je pense qu'il serait très intéressant de connaître votre réponse.

(1245)

Le président:

Oui, ce serait beaucoup mieux ainsi.

Cela change tout le temps.

Je donne la parole à Mme Vandenbeld, puis à Mme Sohota.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

J'aimerais répondre au point soulevé par M. Reid. Outre les votes prévus, il faut tenir compte des motions dilatoires ou d'autres choses imprévues. C'est pour cette raison que, souvent, un certain nombre de députés doivent pouvoir se rendre sur la Colline dans un délai de 15 minutes.

Je sais qu'on peut se mettre en mode pilote automatique lors des débats d'ajournement. Nous pourrions répondre à ce besoin, même le vendredi, en veillant à ce que... Je sais que, comme la question du quorum est inscrite dans la Constitution, il est peu probable que notre comité envisage de le modifier à la baisse. Toutefois, nous pourrions nous mettre en mode pilote automatique plus souvent, notamment le vendredi, en sachant qu'il ne sera pas nécessaire de rappeler en catastrophe un certain nombre de députés à la Chambre en raison d'un vote imprévu. Je pense que c'est de plus en plus le cas maintenant.

Depuis que je siège à la Chambre, aucun vote n'a été prévu le jeudi soir. Cependant, nous devons toujours être de service à la Chambre. Un certain nombre de mes collègues m'ont parlé de cela.

M. Scott Reid:

Anita a tout à fait raison. Je n'avais pas tenu compte de cette situation.

Le jeudi, comme les partis s'adonnent à un petit jeu, il faut souvent attendre jusqu'à la dernière minute avant de savoir s'il y aura un vote impromptu ou pas.

Je ne tente pas de régler ce problème. Un changement aux règles pourrait toutefois nous permettre d'y arriver.

Le président:

Comme vous le dites, on pourrait changer les règles. Nous l'avons fait pour les séances du vendredi. Il n'y a jamais de votes le vendredi.

Madame Sahota, vous avez la parole.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je tiens simplement à souligner qu'il serait très utile qu'Anita fasse circuler les résultats de ce sondage. Je pense que les conservateurs, en particulier, pourraient en prendre connaissance, car, bien qu'il y ait beaucoup de députés conservateurs à la Chambre, nous avons entendu très peu de commentaires de leur part à ce sujet. Il est important de savoir ce que pensent les députés conservateurs. Comme Anita, j'ai l'impression que, parfois, certains députés conservateurs sont plus disposés à dire ce qu'ils pensent de manière anonyme, de crainte d'être réprimandés ou traités avec condescendance, parce que, soi-disant, ils ne souhaitent pas travailler assez fort, alors que ce n'est sûrement pas le cas.

Des articles de presse tentent déjà de déformer les faits en prétendant que nous souhaitons travailler moins d'heures. Nous voulons simplement déterminer des façons d'en arriver à une représentation satisfaisante à la Chambre et éviter de dissuader des personnes de se présenter comme candidats aux élections. C'est ce dont nous avons discuté avec la ministre. Beaucoup de gens souhaitent représenter avec fierté leurs concitoyens. Nous souhaitons parvenir à attirer ces gens. Pour ma part, j'ai discuté avec de nombreux députés conservateurs qui ont des opinions très tranchées sur la façon de créer un milieu politique favorable aux familles et qui souhaitent vraiment que des changements soient apportés. Cela ne veut pas nécessairement dire qu'il faut abolir les séances du vendredi ou faire d'autres changements du genre.

À un certain moment, M. Richards a dit que les conservateurs ne souhaitaient certainement pas que nous éliminions l'obligation de rendre des comptes. Je ne sais pas d'où il tient cela, car, dans toutes les discussions que nous avons eues, il n'a jamais été question d'éliminer cette obligation de quelque manière que ce soit. Il y a toujours une période des questions et nous tentons toujours... Selon les commentaires recueillis jusqu'ici, je pense que tout le monde s'entend pour dire qu'il n'est pas question d'éliminer des heures. Nous souhaitons simplement trouver des façons de planifier notre horaire de manière à répondre aux besoins des députés.

Je tenais à le dire. J'exhorte tous les députés à participer à ce débat important. Au cours de la présente législature, nous avons la possibilité de faire des changements afin de favoriser une meilleure représentation à l'avenir. Si nous ne saisissons pas cette occasion maintenant, je pense que, bien franchement, tous les partis vont en souffrir. Il ne s'agit pas d'un problème qui touche uniquement les libéraux. Je suis persuadée que les néo-démocrates et les conservateurs souhaitent attirer dans leur caucus respectif un large éventail de personnes ayant des antécédents différents. Par conséquent, je pense que nous devrions prendre cet exercice au sérieux et veiller à ce que tous les membres des caucus soient consultés. En parlant à des députés de tous les partis, je me suis rendu compte que les opinions étaient extrêmement variées. Je ne dis pas que nous allons tous en arriver à la même conclusion, mais tous les points de vue méritent d'être exprimés.

(1250)

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez la parole.

M. David Christopherson:

Je sais qu'un membre a proposé que nous retournions à la motion, mais je dois dire que j'attends avec impatience l'occasion de dresser la liste des témoins simplement parce que nous devons commencer à planifier nos travaux, lesquels prennent beaucoup de temps. Comme les discussions commencent à aller dans tous les sens, je pense que, pour faire progresser le dossier en temps opportun, monsieur le président, nous devons finaliser la liste des témoins et demander à la greffière de coordonner leur comparution.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Blake Richards:

Est-ce que je pourrais simplement faire une suggestion, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Blake Richards:

De toute évidence, il nous reste peu de temps aujourd'hui pour tenir un débat en bonne et due forme. J'ai en main une liste de témoins proposée par notre groupe. Il serait peut-être préférable que tous les membres proposent des noms que la greffière pourrait ensuite faire circuler. Je sais que certains noms ont déjà circulé. Je ne sais pas qui les a proposés. Nous pourrions évidemment ajouter des noms à cette liste. On pourrait la faire circuler de nouveau. Nous avons reçu la liste tard hier. Je pense qu'il serait bon que tous les membres aient l'occasion d'examiner la liste et de dire ce qu'ils pensent des personnes proposées. Nous pourrions alors avoir un débat entièrement éclairé à ce sujet dès que l'occasion se présentera, soit, je l'espère, à la prochaine réunion. Je ne sais pas ce qui est prévu pour le Comité.

Le président:

Le délai avait été fixé à... peu importe. Nous avons en main une liste que nous pourrons distribuer. Si vous souhaitez proposer d'autres noms, nous pourrons les ajouter à la liste. Tous les membres pourront consulter la liste contenant les noms proposés jusqu'ici.

Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez la parole.

M. David Christopherson:

Je ne cherche pas la chicane, mais, comme les listes de témoins figuraient aux travaux prévus, je suis un peu surpris... On dirait qu'elles ne sont pas prêtes. Je ne sais pas pourquoi elles ne sont pas prêtes. Nous sommes prêts, et j'ai l'impression que le gouvernement est aussi prêt. Ce n'est pas nouveau. Je ne sais pas quel est le problème.

Le président:

Et il y a...

M. David Christopherson:

J'avoue avoir la même préoccupation. C'est à se demander si les trois partis sont aussi déterminés à faire avancer ce dossier que nous le supposions. Je me le demande.

M. Blake Richards:

Je dirai quelques mots à ce sujet.

Il va sans dire que nous sommes tous déterminés à faire avancer ce dossier et à l'examiner avec soin. C'est seulement que, comme nous venons tout juste de recevoir certaines des listes, nous n'avons pas encore eu la chance de les examiner. Personne ne cherche à retarder les travaux. J'ai moi-même hâte que nous arrivions à des résultats.

Il reste environ sept minutes à la séance. Nous pourrions entamer cette discussion si le Comité le désire, mais la motion de M. Reid presse davantage, puisqu'elle demande que les témoins comparaissent devant le Comité avant la fin mars. J'ai l'impression que le gouvernement tente de faire traîner les choses, mais il faudrait, selon moi, traiter cette motion en priorité.

Le président:

Il y a un point qu'il faudrait régler rapidement. Le directeur général des élections pourrait venir témoigner le 3 ou le 5 mai. Je sais que ces dates sont plutôt éloignées, mais l'équipe a besoin de temps pour planifier. Auriez-vous une objection à ce que nous choisissions l'une de ces deux dates?

M. David Christopherson:

Avons-nous des plans de travail à jour?

Le président:

Nous n'avons rien pour le mois de mai.

M. David Christopherson:

Comme nous n'avons pas de plan de travail, que prévoyez-vous, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Pour le début mai, vous voulez dire?

M. David Christopherson:

Oui.

Le président:

Nous sommes libres, pour le moment. Nous travaillerons à notre rapport et à d'autres tâches.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vois. Dans ce cas, que proposez-vous, monsieur le président?

Le président:

La rencontre aura lieu à l'une de ces dates, donc le mardi ou le jeudi.

M. David Christopherson:

Je propose le mardi, simplement pour faire avancer la discussion.

Le président:

David propose le 3 mai.

Y a-t-il des objections?

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais savoir si nous nous buterons à certaines restrictions quant aux questions que nous pourrons poser. Chaque fois, ou presque chaque fois, qu'un témoin s'est présenté ici et que j'ai voulu poser une question, on m'a dit qu'elle n'était pas permise parce qu'il fallait s'en tenir au sujet X. Pourrons-nous lui poser des questions sur tous les sujets, ou les libéraux prévoient-ils limiter encore une fois la discussion?

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, vous êtes ici depuis assez longtemps pour savoir que, lorsqu'on invite un témoin, l'invitation précise sur quel sujet cette personne devra se prononcer. Il faut respecter ces paramètres.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est pour cela que je demande des précisions.

Le président:

Cette personne a offert de venir nous rendre compte de l'élection dans le cadre d'une séance d'information non officielle.

M. Scott Reid:

Est-ce à dire que vous jugerez irrecevables les questions qui porteraient sur la déclaration que cette personne a faite hier, à propos de l'échéancier à respecter en cas de référendum et du temps qui serait nécessaire pour mettre en oeuvre un nouveau système électoral, puisque cela supposerait probablement une redistribution ou une modification des circonscriptions? Les questions de ce genre seraient-elles recevables ou non?

(1255)

Le président:

M. Christopherson invoque le Règlement.

M. David Christopherson:

Étant donné l'importance de cet enjeu, puis-je faire quelques observations avant que vous répondiez?

Je crois que le directeur général des élections est un agent du Parlement. Dans ce cas, on pourra, d'après mon expérience, lui poser des questions sur une multitude de domaines, puisqu'il doit rendre des comptes au Parlement et non au gouvernement. Si vous refusez à des parlementaires la chance de poser les questions qu'ils désirent... Ce sont des gens brillants. Ils pourront vous dire rapidement s'il y a un lien avec les points qu'ils abordent.

Je tenais à dire, monsieur le président, que je serais très étonné et plutôt mécontent si vous décidiez, à l'avance, de limiter le genre de questions que nous pourrons poser à un agent du Parlement. Cela pourrait porter atteinte aux droits et privilèges des députés, de même qu'à la séparation entre le Parlement, pouvoir législatif, et le gouvernement, pouvoir exécutif.

Le président:

Il s'agit d'une séance d'information. Nous n'avons pas appelé ces gens: ils nous ont offert une séance d'information. Elle devait avoir lieu aujourd'hui, mais nous l'avons reportée. C'est donc à la nouvelle date que je pensais, et à rien d'autre.

Bref, la rencontre aura lieu le 3 mai.

Je vous avais aussi demandé de penser à la lettre du Président de la Chambre, que vous avez maintenant...

Non, en fait, vous ne l'avez pas encore reçue.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, il nous reste deux minutes. Nous avons le temps de mettre aux voix une motion visant à réinviter les membres du comité consultatif afin qu'ils répondent aux questions jugées irrecevables lors de nos rencontres précédentes. Ces questions sont tout à fait pertinentes étant donné leur mandat et la responsabilité qui nous incombe de superviser leur mandat, la ministre et le portefeuille du renouveau démocratique. Il s'agit de questions auxquelles la ministre a déclaré aujourd'hui ne pas pouvoir répondre.

Pourtant, quand M. Chan a expliqué que le gouvernement ne souhaitait pas aller plus loin, que ce serait inutile, il avait pour seul argument que la ministre pourrait répondre à ces questions. C'était aussi l'un des principaux arguments de M. Graham, je crois. La ministre a toutefois confirmé aujourd'hui ne pas être en mesure de répondre à ces questions parce qu'elle n'a pas les renseignements nécessaires. J'aimerais donc que nous revenions là-dessus.

Les libéraux pourraient en discuter pendant deux minutes s'ils le désirent, mais il serait bon de mettre cette motion aux voix. La motion viserait à ce que ces gens témoignent de nouveau devant le Comité avant la fin mars. Notre prochaine rencontre aura lieu le 22 mars, si je me souviens bien. Il serait donc important d'adopter ou de refuser cette motion aujourd'hui même.

Le président:

Je serai heureux de m'en occuper, mais nous devons décider ce que nous souhaitons faire, au juste. Il reste deux journées de rencontres avant le congé de Pâques. La première sera le jour du budget; nous avons convenu de nous rencontrer ce jour-là. La deuxième est prévue pour le Jeudi saint; les leaders à la Chambre n'ont pas encore décidé si la Chambre adoptera l'horaire du vendredi ce jour-là.

M. David Christopherson:

Ils ont pris leur décision.

Le président:

On ne m'en a pas informé.

Si la Chambre suit l'horaire du vendredi, notre rencontre sera annulée. Mais si le Jeudi saint se déroule comme un jeudi ordinaire, notre rencontre aura lieu.

M. David Christopherson:

Je crois savoir que ce jeudi sera traité comme un vendredi.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je n'en suis pas certaine.

M. Scott Simms:

D'après le calendrier, c'est un jeudi ordinaire.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Si c'est un jeudi ordinaire, nous aurons une rencontre ce jour-là.

M. David Christopherson:

Apparemment, la décision n'est pas encore finale. Je croyais que c'était réglé, mais il y a encore des discussions. Dans ce genre de situation, on utilise souvent l'horaire du vendredi.

Le président:

Nous devons, à tout le moins, décider de ce que nous ferons pendant notre séance du mardi, à notre retour. Nous pourrions peut-être nous pencher sur les listes de témoins, puisque nous n'avons pas eu le temps de le faire aujourd'hui.

Êtes-vous d'accord pour que nous examinions les listes de témoins?

Des voix: D'accord.

Le président: Très bien. Donc à notre prochaine rencontre, nous nous occuperons des listes de témoins.

M. David Christopherson:

Avons-nous un budget à examiner?

Le président:

Nous avons reçu le Budget principal des dépenses. Il nous faudra deux heures pour l'examiner, une heure pour le budget de la Chambre, l'autre pour celui d'Élections Canada. Nous pourrions consacrer une heure aux listes de témoins, puis une heure à l'un de ces budgets, si cela vous convient.

Quel budget souhaitez-vous examiner?

M. Scott Reid:

[Note de la rédaction: Inaudible]... donc on ne peut pas le faire?

Le président:

Non, j'y reviendrai dans un instant. Nous devons décider de ce que nous ferons à notre retour.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

En fait, je crois que le jour du dépôt du budget, le 22 mars, aucune salle ne sera disponible en raison des séances d'information à huis clos. Avez-vous déjà réservé une salle? Cela pourrait être difficile.

Le président:

Il n'y aura pas de salles ici, mais le Parlement offre beaucoup d'autres possibilités.

Bref, oui, nous avons une salle.

(1300)

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

D'accord, désolée. Je voulais simplement m'en assurer.

Le président:

Quelqu'un souhaite-t-il proposer que l'on étudie l'un des deux budgets, soit celui de la Chambre...

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, il serait peut-être logique de combiner la discussion sur les élections et la visite du directeur général des élections. Je crois, monsieur Reid, que le champ des questions possibles s'en trouverait élargi.

Le président:

À notre retour du congé, notre rencontre du mardi sera divisée comme suit: une heure pour la liste des témoins, puis une heure pour le budget de la Chambre. Tout le monde est d'accord?

Des voix: D'accord.

Le président: Passons maintenant à votre motion, monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Si cette motion est adoptée, nous devrons inviter les témoins à la séance qui se déroulera le jeudi suivant le congé, puisque ce sera notre dernière rencontre en mars. Voici la motion que je souhaite mettre aux voix: Que les membres fédéraux du Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat soient invités à comparaître devant le Comité avant la fin de mars 2016, pour répondre à toutes les questions concernant leur mandat et leurs responsabilités.

J'ai déjà expliqué pourquoi cela me paraît important.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez la parole.

M. David Christopherson:

N'avons-nous pas une liste d'orateurs?

Le président:

Oui, nous avons une liste. Mais comme il est déjà 13 heures, il me faudrait la permission du Comité pour prolonger la séance, si vous souhaitez poursuivre la discussion.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld:

Je ne suis pas libre. Nous avons d'autres engagements.

Le président:

Nous n'avons pas la permission de continuer.

M. Blake Richards:

Le compte rendu montrera que les membres représentant le gouvernement s'efforcent clairement d'empêcher l'adoption de cette motion.

Le président:

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on March 10, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.