header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-05-14 PROC 155

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[Translation]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning, everyone.[English]

Good morning and welcome to the 155th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

This morning we are hearing witnesses for our study on the mandate of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs and oversight of the Centre Block rehabilitation project and the long-term vision and plan, as discussed at the meeting of Tuesday, May 7.

From the House of Commons, we have Michel Patrice, deputy clerk, administration; and Stéphan Aubé, chief information officer.

From the Department of Public Services and Procurement Canada, we have Rob Wright, assistant deputy minister, parliamentary precinct branch; and Jennifer Garrett, director general, Centre Block rehabilitation program.

We also have Larry Malcic, architect from Centrus Architects.

Thank you all for being here. I've been told that you're all available to stay for the two hours of the meeting. From what I understand, there will be an opening statement to be followed by a presentation on the long-term vision and plan. After that we'll move to questions by committee members for the remainder of the meeting.

As you know, we all have a great interest in increasing communications on this topic, so this is very good. Everyone's very pleased this meeting is occurring.

Mr. Wright, please begin your presentation. [Translation]

Mr. Rob Wright (Assistant Deputy Minister, Parliamentary Precinct Branch, Department of Public Works and Government Services):

Good morning, Mr. Chair and committee members.

I am pleased to be here today to update you on the Centre Block rehabilitation program.

I am accompanied by Jennifer Garrett, director general for the Centre Block rehabilitation program, and Larry Malcic from Centrus, who is the program's design consultant.

We are pleased to be working on this exciting program with our parliamentary partners and to have the opportunity to discuss the restoration of the Centre Block with you this morning.[English]

Since the historic move of parliamentarians out of Centre Block last Christmas, PSPC has been working in collaboration with the administration of the House of Commons on preparing the Centre Block for its major rehabilitation. This involves working hand in hand with Parliament on decommissioning the building so that it is fully separated from the rest of the Hill. This includes such things as rerouting underground IT networks and removing the building from the central heating and cooling plant.

Another key part of the decommissioning process is ensuring that the remaining art and artifacts in the building are safely moved and stored. During this work, the Centre Block remains under the control of Parliament, and we expect that it will be officially transferred to Public Services and Procurement Canada by the end of the summer.

While we continue to collaborate on the important decommissioning process, we are also advancing the assessment program, which had begun while you were still using the Centre Block. We have now progressed to opening up the floors, walls and ceilings to deepen our understanding of the building's condition, which is an important component of de-risking the project.

In addition to working to better understand the building's condition, we have also been working closely with parliamentary officials to define the functionality desired for the Centre Block of the future. In modernizing the Centre Block so that it supports a modern parliamentary democracy, we are also taking care to restore the beautiful building. We have heard loud and clear from you and other parliamentarians the desire to immediately recognize the Centre Block when it reopens and to feel immediately at home again.

An important element of the conversation on the Centre Block's future is phase two of the visitor welcome centre. Much like phase one is done for the West Block, the expanded visitor welcome centre will provide security screening for visitors to Parliament Hill outside of the footprint of the Centre Block and East Block. As well, it will provide additional services to Canadians and international tourists visiting the Parliament Buildings. It is also envisioned that this underground facility will provide functions that directly support the operations of Parliament, such as committee rooms.

You will see in the upcoming presentation that the design and construction of the visitor welcome centre will join the West, East and Centre Blocks in one parliamentary complex. As we move forward, thinking of the Centre Block as a central part of this unified parliamentary complex should provide some interesting opportunities. Approaching the Centre, West and East Blocks as a parliamentary complex is part of a larger initiative to transform the precinct into a more integrated campus. This campus will tie together the facilities on the Hill, as well as important buildings in the three city blocks facing Parliament Hill, such as the Wellington, Sir John A. Macdonald and Valour buildings.

This shift involves moving from a building-by-building approach to a more holistic strategy on such important and interconnected elements as security, the visitor experience, urban design and the landscape, material handling and parking, the movement of people and vehicles, environmental sustainability and accessibility.

Gaining your feedback on the functions you feel should be contained in the Centre Block and the visitor welcome centre and how the space should work for parliamentarians, media and the public is invaluable for our work going forward. We are happy to be back at this committee to hear your thoughts, and we are very eager to continue engaging with parliamentarians on this important work.

I will now ask Ms. Garrett and Mr. Malcic to walk you through the presentation. Along with my colleagues from the House of Commons, I'll be happy to answer any questions you may have. Thank you.

(1105)

Ms. Jennifer Garrett (Director General, Centre Block Program, Department of Public Works and Government Services):

Thank you. Good morning, Mr. Chair, and members of the committee.

With regard to how are going to roll out this presentation, I'm going to take you through what I call the programmatic aspects of the presentation. Then I'm going to hand the floor to Mr. Malcic to take you through some of the initial ideas that the architect has to respond to the 50% functional program that we've received to-date from our parliamentary partners. Then we'll close with you on the next steps.

This next slide depicts the project scope for the program. Launching off the successes of both this building and the Senate of Canada buildings, we're now launching the biggest heritage rehabilitation program that PSPC has ever done. That program contains essentially two key components, the first being the modernization of Centre Block program proper, which is effectively a complete base building upgrade from masonry to structural to seismic to modern and mechanical and electrical systems, just to give you a sense. Essentially, the entire base building needs to be upgraded to meet modern standards. Along with that, there needs to be design to address a functional program to ensure that we're supporting modern parliamentary operations well into the 21st century.

The second component of the program scope is to construct phase two of the visitor welcome centre. Essentially, if you look out in front of Centre Block—and yes it is an underground facility—we're going to dig a very large hole and build that visitor welcome centre phase two. That facility will have capabilities to support parliamentary operations and services in support of visitors who are coming to Parliament Hill, and we'll connect the triad—the East, West and Centre Blocks—effectively forming what Mr. Wright referred to earlier as a “parliamentary complex”. That triad will obviously be part of a broader parliamentary campus.

The next slide shows this joint effort between the House of Commons administration and us to map out for you the construction and the design process as we go through the program.

I would say that at this point we're still working with our construction manager to formalize the final project schedule, but we have key milestones that we can share with you this morning, and we basically have a three-year outlook for the program at this point.

In terms of design, we've essentially launched the functional program phase, as well as the schematic design process. By the end of this fiscal year in March, if you're following along the two top rows of arrows—the functional program and the design arrows—our target is to effectively have a preferred design option at the schematic design level for the Centre Block and visitor welcome centre. But if we start to move down a row and start to follow the construction activities, this is a layered integrated program approach. We're not waiting for the design process to be complete, but are starting construction activities. Two key construction activities that we are going to be launching through the fall and winter time frame are targeted demolition and abatement in a November time frame within Centre Block, as well as the start of excavation in a winter 2020 time frame. To do that, our construction manager has already started the tendering process.

That is the key outlook for the big programs standing up.

The other thing that we're going to be doing, which we've already launched and are actively working on, is completing that comprehensive assessment program that Mr. Wright referred to in his opening remarks and completing the projects that we call the “enabling projects”, things like the temporary loading dock. The books of remembrance relocation was part of that, and there are temporary construction roads, and there's effectively standing up the construction site.

Regarding the next slide, perhaps some or all of you may have seen an early drawing of what we expected to be the construction delineation site early on in the program. This slide in front of you represents our latest thinking and our interactions on planning with the construction manager. It represents our understanding of what we think that site construction delineation is going to be for the program. Effectively, what you'll see, if you look to the left of the slide, is that we've outlined where visitor welcome centre phase one is, and the grey hatched in area is essentially the footprint for the proposed visitor welcome centre phase two, based on the functional program requirements we've received from parliamentary partners to date.

(1110)



That effectively drives it in combination. The three considerations that drive the delineation of that line are support of existing parliamentary operations, the construction needs of what is going to become a very large construction site, and also managing the visitor experience.

We want to make sure that we're balancing all of those, so there has been a significant amount of activity and coordination to ensure that we're setting that line with the administrations of the House, Senate and the Library in consultation with our construction manager. The line we think will allow us to continue to support parliamentary operations and enable a program of visitor experience on the front lawn but allow the construction manager to execute the program.

I'll go to the next slide. Before I hand the floor over to Larry, there are some things or key design challenges that I wanted to flag that we know about right now and that we will start to work through in the coming months over the course of the program. As I referred to when we were talking about the scope slide, base building modernization is going to be significant in terms of Centre Block, and it will take up space. In studying that, what we know to date right now in terms of our assessments and our understanding of modernization and code requirements is that it's going to take up space from the functional program in Centre Block proper to the tune of about 2,500 square metres.

To give you a sense of what that means in terms of physical space, that would be the equivalent of all the offices on the fourth floor of Centre Block. That's to put in things such as conduits for modern HVAC and to increase the structural: put the seismic solution in place, washrooms, IT closets, etc., all the sort of space-building functional requirements. That's the first one.

The second one is the technical challenges of actually modernizing and undertaking a very significant modernized program in what is one of our highest heritage buildings in the country. Rest assured that we have conservators and all sorts of experience with us to do that, but it is not an insignificant challenge. In support of that, we've mapped completely the heritage hierarchy of the building, and we are doing our very best to put design into the building or to design the building so that we're having the least amount of impact on heritage in heritage areas where there would be a lower hierarchy in the building. We're working through that.

Finally, the functional program demand that we have received to date from parliamentary partners does exceed the availability or the supply. We have a demand-and-supply issue, so part of the work that we're going to be going through in the coming months is working through that. There's a series of key decisions that we'll bring you back to, once the architect has taken you through the program, to have a bit of a sense of how we're going to go through that.

We'll go to the next slide, and without further ado I'm going to pass the floor to Mr. Malcic.

(1115)

Mr. Larry Malcic (Architect, Centrus Architects):

Thank you.

I'm pleased to return to this committee to share information and ideas regarding the rehabilitation of Centre Block.

It is, as Mrs. Garrett has said, a high heritage building, and we wish to preserve that key important heritage. But it's also the working heart of the Canadian parliamentary democracy, and that has evolved over the last century since the building was designed and built. What has remained constant is the importance of the fundamental planning principles that created the building and, indeed, the triad of buildings in the first place. Those are the beaux arts design planning principles that have emphasized the hierarchy of spaces and the importance of both ceremonial circulation and processional routes, as well as providing a very strong infrastructure for the functional aspects of the building. You have the symmetrical displacement of the two chambers, the House and Senate, the placement of the library on axis, along with Confederation Hall, and in more recent years the Centennial Flame. We want to ensure that as we move forward with the project, we extend that beaux arts plan to create a campus or a complex of buildings that are appropriate in every way to the historical intentions of the original creators of Parliament Hill.

We see, as we look at this in a conceptual way, the way in which we plan to maintain the axiality of the design. In fact, we'll draw it together more closely, so that we can integrate the collection of buildings in a better way that relies on the fundamental principles, by adding the visitor welcome centre complex, phase two. This will knit together East Block and West Block and provide additional spaces that have long been lacking in Centre Block, particularly new committee rooms, a new entry to the overall complex, especially for visitors, and the connections, as I said, to the other buildings.

I want to specifically begin today perhaps with the House chamber and the modernization considerations that are important there. The House chamber, as a focal point in the overall building, encapsulates the issues faced throughout the building. We want to ensure that the design is “future-proofed” so that it can accommodate, as the nation grows, the growing number of members of Parliament. We have to find a way to accommodate that.

Now, one of the fundamental questions is: Will we accommodate that within the footprint of the existing chamber, or should we develop an expansion of that?

There's the question of furniture, and whether the existing furniture that has been part of the original design can be reused, or whether we shall be looking for something newer for that.

As the number of members of Parliament grows, so the lobbies themselves need to grow as well. The question is, how do we accommodate this important growth, which really reflects the growth of the nation, in the actual physical building itself?

Finally, there's the provision of universal accessibility, which is important throughout the building and is something that the original architects never considered.

If I begin with those considerations of the Commons chamber, the fundamental issues include life safety and code requirements, especially the code requirement for universal accessibility and, as I said before, the seating capacity in line with the growing population and the number of parliamentarians. These will be measured against the heritage assets that are in the building; future broadcast and communications technology; modernization of all heating, cooling and plumbing; and the design for seismic activity, which was of course never considered in the original building.

As we do our discovery and investigate all of these aspects of the building, we're developing a fundamental set of drawings. You see one of them here, a section through the Commons chamber that shows the degree to which we're using modern technology as well, including photo autometry to integrate actual photographic imagery of the building with the drawings themselves.

(1120)



Let's look at the organization of seating in the House of Commons chamber. The chamber as it is does not currently meet building codes for life safety or accessibility. We need to correct those deficiencies and we also need to provide additional seating, ideally to achieve 400 seats plus the Speaker's chair, to provide for growth over the next decades. We can make significant improvements and get to some of that capacity. Obviously, though, it will require changes, and some of those changes may require compromises. We expect that we can achieve code compliance and accessibility from the floor of the chamber to the ambulatory, as shown in one of the options I developed to have the 400 seats.

This potential solution is based on maintaining the House's tradition of parallel seating—and, although other chambers in other places do other forms of seating, the actual configuration of the existing room itself lends itself to the parallel seating.

In looking at the chamber, we need to look not only at the actual floor of the chamber but also at the galleries surrounding the chamber, because they too are equally challenged in terms of contemporary life safety and accessibility requirements and must be updated. We've designed options to make these improvements, but they will come at a cost of capacity. Currently there are a total of 553 seats in all of the galleries combined. Meeting current code standards and providing accessibility may reduce that number to about 305 seats. This would require reorganizing the seating and reducing the steep rake of the north and south galleries that no longer meets code.

The functional program, I should point out, includes the request for a remote chamber to be located in the visitor welcome centre to allow people to view proceedings in a more appropriate setting with multimedia displays, which could be a contemporary and appropriate way to expand the viewing of the House in its meetings.

Just to look in more detail at the north gallery, here is an option for it: reduce the steepness of the pitch of the seats, provide fully accessible viewing positions and achieve building code compliance. You begin to see the way in which modern building codes will impact the existing space.

Similarly, in the south gallery, a plan for it includes, in this case, the console operator booth. These are ways that we can, without altering the historic fabric or indeed the look and feel of the room that are so important to the dignity of Parliament, make the accommodations necessary.

With regard to committee rooms, the importance and use of committee rooms has changed dramatically over the last 100 years. They are now an integral part of the legislative process and much in demand. Both the Senate and the House need new committee rooms, and I would ask Mr. Wright to elaborate on that.

Mr. Rob Wright:

Thanks, Larry.

As has just been positioned, there will be a number of choices, and the options that are shown there are just illustrative. There will be many more options that will be considered over time, so this is really the start of a conversation—which is the important point. It's not the end of a conversation, but a critical piece.

Committee rooms are along that line. We have clarity on the requirements. It's a question of where committee rooms should be situated. It's important to consider the location of those committee rooms in the fullest context of the parliamentary precinct. There's a tendency, as we are focusing on the Centre Block project right now, to want to try to fit everything into the Centre Block, but we may be well served, and Parliament may be well served, by thinking of the broader context as we try to move forward into an integrated campus, with the facilities increasingly being integrated with tunnel infrastructure, for example. So this decision of where to locate committee rooms will be very important.

The last point I'll make on this slide is with regard to the heritage committee rooms within the Centre Block. There are challenges with bringing those up to a high level of security that, for example, a caucus room would require. We have made investments in the West Block, and as we move to a parliamentary complex it may be useful to think of how the West Block and the Centre Block could be used in tandem as an integrated facility.

I'll move to next slide.

This gives you an illustration of where committee rooms are right now, as the Centre Block is now offline. Many of those committee rooms now are not on the Hill proper. You can see that for both the House of Commons and the Senate, there have been a number of major investments off the Hill.

How can we leverage those investments over the long term and ensure that the parliamentary operations remain the primary driver of where the functions that serve Parliament should be located?

The next slide attempts to articulate a diversity of locations where committee rooms could be located. You can see, in the Centre Block, the return of committee room functions that were in the Centre Block, both for the House and the Senate. You can see the potential for committee room locations within the visitor welcome centre phase two. You can see the idea of what are called pavilions on the north end of the Centre Block, and the idea of putting committee rooms where the chamber is in the West Block.

The East Block will go under major restoration for the Senate. Committee rooms could be added there. Of course, the existing committee rooms in the Wellington Building and the Valour Building are there. They remain as important investments. Also important to consider is the fact that we will be working to develop new facilities for both the House and the Senate of Canada adjacent to the former U.S. embassy at 100 Wellington, initially to provide swing space so that we can empty the Confederation Building, which requires restoration as well as the East Block, and then over the long term those would become permanent accommodations for Parliament. That again is a potential location space for committee rooms.

We have to sequence all of this over time to make sure it meets the needs of parliamentarians, but it's an important conversation about how to move that along over time to make sure we're making the best investments on behalf of Parliament to serve the needs of a modern parliamentary democracy.

Again, it's an important dialogue that will take place over the coming months.

I'll pass it back to Larry to continue.

(1125)

Mr. Larry Malcic:

Thank you.

Circulation and connections are fundamental to any building's functioning. Centre Block itself, because of the nature of its beaux arts plan, had a very clear plan of circulation. Once again, however, what we are planning and now designing are ways that we can extend the clarity and power of that circulation system.

It's one in which we need to bring together many different things. Here you begin to see the way in which we want to create the new front door for Parliament in the visitor welcome centre, and to use that then to provide a clear public entrance and public circulation.

We want to ensure that the circulation for parliamentarians and their staff is equally efficient and effective and, ideally, that it would be a circulation system that runs independently of the public circulation. We also have to consider, as part of circulation, the building's servicing. How do we bring goods in and distribute them throughout the building? How do we bring rubbish and garbage out of the building in a way that doesn't have an impact on any of the building users?

All of these things intertwine. We also have the additional layers, in terms of circulation, of bringing the building services into the plan, because those, too, have to be considered as part of the circulation system. The goal is for all of the buildings to become interconnected so they will work as one campus and a complex of buildings. In this way, you will have the benefit of all of them working together rather than simply independently.

At the moment, this is still very much in development, but you begin to see, here in the green, the way in which public circulation could be brought in through the visitor welcome centre. It could come in horizontally across the visitor welcome centre, and then vertically into what are currently the light wells or the courtyards of the building and be given direct access. The public then would have direct access into the galleries. The paths of visitors and members of the public would not necessarily cross those of parliamentarians and those doing parliamentary business. However, it does show that we're considering the courtyards as a fundamental part of the solution for a much better, more operational Centre Block. By glazing them and enclosing them, we are actually able to reduce the overall external footprint of the building and improve its sustainability by reducing its energy consumption. We could then provide a series of spaces where the new functions, including the circulation, could be introduced.

Finally, we've already touched on the visitor welcome centre and its relationship with this, but this shows diagrammatically the way we view it, which is as a great opportunity. It's the opportunity, I guess, of this century, to take Centre Block and expand it—in the green you see the expansion of the House of Commons—to provide committee rooms and other support facilities, which are very necessary to the operations of Parliament.

In red, you see on the east side the expansion for the Senate.

In orange, you see the requirements of the Library of Parliament to provide a better, more appropriate visitor experience.

In yellow, you see the entry sequence, which will actually provide a fitting entrance, one that reflects the dignity of Parliament as it's traditionally defined. We would therefore integrate into a single campus the group of buildings that exist there now, create the connections to the East Block and the West Block and provide the new space for both the Senate and the House. Centre Block itself, freed up and opened up once again, will be able to function as it was conceived and designed, maintaining its dignity, history and prominence while ensuring it has an effective and efficient role as the centre of Canadian parliamentary democracy.

(1130)

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

Earlier, in terms of the presentation, we talked about making some key programming decisions. In delivering this program, the intent is to make decisions in layered approaches, going from the highest level down to the more detailed, so that they can be made in the appropriate time frame. We're looking for enduring decisions, because change is obviously the enemy of projects like these. Once you've designed something and you're going back to reverse decisions that you've made, it costs time and ultimately money.

With regard to the programmatic decisions in support of the program, you'll see that there are some related to the base building modernization effort, and there are those related more to the functional or the parliamentary program. We are working very closely with the administrations of the House of Commons, the Senate and the Library of Parliament to make sure that we are landing those decisions and releasing work for the architect in a way that will benefit the program.

Things like asbestos abatement, the seismic approach, as well as key programmatic decisions around the functional program—what the hoarding is going to physically look like, what the chamber size inlaid is going to be—are all key decisions that we need to make in a transparent fashion. This is in terms not only of their design but also of their impact in support of parliamentary operations, as well as cost.

We're having similar discussions with the other partners and engagements with parliamentarians accordingly. Obviously, some of these will benefit from much-needed feedback from parliamentarians. We look forward to working with the House of Commons to receive that feedback.

I'll close the presentation and give you a sense of what the next year looks like for the Centre Block rehabilitation program. As I referenced earlier, we are going to both refine the functional program and schematic design with a view to landing on the preferred design option in a March time frame. We have a whole bunch of enabling projects at work. The work in the east pleasure grounds and the relocation of monuments to get ready for the substantial construction program are ongoing as we speak.

This is your last year for Canada Day celebrations as traditionally planned on the Hill, because sometime after Labour Day you will see fast fence go up along that site delineation line you saw earlier in the presentation, and the actual construction site for the Centre Block rehabilitation program will take place. For example, you'll see things like the dismantling of the Vaux wall and construction trailers will start to show up on site, as well as the construction hoarding.

We continue to work on the site implementation plan and the hoarding design. We'll soon have some good information on that. We will complete both the comprehensive assessment program, which will feed into the design process; what we know about the building; as well as formed substantive cost, scope and schedule early in 2020.

That's it for the presentation.

We'd be happy to take any questions the committee may have for us.

(1135)

The Chair:

Thank you for that very detailed and helpful presentation.

We'll start with questions, Madame Lapointe. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

My thanks to the witnesses for your presentations.

Frankly, I would have liked to see it in December or March. By showing us far more specific documents, the direction you are taking seems much clearer. You seem much better prepared than the last time you were here, thanks to those supporting documents.

Earlier, you said that you would connect the different buildings together. Right now, we can go from the Centre Block to the East Block through a corridor. Does that mean that we'll have the same thing between the building...

Will you connect the Valour Building and the Victoria Building, so that parliamentarians can walk between the two through inside corridors?

Mr. Rob Wright:

Yes, exactly. In the future, the goal is precisely to have a parliamentary precinct integrated into the infrastructure and to create buildings connected by tunnels in particular.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

You mentioned the Valour and Victoria buildings, but you haven't said anything about the Wellington, Confederation and Justice buildings, where most of the MPs' offices are currently located.

Mr. Rob Wright:

Yes, it's exactly the same thing.

The same idea applies to the Wellington and Sir John A. Macdonald buildings, as well as the Confederation and Justice buildings.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

It may take a number of years to get to that point. If I understand correctly, are all those little buses going to disappear?

Mr. Rob Wright:

That's a question for Parliament to figure out what the best solution is.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay.

Mr. Rob Wright:

In Washington, there is a shuttle service in a tunnel to allow staff to move around.

It might be a good idea to borrow, it might not. That's a different discussion.

(1140)

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

The little buses that go everywhere are not making the task any easier during construction, that's for sure.

It's interesting anyway.

In your documents, earlier, you mentioned that 2,500 square metres will be used for the operations of the buildings, which is equivalent to the area of the fourth floor of the Centre Block. Right now, the Centre Block works fine. How much space is needed? I don't understand why more space is needed.

Since the heating and plumbing are a number of years old, even 100 years old, and today's techniques have improved, am I wrong in saying that less space should be needed? [English]

Mr. Rob Wright:

There are a couple of really critical things. One is that there are insufficient stairs and elevators in the Centre Block. They will take up significant space.

If you look at an example of the West Block, the amount of space required for mechanical space increased fourteenfold as we moved from the previous building to this modern building. It takes a lot more space to operate the systems. We anticipate that there will be more bathrooms to service parliamentarians, so that takes more space, including the plumbing. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

That's for sure. [English]

Mr. Rob Wright:

There's no central air conditioning in the Centre Block. It doesn't meet code in most respects. Bringing it up to code takes space, and modernizing it as well.

Making it a modern building so that it will meet modern codes will require space. One of the potential opportunities—and this is the beginning of a conversation—is to leverage the courtyards so that some of that space.... Elevators, as you saw in the presentation, are one potential opportunity to leverage, so that you lose less space in the heritage interiors of the building. Those decisions will be fundamentally critical over time. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay.

When you came to meet with us the last few times, we talked about consulting parliamentarians who worked in the former Centre Block. The Board of Internal Economy had to be consulted, and so did the members of Parliament. Was there a consultation with MPs to find out their views? I can give you mine.

In your document, for which I thank you, you show that there are currently 338 seats and that there will be 400. People are sitting in rows. I can tell you that folding chairs in rows of five doesn't work. I myself sat on a bench made up of folding chairs. Several colleagues are often not on time and you always have to get up to let them pass.

I'm not sure whether that's what you have in mind, but I'm telling you it's really inconvenient.

Are you consulting the parliamentarians who are currently working here?

With 400 seats, I'm not sure we'll be able to move around.

Mr. Michel Patrice (Deputy Clerk, Administration, House of Commons):

Thank you for your question, Ms. Lapointe.

In response to your first question about the suggested plan, that's only one option to demonstrate that the potential increase in the number of members of Parliament in the House of Commons must be taken into account.

The intent is indeed to present those options to the working group formed by the Board of Internal Economy. Then, it will also be a matter of consulting this committee, of course. So it's an option. You have seen throughout the presentation that no final decision has been made; these are just options. In addition, I think it is our common duty, at Public Services and Procurement Canada and the House administration, to present you with options to start the discussion and receive instructions to meet your needs as parliamentarians.

As for the consultations on your experience in the West Block, administration employees will meet with members of Parliament, for example, officers or staff from those offices to ask for their feedback, as well as their suggestions, advice and comments.

(1145)

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Will it be in the next five weeks? Then the House will adjourn and it may be quite a while until we come back.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

That's right.

We are quite aware of this particular period. What I am telling you is that meetings with parliamentarians or their staff have already begun. They will continue over the next five weeks and will likely continue in the post-election period.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Is that it? I still have some questions.

The Chair:

Yes, it is. You can continue in the next round.[English]

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

I was also enjoying Madame Lapointe's intelligent questions, and the answers were very enlightening as well, so I thank those witnesses who responded.

I want to thank all the witnesses who are here today, and in particular for the very helpful additional information you have given us. This deck you've presented to us is far and away the most informative thing we've seen so far, which we are all grateful for.

As one would expect, it raises many questions.

There was one question I wanted to start with before returning to the documents. This is for Mr. Patrice. When you appeared before us on March 19, you stated that the Board of Internal Economy had approved a governance model, which presumably would be highly relevant going forward. Could you table a copy of that governance model with our clerk?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Yes, I will provide you the decision taken by the Board of Internal Economy. The governance model will be defined, frankly, by the members of that working group, but obviously, that working group, as per the discussion at the Board, will report to the Board, and it will also consult and meet with this committee and other stakeholders going forward toward a successful program.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Would it be unreasonable to ask you to table the relevant documentation in time for us to look at it at our Thursday meeting, which will also be on the same subject?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I will do my best.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'd really appreciate it if you could.

Thank you for the very helpful Gantt chart. I look down it and see that you divided things up timewise. The first one is April to September—we're in that period now—when certain things commence.

The one thing that ends in September 2019 is the Centre Block decommissioning. That is done sometime in September. A number of things start in the period we're in now, and continue on post-September. The one that strikes me most significantly is the schematic design issue. It seems to me that starting that process before the next election is highly problematic in terms of getting input from the House of Commons and us.

Additionally, I should note that construction management—the tendering—starts in September, so there may actually be tenders that are put up before Parliament or the House of Commons has a chance to do any oversight. We are going to be in the middle of an election; no one will be in a position to do oversight. I think that is problematic.

In the interest of the House of Commons—which, after all, is the body that oversees expenditures—having its appropriate share of control over this, both on the costs side and what the costs are being incurred for, I encourage you to put that off until the post-election period. I recognize that this would not speed up the project, but this is one of those times when I think it might be appropriate. My colleagues may contradict me on this point, but that's my initial observation. That is a problematic timeline. I just throw that thought out for your consideration.

Mr. Malcic, thank you for being here. I found your comments with regard to the architectural issues very informative. I did have an administrative question for you. From whom do you formally take your marching orders or instructions? Or, if you wish, who are you contracting with?

Mr. Larry Malcic:

We are contracted to Public Works.

(1150)

Mr. Scott Reid:

I see Ms. Garrett raising her hand. Does that mean they take their instructions from you?

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

They do. PSPC is both the project implementer—the RC or financial authority for the project and the monies that we get for Treasury Board and the project authorities associated with it—and the contracting authority, through our department. We tendered Centrus' contract, and they take instructions from us as the technical authority for that contract.

In terms of that, we get requirements from parliamentary partners, which we translate into scope and a mission for the designer to execute, but they do get their instructions from PSPC.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is it just one contract that you folks have, Mr. Malcic, or is it more than one?

Mr. Larry Malcic:

It's one contract.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I assume that contract is a matter of public record. I shouldn't ask you, Mr. Malcic; I should ask you, Ms. Garrett. Would you be able to submit that to this committee?

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

Absolutely, we can submit that. In fact, we provided that information to the administration of the House of Commons, and it's on buyandsell.gc.ca publicly. It was publicly tendered and is publicly available. We will absolutely get that information to you.

Mr. Scott Reid:

With regard to the construction management design packages, I assume there's some tendering that may be going on. While the tenders won't be put out, is it possible to submit what their content will be—what the tenders are for—to this committee? Is that done at this point, and if so, could it be given to us?

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

Absolutely. We'd be happy to do that. Maybe I could premise that with just a bit of context for you, because it might help put you at ease a little bit.

We're cognizant that we're working in the time frame of an election. We are trying to do engagements and get some feedback to make sure that we can continue to work on the program. Fortunately, some of the early decisions are really around the base building aspects, particularly in support of the two key milestones that I was talking about earlier in the presentation, starting with targeted demolition and abatement, which needs to be done one way or the other within Centre Block itself, as well as the commencement of excavation. We're not talking about tendering our entire program to execute through the construction manager. We're talking about tendering associated with those early works.

We'd be happy to provide those details when they're ready. We're working on that documentation right now.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

If there is anything you can submit to us, we would like to have it. I'll leave it at that and perhaps we can follow up with our clerk at the next meeting as to what you were able to submit.

Do I have any time left, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

You have eight seconds.

Mr. Scott Reid:

In that case, thank you all for being here and for your very informative responses.

The Chair:

I forgot to welcome Dominic Lessard, deputy director, real property, with the House of Commons.

Thank you for joining us.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

That's great. Thank you, Chair.

Thank you all for being here.

It's interesting, quite fascinating, to watch this evolve.

To me it looks like one of the tricky things going forward is the possibility of a parallel chamber. The good news is that this would enhance our democracy; we've already had an initial study. We haven't made it yet, but my hunch is that there'll be a positive recommendation going to the House that we continue to look at this.

The downside is that it's not a decision that's going to be made right away, yet it may be an important ingredient because of the space. It has to be dedicated; it'll just be for that purpose if it's the way we're currently looking at it.

I'd appreciate your thoughts on how we would move forward with that, given the various timings here.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

We're going to adapt to the requirements of the House of Commons. Obviously, we've been listening with interest to the committee's discussions on the parallel chamber and are looking forward to the report of the committee and the decision of the House on this matter. It's our role to respond to and adapt to the needs of the House and its members.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, I get that. I'm looking for a little more.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

It depends on the size of the parallel chamber that you're talking about. I've read and learned that in some jurisdictions the size is not necessarily as significant as the existing chamber.

(1155)

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, not at all.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

We've got quite a few options, if that's the case.

Mr. David Christopherson:

My curiosity is around trying to make the timing work so we can make an informed decision. Parliament is not known for rushing, to start with. You, of course, are on a deadline to make these decisions. Give me your thinking on how that's going to unfold.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I'm thinking of an existing committee room, for example. Depending on the size of this chamber and how frequently it would meet, it would probably depend on rearranging some existing space.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It could be daily.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Then maybe it's a question of blocking out the time for that facility and that space and preparing it in a way that would work for what you decide.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay, that's fine.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

We've got a good team and we're able to respond. They're always up to the challenge.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I have no doubt.

It sounds as if you've taken the election period into account. I want to be very clear: We leave here near the end of June.

This Parliament's not coming back. It'll be the next Parliament. That could be any time in November or later, and then, once Parliament sits, it sometimes takes weeks on end to get committees running—although this one gets set up first. It wouldn't be unreasonable for that to tip us into the new year before committees are on the ground and functioning.

Have you taken that into account, that you're not going to have access to MPs for a period of months, starting Canada Day, recognizing that you've got decisions that have to be made?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Yes, we have taken that into account and have received two names for that working group, and are waiting for the third one, which I believe I'm going to receive this week. The hope is that we're going to have our first meeting following the coming constituency week, and then we'll be in a position to engage with those members and start making early decisions. Here I'm thinking of hoarding design and things like that. They'll have to look at options and see what they prefer and make recommendations. Then there's also the benefit that the Board of Internal Economy will continue to exist.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Here would be my concern if I were returning, which I am not. When we come back and start to ask questions, we might hear, “Oh, sorry, we had to make that decision on a deadline and you weren't around.”

We don't want to hear that. I need an assurance from you so that the 43rd Parliament doesn't get the answer: “Well, we had to make that decision because you weren't here.”

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I understand that. For some of the decisions, the beauty of communication right now is that we're going to be able to reach them. We'll have to assess whether there are key decisions that affect members that would need to be made between, let's say, June and the post-election period.

From what I've seen and what I've glanced over in my discussion with our partners, with Public Works, they understand the context and that things will occur. Certain key decisions will have to wait until the post-election period. There are some decisions that I think can be made before the House rises in June, but that is going to be for the members to decide.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Obviously, there are going to be some decisions made regarding the demolition of the building, and so on. I could be wrong, but I'm not sure that you're interested in making decisions on that piece.

Mr. David Christopherson:

No, and that's a perfect segue to my last question. Would this committee be able to get both a list of key decisions that have to be made, and also the timing of those decisions and the process? Could we get those from you?

We're getting closer to understanding this, but it's still a little bit nebulous about who's making the final call. BOIE represents us...almost. Remember, they're under the string of command that starts with the leaders. We are not. When we sit in these committees, we are each sovereign.

Therefore, I, as a member of this committee, would like to see what that critical path is, with all the decisions listed that have to be made, what the timing is for those decisions and what the current process is, if it's different from a general process of decision-making and specific to any of the particulars. Can we get that?

(1200)

Mr. Michel Patrice:

We can certainly provide you a list of what I would say are key elements, or eye-level elements, of the decisions that need to be made.

The timing depends also on the members, so I won't commit to timing. If a decision needs to wait until the members are ready to make that decision, we can give a general ballpark estimate of the season, and all of that. As I see it, we won't impose our schedule on members. It's not our role to impose that on members.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I appreciate that. You did hear us, and you're responding as though you have it posted above all of your desks.

That's excellent. We appreciate that.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Yes, we will provide you with a list of decisions that we believe members are interested in.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Can I just leave a thought, and then I'm done?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

You might tell us, “On this, we don't want to have any say in it”.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I don't think for one minute that you're going to try to run out in front of us. In fact, in this current system, that's the last thing you want. If anything, you're probably going to be hounding us to make sure. There's lots of CYA here; I get it. That's good. That's what we want.

Here's the point, though: There are some decisions that are mechanical, with one following another, but again, I just want to be clear that there aren't going to be any such decisions that, because they have to be made, negate the ability of Parliament to make a further decision. This might throw things off a bit, but I just want it to be crystal-clear in the committee evidence that there won't be any decisions that preclude this committee's ability to have input and their opinion, both by virtue of optional things and things that have to be done from a construction point of view.

I just want that reassurance.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

That is noted.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Good.

The Chair:

Before I go to Mr. Graham, I have a question.

Ms. Garrett, you mentioned some consultation with MPs.

Mr. Patrice, you mentioned two names related to the consultation process of the Board of Internal Economy.

Could you tell us who those MPs are and how they were chosen?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Those names are chosen by their respective House leaders at the Board of Internal Economy, I would suspect in consultation with their parties. I won't provide you the names until I have the three names.

The Chair:

Ms. Garrett, are those the same people you were referring to?

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

I was only referring to an intention of the House administration to do an engagement with parliamentarians. It has been clear to PSPC that the engagement process will be executed through the House of Commons administration, so I defer to Mr. Patrice's comments on that matter.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I would also encourage you to have a panel of former parliamentarians involved, because as we get further and further from 2019, there will be fewer and fewer people who remember what Centre Block is supposed to be like.

I'd say, “Call David”—

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:—because he would be a good asset for you because he will soon be a former MP, sadly.

On the topic of the secondary debating chamber—this is more of a comment than a question—I would encourage you to look at a permanent space as an idea, not at a committee room that we can reassign, because the structure of the room would be physically different. It would have to be. With the galleries and the television, it would be a different structure. If you leave it as a committee room that gets reassigned, then one week it will have three days. The next week it will have two days. The next week it will just be forgotten. So, it has to have its own structure in place. I want to put that on record.

With regard to Linda's comments on the rang d'Oignon—which is a phrase I love—looking at the 400-seat arrangement you have.... I had the distinct pleasure of having the middle of the five-seat section in the last chamber, and while the chairs were way more physically comfortable than the chairs we have now, the actual egress and entry to those is an absolute royal pain in the ass. If we cannot do that, I would be much obliged.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Nicely put.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

Is there any physical possibility of physically enlarging the chamber?

Mr. Rob Wright:

That option illustrates the challenge, I think. It's not an option that we're saying or advocating should be implemented. We're working on a broad range of options. What that indicates is that if the House wants to maintain its existing set up, that's essentially how to make it work. There are a lot of downsides to that, and that's recognized.

Then it's a conversation about what other ways would work for the House of Commons, whether that would be—and I'm just kind of speaking out loud here—kind of progressing towards benches similar to the U.K. model over time; whether that is taking a very different, more radical approach to putting in the seating; or whether that is enlarging the chamber. These are very important considerations that would, as Ms. Garrett indicated, make it critically important to take decisions as early as we can and have those decisions last until the end of the project.

Enlarging the chamber is very challenging in its own right. There are some significant challenges from a structural and architectural perspective in that part of the building. It's possible, as most things are, but there would be significant costs involved. To make that decision, we would have to, I think, make sure that we've touched bottom on a broad range of options and really be sure that we settle with consensus on what we feel is the right option.

(1205)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is the railway station, now the Senate of Canada building, going to remain as part of the parliamentary precinct after the renovations of Centre Block are finished?

Mr. Rob Wright:

The reading and railway rooms?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No, the railway building, the station.

Mr. Rob Wright:

Oh, sorry.

At this point, those are considered temporary buildings. For the Rideau Committee Rooms, I think we have a lease in place until something like 2034 with the National Capital Commission, so they were planned as temporary accommodations.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You showed a map of the front lawn that shows that we will lose about half of the lawn with the new building. Is that correct? The road would also be quite a bit farther south than it currently is. Is that also correct?

Mr. Rob Wright:

That's just during the construction phase.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's not a permanent thing.

Mr. Rob Wright:

It's not permanent at all, no.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The road will go up above into Centre Block again.

Mr. Rob Wright:

That would be all underground. The entrance would be as close.... So, you'd walk up South Drive, for example, and you would enter in almost at grade. There would be a slight downslope to enter into the facility, and essentially the Vaux wall would be on top of that facility, so the look and feel of the Hill would return to what it is today.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How long are we going to lose the lawn for, and where are Canada Day celebrations going to go?

Mr. Rob Wright:

Those are two important questions. One thing we could consider, if it were something that Parliament wanted, is a phasing of the visitor welcome centre in the Centre Block. It would be possible to open the visitor welcome centre perhaps significantly ahead of the Centre Block. We haven't really looked at that in a detailed way yet, but if it were a desire of Parliament to phase that, then the visitor welcome centre could open in advance. I would be careful about how much time in advance that would be, but let's call it a significant period in advance of the Centre Block. It would potentially do a couple of important things: It would return the look and feel of the Hill more quickly and it would provide additional amenities for visitors as well as important services to support the operations of Parliament. So that's a conversation.

For Canada Day, we have been working very closely with Canadian Heritage, who's the lead on that, as well as the parliamentary partners to try to ensure that all of those core activities that occur on the Hill, especially during the summer months, remain in a modified form. This year there will be zero impact. Then, as we move forward, there will be modified.... We're looking at having a modified sound and light show, trying to ensure that it remains, and an element of Canada Day; it would have to be modified. There's the changing of the guard and all of those elements, from making sure that the flag continues to be changed on the Peace Tower to making sure that the carillon continues to be played as long as possible.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When I started on the Hill almost a decade ago, I heard rumours that there was consideration given to using the front lawn of Parliament as an underground parking lot. Has that ever been considered in a serious way?

Mr. Rob Wright:

I don't think it's ever been considered in a serious way. I think there have been some exploratory elements. We have looked at removing surface parking, which is a principle of the long-term vision and plan. For the most part, most of the feasibility, I'll call it, has looked more at the western area of the campus rather than the front lawn.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Linda touched on the tunnel access between buildings. Confederation and Justice had a tunnel built a few years ago. I think I mentioned this in the previous meeting. In 2011 they ripped out the lawn between those two buildings. It still hasn't reopened. It was supposed to be closed for a year or two.

That tunnel was built recently, within the timeline of the LTVP, but it was not done in a way that staffers and parliamentarians could use it. Why not? Will there be some remediation of that? What is the long-term plan to have all the buildings interconnected by tunnel?

(1210)

Mr. Rob Wright:

I'll have to get back to you on the specifics of that, but the long-term plan, working with Parliament on what services you need, is to have an interconnected campus where, for example, Wellington Street is less of a barrier within the campus, and the Wellington Building, the Sir John A. Macdonald and Valour buildings and the West Block are interconnected, as are Confederation and Justice, and then the visitor welcome centre in a much more meaningful way. It almost becomes one integrated facility.

That is the planning on a go-forward basis. We have conceptual but not detailed plans on those tunnels. We have worked that out on a conceptual level, but that is an important conversation as we move forward together.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you. I'll come back to you later.

The Chair:

We now move to Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

I appreciate our witnesses joining us today.

I want to start with a comment, which I mentioned at a previous meeting that Mr. Wright and Ms. Garrett were not at. It's about this building itself. I find it very disappointing that Public Works, the department that's responsible for accessibility, which I personally find very important, would allow a room to be built in this building on the fourth floor that's not accessible. I'm someone who has a close family member who uses a wheelchair for mobility. My family uses strollers to get our three young kids around. So I find it very disappointing that the room is not accessible. I want to put that on the record once again for the benefit of a department whose responsibility includes accessibility. I am very disappointed by that. It's an exceptional building, but the fact that we have a room that's not accessible to people with mobility issues is disappointing. Frankly, I think it's unacceptable for the Parliament of Canada, and I want to put that on the record.

I would like to follow up on the slide that's here right now, which you touched on earlier, Mr. Graham. Am I right to assume that the visitor welcome centre, phase two, is going ahead? It's been approved and it's happening. Is that a correct assumption?

Mr. Rob Wright:

Well, I would say that maybe the best answer to that, in a way, is yes and no, in the sense that the concept of a visitor welcome centre I think dates back to 1976 with the Abbott commission. There's a long-standing discussion around a visitor centre. As the security and threat environment has continued to evolve, the importance of it being a security element outside of the footprint of the core Parliament Buildings has increasingly become important.

With its becoming a priority as a project for Parliament, we did a review of the long-term vision and plan in 2005 and 2006, and this project was identified as a key priority of Parliament. There have been approvals that have been sought to proceed with this project. At the same time, what I would say is that on this slide you see here a footprint that exists because of the functionality that Parliament wants to be in there, which is an ongoing conversation. We haven't come to the end of that conversation. The shape of that facility I think is still very fluid in working with you.

It could become smaller, but I would say that my understanding at this point is that the requirement of having security screening outside of the footprint of the buildings is a fundamental objective of the long-term vision and plan. The visitor welcome centre exists first and foremost to meet that need, and then it provides multiple other benefits to Parliament in terms of providing interpretive services for visitors as well as core functions for Parliament that are difficult to fit within the heritage buildings themselves.

Mr. John Nater:

Okay. I want to maybe step back a bit, then. You mentioned that approvals had been sought, and I assume approvals have been given for certain elements. Can you share with the committee what those approvals have been, when they happened and what specifically was approved?

I don't think anyone is going to disagree about the security requirement and having it off-site. I assume that's the visitor welcome centre. One is that it's separate and apart, but I think very much knowing what has been approved, what exactly has been approved thus far going forward.... The front lawn of Parliament is Canada's front lawn. Having a massive hole into bedrock for potentially a decade I think would be a concern to the general public, which leads me to my question.

Where has the public been on this? Has there been any consultation whatsoever with the public at large in terms of having a massive hole on Parliament Hill shrinking the size of the front lawn for potentially a decade? Has there been any engagement?

(1215)

Mr. Rob Wright:

As far as public engagement goes, we work very closely with Parliament and want to ensure that parliamentarians are engaged. I think the public consultation—and perhaps Mr. Patrice can add to this—would be done in coordination with parliamentarians, which would be very important. We work hand in glove with the administration of Parliament. Essentially, one of our core objectives is to meet the needs of Parliament.

Our understanding is that the visitor welcome centre is a core priority of Parliament, for both the security requirements and the visitor services as well. Yes, there is the challenging path to getting to a better Hill, I guess, in the sense that there will be disruption, but one of the key objectives of the visitor welcome centre is to enhance the Hill for visitors—for Canadian visitors and for international tourists.

To get to that point requires disruption. There's no way around that. That's a choice for Parliament to make.

Mr. John Nater:

I am out of time, but the chair did give me a brief leeway.

Based on the current approval process, approvals that had been given to the Department of Public Works under the current timeline, when will a shovel go into the ground to start digging phase two of the visitor welcome centre?

Mr. Rob Wright:

As I think Ms. Garrett indicated, this would be early 2020.

Mr. John Nater:

At this point, if we're looking at early 2020, this committee will disappear in five weeks' time and potentially may not come back until January of 2020, depending on when.... There will be no further opportunity for this committee to have input on the visitor welcome centre's phase two.

Mr. Rob Wright:

But absolutely on what is in the visitor welcome centre, phase two—

Mr. John Nater:

But shovels will be in the ground. It's going to happen in that general....

Mr. Rob Wright:

Unless we are given some direction to stop, then yes.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Frankly, the committee would also have a chance to provide input on the actual size in terms of the requirement and all of that, but the concept, as Mr. Wright pointed out, of the visitor welcome centre goes back a decade or so in terms of its approval.

The Chair:

Okay. Before I go to Ms. Sahota I assume that the visitor welcome centre phase two that Mr. Nater is talking about was approved by the Board of Internal Economy, because we just learned about it recently. We don't know anything about it.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Mr. Chair, if I might, it was suggested that one of the things that's left flexible and yet to be decided is the size.

The Chair:

Right.

Mr. David Christopherson:

How can they start digging if they don't know what size it will be?

I'm sorry, but you said that one of the areas where there was still some room for input and flexibility was the size of the welcome centre. How can you start digging it if you don't know how big you're going to make it?

Mr. Rob Wright:

I'll make two points and then I'll pass it on to Ms. Garrett for some additional detail. The visitor welcome centre has been an important part of the long-term vision and plan for some time and has been in public documents for probably longer than a decade, I would say. We've made efforts to communicate that to parliamentarians and the broader public. Maybe we can make better efforts at that. We have an annual report that is posted on our website. It's outlined as a priority within that as well.

As far as the excavation goes, the visitor welcome centre phase two is going to have a significant footprint regardless of what goes in it. There's some fluidity, though, on making sure that it's sized appropriately given the engagement with Parliament.

I'll pass it over to Ms. Garrett.

(1220)

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm sorry, I still didn't hear an answer. If there's still some flexibility about the size of it, how can you start digging the hole? That's all. How can you know how big a hole to dig until you know the size? You're telling me the size is flexible, yet we're going ahead and starting digging. I just need some help understanding this.

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

Perhaps I can provide a little bit more clarity.

In terms of digging the hole, you're correct, that it is important when you go out to tender that you give that contractor whom you're tendering the work to a sense of how big that hole is going to be. I think that in the context of the comments that were made earlier and back to my earlier comments about layered decisions—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes.

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

—how big that hole is going to be is of critical importance.

Then to the other comments that were made, what goes into it will become equally important, but that decision can be made at a later date when there's a little bit more information known and some more consultation completed.

Mr. David Christopherson:

We're getting....

Go ahead.

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

To answer the question more specifically, to manage that risk because of where we are, there are options in front of us. We can start digging the hole by making some assumptions about the minimum size of that hole.

And just going back to when we met about the elm tree, one of the things the committee actually asked us to look at doing was advancing excavation so that we could replant in the east pleasure grounds sooner than later, and we are looking at that.

But what is the minimum footprint that we know we're going to need to make it safe to start digging that hole, so that when Parliament comes back we can talk a little bit more? Having said that, some of the early decisions and engagements that we're trying to get at are discussions that we presented here today around things like committee rooms, which would ultimately influence decisions around how big that hole is going to be, as an example.

I can continue to try to clarify this. I'm trying to answer your question directly.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Let me just try to repeat that in my words and see if I've got it.

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

Sure.

The Chair:

Briefly, David.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, I'll be as quick as I can, but I need to be clear.

There's a minimum size and you're going to dig that anyway, and once you're in there you have the options of making it bigger or not, depending on what decisions are made about committee rooms and where they're placed. It sounds like you can start digging without knowing the final size, because you do know a minimum size and it requires the same kind of start. Am I starting to get it?

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

The answer to that question is yes, recognizing that it makes the contracting aspect a little more complex, but it's manageable. This is a very large and complex program, and that's what we're here for, to manage those types of risks.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks.

The Chair:

I assume any parking spaces will have electric charging stations.

Ms. Sahota, you're on.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

My legislative assistant, Caroline, is amazing. She lived in Europe for a while. She just informed me that with a lot of the excavation projects there, archeologists are often involved if there is anything to be found underneath. Especially with the amount of excavation that's needed for this project, there may be historical artifacts.

Are there archeologists involved in this project?

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

Absolutely, there are. In fact, we've found some interesting things.

Right now, if you stroll by the east pleasure grounds and look through the fencing, you'll see quite a significant archeological dig under way. They've uncovered the old barracks and guard houses. Because there is potential for artifacts on the Hill, we've mapped the potential impact and where we might find those as high, medium and low, and before we do any work—for example, build an east interconnect, or a construction road on top—part of our assessment program is to assess whether or not there are archeological resources, and when we find them, to fully excavate and document them accordingly.

If there's further information this committee would like to have on what we've found and the approach we're taking on that, we'd be happy to provide it. We have very good expertise and capability at Centrus in archeology.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I would love to hear more about whatever you find. I think that's fascinating. It should definitely be showcased and highlighted—maybe in the visitor centre. People could come to learn about it and understand our history.

Has there been any consultation with the Algonquin peoples, since it is unceded territory of the Algonquin?

(1225)

Mr. Rob Wright:

Right now, as you may know, we're working in a very close partnership with the national indigenous organizations and the Algonquin on the former American embassy to turn that into a national indigenous space.

We're working almost daily at this point with those groups, including the Algonquin Nation, on a wide variety of elements in addition to the 100 Wellington project. We're looking at opportunities to do some capacity-building as well as contracting opportunities to increase their participation in the work that's happening within the precinct.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I have a question on the West Block, and then on how that relates to the entrances for Centre Block.

Why are the larger, grander main entrances of West Block usually locked off and not used as everyday entrances for MPs? For example, the double-door entrances on the side and the Mackenzie Tower are all shut down.

Is that something we can expect at Centre Block? Are we not going to be able to go under the bell tower anymore? Will there be just side routes for everybody, or through the visitor centre at the bottom? How's that going to work?

Mr. Stéphan Aubé (Chief Information Officer, House of Commons):

Certainly in the future, the goal is to have these facilities accessible to members as well as visitors so they can have access. In the context of the West Block, the Mackenzie Tower entrance and the Speaker's entrance—these are the main entrances at the sides—have been reserved for specific access for members and visitors right now from other countries, for example the Croatian president, who was here this week. We're reserving these entrances for that. The other entrances are for staff, members and administration.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Are there similar plans for Centre Block? Before, the Centre Block doors were open for all members to use, and if staff were accompanying them, they could use them as well.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I must admit we did not look that far ahead, but I would suspect it's the intent that these doors will still be accessible for members and staff.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'd like to say that—

Mr. Michel Patrice:

The concern is more about the visitors going through, for security purposes obviously, but—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'd like to—

Mr. Michel Patrice:

—I suspect we'll have to look at that, but in my mind those doors would be still accessible above ground by members and parliamentary staff.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I hope so because I definitely think there was a special feeling of entering through those doors, and some of that feeling has been lost since we've been here in the West Block. It's a beautiful building, but I hope we're still able to use some of those entrances.

I'd like to share the remainder of my time with Linda.

Is there anything left?

The Chair:

No.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The visitor welcome centre is the area where almost all of my concerns are focused.

When it comes to issues like putting elevator shafts into the current courtyard areas in the Centre Block, on its face, I think that makes sense, and so on.

My concerns are entirely around the visitor welcome centre and its colossal size. It really is big. It's going to be very expensive. It's bedrock down there. I don't know if it's granite, sandstone or limestone.

Does anybody else know?

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

It's a lot of bedrock.

Mr. Scott Reid:

There's a lot of rock, yes. When it comes to archeology, I thought, well, you don't go down very far before there are no more archeological possibilities. There may be paleontological possibilities. I don't know.

Anyway, here's the thing about it. Once the shovel goes in the ground, once the contracts are given out for the shovel to go in the ground, all of which is scheduled to happen before the election—or at least part of it is scheduled to happen before then—inevitably, many dollars will have been spent that are unrecoverable. The bigger the footprint, the bigger the space we're committing to, even though we do not have a consensus on what should go in there.

I can tell you that, among the things you're showing, I am vigorously opposed to a number of them. Let me tell you, I do not agree with putting the Library of Parliament, which I assume is a museum, there. It's not that we shouldn't have a museum of parliamentary history. As a historian, I love the idea. It's just that there are a lot of other buildings that could go into it. It doesn't have to be attached to the Centre Block.

Viewing rooms to watch parliamentary procedures when there's overflow do not have to be underground there. In the event we think something like that is going to happen, we can set up seating in other places. To go back to the Westminster model, parliament traditionally involved multi-purpose rooms, Westminster Hall being the most obvious and most glorious of them, and that's almost a thousand years old.

On the issue of security, we already have the place people will come in for security reasons. We could put a second spot in, but we have a place that is designed to maximize security. It's well-designed. It serves its purpose well. It's outside of the buildings.

In terms of access from that area to the House of Commons and Senate chambers, well, the Senate is a little more difficult, but for the House of Commons, the tunnel shown there in grey to the west of Centre Block could be a way of accessing viewing areas in the House of Commons, so there's no need to run that in front, underground, which means that you could get that access underground without disrupting Canada's front lawn.

There's room on the side and back, in your plans themselves, for potential pavilions. That might be controversial. I assume those are above ground, but we don't have a chance to speak as to whether that is less intrusive, or to get public feedback. I literally didn't know of this possibility until today.

I know you have a little strip along the belvedere that you've opened up, and I have a personal sentimental reason for wanting that to be open for the next few years. That is the spot where I first kissed my wife, actually, but for the many other people who don't have that particular sentimental attachment, the front lawn is more important.

The pleasure of viewing the side, which is where the Senate extra buildings...that could be done.

On House of Commons committee rooms, none of them should be underground, under what is now the front lawn, because we have a large number of other rooms available to us. Throughout my entire lifetime—and I'm more than half a century old and have lived in Ottawa my whole life—the conference centre, now the Senate, has been sitting there as a great big empty black hole. It's finally being used. Now that it has been reconditioned, we could use that for some committee rooms.

For number 1 Wellington, the old railway tunnel that's being reconditioned, I know we have a lease that expires—in 2034, I think you said—but it's a lease between ourselves and the NCC. We can use those permanently, and they're lovely rooms, so I think we can increase the number of committee rooms easily. In the Macdonald Building, those rooms could be multi-purpose and turned into committee rooms, or at least some of them could be—those in the upstairs part.

You see what I'm getting at. There's lots of room for all these things without doing what is the most intrusive thing of all the different things we're doing here, the most expensive and the one with the least certain timelines.

I know I've used up all of my time, Mr. Chair, but I will say, speaking for myself only, that in my opinion, the absolute.... I would like to see nothing happen with regard to the visitor welcome centre phase two, even if it means missing a building season, until you have the consent of the House of Commons. I feel very strongly about that. If this stuff goes ahead before the next election and we've spent a bunch of money before the House comes back, regardless of which party is in government—it happens—I know that I for one will be distressed.

(1230)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Personally, I don't agree with you, but I won't bring that up now.

We've got lots on the list still.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What's the story with the elm tree?

Mr. Rob Wright:

I'll pass this to Ms. Garrett in a moment. As you know, we were here some time ago—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We know very well.

Mr. Rob Wright:

We had a good discussion on the elm tree. As we discussed, the elm tree was to be cut. The wood is being stored, so that it will be cured and could be used for a future parliamentary use in consultation with Parliament by the dominion sculptor. We are working with the University of Guelph as well to grow some small saplings. I think the survival rate of those saplings was quite low, which was indicative of the health of the tree itself.

I'll pass it off to Ms. Garrett to give more detail.

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

Thank you, Mr. Wright.

Mr. Wright pretty much covered it. The only thing I would add is that based on the tree's health, we did take a hundred cuttings from the tree—the best cuttings the arborist could find. We sent them off to the University of Guelph and they picked the best 50 to try to propagate them. Of those 50 saplings, only 10 have survived that propagation process. We have 10 saplings that are growing in a greenhouse at the University of Guelph and when they're strong enough, they'll be grown outside and then returned to the precinct when it's appropriate.

(1235)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. Thank you.

When I left my last round, I was asking about tunnels. If you go back to slide 17, on proposed circulation for parliamentarians, I'm wondering if you could provide access between East Block and West Block, so we don't have to go up and around. I just thought that the purple should cross, unless you want us all to go through the freight tunnels.

I don't have a lot left and I'll leave it to Ms. Lapointe in a second.

As we've been taking Centre Block apart, have we had any real surprises?

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

I would say we haven't had surprises, but there was a disappointment. We were hopeful that the shafts within the building would be sufficient to carry, for example, our mechanical and electrical.... They're much smaller than we were anticipating, which is causing us to drive to new solutions. We're still in the process of articulating designated substances in the building.

The most interesting discussion will be in terms of the structural work and assessments that we're doing right now. It's related to one of the upcoming decisions, namely, on how we will seismically reinforce the building. There are some opportunities around base isolation that would allow us to save a lot of the heritage hierarchy in the building and the structure that's above the basement in the building.

There have been no surprises from the perspective that we've got a very old building that requires a very significant modernization. Having said that, all of that allows you to do much more detailed planning for the design and costing of the program, which we're working on at present.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There are no listening devices in the walls or bags of cash in behind things, or something like that?

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

There haven't been, so far.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have one last question before I pass this on. When am I going to get kicked out of my office in the Confederation Building?

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

That's a good question.

Mr. Rob Wright:

This is another point of engagement with Parliament on the broader campus strategy. Doing the major restoration of the Confederation Building will require swing space. We are planning to put facilities for the House and the Senate adjacent to the former U.S. Embassy to support the restoration of the Confederation Building, as well as the East Block. Those facilities are not designed yet, nor are they close to construction. You'd be looking towards or past mid-2025 to get to that point.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If I have any time left, I'd like to give it to Ms. Lapointe. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Do I have any time left?

The Chair:

You have one minute left.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Will I have more later?

The Chair:

Yes.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay. I'll wait for the next round in that case.

The Chair:

You'll go after Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If Ms. Lapointe prefers to wait, I'll continue for another minute.[English]

Is the Supreme Court involved in the LTVP? I know there's been talk about renovating that one as well.

Mr. Rob Wright:

Full restoration of the Supreme Court is in the plans. The West Memorial Building is the swing space for that facility. It's part of the long-term vision and plan from a planning principle perspective, but not from an implementation perspective.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned the old U.S. embassy briefly. Is that also to be a swing space, or is it only for the...?

Mr. Rob Wright:

That will be a permanent space with some adjacent space that will run through to Sparks Street for a permanent national indigenous peoples space.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson, you have three minutes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I have a quick question that I promised my daughter I would ask. I was going to do it quietly, but I'll do it publicly. I think I know the answer, but I'm going to ask anyway.

Are there any plans to reintroduce the cat world that existed prior to West Block's being closed?

I confess that walking over to see the cats was her favourite part of coming to Parliament Hill. It's a cool tradition.

Mr. Rob Wright:

It was my grandmother's favourite part as well.

Mr. David Christopherson:

There you go. See?

Mr. Rob Wright:

I think at this point there are no plans to reintroduce it that I am aware of.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I didn't think so, but it would be really cool if there were. I leave that out there. Maybe there are some creative folks.

I have two things, one point and then a question.

The point is that I really appreciated knowing for the first time how you're looking at the parliamentary precinct differently. Right now, truly, we have a frankenparl. In the decade and a half that I've been on the Hill, we added a committee space here and grabbed offices there. It's been pulled together with duct tape and bale wire. It doesn't make any sense when you talk about flow. So I'm pleased to hear that we're going to get away from that nonsense, take a step back and look at all the facilities as they all start to blend, and the idea that we may still have to be off the Hill, whereas we weren't in the past. When I first got here, everything was nice and neat on the Hill. So I'm pleased about that.

I share some of the concerns that Mr. Reid has raised about the visitor welcome centre. When you're providing the committee with the list of decisions and the time frames, I assume this will be a part of that; that a detailed subset will speak to exactly where we are with the visitor welcome centre in the decisions that are made and are not being revisited versus those that, going forward, have not been made, and what your thinking is on when and how those decisions are going to made. I would ask that you include that in the report you provide to us.

(1240)

Mr. Michel Patrice:

It's been noted.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You keep saying “noted”. I assume that “noted” is your word for yes.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Yes.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's very good. Thank you.

The Chair:

Madame Lapointe. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

I want to come back to some of the things that several parliamentarians and I have discussed, but I still feel that I've had no clear answer.

When you first came here on December 11, you said that the rehabilitation of the Centre Block was intended “to safeguard and honour its heritage... to support the work of parliamentarians; to accommodate the institution's evolving needs; to enhance the visitor experience; and to modernize the building's infrastructure.”

I am very concerned about the part about parliamentarians.

On March 19, you said that the Board of Internal Economy would set up a working group. We raised the issue a number of times to find out who would be involved in the working group, but I have heard nothing yet about parliamentarians. However, recently, we were consulted about cutting down an elm tree. Since Parliament will probably not sit until January, who will be consulted if decisions on next steps have to be made by then?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

As I said, we will have a working group of three people. So far, I have received two names and I prefer to wait until I have the third before—

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

There are only five weeks left.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I should receive the third name by the end of this week.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

We were consulted about the felling of a tree. However, I think we have more major decisions to make than cutting down a tree.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Yes.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

That being said, I apologize to those who care a lot about trees.

I am thinking of questions such as when to decide on the number of members, whether or not to set up a parallel debating chamber or whether or not to excavate—my colleague said earlier that there is rock here, under the building.

By the way, I don't feel reassured, because I didn't get the answer I wanted.

When you renovated the West Block, you had to excavate rock because that's all there is under the building. You are now saying that you will have to excavate in front of the Centre Block. What did you learn from the excavation work you did here? What are the best practices you have learned that you will be able to apply to your work on the Centre Block?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I hope that the members of the working group will be able to meet after the next break. For the time being, the leaders of each of the parties in the House have appointed members to sit on this working group, as decided by the Board of Internal Economy.

The general and specific concerns of committee members were heard. The Visitor Welcome Centre will be one of the priority topics before the adjournment in June. Discussions will begin and a list of questions or concerns that parliamentarians have raised with the working group will be compiled. The group will then report to the Board of Internal Economy, which will present it to this committee as soon as possible.

As for the lessons learned from the construction work at the West Block, I'll let Mr. Wright tell you about that.

(1245)

[English]

Mr. Rob Wright:

There have been many lessons learned and I think we could have a deep conversation about that. There would be two that would be relevant to today's conversation that would be very important.

One is, as Ms. Garrett mentioned, the layered decision-making approach and to focus on those elements that we can get consensus on and to move forward on them. That lends itself to phased implementation. In the middle of the West Block we started to shift gears, in working between Public Services Procurement Canada and the House of Commons. We're going to apply that lesson learned fully for Centre Block.

It's the phased approach, really focusing on those structural elements, first and foremost, where we can get the greatest clarity early, and then, once we have the clarity of the functionality that we have, focusing the effort, from a construction perspective, on areas that need to be perfect for the operations of Parliament, the chamber being perhaps the most obvious of those, and committee rooms. They should be completed earlier and handed over to the House of Commons, which is the technical authority on the IT and broadcasting elements. The construction elements of the building and all of the critical IT elements should be finished at the same time, rather than being sequential, which is what we used to do previously in projects. The Wellington Building and the Valour Building and elements of that would have been more sequential. We think we can save time and enhance the quality by approaching it with a more phased approach. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

I still have some questions. [English]

The Chair:

One quick question. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

On March 19, when you appeared before the committee, you said that 20% of the decommissioning process had already been completed. Today, May 14, what is the percentage? [English]

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

I believe that 20% was in reference to the decommissioning process. We are approximately 40% decommissioned. We're on track to finish those decommissioning activities in an August 2019 time frame, with a view of being able to transition the building back from parliamentary partners to PSPC, and then a very rapid turnover to our construction manager, who will take over custody of the site and stand up the construction site.

There are key elements that need to come out of the building. We've moved quite a bit of the moveable assets, things like artifacts and furniture, especially those to support parliamentary operations, but there are residual assets in the building and some pretty important artifacts. A good example are the war paintings in the Senate chamber. Two of the six are down, and the remaining six will be moved by a mid-June time frame.

Most importantly, on the House of Commons side, is the decommissioning of the IT infrastructure in the building. That is ongoing as we speak and is well in progress, but has to be completed, as well as some of the activities to isolate the building, so it can be taken essentially off the grid. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay, thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Before I go to Mr. Reid, I have one question. It came up during our study on a family-friendly House of Commons and I think it was mentioned one of the times you were here before. It was the suggestion that one of the things you might look at is play space or a playground, either outside as Mr. Reid suggested, as part of the courtyard, or indoors. Has any thought been given to that?

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair: Mr. Nater, respect, please!

I'm hearing a long silence.

Ms. Jennifer Garrett:

I can jump in and try to answer.

Part of what we are looking at is making Parliament more family friendly. We have been given requirements from our parliamentary partners to make sure that when parliamentarians and their families are busy, they can effectively support that.

With regard to exterior play, honestly I'd have to go back and check the functional program requirements, but with regard to the interior of the building, I know we've been given requirements for improved family-friendly space in a universally accessible environment and we will endeavour to make sure that those spaces are in the appropriate locations within the building.

(1250)

Mr. Stéphan Aubé:

There have already been discussions on possible play areas on the outside. Consideration was given to the visitor welcome area beside the West Block, but that hasn't yet been finalized. As you can see, we're just in discussions right now, first, on how circulation would happen both inside and outside the building.

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Very briefly, there are a few of us around the table who do have young families now. I joked that my daughter will be the MP by the time we get back into Centre Block, so it won't be relevant, but it would be nice if, when these discussions are happening, those who currently have young families have some type of consultation or input.

My family was up last week and they had a great time on the front lawn of Parliament blowing bubbles and running around. It was a lot of fun. That doesn't happen in the winter, so it would be nice to have some consultation with those of us around the table and in Parliament who currently have young families on the Hill.

The Chair:

I have a six-year-old and a 10-year-old.

Mr. Reid, you're next on the list. Also Ms. Kusie hasn't spoken yet, which you might want to defer to. However, where do you want to go with your motion? Did you want to finalize that today or at another meeting?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, I think it would be preferable if we let that wait until a different meeting. There are still more questions. I know I'm not the only person who has more questions and we have all these witnesses here, so it's our chance to ask them.

The Chair:

Okay. Do you want to allow Ms. Kusie to go, or do you want to go?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Are you okay with my taking it?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

Go ahead.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I want to say a couple of things. First of all, I want to stress one area where I really admire the work you've done: your seismic work on this building to make it earthquake-proof. It was most emphatically not earthquake-proof before you started your work on it, so I congratulate you for that. I'm well aware of the challenges that Centre Block faces in that regard, and while I like to economize on many things, I'm not asking you to economize on that.

I think the fundamental problem that all of you face is that your parliamentary partners, as you describe the various groups that are submitting to you, have not told you what their needs are. They've given you a wish list, which is not quite the same thing. It's the difference between what I would like to have and what the economists talk about as supply and demand.

Demand is ultimately what I want to have and am prepared to pay for. None of us has made the hard choices. I'm not talking about you making hard choices; we haven't made the hard choices. We're imposing the arbitration job to a large degree on you, and that is profoundly unfair. I can see you attempting to deal with it and respond to everybody's needs.

We have to give you clearer guidelines, so I hope that what I've said so far is not understood as criticism of Public Works, the architects or the House administration. Au contraire, it is a critique of the process that we are part of, and we need to get our act together.

On another note, I gather that the idea of swing space beside the former U.S. embassy has not been approved by anybody. I think it is a good idea. Right now, that is an unutilized space. It's a parking lot that doesn't even have cars parked there anymore. It makes eminent sense to put something in there that could be used as space, and then in the long run, the obvious flaw with the current building is that it is too small for an indigenous heritage history museum. There's no way there is enough space. The swing space might serve that purpose.

I do have to ask this question: How long do you anticipate the big hole, as you've called it, in the ground for the visitor welcome centre being there? We know it starts in September 2019. When will it be filled in and the ground covered over and be back to being usable?

Mr. Rob Wright:

I think that would come back to one of the questions. If Parliament wanted to accelerate the opening of the visitor welcome centre, in essence, to prioritize the visitor welcome centre and return the front lawn and the operations that the functionality that would be provided there, that would be a different scenario than if you wanted the visitor welcome centre and the Centre Block to reopen on the same day. We could look at both of those scenarios. If there were a desire to prioritize the visitor welcome centre, it would be there for a shorter period.

(1255)

Mr. Scott Reid:

I assume the rationale for phase two of the visitor welcome centre being the first thing on your agenda is that the work that's going on in Centre Block initially for the first couple of years is not the heavy structural work that will be needed later on. It's a matter of figuring out what's there, removing items that are there. You're trying to do multiple things at the same time. I assume that's the logic of it.

If the visitor welcome centre or parts thereof were started later, thereby allowing us to figure out what should and shouldn't go out there, is it possible that either the amount of time the visitor welcome centre hole is in the ground or the amount of ground that's being dug up at any given time could be reduced, or some combination? I mean some part of the footprint being not dug up for all or part of the period and perhaps the period during which all or part of this being dug up being shrunk.

I worded that in a way that's difficult to answer, but I'll leave that with you.

Mr. Rob Wright:

To be clear on the Centre Block, there will be significant interior demolition work beginning this fall. That's not the construction of particular spaces, but the demolition of large floor plates. Regardless of what you decide you want, that is the way to go. We're comfortable with that. Then the excavation of the visitor welcome centre is to happen in tandem. I understand what's coming from at least certain members of the committee, that waiting could perhaps reduce the footprint and save money, which is admirable. At the same time, waiting spends a lot of money. It's really important for the committee to be aware of that as well. The longer we wait, the more money is being spent. Both sides of the balance sheet have to be looked at.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you very much to all of you. I appreciate it.

The Chair:

I want to thank you all too.

There are lots more questions and meetings. There is another committee coming in here.

Make it really short, David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have just a very quick question to validate.

Is the media being consulted to ensure that there isn't an area like the Hot Room again?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

That is part of the plan.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

I'll go to Mr. Christopherson in a moment.

Just so the committee knows, on Thursday, the first hour is the minister on the main estimates on the debates commission. The second hour is free, perhaps for what Mr. Christopherson is going to do. Then the first meeting after we're back, we had tentatively scheduled to have the review of the draft report on the parallel debating chambers. Sometime we have to get back to Mr. Reid's motion. And we have to get out of here at 1:00 because there is another committee.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

How much time does that give me, Chair? I can't see the face of the clock.

The Chair:

There's about one minute on the clock.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's what I thought. I'll take this opportunity. I appreciate that. I only asked for the floor so that I can formally move my motion: “That the Committee study the following proposed changes to the Standing Orders and report back to the House”. The attached documents with the details of those changes have been circulated in both languages.

I don't know how much discussion we require here. I'm sort of going on the assumption that there's enough support in the back benches to at least explore, and give some air and time to, a lot of work that's been done by a lot of colleagues. I'm a little bit part of it, mostly just contributing thoughts as opposed to being a key player. My role is just that I'm on this committee, so I'm the one moving the motion.

I'd be looking for, either now or quietly afterwards, or at the beginning of the next meeting, but in some way, whether the study is going to become an issue or whether we can quickly deal with this motion and get on with having the delegation come in and start rolling up our sleeves and going through some of the proposals.

That's what I would be seeking going forward. The answer to that will dictate how quickly we can dispose of this motion and get on with the work, or if we're going to have to make a bit of a cause célèbre out of it, which I'm hoping is not the case.

(1300)

The Chair:

We'll certainly discuss that shortly, but probably not today.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm ready to vote.

The Chair:

You're ready to vote.

Mr. David Christopherson:

If I can win, I'll take a vote now.

The Chair:

Ms. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I think we need some time to discuss it further before we go to a vote.

The Chair:

Okay.

We'll bring it up soon, David.

Well, thank you again. Hopefully, these good discussions will continue, because you brought lots of great information today that was very helpful to us. Thank you very much for doing that and keeping us in touch as things proceed.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Français]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour, tout le monde.[Traduction]

Bonjour et bienvenue à la 155e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Ce matin, nous entendrons des témoins dans le cadre de notre étude sur le mandat du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, et sur la surveillance du projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre et la vision et le plan à long terme, comme nous en avons discuté lors de la séance du mardi 7 mai.

Nous recevons Michel Patrice, sous-greffier de l'Administration, et Stéphan Aubé, dirigeant principal de l'information, de la Chambre des communes.

Nous entendrons également Rob Wright, sous-ministre adjoint de la Direction générale de la Cité parlementaire, et Jennifer Garrett, directrice générale du Programme de l'édifice du Centre, de Services gouvernementaux et Approvisionnement Canada.

Nous accueillons en outre Larry Malcic, architecte chez Centrus Architects.

Merci à tous de comparaître. On m'a indiqué que vous pouviez tous rester pour les deux heures que durera la séance. Je crois comprendre que vous ferez un exposé, suivi d'un diaporama sur la vision et le plan à long terme. Les membres du Comité vous poseront ensuite des questions pour le reste de la séance.

Comme vous le savez, nous tenons beaucoup à améliorer les communications à ce sujet; c'est donc une excellente chose que nous nous rencontrions. Tout le monde est enchanté que la présente séance ait lieu.

Monsieur Wright, vous pouvez commencer votre exposé. [Français]

M. Rob Wright (sous-ministre adjoint, Direction générale de la Cité parlementaire, ministère des Travaux publics et des Services gouvernementaux):

Bonjour, monsieur le président et membres du Comité.

Je suis heureux d'être ici, aujourd'hui, pour vous donner une mise à jour du programme de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre.

Je suis accompagné de Mme Jennifer Garrett, directrice générale du Programme de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre, et de M. Larry Malcic, de Centrus, qui est le consultant en design du programme.

Nous sommes heureux de travailler sur ce programme excitant en collaboration avec les partenaires parlementaires et d'avoir l'occasion de discuter de la restauration de l'édifice du Centre avec vous, ce matin.[Traduction]

Depuis le déménagement historique des parlementaires, qui ont quitté l'automne dernier l'édifice du Centre, SPAC et l'Administration de la Chambre des communes se chargent conjointement des préparatifs pour les travaux de réhabilitation majeurs qui seront effectués. Cela exige de travailler en étroite association avec le Parlement pour procéder à la fermeture de l'édifice. Il s'agit de l'isoler complètement du reste de la Colline, par exemple, en réaménageant les réseaux de TI souterrains et en débranchant l'édifice de la centrale de chauffage et de refroidissement.

Une autre partie cruciale du processus de fermeture consiste à s'assurer que les objets d'art et les artefacts encore présents dans l'édifice sont entreposés dans un endroit sûr. Pendant ces travaux, l'édifice du Centre reste sous le contrôle du Parlement. On prévoit qu'il sera officiellement confié à Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada d'ici la fin de l'été.

Pendant que nous continuons de travailler à cet important processus de fermeture, nous mettons également en œuvre le programme d'évaluation, qui a commencé alors que vous occupiez toujours l'édifice du Centre. Nous avons maintenant commencé à ouvrir les planchers, les murs et les plafonds pour mieux évaluer l'état de l'édifice; il s'agit d'une étape importante pour atténuer les risques liés au projet

En plus de nous efforcer de bien saisir l'état de l'édifice, nous collaborons étroitement avec les agents parlementaires à définir les caractéristiques souhaitées pour l'édifice du Centre de l'avenir. Tout en travaillant à moderniser l'édifice du Centre pour qu'il appuie le fonctionnement d'une démocratie parlementaire moderne, nous nous consacrons à remettre ce magnifique bâtiment en état. Nous avons bien compris le désir exprimé par vous et d'autres parlementaires de retrouver l'édifice du Centre que vous connaissez et de vous y sentir chez vous dès sa réouverture.

Par ailleurs, la phase II du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs est un autre élément important dans la discussion entourant l'avenir de l'édifice du Centre. L'agrandissement du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs permettra d'effectuer le filtrage de sécurité des visiteurs hors des murs des édifices du Centre et de l'Est, comme cela a été le cas avec la phase I de l'édifice de l'Ouest. Le centre réaménagé offrira aussi de nouveaux services aux Canadiens et aux touristes étrangers venant visiter les édifices du Parlement. On prévoit également intégrer aux nouvelles installations souterraines des fonctions utiles au fonctionnement du Parlement, comme des salles de comités.

Comme vous le constaterez dans le diaporama à venir, en vertu de la nouvelle conception, le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs rassemblera les édifices de l'Ouest, de l'Est et du Centre de façon à former un complexe parlementaire unifié. À mesure que les travaux progressent, le nouveau rôle de l'édifice du Centre comme cœur d'un complexe parlementaire devrait donner naissance à toutes sortes de possibilités intéressantes. Cette vision d'unification des édifices du Centre, de l'Ouest et de l'Est s'inscrit dans un projet plus large consistant à faire de la Cité parlementaire un complexe intégré rassemblant les installations situées sur la Colline, mais aussi des édifices importants situés dans les trois pâtés de maisons lui faisant face, comme les édifices Wellington, Sir-John-A.-Macdonald et de la Bravoure.

Cette transition exige d'abandonner une vision axée sur des immeubles distincts pour adopter une stratégie d'ensemble à l'égard d'éléments cruciaux et interreliés, comme la sécurité, l'expérience des visiteurs, l'urbanisme et l'aménagement paysager, la manutention et le stationnement, la circulation des personnes et des véhicules, la durabilité environnementale et l'accessibilité.

Vos avis sur les fonctions qui devraient être hébergées dans l'édifice du Centre et le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, et sur la façon dont devrait être organisé l'espace pour servir les parlementaires, les médias et le public, nous seront extrêmement précieux. Nous sommes heureux de comparaître de nouveau devant vous pour entendre vos commentaires, et nous nous faisons fort de poursuivre nos consultations auprès des parlementaires dans le cadre de ces travaux de grande importance.

Je vais maintenant céder la parole à Mme Garrett et à M. Malcic, qui présenteront le diaporama. Je serai ensuite heureux de répondre à toutes vos questions avec l'aide de mes collègues de la Chambre des communes. Merci.

(1105)

Mme Jennifer Garrett (directrice générale, Programme de l'édifice du Centre, ministère des Travaux publics et des Services gouvernementaux):

Merci. Bonjour, monsieur le président et distingués membres du Comité.

Notre diaporama se déroulera comme suit. Je vous expliquerai ce que j'appelle les aspects problématiques du dossier, après quoi je céderai la parole à M. Malcic, qui vous exposera certaines des idées initiales qu'a l'architecte en réaction au programme à moitié fonctionnel que nous avons reçu de nos partenaires parlementaires. Nous terminerons en vous présentant les prochaines étapes.

La diapositive suivante explique la portée du programme. Forts de la réussite des projets de l'édifice où nous nous trouvons et des édifices du Sénat du Canada, nous lançons maintenant le plus important programme de réhabilitation patrimoniale que SPAC ait jamais entrepris. Ce programme comprend essentiellement deux composantes clés, la première étant la modernisation de l'édifice du Centre proprement dit afin de mettre entièrement à niveau l'édifice de base, qu'il s'agisse de la maçonnerie, de la structure, de la résistance aux séismes ou des systèmes mécaniques et électriques. Voilà qui vous donne une idée de l'ampleur de la tâche. Essentiellement, l'édifice de base doit être entièrement porté aux normes modernes. Il faut en outre procéder à la conception dans le cadre d'un programme fonctionnel pour s'assurer d'appuyer les activités parlementaires modernes tout au long du XXIe siècle.

La deuxième composante du programme consiste à construire la deuxième phase du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Essentiellement, devant l'édifice du Centre, nous creuserons un immense trou afin d'y construire la deuxième phase du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, car oui, il s'agira d'une installation souterraine. Cette dernière aura la capacité d'appuyer les activités et les services parlementaires afin d'accueillir les visiteurs qui viennent sur la Colline du Parlement, et nous relierons les édifices de l'Est, de l'Ouest et du Centre afin de former ce que M. Wright a qualifié plus tôt de « complexe parlementaire ».

La diapositive suivante montre l'effort conjoint déployé par l'Administration de la Chambre des communes et nous afin de vous expliquer le processus de conception et de construction que nous suivrons au cours du programme.

Je dirais que pour le moment, nous travaillons encore avec notre gestionnaire de construction afin d'officialiser l'échéancier final du projet, mais nous connaissons les principaux jalons que nous pouvons vous présenter ce matin. À l'heure actuelle, nous avons essentiellement un horizon de trois ans pour le projet.

Sur le plan de la conception, nous avons essentiellement lancé la phase du programme fonctionnel ainsi que le processus de conception schématique. Si vous suivez les deux premières lignes de flèches, soit celles du programme fonctionnel et de la conception, vous verrez que d'ici la fin de l'exercice, en mars, notre objectif consiste à choisir une option préférée en matière de conception à l'étape de la conception schématique pour l'édifice du Centre et le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Cependant, si on descend pour commencer à suivre les activités de construction, on voit qu'il y a une approche intégrée par couches sur le plan du programme. Nous n'attendons pas la fin du processus de conception pour entamer les activités de construction. Deux activités de construction clés que nous lancerons à l'automne et à l'hiver visent à procéder à la démolition et à l'abattage ciblés à l'intérieur de l'édifice du Centre en novembre et à commencer l'excavation au cours de l'hiver 2020. À cette fin, notre gestionnaire de construction a déjà amorcé le processus d'appel d'offres.

Voilà les principales étapes prévues pour les grands programmes.

En outre, nous avons déjà lancé le programme d'évaluation exhaustive auquel M. Wright a fait référence dans son exposé. Nous travaillons activement à ce programme, tout en achevant ce que nous appelons les « projets habilitants , comme celui du quai de chargement temporaire. Parmi ces projets figuraient le déplacement des Livres du Souvenir, les routes de construction temporaires et l'aménagement du chantier de construction.

La diapositive suivante comprend un schéma, dont certains ou la totalité d'entre vous ont peut-être déjà vu une version préalable montrant ce dont le site devrait avoir l'air au début du programme. La diapositive devant vous vous présente le fruit de nos dernières réflexions et interactions en matière de planification avec le gestionnaire de construction. Elle montre ce que nous pensons être la disposition prévue du chantier de construction dans le cadre du programme. De fait, si vous examinez la partie gauche de la diapositive, vous verrez l'endroit où se trouve la phase un du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, alors que la zone grise hachurée montre essentiellement l'empreinte du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs proposé à la phase deux, le tout se fondant sur les besoins exprimés par les partenaires parlementaires jusqu'à présent dans le cadre du programme fonctionnel.

(1110)



Le tout s'appuie essentiellement sur une combinaison de trois facteurs, qui déterminent l'emplacement de cette ligne: le soutien aux activités parlementaires, les besoins en matière de construction pour ce qui deviendra un immense chantier de construction, et la gestion de l'expérience des visiteurs.

Nous voulons nous assurer de concilier tous ces facteurs; nous avons donc fait beaucoup d'activités et de coordination afin de tracer cette ligne en tenant compte de l'Administration de la Chambre des communes, du Sénat et de la Bibliothèque, en consultation avec notre gestionnaire de construction. Cette ligne nous permettra, selon nous, de continuer d'appuyer les activités parlementaires et d'offrir un programme d'accueil des visiteurs sur le terrain avant, tout en permettant au gestionnaire de construction d'exécuter le programme.

Je passerai à la diapositive suivante. Avant de céder la parole à Larry, je voulais traiter de points ou de défis que nous connaissons déjà au chapitre de la conception et auxquels nous commencerons à nous attaquer dans les prochains mois dans le cadre du programme. Comme je l'ai indiqué lorsque je présentais la diapositive sur la portée, la modernisation de l'édifice de base aura des répercussions considérables dans l'édifice du Centre en réduisant l'espace disponible. Pour avoir étudié la question, nous savons actuellement, grâce à notre évaluation et à notre compréhension des exigences de la modernisation et du code, que le projet réduira de quelque 2 500 mètres carrés l'espace disponible pour le programme fonctionnel dans l'édifice du Centre.

Pour vous donner un aperçu de l'espace physique que cette superficie représente, cela équivaudrait à tous les bureaux du quatrième étage de l'édifice du Centre. Ces travaux visent à installer les conduites pour des systèmes de chauffage, de ventilation et de climatisation modernes, et à améliorer la structure afin de mettre en place la solution de résistance aux séismes, des toilettes, des salles de TI et d'autres installations afin de satisfaire l'éventail de besoins fonctionnels de l'édifice. C'est la première étape.

La deuxième concerne les défis techniques qui vont de pair avec la mise en œuvre d'un important programme de modernisation dans un des plus importants édifices patrimoniaux du pays. Je peux vous garantir que nous faisons appel à des restaurateurs et à des personnes aux expériences variées pour intervenir, mais le défi est de taille. À l'appui de ces activités, nous avons entièrement établi la hiérarchie patrimoniale de l'édifice, faisant de notre mieux pour intervenir de manière à avoir le moins de répercussions possible sur le patrimoine dans les aires patrimoniales où la hiérarchie est moins élevée dans l'édifice. Nous déployons donc des efforts à ce sujet.

Enfin, les demandes reçues à ce jour de la part des partenaires parlementaires dans le cadre du programme fonctionnel dépassent actuellement l'offre d'espace disponible. Nous avons donc un problème d'offre et de demande. Nous tenterons de trouver une solution dans les prochains mois. Nous vous présenterons une série de décisions clés après que l'architecte vous aura expliqué le programme afin de vous donner une petite idée de ce que nous ferons à cet égard.

Nous passerons maintenant à la diapositive suivante, et sans plus attendre, je céderai la parole à M. Malcic.

(1115)

M. Larry Malcic (architecte, Centrus Architects):

Merci.

Je suis enchanté de témoigner de nouveau devant le Comité pour lui présenter de l'information et des idées sur la réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre.

Ce dernier est, comme Mme Garrett l'a souligné, un important édifice patrimonial que nous souhaitons préserver. Cet édifice constitue toutefois également le cœur de la démocratie parlementaire canadienne, laquelle a évolué au cours du dernier siècle depuis la conception et la construction de l'édifice. Ce qui est demeuré constant, cependant, c'est l'importance des principes de planification fondamentaux à l'origine de ce trio d'édifices. Ce sont des principes du plan de style beaux-arts qui mettent en lumière la hiérarchie des espaces et l'importance de la circulation cérémoniale et des parcours de procession, tout en offrant de très solides infrastructures pour les aspects fonctionnels de l'édifice. Les deux chambres, soit la Chambre des communes et le Sénat, sont disposées de manière symétrique autour de l'axe formé par la Bibliothèque et la rotonde de la Confédération. Ces dernières années s'est ajoutée la flamme du centenaire. Nous voulons, alors que nous allons de l'avant avec le projet, élargir le plan de style beaux-arts afin de créer un campus ou un complexe d'édifices convenant à tous les égards aux intentions historiques des créateurs initiaux de la Colline du Parlement.

Alors que nous examinons le projet du point de vue conceptuel, nous voyons de quelle manière nous comptons maintenir l'axe dans la conception. En fait, nous rapprocherons le tout de manière à mieux intégrer les édifices en nous appuyant sur les principes fondamentaux grâce à l'ajout de la phase deux du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Ce faisant, nous relierons les édifices de l'Est et de l'Ouest et fournirons des espaces supplémentaires qui font défaut depuis longtemps dans l'édifice du Centre, particulièrement de nouvelles salles de comité, une nouvelle entrée au complexe, notamment pour les visiteurs, et des liens menant aux autres édifices, comme je l'ai indiqué.

Je veux commencer aujourd'hui en parlant peut-être des points à considérer pour la modernisation de la Chambre des communes. Cette dernière, à titre de point de mire de l'édifice, illustre les problèmes qui se posent dans l'édifice. Nous voulons que la conception soit à l'épreuve du temps afin de pouvoir accueillir les députés, dont le nombre augmentera à mesure que la population croîtra. Nous devons trouver un moyen d'y parvenir.

Il faut toutefois se poser la question fondamentale suivante: le ferons-nous dans l'empreinte actuelle de la Chambre ou devrions-nous procéder à un agrandissement?

Nous devons nous demander si nous pouvons réutiliser le mobilier actuel, qui faisait partie de la conception initiale, ou si nous devons en acheter du nouveau.

À mesure que le nombre de députés augmentera, celui des groupes de pression fera de même. Comment ferons-nous pour que l'édifice puisse suivre cette croissance importante, qui témoigne en fait de la croissance de la population?

Enfin, il y a la question de l'accessibilité universelle, qui est importante dans l'ensemble de l'édifice et à laquelle les concepteurs initiaux n'ont jamais pensé.

Si je commence par les considérations relatives à la Chambre des communes, les problèmes fondamentaux incluent les exigences ayant trait à la sécurité et au code, en ce qui concerne notamment l'accessibilité universelle et, comme je l'ai indiqué plus tôt, le nombre de places assises pour tenir compte de l'augmentation de la population et du nombre de parlementaires. À cet égard, il faudra tenir compte des biens patrimoniaux que contient l'édifice, de la future technologie de diffusion et de communication, de la modernisation de tous les systèmes de chauffage, de climatisation et de plomberie, et de la résistance à l'activité sismique, tous des facteurs qui n'ont évidemment jamais été pris en compte lors la conception initiale de l'édifice.

À mesure que nous faisons des découvertes et que nous examinons tous ces aspects de l'édifice, nous réalisons un ensemble fondamental de dessins. Vous en voyez un ici; il s'agit d'une section de la Chambre des communes qui montre à quel point nous utilisons également la technologie moderne, dont l'autométrie photographique, pour intégrer de véritables images photo aux dessins proprement dits.

(1120)



Examinons l'aménagement des sièges dans l'enceinte de la Chambre des communes. Actuellement, l'aménagement ne satisfait pas aux exigences du code du bâtiment en matière de sécurité des personnes ou d'accessibilité. Nous devons corriger ces lacunes. Nous devons aussi fournir des sièges supplémentaires, idéalement pour passer à 400 sièges, plus le fauteuil du Président, ce qui nous donnerait la latitude nécessaire pour la croissance des prochaines décennies. Nous pouvons apporter des améliorations importantes pour atteindre cette capacité, en partie. Cependant, des changements seront nécessaires, évidemment, ce qui exigera des compromis. Nous estimons être en mesure de respecter le code et d'assurer l'accessibilité du parquet de la Chambre jusqu'à la zone ambulatoire, comme on le voit dans l'une des options que j'ai préparées pour atteindre les 400 sièges.

Cette solution potentielle est fondée sur le maintien de l'aménagement traditionnel des sièges à la Chambre, les sièges parallèles. Bien que d'autres configurations soient utilisées ailleurs, la configuration de la salle actuelle se prête à un aménagement en parallèle.

Lorsqu'on étudie la Chambre, il convient de ne pas se limiter au parquet. Il faut aussi considérer les tribunes qui l'entourent, qui doivent être modernisées, car les mêmes enjeux liés à la sécurité des personnes et à l'accessibilité s'y posent. Nous avons conçu des options pour améliorer ces aspects, mais cela a une incidence sur la capacité. Actuellement, les tribunes comptent 553 sièges au total, ce qui pourrait être réduit à environ 305 sièges afin de respecter les normes actuelles du code du bâtiment et assurer l'accessibilité. Pour ce faire, il faudrait réaménager les sièges et réduire l'inclinaison abrupte des tribunes nord et sud, qui ne sont plus conformes au code.

Je souligne que le programme fonctionnel comprend l'aménagement d'une salle dans le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs afin de permettre aux gens de suivre les délibérations de la Chambre à distance, dans un cadre plus approprié avec des écrans multimédias. Cela pourrait être une façon moderne et appropriée d'accroître le nombre de spectateurs pour les séances de la Chambre.

Examinons la tribune nord plus attentivement. Une des options consisterait à réduire l'inclinaison de la tribune afin d'offrir des points de vue entièrement accessibles et de respecter le code du bâtiment. Cela vous donne un aperçu de l'incidence des codes du bâtiment modernes sur l'espace existant.

Pour la tribune sud, le plan d'aménagement comprend, dans ce cas-ci, la cabine de l'opérateur de console. Voilà ce que nous pouvons faire pour prendre les mesures d'adaptation qui s'imposent, mais sans altérer le tissu historique ou l'apparence de la salle, qui sont si importants pour maintenir la dignité du Parlement.

En ce qui concerne les salles de comité, leur importance et leur utilisation ont considérablement changé au cours des 100 dernières années. Ils font maintenant partie intégrante du processus législatif; la demande est grande. Tant le Sénat que la Chambre des communes ont besoin de nouvelles salles de comité. Je vais laisser M. Wright donner des détails à ce sujet.

M. Rob Wright:

Merci, Larry.

Comme on vient de l'indiquer, diverses options seront offertes, et celles qui sont présentées ici ne sont qu'à titre indicatif. Beaucoup plus d'options seront examinées au fil du temps. Donc, nous en sommes essentiellement au début de la discussion. Il importe de le souligner. Ce n'est pas l'aboutissement de la discussion, mais un élément essentiel.

Les salles de comité en font partie. Les exigences à cet égard sont claires. La question est de savoir où elles devraient être situées. Il est important de considérer l'emplacement des salles de comité dans le contexte général de la Cité parlementaire. Alors que nous nous concentrons sur le projet de l'édifice du Centre, nous avons tendance à vouloir tout intégrer à l'édifice du Centre, mais il pourrait être avisé, pour nous et le Parlement, d'examiner cela en fonction d'un contexte plus large axé sur la création d'un campus intégré, par exemple avec une plus grande intégration des installations aux infrastructures des tunnels. Le choix de l'emplacement des salles de comité sera donc très important.

Mon dernier point au sujet de cette diapositive porte sur les salles de comité patrimoniales de l'édifice du Centre. Assurer un niveau de sécurité adéquat pour une salle de caucus, par exemple, n'est pas facile. Nous avons investi dans l'édifice de l'Ouest et, tandis que nous progressons vers la création d'un complexe parlementaire, réfléchir aux façons d'utiliser l'édifice de l'Ouest et l'édifice du Centre en tandem, comme une installation intégrée, pourrait être utile.

Passons maintenant à la diapositive suivante.

Vous voyez ici l'emplacement actuel des salles de comité, étant donné que l'édifice du Centre est maintenant hors service. Beaucoup de salles de comité ne sont pas sur la Colline. Vous constaterez qu'un certain nombre d'investissements importants ont été faits à l'extérieur de la Colline du Parlement, tant pour la Chambre des communes que pour le Sénat.

Comment pouvons-nous tirer parti de ces investissements à long terme et veiller à ce que l'emplacement des salles réservées aux travaux parlementaires soit toujours fonction de leur incidence sur le fonctionnement du Parlement?

Sur la diapositive suivante, nous présentons les divers emplacements possibles des salles de comité. Vous pouvez voir qu'il y aura toujours, dans l'édifice du Centre, des salles de comité, tant pour la Chambre que pour le Sénat. Vous pouvez voir les emplacements potentiels des salles de comité dans le cadre de la phase 2 du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Vous pouvez voir les propositions pour les pavillons, comme on les appelle, à l'extrémité nord de l'édifice du Centre et une proposition sur l'établissement des salles de comité dans l'édifice de l'Ouest.

L'édifice de l'Est fera l'objet d'une restauration majeure pour le Sénat. Des salles de comité pourraient y être ajoutées. Évidemment, les salles de comité actuelles de l'édifice Wellington et de l'édifice de la Bravoure sont là. Ce sont toujours d'importants investissements. Il est aussi important de garder à l'esprit que nous travaillerons à l'aménagement de nouvelles installations pour la Chambre et le Sénat du Canada au 100, rue Wellington, près de l'ancienne ambassade des États-Unis. Ces installations serviront de locaux transitoires. Cela nous permettra de vider l'édifice de la Confédération, qui doit être restauré, ainsi que l'édifice de l'Est. À long terme, ces locaux pourraient être intégrés en permanence au complexe parlementaire. C'est un autre emplacement éventuel pour les salles de comité.

Nous devons échelonner tout cela dans le temps pour veiller à répondre aux besoins des parlementaires. Il s'agit d'une discussion importante sur la marche à suivre. Notre but est de faire les meilleurs investissements au nom du Parlement pour satisfaire aux exigences d'une démocratie parlementaire moderne.

Encore une fois, c'est une discussion importante qui aura lieu au cours des prochains mois.

Je cède la parole à Larry pour la suite.

(1125)

M. Larry Malcic:

Merci.

La circulation et les connexions sont essentielles au fonctionnement de tout bâtiment. Le plan de circulation de l'édifice du Centre lui-même était très clair, en raison de son style beaux-arts typique. Encore une fois, cependant, nous en sommes aux étapes de planification et de conception des moyens d'accroître la clarté et l'efficacité de ce système de circulation.

Cela nécessite la prise en compte de nombreux facteurs distincts. Ici, vous pouvez voir ce que nous voulons faire pour aménager la nouvelle porte d'entrée du Parlement, dans le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Notre objectif est qu'elle serve d'entrée publique et qu'elle facilite la circulation du public.

Nous voulons nous assurer que les parlementaires et leur personnel peuvent circuler tout aussi efficacement. Idéalement, les voies d'accès seraient indépendantes des voies réservées au public. Dans ce contexte, il faut aussi prendre en compte l'entretien de l'édifice. Comment peut-on faire entrer les marchandises et les distribuer partout à l'intérieur? Comment peut-on éliminer les déchets sans nuire aux activités des occupants de l'édifice?

Toutes ces choses sont entremêlées. À cela s'ajoute la circulation des travailleurs de la construction. Il faut en tenir compte dans le plan de circulation. L'objectif est de relier tous les bâtiments pour qu'ils fonctionnent comme un campus, comme un complexe de bâtiments. Ce sera avantageux, car ils fonctionneront de manière intégrée et non de façon indépendante.

Nous en sommes encore à l'étape de la conception, pour le moment, mais vous commencez à voir — ici, en vert — le chemin que pourront emprunter les membres du public, en passant par le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, qui serait l'entrée horizontale, disons, puis ils pourraient monter, verticalement, dans les puits de lumière actuels ou les cours de l'édifice. Le public aurait alors un accès direct aux tribunes. Les parcours des visiteurs et des membres du public ne croiseraient pas nécessairement les voies d'accès réservées aux parlementaires et au personnel. Toutefois, cela démontre que nous considérons que les cours intérieures font partie intégrante d'une solution visant à améliorer l'édifice du Centre et son fonctionnement. L'installation de vitrage et de cloisons nous permet de réduire l'empreinte extérieure globale du bâtiment et d'améliorer sa durabilité en réduisant sa consommation d'énergie. Ainsi, nous aurions la possibilité d'aménager divers espaces propices à l'introduction de nouvelles fonctions, y compris la circulation.

Enfin, nous avons déjà parlé du centre d'accueil et de son rôle dans l'ensemble. Vous voyez ici une représentation schématique de notre vision. C'est une occasion formidable. Je pourrais dire que c'est une occasion unique d'agrandir l'édifice du Centre — en vert, vous voyez l'agrandissement de la Chambre des communes — pour aménager des salles de comité et d'autres installations auxiliaires qui jouent un rôle essentiel dans les activités du Parlement.

En rouge, à l'est, vous voyez l'agrandissement du Sénat.

En orange, vous voyez les exigences de la Bibliothèque du Parlement qui visent à améliorer l'expérience des visiteurs.

En jaune, vous voyez la séquence d'entrée. Ce sera une entrée convenable, une entrée qui reflétera la dignité du Parlement, selon la définition traditionnelle du terme. Le résultat serait l'intégration, en un seul campus, de l'ensemble des édifices actuels, l'établissement de liens avec l'édifice de l'Est et l'édifice de l'Ouest, et la création de nouveaux locaux au Sénat et à la Chambre. Après sa réouverture, l'édifice du Centre, qui aura été dégagé, pourra fonctionner comme il a été imaginé et conçu, en conservant sa dignité, son histoire et son importance. En outre, nous veillerons à ce qu'il puisse jouer efficacement son rôle au cœur de la démocratie parlementaire canadienne.

(1130)

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Plus tôt dans notre exposé, nous avons parlé de la prise de décisions clés en matière de programmation. Dans la prestation de ce programme, nous visons à prendre des décisions selon des approches multidimensionnelles, du niveau plus général au plus détaillé, afin que les décisions soient prises dans les délais appropriés. Nous recherchons des décisions durables, car dans des projets comme celui-ci, le changement est notre ennemi, évidemment. Une fois franchie l'étape de la conception, tout retour en arrière pour annuler les décisions que vous avez prises a un coût, en temps et, ultimement, en argent.

Pour ce qui est des décisions essentielles visant à appuyer le programme, vous verrez que certaines d'entre elles sont liées aux travaux de base de modernisation de l'édifice, et d'autres qui sont davantage liées au programme fonctionnel ou au programme parlementaire. Nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec les administrations de la Chambre des communes, du Sénat et de la Bibliothèque du Parlement pour veiller à ce que ces décisions soient prises puis transmises à l'architecte, pour la réussite du programme.

L'élimination de l'amiante, les mesures parasismiques et les principales décisions essentielles liées au programme fonctionnel — l'apparence physique de la palissade, la taille de la Chambre — sont toutes des décisions clés que nous devons prendre en toute transparence. Ici, on ne parle pas seulement de la conception, mais aussi de leur incidence sur les activités parlementaires et de leur coût.

Nous avons des discussions semblables avec nos autres partenaires, puis nous consultons les parlementaires en conséquence. De toute évidence, certains partenaires bénéficieront de la rétroaction tant attendue des parlementaires. Nous avons hâte de travailler avec la Chambre des communes pour obtenir cette rétroaction.

Pour terminer cet exposé, je vais vous donner un aperçu des étapes du programme de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre au cours de la prochaine année. Comme je l'ai mentionné plus tôt, nous allons mettre au point le programme fonctionnel et la conception schématique pour qu'une décision soit prise quant à l'option préférée d'ici le mois de mars. Une série de projets de base ont été mis en œuvre. Des travaux préparatoires en vue de l'importante étape de la construction sont en cours, notamment les travaux sur les aires de détente du côté est et le déplacement des monuments.

Cette année sera votre dernière occasion de célébrer la fête du Canada sur la Colline du Parlement, comme le veut la tradition. En effet, quelque temps après la fête du Travail, une clôture sera rapidement érigée le long de la ligne de délimitation du site que vous avez vue plus tôt dans la présentation, et la construction commencera sur le site même du programme de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre. Par exemple, vous assisterez notamment au démantèlement du mur de Vaux, à l'installation de remorques de construction et à la mise en place de la palissade en vue de la construction.

Nous poursuivons notre travail sur le plan de mise en œuvre et la conception de la palissade. Nous aurons bientôt des renseignements utiles à ce sujet. Au début de 2020, nous terminerons le programme d'évaluation globale, qui servira au processus de conception, ainsi que le regroupement des informations sur l'immeuble, l'établissement des coûts, de la portée et du calendrier.

C'est tout pour la présentation.

C'est avec plaisir que nous répondrons à vos questions.

(1135)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup de cette présentation très détaillée et utile.

Nous commençons les questions avec Mme Lapointe. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les témoins de leur présentation.

Franchement, j'aurais aimé y assister au mois de décembre ou au mois de mars. En nous montrant des documents beaucoup plus précis, le chemin que vous empruntez semble bien plus clair. Vous semblez beaucoup mieux préparés que lorsque vous êtes venus les dernières fois, grâce à ces documents à l'appui.

Tantôt, vous avez dit que vous alliez intégrer les différents édifices ensemble. Présentement, on peut aller de l'édifice du Centre à l'édifice de l'Est par un couloir. Cela veut dire qu'il va y avoir la même chose entre l'édifice...

Est-ce que vous connecterez l'édifice de la Bravoure ainsi que l'édifice Victoria, pour que les parlementaires puissent se promener entre les deux par des couloirs intérieurs?

M. Rob Wright:

Oui, exactement. Dans l'avenir, le but est exactement d'avoir une cité parlementaire intégrée à l'infrastructure et de créer des édifices reliés par des tunnels, notamment.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Vous parlez des édifices de la Bravoure et Victoria, mais vous ne parlez pas des édifices Wellington, de la Confédération, ainsi que de la Justice, là où se trouve actuellement la majorité des bureaux des députés.

M. Rob Wright:

Oui, c'est exactement la même chose.

C'est le même but en ce qui concerne les édifices Wellington et Sir-John-A.-Macdonald, ainsi que les édifices de la Confédération et de la Justice.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Il faudra éventuellement plusieurs années avant d'en arriver là. Si je comprends bien, tous ces petits autobus qui circulent vont disparaître?

M. Rob Wright:

C'est une question à poser au Parlement pour savoir quelle serait la meilleure solution.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord.

M. Rob Wright:

À Washington, il y a un service de navette dans un tunnel pour permettre au personnel de circuler.

Ce serait peut-être une bonne idée à emprunter, ou peut-être pas. Cela fait partie d'une autre discussion.

(1140)

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Il est sûr et certain que, durant la construction, les petits autobus qui circulent un peu partout ne facilitent pas la tâche.

C'est en tout cas intéressant.

Dans vos documents, vous avez parlé plus tôt de 2 500 mètres carrés qui serviront au fonctionnement des édifices, ce qui équivaut à la superficie du 4e étage de l'édifice du Centre. Présentement, on fait fonctionner l'édifice du Centre. De combien d'espace a-t-on besoin? Je ne comprends pas qu'il faille plus d'espace.

Comme les techniques de chauffage et de plomberie qui sont utilisées datent de plusieurs années, voire de 100 ans, et que les techniques d'aujourd'hui se sont améliorées, est-ce que je me trompe en disant que cela devrait prendre moins d'espace? [Traduction]

M. Rob Wright:

Il y a deux ou trois aspects très importants. Le premier est le manque d'escaliers et d'ascenseurs dans l'édifice du Centre. Ils prendront beaucoup d'espace.

Je vous donne un exemple pour l'édifice de l'Ouest. L'espace requis pour les systèmes mécaniques était 14 fois plus important lorsque nous sommes déménagés de l'ancien bâtiment à ce bâtiment moderne. Il faut donc beaucoup plus d'espace pour ces systèmes. Nous prévoyons qu'il y aura plus de salles de toilettes pour les parlementaires; il faudra plus d'espace, notamment pour la plomberie. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

C'est sûr. [Traduction]

M. Rob Wright:

L'édifice du Centre n'est pas doté d'un système de climatisation centrale et, à bien des égards, il n'est pas conforme au Code du bâtiment. Il faudra de l'espace pour le moderniser conformément au Code.

Donc, il faudra de l'espace pour en faire un bâtiment moderne conforme aux codes du bâtiment actuels. L'une des possibilités — et ce n'est que le début d'une discussion — est d'exploiter les cours intérieures pour qu'une partie de cet espace... Comme vous l'avez vu dans la présentation, c'est une possibilité pour les ascenseurs. Ainsi, vous perdriez moins d'espace dans l'intérieur patrimonial de l'édifice. Ces décisions seront fondamentalement essentielles au fil du temps. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord.

Quand vous êtes venus nous rencontrer les dernières fois, nous avons parlé de consulter les parlementaires ayant travaillé dans l'ancien édifice du Centre. Le Bureau de régie interne devait être consulté, ainsi que les députés. Y a-t-il eu une consultation des députés pour recueillir leur avis? Je peux vous donner le mien.

Dans votre document, pour lequel je vous remercie, vous montrez qu'il y a actuellement 338 places et qu'il y en aura 400. Les gens sont assis en rang d'oignons. Je peux vous dire que les chaises rabattables par rangées de cinq, ça ne fonctionne pas. J'étais moi-même assise sur une banquette composée de chaises rabattables. Souvent, plusieurs collègues ne sont pas à l'heure et il faut toujours se lever pour les laisser passer.

Je ne sais pas si c'est à cela que vous pensez, mais je vous dis que ce n'est vraiment pas commode.

Consultez-vous les parlementaires qui travaillent ici actuellement?

Avec 400 places, je ne sais pas si nous serons en mesure de circuler.

M. Michel Patrice (sous-greffier, Administration, Chambre des communes):

Je vous remercie, madame Lapointe, de votre question.

En réponse à votre première question, en ce qui concerne le plan suggéré, il ne s'agit que d'une option pour démontrer qu'il faut tenir compte de la croissance éventuelle du nombre de députés à la Chambre des communes.

L'intention est effectivement de présenter ces options au groupe de travail qui a été formé par le Bureau de la régie interne. Plus tard, il s'agira aussi de consulter évidemment ce comité-ci. Donc, c'est une option. Vous avez vu, dans toute la présentation, qu'aucune décision définitive n'a été prise, il ne s'agit que d'options. De plus, je considère qu'il est de notre devoir commun, à Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada et à l'Administration de la Chambre, de vous présenter des options pour démarrer la discussion et recevoir des directives en vue de répondre à vos besoins à titre de parlementaires.

Pour ce qui est des consultations sur l'expérience que vous êtes tous et toutes en train de vivre en occupant l'édifice de l'Ouest, il y a effectivement des employés de l'Administration qui vont rencontrer des députés, par exemple, des agents ou des membres du personnel de ces bureaux pour leur demander leur rétroaction, ainsi que leurs suggestions, conseils et commentaires.

(1145)

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Est-ce que ce sera dans les cinq prochaines semaines? Ensuite, la session sera ajournée et, avant qu'on revienne, il pourrait s'écouler beaucoup de temps.

M. Michel Patrice:

C'est exact.

Nous sommes tout à fait conscients en fait de cette période particulière. Ce que je vous dis, c'est que les rencontres avec les parlementaires ou les membres de leur personnel ont déjà débuté. Elles vont continuer au cours des cinq prochaines semaines et elles se poursuivront vraisemblablement durant la période postélectorale.

Le président:

Merci.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

C'est fini? J'ai encore des questions à poser.

Le président:

Oui. Vous pourrez continuer au prochain tour.[Traduction]

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

J'ai bien aimé également les questions intelligentes de Mme Lapointe, et les réponses ont également été très éclairantes, alors je remercie les témoins qui ont répondu aux questions.

Je tiens à remercier tous les témoins de leur présence aujourd'hui, et en particulier des nouveaux renseignements très utiles que vous nous avez fournis. La présentation que vous nous avez faite est, de loin, l'information la plus utile que nous ayons reçue jusqu'à maintenant, et nous vous en sommes tous reconnaissants.

Comme il fallait s'y attendre, cela soulève beaucoup de questions.

J'ai une question que je veux vous poser tout d'abord avant de revenir aux documents. Elle s'adresse à M. Patrice. Lorsque vous êtes venu témoigner le 19 mars dernier, vous avez mentionné que le Bureau de régie interne avait approuvé un modèle de gouvernance, qui sera probablement très pertinent à partir de maintenant. Pourriez-vous en faire parvenir une copie à notre greffier?

M. Michel Patrice:

Oui, je vais vous faire parvenir la décision qui a été prise par le Bureau de régie interne. Le modèle de gouvernance sera établi, à vrai dire, par les membres du groupe de travail, mais bien sûr, le groupe de travail, comme il en a été discuté au Bureau, fera rapport au Bureau, et il consultera et rencontrera le Comité et d'autres intervenants pour assurer la réussite du programme.

M. Scott Reid:

Si ce n'est pas trop demander, pourriez-vous faire parvenir les documents pertinents à temps pour que nous puissions les examiner à notre séance de jeudi, qui portera également sur le même sujet?

M. Michel Patrice:

Je vais faire de mon mieux.

M. Scott Reid:

Si vous pouviez le faire, je vous en serais très reconnaissant.

Merci beaucoup du diagramme de Gantt qui est très utile. En le regardant, je vois que vous avez divisé le projet en fonction des périodes. La première est avril à septembre — soit la période dans laquelle nous nous trouvons — lorsque certains éléments se mettent en branle.

L'événement qui se produit en septembre 2019 est la fermeture de l'édifice du Centre. Cela aura lieu quelque part en septembre. Certains éléments débutent pendant la période dans laquelle nous nous trouvons et se poursuivent après septembre. L'un d'eux qui retiennent plus précisément mon attention est l'avant-projet de conception. Il me semble qu'il sera très difficile d'obtenir nos commentaires et ceux de la Chambre des communes en entamant ce processus avant les prochaines élections.

De plus, je dois souligner que la gestion de construction — le processus d'appels d'offres — commence en septembre, ce qui veut dire qu'il se pourrait que certains appels d'offres soient mis en place avant que le Parlement ou la Chambre des communes n'ait eu la chance d'effectuer aucune surveillance. Nous serons au beau milieu des élections; personne ne sera en mesure d'effectuer la surveillance. Je pense que c'est un problème.

Afin de s'assurer que la Chambre des communes — qui, après tout, est l'organe de surveillance des dépenses — peut assumer la part de contrôle qui lui revient, tant pour ce qui est des coûts engagés que ce à quoi ils sont associés, je vous encourage à reporter le tout après les élections. Je suis conscient que cela n'aurait pas pour effet d'accélérer le projet, mais je pense que c'est le genre de situation où il serait opportun de le faire. Mes collègues pourraient avoir une opinion contraire, mais c'est ma première observation. C'est un échéancier qui pose problème. Je lance tout simplement l'idée pour que vous puissiez en discuter.

Monsieur Malcic, merci d'être avec nous. Vos remarques au sujet des enjeux architecturaux ont été très utiles. J'ai une question de nature administrative à vous poser. De qui prenez-vous officiellement vos ordres ou vos instructions? Ou, si vous préférez, qui vous a accordé le contrat?

M. Larry Malcic:

Nous avons été embauchés par Travaux publics.

(1150)

M. Scott Reid:

Je vois que Mme Garrett lève la main. Est-ce que cela veut dire que c'est vous qui leur donnez les instructions?

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Oui, en effet. Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada est à la fois le réalisateur du projet — l'autorité financière responsable du projet et des fonds que nous recevons du Conseil du Tésor et les pouvoirs d'approbation connexes — et l'autorité contractante. C'est notre ministère qui a attribué le contrat à Centrus, et comme nous sommes le responsable technique chargé du contrat, ils suivent nos instructions.

À ce sujet, nos partenaires parlementaires nous font part de leurs exigences, que nous convertissons en tâches définies que le concepteur doit exécuter, mais c'est bel et bien Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada qui leur donne les instructions.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur Malcic, est-ce que vous avez un ou plusieurs contrats?

M. Larry Malcic:

Il s'agit d'un seul contrat.

M. Scott Reid:

Je présume que le contrat est du domaine public. C'est une question que je ne devrais pas vous poser à vous, monsieur Malcic, mais plutôt à Mme Garrett. Seriez-vous en mesure de fournir l'information au Comité?

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Bien sûr, nous pouvons vous la faire parvenir. En fait, nous avons fourni l'information à l'Administration de la Chambre des communes, et c'est sur le site achatsetventes.gc.ca. Il s'agissait d'un appel d'offres public et l'information est publique. Nous allons vous fournir l'information sans problème.

M. Scott Reid:

Au sujet de la gestion de construction et de l'ensemble des détails de design, je présume qu'il y a des appels d'offres en préparation. Même s'ils ne sont pas rendus publics, serait-il possible de faire parvenir au Comité quel sera leur contenu, soit ce sur quoi ils porteront? Est-ce déjà prêt, et si c'est le cas, est-ce de l'information que vous pourriez nous fournir?

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Tout à fait. Nous serons heureux de le faire. Je peux vous donner un peu de contexte tout de suite, ce qui aiderait sans doute à vous rassurer un peu.

Nous sommes très conscients de travailler pendant une période électorale. Nous essayons de consulter les gens et de recueillir leurs points de vue pour nous assurer de pouvoir continuer de travailler sur le programme. Heureusement, quelques-unes des premières décisions qui doivent être prises portent sur des aspects du bâtiment de base, tout particulièrement pour ce qui est des deux jalons importants dont je vous parlais au début de mon exposé, soit entreprendre les travaux ciblés de démolition et d'assainissement qui doivent avoir lieu, de toute façon, dans l'édifice du Centre même, de même que les travaux d'excavation. On ne parle pas de lancer des appels d'offres pour tout le programme par l'entremise du gestionnaire de construction. On parle de lancer des appels d'offres pour ces aspects préliminaires des travaux.

Nous serons heureux de vous fournir les détails dès qu'ils seront prêts. Nous travaillons sur ces documents en ce moment.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

S'il y a d'autres renseignements que vous pouvez nous faire parvenir, nous aimerions les recevoir. Je vais m'en tenir à cela, et nous pourrons sans doute faire du suivi auprès du greffier à la prochaine réunion pour savoir ce que vous avez été en mesure de nous soumettre.

Monsieur le président, me reste-t-il du temps ?

Le président:

Il vous reste huit secondes.

M. Scott Reid:

Dans ce cas, merci de votre présence et de vos réponses très éclairantes.

Le président:

J'ai oublié de souhaiter la bienvenue à M. Dominic Lessard, directeur adjoint, Biens immobiliers, qui travaille pour la Chambre des communes.

Merci d'être avec nous.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

C'est bien. Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à tous d'être avec nous.

C'est intéressant, très fascinant, de voir les choses évoluer.

Je pense qu'une des difficultés à venir est la possibilité d'une chambre parallèle. La bonne nouvelle, c'est que cela renforcerait notre démocratie; nous avons déjà effectué une première étude. Le rapport n'est pas encore prêt, mais j'ai le pressentiment qu'on recommandera notamment à la Chambre de continuer d'examiner la question.

L'inconvénient, c'est que la décision ne sera pas prise tout de suite, mais que ce serait un élément important pour prévoir l'espace. Il faut que l'espace soit réservé uniquement à cet usage, si cela va dans le sens de ce que nous envisageons actuellement.

J'aimerais avoir vos idées sur la façon de procéder, étant donné les divers échéanciers ici.

M. Michel Patrice:

Nous allons nous adapter aux exigences de la Chambre des communes. Nous avons suivi avec intérêt les discussions du Comité à propos de la chambre parallèle et attendons avec impatience le rapport du Comité et la décision de la Chambre à ce sujet. Notre rôle consiste à nous adapter aux besoins de la Chambre et de ses députés.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, je comprends bien cela, mais j'aimerais avoir un peu plus d'information.

M. Michel Patrice:

Tout dépend de la taille de la chambre parallèle dont vous parlez. J'ai lu quelque part que dans certains pays, sa taille n'est pas nécessairement aussi importante que celle de la chambre existante.

(1155)

M. David Christopherson:

Non, pas du tout.

M. Michel Patrice:

Nous avons quelques options, le cas échéant.

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis curieux de savoir comment l'échéancier peut fonctionner pour que nous puissions prendre une décision éclairée. On sait, en partant, que le Parlement n'est pas reconnu pour agir à la hâte. Vous, naturellement, avez des décisions à prendre et des délais à respecter. Dites-moi comment vous envisagez les choses.

M. Michel Patrice:

Je pense à une salle de comité existante, par exemple. Selon la taille de la chambre et la fréquence à laquelle elle se réunit, on pourrait sans doute réorganiser un espace existant.

M. David Christopherson:

Elle pourrait siéger quotidiennement.

M. Michel Patrice:

On pourrait alors réserver du temps pour cette salle et l'organiser en fonction de ce qui fonctionnerait pour vous.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord, très bien.

M. Michel Patrice:

Nous avons une bonne équipe et nous sommes en mesure de nous adapter. Nous sommes toujours en mesure de relever le défi.

M. David Christopherson:

Je n'en doute pas.

Il semble que vous ayez tenu compte de la période électorale. Je veux être très clair: nous quittons vers la fin juin.

C'est la fin de la présente législature. On passera à la suivante. Il se pourrait que ce soit en novembre ou plus tard et, une fois que la Chambre a recommencé à siéger, il faut parfois quelques semaines pour que les comités reprennent leurs travaux — bien que notre comité soit le premier à être formé. Il ne serait pas déraisonnable de penser que les comités pourraient ne pas être fonctionnels avant la nouvelle année.

Avez-vous pris cela en considération, soit que les députés ne seront pas ici pendant des mois, à partir de la fête du Canada, et que vous avez des décisions qui doivent être prises?

M. Michel Patrice:

Oui, nous avons pris cela en considération et nous avons reçu le nom de deux députés qui feront partie du groupe de travail, et nous attendons le nom d'un troisième que je devrais recevoir, je crois, cette semaine. Nous espérons pouvoir tenir la première réunion au cours de la semaine qui suivra la prochaine relâche, puis nous serons en position d'entamer les discussions avec ces députés et de commencer à prendre les premières décisions. Je pense ici au design et à d'autres éléments du genre. Ils devront examiner les options et décider ce qu'ils préfèrent et formuler des recommandations. Comme le Bureau de régie interne poursuivra ses activités, c'est aussi un avantage.

M. David Christopherson:

Voici ce qui m'inquiéterait, si je revenais, ce qui n'est pas le cas. Au retour, il se pourrait qu'on pose des questions et qu'on entende la réponse suivante: « Oh, désolé, nous avions un échéancier pour prendre cette décision et vous n'étiez pas là. »

C'est une réponse qu'on ne veut pas entendre. J'ai besoin que vous me garantissiez que les députés de la 43e législature ne vous entendront pas dire: « Eh bien, nous avons dû prendre la décision parce que vous n'étiez pas ici. »

M. Michel Patrice:

Je comprends cela. Dans le cas de certaines décisions, la beauté des communications à l'heure actuelle est que nous allons pouvoir les joindre. Nous allons devoir évaluer si des décisions clés qui touchent les députés devront être prises, disons, entre juin et la période postélectorale.

D'après ce que j'ai vu et entendu lors de mes discussions avec nos partenaires, avec Travaux publics, ils sont conscients du contexte et des situations qui pourront se présenter. Certaines décisions clés devront attendre après la période électorale. Je pense que certaines pourront être prises avant que la Chambre cesse de siéger en juin, mais ce sera aux députés d'en décider.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord.

M. Michel Patrice:

De toute évidence, il faudra prendre des décisions au sujet de la démolition de l'édifice, etc. Il se pourrait que je me trompe, mais je ne suis pas certain que vous souhaitiez prendre les décisions à ce sujet.

M. David Christopherson:

Non, et c'est le lien parfait avec ma prochaine question. Est-ce que le Comité pourrait obtenir la liste des décisions clés qui doivent être prises, de même que quand elles doivent l'être et le processus? Pouvez-vous nous fournir cette information?

Nous commençons à mieux comprendre le tout, mais ce n'est pas encore tout à fait clair qui prend l'ultime décision. Le Bureau de régie interne nous représente… presque. N'oubliez pas que ses membres relèvent de la chaîne de commandement qui remonte jusqu'aux chefs. Ce n'est pas notre cas. Quand nous siégeons au sein des comités, nous sommes maîtres à bord.

Ainsi, en tant que membre de ce comité, j'aimerais voir en quoi consiste le chemin critique, avec le moment où les décisions doivent être prises et quel est le processus actuel, s'il s'avère différent du processus général de prise de décisions et particulier dans chaque cas. Pouvons-nous obtenir cette information?

(1200)

M. Michel Patrice:

Nous pouvons très certainement vous fournir la liste de ce que j'appellerais les principaux éléments, les éléments de haut niveau, concernant les décisions qui doivent être prises.

Le moment choisi dépend aussi des députés, alors je ne vais pas m'engager à cet égard. Si une décision doit attendre jusqu'à ce que les députés soient prêts à la prendre, nous pouvons donner une idée approximative du temps, comme la saison, etc. À mon sens, nous n'imposerons pas notre échéancier aux députés. Notre rôle n'est pas d'imposer cela aux députés.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vous en remercie. Vous nous avez entendus, et vous répondez comme si c'était affiché dans chacun de vos bureaux.

C'est excellent. Nous vous en remercions.

M. Michel Patrice:

Oui, nous allons vous fournir une liste des décisions qui, selon nous, intéressent les députés.

M. David Christopherson:

Puis-je simplement ajouter quelque chose, avant de terminer?

M. Michel Patrice:

Vous pourriez nous dire: « Sur ce point, nous ne voulons pas avoir notre mot à dire. »

M. David Christopherson:

Je ne pense pas un instant que vous allez essayer d'aller plus vite que nous. En fait, dans le système actuel, c'est la dernière chose que vous souhaitez. Vous allez sans doute nous harceler pour avoir la confirmation. Il y a beaucoup de « protégez vos arrières » ici; je comprends. C'est une bonne chose. C'est ce que nous souhaitons.

Voici ce qu'il faut retenir toutefois: certaines décisions sont mécaniques, une suivant l'autre, mais encore une fois, je veux juste m'assurer d'être clair, à savoir qu'aucune décision, parce qu'elle doit être prise, n'empêchera le Parlement d'en décider autrement par la suite. Cela pourrait avoir pour effet de bousculer un peu les choses, mais je veux simplement être très clair dans les témoignages du Comité qu'aucune décision n'empêchera le Comité d'avoir son mot à dire au sujet tant des éléments optionnels que de ce qui doit être fait du point de vue de la construction.

Je veux simplement en avoir l'assurance.

M. Michel Patrice:

C'est noté.

M. David Christopherson:

Excellent.

Le président:

Avant de passer à M. Graham, j'ai une question.

Madame Garrett, vous avez parlé de la consultation des députés.

Monsieur Patrice, vous avez mentionné deux noms au sujet du processus de consultation du Bureau de régie interne.

Pouvez-vous nous dire qui sont ces députés et comment ils ont été choisis?

M. Michel Patrice:

Les personnes ont été choisies par leurs leaders à la Chambre respectifs au Bureau de régie interne. Je présume qu'elles l'ont été en collaboration avec leurs partis. Je m'abstiendrai de vous donner les noms jusqu'à ce que j'aie celui de la troisième personne.

Le président:

Madame Garrett, est-ce les mêmes personnes à qui vous faisiez allusion?

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Je faisais simplement allusion à l'intention de l'Administration de la Chambre de consulter les parlementaires. Il est clair pour Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada que c'est l'Administration de la Chambre des communes qui s'occupera du processus de consultation, alors je m'en remets à ce qu'a dit M. Patrice à ce sujet.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je vous encouragerais aussi à faire participer un groupe d'anciens parlementaires, parce que plus nous nous éloignerons de l'année 2019, moins de gens se souviendront de ce à quoi l'édifice du Centre est censé ressembler.

Je dirais: « Appelez M. Christopherson »...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. David de Burgh Graham:...car il serait un excellent atout pour vous, étant donné que, malheureusement, il ne sera bientôt plus député.

En ce qui concerne le sujet de la chambre de débat parallèle — il s'agit davantage d'une observation que d'une question —, je vous encouragerais à chercher un espace permanent, au lieu d'une salle de comité que nous pourrions réattribuer, car la structure de la salle serait différente. Il faudrait qu'elle le soit, compte tenu des tribunes et des services de télévision. Si vous permettez que ce soit une salle de comité qui est réattribuée, une semaine, elle aura trois jours de disponibilité. La semaine suivante, elle aura deux jours de disponibilité. Et la semaine suivante, elle sera simplement oubliée. La structure de cette chambre doit être mise en place, et je tiens à ce que cela figure dans le compte rendu.

En ce qui concerne les commentaires de Mme Lapointe à propos des sièges en rang d'oignons — c'est une expression que j'aime beaucoup —, en examinant la disposition des 400 sièges que vous avez prévus... dans l'ancienne chambre, j'ai eu le grand plaisir d'occuper le siège du milieu d'une section de cinq sièges et, même si les sièges étaient beaucoup plus confortables que ceux dont nous disposons en ce moment, la manœuvre requise pour occuper un siège ou le quitter était vraiment pénible. Si nous pouvions éviter cela, je vous en serais grandement reconnaissant.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est très bien dit.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

Est-il possible d'agrandir la chambre?

M. Rob Wright:

Cette option illustre les difficultés que nous rencontrons, je crois. Ce n'est pas une option que nous suggérerions fortement ou dont nous recommanderions la mise en oeuvre. Nous nous employons à élaborer un vaste éventail d'options. Cela indique que, si la chambre souhaite maintenir son aménagement actuel, c'est essentiellement la seule façon d'accommoder cela. Cette option a de nombreux désavantages, que nous reconnaissons.

Sinon, il faudrait avoir une discussion à propos des autres aménagements qui fonctionneraient pour la Chambre des communes, que ce soit — et je réfléchis un peu à voix haute maintenant — un genre d'évolution avec le temps vers des bancs semblables au modèle adopté au Royaume-Uni, que ce soit l'adoption d'une approche très différente et plus radicale en matière d'aménagement des sièges, que ce soit un agrandissement de la chambre. Ce sont là des considérations très importantes qui, comme Mme Garrett l'a indiqué, rendent cruciale l'importance de prendre des décisions aussitôt que possible et de maintenir ces décisions jusqu'à la fin du projet.

L'agrandissement de la chambre est à lui seul une tâche très difficile. D'un point de vue structurel et architectural, cette partie de l'édifice présente certaines difficultés de taille. Il est possible d'agrandir la chambre, comme il est possible de mettre en oeuvre la plupart des idées, mais cela entraînerait des coûts importants. Avant de prendre cette décision, il faudrait, selon moi, que nous ayons épuisé un vaste éventail d'options et que nous soyons certains qu'il y a consensus quant à l'option qui nous semble correcte.

(1205)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce qu'après la fin des rénovations de l'édifice du Centre, la gare ferroviaire, qui constitue en ce moment l'édifice du Sénat du Canada, continuera de faire partie de la Cité parlementaire?

M. Rob Wright:

La salle de lecture et la salle ferroviaire?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non, l'édifice ferroviaire, la gare ferroviaire.

M. Rob Wright:

Oh, pardon.

Pour le moment, ces édifices sont considérés comme temporaires. En ce qui concerne les salles de comité Rideau, je pense que nous avons signé avec la Commission de la capitale nationale un bail qui expirera à une date comme 2034. Elles ont donc été prévues à titre temporaire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous nous avez montré une carte de la pelouse avant qui montre qu'elle perdra la moitié de sa superficie en raison de la construction du nouvel édifice. Est-ce exact? Le chemin se situerait aussi beaucoup plus au sud qu'il l'est en ce moment. Est-ce aussi exact?

M. Rob Wright:

Les choses seront ainsi seulement pendant la période de construction.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cet aménagement n'est pas permanent.

M. Rob Wright:

Non, il n'est pas du tout permanent.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le chemin remontra de nouveau jusqu'à l'édifice du Centre.

M. Rob Wright:

Tout cela sera sous terre. L'entrée sera aussi près... Par conséquent, si vous empruntez la promenade Sud, par exemple, vous entrerez presque au niveau du sol. Une légère pente vous mènera vers l'entrée de l'installation. Le mur de Vaux se trouvera au-dessus de l'installation. La colline du Parlement retrouvera donc son apparence actuelle.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pendant combien de temps perdrons-nous la pelouse, et où les célébrations de la fête du Canada se dérouleront-elles?

M. Rob Wright:

Voilà deux importantes questions. Si le Parlement le souhaitait, nous pourrions envisager d'ouvrir à l'avance le centre d'accueil des visiteurs de l'édifice du Centre. Il serait possible d'ouvrir le centre d'accueil des visiteurs peut-être assez longtemps avant l'ouverture de l'édifice du Centre. Nous n'avons pas encore examiné vraiment cette possibilité en détail, mais, si le Parlement le désirait, le centre d'accueil des visiteurs pourrait ouvrir à l'avance. Je serais prudent avant de préciser combien de temps à l'avance cette ouverture pourrait avoir lieu, mais disons que cette période serait importante. Cela pourrait avoir deux ou trois effets importants: la colline du Parlement retrouverait son apparence plus rapidement, et le centre permettrait d'offrir des commodités supplémentaires aux visiteurs ainsi que d'importants services pour appuyer les activités du Parlement. C'est donc une conversation que nous devrions avoir.

En ce qui concerne la fête du Canada, nous travaillons très étroitement avec Patrimoine canadien, qui est le ministère responsable de cet événement, ainsi qu'avec les partenaires parlementaires afin d'essayer de faire en sorte que toutes les activités de base qui se déroulent sur la colline du Parlement, en particulier pendant les mois d'été, se poursuivent sous une forme modifiée. Cette année, il n'y aura aucun impact. Puis, à mesure que les travaux avanceront, il y aura des modifications... nous envisageons de présenter une version modifiée du spectacle son et lumière afin de nous efforcer de maintenir sa présence et sa contribution à la fête du Canada. Il sera nécessaire de le modifier. Il y a aussi la relève de la garde et tous ces éléments, qui vont de la nécessité de s'assurer que le drapeau au sommet de la Tour de la Paix continue d'être remplacé à la nécessité de s'assurer que le carillon continue de jouer aussi longtemps que possible.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Lorsque je suis arrivé sur la colline du Parlement il y a 10 ans de cela, j'ai entendu des rumeurs, selon lesquelles on envisageait d'utiliser la pelouse avant pour construire un stationnement souterrain. Cela a-t-il déjà été envisagé sérieusement?

M. Rob Wright:

Je ne crois pas que cela ait déjà été envisagé sérieusement. Je pense qu'il y a eu quelques activités exploratoires. Nous avons cherché à supprimer les aires de stationnement de surface, un principe qui figure dans la vision et le plan à long terme. Dans la plupart des cas, ce que j'appellerai les études de faisabilité ont mis davantage l'accent sur la partie ouest du campus plutôt que sur la pelouse avant.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mme Lapointe a abordé la question de l'accès par tunnel entre les édifices. Il y a quelques années, un tunnel a été construit entre l'édifice de la Confédération et l'édifice de la Justice. Je pense que j'ai mentionné cela au cours de la séance précédente. En 2011, ils ont arraché la pelouse entre ces deux édifices. Depuis, ils n'ont toujours pas rouvert le tunnel. Il était censé être fermé pendant une année ou deux.

Ce tunnel a été construit récemment, dans le contexte de la VPLT, mais il n'a pas été construit de manière à ce que les parlementaires et les membres du personnel puissent s'en servir. Pourquoi pas? Des mesures correctrices seront-elles prises à cet égard? Quel est le plan à long terme en ce qui concerne l'accès par tunnel à tous les édifices?

(1210)

M. Rob Wright:

Je vais devoir vérifier et vous communiquer les détails plus tard, mais le plan à long terme, qui a été élaboré en travaillant avec le Parlement afin de déterminer les services dont vous avez besoin, vise à créer un campus interrelié où, par exemple, la rue Wellington représente moins un obstacle au sein du campus, et l'édifice Wellington, l'édifice Sir-John-A.-Macdonald, l'édifice de la Bravoure et l'édifice de l'Ouest sont interreliés, tout comme l'édifice de la Confédération et l'édifice de la Justice, pour ensuite être reliés au centre d'accueil des visiteurs d'une façon beaucoup plus constructive. Ces édifices deviendront presque une installation intégrée.

C'est là la planification à venir. Nous disposons de plans conceptuels de ces tunnels, mais pas encore de plans détaillés. Nous avons trouvé des solutions au niveau conceptuel, mais c'est une conversation qu'il est important que nous ayons à mesure que nous avançons ensemble.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. Je vous interrogerai de nouveau plus tard.

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Je suis reconnaissant à nos témoins de s'être joints à nous aujourd'hui.

J'aimerais commencer par formuler une observation, que j'ai mentionnée au cours d'une séance précédente à laquelle M. Wright et Mme Garrett n'assistaient pas. Elle concerne l'édifice où nous nous trouvons. Je trouve très décevant que Travaux publics, le ministère responsable de l'accessibilité — une dimension que, personnellement, je juge très importante —, permette la construction d'une salle non accessible au quatrième étage d'un édifice. Un membre proche de ma famille utilise un fauteuil roulant pour se déplacer, et ma famille utilise des poussettes pour déplacer mes trois jeunes enfants. Je trouve donc très décevant que la salle que nous occupons ne soit pas accessible. Je tiens à ce que cela figure dans le compte rendu une fois de plus, au profit du ministère dont les responsabilités comprennent l'accessibilité. Je suis très désappointé à ce sujet. Cet édifice est exceptionnel, mais le fait que cette salle ne soit pas accessible aux personnes ayant des problèmes de mobilité est très décevant. Pour être franc, je trouve cela inacceptable de la part du Parlement du Canada, et je tiens à ce que le compte rendu en fasse état.

J'aimerais maintenant donner suite à la diapositive qui est projetée en ce moment et que vous avez abordée plus tôt, monsieur Graham. Ai-je raison de supposer que la phase 2 du centre d'accueil des visiteurs ira de l'avant? Elle a été approuvée, et elle sera mise en œuvre. Ma supposition est-elle correcte?

M. Rob Wright:

Eh bien, je dirais que, d'une certaine façon, la meilleure réponse à votre question est peut-être oui et non, en ce sens que le concept d'un centre d'accueil des visiteurs remonte à 1976, je crois, à l'époque de la Commission Abbott. Les gens discutent depuis longtemps d'un centre d'accueil des visiteurs. À mesure que le contexte de la sécurité et des menaces a continué d'évoluer, il est devenu de plus en plus important que le centre d'accueil des visiteurs devienne un élément de sécurité situé à l'extérieur des principaux édifices du Parlement.

Comme ce projet pour le Parlement est devenu prioritaire, nous avons examiné la vision et le plan à long terme en 2005 et en 2006, et ce projet a été distingué comme l'une des priorités du Parlement. Nous avons cherché à obtenir des approbations pour pouvoir amorcer le projet. En même temps, je dirais que vous voyez sur la diapositive une empreinte qui existe en raison de la fonctionnalité que le Parlement souhaite intégrer dans ce centre, ce qui engendre une conversation permanente. Nous n'avons pas encore terminé cette conversation. Je crois que la forme que prendra cette installation est encore très fluide et assujettie au travail que nous réaliserons avec vous.

Le centre pourrait devenir plus petit, mais je dirais qu'à ma connaissance actuelle, la nécessité d'avoir une vérification de sécurité à l'extérieur des édifices du Parlement est un objectif fondamental de la vision et du plan à long terme. Le centre d'accueil des visiteurs existe d'abord et avant tout pour répondre à ce besoin, puis pour fournir plusieurs autres avantages au Parlement qui sont liés à la prestation de services d'interprétation pour les visiteurs et à l'exercice de fonctions de base pour le Parlement, des fonctions qu'il serait difficile d'abriter dans les édifices patrimoniaux mêmes.

M. John Nater:

D'accord. Alors, j'aimerais peut-être retourner un peu en arrière. Vous avez mentionné que vous cherchiez à obtenir des approbations, et je présume que certains éléments ont été approuvés. Pourriez-vous indiquer au comité quelles approbations ont été reçues, quand elles ont été reçues, et qu'est-ce qui a été approuvé précisément?

Je crois que personne ne contestera les exigences en matière de sécurité et le besoin d'assurer ces services de sécurité à l'extérieur des édifices du Parlement. Je présume que c'est le centre d'accueil des visiteurs qui jouera ce rôle. Premièrement, il est distinct et éloigné, mais je pense que le fait de savoir ce qui a été approuvé exactement jusqu'à maintenant... La pelouse avant du Parlement est la pelouse avant du Canada. Je pense que le grand public sera préoccupé par le fait d'avoir un énorme trou dans le sous-sol rocheux de cette pelouse pendant peut-être une dizaine d'années, ce qui m'amène à poser la question suivante.

Quel rôle le public a-t-il joué à cet égard? Des consultations ont-elles été menées auprès de la population en général, en ce qui concerne le fait d'avoir un énorme trou sur la colline du Parlement et de réduire la taille de la pelouse avant pendant peut-être une dizaine d'années? Des dialogues ont-ils été noués avec le public?

(1215)

M. Rob Wright:

En ce qui concerne la participation du public, nous travaillons très étroitement avec le Parlement, et nous souhaitons nous assurer que les parlementaires sont consultés. Je pense que la consultation du public — et peut-être que M. Patrice pourra ajouter quelque chose à cet égard — sera entreprise en collaboration avec les parlementaires, ce qui serait très important. Nous travaillons main dans la main avec l'administration du Parlement. Essentiellement, l'un de nos objectifs fondamentaux consiste à répondre aux besoins du Parlement.

Nous croyons comprendre que le centre d'accueil des visiteurs est l'une des priorités fondamentales du Parlement, à la fois pour satisfaire à des exigences en matière de sécurité et pour offrir des services aux visiteurs. Oui, je suppose que le parcours pour améliorer la colline du Parlement sera difficile, en ce sens qu'il provoquera des perturbations, mais l'un des principaux objectifs du centre d'accueil des visiteurs est d'améliorer la colline du Parlement pour les visiteurs canadiens ou les touristes internationaux.

Des perturbations seront nécessaires pour en arriver là, et il n'y a aucun moyen d'éviter cela. C'est un choix que le Parlement fait.

M. John Nater:

Mon temps de parole est écoulé, mais le président m'a accordé une légère marge de manœuvre.

Compte tenu du processus d'approbation actuel et des approbations que le ministère des Travaux publics a reçues dans les limites de l'échéancier actuel, quand commencerez-vous à creuser pour entreprendre la phase 2 du centre d'accueil des visiteurs?

M. Rob Wright:

Comme Mme Garrett l'a dit, je crois, ce serait au début de 2020.

M. John Nater:

En prenant le début de 2020 comme cible et sachant que ce comité disparaîtra dans cinq semaines pour ne revenir, peut-être, qu'en janvier 2020, selon le moment où... Le Comité n'aura plus l'occasion de se prononcer sur la deuxième phase du projet de centre d'accueil des visiteurs.

M. Rob Wright:

Mais il pourra absolument se prononcer sur ce qu'il y aura dans le centre d'accueil, phase deux...

M. John Nater:

Mais les pelles auront commencé à creuser. Cela va se produire dans ce contexte général...

M. Rob Wright:

À moins qu'on ne nous donne des directives pour arrêter, alors oui.

M. Michel Patrice:

Franchement, le Comité aurait aussi l'occasion de se prononcer sur la taille réelle du centre d'accueil par rapport aux exigences et tout cela, mais, comme l'a souligné M. Wright, l'approbation du concept remonte à environ une décennie.

Le président:

Avant de donner la parole à Mme Sahota, je présume que la deuxième phase du centre d'accueil dont parle M. Nater a été approuvée par le Bureau de régie interne, car nous venons tout juste d'en entendre parler. On ne sait rien à ce sujet.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, si vous me le permettez, on a laissé entendre que l'une des choses qu'il est encore possible de déterminer et pour laquelle il y a une certaine souplesse, c'est la taille.

Le président:

C'est vrai.

M. David Christopherson:

Comment peuvent-ils commencer à creuser s'ils ne savent pas quelle taille il aura?

Je suis désolé, mais vous avez dit que l'un des aspects où il y avait encore une certaine marge de manoeuvre et de flexibilité était la taille du centre d'accueil. Comment pouvez-vous commencer à creuser si vous ne savez pas quelle taille aura l'immeuble?

M. Rob Wright:

Je vais faire deux remarques, puis je céderai la parole à Mme Garrett pour plus de détails. Le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs est un élément important de la vision et du plan à long terme depuis un certain temps et il fait partie des documents publics depuis probablement plus d'une décennie, je dirais. Nous avons fait des efforts pour communiquer cela aux parlementaires et au grand public. Nous pourrions peut-être faire de meilleurs efforts à cet égard. Nous avons un rapport annuel qui est affiché sur notre site Web, et ce centre y est décrit comme étant une priorité.

En ce qui concerne l'excavation, la deuxième phase du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs aura une empreinte importante, peu importe ce qu'il contient. Il y a toutefois une certaine marge de manoeuvre qui nous permettra de nous assurer que sa taille sera appropriée, compte tenu de l'engagement pris auprès du Parlement.

Je cède la parole à Mme Garrett.

(1220)

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis désolé, je n'ai toujours pas entendu de réponse. S'il y a encore une certaine flexibilité quant à la taille du trou, comment pouvez-vous commencer à le creuser? C'est tout. Comment savoir jusqu'où creuser si l'on ignore la taille du trou qui doit être creusé? Vous me dites que la taille exacte reste encore à déterminer, mais nous allons quand même de l'avant et nous commençons à creuser. J'ai juste besoin que l'on m'aide à comprendre cela.

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Je pourrais peut-être apporter quelques précisions.

Pour ce qui est de creuser le trou, vous avez raison de dire qu'il est important, dans le cadre d'un appel d'offres, de donner à l'entrepreneur retenu une idée de la taille que devra avoir ce trou. Je pense que dans le contexte des observations qui ont été faites plus tôt et de celles que j'ai formulées tout à l'heure au sujet des décisions à plusieurs niveaux...

M. David Christopherson:

Oui.

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

... la taille de ce trou est d'une importance capitale.

Ensuite, en ce qui concerne les autres observations qui ont été faites, ce qui sera mis dans ce centre deviendra tout aussi important que le reste, mais cette décision pourra être prise à une date ultérieure lorsqu'on en saura un peu plus et que les consultations seront plus avancées.

M. David Christopherson:

Nous obtenons...

Allez-y.

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Pour répondre à la question plus précisément, c'est-à-dire pour gérer ce risque en fonction de la situation où nous sommes, nous avons des options. Nous pouvons commencer à creuser le trou en faisant des hypothèses sur la taille minimale qu'il devrait avoir.

Pour revenir au moment où nous nous sommes rencontrés au sujet de l'orme, l'une des choses que le Comité nous a demandé d'envisager, c'est de faire avancer les travaux d'excavation pour que nous puissions replanter les terrains d'agrément de l'édifice de l'Est le plus tôt possible, et c'est quelque chose que nous sommes en train d'examiner.

Mais quelle est la taille de l'empreinte minimale dont nous savons que nous avons besoin pour commencer à creuser ce trou en toute quiétude et qui nous permettra de faire avancer la conversation lorsque le Parlement reprendra? Cela dit, certaines des premières décisions et certains des premiers engagements que nous essayons d'obtenir portent sur des choses que nous avons présentées ici aujourd'hui, comme les salles de comité, ce qui, en fin de compte, pourrait avoir une incidence sur les décisions relatives à l'ampleur du trou, par exemple.

Je peux continuer d'essayer de clarifier cela. J'essaie de répondre directement à votre question.

M. David Christopherson:

Permettez-moi de le répéter dans mes propres mots et de voir si j'ai bien compris.

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Bien sûr.

Le président:

Rapidement, David.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, je serai aussi rapide que possible, mais je dois être clair.

Il y a une taille minimale, mais vous allez creuser de toute manière, et une fois que vous aurez commencé, vous aurez la possibilité de l'agrandir ou non, selon les décisions qui seront prises au sujet des salles de comité et de l'emplacement de ces salles. On dirait que vous pouvez commencer à creuser sans connaître la taille définitive, parce que vous connaissez une taille minimale et que cela ne change rien au début des travaux. Est-ce que je commence à comprendre?

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

La réponse à cette question est oui, reconnaissant que cela rend l'aspect contractuel un peu plus complexe, mais c'est gérable. Il s'agit d'un programme très vaste et très complexe, et c'est pour cela que nous sommes là, c'est-à-dire pour gérer ce genre de risques.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Le président:

Je suppose que toutes les places de stationnement seront équipées de bornes de recharge électriques.

Madame Sahota, c'est à vous.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Mon assistante législative, Caroline, est incroyable. Elle a vécu en Europe pendant un certain temps. Elle vient de m'informer que dans bon nombre de projets d'excavation, les archéologues sont sur place au cas où il y aurait des découvertes intéressantes à faire. Étant donné l'ampleur du trou qu'il faudra creuser pour ce projet, il se peut que l'on tombe sur des artefacts historiques.

Y a-t-il des archéologues impliqués dans ce projet?

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Absolument, il y en a. En fait, nous avons trouvé des choses intéressantes.

À l'heure actuelle, si vous vous promenez sur les terrains d'agrément de l'édifice de l'Est et que vous regardez à travers la clôture, vous allez voir qu'une fouille archéologique assez importante est en cours. Ils ont découvert de vieux baraquements et des postes de garde. Parce qu'il y a un potentiel d'artefacts sur la Colline, nous avons cartographié l'impact potentiel des travaux et nous avons répertorié les endroits où les probabilités de trouver des artefacts sont élevées, moyennes ou faibles. Avant de faire quoi que ce soit — par exemple, construire une connexion avec l'édifice de l'Est ou aménager un chemin de construction en surface —, nous devons nous plier à notre programme d'évaluation afin de déterminer s'il existe des ressources archéologiques. Le cas échéant, nous devons les excaver complètement et les documenter en bonne et due forme.

S'il y a d'autres renseignements que le Comité aimerait avoir sur ce que nous avons trouvé et sur notre approche à cet égard, nous serons heureux de les lui transmettre. Chez Centrus, nous disposons d'un grand savoir-faire et d'excellentes ressources en matière d'archéologie.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'aimerais en savoir plus sur ce que vous allez trouver. Je trouve cela fascinant. Ces découvertes devraient assurément être mises en valeur — peut-être dans le centre d'accueil. Les gens pourraient venir pour en apprendre davantage au sujet de ces artéfacts et pour mieux comprendre notre histoire.

Puisqu'il s'agit d'un territoire algonquin non cédé, y a-t-il eu des consultations avec les Algonquins?

(1225)

M. Rob Wright:

À l'heure actuelle, comme vous le savez peut-être, nous travaillons en étroite collaboration avec des organismes autochtones nationaux et avec les Algonquins afin de voir comment il serait possible de transformer l'ancienne ambassade américaine en un espace autochtone national.

À l'heure actuelle, nous travaillons presque quotidiennement avec ces groupes — y compris avec la nation algonquine — sur toute une variété de choses en plus du projet du 100, rue Wellington. Nous cherchons des occasions de renforcer nos capacités et de passer des marchés afin d'accroître la participation de ces peuples aux travaux qui se déroulent dans la Cité parlementaire.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'ai une question sur l'édifice de l'Ouest, puis sur la façon dont cela est lié aux entrées de l'édifice du Centre.

Pourquoi les grandes entrées principales de l'édifice de l'Ouest sont-elles fermées à clé la plupart du temps? Pourquoi ne sont-elles pas utilisées comme entrées de tous les jours pour les députés? Par exemple, les entrées à double porte sur les côtés et l'entrée de la tour Mackenzie sont toutes fermées.

Est-ce quelque chose à laquelle on peut s'attendre à l'édifice du Centre? Nous sera-t-il désormais impossible de passer sous le clocher? Y aura-t-il des trajets secondaires pour tout le monde? Ou devrons-nous passer par le centre d'accueil au bas de l'escalier? Comment envisage-t-on cela?

M. Stéphan Aubé (dirigeant principal de l'information, Chambre des communes):

Il est certain qu'à l'avenir, l'objectif est de rendre ces installations accessibles aux députés et aux visiteurs, de leur en donner l'accès. Dans le contexte de l'édifice de l'Ouest, l'entrée de la tour Mackenzie et l'entrée du Président — ce sont les entrées principales sur les côtés — sont, pour l'instant, réservées aux députés et aux visiteurs d'autres pays. Par exemple, c'est ce qu'on a pu voir avec le président croate, qui était ici cette semaine. Nous réservons ces entrées pour ces personnes. Les autres entrées sont pour le personnel, les députés et l'administration.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Existe-t-il des plans semblables pour l'édifice du Centre? Auparavant, les portes de l'édifice du Centre étaient ouvertes à tous les députés, et si le personnel les accompagnait, il pouvait les utiliser également.

M. Michel Patrice:

Je dois admettre que nous n'avons pas regardé aussi loin en avant, mais je présume que l'intention est de permettre aux députés et au personnel de continuer d'utiliser ces portes.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'aimerais dire que...

M. Michel Patrice:

Ce qui nous préoccupe, ce sont plutôt les visiteurs, sécurité oblige, mais...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'aimerais...

M. Michel Patrice:

... je crois bien que nous allons devoir nous pencher là-dessus, mais à mon avis, les députés et le personnel parlementaire pourront continuer d'utiliser ces portes du rez-de-chaussée.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je l'espère parce que je crois qu'il y avait un sentiment spécial au fait d'entrer par ces portes, et qu'une partie de ce sentiment a disparu depuis que nous sommes ici, dans l'édifice de l'Ouest. C'est un bel immeuble, mais j'espère que nous pourrons continuer d'utiliser certaines de ces entrées.

J'aimerais donner le reste de mon temps de parole à Linda.

M'en reste-t-il?

Le président:

Non, votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Reid, nous vous écoutons.

M. Scott Reid:

Le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs est l'objet de presque toutes mes préoccupations.

Quand il s'agit de questions comme l'installation de cages d'ascenseur dans les cours intérieures actuelles de l'édifice du Centre, à première vue, je pense que cela a du bon sens.

Mes préoccupations concernent entièrement le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs et sa taille colossale. C'est vraiment énorme. Cela va coûter très cher. À cet endroit, le sous-sol, c'est de la roche. Je ne sais pas si c'est du granit, du grès ou du calcaire.

Est-ce que quelqu'un d'autre le saurait?

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

C'est une bonne couche de roche.

M. Scott Reid:

Il y en a beaucoup, oui. Pour ce qui est de l'archéologie, je me suis dit, eh bien, il ne faut pas creuser très profondément pour qu'il n'y ait plus de possibilités de ce côté-là. Il peut y avoir des possibilités sur le plan paléontologique. Je ne sais pas.

Quoi qu'il en soit, voilà ce qu'il faut retenir. Une fois que les travaux seront commencés, une fois que les contrats auront été attribués pour commencer à creuser — ce qui est prévu avant les élections ou du moins, en partie avant les élections —, on aura par la force des choses dépensé beaucoup d'argent qu'il nous sera impossible de récupérer. Plus l'empreinte est grande, plus l'espace auquel nous souscrivons est grand, même si nous n'avons pas de consensus sur ce que cet espace devrait contenir.

Je peux vous dire que je m'oppose vigoureusement à certaines des choses que vous proposez. Par exemple, je ne suis pas d'accord pour que la Bibliothèque du Parlement, qui est, je suppose, un musée, y soit aménagée. Je ne dis pas que nous ne devrions pas avoir un musée d'histoire parlementaire. En tant qu'historien, j'adore l'idée. C'est juste qu'il y a beaucoup d'autres bâtiments qui pourraient faire l'affaire. Il n'est pas nécessaire de l'attacher à l'édifice du Centre.

Il n'est pas nécessaire que les salles où il sera possible d'observer les procédures parlementaires quand il y aura débordement soient souterraines. Si nous pensons qu'une telle chose va se produire, nous pouvons installer d'autres sièges ailleurs. Pour en revenir au modèle de Westminster, le Parlement avait traditionnellement des salles polyvalentes. Westminster Hall étant la plus en vue et la plus impressionnante d'entre elles, et cela remonte à presque 1 000 ans.

Pour ce qui est de la sécurité, nous avons déjà un endroit par où les gens devront entrer. Nous pourrions aménager un deuxième endroit, mais celui que nous avons est conçu pour maximiser la sécurité. Il est bien conçu et il remplit bien sa fonction. C'est à l'extérieur des bâtiments.

Maintenant, en ce qui concerne l'accès à la Chambre des communes et au Sénat, disons d'entrée de jeu que les choses sont un peu plus compliquées pour le Sénat. En revanche, pour la Chambre des communes, le tunnel illustré en gris à l'ouest de l'édifice du Centre pourrait être un moyen d'accéder aux aires d'observation. Il n'est donc pas nécessaire de faire passer cela devant, sous terre. Ce qui signifie qu'il serait possible de rejoindre cet accès souterrain sans toucher à la pelouse avant.

Dans vos propres plans, il y a de la place sur le côté et à l'arrière pour d'autres pavillons. C'est quelque chose qui pourrait être controversé. Je suppose que ceux-là sont en surface, mais nous n'avons pas eu la chance d'établir si c'était moins intrusif ou de savoir ce que le public en pense. Je n'avais littéralement jamais entendu parler de cette possibilité avant aujourd'hui.

Je sais que vous avez ouvert une petite allée le long du belvédère, et j'ai une raison sentimentale personnelle de vouloir que ce passage reste ouvert pendant les prochaines années. Pour tout dire, c'est l'endroit où j'ai embrassé ma femme pour la première fois, mais pour les nombreuses autres personnes qui n'ont pas cet attachement sentimental particulier, la pelouse avant est évidemment plus importante.

Le plaisir de voir le côté, c'est-à-dire là où se trouvent les édifices supplémentaires du Sénat... Cela pourrait se faire.

En ce qui concerne les salles des comités de la Chambre des communes, aucune d'entre elles ne devrait être souterraine — c'est-à-dire sous ce qui est maintenant la pelouse avant — parce que nous avons un grand nombre d'autres salles à notre disposition. Tout au long de ma vie — et j'ai plus d'un demi-siècle et j'ai toujours vécu à Ottawa —, le centre des congrès, ce qui est maintenant le Sénat, a été là comme un grand trou noir vide. Il est enfin utilisé. Maintenant qu'il a été remis en état, nous pourrions utiliser certains de ses locaux pour les audiences des comités.

En ce qui concerne le 1, rue Wellington, l'ancien tunnel ferroviaire qui fait l'objet d'une remise en état, je sais que nous avons un bail à durée limitée — je crois que vous avez dit qu'il prenait fin en 2034 —, mais il s'agit d'un bail entre nous et la CCN. Nous pouvons utiliser ces locaux en permanence, et ce sont de belles salles. Je pense donc que nous pouvons facilement augmenter le nombre de salles pour les comités. Dans l'édifice Macdonald, ces pièces pourraient être polyvalentes et devenir des salles pour les comités — ou du moins certaines d'entre elles, celles qui sont à l'étage.

Voyez-vous où je veux en venir? Il y a beaucoup d'espaces que nous pouvons utiliser pour toutes ces choses sans avoir à recourir aux scénarios les plus intrusifs, les plus coûteux et à ceux dont les délais sont les moins précis.

Je sais que j'ai épuisé tout mon temps de parole, monsieur le président, mais je dirai, pour ma part seulement, qu'à mon avis, l'absolu... J'aimerais que la deuxième phase du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs soit mise en veilleuse jusqu'à ce que vous ayez le consentement de la Chambre des communes, même si cela veut dire qu'on perdra une saison de construction. C'est quelque chose qui me tient à coeur. Si ce projet de loi est adopté avant les prochaines élections et que nous avons dépensé beaucoup d'argent avant le retour de la Chambre, je sais que je vais me sentir mal à l'aise, et ce, quel que soit le parti au pouvoir.

(1230)

Le président:

Merci.

Personnellement, je ne suis pas d'accord avec vous, mais j'en resterai là.

Il y a encore beaucoup d'intervenants sur la liste.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quelle est la situation en ce qui concerne l'orme?

M. Rob Wright:

Je vais céder la parole à Mme Garrett dans un instant. Comme vous le savez, nous étions ici il y a quelque temps...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous le savons très bien.

M. Rob Wright:

Nous avons eu une bonne discussion à ce sujet. Comme nous l'avons expliqué, l'orme devait être abattu. Le bois est entreposé en ce moment et, une fois qu'il sera durci, il pourra servir à un usage parlementaire futur; c'est le sculpteur du Dominion qui en décidera, en consultation avec le Parlement. Nous collaborons également avec l'Université de Guelph pour faire pousser quelques petits arbrisseaux. Je crois que le taux de survie de ces arbrisseaux était assez faible, ce qui en dit long sur la santé de l'arbre lui-même.

Je cède la parole à Mme Garrett, qui vous donnera plus de détails.

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Merci, monsieur Wright.

M. Wright a fait le tour de la question. J'ajouterais seulement que, compte tenu de la santé de l'arbre, nous avons prélevé une centaine de brindilles — les meilleures que l'arboriculteur a pu trouver. Nous les avons envoyées à l'Université de Guelph, et les chercheurs ont choisi les 50 meilleures pour essayer de les propager. Parmi ces 50 arbrisseaux, seulement 10 ont survécu au processus de propagation. Il y a donc 10 arbrisseaux qui poussent dans une serre de l'université et lorsqu'ils seront assez solides, ils seront transférés à l'extérieur, puis retournés sur les lieux, le moment venu.

(1235)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Merci.

Avant la fin de ma dernière intervention, je vous ai posé des questions sur les tunnels. Si vous retournez à la diapositive 17, qui montre la circulation proposée pour les parlementaires, je me demande s'il y a lieu de fournir un accès entre l'édifice de l'Est et celui de l'Ouest afin que nous n'ayons pas à faire un détour. Il me semble que les lignes mauves devraient se croiser, à moins que vous vouliez que nous passions par les tunnels de marchandises.

Comme il ne me reste pas beaucoup de temps, je vais céder la parole à Mme Lapointe dans un instant.

À mesure que nous démantelons l'édifice du Centre, avons-nous eu droit à de vraies surprises?

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Je dirais que nous n'avons pas eu de surprises, mais il y a une chose qui nous a déçus. Nous espérions que les puits à l'intérieur de l'édifice suffiraient pour supporter, par exemple, les systèmes mécaniques et électriques... Ils sont plus petits que nous l'avions prévu, ce qui nous oblige à trouver de nouvelles solutions. Nous en sommes encore à déterminer les substances désignées dans l'édifice.

La discussion la plus intéressante portera sur les travaux structurels et les évaluations que nous effectuons à l'heure actuelle. C'est lié à l'une des décisions qu'il faudra prendre prochainement, c'est-à-dire comment nous envisageons de renforcer la résistance de l'édifice aux séismes. Il y a certaines possibilités concernant l'isolation de la fondation, ce qui nous permettrait de sauver une bonne partie de la hiérarchie patrimoniale de l'édifice et la structure située au-dessus du sous-sol.

Il n'y a pas eu de surprises, étant donné qu'il s'agit d'un très ancien édifice qui nécessite une modernisation de très grande envergure. Cela dit, le tout vous permet de faire une planification beaucoup plus détaillée de la conception et de l'établissement des coûts du programme, et c'est sur quoi nous travaillons en ce moment.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous n'avez pas découvert des dispositifs d'écoute dans les murs ou des sacs remplis d'argent derrière les structures ou quelque chose de ce genre?

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Il n'y a rien eu de tel, du moins jusqu'à maintenant.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une dernière question avant de céder la parole. Quand serai-je expulsé de mon bureau à l'édifice de la Confédération?

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

C'est une bonne question.

M. Rob Wright:

Voilà un autre point dont il faudra discuter avec le Parlement dans le cadre de la stratégie générale du complexe. La restauration majeure de l'édifice de la Confédération exigera des locaux transitoires. Nous planifions l'aménagement d'installations pour la Chambre et le Sénat, à côté de l'ancienne ambassade des États-Unis pour appuyer la restauration de l'édifice de la Confédération, ainsi que de l'édifice de l'Est. Ces installations ne sont pas encore conçues, et elles sont loin d'être construites. Il faudrait attendre jusqu'au milieu de l'année 2025 ou au-delà.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

S'il me reste du temps, j'aimerais le céder à Mme Lapointe. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Me reste-t-il du temps de parole?

Le président:

Il vous reste une minute.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

En aurai-je d'autre plus tard?

Le président:

Oui.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord. Je vais attendre à plus tard dans ce cas.

Le président:

Vous passerez après M. Christopherson.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si Mme Lapointe préfère attendre, je vais continuer une minute.[Traduction]

La Cour suprême participe-t-elle à la vision et au plan à long terme? Je sais qu'il y a eu des pourparlers sur la rénovation de cet édifice également.

M. Rob Wright:

La restauration complète de l'édifice de la Cour suprême fait partie des plans. Les locaux transitoires pour cette installation se trouvent dans l'édifice commémoratif de l'Ouest. Cela s'inscrit dans la vision et le plan à long terme, du point de vue des principes de planification, mais pas du point de vue de la mise en oeuvre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez mentionné brièvement l'ancienne ambassade des États-Unis. Est-ce que ce sera également un endroit pour les locaux transitoires, ou s'agit-il seulement de...?

M. Rob Wright:

Ce sera un espace permanent, composé d'une partie adjacente, le long de la rue Sparks, l'objectif étant de créer un espace national permanent pour les peuples autochtones.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson, vous avez trois minutes.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai promis à ma fille de vous poser une petite question. J'allais le faire en privé, mais j'ai changé d'avis. Je crois connaître la réponse, mais je vais vous poser la question quand même.

Prévoit-on rétablir le sanctuaire des chats qui était là avant la fermeture de l'édifice de l'Ouest?

Je dois avouer que le fait d'aller voir les chats était ce que ma fille préférait lorsqu'elle venait sur la Colline du Parlement. C'est cool comme tradition.

M. Rob Wright:

C'était ce que préférait ma grand-mère aussi.

M. David Christopherson:

Voilà. Vous voyez?

M. Rob Wright:

Je crois qu'à ce stade-ci, rien n'est prévu pour le rétablir, pour autant que je sache.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est bien ce que je pensais, mais cela aurait été merveilleux si on le rétablissait. Je vous laisse y réfléchir. Il y a peut-être des gens créatifs.

J'aimerais faire une observation, puis poser une question.

Je suis vraiment heureux de savoir, pour la première fois, comment vous examinez la Cité parlementaire différemment. À l'heure actuelle, en toute honnêteté, nous avons affaire à un parlement à la Frankenstein. Depuis les 15 ans que je suis sur la Colline, nous avons ajouté une salle de comité et des bureaux ici et là. Le tout se tient au moyen d'un ruban adhésif et de fils métalliques. Cela n'a aucun sens quand on tient compte du déroulement des travaux. Je suis donc ravi d'apprendre que nous allons nous éloigner de cette situation absurde, prendre du recul et examiner toutes les installations à mesure qu'elles commencent à devenir un complexe intégré, sans oublier l'idée que nous devrons peut-être rester à l'extérieur de la Colline, alors que ce n'était pas le cas avant. À mes débuts au Parlement, tout était beau et propre sur la Colline. J'en suis donc content.

Je partage certaines des préoccupations que M. Reid a soulevées au sujet du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Lorsque vous fournirez au Comité la liste des décisions et des échéances, je suppose que cet aspect en fera partie; il y aura sans doute une sous-section détaillée qui décrira la situation actuelle des travaux liés au Centre d'accueil des visiteurs en ce qui concerne les décisions qui sont déjà prises et qui n'ont pas besoin d'être revues, par rapport à celles qui n'ont pas encore été prises, et vous pourriez également prévoir quand et comment ces décisions seront prises. Je vous invite donc à inclure cette information dans le rapport que vous nous remettrez.

(1240)

M. Michel Patrice:

C'est noté.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous n'arrêtez pas de dire « c'est noté ». Je suppose que c'est votre façon de dire oui.

M. Michel Patrice:

Oui.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est très bien. Merci.

Le président:

Madame Lapointe, la parole est à vous. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Je veux revenir sur certaines choses que plusieurs parlementaires et moi avons abordées et au sujet desquelles je n'ai toujours pas l'impression d'avoir eu une réponse claire.

Quand vous êtes venus la première fois, le 11 décembre dernier, vous avez dit que la réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre visait « à protéger et honorer le patrimoine de l'édifice [...] à appuyer le travail des parlementaires, à répondre à l'évolution des besoins de l'institution, à améliorer l'expérience des visiteurs et à moderniser l'infrastructure de l'édifice. »

Je suis très préoccupée par le volet des parlementaires.

Le 19 mars, vous nous avez dit que le Bureau de régie interne mettrait sur pied un groupe de travail. Nous sommes revenus plusieurs fois à la charge pour savoir qui serait impliqué dans ce groupe de travail, mais je n'ai encore entendu parler d'aucun parlementaire. Par contre, dernièrement, nous avons été consultés au sujet de l'abattage d'un orme. Puisque le Parlement ne siégera probablement pas avant le mois de janvier, qui sera consulté si des décisions doivent être prises d'ici là sur les prochaines étapes?

M. Michel Patrice:

Comme je l'ai dit, nous aurons un groupe de travail composé de trois personnes. Jusqu'à présent, j'ai reçu deux noms et je préfère attendre d'avoir le troisième avant...

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Il ne reste que cinq semaines.

M. Michel Patrice:

Je devrais recevoir le troisième nom d'ici la fin de cette semaine.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Nous avons été consultés pour l'abattage d'un arbre. Or, il y a selon moi des décisions à prendre qui sont beaucoup plus importantes que l'abattage d'un arbre.

M. Michel Patrice:

Oui.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Cela dit, je demande pardon à ceux qui tiennent beaucoup aux arbres.

Je pense à des questions comme à quel moment décider du nombre de députés, l'établissement ou non d'une chambre de débat parallèle ou encore la nécessité d'une excavation — mon collègue a dit tantôt que c'était du roc, ici, sous l'édifice.

En passant, vous ne me réconfortez pas, car je n'ai pas obtenu la réponse que je voulais.

Quand vous avez rénové l'édifice de l'Ouest, vous avez dû excaver du roc puisqu'il n'y a que cela sous le bâtiment. Vous dites maintenant que vous allez devoir excaver devant l'édifice du Centre. Qu'avez appris des travaux d'excavation que vous avez menés ici? Quelles sont les meilleures pratiques que vous avez apprises ici et que vous allez pouvoir appliquer à vos travaux sur l'édifice du Centre?

M. Michel Patrice:

J'ai espoir que les membres du groupe de travail pourront se rencontrer au retour de la prochaine pause. Pour l'instant, les leaders de chacun des partis de la Chambre ont désigné des députés pour siéger à ce groupe de travail, tel que décidé le Bureau de régie interne.

On a entendu leurs préoccupations générales et particulières des membres du Comité. Le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs sera l'un des sujets abordés de façon prioritaire, avant l'ajournement en juin. Les discussions vont commencer et on dressera une liste des questions ou préoccupations dont les parlementaires auront fait part au groupe de travail, qui fera ensuite rapport au Bureau de régie interne, qui le présentera dès que possible à ce comité.

Pour ce qui est des leçons apprises à la suite des travaux de construction à l'édifice de l'Ouest, je vais laisser M. Wright vous en parler.

(1245)

[Traduction]

M. Rob Wright:

De nombreuses leçons ont été tirées, et je crois que nous pourrions avoir une conversation approfondie à ce sujet. Il y en aurait deux qui seraient utiles et très importantes dans le contexte de la discussion d'aujourd'hui.

La première leçon concerne, comme Mme Garrett l'a mentionné, l'approche décisionnelle à plusieurs niveaux et la nécessité de mettre l'accent sur les éléments sur lesquels nous pouvons nous entendre et d'y donner suite. Cela se prête à une mise en œuvre progressive. En plein milieu des travaux liés à l'édifice de l'Ouest, nous avons commencé à changer de vitesse grâce à notre collaboration avec Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada et la Chambre des communes. Nous allons appliquer pleinement cette leçon aux travaux de l'édifice du Centre.

Voilà donc l'approche progressive, qui consiste vraiment à mettre l'accent, d'abord et avant tout, sur les éléments structurels que nous pouvons déterminer avec la plus grande clarté, tôt dans le processus, et ensuite, une fois que nous avons tiré au clair la fonctionnalité, il s'agit de concentrer nos efforts, du point de vue de la construction, sur les zones qui doivent être parfaites pour le fonctionnement du Parlement. L'enceinte est peut-être l'endroit le plus évident, de même que les salles de comités. Ainsi, ces endroits devraient être remis en état en premier, puis cédés à la Chambre des communes, qui assume la responsabilité technique en matière de TI et de télédiffusion. Les éléments liés à la construction de l'édifice et tous les éléments essentiels en matière de TI devraient être terminés en même temps, au lieu d'être échelonnés, comme nous le faisions auparavant dans le cadre des projets. Quant aux édifices Wellington et de la Bravoure, les travaux seraient réalisés par étapes. Nous pensons pouvoir gagner du temps et améliorer la qualité grâce à une approche plus progressive. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

J'ai encore des questions. [Traduction]

Le président:

Permettez-moi de poser une brève question. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Le 19 mars dernier, lorsque vous êtes venu au Comité, vous avez dit que 20 % du processus de déclassement était déjà fait. Aujourd'hui, le 14 mai, à quel pourcentage en est-on? [Traduction]

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Je crois que le pourcentage de 20 % se rapportait au processus de déclassement. Nous en sommes maintenant à environ 40 %. Nous sommes en bonne voie de terminer les activités de déclassement d'ici août 2019 afin de pouvoir assurer la transition de retour, de sorte que l'édifice soit transféré des partenaires parlementaires à SPAC. Ensuite, après un roulement très rapide, notre gestionnaire des travaux de construction assumera la garde du site et surveillera le chantier de construction.

Par ailleurs, il faut enlever certains objets clés de l'édifice. Nous avons déplacé une bonne partie des biens mobiliers — des choses comme des artefacts et des meubles —, surtout ceux destinés à appuyer les activités parlementaires, mais il reste quelques biens dans l'édifice, notamment certains artefacts d'une grande importance. Voici un bon exemple: les tableaux de guerre dans la salle du Sénat. Deux des six tableaux ont été décrochés, et les autres le seront à la mi-juin.

Par-dessus tout, du côté de la Chambre des communes, nous procédons au déclassement de l'infrastructure de TI dont est doté l'édifice. Ce travail se poursuit en ce moment même, et le tout progresse bien, mais nous devons terminer le déclassement, ainsi que les activités destinées à isoler l'édifice, pour pouvoir essentiellement le débrancher du réseau électrique. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord, je vous remercie. [Traduction]

Le président:

Avant de donner la parole à M. Reid, j'aimerais poser une question. Ce point a été soulevé dans le cadre de notre étude sur une Chambre des communes propice à la vie familiale, et je crois que nous en avons également parlé lors d'une de vos comparutions devant notre comité. Il s'agit de la proposition d'envisager, entre autres, de créer une aire de jeux ou un terrain de jeux, soit à l'extérieur — quelque part dans la cour, comme M. Reid l'a proposé —, soit à l'intérieur. A-t-on réfléchi à cette possibilité?

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président: Monsieur Nater, un peu de respect, je vous prie.

Voilà un long silence.

Mme Jennifer Garrett:

Je peux essayer de répondre.

Un de nos objectifs est de rendre le Parlement plus propice à la vie familiale. Nous avons pris connaissance des exigences de nos partenaires parlementaires pour veiller à ce que les parlementaires puissent compter sur ce soutien lorsqu'ils sont occupés avec leur famille.

En ce qui concerne le terrain de jeux extérieur, honnêtement, il faudrait que je vérifie les exigences du programme fonctionnel, mais pour ce qui est de l'intérieur de l'édifice, je sais que nous avons reçu des directives pour un espace amélioré et favorable à la vie familiale dans un environnement accessible à tous, et nous nous efforcerons de faire en sorte que ces espaces soient situés aux endroits appropriés dans l'édifice.

(1250)

M. Stéphan Aubé:

Il y a déjà eu des discussions sur les aires de jeux possibles à l'extérieur. Nous avons pris en compte la zone d'accueil des visiteurs à côté de l'édifice de l'Ouest, mais ce n'est pas encore confirmé. Comme vous pouvez le constater, nous sommes en train de discuter, en premier lieu, de la circulation à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur de l'édifice.

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, vous avez la parole.

M. John Nater:

Très brièvement, certains d'entre nous ont de jeunes enfants. Je dis à la blague que ma fille sera élue députée d'ici notre retour à l'édifice du Centre, alors ce ne sera plus pertinent. En tout cas, ce serait bien si, dans le cadre des discussions, ceux qui ont actuellement de jeunes enfants pouvaient être consultés ou avoir leur mot à dire.

Ma famille était sur la Colline la semaine dernière, et les enfants ont passé un bon moment sur la pelouse, devant le Parlement, à faire des bulles et à courir. C'était très amusant. Nous n'avons pas une telle occasion en hiver, alors il serait intéressant de consulter ceux d'entre nous, au Comité et au Parlement, qui ont de jeunes enfants en ce moment.

Le président:

J'ai moi-même deux enfants âgés de 6 et 10 ans.

Monsieur Reid, vous êtes le suivant sur la liste. Comme Mme Kusie n'a pas encore pris la parole, vous pourriez peut-être partager votre temps avec elle. Cela dit, qu'aimeriez-vous faire avec votre motion? Vouliez-vous que nous nous en occupions aujourd'hui ou à une autre réunion?

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, je crois qu'il serait préférable de reporter la motion à une autre réunion. Il y a encore des questions en suspens. Je sais que je ne suis pas le seul à avoir d'autres questions à poser, et nous avons tous ces témoins parmi nous, alors c'est l'occasion pour nous de les interroger.

Le président:

D'accord. Voulez-vous céder la parole à Mme Kusie, ou préférez-vous intervenir en premier?

M. Scott Reid:

Est-ce que cela vous dérange si j'y vais en premier?

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Allez-y.

M. Scott Reid:

J'aimerais soulever deux points. Je tiens d'abord à insister sur un secteur dans lequel j'admire vraiment le travail que vous avez réalisé: votre mise à niveau séismique du présent édifice pour qu'il soit résistant aux tremblements de terre. Il ne l'était clairement pas avant que vous entamiez vos travaux, alors je vous félicite. Je suis bien conscient des défis qui touchent l'édifice du Centre à cet égard, et même si j'aime qu'on économise sur bien des choses, je ne vous demande pas de le faire sur ce point.

Je pense que le problème fondamental auquel vous êtes tous confrontés est que vos partenaires parlementaires, comme vous décrivez les divers groupes qui vous font des soumissions, ne vous ont pas fait part de leurs besoins. Ils vous ont donné une liste de souhaits, ce qui n'est pas tout à fait la même chose. C'est la différence entre ce qu'on aimerait avoir et ce que les économistes qualifient d'offre et de demande.

Au bout du compte, la demande est ce que je veux avoir et ce pour quoi je suis prêt à payer. Aucun d'entre nous n'a arrêté les choix difficiles. Je ne dis pas que vous faites des choix difficiles; nous n'avons pas arrêté de choix difficiles. Nous vous imposons le travail d'arbitrage, dans une large mesure, et c'est profondément injuste. Je peux voir que vous essayez de vous acquitter de cette tâche et de répondre aux besoins de tous.

Nous devons vous donner des lignes directrices plus claires, alors j'espère que ce que j'ai dit jusqu'à présent n'est pas perçu comme une critique de Travaux publics, des architectes ou de l'Administration de la Chambre. Au contraire, c'est plutôt une critique du processus auquel nous participons, et nous devons nous reprendre en main.

Changement de sujet, je conclus que l'idée d'un espace pour mettre des locaux temporaires à côté de l'ancienne ambassade des États-Unis n'a été approuvée par personne. Je pense que c'est une bonne idée. À l'heure actuelle, c'est un espace inutilisé, un stationnement où on ne se gare même plus. Il y a vraiment lieu d'y créer un espace qu'on pourrait utiliser et, à long terme, le défaut évident du bâtiment actuel est qu'il est trop petit pour un musée de l'histoire et du patrimoine autochtones. C'est impossible qu'il soit suffisamment grand. Les locaux temporaires pourraient être utiles à cet égard.

Je dois vous poser une question: selon vous, combien de temps faudra-t-il pour que soit rempli le gros trou — comme vous l'avez appelé — à l'endroit où l'on construira le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs? Nous savons que les travaux commenceront en septembre 2019. Quand sera-t-il remblayé et à quel moment le sol serait-il recouvert et prêt à être utilisé?

M. Rob Wright:

Je pense que cela nous ramène à une des questions que nous nous posions. Si le Parlement voulait hâter l'ouverture du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, grosso modo, pour lui accorder la priorité et libérer la pelouse en vue de reprendre les opérations et fonctions normales à cet endroit, ce serait différent d'un scénario dans lequel on voudrait que le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs et l'édifice du Centre rouvrent leurs portes la même journée. Nous pourrions nous pencher sur ces deux scénarios. Si on souhaitait accorder la priorité au Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, ce serait sur une période plus courte.

(1255)

M. Scott Reid:

Je présume que si la construction de la phase 2 du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs est votre priorité, c'est que les travaux en cours à l'édifice du Centre pendant les deux premières années ne sont pas les travaux structurels importants qu'il faudra effectuer plus tard. Il faut déterminer les objets qui s'y trouvent et les enlever. Vous essayez de faire plusieurs choses à la fois. Je présume que c'est votre logique.

Si on entamait des travaux sur le Centre d'accueil des visiteurs ou des parties de celui-ci à une date ultérieure, ce qui nous permettrait de déterminer ce qui devrait ou non s'y trouver, pourrait-on réduire la durée de la période pendant laquelle il y aura un trou dans le sol à l'emplacement du Centre ou la superficie sur laquelle se fera l'excavation à n'importe quel moment, ou une combinaison des deux? C'est-à-dire, pourra-t-on faire en sorte qu'il n'y ait pas de travaux d'excavation dans une section de l'empreinte pendant toute la période ou une partie de celle-ci et potentiellement réduire la période d'excavation pour l'ensemble ou une partie du projet.

J'ai formulé ma question de telle façon qu'il est difficile d'y répondre, mais je vous laisse y penser.

M. Rob Wright:

Pour être bien clair en ce qui concerne l'édifice du Centre, d'importants travaux de démolition intérieure débuteront cet automne. Il ne s'agit pas de la construction d'espaces particuliers, mais bien de la démolition de plaques de plancher spacieuses. Quoi que vous décidiez, c'est la façon de procéder. Cela nous convient. Ensuite, l'excavation du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs doit se faire simultanément. Je crois comprendre ce qui s'en vient pour avoir entendu au moins certains membres du Comité en parler: le fait d'attendre pourrait réduire l'empreinte et permettre de réaliser des économies, ce qui est admirable. Parallèlement, l'attente coûte cher. Il est très important que les membres du Comité en soient aussi conscients. Plus nous attendons, plus nous dépensons de l'argent. Il faut tenir compte des deux côtés du bilan.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci beaucoup à vous tous. Je vous en sais gré.

Le président:

Je tiens moi aussi à vous remercier tous.

Il nous reste bien des questions et des réunions. Un autre comité s'en vient dans cette pièce.

Soyez très bref, monsieur de Burgh Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai juste une question brève à poser.

Consulte-t-on les médias pour s'assurer qu'il n'y a pas d'endroit comme la Salle des dépêches encore une fois?

M. Michel Patrice:

Cela fait partie du plan.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Je vais céder la parole à M. Christopherson dans un moment.

Pour votre information, jeudi, pendant la première heure de notre réunion, le ministre nous parlera du Budget principal des dépenses en ce qui concerne la Commission des débats des chefs. La seconde heure sera libre, peut-être pour ce que M. Christopherson fera. Ensuite, au cours de la première réunion après notre retour, nous avons pour l'instant prévu d'examiner l'ébauche du rapport sur les chambres de débat parallèle. À un moment donné, il nous faudra revenir à la motion de M. Reid. Et nous devons quitter cette pièce à 13 heures parce qu'il y a un autre comité.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Combien de temps cela me laisse-t-il, monsieur le président? Je n'arrive pas à voir l'horloge.

Le président:

Il reste environ une minute.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est ce que je pensais. Je vais en profiter. Je vous en sais gré. Je n'ai demandé la parole que pour pouvoir officiellement proposer ma motion: « Que le comité soit chargé d'étudier les modifications proposées suivantes au Règlement et en fasse rapport à la Chambre. » Les documents contenant les détails de ces modifications ont été distribués dans les deux langues.

J'ignore dans quelle mesure nous devons en discuter. Je pars, en quelque sorte, du principe que nous avons suffisamment d'appui chez les députés d'arrière-banc pour au moins explorer quantité de travaux qui ont été effectués par de nombreux collègues et y accorder un peu d'attention. J'en fais un peu partie; j'ai surtout proposé des idées au lieu d'avoir été un des principaux acteurs. Mon rôle est simplement d'être membre du Comité. Voilà pourquoi je présente la motion.

J'aimerais qu'on détermine, soit maintenant ou simplement après, ou au début de la prochaine réunion, mais d'une façon ou d'une autre, si l'étude posera problème ou si on peut rapidement traiter cette motion pour faire venir la délégation afin de nous mettre au travail et d'examiner certaines des propositions.

C'est ce que je chercherais à faire par la suite. C'est la réponse qui déterminera à quelle vitesse on peut traiter cette motion et se mettre au travail, ou si nous aurons besoin d'en faire un type de cause célèbre — j'espère qu'il n'en sera rien.

(1300)

Le président:

Nous allons en discuter bientôt, c'est clair, mais pas aujourd'hui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suis prêt à voter.

Le président:

Vous êtes prêt à voter.

M. David Christopherson:

Si je peux obtenir gain de cause, j'aimerais qu'on passe au vote maintenant.

Le président:

Madame Kusie, la parole est à vous.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je pense que nous avons besoin de temps pour discuter davantage de la motion avant de la mettre aux voix.

Le président:

D'accord.

Nous allons le faire bientôt, monsieur Christopherson.

Merci encore. Espérons que ces bonnes discussions continueront parce que vous nous avez donné aujourd'hui énormément d'excellents renseignements qui nous seront très utiles. Merci beaucoup de l'avoir fait et de nous tenir au courant au fur et à mesure que les choses progressent.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 14, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.