header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-05-14 RNNR 136

Standing Committee on Natural Resources

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everybody. Thank you for joining us.

We are going back in time today. Back in 2016, when we first convened this committee, the first thing we did was to study the oil and gas sector, and produced a report entitled “The Future of Canada's Oil and Gas Sector: Innovation, Sustainable Solutions and Economic Opportunities”. The government provided a report in response, and today we're here to discuss an update on those issues and to get a briefing from our friends at NRCan to tell us where things stand as of 2019.

We're grateful to you for taking the time to be here. After your remarks, we will open the floor to questions from members around the table.

Welcome, and thank you.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers (Assistant Deputy Minister, Innovation and Energy Technology Sector, Department of Natural Resources):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. It's a pleasure to be here and to report on our progress.

I'm accompanied by two colleagues: Dr. Cecile Siewe, director general of the CanmetENERGY laboratory in Devon, Alberta; and Chris Evans, senior director in the petroleum resources branch at Natural Resources Canada.

We shared a copy of a short overview presentation, but I thought perhaps I could touch on it quickly to give you a bit of sense of what has happened since our last encounter on this topic.

With regard to the broad context and sheer importance of the oil and gas sector in the country, it is a major industry, a major driver of jobs, GDP, and exports. You have seen some of those data in the report itself, but it's worth reminding ourselves that it's 276,000 jobs around the country, so it affects a lot of people and their families. It accounts for some $100 billion in exports and 5.6% of GDP. Canada is a very large player in the global scene in the production and export of both oil and natural gas.

As we all know, the industry has faced some pretty challenging times in recent years, in particular thanks to the decline in commodity prices affecting world markets. Our industry and our people working in this industry surely felt it most directly.

Despite the short-term turmoil, the long-term future of the oil and gas industry remains quite strong, as shown in NEB reports, as well as assessments conducted by the International Energy Agency. Despite those challenging times, we've had our share of good news lately with some major project announcements, including the largest project in Canada's history, the LNG Canada project, a $40 billion project in British Columbia. This project will make Canada a prominent player in the LNG space, which as we know is a very important trend globally in energy markets, with our being the cleanest energy producer in the world. This will assist us in servicing our Asian clients, who are trying to move away from coal.

Another key project worth noting is in the offshore of Newfoundland and Labrador, the Hebron project, a $14 billion initiative. There are also major petrochemical projects in Alberta, which were announced in recent months. These are certainly encouraging signs. [Translation]

We're coming back to the elements of the government's response to the report you produced. They are grouped around four main themes.[English]

The first one was around intergovernmental collaboration and co-operation, the second focused on building public trust and transparency, the third was directed at engagement with indigenous people and resource development, and the fourth was on innovation in oil and gas.

I hope to cover some of this in my interim remarks, but because of time considerations, we may have to cover this during the Qs and As.

I'd like to note some of the major initiatives currently in play. There is Bill C-69, which is currently in front of the Senate for deliberation. There is the work around the consultation for the Trans Mountain Pipeline, which is also ongoing. I should also note the sizable investment made by the government in clean technology innovation—some $3 billion has been invested to date, with some key investments in the oil and gas sector, which I will touch on.

Looking at the engagement with citizens was also a key element of our focus this past fall. Our department's Generation Energy Council is engaged with some 380,000 Canadians on what the future of energy should look like. In those discussions, four pathways have emerged. One of these was being a clean oil and gas producer, which remains central to our game plan.

To cut to the chase, the key takeaway from that consultation, which lasted several months, was the desire of our citizens to see us as competitive, to make sure that our oil and gas industry can thrive, and to sustain those jobs and wealth creation. However, it also looked at ways to improve our environmental performance in terms of both GHGs and also our impacts on water and land.

Those two themes were very present throughout our conversation, along with the theme of the innovation required to get to that desired objective.

The industry has gone through a rather challenging environment lately, and this past December the government announced a support package to help the workers and communities affected by the downturn in the price of oil and gas. The total package was worth $1.6 billion.

(1540)



I want to perhaps touch on some of those key components, the first one being $1 billion in commercial financial support coming from Export Development Canada to support the working capital needs of companies as well as their export potential in new markets.

The second envelope was $500 million from the Business Development Bank to help commercial financing to diversify those markets.

The third component was around R and D, with a $50 million investment from the clean growth program at NRCan being set aside. The total value of those projects is $890 million.

The next component was from the strategic innovation fund from ISED, the innovation department. That's a $100 million envelope.

Lastly, there is access to the national trade corridors fund, with a total value of $750 million. A significant amount of commitments have been made in that regard.

To close, in terms of tax measures, in the fiscal updates in the past fall, as colleagues will know, Mr. Chair, there was a significant announcement with regard to accelerated capital cost allowance measures to boost the competitiveness of all industry sectors in the country. The total value of those measures was in the order of $5 billion in terms of foregone tax revenues. Obviously, the oil and gas sector, being such a major player in terms of domestic industry, was one of those that obviously benefited from it, especially in terms of expensing clean energy equipment investments.

That brings me to the innovation team, which I touched on earlier. Obviously I will not be comprehensive here, but again, through our conversations that will follow, we may be able to touch a bit more on that. The government has been working very closely with industry and provincial governments to look at ways to really help drive the industry forward in terms of the future, as the title of your study invites.

While the industry does a terrific job in looking at those incremental improvements, there's a collective sense that we need to look at leapfrogging in terms of environmental performance and cost reductions. This is where renewed efforts with extraction technologies, tailing ponds management, air emissions as well as carbon use have been widely seen as being critical.

I won't go into those in detail, but to give you a bit of a hint, in terms of extraction technologies, there are some promising leads there that we and the industry are pursuing with vigour, to look at both reducing the cost of production but also reducing emissions by the order of 40% to 50%. We have a number of projects in this area, which are very exciting indeed, that we are driving quite actively right now.

It's the same thing in the area of tailings. We hear a lot of concern among our citizens in terms of how we can cope with those and reduce the production of those tailing ponds. There's effort there. It's also looking at using some of those tailing ponds and making sure that we're able to extract the valuable hydrocarbon and heavy metals such as titanium to be able to make better use of it. It's very much in the spirit of a cyclical economy, being able to recycle some of those products.

We have a large-scale project currently under way, which was announced by the Province of Alberta with Titanium Corporation, to do precisely that.

These are, for us, very encouraging signs of what Canada is able to do. Of all sectors, the oil and gas sector in Canada has been known for decades to be extremely innovative and entrepreneurial. I have a lot of confidence that we'll be able to advance those projects successfully.

The the penultimate slide speaks a bit to how we went about doing it. As you know, the pan-Canadian framework was anchored around this notion of working collaboratively with provincial and territorial governments. We felt it was the right thing to do to pay special attention to how we went about doing business.

There I could point out perhaps three elements that were, in our eyes, quite meaningful. The first is the establishment of a clean growth hub, which is essentially a one-stop shop for people to interact with the federal family. Sometimes it's a bit difficult if you're a university researcher, a small firm out there, to figure out whom to talk to. Their wish was to have have a one-stop shop where they could interact with us. We heard that feedback, and we took it to heart and established this hub. It is is a grouping of 16 department and agencies physically co-located in an office here in downtown Ottawa. They are able to interact with clients and direct them, whether they need financing, access to market, regulatory changes or issues around procurement—whatever topic they may have.

(1545)



In our one short year of operation, we've had more than 1,000 clients come our way to look for guidance and support, and it's a very popular feature of our ecosystem nowadays.

The second thing I would note is around the trusted partnership model. We have finite resources both federally and provincially to invest taxpayers' dollars, so we have to try to find ways to use those limited resources smartly. We reach out to provinces and say “How about we try to identify together what the most promising technologies are and look at having an integrated review process?”.

Instead of having researchers in universities go through separate processes both federally and provincially, we essentially recognize each other's process, saving an enormous amount of time for the researchers and innovators to access the federal or provincial funding, and also it speeds up the process considerably. We have eight or nine of those trusted partnership models across the country, which have proven to be quite successful.

The third and last thing I would note is that the government announced, in budget 2019, $100 million in funding for the Clean Resource Innovation Network, or CRIN for short. It brings together innovators in the oil and gas sector, mostly in western Canada, and the grouping has been active now for about a year. The federal government was happy to provide some support for that. They were actually in town just this past week, and it looks to be quite exciting in development. [Translation]

To conclude, I'll talk about the national energy labs.

We have a network of four national labs located in several parts of the country, in Montreal, Ottawa, Hamilton, Ontario, and Alberta. They bring together more than 600 researchers, engineers and technicians in this field.[English]They cover a wide range of technologies: renewable energy, PV, geothermal, bioenergy, marine, energy efficiency, advanced materials. They look at artificial intelligence application in energy as well as fossil energy.

We have the privilege of having Dr. Cecile Siewe here, who is the lab DG from our CanmetENERGY-Devon facility, which is focusing precisely on oil and gas research. As we'll hear during the audience, there's a lot of work there around water research, extraction technologies, partial upgrading, oil spill recovery and a lot of those domains of expertise. Dr. Siewe is a highly renowned scientist in her own right but also the lead of that lab. I thought it could be of interest to the committee members to interact directly with her.

I'll pause here and turn the floor over to you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Whalen, you're going to start us off.

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.):

It's great to hear from you guys on what the government is doing on the innovation side.

I was hoping to maybe get some of your general overall views or just some facts to put on the record about the current opportunities for Canadian petroleum-based energy in the market. Could you guys provide some statistics or some information on what the global market looks like for oil and gas between now and the end of the century, when we hope not to use it anymore, and how much of that oil consumption at that time could or should come from Canada?

Mr. Chris Evans (Senior Director, Pipelines, Gas and LNG, Energy Sector, Petroleum Resources Branch, Department of Natural Resources):

Thank you for the question. It's a good one.

I think we'll have to qualify our answer a little bit in the Canadian context, but certainly at a high level we can say that the International Energy Agency has indicated and highlighted that there is an expectation that, even as the world tries to control its carbon footprint, there is going to be growth in oil. The National Energy Board last year did an energy futures report, which suggested more in the Canadian context a growth of at least 1.7 million barrels of oil out of Canada, out to 2030.

There's a dynamic there where the expectation is that there will be more oil that needs to be consumed by the world and that Canada's production will increase.

(1550)

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Do you see potential benefits in the market from the way carbon is being priced around the world that would see lower output pollution costs resulting in benefits for different types of oil that might be produced here, say, at offshore Newfoundland to the detriment of Alberta oil? And how much is that starting to play a role in the marketplace and in global consumers' decisions on where they're sourcing their hydrocarbons from?

Mr. Chris Evans:

I think I'll need to be a little bit cautious about talking too much about carbon pricing, as it sits under a different minister's remit. I think I can say that the government is looking to implement carbon pricing in a way that remains focused on competitiveness. There are several avenues or elements of the carbon approach, including mitigation, adaptation and innovation, which is a very important element. The carbon price does sit within the overall plan.

The current approach has forecasted measurable reductions in carbon pollution out to 2022, just on the plan as it currently exists, but there is still a lot of work being done on the shape of some of the implementation, and I think I wouldn't be able to opine on some of the points you raised.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

That's fair enough.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

If I may supplement this.

It's true in the case of oil. It's also very true in the case of LNG.

In our discussions with super majors and domestic producers as well, we hear a lot about the preoccupation with the carbon footprint, as the member is referencing, and looking at those suppliers who are seen to be clean or the cleanest in the space. It is quite an opportunity for Canada, which is seen as a politically stable jurisdiction, but also potentially as one that is differentiated in the commodity markets in being seen as a clean energy supplier. It is certainly true in the case of our LNG Canada project on the west coast. I think both the domestic constituents care about it and our clients as well, and so do investors.

We're very mindful of that, and it may not be intuitive to many. The fact that we have such an abundant clean electricity supply is one of our advantages, because in order to power those very large pieces of equipment, you need a large amount of power. We're fortunate to have large hydro power and renewable energy, which are able to sharply reduce the carbon footprint of those operations. Whether it's on the west coast or the east coast, we have a chance to differentiate ourselves in a big way.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

When my constituents write to me—and it's more of a political question—they want to know how Canada can continue to participate in the market while living up to its environmental commitments.

I want to get a sense of where we see our markets in the future. Do you see a decline in North Sea production as an opportunity for Newfoundland to pick up some market share? How are we on the greenhouse gas emissions side; how do we compare with the North Sea, the Middle East and with South America, Venezuela in particular?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

It is a good point.

Again, when we look at Canada's production compared not only with that of other oil or gas producers, but also in terms of energy switching, if you're looking at opportunities in the big picture for major emissions reductions, a lot of it is around moving coal to cleaner fuels, either fossil fuel or renewable energy. It's true in the United States, where we've literally seen dozens of coal plants being shut down and moving to either natural gas or clean electricity when possible.

The same is true also in eastern Europe and Asia, where very large domestic production of coal is still used for power production. This is where natural gas can be part of that energy switch from coal to cleaner fuels or cleaner energy.

Fuel switching in the United States has been the largest contributor by far to their improvements in GHG.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

That's good to hear.

It's difficult for Canadians to wrap their head around the sheer volume of oil production in Alberta and what that means and how important it is. When we talk about pipelines and getting the volume of this commodity to market, it's difficult for Canadians to picture how much benefit TMX will have in the mix of the distribution of this oil to markets versus Keystone XL, and difficult for people to understand why energy east is no longer on the table.

If Keystone XL and TMX come online, will that solve the problem Alberta has in getting its current production levels to market? Is there a potential future role for energy east to help Alberta expand its production and get even more resource to market?

(1555)

Mr. Chris Evans:

Canada is a market-driven economy for its energy projects. We rely, of course, on private sector players, by and large, to decide on projects.

In the case of the energy east pipeline, that decision was taken by the company when it looked at all of the factors that were coming to bear.

Strictly in terms of TMX, KXL, and the Line 3 replacement project, if you consider the incremental pipeline capacity that these three projects would contribute to the market, it roughly speaking matches the NEB's forecast of growth in oil production in Canada.

The Chair:

Ms. Stubbs.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC):

With the energy east pipeline, one of the factors that was brought to bear in the proponents' decision was the political intervention in what should have been an unbiased, science-based, evidence-based review, fair to all pipeline considerations.

In fact, because of the stalling and the reappointment of a panel by the Liberals.... Then, for the first time ever, there was the application of downstream emissions criteria as a factor in the assessment of the energy east pipeline, unlike Trans Mountain, which was only assessed on upstream emissions. The energy east pipeline was held to upstream and downstream emissions. That, ultimately, was exactly what the company mentioned one month before, when it asked to stall the process to be able to continue with their application. A month later, it announced it was leaving. This of course is why regulatory certainty is so critical and important.

I have a quick question. I remember that about this time last year—and I don't know what the answer to this is—the government launched a $280,000 study on oil and gas competitiveness. It was led by NRCan, and a firm was commissioned to do it. I think it was completed in June 2018—I don't know. Has that report been made public? Is there a report that has come out of that study?

Mr. Chris Evans:

I really regret that I'll have to look into that. I don't have information about that on hand.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

If you could find out about it and then table it with the committee, that would be great. I remember its being announced, but didn't really ever see the conclusion. Given the dollar amount we knew it would cost taxpayers, it would be great if Canadians would be able to get to see that report.

Speaking about the regulatory review for crucial energy infrastructure in Canada, Bill C-69, as you referenced, will make some major changes. The provinces and three territories have now come out with deep concerns about the impacts of Bill C-69 on future development of oil and gas, given the draft project list that was released last week, all of the kinds of interventions in provincial jurisdiction, as well as the the impact on the ability to build anything in Canada. It's not your job to answer for that; it's the politicians' job.

Because there was a budget allotment relating to the transition between the NEB to whatever ends up coming out of Bill C-69, is your department involved in the plans for that transition? Are you able to shed any light on what the timeline would look like? Can I get some details on that?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

As the committee chair will I'm surely appreciate—given the lively discussions that are currently taking place in the Senate—it would be premature for us to pronounce on how the transition will take shape. Officials are reflecting on all of those considerations, but we need to see how the legislative piece lands before we can firm up all of those plans. We're getting ready for that implementation, should Parliament decide to approve it.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

In our committee study and recommendations, page 5 of the report noted the importance of how society perceives energy development and public confidence. I would argue that the Liberals have campaigned against Canada's world-renowned track record of regulatory reviews of energy projects.

You'll remember that the Liberals campaigned on a loss of confidence in the National Energy Board, even though they never provided a shred of evidence about that. I am confident that you all know that Canada, for decades, when benchmarked substantively against other energy-producing countries in the world, has literally been second to none on all the measures of concern.

Given the comments by the Liberal Minister of Democratic Institutions, who said, “It's time to landlock Alberta's tar sands”, and the Prime Minister's rejection of the Enbridge pipeline, thereby removing the potential for standalone exports to Asia-Pacific, do you have any comments, first of all, on what rhetoric like that by elected representatives does to Canada's reputation as a responsible energy producer? Since you're experts, could you inform everybody, and that Liberal minister in particular, once and for all, if there is actually any tar in the oil sands?

(1600)

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

It's probably not appropriate for me to comment on an exchange from a minister's and MP's perspective, but with regard to making sure that the facts of the full carbon cycle from wells to wheels in terms of our production methods are communicated, I can certainly reassure committee members that the impact we're having and the progress we're making in environmental outcomes are communicated clearly.

That's something we strive to do, not just domestically, but also for investors and key partner countries that, as you can appreciate, we're interacting with daily and who are seeking information and evidence with regard to our work. I would also add that a key element of our plan is making sure that they are included in scientific evidence and facts. We're privileged to have, in our universities and in our national labs, highly respected experts who are able to bring those facts, figures and evidence to the interests of those investors and players so they can make informed decisions.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

It would certainly be difficult.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

The same is true for the IEA, for instance, where we're a very active member, to make sure that Canada can present the facts as they are.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

And there is no tar in the oil sands.

Quickly on the Liberal fuel standard, I just wonder if you have you been consulted as a department in the development of the Liberal fuel standard. While the environment department admits they have no modelling for emissions reductions or the cost consequences of the fuel standard, I just wonder if your department has been engaged in the development of it—or maybe you are now, now that they're consulting in the back end, even though they announced it in December—particularly with regard to cost consequences for refiners in Canada.

Mr. Chris Evans:

Certainly our department is working with ECCC in supporting them with analysis and working with our stakeholders as well to take on board their views, conducting analysis and feeding it into the ECCC-led process, yes.

The Chair:

Mr. Cannings.

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP):

Thank you all for coming here today; it's been interesting.

I think I'll just pick up on some of the things Mr. Evans said, just to get some clarification. You say there's growth in oil demand around the world. Is that from the IEA projections, which you were talking about, or is it NEB?

Mr. Chris Evans:

I don't have the figures from the International Energy Agency's forecast.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I'm sorry—

Mr. Chris Evans:

What I was speaking of in terms of the 1.7 million barrels growth out to 2030 was the National Energy Board forecasts.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

That's the production, right, whereas the other one was demand.

Mr. Chris Evans:

It was the forecasted growth in production to meet demand.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I just wanted to make sure I heard the following right. Did you say the world will have more oil than it needs as Canadian production increases?

Mr. Chris Evans:

If those were my words, that was not what I intended to say.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

That's why I wanted to make sure I heard it clearly.

(1605)

Mr. Chris Evans:

I only want to speak in the Canadian context.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Okay.

Mr. Chris Evans:

I prefer not to speak to the International Energy Agency's demand forecasts, because I don't have the numbers before me. Essentially what I was saying was that there is a forecast for growth in oil production in Canada, and that is intended to meet what is understood to be a demand growth globally.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Okay, and so you won't.... I know we had a question about the North Sea, but you can't comment on what the American production might look like over the next few decades.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

I think those authoritative sources like the IEA and NEB are probably the most reliable sources for domestic production. We don't have an opinion on what oil this displaces.... It all goes to the world markets, and as we've seen in recent years, there can be a significant shift based on technological developments. It's certainly the case in U.S. oil and gas production, where we've seen a major spike that was not foreseen by anybody. We're continuously tracking both the public and private sector forecasts, and we take them as part of our discussions. However, at the end of the day, it's a market-driven approach in allocation of resources.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I've seen analyses that the American production doesn't show any signs of tailing off in 10 years. It just seems to be staying where it is, if not increasing. I've also seen analyses about the IEA forecasts being consistently, year after year after year, 10% too high.

I'm just a bit wary of some of the statistics I see in some of the forecasts. I know when the National Energy Board was before us for the study we're talking about today, they presented world energy demand curves. When I asked them about that...these were two years out of date, they were before Paris, they were before the tight oil production situation and everything. When they came back a year later, it was very different.

I just wanted to make sure I understood what you said. I guess I misunderstood you, so thank you for that.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

If I may add, Mr. Chair, I'm trained as an economist and we have a good old joke in economic forecasting, which I guess could also apply to weathermen or other domains: Pick a number, pick a date, but never the two of them together.

I think the same challenges apply in the oil and gas markets. It is hard to predict with certainty what's going to happen despite the best minds and the best data. Things are constantly changing in the marketplace.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I heard one of Canada's best resource economists say we're here to make astrologers look good.

I just wanted to get some clarity on that.

Getting back to the study, one of the things we heard—and I remember Professor Monica Gattinger talking about her concerns with respect to the lack of trust in the regulatory system—was that trust would continue to erode until the regulatory system was fixed, or the holes in it were fixed.

Could you comment on what's been done there, what Bill C-69 was meant to address in that regard and where that stands?

Mr. Chris Evans:

In terms of Bill C-69, the overall objectives of the act were to put in place a framework that would give greater transparency to everybody involved in the regulatory process and to restore public trust. This would be in recognition of the fact that efficient, credible and predictable assessments in decision-making processes are critical to attracting investment and maintaining competitiveness.

The overall process would create an impact assessment system with better timelines and greater clarity from the start for all stakeholders, both proponents and Canadians at large, and be built with a lot of engagement with first nations.

Right now, as you know, Bill C-69 is before the Senate Standing Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources, with all of the parliamentary activity that involves. I don't think we're in a great position to comment more on it.

(1610)

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I have 30 seconds left and I would like to get one more clarification because I thought I heard you incorrectly. When you were talking about the $1.6 billion and what that was made up of, I thought you said you started off with $1 billion for the EDC. Was that correct?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

That's right.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

That's all I need. Thanks.

The Chair:

Mr. Hehr.

Hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary Centre, Lib.):

Thanks to our honoured guests for being here.

I have a follow-up question to Mr. Whalen's. You guys were describing our pipeline capacity and how we're going to be moving forward on the Trans Mountain pipeline the right way, and with Enbridge Line 3 and Keystone XL. That roughly equates to oil sands growth in the near term. Is that correct?

Mr. Chris Evans:

If you just take the nameplate capacity of those three pipelines—the incremental new capacity—it would match what the NEB forecasted as growth in Canada's production.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

The timing on some of these is a little unclear. This is like the joke Mr. Des Rosiers made earlier, which could also apply to pipelines. Some of those things are outside of our control, given what's happening in the jurisdiction south of the border, particularly with regard to Keystone and other things.

Are we looking at plans to develop more rail capacity and ability to get more oil by rail? Where are we on that? Have the costs come down on how that process is unfolding?

Mr. Chris Evans:

In the media it was reported that the Province of Alberta was looking at rail procurement for its provincial purposes. The federal government generally takes the view, I believe, that it's the market that determines what's the best supply-and-demand matching.... Although Alberta has made an approach, our department is not looking at anything in particular beyond that.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Okay. Thank you for that answer.

Given that 45 nations and 24 subnational governments have carbon pricing, that seems to be the move towards things being as they are. You mentioned earlier that you guys are working on things that lower the carbon usage or the carbon being emitted to the atmosphere in our oil production, not only in the oil sands but elsewhere. How are those projections going? What are you guys seeing? Are our oil companies and things taking this issue seriously?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Mr. Chair, it's right to note that carbon pricing is seen widely by economists around the world as one of those powerful means to signal to the marketplace how to allocate resources and make investments, whether they're producers, consumers or heavy industries. When you're able to weave that into your everyday budget allocation, it certainly has a very powerful impact. It's not surprising that some of the world's super majors have actually been among the most vocal supporters for having a carbon-pricing regime, and I'm not trying to take a comment from an individual jurisdiction perspective, but just in terms of research and economics, that's a textbook case of using pricing signals to allocate resources.

To the question, most certainly companies are paying close attention. This is not going to be a surprise to committee members: many companies are having so-called shadow prices in terms of their research allocation, i.e., that whether a given jurisdiction has a carbon price or not, they tend to build in a price for the medium- to long-term decisions they're making. As you can appreciate, in the oil and gas sector it's not uncommon to make an investment on a 20-, 30- or 40-year horizon in order to recoup very large capital investments. Companies typically don't reveal those shadow prices, but they have a shadow price for their investment decisions across large jurisdictions or their global operations to take into account what they foresee to be the operating environment in years to come. In effect, many of the large companies that are succeeding are actually doing this already.

(1615)

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Fabulous.

You mentioned LNG Canada. Of course, that's a tremendous success story that we're very proud of and that can not only move our economy forward but help with world GHG emissions. In fact, if we do it right and get it to markets overseas, this will help reduce global GHGs and global warming and climate change. Is there capacity in terms of projections for Canada to have more production of LNG here? What would be our potential here to develop that? Do we have an ability to do that?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Most certainly, there's potential to have other projects. These are large-scale projects that require careful consideration by the investors given the sheer scale and the impact in terms of infrastructure, but we do have multiple projects on both the west coast and the east coast that are at different stages of review and consideration.

I think it's fair to say that the LNG Canada investment was a major signal to the marketplace that Canada is a competitive nation when it comes to energy investments. Already we were aware of many projects on both coasts that were under consideration, but that really gave it a significant amount of profile and a boost in terms of Canada's credibility to make those things happen.

We're certainly tracking those discussions, which are confidential and involve many parties, but we're hopeful that in the coming years there will be more of those.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I have a quick question to follow up on Ms. Stubbs' line of questioning. It appears to me right now that what we were operating on before was the 2012 process for developing pipelines that put in place by the Conservatives and, at least from my view, if there has been a “no pipeline bill”, that would essentially be it, as it led to pipelines being in court, not in the ground.

In any event, I know that Bill C-69 has tried to deal with some of that and some of your work around that. Can you talk about early engagement? It seems like that was not as significantly involved in the earlier 2012 process. Is that incorporated in Bill C-69?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

I'm not sure I understand the question.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

It's about the early engagement of indigenous peoples.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

That certainly is a prominent feature in our engagement. We're reminded by the courts, by the Federal Court of Appeal this year, of the importance of doing that, and doing that thoroughly. The government took that most seriously. As you've seen, we've devoted considerable efforts, with the help of former Supreme Court Justice Iacobucci, to making sure that we're doing this in the spirit of what the court was advising us to do. We're going through those motions at this very moment; absolutely.

The Chair:

Mr. Schmale, you have five minutes.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

I appreciate your coming and speaking with us today.

I'm wondering if you could tell this committee how many pipelines were approved and built under the previous Conservative government in the previous 10 years.

Mr. Chris Evans:

I'm afraid I don't have the data on that. I apologize; we didn't bring that in our briefing book.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

No? Okay: How about the Kinder Morgan Anchor Loop, the Enbridge Line 9 reversal, the Enbridge Alberta Clipper and the TransCanada Keystone pipeline? We can even talk about others as well.

Maybe to go back to Mr. Hehr's question, in the top 10 oil-producing countries in the world, how many of those top 10 have a carbon tax?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

I feel I'm being asked to play trivia here.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers: I suspect that the committee member may have the answer.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

The answer is zero.

The Chair:

There's no prize, I might add.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

The answer is absolutely zero.

Mr. Ted Falk (Provencher, CPC):

Oh, there's a big prize: October 21.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

That's right, October 21.

Now, when my friend Mr. Hehr talked about how it was the Conservatives talking about Bill C-69, calling it the “no more pipelines bill”, it actually wasn't us. We picked it up from industry. They coined that term and we took it from them.

Maybe you can tell us a bit about competitiveness overall in Canada and how we are faring.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

I welcome the chance to cover this, because it is a key preoccupation right now across the country and the industry. We hear that loud and clear every time we engage with those players to make sure that Canada is a clean producer but also cost-competitive. I mentioned the extraordinary degree of innovation but also entrepreneurial spirit in the country.

As we've seen in history in so many ways, a crisis will kind of force humans to come up with extraordinary solutions. I think we've seen this happen again and again in Canada's oil and gas sector. Most recently, with the price downturn, we've seen those companies and individuals looking at all sorts of innovative ways to reduce their costs of operation. They're changing some of the technologies they use, looking at their use of the labour force, looking at reducing the input of productions in their activities, and trying to consolidate in some cases the industry players in their domains. All of this has led to very significant cost reductions, driven by those firms. We are in regular discussions with all the major oil and gas producers in Canada. It's truly impressive what they've managed to do to reduce their costs of operation at the firm level.

From a country's perspective, as I mentioned earlier, the government featured this prominently in the 2018 fiscal update. The principal announcement in that update was around competitiveness and bringing about measures in our tax system to accelerate the capital cost allowance of some of the large investments. This was seen also in the context of the competitive landscape, especially in North America, where south of the border some major corporate tax announcements were made and the government came up with fairly sizable corporate tax measures to the tune of $5 billion a year. It was certainly not trivial in terms of changing that landscape.

(1620)

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

How aggressive is the United States' oil and gas industry right now? You just talked a bit about it, but can you do a very quick comparison of the two countries and how they are different?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

On both sides of the border, this is an intensely competitive industry, not just Canada-U.S. but also globally. Canada has to constantly make sure that we're able to play at par.

I can certainly comment briefly in terms of our overall tax regime. Looking at the corporate tax rates, in terms of effective tax rates, Canada compares quite advantageously not just with the U.S. but also with global G7 competitors. I think we're in good stead in that regard.

In terms of skilled talent, Canada is doing remarkably well in terms of our engineering and technical talent. Again, as for entrepreneurial flair, our country's workforce is second to none in terms of expertise in that domain. We see this not just in Canada but around the world. Our engineers and our experts are consistently sought after to bring their expertise.

So there are many dimensions to competitiveness. I will not try, in my 30 seconds, to answer it fully. I would just reassure you—

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

We're seeing billions of dollars—

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

—that this is something we're very—

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

—in investment fleeing Canada.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

—seized with, and we're working hard to continue to improve. It's an ongoing effort that every country has to pay attention to.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Since we're on the theme—

The Chair:

You're right on time there.

Mr. Jamie Schmale: Oh. All right.

The Chair: I hate to be the bearer of bad news.

Your colleague to the right can tell you what it's like.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

The Chair: Mr. Graham, you have the floor. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Mr. Des Rosiers, in your opening remarks, you mentioned 276,000 jobs in the oil and gas sector.

What does this figure include? Does it go so far as to include gas station attendants in the retail sector? Who does it cover? [English]

Mr. Chris Evans:

That figure was for direct employment.[Translation]

I'm sorry, the question was addressed to my colleague.[English]

The same data source that gives us the 276,000 direct jobs would give 900,000 if indirect jobs were counted. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's true.

Slide number 5 talks about new technologies for managing wastewater.

Can you talk more about it? Are we going to get to the point where wastewater could be transformed back into drinking water? If not, what do we do with this water?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

You're referring to the work on retention basins.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

This is a significant issue, which has been raised many times by our citizens and clients. We have all seen the images of these huge basins that could and do pose short-, medium- and long-term problems. In the mining sector, for example, we have seen significant risks of spills in this regard. This explains our attention and that of the industry to develop extraction processes that do not generate large retention basins of this type. In this regard, there are various technologies that are at the demonstration stage before they can be exploited on a commercial scale.

I mentioned another initiative a moment ago. We have been talking about this for several years now, and now we have reached the stage of carrying out these large-scale projects. The aim is to be able to extract hydrocarbon residues from these large ponds that are still commercially attractive, as well as metals, in particular heavy metals such as titanium, and therefore be able to sell them on the global market in order to generate products.

This technology has been under development for several years by Titanium Corporation. It is preparing, with major oil and gas companies, to carry out a project worth $400 million to make this dream a reality. This is a golden opportunity for Canada to reduce or eliminate these types of facilities that are of concern to our citizens.

(1625)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

With regard to the tailings we already have, is there any way or any upcoming technology that can transform wastewater into drinking water? Will it be recycled later in one way or another?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

The main concern at present[English]—and maybe my colleague, Dr. Siewe, could elaborate on this, as the lab definitely does a lot of water research to reduce the amount of freshwater intake into the process—[Translation]

and therefore to use the current water in several usage cycles. Does the water become potable?[English]

I'll leave that to my colleague, who is more expert than I am.

Mrs. Cecile Siewe (Director General, Innovation and Energy Technology Sector, CanmetENERGY-Devon):

It's not possible to recycle the water yet, but the intention is to reduce the amount of fresh water as much as possible, and then have investigation and R and D into the treatment process, to get it as close as possible to a state that allows you to return it. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Concerning the transformation technology for CO2—we also talk about it on the same page—what solution have you already found? What can we already do with CO2?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Thank you for the question.

This is really a fast-growing sector, where Canada is a world leader in capturing CO2 at the source. There are different carbon capture techniques. It can be captured on industrial sites and even in the air. Carbon Engineering of Squamish, British Columbia, is a world leader in the field and has attracted significant investment from major institutional investors.

The fields of application are numerous. When we think of CO2, we think of negative repercussions, whereas it can be transformed into useful products. Among the Canadian companies that stand out in this regard are CarbonCure Technologies, which reinjects CO2 into concrete or cement to improve its chemical properties and make it more robust and efficient, while reducing production costs. It is very successful not only in Canada, but also in North America, with nearly 100 sites operating commercially throughout the Americas. This company is also the subject of strong interest in other markets around the world. This is an example of a company with great potential. This can also be used to produce plastics or other building materials. There is a strong interest here.

Canada, Canadian and American companies have joined forces with the XPRIZE Foundation, which launches major global competitions and has invested $20 million to gather ideas in the field. The most popular competition in the history of XPRIZE Foundation was the development of new uses for CO2. The good news is that many of the companies selected are Canadian.

At the end of the month, a major ministerial conference will be held in Vancouver, which will bring together the 25 major players in the clean energy sector. Canada will host Clean Energy Ministerial and Mission Innovation-4 to celebrate these types of companies and solutions that are available to the world. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Falk.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Thank you, witnesses, for your presentation here today.

I've got more questions than time. I will start with one question.

Earlier today I was able to meet with the Mining Association of Canada. One of their concerns was a Liberal fuel standard that's being proposed. You mentioned earlier in your presentation that from a tax perspective we are very competitive with our major competition, the United States. They don't have a carbon tax. When you consider the carbon tax and a proposed Liberal fuel standard that could amount to anywhere from $150 to $400 per tonne of carbon, how will that position us competitively?

(1630)

Mr. Chris Evans:

In developing the fuel standard, I think the government recognizes the impacts that climate change is having on Canada and the world and is committed to addressing it. The clean fuel standard is part of that. It's led by Environment and Climate Change Canada. The government has stated an objective through that of reducing carbon pollution by 30 megatonnes by 2030, which is equivalent to taking about seven million cars off the road.

As I mentioned earlier, our department continues to work with ECCC on this file in understanding the impact on stakeholders, in terms of of analysis, and providing that input to them so they can continue their work in refining the shape this may take.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Have you done any modelling on how this might impact our natural gas and oil producers? We already know that over $80 billion in investment in our energy sector has gone south or elsewhere in the last three years.

How would a Liberal fuel standard impact that?

Mr. Chris Evans:

As I said, we continue to work with stakeholders on the analysis. A lot of them are looking at understanding the impacts this standard may have on their industries. I can't give you technical details here on the structure of the analysis that's been happening, but we are continuing to work with these interested parties to make sure that we understand their perspective and that we're looking at what we understand it will mean to the industry. We're making sure that ECCC is aware of that in shaping the final standard.

Mr. Ted Falk:

The mining executives I met today reminded me of how many investment dollars have left our country when it comes to development of more metal mines. Does the department have an analysis on what the prognosis is, going forward?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Our colleagues from the mining sector, which is part of NRCan, are certainly attuned to that. You may have noted that we most recently published a mineral action plan for Canada in conjunction with our provincial stakeholders, which is precisely meant to address that very point about making sure that Canada has an agreed-upon game plan that is accepted and supported by all. I must say that the degree of support around that mineral action plan was extraordinarily high, including from our colleagues from the Mining Association of Canada, along with a large number of stakeholders. It was presented at the PDAC, which as you know is the Prospectors and Developers Association's meeting, gathering tens of thousands of players from Canada and around the world. The work will carry on over the coming months to shape up the various components of that action plan. But we're working very actively on that very point.

Mr. Ted Falk:

If I heard you correctly, you said earlier that we will require additional pipelines to be built to meet up with production. I'd like you to clarify that.

Mr. Chris Evans:

I only commented on the National Energy Board's forecast for production growth and on the nameplate capacity. I am not stating an opinion about public need. That is for another organization. That's part of the National Energy Board's review process, and that will be part of the impending decision of the Governor in Council. It's not appropriate for me to comment on that.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Okay.

How much time do I have?

The Chair:

You have 20 seconds.

Mr. Ted Falk:

What do you see as the major impediments in fast-tracking the TMX?

Mr. Chris Evans:

That, I think, is sort of a question that would be beyond the scope of what I'm really to opine on.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Okay.

The Chair:

Mr. Hehr, we'll go back to you.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I note that you brought up towards the end of your presentation the government's $100 million investment in CRIN and that a group of people came from Calgary to Ottawa to discuss this initiative. You say that the group has been collaborating for the last year. Can you shed a little more light on it and tell us what this group is doing and what outcomes we can expect?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Sure.

Recognizing that this is led by industry and universities out west— I don't speak on their behalf, and I certainly haven't been directly involved in it—I'll perhaps ask my colleague Dr. Cecile Siewe, who is part of the governance of the CRIN, to add to my remarks.

We do have, thanks to this network, both Canada's oil and natural gas producers coming together to really make sure that the ecosystem is efficiently managed. They have established a number of working groups and focus areas, which touch on water technology, which we talked about, novel extraction technology, which we've talked about just earlier. They are looking at novel production and end use, cleaner fuels, methane. There are number of domains that are under consideration, and they want to make sure there is clarity in terms of what is needed from the adopters' perspective. So the oil and gas companies, in this case, are making sure they communicate that clearly to people like Dr. Cecile Siewe in the national lab, to colleagues in universities, to small firms, so that they know exactly what they're looking for.

Is that correct?

(1635)

Mrs. Cecile Siewe:

Absolutely.

One of the rationales for CRIN was really developing that ecosystem in the energy industry to minimize duplication, just increase the level of awareness, build a network of the different parties working in that space—what is going on, who is doing what, what gaps the different parties are trying complete—and create that degree of leveraging of effort so that you can both accelerate the pace of development toward getting commercialized solutions and create synergies between what has already gone on in the different companies in actually addressing some of those gaps.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

This is an exciting project that, hopefully, will wield some excellent results.

Here's a follow-up question to your presentation. You were saying that much work has been done on tailing ponds.

I was actually in the Alberta legislature in 2008 when there was an incident where ducks were migrating and they perished in the tailings ponds. I think at that time it was highlighted, and we faced a lot of pressure from not only Canadian citizens but the international community to try to do better in terms of environmental protection and things of that nature. Could you give me an update on where we are on that and what types of technologies we're using to reduce tailings ponds?

Mrs. Cecile Siewe:

I will take that in three parts.

I will start with generating the ponds. What we're doing and investigating and working on in collaboration with industry is how we can ensure that less of the material goes into the tailing ponds. This is where new technologies, like using a hybrid, which use a lot less water, or you use no water at all in the extraction process, generates a different kind of tailings that doesn't have as much water in it. It consolidates faster. That is one aspect of addressing the tailing ponds issues.

Then with the material that's already been generated, we are looking at things like the geotechnical stability of the tailings ponds. We work in collaboration with our colleagues in the Canadian Forest Service, CFS. We have to get the ponds stable before we can starting talking about reclamation, so we work in collaboration with them on that.

We also look at things like the GHG emissions from the tailings ponds. How can we mitigate or manage them? How can you also ensure the release of water from the tailings ponds? To what extent can you treat the water that is released so that it can be reused or released back into the environment. It's a multi-faceted approach which is still ongoing.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Perhaps you know, Mr. Chair, that the ocean protection plan added a $1.5-billion envelope that committed investment in equipment and scientists—like the one that Dr. Cecile Siewe just described—who are able to have specialized equipment. Specialized staff were able to evaluate the kinds of opportunities that we just talked about.

The Chair:

You can have a quick question.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Is NRCan developing more frameworks and more robust systems to allow geothermal to happen throughout Canada?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Yes, we are. I welcome the question, Mr. Chair, about geothermal energy.

I would say that this is the missing link in Canada. If you travel in Europe, if you travel in the U.S. and many countries, you would see its presence. You might wonder why we don't have any more here. It's not because we don't have opportunities. If you look at the geothermal map that we produce at NRCan, you will see that we actually have plenty of resources in the country—in the east, west, south, and in the north as well where we have fantastic potential to develop this.

Perhaps because we have such abundant energy supply in all forms—renewable energy and fossil—it was somewhat overlooked. We really felt it was missing in our game because it was such an attractive proposition. We were very happy to announce recently a project in Saskatchewan, the project DEEP, which is looking at having an industrial-scale electricity generation capacity using geothermal energy.

We just announced a couple of weeks ago another project, the Eavor-Loop. This one, I want to say, is in Alberta, but I reserve judgment on that. Interestingly, it is looking at oil and gas experts, horizontal drillers. Those same people who do horizontal drilling in the oil and gas sector brought their expertise to do two vertical drills and then make a geothermal plate that is even more stable, efficient and productive. This is a world first. We're really pleased to see it. one. We are curious to see how the demo turns out.

(1640)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Cannings, you have three minutes.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I'm going to move on. This is something we studied in a different study: the energy data centre, or whatever you would call it. I think in the latest budget there was some money for Statistics Canada to take that up.

Is that where it has landed?

I think a lot of us around this committee and a lot of us across the country would like to have a source of energy data that's open to the public, that's timely, that's transparent and accurate. Then I wouldn't have to ask you all of these questions about things. I'm just wondering if that's where it's landed.

If you know, why wasn't there a separate body created as there is in the United States, where you have something that's truly apart from government that could be seen as unbiased?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Yes, I certainly welcome the questions.

Do you want to take a crack at it?

Mr. Chris Evans:

Certainly. Following the study that you did, I think from April to June last year, you made the point that accurate and reliable information was important to Canada's energy future and to people having a transparent understanding of the market. Through budget 2019, as you observed, there was money given and, in collaboration with provinces and territories, the government has been working to launch a response to what was essentially the first recommendation in your report, namely, for a virtual one-stop shop to bring together and rationalize information, not only from Statistics Canada but from other public institutions and the private sector as well.

Stats Canada, as you know, has world-class expertise in collecting and managing data, so it provides a hard core to this endeavour. It maintains data sharing agreements with provinces, territories and other organizations and positions them to undertake this work well.

The portal, in fact, is expected to be launched relatively soon, recognizing that this energy information co-operation will be a key area for working with provinces and territories. It will be continued through the upcoming energy and mines ministers conference. It's going to happen in July in British Columbia.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

I just note that the member of Parliament, Mr. Chair, is not alone in looking for this kind of information. That's something we heard a lot during the Generation Energy discussion. People are curious. They want to have the data, the evidence. They want to forge their own opinions. We think that having this portal and this data available will help inform the public debate.

The Chair:

We have about 15 minutes left. We've gone through two rounds. We could do another round. I propose maybe four minutes per party, if there's an appetite for that, or we could stop now. What's the will of the room?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, I have a couple more.

The Chair:

Okay. Why don't we go Conservative, Liberal, NDP, finish? You can have the last word, Richard. How's that?

You have four minutes each.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Okay. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

So $1.6 billion. Can you elaborate a little bit more on where that money was and who got it?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Sure. I could do it.

On the first tranche, that $1 billion for EDC, we were in touch with those colleagues earlier to take stock of how things are shaping up. Their latest assessment is that they expect to have something in the order of $500 million of that amount be committed by the end of this year—in the coming six to seven months. This money is there to provide for some of the working capital needs of companies that are looking to export, principally, and to find new markets.

The second one is the $500-million inflow from the Business Development Bank. This is geared toward providing some commercial financing, especially to small and medium-sized enterprises in the oil and gas sector. They've committed some $50.8 million in new commercial support thus far. They expect to provide an additional $150 million in support between now and the end of June, within a month or so. They expect to commit another $335 million of ongoing commercial support, so it looks like it's well on track.

(1645)

Mr. Ted Falk:

What is the EDC doing with the $1 billion it has?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

I don't know if you want to add to this, Chris, but it's funding to support companies to invest in innovative technologies and for their working capital needs to export to new markets. That's essentially the gist of it.

Do you want to add anything more to that?

Mr. Chris Evans:

No, I think that captures it. The numbers you gave accurately explain how the $500 million that they were planning out of the $1 billion for this year would be rolled out.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

And just to note—

Mr. Ted Falk:

I understand that, but what would that $500 million be used for? I understand it is for support, but what does that look like? What kind of companies are getting it? What are they using it for? Is it an outright grant? Is it a repayable loan?

Mr. Chris Evans:

I can give you, if it would help, examples of the sorts of interventions the BDC has made. We have two nice illustrative examples that will really drive home in concrete terms how small Canadian companies have benefited from receiving that money.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Just know that we cannot share commercially sensitive information, so we're using generic cases, albeit they are real. We cannot reveal a company's name.

Mr. Chris Evans:

For example, one of the companies that received BDC financing was a drilling waste management client that had a challenge, because its primary bank was pulling back on financing options because of the challenges in the reduced oil and gas rig count in Canada and in light of the production curtailment in Alberta. BDC, recognizing the niche environment of waste reduction and its cost-effectiveness, elected to provide financing, which allowed the client to continue a diversification strategy and enhance its product offering, including hiring an environmental engineer to provide a more comprehensive suite of products.

A second example was a client that was facing challenges in the hauling industry due to the economic downturn, in this case in Alberta, again related to the need to adapt to some of the production cuts that can impact the hauling industry. BDC provided working capital as a loan that gave the client the opportunity and time to adjust its business structure to the changing market conditions, allowing it to diversify its services and provide hauling in different industries. This particular company decided to expand into a service called vacuum trucks, which allowed the company, through that loan, to maintain its liquid position and to be successful.

BDC has given out, as of April 30, 392 commercial loans totalling $97 million out of the $500 million envelope.

The Chair:

Thanks for that.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Des Rosiers, if you wish to comment, please go ahead.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

I'll be very brief. The $500 million has been fully allocated and those projects have been announced in large part. Others will come in the coming weeks, but they involve a number of projects around the country.

As for the strategic innovation fund, the $100 million has been fully committed. Half of it has been announced for our petrochemical projects—two main projects in western Canada. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I would like to come back to this research we were talking about earlier.

We know how much plastic waste causes huge problems all over the world. It's found in enormous quantities in the oceans, in particular. Has research been conducted on the possibility of converting old plastics or plastic waste into usable fuel or gas?

(1650)

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Effectively. The theme of plastics dominated the G7's work, both for the heads of state last June and during the meeting of Canada's Environment, Oceans and Energy Ministers in September.

The Government of Canada continued its efforts in this area in three departments: Environment and Climate Change, Natural Resources, and Fisheries and Oceans. We have challenged ourselves precisely to convert plastics into energy, whether it is thermal energy or liquid fuels. Various technologies are involved. We are very keen to develop this type of process, not only in our labs, but also with outside partners.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll come back to the report that the committee tabled in 2016, before I became a member of the committee. The government then presented its response to this report, in which it discussed collaboration with the United States, particularly in the area of research. Can you tell us about the results of this collaboration?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

This collaboration is generating a lot of interest, both among companies and governments. In particular, we are working with the USDOE national laboratories, the U.S. Department of Energy, to develop approaches that would work for our companies, which do business on both sides of the border. Our collaboration continues, as our American partners are also very keen to see their companies able to do business on both sides of the border.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are there other countries we work with so closely or we collaborate well with?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

In this sector, I would say that our closest relationship is with the United States. However, we also collaborate with European and Asian colleagues. Several of them will be present at the meeting in Vancouver, where many of these discussions will continue.

Few people seem to be aware that Canada has a reputation as a major player in the clean energy sector. Indeed, many countries are offering to collaborate with us. However, we have chosen to focus mainly on the United States, Europe and Asia.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the same report, the need to consult and further involve indigenous communities was also mentioned. In fact, as you know, our committee has been working on this specific subject for several months. Can you comment and tell us where these steps stand?

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

What are you talking about in relation to indigenous people?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I am talking about consultations on any project, particularly pipeline projects, in which they are involved. In its response to the 2016 report, the government committed to increasing its collaboration with indigenous communities. I want to know where we are on this.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

That's right.

As you know, this applies to the oil and gas sector, particularly for pipeline projects, such as the consultations we are conducting in response to the Court of Appeal's decision. This also applies to all major projects that focus on Canada's energy, mining and forestry resources. We do it rigorously.

We are also exploring another area that is generating great enthusiasm and involvement from our partners in indigenous communities. Specifically, we are looking for ways to reduce their reliance on diesel to produce energy and allow them to migrate to clean energy sources, focus on renewable energy and store energy. Just recently, we launched a $20 million program to train a new generation in this area. We have a large number of projects under way with indigenous communities across the country to help them make this transition to clean energy sources.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you very much. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Cannings, you're last, but not least.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I'm trying to think of a way to wrap up here, because I'm still a bit....

We have the IPCC report that tells us that if we're going to meet our targets, not just in Canada but around the world, we are going to have to start cutting back significantly on our oil use around the world. The curve goes down steeply, to basically zero by 2050—30 years from now.

I'm wondering if NRCan ever looks at those scenarios and believes that maybe the world can do this, that maybe we can beat climate change, or do you throw up your hands and say, “I hope those IPCC scientists are wrong. We hope that the other countries of the world won't meet their targets, so that all of this investment won't be for naught.”

Every day, I'm puzzled at that scenario. We are facing this world problem and yet I come here and hear there are plans for increased production—not just here but around the world.

I'm wondering how you deal with that at NRCan.

(1655)

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Mr. Chair, the question by committee members with regard to the IPCC is one that we take extremely seriously. This is why this government has invested such a large amount of effort in the development of a pan-Canadian framework on climate change.

This department, NRCan, is the delivery arm for the majority of those programs, whether it's trying to green the oil and gas sector and looking at transformative technologies to sharply reduce GHG emissions, whether it's looking at transportation where we have a number of efforts trying to electrify the fleet and making this more and more commonplace—and we're starting to see it in our streets—or whether it's working on energy efficiency and looking at net-zero solutions for both residences and commercial buildings. We're pursuing this with vigour.

We are certainly keenly aware of it. Another part of our mandate is looking at the impact on the country of adaptation to climate change. It's not just from reports that we are getting some warning signals, but we actually see it on the ground, affecting our north, our communities. As we've seen in the flooding season again this past spring, there is a very real impact on our population.

Of course, there are reasons to be preoccupied. There are also reasons to be optimistic that Canada will be among the leaders in trying to drive to that low-carbon future. Again, during the ministerial meetings every month, there is an opportunity for all of us to share what we can do in terms of technology, partnerships, and new financing modes, so that we can bring the private sector to help us engineer that transition.

We are pursuing this with vigour, but with humility as well, recognizing that there's a lot more to be done to get to the kind of medium-term target that the IPCC is driving us toward. When thinking of those minus 40%, minus 50% GHG reductions by the year 2050, we'll need to redouble our efforts in the years to come, for sure.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I'm sure that we'll be needing oil and gas for years to come. I'm not confused about that.

However, here we are saying that we have to use less and less, and we're doing all we can to produce more and more. That's the conundrum that I face, and when I hear this testimony, it doesn't go away.

Thank you.

The Chair:

You have about 20 seconds left. Mr. Whalen tells me he has a very intriguing question to ask.

Ask it very quickly.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Mr. Evans, we talked earlier about the NEB's projections for future production capacity. It seems to me that it's one of those instances where there's a lot of yin and yang between distribution capacity and expected production. There's no strategic petroleum reserve or a place to store large amounts of oil in Alberta to provide that buffer so that people can ramp up their production beyond what's available for distribution beyond the province.

Is there capacity for oil and gas to be expanded beyond the current distribution capacity? Would the NEB be in a position where...? Did the report mention that production could expand beyond the forecasted distribution amounts but that it cannot, because there's nowhere to store the oil?

Mr. Chris Evans:

When the NEB is making those forecasts, it provides more than one case, so we use the reference case as the baseline. It takes into account a lot of factors at a high level, and I'm not privy to everything used in balancing out how it arrives at its forecasts. I can't specifically address the storage issue.

However, we do know that in Alberta, they often speak about how much petroleum product they can store right now. Sometimes, you'll see references in the papers to storage in the 30-million barrel range.

I don't know how the NEB, in particular, would factor storage into its forecasting. I'm sorry.

The Chair:

Thank you.

That takes us to the end of the meeting.

Thank you all very much for joining us today. I appreciate the update. I think everybody will agree that it was very helpful and very informative.

We will see everybody on Thursday at 3:30.

Comité permanent des ressources naturelles

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous. Merci de vous joindre à nous.

Remontons dans le temps. En 2016, année où il a été mis sur pied, le Comité s'est attaqué tout d'abord à l'étude du secteur pétrolier et gazier, et il a produit un rapport, L’avenir des industries pétrolière et gazière au Canada: Innovation, solutions durables et débouchés économiques, auquel le gouvernement a donné une réponse. Aujourd'hui, nous faisons le point sur les mêmes enjeux, et les fonctionnaires du ministère des Ressources naturelles du Canada nous proposent une séance d'information sur l'état des lieux en 2019.

Merci de bien vouloir prendre le temps de comparaître. Après votre exposé, les députés vous adresseront des questions.

Bienvenue et merci.

M. Frank Des Rosiers (sous-ministre adjoint, Secteur de l'innovation et de la technologie de l'énergie, ministère des Ressources naturelles):

Merci, monsieur le président. C'est un plaisir de comparaître pour faire le point.

Deux collègues m'accompagnent, Cecile Siewe, directrice générale du laboratoire de CanmetÉNERGIE, à Devon, en Alberta, et Chris Evans, directeur principal à la Direction des ressources pétrolières, chez Ressources naturelles Canada.

Nous vous avons remis un bref exposé, mais je me suis dit que je pourrais vous en proposer un survol pour vous donner une idée de ce qui s’est passé depuis notre dernière rencontre consacrée à ce sujet.

Pour ce qui est du contexte général et de l’importance du secteur pétrolier et gazier au Canada, on peut dire qu'il s’agit d’une industrie majeure, qu'elle est la source de beaucoup d'emplois, d'une part importante du PIB et d'exportations considérables. Vous avez vu certaines de ces données dans le rapport même, mais il ne faut pas oublier que le secteur représente 276 000 emplois au Canada, ce qui intéresse beaucoup de travailleurs avec leurs familles, quelque 100 milliards de dollars en exportations et 5,6 % du PIB. Le Canada joue un rôle très important sur la scène mondiale dans la production et l’exportation de pétrole et de gaz naturel.

Comme nous le savons tous, l’industrie a traversé ces dernières années une période assez difficile, en particulier à cause de la baisse des cours mondiaux des produits de base. Ce sont surtout l'industrie et ceux qui y travaillent qui ont souffert le plus directement de ces difficultés.

Malgré les bouleversements à court terme, l’avenir à long terme de l’industrie pétrolière et gazière demeure très solide, comme le montrent les rapports de l’ONE et les évaluations menées par l’Agence internationale de l’énergie. En dépit de ces temps difficiles, nous avons eu notre part de bonnes nouvelles ces derniers temps, notamment l'annonce de quelques grands projets, dont le plus grand projet de l’histoire du Canada, LNG Canada, un projet de 40 milliards de dollars qui se réalisera en Colombie-Britannique. Il fera du Canada un acteur de premier plan dans le domaine du GNL, qui, comme nous le savons, est une tendance très importante sur les marchés de l’énergie à l’échelle mondiale, puisque nous sommes le producteur d’énergie le plus propre au monde. Cela nous aidera à desservir nos clients asiatiques qui essaient de délaisser le charbon.

Le projet Hebron, une initiative de 14 milliards de dollars, au large de Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador, est un autre projet important qui mérite d’être souligné. Il y a aussi de grands projets pétrochimiques, en Alberta, qui ont été annoncés au cours des derniers mois. Ce sont certainement des signes encourageants. [Français] On revient sur les éléments de la réponse du gouvernement au rapport que vous avez produit. Ils sont regroupés autour de quatre grands thèmes.[Traduction]

Le premier thème portait sur la collaboration et la coopération intergouvernementales, le deuxième sur le renforcement de la confiance du public et la transparence, le troisième sur la mobilisation des peuples autochtones et l’exploitation des ressources, et le quatrième sur l’innovation dans le secteur pétrolier et gazier.

J’espère pouvoir aborder certains de ces sujets dans mon exposé, mais, faute de temps, nous devrons peut-être en parler seulement pendant les questions.

Je voudrais attirer l'attention sur certaines des grandes initiatives en cours. Il y a le projet de loi C-69, dont le Sénat est actuellement saisi. Il y a aussi le travail de consultation sur le pipeline Trans Mountain, également en cours. Je tiens aussi à signaler l’investissement appréciable que le gouvernement a consenti pour l’innovation dans les technologies propres — quelque 3 milliards de dollars ont été injectés à ce jour, dont certains investissements clés dans le secteur pétrolier et gazier. Je vais en dire un mot.

L’étude de la mobilisation des citoyens a été un autre élément clé qui a retenu notre attention l’automne dernier. Le Conseil Génération Énergie de notre ministère consulte quelque 380 000 Canadiens sur l’avenir de l’énergie. De ces discussions, quatre orientations se sont dégagées, dont l'une est celle d'une production de pétrole et de gaz propres, ce qui demeure au cœur de notre plan de match.

Pour aller droit au but, la principale leçon à tirer de cette consultation, qui a duré plusieurs mois, c'est que les Canadiens veulent que nous soyons concurrentiels pour que notre industrie pétrolière et gazière puisse prospérer, et que nous soutenions les emplois et la création de richesse. Toutefois, ils sont aussi à la recherche de moyens d’améliorer la performance environnementale des points de vue tant des GES que des impacts de l'activité sur l’eau et les terres.

Ces deux thèmes ont été très présents tout au long des échanges, tout comme celui de l’innovation nécessaire pour atteindre l'objectif visé.

Ces derniers temps, l’industrie a traversé une période assez difficile. C'est pourquoi, en décembre dernier, le gouvernement a annoncé un programme de soutien totalisant 1,6 milliard de dollars pour aider les travailleurs et les collectivités touchés par la baisse des cours pétroliers et gaziers.

(1540)



Je voudrais dire un mot de certains des éléments clés de ce programme, le premier étant le soutien financier commercial de 1 milliard de dollars d’Exportation et développement Canada pour répondre aux besoins en fonds de roulement des entreprises, qu'il s'agit également d'aider à percer de nouveaux marchés d'exportation.

La deuxième enveloppe, de 500 millions de dollars cette fois, vient de la Banque de développement du Canada. Elle soutient le financement commercial nécessaire à la diversification des marchés.

Le troisième volet concerne la R-D. C'est un apport de 50 millions de dollars au programme de croissance propre de RNCan. La valeur de ces projets totalise 890 millions de dollars.

Le volet suivant provient du Fonds stratégique pour l’innovation d’ISDE, le ministère de l’Innovation. Il s'agit d'un montant de 100 millions de dollars.

Enfin, il y a l’accès au Fonds national des corridors commerciaux, d’une valeur totale de 750 millions de dollars. Beaucoup d’engagements ont été pris à cet égard.

Pour terminer, les mesures fiscales. Dans la mise à jour relative à la situation financière, l’automne dernier, monsieur le président, il y a eu, comme mes collègues le savent, une annonce importante au sujet de mesures relatives la déduction pour amortissement accéléré visant à accroître la compétitivité de tous les secteurs industriels au Canada. La valeur totale de ces mesures était de l’ordre de 5 milliards de dollars en recettes fiscales cédées. De toute évidence, le secteur pétrolier et gazier, qui joue un rôle très important dans l’industrie nationale, est l’un de ceux qui en ont manifestement profité, surtout pour ses dépenses liées aux investissements en matériel de production d’énergie propre.

Cela m’amène à parler de l’équipe d’innovation, dont j’ai dit un mot plus tôt. Évidemment, je ne vais pas tout vous dire, mais, encore une fois, grâce aux échanges qui suivront, nous pourrons peut-être étoffer cette information. Le gouvernement central a étroitement collaboré avec l’industrie et les gouvernements provinciaux pour trouver des moyens de vraiment aider l’industrie à progresser à l'avenir, comme le titre de votre étude l’invite à le faire.

Bien que l’industrie fasse un excellent travail dans la recherche d'améliorations progressives, l'impression générale veut que nous devions avancer bien plus rapidement si nous voulons obtenir une meilleure performance environnementale et réduire les coûts. C’est là que des efforts renouvelés en matière de technologies d’extraction, de gestion des bassins de résidus, d’émissions atmosphériques et d’utilisation du carbone ont été largement considérés comme essentiels.

Je n’entrerai pas dans les détails, mais pour vous donner une petite idée, il y a des pistes prometteuses en technologies d’extraction, que nous et l’industrie explorons résolument et qui permettraient une réduction de l’ordre de 40 à 50 % à la fois des coûts de production et des émissions. Nous avons dans ce domaine un certain nombre de projets qui sont très intéressants et que nous menons très activement en ce moment.

C’est la même chose pour les résidus. Nous entendons beaucoup de préoccupations chez nos concitoyens quant à la façon dont nous pouvons affronter ces problèmes et réduire la production de ces bassins de décantation. Des efforts sont déployés à cet égard. Il s’agit également d’utiliser certains de ces bassins de décantation et d’en extraire les hydrocarbures et les métaux lourds précieux comme le titane pour en faire une meilleure utilisation. Le recyclage de certains de ces produits se fait dans l’esprit d’une économie cyclique.

Un projet à grande échelle est en voie de réalisation. Il a été annoncé par la province de l’Alberta avec Titanium Corporation, précisément pour recycler des produits.

Pour nous, ce sont des signes très encourageants qui montrent ce que le Canada peut faire. De tous les secteurs, celui du pétrole et du gaz au Canada est reconnu depuis des décennies comme étant extrêmement novateur et animé par un grand esprit d'entreprise. J’ai bon espoir que nous pourrons faire avancer ces projets avec succès.

L’avant-dernière diapositive explique un peu comment nous avons procédé. Comme vous le savez, le cadre pancanadien était axé sur la collaboration avec les gouvernements provinciaux et territoriaux. Nous estimions que c’était la bonne chose à faire que de porter une attention particulière à la façon dont nous faisions les choses.

À cet égard, je pourrais peut-être souligner trois éléments qui, à nos yeux, étaient très importants. Le premier est la création d’un Carrefour de la croissance propre, qui est essentiellement un guichet unique qui permet d'interagir avec la famille fédérale. Il est parfois un peu difficile pour un chercheur universitaire ou une petite entreprise de savoir à qui s’adresser. Ils souhaitaient avoir un guichet unique pour communiquer avec nous. Nous avons entendu ces réflexions, nous les avons prises à coeur et nous avons établi cette plaque tournante. Il s’agit d’un regroupement de 16 ministères et organismes qui partagent un bureau au centre-ville d’Ottawa. Ils sont en mesure d’interagir avec les clients et de les orienter, qu’ils aient besoin de fonds, d’un accès au marché, de changements réglementaires ou qu'ils aient des problèmes liés à l’approvisionnement — peu importe le sujet qu’ils abordent.

(1545)



Au cours de notre brève année d’activité, plus d'un millier de clients nous ont demandé des conseils et du soutien, et c’est un élément très populaire de notre écosystème actuel.

La deuxième chose à souligner concerne les modèles de partenariat de confiance. Aux niveaux tant fédéral que provincial, nous avons des ressources limitées à investir, et elles viennent des contribuables. Nous devons donc chercher les moyens d'utiliser intelligemment ces ressources limitées. Nous tendons la main aux provinces et leur disons: « Pourquoi ne pas essayer de voir ensemble quelles sont les technologies les plus prometteuses et envisager d'adopter un processus d’examen intégré? »

Au lieu d’obliger les chercheurs des universités à faire des démarches distinctes aux niveaux fédéral et provincial, nous reconnaissons mutuellement nos processus en place, ce qui permet aux chercheurs et aux innovateurs d’économiser énormément de temps lorsqu'ils tentent d'obtenir des fonds fédéraux ou provinciaux. La démarche s'en trouve considérablement accélérée. Nous avons huit ou neuf de ces modèles de partenariat de confiance partout au Canada, et ils se sont avérés très efficaces.

La troisième et dernière chose que je voudrais souligner, c’est que le gouvernement a annoncé, dans le budget de 2019, des fonds de 100 millions de dollars pour le Réseau d'innovation pour des ressources propres. Il réunit des innovateurs du secteur pétrolier et gazier, surtout dans l’Ouest du Canada, et le groupe est actif depuis environ un an. Le gouvernement fédéral a été heureux de lui apporter un certain soutien. Des représentants du Réseau, qui suscite un grand enthousiasme, étaient à Ottawa la semaine dernière. [Français]

Pour conclure, je vais parler des activités des laboratoires nationaux en matière d'énergie.

Nous avons un réseau de quatre laboratoires nationaux situés dans plusieurs endroits du pays, c'est-à-dire à Montréal, à Ottawa, à Hamilton, en Ontario, et en Alberta. Ils regroupent plus de 600 chercheurs, ingénieurs et techniciens dans ce domaine.[Traduction]Le Réseau s'intéresse à un large éventail de technologies: énergie renouvelable, PV, géothermie, bioénergie, énergie marine, efficacité énergétique, matériaux de pointe, sans oublier l’application de l’intelligence artificielle dans l’énergie et dans les énergies fossiles.

Nous avons l'honneur d’être accompagnés de Mme Cecile Siewe, qui est directrice générale du laboratoire de CanmetÉNERGIE à Devon, installations où les recherches portent précisément sur le pétrole et le gaz. Comme nous l’entendrons au cours de l'audience, il y a beaucoup de travail qui se fait là-bas en recherche sur l’eau, les technologies d’extraction, la valorisation partielle, la récupération des déversements de pétrole et de nombreux champs d’expertise. Mme Siewe est une scientifique de renom, mais elle dirige aussi ce laboratoire. Il m'a semblé intéressant que les membres du Comité puissent discuter directement avec elle.

Je vais m’arrêter ici et vous rendre la parole.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Whalen, vous allez commencer.

M. Nick Whalen (St. John's-Est, Lib.):

C’est formidable de vous entendre parler de ce que fait le gouvernement en matière d’innovation.

J’espérais peut-être obtenir une vue d'ensemble ou même seulement quelques faits sur les possibilités qui s'offrent actuellement au secteur canadien de l’énergie pétrolière sur le marché. Pourriez-vous nous fournir des statistiques ou des renseignements sur ce que sera le marché mondial du pétrole et du gaz d’ici la fin du siècle, au moment où nous espérons pouvoir nous en passer? Quelle proportion du pétrole consommé à ce moment-là pourrait ou devrait provenir du Canada?

M. Chris Evans (directeur principal, Pipelines, gaz et GNL, Secteur de l’énergie, Direction des ressources pétrolières, ministère des Ressources naturelles):

Merci de votre question, qui est excellente.

Il faut sans doute nuancer cette réponse dans le contexte canadien, mais nous pouvons certainement dire que, à un niveau élevé de généralité, l’Agence internationale de l’énergie a souligné qu’on s’attend à ce que, même si le monde tente de limiter son empreinte carbone, il y ait une croissance de la consommation de pétrole. L’an dernier, l’Office national de l’énergie a publié un rapport sur l’avenir énergétique, qui, plutôt dans le contexte canadien, laissait entrevoir une croissance d’au moins 1,7 million de barils de la production canadienne de pétrole d’ici 2030.

Selon la dynamique qui existe sur le terrain, le monde devra consommer plus de pétrole et la production canadienne augmentera.

(1550)

M. Nick Whalen:

Est-il possible que, grâce à la tarification du carbone dans le monde pour faire baisser les coûts de la pollution, des avantages apparaissent sur le marché pour des types particuliers de pétrole produits chez nous, par exemple le pétrole extracôtier de Terre-Neuve, au détriment du pétrole albertain? Et dans quelle mesure cela commence-t-il à jouer un rôle sur le marché et dans les décisions des consommateurs, à l'échelle mondiale, qui ont à choisir leurs fournisseurs d'hydrocarbures?

M. Chris Evans:

Je vais devoir aborder avec prudence la question de la tarification du carbone, car cela relève d’un autre ministre. Je crois pouvoir dire que le gouvernement cherche à mettre en oeuvre la tarification du carbone sans perdre de vue la compétitivité. L'approche à l'égard du carbone réunit un faisceau d'avenues ou d'éléments, dont l'atténuation, l’adaptation et l’innovation, qui est un élément très important. La tarification du carbone trouve place dans cet ensemble.

L’approche actuelle prévoit des réductions mesurables de la pollution par le carbone d’ici 2022, simplement en fonction du plan tel qu’il existe actuellement, mais il y a encore beaucoup de travail qui se fait sur les modalités de la mise en oeuvre, et je ne pense pas pouvoir me prononcer sur certains des points que vous avez soulevés.

M. Nick Whalen:

C’est très bien.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Puis-je ajouter quelque chose?

C’est vrai dans le cas du pétrole. C’est aussi très vrai dans le cas du GNL.

Au cours de nos discussions avec les supergrands et les producteurs nationaux, nous avons beaucoup entendu parler de l’empreinte carbone, comme le député l’a dit, et de la recherche des fournisseurs perçus comme propres ou comme les plus propres dans le domaine. Il s’agit d’une belle occasion pour le Canada, qui est perçu comme un pays politiquement stable, mais peut-être aussi comme un pays qui se distingue sur les marchés des produits de base comme un fournisseur d’énergie propre. C’est certainement vrai dans le cas du projet LNG Canada, sur la côte Ouest. Les électeurs canadiens, nos clients et les investisseurs se soucient de la question.

Nous sommes très conscients de cela, même si, chez bien des gens, cette idée ne vient pas naturellement. L'électricité propre que nous avons en abondance est un de nos avantages. Pour faire tourner ces imposantes pièces d’équipement, il faut beaucoup d’électricité. Nous avons la chance d’avoir de grandes centrales hydroélectriques et de grandes sources d’énergie renouvelable, ce qui permet de réduire considérablement l’empreinte carbone de ces activités. Que ce soit sur la côte Ouest ou sur la côte Est, nous avons l’occasion de nous démarquer nettement.

M. Nick Whalen:

Lorsque mes électeurs m’écrivent — et c’est davantage une question de nature politique —, ils me demandent comment le Canada peut continuer de participer au marché tout en respectant ses engagements en matière d'environnement.

Je voudrais avoir une idée de l’avenir de nos marchés. Où se situeront-ils? Croyez-vous que le déclin de la production en mer du Nord pourrait permettre à Terre-Neuve d'élargir sa part de marché? Qu’en est-il des émissions de gaz à effet de serre? Comment nous comparons-nous à la mer du Nord, au Moyen-Orient et à l’Amérique du Sud, notamment au Venezuela?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

C’est un bon point.

Encore une fois, si non seulement on compare la production canadienne à celle des autres producteurs de pétrole ou de gaz, mais si on tient compte aussi du passage de certaines formes d'énergie à d'autres et si on examine les possibilités de réductions importantes des émissions dans l’ensemble, on constate qu'il s’agit en grande partie de passer du charbon à des combustibles plus propres, comme d'autres combustibles fossiles ou des énergies renouvelables. C’est vrai aux États-Unis, où des dizaines de centrales au charbon ont été fermées et sont passées au gaz naturel ou à l’électricité propre lorsque c’était possible.

Il en va de même en Europe de l’Est et en Asie, où une très grande production intérieure de charbon est toujours utilisée pour produire de l’électricité. C’est là que le gaz naturel peut profiter de ce passage du charbon à des combustibles plus propres ou à une énergie plus propre.

Aux États-Unis, ce remplacement de certaines formes d'énergie est ce qui a le plus contribué à la diminution des émissions de GES de ce pays.

M. Nick Whalen:

Je suis heureux de l’entendre.

Il est difficile pour les Canadiens de comprendre le volume même de la production pétrolière en Alberta, ce que cela signifie et à quel point c’est important. Lorsque nous parlons des pipelines et de l’acheminement d’un grand volume de ce produit vers les marchés, il est difficile pour les Canadiens de se faire une idée des avantages que le projet Trans Mountain aura quant à la répartition et au transport du pétrole vers les marchés par rapport au projet Keystone XL. Il est aussi difficile pour les gens de comprendre pourquoi le projet Énergie Est n’est plus sur la table.

Si les projets Keystone XL et TMX sont mis en œuvre, cela réglera-t-il le problème que connaît l’Alberta pour ce qui est d’acheminer le pétrole qu’elle produit à l’heure actuelle vers les marchés? Le projet Énergie Est pourrait-il aider l’Alberta à accroître sa production et à acheminer encore plus de ressources vers les marchés?

(1555)

M. Chris Evans:

Le Canada est une économie de marché relativement à ses projets énergétiques. Nous nous fions, bien sûr, aux acteurs du secteur privé, dans l’ensemble, pour décider des projets.

Dans le cas de l’oléoduc Énergie Est, la décision a été prise par la société lorsqu’elle a examiné tous les facteurs à prendre en compte.

En ce qui concerne les projets TMX, KXL et le projet de remplacement de la canalisation 3, si l’on tient compte de l’augmentation de la capacité pipelinière que ces trois projets apporteraient au marché, cela correspond à peu près aux prévisions de l’Office national de l’énergie quant à la croissance de la production pétrolière au Canada.

Le président:

Madame Stubbs.

Mme Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, PCC):

Dans le cas de l’oléoduc Énergie Est, l’un des facteurs qui a été pris en compte dans la décision des promoteurs était l’intervention politique dans ce qui aurait dû être un examen objectif, scientifique et fondé sur des données probantes, équitable pour tous les facteurs liés aux pipelines.

En fait, en raison de l’obstruction et du renouvellement du mandat d’un groupe d’experts par les libéraux... Puis, pour la toute première fois, des critères d’émissions en aval ont été appliqués comme facteur dans l’évaluation du pipeline Énergie Est, contrairement à Trans Mountain, qui n’a été évalué que pour les émissions en amont. L’oléoduc Énergie Est a été évalué en fonction des émissions en amont et en aval. En fin de compte, c’est exactement ce que l’entreprise a mentionné un mois auparavant, lorsqu’elle a demandé de retarder le processus pour pouvoir continuer de présenter sa demande. Un mois plus tard, elle annonçait son départ. C’est pourquoi la certitude réglementaire est si essentielle et si importante.

J’ai une brève question. Je me souviens qu’à peu près à la même époque l’an dernier — et je ne sais pas quelle est la réponse à cette question — le gouvernement a lancé une étude de 280 000 $ sur la compétitivité du secteur pétrolier et gazier. Elle a été réalisée par une entreprise sous la direction de RNCan. Je crois qu’elle a été complétée en juin 2018 — je ne sais pas. Ce rapport a-t-il été rendu public? Y a-t-il un rapport découlant de cette étude?

M. Chris Evans:

J’ai le regret de vous dire que je devrai faire quelques recherches. Je n’ai pas d’information à ce sujet.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Si vous pouviez vous renseigner à ce sujet et faire part de votre réponse au Comité, ce serait formidable. Je me souviens qu’elle a été annoncée, mais je n’ai jamais vraiment vu de rapport final. Étant donné que nous savions ce que cela coûterait aux contribuables, il serait formidable que les Canadiens puissent voir ce rapport.

En ce qui concerne l’examen réglementaire des infrastructures énergétiques essentielles au Canada, le projet de loi C-69, comme vous l’avez mentionné, apportera des changements majeurs. Les provinces et les trois territoires ont maintenant exprimé de vives préoccupations au sujet des répercussions du projet de loi C-69 sur l’exploitation future du pétrole et du gaz, compte tenu de la liste des projets publiée la semaine dernière, de tous les types d’interventions dans les domaines de compétence provinciale, ainsi que de l’incidence sur la capacité de construire quoique ce soit au Canada. Ce n’est pas à vous de répondre de cela; c’est le travail des politiciens.

Étant donné qu’il y avait une affectation budgétaire liée à la transition entre l’ONE et ce qui découlera du projet de loi C-69, votre ministère participe-t-il à la planification de cette transition? Pouvez-vous nous dire à quoi ressemblerait l’échéancier? Pouvez-vous me donner des détails à ce sujet?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Je suis certain que le président du Comité comprendra qu’il serait prématuré pour nous de nous prononcer sur la façon dont la transition se déroulera en raison des discussions animées qui sont en cours au Sénat. Les fonctionnaires réfléchissent à tous ces éléments, mais nous devons attendre la suite des choses quant à cette mesure législative avant de pouvoir préciser tous ces plans. Nous nous préparons à cette mise en œuvre, si le Parlement décide de l’approuver.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Dans l’étude et les recommandations de notre comité, à la page 5 du rapport, nous soulignons l’importance de la façon dont la société perçoit le développement énergétique et la confiance du public. Je dirais que les libéraux ont fait campagne contre le bilan de renommée mondiale du Canada en matière d’examen réglementaire des projets énergétiques.

Vous vous souviendrez que les libéraux ont fait campagne en disant que le public avait perdu confiance à l’égard de l’Office national de l’énergie, même s’ils n’ont jamais fourni la moindre preuve à ce sujet. Je suis convaincue que vous savez tous que le Canada, pendant des décennies, a été littéralement sans égal sur tous les plans lorsqu’il a été comparé de façon substantielle à d’autres pays producteurs d’énergie dans le monde.

Étant donné que la ministre des Institutions démocratiques libérale a dit, « Il est temps d’enclaver les sables bitumineux de l’Alberta », et du rejet par le premier ministre du projet d’oléoduc d’Enbridge, éliminant ainsi la possibilité d’exportations autonomes vers l’Asie-Pacifique, avez-vous des commentaires, tout d’abord, quant à l’incidence de tels propos de la part des élus sur la réputation du Canada en tant que producteur d’énergie responsable? Puisque vous êtes des experts, pourriez-vous dire à tout le monde, et à la ministre libérale en particulier, une fois pour toutes, si les sables bitumineux sont à proprement parler du bitume?

(1600)

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Il n’est probablement pas approprié que je me prononce quant au point de vue d’un ministre et d’un député. Toutefois, pour ce qui est de veiller à ce que les faits relatifs au cycle complet du carbone, des puits aux roues, quant à nos méthodes de production, je peux certainement rassurer les membres du Comité que les répercussions que nous avons et les progrès que nous faisons en matière de résultats environnementaux sont communiqués clairement.

C’est quelque chose que nous nous efforçons de faire, non seulement à l’échelle nationale, mais aussi pour les investisseurs et les pays partenaires clés avec lesquels, comme vous pouvez le comprendre, nous interagissons quotidiennement et qui cherchent de l’information et des données probantes concernant notre travail. J’ajouterais également qu’un élément clé de notre plan consiste à nous assurer qu’ils sont inclus dans les preuves et les faits scientifiques. Nous avons le privilège d’avoir, dans nos universités et nos laboratoires nationaux, des experts très respectés qui sont en mesure de présenter ces faits, ces chiffres et ces preuves à ces investisseurs et intervenants afin qu’ils puissent prendre des décisions éclairées.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Ce serait certainement difficile.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Il en va de même pour l’AIE, par exemple, dont nous sommes un membre très actif, pour veiller à ce que le Canada puisse présenter les faits tels qu’ils sont.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Et les sables bitumineux ne sont pas du bitume à proprement parler.

Brièvement, en ce qui concerne la norme libérale sur les carburants, je me demande si votre ministère a été consulté dans le cadre de l’élaboration de cette norme. Bien que le ministère de l’Environnement admette qu’il n’a pas de modèle pour la réduction des émissions ou les conséquences financières de la norme sur les carburants, je me demande si votre ministère a participé à l’élaboration de cette norme. Est-ce que vous participez maintenant à ce processus, alors que votre ministère mène des consultations en aval, même si cette norme a été annoncée en décembre? Ma question porte notamment sur les conséquences financières pour les raffineurs au Canada.

M. Chris Evans:

Il est certain que notre ministère travaille avec ECCC pour l’aider à effectuer des analyses et à travailler avec nos intervenants également pour recueillir leurs points de vue, effectuer des analyses et les intégrer au processus dirigé par ECCC, oui.

Le président:

Monsieur Cannings.

M. Richard Cannings (Okanagan-Sud—Kootenay-Ouest, NPD):

Merci à tous d’être venus aujourd’hui; c’était intéressant.

Je pense que je vais simplement reprendre certaines des choses qu’a dites M. Evans, pour avoir des éclaircissements. Vous dites que la demande de pétrole augmente partout dans le monde. S’agit-il des projections de l’AIE, dont vous parliez, ou de l’ONE?

M. Chris Evans:

Je n’ai pas les chiffres des prévisions de l’Agence internationale de l’énergie.

M. Richard Cannings:

Je suis désolé...

M. Chris Evans:

En ce qui concerne la croissance de 1,7 million de barils d’ici 2030, je parlais des prévisions de l’Office national de l’énergie.

M. Richard Cannings:

Cela porte sur la production, n’est-ce pas, alors que l’autre porte sur la demande.

M. Chris Evans:

Il s’agissait de la croissance prévue de la production pour répondre à la demande.

M. Richard Cannings:

Je voulais simplement m’assurer d’avoir bien compris. Avez-vous dit que le monde aura plus de pétrole qu’il n’en aura besoin à mesure que la production canadienne augmentera?

M. Chris Evans:

Si c’est ce que j’ai dit, ce n’est pas ce que je voulais dire.

M. Richard Cannings:

C’est pourquoi je voulais m’assurer d’avoir bien compris.

(1605)

M. Chris Evans:

Je veux seulement parler du contexte canadien.

M. Richard Cannings:

D’accord.

M. Chris Evans:

Je préfère ne pas parler des prévisions de demande de l’Agence internationale de l’énergie, parce que je n’ai pas les chiffres devant moi. Essentiellement, ce que je disais, c’est qu’il y a une prévision de croissance de la production pétrolière au Canada, et cela vise à répondre à ce qui est considéré comme une croissance de la demande mondiale.

M. Richard Cannings:

D’accord, et vous ne... Je sais que nous avions une question au sujet de la mer du Nord, mais vous ne pouvez pas nous dire à quoi pourrait ressembler la production américaine au cours des prochaines décennies.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Je pense que les sources qui font autorité, comme l’AIE et l’ONE, sont probablement les plus fiables pour la production nationale. Nous n’avons pas d’opinion sur le pétrole que cela déplace... Tout va vers les marchés mondiaux, et comme nous l’avons vu au cours des dernières années, il peut y avoir un changement important en fonction des progrès technologiques. C’est certainement le cas de la production de pétrole et de gaz aux États-Unis, où nous avons observé une hausse importante que personne n’avait prévue. Nous suivons continuellement les prévisions des secteurs public et privé, et nous en tenons compte dans nos discussions. Toutefois, au bout du compte, c’est une approche axée sur le marché quant à l’affectation des ressources.

M. Richard Cannings:

J’ai vu des analyses selon lesquelles la production américaine ne montrera aucun signe de déclin dans 10 ans. Il semble qu’elle restera stable ou qu’elle augmentera. J’ai aussi vu des analyses selon lesquelles les prévisions de l’AIE sont constamment 10 % trop élevées, année après année.

Je me méfie un peu des statistiques que je vois dans certaines prévisions. Je sais que lorsque les représentants de l’Office national de l’énergie ont comparu devant nous dans le cadre de l’étude dont nous parlons aujourd’hui, ils ont présenté les courbes de la demande mondiale d’énergie. Lorsque je leur ai posé des questions à ce sujet... ces données étaient désuètes depuis deux ans. Elles avaient été calculées avant l’accord de Paris, avant la production de pétrole de réservoirs étanches et tout le reste. Lorsqu’ils sont revenus un an plus tard, c’était très différent.

Je voulais simplement m’assurer d’avoir bien compris ce que vous avez dit. Je suppose que je vous ai mal compris, alors je vous en remercie.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Si vous me permettez d’ajouter quelque chose, monsieur le président, j’ai une formation d’économiste et nous avons une bonne vieille blague en matière de prévisions économiques qui, je suppose, pourrait également s’appliquer à la météorologie ou à d’autres domaines, c’est-à-dire choisissez un chiffre, choisissez une date, mais jamais les deux ensemble.

Je pense que les mêmes défis s’appliquent aux marchés du pétrole et du gaz. Il est difficile de prédire avec certitude ce qui va se passer en dépit des meilleurs cerveaux et des meilleures données. Les choses changent constamment sur le marché.

M. Richard Cannings:

J’ai entendu l’un des meilleurs économistes spécialistes des ressources du Canada dire que nous sommes ici pour faire bien paraître les astrologues.

Je voulais simplement obtenir des précisions à ce sujet.

Pour en revenir à l’étude, l’une des choses que nous avons entendues— et je me souviens que Mme Monica Gattinger a parlé de ses préoccupations concernant le manque de confiance dans le système de réglementation — c’est que la confiance continuerait de s’éroder jusqu’à ce que le système de réglementation soit corrigé ou jusqu’à ce que les lacunes soient comblées.

Pourriez-vous nous parler de ce qui a été fait là-bas, de ce que le projet de loi C-69visait à faire à cet égard et nous dire où en est la situation?

M. Chris Evans:

En ce qui concerne le projet de loi C-69, les objectifs généraux de la loi étaient de mettre en place un cadre qui assurerait une plus grande transparence pour tous ceux qui participent au processus réglementaire et de rétablir la confiance du public. On reconnaîtrait ainsi le fait que des évaluations efficaces, crédibles et prévisibles des processus décisionnels sont essentielles pour attirer des investissements et maintenir la compétitivité.

Le processus global créerait un système d’évaluation des répercussions assorties de meilleurs échéanciers et d’une plus grande clarté dès le départ pour tous les intervenants, tant les promoteurs que les Canadiens en général, et il serait construit avec une importante participation des Premières Nations.

À l’heure actuelle, comme vous le savez, le projet de loi C-69 est devant le Comité sénatorial permanent de l’énergie, de l’environnement et des ressources naturelles, avec toutes les activités parlementaires que cela implique. Je ne pense pas que nous soyons très bien placés pour en parler davantage.

(1610)

M. Richard Cannings:

Il me reste 30 secondes et j’aimerais obtenir une autre précision parce que je crois vous avoir mal compris. Lorsque vous avez parlé des 1,6 milliard de dollars et de quoi cela consistait, je crois que vous avez dit que vous aviez commencé avec un milliard de dollars de la part d’EDC. Est-ce exact?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

C’est exact.

M. Richard Cannings:

C’est tout ce dont j’ai besoin. Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Hehr.

L’hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary-Centre, Lib.):

Merci à nos distingués invités d’être ici.

J’ai une question complémentaire à celle de M. Whalen. Vous avez décrit notre capacité pipelinière et la façon dont nous allons procéder de la bonne manière quant au pipeline Trans Mountain, à la canalisation 3 d’Enbridge et à Keystone XL. Cela équivaut à la croissance des sables bitumineux à court terme. Est-ce exact?

M. Chris Evans:

Si vous prenez simplement la capacité nominale de ces trois pipelines — la nouvelle capacité supplémentaire — elle correspondrait à la croissance de la production canadienne prévue par l’ONE.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Dans certains cas, le calendrier n’est pas très clair. C’est comme la blague que M. Des Rosiers a faite tout à l’heure, qui pourrait aussi s’appliquer aux pipelines. Certaines de ces choses échappent à notre contrôle, étant donné ce qui se passe au sud de la frontière, particulièrement en ce qui concerne Keystone et d’autres choses.

Envisageons-nous d’élaborer des plans pour accroître la capacité ferroviaire et la capacité de transporter plus de pétrole par rail? Où en sommes-nous à cet égard? Les coûts ont-ils diminué dans le cadre du processus en cours?

M. Chris Evans:

Les médias ont rapporté que l’Alberta se penchait sur l’approvisionnement ferroviaire à des fins provinciales. Le gouvernement fédéral est généralement d’avis, je crois, que c’est le marché qui détermine ce qui correspond le mieux à l’offre et à la demande... Bien que l’Alberta ait adopté une approche, notre ministère n’envisage rien de plus.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

D’accord. Merci de votre réponse.

Étant donné que 45 pays et 24 gouvernements infranationaux ont une tarification du carbone, il semble que ce soit la tendance actuelle. Vous avez dit tout à l’heure que vous travaillez à des choses qui réduisent la consommation de carbone ou le carbone émis dans l’atmosphère par notre production de pétrole, non seulement dans le contexte des sables bitumineux, mais ailleurs. Comment vont ces projections? Qu’est-ce que vous envisagez? Nos compagnies pétrolières prennent-elles cette question au sérieux?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Monsieur le président, il est juste de souligner que la tarification du carbone est largement perçue par les économistes du monde entier comme l’un de ces puissants moyens de montrer au marché comment répartir les ressources et faire des investissements, qu’il s’agisse de producteurs, de consommateurs ou d’industries lourdes. Lorsque vous arrivez à intégrer cela dans votre budget quotidien, cela a certainement un impact très puissant. Il n’est pas surprenant que certaines des grandes entreprises du monde aient en fait été parmi les plus ardents partisans d’un régime de tarification du carbone, et je ne tente pas d’appuyer le point de vue d’une administration en particulier. Toutefois, en matière de recherche et d’économie, c’est un exemple classique d’utilisation de signaux de prix pour allouer des ressources.

Pour répondre à la question, il est certain que les entreprises sont très attentives. Les membres du Comité ne seront pas surpris d’apprendre que de nombreuses entreprises ont des prix fictifs pour ce qui est de leur allocation de recherche, c’est-à-dire que peu importe qu’un pays ait un prix sur le carbone ou non, elles ont tendance à établir un prix pour les décisions qu’elles prennent à moyen et à long terme. Comme vous pouvez le comprendre, dans le secteur pétrolier et gazier, il n’est pas rare de faire un investissement sur une période de 20, 30 ou 40 ans afin de récupérer de très gros investissements en capital. Généralement, les entreprises ne révèlent pas ces prix fictifs, mais elles ont un prix fictif pour leurs décisions d’investissement dans les grandes administrations ou leurs opérations mondiales afin de tenir compte de leurs prévisions relatives au contexte opérationnel dans les années à venir. En fait, bon nombre des grandes entreprises qui réussissent le font déjà.

(1615)

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

C’est fantastique.

Vous avez mentionné LNG Canada. Bien sûr, c’est une grande réussite dont nous sommes très fiers et qui peut non seulement faire progresser notre économie, mais aussi contribuer à réduire les émissions mondiales de gaz à effet de serre. En fait, si nous faisons bien les choses et que nous transportons nos produits vers des marchés étrangers, cela aidera à réduire les émissions de gaz à effet de serre, le réchauffement de la planète et les changements climatiques. Le Canada a-t-il la capacité, selon les prévisions, d’augmenter sa production de GNL? Quel serait notre potentiel à cet égard? Avons-nous la capacité de le faire?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Bien sûr, d'autres projets sont possibles. Il s'agit de projets de grande envergure qui nécessitent un examen attentif de la part des investisseurs, compte tenu de leur ampleur et de leurs répercussions sur le plan de l'infrastructure. Mais nous avons de nombreux projets sur la côte Ouest et sur la côte Est qui sont à différentes étapes d'examen et de réflexion.

Je pense qu'il est juste de dire que l'investissement de LNG Canada a envoyé un signal important au marché montrant que le Canada est un pays concurrentiel en matière d'investissements dans l'énergie. Nous avions déjà connaissance de nombreux projets à l'étude sur les deux côtes, mais cet investissement nous a vraiment offert une bonne visibilité et a donné un coup de pouce à la crédibilité du Canada quant à sa capacité à concrétiser ce genre de projets.

Nous suivons évidemment ces discussions, qui sont confidentielles et auxquelles participent de nombreuses parties, mais nous espérons qu'il y en aura d'autres au cours des prochaines années.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

J'ai une brève question qui fait suite à celles de Mme Stubbs. Il me semble qu'auparavant, nous travaillions dans le cadre du processus de 2012 pour la construction de pipelines, mis en place par les conservateurs. À mon avis, s'il y a eu un « projet de loi anti-pipelines », ce serait celui-là, car ce processus a mené les projets de pipelines devant les tribunaux et non pas à leur construction.

Quoi qu'il en soit, je sais que le projet de loi C-69 a tenté de régler une partie de ce problème et de prendre en compte une partie de votre travail à cet égard. Pouvez-vous parler de la participation précoce? Il semble que ce n'était pas tellement important dans le processus de 2012. Est-ce intégré au projet de loi C-69?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Je ne suis pas sûr de comprendre la question.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Il s'agit de la participation précoce des peuples autochtones.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

C'est un élément important de notre politique de participation. Les tribunaux, la Cour d'appel fédérale, nous ont rappelé cette année qu'il est important de le faire et de le faire de façon approfondie. Le gouvernement a pris cela très au sérieux. Comme vous l'avez vu, nous avons déployé des efforts considérables, avec l'aide de l'ancien juge de la Cour suprême Iacobucci, pour nous assurer que nous agissions conformément à l'esprit des recommandations de la cour. Nous examinons ces motions en ce moment même.

Le président:

Monsieur Schmale, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Je vous remercie d'être venus nous parler aujourd'hui.

Pourriez-vous dire au Comité combien de pipelines ont été approuvés et construits sous le précédent gouvernement conservateur, au cours des 10 dernières années?

M. Chris Evans:

Je crains de ne pas avoir les données à ce sujet. Je m'excuse, cela ne figure pas dans notre cahier d'information.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Non? D'accord: qu'en est-il des projets Alberta Clipper d'Enbridge, Keystone de TransCanada, Anchor Loop de Kinder Morgan et de l'inversion de la canalisation 9B d'Enbridge? On peut même parler des autres aussi.

Pour revenir à la question de M. Hehr, parmi les 10 principaux pays producteurs de pétrole au monde, combien ont une taxe sur le carbone?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

J'ai l'impression qu'on me demande de jouer à des jeux futiles.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Frank Des Rosiers: Je suppose que le membre du Comité a la réponse.

M. Jamie Schmale:

La réponse est aucun.

Le président:

J'ajouterais qu'il n'y a pas non plus de prix. De prix du carbone je veux dire.

M. Jamie Schmale:

La réponse est absolument aucun.

M. Ted Falk (Provencher, PCC):

Oh si, il y a un grand prix: c'est le 21 octobre.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Jamie Schmale:

C'est exact, le 21 octobre.

Lorsque mon ami, M. Hehr, a dit que ce sont les conservateurs qui parlaient du projet de loi C-69, en le nommant le « projet de loi anti-pipelines », en réalité ce n'était pas nous. Nous avons emprunté cette formule à l'industrie. Ils ont inventé ce terme et nous l'avons repris.

Peut-être pourriez-vous nous parler un peu de la compétitivité globale au Canada et de nos performances dans ce domaine.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Je suis heureux d'avoir l'occasion d'aborder cette question, car c'est une préoccupation majeure à l'heure actuelle dans l'ensemble du pays et dans l'industrie. Nous entendons cela très clairement chaque fois que nous discutons avec ces intervenants pour nous assurer que le Canada est un producteur propre, mais aussi concurrentiel. J'ai mentionné le niveau extraordinaire d'innovation, mais aussi l'esprit d'entreprise qui existent dans notre pays.

Comme nous l'avons souvent vu par le passé, une crise forcera les humains à trouver des solutions extraordinaires. Je pense que cela s'est produit maintes et maintes fois dans le secteur pétrolier et gazier du Canada. Plus récemment, avec la baisse des prix, nous avons vu ces entreprises et ces personnes examiner toutes sortes de façons novatrices de réduire leurs coûts d'exploitation. Elles utilisent d'autres technologies, analysent leur utilisation de la main-d'oeuvre, cherchent à réduire la part des productions dans leurs activités et, dans certains cas, essaient de renforcer les acteurs de l'industrie dans leurs domaines. Tout cela a entraîné des réductions de coûts très importantes, grâce à ces entreprises. Nous discutons régulièrement avec tous les grands producteurs de pétrole et de gaz au Canada. Ce qu'ils ont réussi à faire pour réduire leurs coûts d'exploitation au niveau de l'entreprise est vraiment impressionnant.

Du point de vue du pays, comme je l'ai mentionné tout à l'heure, le gouvernement a mis cela au premier plan dans la mise à jour financière de 2018. La principale annonce faite dans cette mise à jour portait sur la compétitivité et la mise en place de mesures fiscales pour accélérer la déduction pour amortissement de certains gros investissements. On l'a vu aussi dans le contexte concurrentiel, surtout en Amérique du Nord. En effet, au sud de la frontière, de grandes annonces on été faites concernant l'impôt des sociétés et le gouvernement a proposé des mesures fiscales assez importantes pour les sociétés, qui s'élèvent à 5 milliards de dollars par année. Cela a modifié le contexte concurrentiel de façon non négligeable.

(1620)

M. Jamie Schmale:

Dans quelle mesure l'industrie pétrolière et gazière des États-Unis est-elle agressive à l'heure actuelle? Vous venez d'en dire un mot, mais pouvez-vous faire une comparaison très rapide des deux pays et de leurs différences?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

De part et d'autre de la frontière, il s'agit d'une industrie extrêmement concurrentielle, non seulement entre le Canada et les États-Unis, mais aussi à l'échelle mondiale. Le Canada doit constamment s'assurer de pouvoir jouer à égalité.

Je peux parler brièvement de notre régime fiscal global. En ce qui concerne les taux d'imposition réels des sociétés, le Canada se compare avantageusement non seulement aux États-Unis, mais aussi à ses concurrents du G7. Je pense que nous sommes en bonne position à cet égard.

Pour ce qui est des travailleurs qualifiés, le Canada s'en tire remarquablement bien en ce qui concerne les compétences des ingénieurs et des techniciens. Encore une fois, pour ce qui est de la compétence entrepreneuriale, la main-d'œuvre de notre pays est sans égale dans ce domaine. Nous le constatons non seulement au Canada, mais partout dans le monde. Nos ingénieurs et nos experts sont constamment sollicités pour apporter leur expertise.

Il y a donc de nombreuses dimensions à la compétitivité. Je n'essaierai pas de répondre en 30 secondes. Je veux simplement vous rassurer...

M. Jamie Schmale:

Nous voyons des milliards de dollars...

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

... c'est un domaine dans lequel nous sommes très...

M. Jamie Schmale:

... d'investissements qui fuient le Canada.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

... investis, et nous travaillons d'arrache-pied pour continuer à nous améliorer. C'est un effort continu auquel chaque pays doit prêter attention.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Puisque nous parlons de...

Le président:

Vous avez terminé juste à temps.

M. Jamie Schmale: Ah. D'accord.

Le président: Je déteste être porteur de mauvaises nouvelles.

Votre voisin de droite peut vous le dire.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Le président: Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Monsieur Des Rosiers, dans vos commentaires préliminaires, vous avez parlé de 276 000 emplois dans le secteur du pétrole et du gaz.

Qu'est-ce qui est inclus dans ce chiffre? Cela va-t-il jusqu'à inclure des préposés aux stations-services dans le secteur du détail? Qui cela couvre-t-il? [Traduction]

M. Chris Evans:

Ce chiffre concernait l'emploi direct.[Français]

Excusez-moi, la question était adressée à mon collègue.[Traduction]

La source de données qui nous donne les 276 000 emplois directs en donnerait 900 000 si on comptait les emplois indirects. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est vrai.

Sur la diapositive no 5, on parle des nouvelles technologies pour gérer les eaux résiduelles.

Pouvez-vous en parler davantage? Allons-nous en arriver au point où les eaux résiduelles pourraient être transformées pour redevenir de l'eau potable? Sinon, qu'est-ce qu'on fait de ces eaux?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Vous faites référence aux travaux en matière de bassins de rétention.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

C'est un enjeu significatif, qui a été soulevé à maintes reprises par nos citoyens et nos clients. On a tous vu les images de ces immenses bassins qui risquent de poser, et qui posent, des problèmes à court, à moyen et à long terme. On a vu dans le secteur minier, par exemple, des risques significatifs de déversement à cet égard. C'est ce qui explique notre attention et celle de l'industrie pour développer des processus d'extraction qui ne génèrent pas de grands bassins de rétention de ce genre. À ce propos, il y a différentes technologies qui sont à l'étape de la démonstration avant de pouvoir être exploitées à l'échelle commerciale.

J'ai mentionné à l'instant une autre initiative. Cela fait plusieurs années qu'on en parle et là on est rendu à mener ces projets de grande ampleur. Il s'agit de pouvoir extraire de ces grands bassins des résidus d'hydrocarbone qui sont encore commercialement attrayants, ainsi que des métaux, en particulier des métaux lourds, comme le titane, et de pouvoir ainsi les revendre sur le marché mondial afin de générer des produits.

C'est une technologie en développement depuis plusieurs années par la compagnie Titanium Corporation. Elle s'apprête, avec de grandes entreprises pétrolières et gazières, à réaliser un projet de l'ordre de 400 millions de dollars, justement afin de mener à bien ce rêve. C'est là une occasion en or pour le Canada de réduire, voire d'éliminer, ce type d'installations qui préoccupe nos citoyens.

(1625)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En ce qui concerne les résidus qu'on a déjà, est-ce qu'il y a une manière ou une technologie qui s'en vient pour être capable de transformer de l'eau résiduelle en eau potable? Est-ce que cela va être recyclé ultérieurement d'une manière ou d'une autre?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Le principal souci présentement[Traduction]... et peut-être que ma collègue, Mme Siewe, pourrait vous en dire plus à ce sujet, étant donné que le laboratoire fait beaucoup de recherches pour réduire la quantité d'eau douce utilisée dans le processus...[Français]et donc d'utiliser les eaux actuelles dans plusieurs cycles d'utilisation. Est-ce que l'eau devient potable?[Traduction]

Je laisse cela à ma collègue, qui est plus experte que moi.

Mme Cecile Siewe (directrice générale, Secteur de l'innovation et de la technologie de l'énergie, CanmetÉNERGIE-Devon):

Il n'est pas encore possible de recycler l'eau, mais le but recherché est de réduire le plus possible la quantité d'eau douce utilisée, puis de faire des recherches et de la R-D sur le processus de traitement, pour obtenir de l'eau qui se rapproche le plus possible d'un état nous permettant de la restituer. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Concernant la technologie de transformation du CO2— on en parle aussi dans la même page —, quelle solution avez-vous déjà trouvée? Qu'est-ce qu'on peut déjà faire avec le CO2?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Je vous remercie de cette question.

C'est vraiment un secteur en fort développement, où le Canada est un chef de file mondial dans le captage du CO2 à la source. Il y a différentes techniques de captage du carbone. On peut le capter sur les sites industriels et même dans l'air. L'entreprise Carbon Engineering, de Squamish, en Colombie-Britannique, est un chef de file mondial dans le domaine et a attiré des investissements importants de grands investisseurs institutionnels.

Les domaines d'application sont nombreux. Quand on pense au CO2, on pense à des répercussions négatives, alors qu'il peut être transformé en produits utiles. Parmi les entreprises canadiennes qui se démarquent à cet égard, il y a CarbonCure Technologies, qui réinjecte le CO2 dans le béton ou le ciment pour en améliorer les propriétés chimiques et le rendre ainsi plus robuste et performant, tout en réduisant les coûts de production. Elle connaît un grand succès non seulement au Canada, mais aussi en Amérique du Nord, avec près d'une centaine de sites qui sont exploités commercialement partout en Amérique. Cette entreprise fait aussi l'objet d'un vif intérêt d'autres marchés ailleurs dans le monde. C'est un exemple d'entreprise qui présente un grand potentiel. Cela peut être aussi pour produire des plastiques ou d'autres matériaux de construction. Il y a là un fort intérêt.

Le Canada, des compagnies canadiennes et américaines se sont alliées à la fondation XPRIZE. Cette fondation lance de grands concours mondiaux et a investi 20 millions de dollars pour recueillir les idées dans le domaine. Le concours le plus populaire de toute l'histoire de la fondation XPRIZE concernait le développement de nouvelles utilisations du CO2. La bonne nouvelle, c'est que plusieurs entreprises retenues sont canadiennes.

À la fin du mois se tiendra à Vancouver une grande conférence ministérielle, qui accueillera les 25 principaux acteurs du secteur de l'énergie propre. Le Canada sera l'hôte du Clean Energy Ministerial et de Mission Innovation-4, afin justement de célébrer ce type d'entreprises et de solutions qui sont offertes au monde. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Falk, c'est à vous.

M. Ted Falk:

Je remercie les témoins de leur exposé.

J'ai plus de questions que de temps de parole. Voici ma première question.

Aujourd'hui, j'ai pu rencontrer des représentants de l'Association minière du Canada. L'une de leurs inquiétudes concerne la norme sur les carburants proposée par les libéraux. Vous avez dit dans votre exposé que du point de vue fiscal, nous sommes très concurrentiels par rapport à notre principal concurrent, les États-Unis. Il n'y a pas de taxe sur le carbone là-bas. Compte tenu de la norme proposée par les libéraux sur les carburants et de la taxe sur le carbone, qui pourrait se chiffrer entre 150 $ et 400 $ la tonne de carbone, comment cela nous placera-t-il vis-à-vis de nos concurrents?

(1630)

M. Chris Evans:

En élaborant la norme sur les carburants, je crois que le gouvernement reconnaît les répercussions des changements climatiques sur le Canada et sur le reste du monde et qu'il est déterminé à s'y attaquer. La Norme sur les combustibles propres en est un aspect. Elle est dirigée par Environnement et Changement climatique Canada. Le gouvernement s'est fixé comme objectif de réduire la pollution par le carbone de 30 mégatonnes d'ici 2030, ce qui équivaut à retirer environ 7 millions de voitures de la circulation.

Comme je l'ai indiqué, notre ministère continue de travailler avec ECCC sur ce dossier afin d'en comprendre les répercussions sur les intervenants et de leur fournir ces données afin qu'ils puissent poursuivre leur travail d'amélioration de ce projet.

M. Ted Falk:

Avez-vous modélisé l'impact que cela pourrait avoir sur nos producteurs de gaz naturel et de pétrole? Nous savons déjà que plus de 80 milliards de dollars d'investissements dans le secteur énergétique sont partis aux États-Unis ou ailleurs au cours des trois dernières années.

Quelle serait l'incidence de la norme sur le carburant proposée par les libéraux?

M. Chris Evans:

Comme je l'ai dit, nous continuons d'analyser cela avec les intervenants. Beaucoup d'entre eux cherchent à comprendre les répercussions que cette norme pourrait avoir sur leurs industries. Je ne peux pas vous donner de détails techniques sur la structure de l'analyse qui a été faite, mais nous continuons de travailler avec ces parties intéressées pour comprendre leur point de vue et les répercussions que cela aura pour l'industrie. Nous veillons à ce qu'ECCC prenne cela en compte dans l'élaboration de la norme finale.

M. Ted Falk:

Les dirigeants du secteur minier que j'ai rencontrés aujourd'hui m'ont rappelé le montant en dollars d'investissement dans le développement de nouvelles mines de métaux qui avaient quitté notre pays. Le ministère a-t-il un pronostic pour l'avenir?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Nos collègues du secteur minier, qui fait partie de RNCan, sont parfaitement au courant de cela. Vous avez peut-être remarqué que nous avons récemment publié un plan canadien pour les minéraux et les métaux, en collaboration avec nos intervenants provinciaux, qui vise précisément à s'assurer que le Canada a un plan d'action accepté et appuyé par tous. Je dois dire que le soutien à l'égard de ce plan d'action sur les minéraux a été extraordinairement élevé, y compris de la part de nos collègues de l'Association minière du Canada et d'un grand nombre d'intervenants. Il a été présenté à l'ACPE, qui, comme vous le savez, est la réunion de l'Association canadienne des prospecteurs et entrepreneurs, réunissant des dizaines de milliers d'acteurs du Canada et du monde entier. Les travaux se poursuivront au cours des prochains mois pour élaborer les diverses composantes de ce plan d'action. Mais nous travaillons très activement là-dessus.

M. Ted Falk:

Si je vous ai bien compris, vous avez dit tout à l'heure qu'il faudrait construire d'autres pipelines pour répondre à la production. J'aimerais que vous précisiez cela.

M. Chris Evans:

Je n'ai fait que commenter les prévisions de l'Office national de l'énergie concernant la croissance de la production et la capacité nominale. Je ne parle pas de la nécessité publique. Cela concerne une autre organisation. Cela fait partie du processus d'examen de l'Office national de l'énergie et cela fera partie de la décision imminente du gouverneur en conseil. Ce n'est pas à moi de me prononcer là-dessus.

M. Ted Falk:

D'accord.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Il vous reste 20 secondes.

M. Ted Falk:

Selon vous, quels sont les principaux obstacles qui freinent le projet d'oléoduc TMX?

M. Chris Evans:

Je pense que c'est une question qui dépasse la portée de mes attributions.

M. Ted Falk:

D'accord.

Le président:

Monsieur Hehr, revenons à vous.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Je remarque que vers la fin de votre exposé, vous avez parlé de l'investissement du gouvernement de 100 millions de dollars dans le Réseau d'innovation en ressources propres et vous avez dit qu'un groupe de personnes était venu de Calgary à Ottawa pour discuter de cette initiative. Vous dites que le groupe collabore depuis un an. Pouvez-vous nous éclairer un peu plus à ce sujet et nous dire ce que fait ce groupe et quels résultats nous pouvons attendre?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Bien sûr.

Étant donné que cette initiative est dirigée par l'industrie et les universités de l'Ouest — je ne parle pas en leur nom et je n'y ai absolument pas participé de façon directe —, je vais peut-être demander à ma collègue Cecile Siewe, qui fait partie de la gouvernance du Réseau d'innovation en ressources propres, d'en dire un mot.

Grâce à ce réseau, les producteurs canadiens de pétrole et de gaz naturel unissent leurs efforts pour s'assurer que l'écosystème est géré efficacement. Ils ont mis sur pied un certain nombre de groupes de travail et de secteurs prioritaires, qui portent sur la technologie de l'eau, dont nous avons parlé, les nouvelles technologies d'extraction, dont nous avons parlé tout à l'heure. Ils se penchent sur la production nouvelle et l'utilisation finale, les carburants plus propres, le méthane. Il y a un certain nombre de domaines qui sont à l'étude et ils veulent s'assurer que les besoins sont clairs du point de vue des adopteurs. Donc, les sociétés pétrolières et gazières, dans ce cas-ci, font en sorte de communiquer cela clairement à des gens comme Cecile Siewe, du laboratoire national, à des collègues des universités, à de petites entreprises, pour qu'ils sachent exactement sur quoi porter leurs recherches.

Est-ce exact?

(1635)

Mme Cecile Siewe:

Absolument.

L'une des raisons pour lesquelles le Réseau d'innovation en ressources propres a été créé était de développer cet écosystème dans l'industrie de l'énergie pour réduire au minimum le double emploi, simplement accroître le niveau de sensibilisation, mettre en réseau les différentes parties qui travaillent dans ce domaine — que se passe-t-il, qui fait quoi, quelles sont les lacunes que les différentes parties essaient de combler? Il s'agit aussi de démultiplier les efforts afin de pouvoir à la fois accélérer le rythme de développement vers des solutions commercialisées et créer des synergies entre ce qui se passe déjà dans les différentes entreprises pour combler certaines de ces lacunes.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Il s'agit d'un projet stimulant qui, nous l'espérons, donnera d'excellents résultats.

Voici une question qui fait suite à votre exposé. Vous disiez que beaucoup de travail a été fait sur les bassins de décantation.

Il se trouve que j'étais à l'Assemblée législative de l'Alberta en 2008 lorsqu'il y a eu cet incident. Des canards en migration ont péri dans les bassins de décantation. Je pense qu'à ce moment-là, cette question s'est trouvée sous le feu des projecteurs et nous avons dû faire face à beaucoup de pressions non seulement de la part des citoyens canadiens, mais aussi de la communauté internationale, pour essayer de mieux protéger l'environnement et ce genre de choses. Pourriez-vous me dire où nous en sommes à cet égard et quels types de technologies nous utilisons pour réduire le recours aux bassins de décantation?

Mme Cecile Siewe:

Ma réponse aura trois parties.

Je vais commencer par la création de bassins. En collaboration avec l'industrie, nous cherchons à faire en sorte qu'une moins grande quantité de matières se retrouve dans les bassins de décantation. C'est là que les nouvelles technologies, comme l'utilisation d'un hybride, qui utilise beaucoup moins d'eau, ou qui permet de ne pas utiliser d'eau du tout dans le processus d'extraction, génèrent un type différent de résidus qui ne contiennent pas autant d'eau. Ils se consolident plus rapidement. C'est une manière de gérer la question des bassins de décantation.

En ce qui concerne les matières déjà produites, nous examinons notamment la stabilité géotechnique des bassins de décantation. Nous travaillons en collaboration avec nos collègues du Service canadien des forêts, le SCF. Nous devons stabiliser les bassins avant de commencer à parler de remise en état, alors nous travaillons en collaboration avec eux dans ce domaine.

Nous examinons aussi les émissions de GES provenant des bassins de décantation. Comment pouvons-nous les atténuer ou les gérer? Comment pouvons-nous gérer les rejets d'eau des bassins de décantation? Dans quelle mesure peut-on traiter l'eau qui est rejetée afin qu'elle puisse être réutilisée ou rejetée dans l'environnement? C'est une approche multidimensionnelle et elle est toujours en cours.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Vous savez peut-être, monsieur le président, que le Plan de protection des océans a permis d'ajouter une enveloppe de 1,5 milliard de dollars d'investissements dans l'équipement. Ainsi, les scientifiques peuvent bénéficier d'équipements spécialisés pour leurs travaux — comme ceux que Mme Cecile Siewe vient de décrire. Le personnel spécialisé a pu évaluer le genre de possibilités dont nous venons de parler.

Le président:

Vous pouvez poser une brève question.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

RNCan élabore-t-il davantage de cadres et de systèmes plus robustes pour permettre le développement de la géothermie dans l'ensemble du Canada?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Oui. Je suis heureux que vous posiez la question, monsieur le président, au sujet de l'énergie géothermique.

Je dirais que c'est le chaînon manquant au Canada. Si vous alliez en Europe, aux États-Unis et dans de nombreux autres pays, vous le constateriez. Vous vous demandez peut-être pourquoi nous n'en avons plus ici. Ce n'est pas parce que nous n'avons pas la possibilité. Si vous consultez la carte géothermique que nous produisons à RNCan, vous verrez que nous avons en fait beaucoup de ressources — à l'est, à l'ouest, au sud et au nord aussi, où nous avons un potentiel fantastique pour la mettre en valeur.

C'est peut-être parce que nous avons un approvisionnement énergétique très abondant sous toutes ses formes — énergies renouvelables et fossiles — qu'elle a été un peu négligée. Nous avions vraiment l'impression qu'elle ne faisait pas partie de nos plans, parce que c'était une proposition tellement intéressante. Nous avons été très heureux d'annoncer récemment un projet en Saskatchewan, le projet de DEEP, qui vise à créer une capacité de production d'électricité à une échelle industrielle à partir de l'énergie géothermique.

Il y a quelques semaines, nous avons annoncé un autre projet, Eavor-Loop. Celui-ci, je tiens à le dire, se trouve en Alberta, mais je réserve mon jugement là-dessus. Ce qui est intéressant, c'est qu'il s'adresse aux experts des domaines de l'exploration pétrolière et gazière et du forage horizontal. Les spécialistes du forage horizontal dans le secteur pétrolier et gazier ont mis à contribution leur expertise pour faire deux forages verticaux, puis une plaque géothermique qui est encore plus stable, efficace et productive. C'est une première mondiale. Nous en sommes vraiment heureux. Nous avons hâte de voir le résultat de la démonstration.

(1640)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Cannings, vous avez trois minutes.

M. Richard Cannings:

Je vais passer à quelque chose que nous avons examiné dans le cadre d'une autre étude: le centre de données sur l'énergie, ou peu importe comment vous l'appelez. Je pense que dans le dernier budget, il y avait de l'argent pour permettre à Statistique Canada de s'en occuper.

Est-ce bien cela?

Je pense qu'un grand nombre d'entre nous ici et dans l'ensemble du pays aimeraient avoir une source de données sur l'énergie qui soit ouverte au public, qui soit opportune, transparente et exacte. Je n'aurais alors pas à vous poser toutes ces questions à ce sujet. Je me demande simplement si c'est là où on en est rendu.

Pourquoi n'a-t-on pas créé un organisme distinct comme c'est le cas aux États-Unis, où vous avez un organisme vraiment indépendant du gouvernement qui pourrait être considéré comme impartial, le savez-vous?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Oui, je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions.

Voulez-vous essayer de répondre?

M. Chris Evans:

Certainement. À la suite de l'étude que vous avez faite, entre avril et juin de l'année dernière, je crois, vous avez fait valoir qu'il était important d'avoir des renseignements exacts et fiables pour l'avenir énergétique du Canada, et qu'il était important que les gens aient une compréhension transparente du marché. Dans le budget de 2019, comme vous l'avez signalé, des fonds ont été accordés et, en collaboration avec les provinces et les territoires, le gouvernement s'apprête à répondre à ce qui était essentiellement la première recommandation de votre rapport, à savoir un guichet unique virtuel pour rassembler et rationaliser l'information, non seulement de Statistique Canada, mais aussi d'autres organismes publics et du secteur privé.

Comme vous le savez, Statistique Canada possède une expertise de calibre mondial en matière de collecte et de gestion de données, ce qui en fait un élément essentiel de cette entreprise. Il maintient des ententes d'échange de données avec les provinces, les territoires et d'autres organisations et les positionne de façon à bien faire ce travail.

En fait, on s'attend à ce que le portail soit lancé relativement bientôt, étant donné que cette coopération en matière d'information sur l'énergie sera un domaine clé de la collaboration avec les provinces et les territoires. Elle se poursuivra jusqu'à la fin de la prochaine conférence des ministres de l'Énergie et des Mines, en juillet en Colombie-Britannique.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Monsieur le président, je fais simplement remarquer que le député n'est pas le seul à chercher ce genre de renseignements. Il en a été beaucoup question pendant la discussion sur Génération Énergie. Les gens sont curieux. Ils veulent avoir les données, les preuves. Ils veulent forger leurs propres opinions. Nous pensons que le fait de disposer de ce portail et de ces données contribuera à éclairer le débat public.

Le président:

Il nous reste environ 15 minutes. Nous avons fait deux tours. Nous pourrions faire un autre tour. Je propose peut-être quatre minutes par parti, si cela vous intéresse, ou nous pourrions nous arrêter maintenant. Qu'en dites-vous?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, je poserais bien quelques autres questions.

Le président:

D'accord. L'ordre sera le suivant: Parti conservateur, Parti libéral, NPD. Vous avez le dernier mot, Richard. Qu'en pensez-vous?

Vous avez quatre minutes chacun.

M. Ted Falk:

D'accord. Merci, monsieur le président.

Donc, 1,6 milliard de dollars. Pouvez-vous nous en dire un peu plus sur la provenance de cet argent et qui l'a reçu?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Bien sûr.

Pour ce qui est de la première tranche de 1 milliard de dollars pour EDC, nous avons communiqué plus tôt avec ces collègues pour faire le point sur la situation. Selon leur dernière évaluation, ils s'attendent à ce que quelque 500 millions de dollars soient engagés d'ici la fin de l'année — au cours des 6 à 7 prochains mois. Cet argent est là pour assurer le fonds de roulement des entreprises qui cherchent à exporter, principalement, et à trouver de nouveaux marchés.

Le deuxième est l'apport de 500 millions de dollars de la Banque de développement du Canada. Cette somme est destinée au financement commercial, surtout pour les petites et moyennes entreprises du secteur pétrolier et gazier. Jusqu'à maintenant, elle a engagé quelque 50,8 millions de dollars en nouveau soutien commercial. Elle s'attend à fournir un soutien supplémentaire de 150 millions de dollars d'ici à la fin de juin, un mois environ. Elle s'attend à engager 335 millions de dollars de plus en soutien commercial continu, alors il semble bien que ce soit en bonne voie.

(1645)

M. Ted Falk:

Que fait EDC avec le milliard de dollars dont elle dispose?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Je ne sais pas si vous voulez ajouter quelque chose, Chris, mais il s'agit de financement pour aider les entreprises à investir dans des technologies novatrices et pour répondre à leurs besoins en fonds de roulement pour exporter vers de nouveaux marchés. C'est essentiellement cela.

Voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

M. Chris Evans:

Non, je pense que cela résume bien la situation. Les chiffres que vous avez donnés expliquent exactement comment les 500 millions de dollars prévus sur le milliard de dollars de cette année seront dépensés.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Et juste pour noter...

M. Ted Falk:

Je comprends, mais à quoi serviraient ces 500 millions de dollars? Je comprends que c'est pour offrir du soutien, mais comment au juste? Quel genre d'entreprises l'obtiennent? À quoi cet argent sert-il? S'agit-il d'une subvention pure et simple? S'agit-il d'un prêt remboursable?

M. Chris Evans:

Je peux vous donner, si cela peut vous aider, des exemples du genre d'interventions que la BDC a faites. Nous avons deux bons exemples qui montrent concrètement comment les petites entreprises canadiennes ont bénéficié de cet argent.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Sachez simplement que nous ne pouvons pas communiquer des renseignements sensibles sur le plan commercial, alors nous utilisons des cas génériques, quoique réels. On ne peut pas révéler le nom d'une entreprise.

M. Chris Evans:

Par exemple, l'une des entreprises qui a reçu un financement de la BDC était un client oeuvrant dans la gestion des résidus de forage qui avait un problème, parce que sa banque principale se retirait des options de financement en raison des difficultés liées à la réduction du nombre de plateformes de forage au Canada et à la réduction de la production en Alberta. Consciente du créneau de la réduction des déchets et de sa rentabilité, la BDC a décidé de fournir du financement, ce qui a permis au client de poursuivre sa stratégie de diversification et d'améliorer son offre de produits, notamment en embauchant un ingénieur en environnement pour fournir une gamme plus complète de produits.

Mon deuxième exemple est celui d'un client qui faisait face à des problèmes dans l'industrie du transport en raison du ralentissement économique, en l'occurrence en Alberta, encore une fois en raison de la nécessité de s'adapter à certaines des réductions de production qui peuvent avoir une incidence sur l'industrie du transport. BDC a fourni un fonds de roulement sous forme de prêt qui a donné au client la possibilité et le temps d'adapter la structure de son entreprise aux conditions changeantes du marché, ce qui lui a permis de diversifier ses services et d'offrir des services de transport dans différentes industries. L'entreprise en question a décidé de prendre de l'expansion pour offrir un service de camions aspirateurs, ce qui lui a permis, grâce à ce prêt, de maintenir sa position de liquidité et de connaître du succès.

Au 30 avril, la BDC avait accordé 392 prêts commerciaux totalisant 97 millions de dollars sur l'enveloppe de 500 millions de dollars.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Des Rosiers, si vous voulez faire un commentaire, allez-y.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Je serai très bref. Les 500 millions de dollars ont été entièrement attribués et ces projets ont été en grande partie annoncés. D'autres viendront au cours des prochaines semaines, mais il s'agit de plusieurs projets partout au pays.

Pour ce qui est du Fonds stratégique pour l'innovation, les 100 millions de dollars ont été entièrement engagés. La moitié de cette somme a été annoncée pour nos projets pétrochimiques — deux projets principaux dans l'Ouest canadien. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aimerais revenir sur ces recherches dont nous parlions plus tôt.

On sait à quel point les déchets de plastique causent d'immenses problèmes partout sur la planète. On les retrouve en quantité énorme dans les océans, notamment. Des recherches ont-elles été menées sur la possibilité de convertir d'anciennes matières plastiques ou des déchets de plastique en carburant ou en gaz utilisables?

(1650)

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Effectivement. Le thème des plastiques a prédominé dans les travaux du G7, tant pour les chefs d'État en juin dernier que durant la rencontre des ministres canadiens de l'Environnement, des Océans et de l'Énergie qui s'est tenue en septembre.

Le gouvernement du Canada a poursuivi ses efforts dans ce domaine au sein de trois ministères: Environnement et Changement climatique, Ressources naturelles, et Pêches et Océans. Nous avons lancé des défis précisément pour arriver à convertir les matières plastiques en énergie, qu'il s'agisse d'énergie thermique ou de combustibles liquides. Diverses technologies sont en cause. Nous sommes très désireux de développer ce type de procédé, pas uniquement dans nos laboratoires, mais aussi avec des partenaires externes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je reviens au rapport que le Comité a déposé en 2016, avant que je ne devienne membre du comité. Le gouvernement a ensuite présenté sa réponse à ce rapport, dans laquelle il traite de la collaboration avec les États-Unis, particulièrement en matière de recherche. Est-ce que vous pouvez nous parler des résultats de cette collaboration?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Cette collaboration suscite beaucoup d'intérêt, tant au sein des entreprises que des gouvernements. Nous travaillons notamment avec les laboratoires nationaux du USDOE, le département de l'Énergie aux États-Unis, afin de développer des approches qui conviendraient à nos entreprises, lesquelles font des affaires des deux côtés de la frontière. Notre collaboration se poursuit, car nos partenaires américains sont, eux aussi, très désireux de voir leurs entreprises pouvoir traiter des deux côtés de la frontière.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce qu'il y a d'autres pays avec lesquels nous travaillons d'aussi près ou avec lesquels notre collaboration est bonne?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Dans ce secteur, je dirais que nos relations les plus étroites sont avec les États-Unis. Cependant, nous collaborons également avec des collègues européens et asiatiques. Plusieurs d'entre eux seront présents lors de la rencontre à Vancouver, où bon nombre de ces discussions vont se poursuivre.

Peu de gens semblent au courant du fait que le Canada a la réputation d'être l'un des acteurs principaux dans le secteur des énergies propres. En effet, de nombreux pays nous proposent de collaborer. Cependant, nous avons choisi de cibler principalement les États-Unis, l'Europe et l'Asie.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans ce même rapport, il est question de la nécessité de consulter et de davantage impliquer les communautés autochtones. D'ailleurs, comme vous le savez, notre comité se consacre à ce sujet précis depuis plusieurs mois. Pouvez-vous faire des commentaires et nous dire où en sont ces démarches?

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

De quel aspect parlez-vous en lien avec les Autochtones?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je parle des consultations sur tout projet, notamment de pipeline, dans lesquels ils sont impliqués. Dans sa réponse au rapport de 2016, le gouvernement s'engageait à accroître sa collaboration avec les communautés autochtones. Je veux savoir où nous en sommes rendus à ce sujet.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

C'est fort juste.

Comme vous le savez, cela s'applique aux secteurs pétrolier et gazier, notamment pour des projets de pipeline, telles les consultations que nous sommes en train de mener en réponse à la décision de la Cour d'appel. Cela s'applique aussi à tous les projets de grande ampleur qui visent les ressources énergétiques, minières et forestières du Canada. Nous le faisons de façon rigoureuse.

Nous explorons aussi un autre domaine qui suscite un grand enthousiasme et une grande implication de la part de nos partenaires des communautés autochtones. Plus précisément, nous cherchons des façons de réduire leur dépendance au diésel pour produire de l'énergie et de leur permettre de migrer vers des sources d'énergie propre, de privilégier les énergies renouvelables et de stocker l'énergie. Tout récemment, nous avons lancé un programme de 20 millions de dollars pour former une relève en la matière. Nous avons un grand nombre de projets en cours avec les communautés autochtones de partout au pays pour leur permettre d'effectuer cette transition vers des sources d'énergie propre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci beaucoup. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Cannings, vous êtes le dernier, mais non le moindre.

M. Richard Cannings:

J'essaie de trouver une façon de conclure, parce que je suis encore un peu...

Nous avons le rapport du Groupe d'experts intergouvernemental sur l'évolution du climat, le GIEC, qui nous dit que si nous voulons atteindre nos objectifs, pas seulement au Canada, mais partout dans le monde, il va falloir commencer à réduire considérablement l'utilisation du pétrole dans le monde. La courbe descend rapidement, à zéro d'ici à 2050 — dans 30 ans.

Je me demande si RNCan examine ces scénarios et s'il croit que le monde peut peut-être faire cela, que nous pouvons peut-être vaincre les changements climatiques, ou si vous baissez les bras et dites: « J'espère que ces scientifiques du GIEC ont tort. Nous espérons que les autres pays du monde n'atteindront pas leurs objectifs, afin que tous ces investissements ne soient pas vains. »

Chaque jour, ce scénario me laisse perplexe. Nous sommes confrontés à ce problème mondial et pourtant, je viens ici et j'entends dire qu'il y a des plans pour accroître la production — pas seulement ici, mais partout dans le monde.

Je me demande comment vous composez avec cela à RNCan.

(1655)

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

Monsieur le président, nous prenons très au sérieux la question des membres du Comité concernant le GIEC. Voilà pourquoi le gouvernement a investi autant d'efforts dans l'élaboration d'un cadre pancanadien sur les changements climatiques.

Notre ministère, RNCan, est chargé de l'exécution de la majorité de ces programmes, qu'il s'agisse d'écologiser le secteur pétrolier et gazier et d'envisager des technologies transformatrices pour réduire considérablement les émissions de gaz à effet de serre, qu'il s'agisse des transports, où nous déployons des efforts pour électrifier le parc de véhicules et rendre cette pratique de plus en plus courante — et nous commençons à le voir dans nos rues —, ou qu'il s'agisse d'améliorer l'efficacité énergétique et de trouver des solutions de consommation d'énergie nette zéro tant pour les résidences que les immeubles commerciaux. Nous poursuivons ce dossier avec vigueur.

Nous en sommes certainement très conscients. Une autre partie de notre mandat consiste à examiner les répercussions de l'adaptation aux changements climatiques sur le pays. Ce ne sont pas seulement des rapports qui nous envoient des signaux d'alarme, mais nous le voyons sur le terrain, ce qui touche notre Nord, nos collectivités. Comme nous l'avons vu encore une fois au cours de la saison des inondations du printemps dernier, il y a une incidence très réelle sur notre population.

Bien sûr, il y a des raisons de s'inquiéter. Il y a aussi des raisons d'avoir confiance que le Canada sera parmi les chefs de file pour ce qui est d'essayer d'assurer cet avenir sobre en carbone. Encore une fois, lors des réunions ministérielles qui ont lieu tous les mois, nous avons tous l'occasion de faire part de ce que nous pouvons faire en matière de technologie, de partenariats et de nouveaux modes de financement, afin que nous puissions faire appel au secteur privé pour nous aider à réaliser cette transition.

Nous poursuivons ce dossier avec vigueur, mais aussi avec humilité, en reconnaissant qu'il reste beaucoup à faire pour atteindre le genre d'objectif à moyen terme que vise le GIEC. Quand on pense aux réductions de 40 et de 50 % des émissions de gaz à effet de serre d'ici à 2050, il est certain que nous devrons redoubler d'efforts dans les années à venir.

M. Richard Cannings:

Je suis convaincu que nous aurons besoin de pétrole et de gaz pendant des années. Je le sais très bien.

Cependant, nous disons ici que nous devons utiliser de moins en moins, et nous faisons tout ce que nous pouvons pour produire de plus en plus. C'est le dilemme auquel je suis confronté, et lorsque j'entends vos témoignages, il ne s'estompe pas.

Merci.

Le président:

Il vous reste environ 20 secondes. M. Whalen me dit qu'il a une question très intéressante à poser.

Posez-la très rapidement.

M. Nick Whalen:

Monsieur Evans, on a parlé tout à l'heure des projections de l'ONE quant à la capacité de production future. Il me semble que c'est un des cas où il y a beaucoup de yin et de yang entre la capacité de distribution et la production prévue. Il n'y a pas de réserve de pétrole stratégique ni d'endroit où stocker de grandes quantités de pétrole en Alberta de façon à offrir ce tampon afin que les gens puissent augmenter leur production au-delà de ce qui est disponible pour la distribution à l'extérieur de la province.

Dans le cas du pétrole et du gaz, y a-t-il une capacité d'expansion au-delà de la capacité de distribution actuelle? L'ONE serait-il en mesure de... Le rapport mentionnait-il que la production pourrait aller au-delà de la distribution prévue, mais qu'elle ne le peut pas, parce qu'il n'y a aucun endroit où stocker le pétrole?

M. Chris Evans:

Lorsque l'ONE fait ces prévisions, il fournit plus d'un cas, alors nous utilisons le scénario de référence comme base. Il tient compte d'un grand nombre de facteurs à un haut niveau. Je ne suis pas au courant de tout ce qu'il utilise pour arriver à ses prévisions. Je ne peux pas parler précisément de la question du stockage.

Toutefois, nous savons qu'en Alberta, on parle souvent de la quantité de produits pétroliers qu'on peut stocker à l'heure actuelle. Parfois, vous verrez dans les journaux des références à un stockage de l'ordre de 30 millions de barils.

Je ne sais pas comment l'ONE, en particulier, tiendrait compte du stockage dans ses prévisions. Je suis désolé.

Le président:

Merci.

Cela nous amène à la fin de la réunion.

Merci beaucoup à tous de vous être joints à nous aujourd'hui. Je vous remercie d'avoir fait le point. Je pense que tout le monde conviendra que c'était très utile et très instructif.

Nous nous reverrons tous jeudi à 15 h 30.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 14, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.