header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-05-13 SECU 162

Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security

(1525)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

I'll bring this meeting to order.

Welcome to the 162nd meeting of the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security.

We have the Honourable David McGuinty and Rennie Marcoux. Thank you to both of you for coming and presenting the annual report of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, which has the unfortunate name of NSICOP. I'm sure Mr. McGuinty will explain in his own inimitable style what NSICOP actually does.

Welcome, Mr. McGuinty, to the committee. We look forward to your comments.

Hon. David McGuinty (Chair, National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Good afternoon, colleagues. Thank you for your invitation to appear before your committee. I am joined by Rennie Marcoux, executive director of the Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, or NSICOP.

It's a privilege to be here with you today to discuss the 2018 annual report of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians.

The committee's first annual report is the result of the work, the dedication and the commitment from my colleagues on the committee. It is intended to contribute to an informed debate among Canadians on the difficult challenges of providing security and intelligence organizations with the exceptional powers necessary to identify and counter threats to the nation while at the same time ensuring that their activities continue to respect and preserve our democratic rights. [Translation]

NSICOP has the mandate to review the overall framework for national security and intelligence in Canada, including legislation, regulations, policy, administration and finances.

It may also examine any activity that is carried out by a department that relates to national security or intelligence.

Finally, it may review any matter relating to national security or intelligence that a minister refers to the committee.[English]

Members of the committee are all cleared to a top secret level, swear an oath and are permanently bound to secrecy. Members also agree that the nature of the committee, multi-party, drawn from the House of Commons and the Senate, with a broad range of experience, bring a unique perspective to these important issues.

In order to conduct our work, we are entitled to have access to any information that is related to our mandate, but there are some exceptions, namely, cabinet confidences, the identity of confidential sources or protected witnesses, and ongoing law enforcement investigations that may lead to prosecutions.

The year 2018 was a year of learning for the committee. We spent many hours and meetings building our understanding of our mandate and of the organizations responsible for protecting Canada and Canadians. The committee was briefed by officials from across the security and intelligence community and visited all seven of the main departments and agencies. Numerous meetings were also held with the national security and intelligence adviser to the Prime Minister. NSICOP also decided to conduct a review of certain security allegations surrounding the Prime Minister's trip to India in February 2018.

Over the course of the calendar year, the committee met 54 times, with an average of four hours per meeting. Annex E of the report outlines the committee's extensive outreach and engagement activities with government officials, academics and civil liberties groups.

The annual report is a result of extensive oral and written briefings, more than 8,000 pages of printed materials, dozens of meetings between NSICOP analysts and government officials, in-depth research and analysis, and thoughtful and detailed deliberations among committee members.

The report is also unanimous. In total, the report makes 11 findings and seven recommendations to the government. The committee has been scrupulously careful to take a non-partisan approach to these issues. We hope that our findings and recommendations will strengthen the accountability and effectiveness of Canada's security and intelligence community.

(1530)

[Translation]

The report before you contains five chapters, including the two substantive reviews conducted by the committee.

The first chapter explains the origins of NSICOP, its mandate and how it approaches its work, including what factors the committee takes into consideration when deciding what to review.

The second chapter provides an overview of the security and intelligence organizations in Canada, of the threats to Canada's security and how these organizations work together to keep Canada and Canadian safe and to promote Canadian interests.

Those two chapters are followed by the committee's two substantive reviews for 2018.[English]

In chapter 3, the committee reviewed the way the government determines its intelligence priorities. Why is this important? There are three reasons.

First, this process is the fundamental means of providing direction to Canada's intelligence collectors and assessors, ensuring they focus on the government's, and the country's, highest priorities.

Second, this process is essential to ensure accountability in the intelligence community. What the intelligence community does is highly classified. This process gives the government regular insight into intelligence operations from a government-wide lens.

Third, this process helps the government to manage risk. When the government approves the intelligence priorities, it is accepting the risks of focusing on some targets and also the risk of not focusing on others. [Translation]

The committee found that the process, from identifying priorities to translating them into practical guidance, to informing ministers and seeking their approval, does have a solid foundation. That said, any process can be improved.

In particular, the committee recommends that the Prime Minister's national security and intelligence advisor should take a stronger leadership role in the process in order to make sure that cabinet has the best information to make important decisions on where Canada should focus its intelligence activities and its resources.[English]

Moving on, chapter 4 reviews the intelligence activities of the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces. The government's defence policy, “Strong, Secure, Engaged”, states that DND/CAF is “the only entity within the Government of Canada that employs the full spectrum of intelligence collection capabilities while providing multi-source analysis.”

We recognize that defence intelligence activities are critical to the safety of troops and the success of Canadian military activities, including those abroad, and they are expected to grow. When the government decides to deploy the Canadian Armed Forces, DND/CAF also has implicit authority to conduct defence intelligence activities. In both cases, the source of authority is what is known as the Crown prerogative. This is very different from how other intelligence organizations, notably CSE and CSIS, operate. Each of those organizations has clear statutory authority to conduct intelligence activities, and they are subject to regular, independent and external review.

This was a significant and complex review for the committee, with four findings and three recommendations.

Our first recommendation focuses on areas where DND/CAF could make changes to strengthen its existing internal governance structure over its intelligence activities and to strengthen the accountability of the minister.

The other two recommendations would require the government to amend or to consider enacting legislation. The committee has set out the reasons why it formed the view that regular independent review of DND/CAF intelligence activities will strengthen accountability over its operations.

We believe there is an opportunity for the government, with Bill C-59 still before the Senate, to put in place requirements for annual reporting on DND/CAF's national security or intelligence activities, as would be required for CSIS and CSE.

Second, the committee also believes that its review substantiates the need for the government to give very serious consideration to providing explicit legislative authority for the conduct of defence intelligence activities. Defence intelligence is critical to the operations of the Canadian Armed Forces and, like all intelligence activities, involves inherent risks.

DND/CAF officials expressed concerns to the committee about maintaining operational flexibility for the conduct of defence intelligence activities in support of military operations. The committee, therefore, thought it was important to present both the risks and the benefits of placing defence intelligence on a clear statutory footing.

Our recommendations are a reflection of the committee's analysis of these important issues.

(1535)

[Translation]

We would be pleased to take your questions.[English]

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. McGuinty.

Mr. Picard, you have seven minutes, please. [Translation]

Mr. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Thank you.

Welcome to our witnesses.

This my first experience with this committee, and I am very enthusiastic about it.

My first question is very basic, Mr. McGuinty, just to get the discussion rolling.

The NSICOP is a new organization and there is currently a learning curve associated with it. It is an addition to our current structures.

To help us better understand what our intelligence organizations do, can you explain how this organization, the NSICOP, adds value to what was done in the past, before it was established?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Thank you for the question.

I would start by saying that the added value comes first from the fact that members of NSICOP have access to all classified information, to all documents, to presentations and to witnesses. Having access to the most in-depth information helps a great deal.

Then I believe that, this year, NSICOP has shown that it is very possible for parliamentarians of all parties, from both Houses of the Parliament of Canada, to work together in a non-partisan way. That is being done against a currently very partisan backdrop, I feel.

My colleagues and I decided from the outset that we would check the partisan approach at the door because of the importance of the work. Matters of national security are simply too important for us to be part of the normal daily tensions on the political stage.

The year was not easy because, in a sense, we had to learn how to get the plane off the ground. We formed a secretariat, we hired about a dozen full-time people and we have a budget of $3.5 million per year.

We are proud of what we have done to get NSICOP started in its first year.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Thank you.

So I am now going to ask you a more technical question. I would like to go back to your comment about military intelligence.

You made a comparison between the intelligence services, the agencies working in intelligence, such as the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, or CSIS, and the Security Communications Establishment, or CSE, on the one hand and, on the other hand, the other agencies engaged in intelligence activities.

When you talk about military intelligence, you say that the Department of National Defence encompasses the entire range of intelligence services. Are the services similar to the extent that we can consider them equal?

How are military intelligence activities broader in scope than those in the other agencies?

What comparisons can the government use to evaluate the issue of military intelligence? For example, can it rely on best practices in other countries in order to properly evaluate the needs in terms of military intelligence?

Hon. David McGuinty:

First of all, we cannot forget that the legislative basis for the Department of National Defence always remains the prerogative of the Crown.

(1540)

[English]

What we know about the Crown prerogative is that it's several centuries old. It's a very old vestigial power vested in the Crown that allows countries to, for example, deploy troops, prosecute wars and conduct foreign policy.

The powers vested today in CSIS and CSE, for example, also sprang forth from the original concept of the Crown prerogative, but as a result of evolving, both of those organizations now have four corners of a statute within which to operate. They have their own law. They have their own enabling legislation, and by its own admission, in the government's defence paper, the Department of National Defence indicates that it's the only full spectrum organization in the country. In other words, it does what CSIS, CSE and the RCMP do combined.

It also plans on expanding the number of intelligence personnel by 300 over the next several years. It is a major actor in the intelligence sphere.

We took a long hard look at the statutory footing on which it's operating and began to ask some difficult probative questions. The report tries to walk a fine line between the merits of the government considering a statutory footing, new legislation, and some of the inherent risks that the department has brought to our attention. We've been very careful in the report to put it in very plain black and white for people to understand. In so doing, we wanted to simply raise the profile of this issue and ignite a debate, not only amongst parliamentarians but in Canadian society.

Mr. Michel Picard:

For the remaining time, my last question will be on one of your findings. On page 54 it states: F7. Performance measurements for the security and intelligence community is not robust enough to give Cabinet the context it needs to understand the efficiency and effectiveness of the security and Intelligence community.

Do we have any example of prejudice caused by the lack of effectiveness? Would you expand on this finding please?

Ms. Rennie Marcoux (Executive Director, Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians):

I'll answer the question.

What we've indicated in the report is that we did not have access to the actual cabinet documents, since it's a limit in our legislation. What we saw were all the discussions, the briefing materials and the minutes of meetings leading up to that. I think it's in the overall process, from start to finish, where we identify the result, that cabinet did not get enough in terms of answering these questions: What are the risks? What are the benefits? Where are the gaps in collection? Where are the gaps in assessment? Could we contribute more to the alliance?

It was the whole gamut of information, in terms of measuring the committee's performance, that we felt could be better.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Picard.

We'll hear from Mr. Paul-Hus for seven minutes, please. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Mr. McGuinty and Ms. Marcoux.

On page 26 of your report, paragraph 66, you talk about espionage and foreign influence.

Do you consider election campaigns, such as for the election coming up, to be a national security issue?

Hon. David McGuinty:

NSICOP has not yet looked deeply into the whole matter of the integrity of elections, specifically the one coming up.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Do you feel that foreign interference in elections is a matter of national security? In paragraphs 66 and 67, you say that Russia and China are two countries known to be major players in political interference. You also talk about activities designed to influence political parties as well.

It is mentioned in your report. It is a known fact.

Is NSICOP currently in a position to take measures to help stop the Chinese Communist Party trying to interfere in the coming election campaign?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Let me be clear on two things.

We included Russia and China in the report because we relied on open sources. So that is what was repeated there.

Then, we announced that one of the reviews that we will be doing in 2019 is about foreign interference. Eventually, we will have much more to say about it.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

So clearly, we will not have the information before the next campaign. Is that right?

(1545)

Hon. David McGuinty:

Probably not.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

When you undertook the study on the trip the Prime Minister took to India, it was likely because a matter of national security would normally be involved. Is that correct?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Yes.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Minister Goodale appeared before this committee during the hearings on Bill C-59, I believe. At that time, he told us that he could not answer certain questions because it was a matter of national security. After that, in the House of Commons, Minister Goodale said the opposite. Daniel Jean also testified before our committee that it was not a matter of national security.

In your opinion, is it a matter of national security?

Hon. David McGuinty:

In the report, we included a letter to the Prime Minister in which we clearly deal with it.

We told him that, as per our terms of reference, we had examined the allegations of foreign interference, of risks to the Prime Minister’s security, and of inappropriate use of intelligence.

The report deals with those three matters specifically. The Department of Justice clearly redacted the report and revised it.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Your report on the trip to India mentions that the Prime Minister’s Office did not screen the visitors well and that an error in judgment was probably made.

Has the Prime Minister or a member of his staff responded to your recommendations?

Hon. David McGuinty:

No, not yet. We are still waiting for a response from the government to both reports.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

So you submit your reports but there has been no follow-up or reply on the recommendations. Is that right?

Hon. David McGuinty:

NSICOP hopes that there will be some follow-up. We are still waiting for a response. We have raised the matter with the appropriate authorities.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

We certainly see that, basically, colleagues from all parties who work with you on the NSICOP have done so seriously since it was created. That is also clear as we read your report. There is a desire to take the work very seriously.

However, we still have doubts about what will come of your reports. Right from when you submit a report in which you identified serious matters, the Prime Minister basically always has the last word.

The concern we have had since the beginning, when Bill C-22 was introduced, is about the way information is transmitted. Of course, we understand that highly secret information cannot be made public.

However, when the Prime Minister himself is the subject of a study, we don’t expect a response.

As chair of the committee, do you expect at the very least a reply to your studies from the government and the Prime Minister?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Yes, Mr. Paul-Hus.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Your notes mention Bill C-59. You make recommendations involving the Department of National Defence, DND. I know that the bill is being studied in the Senate at the moment, but I no longer recall which stage it has reached. Do you think that amendments will be proposed by the Senate or the government? Have you heard anything about that?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Our role is to submit reports to the government, and we have done that. All we can do is hope that the government will take them seriously[English]

The national security and intelligence review agency, NSIRA, once it's created under Bill C-59, will have the power to review the Department of National Defence but will not be obligated to do so on an annual basis like it will for CSIS and CSE. The committee was unanimous in calling for NSIRA to have that annual responsibility built into Bill C-59 so that the extensive activities of the Department of National Defence in intelligence were reviewed on an ongoing basis. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

You explained that NSICOP has had a number of working sessions and that they are several hours long. What is the main subject that concerns you?

Hon. David McGuinty:

What do you mean?

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

For example, when you have an investigation to conduct and you need information, do you have easy access to it?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Yes, Mr. Paul-Hus.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

The doors of all departments are open?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Sometimes, we ask for so much documentation that the members of NSICOP find it quite difficult to manage the amount. But we have an exceptional secretariat and very experienced analysts. However, from time to time, we have to put a little pressure on some departments or some agencies. But you have to remember that our committee has only been in existence for 17 or 18 months.

Do you want to add anything, Ms. Marcoux?

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

Yes.

What we notice most is the difference between agencies that are already subject to examination and that are used to providing classified information—such as the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, CSIS, the Communications Security Establishment, CSE, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the RCMP—and other departments that are not used to it.

Those other organizations, such as the Department of National Defence or other departments, first of all have to establish a triage process for the documents and make sure that their directorates or divisions accept that a committee like ours has an almost absolute right of access to classified information, including information protected by solicitor-client privilege. It really is a learning process.

(1550)

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Marcoux.

Mr. Paul-Hus and Mr. Dubé, you have the floor for seven minutes.

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

My thanks to the witnesses for joining us today.

First of all, I want to thank you and all the members of the NSICOP for the work that you have done up to now. Given that this is the first experience for us all, please know that, if we are asking more technical questions on the procedure, it is in order to reach certain conclusions, it is not that we are criticizing your work, quite the contrary.

I would like to know more about the follow-up to your recommendations. As an example, when the Auditor General submits a report, the Standing Committee on Public Accounts generally makes it a point to hear from representatives of the various departments.

In your case, it is a little more complicated for two reasons. First of all, the information needed for the follow-up may well be classified. Then, you are not completely able to engage in the political jousting that is sometimes necessary to achieve good accountability.

Would it be appropriate for a committee, like ours, for example, to be given the responsibility of conducting the follow-up with some of the organizations mentioned in your recommendations?

Hon. David McGuinty:

That is a question that the members of the committee have discussed at length: how can we push a little harder and require the recommendations to be implemented?

We are considering several possibilities. We have learned, for example, that the CSE carries over recommendations that have not yet been implemented from one report to the next. That is a possibility we are looking at, but we are in contact with the people involved every day.

To go back to Mr. Paul-Hus’ question, the Department of National Defence has never yet been examined by an external committee of parliamentarians like the NSICOP, which has the authority to require all that information.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Yes.

Hon. David McGuinty:

Since we have had DND in our sights, they, for the first time in their history, have established a group of employees with the sole responsibility of processing all the information requested. That alone is progress.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you.

Please forgive me if I move things along. I have a limited amount of time.

Hon. David McGuinty:

I understand.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I would like to focus on one other point. I am going back to the question that was asked about foreign interference.

Your study was supposed to be submitted, or at least completed, before May 3, if I am not mistaken. Did I understand correctly that it is possible that the report will not be tabled in the House before Parliament adjourns for the summer?

Hon. David McGuinty:

We are working as fast as we can and spending a lot of time on that task in order to try to finish the report. However, it deals with four topics.

The problem is that the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians Act stipulates that the government must table its reports, once the process of redaction, or revision, is complete, within 30 days.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I do not want to add to your workload and I understand that you are making every possible effort.

Is the committee satisfied with the length of time between your report arriving at the Prime Minister’s Office and it being laid before the House?

Hon. David McGuinty:

That is an excellent question. In fact, we are thinking of studying those timeframes as part of the review of the act, which has to be done five years after its coming into force. You have put your finger on a good question.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I am not doubting your good faith, but it is important for us to ask these kinds of questions in order to do our work, especially as the elections draw nearer.

In paragraph 49 of your report, you talk about the national intelligence expenditure report. You quote statistics from Australia, but the figures for Canada are redacted. Why did the Australians decide that it was appropriate to make those figures public to the extent that even we in our country are aware of them, but Canada did not? Are you able to answer that?

(1555)

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

We asked the government the same question when we learned that this information was going to be redacted.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Have you received a response that you're able to send us?

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

The government told us that this was classified data and that it did not want to disclose these details.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

This is interesting, especially considering that Australia is a member of the Five Eyes.

I have another question on redacting, particularly with regard to the summary, which must remain consistent with the rest of the document. Does the NSICOP determine how the summary is written?

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

The summary is written by the staff of our secretariat. In this case, after reviewing the sentences or sentence sections and the paragraphs that had been redacted, we decided to reformulate sentences to make them complete and therefore produce a complete summary.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Was your decision to use asterisks draw from the British model?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Yes, exactly.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Right, thank you.

I have another question on National Defence and the recommendation to amend Bill C-59 as well as on the definition of the mandate that would be given to the new committee.

Is your committee concerned about the resources that this new sister committee would have to do this monitoring? The resources are already rather limited. If the mandate is expanded, are you concerned about whether the new committee will be able to carry it out each year? I would like it to be and I agree with the recommendation, but the question is whether it will be able to do so adequately given current or planned resources.

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

We aren't aware of the resources and budget available to the new committee. I know that this budget will be much larger than the one allocated to my secretariat because the mandate of the new committee is much broader, but we are not aware of the precise figures. That being said, we agree that resources will have to be allocated according to the mandate.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I have one last question, which may be obvious, but which I would like to ask in the 15 seconds I have left.

When you list the criteria—sufficient, but not necessary, or still necessary, but insufficient—according to which you have decided to initiate an investigation or study, can it be said that it is in fact only a guide to inform the public, since you do not necessarily limit yourself to these criteria as appropriate?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Absolutely.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Spengemann and then Mr. Graham.

Mr. Sven Spengemann (Mississauga—Lakeshore, Lib.):

Mr. Chair, thank you very much.

Mr. McGuinty and Madam Marcoux, thank you very much for being with us. Congratulations on tabling the report.

Mr. McGuinty, in addition to chairing the NSICOP, which is a committee of parliamentarians and not a parliamentary committee, you also chair the Canadian Group of the Inter-Parliamentary Union, or IPU, which is the umbrella organization for the world's parliaments founded in 1889.

This puts you in a very unique position to comment on the role of parliamentarians on two fundamental policy objectives that are very live around the globe today. One is the fight against terrorism and also violent extremism in all of its forms. The other is the fight for diversity and inclusion, the fight for gender equality, the fight against racism and the fight for LGBTI rights.

I'm wondering if I could invite you to comment on your perspectives, your reflections on the role of parliamentarians on these two issues, drawing on the two roles that you currently hold.

Hon. David McGuinty:

Thank you for the question.

One of the things we've been hearing as a new committee as we interface with our colleagues in Australia, the United States, Britain, New Zealand, the Five Eyes and beyond, is that parliaments worldwide are struggling with this tension between the granting of exceptional powers for security purposes and the ways in which those powers are exercised with the protection of fundamental rights to privacy, freedom, and charter rights in the Canadian context, for example.

We're not alone on this journey. Many countries have reached out to NSICOP already. Ms. Marcoux was in Europe speaking to a number of countries that are fascinated by our approach. We've been invited to countries, like Colombia, and elsewhere to help them build capacity in this regard.

I think it's not necessarily only a Canadian challenge; it's obviously a global one, with the rise of violent extremism and terrorist activity.

However, we have to make sure that we get this balance right. That's what the government's intention was when NSICOP was created, and it is certainly the informing ethic among all the members of all parties who sit on the committee now.

(1600)

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

If you were to put your finger on the one most important aspect of parliamentary dialogue in an unencumbered setting like the IPU where there is no ministerial direction—the reconciliation between these two policy objectives—what would that role be for parliamentarians such as ourselves here on the committee?

Hon. David McGuinty:

I think the secret sauce in the work that we're doing is non-partisanship. If we learned how to work together in a more non-partisan fashion in many critical areas that we're facing as a country and as a planet—security being one, climate change being another—we might do better by our respective populations, the people we represent. I think that is integral to being able to treat issues like national security in that balance between security and rights.

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

Thank you very much.

I'll hand it over to my colleague.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

Mr. McGuinty, I'd like to put it on the record that without your mentorship when I was a staffer many years ago, I probably wouldn't be at this table today. Thank you for that.

I am happy to see your considerable skills and experience being put to use in this important work, which is very far from the public eye.

Chapter 2 makes frequent reference to Canadians not appreciating the extent of our intelligence services or understanding the various roles.

What is the most important thing you want Canadians to understand that they they don't understand today?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Thanks for pointing that out, Mr. Graham.

We were struck early on in our steep learning curve about how little Canadians knew about the security and intelligence community in the country: who were the actors, what were their powers, how did they co-operate, how did they not co-operate, how could things be improved, and what are the threats facing the country.

We saw some astonishing polling results about the lack of information in Canadian society. Despite the fact that we have good agencies and departments putting out good information, Canadians are not ferreting out that information, not understanding it and not collating it.

We decided, on a foundational go-forward basis, to provide some 30 to 32 pages at the front end in this chapter to give Canadians a bit of a survey, a security and intelligence 101 course in plain English.

One of my favourite tests that I apply all the time in the committee is, if you can't stop anybody coming off of a Canadian bus or train or commuter vehicle and put this report in front of them and have them understand it, you've failed. We've tried to write and deliver information here for Canadians to understand what's going on in the country in a way that they can get it.

Canadians do get this; they get it perfectly well. It's just that I think we haven't necessarily taken the time to put it in a format and a way that they can understand and digest it. That's the purpose of those 32 or 34-odd pages, to paint a picture and a mosaic of what is going on, and at the same time to show Canadians that historically, security and intelligence has been an almost organic process.

I mentioned earlier that CSIS was spun off from the RCMP—after the RCMP was involved in some shenanigans going way back—from the Macdonald commission. It was given its own statutory footing, and CSE was given its statutory footing. Things evolved, and we think that this is an organic process in the security and intelligence field. We've tried to capture that as well.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I have quite a lot of questions, but I probably won't have time to get through most of them.

Do we have an appropriate number of intelligence agencies? Are there too many, too few?

Before you answer that, table 1 on page 20 lists 17 organizations, and I think there might be one missing. From our work at procedure and House affairs, we've learned that the Parliamentary Protective Service has its own intelligence unit.

Would that fall under your mandate? As a parliamentarian or as a government committee, how would you see that?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Any federal actor involved in national security and intelligence falls under the mandate of NSICOP. We did not turn our minds to the sufficiency or insufficiency or perhaps over-sufficiency of the number of actors in the field so I can't comment on that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you very much. I still have a few seconds.

The Chair:

Yes, you do.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned plain English as an important point.

There's a whole page, page 94, describing the arguments by DND against legislative supervision. Could you boil that down into plain English for us on how that debate went?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Manoeuvrability, operational manoeuvrability. We wanted to capture in the report verbatim the submission made by DND for that very reason. We wanted Canadians to juxtapose what we think are the merits of proceeding or considering to proceed this way with a legislative basis and some of the challenges coming forth from our front-line practitioners in the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces, so we reflected that very accurately. In a sense we wanted to give Canadians a shot at the state of the debate in this area.

(1605)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Motz, for five minutes, please.

Mr. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Mr. McGuinty and Ms. Marcoux, for being here today.

Before I begin with my questions, I just want to commend you and thank you for your dedication of this report to our colleague Gord Brown who passed away just about a year ago. I know his family is really appreciative of that gesture, so thank you very much.

Hon. David McGuinty:

Thank you, sir.

Mr. Glen Motz:

I also appreciate the comments you made about the necessity to have national security issues remain non-partisan. These issues need to be non-partisan. I couldn't agree with you more and there are a lot of lessons to be learned.

Unfortunately, the 2018 terrorism report produced by the Minister of Public Safety appears to have now become mired in some partisan politics.

Would that report have come to NSICOP before it was published?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Do you want to take a shot at that?

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

Are you referring to the 2017 or the 2018 report?

Mr. Glen Motz:

The 2018 terrorist threat.

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

We were given a copy of the final report, I think, a day or two in advance of its publication, as a courtesy.

Mr. Glen Motz:

You were not involved in reviewing it.

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

No.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Mr. McGuinty, does your committee intend then to evaluate the development or publication or revision of this report to determine if there was any political interference in its various iterations, in what best practices should be moving forward, or does that not fall within your mandate?

Hon. David McGuinty:

It might, but it's not something I'm in a position to comment on now. We have a full spectrum of four reviews for 2019 and we generally only pronounce on what we're working on once we announce what we're working on.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay, fair enough.

In the original terrorism threat report, the Minister of Public Safety named Khalistan extremism as a threat. The minister has since reworded that, but the evidence remains very dated in the report.

The only explanation that I can think of is either that the new information can't be published or that it was a political issue, not a security one. If it's the latter, if it was political and not security, then it's a significant breach of trust, in my opinion, to use terrorism threats for a political purpose.

Where should these questions be investigated? Is this committee the right one? Is your committee the right one? How do we get to the bottom of that issue, sir?

Hon. David McGuinty:

We haven't turned our minds to this question at all. We're not in a position at all to comment on the government's decision one way or the other. I think that's a question better put to the government itself and the minister.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay. Are your members of the committee prevented from speaking out on any errors in reports like this?

Hon. David McGuinty:

As a general rule, the membership has agreed from the very beginning that we are extremely circumspect in any public comments, and generally we only comment on the merits of the work that we've done in the form of reports.

Mr. Glen Motz:

The work you've done....

Hon. David McGuinty:

The work our committee has done. That's correct.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay. So—

Hon. David McGuinty:

And those reports, of course, are unanimous.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay, very good.

I just want to ask a more general question about the committee and how you operate now.

During study of Bill C-22, which is the legislation that created your committee, former CSIS director and national security adviser Richard Fadden said that the committee should go slow and see how the committee does.

Now that you have 16 to 18 months of operations under your belt, do you think there are aspects that the committee should consider changing in its operations, in its role or its access? I know you and Mr. Dubé just talked about the timeliness of its release once you give it to the PMO. Is there anything else you can think of? Would those changes be legislative or internal? There must be touchpoints now, some things you need to work on.

Hon. David McGuinty:

Yes, one of the areas we're learning a lot about is this question of redaction and the redaction process. We have turned our minds to this, and we reserve the right, so to speak, to say more about it in due course. We're comparing and contrasting with other redaction processes—Australia was raised, and there's the United States and other countries—to see what their practices are. We also think the redaction process may be capable of evolving. However, we always tend, as best as we can, towards providing more information, rather than less, to the Canadian public.

Mr. Glen Motz:

If I'm hearing you correctly, this committee should maybe have its own redaction rules, and because it's non-partisan and it represents the government, well, the whole House, then maybe no outside redaction should occur. Have I heard you correctly?

(1610)

Hon. David McGuinty:

Not exactly. What we're trying to get our heads around collectively as a committee of parliamentarians is how the redaction process works, how the departments fit into this, what role the national security adviser plays, the role of the Department of Justice under the Canada Evidence Act, and on. We think its capable of evolving and becoming more transparent over time.

The Chair:

Thank you Mr. Motz.

Ms. Dabrusin, you have five minutes.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Over the past few exchanges, we've heard a little bit about Bill C-59 and the other forms of oversight or review that might be put in place. In respect of the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency, NSIRA, how would you see the complementarity between the review agency and yourself?

Hon. David McGuinty:

I think it's fair to say that NSIRA's mandate will be chiefly based on examining the activities of different security and intelligence actors on the basis of their lawfulness and whether they're operating within the powers they have vested in them. They also have some mandatory yearly reviews to perform. They'll be becoming, as they say, a bit of a super-SIRC, so they'll have to review SIRC as well as the Communications Security Establishment on an annual basis.

Public complaints will be a big factor in terms of receiving Canadians' complaints. That will be a very large component, but we'll wait and see. We've already met with the folks at SIRC and other agencies that are in place, and we fully intend to meet up with NSIRA, when it's created. I'm sure we will be co-operating and sharing information, research, and analysis. One of the benefits of having a secretariat, which will be led by Ms. Marcoux, is that the institutional memory will remain constant, transcending any one government or any one membership of the committee.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Do you think having that kind of a super-SIRC agency will result in the creation of another base of information that will help you do your work?

Hon. David McGuinty:

We think so. It's going to be in a position to have access to key information and classified materials, and I fully expect that we'll be sharing and co-operating as best we can.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

In paragraph 69 of your report, you talk about the threat of espionage and foreign influence that's growing in Canada, and then at the end, the last sentence refers to Australian legislation. It says, "The committee agrees and notes that Australia passed legislation in June 2018 to better prevent, investigate, and disrupt foreign interference."

I'm wondering if you'd be able to tell me a little bit about that legislation, and what you think we could learn from it.

Hon. David McGuinty:

Well, we can't learn very much as this stage, because we're actually in the throes of reviewing the government's response to foreign interference, and that's one of our major reviews for 2019. Following this 2018 report, we want to shed light on the scope of the threat of foreign interference.

We also want to assess the government's response to that threat. We want to do this particularly with respect to Canadian institutions and different ethnocultural communities in a Canadian context. We are not looking so much at electoral integrity or the acquisition of Canadian companies under the Investment Canada Act. Those are not areas or cybersecurity, not the areas that we're honing in on. We're going to be looking at who these foreign actors are, what they're up to, and how well we're responding.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Is there anything you would be able to comment on about the Australian legislation? It's referenced in this paragraph, so is there something you can tell us about the Australian example?

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

I don't have the details of the legislation in front of me, but I remember something of the discussion at committee. I was struck by the fact that Australia had enacted explicit legislation on foreign interference, whereas here in Canada, foreign interference is listed as a threat to national security under the CSIS Act. Australia felt that the threat was severe enough to draft and enact explicit legislation on it—probably a whole-of-government approach as opposed to that of a single agency.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

You're working on that right now, so it's something that hopefully we'll get to—

Hon. David McGuinty:

You will have more to say.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

—talk to you about a little bit more.

This is the last one, as I only have a minute.

You've talked a bit about the lack of awareness among Canadians about our security agencies. When you looked into it, what did you find was the biggest misunderstanding, if there was a biggest misunderstanding? There's one part you note in the report about lack of knowledge about what our agencies are, but was there anything where you actually spotted a misunderstanding as to how our agencies work?

(1615)

Hon. David McGuinty:

It was more basic than that. Very few Canadians could name our core intelligence agencies. Very few knew what CSE was. Very few really understood what CSIS was, what it was doing, how it was operating. It's an even more rudimentary lack of understanding not so much in precision about the way they act, but simply the very existence of the organizations or the number of organizations that are acting. This is very new for Canadians.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

A chart of all the organizations is in here, so that might help get that information out.

Hon. David McGuinty:

We hope so, thank you.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Dabrusin.

Mr. Eglinski, for five minutes, please.

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC):

Thank you.

I'd like to thank both presenters today. Thank you for the work that you're doing for our country. It's a lot of long hours, and I appreciate what you're doing.

I noticed in your report, especially paragraphs 67 and 68 and even partially going into 69 where.... I think in 68 you mention CSIS has raised concerns about Chinese influence in Canadian elections and stuff like that. Is your agency involved in any of the preparations for the 2019 election to ensure there's no political interference from foreign agents, or could it potentially retroactively look at this issue? Are you going to look at it before...? Have there been any studies done?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Not at this time, not by NSICOP. In our foreign interference focus, as I mentioned, our first objective is to simply shed light on the breadth and the scope of the threat by foreign actors in terms of who these primary threat actors are, what threat they are posing, and what they are doing, and also, how well our country is responding to the threat. We're not focusing so much on electoral integrity in this forthcoming election as we are the general role of outside actors.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Your organization itself is not. Do you know if the other groups, like CSIS, are doing some active research, study or intelligence work in that area?

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

One of the reasons we didn't look at the upcoming election in terms of foreign interference is that the government—they informed us—was doing so much work in terms of assessing the threat and then taking action to prevent the threat of foreign interference.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you.

Being a new organization and working with our basically eight major intelligence gathering organizations in Canada, how have you found over the last year the co-operation with these outside agencies? Quite often these agencies are reluctant to give information, reluctant to trust a new organization or outside.... Has the transition been fairly good? Are they buying into the need for our national organization—you, your group?

Hon. David McGuinty:

That's a great question.

Generally yes, I think most folks we work with are very supportive, but it's new. We're building trust and building a relationship of co-operation and getting access to information, pushing and poking and prodding from time to time to get what we need.

I mentioned earlier the Department of National Defence has never had a spotlight shone on it this way in terms of its intelligence activities. That was a great learning experience, and there was a lot of trust.

This year, we're doing a major review on the Canada Border Services Agency, which has never been reviewed by an outside body of parliamentarians. We've already received roughly 15,000 to 16,000 pages of documentation from CBSA, so the co-operation is very good so far.

I think most folks think that this kind of external review is helpful in terms of how they conduct their affairs, and look forward to the findings of NSICOP because they are non-partisan, and because they are very much recommendations for improvement.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you.

Just expanding on that, how are you finding your group being recognized by international communities?

Hon. David McGuinty:

We're very proud of the report; the annual report has been well received around the world. We've had commentary from the U.K., the United States, Australia and New Zealand. For example, we heard from New Zealand's intelligence commissioner, I think she's called—

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

She's the inspector general.

Hon. David McGuinty:

She has said that chapter 4 on national defence—

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

It's the intelligence priorities.

Hon. David McGuinty:

I'm sorry. The intelligence priorities will be part of the foundational examination in the commission of inquiry on the Christchurch shooting. We're reaching out as best we can, but the feedback so far is very positive.

(1620)

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I have a quick last question.

We gave you a mandate when the group was started, and there was lots of controversy over it initially. Have we given you enough tools? I believe there was supposed to be a five-year review. Do you find, even in your first year, that we may need to look at that more quickly? Are you going to need better tools to assist your organization?

Hon. David McGuinty:

We might, but right now we're only two years or so into the five-year mandate, and I think it's going to be interrupted a bit with an election campaign in the fall—

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Yes, it will be.

Hon. David McGuinty:

I think the committee would say that five years is an appropriate moment, but we're certainly carrying forward some of these areas, and as we practise and get more experience, I think we'll have more to say and perhaps more suggestions for improvement.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Eglinski.

Mr. Graham, you have five minutes, please.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

On page 66 of the report, paragraph 170 describes defence intelligence. There is a description of the different types of intelligence. Signals intelligence is, of course, the one that gets the most interest. It's the one that all the Edward Snowden stories were about at the core. By the very nature of SIGINT, it captures everything; it's really hard not to.

In your view, and this comes down to the core reason the committee was created for political reasons, does Canada's intelligence apparatus, and our Five Eyes partners especially, take adequate safeguards to prevent unjustified or illegal collection of data by, about or between Canadians?

Hon. David McGuinty:

That's an excellent and really difficult question. I'm going to deflect it to a certain extent by letting you know that again this year, 2019, one of the major reviews we're undertaking is a special review of the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces. We're going to be examining the collection, use, retention and dissemination of information on Canadian citizens by the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces. We're going to try to make sure there's clarity on the legal and policy constraints around this collection of information on Canadian citizens when conducting defence intelligence activities. So it's something we're immediately seized with.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Does DND have domestic intelligence or is it mostly international?

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

They're able to collect intelligence if they have a legally mandated authority to deploy forces on a mission, whether it's in Canada in support of the RCMP or CSE for example, or on a mission abroad. They can collect in support of a mission wherever it is.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do we know if the existence of NSICOP has changed the behaviour of any of the intelligence community?

Hon. David McGuinty:

I think it has. I mentioned earlier that one of the immediate effects of examining intelligence activities at the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces is that for the first time ever, the department set up a unit within to respond to outside review, to pull together information, to collate and to respond to the requests that we made. We've made many requests to the department and have received thousands of pages. When we think it's not satisfactory, we go back and ask for more. If something is missing, we ask why things might be missing.

We think the probity that NSICOP can bring to organizations that are involved in national security intelligence is really positive for Canadians.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

At the very end of your report, paragraph 265, I read a hint of frustration that the intelligence community is less than forthcoming and sometimes has to be coaxed along to provide information you're asking for. Is this changing, and will the recommendations you propose also help solve that?

Hon. David McGuinty:

Did you say paragraph 265?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Paragraph 265 on page 110. It's towards the end of the report. There was a bit of frustration by the committee that you'd ask a question and you'd get a very narrow response instead of getting the answers you're looking for.

Hon. David McGuinty:

I think Ms. Marcoux is best placed to answer that question, because she is dealing with her colleagues inside these departments and agencies on a regular basis.

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

As I think I mentioned earlier, it's a question of the departments, particularly those that are not subject to regular review, getting used to providing information, the relevant information, to the committee.

In some cases, it's perhaps about the secretariat needing to be more precise in terms of time frames or the type of information we want. It's a back and forth process that's going on. In some cases, it's just a question of the need to read the document carefully. If there's a reference, for example, to a document in a footnote, it is incumbent on them to give us that document as well. So it can be the small things as well as the big ones.

(1625)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I understand.

Paragraph 107, on page 41—you don't need to go to each page; I'm just telling you where they are—discusses a case of CSIS drafting a ministerial direction minus two priorities, and it creating a bunch of confusion about whether or not intelligence can be collected.

Are they allowed to collect things outside of the priority list? Why would it create confusion? They can still do data collection, even if it's not among 10 items that are redrafted on the—

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

It's easier for me to—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Sure. It's paragraph 107, on pages41 and 42. This is excellent weekend reading, by the way.

Hon. David McGuinty:

I don't think we're in a position to give you much more insight, given the classified information that backs up that paragraph.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I understand.

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

Yes. I think it's because CSIS operates within very precise references and direction, so the more precision they get, the better it is for the officers in a region to collect. I think that's what we were trying to refer to.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Dubé, you have three minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I just have two last questions. One may seem a little ridiculous, but I think it's important.

Will the format of the report be different next time so that it is easier to view on a computer—for example, to allow searching using the Ctrl-F keys? In other words, will it still be a scanned copy?

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

This problem is related to the redaction process. You can't just cross out the information in a document and then transfer it to a computer or on the web. In fact, copies and photocopies must be made before they are posted on the website.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

You will forgive me for saying that in 2019, we should be able to find a solution to consult the document more quickly.

Ms. Rennie Marcoux:

Yes.

We share your frustration, Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Excellent. Thank you. I couldn't help but mention it.

I have one last quick thing to ask you.

To go back to the first question I asked, is there a plan to formally monitor the implementation of the recommendations made by the NSICOP? I asked the same question at the beginning of my intervention, but I just want to make sure that there is a formal follow-up on these recommendations.

Hon. David McGuinty:

Yes.

The NSICOP has a plan to do exactly this kind of follow-up. We are really pleased to be here today, and perhaps be invited to the Senate later, to address your counterparts there. We think this is a good start to raise awareness among parliamentarians at the very least.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Excellent. Thank you.

Hon. David McGuinty:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.

I have one last question.

In your recommendations, you talk about the process for setting intelligence priorities, the F1 recommendation, and you're complimentary about that. Then you say in F7 that the performance measurement for the security and intelligence community is not robust enough.

Intelligence priorities change all the time. The one that comes to mind is the change in priorities between terrorism and cybersecurity. A lot of intelligence analysts think that cybersecurity is a far greater threat than terrorism.

Can you describe that process, in terms of whether you're satisfied that, ultimately, we have our priorities correct?

Hon. David McGuinty:

When we undertook the intelligence priority setting review, we did it because we wanted to be, so to speak, at the top of the crow's nest for the country, examining the overall architecture of security and intelligence, while at the same time getting into the engine room, to see how these priorities were, in fact, arrived at.

One of the stumbling blocks we think we happened upon here, which is made very plain in the recommendation, is this question of standing intelligence requirements. There are over 400. It's very difficult to triage and feed 400-plus standing intelligence requirements into a cabinet process. We don't have access to cabinet confidences in this regard, but we see most of the material that has led up to those kinds of discussions and debate.

We think there's real improvement to be made, which is why we're calling on the national security and intelligence adviser to take a much more proactive role. The NSIA is pivotal in the overall architecture of security and intelligence in Canada, and she is best placed, we believe, to streamline and simplify. A lot of good front-line actors in security and intelligence in the country are looking for more clarity, and perhaps a smoother process.

The entire chapter breaks down for Canadians how this works, step by step, and we've honed in on a couple of internal fine-tuning mechanisms that we think would go a certain distance in improving the entire process.

(1630)

The Chair:

Thank you for that.

On behalf of the committee, I want to thank both of you for your presentation. It's an insight that all of us appreciate. I commend the work of your committee. I commend your report. Thank you for the very hard work that I know you have put in over the last 18 months.

With that, colleagues, I propose to suspend until we see Minister Goodale in the room, but I'm going to turn to Mr. Paul-Hus while we have a little bit of time. He wishes to deal with M-167, which is not on the agenda. I only want to deal with that if there is unanimity on the part of colleagues to deal with it now. If not, I'm just going to shut it down and deal with it—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We have to be in camera for that, right?

The Chair:

Yes, we do.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We can't wait for Ralph then.

The Chair:

First of all, is there an attitude that we wish to do this at the end of Minister Goodale's presentation?

An hon. member: That's fine.

The Chair: You'll be fine if I then go in camera. Is that right? I want to just make sure we are all okay.

With that, we will suspend.

(1630)

(1630)

The Chair:

We will resume. The minister and his colleagues are with us.

This is a special meeting. We agreed to invite the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness to appear on, respond to and take questions on the “2018 Public Report on the Terrorist Threat to Canada”.

I'll turn to Minister Goodale for his opening statement and ask him to introduce his colleagues.

Hon. Ralph Goodale (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and members of the committee. It's good to be back.

I have with me today the associate deputy minister, Vincent Rigby, the commissioner of the RCMP, Brenda Lucki, and the director of CSIS, David Vigneault.

We're happy to try to respond to your questions about the “2018 Public Report on the Terrorist Threat to Canada”.

I'd like to begin by saying that the women and men who work for our intelligence and security agencies do an incredible and very difficult job of identifying, monitoring, mitigating, and stopping threats in the interests of keeping Canadians safe. It is a 24-7, unrelenting job and the people who protect us deserve our admiration and our thanks.

The purpose of the “Public Report on the Terrorist Threat to Canada” is to provide Canadians with unclassified information about the threats we are facing. That includes threats emanating from Canada but targeted elsewhere around the world. No country wants to be an exporter of terrorism or violent extremism. Providing Canadians with a public assessment of terrorists threats is a core element of the government's commitment to transparency and accountability. While never exposing classified information, the goal is to be informative and accurate.

Before I get into the specifics of this year's report, I would like to remind committee members about the “2016 Public Report on the Terrorist Threat to Canada”. In the ministerial foreword to that report, I wrote this: It is a serious and unfortunate reality that terrorist groups, most notably the so-called Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), use violent extremist propaganda to encourage individuals to support their cause. This group is neither Islamic nor a state, and so will be referred to as Daesh (its Arabic acronym) in this Report.

In hindsight, that principle is something that should have better guided the authors of subsequent reports when referring to the various terrorist threats facing our country. Canadians of all faiths and backgrounds have helped to build our country and continue to be integral members of our communities and neighbourhoods. They contribute to inspiring a stronger, more equal and compassionate Canada, one that we all strive for. It is neither accurate nor fair to equate any one community or an entire religion with extremist violence or terror. To do so is simply wrong and inaccurate.

Following the issuance of the 2018 report, we heard several strong objections, particularly from the Sikh and Muslim communities in Canada, that the language in the report was not sufficiently precise. Due to its use of terms such as “Sikh extremism” or “Sunni extremism”, the report was perceived as impugning entire religions instead of properly zeroing in on the dangerous actions of a small number of people. I can assure you that broad brush was not the intent of the report. It used language that has actually been in use for years. It has appeared in places such as the previous government's 2012 counterterrorism strategy and the report in December 2018 of the all-party National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians. Similar language also appeared on the Order Paper of the House of Commons in reference to certain proposed parliamentary business. As I have said before, language matters. Just because something has often been phrased in a certain way does not mean that it should be phrased in that way now or in the future.

As a result of the concerns presented to me, I requested a review of the language in the report, to ensure that it provides Canadians with useful, unclassified information about terrorist threats to Canada without falsely maligning any particular community. We consulted with the Sikh and Muslim communities in Canada. We consulted with the Cross-Cultural Roundtable on National Security. We consulted with our security and intelligence agencies. We also heard from many members of Parliament.

(1635)



Going forward, we will use terminology that focuses on intent or ideology, rather than an entire religion. As an example, the report now refers to “extremists who support violent means to establish an independent state within India”. This is an approach, interestingly enough, that is sometimes used by some of our allies. For instance, the 2018 national strategy for counterterrorism of the United States of America reads in part, “Babbar Khalsa International seeks, through violent means, to establish its own independent state in India”.

The objective must be to describe the threat to the public accurately and precisely, without unintentionally condemning the entire Sikh community or any other community. The vast majority of the Sikh community in Canada are peaceful and would never wish to harm anyone, not in this country or anywhere else.

Similarly, we have eliminated the use of terms such as “Shia or Sunni extremism”. Going forward, these threats will be described in a more precise manner, such as by referring directly to terrorist organizations like Hezbollah or Daesh. That is more accurate and more informative. Once again, the point is that language matters, and we must always be mindful of that fact, which is why the review will be an ongoing process.

I'm sure that every member here has seen the increasing statistics on hate crime published just a couple of weeks ago. Sadly, 2017 saw a 47% increase in police-reported hate crime in Canada. Social media platforms are making it easier and easier for hateful individuals to find each other and then to amplify their toxic rhetoric. Tragically, as we saw very recently in New Zealand, this sometimes leads to devastating and deadly consequences. The idea should be anathema to all of us that governments of any stripe might inadvertently continue to use language that can then be twisted by these nefarious and violent individuals as proof points in their minds and justifications for their hatred.

In addition to the language review, I would like to share some of the innovative things that our security agencies are doing to be accurate, effective and bias-free in their day-to-day work. That's just one example. For the past several months, the people who are tasked with making those final difficult decisions about adding someone to the SATA, the Secure Air Travel Act, or the no-fly list, in other words, have had the name and the picture of that particular person removed from the file, so that the name or the picture does not influence the final decision, not even subconsciously. The focus of the decision-makers must be on the facts that are in the file, and they must make a decision on the basis of those facts. So it's a matter of fact and not prejudice.

The women and men of our intelligence and security community are hard-working professionals, but there is not a human being alive who is not prone to some preconceived idea or bias. Government should try very hard to mitigate the effects of this very human trait.

Finally, while the updated report has been received reasonably well, there have been critics who have complained that the changes reduce the ability of our agencies to do their job. I would profoundly disagree with that. The factual content of the report has not changed. It continues to outline the threats facing and emanating from Canada. It simply does it in a manner that cannot be interpreted to denigrate entire communities or religions because of the actions of a small number of individuals who are actually behaving in a manner that is contrary to what that community holds dear. The whole community should not be condemned for that.

(1640)



Frankly, our security and intelligence agencies need the goodwill and the support of all peaceful, law-abiding members of all communities to do their jobs effectively. We cannot build those partnerships if the language we use creates division or distance or unease among those communities and our security agencies.

Mr. Chair, thank you for inviting me to be here again today. I and my officials would be pleased to try to answer your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister Goodale.

Ms. Sahota, you have seven minutes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

At the outset, Minister, I'd like to thank you for appearing here today. Thank you for the work you do. We know with the RCMP and CSIS, your job is not easy. You keep our country safe, and it is much appreciated.

I have raised this issue with you, Minister, several times. My community and several stakeholders contacted me after this report was made public back in December. They were truly bewildered as to why Sikhs had been identified in this way, why other faiths—Sunni, Shia, Islamist—had been mentioned in this report. Previously in these public reports they've always focused on regions and extremist travellers. Why the change in the way this report was set up this time?

(1645)

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Ms. Sahota, the report is the collective work of a variety of security and intelligence agencies within the Government of Canada. As you have acknowledged, they do a very difficult and very professional job of assessing the risks before the country at any given moment. That changes from time to time. Since this is a report to the government and to the public, it's perhaps not for me to comment on the input that went into it.

Perhaps, David, from CSIS's point of view, can you provide a perspective on the factors that would come into the thinking of the authors of the report in what needs to be assembled at any given moment and...?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

If I may just add a little more to that, in your introductory remarks, Minister, you referred to the 2016 report which specifically mentioned that ISIL would no longer be used as it's neither Islamic nor a state and Daesh would be used. Why that reversal in this report? We've seen a lot of changes in the layout, the substance and the description in this report.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Mr. Rigby, the associate deputy minister, wants to comment.

Mr. Vincent Rigby (Associate Deputy Minister, Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness):

Thanks very much, Minister.

This is a whole of security and intelligence community product. Public Safety has the technical lead, but we reach out to the community and in a very inclusive way take input from across the RCMP, from CSIS, from ITAC. We assemble the information both in threat and threat capabilities and also in the government response. We pull all that material together and then we all collectively agree at the end of the day, right up to head of agency, before it goes to the government and to the minister to sign off.

There had been, I think, a little criticism in the last couple of years that the reports had not been as detailed as people would like. They'd like it to be a little more expansive and go into a little more of the intricacies of the threat, etc. I think in our attempt perhaps to provide a little more of that detail, unfortunately some language crept into the report that, at the end of the day, we're now here to discuss. As the minister said, the language which in future we would much prefer will focus more on ideology and less on community.

That's a little of the background as to how this slipped in. Again, the language had been used in previous reports, but in some of the specific terminology the minister referred to, had not been used since 2012.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay. I know there has been some criticism about removing these words, saying that it will not be precise, but like the minister, I disagree. I think homing in on the actual terrorist organizations is being far more precise.

Can you explain to me, in the section on those who continue to support establishing an independent state within India by violent means, how this section is precise? The questions I get from stakeholders in the community is that this section, or reference to this section, has not previously been in past reports other than the mention of one organization, so why now? Why, when no events have occurred publicly that we know of, was it included in the 2018 report and never referenced before, when in that section it mainly references an incident and a time between 1982 and 1993?

(1650)

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I think Mr. Vigneault can comment on this, but I'd just make two preliminary observations.

The material that is prepared and published in the public threat report of course has to be unclassified. Classified information has to remain classified, but there is a parliamentary avenue for some examination of that. Of course, that's the purview of your previous witness this afternoon.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I was thinking that myself.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians was created for the purpose of allowing our security agencies, when appropriate, to be able to discuss classified information with the appropriate group of parliamentarians. That is the NSICOP as opposed to a standard parliamentary committee. If the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians wishes to pursue an issue of this kind, that would be the appropriate venue for that discussion to happen.

I will invite David Vigneault, the director of CSIS, to comment further.

Mr. David Vigneault (Director, Canadian Security Intelligence Service):

Thank you, Minister.

Thank you for your question and for giving me an opportunity to elaborate on this topic.

As you can imagine, CSIS's national security investigations are very fluid. They're influenced by events taking place here in Canada and taking place abroad. Our mandate is to make sure that individuals here in Canada who are supporting or engaged somehow in support of the use of violence for political purposes are investigated. These fluid investigations ebb and flow, and we have been providing advice to the government, and we have been providing advice to Public Safety in the context of the report and our threat assessment.

We stand behind the assessment we've provided that there is a small group of individuals who right now are engaging in activities that are pursuing use of violent means to establish an independent state in India. It is our responsibility to make sure that we investigate these threats and that we provide advice to the RCMP and to other colleagues to make sure, based on our information and our own investigations done by CSIS, that Canada is not being used to plot terrorist activity and that we Canadians are also safe at the same time.

The Chair:

We're going to have to leave it there, Ms. Sahota.

Mr. Paul-Hus, you have seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Goodale, I was fortunate to have the first copy of the December 11, 2018 report, which gave us some information. I understand your arguments and the whole explanation you are giving us to try to fix what, technically, we should not have had to do. I'm glad I got it, because it gives us information about national security.

For you, you're playing politics with it. What worries me a little bit is that at one point, as Canadians, we had access to information, which was then changed. We have learned that CSIS, the RCMP and other agencies have done some work and have reported important information in a Public Safety Canada report about our security. Subsequently, groups lobbied. You were initially pressured and on April 12, you amended the report. A second version has been put online on the site. Two weeks later, on April 26, another group lobbied, and you modified the report a second time. We now have a watered down version.

I want to understand the process. I know it can affect communities, but the fact remains that reports have been prepared by our security agencies and that information has been put on them that corresponds to the situation described. To what extent does politics play a role and do we water down reality so as not to hurt anyone? How does it work? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Mr. Paul-Hus, the representations that we received, as I mentioned in my remarks, came from representatives of the Muslim community and the Sikh community in particular. We also heard from a number of members of Parliament from different political parties, not just one. In fact, all sides of the House of Commons had occasion to comment on this situation and made their views known, raising similar kinds of concerns.

In assessing the input that was coming in, contrary to the assertion in your question, it was not a partisan issue; it was a matter of accuracy, fairness and being effective.

(1655)

[Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

I believe the information was accurate. The information presented still clearly indicated points concerning an existing threat. You changed some words to lighten it up.

In essence, that's what politics is all about: trying not to displease people. However, the fact remains that the first version of the agencies was clear. [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

No. That is not the purpose of the changes.

Clearly, what we heard from a number of stakeholders across the country, the Cross-Cultural Roundtable on National Security, and members of Parliament of several different political parties, when you read the words in the report, was the impression that an entire religion or an entire community was a threat to national security. That is factually incorrect.

There are certain individuals that are threats to national security that need to be properly investigated, but when you report on that matter publicly, using expressions that leave the impression with people that it's an entire religion, or an entire ethnocultural community that's to be feared, that is factually incorrect. That is what needed to be corrected. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

But we understand that we are talking about extremism. Obviously, not everyone is targeted. No matter which religions and cultural communities are involved, when we talk about radical Islam, for example, we clearly say “radical Islam”. We refer to people who are radical or radicalized. We don't attack all Muslims, of course.

Is there a way to be clear without attacking people who do not need to be targeted?

Word choice is important. It is important to avoid removing information, especially if you do not want to displease. What I want to know is the truth. [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

No. The very objective here, Mr. Paul-Hus, is to do exactly what you have said, to convey the threats in a public way, in an accurate way, but not using a brush that is so broad that you condemn an entire religion, or you condemn an entire ethnocultural community.

While you have seen phrases in the report which to you were clear in narrowing the scope of what was being referred to, there were others who read that report and saw it exactly through the opposite end of the telescope, and saw the language used was broadening the brush beyond what really was the threat.

The objective of the review, the consultation, and the work we have done here is to be accurate and precise in telling Canadians what the threat is, but also to be fair in the sense that we are not condemning, impugning or maligning entire religions or entire ethnic communities. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

To your knowledge, is this the first time interest groups have lobbied to change a national security report?

In your government or in other governments, has there ever been a case where, following official publication, groups have information changed? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

In my experience in the areas over which I have jurisdiction and responsibility, this is the first change of this nature. The reaction was sufficiently large and pointed. It lead me to the conclusion that the problem being raised was a serious one. It wasn't just a little semantic argument. It was a very serious concern that impressions were being left by the report that were not fair and accurate, and that the language needed to be modified.

When we looked at the language, we found that very similar phrases had been used in many other places at different times, including in reports that had been filed by the previous government, in reports that had been filed by the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians. Indeed, some of the language also appeared at one point in time on the Order Paper of the House of Commons.

The language had been in use, but just because it had been in use for a certain period of time or for certain purposes does not mean you need to continue using a phrase that is running the risk of conveying misinformation and a misimpression of entire communities or entire religions.

(1700)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Paul-Hus.

It would be helpful, Minister, if from time to time you looked at the chair so that colleagues can get their questions in.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

You are indeed a very attractive specimen, sir, but—

Voices: Oh, oh!

Hon. Ralph Goodale: —I'm admiring this entire committee.

The Chair:

I thought you'd admire my tie.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: Mr. Dubé, you have seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[English]

Minister, thank you for being here. I want to thank my colleagues on the committee for accepting my motion to have you come and speak to this issue. As you know, I wrote to you in December when this issue first arose, and Mr. Singh and I had both written to the Prime Minister before the changes were made. Unlike what was just mentioned, the words do matter, and on that we agree, Minister.

I think the Sikh community deserves praise for standing up for itself because ultimately, the consequences are very real. There is a rise in hate crimes, and there is another form of terrorism that is happening in communities not just here in Canada but around the world, namely, going after and attacking faith communities, and other communities of course.

I think these changes are welcome, and I certainly hope the work will continue with affected communities, because there's a specific issue that was raised in this report. We know, though, that the Muslim community both here in Canada and around the world, and certainly in the United States, has faced this issue with regard to terrorism for the better part of two decades. It's a concern that has been raised. One of the reasons you've had to make changes to the no-fly list is that there is a form of profiling inherent in the way that apparatus works.

Minister, you've said a lot of the things that I think are welcome certainly by folks hoping for change in how this is done. We've asked that there be a rethink of this process, given that we are seeing a rise in hate crimes and other incidents that seriously jeopardize public safety.

Will there be a push to institutionalize the thinking that you've put forward here today? These types of mechanisms, transparency-wise, are very important but can have the opposite affect, as you've pointed out.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

We intend to use language throughout our systems, Mr. Dubé, that is accurate, precise and fair in conveying information about terrorist threats. It has to be an ongoing process. It's not something that you can just sort of do once as a kind of blip and presume that you've addressed the issue or solved the problem.

People need to be alert to the issue all the time, partly for the reason that you mentioned, that if you're not alert to the issue, you can inadvertently be encouraging those who would be inclined towards hate crimes and using the language as a pretext for what they do. The other reason it's important, Mr. Dubé, is that if we're going to have a safe, respectful, inclusive society, there has to be a good rapport between our police and security agencies and every community in our society. If language is used that is seen to be divisive, then you won't have that rapport, and we'll have a less safe society.

(1705)

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

It's probably not the greatest point to interrupt you on, but my time is limited. I did want to get to the substantive piece, though.

Older reports are quite challenging to find in this digital age, to be fair. I think that's worth pointing out, but from what we see, it has been 17 years since the issue that was raised in this report was ever part of a similar report, so it's been quite a while.

I think one of the issues that was raised by many who were taking issue with this is not just the language that's used, which we've all addressed today, but it's also the why. I think there was a question raised to that effect.

Given that you can't divulge everything because it's classified information, as much as we always want transparency, is there not a concern that if you can't explain why, some thought needs to be put into whether it's better to leave some things classified instead of sort of going halfway without being able to provide any justification?

This was also a big issue that was taken up by some of the communities that were calling the government to account on this.

It is important to raise the question of why. There was reporting this morning, even about the Minister of Foreign Affairs getting talking points relating to specific communities on foreign trips.

There is some cynicism around that. Are you not concerned that it gets fed into by dropping something into a report and then not being able to back it up?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

There are two imperatives, Mr. Dubé. They sometimes present a bit of a conflict. On the one side, our security agencies would want to be as forthcoming with Canadians as they can possibly be in a public report to provide information that would be useful and helpful to Canadians in understanding the various public threats. At the same time, you raise the competing issue, which is the extent to which they can actually discuss the details.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Right.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The experience will undoubtedly be borne in mind when future reports are written.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Minister, with the last minute I have, I just want to ask you about the fact that the consequences were, perhaps, not properly thought out. Is that a sign of a larger issue that seems to be coming more and more to the forefront, which is to say that the threat posed by another form of extremism, namely, white nationalism and white supremacy, is being understated or undervalued by our security agencies? Does more thought need to be put into what's happening there, and the consequences that it has?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The police and security agencies have to deal with all of it, Mr. Dubé. They are alert to all of those threats and potential risks. You will note that in this report there are frequent references to far-right-wing extremism that poses a threat as well. It is very much a part of the matrix of issues that the police and security agencies are alert to and are dealing with.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.

Ms. Dabrusin, you have seven minutes.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Thank you, Minister.

In fact, I'll be picking up a little bit from where Mr. Dubé left off. It's the sections in this report about right-wing extremism.

I'm from Montreal. I was a CEGEP student at the time of École Polytechnique, which was an impactful event, as far as it was clearly targeting women because of the hatred of women. Only about a month ago, I was at a vigil for the van attack on Yonge Street, which was another event that was based on the hatred of women. At least that's what we've heard from reports.

At the beginning of this year, we held a vigil outside a mosque in my community because of what happened in Christchurch, New Zealand. In fact, not so long ago, we had also had a vigil because of what had happened at the mosque shooting in Sainte-Foy.

Those are three very large events, as far as people killed. All of them would be based on right-wing extremism and that kind of a philosophy. Yet, when I'm looking at this report, it says, “However, while racism, bigotry, and misogyny may undermine the fabric of Canadian society, ultimately they do not usually result in criminal behavior or threats to national security.”

Is this type of extremism truly less dangerous than the other forms of extremism? That doesn't seem to be, at least in my experience when I look back on our recent history.

(1710)

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Ms. Dabrusin, I'll invite both the commissioner of the RCMP and David Vigneault to comment on those issues, because it falls to them to do the investigations and to keep people safe.

I can tell you that, over the course of the last several years when I've had the vantage point of being fairly close to our security agencies, watching their activities and the shaping of their priorities and so forth, they have worked very hard on the issue of right-wing extremism. The report that is the subject of this meeting in fact makes specific reference to a number of incidents that demonstrate why this worry needs to be treated seriously.

We've had instances from outside the country, in New Zealand, in Pittsburgh, in Charlottesville, and so forth, but within our own country, the van attack on Yonge Street, the mosque attack in Sainte-Foy, the attack on police officers at Mayerthorpe and Moncton and the misogynist attacks at Dawson College and École Polytechnique are all the product of the same perverted and evil ideology that results in people being put at risk and people losing their lives. It is taken seriously.

Let me ask Brenda and David to comment.

Commissioner Brenda Lucki (Commissioner, Royal Canadian Mounted Police):

To respond, it's no less a threat than other topics within this report, but when we look at the report, one focus, the goal, amongst others, was to provide an overall assessment of the terrorist threats to Canada first. We've added in right-wing extremism because it is a threat, maybe not when we talk, as you mentioned in your quote, to national security; it's more to events and individuals.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Just to clarify, the report says, “ultimately they do not usually result in criminal behaviour or threats to national security.” It seemed to me that, when we look at the list of events, in fact, you have a very long list of events that seem to be due to right-wing extremism.

Commr Brenda Lucki:

Yes, there's absolutely criminal activity, and that would be our focus. When we do our focus on criminal activity, it's conducted by groups or individuals in any category within this report or outside, most definitely. It's no less a threat.

Mr. David Vigneault:

From CSIS's perspective, the way we look at this is that any individuals or groups who are looking to use violence to achieve political, religious or ideological objectives are a threat to national security as per the definition in our act. I'm on the record in the other chamber recently, too, having said that we are focusing more of our resources on looking at the threat of different extremist groups: misogynist, white nationalist and neo-nationalist. Essentially, they are now using terrorist methods to achieve some of their goals.

As for the attack on Yonge Street, the method was publicized initially by an al Qaeda-affiliated magazine. They called it the ultimate mowing machine, essentially telling people that it is what they should be doing. You had someone who had other extremist views who used a technique that had been developed or popularized by another set of groups to essentially kill people. From our perspective, we're not marking the difference. We investigate these groups when they meet these definitions.

(1715)

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

My only concern is that, when I was reading the rest of the report, I didn't see any other form of terrorism or criminal behaviour being kept within the context of saying that, whatever these groups, ultimately they do not usually result in criminal behaviour or threats to national security. Those kinds of terms weren't couched around other types of groups. I was just curious why the differentiation when we're looking at—

Mr. David Vigneault:

I can't speak for all the groups, but essentially, if you look at a funnel, the vast majority of the commentary, the vile commentary online, will have an impact on society but would not be admitted to the criminal threshold. Then you have a small amount of that, which may be of interest to the RCMP or to other police bodies and law enforcement in Canada. Then you have a very, very small group of people, individuals or small groups, who are looking to organize themselves and use violence to achieve some political purpose, and that would be a national security case. It is, if you want, a kind of methodology we're looking at to essentially better understand and better characterize what we're seeing in society, but it is definitely evolving.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Dabrusin.

Mr. Motz, you have five minutes.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you, Chair, and thank you, Minister and officials, for being here today.

In reference to this, I have some experience in threat assessments from a criminal organization perspective that fit into a national organized crime threat assessment for this country, so I understand the work and vigour it takes from our security agencies to create this.

With that in mind, Mr. Minister, I'd like to read a quote from Phil Gurski, a former CSIS analyst, and a well-respected one. He said the following with regard to this report: What about 'individuals or groups who are inspired by violent ideologies and terrorist groups, such as Daesh or al-Qaida (AQ)?' Aside from the ridiculous insistence on 'Daesh' rather than Islamic State (Minister Goodale: Daesh is Arabic for 'Islamic State' by the way), this phrase is only partially accurate. I know from my days at CSIS that yes some Canadians are inspired by these terrorist groups but there is also a huge swathe that radicalise to violence in the name of greater Sunni Islamist extremist thought (Shia Islamist extremists are a different beast altogether) that has little or nothing to do with AQ [al-Qaida] or IS [Islamic State] or any other terrorist group. Oh and guess what else? They are all Muslims—nary a Buddhist or an animist among them. Again, using the term 'Sunni Islamist extremism', which is what we called it when I was at CSIS, does not mean all Canadian Muslims are terrorists. To my mind this is just political correctness and electioneering gone mad.

I think it's important to recognize, and I know you do, sir, that national security issues are far more important for Canadians than to have politics as part of that. My question for you is this: Do you think that informing Canadians, informing the public, of the actual threats posed by terrorists, regardless of the moniker, should be beyond any electoral designs of the current government?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Absolutely, and that's the way I conduct myself.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay. How will you then dismiss Mr. Gurski's expertise so easily with regard to the changes that have been made to this report?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Well, I don't have his quote in front of me, but I go to the latter part of it that you referred to, where he seemed to be saying, despite some of the language that he referred to, that everybody would understand that not all of the Muslim community was being criticized. That's a rough paraphrase of what you said.

It's not at all clear, Mr. Motz, that that's in fact true. When you use broad-brush language, you can, by implication, be impugning innocent people who you do not mean to criticize, but the language gets extrapolated and extrapolated, and if you look at some of the material on the Internet, you see the distortions, the misinterpretations and the abuse.

It all gets back to the original point. Let's be very, very careful about the language used in the first place. We have to be accurate about conveying the nature of the risk, but let's not express it in such a way that we impugn people who are innocent and, by impugning them, put them at risk.

(1720)

Mr. Glen Motz:

We all agree that a threat can be an individual and it can be a small element within certain communities, but I think Canadians are astute enough to appreciate and understand that it is not the entire community at all that is subject to the very defining language that would define a terrorist threat.

I guess one of the things that I'm curious about is how many agencies contributed to this report. Who were they?

The Chair:

Very briefly, Minister.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I'll ask Mr. Rigby to do the calculation of adding up the numbers that were involved.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Along with that question, on the agencies that were involved in the creation of this, were they also involved in the—

The Chair:

Mr. Motz, you are stretching the chair's patience.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Were they also involved and consulted in the revision?

The Chair:

Mr. Motz, please.

Mr. Glen Motz:

That's all I'm getting at.

The Chair:

Please, a brief answer.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

As I said, we consulted with a whole variety of agencies to get their input.

I'll ask Mr. Rigby to talk about the total numbers that are involved in the intelligence community within the Government of Canada.

I think when the people who wrote the material were using those expressions that you've just referred to, their intent was to narrow the focus, but when members of the public saw those expressions, they actually saw the situation through the other end of the telescope and thought the criticism was actually getting broader rather than narrower. That's the dilemma here of finding the language that is accurate and precise, but at the same time, fair so that we're not having consequences that we don't mean to have.

The Chair:

We're going to have to leave the answer there.

We'll go to Ms. Sahota, for five minutes, please.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'm going to follow on what my colleague Julie was saying earlier.

In the right-wing extremism section, it says: It may be difficult to assess, in the short term, to what extent a specific act was ideologically driven, or comment while investigations are ongoing or cases are before the court.

To one of my previous questions, it was mentioned that there are fluid investigations ongoing and that we would not want a plot to occur on Canadian soil. I agree with you 100%. I would never want to see what had happened in 1985 ever happen on Canadian soil again. I hope you catch the people who are up to no good, because they indirectly, or directly in this case, end up impacting whole communities at times. I think all of us would be outraged if any religion, Catholicism or Protestantism, were ever brought into any organization that had committed an act, and we wouldn't do that. However, it seems as though, from this perspective, there's an insensitivity originally to other faiths that don't originate from the western world.

In short, why wasn't the “but” language, which is included in the right-wing extremism section, included in those other sections? You're saying they are fluid investigations. How do you know for sure whether they were ideologically driven? Those exceptions are definitely referred to in the right-wing extremism section.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

David, can you comment on that?

Mr. David Vigneault:

I'm not the author of the report, so I cannot comment on exactly why the final wording is there.

However, I can say from a CSIS perspective, as I mentioned earlier, that we're not looking at a specific religion; we're looking at the activity of individuals. If the activity of individuals is plotting to use violence to achieve political, ideological or religious objectives, that's when we would be investigating.

With the example in New Zealand, that individual invoked about five, six or seven different reasons as to why he committed the activity. When you start to mix what is happening online with mental health issues, and so on, what exactly was the motivator of an individual can be extremely delicate to determine. That's why when we work in the sphere of national security, when our colleagues in law enforcement are investigating, we might not know exactly what we're dealing with initially.

I can only speak to the types of investigations. In terms of the report and why these other caveats were not added to the others, I cannot speak to that angle.

(1725)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

There has been a lot of skepticism since the release of the report. From my investigation and from my talks with Minister Goodale, I found out that about 17 different agencies and departments were involved in feeding into this report.

I don't think we got to that number.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

That's approximately correct.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I also found out that, when compiling this report, no evidence is taken from any single source.

Can a single source be feeding allegations or evidence into all these various different departments, and therefore, when it comes out of more than a few departments, it elevates to the level of being in the report? What are your comments on that?

Mr. Vincent Rigby:

I'll defer to David in terms of some of the source reporting from a CSIS perspective, but I can only repeat what you just said. When we went out to those 17 agencies and departments representing the breadth and scope of the security intelligence community, we looked at all sources.

Everything that came up to us was intelligence, open sources, consultations with academics right across the board. What you see reflected in the report is a composite picture of all the evidence, all the intelligence, and all the analysis, open-sourced right on down across the spectrum.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Could it be bad intelligence coming from another country?

Mr. Vincent Rigby:

How would you define bad intelligence?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Is it verified intelligence by our own independent agencies?

Mr. Vincent Rigby:

I'll defer to David on this, but we are in regular consultation, without a doubt, with our allied partners, particularly in a Five Eyes context, so we're often looking at the intelligence they provide as well.

I should stop here and let David finish it off, but we are going to make our own assessments. We will certainly look at what our allies are saying, but this is a Canadian assessment at the end of the day.

The Chair:

Mr. Vigneault is going to have to finish it off very quickly.

Mr. David Vigneault:

Mr. Rigby described the way it is done very well. I mentioned in my first answer to you, Ms. Sahota, that it was based on our own investigations. I want to be very clear that they were CSIS-led investigations.

The Chair:

I want to thank the minister and his colleagues for their attendance and a thorough discussion of this issue.

We're going to suspend and then go in camera.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale

(1525)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte.

Bienvenue à cette 162e réunion du Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale.

Nous accueillons aujourd'hui l'honorable David McGuinty et Mme Rennie Marcoux. Merci à tous les deux d'être des nôtres pour nous présenter le rapport annuel du Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement (CPSNR). Je suis convaincu que M. McGuinty saura nous expliquer dans son style bien à lui le rôle exact de ce comité.

Bienvenue, monsieur McGuinty. Je vous cède la parole pour vos observations préliminaires.

L’hon. David McGuinty (président, Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Bonjour, chers collègues, et merci de nous avoir invités à comparaître devant votre comité. Je suis accompagné de Mme Rennie Marcoux, directrice générale du Secrétariat du CPSNR.

C'est un privilège pour nous de pouvoir discuter avec vous aujourd'hui du rapport annuel du Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement pour 2018.

Ce premier rapport annuel est le fruit du travail, du dévouement et de l'engagement de tous mes collègues faisant partie de ce comité. Nous souhaitons que ce rapport puisse contribuer à un débat éclairé entre Canadiens quant aux difficultés qui nous attendent lorsqu'il s'agit de conférer aux organisations de sécurité et de renseignement les pouvoirs exceptionnels nécessaires pour cerner et contrer les menaces qui pèsent sur la nation tout en veillant à ce que leurs activités soient menées de manière à respecter et à protéger nos droits démocratiques.[Français]

Le CPSNR a pour mandat d'examiner l'ensemble du cadre de la sécurité nationale et du renseignement au Canada, soit les lois, les règlements, la stratégie, l'administration et les finances.

Il peut aussi examiner toute activité menée par un ministère lié à la sécurité nationale ou au renseignement.

Enfin, il peut examiner toute question se rapportant à la sécurité nationale ou au renseignement qu'un ministre nous confie.[Traduction]

Les membres de notre comité possèdent tous une cote de sécurité de niveau « très secret ». Nous prêtons serment et nous sommes astreints au secret à perpétuité. Nous pouvons en outre jeter un éclairage tout à fait particulier sur ces enjeux primordiaux du fait que nous comptons des membres de plusieurs partis, aussi bien à la Chambre des communes qu'au Sénat, qui nous font bénéficier d'une gamme variée d'expériences.

Nous pouvons accéder à tout renseignement se rapportant à notre mandat afin d'exécuter notre travail. Il y a cependant des exceptions. C'est le cas notamment des documents confidentiels du Cabinet, de l'identité de sources confidentielles ou de témoins protégés, et des enquêtes menées par les forces de l'ordre pouvant conduire à des poursuites judiciaires.

L'année 2018 en été une d'apprentissage pour le comité. Nous avons consacré plusieurs heures et réunions au développement d'une meilleure compréhension de notre mandat et du fonctionnement des organismes chargés de protéger le Canada et les Canadiens. Des fonctionnaires des différents secteurs de la sécurité et du renseignement ont informé les membres du comité, et nous avons visité les sept principaux ministères et organismes concernés. Nous avons rencontré plusieurs fois la conseillère à la sécurité nationale et au renseignement auprès du premier ministre. Le comité a également décidé de faire enquête concernant les diverses allégations entourant le voyage du premier ministre en Inde en février 2018.

En 2018, le comité s'est réuni à 54 reprises, en moyenne quatre heures à chaque fois. Vous trouverez à l'annexe C du rapport la liste des représentants du gouvernement, du milieu universitaire et des groupes de défense des libertés civiles que le comité a eu le plaisir de rencontrer en 2018.

Notre rapport annuel est l'aboutissement de nombreuses séances d'information, écrites et orales, d'une analyse de plus de 8 000 pages de documents, de dizaines de rencontres entre les analystes du CPSNR et les représentants du gouvernement, d'un travail approfondi de recherche et d'analyse, et de délibérations réfléchies et détaillées entre les membres du comité.

Il faut aussi préciser que ce rapport est unanime. En tout et partout, nous avons tiré 11 conclusions et formulé sept recommandations à l'intention du gouvernement. Le comité s'est bien assuré d'aborder ces questions en adoptant une approche non partisane. Nous osons espérer que nos conclusions et recommandations contribueront à renforcer la reddition de comptes et l'efficacité au sein de l'appareil de la sécurité et du renseignement au Canada.

(1530)

[Français]

Le rapport qui vous est présenté aujourd'hui contient cinq chapitres, dont certains portent sur les deux examens de fond menés par le CPSNR.

Le premier chapitre décrit les origines du CPSNR, son mandat et sa façon d'aborder le travail, y compris les facteurs qu'il examine ou considère au moment de choisir les examens à effectuer.

Le deuxième chapitre présente un aperçu des organismes de la sécurité et du renseignement au Canada et des menaces pour la sécurité du Canada ainsi que la manière dont ces organismes collaborent afin d'assurer la sécurité du Canada et des Canadiens et de promouvoir les intérêts du pays.

Les chapitres suivants présentent les deux examens de fond entrepris par le CPSNR en 2018.[Traduction]

Au chapitre 3, le comité a examiné la façon dont le gouvernement du Canada établit ses priorités en matière de renseignement. Pourquoi est-ce important? Pour trois raisons.

Premièrement, ce processus est le moyen privilégié pour guider le travail des collecteurs et des évaluateurs de renseignement du Canada afin de veiller à ce qu'ils canalisent leurs efforts en fonction des grandes priorités du gouvernement et de notre pays.

Deuxièmement, c'est un processus essentiel pour s'assurer qu'il y a reddition de comptes au sein de l'appareil du renseignement, lequel accomplit un travail hautement confidentiel. Grâce à ce processus, le gouvernement bénéficie de mises à jour régulières sur les opérations de renseignement dans une optique de gestion pangouvernementale.

Troisièmement, ce processus aide le gouvernement à gérer le risque. Lorsque le gouvernement approuve les priorités en matière de renseignement, il accepte le risque de se concentrer sur certaines cibles en même temps que le risque de ne pas mettre l'accent sur d'autres objectifs. [Français]

Le CPSNR a conclu que le processus, de la détermination des priorités à l'orientation pratique, et de la transmission de l'information aux ministres à l'obtention de leur approbation, repose sur des bases solides. Cela étant dit, on peut améliorer n'importe quel processus.

En particulier, le CPSNR recommande que la conseillère à la sécurité nationale et au renseignement auprès du premier ministre joue un rôle plus net de chef de file durant le processus afin d'assurer que le Cabinet possède les meilleurs renseignements qui soient pour être en mesure de prendre les décisions importantes, par exemple en ce qui a trait aux secteurs sur lesquels le Canada devrait axer ses activités de renseignement et ses ressources[Traduction]

Je passe maintenant au chapitre 4 qui traite des activités de renseignement du ministère de la Défense nationale et des Forces armées canadiennes. La politique de défense du gouvernement, Protection, Sécurité, Engagement, stipule que ces deux organisations constituent « l'unique entité du gouvernement du Canada à utiliser le spectre complet des activités de collecte de renseignements tout en assurant une analyse multisources. »

Nous reconnaissons que les activités de renseignement de la Défense sont essentielles à la sécurité des troupes et à la réussite des activités militaires canadiennes, y compris celles menées à l'étranger, et qu'elles devraient prendre de l'expansion. Quand le gouvernement décide de déployer les forces armées, le ministère de la Défense et les Forces armées canadiennes ont l'autorité implicite de mener leurs activités de renseignement de défense. Dans les deux cas, c'est la prérogative de la Couronne qui confère cette autorité. Cette structure diffère de celle des autres organismes de renseignement, le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications (CST) et le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité (SCRS), qui mènent leurs activités en vertu de pouvoirs clairs conférés par une loi et sont assujettis à des examens externes indépendants.

C'est donc à l'issue d'un examen complexe que le comité a formulé quatre conclusions et trois recommandations.

Notre première recommandation est axée sur les secteurs où le ministère de la Défense nationale et les Forces armées canadiennes pourraient apporter des changements à l'interne en vue de renforcer la structure de gouvernance de leurs activités de renseignement et la reddition de comptes de la part du ministre.

Nos deux autres recommandations exigeraient du gouvernement qu'il modifie ou adopte des lois. Le comité a expliqué les raisons pour lesquelles il en est venu à la conclusion qu'un examen indépendant régulier des activités de renseignements du ministère de la Défense nationale et des Forces armées canadiennes permettrait une plus grande responsabilisation.

Étant donné que le projet de loi C-59 est encore devant le Sénat, nous croyons que le gouvernement a ici l'occasion de le modifier afin que l'on fasse rapport chaque année des activités de renseignement ou de sécurité nationale du ministère de la Défense nationale et des Forces armées canadiennes, comme on l'exige du CST et du SCRS.

Le comité est également d'avis que son examen confirme la nécessité pour le gouvernement d'envisager très sérieusement d'accorder un pouvoir législatif explicite en matière d'activités de renseignement de défense. Ce type de renseignement est essentiel aux opérations des Forces armées canadiennes et comporte, comme toutes les activités de renseignement, des risques inhérents.

Dans le cadre de notre examen, nous avons entendu les préoccupations des fonctionnaires du ministère de la Défense nationale quant à l'importance de maintenir une flexibilité opérationnelle suffisante aux fins des activités de renseignement à l'appui des opérations militaires. Nous avons donc jugé nécessaire d'exposer les risques et les avantages de l'établissement d'une assise législative claire pour le renseignement de défense.

Nos recommandations sont le fruit de notre analyse de ces enjeux importants.

(1535)

[Français]

C'est avec plaisir que nous répondrons à vos questions.[Traduction]

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur McGuinty.

Monsieur Picard, vous avez sept minutes. [Français]

M. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Merci.

Je souhaite la bienvenue aux témoins.

C'est ma première expérience à ce comité, ce que je fais avec beaucoup d'enthousiasme.

Monsieur McGuinty, j'ai tout d'abord une question élémentaire, simplement pour amorcer la discussion.

Le CPSNR est un nouvel organisme et sa courbe d'apprentissage est actuellement en progression. C'est un ajout à nos structures actuelles.

Pour nous aider à mieux comprendre ce que nos organismes de renseignement font, pouvez-vous nous expliquer en quoi cet organisme, le CPSNR, constitue une valeur ajoutée par rapport à ce qui se faisait par le passé, avant sa création?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Merci de la question.

Je commencerais par dire que la valeur ajoutée vient d'abord du fait que les membres du CPSNR ont accès à toutes le matériel classifié, à toute la documentation, aux présentations et aux témoins. Cela aide énormément quand on a accès aux informations les plus approfondies.

Ensuite, je crois que le CPSNR a démontré, cette année, que c'est très possible pour les parlementaires, tous partis confondus et qu'ils viennent de l'une ou l'autre des deux Chambres du Parlement du Canada, de travailler ensemble d'une façon non partisane. Je crois que cela se fait dans un contexte où il y a actuellement énormément de partisanerie.

Nous avons décidé, dès le début, mes collègues et moi, que nous laisserions à la porte cette approche partisane étant donné l'importance du travail. Les questions qui entourent la sécurité nationale sont simplement trop importantes pour que nous prenions part aux tiraillements normaux de la scène politique au quotidien.

L'année n'a pas été facile parce que, d'une certaine façon, il fallait faire voler l'avion tout en le pilotant. Nous avons formé un secrétariat. Nous avons embauché une dizaine de personnes à temps plein, et notre budget est de 3,5 millions de dollars par année.

Nous sommes fiers. Nous sommes fiers des débuts du CPSNR, de cette première année.

M. Michel Picard:

Merci.

Je vais alors vous poser une question d'ordre plus technique. J'aimerais revenir sur votre commentaire à l'égard du renseignement militaire.

Vous avez fait une comparaison entre, d'une part, les services de renseignement ou les agences qui travaillent dans le renseignement, notamment le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité, ou SCRS, et le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, ou CST, et, d'autre part, d'autres agences qui sont aussi engagées dans des activités de renseignement.

Lorsque vous parlez du renseignement militaire, vous dites que le ministère de la Défense nationale abrite le spectre global des services de renseignement. Les services sont-ils similaires à tel point que nous puissions les comparer d'égal à égal?

En quoi les activités du renseignement militaire sont-elles plus larges que ce qui constitue le spectre du renseignement dans les autres agences?

Sur quelles comparaisons le gouvernement peut-il s'appuyer pour évaluer la question du renseignement militaire? Par exemple, peut-il se fier aux pratiques exemplaires qui ont cours dans d'autres pays pour évaluer à sa juste valeur les besoins quant au renseignement militaire?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

En premier lieu, il ne faut pas oublier que le fondement législatif du ministère de la Défense nationale reste toujours la prérogative de la Couronne.

(1540)

[Traduction]

Nous savons que la prérogative de la Couronne est un concept qui date de plusieurs siècles. C'est un pouvoir très ancien dont bénéficie la Couronne pour permettre à un pays de déployer des troupes, de faire la guerre et d'appliquer sa politique étrangère, entre autres exemples.

Les pouvoirs conférés notamment aujourd'hui au SCRS et au CST tirent aussi leur origine de ce concept ancien de la prérogative de la Couronne. Les choses ont toutefois évolué de telle sorte que ces deux organisations fonctionnent désormais dans le cadre bien défini de leurs lois habilitantes respectives. Dans sa propre politique de défense, le gouvernement indique que le ministère de la Défense nationale est la seule organisation au pays à utiliser le spectre complet des capacités de renseignement. Autrement dit, il mène toutes les activités de renseignement que le SCRS, le CST et la GRC réalisent chacun de leur côté.

Au cours des prochaines années, le ministère compte également ajouter 300 employés à son personnel affecté au renseignement. Il est donc un acteur de tout premier plan dans ce domaine.

Nous avons examiné de très près l'assise législative servant de base à son fonctionnement et avons commencé à poser certaines questions difficiles qui revêtent une importance capitale. Notre rapport essaie d'établir un juste équilibre entre les avantages pour le gouvernement d'envisager l'adoption d'une loi pouvant offrir ce fondement juridique et quelques-uns des risques inhérents portés à notre attention par le ministère. Nous avons mis tout en oeuvre pour expliquer tout cela le plus clairement possible dans le rapport de telle sorte que chacun puisse bien le comprendre. Nous voulions ainsi mettre cet enjeu en lumière et susciter un débat, non seulement entre les parlementaires, mais au sein de la société canadienne dans son ensemble.

M. Michel Picard:

J'ai une dernière question portant sur vos conclusions. On peut lire à la page 59 de votre rapport: C7. La mesure du rendement pour l'appareil de la sécurité et du renseignement n'est pas suffisamment robuste pour fournir au Cabinet le contexte requis pour comprendre l'efficience et l'efficacité de l'appareil de la sécurité et du renseignement.

Pouvez-vous nous donner un exemple des préjudices causés par ce manque d'efficacité? Pourriez-vous nous en dire plus long au sujet de cette conclusion?

Mme Rennie Marcoux (directrice générale, Secrétariat du Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement):

Je vais répondre.

Nous avons indiqué dans le rapport que nous n'avions pas accès aux documents du Cabinet, car la loi nous impose des restrictions en la matière. Nous avons pu prendre connaissance de l'ensemble des discussions, des documents d'information et des procès-verbaux de réunions qui ont mené à l'élaboration de ces documents. Je crois que c'est pour le processus dans son entier, du début à la fin, que nous avons noté le manque d'efficacité du Cabinet à répondre aux questions qui se posaient: Quels sont les risques? Quels sont les avantages? Quelles sont les lacunes en matière de collecte de renseignement? En quoi l'évaluation est-elle déficiente? Pourrions-nous apporter une plus grande contribution à l'alliance?

Nous avions donc l'impression que nous aurions dû pouvoir compter sur une gamme d'information de meilleure qualité pour évaluer le rendement de l'appareil de la sécurité et du renseignement.

M. Michel Picard:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Picard.

Nous passons à M. Paul-Hus pour les sept prochaines minutes. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur McGuinty et madame Marcoux.

Dans la version française de votre rapport, au paragraphe 66 de la page 29, vous parlez d'espionnage et d'influence étrangère.

Lorsqu'on parle d'élections, des élections à venir entre autres, considérez-vous qu'une campagne électorale est un enjeu de sécurité nationale?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Le CPSNR n'a pas examiné de façon approfondie la question de tout ce qui touche l'intégrité électorale, notamment des prochaines élections.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Considérez-vous que l'aspect de l'ingérence possible dans les élections soit un enjeu de sécurité nationale? Aux paragraphes 66 et 67, vous mentionnez que la Russie et la Chine sont deux pays reconnus comme étant des acteurs importants de l'ingérence politique, et vous parlez d'activités d'influence visant les partis politiques également.

C'est mentionné dans votre rapport, c'est un fait reconnu.

Le CPSNR est-il actuellement capable de prendre des mesures pour aider à empêcher le Parti communiste chinois de tenter de se livrer à des activités d'ingérence à l'occasion de la prochaine campagne électorale?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Je veux préciser deux choses.

Nous avons fait état de la Russie et de la Chine dans le rapport parce que nous nous sommes fiés à des sources ouvertes. C'est donc ce qui y a été répété.

De plus, nous avons annoncé que l'une des revues que nous entreprenons en 2019 touche la question de l'ingérence étrangère. Éventuellement, nous aurons beaucoup plus à dire sur ce sujet.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Nous n'aurons évidemment pas l'information avant la prochaine campagne. N'est-ce pas?

(1545)

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Probablement pas.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Lorsque vous avez entrepris l'étude au sujet du voyage du premier ministre en Inde, c'était parce que, normalement, il devait y avoir une question de sécurité nationale en jeu, est-ce bien le cas?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Oui.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Le ministre Goodale a comparu devant ce comité lors des séances portant sur le projet de loi C-59, je crois. À ce moment-là, il nous a dit qu'il ne pouvait pas répondre à certaines questions parce qu'il s'agissait d'un sujet lié à la sécurité nationale. Par la suite, à la Chambre des communes, le ministre Goodale a dit le contraire. M. Daniel Jean a aussi témoigné devant notre comité pour dire que ce n'était pas une question de sécurité nationale.

Selon vous, s'agit-il d'un enjeu de sécurité nationale?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Dans le rapport, nous avons inclus une lettre destinée au premier ministre dans laquelle nous l'indiquons clairement.

Nous lui avons dit que, tel qu'il était mentionné dans notre cadre de référence, nous avions examiné les allégations d'ingérence étrangère, de risque à la sécurité du premier ministre et d'utilisation inappropriée de renseignements.

Le rapport traite de ces trois questions précisément. Le ministère de la Justice a évidemment caviardé le rapport et celui-ci a été révisé.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Concernant le voyage en Inde, il est mentionné dans votre rapport que le Cabinet du premier ministre n'avait pas bien trié les visiteurs et qu'il y aurait eu une erreur de jugement.

Est-ce que le premier ministre ou un membre de son personnel a répondu aux recommandations du CPSNR?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Non, pas encore. Nous attendons toujours une réponse du gouvernement concernant les deux rapports.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Vous présentez donc vos rapports, mais il n'y a pas eu de suivi ni de réponse quant aux recommandations. Est-ce bien cela?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Le CPSNR espère qu'il y aura un suivi. Nous attendons toujours une réponse. Nous avons soulevé cette question auprès des autorités appropriées.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Nous constatons bien que, au fond, les collègues de tous les partis qui travaillent avec vous au CPSNR le font avec sérieux depuis la création de celui-ci. Cela est aussi manifeste à la lecture de votre rapport. Il y a une volonté de faire le travail de façon très sérieuse.

Toutefois, nous avons toujours eu un doute quant à la suite qui sera donnée au rapport. À partir du moment où un rapport est présenté, où des choses sérieuses ont été circonscrites, le premier ministre a toujours le dernier mot, au bout du compte.

L'inquiétude que nous avions dès le début, lorsque le projet de loi C-22 a été proposé, concernait l'information transmise. Nous comprenons, bien sûr, que de l'information très secrète ne peut pas être rendue publique.

Cependant, lorsque le premier ministre lui-même est visé dans une étude, on ne s'attend pas à ce qu'il y ait des réponses.

En tant que président du CPSNR, vous attendez-vous à un minimum de la part du gouvernement et du premier ministre, en réponse à vos études?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Oui, monsieur Paul-Hus.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Vos notes mentionnent le projet de loi C-59. Vous faites état de recommandations concernant le ministère de la Défense nationale, ou MDN. Je sais que ce projet de loi est en ce moment à l'étude au Sénat, mais je ne me rappelle plus à quelle étape il est rendu. Pensez-vous que des amendements seront proposés par le Sénat ou par le gouvernement? En avez-vous entendu parler?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Notre rôle est de présenter les rapports au gouvernement, ce que nous avons fait. Il nous reste à espérer que le gouvernement les considère sérieusement.[Traduction]

Une fois qu'il aura été créé avec l'adoption du projet de loi C-59, l'Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement aura le pouvoir d'examiner les activités du ministère de la Défense nationale, mais ne sera pas tenu de le faire chaque année comme ce sera le cas pour le SCRS et le CST. Notre comité a réclamé unanimement que cette responsabilité annuelle soit ajoutée au mandat de l'Office dans le projet de loi C-59 de telle sorte que l'on puisse examiner régulièrement l'ensemble des activités de renseignement du ministère de la Défense nationale. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Vous avez expliqué que le CPSNR tenait plusieurs séances de travail auxquelles il consacre plusieurs heures. Quel est le principal sujet qui vous préoccupe?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Que voulez-vous dire?

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Par exemple, lorsque vous avez une enquête à faire et que vous avez besoin d'information, y avez-vous accès facilement?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Oui, monsieur Paul-Hus.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Toutes les portes des ministères sont-elles ouvertes?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Nous exigeons parfois tellement de documentation que les membres du CPSNR trouvent assez difficile d'en gérer le volume, mais nous avons un secrétariat exceptionnel et des analystes très expérimentés. Cela dit, nous devons de temps en temps exercer un peu de pression sur certains ministères ou certaines agences. Il faut toutefois rappeler que cela ne fait que 17 ou 18 mois que notre comité existe.

Voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose, madame Marcoux?

Mme Rennie Marcoux:

Oui.

Nous remarquons surtout la différence entre les agences qui sont déjà sujettes à examen et qui ont l'habitude de fournir de l'information classifiée, comme le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité, ou SCRS, le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, ou CST et la Gendarmerie royale du Canada, ou GRC, et les autres ministères qui n'y sont pas habitués.

Ces autres organismes, comme le ministère de la Défense nationale ou d'autres ministères, doivent donc d'abord établir un processus pour trier les documents et s'assurer que leurs directions ou leurs divisions acceptent qu'un comité comme le nôtre a un droit d'accès presque absolu à l'information classifiée, y compris celle protégée par le secret professionnel qui lie un avocat à son client. Il s'agit vraiment d'une question d'apprentissage.

(1550)

Le président:

Merci, madame Marcoux.

Messieurs Paul-Hus et Dubé, vous avez la parole pour sept minutes.

M. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci aux témoins d'être présents aujourd'hui.

Je veux tout d'abord vous remercier, ainsi que les membres du CPSNR, du travail que vous avez accompli jusqu'ici. Étant donné qu'il s'agit de notre première expérience à tous, sachez que si nous posons des questions plus techniques sur la procédure pour en arriver à certaines conclusions, cela ne se veut nullement une critique de votre travail, bien au contraire.

J'aimerais en savoir plus en ce qui concerne le suivi de vos recommandations. À titre d'exemple, quand le vérificateur général dépose un rapport, le Comité permanent des comptes publics se charge habituellement d'entendre les représentants des différents ministères.

De votre côté, c'est un peu plus compliqué pour deux raisons. Tout d'abord, les informations nécessaires pour ce suivi sont peut-être classifiées. Ensuite, vous n'êtes pas totalement en mesure de vous livrer aux joutes politiques qui sont parfois nécessaires pour une bonne reddition de comptes.

Serait-il approprié de confier à un comité — par exemple le nôtre — la responsabilité d'effectuer un suivi auprès de certains des organismes visés par vos recommandations?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Il s'agit d'une question dont les membres du CPSNR ont discuté longuement: comment pousser un peu plus fort et exiger la mise en oeuvre des recommandations?

Nous considérons plusieurs possibilités. Nous avons notamment appris que le CST répète d'un rapport annuel à l'autre les recommandations qui n'ont pas encore été mises en oeuvre. C'est une des possibilités que nous étudions, mais nous sommes tous les jours en contact avec les personnes visées.

Pour en revenir à la question de M. Paul-Hus, le ministère de la Défense nationale n'avait encore jamais été examiné de l'extérieur par un comité de parlementaires comme le CPSNR, qui a l'autorité d'exiger toutes ces informations.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Oui.

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Depuis que nous avons braqué nos caméras sur le MDN, celui-ci a pour la première fois de son histoire mis sur pied un groupe d'employés consacré au traitement de toute l'information demandée. Cela constitue tout de même du progrès.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci.

Veuillez me pardonner si je vais vite: le temps est limité.

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Je comprends.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Il y a un autre élément sur lequel je voudrais me pencher. Je reviens à la question qui a été posée en rapport avec l'ingérence étrangère.

Votre étude devait être remise — ou à tout le moins terminée — avant le 3 mai, si je ne me trompe pas. Ai-je bien compris qu'il est possible que le rapport ne soit pas déposé à la Chambre avant que le Parlement n'ajourne ses travaux pour l'été?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Nous travaillons d'arrache-pied et nous consacrons beaucoup d'heures à cette tâche pour essayer de finir le rapport. Ce dernier couvre quand même quatre sujets.

Le problème, c'est que la Loi sur le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement prévoit que le gouvernement doit déposer ses rapports, une fois que le processus de caviardage ou de révision est terminé, dans les 30 jours.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je ne veux pas ajouter à votre charge de travail et je comprends que vous faites tous les efforts possibles.

Le Comité est-il satisfait du délai entre le moment où votre rapport arrive au Cabinet du premier ministre et celui où il est déposé à la Chambre?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

C'est une excellente question. Nous songeons effectivement à étudier ces échéanciers dans le cadre de la révision de la Loi, qui doit être effectuée cinq ans après son entrée en vigueur. Vous avez donc mis le doigt sur une bonne question.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je ne doute pas de votre bonne foi, mais c'est important que nous posions ce genre de questions pour faire notre travail, surtout à l'approche des élections.

Au paragraphe 49 de votre rapport, vous parlez de l'Examen national des dépenses en renseignement. Des statistiques relatives à l'Australie y sont citées, mais les chiffres concernant le Canada sont caviardés. Pourquoi, contrairement au Canada, les Australiens ont-ils décidé qu'il était approprié de rendre ces chiffres publics, au point où même notre pays en a pris connaissance? Êtes-vous en mesure de répondre à cela?

(1555)

Mme Rennie Marcoux:

Nous avons posé cette même question au gouvernement lorsque nous avons appris que cette information allait être caviardée.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Avez-vous reçu une réponse que vous êtes en mesure de nous transmettre?

Mme Rennie Marcoux:

Le gouvernement nous a dit qu'il s'agissait de données classifiées et qu'il ne voulait pas divulguer ces détails.

M. Matthew Dubé:

C'est intéressant, surtout lorsqu'on sait que l'Australie est membre du Groupe des cinq.

J'ai une autre question sur le caviardage, particulièrement en ce qui a trait au sommaire, qui doit demeurer cohérent quant au reste du document. Est-ce le CPSNR qui détermine de quelle façon le sommaire est écrit?

Mme Rennie Marcoux:

C'est le personnel de notre secrétariat qui rédige le sommaire. Dans le cas présent, après avoir pris connaissance des phrases ou des sections de phrases ainsi que des paragraphes qui avaient été caviardés, nous avons décidé de reformuler des phrases pour les rendre complètes et produire ainsi un résumé complet.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Quant à la décision d'utiliser des astérisques, vous êtes-vous inspirés du modèle britannique?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Oui, exactement.

M. Matthew Dubé:

D'accord, merci.

J'ai une autre question sur la Défense nationale et la recommandation d'amender le projet de loi C-59 ainsi que sur la définition du mandat qui serait confié au nouveau comité.

Votre comité s'inquiète-t-il des ressources dont disposerait ce nouveau comité frère pour faire cette surveillance? Les moyens sont déjà plutôt limités. Si le mandat est élargi, vous inquiétez-vous de savoir si le nouveau comité sera en mesure de s'en acquitter chaque année? Je souhaite qu'il le soit et je suis d'accord avec la recommandation, mais il s'agit de savoir s'il sera en mesure de s'en acquitter de façon adéquate compte tenu des ressources actuelles ou de celles prévues.

Mme Rennie Marcoux:

Nous ne sommes pas au courant des ressources ni du budget dont disposera le nouveau comité. Je sais que ce budget sera beaucoup plus important que celui alloué à mon secrétariat parce que le mandat du nouveau comité est beaucoup plus large, mais nous ne sommes pas au courant des chiffres précis. Cela dit, nous sommes d'accord sur le fait qu'il va falloir prévoir les ressources en fonction du mandat.

M. Matthew Dubé:

J'ai une dernière question, laquelle va peut-être de soi, mais que je me permets de poser dans les quinze secondes qu'il me reste.

Quand vous énumérez les critères — suffisants, mais pas nécessaires, ou encore nécessaires, mais insuffisants — suivant lesquels vous avez décidé de déclencher une enquête ou une étude, peut-on dire qu'il ne s'agit en fait que d'un guide visant à informer le public, puisque vous ne vous limitez pas nécessairement à ces critères selon les cas?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Absolument.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Dubé.

M. Spengemann, puis M. Graham.

M. Sven Spengemann (Mississauga—Lakeshore, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur McGuinty et madame Marcoux, merci beaucoup d'être des nôtres aujourd'hui. Félicitations pour ce rapport que vous avez déposé.

Monsieur McGuinty, en plus de présider le CPSNR, qui est un comité de parlementaires, et non un comité parlementaire, vous assumez la présidence du Groupe canadien de l'Union interparlementaire, l'organisation fondée en 1889 pour regrouper tous les parlements de la planète.

Vous vous retrouvez ainsi dans une position tout à fait privilégiée pour nous parler du rôle des parlementaires à l'égard de deux objectifs stratégiques fondamentaux qui sont au cœur des efforts déployés actuellement à l'échelle mondiale. Il y a d'abord la lutte contre le terrorisme et l'extrémisme violent sous toutes ses formes. Il y a aussi la bataille pour la diversité et l'inclusion ainsi que l'égalité entre les sexes, la défense des droits de la communauté LGBTI. et le combat contre le racisme.

À la lumière des deux fonctions que vous occupez actuellement, pourriez-vous nous dire ce que vous pensez du rôle des parlementaires dans ces deux dossiers?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Merci pour la question.

Dans nos interactions avec nos collègues australiens, américains, britanniques et néo-zélandais du Groupe des cinq ainsi qu'avec d'autres nouveaux homologues, nous avons pu nous rendre compte que tous les parlements du monde doivent composer avec cette tension qui existe entre l'octroi de pouvoirs exceptionnels à des fins de sécurité et la nécessité de voir à ce que lesdits pouvoirs soient exercés en assurant la protection des droits fondamentaux relativement à la vie privée, à la liberté et aux autres considérations prévues dans la Charte, si l'on prend l'exemple du contexte canadien.

Nous sommes loin de faire cavalier seul. De nombreux pays ont déjà communiqué avec le CPSNR. Mme Marcoux s'est d'ailleurs rendue en Europe pour parler aux représentants de différents pays que notre approche intéresse vivement. Nous avons aussi été invités à nous rendre dans des pays comme la Colombie qui souhaitent obtenir de l'aide pour se doter des capacités voulues à cette fin.

Ce n'est certes pas un défi qui se pose uniquement pour le Canada. Compte tenu de la montée de l'extrémisme violent et des activités terroristes, c'est bien sûr toute la planète qui est interpellée.

Il faut toutefois nous assurer de parvenir à ce juste équilibre. C'était l'intention visée par le gouvernement lorsqu'il a mis sur pied le CPSNR, et c'est assurément ce qui guide le travail de tous les membres de notre comité multipartite.

(1600)

M. Sven Spengemann:

Quel pourrait être selon vous l'aspect le plus important qui ressort des échanges tenus au sein d'une entité sans entrave et sans orientation ministérielle comme l'Union interparlementaire relativement au rôle que peuvent jouer des parlementaires comme nous pour aider à concilier ces deux objectifs stratégiques?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Je crois que c'est l'absence de partisanerie politique dans notre travail qui est l'ingrédient secret. Si nous apprenions à travailler ensemble sans tenir compte des considérations partisanes dans bon nombre des dossiers cruciaux avec lesquels notre pays et notre planète doivent composer — comme la sécurité et le changement climatique — nous pourrions mieux servir nos populations respectives, les gens que nous représentons. J'estime que c'est un élément essentiel pour traiter de questions comme la sécurité nationale en assurant un juste équilibre entre la protection des gens et celle des droits.

M. Sven Spengemann:

Merci beaucoup.

Je cède la parole à mon collègue.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Monsieur McGuinty, je tiens à ce que tous sachent bien que sans le mentorat que vous m'avez offert alors que j'étais membre de votre personnel il y a bien des années déjà, je ne serais sans doute pas assis ici aujourd'hui. Je veux vous en remercier.

Je me réjouis de constater que tout votre bagage de compétences et d'expérience est mis à contribution pour cet important travail qui s'effectue dans l'ombre.

Dans le chapitre 2, on indique à plusieurs reprises que les Canadiens ne saisissent pas vraiment toute l'ampleur de nos services de renseignement et ne comprennent pas les rôles des différents intervenants.

Quelle est la chose la plus importante que vous voudriez que les Canadiens comprennent mieux?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Merci de signaler cet élément, monsieur Graham.

Dès l'amorce de notre courbe d'apprentissage assez abrupte, nous avons été surpris de constater à quel point les Canadiens en savaient peu au sujet de l'appareil de la sécurité et du renseignement de notre pays. On n'a pas vraiment idée de qui sont les intervenants et qui détient les pouvoirs, de la mesure dans laquelle il y a coopération, des améliorations qui pourraient être apportées et des menaces qui pèsent sur le Canada.

Nous avons pris connaissance de résultats de sondage assez stupéfiants quant au manque d'information au sein de la société canadienne, et ce, malgré la contribution d'organismes et de ministères efficaces qui rendent accessibles des données de qualité. Cependant, les Canadiens ne vont pas chercher cette information, ne la comprennent pas ou n'établissent pas les liens nécessaires.

Afin d'offrir une base pour l'avenir, nous avons décidé de débuter ce chapitre par une trentaine de pages offrant aux Canadiens dans un langage clair et simple un aperçu de la situation de nos services de sécurité et de renseignement.

Il y a un critère que j'aime particulièrement rappeler aux membres de notre comité à ce sujet. Si vous présentez ce rapport à n'importe quel citoyen sortant d'un autobus, d'un train ou de son véhicule et qu'il n'y comprend rien, vous avez failli à la tâche. Nous nous sommes donc efforcés de présenter cette information de manière à ce que tous les Canadiens puissent comprendre ce qui se passe au pays.

Les Canadiens sont tout à fait à même de saisir ces choses-là. C'est sans doute simplement que nous n'avons pas nécessairement pris le temps de présenter le tout dans un format à la fois compréhensible et digestible. C'est pour cette raison que nous avons utilisé cette trentaine de pages afin de brosser un tableau de la situation tout en montrant aux Canadiens que les efforts en matière de sécurité et de renseignement se sont toujours inscrits dans un processus tout à fait naturel.

J'ai mentionné précédemment que le SCRS a vu le jour à l'époque de la commission Macdonald après que la GRC eut été impliquée dans quelques manigances. On lui a ensuite donné sa propre assise législative, et on a fait de même pour le CST. Les choses ont évolué dans le cadre d'un processus que nous jugeons tout à fait naturel dans le domaine de la sécurité et du renseignement. Nous avons tenté de faire ressortir cette évolution également.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

J'ai un grand nombre de questions, mais je n'aurai sans doute pas le temps de vous poser la plupart d'entre elles.

Avons-nous suffisamment d'agences de renseignement? Y en a-t-il trop?

Avant de vous laisser répondre, je vous signale qu'il semble manquer une organisation à la liste de 17 fournie au tableau 1 de la page 22. Notre travail au sein du Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre nous a appris que le Service de protection parlementaire a sa propre unité de renseignement.

Est-ce que cette unité relève de votre mandat à titre de parlementaire ou de comité du gouvernement? Comment voyez-vous les choses?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Toutes les instances fédérales jouant un rôle en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement relèvent du mandat du CPSNR. Nous ne nous sommes pas interrogés quant à savoir s'il y avait un nombre suffisant ou non d'intervenants dans ce secteur. Je ne peux donc pas vraiment vous répondre à ce sujet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci beaucoup. Il me reste encore quelques secondes.

Le président:

Oui, quelques secondes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez parlé de l'importance d'utiliser un langage clair et simple.

Il y a toute une section, autour de la page 100, qui présente les arguments du ministère de la Défense nationale à l'encontre d'un cadre législatif. Pourriez-vous nous expliquer en langage clair et simple les arguments avancés de part et d'autre?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

On a beaucoup parlé de la souplesse opérationnelle. C'est justement pour cette raison que nous souhaitions reproduire mot à mot dans notre rapport le mémoire soumis par le ministère. Nous souhaitions que les Canadiens puissent prendre connaissance à la fois des avantages d'un cadre législatif et de quelques-unes des difficultés que cela entraîne pour nos intervenants de première ligne au sein du ministère de la Défense nationale et des Forces armées canadiennes. Nous avons donc repris très fidèlement les arguments de la Défense. Nous voulions en quelque sorte que les Canadiens puissent se faire une bonne idée de l'évolution du débat à ce sujet.

(1605)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Motz, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur McGuinty et madame Marcoux, de votre présence aujourd'hui.

Avant de vous poser mes questions, je tiens à vous féliciter et à vous remercier d'avoir dédié ce rapport à la mémoire de notre collègue Gord Brown qui nous a quittés il y a environ un an. Je sais que sa famille a beaucoup apprécié ce geste et je veux vous en remercier du fond du coeur.

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Merci, monsieur.

M. Glen Motz:

Moi aussi, j'ai aimé ce que vous avez dit sur le fait que la sécurité nationale doit demeurer une question non partisane. Elle doit être abordée de façon impartiale. Je ne saurais être plus d'accord avec vous, et il y a beaucoup de leçons à tirer de cela.

Malheureusement, le rapport sur le terrorisme produit en 2018 par le ministre de la Sécurité publique semble maintenant dégoulinant de partisanerie.

Ce rapport a-t-il dû être soumis au CPSNR avant d'être publié?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Voulez-vous répondre à cette question?

Mme Rennie Marcoux:

Parlez-vous du rapport de 2017 ou de celui de 2018?

M. Glen Motz:

Du rapport de 2018 sur la menace terroriste.

Mme Rennie Marcoux:

On nous a remis une copie de la version finale du rapport une journée ou deux avant qu'il ne soit publié, si je ne me trompe pas, par courtoisie.

M. Glen Motz:

Vous n'avez pas participé à son examen.

Mme Rennie Marcoux:

Non.

M. Glen Motz:

Monsieur McGuinty, votre comité a-t-il l'intention d'évaluer la préparation, la publication ou la révision de ce rapport pour déterminer s'il y a eu ingérence politique dans ses diverses versions, sur les pratiques exemplaires à privilégier, ou cela ne fait-il pas partie de votre mandat?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

C'est possible, mais je ne peux pas me prononcer sur la question aujourd'hui. Nous avons un programme complet de quatre examens prévus en 2019, et nous ne nous prononçons généralement pas sur les questions sur lesquelles nous nous pencherons avant d'en avoir fait l'annonce.

M. Glen Motz:

Très bien, je comprends.

Dans la version originale de son rapport sur la menace terroriste, le ministre de la Sécurité publique avait qualifié de menace l'extrémisme pour la création du Khalistan. Le ministre a reformulé sa position depuis, mais les faits sur lesquels il se fonde dans ce rapport restent très vieux.

La seule explication à laquelle je puisse penser, c'est que soit il a reçu de nouveaux renseignements qui ne peuvent être divulgués, soit c'est une question politique plutôt qu'une question de sécurité. Le cas échéant, si c'était une question politique plutôt que de sécurité, cela représente un abus de confiance important, à mon avis, que d'utiliser la menace terroriste à des fins politiques.

Qui devrait enquêter là-dessus? Ce comité? Le vôtre? Comment pouvons-nous aller au fond des choses, monsieur?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Nous n'avons absolument pas réfléchi à cette question. Nous ne sommes pas du tout en mesure de commenter la décision du gouvernement d'une manière ou d'une autre. Je pense que vous feriez mieux de poser cette question au ministre et à son gouvernement eux-mêmes.

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord. Est-il interdit aux membres de votre comité de dénoncer des erreurs qui pourraient s'être glissées dans des rapports comme celui-ci?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

En règle générale, les membres ont accepté en début de mandat d'être extrêmement circonspects dans leurs commentaires publics, et généralement, nous ne nous exprimerons que sur la base du travail que nous avons fait, sous la forme de rapports.

M. Glen Motz:

Le travail que vous avez fait...

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Le travail que notre comité a fait. C'est juste.

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord. Donc...

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Et bien sûr, nos rapports sont unanimes.

M. Glen Motz:

Très bien.

J'aimerais vous poser une question plus générale sur le comité et son fonctionnement.

Pendant l'étude du projet de loi C-22, qui portait création de votre comité, l'ancien directeur du SCRS et conseiller en matière de sécurité nationale, Richard Fadden, a dit que ce comité devrait commencer son travail doucement, puis que nous verrions comment il évolue.

Après 16 à 18 mois d'activités, croyez-vous qu'il y a des éléments de son fonctionnement que le comité devrait envisager de changer, des aspects de son rôle ou de ses droits d'accès? Je sais que M. Dubé et vous venez tout juste de parler de la rapidité à laquelle les rapports sont publiés après que vous les ayez remis au Cabinet du premier ministre. Y a-t-il autre chose qui vous vienne à l'esprit? Cela relèverait-il de changements législatifs ou internes? Il doit y avoir des petits accrocs ici et là, des choses à améliorer.

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Oui, nous en apprenons beaucoup sur la rédaction, sur le processus de rédaction. Nous y avons réfléchi et nous nous réservons le droit, pour ainsi dire, d'en dire plus à ce sujet en temps et lieu. Nous comparons notre façon de faire avec d'autres démarches rédactionnelles, nous regardons ce qui se fait ailleurs, comme en Australie, aux États-Unis et dans d'autres pays. Nous croyons aussi que le processus de rédaction peut évoluer. Cependant, nous avons toujours tendance, dans la mesure du possible, à fournir plus d'information, plutôt que moins, au public canadien.

M. Glen Motz:

Si je vous comprends bien, votre comité devrait peut-être revoir ses propres règles rédactionnelles, parce que c'est un comité non partisan et qu'il représente le gouvernement ou toute la Chambre, en fait, et qu'il ne devrait peut-être pas y avoir de contribution externe. Est-ce que je vous ai bien compris?

(1610)

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Pas tout à fait. Ce que nous essayons de déterminer, collectivement, à titre de comité composé de parlementaires, c'est comment le processus rédactionnel fonctionne, quelle est la place des ministères dans ce processus, quel est le rôle du conseiller en matière de sécurité nationale, celui du ministère de la Justice sous le régime de la Loi sur la preuve au Canada, etc. Nous pensons que ce processus peut évoluer et devenir plus transparent avec le temps.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Motz.

Madame Dabrusin, vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Pendant les quelques derniers échanges, nous avons entendu un peu parler du projet de loi C-59 et des autres formes de surveillance ou de révision qui peuvent avoir lieu. Concernant l'Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement, l'OSSNR, quelle forme de complémentarité voyez-vous entre l'Office et vous?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Je pense qu'on peut dire que le mandat de l'OSSNR consiste principalement à examiner les activités des divers acteurs du domaine de la sécurité et du renseignement, pour en évaluer la légitimité et vérifier s'ils respectent les pouvoirs qui leur sont conférés. Il doit également obligatoirement effectuer des examens annuels. À la longue, il deviendra, comme ses membres le disent, un genre de super-CSARS, donc il devra également surveiller chaque année les activités du CSARS et du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications.

Les plaintes reçues du public canadien joueront un rôle important. Ce sera une composante de premier plan, mais nous verrons. Nous avons déjà rencontré les gens du CSARS et d'autres organismes existants, et nous avons fermement l'intention de rencontrer les gens de l'OSSNR dès qu'il sera créé. Je suis certain que nous coopérerons et que nous nous communiquerons de l'information, des recherches et des analyses. L'un des avantages du secrétariat qui sera dirigé par Mme Marcoux, c'est qu'il permettra de conserver une mémoire institutionnelle qui transcendera les cycles gouvernementaux, de même que les arrivées et les départs des membres du comité.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Pensez-vous que ce genre de super-CSARS permettra de créer une autre base d'information qui vous aidera dans votre travail?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Nous le pensons. Il aura accès à l'information clé, aux documents classifiés, et je m'attends vraiment à ce que nous nous communiquions de l'information et à ce que nous coopérions le mieux possible.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Au paragraphe 69 de votre rapport, vous parlez de la menace que représentent l'espionnage et l'influence étrangère, qui gagnent en ampleur au Canada. À la toute fin, dans la dernière phrase, vous faites mention de la loi adoptée par l'Australie. Vous écrivez: « Le Comité est du même avis et note que l'Australie a adopté une loi en juin 2018 afin de mieux prévenir et perturber l'ingérence étrangère et faire enquête sur celle-ci. »

J'aimerais savoir si vous pouvez me parler un peu de cette loi et me dire ce que nous pourrions en retenir, d'après vous.

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Eh bien, nous ne pouvons pas en retenir grand-chose pour l'instant, puisque nous sommes en train d'examiner la réponse du gouvernement sur l'ingérence étrangère, qui est le thème de l'une des grandes études que nous mènerons en 2019. Après ce rapport de 2018, nous voulons faire la lumière sur l'ampleur de la menace que représente l'ingérence étrangère.

Nous voulons aussi évaluer la réponse du gouvernement à cette menace, spécialement à l'égard des institutions canadiennes et des différentes communautés ethnoculturelles en contexte canadien. Nous ne nous penchons pas en tant que tel sur l'intégrité des élections ni sur l'acquisition d'entreprises canadiennes en vertu de la Loi sur Investissement Canada. Ces questions ou la cybersécurité ne sont pas celles sur lesquelles nous nous concentrons. Nous cherchons plutôt à déterminer qui sont les acteurs étrangers qui font de l'ingérence, ce qu'ils complotent et comment nous y réagissons.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Pouvez-vous nous dire quoi que ce soit sur la loi australienne? Vous en faites mention dans ce paragraphe, donc y a-t-il quelque chose que vous puissiez nous dire sur l'exemple australien?

Mme Rennie Marcoux:

Je n'ai pas toute l'information sur cette loi sous les yeux, mais je me rappelle un peu la discussion que nous avons eue en comité. J'étais étonnée que l'Australie ait adopté une loi explicite sur l'ingérence étrangère, alors qu'ici, au Canada, l'ingérence étrangère fait partie de toute une liste de menaces à la sécurité nationale dans la Loi sur le SCRS. L'Australie a déterminé que cette menace était assez grave pour faire l'objet d'une loi explicite à part et probablement établir une approche pangouvernementale plutôt que de miser sur un organisme unique.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Vous êtes en train d'étudier la chose en ce moment même, donc nous pouvons espérer que nous aurons...

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Vous pourrez nous en reparler.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

... nous pourrons vous en parler un peu plus.

C'est ma dernière question, puisque je n'ai qu'une minute encore.

Vous avez parlé un peu du fait que les Canadiens connaissent mal nos organismes de sécurité. Quand vous vous êtes penchés sur la question, quelles sont les plus grandes incompréhensions auxquelles vous vous êtes heurtés? Y a-t-il un élément qui ressort en particulier? Vous mentionnez quelque part dans votre rapport que nos organismes sont méconnus, mais avez-vous remarqué une incompréhension quelconque de leur fonctionnement?

(1615)

L’hon. David McGuinty:

C'est encore plus rudimentaire que cela. Très peu de Canadiens peuvent nommer nos principaux organismes du renseignement. Très peu connaissent le CST. Très peu comprennent vraiment ce qu'est le SCRS, ce qu'il fait, comment il fonctionne. C'est un manque de connaissances encore plus rudimentaire. Ce n'est pas qu'ils ne savent pas précisément comment ces organismes fonctionnent, mais simplement qu'ils ne sont pas au courant de leur existence même ni du nombre d'organisations qui existent. C'est très nouveau pour les Canadiens.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

On trouve ici un tableau présentant toutes ces organisations, donc cela pourrait nous aider à les faire connaître.

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Nous l'espérons, merci.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, madame Dabrusin.

Monsieur Eglinski, vous avez cinq minutes, s'il vous plaît.

M. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, PCC):

Merci.

Je remercie nos deux témoins d'aujourd'hui. Je vous remercie de tout le travail que vous faites pour notre pays. Vous travaillez de longues heures, et je vous en suis reconnaissant.

J'ai remarqué dans votre rapport, particulièrement aux paragraphes 67 et 68, et même un peu au paragraphe 69 que... Je pense que c'est dans le 68 que vous mentionnez que le SCRS a exprimé des inquiétudes quant à l'influence exercée par la Chine sur les élections canadiennes et tout et tout. Votre organisme joue-t-il un rôle en préparation aux élections de 2019, pour qu'il n'y ait pas d'ingérence politique étrangère ou pourrait-il ensuite examiner rétroactivement ce qui ce sera passé? Vous pencherez-vous sur la question en amont? Y a-t-il déjà des études qui ont été faites?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Pas pour l'instant, pas le CPSNR. Comme je l'ai mentionné, dans notre étude sur l'ingérence étrangère, nous avons pour principal objectif de faire la lumière sur l'étendue et la portée de la menace que présentent les acteurs étrangers; nous voulons identifier les principaux acteurs menaçants, évaluer la menace qu'ils présentent, ce qu'ils font et l'efficacité des mesures que prend notre pays pour y réagir. Nous ne mettons pas tellement l'accent sur l'intégrité des élections en vue des prochaines élections, puisque nous exerçons plutôt un rôle externe à cet égard.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Votre organisation ne le fait peut-être pas, mais savez-vous s'il y a d'autres groupes, comme le SCRS, qui enquêtent, étudient activement la chose ou recueillent des renseignements à cet égard?

Mme Rennie Marcoux:

L'une des raisons pour lesquelles nous avons décidé de ne pas nous concentrer sur l'ingérence étrangère dans les prochaines élections, c'est que le gouvernement, d'après l'information qu'il nous a donnée, prend déjà beaucoup de mesures pour évaluer la menace d'ingérence étrangère et la prévenir.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Merci.

Votre organisation est encore toute jeune. Comment avez-vous trouvé la coopération avec nos huit grandes organisations de renseignement au Canada au cours de la dernière année? Bien souvent, ces organisations rechignent à fournir de l'information et à accorder leur confiance à une nouvelle organisation extérieure. La transition se passe-t-elle assez bien? Vos homologues comprennent-ils le bien-fondé de cette organisation nationale, de votre groupe?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

C'est une excellente question.

De manière générale, je dirais que oui, la plupart des personnes avec qui nous travaillons nous appuient beaucoup, mais c'est nouveau. Nous sommes toujours en train de gagner leur confiance et d'établir une relation de coopération pour avoir accès à l'information, et il nous faut parfois pousser un peu et insister pour obtenir ce dont nous avons besoin.

J'ai déjà mentionné que le ministère de la Défense nationale n'avait jamais vu de tels projecteurs se braquer sur ses activités de renseignement. Cela a été une grande occasion d'apprentissage, et il y avait beaucoup de confiance.

Cette année, nous effectuons un examen en profondeur de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, qui n'a jamais fait l'objet d'un examen d'un comité externe composé de parlementaires. Nous avons déjà reçu à peu près 15 000 ou 16 000 pages de documentation de l'ASFC, donc la coopération à ce jour est très bonne.

Je pense que la plupart de gens estiment que ce genre d'examen externe peut les aider à mener leurs activités, et nous avons hâte de voir les conclusions que tirera le CPSNR parce que c'est un comité non partisan qui fait véritablement des recommandations d'améliorations.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Merci.

Dans la même veine, comment votre groupe est-il accueilli ailleurs dans le monde?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Nous sommes très fiers de ce rapport. Notre rapport annuel a été bien accueilli dans le monde. Nous avons reçu des commentaires du Royaume-Uni, des États-Unis, de l'Australie et de la Nouvelle-Zélande. Par exemple, nous avons reçu des commentaires de la commissaire au renseignement de la Nouvelle-Zélande, je pense que son titre est...

Mme Rennie Marcoux:

Elle est inspectrice générale.

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Elle a dit que le chapitre 4, sur la défense nationale...

Mme Rennie Marcoux:

C'est sur les priorités en matière de renseignement.

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Je m'excuse. Les priorités en matière de renseignement feront partie de l'enquête sur les motivations du tireur de Christchurch. Nous tissons le plus de liens possible, et jusqu'à maintenant, la réaction est très positive.

(1620)

M. Jim Eglinski:

J'ai une brève question à vous poser.

Nous vous avons donné un mandat quand ce groupe a été fondé, et il avait créé beaucoup de controverse au départ. Est-ce que nous vous avons donné assez d'outils? Je pense qu'il doit y avoir un examen au bout de cinq ans. Trouvez-vous, déjà pendant votre première année, que nous devrions peut-être nous pencher sur la question plus vite? Aurez-vous besoin de meilleurs outils pour faire votre travail?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Peut-être, mais nous n'avons qu'environ deux années de faites sur un mandat de cinq ans, et je pense qu'il sera un peu interrompu par une campagne électorale à l'automne...

M. Jim Eglinski:

Effectivement, il le sera.

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Je pense que le comité vous dirait que l'horizon de cinq ans est adéquat, mais nous creusons tout cela, et plus nous gagnons en expérience et mettons nos compétences en pratique, plus nous nous positionnons. Je pense que nous en aurons plus à dire à ce sujet en temps et lieu et que nous pourrions recommander des améliorations.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Eglinski.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez cinq minutes, s'il vous plaît.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

À la page 70 du rapport, au paragraphe 170, il est question du renseignement de défense. On y trouve une description des différents types de renseignements. Le renseignement électromagnétique est bien sûr celui qui suscite le plus d'intérêt. C'est celui à la base de toutes les histoires d'Edward Snowden. De par sa nature, le SIGINT capte tout, donc ce serait difficile de ne pas s'y intéresser.

À votre avis, et c'est la principale raison pour laquelle ce comité a été créé, pour des raisons politiques, l'appareil de renseignement du Canada et nos partenaires du Groupe des cinq, en particulier, prennent-ils des mesures adéquates pour prévenir la collecte injustifiée ou illégale de données par des Canadiens, sur eux ou entre eux?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

C'est une excellente question, à laquelle il est très difficile de répondre. Je vais la contourner un peu et répéter que cette année, en 2019, l'un de nos principaux examens sera l'examen spécial du ministère de la Défense nationale et des Forces armées canadiennes. Nous examinerons la collecte, l'utilisation, la conservation et la diffusion d'informations sur les citoyens canadiens par le ministère de la Défense nationale et les Forces armées canadiennes. Nous essaierons de bien clarifier les contraintes juridiques et politiques à la collecte de données sur les citoyens canadiens dans le cadre des activités de renseignement de défense. Nous sommes donc saisis de la question en ce moment même.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le ministère de la Défense nationale mène-t-il des activités de renseignement au Canada ou ses activités se font-elles surtout à l'étranger?

Mme Rennie Marcoux:

Il peut recueillir des renseignements s'il a le mandat officiel de déployer des forces dans le cadre d'une mission, que ce soit au Canada, en appui à la GRC ou au CST, par exemple, ou à l'étranger. Il peut recueillir des données à l'appui d'une mission, où qu'elle se tienne.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Savons-nous si l'existence du CPSNR a changé le comportement des divers acteurs du milieu du renseignement?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Je pense que oui. J'ai mentionné un peu plus tôt que l'un des effets immédiats de notre examen des activités de renseignement du ministère de la Défense nationale et des Forces armées canadiennes, c'est que pour la toute première fois, le ministère a créé une unité interne en réaction à cet examen externe. Elle a le mandat de recueillir l'information nécessaire, de rassembler les données et de répondre aux demandes qui lui sont présentées. Nous avons présenté beaucoup de demandes au ministère, et nous avons reçu des milliers de pages de documentation. Quand nous jugeons ces documents insatisfaisants, nous en demandons d'autres. S'il manque quelque chose, nous demandons pourquoi il manque des choses.

Nous croyons que le degré de probité que le CPSNR confère aux organisations qui recueillent ou utilisent des renseignements en matière de sécurité nationale est très positif pour les Canadiens.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À la toute fin de votre rapport, au paragraphe 265, je sens un peu de frustration. Vous semblez dire que les gens du milieu du renseignement ne sont pas très coopératifs et que parfois, vous devez insister beaucoup pour qu'ils vous fournissent l'information demandée. Est-ce que cela change? Les recommandations que vous faites contribuent-elles à résoudre le problème?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Avez-vous dit le paragraphe 265?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est le paragraphe 265, à la page 118. C'est vers la fin du rapport. Il y avait un sentiment de frustration au sein du comité lorsqu'il posait une question et qu'il obtenait une réponse très restreinte plutôt que la réponse qu'il souhaitait obtenir.

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Je crois que Mme Marcoux est mieux placée pour répondre à cette question, car elle est régulièrement en communication avec ses collègues au sein de ces ministères et organismes.

Mme Rennie Marcoux:

Comme je l'ai mentionné plus tôt, je pense, c'est attribuable au fait que les ministères, particulièrement ceux qui ne sont pas assujettis à un examen régulier, doivent s'habituer à fournir au comité de l'information, l'information pertinente.

Dans certains cas, c'est peut-être que le secrétariat doit être plus précis en ce qui concerne les délais ou le type d'information que nous souhaitons obtenir. C'est un processus qui implique des échanges. Dans d'autres cas, c'est attribuable au fait qu'il faut lire le document attentivement. Si on fait référence, par exemple, à un document dans une note de bas de page, ils ont la responsabilité de nous fournir ce document également. C'est donc attribuable à des détails ou à des éléments plus importants.

(1625)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends.

Au paragraphe 107, à la page 47 — vous n'avez pas à aller à chacune des pages; je vous mentionne seulement où cela se trouve — on explique que le SCRS a rédigé une directive ministérielle qui excluait deux priorités, ce qui a semé la confusion au SCRS à savoir si ses agents pouvaient recueillir ou non du renseignement.

Est-ce que les agents sont autorisés à recueillir de l'information qui n'est pas reliée aux priorités établies? Pourquoi est-ce que cela a semé de la confusion? Ils peuvent recueillir des données, même si elles ne portent pas sur les 10 points...

Mme Rennie Marcoux:

Ce serait plus facile pour moi si...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Bien sûr. Il s'agit du paragraphe 107, à la page 47. C'est une excellente lecture pour le week-end, soit dit en passant.

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Je ne pense pas que nous sommes en mesure de vous en dire davantage, étant donné les renseignements classifiés qui y sont liés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends.

Mme Rennie Marcoux:

Je crois que c'est parce que le SCRS doit respecter des directives très précises, donc, plus les directives sont précises, plus il est facile pour les agents de déterminer ce qu'ils peuvent recueillir. Je crois que c'est ce que nous voulions expliquer.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Dubé, vous avez trois minutes. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Il me reste juste deux dernières questions. L'une peut sembler un peu ridicule, mais, à mon avis, elle est importante.

Est-ce que le format du rapport sera différent la prochaine fois de sorte qu'il soit plus facile à consulter sur un ordinateur — pour permettre, par exemple, la recherche au moyen des touches Ctrl-F? Autrement dit, s'agira-t-il encore d'une copie numérisée?

Mme Rennie Marcoux:

Ce problème est lié au processus de caviardage. On ne peut pas simplement biffer l'information dans un document, puis le transférer à l'ordinateur ou sur le Web. En fait, il faut faire des copies et des photocopies avant de les diffuser ensuite sur le site Web.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Vous allez me pardonner de dire qu'en 2019, on devrait pouvoir trouver une solution pour consulter le document plus rapidement.

Mme Rennie Marcoux:

Oui.

Nous partageons votre frustration, monsieur.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Excellent. Merci. Je ne pouvais pas m'empêcher de le noter.

J'ai une dernière petite chose à vous demander.

Pour revenir à la première question que j'ai posée, existe-t-il un plan visant le suivi officiel de la mise en oeuvre des recommandations formulées par le CPSNR? J'ai un peu posé la même question au début de mon intervention, mais je veux juste m'assurer qu'il y a un suivi officiel de ces recommandations.

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Oui.

Le CPSNR dispose d'un plan pour faire exactement ce genre de suivi. Nous sommes vraiment contents d'être ici aujourd'hui, et d'être peut-être invités au Sénat plus tard, pour nous adresser à vos homologues. Nous pensons que c'est un bon début pour, à tout le au moins, sensibiliser les parlementaires.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Excellent. Je vous remercie.

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Merci, monsieur Dubé. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Dubé.

J'ai une dernière question à poser.

Dans l'une de vos recommandations, la R1, vous parlez du processus d'établissement des priorités en matière de renseignement. À la conclusion 7, vous dites que la mesure du rendement pour l'appareil de la sécurité et du renseignement n'est pas suffisamment robuste.

Les priorités en matière de renseignement changent constamment. Le changement qui me vient à l'esprit est celui qui concerne les priorités que sont le terrorisme et la cybersécurité. Un grand nombre d'analystes du renseignement croient que la cybersécurité constitue une menace beaucoup plus importante que le terrorisme.

Pouvez-vous décrire ce processus et nous dire si vous estimez que les priorités établies sont les bonnes?

L’hon. David McGuinty:

Nous avons entrepris l'examen de l'établissement des priorités en matière de renseignement parce que nous voulions avoir une vue d'ensemble de l'appareil de la sécurité et du renseignement et en examiner les rouages, par le fait même, pour voir comment les priorités étaient en fait établies.

L'un des problèmes que nous avons constatés, qui fait très clairement l'objet d'une recommandation, ce sont les exigences permanentes en matière de renseignement. Il y en a plus de 400. Il est très difficile de faire un tri et d'inclure plus de 400 exigences dans un processus du Cabinet. Nous n'avons pas accès aux documents confidentiels du Cabinet, mais nous avons accès à la plupart des documents qui ont donné lieu aux discussions et au débat.

Nous croyons qu'il y a des améliorations à apporter, et c'est pourquoi nous demandons à la conseillère à la sécurité nationale et au renseignement de jouer un rôle plus proactif. La conseillère joue un rôle essentiel au sein de l'appareil de la sécurité et du renseignement au Canada, et elle est la mieux placée, selon nous, pour rationaliser et simplifier les choses. Un grand nombre d'acteurs de première ligne dans le secteur de la sécurité et du renseignement au pays souhaitent davantage de clarté et sans doute un processus plus harmonieux.

L'ensemble du chapitre explique le fonctionnement aux Canadiens, étape par étape, et nous nous sommes concentrés sur quelques mécanismes internes de peaufinage qui, selon nous, permettraient dans une certaine mesure d'améliorer l'ensemble du processus.

(1630)

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Au nom du Comité, je vous remercie tous les deux pour votre comparution. Nous vous sommes reconnaissants de nous avoir donné cette vue d'ensemble. Je félicite votre comité pour son travail et son rapport. Je vous remercie également pour le travail acharné que vous avez effectué au cours des 18 derniers mois.

Chers collègues, nous allons faire une pause jusqu'à ce que le ministre Goodale arrive. Comme nous avons un peu de temps, je vais m'adresser à M. Paul-Hus. Il souhaite que nous examinions la motion M-167, qui ne figure pas à l'ordre du jour. Nous allons l'examiner seulement si tous les membres souhaitent l'étudier maintenant. Sinon, je vais mettre cela de côté et...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous devons faire cela à huis clos, n'est-ce pas?

Le président:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous ne pouvons pas attendre que M. Goodale soit là alors.

Le président:

Premièrement, souhaitons-nous nous occuper de cela après la comparution du ministre?

Un député: Oui, ça irait.

Le président: Vous seriez d'accord pour qu'on passe alors à huis clos? Je veux seulement m'assurer que nous sommes tous d'accord.

Nous allons maintenant faire une pause.

(1630)

(1630)

Le président:

Nous allons reprendre. Le ministre et ses collègues sont ici.

C'est une réunion spéciale. Nous avons invité le ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile à comparaître au sujet du Rapport public de 2018 sur la menace terroriste pour le Canada et à répondre aux questions à ce sujet.

Je vais maintenant demander au ministre Goodale de faire sa déclaration liminaire et de nous présenter ses collègues.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale (ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président, et je remercie les membres du Comité. Je suis heureux de comparaître à nouveau devant vous.

Je suis accompagné aujourd'hui du sous-ministre délégué, Vincent Rigby, de la commissaire de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada, Brenda Lucki, et du directeur du Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité, David Vigneault.

Nous serons ravis d'essayer de répondre à vos questions au sujet du Rapport public de 2018 sur la menace terroriste pour le Canada.

Je tiens d'abord à dire que les hommes et les femmes qui travaillent au sein de nos organismes chargés de la sécurité et du renseignement ont la tâche importante et très difficile de repérer, de surveiller, d'atténuer et de stopper les menaces afin d'assurer la protection des Canadiens. Ils effectuent ce travail sans relâche, 24 heures par jour, 7 jours par semaine, pour nous protéger, et ils méritent notre admiration et nos remerciements.

L'objectif du Rapport public sur la menace terroriste pour le Canada est de fournir aux Canadiens des renseignements non classifiés à propos des menaces auxquelles nous sommes confrontés. Il s'agit notamment de menaces qui proviennent du Canada, mais qui visent d'autres pays dans le monde. Aucun pays ne souhaite être une pépinière de terroristes ou d'extrémistes violents. Présenter aux Canadiens un rapport public sur la menace terroriste est un élément central de l'engagement du gouvernement en matière de transparence et de reddition de comptes. L'objectif est d'informer avec exactitude, sans toutefois révéler de renseignements classifiés.

Avant d'entrer dans les détails du rapport de cette année, j'aimerais revenir sur le Rapport public de 2016 sur la menace terroriste pour le Canada. Dans l'avant-propos ministériel de ce rapport, j'ai écrit ceci: C'est une grave et triste réalité que des groupes terroristes, en particulier le soi-disant État islamique en Iraq et au Levant (EIIL), aient recours à la propagande extrémiste violente pour encourager des personnes à soutenir leur cause. Ce groupe n'est ni islamique, ni un État, et sera donc appelé Daesh (son acronyme arabe) dans le présent rapport.

En rétrospective, je peux dire que ce principe aurait dû mieux guider les auteurs des rapports subséquents lorsqu'ils faisaient référence aux diverses menaces terroristes auxquelles fait face notre pays. Des Canadiens de diverses confessions et origines ont contribué à bâtir notre pays et ils font partie intégrante de nos collectivités et de nos quartiers. Ils contribuent à faire du Canada un pays plus fort, plus égalitaire et plus compatissant, un pays auquel nous aspirons. Il est inapproprié et injuste d'associer une collectivité en particulier ou un groupe religieux entier au terrorisme ou à la violence extrémiste. C'est tout simplement inacceptable et inapproprié.

À la suite de la publication du rapport de 2018, plusieurs communautés, particulièrement les communautés sikhes et musulmanes du Canada, ont fait valoir vigoureusement que le vocabulaire utilisé dans le rapport n'était pas suffisamment précis. L'utilisation de termes tels que « extrémisme sikh » ou « extrémisme sunnite » dans le rapport donnait l'impression qu'on visait des groupes religieux entiers plutôt que de cibler des actes dangereux commis par un petit nombre de personnes. Je peux vous assurer que l'intention n'était pas de généraliser. On a utilisé des termes qui sont employés depuis des années. Ces termes ont été utilisés notamment dans le cadre de la stratégie antiterroriste lancée en 2012 par le gouvernement précédent et dans le rapport de décembre 2018 du Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement. Des termes semblables ont également figuré dans le Feuilleton de la Chambre des communes relativement à certains travaux parlementaires proposés. Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, le choix des termes est important. Ce n'est pas parce qu'on a souvent utilisé une certaine formulation qu'il faudrait continuer de l'utiliser maintenant ou dans l'avenir.

En raison des préoccupations qui ont été portées à mon attention, j'ai demandé qu'on examine le vocabulaire employé dans le rapport pour s'assurer qu'il fournit aux Canadiens des renseignements utiles non classifiés à propos de la menace terroriste pour le Canada sans nuire à une communauté en particulier. Nous avons consulté les communautés sikhes et musulmanes du Canada. Nous avons aussi consulté la Table ronde transculturelle sur la sécurité, nos organismes responsables de la sécurité et du renseignement ainsi que de nombreux députés.

(1635)



À l'avenir, nous utiliserons une terminologie axée sur l'intention ou l'idéologie, plutôt que sur un groupe religieux entier. Par exemple, dans le rapport, nous parlons maintenant des « extrémistes qui préconisent la violence pour établir un État indépendant à l'intérieur de l'Inde ». Fait intéressant, c'est une approche qui est parfois utilisée par certains de nos alliés. Par exemple, dans la stratégie nationale antiterroriste de 2018 des États-Unis d'Amérique, on peut lire notamment ceci: « Babbar Khalsa International cherche, par la violence, à établir son propre État indépendant en Inde. »

L'objectif est de décrire la menace à l'intention du public avec exactitude et précision, sans condamner involontairement l'ensemble de la communauté sikhe ou toute autre communauté. La vaste majorité de la communauté sikhe au Canada est pacifique et ne souhaiterait jamais causer du tort à qui que ce soit, ni au Canada ni ailleurs.

De même, nous avons cessé d'utiliser des termes comme « extrémisme chiite ou sunnite ». À l'avenir, ces menaces seront décrites d'une façon plus précise, notamment en faisant référence directement à des organisations terroristes comme le Hezbollah ou Daech. Ce sera plus exact et plus instructif. Je le répète, le vocabulaire employé est important, et nous devons toujours garder cela à l'esprit. C'est pourquoi nous procéderons continuellement à ce genre d'examen.

Je suis certain que tous les membres du Comité ont pris connaissance des statistiques révélant une augmentation des crimes haineux, qui ont été publiées il y a deux semaines. Malheureusement, en 2017, on a enregistré au Canada une hausse de 47 % des crimes haineux déclarés par la police. Les médias sociaux font en sorte qu'il est de plus en plus facile pour les personnes remplies de haine de communiquer entre elles et d'amplifier leur discours toxique. Ce qui est tragique, c'est que, parfois, cela a des conséquences désastreuses et mortelles, comme on l'a vu très récemment en Nouvelle-Zélande. Cela devrait être un anathème pour nous tous. Les gouvernements, peu importe leur allégeance, pourraient, par inadvertance, continuer d'utiliser des termes que ces individus infâmes et violents pourraient considérer dans leur esprit comme étant la preuve qu'ils ont raison de fomenter la haine.

En plus de procéder à un examen du vocabulaire utilisé, nos organismes chargés de la sécurité prennent également certaines mesures novatrices afin d'accomplir leur travail quotidien avec exactitude, efficacité et objectivité. Je vais vous en donner un exemple. Depuis quelques mois, les personnes qui ont pour tâche de prendre la difficile décision finale d'inscrire le nom d'une personne sur la liste établie en vertu de Loi sur la sûreté des déplacements aériens, autrement dit, la liste d'interdiction de vol, ne voit plus le nom et la photo de la personne en question dans le dossier. Ainsi, ni le nom ni la photo ne peut influencer la décision finale, pas même inconsciemment. Ceux qui prennent la décision doivent s'attarder aux faits exposés dans le dossier et ils doivent prendre une décision en fonction de ces faits. Il est donc question de faits et non de préjugés.

Les hommes et les femmes qui travaillent au sein des organismes responsables de la sécurité et du renseignement sont des professionnels vaillants, mais aucun être humain n'est à l'abri de certaines idées préconçues. Le gouvernement devrait s'efforcer d'atténuer les conséquences de ce trait de la nature humaine.

Enfin, bien que la version actualisée du rapport ait été raisonnablement bien accueillie, certaines personnes ont critiqué les changements, faisant valoir qu'ils diminuent la capacité de nos organismes d'effectuer leur travail. Je suis profondément en désaccord. Le contenu factuel du rapport n'a pas changé. Le rapport continue de décrire la menace à laquelle le Canada fait face et la menace qui provient du Canada. Il le fait simplement d'une manière qui ne peut pas donner à penser qu'on dénigre des communautés ou des groupes religieux entiers à cause des actes d'un petit nombre de personnes, qui se comportent d'une façon qui va à l'encontre des valeurs d'une communauté en particulier. L'ensemble de cette communauté ne devrait pas être condamnée à cause de ces individus.

(1640)



Honnêtement, je dois dire que nos organismes chargés de la sécurité et du renseignement ont besoin de la bonne volonté et du soutien de l'ensemble des membres pacifiques et respectueux des lois de toutes les communautés pour pouvoir effectuer leur travail efficacement. Nous ne pouvons pas établir des partenariats si les termes que nous utilisons créent un fossé, une distance ou un malaise entre les communautés et nos organismes responsables de la sécurité.

Monsieur le président, je vous remercie de m'avoir invité à comparaître à nouveau devant le Comité. Je serai heureux d'essayer de répondre à vos questions avec l'aide des personnes qui m'accompagnent.

Le président:

Je vous remercie, monsieur Goodale.

Madame Sahota, vous avez sept minutes.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Tout d'abord, monsieur le ministre, je tiens à vous remercier de comparaître aujourd'hui. Je vous remercie également pour le travail que vous accomplissez. Nous savons que la partie de votre travail qui concerne la GRC et le SCRS n'est pas facile. Vous veillez à protéger notre pays, et nous vous en sommes reconnaissants.

Je vous ai déjà parlé de ce problème à plusieurs reprises. Des gens de ma communauté et plusieurs intervenants ont communiqué avec moi après que le rapport a été rendu public en décembre. Ils étaient vraiment abasourdis, car ils ne comprenaient pas pourquoi les sikhs avaient été ciblés de cette façon et pourquoi d'autres confessions — sunnites, chiites, islamistes — ont été mentionnées dans le rapport. Auparavant, dans ces rapports publics, on mettait toujours l'accent sur des régions et des voyageurs extrémistes. Pourquoi y a-t-il eu un changement à cet égard cette fois-ci?

(1645)

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Madame Sahota, le rapport est le fruit du travail de différents organismes chargés de la sécurité et du renseignement au sein du gouvernement du Canada. Comme vous l'avez reconnu, ils accomplissent de façon très professionnelle un travail très difficile, qui consiste à évaluer les risques auxquels le pays est confronté à tout moment. Ces risques ne sont pas toujours les mêmes. Puisqu'il s'agit d'un rapport qui s'adresse au gouvernement et au public, il ne m'appartient sans doute pas de commenter le travail effectué pour produire ce rapport.

Peut-être que vous pourriez, monsieur Vigneault, expliquer, du point de vue du SCRS, les facteurs dont tiennent compte les auteurs du rapport lorsqu'il s'agit de déterminer le contenu à quelque moment que ce soit et...?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Permettez-moi d'ajouter que, dans votre déclaration liminaire, monsieur le ministre, vous avez parlé du rapport de 2016, qui précise qu'on ne ferait plus mention de l'EIIL, car ce groupe n'est ni islamique, ni un État. Vous avez dit qu'il sera donc appelé Daech. Pourquoi ce revirement dans ce rapport? Nous avons vu que beaucoup de changements ont été apportés sur les plans de la présentation, de la teneur et des descriptions.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

M. Rigby, le sous-ministre délégué, souhaite commenter.

M. Vincent Rigby (sous-ministre délégué, ministère de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile):

Je vous remercie beaucoup, monsieur le ministre.

Il s'agit d'un rapport auquel a contribué l'ensemble des organismes chargés de la sécurité et du renseignement. Le ministère de la Sécurité publique est le responsable, mais il s'adresse aux organismes pour obtenir les commentaires de la GRC, du SCRS et du CIET. Nous rassemblons l'information concernant la menace et ses capacités et celle que contient la réponse du gouvernement. Nous rassemblons toute cette information, puis nous nous entendons collectivement, en incluant le dirigeant de l'organisme, sur le contenu avant de le soumettre à l'approbation du gouvernement et du ministre.

Au cours des dernières années, je pense que certaines personnes ont critiqué le fait que les rapports n'étaient pas aussi détaillés que les gens l'auraient souhaité. Ils auraient voulu que le rapport s'étende un peu plus sur les subtilités de la menace, etc. Je crois qu'en tentant de fournir davantage de détails, nous avons malheureusement introduit dans le rapport certains termes, et nous sommes ici aujourd'hui pour en discuter. Comme le ministre l'a dit, la terminologie que nous utiliserons à l'avenir sera axée davantage sur l'idéologie que sur les communautés.

Cela vous explique un peu comment ces termes se sont glissés dans le rapport. Je le répète, ces termes ont déjà été utilisés dans des rapports précédents, mais certains termes précis dont le ministre a parlé n'avaient pas été utilisés depuis 2012.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord. Je sais que le retrait de ces termes a été critiqué. On a dit que ce n'était pas assez précis, mais comme le ministre, je ne suis pas de cet avis. Je crois qu'on est bien plus précis si l'on se concentre sur les organisations terroristes.

Pouvez-vous m'expliquer en quoi la partie qui porte sur les personnes qui continuent de préconiser la violence pour établir un état indépendant à l'intérieur de l'Inde est précise? Des intervenants de la collectivité me posent des questions à ce sujet. Ils disent que cette partie ou ce dont il y est question ne figuraient pas dans des rapports précédents, mis à part qu'une organisation était mentionnée, et ils se demandent alors pourquoi on le fait maintenant. Pourquoi, si aucun événement ne s'est produit, à notre connaissance, cela a été inclus dans le rapport de 2018 et qu'on n'en avait jamais fait mention auparavant, alors que cette partie porte principalement sur un incident et une période, soit entre 1982 et 1993?

(1650)

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je crois que M. Vigneault peut répondre à la question, mais je vais faire seulement deux observations préliminaires.

Bien entendu, le contenu préparé et publié dans le rapport public sur la menace doit être non classifié. L'information classifiée doit demeurer classifiée, mais il y a un moyen parlementaire d'en faire un examen. Bien entendu, cela relève de la compétence du témoin qui a comparu précédemment.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est ce que je pensais.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement a été créé dans le but de permettre à nos organismes de sécurité, au besoin, de discuter des renseignements classifiés avec le groupe de parlementaires approprié. Il s'agit du Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement plutôt que d'un comité parlementaire régulier. Si le comité des parlementaires souhaite examiner une question de ce type, c'est dans ce cadre qu'il conviendrait de le faire.

J'invite le directeur du SCRS, David Vigneault, à en dire davantage.

M. David Vigneault (directeur, Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité):

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Je vous remercie d'avoir posé la question et de me donner l'occasion d'en dire plus à ce sujet.

Comme vous pouvez l'imaginer, les enquêtes de sécurité nationale du SCRS sont en constante évolution. Elles sont influencées par des événements qui se passent ici, au Canada, et à l'étranger. Notre mandat consiste à nous assurer que les gens, ici au Canada, qui appuient le recours à la violence à des fins politiques ou qui y participent en quelque sorte, font l'objet d'une enquête. Ces enquêtes évoluent, et nous donnons des conseils au gouvernement, et nous en donnons à Sécurité publique Canada dans le contexte du rapport et de notre évaluation des menaces.

Nous soutenons l'évaluation que nous avons faite, soit qu'il y a un petit groupe d'individus qui, à l'heure actuelle, participent à des activités qui consistent à utiliser la violence pour établir un État indépendant en Inde. Il nous incombe de nous assurer d'enquêter sur ces menaces et de donner des conseils à la GRC et à d'autres collègues pour faire en sorte que, selon les renseignements et les enquêtes du SCRS, le Canada ne soit pas utilisé pour planifier un acte terroriste et que parallèlement, nous, les Canadiens, soyons en sécurité.

Le président:

Nous allons nous arrêter ici, madame Sahota.

Monsieur Paul-Hus, vous disposez de sept minutes. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Goodale, j'ai eu la chance d'avoir la première copie du rapport du 11 décembre 2018, qui nous a donné une certaine information. Je comprends vos arguments et toute l'explication que vous nous fournissez pour tenter de réparer ce que, techniquement, nous n'aurions pas dû avoir. Je suis content de l'avoir eue, parce que cela nous donne des informations au sujet de la sécurité nationale.

Quant à vous, vous faites de la politique avec cela. Ce qui m'inquiète un peu, c'est de savoir qu'à un moment donné, comme Canadiens, nous avons eu accès à de l'information, qui a ensuite été modifiée. Nous avons appris que le SCRS, la GRC et d'autres agences ont fait un certain travail et qu'ils ont signalé, dans un rapport de Sécurité publique Canada, des informations importantes sur notre sécurité. Par la suite, des groupes ont fait pression. On a exercé une première pression sur vous et, le 12 avril, vous avez modifié le rapport. Une deuxième version a été mise en ligne sur le site. Deux semaines plus tard, le 26 avril, un autre groupe a fait pression et vous avez modifié le rapport une deuxième fois. Nous avons maintenant une version édulcorée.

Je veux bien comprendre le processus. Je sais que cela peut toucher des communautés, mais il reste que des rapports ont été établis par nos agences de sécurité et que l'on y a mis de l'information qui correspond à ce qu'il en est quant à la situation décrite. À quel point la politique joue-t-elle un rôle et édulcore-t-on la réalité pour ne blesser personne? Comment cela fonctionne-t-il? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur Paul-Hus, comme je l'ai mentionné dans ma déclaration préliminaire, les observations qui nous ont été présentées provenaient des communautés musulmane et sikhe en particulier. De plus, nous avons entendu le point de vue d'un certain nombre de députés de différents partis politiques, et non pas d'un seul parti. En fait, à la Chambre des communes, tous les partis ont eu l'occasion de faire des observations sur la situation et ont fait connaître leur point de vue, et ils ont soulevé des préoccupations similaires.

Nous avons évalué les commentaires que nous avons reçus, et contrairement à l'affirmation que vous avez faite dans votre question, il ne s'agissait pas d'une question partisane; c'était plutôt une question de précision, d'équité et d'efficacité.

(1655)

[Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Je crois que l'information était précise. L'information présentée signalait quand même clairement des points concernant une menace existante. Vous avez changé des mots pour alléger le tout.

Dans le fond, c'est cela, faire de la politique; c'est essayer de ne pas déplaire aux gens. Toutefois, il reste que la première version des agences était claire. [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Non. Ce n'est pas ce que visent les changements.

Manifestement, ce que nous ont dit un certain nombre d'intervenants de partout au pays, la Table ronde transculturelle sur la sécurité nationale et des députés de plusieurs partis politiques, c'est que les mots employés dans le rapport donnaient l'impression que tout un groupe religieux ou toute une communauté représentaient une menace pour la sécurité nationale. C'est faux.

Certains individus représentent une menace pour la sécurité nationale et doivent faire l'objet d'enquêtes, mais lorsqu'on publie un rapport sur le sujet qui contient des expressions qui donnent l'impression qu'il faut craindre un groupe religieux entier ou une communauté ethnoculturelle entière, cela ne correspond pas à la réalité. C'est ce qu'il fallait corriger. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Pourtant, on comprend qu'on parle d'extrémisme. Évidemment, ce n'est pas tout le monde qui est visé. Peu importent les religions et les communautés culturelles, quand on parle de l'Islam radical, par exemple, on dit clairement « Islam radical ». On désigne les gens qui sont radicaux ou radicalisés. On ne s'attaque pas à tous les musulmans, bien entendu.

Y a-t-il moyen d'être clair sans s'attaquer aux gens qui n'ont pas à être visés?

Le choix des mots est important. Il faut éviter d'enlever des informations, surtout pour ne pas déplaire. Ce que je veux savoir, c'est la vérité. [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Non. L'objectif ici, monsieur Paul-Hus, c'est de faire exactement ce que vous avez dit, soit mettre le public au courant des menaces de façon précise sans généraliser au point de condamner une religion ou une communauté ethnoculturelle entières.

Vous avez vu des formulations dans le rapport qui vous ont semblé restreindre la portée de ce dont il était question, mais d'autres personnes, en lisant le rapport, ont vu exactement l'opposé et ont vu que les termes utilisés allaient au-delà ce qu'était la menace réelle.

L'objectif de notre examen, de nos consultations et de nos travaux, c'est de dire exactement aux Canadiens quelle est la menace, mais aussi d'être justes en ce sens que nous ne condamnons ou ne critiquons pas des religions ou des communautés ethniques entières. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

À votre connaissance, est-ce la première fois que des groupes d'intérêts font pression pour faire modifier un rapport sur la sécurité nationale?

Dans votre gouvernement ou dans d'autres gouvernements, est-il déjà arrivé que, à la suite d'une publication officielle, des groupes fassent modifier des informations? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

À ma connaissance, dans ce qui relève de ma compétence, c'est la première modification de cette nature. La réponse a été suffisamment vaste et critique. J'en ai conclu que le problème qui était soulevé était sérieux. Il ne s'agissait pas d'un petit débat sémantique. On craignait grandement que le rapport donne une impression injuste et inexacte et on disait qu'il fallait modifier le vocabulaire.

En examinant le vocabulaire, nous avons constaté que des expressions très similaires avaient été utilisées à bien d'autres endroits à différents moments, y compris dans des rapports qui avaient été présentés par le gouvernement précédent, dans des rapports qui avaient été présentés par le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement. En effet, certaines expressions ont également figuré au Feuilleton de la Chambre des communes à un moment donné .

Le vocabulaire avait été utilisé, mais ce n'est pas parce qu'il a été utilisé à une certaine période ou à certaines fins qu'il faut continuer d'utiliser des expressions qui risquent de faire en sorte qu'on communique de fausses informations et qu'on donne une fausse impression de communautés et de religions entières.

(1700)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Paul-Hus.

Il serait bon, monsieur le ministre, que vous regardiez la présidence de temps en temps pour que vos collègues puissent poser leurs questions.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Vous êtes, en effet, un très beau spécimen, monsieur, mais...

Des voix: Ha, ha!

L'hon. Ralph Goodale: ... j'admire le Comité dans son ensemble.

Le président:

Je croyais que vous admiriez ma cravate.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

Le président: Monsieur Dubé, vous disposez de sept minutes. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci, monsieur le président.[Traduction]

Monsieur le ministre, je vous remercie de votre présence. Je veux remercier mes collègues du Comité d'avoir accepté la motion que j'ai présentée pour vous inviter à venir témoigner sur cette question. Comme vous le savez, je vous ai écrit, en décembre, lorsque cette question a été soulevée, et M. Singh et moi avions tous les deux écrit au premier ministre avant que les modifications soient apportées. Contrairement à ce qu'on vient de dire, le choix des mots est important, et nous nous entendons là-dessus, monsieur le ministre.

Je crois que la communauté sikhe mérite des félicitations pour s'être défendue, car, au bout du compte, il y a des conséquences bien concrètes. On assiste à une montée des crimes haineux, et une autre forme de terrorisme est pratiquée non seulement au Canada, mais ailleurs dans le monde. Elle consiste à s'attaquer à des groupes confessionnels et à d'autres communautés, bien sûr.

Je pense que ces changements sont les bienvenus, et j'espère certainement que l'on continuera à travailler avec les communautés touchées, car un problème particulier a été soulevé dans le rapport. Nous savons, cependant, que la communauté musulmane, tant au Canada qu'ailleurs dans le monde, et certainement aux États-Unis, est confrontée à ce problème en ce qui concerne le terrorisme depuis presque 20 ans. Cela a été soulevé. Si des changements ont été apportés à la liste d'interdiction de vol, c'est entre autres parce qu'il y a une forme de profilage qui est inhérente à la façon dont cette structure fonctionne.

Monsieur le ministre, vous avez dit une bonne partie des choses qui sont certainement bien accueillies, je crois, par des gens qui espèrent des changements dans la façon de procéder. Nous avons demandé à ce que ce processus soit repensé, étant donné que nous assistons à une montée des crimes haineux et d'autres incidents qui menacent sérieusement la sécurité publique.

Est-ce que des efforts seront déployés pour institutionnaliser la pensée que vous avez mise de l'avant aujourd'hui? Ces types de mécanismes, sur le plan de la transparence, sont très importants, mais comme vous l'avez souligné, ils peuvent avoir l'effet contraire.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Dans nos systèmes, monsieur Dubé, nous voulons employer des termes qui sont exacts, précis et justes lorsque nous communiquons des renseignements sur des menaces terroristes. Il doit s'agir d'un processus permanent. On ne peut faire ce genre de choses qu'une seule fois, en quelque sorte, et penser qu'on a réglé le problème.

Les gens doivent toujours être conscients du problème, en partie pour la raison que vous avez mentionnée, soit que si l'on n'est pas conscient du problème, on peut involontairement encourager les gens qui ont une propension à commettre des crimes haineux et utiliser les termes comme prétexte pour ce qu'ils font. L'autre raison pour laquelle c'est important, monsieur Dubé, c'est que si nous voulons avoir une société sûre, respectueuse et inclusive, il faut que nos services de police et de sécurité et chaque communauté de notre société aient de bonnes relations. Si des termes sont utilisés d'une façon qui suscite la division, alors ces bonnes relations n'existeront pas, et notre société sera moins bien protégée.

(1705)

M. Matthew Dubé:

Ce n'est probablement pas le moment idéal pour vous interrompre, mais le temps dont je dispose est limité. Je voulais toutefois parler de la question de fond.

Honnêtement, à l'ère numérique, il est assez difficile de trouver d'anciens rapports. Je crois qu'il vaut la peine de le souligner, mais d'après ce que nous constatons, cela fait 17 ans que la question qui a été soulevée dans ce rapport a fait partie d'un rapport similaire. Cela fait donc un bon moment.

Je pense que l'une des questions soulevées par bon nombre de ceux qui s'opposaient à cela ne concernait pas seulement les termes utilisés, dont nous avons parlé aujourd'hui, mais les raisons. Je crois qu'une question a été soulevée à cet égard.

Étant donné que vous ne pouvez pas tout divulguer parce qu'il s'agit de renseignements classifiés — même si nous voulons toujours de la transparence —, n'y a-t-il pas lieu de se demander, si vous ne pouvez pas expliquer les raisons, s'il vaut mieux laisser certaines choses classifiées plutôt que d'aller à mi-chemin en quelque sorte sans pouvoir ne fournir aucune justification?

C'est également une question importante qui a été soulevée par certaines des communautés qui demandaient des comptes au gouvernement à ce sujet.

Il est important de soulever la question. Il était question, ce matin, du fait que la ministre des Affaires étrangères obtenait des points de discussion au sujet de certaines communautés lors de voyages à l'étranger.

Il existe un certain cynisme à cet égard. Ne craignez-vous pas qu'on l'alimente en incluant de l'information dans un rapport sans pouvoir l'étayer?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Il y a deux choses essentielles, monsieur Dubé. Parfois, elles entrent quelque peu en conflit. D'un côté, nos organismes de sécurité voudraient, dans un rapport public, fournir le plus possible des informations aux Canadiens qui les aideraient à comprendre les différentes menaces à la sécurité publique. En même temps, vous soulevez la question opposée, soit la mesure dans laquelle ils peuvent parler des détails.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Oui.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Nul doute qu'on se rappellera l'expérience lorsque d'autres rapports seront rédigés.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Monsieur le ministre, pour la dernière minute qu'il me reste, je veux vous poser une question sur le fait qu'on n'a peut-être pas bien réfléchi aux conséquences. Est-ce là le signe d'un problème plus vaste qui semble de plus en plus à l'avant-plan, c'est-à-dire que la menace posée par une autre forme d'extrémisme, à savoir, le nationalisme blanc et la suprématie blanche, est sous-estimée par nos organismes de sécurité? Faut-il réfléchir davantage à ce qui se passe à cet égard et aux conséquences?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Les services de police et les organismes de sécurité doivent s'occuper de tout cela, monsieur Dubé. Ils sont conscients de toutes ces menaces et de tous ces risques potentiels. Vous remarquerez que dans ce rapport, on fait souvent référence à l'extrémisme de droite, qui constitue également une menace. C'est un élément important de l'ensemble des problèmes dont les services de police et les organismes de sécurité sont conscients et dont ils s'occupent.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Dubé.

Madame Dabrusin, vous disposez de sept minutes.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

En fait, je vais poursuivre un peu dans la même veine que M. Dubé. Je veux parler de ce qui est dit sur l'extrémisme de droite dans le rapport.

Je viens de Montréal. J'étudiais au cégep à l'époque du drame survenu à l'École polytechnique, un événement marquant, où des femmes étaient ciblées en raison de la haine éprouvée à leur égard. Il y a à peine un mois, j'ai participé à une vigile qui a été tenue pour les victimes de l'attaque au camion-bélier survenue sur la rue Yonge, un autre acte de violence fondé sur la haine des femmes. C'est du moins ce qu'on nous a appris.

Au début de l'année, nous avons tenu une vigile à l'extérieur d'une mosquée dans ma communauté en raison de ce qui s'est passé à Christchurch, en Nouvelle-Zélande. En fait, il n'y a pas tellement longtemps, nous en avons tenu une également pour les victimes de la tuerie survenue à la mosquée de Sainte-Foy.

Ce sont trois événements qui ont causé des décès. Tous les trois étaient fondés sur l'extrémisme de droite et ce type de philosophie. Pourtant, dans le rapport, on dit ce qui suit: « [t]outefois, même si le racisme, le sectarisme et la misogynie peuvent porter atteinte à la cohésion de la société canadienne, en fin de compte, ils ne conduisent pas habituellement à des comportements criminels ou à des menaces à la sécurité nationale ».

Ce type d'extrémisme est-il vraiment moins dangereux que les autres formes d'extrémisme? Il me semble que ce ne soit pas le cas, du moins d'après mon expérience, quand je pense à notre histoire récente.

(1710)

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Madame Dabrusin, j'invite la commissaire de la GRC et David Vigneault à formuler des commentaires sur ces questions,car il leur incombe de mener des enquêtes à cet égard et de protéger la population.

Je peux vous dire qu'au cours des dernières années, pendant que je travaillais à proximité de nos organismes chargés de la sécurité, j'ai eu l'occasion d'observer leurs activités et l'établissement de leurs priorités, et j'ai constaté que leurs intervenants travaillaient très fort sur la question de l'extrémisme de droite. Le rapport sur lequel porte la réunion d'aujourd'hui mentionne spécifiquement plusieurs incidents qui démontrent les raisons pour lesquelles ces inquiétudes doivent être prises au sérieux.

De tels incidents se sont produits à l'extérieur du pays, par exemple en Nouvelle-Zélande, à Pittsburgh, à Charlottesville et à d'autres endroits, mais dans notre pays, l'attaque menée avec une fourgonnette sur la rue Yonge, l'attaque dans une mosquée de Sainte-Foy, les attaques menées contre des policiers à Mayerthorpe et à Moncton et les attaques misogynes commises à Dawson College et à l'École Polytechnique découlent toutes de la même idéologie perverse et néfaste qui met des personnes à risque et en tuent d'autres. Ce sujet est donc pris au sérieux.

Permettez-moi de demander à Mme Lucki et à M. Vigneault de formuler des commentaires sur cette question.

Commissaire Brenda Lucki (commissaire, Gendarmerie royale du Canada):

Pour répondre à la question, cette menace n'est pas moins importante que les autres menaces mentionnées dans le rapport, mais lorsque nous examinons le rapport, nous constatons que l'un des objectifs est de fournir une évaluation globale des menaces terroristes qui pèsent, tout d'abord, sur le Canada. Nous avons ajouté l'extrémisme de droite, car il s'agit d'une menace, mais qui ne pèse peut-être pas, comme vous l'avez mentionné dans votre citation, sur la sécurité nationale. Cela concerne plutôt des événements et des individus.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Aux fins d'éclaircissements, le rapport indique que ces activités « ... ne conduisent pas habituellement à des comportements criminels ou à des menaces à la sécurité nationale. » Il me semble que lorsqu'on examine la liste des événements concernés, il y a en fait de nombreux événements qui semblent être attribuables à l'extrémisme de droite.

Comm. Brenda Lucki:

Oui, il y a certainement des activités criminelles, et nous nous concentrons là-dessus. Lorsque nous nous concentrons sur les activités criminelles, nous visons certainement les groupes ou les individus de toutes les catégories mentionnées dans le rapport ou ailleurs. Ce n'est pas une menace moins importante.

M. David Vigneault:

Selon le point de vue du SCRS, tout individu ou groupe qui envisage d'avoir recours à la violence pour atteindre des objectifs politiques, religieux ou idéologiques représente une menace à la sécurité nationale en vertu de la définition contenue dans notre Loi. Le compte rendu de l'autre endroit démontrera que j'ai également dit, là-bas, que nous consacrons une plus grande partie de nos ressources à la surveillance de la menace posée par différents groupes extrémistes, par exemple les groupes misogynes, les nationalistes blancs et les néonationalistes. Ces groupes utilisent maintenant des méthodes essentiellement terroristes pour atteindre certains de leurs objectifs.

En ce qui concerne l'attaque menée sur la rue Yonge, la méthode utilisée a d'abord été publicisée dans un magazine affilié à Al-Qaïda, qui l'a appelée la tondeuse ultime, en disant essentiellement aux gens que c'est ce qu'ils devraient faire. Un autre individu favorisant un autre type d'extrémisme a utilisé une technique mise au point ou popularisée par une autre série de groupes pour tuer des gens. Pour nous, il n'y a aucune différence. Nous enquêtons sur ces groupes lorsqu'ils correspondent à ces définitions.

(1715)

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Ce qui me préoccupe, c'est que lorsque j'ai lu le reste du rapport, je n'ai vu aucun autre type de terrorisme ou de comportement criminel auquel on avait appliqué ce contexte selon lequel les activités de ces groupes, au bout du compte, ne débouchent pas sur des comportements criminels ou des menaces à la sécurité nationale. Ce type de description n'était appliqué à aucun autre type de groupe. Je me demandais donc pourquoi on avait établi cette différence lorsqu'il s'agit de...

M. David Vigneault:

Je ne peux pas parler pour tous les groupes, mais essentiellement, pour utiliser l'image d'un entonnoir, la grande majorité des commentaires odieux formulés en ligne auront des répercussions sur la société, mais ils ne passeraient pas le seuil criminel. Ensuite, une petite partie de ces commentaires seraient susceptibles d'intéresser la GRC ou les services de police et les organismes d'application de la loi au Canada. Enfin, un très petit groupe de personnes, qu'il s'agisse d'individus ou de groupes, tentent de s'organiser et d'utiliser la violence pour atteindre un objectif politique quelconque; il s'agit dans ce cas d'une affaire de sécurité nationale. C'est en quelque sorte la méthode utilisée pour mieux comprendre et définir ce que nous observons dans la société, mais cette méthode est certainement en évolution.

Le président:

Merci, madame Dabrusin.

Monsieur Motz, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Glen Motz:

Merci, monsieur le président. J'aimerais également remercier le ministre et les représentants ministériels d'être ici aujourd'hui.

À ce sujet, j'ai une certaine expérience en matière d'évaluation des menaces liées aux organisations criminelles qui s'inscrivent dans le cadre d'une évaluation de la menace nationale que représentent les organisations criminelles pour notre pays, et je comprends donc le travail et les efforts que nos organismes de sécurité doivent fournir pour créer ce cadre.

En tenant compte de cela, monsieur le ministre, j'aimerais vous lire une citation de Phil Gurski, un ancien analyste très respecté du SCRS. Concernant le rapport, il a dit ceci: Qu'en est-il des « personnes ou (...) groupes qui sont inspirés par des idéologies et des groupes terroristes violents tels que Daech et Al-Qaïda (AQ) »? À part l'obstination à parler de « Daech » plutôt que de l'État islamique (monsieur le ministre Goodale, j'aimerais préciser que Daech est le mot arabe pour « État islamique », soit dit en passant), cette expression n'est que partiellement exacte. D'après mon expérience au SCRS, je sais que, oui, certains Canadiens s'inspirent de ces groupes terroristes, mais ils sont également très nombreux à se radicaliser à la violence au nom d'un extrémisme islamiste sunnite encore plus vaste (l'extrémisme islamiste chiite est un tout autre sujet) qui a peu ou rien à voir avec Al-Qaïda ou l'État islamique ou tout autre groupe terroriste. Oh et une dernière chose: ils sont tous musulmans — il n'y a aucun bouddhiste ou animiste parmi eux. Encore une fois, l'utilisation de l'expression « extrémisme islamiste sunnite » — et c'est le nom que nous utilisions lorsque j'étais au SCRS — ne signifie pas que tous les musulmans canadiens sont des terroristes. À mon avis, il s'agit seulement de rectitude politique et de propagande électorale débridées.

Je pense qu'il est important de reconnaître — et je sais que vous le reconnaissez, monsieur — que les enjeux de sécurité nationale sont beaucoup plus importants pour les Canadiens que les considérations politiques à cet égard. Voici donc ma question. À votre avis, le fait d'informer les Canadiens sur les menaces réelles posées par les terroristes, peu importe les noms qu'on leur donne, devrait-il dépasser tout projet électoral du gouvernement actuel?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Certainement, et c'est la ligne de conduite que j'ai moi-même adoptée.

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord. Dans ce cas, comment rejeterez-vous l'expertise de M. Gurski aussi facilement en ce qui concerne les changements qui ont été apportés à ce rapport?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Eh bien, je n'ai pas ce qu'il a dit devant moi, mais je reviens sur la dernière partie, lorsqu'il semble dire, malgré certains mots auxquels il fait référence, que tout le monde comprend que ce ne sont pas tous les membres de la communauté islamique qui sont visés par les critiques. C'est à peu près ce que vous avez dit.

Mais il n'est pas du tout certain, monsieur Motz, que c'est effectivement le cas. Lorsqu'on utilise un vocabulaire vague on peut, implicitement, porter atteinte à des personnes innocentes qu'on n'avait pas l'intention de critiquer, mais les mots utilisés sont extrapolés de plus en plus, et si vous jetez un coup d'oeil à ce qui est publié sur Internet, vous verrez des distorsions, des fausses interprétations et de l'abus.

Tout cela revient au point qu'on faisait valoir au début. Il faut être extrêmement prudent avec les mots utilisés, et ce, dès le départ. Nous devons communiquer la nature du risque avec exactitude, tout en évitant de l'exprimer de façon à porter atteinte à des gens innocents et, ce faisant, de les exposer à des risques.

(1720)

M. Glen Motz:

Nous convenons tous qu'une menace peut être constituée d'un individu ou d'un petit nombre de personnes au sein de certaines communautés, mais je pense que les Canadiens sont suffisamment intelligents pour comprendre que l'ensemble d'une communauté n'est pas visé par les mots très précis qui servent à définir une menace terroriste.

Je présume que l'une des choses que j'aimerais savoir, c'est le nombre d'organismes qui ont contribué à ce rapport. De quels organismes s'agit-il?

Le président:

Veuillez répondre très brièvement, monsieur le ministre.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je demanderais à M. Rigby de calculer le nombre d'organismes participants.

M. Glen Motz:

Pour poursuivre cette question, les organismes qui ont participé à la production de ce rapport ont-ils également participé à...

Le président:

Monsieur Motz, vous abusez de la patience du président.

M. Glen Motz:

Ont-ils également participé à sa révision, et ont-ils été consultés à cette étape?

Le président:

Monsieur Motz, s'il vous plaît.

M. Glen Motz:

C'est tout ce que je tente de savoir.

Le président:

Veuillez répondre brièvement, s'il vous plaît.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Comme je l'ai dit, nous avons consulté un large éventail d'organismes pour obtenir leur contribution.

Je demanderais à M. Rigby de parler du nombre total d'organismes qui aident la communauté du renseignement au sein du gouvernement du Canada.

Je pense que lorsque les rédacteurs de ces documents ont utilisé les expressions dont vous venez de parler, leur intention était de cibler le champ d'intérêt, mais lorsque les membres du public ont vu ces expressions, ils ont abordé la situation à l'autre extrémité du spectre, et ils ont cru que la portée des critiques s'élargissait plutôt que de devenir plus précise. C'est le dilemme qui se pose dans ce cas-ci, lorsqu'il s'agit de trouver des mots exacts et précis tout en restant justes, afin de ne pas engendrer des conséquences imprévues.

Le président:

Nous devons nous arrêter ici.

La parole est maintenant à Mme Sahota. Elle a cinq minutes.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'aimerais faire le suivi de ce que disait ma collègue, Mme Dabrusin, plus tôt.

Dans la partie sur l'extrémisme de droite, on indique ceci: Il peut être difficile toutefois d'évaluer, à court terme, dans quelle mesure un acte donné était d'origine idéologique, ou de commenter pendant que les enquêtes suivent leur cours ou que les affaires sont devant les tribunaux.

Pour revenir sur l'une de mes questions précédentes, il a été mentionné que les enquêtes en cours étaient en évolution et que nous ne souhaitions pas qu'un complot se trame en sol canadien. Je suis tout à fait d'accord avec vous, c'est-à-dire que je ne voudrais jamais que ce qui s'est produit en 1985 se produise à nouveau en sol canadien. J'espère que vous appréhenderez les individus qui préparent un mauvais coup, car au bout du compte, ils ont parfois des répercussions indirectes, ou dans ce cas-ci des répercussions directes, sur l'ensemble d'une communauté. Je pense que nous serions tous outrés si n'importe quelle religion, par exemple le catholicisme ou le protestantisme, était associée à une organisation qui avait commis des actes que nous ne commettrions pas nous-mêmes. Toutefois, de ce point de vue, il semble qu'on manifeste un certain détachement, au départ, à l'égard d'autres religions qui ne sont pas d'origine occidentale.

En résumé, pourquoi ce discours nuancé, qui a été utilisé dans la partie sur l'extrémisme de droite, n'a-t-il pas été aussi utilisé dans les autres parties? Vous dites que les enquêtes en cours sont en constante évolution. Comment avez-vous la certitude qu'elles étaient poussées par une idéologie? On mentionne certainement ces exceptions dans la partie sur l'extrémisme de droite.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

David, pouvez-vous formuler des commentaires sur cette question?

M. David Vigneault:

Je ne suis pas l'auteur du rapport, et je ne peux donc pas formuler de commentaires sur les raisons pour lesquelles il a été écrit d'une certaine façon au bout du compte.

Toutefois, comme je l'ai mentionné plus tôt, je peux affirmer que le SCRS ne vise pas une religion en particulier. En effet, nous examinons les activités des individus. Si ces activités consistent à comploter en vue d'avoir recours à la violence pour atteindre des objectifs politiques, idéologiques ou religieux, nous mènerons une enquête.

Dans l'exemple de la Nouvelle-Zélande, l'individu responsable a invoqué cinq, six ou sept raisons différentes pour justifier son geste. Lorsqu'on commence à tenir compte de ce qui se passe en ligne et des troubles de santé mentale et d'autres facteurs, il peut être extrêmement ardu de déterminer le motif exact d'un individu. C'est la raison pour laquelle, lorsque nous travaillons dans le domaine de la sécurité nationale et que nos collègues des organismes d'application de la loi mènent leur enquête, nous ne savons pas toujours exactement à quoi nous avons affaire au début.

Je peux seulement parler des types d'enquêtes. Je ne peux pas me prononcer sur les raisons pour lesquelles ces remarques n'ont pas été appliquées aux autres communautés dans le rapport.

(1725)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

Le rapport a fait l'objet d'un grand scepticisme depuis sa publication. Dans le cadre de mon enquête et de mes discussions avec le ministre Goodale, j'ai appris qu'environ 17 organismes et ministères différents avaient contribué au rapport.

Je ne pense pas que nous ayons abordé ce chiffre.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

C'est à peu près exact.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'ai également appris que pendant la rédaction de ce rapport, aucune preuve n'est prise d'une seule source.

Est-il possible qu'une source unique fournisse toutes les allégations ou les preuves aux divers ministères et que lorsqu'un certain nombre de ministères disent tous la même chose, ces renseignements sont ajoutés au rapport? Quel est votre avis sur cette question?

M. Vincent Rigby:

Je demanderais à M. Vigneault de vous parler de certaines des sources liées au SCRS, mais je peux seulement répéter ce que vous venez de dire. Lorsque nous avons consulté ces 17 organismes et ministères qui forment l'étendue et la portée de la communauté du renseignement de sécurité, nous avons examiné toutes les sources.

Tout ce qui nous a été communiqué provenait de renseignements, de sources ouvertes et de consultations auprès d'universitaires. Ce que vous voyez dans le rapport est un portrait global de toutes les preuves, de tous les renseignements et de toutes les analyses qui proviennent de sources ouvertes sur l'ensemble du spectre.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pourrait-il s'agir de renseignements erronés fournis par un autre pays?

M. Vincent Rigby:

Qu'entendez-vous par des renseignements erronés?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

S'agit-il de renseignements vérifiés par nos propres organismes indépendants?

M. Vincent Rigby:

Je demanderais à M. Vigneault de répondre à cette question, mais il ne fait aucun doute que nous consultons régulièrement nos partenaires alliés, surtout ceux du Groupe des cinq, et nous examinons donc souvent les renseignements qu'ils nous fournissent.

Je devrais m'arrêter ici et laisser M. Vigneault poursuivre la discussion, mais nous ferons nos propres évaluations. Nous tiendrons certainement compte de l'opinion de nos alliés, mais au bout du compte, il s'agit d'une évaluation canadienne.

Le président:

M. Vigneault devra conclure très rapidement.

M. David Vigneault:

M. Rigby a très bien décrit la façon de procéder. Dans la première réponse que je vous ai donnée, madame Sahota, j'ai mentionné que c'était fondé sur nos propres enquêtes. Je tiens à préciser qu'il s'agissait d'enquêtes menées par le SCRS.

Le président:

J'aimerais remercier le ministre et ses collègues d'avoir assisté à la réunion d'aujourd'hui et d'avoir participé à une discussion approfondie sur cet enjeu.

Nous suspendrons la séance et nous nous réunirons ensuite à huis clos.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 13, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.