header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-05-09 ETHI 148

Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Bob Zimmer (Prince George—Peace River—Northern Rockies, CPC)):

Good day, everybody. We're at the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics, meeting 148, pursuant to Standing Order 108(3)(h)(vi) and (vii), a study of election advertising on YouTube.

Today we have with us, from Google Canada, Colin McKay, head of public policy and government relations. We also have Jason Kee, public policy and government relations counsel.

Just before we get started, I want to announce to the room that the release went out at 3:30, so it's going out as we speak, with regard to the matter that we dealt with on Tuesday, so watch for that.

We'll start off with Mr. McKay.

Mr. Colin McKay (Head, Public Policy and Government Relations, Google Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you very much for the invitation to speak to you today.

I'd like to start off with an observation. First and foremost, we would like to clarify that we feel there is an inaccuracy in the language of the motion initiating this study. Specifically, the motion invited us to explain our “decision not to run ads during the upcoming election” and our “refusal to comply with Bill C-76”. To be clear, our decision to not accept regulated political advertising is not a refusal to comply with Bill C-76 and the Canada Elections Act, but rather was specifically taken in order to comply.

Free and fair elections are fundamental to democracy, and we at Google take our work to protect elections and promote civic engagement very seriously. On cybersecurity, we have developed several products that are available to political campaigns, elections agencies and news organizations free of charge. These include, as I've mentioned to you before, Project Shield, which uses Google's infrastructure to protect organizations from denial of service attacks and our advanced protection program, which safeguards accounts of those at risk of targeted attacks by implementing two-factor authentication, limiting data sharing across apps and providing strong vetting of account recovery requests. These are over and above the robust protections we've already built into our products.

We have also undertaken significant efforts to combat the intentional spread of disinformation across search, news, YouTube and our advertising systems. This work is based on three foundational pillars: making quality count, fighting bad actors and giving people context.

I'll turn to my colleague.

Mr. Jason Kee (Public Policy and Government Relations Counsel, Google Canada):

We are making quality count by identifying and ranking high-quality content in search, news and YouTube in order to provide users the most authoritative information for their news-seeking queries. This includes providing more significant weight to authority as opposed to relevance or popularity for queries that are news related, especially during times of crisis or breaking news.

On YouTube, this also includes reducing recommendations for borderline content that is close to violating our content policies, content that can misinform users in harmful ways or low-quality content that may result in a poor user experience.

We are fighting bad actors by cutting off their flow of money and traffic. We are constantly updating our content and advertising policies to prohibit misleading behaviours such as misrepresentation in our ads products or impersonation on YouTube and to prohibit ads on inflammatory, hateful or violent content or that which covers controversial issues or sensitive events.

We enforce these policies vigorously, using the latest advances in machine learning to identify policy-violative content and ads, and we have a team of over 10,000 people working on these issues.

While diversity of information is inherently built into the design of search news and YouTube, each search query delivers multiple options from various sources, increasing exposure to diverse perspectives. We are also working to provide users further context around the information they see. These include knowledge panels in search that provide high-level facts about a person or issue; content labels in search and news to identify when it contains fact-checking or is an opinion piece; and on YouTube, dedicated news shelves to ensure users are exposed to news from authoritative sources during news events and information panels identifying if a given channel is state or publicly funded, and providing authoritative information on well-established topics that are often subject to misinformation.

Mr. Colin McKay:

ln relation to elections, we are partnering with Elections Canada and Canadian news organizations to provide information on how to vote and essential information about candidates. We will also support the live streaming of candidate debates on YouTube and we are creating a YouTube channel dedicated to election coverage from authoritative news sources.

Our work to address misinformation is not limited to our products. A healthy news ecosystem is critical for democracy, and we dedicate significant resources to supporting quality journalism and related efforts.

The Google news initiative has developed a comprehensive suite of products, partnerships and programs to support the news industry and committed $300 million to funding programs. We are also supporting news literacy in Canada, including a half-million-dollar grant to the Canadian Journalism Foundation and CIVIX to develop NewsWise, a news literacy program reaching over one million Canadian students, and a further $1-million grant announced last week to the CJF to support news literacy for voting-age Canadians.

We're funding these programs because we believe it's critical that Canadians of all ages understand how to evaluate information online.

(1535)

Mr. Jason Kee:

In line with this, we fully support improving transparency in political advertising. Last year we voluntarily introduced enhanced verification requirements for U.S. political advertisers, in-ad disclosures for election ads, and a new transparency report and political ad library for the U.S. mid-terms. We deployed similar tools for the Indian and EU parliamentary elections. While we had intended to introduce similar measures in Canada, unfortunately the new online platforms provisions introduced in Bill C-76 do not reflect how our online advertising systems or transparency reports currently function. It was simply not feasible for us to implement the extensive changes that would have been necessary to accommodate the new requirements in the very short time we had before the new provisions took effect.

First, the definition of “online platform” includes any “Internet site or Internet application” that sells advertising space “directly or indirectly”, and imposes the new registry obligation on any platform that meets certain minimum traffic thresholds. This captures not only social media or large online advertising platforms, but also most national and regional news publishers, virtually all multicultural publications, and most popular ad-supported websites and apps, making its application extraordinarily broad.

Second, the provisions specifically require that each site or app maintain their own registry. Unlike some companies, Google provides a wide array of advertising products and services. Advertisers can purchase campaigns through Google that will run on both Google sites and/or third party publisher sites. These systems are automated. Often there is no direct relationship between the advertiser and the publisher. While the page is loading, the site will send a signal that a user meeting certain demographic criteria is available to be advertised to. The advertisers will then bid for the opportunity to display an ad to that user. The winning advertiser's ad server displays the winning ad in the user's browser. This all happens within fractions of a second. The publisher does not immediately know what ad was displayed and does not have immediate access to the ad that was shown. To accommodate the new provisions, we would have had to build entirely new systems to inform publishers that a regulated political ad had displayed and then deliver a copy of that ad and the requisite information to each publisher for inclusion in their own registry. This was simply not achievable in the very short time before the provisions took effect.

Third, the provisions require the registry to be updated the same day as the regulated political ad is displayed. This effectively means that the registry must be updated in real time, as a regulated political ad that was displayed at 11:59 p.m. would need to be included in the registry before midnight. Due to the complexities of our online advertising systems, we simply could not commit to such a turnaround time.

A final complication is that “election advertising” includes advertising “taking a position on an issue with which a registered party or candidate is associated”. These are generally referred to as “issue ads”. Issue ads are highly contextual and notoriously difficult to identify reliably, especially as the definition is vague and will change and evolve during the course of a campaign. Given these challenges, we generally prohibit this class of advertising in countries where it's regulated, such as our recent prohibition in France.

Mr. Colin McKay:

We wish to stress that our decision to not accept regulated political advertising in Canada was not a decision we took lightly. We sincerely believe in the responsible use of online advertising to reach the electorate, especially for those candidates who may not have a sophisticated party apparatus behind them, and for legitimate third parties to engage in advocacy on a range of issues. It is also worth noting that any time we opt to no longer accept a category of advertising, it necessarily has negative revenue impacts. However, after several months of internal deliberations and explorations of potential solutions to try to otherwise accommodate the new requirements, it became clear that this would simply not be feasible in the few months we had available. Consequently, it was decided to not accept regulated political ads, and focus our efforts on promoting civic engagement and other initiatives.

(1540)

Mr. Jason Kee:

In the coming weeks, our decision to not accept regulated political advertising in Canada will be formally reflected in our ads policies. We will continue the process of notifying all affected parties of the change. Similar to other ads categories that we don't accept, the policy will be enforced by a combination of automated systems and dedicated ads enforcement teams, who will undergo rigorous training on the new policy. We will also continue our work with Elections Canada and the commissioner of Canada elections on interpretation and enforcement matters and the relevant industry organizations that are working on measures to assist online platforms and publishers with the new obligations.

We appreciate the opportunity to discuss our elections activities in Canada and our decision to prohibit regulated political advertising.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you to both of you.

First up in our seven-minute round is Mr. Erskine-Smith.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York, Lib.):

Thanks very much.

I understand that Facebook and Google together are 75% of digital ad revenue. The decision of Google to not accept political ads is thus pretty significant for the upcoming election. Do you agree with that?

Mr. Colin McKay:

We think it's significant for us to take a decision like this. However, that number is generalized. It may not reflect the market for political advertising.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

It's a significant decision for the Canadian election.

Now, I want to contrast and compare two really large companies that operate in this space.

Have you read the recent report from the OPC, on the Facebook-Cambridge Analytica breach?

Mr. Colin McKay:

Yes.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Okay. Take that as an example. If the Office of the Privacy Commissioner investigated Google, and made recommendations consistent with what took place with Facebook, would Google be complying with the recommendations the OPC made?

Mr. Colin McKay:

I would say that we have historically worked with the privacy commissioners to arrive at agreed statements of finding, and then implemented them.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Right. I think there's a higher standard that Google has set for itself. The Privacy Commissioner says that the privacy framework at Facebook was empty, and is empty. You don't consider Google's privacy framework to be empty, do you?

Mr. Colin McKay:

We are two very different companies, with two very different approaches to data protection and privacy.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Again, you hold yourself to a higher standard. Remind me: How much money did Google make last year?

Mr. Colin McKay:

I don't know, offhand.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I have $8.94 billion in income, just in Q4 of 2018. We have a company that is raking in billions of dollars, and holds itself to a higher standard than Facebook, on a number of different issues. Yet, Facebook is able to implement the rules under Bill C-76.

Why can't Google?

Mr. Colin McKay:

As Jason touched upon just now—and he touched upon the Senate, when they were considering the amendments to Bill C-76—our systems, and the range of advertising tools we provide to advertisers, are much broader than Facebook's. I can't speak to Facebook's decision in this regard.

I can say that we spent an intensive amount of time this year trying to evaluate how we would implement changes that would meet the obligations of Bill C-76. Because of the breadth of the advertising tools we provide—and Jason identified the number of different ways that touches upon our publishing partners and advertisers—we reluctantly came to the decision that we would have to not accept political advertising this year.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

When you say this year, you mean that you're actively working on this, to ensure that you will accept political ads in future Canadian elections?

Mr. Colin McKay:

This is an important point. We do feel committed to encouraging strong and informed political discourse. It was a very difficult conversation for us.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Is that a yes?

Mr. Colin McKay:

Yes.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

You will accept political ads in the next federal election after 2019.

Mr. Colin McKay:

What I will say is that we are trying to evolve our products to a point where we reach compliance with the Canadian regulations. At the moment, we can't do that. It's a tremendously difficult task.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

What about Washington state? Are you going to run political ads at the local level in Washington state?

Mr. Colin McKay:

We didn't during the last cycle.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Are you committed to doing so in the next cycle?

Mr. Colin McKay:

I can't speak specifically to the obligations of Washington state. I don't know if they evolved.

(1545)

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Here's my frustration. You have a company that makes billions of dollars, and looks at a small jurisdiction in Washington state and a small jurisdiction in Canada, and says, “Your democracy doesn't matter enough to us. We're not going to participate.” If a big player decided to change the rules, I guarantee that you would follow those rules.

We are too small for you. You are too big. You are too important, and we are just not important enough for Google to take us seriously.

Mr. Colin McKay:

I'd contest that observation, because as we mentioned, there have been other examples where we've had to make this decision. We don't do it willingly. We look for every route we can to have that tool available to voters.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

What's the largest jurisdiction where you have made a decision like this?

Mr. Colin McKay:

As Jason just mentioned, the advertising has to be blocked in France. That's the reality. The reality for us here is not a commitment to democracy in Canada. The reality here is the technical challenge we confronted, with the amendments to the Elections Act. The internal evaluation resulted in the decision that we can't implement the technical challenges in time for the election cycle.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I accept that timing is a constraint. What I struggle with is when you don't give me a direct answer when I ask whether you are committed to doing so for the next federal election, or for the next election at the local level in Washington state.

That is an obvious frustration. Can you say, “Yes, we're committed to doing so. We'll fulfill that,” as a clear answer to my question?

Mr. Colin McKay:

The reason I paused in replying to you is that in a parliamentary system, we have fixed election dates. But conceivably, there could be an election date within the next six, nine or 18 months.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Okay, but let's say you're looking at a four-year cycle. Do you think that's reasonable?

Mr. Colin McKay:

What I'm saying to you is that we work to improve all of our elections tools, and to meet the expectations of our users, and especially of regulations. Our intent is always to increase both the quality and the breadth of those tools.

As we look at the obligations under the Elections Act, our intent is to try to reach those standards. We're faced with a time frame right now where we couldn't do that for this election.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I understand. By 2023, I expect that you'll be able to do that.

Mr. Colin McKay:

Yes.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

It's a shame that you were unable to do so, but Facebook was able to figure it out.

The last thing I want to ask about, just because you've raised it, is recommended videos on YouTube. You've recently made a decision. After many years of not considering this to be a problem, in January of this year you decided that borderline content would not be recommended. Is that right?

Mr. Jason Kee:

That's correct.

I would dispute the characterization that this isn't something that we considered to be an issue. We've been examining this for a while and doing various experimentation with the recommendation system in order to improve the quality of the content the users would see.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Then you disagree with the—

Mr. Jason Kee:

The borderline content policy was introduced earlier this year. That's correct.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I was referring to and taking my direction from a number of past Google employees who were quoted on Bloomberg suggesting that you two actively dissuaded the staff from being proactive on this front specifically. I take it that you don't think that's true.

Lastly, I understand the idea of safe harbour, where someone posts a video, posts content, and you can't be liable for everything that somebody posts. However, do you agree that as soon as you recommend videos, as soon as your algorithm is putting in particular content, boosting particular content and encouraging people to see particular content, you should be liable for that content and responsible for that content?

Mr. Jason Kee:

I would agree with you insofar as, when there's a difference between the results that are being served or the result of a passive query versus a proactive recommendation, there's a heightened level of responsibility.

With respect to notions of liability, the challenge is that there's a binary that exists in the current conversation between whether you are a publisher or a platform. As a platform that is also, in the case of YouTube, taking in 500 hours of video every single minute and has over a billion hours of content being watched every day, being able to—

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I'm only talking about content that's recommended by you, specifically.

Mr. Jason Kee:

Yes. In that case, we are endeavouring, through the process of the recommendation system, to basically provide content that is relevant to what we think the user wants to watch, in a corpus that is much larger than conventional publishers are actually dealing with.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

It's a long answer that isn't really saying anything. The answer is obviously yes.

Thanks very much.

The Chair:

Next up we have Ms. Kusie, for seven minutes.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

Thank you very much, Chair.

When Bill C-76 was being drafted, did your organization have the opportunity to meet with the minister?

Mr. Jason Kee:

No.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Did you have the opportunity to meet with the ministerial staff?

Mr. Jason Kee:

While it was being drafted, no, we did not.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

After the original draft was completed, with the proposed clauses, were you then approached by the minister?

Mr. Jason Kee:

We became aware of the proposed clauses that were being introduced at clause-by-clause at the procedure and House affairs committee, actually when it was reported publicly, at which point we approached the minister's office, first to gather further information, because there wasn't much detail with respect to what those clauses contained, and then to engage robustly with the minister's office to identify some of the concerns we had and to develop proposed amendments that would resolve those concerns.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

It's fair to say, then, that you were not consulted by the minister or by ministerial staff until Bill C-76 came to the clause-by-clause procedure, until it became public.

(1550)

Mr. Jason Kee:

That's correct.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's pretty significant.

When you went to the clause-by-clause process of Bill C-76, I'll going to assume that was in the House procedures committee, PROC. Is that correct?

Mr. Jason Kee:

That's correct.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Did you explain at the time that you would not be able to comply with this legislation as it was laid out?

Mr. Jason Kee:

By the time Bill C-76 was amended to include the new online platforms provisions, the witness list unfortunately had already closed. As a consequence, there wasn't an opportunity to discuss that with members of the committee.

We discussed it with individual members of the committee to express some of the concerns at the time, and then certainly raised it when it was at the Senate justice committee.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay.

You're saying, then, that you did not have the opportunity, in the House procedures committee, to explain to the committee why this legislation would not work for your organization, why you would not be able to comply. I know it was said in the preamble that you don't prefer this term, but you did express that it would be difficult for you to comply, recognizing that, as Mr. McKay said, in deciding not to advertise in elections, you are not subjecting yourself to the non-compliance.

Did you express that at that time?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Do you mean after the bill was introduced? Sorry, I'm....

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, no problem. Were you able to express at that time that you would not be able to comply with the legislation as it was laid out?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Yes. Once we were aware of the provisions, and also once we were able to obtain a copy of the proposed amendments, we engaged with the minister's office. We essentially reviewed what we have just reviewed with all of you, which is to say that there are certain aspects of those provisions that would be challenging due to our particular advertising systems. One of the possible outcomes would be that we would not be able to achieve the changes we need in the time allowed, and that we would therefore not be able to accommodate political advertising for the federal election.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

The minister and her staff were aware that you would not be able to comply as Bill C-76 was laid out. What was her response to you at that time, when you indicated that your organization would not be able to comply with the legislation as it was presented?

Mr. Jason Kee:

They were hopeful that we would be able to accommodate the new changes.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

How? What did they expect, if I may ask?

Mr. Jason Kee:

They didn't articulate anything more than that, except for, basically, a desire for us to be able to implement the new changes. Also at that time, procedurally, they expressed that because it had already proceeded to clause by clause and was going to the Senate, essentially we should raise our concerns with the Senate in the hope to obtain the amendments we were seeking.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Did you have any conversations with the minister or her staff regarding the tools you rolled out in the U.S., which you went into some detail on here?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Yes, we did.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

What was her response in regard to the tools that were rolled out in the U.S. comparative to the legislation that was presented in Bill C-76? What was her response to those tools, and did she mention if there was any gap between those two items?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Well certainly, they were aware of the tools that we had introduced in the U.S. mid-terms, and essentially they were hoping that with the introduction of the changes to Bill C-76, we would introduce similar tools in Canada. It was really a matter of going through the details about why the specific provisions in Bill C-76 would make this challenging, which is where we had a back and forth. Essentially, they were looking for us to introduce tools similar to what we had there.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

In looking to introduce tools similar to what you have within the U.S., why are you not able to introduce these tools within the Canadian system, and why do they not comply with Bill C-76?

Mr. Jason Kee:

In short, as I covered in my opening remarks, we have advertising systems that serve advertising to third party publisher sites, but we don't have a means of delivering the ad creative and the requisite information to them in real time, which would be required under Bill C-76. There are also the complications with respect to the real-time registry itself, which is why, even for our owned and operated sites like Google Search or YouTube, we also wouldn't be able to comply—at least we didn't feel comfortable we could commit to that.

Finally, there is the additional complication with respect to the inclusion of issue advertising. To be clear, the registries that we have available in other jurisdictions actually do not include issue advertising because, as I said, it is very difficult to cogently identify. Therefore, we were concerned that we would not be able to identify issue advertising for inclusion.

(1555)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

To summarize then, you were not included in the drafting stage of Bill C-76. You were not consulted by the minister or her staff as this government went forward with Bill C-76 in an effort to determine electoral reform for Canada.

Mr. Jason Kee:

That's largely correct. I should also amend the record. We did have one discussion with the minister's office shortly after Bill C-76 was introduced, to discuss the contours of the legislation as it existed at first reading, before any of the online platform provisions were added and before any registry requirements were added. It was a robust discussion, but certainly at the time, we did not contemplate the introduction of the new provisions, so we didn't cover that. Besides that, there wasn't any engagement.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure.

What advice would you give to the next Parliament in regard to this legislation?

Mr. Jason Kee:

As we have basically expressed before the Senate committee and elsewhere, and also to the minister's office, we are fully supportive of and aligned with the idea of increasing transparency in political advertising, and we had intended to actually bring the registry to Canada.

There were a certain number of extremely targeted amendments. Basically, I think it was 15 words we actually changed that would have altered Bill C-76 sufficiently, such that we actually could have accommodated the requirements.

My recommendation, if possible, would be for a future Parliament to look at those recommendations, basically look at the challenges the new provisions added—and it's worth noting, as covered by the CBC, many platforms have also similarly announced that they wouldn't be accepting political advertising because of the challenges the specific revisions are introducing—and to revisit them at that time, to see if there are tweaks that can be made to help alleviate the concerns.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Next, we'll go to Mr. Dusseault for seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault (Sherbrooke, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I am pleased to join this committee today. I have the privilege of returning to this committee, which I had the opportunity to chair for a few years before you, Mr. Chair. I am happy to see faces I have seen in the past.

Mr. McKay and Mr. Kee, you know the influence you have. I am sure you are aware of the influence you have on elections and the information that circulates during elections, which influences voters and, ultimately, their decision. It is in this context that it is important to have a discussion with you about the announcements you have made recently regarding election advertising.

My first question relates to the preamble that other colleagues have made. Other fairly large companies in the market have said that they are able to comply with the Canada Elections Act, as amended. Given the fact that you have made many investments in other countries to make such registries, for example in the United States and Europe, and also the fact that you have invested millions of dollars in certain markets, such as China, to be able to adapt your search engine to their laws—in China, we agree, the laws are very strict, which you know quite well—I have difficulty understanding why Google isn't able to adapt to Canadian legislation like that in preparation for the next federal election.

In your opinion, what makes you unable to adapt to Canadian legislation?

Is it because the rules don't reflect international practices or the way online advertising works? Is it because you can't afford to do it or you just don't have the will to do it?

Mr. Colin McKay:

I apologize, but I'm going to answer in English.[English]

I want to underline that our decision was led by a technical evaluation about whether we could comply. It was not a specific question about the regulatory framework within Canada or our commitment to the electoral process in Canada and helping keep it both informed and transparent.

We are on a path in other countries to implement tools like those described in the legislation, to improve those tools and to work on the back-end technical infrastructure to make those tools more informative and more useful for users as well as for all participants in an election.

We arrived at a very difficult conversation because we were faced with a constrained time frame with amendments to legislation that are very important within the Canadian context and to us as Canadians, both as electors and participants in the electoral process. And we had to make a decision about whether or not we could comply with the legislation in the time frame allowed, and we couldn't. So our compliance was left to not accepting political advertising. It is in no way a reflection of either our corporate or our personal attitude towards Canada's authority and jurisdiction in regulating this space, and it certainly wasn't meant to be a signal about our opinion about the amendments to the Elections Act.

It was very difficult for us, and the decision was driven by the technical challenges and the time frame we were faced with.

(1600)

[Translation]

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

I have a supplementary question about the registry you set up during the American mid-term elections and the one you plan to set up in Europe for the European Parliament.

Are these registries, or are these rules, an initiative by Google, or are they implemented as a result of an obligation imposed by law?

Can you clarify why you are moving forward in the United States and Europe? Are you required to do so, or do you do it on your own? [English]

Mr. Jason Kee:

It's actually of our own volition. Essentially, it was entirely a voluntary initiative in light of concerns that were raised as a consequence of the U.S. federal election. There were obviously a lot of robust discussions with respect to how to ensure there was enhanced transparency in the course of political advertising. As a consequence, Google, Facebook and a number of the other companies all worked very hard, to be honest, to basically start building out transparency, who gets registries and reports, that would provide our users with much more context in terms of the political advertising they were seeing. This is not just in access to copies of the actual ads themselves, but also contextual information with respect to why it was they may have been targeted, what audience this audit was looking for, how much money that particular advertiser had spent, those kinds of details.

Once this was built for the U.S. mid-terms, there was—as Colin alluded to—a process of learning. We have global teams that build this out and are basically moving from election to election and actually learning from each individual election and improving the processes. Essentially we had a template in place that we were capable of deploying in India, that we were capable of deploying for the EU, that we expect to be deploying in other places. Also, we had individual processes over and above the registry itself. What is the process we use to verify the political advertiser? In the case of the United States, we would verify not only the identity of the advertiser by asking them to provide ID, but we would then also verify that they were authorized to run political advertising with the Federal Election Commission in the U.S.

We have had to adapt that process as we move and implement the registry in other countries because not every election's regulator is capable of providing the kind of validation we had in the United States. So, we're adapting that and learning from those processes as well.

This has been something we have done entirely ourselves versus being compelled by law. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

In these cases, you are happy to do so because they are your own standards and rules. However, when you have to comply with rules set by others, you are much more reluctant to do so. The decision you have made will ensure that you comply with the act, because, on balance, there will be no election advertising.

Given the time I have left, I would like to address a complementary topic. This is the announcement you mentioned in your introduction, which concerns a channel devoted to the election campaign, intended to compensate somewhat for your decision not to authorize advertising.

I wonder about the transparency of this platform and the algorithms used to distribute the content. What content will be broadcast? You say it's content from authoritative sources, but what does that really mean? Will the public have access to this type of information on the platform in question? Will it have access to the policies used to disseminate content and ensure that all candidates or parties have equitable coverage?

Since it's a decision that obviously belongs to Google, who decides on this coverage? You know the influence you have and can have. Who will determine these policy issues that you will publish on this platform during the campaign?

(1605)

[English]

Mr. Jason Kee:

There are actually two separate discussion points that you raised there.

One is that we keep on saying the word “authoritative”. What do we mean by that? That's a perfectly fair question. It's basically something that informs Google Search, Google News and YouTube as well. We actually have very robust guidelines, about 170 pages of search rater guidelines. We use external search rater pools that evaluate the results that we get to ensure that we're providing results to users in response to queries that are actually relevant to the queries they're looking for and actually from authoritative sources.

By authoritative, we actually rank it based on authoritativeness, expertise and a third classification.... I can send you the information. I'm blanking on it.

It's based on information we get from the search rater guides. As I said, there are pools of them, so as a result it's all done in aggregate, which helps us to surface authoritative information. These are the same signals we use, as I said, to identify this class of information and it tends to weight towards established organizations and so forth that actually do original work. To be clear, we're not evaluating the content of the work. We're just evaluating whether this is a site that's actually expert in the subject that they claim to be.

With respect to the YouTube channel, it's a very different thing. It's a very specific, individualized channel that will be available on YouTube. We did this in the 2015 election. In that instance, we got a third party organization, Storyful, to curate that for us. It isn't done algorithmically; it is actually curated. We will do a similar thing where we will have a third party that will then curate that by pulling in information from various sources.

We will establish with that third party what the guidelines for their inclusion will be, which we will be publishing so people are aware of how information is being included in there. It will be predominantly information on YouTube that is posted by established broadcasters and news organizations that we simply populate into the channel as a singular location for people to see.

All this information would also be available from, for example, the CBC website, National Post and so forth. It would also be available there individually as well.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Next up, for seven minutes, is Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you. It's nice to see both of you again.

As you probably know, I'm an early adopter of Google. I've been using Google for a solid 20 years. I think it's a good service, but it's grown massively, and become a very powerful tool. With great power comes great responsibility, so I think it's very important that we have this discussion.

The part of C-76 we're talking about is 208.1, and you want to change 15 words. What were those 15 words?

Mr. Jason Kee:

I can happily give you a copy of the proposed amendments we provided, which might be a little more cogent.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That would be helpful.

Do you oppose the changes we have on C-76, or do you support the bill, from a philosophical point of view?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Absolutely.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you support the use of ad registries in general, not just for politics, but ad registries across the board?

Mr. Jason Kee:

It's something we're looking at. As in the political context, there's obviously a certain urgency to the issues with expected transparency, and so forth. It's something we are examining, in terms of how we can provide increased transparency to our users. In fact, just this week, we announced some additional measures with respect to that.

Colin, did you want to touch on that?

Mr. Colin McKay:

Yes. At our developer's conference, we announced a browser extension for Chrome that allows you to see more detail about what ads you're seeing, where they came from—what networks—and how they arrived on your page. We're building it as an open-source tool, so that other ad networks that are also serving ads to sites and pages you're using can feed that information as well.

The direction we're heading, because we recognize that this is important, is providing as much information as possible for users around why they're seeing ads.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That leads to my next question. You talk about the technical limitations of implementing C-76, and I'm trying to get my mind around that, as a technical person. I have a fairly good sense of how your systems work, so I'm trying to see where the problem is, in the next five months, with adding the subroutines needed to grok political advertising so that you can actually use it.

If you can help me understand the technical side of things, I will understand it. I'd like to hear what those are.

Mr. Jason Kee:

Certainly. The principle challenge we had was this notion that the registry had to be updated in real time, simply due to the fact that we have a very wide array of advertising systems. People who run campaigns with Google will do search ads, so they show up on your search results. They can be YouTube ads—video—or TrueView. You can skip it, and also display advertising that shows up on third party publisher sites.

In the case of the third party publisher sites, those ads are often being served by third party ad servers. We don't necessarily have immediate access to the creative ourselves. For us to update even our own registry in real time, let alone the registry of a third party that had to maintain their own registry, would be very challenging.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What if you just have it on your own servers, and not the third party ones?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Then, again, we could do it faster. Currently, real time would still be a challenge, based on our systems, just by virtue of the fact that we'd have to know the ad server, and then be able to update it immediately after that.

(1610)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I forget the name of the page, but there's a page on Google where you can see all the data Google has on you. It's an easy page to find, and you can see everything you've ever done that Google knows about, in real time. If you can do that for a person, why can't you do it for an ad?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Primarily because the advertising systems are a bit different, in terms of how the creative is being uploaded to us, how it's stored and how it's managed internally. That's why I said it would be the kind of thing that we would work towards, but we didn't feel comfortable this time around that we could commit to that kind of turnaround time.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What kind of investment of time and resources would it take to make it happen, if you decided to do so? You say it's possible for the 2023 elections, so it is possible. What would it take to do it?

Mr. Jason Kee:

To be honest with you, it's not a question I could answer, simply because after examining it seriously, we couldn't match the time frame we had. I couldn't give you an estimate as to how long it would take, or what the resources required would be.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you have a sense of how much profit Google takes out of Canada versus what's invested in Canada?

Mr. Colin McKay:

I think I'd describe that in two separate ways. It's actually broader than that, because the way our platforms and services work, we are often an enabler for Canadian businesses and Canadian companies, whether providing free services or paid services that support their infrastructure.

As well, with something as broad as advertising, it certainly.... With revenue that's generated by online advertising when you're dealing with Google, there's often revenue sharing with platforms and sites, so the conversation is not a one to one. Canadian businesses are using our technology to place ads, pay for their services and drive revenue themselves.

We're very proud of the investment being undertaken in Canada, on behalf of Google, in terms of the growth of our engineering and R and D teams, and our offices themselves.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Kee, I think you were recently at Industry's study on copyright. One of the questions that came up was on rights management systems, and whether they have followed fair dealing to apply to Canadian law. The answer from both Google and Facebook was no. They don't follow fair dealing. They apply their own policies.

How do we get to a point where Google says, “Canada is important enough that we will make it a priority to follow local laws on matters that affect this company with great responsibility”?

Mr. Jason Kee:

That is in no way a reflection on the relative view of the importance of Canada or local law, in terms of the application of our content identification system.

For the benefit of the other committee members who aren't necessarily familiar with it, Content ID is our copyright management system on YouTube. The way it works is that a rights holder will provide us with a reference file—a copy of the file they want managed online—and then we apply a policy on every single copy that we detect has been uploaded to YouTube.

Because the system is automated, it doesn't handle context or exceptions very well. Fair dealing and Canadian copyright are actually exceptions to the law, which says they are exceptions to general infringement, because of a certain basic line of reasoning, and require a contextual analysis. It's why we respond to those exceptions by having a robust appeal system. In the event that Content ID flags content inappropriately, because you feel you have a very strong argument that fair dealing applies, you then appeal that decision and assert that fair dealing applies, and then an assessment is made.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the case of the copyright system, you are going ahead with a system that doesn't follow Canadian law, but has an appeal system. In the case of Bill C-76, you're saying, “We're not going to do it, because it doesn't make practical sense.”

In the copyright experience, you're not worrying about Canadian law, quite frankly, because if somebody does have a fair-dealing exemption, it shouldn't be incumbent on them to prove they have the right to do something that they absolutely have the right to do.

I'm trying to get my head around why you're going ahead with the copyright, and not following it with Bill C-76. To me, it seems like a difficult but entirely doable system to resolve. As Nate said earlier, if it was the United States, I'm sure it would be fixed already.

Mr. Jason Kee:

Essentially, the main difference, at the risk of getting slightly technical, is that fair dealing in Canada is an exception to infringement. It is a defence that one raises in response to a claim that you have engaged in an act of infringement, so the way that is managed is very different.

In this instance, Bill C-76 was introducing positive obligations—not only that you had to introduce an ads registry, but about the way it had to be done—that we simply couldn't accommodate in the time frame allowed. That's the main difference in the two.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Next up, for five minutes, is Monsieur Gourde.

(1615)

[Translation]

Mr. Jacques Gourde (Lévis—Lotbinière, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to the witnesses for being here this morning.

We know that there is only a short period of time left before the elections. You mentioned the technical problems, the problems in complying with the Canada Elections Act.

In Canada, the reality is that we can put advertising on your platforms, but Canadian legislation limits election spending limits and the diversity of places where political parties and candidates can spend their money. This determines a certain market share, which you may have evaluated.

First, did you evaluate this market share?

Second, it may have been such a small amount of money, considering all the projects you are running simultaneously on your platform, that it was simply not worth complying with the act this year because of the amount it could bring you.

Has an evaluation been done internally by your managers? For example, to have an additional income of $1 million would have cost $5 million. It may not have been worth it to comply with the act for the 2019 election. Is that correct? [English]

Mr. Jason Kee:

That was not a calculus that entered into the determinations at all. It was fundamentally down to how we would engage the requirements, whether it was technically feasible for us, given the way our systems currently work, given the time frames and, frankly, our risk tolerance, with respect to what would happen if we ended up getting it wrong. That was entirely it.

It never came down to a calculation of a cost benefit. If anything, it's worthwhile noting, we have opted out of engaging in the only thing elections-related that actually would earn us revenue. Instead, we are investing in things that do not earn us revenue, such as our engagement with Elections Canada on promoting election information through search and knowledge panels, and so forth, with YouTube and in various other measures, not the least of which was a $1-million grant to CJF on news literacy, in advance of the Canadian election.

Essentially, we have doubled down on the non-revenue-earning components of it, to compensate for the fact that we simply could not accommodate the requirements of Bill C-76. [Translation]

Mr. Jacques Gourde:

In your answer, you talked about risk tolerance. Was it too risky, given that some of the provisions of the bill amending the Canada Elections Act were relatively vague and didn't allow you to be sure how to implement new platforms? [English]

Mr. Jason Kee:

It had to do with some of the wording, which was vague. Again, there were the concerns I flagged with respect to the issue of ads, but as well, it was the time frame that would be required to update the registry based on this idea, as stated in the act, that it had to be done within the same day. Does that mean literally real time or not, and what was the flexibility there?

We have had robust engagements with both the commissioner of Canada elections and Elections Canada on matters of interpretation. You may have seen Elections Canada issue guidance about a week and a half ago with respect to that, which actually largely confirmed some of the concerns we had, and it was more of a reflection of that. [Translation]

Mr. Jacques Gourde:

It may happen that some ads made by third parties directly or indirectly are not necessarily considered election ads, but that they attack certain parties. You talked about human control of your platforms. Do these people have the necessary expertise in Canadian politics to distinguish between advertising that actually attacks other parties and advertising that promotes a Canadian election issue? In fact, I would like to know what the expertise of the people who will be monitoring these platforms is. Do they have expertise in Canadian politics, American politics or the politics of another country? [English]

Mr. Jason Kee:

It's actually a combination of all of the above.

What's happening is that in order to implement the prohibition, we will be updating our ads policies. As I said, there are entire classes of ads where basically we will not accept the ad, such as cannabis advertising. There's another class of ad that goes through registration requirements. That's all governed by our advertising policies.

This decision will be reflected in those ads policies. We will have ads enforcement teams located in various places around the world who will be educated on these ads enforcement policies.

With respect to the specific issues on the use of the ad, every class of ad that you described sounds as though it would likely fall within the ambit of Bill C-76 and fall within the ambit of the prohibition.

We will have actually teams that are trained on that, but also, specifically looking at it from a Canadian perspective, informed by the advice that we have across functional teams located here in Canada.

(1620)

[Translation]

Mr. Jacques Gourde:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Monsieur Picard, you're next up, for five minutes.

Mr. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Thank you.

Did you just mention to my colleague that you have not looked at the return on investment issue in regard to this case?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Correct. That wasn't entering into the calculus of the decision.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Do I understand correctly when you say that one of the technical problems you have is that with third party publicity or advertising, when they use those third party ad “brokers”, or whatever, it is difficult, and maybe impossible, to know where it comes from? Therefore, not being able to divulge the name of the author, the publicity is therefore too complicated for now, so you cannot go forward and just backtrack from the initiative of having publicity in the next election.

Mr. Jason Kee:

It was less about the source of the advertising. It was more about our ability to update whoever it is that showed the ad in real time, the information that they showed in a political ad, and then provide them the information and the ad creative they need to update their own registries.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Is this practice in advertising the same in other countries with those sources and third party middlemen?

Mr. Jason Kee:

It depends on the individual practice in individual countries. I'm reticent to comment on the electoral law of other countries that I'm simply not familiar with.

I know with respect to our own policies we've applied around political advertising in countries where we've deployed a transparency report, a registry, we've actually been employing similar requirements with respect to advertiser verification and finding means to verify that the advertiser in question was authorized to run political advertising by the local electoral regulator.

Mr. Michel Picard:

What was the difference where you were able to apply that? Based on that experience, what is the difference in our case where it's not possible?

Mr. Jason Kee:

It's simply because the systems we've deployed in the U.S., the EU and India would not have accommodated the specific requirements in Bill C-76. If we had moved forward with that, we would have actually implemented a similar system.

We actually have had preliminary conversations with Elections Canada with respect to this, but in the end, it just became clear that with Bill C-76 and the specific requirement that each individual publisher had to maintain its own registry, we would have a very difficult time accommodating the requirements.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Chair, I'll give the rest of my time to Mr. Erskine-Smith.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I'm not technical like Mr. Graham, but I can read Bill C-76 and I have it in front of me.

It's the publication period of the registry that caused your problem. Is that correct?

Mr. Jason Kee:

That's correct.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Right.

They don't say “real time”. You've said “real time” a number of times, but it's not what the act says.

The act says, “during the period that begins on the day on which the online platform first publishes the advertising message”. That's the part that you're referring to.

Mr. Jason Kee:

That's correct, because basically if the ad was displayed at 11:59 p.m., the registry would have to be updated by midnight.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

That's one interpretation. Another interpretation might be a 24-hour period of time, which might be a more reasonable interpretation. You have high-priced lawyers and presumably they're right. I'm just thinking off the top of my head and haven't taken the detailed analysis that you have, of course, but certainly one solution would be that you just defer the publication of the ad.

Why couldn't you defer the publication in order to have a 24-hour or 48-hour waiting period until you first publish it? Then it would be quite easy to do, wouldn't it?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Again, it's simply because technically it wasn't feasible for us to do that.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Why not?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Our engineers told us it wouldn't be feasible for us to do that.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Okay, so when I go to post an ad on Facebook, they don't publish it right away. There's a holding period and they assess whether it's something that ought to be published.

Your engineers couldn't figure out a deferral process of 24 hours, 48 hours, or even seven days, and you put it on us to say we have to schedule our advertising for the election knowing we've made it hard on you, with tight timelines. There is no way you could have figured this out with all the money that you got.

Mr. Jason Kee:

It would have been a challenge for us to re-architect within six months the entire underlying systems that we have for online advertising.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I have to say, I find the answers incredulous, as incredulous as you suggesting that $1 million is such a wonderful thing when you made $8 billion in Q4 last year. Not taking this as seriously as you ought to have is a detriment to our democracy, and you should have done better.

Thanks.

The Chair:

Monsieur Gourde, you're next up, for another five minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Jacques Gourde:

I'm going to come back to a practical question.

Elections Canada will pay particular attention to all digital platforms during this election. If a problem arises due to false advertising, fake news or the like, do you have a memorandum of understanding to work directly with Elections Canada as quickly as possible to remedy the situation?

(1625)

[English]

Mr. Jason Kee:

We don't have something as formal as an MOU. We've had extremely robust engagement with both Elections Canada and the commissioner of Canada elections. The commissioner's office is actually doing the enforcement of act; Elections Canada actually administers the elections.

Especially with Elections Canada, we're working with them to source data on candidates and information that we can actually see surface in Google Search, for example, when someone is searching for candidate information.

Certainly with the commissioner of Canada elections, we're working on enforcement-related actions. With respect to their principal concern about advertising, because we're not taking advertising, it's less of a concern, but there are also additional measures that were introduced in the act around impersonation, for example, and we're working with them on those issues. We will work with them very closely. [Translation]

Mr. Jacques Gourde:

I'm a little worried about that, because today, everything moves so fast in the digital age. If there is an irregularity during my election campaign, I will file a complaint with Elections Canada, and an Elections Canada representative may check with you that same day. You tell me that you have no memorandum of understanding, that you have never negotiated in order to put in place ways of working and that you have not designated anyone. An Elections Canada representative will call you, but who will they contact?

The complaint will be transferred from one person to another, and someone will eventually answer it? Has someone in your company already been designated for the election period to speak to an Elections Canada representative and respond to complaints? [English]

Mr. Jason Kee:

Yes. Essentially, there will be a team of people, depending on the specific issue, to respond to specific issues that get raised. We call them “escalation paths”.

Essentially, when we have established regulators such as the commissioner's office or Elections Canada, they will actually have means to get immediate responses on urgent issues simply because they will escalate issues that are serious ones, and then we would actually bypass or accelerate through the normal reporting processes.

It's also worth noting, in the event that you see anything on any of our systems, that we have a wide variety of reporting mechanisms for you to report it directly to us, so we'd encourage you to do that as well. [Translation]

Mr. Jacques Gourde:

Is this team already in place? Does it already exist, or will it be set up over the summer? [English]

Mr. Jason Kee:

The team is actually in the process of being set up. [Translation]

Mr. Jacques Gourde:

Thank you.

That's it for me. [English]

The Chair:

Next up for five minutes is Mr. Baylis.

Mr. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Thank you, gentlemen.

I want to follow up a little bit on what my colleague Nate was saying. We are clearly struggling to believe you about the aspect of you being able to meet the requirements of Bill C-76. Facebook says they can meet them. Are you aware of that?

Mr. Jason Kee:

We are aware.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You're aware of that.

What skills do their engineers have that your engineers don't have?

Mr. Jason Kee:

It's not a reflection of skill. It's a reflection of their advertising systems work very differently from ours and they could accommodate the requirements in a way that we simply could not.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

What if when you want to go post an advertisement, you go through that page, you post up your advertisement, and you just add a little box that says this is a political ad? Then you have your programmers program exactly like Mr. Erskine-Smith said, so it will delay that going up for 24 hours.

Why don't they do that? It seems like a pretty simple fix.

Mr. Jason Kee:

Simply because the way our advertisement systems work, the fix was not nearly as simple as it might seem on the surface. Again, these are extremely complex systems so that every single time you implement one change it actually has a cascade effect. After robust discussion over many months about the ability to implement these kinds of systems, basically it simply became clear we couldn't do it in time.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

It became clear, so you had a long discussion. Clearly when you had that discussion you came out with a timeline that was reasonable, right?

Mr. Jason Kee:

We were working towards the June 30 timeline, which is when the requirements—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

And I got that. You said you couldn't meet that.

When you had this robust discussion you clearly said we looked at it all, we can't get it done in this time. You had a schedule that had to be done. What was the schedule date?

Mr. Jason Kee:

June 30 was the only scheduled date we were looking at because that's when the legal obligations came into effect.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Let's say I've got to do a project and I've got to get it done by June 30. I say how do I get it done, I see the steps that need to be done, and I come up with a date, and I say can I meet that date or not?

I don't just say as an engineer we can't do June 30. They had to do some form of calculations and some form of projections. That's what I'm asking you. They clearly did that to say they can't meet this, so when they did these projections, what date did they come up with?

Mr. Jason Kee:

There wasn't a date because June 30 was the only date. It was the date when legal obligations came into force and if the system was not built and in place by then, we would not be in compliance with the law. Therefore, if it was—

(1630)

Mr. Frank Baylis:

How did they determine they couldn't meet that date?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Simply by virtue of having looked at the work that would be required—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Okay, so they looked at the work that would be required and then they said it's a lot of work. I got that. They had to say how long that work's going to take if we start today. How long did they say that work would take?

Mr. Jason Kee:

The didn't give us that projection.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I want to understand something. We said we need it done by June 30 and then they went and did some kind of projection that said they couldn't do it by June 30, but the projection didn't say when they could do it, it just said it couldn't be done. But they have to, then, say I need six months, seven months, 10 months, 10 years, and then say if I start today, I can make it. What was their projection date to get it done by?

Mr. Jason Kee:

I can't give you that information because it was a “can you do it by this?”

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Even if they say can you do it by this...? Let's say I want you to build me a house and I want you to build it in 10 days. They say they did the calculations, they could only build it in 30 days. Okay fine, so if you start today, you've got 30 days.

You say I want to program something. It's really complicated.

I understand that, Mr. Kee, it's very complicated. So I do a calculation, I say I need seven months, and it says that you've got to get it done in six. It can't get done. I get that. But I want the seven months number, or the 10 days number. I want the number when they did the projections of when it can be done by. It's a simple question. They can't just say it can't be done, because then they didn't do the work.

Do you follow me or not?

Did they do a schedule to say when it could be done? They have to have done this to say it could not be done by this schedule.

Mr. Jason Kee:

I don't have the information. I can inquire.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I'm not asking you to inquire only. I'm asking you to come back here and give us a specific date on the calculations that they did to say they could meet this date. Am I clear?

Mr. Jason Kee:

You're clear.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Do you understand what I'm asking for?

Mr. Jason Kee:

I understand what you're asking. With respect to our ability to disclose it, because given the fact that it's an internal confidential engineering information—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You cannot disclose—

Mr. Jason Kee:

I'm saying that I was not made aware of any kind of projected dates.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I understand that you per se weren't made aware of it, but it exists. Are you going to disclose it or not? Is this some kind of secret that it takes...? Is this is part of the Google secrets?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Simply put, I cannot commit to the disclosure without having internal conversations first.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I would like to see the exact calculations that were done when they predicted they couldn't meet this date. Does that make sense or not? Is this some kind of bad question I'm asking? I'm just curious.

Mr. Jason Kee:

Given the fact that as of June 30, legal obligations came into force and that [Inaudible-Editor]

Mr. Frank Baylis:

They couldn't meet them, I got that.

Mr. Jason Kee:

The question was a binary one, simply “Can you do it by this date?” The answer was no. That was where we were.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Okay, so how did they get to the “no”? They were asked, “Can you do it in six months?” They said, “No, we can't.”

How did they get there? Did they just say, “No, can't do it”, or did they make some type of calculation?

It's a simple question. I'm asking you, “Can you get it done in this time frame?” “No.” Did you just say no off the top of your head, or did you do some type of work to say when you can't get it done by?

Facebook said, “Well, our engineers are maybe a little smarter,” or “Our systems are clearly not as complex as their wonderful systems,” or “We have more money than Google to do it.” I don't know what they did, but they did some calculations and said, “Yeah, we can do it.”

You guys did some calculations and said no, or did you just say off the top of your head, “No, we can't do it”?

Did you make it up or did you at least do some type of work? That's what I'm asking; and if you did the work, I'd like to see it.

Mr. Jason Kee:

As I said, we examined the requirements and it became clear that we simply couldn't comply within the time frame. To be clear, it has also been clear that Microsoft can't do it; Yahoo! is still undetermined, but likely also; and many others are not going to be able to complete the requirement.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Facebook can do it; and Microsoft, you said....

Yahoo! is doing some type of calculations to determine if they can do it.

You did some calculations, or did you make it up?

It's a simple question: Did you calculate it, or did you just decide you can't do it.

Mr. Jason Kee:

We were advised by our engineering teams that we would not be able to meet the requirement. That is—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Did your engineering team just say it off the top of their heads, or did they do some type of work?

Why are you hiding from this? If you did the work, just say, “Look, Frank, we looked at it; it's going to take us 2.2 years and four months.”

Why are you so upset about it? Just tell me. Why are you hiding from it?

Mr. Jason Kee:

It's not a matter of being upset. It's just more the fact that there was a hard deadline and the question was a binary yes or no. The answer—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Okay, but how did you get the answer to that question?

Mr. Jason Kee:

That is what I'm saying we'd have to look into.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Did they just make it off the top of their heads, “We can't do it”, or did they do some calculations? You said Yahoo! is doing some calculations.

Mr. Jason Kee:

I've already told you that we would have to inquire.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Are you going to come back with the dates—

Mr. Jason Kee:

I have to inquire.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

—and the calculations?

Mr. Jason Kee:

I have to inquire. I can't commit to coming back with calculations.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

If they've done—

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Baylis. We are going to have more time, so if you want some more time, you can ask for that.

Next we'll have Mr. Dusseault.

Folks, we do have quite a bit of time. We have 55 minutes. We have these witnesses for the rest of the time. Anyway, just let me know. Typically, we try to end by five on Thursdays, but we'll see where it goes.

Mr. Dusseault, you have three minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

This time I will focus more on YouTube, a very popular and influential platform, just like Google, of which it is a part. I was talking about it earlier. YouTube sometimes directs users to extreme, unreliable content that reports or occasionally praises conspiracy theories. YouTube makes this content look like real information.

I was wondering if you had any details about the algorithm used for users, once they are on a web page displaying, say, political content, since that is the subject of our discussion today. The algorithm will give them suggestions for other videos on the right of the page they are viewing, or under the video if they are using a mobile phone. What algorithm is used and what is the degree of transparency of this algorithm that suggests content to users when they are on a particular web page?

What mechanism is there to ensure that this content does not praise conspiracy theories or give fake news, unreliable information or, perhaps, unbalanced information, in other words information that may just promote an idea or vision, a political party?

What degree of transparency and what mechanism have you put in place to ensure that the content that is suggested to users is quality content, that it is balanced in terms of public policy, political parties and political ideas as well?

(1635)

[English]

Mr. Jason Kee:

There are a number of factors that go into the recommendation system. It's worthwhile noting that the weighting that occurs around news and information content is different from, say, entertainment content. Initially, the recommendations were actually built more for entertainment content such as music, etc. It actually works extremely well for that.

When it was applied to news and information, it became more apparent that there were some challenges, which is actually why we changed the weighting system. What that means, again, is looking at the factor once we evaluate the video and then at what's the authoritativeness: overweighting for authoritativeness and under-weighting for information that isn't necessarily going to be authoritative or trustworthy.

That is very contextual. It depends on the specifics of whether you're signed in or not. The information is available on your watch time. It's based on information about the video you're watching, on the kind of video that other people have liked to watch and on what are the other videos that people who have liked this video like to watch, etc. This is why it actually is dynamic and will constantly evolve and change.

In addition to making tweaks and changes to that system over time to ensure that we're actually providing more authoritative information in the case of news and information, we're also adding additional contextual pieces, whereby we'll actually have clear flags, labels and contextual boxes to indicate when there is subject matter or individuals that are frequently subject to misinformation. For example, there's the conspiracy theory issue that you raised.

Essentially, if you see a video that may be suggesting vaccine hesitation or so on and so forth, you'll get information saying that this is not actually confirmed by science and that gives more contextual information about what that video is covering. The same thing applies to things like 9/11 conspiracy theories and so on and so forth. This will be an ongoing process.

Mostly, we want to make sure that even if a user is seeing information, they're actually given context so they can properly evaluate it themselves. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

I would like to use the seconds I have left to discuss the transparency of this algorithm. Earlier, I think Mr. McKay talked about this issue of transparency with respect to advertising, which is why you are shown certain ads. There even seems to be a new feature in the Chrome browser that allows users to see why such advertising has been offered to them.

Is it possible to have the same functionality for content recommended to YouTube users? This would give them a better understanding of why certain content is suggested to them rather than another. [English]

Mr. Jason Kee:

Certainly, finding means by which we can actually increase transparency and users can understand the context in which they're being served information is something that we're constantly working on.

We actually produced a report—I think it was 25 pages—on how Google fights this information. That includes an entire dedicated section on YouTube that explains much of what I described to you, as well as, again, the general factors that go in. It's something that we'll strive to work towards, like we're doing on ads on the YouTube platform as well.

(1640)

Mr. Colin McKay:

Just to add a supplemental to what Mr. Kee just said, on your Google account writ more largely, you can go into “myaccount” and it will identify what we've identified as your interests across all of our products and services. You can go to myaccount and it will say in general terms that you like 1980s music and racing videos. It will give you that general observation, which you can then correct. You can delete that information or you can add in additional interests so that across our services we have a better understanding of what you're interested in and, as well, what you don't want us to serve.

On the page itself, there is a little three-dot bar beside the videos, the specially recommended videos—on mobile, as you mentioned—where you can signal that you're not interested in that content or that you would like more of it. There is granular control to not seeing that in your video feed, your newsfeed or across Google services.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We will go into the next round, which will be our final one. I think we have four more questions to be asked, or four more time periods. On the list, we have Mr. Graham, Mr. Erskine-Smith, Mr. Nater and Mr. Baylis, each for five minutes.

Is that okay?

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thanks.

I want to build on other questions on timelines. At the very beginning, in the first round of questions, we were trying to get a sense of whether you would be ready for the next election in 2023. That seemed to be a difficult question to answer. I never got an answer that said “yes, Google will be ready to implement Bill C-76, by the 2023 federal election”, assuming it happens at that time.

If we know that it's going to be ready for 2023 and we know it's not going to be ready for June 30, 2019, do you know? Are you actively working on it now? Do you know if it's going to be ready at some point between those two dates?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Simply put, it would be clear to say that we are going to strive to have it ready by 2023. I couldn't commit to you specifically about when it may or may not be ready.

The other thing that is worthwhile noting is that as a global company we work on global elections, so the teams that are working on this are deploying the transparency report from place to place to place. It will continue to evolve and grow in terms of that. As well, our own advertising systems will continue to evolve and grow.

That's why providing a hard date—that it will take two years or however—is very difficult. Between now and then, there will be a number of changes that have already been introduced in the system that would actually impact that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Understood.

When GDPR came in fairly recently, how long a lead time did you have on that and how long did it take for you to put it in place?

Mr. Colin McKay:

I believe the conversations around GDPR took upwards of four years to deliberate on the legislation itself and then its implementation. It's still going through implementation. The focus we had on GDPR from the outset was both on participating in the discussion about the content, the tone and the objectives of the legislation, working closely with the European Commission and their staff, and then on also ensuring we had the systems in place to be able to comply with it. That's still an ongoing process.

If you're drawing an analogy, there's an extreme distinction between the way the amendments to Bill C-76 were considered and implemented and the way legislation normally is considered and implemented.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate your point.

Mr. Kee, I talked in the last round of questions about the 15 word changes. Between rounds, I've been looking through my notes, because I do sit on PROC and I was involved with the Bill C-76 process from beginning to end. We had numerous witnesses and numerous submissions, but I cannot find any from Google. On those 15 words, how would—

Mr. Jason Kee:

That would be because the changes were introduced during clause-by-clause after the witness list had closed, so we didn't make representations to the committee because the provisions in question were not being considered at the time.

As I said, I'm more than happy to circulate them now. They were provided to the Senate committee when it was at that stage.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. Thank you. That's good to know.

That's all I have for the moment. I appreciate your being here. It's been an interesting meeting, so thank you very much for this.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Go ahead, Mr. Baylis.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You're not going to accept political advertisements. That was the decision that was made, right?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Correct.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Okay.

How are you going to stop me from advertising? You say that you don't want to accept my ad, but I'm, like, nefarious. I'm not a good actor, so I'm going to try to put an ad up anyway. How are you going to stop me?

Mr. Jason Kee:

As I mentioned in my opening remarks, there will be a combination of automated systems that will be evaluating advertising that comes in, as well as, basically, ad enforcement teams that will be also reviewing all the ads.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Okay. To stop me, you're going to have this system that you're going to put in place to identify an ad, right?

Mr. Jason Kee: Correct.

Mr. Frank Baylis: Then you're also going to have a separate team to identify ads as well—one automated, one not automated—and they're going to identify these ads, right?

(1645)

Mr. Jason Kee:

Yes. Often what happens is that the automated systems will review the ads at the beginning and look for flags or tags that indicate that it's probably a political ad. Then, in some instances, that will go to a human team for review, because it may require a contextual analysis that the machines simply can't provide.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Right. You are not able within this time frame to make the registry, but you're able to put in the programming, the people and the resources necessary to stop it, right?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Correct.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Okay. I come along and I have this ad. Either you can take this ad and put it on the registry or you can just stop it, but you clearly can identify it, right? We've agreed on that. You've just said that you can identify it.

Mr. Jason Kee:

We will be using our systems to identify and enforce our ad policies, yes.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You said to me that you agree that you can identify that this is the ad.

Mr. Jason Kee:

Correct.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Okay.

Once you can identify that it's the ad, instead of saying “I have all my technology and people to block it”—you've got that—why can't you just say, “Okay, I've identified it, and I'm just going to put it on the registry”?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Simply because, again, the real-time time frame in order to do that would actually be tricky for us to comply with, to update a registry, and, as I said, it also would be delivering that information to third parties.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You can't do it in real time.

Let's say I come along. You have your automated system. Here's the ad. It's no good, but you don't know that because you can't do it in real time, right? It's up on your page or your Google platform for however time it takes you.... You can't do it in 24 hours, so in how long can you do it...? Two days? Give me a number.

Mr. Jason Kee:

Well, like I said, it would get tagged and then reviewed—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I know, but how long would it take for you to identify it? You couldn't make the 24 hours, right? I got that. In how long could you have done it...? A week? A day? Two days?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Again, I couldn't provide you with specific time frames.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Let's say 48 hours. Can we say that just for argument's sake?

I come along. Here's my ad—boom. I have a system to identify it. It takes 48 hours, though, right? It's up on your system for 48 hours before you go, “Oh my gosh, this ad has taken us 48 hours to identify and now we have to take it down.” Is that what's going to happen?

Mr. Jason Kee:

As I said, we will have both the automated systems and our ads enforcement team that will identify it and—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

But will they be able to identify it in real time?

Mr. Jason Kee: —that will basically be applying—

Mr. Frank Baylis: In real time?

Mr. Jason Kee:

As fast as we can manage.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Okay, but you have to do it within 24 hours, right?

Mr. Jason Kee:

There's a difference between being able to identify and remove the ad versus being able to update an ad registry.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Okay. I want to make sure I understand. There's a difference between being able to identify it and remove it within 24 hours, no problem.... I have an automated system to identify it and remove it, and I have automated system people. Say I've identified it and removed it—whew, that was close. Identifying it and removing it in 24 hours, that I can do, but identifying it and putting it on a registry, like a big database—it's not even that big, I'd imagine, by your standards—that I can't do. Is that what I understand?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Due to other aspects of the complexities with respect to the registry requirements, that is why we couldn't actually deploy. As I said, we do this in other jurisdictions, right?

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Yes, I'm sure you do.

Let's be clear on what you're saying. You can identify it and block it within 24 hours, using a combination of software and people.

You can identify and block it within 24 hours. Is that correct?

Mr. Jason Kee:

As I said, we will be enforcing very vigorously and with respect to detecting and removal.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You said that you have the systems. Your engineers did that.

Say I've identified it and blocked it within 24 hours. Once you've identified it, whatever programming...because I have to do some programming to say, “Poof, take it down within 24 hours.” I imagine you can do it instantaneously or is it going to be up for 24 hours? I don't even know. How long is it going to be up for? That's my question to you.

Mr. Jason Kee:

As we do with all classes of advertising, we'll basically be trying to remove it immediately upon detection.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Oh, immediately. What's that? Instantaneously?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Immediately upon detection.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Okay. So you can catch it and immediately bring it down, but you can't catch it and within 24 hours you have to program it and move it all the way into this database? Now, that's asking too much, frankly; your programmers can't do that, but they can sure as heck program it, find it, get a backup team and get it down instantaneously. That ad is not getting up there. Say I know the ad, and I found it instantaneously, but you want me to program a database? I mean, we're just Google....

How many billions of hours do you get watched a day, did you say? Was it 500? What was your number?

Mr. Jason Kee:

On YouTube, there are a billion hours of content watched every day.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

A day? So you have a pretty big database. Can I assume that?

Mr. Jason Kee:

There are a multitude of databases, but again—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

For a little database for a bunch of legal advertisements to put on...I can't imagine that database is one-tenth of one-tenth of one-tenth of your hardware/software net, but your engineers can't program...? They can do everything. They can catch it and identify it instantaneously, but they just can't put it in a database because that's too complicated? Isn't one of the expertises of Google database management? Am I off here?

(1650)

Mr. Jason Kee:

As I said previously, the specific requirements were simply something that we couldn't accommodate.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Can you put—

The Chair:

Mr. Baylis, that finishes the combined time for you and Mr. Erskine-Smith.

We have somebody else, and then we're going to come back to you.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

All right. That's fair.

The Chair:

It looks as if that's what you're asking for.

We'll go next to Mr. Nater for five minutes.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

It's good to be here on this committee. I usually sit on the procedure and House affairs committee, so it's nice to be here for a bit of a change of scenery.

When it comes to YouTube, you have policies in place in terms of what can and cannot be shown on YouTube. Often, though, there are situations where some of the most viral videos, or those that approach that line and may not quite step over the line.... How do you determine how close to that line you get? What type of contextual analysis is there? What types of safeguards are in place to establish where that line is and when someone may get right up to that line without necessarily stepping over it? What types of procedures do you have in place?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Essentially, any video that gets identified as such, either through reporting or through our automated systems, which also, again, review the videos to detect for compliance, will go to manual review for a human analysis. We'll also basically examine it, saying, okay, this doesn't actually cross the line into actual hate speech that's inciting violence, but it's derogatory in some other way, and they will basically classify it in its borderline context.

Mr. John Nater:

I want to go back to Bill C-76 for a minute.

When we talk about technology, innovation, the digital economy, the first people I think of are not public servants at the Privy Council Office; they are not public servants at Elections Canada. When I think of the digital economy and things like that, I think of companies like Google, Facebook, Twitter—those that are innovating.

In your testimony, you mentioned that you weren't consulted by the drafters of the legislation. I find that troubling. Government is probably one of the worst offenders for keeping up with technology, especially when drafting legislation, when they're not consulting with those within the industry.

You mentioned that the decision not to advertise was largely a technical decision, based on the requirements of obtaining that by June 30, July 1. I can accept that, and I want to put on the record the reason why I accept that.

Elections Canada themselves said that the provisions in Bill C-76 ought to have been in law with royal assent by April 30, 2018. On April 30, 2018, the legislation was only just tabled in the House of Commons. It did not receive royal assent until December 2018.

If Google, YouTube, your private businesses decide tomorrow that you no longer want to stream cute cat videos, there is nothing that the Government of Canada can do force you to do so. I would assume it would be the same with any type of advertising. If you decide not to advertise for any reason outside of human rights violations, there is nothing requiring you to do that.

What I find fascinating, though—and it is more of a rant than a question—is that the Government of Canada, in their rush to implement this legislation at the very last minute of the time period they're able to do it within, never consulted with those who would be implementing a large portion of this legislation.

The changes were done in clause-by-clause. There were 200-plus amendments in clause-by-clause. I was part of those discussions. I missed a few of them for the birth of a child, but I was there for most of the discussions. Then, they were table-dropped at the very last minute, after the witnesses had the opportunity to discuss....

It's not a question, but you're welcome to comment on that. I am just incredulous that the government would rush this legislation—the very last possible period of time to have it implemented before the election—and then expect every private business to comply with the rules for which they have had no opportunity to, (a) be consulted or (b) make suggestions during the period that clause-by-clause happened.

I'd be happy if you have any comments on that.

Mr. Colin McKay:

I can reply with an observation. We're having a conversation here where the discussion is effectively that one company has discussed how they may possibly implement this, based on a promise to do it by June 30, and how we have provided information on why we cannot introduce tools that reflect the obligations in the Elections Act as amended.

The reality, as you described it, is that many companies have many different products and services across this industry, whether it's with advertising or delivering news, and there are many different ways that they're interpreting the obligations and their capacity to meet the obligations. So far, we've had only one company that has said they in fact will be implementing a tool as described in the legislation.

I am not saying that as a defence; I am saying that as a reflection of the complexity issues. As you observed, it needs an intense amount of study and discussion to be able to roll out tools that are effective, and that have longevity and provide the information in a predictable and reliable way to users.

In no way do we want to be in a position where we're not doing that. Our business is to provide information and answers to questions from our users.

However, we are in an uncomfortable situation where we are complying with the legislation by not taking political advertising. The reality, as you said, is that with further consultation and a discussion of the amendments that Mr. Kee tabled, as well as broader consideration of the industry, from both our point of view as well as Canadian businesses and Canadian sites, there may have been a different conversation around the appropriate tool for Canadians that would deliver information to them during this electoral cycle.

(1655)

The Chair:

Next up, we're going to go with a combination. We're going to go with Mr. Erskine-Smith first and then Mr. Baylis to finish. We have about four minutes left.

Go ahead, Mr. Erskine-Smith.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Thanks very much.

First I want to ask about the review team. Obviously a lot depends upon the honesty of users, in a way. You had a certain experience in Washington state that was reported where political ads were placed in some instances.

What is the size of the team in Canada that will be reviewing this? How many staff—?

Mr. Jason Kee:

It will be a globally distributed team that will basically be ramped up as required to respond and enforce the ads policy.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Is there a number of staff that you've targeted?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Again, I don't know the specific number of staff: enough to comply with the policy.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Okay.

I ask about numbers, because with respect to trust and safety.... Again, this is from an article in Bloomberg. I understand that there were a modest number of staff—only 22, I think—who were to review content for trust and safety. That number is higher now.

What is the exact number of people who are now reviewing content for trust and safety?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Over 10,000.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

So you've gone from 22 to over 10,000. That's great.

Maybe you could enlighten me.... In 2016, one of your employees proposed that content right up to that line ought not to be recommended. YouTube did not take that advice seriously and rejected that advice.

You said now that as of January of this year, they have accepted the advice. What changed?

Mr. Jason Kee:

Again, I wouldn't characterize it that way.

I think it's part of an ongoing development and evolution of the policies, and basically how we approach borderline, challenging, controversial, unauthoritative, low-quality content on the platform. There is currently an evolution in our approach with respect to this, and basically a deployment of additional technologies, especially through algorithms, etc., to try to make sure we're serving up authoritative and quality content to our users.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

So it's not perhaps because no one was paying attention previously and you were making lots of money, and now people are paying attention and there's negative press and you've decided to change your practices as a result.

Mr. Jason Kee:

I wouldn't agree with the interpretation.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Okay.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I'm going to take a different tack now.

Google, my colleague said that you made $8 billion in last quarter. I looked it up. It's actually $8.5 billion in U.S. dollars, so congratulations. That's really good in Canadian dollars. You make it by selling advertisements, right? I like a certain music video or I like to read a certain journalist, so you show me that information and then you throw an ad up there and you make a lot of money on it. You make a tremendous amount of money.

That has worked very well for you. In fact, what has happened is that the journalist, the musician, photographer, writer, actor, the movie producer—all those people—make nothing. But that's okay. Even though that copyright is taken from them and they make nothing and you make all the money, that's okay. Why is it okay? As you well said, Mr. Kee, you're a platform not a publisher, and as long as you remain a platform, you have something called “safe harbour” which protects you.

What happens is that all of our artists, anybody who has anything copyrighted, a photojournalist.... It used to happen that they'd get an amazing picture, and they'd sell that picture and make a lot of money. Now you take that picture for free, but you didn't do anything. You show me the picture; you throw up an advertisement, and you make all the money. That's where all this content is coming from, and you don't pay for it and you don't want to.

The danger you have—why you don't want to do this—is that the minute you start controlling these ads, you move from being a platform to proof positive that you're a publisher. Once you're a publisher, you're subject to copyright and all that.

Is that not the real reason....? With this technical mumbo-jumbo you just fed me about how you can catch it instantaneously, stop it, but you can't get it on a database, is that not really that you're trying to protect this business model that allows you to make $8.5 billion U.S. in a quarter while all of these copyrighted people can't make a nickel? They've have been screaming to high hell that they can't make a nickel, and you're taking all that money. You just don't want to be a publisher, because once you're a publisher, you're no longer covered by safe harbour.

Isn't that the real reason?

(1700)

Mr. Jason Kee:

Not remotely.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

That's what I thought—

Mr. Jason Kee:

There are several things there.

Number one, if that were the case, it's puzzling as to why we would take a decision that is costing us money, insofar as we're no longer earning revenue from a class of ads. More importantly, vis-à-vis our publisher partners, vis-à-vis YouTube creators, we operate under a partnership model where we actually share revenue. In the case of websites, for example, that use Google's infrastructure—which is what has generated our challenges for complying with Bill C-76, because they show Google ads against their content—they earn more than 70% of the revenue for every single ad that shows because they're the ones providing the content.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Mr. Kee, you're paying a few dollars to protect your business model. You're not paying it...and don't ever try to pass that off as being good citizens.

Mr. Jason Kee:

We paid over $13 billion out to websites last year alone.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You're paying it because you do not want to become a publisher. Are you ready to say here and now that you're ready to be a publisher, and call yourself a publisher, and be subject—

Mr. Jason Kee:

We're not a publisher.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

I know you're not a publisher. I know you're very well protecting yourself that way, because the minute you become a publisher, all that money that you're stealing from everybody else you have to start paying for.

Mr. Jason Kee:

As I said, because we operate under a partnership model, where we're actually paying out to creators and we're paying out to these publishers—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

And you have negotiated.... You are paying out, and which artists did you negotiate how much for their—

Mr. Jason Kee:

We have thousands of music licence agreements in place with all the major collectives, record labels, etc., where we paid out over $6 billion to the music industry last year.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You paid $6 billion, and you only made $8.5 billion a quarter.

Mr. Jason Kee:

That was through YouTube alone. That's not actually talking about our other services.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

That's it; you made even more money, I know that.

Mr. Jason Kee:

That's in addition to the over $13 billion we paid out to publishers who are showing our ads. As we said, our fundamental model is a partnership model.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Are you telling me here and now that all these people have copyright, are happy...?

The Chair:

Mr. Baylis—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

This is my last question.

Are you telling me you're such a good corporate citizen that if I talked to any of the musicians, the journalists, the photographers, the writers, the actors or the movie producers, they would say, “We're very satisfied with what Google and YouTube are paying us”? That's a yes-or-no question.

Mr. Jason Kee:

We will continue to engage with them. We treat them as partners, and we'll do that.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Can you just say yes or no? Will they say, yes, they are happy, or no?

Mr. Jason Kee:

We will continue to engage and we have a partnership with them.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

It's a simple question. Are they going to be happy?

Mr. Jason Kee:

We have a partnership model with them.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Thank you.

The Chair:

That brings us to the end of our questions.

Mr. Erskine-Smith, have you one last comment, or are we good? Okay.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I want to make a comment on a separate topic, on something that Google did say, because it's not all bad.

I want to congratulate Google, because today you announced that all Chromebooks will be Linux-compatible out of the box starting soon. So not everything is negative. I'm very happy with some of the things you are doing. Thank you for that.

The Chair:

Once again, Mr. McKay and Mr. Kee, thank you for coming. We look forward to your appearance and Google's appearance at the IGC. I hope the requests are taken seriously, as we've requested your CEO; we hope you're still considering that.

Thanks for coming today.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Bob Zimmer (Prince George—Peace River—Northern Rockies, PCC)):

Bonjour à tous. Nous en sommes à la 148e séance du Comité permanent de l’accès à l’information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l’éthique, conformément aux sous-alinéas 108(3)h)(vi) et (vii) du Règlement, étude de la publicité électorale sur YouTube.

Nous accueillons aujourd’hui, de Google Canada, Colin McKay, chef, Politiques publiques et relations gouvernementales. Nous accueillons également Jason Kee, conseiller en politiques publiques et relations gouvernementales.

Avant que nous ne commencions, j’aimerais annoncer à la salle que le communiqué a été annoncé à 15 h 30, de sorte qu’il est diffusé en ce moment même, en ce qui concerne la question dont nous avons traité mardi, alors surveillez-le bien.

Nous allons commencer par M. McKay.

M. Colin McKay (chef, Politiques publiques et relations gouvernementales, Google Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci beaucoup de m’avoir invité à m’adresser à vous aujourd’hui.

J’aimerais commencer par une observation. D’abord et avant tout, nous tenons à préciser que nous estimons qu’il y a une inexactitude dans le texte de la motion à l’origine de cette étude. Plus précisément, la motion nous invitait à expliquer notre décision de ne pas faire de publicité pendant les prochaines élections et notre refus de nous conformer au projet de loi C-76. Notre décision de ne pas accepter de publicité politique réglementée ne constitue pas un refus de nous conformer au projet de loi C-76 et à la Loi électorale du Canada, mais elle a plutôt été prise précisément pour nous y conformer.

Des élections libres et justes sont essentielles à la démocratie, et nous, chez Google, prenons très au sérieux notre travail de protection des élections et de promotion de l’engagement civique. En ce qui concerne la cybersécurité, nous avons mis au point plusieurs produits qui sont offerts gratuitement aux campagnes politiques, aux organismes électoraux et aux organes de presse. Il s’agit, comme je l’ai déjà mentionné, du Projet Shield, qui utilise l’infrastructure de Google pour protéger les organisations contre les attaques par déni de service et de notre programme de protection avancé, qui protège les comptes de personnes à risque d’attaques ciblées en mettant en œuvre l’authentification à deux facteurs, en limitant le partage de données entre les applications et en prévoyant une autorisation spéciale au titre des demandes de recouvrement de comptes. Cela va au-delà des protections robustes que nous avons déjà intégrées à nos produits.

Nous avons également entrepris d’importants efforts pour lutter contre la propagation intentionnelle de la désinformation dans les moteurs de recherche, sur les sites d'actualités, sur YouTube et dans nos publicités. Ce travail repose sur trois piliers fondamentaux: insister sur la qualité, lutter contre les mauvais joueurs et donner un contexte aux personnes.

Je vais maintenant céder la parole à mon collègue.

M. Jason Kee (conseiller en politiques publiques et relations gouvernementales, Google Canada):

Nous insistons sur la qualité en identifiant et en classant les contenus de haute qualité dans les moteurs de recherche, les sites d'actualités et sur YouTube afin de fournir aux utilisateurs l’information qui fait le plus autorité en réponse à leurs requêtes de nouvelles. Cela consiste à accorder un poids plus important aux informations qui font autorité, par opposition à leur pertinence ou à leur popularité, en réponse aux requêtes de nouvelles, surtout en temps de crise ou de nouvelles de dernière heure.

Sur YouTube, cela comprend également la réduction des recommandations de contenu limite qui enfreint presque nos politiques sur le contenu, du contenu qui peut induire les utilisateurs en erreur de manière préjudiciable ou du contenu de faible qualité qui peut entraîner une mauvaise expérience de l’utilisateur.

Nous combattons les mauvais joueurs en coupant leurs flux d’argent et de trafic. Nous mettons constamment à jour notre contenu et nos politiques de publicité pour interdire les comportements trompeurs, comme la fausse représentation dans nos annonces ou l’usurpation d’identité sur YouTube, et pour interdire les publicités de contenu offensif, haineux ou violent ou celles qui dissimulent des questions controversées ou des événements délicats.

Nous appliquons ces politiques avec vigueur, en utilisant les dernières avancées de l’apprentissage automatique pour identifier le contenu et les publicités qui enfreignent nos politiques, et nous avons une équipe de plus de 10 000 personnes qui y travaillent.

Bien que la diversité de l’information soit intrinsèquement intégrée dans la conception des moteurs de recherche de nouvelles et de YouTube, chaque recherche offre de multiples options provenant de diverses sources, ce qui accroît l’exposition à diverses perspectives. Nous travaillons également à fournir plus de contexte aux utilisateurs de l’information qu’ils lisent. Pour ce faire, nous avons mis sur pied des comités de connaissances en recherche qui fournissent des renseignements de haut niveau sur une personne ou un enjeu; des étiquettes de contenu dans la recherche et les nouvelles de façon à préciser lorsqu’elles ont fait l'objet d'une vérification des faits ou qu'elles constituent un article d’opinion; et sur YouTube, des rayons dédiés à l’information pour s’assurer que les utilisateurs sont exposés à des sources d’information faisant autorité durant des événements d’actualité et des comités d’information qui précisent si une chaîne donnée est financée par l’État ou par le secteur public, et des informations faisant autorité sur des sujets bien établis qui font souvent l'objet de campagnes de désinformation.

M. Colin McKay:

En ce qui concerne les élections, nous travaillons en partenariat avec Élections Canada et des organes de presse canadiens pour fournir de l’information sur la façon de voter et des renseignements essentiels sur les candidats. Nous soutiendrons également la diffusion en direct des débats des candidats sur YouTube et nous créons une chaîne YouTube consacrée à la couverture électorale à partir de sources d’information faisant autorité.

Notre travail de lutte contre la désinformation ne se limite pas à nos produits. Un écosystème de l’information en santé est essentiel à la démocratie, et nous consacrons des ressources importantes au soutien d’un journalisme de qualité et des efforts connexes.

L’initiative Google Actualités a élaboré une gamme complète de produits, de partenariats et de programmes pour appuyer l’industrie de l’information et a engagé 300 millions de dollars pour financer des programmes. Nous soutenons également la compréhension de l'actualité au Canada, y compris au moyen d'une subvention d’un demi-million de dollars à la Fondation canadienne du journalisme et à CIVIX pour développer NewsWise, un programme de compréhension de l'actualité qui rejoint plus d’un million d’étudiants canadiens, et une autre subvention d’un million de dollars à la Fondation canadienne du journalisme annoncée la semaine dernière pour appuyer la compréhension de l'actualité chez les Canadiens en âge de voter.

Nous finançons ces programmes parce que nous croyons que les Canadiens de tous âges comprennent comment évaluer l'information en ligne.

(1535)

M. Jason Kee:

Dans le même ordre d’idées, nous appuyons pleinement l’amélioration de la transparence des publicités politiques. L’an dernier, nous avons volontairement mis en place des exigences de vérification améliorées pour les annonceurs politiques américains, des divulgations dans les publicités électorales, ainsi qu’un nouveau rapport sur la transparence et une bibliothèque de publicités politiques pour les élections de mi-mandat aux États-Unis. Nous avons déployé des outils semblables pour les élections parlementaires en Inde et dans l’Union européenne. Même si nous avions l’intention d’adopter des mesures semblables au Canada, malheureusement, les nouvelles dispositions relatives aux plateformes en ligne présentées dans le projet de loi C-76 ne reflètent pas le fonctionnement actuel de nos systèmes de publicité en ligne ou des rapports sur la transparence. Il n’était tout simplement pas possible pour nous de mettre en oeuvre les changements importants qui auraient été nécessaires pour répondre aux nouvelles exigences dans le peu de temps que nous avions avant l’entrée en vigueur des nouvelles dispositions.

Premièrement, la définition de « plateforme en ligne » comprend un « site Internet ou une application Internet » qui vend des espaces publicitaires « directement ou indirectement », et le projet de loi impose la nouvelle obligation de registre à toute plateforme qui atteint certains seuils minimums de consultation. Cette disposition englobe non seulement les médias sociaux ou les grandes plateformes de publicité en ligne, mais aussi la plupart des éditeurs de nouvelles nationaux et régionaux, pratiquement toutes les publications multiculturelles et les sites Web et applications les plus populaires financés par la publicité, ce qui en fait une disposition d'application extraordinairement vaste.

Deuxièmement, les dispositions exigent expressément que chaque site ou application tienne son propre registre. À la différence de certaines entreprises, Google offre une vaste gamme de produits et de services publicitaires. Les annonceurs peuvent acheter des campagnes par l’entremise de Google qui seront diffusées sur des sites Google et/ou sur des sites d’éditeurs tiers. Ces systèmes sont automatisés. Souvent, il n’y a pas de lien direct entre l’annonceur et l’éditeur. Pendant le chargement de la page, le site enverra un signal indiquant qu’un utilisateur répondant à certains critères démographiques peut recevoir une annonce. Les annonceurs soumissionneront ensuite pour la possibilité d’afficher une annonce à l'intention de cet utilisateur. Le serveur publicitaire de l’annonceur gagnant affiche l’annonce gagnante dans le navigateur de l’utilisateur. Tout cela se produit en quelques fractions de seconde. L’éditeur ne sait pas immédiatement quelle annonce a été affichée et n’a pas immédiatement accès à l’annonce qui a été diffusée. Pour tenir compte des nouvelles dispositions, nous aurions dû mettre en place des systèmes entièrement nouveaux pour informer les éditeurs qu’une publicité politique réglementée avait été affichée, puis remettre une copie de cette annonce et les renseignements requis à chaque éditeur pour qu’ils les inscrivent dans leur propre registre. Cela n’était tout simplement pas possible dans le très court laps de temps qui a précédé l’entrée en vigueur des dispositions.

Troisièmement, les dispositions exigent que le registre soit mis à jour le jour même où la publicité politique réglementée est affichée. Cela signifie en fait que le registre doit être mis à jour en temps réel, puisqu’une annonce politique réglementée qui était affichée à 23 h 59 devrait être incluse dans le registre avant minuit. En raison de la complexité de nos systèmes de publicité en ligne, nous ne pouvions tout simplement pas nous engager à respecter un tel délai.

Une dernière complication est que la « publicité électorale » comprend la publicité qui favorise l'élection d'un candidat « par une prise de position sur une question à laquelle est associé un parti enregistré ou un candidat ». On les appelle généralement des « publicités thématiques ». Les publicités thématiques sont très contextuelles et il est notoire qu’elles sont difficiles à cerner de façon fiable, surtout que leur définition est vague et qu’elle évolue au cours d’une campagne. Compte tenu de ces défis, nous interdisons en général cette catégorie de publicité dans les pays où elle est réglementée, comme c'est le cas avec notre récente interdiction en France.

M. Colin McKay:

Nous tenons à souligner que notre décision de ne pas accepter la publicité politique réglementée au Canada n’a pas été prise à la légère. Nous croyons sincèrement à l’utilisation responsable de la publicité en ligne pour rejoindre l’électorat, surtout pour les candidats qui n’ont peut-être pas l'aide d'un parti bien préparé derrière eux, et pour les tiers légitimes qui veulent défendre une gamme de dossiers. Il convient également de souligner que chaque fois que nous décidons de ne plus accepter une catégorie de publicité, il en résulte nécessairement des répercussions négatives sur nos revenus. Cependant, après plusieurs mois de délibérations internes et d’exploration de solutions possibles pour essayer de satisfaire autrement aux nouvelles exigences, il est devenu évident que cela ne serait tout simplement pas possible dans les quelques mois dont nous disposions. En conséquence, il a été décidé de ne pas accepter les publicités politiques réglementées et de concentrer nos efforts sur la promotion de l’engagement civique et d’autres initiatives.

(1540)

M. Jason Kee:

Au cours des prochaines semaines, notre décision de ne pas accepter la publicité politique réglementée au Canada se reflétera officiellement dans nos politiques publicitaires. Nous continuerons d’informer toutes les parties concernées du changement. Comme pour les autres catégories d’annonces que nous n’acceptons pas, la politique sera appliquée par une combinaison de systèmes automatisés et d’équipes spécialisées dans l’application des politiques sur les publicités, qui suivront une formation rigoureuse sur la nouvelle politique. Nous poursuivrons également notre travail avec Élections Canada et le commissaire aux élections fédérales sur les questions d’interprétation et d’application de la loi et les organisations pertinentes de l’industrie qui travaillent à des mesures visant à aider les plateformes en ligne et les éditeurs à s’acquitter de leurs nouvelles obligations.

Nous sommes heureux d’avoir l’occasion de discuter de nos activités électorales au Canada et de notre décision d’interdire la publicité politique réglementée.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci à vous deux.

M. Erskine-Smith sera le premier intervenant pendant notre tour de sept minutes.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Je crois savoir que Facebook et Google comptent ensemble pour 75 % des revenus de publicité numérique. La décision de Google de ne pas accepter les publicités politiques est donc assez importante pour les prochaines élections. Êtes-vous d’accord avec cela?

M. Colin McKay:

Nous pensons qu’il est important pour nous de prendre une telle décision. Toutefois, ce chiffre est généralisé. Cela ne reflète peut-être pas le marché de la publicité politique.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

C’est une décision importante pour les élections canadiennes.

Maintenant, je veux mettre en contraste et comparer deux très grandes entreprises qui opèrent dans cet espace.

Avez-vous lu le récent rapport du Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée du Canada sur l’atteinte à la sécurité de Facebook-Cambridge Analytica?

M. Colin McKay:

Oui.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

D’accord. Prenons cet exemple. Si le Commissariat à la protection de la vie privée faisait enquête sur Google et faisait des recommandations conformes à ce qui s’est passé avec Facebook, est-ce que Google se conformerait aux recommandations du Commissariat?

M. Colin McKay:

Je dirais que nous avons toujours travaillé avec les commissaires à la protection de la vie privée pour en arriver à des conclusions convenues, puis nous les avons mises en oeuvre.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

D’accord. Je pense que Google s’est fixé une norme plus élevée. Le commissaire à la protection de la vie privée dit que le cadre de protection des renseignements personnels de Facebook était vide et qu’il est encore vide. Vous ne considérez pas que le cadre de protection des renseignements personnels de Google est vide, n’est-ce pas?

M. Colin McKay:

Nous sommes deux entreprises très différentes, avec deux approches très différentes de la protection des données et de la protection des renseignements personnels.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Encore une fois, vous respectez des normes plus élevées. Rappelez-moi combien d’argent Google a-t-il rapporté l’an dernier?

M. Colin McKay:

Je ne connais pas ces chiffres par coeur.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

J’ai ici des chiffres qui montrent un revenu de 8,94 milliards de dollars, seulement pour le quatrième trimestre de 2018. Nous parlons donc d'une entreprise qui amasse des milliards de dollars et qui se conforme à des normes plus élevées que celles de Facebook, sur un certain nombre de questions différentes. Pourtant, Facebook est en mesure de mettre en oeuvre les règles prévues dans le projet de loi C-76.

Pourquoi Google ne le peut-elle pas?

M. Colin McKay:

Comme Jason l’a mentionné tout à l’heure — et il a parlé du Sénat qui se penchait sur les amendements au projet de loi C-76 —, nos systèmes et la gamme d’outils de publicité que nous offrons aux annonceurs sont beaucoup plus vastes que ceux de Facebook. Je ne peux pas parler de la décision de Facebook à cet égard.

Je peux dire que nous avons passé beaucoup de temps cette année à essayer d’évaluer comment nous mettrions en oeuvre des changements qui nous permettraient de respecter les obligations du projet de loi C-76. En raison de l’ampleur des outils de publicité que nous offrons — et Jason a mentionné les nombreux facteurs différents qui touchent nos partenaires de l’édition et nos annonceurs —, nous avons pris à contrecoeur la décision de ne pas accepter de publicités politiques cette année.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Quand vous parlez de cette année, vous voulez dire que vous travaillez activement à ce dossier, pour vous assurer que vous accepterez les publicités politiques lors des prochaines élections canadiennes?

M. Colin McKay:

C’est un point important. Nous sommes déterminés à encourager un discours politique fort et éclairé. Ce fut une décision très difficile à prendre pour nous.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Dois-je interpréter cette réponse comme un oui?

M. Colin McKay:

Oui.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Vous accepterez des publicités politiques aux prochaines élections fédérales après 2019.

M. Colin McKay:

Ce que je peux dire, c’est que nous essayons de faire évoluer nos produits au point où nous pouvons nous conformer à la réglementation canadienne. Pour l’instant, nous ne pouvons pas le faire. C’est une tâche extrêmement difficile.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Qu’en est-il de l’État de Washington? Allez-vous accepter des publicités politiques au niveau local dans l’État de Washington?

M. Colin McKay:

Nous ne l’avons pas fait au cours du dernier cycle.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Avez-vous pris l'engagement de le faire au cours du prochain cycle?

M. Colin McKay:

Je ne peux pas parler en particulier des obligations à respecter dans l’État de Washington. Je n'ai pas suivi leur évolution.

(1545)

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Je vais vous expliquer la cause de ma frustration. Vous avez une entreprise qui fait des milliards de dollars et qui examine le petit territoire de l’État de Washington et le petit territoire du Canada et qui se dit: « Votre démocratie ne nous importe pas assez. Nous n’allons simplement pas y participer. » Si un gros joueur décidait de changer les règles, je vous garantis que vous les suivriez.

Nous sommes trop petits pour vous. Vous êtes trop gros. Vous êtes trop important, et nous ne sommes tout simplement pas assez importants pour que Google nous prenne au sérieux.

M. Colin McKay:

Je conteste cette observation parce que, comme nous l’avons mentionné, il y a eu d’autres exemples où nous avons dû prendre cette décision. Nous ne le faisons pas volontairement. Nous cherchons tous les moyens possibles de mettre cet outil à la disposition des électeurs.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Quelle est la plus grande administration où vous avez pris une telle décision?

M. Colin McKay:

Comme Jason vient de le mentionner, la publicité doit être bloquée en France. C’est la réalité. La réalité pour nous ici ne concerne pas un engagement envers la démocratie au Canada. La réalité, c’est le défi technique auquel nous sommes confrontés, avec les modifications apportées à la Loi électorale. L’évaluation interne a mené à la conclusion que nous ne pourrions pas relever les défis techniques à temps pour le cycle électoral.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Je reconnais que le calendrier constitue une contrainte. Ce qui me pose problème, c’est lorsque vous ne me donnez pas de réponse directe quand je vous demande si vous vous engagez à le faire pour la prochaine élection fédérale ou pour la prochaine élection au niveau local dans l’État de Washington.

C’est une source de frustration évidente. Pouvez-vous simplement dire: « Oui, nous sommes déterminés à y arriver. Nous allons le faire », pour répondre clairement à ma question?

M. Colin McKay:

La raison pour laquelle j’ai fait une pause avant de vous répondre, c’est que dans un système parlementaire, il y a des élections à date fixe. Mais on peut imaginer qu’il pourrait y avoir des élections d’ici six, neuf ou 18 mois.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

D’accord, mais disons qu’il s’agit d’un cycle de quatre ans. Pensez-vous que c’est raisonnable?

M. Colin McKay:

Ce que je vous dis, c’est que nous travaillons à améliorer tous nos outils électoraux et à répondre aux attentes de nos utilisateurs, et surtout à celles de la réglementation. Nous avons toujours l’intention d’améliorer la qualité et la portée de ces outils.

Lorsque nous examinons les obligations en vertu de la Loi électorale, nous essayons de respecter ces normes. À l’heure actuelle, nous n’avons pas pu le faire pour cette élection.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Je comprends. Je m’attends à ce que vous puissiez le faire d’ici 2023.

M. Colin McKay:

Oui.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

C’est dommage que vous n’ayez pas pu y arriver, mais que Facebook ait réussi de son côté.

La dernière question que je veux poser, parce que vous l’avez soulevée, concerne les vidéos recommandées sur YouTube. Vous avez récemment pris une décision. Après avoir passé de nombreuses années à ne pas considérer cela comme un problème, en janvier dernier, vous avez décidé que le contenu limite ne serait pas recommandé. Est-ce exact?

M. Jason Kee:

C’est exact.

Je ne suis pas d’accord pour dire que nous ne considérions pas cela comme un problème. Nous examinons cela depuis un certain temps et nous faisons diverses expériences avec le système de recommandations afin d’améliorer la qualité du contenu que voient les utilisateurs.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Alors vous n’êtes pas d’accord avec le...

M. Jason Kee:

La politique sur le contenu limite a été présentée plus tôt cette année. C’est exact.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Je faisais allusion à un certain nombre d’ex-employés de Google qui ont été cités sur Bloomberg et qui suggéraient que vous deux aviez activement dissuadé le personnel d’être proactif à cet égard. Je suppose que vous n'êtes pas d'accord?

Enfin, je comprends l’idée d’exonération de responsabilité, selon laquelle vous ne pouvez pas être tenu responsable de tous les contenus et de toutes les vidéos que publient les gens. Cependant, êtes-vous d’accord pour dire que dès que vous recommandez des vidéos, dès que votre algorithme publie un contenu particulier, qu’il favorise un contenu particulier et qu’il encourage les gens à voir ce contenu, vous devriez être responsable de ce contenu?

M. Jason Kee:

Je suis d’accord avec vous dans la mesure où, lorsqu’il y a une différence entre les résultats obtenus ou entre le résultat d’une requête passive par rapport à une recommandation proactive, notre niveau de responsabilité est accru.

En ce qui concerne les notions de responsabilité, le problème réside actuellement dans l'opposition binaire entre le fait d'être un éditeur ou une plateforme. À titre de plateforme qui diffuse également, dans le cas de YouTube, 500 heures de vidéo par minute et dont le contenu est visionné plus d’un milliard d’heures chaque jour, d’être en mesure de...

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Je ne parle que du contenu que vous recommandez en particulier.

M. Jason Kee:

Oui. Dans ce cas, nous nous efforçons, dans le cadre du processus de recommandation, de fournir essentiellement un contenu qui correspond à ce que nous pensons que l’utilisateur veut regarder, dans un corpus qui est beaucoup plus grand que celui dont s’occupent les éditeurs conventionnels.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

C’est une longue réponse pour à peu près ne rien dire. La réponse est évidemment oui.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Kusie, pour sept minutes.

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Lors de la rédaction du projet de loi C-76, votre organisation a-t-elle eu l’occasion de rencontrer la ministre?

M. Jason Kee:

Non.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Avez-vous eu l’occasion de rencontrer le personnel ministériel?

M. Jason Kee:

Pendant que le projet de loi était en cours de rédaction, non, nous n'avons pas eu cette occasion.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Après l’ébauche initiale, une fois les articles proposés, la ministre a-t-il communiqué avec vous?

M. Jason Kee:

Nous avons pris connaissance des articles proposés qui ont été présentés lors de l’étude article par article au Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, en fait lorsqu’ils ont fait l’objet d’un rapport public. À ce moment-là, nous nous sommes adressés au cabinet de la ministre, d’abord pour obtenir de plus amples renseignements, parce qu’il n’y avait pas beaucoup de détails sur le contenu de ces articles, et ensuite pour discuter sérieusement avec le cabinet de la ministre afin d'exprimer certaines de nos préoccupations et d’élaborer des amendements qui permettraient d'apaiser ces préoccupations.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Est-il donc juste de dire que vous n’avez pas été consulté par la ministre ou par le personnel ministériel avant que le projet de loi C-76 soit étudié article par article, avant qu’il soit rendu public?

(1550)

M. Jason Kee:

C’est exact.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C’est assez important.

Lorsque vous avez parlé de l’étude article par article du projet de loi C-76, je suppose que c’était au Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, PROC. Est-ce exact?

M. Jason Kee:

C’est exact.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Avez-vous expliqué à ce moment-là que vous ne seriez pas en mesure de respecter cette loi telle qu’elle avait été présentée?

M. Jason Kee:

Lorsque le projet de loi C-76 a été amendé pour inclure les nouvelles dispositions sur les plateformes en ligne, la liste des témoins avait malheureusement déjà été établie. En conséquence, nous n’avons pas eu l’occasion d’en discuter avec les membres du comité.

Nous en avons discuté avec les membres du comité afin d’exprimer certaines des préoccupations à ce moment-là, et nous avons certes soulevé la question au Comité sénatorial de la justice.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D’accord.

Vous dites donc que vous n’avez pas eu l’occasion, au Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, d’expliquer pourquoi cette loi ne fonctionnerait pas pour votre organisation, pourquoi vous ne pourriez pas vous y conformer. Je sais qu’il a été dit dans le préambule que vous n'aimez pas cette formulation, mais vous avez dit vous-même qu’il vous aurait été difficile de vous y conformer, reconnaissant que, comme l’a dit M. McKay, en décidant de ne pas faire de publicité électorale, vous ne risquez pas de ne pas vous y conformer.

L’avez-vous dit à ce moment-là?

M. Jason Kee:

Voulez-vous dire après le dépôt du projet de loi? Désolé, je suis...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, pas de problème. Avez-vous pu dire à ce moment-là que vous ne seriez pas en mesure de vous conformer à la loi telle qu’elle était formulée?

M. Jason Kee:

Oui. Une fois que nous avons pris connaissance des dispositions et que nous avons pu obtenir une copie des amendements proposés, nous avons communiqué avec le cabinet de la ministre. Nous avons essentiellement examiné ce que nous venons d’examiner avec vous tous, c’est-à-dire qu’il y a certains aspects de ces dispositions qui posaient problème en raison de nos systèmes de publicité particuliers. L’un des résultats possibles serait que nous ne serions pas en mesure d’apporter les changements nécessaires dans le temps qui nous était alloué et qu'en conséquence, nous ne serions pas en mesure d'accepter les publicités électorales pour les élections fédérales.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

La ministre et son personnel savaient que vous ne seriez pas en mesure de vous conformer aux dispositions du projet de loi C-76. Qu’a-t-elle répondu à ce moment-là, quand vous avez dit que votre organisation ne serait pas en mesure de se conformer à la loi telle qu’elle avait été présentée?

M. Jason Kee:

La ministre et son personnel espéraient que nous pourrions nous adapter aux nouveaux changements.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Comment? À quoi s’attendaient-ils, si je peux me permettre de poser la question?

M. Jason Kee:

Ils n’ont rien dit de plus à ce sujet, si ce n’est qu’ils souhaitent que nous puissions mettre en oeuvre les nouveaux changements. De plus, à ce moment-là, du point de vue de la procédure, ils ont dit qu’étant donné que le projet de loi avait déjà été étudié article par article et qu’il allait être renvoyé au Sénat, nous devrions essentiellement faire part de nos préoccupations au Sénat dans l’espoir d’obtenir les amendements que nous demandions.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Avez-vous eu des conversations avec la ministre ou son personnel au sujet des outils que vous avez mis en place aux États-Unis et dont vous avez parlé en détail ici?

M. Jason Kee:

Oui.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Qu’a-t-elle répondu au sujet des outils mis en place aux États-Unis par rapport aux mesures législatives présentées dans le projet de loi C-76? Qu’a-t-elle répondu par rapport à ces outils et a-t-elle mentionné s’il y avait un écart entre les deux?

M. Jason Kee:

Eh bien, ils étaient certainement au courant des outils que nous avions mis en place aux États-Unis pour les élections de mi-mandat, et essentiellement, ils espéraient qu’avec les changements apportés au projet de loi C-76, nous présenterions des outils semblables au Canada. Il s’agissait vraiment d’examiner en détail les raisons pour lesquelles les dispositions précises du projet de loi C-76 rendaient cette tâche difficile, et c’est là que nous avons eu des échanges. Essentiellement, ils voulaient que nous introduisions des outils semblables à ceux que nous avions là-bas.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

En cherchant à introduire des outils semblables à ceux que vous avez aux États-Unis, pourquoi n’êtes-vous capable et pourquoi ne se conforment-ils pas au projet de loi C-76?

M. Jason Kee:

Bref, comme je l’ai dit dans ma déclaration préliminaire, nous avons des systèmes qui servent à la publicité sur les sites d’éditeurs tiers, mais nous ne pouvons pas leur fournir la création publicitaire et l’information requise en temps réel, comme l'exige le projet de loi C-76. Il y a aussi des complications liées au registre en temps réel en soi, et c’est pourquoi, même pour les sites que nous possédons et exploitons comme Google Search ou YouTube, nous ne serions pas non plus en mesure de nous y conformer — du moins, nous ne nous sentions pas à l’aise de le faire.

Enfin, il y a la complication supplémentaire liée à l’inclusion de la publicité thématique. En gros, les registres que nous avons dans d’autres pays n’incluent pas la publicité thématique parce que, comme je l’ai dit, il est très difficile de l'identifier de façon convaincante. En conséquence, nous craignions de ne pas être en mesure d’identifier les publicités à inclure dans le registre.

(1555)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

En résumé, vous n’avez pas été inclus à l’étape de la rédaction du projet de loi C-76. Vous n’avez pas été consulté par la ministre ou son personnel lorsque le gouvernement a présenté le projet de loi C-76 dans le but de déterminer la réforme électorale du Canada.

M. Jason Kee:

C’est en grande partie exact. Je dois également modifier le compte rendu. Nous avons eu une discussion avec le cabinet de la ministre peu de temps après le dépôt du projet de loi C-76, pour discuter des contours de la loi telle qu’elle était libellée à l’étape de la première lecture, avant l’ajout de l’une ou l’autre des dispositions sur les plateformes en ligne et avant l’ajout de toute exigence de registre. C’était une discussion sérieuse, mais à l’époque, puisque nous n’avions pas envisagé que de nouvelles dispositions seraient introduites, nous n’en avons pas parlé. À part cela, il n’y a pas eu de consultation.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Bien sûr.

Quels conseils donneriez-vous à la prochaine législature au sujet de ce projet de loi?

M. Jason Kee:

Comme nous l’avons dit au comité sénatorial et ailleurs, ainsi qu’au cabinet de la ministre, nous appuyons sans réserve l’idée d’accroître la transparence de la publicité électorale et nous avions l’intention de créer le registre au Canada.

Il y a eu un certain nombre d’amendements extrêmement ciblés. Essentiellement, je pense que nous avons modifié 15 mots qui auraient amendé suffisamment le projet de loi C-76, de sorte que nous aurions pu satisfaire aux exigences.

Ma recommandation, si c’est possible, serait qu’une future législature examine ces recommandations, qu’elle examine essentiellement les difficultés ajoutées par les nouvelles dispositions — et il vaut la peine de souligner, comme l’a fait la CBC, que de nombreuses plateformes ont également annoncé qu’elles n’accepteraient pas de publicité électorale en raison des difficultés que posent les révisions particulières — et qu’elle il détermine si des ajustements peuvent être apportés pour atténuer les préoccupations.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous cédons maintenant la parole à M. Dusseault, pour sept minutes. [Français]

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault (Sherbrooke, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

C'est avec plaisir que je me joins à ce comité aujourd'hui. J'ai le privilège de revenir à ce comité que j'ai eu la chance de présider pendant quelques années avant vous, monsieur le président. Je suis heureux de revoir des visages que j'ai déjà vus dans le passé.

Messieurs McKay et Kee, vous savez l'influence que vous avez. Je suis sûr que vous connaissez l'influence que vous avez sur les élections et sur l'information qui circule pendant les élections, qui influe sur les électeurs et, ultimement, sur leur décision. C'est dans ce contexte qu'il est important d'avoir une discussion avec vous à propos des annonces que vous avez faites récemment en ce qui a trait aux publicités électorales.

Ma première question se rapporte au préambule que d'autres collègues ont fait. D'autres compagnies assez importantes sur le marché ont dit qu'elles étaient en mesure de se conformer à la Loi électorale du Canada, dans sa version modifiée. Compte tenu du fait que vous avez effectué de nombreux investissements dans d'autres pays pour faire de tels registres, par exemple aux États-Unis et en Europe, et aussi du fait que vous avez investi des millions de dollars dans certains marchés, comme celui de la Chine, pour pouvoir adapter votre moteur de recherche à leurs lois — en Chine, on s'entend, ce sont des lois très strictes, et vous le savez très bien —, j'ai de la misère à comprendre pourquoi Google n'est pas capable de s'adapter à une loi canadienne comme celle-là en vue de la prochaine élection fédérale.

Selon vous, qu'est-ce qui fait en sorte que vous n'êtes pas capables de vous adapter à la loi canadienne?

Est-ce en raison du fait que les règles ne reflètent pas les pratiques internationales ni la façon dont les publicités en ligne fonctionnent? Est-ce parce que vous n'avez pas les moyens de le faire ou, tout simplement, vous n'avez pas la volonté de le faire?

M. Colin McKay:

Je m'excuse, je vais répondre en anglais.[Traduction]

Je tiens à souligner que notre décision a été prise par suite d’une évaluation technique visant à déterminer si nous pouvions nous y conformer. Il ne s’agissait pas d’une question précise au sujet du cadre de réglementation au Canada ou de notre engagement à l’égard du processus électoral au Canada et de notre contribution à le maintenir éclairé et transparent.

Nous sommes en voie, dans d’autres pays, de mettre en place des outils comme ceux décrits dans la loi, d’améliorer ces outils et de travailler à l’infrastructure technique en aval pour rendre ces outils plus informatifs et plus utiles pour les utilisateurs ainsi que pour tous les participants à une élection.

Nous en sommes arrivés à une décision très difficile parce que nous étions confrontés à un calendrier serré et à des modifications législatives qui sont très importantes dans le contexte canadien et pour nous, Canadiens, comme électeurs et participants au processus électoral. Nous avons donc dû déterminer si nous pouvions ou non nous conformer à la loi dans les délais impartis, et nous ne le pouvions pas. Nous nous sommes donc contentés de ne pas accepter de publicité électorale. Cela ne reflète en rien notre attitude personnelle ou celle de notre entreprise à l’égard de l’autorité et de la compétence du Canada en matière de réglementation de cet espace, et ce n’était certainement pas une expression de notre opinion au sujet des modifications apportées à la Loi électorale.

Cela a été très difficile pour nous, mais la décision n'a été motivée que par les difficultés techniques et les délais auxquels nous étions confrontés.

(1600)

[Français]

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

J'ai une question complémentaire par rapport au registre que vous avez mis en place au cours des élections américaines de mi-mandat et celui que vous prévoyez mettre en place en Europe pour le Parlement européen.

Ces registres, ou ces règles, sont-ils une initiative de Google ou leur mise en place découle-t-elle d'une obligation imposée par des lois?

Pouvez-vous clarifier la raison pour laquelle vous allez de l'avant aux États-Unis et en Europe? Êtes-vous obligés de le faire, ou le faites-vous de votre propre chef? [Traduction]

M. Jason Kee:

Nous le faisons en fait de notre propre gré. Essentiellement, il s’agissait d’une initiative entièrement volontaire à la lumière des préoccupations soulevées dans la foulée des élections fédérales américaines. De toute évidence, il y a eu beaucoup de discussions sérieuses sur la façon d’assurer une plus grande transparence du processus des publicités électorales. En conséquence, Google, Facebook et un certain nombre d’autres entreprises ont toutes travaillé très fort, pour être honnête, afin de commencer à instaurer la transparence, à savoir qui obtient les registres et les rapports, ce qui donnerait à nos utilisateurs beaucoup plus de contexte en ce qui concerne les publicités électorales auxquelles ils sont exposés. Il ne s’agit pas seulement de l’accès aux copies des publicités en soi, mais aussi de renseignements contextuels sur les raisons pour lesquelles elles ont été ciblées, sur l’auditoire visé par la vérification, sur les sommes dépensées par l’annonceur, ce genre de détails.

Une fois cela établi pour les élections de mi-mandat aux États-Unis, il y a eu — comme Colin l’a dit — un processus d’apprentissage. Nous avons des équipes mondiales qui s’en occupent et qui, essentiellement, passent d’une élection à l’autre, tirent des leçons de chaque élection et améliorent les processus. Essentiellement, nous avions un modèle en place que nous étions capables de déployer en Inde, que nous pouvions déployer dans l’Union européenne, et que nous nous attendions à déployer ailleurs. De plus, nous avions établi des processus individuels en plus du registre en soi. Quel est le processus que nous utilisons pour vérifier l’identité de l’annonceur politique? Dans le cas des États-Unis, nous vérifions non seulement l’identité de l’annonceur en lui demandant de fournir une pièce d’identité, mais nous vérifions aussi s’il est autorisé à faire de la publicité électorale auprès de la Federal Election Commission des États-Unis.

Nous avons dû adapter ce processus au fur et à mesure que nous mettons en oeuvre le registre dans d’autres pays parce que l’organisme de réglementation de chaque élection n’est pas en mesure de fournir le genre de validation que nous obtenons aux États-Unis. Donc, nous adaptons ce processus et nous en tirons aussi des leçons.

Ce sont des mesures que nous avons prises de plein gré, sans y être contraints par la loi. [Français]

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Dans ces cas-ci, vous êtes heureux de le faire parce que ce sont vos propres normes et règles. Cependant, lorsque vous devez vous conformer à des règles établies par d'autres, vous êtes beaucoup plus réticents à le faire. La décision que vous avez prise fera en sorte que vous vous conformerez à la Loi, parce que, tout compte fait, il n'y aura pas de publicité électorale.

Étant donné le temps qu'il me reste, j'aimerais aborder un sujet complémentaire. Il s'agit de l'annonce dont vous avez parlé dans votre introduction, qui porte sur une chaîne consacrée à la campagne électorale, prévue pour pallier un peu votre décision de ne pas autoriser de publicité.

Je m'interroge quant à la transparence de cette plateforme et quant aux algorithmes utilisés pour diffuser le contenu. Quel contenu sera diffusé? Vous dites que c'est du contenu de sources faisant autorité, mais qu'est-ce que cela veut dire vraiment? Le public aura-t-il accès à ce type d'informations sur la plateforme en question? Aura-t-il accès aux politiques utilisées pour diffuser le contenu et pour garantir que tous les candidats ou tous les partis auront une couverture équitable?

Comme c'est une décision qui revient évidemment à Google, qui décide de cette couverture? Vous savez l'influence que vous avez et que vous pouvez avoir. Qui va déterminer ces questions de politiques que vous allez publier sur cette plateforme au cours de la campagne?

(1605)

[Traduction]

M. Jason Kee:

Il y a en fait deux points de discussion distincts que vous avez soulevés.

Le premier concerne l'expression « faisant autorité ». Qu’entend-on par là? C’est une question tout à fait légitime. C’est essentiellement un critère qui éclaire Google Search, Google News et YouTube également. Nous avons en fait des lignes directrices très rigoureuses, soit environ 170 pages de lignes directrices sur les évaluateurs de recherche. Nous utilisons des bassins d’évaluateurs externes qui évaluent les résultats que nous obtenons pour nous assurer que nous fournissons des résultats aux utilisateurs en réponse à des demandes qui sont vraiment pertinentes pour leurs demandes et qui proviennent en fait de sources faisant autorité.

Par « faisant autorité », nous parlons d'un classement établi en fonction du caractère officiel, du caractère professionnel et d’une troisième classification... Je peux vous faire parvenir l’information. J'ai un trou de mémoire.

Nous nous fondons sur l’information que nous obtenons des guides de recherche des évaluateurs. Comme je l’ai dit, nous faisons appel à des bassins d'évaluateurs, alors tout se fait globalement, ce qui nous aide à recueillir des renseignements qui font autorité. Ce sont les mêmes signaux que nous utilisons, comme je l’ai dit, pour identifier cette catégorie d’information et la pondération tend ainsi à aller aux organisations établies et ainsi de suite qui sont à l'origine du résultat initial. Nous n’évaluons pas le contenu des travaux. Nous déterminons simplement s’il s’agit d’un site qui se spécialise réellement dans le domaine dans lequel il le prétend.

En ce qui concerne la chaîne YouTube, c’est très différent. Il s’agit d’un canal très précis et personnalisé qui sera disponible sur YouTube. Nous l’avons offert lors des élections de 2015. Dans ce cas, nous avons demandé à un organisme tiers, Storyful, de s’en occuper pour nous. Ce n’est pas un service algorithmique; il est effectivement surveillé. Nous faisons donc la même chose, c’est-à-dire qu'une tierce partie s’en occupe en tirant des renseignements de diverses sources.

Nous établissons avec cette tierce partie quelles sont les lignes directrices au titre de l'inclusion de l'information, que nous publions ensuite pour que les gens sachent comment l’information est incluse. Il s’agit surtout de renseignements publiés sur YouTube par des diffuseurs et des organes d’information bien établis que nous ajoutons simplement à la chaîne pour que les gens puissent les voir.

Tous ces renseignements seraient également disponibles, par exemple, sur le site Web de la CBC, du National Post et ainsi de suite. Ils seraient également disponibles sur ces sites individuellement.

Le président:

Merci.

C’est maintenant au tour de M. Graham, pour sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci. Je suis heureux de vous revoir tous les deux.

Comme vous le savez probablement, j’ai été parmi les premiers à adopter Google. J’utilise Google depuis une bonne vingtaine d'années. Je pense que c’est un bon service, mais il s’est développé massivement et est devenu un outil très puissant. Or, comme qui dit grande puissance dit aussi grandes responsabilités, je pense qu’il est très important d'avoir cette discussion.

La partie du projet de loi C-76 dont nous parlons est l'article 208.1, et vous vouliez changer 15 mots. Quels étaient ces 15 mots?

M. Jason Kee:

Je me ferai un plaisir de vous remettre une copie des amendements que nous avons proposés, par souci d'exactitude.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce serait utile.

Vous opposez-vous aux changements que nous avons apportés au projet de loi C-76 ou appuyez-vous le projet de loi, d’un point de vue philosophique?

M. Jason Kee:

Tout à fait.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Êtes-vous favorable à l’utilisation des registres de publicité en général, pas seulement en contexte électoral, mais en tout temps?

M. Jason Kee:

C’est un aspect que nous examinons. Comme dans le contexte politique, il y a évidemment une certaine urgence à régler les problèmes avec la transparence attendue, et ainsi de suite. C’est un volet que nous examinons, pour voir comment nous pouvons accroître la transparence pour nos utilisateurs. En fait, pas plus tard que cette semaine, nous avons annoncé des mesures supplémentaires à cet égard.

Colin, avez-vous quelque chose à dire à ce sujet?

M. Colin McKay:

Oui. Lors de notre conférence des développeurs, nous avons annoncé une extension de navigateur pour Chrome. Il permet de voir plus en détail les publicités affichées, d’où elles viennent — quels réseaux — et comment elles sont arrivées sur la page. Nous en faisons un outil ouvert, de sorte que d’autres réseaux de publicité qui diffusent des annonces sur des sites et des pages que l'internaute consulte puissent également acheminer cette information.

Comme la chose est importante, nous cherchons à fournir le plus d’information possible aux utilisateurs sur les raisons pour lesquelles ils reçoivent des publicités.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce qui m’amène à ma prochaine question. Vous avez parlé des limites techniques dans l'application du projet de loi C-76, et j’essaie de comprendre, moi qui suis technicien. Comme j’ai une assez bonne idée du fonctionnement de vos systèmes, j’essaie de voir ce qui vous empêche, au cours des cinq prochains mois, d'ajouter les sous-programmes nécessaires pour traiter la publicité politique et l’utiliser.

Si vous m’aidez à comprendre l’aspect technique, je vais saisir. Je voudrais savoir en quoi consistent les problèmes.

M. Jason Kee:

Certainement. Notre principale difficulté tient à l'idée qu'il faudrait mettre le registre à jour en temps réel. En effet, nous avons un très large éventail de systèmes de publicité. Ceux qui mènent des campagnes sur Google font des recherches de publicité, ce qui apparaît dans les résultats de recherche. Il peut s’agir de publicités sur YouTube, de vidéos ou de TrueView. L'utilisateur peut les sauter et aussi afficher de la publicité qui apparaît sur les sites éditeurs tiers.

Dans le cas des sites éditeurs tiers, ces publicités viennent souvent de serveurs publicitaires tiers. Nous n’avons pas nécessairement un accès immédiat aux créateurs nous-mêmes. Il nous serait très difficile de mettre à jour même notre propre registre en temps réel, sans parler du registre d’un tiers qui doit tenir son propre registre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Que se passe-t-il si vous vous en tenez à vos propres serveurs, en laissant de côté ceux des tiers?

M. Jason Kee:

Nous pourrions faire la mise à jour plus rapidement. À l’heure actuelle, la mise à jour en temps réel demeure un défi, compte tenu de nos systèmes, simplement parce que nous devons connaître le serveur de la publicité, puis être en mesure de faire la mise à jour immédiatement après.

(1610)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J’en oublie le nom, mais il y a une page sur Google où on peut voir toutes les données que Google possède sur soi. Elle est facile à trouver, et on peut y voir tout ce qu'on a fait et que Google connaît, en temps réel. Si vous pouvez faire cela pour un particulier, pourquoi ne pouvez-vous pas le faire pour une publicité?

M. Jason Kee:

Principalement parce que les systèmes de publicité sont un peu différents en ce qui concerne le téléchargement, le stockage et la gestion à l'interne. C’est pourquoi j’ai dit que c’était un objectif que nous allions poursuivre, mais nous ne nous sentions pas à l’aise cette fois-ci pour nous engager à respecter ce genre de délai.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quel ordre d’investissement en temps et en ressources faudrait-il pour y arriver, si vous décidiez de le faire? Vous dites que c’est possible pour les élections de 2023. C'est donc possible. Que faudrait-il pour y arriver?

M. Jason Kee:

Pour être honnête avec vous, je ne peux pas répondre. Après avoir étudié la question sérieusement, nous avons conclu qu'il était impossible de respecter le délai. Je ne pourrais vous donner aucune estimation du temps qu’il faudrait ni des ressources nécessaires.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avez-vous une idée des profits que Google retire du Canada par rapport à ce qu'il y a investi?

M. Colin McKay:

Je répondrais de deux façons distinctes. En fait, la question est plus vaste, car, compte tenu de la façon dont nos plateformes et nos services fonctionnent, nous sommes souvent un outil pour les entreprises et les sociétés canadiennes, étant donné nos services gratuits ou payants qui en soutiennent l'infrastructure.

De plus, dans un domaine aussi vaste que la publicité, c’est certainement... Les revenus de la publicité en ligne chez Google sont souvent partagés avec les plateformes et les sites. Il n'y a donc pas seulement deux parties en présence. Les entreprises canadiennes utilisent notre technologie pour placer des publicités, payer leurs services et produire elles-mêmes des revenus.

Nous sommes très fiers des investissements réalisés au Canada, au nom de Google, pour faire croître nos équipes d'ingénieurs et de R-D et nos bureaux.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Kee, sauf erreur, vous avez participé récemment à l’étude du ministère de l’Industrie sur le droit d’auteur. L’une des questions abordées a été celle des systèmes de gestion des droits et celle du principe de l’utilisation équitable dans l'application du droit canadien. La réponse de Google et de Facebook a été non. Ils ne se conforment pas à ce principe. Ils appliquent leurs propres politiques.

Comment en arriver au point où Google pourrait dire: « Le Canada est suffisamment important pour que ce soit une priorité de respecter les lois locales dans des domaines où notre société a une grande responsabilité »?

M. Jason Kee:

Cela n’a rien à voir avec la perception relative de l’importance du Canada ou des lois locales dans l’application de notre système d’identification du contenu.

Pour la gouverne des autres membres du Comité qui ne le connaissent pas nécessairement, Content ID est notre système de gestion du droit d’auteur sur YouTube. Voici comment cela fonctionne: le titulaire de droits nous fournit un fichier de référence — une copie du fichier qu’il veut gérer en ligne — et nous appliquons ensuite une politique pour chaque téléchargement sur YouTube.

Comme le système est automatisé, il ne gère pas très bien le contexte ni les exceptions. L’utilisation équitable, dans le régime de droit d’auteur canadien, est en fait une exception. Aux termes de la loi, il s'agit d'une exception à la violation générale et elle repose sur un certain raisonnement de base. Elle nécessite une analyse du contexte. C’est pourquoi nous réagissons aux exceptions par un système d’appel solide. Si Content ID signale un contenu de façon inappropriée, vous interjetez appel de cette décision parce que vous estimez avoir un argument très solide en faveur du principe de l’utilisation équitable, et vous affirmez que ce principe s’applique. Une évaluation est alors faite.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans le cas du droit d’auteur, vous mettez en place un système qui ne respecte pas le droit canadien, mais assorti d'un dispositif d’appel. Dans le cas du projet de loi C-76, vous dites: « Nous n’allons rien faire, parce que cela ne se justifie pas sur le plan pratique. »

Dans l’application du droit d’auteur, vous ne vous souciez pas du droit canadien, très franchement, parce que si quelqu’un a une exemption fondée sur le principe de l’utilisation équitable, il ne devrait pas lui incomber de prouver son droit de faire quelque chose qu’il a absolument le droit de faire.

J’essaie de comprendre pourquoi vous allez de l’avant dans le cas du droit d’auteur et pas dans celui du projet de loi C-76. À mon avis, la tâche, pour être difficile, est tout à fait réalisable. Comme M. Erskine-Smith l’a dit tout à l’heure, si nous étions aux États-Unis, je suis sûr que la question serait déjà réglée.

M. Jason Kee:

Essentiellement, la principale différence, au risque de devenir un peu technique, c’est que l’utilisation équitable au Canada est une exception à la violation. C’est un moyen de défense qu’on invoque en réponse à une allégation selon laquelle on a violé le droit d'auteur. La gestion est très différente.

Dans ce cas-ci, le projet de loi C-76 introduisait des obligations positives. Non seulement il fallait créer un registre des publicités, mais la façon de le faire était aussi imposée. Nous ne pouvions tout simplement pas nous conformer dans le délai imparti. C’est la principale différence entre les deux cas.

Le président:

Merci.

Ce sera maintenant M. Gourde, qui aura cinq minutes.

(1615)

[Français]

M. Jacques Gourde (Lévis—Lotbinière, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci aux témoins d'être ici ce matin.

Nous savons qu'il reste seulement une courte période de temps avant les élections. Vous avez parlé des problèmes techniques, des problèmes pour se conformer à la Loi électorale du Canada.

Au Canada, la réalité est telle que nous pouvons mettre de la publicité sur vos plateformes, mais que la loi canadienne limite les plafonds de dépenses électorales et la diversité des endroits où les partis politiques et les candidats peuvent dépenser leur argent. Cela détermine une certaine part de marché, que vous avez peut-être évaluée.

Premièrement, est-ce que vous avez évalué cette part de marché?

Deuxièmement, cela représentait peut-être un montant tellement dérisoire, compte tenu de tous les projets que vous menez simultanément sur votre plateforme, que cela ne valait tout simplement pas la peine de vous conformer à la Loi, cette année, en raison du montant que cela pourrait vous rapporter?

Est-ce qu'il y a une évaluation qui a été faite à l'interne par vos gestionnaires? Par exemple, pour avoir un revenu supplémentaire de 1 million de dollars, cela aurait coûté 5 millions de dollars. Cela ne valait peut-être pas la peine de vous conformer à la Loi pour l'élection de 2019. Est-ce exact? [Traduction]

M. Jason Kee:

Ce n'est pas un calcul que nous avons fait pour parvenir à nos décisions. Il s'agissait essentiellement de savoir comment nous allions satisfaire aux exigences, de voir si c’était techniquement réalisable, compte tenu de la façon dont nos systèmes fonctionnent actuellement et des délais et, à dire vrai, de notre tolérance au risque, car nous ne savions pas ce qui arriverait si nous commettions une erreur. Voilà toute l'explication.

Il n’a jamais été question de calcul de rentabilité. En fait, il vaut la peine de le souligner, nous avons choisi de nous retirer de la seule activité liée aux élections qui nous rapporterait des revenus. Au lieu de cela, nous faisons des investissements qui ne nous rapportent pas, comme notre engagement auprès d’Élections Canada pour promouvoir l’information sur les élections au moyen de groupes de recherche et d’information, etc., avec YouTube et par diverses autres mesures, dont une subvention d’un million de dollars au FJC pour la littératie en information, avant les élections canadiennes.

Essentiellement, nous avons redoublé d'efforts sur les éléments qui ne rapportent pas pour compenser le fait que nous ne pouvions tout simplement pas satisfaire aux exigences du projet de loi C-76. [Français]

M. Jacques Gourde:

Dans votre réponse, vous avez parlé de la tolérance au risque. Est-ce que c'était trop risqué, étant donné que certaines dispositions du projet de loi modifiant la Loi électorale du Canada étaient relativement vagues et ne vous permettaient pas d'être certain de la façon de mettre en application de nouvelles plateformes? [Traduction]

M. Jason Kee:

Une partie du libellé est vague. Il y avait donc les préoccupations dont j'ai parlé au sujet de la publicité, mais il y a aussi le délai de mise à jour du registre, étant donné cette idée, énoncée dans la loi, qu'elle doit se faire le même jour. Est-ce que cela signifie littéralement en temps réel ou non? Quelle latitude nous était laissée?

Nous avons eu de solides discussions avec le commissaire aux élections fédérales et Élections Canada sur des questions d’interprétation. Vous avez peut-être vu les directives d’Élections Canada il y a environ une semaine et demie à ce sujet, qui confirmaient en grande partie certaines de nos appréhensions. C'est plutôt cela qui a motivé notre décision. [Français]

M. Jacques Gourde:

Il peut arriver que certaines publicités faites par des tiers directement ou indirectement ne soient pas nécessairement considérées comme des publicités électorales, mais qu'elles attaquent certains partis. Vous avez parlé de contrôle de vos plateformes effectué par des êtres humains. Ces personnes ont-elles l'expertise nécessaire en politique canadienne pour faire la distinction entre une publicité qui attaque réellement d'autres partis et une publicité qui fait la promotion d'un enjeu électoral canadien? En fait, j'aimerais savoir quelle est l'expertise des personnes qui vont surveiller ces plateformes. Ont-elles une expertise en politique canadienne, en politique américaine ou en politique d'un autre pays dans le monde? [Traduction]

M. Jason Kee:

Il s'agit en fait d'une combinaison de tous ces éléments.

Ce qui se passe, c’est que, pour mettre en œuvre l’interdiction, nous mettrons à jour nos politiques publicitaires. Je le répète, il y a des catégories entières de publicités que nous n’accepterons pas, comme la publicité sur le cannabis. Il y a une autre catégorie de publicité qui est assujettie aux exigences d’enregistrement. Tout cela est régi par nos politiques en matière de publicité.

Cette décision se reflétera dans ces politiques publicitaires. Nous aurons des équipes d’application de la loi en matière de publicité dans diverses régions du monde qui seront sensibilisées à ces politiques d’application de la loi.

Quant aux questions précises relatives à l’utilisation de la publicité, chaque catégorie de publicité que vous avez décrite semble relever du projet de loi C-76 et être visée par l’interdiction.

Nous aurons en fait des équipes qui seront formées à cet égard, mais aussi, en tenant compte du point de vue canadien, en nous fondant sur les conseils que nous avons reçus de toutes les équipes fonctionnelles d'ici, au Canada.

(1620)

[Français]

M. Jacques Gourde:

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Picard, à votre tour. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Merci.

Vous venez de dire à mon collègue que vous n’avez pas calculé le rendement sur l’investissement dans ce cas-ci?

M. Jason Kee:

C’est exact. Cela n'a pas joué dans l'élaboration de la décision.

M. Michel Picard:

Vous ai-je bien compris? Vous avez dit qu'un de vos problèmes d'ordre technique est que, dans la publicité de tiers, lorsqu’on a recours à des « courtiers » publicitaires tiers, ou peu importe comment on les appelle, il est difficile, voire impossible, de savoir d’où vient la publicité? Par conséquent, puisqu'il est impossible de divulguer le nom de l’auteur, le cas de cette publicité est trop compliqué pour l’instant, de sorte que vous refusez de vous avancer et de publier de la publicité pendant la prochaine campagne électorale.

M. Jason Kee:

Le problème ne tient pas tant à la source de la publicité qu'à la capacité de faire une mise à jour en temps réel: celui qui a diffusé la publicité et l'information présentée dans la publicité politique. Puis, il faut communiquer l'information et le nom de l'auteur pour que la mise à jour des registres soit possible.

M. Michel Picard:

La pratique suivie en matière de publicité est-elle la même dans d’autres pays, à l'égard des sources et des intermédiaires?

M. Jason Kee:

Cela dépend de la pratique qui a cours dans les divers pays. J’hésite à parler de la loi électorale d’autres pays parce que je ne la connais tout simplement pas.

En ce qui concerne nos propres politiques sur la publicité politique dans les pays où nous avons déployé un rapport de transparence, un registre, nous avons en fait eu recours à des exigences semblables su sujet de la vérification des annonceurs et de la recherche de moyens de vérifier que l’annonceur en question était autorisé à faire de la publicité politique par l’organisme local de réglementation électorale.

M. Michel Picard:

Qu'y avait-il de différent, là où vous avez pu appliquer ces dispositions? À lumière de cette expérience, quelle est la différence propre à notre situation qui vous empêche de passer à l'action?

M. Jason Kee:

Les systèmes que nous avons déployés aux États-Unis, dans l’Union européenne et en Inde n’auraient pas permis de répondre aux exigences précises du projet de loi C-76. Si nous étions allés de l'avant, nous aurions mis en place un système semblable.

En fait, nous avons eu des entretiens préliminaires avec Élections Canada à ce sujet, mais en fin de compte, il est devenu évident que, étant donné le projet de loi C-76 et l’exigence particulière voulant que chaque éditeur tienne son propre registre, nous aurions beaucoup de mal à satisfaire aux exigences.

M. Michel Picard:

Monsieur le président, je cède le reste de mon temps de parole à M. Erskine-Smith.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Je n'ai pas autant de compétences techniques que M. Graham, mais je peux lire le projet de loi C-76 et je l’ai sous les yeux.

C’est le délai de publication du registre qui est à l'origine de votre problème. Est-ce exact?

M. Jason Kee:

C’est exact.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

D’accord.

On ne dit pas « en temps réel ». Vous avez dit « en temps réel » à plusieurs reprises, mais ce n’est pas ce que dit la loi.

La loi dit ceci: « commençant le jour de sa première publication ». C’est de cela que vous parlez.

M. Jason Kee:

C’est exact. Si l’annonce était affichée à 23 h 59, il faudrait que le registre soit mis à jour avant minuit.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

C’est une interprétation. On pourrait en donner une autre, plus raisonnable: une période de 24 heures. Vous avez des avocats grassement payés et je présume qu’ils ont raison. Je réfléchis librement, sans avoir fait une analyse détaillée comme la vôtre, mais il est certain qu'une solution consisterait à reporter la publication de la publicité.

Pourquoi ne pourriez-vous pas reporter la publication afin d’avoir un délai de 24 ou de 48 heures avant la première publication? Tout serait alors très facile, n’est-ce pas?

M. Jason Kee:

Je le répète, techniquement, ce n’était pas possible pour nous.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Pourquoi pas?

M. Jason Kee:

Nos ingénieurs nous ont dit que ce ne serait pas réalisable.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Donc quand je fais paraître une annonce sur Facebook, les responsables ne la publient pas tout de suite. Il y a un délai et on essaie de voir s'il y a lieu de la publier.

Vos ingénieurs ne sont pas arrivés à comprendre un processus de report de 24 heures, de 48 heures ou même de sept jours, et vous dites que c'est à cause de nous si les exigences sur la programmation de la publicité électorale sont telles et que nous avons été impitoyables avec vous en imposant des délais serrés. Avec tout votre argent, vous avez été incapables de trouver une solution.

M. Jason Kee:

Il nous aurait été difficile de restructurer en six mois tous les systèmes sous-jacents de la publicité en ligne.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Je dois dire que je trouve les réponses ahurissantes. Par exemple, comment croire qu'un million de dollars représente quelque chose de pharamineux alors que vous avez réalisé des gains de 8 milliards de dollars au quatrième trimestre de l'an dernier. En ne prenant pas les choses assez au sérieux, vous portez préjudice à notre démocratie. Vous auriez dû faire bien mieux que cela.

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Gourde, vous avez la parole. Cinq minutes. [Français]

M. Jacques Gourde:

Je vais revenir à une question d'ordre pratique.

Élections Canada portera une attention particulière à toutes les plateformes numériques au cours de cette élection-ci. Si un problème surgit en raison d'une fausse publicité, d'une fausse nouvelle ou d'autre chose du genre, avez-vous un protocole d'entente pour travailler directement avec Élections Canada, le plus rapidement possible, afin de remédier à la situation?

(1625)

[Traduction]

M. Jason Kee:

Nous n’avons rien d’aussi officiel qu’un protocole d’entente. Nous avons eu des échanges extrêmement sérieux avec Élections Canada et le commissaire aux élections fédérales. Le Bureau du commissaire s’occupe de l’application de la loi, tandis qu'Élections Canada administre les élections.

Nous travaillons surtout avec Élections Canada pour trouver l'origine des données sur les candidats et des renseignements qui peuvent apparaître dans Google Search, par exemple, lorsqu'un internaute cherche des renseignements de cette nature.

Chose certaine, avec le commissaire aux élections fédérales, nous travaillons à des mesures d’application de la loi. Nous nous intéressons moins à sa grande préoccupation, la publicité, puisque nous n'en faisons pas, mais il y a aussi des mesures supplémentaires qui ont été prévues dans la loi au sujet de l’usurpation d’identité, par exemple, et nous travaillons avec lui à ces questions. Nous continuerons de travailler en étroite collaboration avec lui. [Français]

M. Jacques Gourde:

Cela m'inquiète tout de même un peu, parce qu'aujourd'hui, tout va si vite à l'ère numérique. S'il se produisait une irrégularité au cours de ma campagne électorale, j'irais faire une plainte auprès d'Élections Canada, et un représentant d'Élections Canada vérifierait peut-être auprès de vous dans la journée même. Vous me dites que vous n'avez aucun protocole d'entente, que vous n'avez jamais négocié afin de mettre en place des façons de fonctionner et que vous n'avez pas désigné des personnes. Un représentant d'Élections Canada va appeler chez vous, mais à qui s'adressera-t-il?

La plainte sera transférée d'une personne à l'autre, et quelqu'un finira par y répondre? Y a-t-il déjà une personne désignée au sein de votre compagnie pendant toute la période d'élections pour parler à un représentant d'Élections Canada et pour répondre aux plaintes? [Traduction]

M. Jason Kee:

Oui. Essentiellement, il y aura une équipe, selon le problème précis en cause, pour répondre aux questions précises qui seront soulevées. Nous parlons à ce sujet de cheminement hiérarchique.

Essentiellement, lorsque nous sommes en présence d'organismes de réglementation établis comme le Bureau du commissaire ou Élections Canada, ceux-ci ont les moyens d’obtenir des réponses immédiates à des questions urgentes simplement parce qu’ils font remonter les problèmes les plus graves. En pareil cas, nous faisons abstraction des circuits ordinaires et accélérerons les processus de rapport normaux.

Il vaut également la peine de noter que, au cas où vous verriez quoi que ce soit dans l’un de nos systèmes, nous avons une grande variété de mécanismes qui permettent de nous le signaler directement. Nous vous encourageons à les utiliser. [Français]

M. Jacques Gourde:

Cette équipe est-elle déjà en place? Existe-t-elle déjà ou sera-t-elle formée pendant l'été? [Traduction]

M. Jason Kee:

Nous sommes en train de mettre l’équipe sur pied. [Français]

M. Jacques Gourde:

Merci.

C'est tout pour moi. [Traduction]

Le président:

Ce sera maintenant M. Baylis. Cinq minutes.

M. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Merci, messieurs.

Je voudrais revenir un peu sur ce que disait mon collègue, M. Erskine-Smith. De toute évidence, nous avons du mal à vous croire au sujet de votre capacité de satisfaire aux exigences du projet de loi C-76. Facebook dit pouvoir y arriver. Êtes-vous au courant?

M. Jason Kee:

Nous sommes au courant.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous savez donc.

Quelles compétences ont ses ingénieurs que les vôtres n’ont pas?

M. Jason Kee:

Ce n’est pas une question de compétences. Ses systèmes de publicité fonctionnent très différemment des nôtres et Facebook a pu répondre aux exigences d'une manière qui est impossible pour nous.

M. Frank Baylis:

Que se passe-t-il si, lorsqu'on veut publier une annonce, qu'on va sur la page, affiche la publicité et coche la petite case pour indiquer qu'il s'agit d’une publicité politique? Ensuite, vos programmeurs font exactement ce que M. Erskine-Smith a décrit, ce qui entraînerait un délai d'au plus 24 heures.

Pourquoi ne pas faire comme cela? C'est une solution qui semble assez simple.

M. Jason Kee:

À cause du mode de fonctionnement de nos systèmes publicitaires, la solution n’est pas aussi simple qu’elle pourrait le sembler à première vue. Ce sont des systèmes extrêmement complexes et le moindre changement a des effets en cascade. Après de longues discussions sur la capacité de mettre en place des systèmes comme ceux-là, il est devenu évident que nous ne pouvions pas y arriver à temps.

M. Frank Baylis:

C’est devenu clair, alors vous avez eu une longue discussion. Bien entendu, lorsque vous avez eu cette discussion, vous avez établi un calendrier raisonnable, n’est-ce pas?

M. Jason Kee:

Nous cherchions à respecter la date limite du 30 juin, date à laquelle les exigences...

M. Frank Baylis:

J’ai compris. Vous avez dit que vous ne pouviez pas respecter cette date.

Lorsque vous avez eu cette solide discussion, vous avez clairement dit que vous aviez tout examiné et que vous ne pourriez pas y arriver cette fois-ci. Vous aviez un calendrier à respecter. Quelle était la date à respecter?

M. Jason Kee:

Le 30 juin était la seule date à prendre en considération parce que c’est celle de l'entrée en vigueur des exigences de la loi.

M. Frank Baylis:

Disons que je dois réaliser un projet et que je dois le faire d’ici le 30 juin. Je me demande comment je vais m’y prendre, je vois les étapes à franchir et je fixe une date, et je me demande si je peux la respecter ou non.

Je ne dis pas simplement qu’en tant qu’ingénieur, je ne peux pas y arriver pour le 30 juin. Les ingénieurs ont dû faire des calculs et des projections. Voilà ce que je vous demande. Ils ont sûrement fait ces calculs pour dire qu’ils ne pouvaient pas atteindre tel ou tel objectif. Quand ils ont fait ces projections, à quelle date sont-ils arrivés?

M. Jason Kee:

Il n’y avait pas d'autre date que le 30 juin, la date d'entrée en vigueur des obligations prévues par la loi. Si le système n'était pas élaboré et mis en place à ce moment-là, nous dérogerions à la loi. Par conséquent, si c’était...

(1630)

M. Frank Baylis:

Comment sont-ils arrivés à la conclusion qu’ils ne pouvaient pas respecter cette date?

M. Jason Kee:

Simplement en examinant la charge de travail à accomplir...

M. Frank Baylis:

D’accord, alors ils ont examiné le travail nécessaire et ils ont dit que c’était une lourde charge. J’ai compris. Ils devaient dire combien de temps il faudrait si le travail s'amorçait aujourd’hui. Combien de temps ont-ils dit qu'il faudrait?

M. Jason Kee:

Ils ne nous ont pas donné cette projection.

M. Frank Baylis:

Je voudrais comprendre quelque chose. Nous avons dit qu’il fallait apporter les changements au plus tard le 30 juin. Les ingénieurs ont fait une sorte de projection, concluant qu'ils ne pouvaient pas y arriver. Mais ils n'ont pas dit quand ils pouvaient y arriver; seulement qu'ils ne pouvaient pas le faire. Mais ils doivent dire, par exemple qu'il leur faut six mois, sept mois, 10 mois, 10 ans, et ajouter ensuite que, s'ils s'y mettent aujourd'hui, ils peuvent achever le travail à une certaine date. Quelle est cette date?

M. Jason Kee:

Je ne peux pas vous donner cette information. On leur a simplement demandé s'ils pouvaient y arriver à une date donnée.

M. Frank Baylis:

Même si on demande: pouvez-vous faire cela d'ici... Disons que je veux me faire construire une maison dans les 10 jours. Le constructeur fait ses calculs et me dit qu'il lui en faut 30. Parfait. Donc, à compter d'aujourd'hui, vous avez 30 jours.

Mettons que je veuille programmer quelque chose, et c’est vraiment compliqué.

Je comprends, monsieur Kee, que ce soit très compliqué. Je fais donc mes calculs, je dis qu'il me faut sept mois alors qu'on me demande de m'en tenir à six. Ce n’est pas possible. Je comprends. Mais je veux un chiffre, que ce soit sept mois ou 10 jours. Je veux connaître la date que donnent les prévisions. C’est une question simple. Les ingénieurs ne peuvent pas se contenter de dire que ce n’est pas possible, parce qu’ils n’ont pas fait le travail.

Me suivez-vous ou non?

A-t-on établi un calendrier pour dire quand cela pourrait se faire? Il faut qu’ils aient fait cette étude pour pouvoir dire qu'il était impossible de respecter le délai.

M. Jason Kee:

Je n’ai pas cette information. Je peux me renseigner.

M. Frank Baylis:

Je ne vous demande pas seulement de vous renseigner. Je vous demande de revenir ici et de nous donner la date précise découlant de leurs calculs. C'est clair?

M. Jason Kee:

Absolument.

M. Frank Baylis:

Comprenez-vous ce que je demande?

M. Jason Kee:

Je vois ce que vous voulez savoir. Pouvons-nous communiquer cette donné, étant donné qu’il s’agit de renseignements techniques confidentiels internes...

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous ne pouvez pas divulguer...

M. Jason Kee:

Je dis que je n’ai pas été informé des dates prévues.

M. Frank Baylis:

Je comprends que vous n’en avez pas été informé, mais ce renseignement existe. Allez-vous le communiquer ou non? Est-ce une sorte de secret qu’il faut... Fait-il partie des secrets de Google?

M. Jason Kee:

Soit dit simplement, je ne peux pas m’engager à divulguer des renseignements sans avoir des échanges à l'interne au préalable.

M. Frank Baylis:

Je voudrais voir les calculs exacts que les ingénieurs ont faits avant de dire qu'ils ne pouvaient respecter une date donnée. Est-ce une question logique ou non? Est-ce une question qui ne tient pas debout? Je suis curieux.

M. Jason Kee:

Étant donné que, à compter du 30 juin, des obligations légales sont en vigueur et que... [Inaudible]

M. Frank Baylis:

Ils ne pouvaient pas respecter les exigences, j’ai compris.

M. Jason Kee:

La question appelait un oui ou un non: « Pouvez-vous y arriver avant cette date? » La réponse a été non. Voilà où nous en étions.

M. Frank Baylis:

D’accord, alors comment les ingénieurs en sont-ils arrivés à dire non? On leur a demandé s'ils pouvaient faire le travail en six mois et ils ont répondu par la négative.

Comment en sont-ils arrivés là? Ont-ils simplement dit: « Non, impossible », ou ont-ils fait un calcul quelconque?

C’est une question simple. Je vous demande: « Pouvez-vous faire le travail dans tel délai? » La réponse est négative. Avez-vous simplement dit non comme ça, ou avez-vous fait un travail quelconque avant de conclure que c'était impossible?

Facebook a dit: « Nos ingénieurs sont peut-être un peu plus intelligents », ou: « Nos systèmes ne sont manifestement pas aussi complexes que leurs merveilleux systèmes » ou encore: « Nous avons plus d’argent que Google pour faire le travail ». J'ignore ce qu'on a fait chez Facebook, mais ces gens-là ont fait des calculs et conclu qu'ils pouvaient y arriver.

Vous avez fait des calculs avant de répondre non, ou avez-vous simplement dit comme ça: « Non, impossible »?

Avez-vous répondu spontanément ou avez-vous au moins fait un certain travail? C’est ce que je demande; et si vous avez fait un certain travail, je voudrais en prendre connaissance.

M. Jason Kee:

Je le répète, nous avons examiné les exigences et il a été évident que nous ne pouvions vraiment pas nous y conformer dans le délai imparti. Soyons clairs: il est également évident que Microsoft ne peut pas y arriver; Yahoo! n'a pas encore annoncé sa décision, mais il probable qu'il ne pourra pas non plus; beaucoup d’autres ne seront pas en mesure de satisfaire aux exigences.

M. Frank Baylis:

Facebook peut le faire; et vous dites que Microsoft...

Yahoo! fait des calculs pour voir s'il est possible d'y arriver.

Vous avez fait des calculs, ou avez-vous pris une décision spontanée?

C’est une question simple: avez-vous fait des calculs ou simplement décidé que c'était impossible?

M. Jason Kee:

Nos équipes d’ingénieurs nous ont dit que nous ne serions pas en mesure de satisfaire aux exigences. C’est cela...

M. Frank Baylis:

Votre équipe d’ingénieurs a-t-elle répondu sans trop réfléchir ou a-t-elle fait un travail quelconque?

Pourquoi ces mystères? Si vous avez fait le travail, répondez simplement: « Écoutez, Frank, nous avons examiné la question; il nous faudrait 2,2 ans et quatre mois. »

Pourquoi êtes-vous si contrarié? Dites-le-moi. Pourquoi ces mystères?

M. Jason Kee:

Il ne s’agit pas d’être contrarié. C’est plutôt qu’il y avait un délai ferme et qu'il fallait répondre par oui ou non. La réponse...

M. Frank Baylis:

D’accord, mais comment êtes-vous parvenus à la réponse?

M. Jason Kee:

J'ai dit qu'il nous faudrait voir.

M. Frank Baylis:

Les ingénieurs ont-ils répondu spontanément ou ont-ils fait des calculs? Vous avez dit que Yahoo! est en train de faire des calculs.

M. Jason Kee:

Je vous ai déjà dit qu’il faudrait nous renseigner.

M. Frank Baylis:

Allez-vous nous communiquer les dates...

M. Jason Kee:

Je dois me renseigner.

M. Frank Baylis:

... et les calculs?

M. Jason Kee:

Je dois me renseigner. Je ne peux pas m’engager à vous communiquer les calculs.

M. Frank Baylis:

S’ils l’ont fait...

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Baylis. Nous aurons encore un peu de temps. Si vous voulez intervenir de nouveau, vous pourrez demander à le faire.

C’est maintenant au tour de M. Dusseault.

Mesdames et messieurs, il nous reste passablement de temps. Nous avons 55 minutes. Les témoins sont là pour le reste de la période. Quoi qu’il en soit, dites-moi. D'habitude, nous essayons de terminer à 17 heures le jeudi, mais nous verrons où cela nous mènera.

Monsieur Dusseault, vous avez trois minutes. [Français]

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Cette fois-ci, je vais me concentrer davantage sur YouTube, une plateforme très populaire qui a beaucoup d'influence, tout comme Google — dont elle fait partie. J'en parlais d'ailleurs tantôt. YouTube dirige parfois des usagers vers des contenus extrêmes, peu fiables, qui font état de théories conspirationnistes ou qui en font aussi l'éloge à l'occasion. YouTube fait passer ces contenus pour de la véritable information.

Je me demandais si vous aviez quelques détails à nous donner sur l'algorithme utilisé concernant les usagers, une fois qu'ils sont sur une page Web affichant, disons, un contenu de nature politique, puisque c'est le sujet de notre discussion aujourd'hui. L'algorithme va leur donner des suggestions d'autres vidéos à droite de la page qu'ils consultent, ou sous la vidéo s'ils utilisent un téléphone mobile. Quel algorithme est utilisé et quel est le degré de transparence de cet algorithme qui suggère du contenu aux usagers quand ils sont sur une page Web en particulier?

Quel mécanisme y a-t-il pour s'assurer que ce contenu ne fera pas l'éloge de théories de conspiration ou ne donnera pas de fausses nouvelles, de l'information peu fiable ou, peut-être aussi, de l'information non équilibrée, c'est-à-dire de l'information qui fait peut-être juste la promotion d'une idée ou d'une vision, d'un parti politique?

Quel degré de transparence et quel mécanisme avez-vous mis en place pour vous assurer que le contenu qui est suggéré aux usagers est un contenu de qualité, qu'il est équilibré en matière de politique publique, de partis politiques et d'idées politiques également?

(1635)

[Traduction]

M. Jason Kee:

Un certain nombre de facteurs entrent en ligne de compte dans le système de recommandation. Il vaut la peine de souligner que la pondération qui se fait autour des informations et du contenu est différente, disons, de celle qui s'applique au divertissement. Au départ, les recommandations visaient davantage le contenu de divertissement comme la musique, etc. En fait, cela fonctionne extrêmement bien à cet égard.

Lorsque le système a été appliqué à l'information, il est devenu plus évident qu’il y avait des difficultés à surmonter, et c’est même pourquoi nous avons modifié le système de pondération. Ce que cela signifie, c’est qu'il faut examiner le facteur lorsque nous évaluons la vidéo et voir ensuite dans quelle mesure elle fait autorité: surpondération pour ce qui fait autorité et sous-pondération pour l’information qui ne fera pas nécessairement autorité ou qui ne sera pas digne de confiance.

C’est très contextuel. Cela dépend des détails de votre signature. L’information est disponible pendant votre temps de navigation. On se fonde sur l’information sur la vidéo que vous regardez, sur le genre de vidéo que d’autres personnes ont aimé regarder et sur les autres vidéos que les gens qui ont aimé cette vidéo aiment regarder, etc. C’est pourquoi tout est vraiment dynamique, évolue et change constamment.

En plus d’apporter des rajustements et des changements au système au fil du temps pour veiller à ce que nous fournissions de l’information faisant davantage autorité dans le cas des informations, nous ajoutons également des éléments contextuels supplémentaires, grâce auxquels nous aurons en fait des indicateurs clairs, des étiquettes et des cases contextuelles pour indiquer s’il y a des sujets ou des personnes qui font souvent l’objet de désinformation. Par exemple, il y a les théories du complot que vous avez évoqués.

En gros, si l'internaute voit une vidéo qui donne à penser qu'il a une certaine hésitation à l’égard de la vaccination, etc., il obtiendra de l’information disant qu'il n'y a pas de confirmation scientifique et fournissant des données contextuelles sur le sujet de la vidéo. La même chose s’applique par exemple aux théories du complot concernant les attentats du 11 septembre. Ce sera un processus ininterrompu.

Nous voulons surtout nous assurer que, même si un utilisateur voit de l’information, on lui donne le contexte pour qu’il puisse l’évaluer lui-même. [Français]

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

J'aimerais utiliser les secondes qu'il me reste pour discuter de la transparence de cet algorithme. Plus tôt, je pense que M. McKay a parlé de cette question de transparence pour ce qui est des publicités, à savoir pourquoi certaines publicités vous sont présentées. Il y a même, semble-t-il, une nouvelle fonctionnalité du navigateur Chrome qui permet justement aux usagers de voir pourquoi telle publicité leur a été proposée.

Serait-il possible d'avoir cette même fonctionnalité pour ce qui est du contenu recommandé aux utilisateurs de YouTube? Ces derniers pourraient ainsi un peu mieux comprendre pourquoi tel contenu leur est suggéré plutôt qu'un autre. [Traduction]

M. Jason Kee:

Nous cherchons constamment des moyens d’accroître la transparence et de faire en sorte que les utilisateurs comprennent le contexte dans lequel ils reçoivent l’information.

En fait, nous avons publié un rapport — je crois qu’il comptait 25 pages — sur la façon dont Google lutte contre cette information. Cela comprend toute une section consacrée à YouTube qui explique une bonne partie de ce que je vous ai décrit, ainsi que, encore une fois, les facteurs généraux qui entrent en ligne de compte. Nous nous efforcerons d’atteindre cet objectif, comme nous le faisons pour les publicités sur la plateforme YouTube.

(1640)

M. Colin McKay:

Je voudrais ajouter quelque chose à ce que M. Kee vient de dire. Dans le cas du compte Google, l'internaute peut aller dans « myaccount » et il y trouve ce que nous avons identifié comme ses intérêts pour l’ensemble de nos produits et services. Il peut aller dans myaccount et voir qu’en général, il aime la musique des années 1980 et les vidéos de course, par exemple Il y trouve cette observation générale, qu'il peut ensuite corriger. Il peut supprimer cette information ou ajouter des intérêts supplémentaires afin que nous puissions mieux comprendre ce qui l'intéresse et ce qu'il ne veut pas recevoir.

Sur la page elle-même, il y a une petite barre de trois points à côté des vidéos, les vidéos spécialement recommandées — sur les appareils mobiles, comme vous l’avez dit — où l'internaute peut signaler que tel contenu ne l'intéresse pas ou qu'il en voudrait davantage. Il y a un contrôle fin qui permet de ne pas voir telle ou telle chose dans son flux vidéo, sur son fil de nouvelles ou dans les services de Google.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons passer au prochain tour, qui sera le dernier. Nous avons quatre autres questions à poser, ou quatre autres créneaux. Sur la liste figurent M. Graham, M. Erskine-Smith, M. Nater et M. Baylis, qui ont chacun cinq minutes.

Cela vous convient-il?

Allez-y, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Je voudrais revenir sur d’autres questions concernant les délais. Au tout début, pendant le premier tour, nous avons essayé de savoir si vous seriez prêts pour les prochaines élections, en 2023. Il semblait difficile de répondre à cette question. Je n’ai jamais eu de réponse disant que Google serait prêt à appliquer les dispositions du projet de loi C-76 d’ici les élections fédérales de 2023. À supposer qu'elles aient lieu cette année-là.

Si nous savons que le système sera prêt pour 2023 et ne le sera pas pour le 30 juin 2019, savez-vous à quoi vous en tenir? Y travaillez-vous sérieusement en ce moment? Savez-vous s’il sera prêt à un moment donné entre ces deux dates?

M. Jason Kee:

En termes simples, ce serait clair si je disais que nous allons nous efforcer d'être prêts d’ici 2023. Je ne peux pas prendre d'engagement précis quant à la date.

Il vaut la peine de souligner autre chose: nous sommes une entreprise mondiale et nous travaillons à des élections dans le monde entier. Les équipes chargées de ce travail déploient le rapport de transparence d’un endroit à l’autre. Cela continuera d’évoluer et de croître. De plus, nos propres systèmes de publicité continueront d’évoluer et de croître.

C’est pourquoi il est très difficile de fixer une date ferme, de dire par exemple qu'il faudra deux ans. D'ici là, il y aura un certain nombre de changements, qui ont du reste déjà été amorcés dans le système et qui auront des répercussions à cet égard.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Compris.

Lorsque le RGPD est entré en vigueur, assez récemment, combien de temps vous a-t-il fallu pour le mettre en place?

M. Colin McKay:

Je crois qu’il a fallu plus de quatre ans pour discuter du RGPD et de son application. La mise en oeuvre se poursuit. Dès le départ, nous nous sommes concentrés sur le RGPD en participant à la discussion sur le contenu, le ton et les objectifs du texte, en travaillant en étroite collaboration avec la Commission européenne et son personnel, puis en veillant à ce que nous ayons les systèmes en place pour pouvoir nous y conformer. C’est un processus qui se poursuit.

Pour faire une analogie, disons qu'il y a une distinction extrême entre la façon dont les amendements au projet de loi C-76 ont été examinés et mis en oeuvre et la manière dont les lois sont normalement étudiées et mises en oeuvre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends ce que vous voulez dire.

Monsieur Kee, pendant le dernier tour, j’ai parlé des changements de 15 mots. Entre les tours, j’ai parcouru mes notes, car je siège au Comité de la procédure et j’ai participé au processus du projet de loi C-76 du début à la fin. Nous avons entendu de nombreux témoins et reçu beaucoup de mémoires, mais je n’en trouve aucun de Google. Sur ces 15 mots, comment...

M. Jason Kee:

C’est parce que les changements ont été apportés lors de l’étude article par article après la clôture de la liste des témoins, de sorte que nous n’avons pas fait de représentations au comité parce que l'on n’étudiait pas les dispositions en question à ce moment-là.

Comme je l’ai dit, je me ferai un plaisir de les distribuer maintenant. C'est à ce stade qu'elles ont été fournies au comité sénatorial.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D’accord. Merci. C’est bon à savoir.

C’est tout pour l’instant. Je vous remercie de votre participation. La réunion a été intéressante, et je vous en remercie beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci.

Allez-y, monsieur Baylis.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous n’accepterez pas les publicités politiques. C’est la décision qui a été prise, n’est-ce pas?

M. Jason Kee:

C’est exact.

M. Frank Baylis:

D’accord.

Comment allez-vous m’empêcher de faire de la publicité? Vous ne voulez pas accepter ma publicité, mais je suis, disons, vilain. Je ne suis pas un bon acteur, alors je vais essayer de faire passer une annonce de toute façon. Comment m’en empêcherez-vous?

M. Jason Kee:

Comme je l’ai dit dans ma déclaration préliminaire, toute la publicité entrante sera évaluée par une combinaison de systèmes automatisés et des équipes d'inspecteurs chargées d'en faire la police.

M. Frank Baylis:

D’accord. Pour m’arrêter, vous allez mettre en place ce système permettant d'identifier une publicité, n’est-ce pas?

M. Jason Kee: C’est exact.

M. Frank Baylis: Et à côté vous aurez une équipe de contrôleurs — un système automatisé, une équipe non automatisée —et ils vont aussi identifier ces publicités, n’est-ce pas?

(1645)

M. Jason Kee:

Oui. En général, le système automatisé fait un premier tri dans les publicités basé sur la recherche de signaux ou de balises indiquant qu’il s’agit probablement d’une publicité politique. Puis, éventuellement, l’examen est confié à une équipe humaine, s’il faut par exemple une analyse contextuelle que les machines ne peuvent tout simplement pas fournir.

M. Frank Baylis:

D’accord. Vous n’êtes pas en mesure de créer le registre dans ce délai, mais vous êtes en mesure de mettre en place les programmes, le personnel et les ressources nécessaires pour y mettre fin, n’est-ce pas?

M. Jason Kee:

C’est exact.

M. Frank Baylis:

D’accord. J’arrive avec ma pub. Vous pouvez soit l'accueillir dans le registre, soit tout simplement la bloquer, mais vous pouvez clairement l’identifier, n’est-ce pas? Nous sommes d'accord là-dessus. Vous venez de dire que vous pouvez l’identifier.

M. Jason Kee:

Nous utiliserons nos systèmes pour identifier et appliquer nos politiques publicitaires, oui.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous avez admis que vous pouvez identifier la publicité.

M. Jason Kee:

C’est exact.

M. Frank Baylis:

D’accord.

Une fois que vous pouvez déterminer qu’il s’agit de la publicité, au lieu de dire: « J’ai toute ma technologie et les gens pour la bloquer » — vous l'avez — pourquoi ne pouvez-vous pas simplement dire: « D’accord, je l’ai identifiée, et je vais simplement la verser au registre »?

M. Jason Kee:

Simplement parce que, encore une fois, on aurait du mal à actualiser le registre en temps réel et, comme je l’ai dit, on fournirait aussi par là cette information à des tiers.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous ne pouvez pas le faire en temps réel.

Disons que j’arrive. Vous avez votre système automatisé. Voici la pub. elle n’est pas bonne, mais vous ne le savez pas parce que vous ne pouvez pas le faire en temps réel, n’est-ce pas? C’est sur votre page ou votre plateforme Google pour le temps qu’il vous faut... Vous ne pouvez pas le faire en 24 heures, alors combien de temps vous faut-il... Deux jours? Donnez-moi un chiffre.

M. Jason Kee:

Eh bien, comme je l’ai dit, elle serait étiquetée, puis examinée...

M. Frank Baylis:

Je sais, mais combien de temps vous faudra-t-il pour l’identifier? Pas moins de 24 heures, n’est-ce pas? J’ai compris. En combien de temps pouvez-vous le faire? Une semaine? Un jour? Deux jours?

M. Jason Kee:

Encore une fois, je ne pourrais pas vous donner de délais précis.

M. Frank Baylis:

Disons 48 heures. Pouvons-nous dire cela simplement pour les besoins de la discussion?

J’arrive. Voici ma publicité — boum. J’ai un système pour l’identifier. Mais ça prend 48 heures, n’est-ce pas? Ma pub est dans votre système pendant 48 heures avant que vous ne disiez: « Bigre, ça nous a pris 48 heures pour identifier cette pub et maintenant on doit la retirer. » C'est ce qui va se passer?

M. Jason Kee:

Comme je l’ai dit, on aura à la fois les systèmes automatisés et notre équipe d’inspection de publicité pour l'identifier et...

M. Frank Baylis:

Mais seront-ils en mesure de l’identifier en temps réel?

M. Jason Kee: ... qui s’appliqueront essentiellement...

M. Frank Baylis: En temps réel?

M. Jason Kee:

Le plus rapidement possible.

M. Frank Baylis:

D’accord, mais vous devez le faire dans les 24 heures, n’est-ce pas?

M. Jason Kee:

Il y a une différence entre la capacité d’identifier et de supprimer une pub et celle de mettre à jour un registre de publicité.

M. Frank Baylis:

D’accord. Je veux m’assurer de bien comprendre. Il y a une différence entre le fait de pouvoir l’identifier et la retirer dans les 24 heures, aucun problème... Pour l’identifier et la retirer, j’ai un système automatisé et le personnel qui va avec. Disons que j’ai identifié la pub et que je l’ai retirée — Ouf, on a eu chaud. Je peux l’identifier et l’enlever en 24 heures, mais je ne peux pas l’identifier et l’inscrire dans un registre, comme une grosse base de données — d'ailleurs même pas si grande, j’imagine, selon vos normes. Est-ce bien ce que je comprends?

M. Jason Kee:

En raison d’autres aspects complexes liés aux exigences du registre, c’est la raison pour laquelle on n’a pas pu déployer le système. Comme je l’ai dit, nous le faisons dans d’autres pays, n’est-ce pas?

M. Frank Baylis:

Oui, j’en suis sûr.

Soyons clairs sur ce que vous dites. Vous pouvez identifier et bloquer la pub dans les 24 heures, à l’aide d’une combinaison de logiciels et de personnes.

Vous pouvez l’identifier et la bloquer dans les 24 heures. Est-ce exact?

M. Jason Kee:

Comme je l’ai dit, on appliquera la loi de façon très rigoureuse en ce qui concerne la détection et le retrait.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous avez les systèmes, avez-vous dit. C'est l'oeuvre de vos ingénieurs.

Disons que j’ai identifié et bloqué la pub dans les 24 heures. Une fois que vous l’avez identifié, quelle que soit la programmation... parce qu'il en faut un peu pour dire, « paf, retirez-le dans les 24 heures ». J’imagine que vous pouvez le faire instantanément ou est-ce qu'elle restera 24 heures? Je ne sais même pas. Combien de temps restera-t-elle? C’est la question que je vous pose.

M. Jason Kee:

Comme on le fait pour toutes les catégories de publicité, on essaie de les supprimer immédiatement après la détection.

M. Frank Baylis:

Oh, immédiatement. Qu’est-ce que c’est? Instantanément?

M. Jason Kee:

Immédiatement après la détection.

M. Frank Baylis:

D’accord. Vous pouvez donc la capturer et la supprimer immédiatement, mais vous ne pouvez pas la capturer et, dans les 24 heures, programmer son transfert dans cette base de données? Bien franchement, c’est trop demander. Vos programmeurs ne peuvent pas le faire, mais bien sûr qu'ils peuvent faire le programme, la trouver, constituer une équipe de soutien et la retirer instantanément. Cette pub n'est pas diffusée. Disons que je connais la pub et que je l’ai trouvée instantanément, mais vous voudriez que je programme une base de données? Allons donc, nous ne sommes que Google...

Combien de milliards d’heures êtes-vous regardé par jour, avez-vous dit? Était-ce 500? Quel était votre chiffre?

M. Jason Kee:

Sur YouTube, il y a un milliard d’heures de contenu regardé chaque jour.

M. Frank Baylis:

Un jour? Vous avez donc une assez grosse base de données. Puis-je le supposer?

M. Jason Kee:

Il y a une multitude de bases de données, mais encore une fois...

M. Frank Baylis:

Pour une petite base de données pour un tas de publicités légales à mettre... Je ne peux pas imaginer que cette base de données représente un dixième d’un dixième de votre réseau matériel/logiciel, mais vos ingénieurs ne peuvent pas programmer... Ils peuvent tout faire. Ils peuvent l’attraper et l’identifier instantanément, mais ils ne peuvent tout simplement pas l’inscrire dans une base de données parce que c’est trop compliqué? la gestion des bases de données n’est-elle pas l’une des spécialités de Google? Est-ce que je me trompe?

(1650)

M. Jason Kee:

Comme je l’ai déjà dit, nous ne pouvions tout simplement pas répondre aux exigences particulières.

M. Frank Baylis:

Pouvez-vous mettre...

Le président:

Monsieur Baylis, cela met fin au temps dont vous et M. Erskine-Smith disposiez ensemble.

Nous avons quelqu’un d’autre, puis nous reviendrons à vous.

M. Frank Baylis:

D’accord. C’est juste.

Le président:

Il semble que c’est ce que vous demandez.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Nater, pour cinq minutes.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je suis heureux de faire partie de ce comité. Je siège habituellement au Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, alors c'est bon de changer un peu de décor.

En ce qui concerne YouTube, vous avez des politiques en place touchant ce qui peut être et ne pas être diffusé sur YouTube. Mais bien souvent, il y a des situations où certaines des vidéos les plus virales, ou celles qui frôlent la ligne sans vraiment la franchir... Comment déterminez-vous à quel point vous êtes près de cette ligne? Quel type d’analyse contextuelle y a-t-il? Quels types de mesures de protection sont en place pour établir où se trouve la limite et quand quelqu’un la frôle sans nécessairement la franchir? Quels types de procédures avez-vous mis en place?

M. Jason Kee:

Essentiellement, toute vidéo identifiée comme tangente, au moyen d'un rapport ou de nos systèmes automatisés, qui, on l'a dit, vérifient la conformité des vidéos, est soumise à un examen manuel pour une analyse humaine. L’examen, en gros, conclura, d’accord, ceci ne va pas vraiment jusqu’au discours haineux qui incite à la violence, mais ça a quelque chose de dénigrant et la vidéo sera classée parmi les cas limite.

M. John Nater:

J’aimerais revenir un instant au projet de loi C-76.

Quand on parle de technologie, d’innovation, d’économie numérique, ce n'est pas aux fonctionnaires du Bureau du Conseil privé, ni à ceux d’Élections Canada que je pense en premier lieu. Quand je pense à l'univers de l’économie numérique, je pense à des entreprises comme Google, Facebook, Twitter — celles qui innovent.

Dans votre témoignage, vous avez mentionné que les rédacteurs du projet de loi ne vous avaient pas consulté. Je trouve cela troublant. Le gouvernement est probablement l’un des pires délinquants pour ce qui est de suivre l’évolution de la technologie, surtout lorsqu’il rédige des lois, lorsqu’il ne consulte pas les gens de l’industrie.

La décision de ne pas faire de publicité était surtout d'ordre technique, avez-vous dit, en raison de l'échéance du 30 juin, 1 juillet, impossible à tenir. Je peux l’accepter, et je tiens à préciser pour le compte rendu la raison pour laquelle je l’accepte.

Élections Canada a lui-même dit que les dispositions du projet de loi C-76auraient dû être en vigueur et recevoir la sanction royale au plus tard le 30 avril 2018. Le 30 avril 2018, le projet de loi avait tout juste été déposé à la Chambre des communes. Il n’a reçu la sanction royale qu'en décembre 2018.

Si Google, YouTube, vos entreprises privées décident demain que vous ne voulez plus diffuser de belles vidéos de chats, il n’y a rien que le gouvernement du Canada puisse faire pour vous y forcer. Ce serait la même chose, je suppose, pour n’importe quel type de publicité. Si vous décidez de ne pas faire de publicité pour une raison autre que les violations des droits de la personne, rien ne vous oblige à le faire.

Ce que je trouve fascinant, cependant — et c’est davantage une diatribe qu’une question —, c’est que le gouvernement du Canada, dans sa hâte de mettre en oeuvre ce projet de loi à la toute dernière minute, n’a jamais consulté ceux qui pour l'essentiel devraient le mettre en oeuvre .

Les changements ont été apportés au cours de l’étude article par article. Il y en a eu plus de 200. J’ai participé à la plupart de ces discussions, hormis quelques séances manquées en raison d'une naissance. Ensuite, ils ont été déposés à la dernière minute, après que les témoins aient eu l’occasion de discuter...

Ce n’est pas une question, mais vous pouvez faire des commentaires à ce sujet. Je suis tout simplement incrédule à l’idée que le gouvernement précipite l’adoption de ce projet de loi — la toute dernière période possible avant les élections — pour ensuite s’attendre à ce que toutes les entreprises privées se conforment aux règles pour lesquelles elles n’ont pas eu l’occasion a) d'être consultées ou b) de faire des suggestions pendant l’étude article par article.

Je serais heureux de savoir ce que vous en pensez.

M. Colin McKay:

Je peux répondre par une observation. Nous sommes en train de discuter du fait qu’une entreprise a déclaré ne pouvoir mettre en oeuvre cette mesure, en respectant l'échéance du 30 juin, et du fait que l'on a fourni de l’information sur les raisons pour lesquelles on ne peut pas mettre en place les outils répondant aux exigences de la Loi électorale telle que modifiée.

La réalité, comme vous l’avez décrite, c’est que toutes les entreprises ont des produits et services différents dans cette industrie, que ce soit pour la publicité ou la diffusion de nouvelles, et qu'elles peuvent interpréter leurs obligations et leur capacité de les respecter de multiples façons. Jusqu’à maintenant, une seule entreprise a dit qu’elle allait mettre en oeuvre un outil décrit dans la loi.

Je ne dis pas cela à titre de défense, mais pour refléter la complexité des questions. Comme vous l’avez fait remarquer, il faut beaucoup d’études et de discussions pour être en mesure de déployer des outils qui sont efficaces, qui durent longtemps et qui fournissent l’information de façon prévisible et fiable aux utilisateurs.

On ne veut absolument pas se retrouver dans une situation où l'on ne serait pas en mesure de le faire. Notre travail consiste à fournir de l’information et des réponses aux questions de nos utilisateurs.

Cependant, on est dans une situation inconfortable où le respect de la loi passe par la suppression de la publicité politique. La réalité, comme vous l’avez dit, c’est qu’avec d’autres consultations et une discussion sur les amendements déposés par M. Kee, ainsi qu’une plus grande considération de l’industrie, tant de notre point de vue que de celui des entreprises canadiennes et des sites canadiens, on aurait peut-être pu aboutir à une issue différente sur l’outil approprié pour les Canadiens permettant de leur fournir de l’information pendant ce cycle électoral.

(1655)

Le président:

On va maintenant recourir à une combinaison. On entendra d’abord M. Erskine-Smith, puis M. Baylis pour terminer. Il nous reste environ quatre minutes.

Allez-y, monsieur Erskine-Smith.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Merci beaucoup.

J’aimerais d’abord vous poser une question au sujet de l’équipe chargée de la vérification. Évidemment, beaucoup dépend de l’honnêteté des utilisateurs, d’une certaine façon. On a eu écho de votre expérience dans l’État de Washington où des publicités politiques ont été placées dans certains cas.

Quelle est la taille de l’équipe au Canada qui examinera cette question? Combien d’employés...

M. Jason Kee:

Il y aura une équipe décentralisée qui sera renforcée au besoin pour répondre à la demande et appliquer la politique en matière de publicité.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Vous visez quels effectifs?

M. Jason Kee:

Je n'ai pas de chiffre précis à vous donner: un nombre suffisant pour assurer le respect de la politique.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

D’accord.

Je pose la question au sujet des chiffres, parce qu’en ce qui concerne la confiance et la sécurité... Encore une fois, ceci est tiré d’un article de Bloomberg. Je crois savoir qu’il y avait un nombre modeste d’employés — seulement 22, je crois — qui devaient examiner le contenu pour garantir qu'il est fiable et sûr. Ce nombre est maintenant plus élevé.

Quel est le nombre exact de personnes qui examinent actuellement le contenu pour garantir qu'il est fiable et sûr?

M. Jason Kee:

Plus de 10 000.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Vous êtes donc passé de 22 à plus de 10 000. C’est formidable.

Peut-être pourriez-vous m’éclairer... En 2016, un de vos employés a proposé que le contenu frôlant la limite ne soit pas recommandé. YouTube n’a pas pris cet avis au sérieux et l’a rejeté.

Vous dites maintenant qu’en janvier de cette année, ils ont accepté l’avis. Qu’est-ce qui a changé?

M. Jason Kee:

Encore une fois, je ne dirais pas les choses de cette façon.

Cela fait partie de l’élaboration et de l’évolution continue des politiques, je pense, et de la façon dont on aborde le contenu de la plateforme qui est limite, difficile, controversé, non autorisé et de piètre qualité. Il y a actuellement une évolution dans notre approche à cet égard et concrètement un déploiement de technologies supplémentaires, surtout par le biais d’algorithmes, etc. pour chercher à garantir que l'on fournit à nos utilisateurs du contenu de qualité qui fait autorité.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Ce n’est donc peut-être pas parce que personne n’était attentif auparavant et que vous faisiez beaucoup d’argent, et maintenant les gens sont attentifs, vous avez mauvaise presse et vous avez décidé de changer vos pratiques en conséquence.

M. Jason Kee:

Je ne partage pas cette interprétation.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

D’accord.

M. Frank Baylis:

Je vais maintenant aborder la question sous un angle différent.

Google, mon collègue a dit que vous avez fait 8 milliards de dollars au dernier trimestre. J’ai vérifié. En fait, c’est 8,5 milliards de dollars américains, alors félicitations. C’est vraiment bon en dollars canadiens. C'est grâce à la vente de publicité, n’est-ce pas? J’aime telle vidéo musicale ou j’aime lire tel journaliste, alors vous me montrez cette information, puis vous lancez une publicité et vous faites beaucoup d’argent avec. Vous faites énormément d’argent.

Cela a très bien fonctionné pour vous. En fait, ce qui est arrivé, c’est que le journaliste, le musicien, le photographe, l’écrivain, l’acteur, le producteur de film — tous ces gens — ne gagnent rien. Mais ça ne fait rien. On leur enlève leur droit d’auteur, ils ne gagnent rien et vous empochez tout, mais ça ne fait rien. Pourquoi ça ne fait rien? Comme vous l’avez bien dit, monsieur Kee, vous êtes une plateforme, pas un éditeur, et tant que vous restez une plateforme, vous bénéficiez de la protection dite de « safe harbour » (refuge sûr).

Ce qui se passe, c’est que tous nos artistes, tous ceux qui ont des droits d’auteur, un photojournaliste... Autrefois, il leur arrivait de prendre une image incroyable, ils la vendaient et gagnaient beaucoup d’argent. Aujourd'hui vous prenez cette photo gratuitement, mais vous n’avez rien fait. Vous me montrez la photo; vous lancez une publicité et vous empochez tout. C’est de là que vient tout ce contenu, que vous ne payez pas et ne voulez pas payer.

Le danger que vous courez — la raison pour laquelle vous ne voulez pas faire cela —, c’est que dès que vous commencez à contrôler ces publicités, vous cessez d’être une plateforme pour devenir incontestablement un éditeur. Une fois que vous êtes éditeur, vous êtes assujetti au droit d’auteur et à tout le reste.

N’est-ce pas là la vraie raison? Le charabia technique que vous venez de me servir sur le fait que vous pouvez saisir instantanément la pub, la bloquer, mais pas la verser dans une base de données, ne vise-t-il pas en réalité à protéger ce modèle d’affaires qui vous permet de faire 8,5 milliards de dollars américains en un trimestre alors que tous ces gens protégés par le droit d’auteur ne peuvent pas faire un sou? Ils crient haut et fort qu’ils ne peuvent pas faire un sou, et que vous prenez tout cet argent. Vous ne voulez tout simplement pas être un éditeur, parce qu’une fois que vous êtes un éditeur, vous ne bénéficiez plus de la clause de « safe harbour ».

N’est-ce pas là la véritable raison?

(1700)

M. Jason Kee:

Pas du tout.

M. Frank Baylis:

C’est ce que je pensais...

M. Jason Kee:

Il y a plusieurs choses ici.

Premièrement, si c’était le cas, il est difficile de comprendre pourquoi on devrait prendre une décision qui nous coûte de l’argent, dans la mesure où on ne tire plus de revenus d’une catégorie de publicités. Plus important encore, en ce qui concerne nos partenaires éditeurs et les créateurs de YouTube, on fonctionne selon un modèle de partenariat dans le cadre duquel on partage les revenus. Dans le cas des sites Web, par exemple, qui utilisent l’infrastructure de Google — c’est pourquoi on a eu du mal à se conformer au projet de loi C-76, parce qu’ils affichent des publicités de Google sur leur contenu —, ils gagnent plus de 70 % des revenus pour chaque publicité diffusée parce que ce sont eux qui fournissent le contenu.

M. Frank Baylis:

Monsieur Kee, vous payez quelques dollars pour protéger votre modèle d’affaires. Vous ne payez pas pour... et n’essayez pas avec ça de vous faire passer pour de bons citoyens.

M. Jason Kee:

L’an dernier seulement, nous avons versé plus de 13 milliards de dollars à des sites Web.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous payez parce que vous ne voulez pas devenir éditeur. Êtes-vous prêt à dire ici et maintenant que vous êtes prêt à devenir éditeur, à vous appeler éditeur, et à être assujetti...

M. Jason Kee:

Nous ne sommes pas un éditeur.

M. Frank Baylis:

Je sais que vous n’êtes pas éditeur. Je sais que vous vous protégez très bien de cette façon, parce que dès que vous devenez éditeur, vous devez commencer à payer pour tout cet argent que vous volez à tous les autres.

M. Jason Kee:

Comme je l’ai dit, comme on fonctionne sur la base d'un modèle de partenariat, on verse des fonds aux créateurs et à ces éditeurs...

M. Frank Baylis:

Et vous avez négocié... Vous payez, et avec quels artistes avez-vous négocié le montant pour leur...

M. Jason Kee:

On a des milliers d’accords de licence de musique avec toutes les grandes sociétés de gestion collective, les maisons de disques, etc. et on a versé plus de 6 milliards de dollars à l’industrie de la musique l’an dernier.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous avez payé 6 milliards de dollars, et vous n’avez fait que 8,5 milliards de dollars par trimestre.

M. Jason Kee:

Cela ne concerne que YouTube. Pas nos autres services.

M. Frank Baylis:

Justement! Vous avez gagné encore plus d’argent, je le sais.

M. Jason Kee:

Cela s’ajoute aux plus de 13 milliards de dollars que l'on a versés aux éditeurs qui diffusent nos publicités. Comme on l’a dit, notre modèle fondamental est un modèle de partenariat.

M. Frank Baylis:

Êtes-vous en train de me dire pour le coup que toutes ces personnes ont des droits d’auteur, sont heureuses...

Le président:

M. Baylis...

M. Frank Baylis:

Voici ma dernière question.

Êtes-vous en train de me dire que vous êtes un si bon citoyen corporatif que n'importe quel musicien, journaliste, photographe, écrivain, acteur ou producteur de films, me dirait: « On est tout à fait satisfait de ce que Google et YouTube nous paient »? Vous pouvez répondre à cette question par oui ou par non.

M. Jason Kee:

On continuera de les consulter. On les traite comme des partenaires et c’est ce qu'on fera.

M. Frank Baylis:

Pouvez-vous simplement dire oui ou non? Diront-ils oui, ils sont heureux ou non?

M. Jason Kee:

On continuera de les consulter et on a un partenariat avec eux.

M. Frank Baylis:

C’est une question simple. Seront-ils contents?

M. Jason Kee:

Nous avons un modèle de partenariat avec eux.

M. Frank Baylis:

Merci.

Le président:

Cela nous amène à la fin de nos questions.

Monsieur Erskine-Smith, un dernier commentaire, ou est-ce que c'est bon? D’accord.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J’aimerais faire un commentaire sur un autre sujet, sur quelque chose que Google a dit, parce que tout n’est pas mauvais.

Je tiens à féliciter Google, qui a annoncé aujourd’hui que tous les Chromebooks seront bientôt directement compatibles avec Linux. Tout n’est donc pas négatif. Je suis très satisfait de certaines des choses que vous faites. Je vous en remercie.

Le président:

Encore une fois, monsieur McKay et monsieur Kee, merci d’être venus. Nous attendons avec impatience votre comparution et celle de Google à l’IGC. J’espère que les demandes sont prises au sérieux, comme nous l’avons demandé à votre PDG; nous espérons que vous y réfléchissez encore.

Merci d’être venus aujourd’hui.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 09, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.