header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-04-17 INDU 101

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Welcome, everybody.

We are—exciting times—at meeting number 101 of the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology. Pursuant to the order of reference of Wednesday, December 13, 2017, and section 92 of the Copyright Act, we'll be doing a statutory review of the act.

Before we get into it, I have a few words to say as my preamble. We are televised today. We thought it would be a good idea for the whole world to see us. You're on stage. It's my genuine pleasure to welcome you all to the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology's first meeting on the statutory review of the Copyright Act. The House of Commons honoured my colleagues and me when it entrusted the statutory review of the act to the industry committee. Given the importance of copyright law in our modern economy and the lively arguments it generates, there's a special responsibility that comes with today's undertaking. This is a responsibility shared among members of this committee and participants to the review.

To all Canadians who care about the issue we will examine, whether you submit a brief, appear as a witness in Ottawa, or meet us elsewhere in Canada, [Translation]

you will be heard. You have our full attention. I make that commitment, as the chair of this committee.[English]

But I ask for something in return. As we embark on what will certainly lead to difficult discussions, please remember that the role of the committee members is to ask all manner of questions to better understand the significance that copyright law has for Canada and its modern economy. Let us not presume the outcome of what will be a lengthy and fairly complex study. Let us always show respect to one another, no matter the different views we may hold on copyright. Let us aspire to a thoughtful and courteous conversation in true Canadian fashion.

Conscious of the critical role our Copyright Act plays in our economy and its effect on the everyday life of Canadians, [Translation]

the members of this committee have spent many hours preparing this review. The committee has decided to conduct the review in three phases.[English]

In phase one, we will hear from witnesses involved in specific industries and sectors such as education, publishing, broadcasting, software, and visual arts. This phase will notably provide the opportunity for stakeholders to share concerns that are unique to these industries and sectors of activity.

In phase two, we will hear from witnesses representing multiple industries and sectors. The committee looks forward to hearing from, among others, indigenous communities and the copyright board during this phase.

Finally, in phase three, we will hear from legal experts. The committee should expect bar associations, academics, and lawyers appearing in their individual capacities to share their insight and knowledge to improve the Copyright Act to the benefit of all Canadians.

The House of Commons expects from this committee that we will review every aspect of the act. We'll leave no stone unturned. You will all be heard. I want to thank you in advance for participating in this nice, long study.

Let's begin. Today we have with us, from Universities Canada, Paul Davidson, president; and also Wendy Therrien, director of research and policy. We have from the Canadian Federation of Students, Charlotte Kiddell, deputy chairperson. This is the first panel.

You have five minutes to present, and we will start with Mr. Davidson. [Translation]

Mr. Paul Davidson (President, Universities Canada):

I would like to thank the chair and the members of the committee for inviting me to appear on behalf of Universities Canada.

Our association represents 96 universities in the 10 provinces, whose teaching, learning and research activities extend to the three territories.[English]

With me is Wendy Therrien, director of research for Universities Canada.

Let me just echo the chair's remarks of a moment ago and thank you, on behalf of our members, for undertaking this study. For those who have been on this study before, it is complex, it can be dry, it can be polarized, and it has big impact on the work of students and the work of researchers. Your efforts are vitally important in terms of the more than one million young people studying at Canada's universities today and those who will follow them. Your work is also vitally important to Canada's university researchers, who produce most of the copyrighted educational material used by university students.

The university community brings a balanced perspective to this review, as both owners and users of copyright material. Canada's future will be shaped in large measure by the education students receive today. Fair dealing for education ensures that students across Canada have a diversity of learning materials, educational opportunities, and increased accessibility to post-secondary education.

Digital materials mean that today, more than ever before, young people are equipped to achieve their potential, whether they live in Abbotsford or Attawapiskat, and that helps build a stronger, more prosperous Canada for all. In our rapidly changing world, Canada cannot afford to take a step backward in education. Maintaining fair dealing for education will help ensure Canada's young people continue to have the 21st century education demanded in our changing world.

As mentioned, the vast majority of learning materials used by students today comes from creators on campus, university faculty. University professors are prolific creators in writing books and research papers. One estimate is that academics, not literary authors, produce as much as 92% of the content available in university libraries.

Copyright law needs to balance the interests of copyright owners and the users of copyright material. It should incentivize the creation of new ideas and allow for the dissemination of knowledge. Fair dealing is important for maintaining this balance.

Compliance is also important, and that's why many universities have significantly increased their compliance efforts, with offices staffed by lawyers, librarians, and copyright specialists to advise students, faculty, and staff on the use of copyrighted materials.

Today universities spend more than ever before in purchasing content. According to StatsCan, university library acquisitions in 2016 exceeded $370 million, a figure that has been increasing year over year. In the past three years, universities have spent over $1 billion on library content. Libraries are also changing what they're buying. Our libraries have shifted their primary purchasing from print to digital content. One institution reports that in 2002, only 20% of its acquisitions were digital, but today this number has grown to 80%, and that trend will continue.

It's important for this committee to know that, unlike printed books, the use and reproduction of digital content can be negotiated and contracted. On campus, digital content is usually shared through links and not copies, and is frequently protected by digital locks. Further, Access Copyright's repertoire doesn't cover authors of born-digital works and is restricted to authors of printed material.

Along with digital content, most libraries now have e-reserve systems, making it easier for students to use library content on their personal devices 24-7. These systems are making printed course packs much less common than just a few years ago.

Beyond digital disruption, a series of Supreme Court decisions guides the use of copyright material on campus. Before 2012, the Supreme Court of Canada said fair dealing is a right, and that's significant. In 2012, a series of decisions by the Supreme Court concluded that the right of fair dealing was much broader than how the education sector had been using it up to that point. These judgments were the genesis for the shift in how the education sector has managed copyright.

Since 2012, the courts have continued to expand our understanding of copyright law. A growing body of legal decisions is determining the details of what fair dealing means, and several active court cases are still pending.

I would respectfully submit that Parliament should allow the courts to continue their work before intervening with more legislation.

To conclude, it's true that parts of our cultural industries are struggling to adapt to the digital disruption affecting Canadian society. Canada's universities were pleased to participate in the 2016 review of Canadian cultural policy and to recommend new tools to support the creative economy. But changing fair dealing is not the answer to the challenges facing copyright owners during this period of transition. Changing fair dealing would have a direct impact on the affordability of education for students and the quality of the teaching materials at all levels.

(1540)



Thank you very much for the opportunity to speak with you today. We wish you well in your deliberations. We welcome any questions you may have today or throughout the consultation process.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We'll move to Ms. Kiddell from the Canadian Federation of Students.

Ms. Charlotte Kiddell (Deputy Chairperson, Canadian Federation of Students):

Thank you. Good afternoon, and thank you for your invitation to present today.

As you said, my name is Charlotte Kiddell, and I am the deputy chairperson of the Canadian Federation of Students. The federation is Canada's largest and oldest national student organization, representing over 650,000 university and college students, including the 90,000 graduate student members of our national graduate caucus. Those in this latter group are themselves educational content creators.

The federation has a mandate to advocate for a system of post-secondary education that is of high quality and is accessible to all of Canada's learners. This includes advocating for our members' ability to access learning materials for the purposes of research and education in a way that is affordable and fair.

Over the last several years, we’ve seen a shift initiated within the academic community to prioritize learning opportunities that allow for multiple points of access to information. Tired of predatory pricing from large corporate content owners, academics have increasingly opted towards models of providing content directly to the education community. These models include the use of open access journals and open educational resources. In fact, today nearly half of all research publications in Canada are available online for free.

There's another essential facilitator of access to information—the current fair dealing provisions within the Copyright Act. Fair dealing, which has been affirmed by the Supreme Court as a central tenet of copyright law since 2004, allows for the limited use of copyright-protected works, without payment or permission, for the purposes of research and education. Such provisions allow educators to share brief video clips, news articles, or excerpts of a relevant text. Fair dealing has not resulted in the replacement of traditional learning materials. Rather, it allows educators to supplement these materials for a richer, more dynamic learning experience.

The Supreme Court of Canada has repeatedly affirmed the role of copyright law in serving the public good. The ability of students to fairly access an array of research and educational materials is essential to not only the quality of post-secondary education they receive but also their ability to contribute to innovation and development in Canada.

This government demonstrated its commitment to scientific development and innovation with substantial investment in fundamental sciences in budget 2018. We would ask that the government uphold its commitment to research and development by protecting fair dealing.

In recent months, students have heard myths, perpetuated by private publishing stakeholders, that students’ advocacy for fair dealing is rooted in an unwillingness to adequately compensate content creators for their work. I wish to address these concerns in case they are shared by members of the committee today.

First, let me affirm that students and their families have paid and continue to pay significant sums for learning materials. According to Statistics Canada, average household spending on textbooks in 2015 was $656 for university texts and $437 for college texts. Indeed, a report on the book publishing industry in 2014 finds educational titles to be one of the top two commercial categories in domestic book sales.

Second, I will acknowledge that students do struggle to afford textbooks. A 2015 British Columbia study found that 54% of students reported not purchasing at least one required textbook because of cost; 27% took fewer courses to lessen textbook costs; and 26% chose not to register for a course because of an expensive textbook. However, these results are hardly due to a desire to keep profits from content creators. When both textbook prices and tuition fees increase each year at rates that far outstrip inflation, students and their families are forced to make difficult decisions on how they afford post-secondary education.

Today the average undergraduate student accumulates $28,000 in public student debt for a four-year degree. A student relying on loans may find that a $200 textbook eats up most of their weekly loan disbursement and thus is put in the impossible position of choosing between course books and groceries.

To conclude, I would like to say that both the Supreme Court decisions and Parliament’s passage of the Copyright Modernization Act in 2012 affirmed the wisdom and justice of our current copyright regime, including fair dealing. Canadian copyright law has positioned Canada as a leader in the fair and dynamic exchange of knowledge and ideas. We ask this committee to protect our copyrights in the interest of students and educators, but also of the broader Canadian public. Students have benefited from a good system over the last several years, and are eager to continue working with this government to maintain and strengthen it.

(1545)



Thank you for your time. I look forward to answering any questions you may have.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to jump right into questions.

Mr. Longfield, you have five minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Thank you all for being here. Copyright is a complex topic when it comes to different opinions, depending on whom you're talking to.

Mr. Davidson, you outlined one of the stresses here, the balance between paying content creators for their works and being able to access their works as somebody trying to learn from previous people's publishing. Looking at the online platforms like Cengage, or other platforms available for professors and students to access information, could you talk about how Cengage works within the university platforms?

Mr. Paul Davidson:

I can reiterate the university's position in terms of trying to find the balance between the rights of users and the rights of creators of content and rights holders. That's an ongoing challenge that we've had. The decisions over the last few years by the Supreme Court, by Parliament in the 2012 act, have helped clarify the ground considerably.

One of the newer developments in undergraduate teaching and teaching generally has been the use of learning management systems. I'm not directly familiar with the one you spoke about, but again, the learning management systems are a tool that in many ways can reaffirm the rights of rights holders and the rights of users to effectively use the content and make sure that appropriate compensation is given. There's a wide range of capacities in those learning management systems, but it's separate from the issue of copyright directly before us today.

(1550)

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you for that.

I had a round table in Guelph, and I had the different stakeholders: the university, the bookstore, the librarians, the researchers, the publishing houses. One of the things that came up from the library was the institutional licensing of course material and the libraries having inflationary costs they have to deal with to keep libraries open. The Guelph library did receive federal funding for an expansion for the physical location, but the operational costs continue to increase.

When it comes to policy around institutional licensing, could you speak to what your members are telling you?

Mr. Paul Davidson:

I have a couple of comments there. Again, as the committee embarks on its work, I really invite you to visit campuses across the country to see what a dynamic learning environment there is, how the different factors at play within a university are working with new technology and new pedagogy to ensure that students have an optimum experience, a quality experience.

On the issue of buying content, I want to be clear that universities buy a considerable amount of content each year, over $300 million a year in library acquisitions. That number is large and growing. We're a major customer of the rights holders. There are also a variety of new ways of buying the rights to use content. For many years, Access Copyright was the primary source, but there are other sources now that may be more purpose-built to the needs of students and faculty.

As the committee embarks on its study, we really encourage a detailed look at those different tools and techniques available, because I think many in the university community would say they don't mind paying appropriate amounts for content, but they don't want to have to pay for it three times.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Right. Thank you.

Charlotte, the students that I've talked to mentioned finding other ways to get course materials. There was #textbooksbroke, a site that students were using. There are student stores starting up, and campus stores competing with maybe some of the online stores. Back in the 1970s, when I was buying textbooks, you could buy used textbooks in a different way from what they're doing now.

Could you talk about how the students are getting creative? You mentioned it in the presentation, but how are students getting access to information that they need for their studies?

Ms. Charlotte Kiddell:

I certainly acknowledge that students are increasingly struggling to afford all aspects of post-secondary education. That includes textbooks. When students are put in a position where tuition fees are increasing at exponential rates every single year, they're certainly having to make difficult choices. But I think to pin any decline in income for content creators on students is a false characterization.

For one, students are spending significant sums on university textbooks, over $600 in average annual household family spending. Moreover, adequate funding for arts and for writers is not mutually exclusive from fair dealing. We certainly support that; just not on the backs of students. The other mechanisms I talked about, open educational resources and open access journals, are mechanisms for more dynamic exchanges of information among the educational community, but certainly not at the expense of content creators; rather, they're championed by many content creators within the academic community.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you both for your time.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to jump to Mr. Jeneroux for five minutes.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC):

Great. Thank you, Mr. Chair

Thank you for being here. It's wonderful to kick off this study, which sounds like it will be a long one, with both of your organizations here before us.

I do quickly want to ask a question with regard to something that was done back in early 2015 by one of my predecessors, Minister Holder, when he announced the tri-council granting agency's open access policy.

Mr. Davidson, I'd like to get your assessment of that policy, which stipulates that reports from grant-funded research must be made freely available to the public within 12 months after publishing.

(1555)

Mr. Paul Davidson:

We're already into a great conversation today, because we're seeing the dynamics of a shifting landscape. The initiative of the previous government to ensure that publicly funded research would be publicly available has been a useful development. It has been one that our members watch with great interest. It has been one that I know students and graduate researchers benefit from, and it does address one of the questions of both content creation and accessibility of the research that has been done.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Could that expand to other areas? It's within the granting councils. Do you see a benefit of that expanding?

Mr. Paul Davidson:

The open access publishing development is, as I say, a very rapidly evolving landscape internationally. The academic community is watching it around the world. It is an effort, to pick up on an earlier point, to try to mitigate the exorbitant, excessive costs that publishers can derive from their academic journals, from their academic publications.

I would hope in the course of this study the committee would look at the changing nature of academic publishing in the world, the concentration of ownership, and the impacts that has on the ability of people to access information that has been publicly funded.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Great.

I'm shifting gears a bit in the limited time I have. I'd like to get your assessments, Charlotte and Paul, on the amount of time it takes the Copyright Board to conclude its cases. I'll leave it at that, kind of open-ended on the Copyright Board in general.

Ms. Charlotte Kiddell:

You go ahead.

Mr. Paul Davidson:

Okay.

A number of people, even around this table, have been around copyright issues for a very long time, and I think you will find unanimity as you tour the country on the importance of reform of the Copyright Board, for it to be able to come to timely decisions. That's the key issue. We were pleased to participate in the Government of Canada's consultation on this. We are expecting those deliberations to conclude shortly.

One of the big challenges in this whole terrain is providing certainty to all the players. As the Copyright Board for many years was under-staffed, for many years was not fully constituted, its ability to absorb and carry out its proceedings was really compromised by that. A more robust Copyright Board could be part of the solution to resolving some of these challenges so they're not always before Parliament.

Ms. Charlotte Kiddell:

As I was saying, among our recognition of what is a strong system of copyright right now, there are obviously opportunities to strengthen copyright law. An area of particular interest for students and academics is copyright law as interrelating to indigenous knowledge and indigenous ownership of information. I think some robust consideration is really warranted, and there are opportunities to make what is already a strong piece of legislation stronger.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Do you have anything specific to add on the Copyright Board? No? Okay.

All right, Chair. I'm good.

The Chair:

You still have 30 seconds.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

No, I'm good.

The Chair:

All right.

Mr. Masse, you have five minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you to the witnesses for being here.

One of the things we can't miss, especially in the academic sector, is that students are the ultimate customer. When you think about it, they will be the ones who incur personal debt or personal expense by large financial contributions for their tuition, the materials, and the lifestyle required to spend that much time on education.

They will also incur provincial debt, because most provinces are in a deficit right now. They will be responsible for retiring that debt, so that will be incurred by them.

They will also actually secure a participation rate in a federal debt, as we are federally indebted, and they will again have to pay for the allocations and programs that are assigned over the different budgets.

Lastly, they'll also have to incur the costs of those provincial and federal governments of any private sector incentives that are provided for because we are in debt. Reductions in taxes, SR and ED tax credits, and other types of incentives are all borrowing costs that they will then have to pay back.

So when we're looking at fair dealing here, one of the things that hasn't been solved is the fair dealing of students and what they're actually contributing to the greater Canadian economy. Hence, hopefully when we see something come out of this, there will be some type of recognition that they are probably one of the single largest customers who are still not receiving probably the reciprocity they deserve.

With that, the public funding and sharing of information with regard to the grants that are provided for those things have been noted. I believe there's probably some necessity for private sector participation. If you were a benefactor of public funds from the private sector, should there perhaps be some sharing agreements, given the fact that it could be the research and development grants that are provided? It could be, again, tax reductions or abeyance, or government programs where they receive research, and not only that but also staffing components through some of the job creation programs that are out there. Is there perhaps a role in the private sector to actually share when they receive some money from the public purse?

(1600)

Ms. Charlotte Kiddell:

Could you clarify the last part of your question?

Mr. Brian Masse:

In your opinion, is there a responsibility for the private sector to share some of their materials and information and product, at the end of the day, if there's a public contribution to a private entity? For example, it could be software, it could be some type of innovation, it could be through the arts community, it could be whatever, where there's a financial contribution of some sort to the individual, to the private profits, that comes from public funds.

Ms. Charlotte Kiddell:

A trend that has long concerned students, particularly the graduate student members of the Canadian Federation of Students, is this issue of earmarking public funding for private sector interests. I'm hopeful that we are seeing a shift away from that in terms of reinvestment in basic investigative research, as we saw in the most recent budget. However, certainly when public money is being spent on research and development, I think it is critical, as Mr. Davidson affirmed, that this research and development remain publicly accessible and within the public interest, yes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Mr. Davidson.

Mr. Paul Davidson:

I'll pick up on the most recent budget and the transformative investments that have been made through the granting councils. That's a really important new set of developments that the university community really strongly welcomes.

I was also thinking, as you were speaking, about the investments that are being made around cluster strategy.

Mr. Brian Masse:

That's a good example.

Mr. Paul Davidson:

One of the really compelling impacts of that investment is that it is bringing private sector and public sector, and students as well—young researchers—into a collaborative enterprise, to accelerate the exchange of information and ideas for the benefit of Canada's economy. There are places where we're seeing that happening already. As I say, as you go through several weeks and months of hearings, you will hear about an economy that's in digital transition, what the impacts of that are, and how to make sure the core mission of delivering high-quality education to students is preserved.

I'm struck already in the conversation about how different the undergraduate experience is today from 20 or 30 years ago. Look at the development of e-reserves, for example, whereby students can access their required readings 24-7, copyright cleared for appropriate use, from their devices at home. As you're having this wide-ranging conversation, just keep in mind the dramatic shifts over the last 20 years and the opportunities they present for really thoughtful public policy.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Sheehan, you have five minutes.

Mr. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Thank you very much to our presenters for starting off our copyright study. It's the 101st meeting, so this is Copyright 101, I guess, right away.

Paul, your organization, Universities Canada, has made strong statements about the importance of an indigenous education as it relates to truth and reconciliation. You made it a priority. You recognized the barriers that Canada's indigenous people face—first nations, Métis, Inuit—as it relates to getting a university education. In my riding, we have Algoma University, which is a member of Universities Canada, and it underwent a significant transition. It was a former residential school, and it's now a university. The federal government has just recently invested in the university to maintain its infrastructure and also the new Anishinabek Discovery Centre, a $10.2-million project that is going to house the chiefs' libraries—the artifacts, the teachings, a whole bunch of things. They're undergoing that process. The infrastructure is going up. What Chief Shingwauk wanted was a teaching wigwam.

We know that there have been concerns for quite a while from indigenous people about copyright. How could we help indigenous people better protect their traditional knowledge and culture expressions?

(1605)

Mr. Paul Davidson:

Thank you very much for the question, and thanks for recognizing the work that Canada's universities have been involved in now for close to a decade on improving indigenous access and success, engaging meaningfully in collaborative research, and ensuring that we're engaged in the process of reconciliation coming out of the recommendations of the TRC. As it happens, just this week we're reporting to our members and to all Canadians some of the progress we've made in recent years on these files.

Really, one of the big items ahead for all of us to consider is the question of indigenous knowledge, how it is appropriately recognized academically, how it is appropriately recognized in society, and what the rights are around that indigenous knowledge, beyond copyright to other forms of intellectual property as well. In that regard, something the committee may want to look at is the recent research strategy released by ITK, the Inuit representative group, which really addresses these issues in greater detail. It may be a group that would be interested in appearing before the committee.

The whole reconciliation project is not one of months or years or even decades. It's interesting that at the very start of this conversation you're having today, you're bringing the indigenous conversation to the table. I think that's a very valuable addition.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

I appreciate that very much. Thank you.

For the Canadian Federation of Students, we've been talking about some history here. On April 10, 2013, Adam Awad, then national chairperson of the Canadian Federation of Students, referred to Access Copyright's legal proceedings against York University as a “desperate attempt to wrangle public institutions” into obsolete licensing agreements that ignored the breadth of fair dealing.

I have a few questions around that. First, what changes would the Canadian Federation of Students want to see to Canada's collective licensing regime?

Ms. Charlotte Kiddell:

First and foremost, I would say that the Canadian Federation of Students recognizes that the copyright regime we have at present is very strong. We are interested in pursuing some of these reforms that you've just brought up in terms of better protecting indigenous ownership of intellectual property and protecting indigenous knowledge.

I know as well that there are concerns with current crown ownership under copyright law, but I think that, first and foremost, what students want to affirm for this committee is that the current system is working well, and we do think that this is a strong system for protecting students' access to knowledge and information.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you.

Is my time up? All right.

The Chair:

We'll move to Mr. Lloyd.

You have five minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC):

Thank you, Chair. I'd like to start by saying I'm going to be splitting my time with my colleague.

I think I'm probably one of the few people on this committee—I can't speak for Matt—who's probably still paying off their student loans. That being said, with my recent experience graduating in 2014, one thing that was really useful to me when I went to university was the textbook tax credit that had been implemented by the previous government.

I'll just ask for a comment from the Canadian Federation of Students on the impact of losing the textbook tax credit in a recent budget.

(1610)

Ms. Charlotte Kiddell:

The Canadian Federation of Students advocates for a model of student assistance that is based on upfront needs-based grants rather than tax credits, because we find that tax credits that come after an education disproportionately benefit those who have the most money to spend on a post-secondary education and need that assistance the least.

However, I do understand that that's not what the committee is studying here today. Certainly, if you'd like to discuss some of our recommendations on increasing the accessibility of post-secondary education, I'd be happy to do that. I will say that fair dealing is absolutely a small but very important piece of increasing students' access to post-secondary education.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Absolutely. I just considered it because in this document that we received, textbook costs have such a significant impact on students, so as part of the market of supply and demand, any sort of thing helps in creating the demand for students if they can afford it.

My next question is more for Universities Canada, for Mr. Davidson.

What sort of future do you envision if copyright modernization goes the way that you're looking for? How do you see that compensating creators in that sort of environment?

Mr. Paul Davidson:

When I made my preliminary remarks, I reaffirmed the value of the changes that were made in 2012 by the previous Parliament and by the subsequent court proceedings that have been interpreting that legislation, and we would encourage the committee to allow the courts to continue to do their work.

The key issue as you embark on this study is to find the appropriate balance. That is a hard one to find. I acknowledge that. I think universities, as both users and creators, have an appreciation for the challenge of that. As I was commenting in my remarks, universities are also centres of creative energy, of creative culture, of a dynamic cultural sector, and so we want to make sure that creators are appropriately compensated. We want to make sure that users are not paying more than once for works that they have rights to use. We want to make sure that students can exercise their rights to use works. We want to make sure that researchers have rights to use works to do their research. But it is a question of balance.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you.

How much time do I have left, Chair?

The Chair:

You a minute and 45 seconds.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Go ahead.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Thank you.

If anything, I'll just get it on the record that my wife is a physician, so I too am also paying fees—

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Matt Jeneroux: —proxy through her.

If we come back a little bit to the first line of questioning, Mr. Davidson, on the publicly funded research being made public, is it your opinion that it should also apply to all recipients of public funds, those within the private sector as well?

Mr. Paul Davidson:

To be honest, we don't have a view on that explicitly. Again, we are active participants in the work that you're doing to try to assess what makes most sense in an evolving landscape.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Okay. Great.

Could you quickly expand on some of the court cases you referred to as they're making their way through the court and what type of legislative changes you'd like to see specifically in reference to those cases?

Mr. Paul Davidson:

I should say at the outset that we are seeking leave to be intervenors in one case that's being considered, and that's the York case, so I want to be very careful that we don't comment explicitly about that.

Again, to come back to the point of the previous committee in the previous Parliament, I think there were three ministers involved. There were three rounds of consultations to get the Copyright Modernization Act to its current state in 2012. That was a massive undertaking, and we believe it struck a fair balance. It struck a correct balance. To be upsetting that apple cart as universities are investing in compliance and as, frankly, rights holders are trying to develop new products and services, to dramatically change what we think is a fair balance right now, would not be in the public interest.

(1615)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Baylis, you have five minutes.

Mr. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

First, we heard about your increasing expenses vis-à-vis copyright. I think you said $370 million this year. By the same token and on the other side of the coin, we're hearing a lot from small Canadian publishers who are coming to us and saying they've seen a radical drop-off. Where's the money going? You're paying more and they're not getting any. They're not satisfied. What's happening?

Mr. Paul Davidson:

It's a fair question, and it's something I have great sympathy for. The public policy tools that were developed in the 1960s and 1970s to create a vibrant Canadian culture were extremely effective. I think the real public policy challenge is this: how do we ensure that we have new public policy tools that respond to the new reality to ensure that Canadian stories can be told far and wide? I think the Canadian cultural policy review that looked at export opportunities is something that bears further scrutiny.

In direct answer to your question, about 92% of library holdings are created by academics. The content is created by academics. They're not created by the small Canadian publishers. They're not created by the literary authors. I think there are other vehicles to address the needs of small presses and so on.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Yes, I get that, but let's go just to the point.

Mr. Paul Davidson:

Yes.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

They said that since fair dealing has come in, they've seen a radical drop-off in their income. On the other hand, you say we're paying more and more and more. Where is your money going? You're not giving them the money. It has got to be going somewhere else if you're paying more. Correct?

Mr. Paul Davidson:

Yes.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Where is that money going?

Mr. Paul Davidson:

The money is going to a variety of intellectual property from a variety of sources, international publishers, international rights holders, and other sources—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

This is your chance to talk to us, because they're going to be talking to us and telling us that you should be clamped down in fair dealing. We need to address their concerns. It's not working for them. Unless they're misleading me or whatever, they're saying that they're seeing the point of even bankruptcy. So we need to know.

You mentioned monopolies in publications, and I think Ms. Kiddell mentioned open source. Where is the money going if it's not going to our Canadian small businesses?

Mr. Paul Davidson:

Intellectual property is being purchased in record amounts by Canadian universities through other publishers, through other sources of content providers. That's the best answer I can provide you. It's not that....

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Do you know how much more you would be paying if in 2012 the fair dealing hadn't come in?

Mr. Paul Davidson:

Again, I think some are trying to establish causation by correlation. We're living in a disruptive world. Look at how the taxi industry has changed over the last five years. Look at how other sectors are roiling because of disruptive change. I think there are all sorts of public policy measures and mechanisms that can be used to support small Canadian publishers and small Canadian authors, but fair dealing is not the approach. It's using the wrong tool.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Fair enough. They've come to us, or companies have come to me, on this concept.

I want to touch on the point you had about it going through the court system. I think you were referring to Access Copyright v. York. To my understanding—I've only read summaries of it—York lost, and it was said that they're abusing fair dealing in not paying these publishers. But then in your testimony you said let it go through the courts. I know it's being appealed. Is it your feeling that if it's appealed to the Supreme Court they will reverse what the Federal Court did?

Mr. Paul Davidson:

There are a number of proceedings under way. York is one of them. We are a potential intervenor on that, so I want to be cautious about commenting on specifics in that case. What I will draw your attention to is the ruling of the Federal Court a year ago, and as recently as four weeks ago, that strongly upheld the principles of fair dealing for educational purposes.

So there are a number of court cases under way, and—

Mr. Frank Baylis:

In that sense, in the end it comes down to what's fair: I have written a book, and you're using a chapter of the book. If there are only two chapters in the book, you're using 50%. If there are 10, chapters you're using 10%.

I'll ask both of you, but starting with you, Ms. Kiddell, what in your world view would be fair dealing in, say, taking a book and taking a section of the book and not paying for it? What would be fair in your world view and in the view of the students?

Ms. Charlotte Kiddell:

As I said, I think the current fair dealing provisions under the copyright law are very strong, but I actually want to address what you were bringing up earlier in terms of concerns from the small publishing industry about declines in profits being associated with fair dealing.

I would absolutely echo the statement that that's a matter of correlation and not causation. I think there's strong evidence for this, because internationally, profits and income in terms of content creators and small independent publishers are on the decline, and that's not because of fair dealing. That's happening in many countries without fair dealing for the education sector. I would say that's much more attached to in fact a global trend of stagnant and declining profits and wages.

I think both Mr. Davidson and I have affirmed that there is a strong role for the government to play in funding arts and culture. In fact, I, as a person who represents students who are aspiring content creators, many of whom are already content creators themselves, am very concerned about lack of income for content creators. But government investment in arts and culture for this country ought to come through direct government funding for arts and culture and not through subsidizing that through the education sector and mostly on the backs of students.

(1620)

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're going to move back to Mr. Jeneroux.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

There's a copyright law expert from Osgoode, Professor Vaver. He expressed a concern that clarity in terms of the exact meaning of fair dealing has been left up to the courts, given the ambiguity of its definition in the Copyright Act.

Do you believe copyright should be updated to provide a clearer definition of fair dealing, or should the responsibility be left to the courts?

Mr. Paul Davidson:

Let me jump in and say that, first of all, fair dealing is a right that has existed for decades. Fair dealing for education was made explicit just five years ago in a series of five decisions by the Supreme Court of Canada. So this is complex law that needs to be determined.

There are a variety of approaches to addressing fair dealing. Some advocate very clear definitions of bright lines; others have different views. I think you're at the start of a very long process where you're going to hear a lot of conflicting testimony, and you have a really big task in front of you.

I believe the act in 2012 struck an appropriate balance. We have a set of guidelines that our sector is using that is, in my view, concurrent with the legislation, and that is being tested in the courts right now.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Do you want to get on record?

Ms. Charlotte Kiddell:

I would concur.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Okay. Great.

How would you assess the value and impact of collective licensing agreements proposed by Access Copyright and Copibec, since 2010, on students, teachers, and copyright holders?

Ms. Charlotte Kiddell:

Go ahead.

Mr. Paul Davidson:

I think Access Copyright was a creative solution in a different century. It has a product that is not meeting the needs of students. It has a product that's not meeting the needs of institutions. Institutions have made efforts to encourage them to be more market-oriented and work with one of their largest customers in a period of disruption. Instead of that, we've had continual litigation.

The experience that Canadian universities have had with the copyright agencies has not been universally positive. What we strive to do is make sure that creators are appropriately compensated, that users are able to exercise their rights in a way that's fair and balanced.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Do you concur?

Ms. Charlotte Kiddell:

I do. As I spoke about in my remarks, trends we've seen within the academic community are opting towards more open models of accessing information that result in content creators being able to produce information and provide that information directly to the academic community in lieu of being forced to sell it to large corporate content owners and buy it back to access it at inflated prices. It shows that the priority of the education community is very much on being able to exchange and access information in a way that allows for dynamic sharing of multiple forms of learning materials, multiple media, and a diversity of sources, which is absolutely in the best interest of researchers and educators, and ultimately of students.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Jowhari, you have five minutes.

(1625)

Mr. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Thank you.

Thank you to the witnesses for coming in today.

I'm going to echo back some of the numbers I heard and try to come back to my colleague Mr. Baylis' question in a different way.

I heard about a billion-dollar investment over three years, and about $370 million this year. I heard that we have made the transition to about 20% print and 80% digital. I also heard that over 90% of the knowledge that's there is being generated by academia.

When it comes to fair dealing, with regard to a lot of the content that's being used, is it by that 20% hard copy that's been published, or is it a portion coming from the digital knowledge that's there? Are they correlated? I'm trying to get into really bringing a balance between fair dealing between the user and the creator and also figuring out how the students fit into this fair dealing. Could you shed some light on that one? How does this fair dealing factor into your tuition, basically?

Ms. Charlotte Kiddell:

I am a little bit confused about your question, but I would say that fair dealing allows students to access a greater diversity of sources in terms of professors being able to bring sources outside traditional learning material into the classroom to supplement textbooks and what have you.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

And the universities pay for that.

Ms. Charlotte Kiddell:

That's allowed for under university licensing agreements.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Going back to the universities, you've given us the amount of the investment that's been made—$1 billion over two years, $370 million—and where the sources are, and there is still the discrepancy between the creators saying their revenue is dropping, and you are spending more money.

Coming back to my colleague's question, where is that money going, in your opinion?

Ms. Charlotte Kiddell:

I would first affirm that content creators worldwide are seeing a decline in income, and that is in countries with and without fair dealing. This is a global trend—decreased wages, stagnant wages, decreased public funding in arts and culture. That's outside fair dealing and spending trends in the education sector, which, as Mr. Davidson has affirmed, are on the rise.

Do you want to comment further?

Mr. Paul Davidson:

Sure.

One of the critiques made in particular by Access Copyright is that their revenues are declining and therefore universities must not be paying. Universities have other sources to legally buy intellectual property, whether it's other copyright collectives, clearance centres—

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

And this is an opportunity for you to tell us where the other sources are so that we can get educated on that.

Mr. Paul Davidson:

Sure. I might refer you to the Canadian Association of Research Libraries, who I believe made a request to appear before you, and who can describe the multi-million dollar licences they negotiate on behalf of a consortium of universities to ensure that researchers and students have the most updated research and information available at their fingertips and that the creators are appropriately compensated.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Okay.

You also touched on the Copyright Board. With about a minute left here, what would you change on the Copyright Board, if you were going to change one thing to help them?

Mr. Paul Davidson:

We did make a submission through the consultation process that was under way where we talked about timely renewal of board members, full staffing of the board, and improving the resources available for the board to do its work. Those are two or three suggestions right off the top, and I'd be happy to send you the copy of our submission.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

For the final two minutes we have Mr. Masse.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I think one of the challenges we have with the creators is that if we do something different from right now, turning over compensation to the universities and organizations independent from Parliament, it's going to be highly complicated to see that followed through for real results.

You mentioned that more money than ever has been spent on materials, but the vehicles you now use to access that information appear to have changed from the past. Is that where the discussion is? They're asking on the other side about where the money is going. To be quite clear, though, you're spending more money; it's just going to different avenues than traditionally it has in the past. Is that correct?

(1630)

Mr. Paul Davidson:

It's part of the digital disruption of an evolving landscape; it's about the needs of students to be able to access different materials; and it's about the ability, in the case of Canadian independent publishers, to produce materials that are relevant and important to the research work of universities.

Again, I have sympathy for the small independent publishers. I have sympathy for the creators. But I think a fair dealing approach is the wrong tool. There are other mechanisms, like the public lending right, like the aid to publishing, like other Department of Canadian Heritage issues. To suggest that fair dealing is the reason for the current state of Canadian publishing is misplaced.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Yes: I'm just not sure whether the supposed salvation would be just getting rid of fair dealing for them anyway. That's what I worry about.

Mr. Paul Davidson:

Respectfully, fair dealing is a right that's existed for decades. Fair dealing is a right that's been extended to the education sector not only by Parliament but by the Supreme Court in five significant rulings in 2012. I can't imagine members of Parliament suggesting that they negotiate away other kinds of rights because these are just rights; we can just negotiate away rights.

This is the anniversary of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Are we just going to negotiate away our rights and freedoms?

Mr. Brian Masse:

Last, for students, has there been any measurement, or is there any way to measure if something changes with regard to copyright under these discussions here—the increased potential cost or reduction in cost if a new system or regime is put in place? Is that too complicated, or is that something perhaps we should put on the government? Should it change legislation, perhaps part of that legislative change should be some type of measurement for the costs of students for changing copyright.

The Chair:

Speak very briefly, please.

Ms. Charlotte Kiddell:

Briefly, focusing too much on cost savings as part of fair dealing really misses the main point, which is that fair dealing enables students to access a diversity of learning materials in—

Mr. Brian Masse:

That's not the question. The question is this. If there is a change and it incurs a difference in the cost situation, should that be part of the decision if a change takes place, so there can be real measurement for the costs to students later?

Ms. Charlotte Kiddell:

I'm confused about how you're working the cost of tuition in with cost of learning materials and what have you.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Well, we can follow up, but you're arguing it's costing more if it changes, but that's what we're trying to find out. Is there is a true measurement about the costs to students related to copyright or not?

Ms. Charlotte Kiddell:

The costs would be that students would be paying for any supplementary materials brought into the classroom or that they would be seeing a classroom environment with a much poorer diversity of materials, essentially.

The Chair:

Thank you.

I'm afraid we're out of time for our first panel.

It's important to understand that, as committee members, if we can't get witnesses to say what they need to be saying on the record, then it doesn't enter into the report, so all manner of questions have to be asked and we don't want to assume anything. That is why this is so important. We know it will be complicated.

Thank you very much for coming in. We're going to suspend for a very quick two minutes to get the next panel in.

(1630)

(1635)

The Chair:

Can I get everybody back? We're on a tight timetable. Welcome back, everybody.

For the second portion of this, we have, from the Canadian Association of University Teachers, Pamela Foster, director of research and political action; and Mr. Paul Jones, education officer.

From Campus Stores Canada, we have Shawn Gilbertson, manager of course materials for the University of Waterloo.

I'm sure you sat down and watched the beginning of the proceedings. The name of the game is to get stuff on record. That's how we'll be able to present a good report.

We're going to start right off with Mr. Jones. You have five minutes.

Mr. Paul Jones (Education Officer, Canadian Association of University Teachers):

Thank you. My name is Paul Jones, and I'm with the Canadian Association of University Teachers, CAUT. I'm joined by my colleague, Pam Foster. We would like to begin by thanking the committee for presenting us with the opportunity to appear before you.

CAUT represents 70,000 professors and librarians at 122 colleges and universities across Canada. Our members are writers, creating tens of thousands of articles, books, and other works every year. We understand the importance of authors' rights, and as a labour organization have succeeded in protecting these rights through the collective bargaining process.

Our members are also teachers and librarians, whose success depends on making information available to others. In these capacities, they have been at the forefront of implementing new ways to create and share knowledge with each other, with students, and with the public at large. The dual nature of our membership has taught us that copyright should serve all Canadians equally. It is in respect to the need for the act to serve all Canadians that we raise our first issue.

In their letter to this committee, the Honourable Navdeep Bains and Melanie Joly stated: During your hearings and deliberations, we invite you to pay special attention to the needs and interests of Indigenous peoples as part of Canada's cross-cutting efforts at reconciliation.

This is something we wish to address. From indigenous communities, CAUT has heard first-hand of the damage caused by the appropriation of their cultural heritage, and of the failure of the Copyright Act to provide protection.

In fact, we know of one provision in the act directly responsible for the loss of a community's stories. Indigenous elders and scholars are working to address this broader issue, as are dedicated experts within the public service of Canada. We encourage the committee to support these efforts, and ensure that the Copyright Act recognizes indigenous control over their traditional and living knowledge.

The other issue we wish to address this afternoon is fair dealing. Not that long ago, the Copyright Act's purpose was seen as primarily benefiting the owners of literary and artistic works. This has changed with the Supreme Court's 2002 decision in Théberge v. Galerie d'Art du Petit Champlain inc., which was an important turning point.

In that decision, the court said: The proper balance among these and other public policy objectives lies not only in recognizing the creator’s rights but in giving due weight to their limited nature. In crassly economic terms it would be as inefficient to overcompensate artists and authors for the right of reproduction as it would be self-defeating to undercompensate them.

This idea of balance was expanded in a series of more recent Supreme Court decisions, and it was affirmed by Parliament in the 2012 Copyright Modernization Act.

This approach, in which user rights and owner rights are given equal weight, has accompanied enormous innovation in the way knowledge is created and shared. Librarians and professors have been at the forefront of the open access movement and the open education resource movement, in which the journal articles and textbooks they write are made freely available to the online world.

Fair dealing has been a small but important part of this innovation, allowing students, teachers, and researchers to easily exchange material in a timely fashion. For example, it would allow a class to quickly share a controversial newspaper editorial, an excerpt from a movie, or a chapter from a rare, out-of-print book. The recognition of fair dealing for educational purposes by the Supreme Court and by Parliament has been of benefit to Canada.

Now, as I'm sure you are aware, not everyone is happy with fair dealing. There are two things you will hear or will have already heard. First, you will hear that poets and storytellers in Canada are often struggling at or near the poverty line. This is absolutely true. Second you will hear that fair dealing is in part responsible for this. This is not true.

The impoverishment of large sections of our artistic community far predates educational fair dealing. It is also a sad fact across the globe, including in jurisdictions where educational fair dealing does not exist. The reality is that fair dealing covers a small amount of content use on campuses, of which an even smaller fraction is literary works by Canadian authors. In fact, when it comes to supporting authors and publishers, Canada's post-secondary education sector has a proud record to point to.

Yes, we are developing new ways to create and share information, and it is true that in the last 10 years there has been enormous disruption in the world economy, with more losers than winners in all sectors, but we in the post-secondary sector continue to spend hundreds of millions of dollars per year on content.

To conclude, we urge the committee to affirm the Copyright Act as legislation for all Canadians by addressing the concerns of indigenous communities and by supporting a public post-secondary education sector where a combination of open access journals, open education resources, fair dealing, and hundreds of millions of dollars spent annually on content provides the best possible learning and research environment.

Thank you again for inviting us, and thank you for the important work that you're doing.

(1640)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Shawn Gilbertson from Campus Stores Canada.

You have five minutes, sir.

Mr. Shawn Gilbertson (Manager, Course Materials, University of Waterloo, Campus Stores Canada):

Thank you, Chair.

Good afternoon. I'd like to thank the committee for the opportunity to appear before you today. My name is Shawn Gilbertson. I'm the course materials manager at the University of Waterloo. I'm here today on behalf of Campus Stores Canada, the national trade association of institutionally owned and operated campus stores. Campus Stores Canada has 80 member stores and more than 150 vendor and supplier associates nationwide. This means that, if you know one of the million or so post-secondary students, you probably know someone who is served by a member of Campus Stores Canada.

Campus stores serve students by ensuring they have access to high-quality learning resources by acting as a conduit for the distribution and fulfillment of print and digital course material. We are here today with a simple message. Fair dealing has not negatively impacted the sale and distribution of academic material in Canada. The 2012 expansion of fair dealing to include educational use as an exemption is an important clarification of user rights. Importantly, this review must be considered within the context of a rapidly evolving marketplace.

To be clear, the higher education publishing market has seen a significant shift away from traditional print-based mediums towards digital learning products often sold at lower prices. This might clarify some of the questions asked earlier. Further disruption is a result of changes in consumer behaviour, provincial policy changes, and a competitive online marketplace. These changes are part of an industry faced with increased competition and more choice for consumers in the way they purchase, access, and consume course material.

However, I should note that unaffordable prices of some course material has led to decreased demand for expensive textbooks that may have only been slightly updated. In addition, there has been significant market saturation of print learning material with increased competition through the growth of textbook rentals, imported international editions, peer-to-peer selling, and increased demand for less expensive older editions.

Students, the ultimate users of learning materials, no longer see the value in expensive, single-use texts. As with other industries like music and video, user expectations of value have shifted. New channels, new business models, and new market entrants are further perpetuating the disruption of traditional print revenues, fostering the investment and development of digital products and subscription-based services, with early indicators pointing to significant growth.

With that said, we would like to underscore an important point from the joint ministers responsible for copyright when they stated in a letter to this committee that “...the Copyright Act itself might not be the most effective tool to address all of the concerns stemming from recent disruptions...” Campus Stores Canada encourages the committee to keep this top of mind when reviewing briefs and listening to testimonies from creators and copyright owners.

To conclude, it is imperative that this committee recognize the important balance between creators and users of intellectual property and the value of fair dealing. Fair dealing remains a fundamental right necessary to safeguard creator and user interests as this industry innovates and evolves.

On behalf of Campus Stores Canada and the students we serve, thank you for the opportunity to speak to you today.

(1645)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We are going to go right into questions.

Mr. Sheehan, you have five minutes.

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you very much.

Those were great presentations.

Earlier on, I asked about how the government, this committee, could make recommendations to better address the long-standing issue of indigenous concerns over copyrighting.

Paul, I know in your remarks you just made a statement about that. Again, I don't know if you were here, but in Sault Ste. Marie we have a number of indigenous activities going on relating to truth and reconciliation and the building of initiatives at the Discovery Centre. The infrastructure is being built right now and is going to work with Algoma University, which is also a site that was a former residential school.

They are really trying to address the issue of indigenous education, so they're involved with it, but they're also helping address the truth and reconciliation recommendations. Part of that is that they are going to be housing a lot of artifacts. There are going to be a lot of teachings, and there are concerns about indigenous copyrighting in Canada.

Would you be able to expand a little further about your views or your organization's views on how Canada can better protect indigenous teachings and cultural artifacts, etc. in the institutions through better copyright legislation?

Mr. Paul Jones:

The first thing I should clarify is that we take our knowledge from our indigenous members—indigenous academic staff—who have explained the problems to us. We are trying to convey that along, but they will be the main spokespeople on this and will bring forward the concerns more directly. I would not want to appear to be pre-empting that or speaking on behalf of another community.

We have learned that western notions of intellectual property set out in the Copyright Act or the Patent Act, with very precise definitions of individual or corporate ownership and very precise timelines for the creation of knowledge and how long that knowledge lasts, do not fit at all well with the different kinds of indigenous knowledge systems that exist within aboriginal communities. The mix between those two things—our Copyright Act and traditional approaches to indigenous knowledge—is very difficult.

One particular example that came to our attention was that of a historian in New Brunswick who, in the seventies, recorded stories of elders. When the community wanted to access those stories, recordings, and transcripts, they were not able to, because copyright ownership in those stories was claimed by the person who had made the recordings. It's now section 18 of the act, I think, that gives those rights to the recordist. In this case, the community was not able to access the stories. The elders who had told the stories had died. Most of their children had died. It is just now that they have finally broken through and been able to publish these stories.

That was a specific example of one small part of the act, which in that instance caused real damage to that community, real sorrow and heartbreak. I believe that same situation has happened in other places.

There are other situations where, because the copyright requires a specific creator—someone to claim ownership—and a specific timeline, it doesn't fit well with notions of community ownership or with notions of ownership since time immemorial, going back and going forward.

We would not purport to say exactly what has to be done. We know there are experts and elders within indigenous communities who can speak to this. We just want to put our support behind them in making the changes necessary to protect indigenous knowledge.

(1650)

Mr. Terry Sheehan:

Thank you for that, Paul.

We wanted to make sure we got that on the table right away. This is the first meeting of this copyright study, so to both sets of witnesses, I really appreciate your contribution to that important discussion we'll have later.

For Shawn, what is the position of Campus Stores Canada on the current litigation between collective societies and Canadian universities? Can you delve into that?

Mr. Shawn Gilbertson:

I can only speak to the role that Campus Stores Canada played prior to 2012. Campus Stores Canada is responsible for course pack printing. My understanding is that about 75% of the revenues came from that previous licensing arrangement. As we understand it, there are two parts to that licensing arrangement, one that was a blanket FTE fee that covered all incidental copying, and then 10¢ per page for print course packs.

One of the key differentiators we've seen leading up to 2012 and since is a shift to e-reserve use, because of the increase in expenditures in library licensing. Needless to say, there is less of a need for that type of licensing scheme when students would otherwise be paying twice for that course material.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Monsieur Bernier.[Translation]

You have five minutes.

Hon. Maxime Bernier (Beauce, CPC):

Thank you very much.

My question is for Mr. Gilbertson.[English]

Thank you very much for being with us.

I want to know in a bit more detail what your members are doing to respect the law right now.

Also, what would be the impact on their activities if they wanted to promote their rights? Can you just answer the first part?

Mr. Shawn Gilbertson:

I probably can't speak more broadly on the education sector.

Certainly, Campus Stores Canada is involved in the sale and distribution of course material, not necessarily copyright enforcement. However, we have individuals who are part of our staff and who have expertise in copyright licensing. For example, we still adhere to the transactional licensing required for various permitted uses, those that exceed fair dealing exceptions.

Does that help answer your question?

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

What is the big change that we must make for the renewal of this legislation? If you have only one recommendation, what would be your recommendation?

Mr. Shawn Gilbertson:

It's simply not to address fair dealing. There's no reason to change the current law.

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Okay, thank you.

I have another question for Mr. Jones.

How can we ensure that a university professor would be able to respect that legislation and at the same time also their right to be protected? With the legislation that we have in front of us, what is the biggest concern of the university professors?

Mr. Paul Jones:

You've asked for one concern, and we have five issues we want to bring forward—our five biggest concerns. The first one is to leave fair dealing alone. You know that. We're also very concerned, as in our opening statement, that the concerns of indigenous communities are addressed in the act. Beyond that, the current term is life plus 50, and that's a reasonable approach. To the extent that this can be protected in national legislation, what with international trade agreements starting to infringe on that, we urge that it remain at life plus 50.

The Copyright Modernization Act of 2012 did a good job of moving a lot of things forward. One area where it didn't quite succeed was on the issue of technological protection measures. In particular, a small, but elegant change there that would allow digital locks to be broken for non-infringement purposes.... If there are reasons that you can legally reproduce something, but it's in a digital format and it's protected, you should be able to still go in and do that.

The other issue that we were interested in talking about further, and we'll develop this in our submission, is the issue of crown copyright, which we would want to see loosened, to be moved back to allow Canadians better access to the information that the government produces, ultimately with a goal perhaps of abolishing it, but with some baby steps along the way to move that forward.

(1655)

Hon. Maxime Bernier:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Masse, you have five minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I am going to touch on the digital locks. Give us an example as to what is taking place, and where that can be problematic. I think that's an important part of the previous review that took place that seems to be getting eclipsed in terms of its understanding of the repercussions. Can you perhaps give us a bit of an example?

Mr. Paul Jones:

I will try to give an example, and it's an old example already. Let's say a professor is looking to present a class on the presentation of professors in popular culture or the presentation of politicians in popular culture, and they want to show some clips from a DVD or a video, or some kind of streaming mechanism. It may be that they have to break into that in order to copy those clips. Let's say it's a two-hour movie and they want to show two minutes of it. It may not even reach the threshold of fair dealing. It may be an insubstantial use, so it's perfectly legal to do that in terms of what the Copyright Act says, but because you're not allowed to break digital locks, it would be an infringing activity.

Mr. Brian Masse:

It's a small segment, as you mentioned, and part of it's a practical application. It wouldn't be necessarily that the artists would have an objection to it. It would be the encumbrance to try to find the producer of the lock, the material, and so forth, in terms of trying to get that access. Is that correct?

Mr. Paul Jones:

Yes, that's correct. I think one of the advantages of fair dealing is it allows quick and ready access to materials to present in the classroom.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Yes.

Mr. Gilbertson, in terms of fair dealing, what has changed? Give us a snapshot from a student's perspective in the last five years in terms in bookstores. There's a lot that's taken place in general. You mentioned something. I think it was the quote. I had to write it down because you said, “no longer see the value in”. I was going to say that I didn't see value in that in 1991 when one chapter was changed in a textbook, and you missed out on those who were selling them beforehand, and so forth.

Perhaps you can give us a little more insight into what's changed in the last five years.

Mr. Shawn Gilbertson:

My understanding over the last half-decade or so is that we have seen a significant shift from traditional print-based products to born digital learning products tied to assessment. This is where we've seen the lion's share of investments from large multinational publishers. Certainly, we represent a specific digital intermediary channel where we've seen approximately $50 million since inception in total cumulative sales.

When this type of product is tied to assessment, students are essentially forced to pay. They don't necessarily have an option to share a book or to use a copy from the library, as an example. In the province of Ontario, we have seen some change in policy that allows the use of these particular products as long as institutions have clear guidelines or policies in place that protect student interests.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Has there been more of a movement towards maybe some more individual agreements with regard to the use of resources, materials, and so forth? Is that happening more often, or is it still a blanket policy? Do you now have different products in the university bookstores that might have more variance in independent decision about the usage policies?

Mr. Shawn Gilbertson:

To answer your question simply, I'll just draw on a question from earlier this afternoon.

Cengage Learning just released a product that allows students to access the entire repertoire within their catalogue. That comes at a cost per term or per year. We are seeing some early signs of changes similar to other content industries where content is ubiquitous. Users pay a nominal price, and they get access to way more content than they otherwise would.

(1700)

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're going to move to Mr. Baylis. You have five minutes.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Thank you.

You both reflected back a similar point that was made by the previous witnesses, which is to leave fair dealings alone, recognizing at the same time that authors and small publishers are making less money.

Starting with you, Mr. Jones, you represent teachers. Some of them are the authors, let's say, and yet they're not unhappy with the fair dealings right now, if I understand. Is that correct?

Where's the flow of the money going? There's more and more money going somewhere, but it's not going to our creators, and it's not going to our small publishers.

Mr. Paul Jones:

I heard that question earlier, and I thought about it. I have at least one answer, which is that $120 million per year goes to the CRKN, the Canada Research Knowledge Network. It is a consortium of universities that purchases a blanket licence to access digital material. Mostly, I think it is journal articles, but there are other things as well. That's an example of that shift to digital purchasing.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

You mentioned this new movement towards open access, where authors are not putting it through a journal; they're putting it out there. Is that something that your association of teachers and professors is pushing? Can you elaborate on that aspect?

Mr. Paul Jones:

This was a matter of some discussion within our membership. There wasn't unanimity at first, but a consensus has developed in support of open access. The genesis of it was a realization that our members, paid for by Canadian taxpayers, were producing vast amounts of literature, journal articles. They were transferring that to private sector publishers for free and often doing the editing and peer review work to ensure that it was up to scratch for free. Then, they were purchasing it back at the taxpayers' expense for huge amounts of money. Think of wage increases and inflation. The skyrocketing cost of these journals was just off the charts. Our folks have Ph.D.s, and there was a realization that maybe this wasn't the best way to go about this.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

So the model was that we do all the work, we write it, we publish it, we even edit it. We give it to you, and then you charge us back for it, and we don't make any money on it.

Mr. Paul Jones:

Yes, and this light bulb came on.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

At first, they had that discussion in your group and they were not sure about this open access but then more and more people moved toward it because of this reality.

Mr. Paul Jones:

Yes.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

Mr. Gilbertson, you touched specifically on new ways. I think you talked about disruptive technologies and the way your students see value or don't see value.

Is this part of that movement? Are you seeing that? Is it flowing from the student's mindset about what's worth paying for or not?

Mr. Shawn Gilbertson:

Yes, absolutely.

We're looking at some very new learning tools or technologies where students are paying out of pocket; they're nominal prices like, say, $20 per half credit, for example. One example that comes to mind is Learning Catalytics. It's similar to Cengage learning where the faculty member has access to the entire repertoire in the catalogue and students are paying $20 compared to a $200 textbook. I think this is where we are beginning to see the shifts in the way in which consumers or students value course material, and also, understanding that it is for a single half-credit course. Typically speaking, unless they are professionals, they tend not to hold on to them.

Mr. Frank Baylis:

We've seen similar movements, say, with music, where, at one point, the younger generation was saying they had no issue with getting it for free. Music revenue was dropping and things like Spotify came on. They've turned and now people are saying they're willing to pay this monthly fee because it's a reasonable charge.

Is that the same type of thing that we're going to see in the education system? Is it happening?

Mr. Shawn Gilbertson:

Yes, we're right at that tip right now, I believe. I should also state—not necessarily for this committee, but certainly for Canadian Heritage—that we are concerned about some of the emerging models to protect student pocketbooks. One of them in particular is books and tuition, that being digital course material that may be charged an ancillary fee and where students don't have any option to go elsewhere to purchase that material.

(1705)



There is some real concern that ultimately we might see that bundled with tuition, and then we start to think about all the other policy changes that would have to take place at the federal level to accompany that. That is a concern for us.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Lloyd. You have three minutes.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

My first question is for Mr. Jones and Mr. Gilbertson. Something that came out from the previous government in British Columbia was a little-known program called “creative commons”. Unfortunately I never really had the opportunity to access that, because it came online just as I was graduating.

I was wondering if you could comment on the role of creative commons within the greater copyright issue.

Mr. Shawn Gilbertson:

British Columbia in particular has started making investments in open educational resources that are tied to creative commons licensing. We've seen other provinces, particularly Ontario more recently, which just came online with its open textbook catalogue.

As they started to target first- and second-year level high-enrolment courses, we have started to see a shift away from traditional proprietary resources in that regard, toward closed copyright.

Mr. Paul Jones:

I have a newspaper article here. The headline says that B.C. is to lead Canada in offering students free, open textbooks. It heralds the program there to work on open education resources. The date, interestingly, is October 16, 2012, so we see things that have changed over the last five years, in this case in the growth of open education resources.

We also know that at individual universities, this has saved students hundreds of thousands of dollars. Overall, in British Columbia, they're thinking $4 million or $5 million in the last few years of having free, open, accessible, online textbooks replacing costly versions from private publishers.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Following up on this, how are the content creators compensated under the creative commons scheme? With the answer to that, is this a cost-effective way to provide resources to students but also to respect the rights of creators?

Mr. Paul Jones:

I'll speak to the compensation. For some of the creators, these would be university professors and researchers. They earn a salary every year, and producing this stuff would be considered part of their work.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

It's included in their salary? When they put something on creative commons, they don't receive anything?

Mr. Paul Jones:

There would be a multiplicity of different versions, but the core idea is that as part of their salary, university professors do this kind of writing and would volunteer to devote some of their time to these projects.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Is there government funding that's going into this? That's not paying any of the creators; is that just basically for the set-up and providing of the program?

Mr. Shawn Gilbertson:

It is going to pay for some of the creation of course material.

Mr. Dane Lloyd:

Would you say, then, to answer the question, that it is a cost-effective way of providing resources?

Mr. Shawn Gilbertson:

Yes. I suppose it depends on whose perspective we're looking at, right? Perhaps I'm going to comment on that today, but it is important that the committee review some of the recent developments in this case—the creation of open education resources.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to move to Mr. Longfield. You have three minutes.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Mr. Chair, a fast three minutes.

I'm going to open up with Mr. Gilbertson. It was good to hear you mentioning Cengage, because that is one of the game-changers we're facing.

The cost of books going into tuition is another model. As we look at possibly supporting tuition, we could also be supporting texts at the same time.

Two other pieces for me are the French-language open access journals, the Érudit journals, and looking at the model of digital learning products tied to assessments. That came up in conversations in Guelph as well.

There's policy needed around all of that. Could you comment on where the gaps are that we could be diving into in future discussions?

Mr. Shawn Gilbertson:

I think at the provincial level, we don't necessarily have specific pricing floors or limits, but I do think that's something—you know, indexing to inflation—that will have to be explored at some point.

I probably can't speak to your first question on French-language open access journals. I'm not a content expert in that field of study.

I'll maybe pass it over to Paul.

(1710)

Mr. Paul Jones:

I don't have an answer for that either, but I can commit to finding out, because that's something we will be able to put our fingers on.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

When we look at larger publishing houses out of the States supplying textbooks into Canada, I think it's important that we still get access to Canadian content, in both languages, as well as information that Canadian students need.

With the measure around protecting student copyright over works, students who are studying and contributing to creation of content, we're providing more money for students to be engaged in research. Whether there is some type of opportunity there for students to get relief on textbooks.... I'm not sure where I'm going with that, but the students are part of the equation. On research, they are part of the equation on having to access information.

Maybe this goes back to the comment by Mr. Baylis around creators not getting paid for content. Really, a lot of them aren't motivated to be paid for content; they want to be published.

Mr. Paul Jones:

What your point hits on is that these are very disruptive times, and new methodologies, new approaches, are being tried all the time. What we want to see coming out of this review is that the environment, that ecosystem, is protected. When it's open access, open education resources, fair dealing, the knowledge networks, the site licences, the new approaches, what's the way to go?

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Terrific, thank you very much.

The Chair:

We're going to move to Mr. Jeneroux. You have three minutes.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Thank you all for being here today.

I have just one question for you. You've answered a lot of them.

This is similar to the question that I asked to Universities Canada in terms of the open access policy that stipulates that reports from grant-funded research must be made freely available to the public within 12 months after publishing.

I imagine it's mostly you, Mr. Jones, but you're welcome to weigh in on it as well, Mr. Gilbertson.

What is your assessment of that policy?

Mr. Paul Jones:

Our organization supports open access and we support those policies, but we talked about the disruption and the dislocation that it's caused. Moving to an open access system was something new for our members. It was greeted with interest and some skepticism, and, as it's developed, people are moving to it more and more.

It's not without its problems. One is that the publishing systems are sometimes created by submission fees. If you want to get an article published, it may cost you $500 or $1000. We're looking for ways to bring that out of the grant money that professors get, and other sources, so that new scholars or people in areas where there's not a lot of grant support are still able to publish.

It's working well. We endorse and support it, but there are still some kinks to be worked out.

Mr. Matt Jeneroux:

Do you think that should be expanded once again to all publicly funded research dollars?

Mr. Paul Jones:

I think we would support the idea of making as widely available as possible that research knowledge for which the public has paid for the creation.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

For the final three minutes of the day, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I want to keep going down the road that Mr. Jeneroux is going down. You brought up crown copyright earlier. I find it a fascinating topic that a lot of people have never heard of.

I would go one step further and ask, should publicly funded works be placed in the public domain?

Mr. Paul Jones:

Yes, that would be the ultimate goal. That would be the direction that we would want to move towards.

I know there are some areas where there are issues of confidentiality that may restrict that immediate flow. There are also areas where there is revenue derived from the commercial sale of some material. Maybe things have to be worked out before that is placed immediately into the public domain or crown copyright is removed on those things. Overall, as a matter of principle, we would look towards moving away from crown copyright. I know that in the United States there's no equivalent of that.

(1715)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

With what would you replace crown copyright?

Mr. Paul Jones:

Nothing.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Anything published by the government or belonging to the government would become public domain. Is that how you'd see it?

Mr. Paul Jones:

That would be the ultimate direction to go, with some steps along the way.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How do you compare Canadian fair dealing with American fair use?

Mr. Paul Jones:

My understanding is that fair use in the United States is actually a broader right than fair dealing in Canada, that it's not restricted by a purpose, and that it has fewer limitations overall.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned in your opening remarks that there's a specific section that interferes with indigenous rights. Can you tell me what section that is?

Mr. Paul Jones:

I believe it's section 18 of the current act. At the time when the tapes were made, decades and decades ago, it may have been a different section.

It is a right that I think in some instances makes a lot of sense. The recordists would own and control the things that they record.

In this case, what it allowed was the appropriation of these stories, myths, and legends from this community, and so it wasn't an appropriate application of that rule. In terms of specific things to pinpoint, where indigenous concerns could be brought in, maybe it's that section 18.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

My final question is, for the record, what systems exist to oversee the proper use of fair dealing for professors, campus bookstores, and so forth? Does it run entirely on the honour system?

That question is for all of you.

Mr. Shawn Gilbertson:

I can comment.

I do know that many institutions have set up copyright offices with expertise, and we heard Paul commenting on that earlier. Even within our own institutions, and specifically in campus stores, we adhere to what we call “fair dealing guidelines”, which are implemented at each of our respective campuses. We operate within the interpretation of the act in fair dealing. Relying on the guidance of Universities Canada is how we operate.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Does anyone have any comment on that?

A voice: No, that's a good answer.

The Chair:

On that note, thank you very much. Thus ends our first day of the copyright study.

I want to thank all of our panellists for coming today. We're going to suspend for a very quick two minutes. We need to do some committee business.

Thank you.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

[Énregistrement électronique]

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

Bienvenue à tous.

Nous en sommes à la — que c'est exaltant — 101e séance du Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie. Conformément à l'ordre de renvoi du mercredi 13 décembre 2017, et à l'article 92 de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, nous allons amorcer l'examen prévu par la loi de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Avant de commencer, j'aimerais dire quelques mots. La séance d'aujourd'hui est télévisée. Nous avons pensé que ce serait une bonne idée de nous montrer au reste du monde. Vous êtes donc sous les projecteurs. Je suis sincèrement heureux de tous vous accueillir à cette première séance du Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie sur l'examen prévu par la loi de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. En nous confiant, à moi et à mes collègues, l'examen prévu par la loi de cette loi, la Chambre des communes nous honore. Étant donné l'importance de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur pour notre économie moderne et les échanges animés qu'entraîne cette Loi, c'est une responsabilité particulière qui nous est confiée, une responsabilité que partagent les membres du Comité et ceux qui participent à cet examen.

Je tiens à dire à tous les Canadiens qui se préoccupent de cette question, qui vont présenter un mémoire, ou comparaître ici même à Ottawa ou ailleurs au pays, peu importe,[Français] vous serez entendus. Vous avez toute notre attention. Je m'y engage, en tant que président du Comité.[Traduction]

Mais, en retour, je vous demande une chose. Alors que nous amorçons cette étude qui mènera certainement à des discussions difficiles, n'oubliez pas que le rôle des membres du Comité est de poser toutes sortes de questions afin de mieux comprendre l'importance de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur pour le Canada et son économie moderne. Évitons de présumer du résultat de ce qui sera une longue étude plutôt complexe. Faisons preuve de respect l'un envers l'autre, peu importe nos divergences d'opinions sur le droit d'auteur. Tentons d'avoir des conversations réfléchies et courtoises dans la vraie tradition canadienne.

Conscients du rôle essentiel que joue la Loi sur le droit d'auteur dans notre économie et de son impact sur la vie quotidienne des Canadiens, [Français]les membres de ce comité ont consacré de nombreuses heures à la préparation de cette révision. Le Comité a décidé de mener cette révision en trois phases.[Traduction]

Au cours de la première phase, nous accueillerons des témoins oeuvrant principalement dans des industries et secteurs bien précis, comme l'éducation, l'édition, la diffusion, les logiciels et les arts visuels. Cette phase permettra notamment aux intervenants de nous faire part des préoccupations propres à ces industries et secteurs d'activité.

Dans le cadre de la deuxième phase, nous accueillerons des témoins représentant plusieurs industries et secteurs. Le Comité est impatient d'accueillir, notamment, les communautés autochtones et la Commission du droit d'auteur.

Finalement, au cours de la troisième phase, nous accueillerons des juristes. Nous devrions accueillir des associations d'avocats, universitaires et avocats en leur capacité individuelle qui viendront nous partager leurs idées et connaissances pour améliorer la Loi sur le droit d'auteur pour le bien de tous les Canadiens.

La Chambre des communes s'attend à ce que le Comité examine tous les aspects de la Loi. Rien ne sera laissé au hasard. Vous serez tous entendus. Je tiens à vous remercier à l'avance de votre participation à cette belle et longue étude.

Commençons. Nous accueillons aujourd'hui Paul Davidson, président, ainsi que Wendy Therrien, directrice, Recherche et politiques, Universités Canada; ainsi que Charlotte Kiddell, vice-présidente, Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants. Ces gens forment notre premier groupe de témoins.

Vous disposerez de cinq minutes pour nous présenter votre exposé. Monsieur Davidson, vous avez la parole. [Français]

M. Paul Davidson (président, Universités Canada):

Je remercie le président et les membres du Comité de m'avoir invité à comparaître au nom d'Universités Canada.

Notre association représente 96 universités situées dans les 10 provinces et dont les activités d'enseignement, d'apprentissage et de recherche s'étendent aux trois territoires.[Traduction]

Je suis accompagné de Wendy Therrien, directrice, Recherche et politiques à Universités Canada.

J'aimerais faire écho aux propos du président et vous remercier, au nom de nos membres, d'entreprendre cet examen. Pour ceux qui ont déjà participé à cette étude, celle-ci peut être aride et polarisante. Il s'agit d'une étude complexe qui peut avoir des conséquences importantes sur le travail des étudiants et chercheurs. Vos efforts sont essentiels pour plus d'un million de jeunes étudiants universitaires canadiens et ceux qui les suivront. Votre travail est également essentiel aux chercheurs universitaires canadiens qui produisent la majorité du matériel didactique protégé par le droit d'auteur qu'utilisent les étudiants universitaires.

La communauté universitaire apporte un point de vue équilibré à cet examen, à la fois en tant que propriétaires de droit d'auteur et utilisateurs du matériel protégé par le droit d'auteur. L'avenir du Canada dépendra en grande partie de l'éducation que reçoivent aujourd'hui les étudiants. L'utilisation équitable aux fins d'éducation permet aux étudiants du pays d'avoir accès à une variété de matériel didactique et à des possibilités éducatives et d'avoir un meilleur accès à des études postsecondaires.

Plus que jamais, en raison du matériel numérique disponible, les jeunes ont ce qu'il faut pour atteindre leur plein potentiel, qu'ils vivent à Abbotsford ou à Attawapiskat, ce qui aide à bâtir un Canada plus fort et prospère pour tous. Dans ce monde qui évolue rapidement, le Canada ne peut se permettre de prendre du recul en matière d'éducation. Grâce au maintien de l'utilisation équitable aux fins d'éducation, les jeunes Canadiens continueront de recevoir l'éducation du XXIe siècle que demande notre monde en constante évolution.

Comme je l'ai souligné, la vaste majorité du matériel didactique utilisé par les étudiants provient de créateurs sur le campus, de la faculté universitaire. Les professeurs d'université sont des créateurs prolifiques de livres et de mémoires de recherche. On estime que les universitaires, qui ne sont pas des auteurs littéraires, produisent jusqu'à 92 % du contenu que l'on retrouve dans les bibliothèques universitaires.

La Loi sur le droit d'auteur doit permettre un équilibre entre les intérêts des propriétaires du droit d'auteur et les utilisateurs du matériel protégé par le droit d'auteur. Elle doit favoriser la création de nouvelles idées et permettre la transmission des connaissances. L'utilisation équitable joue un rôle important dans le maintien de cet équilibre.

La conformité est également importante. C'est la raison pour laquelle de nombreuses universités ont accru de façon considérable leurs efforts en matière de conformité en embauchant des avocats, bibliothécaires et spécialistes du droit d'auteur afin de conseiller les étudiants, la faculté et le personnel sur l'utilisation du matériel protégé par le droit d'auteur.

De nos jours, les universités dépensent plus que jamais pour acheter du contenu. Selon Statistique Canada, en 2016, les bibliothèques universitaires ont acheté pour plus de 370 millions de dollars de contenu, une tendance qui s'amplifie d'une année à l'autre. Au cours des trois dernières années, les universités ont dépensé plus d'un milliard de dollars en contenu pour leurs bibliothèques. Le format du contenu qu'achètent les bibliothèques change également. Nos bibliothèques achètent maintenant plus de contenu numérique que de contenu imprimé. Un de nos établissements rapporte qu'en 2002, seulement 20 % de ses acquisitions étaient numériques, alors qu'aujourd'hui, ce format représente 80 % de son contenu, une tendance qui se poursuivra.

Il est important pour le Comité de comprendre que contrairement aux livres imprimés, l'utilisation et la reproduction du contenu numérique peuvent être négociées et permises par l'entremise de contrats. Sur les campus, le contenu numérique est habituellement partagé par l'entremise de liens, et non par des copies, et souvent protégé par des verrous numériques. De plus, les répertoires d'Access Copyright ne couvrent pas les auteurs de matériel numérique, seulement les auteurs de matériel imprimé.

En plus du contenu numérique, la plupart des bibliothèques disposent maintenant de systèmes de réservation électronique offrant aux étudiants un accès plus facile au contenu des bibliothèques sur leur appareil personnel, et ce, jour et nuit. Ces systèmes font en sorte que les documents pédagogiques imprimés sont de moins en moins courants qu'il y a à peine quelques années.

Outre la perturbation numérique, une série de décisions rendues par la Cour suprême nous guident quant à l'utilisation sur le campus du matériel protégé par le droit d'auteur. Avant 2012, la Cour suprême du Canada a rendu une décision importante, soit que l'utilisation équitable était un droit. En 2012, dans une série de décisions qu'elle a rendues, la Cour suprême a conclu que le droit à l'utilisation équitable est beaucoup plus large que l'interprétation qu'en faisait le secteur de l'éducation jusqu'à ce point. Ces décisions ont été la genèse du changement dans la façon dont le secteur de l'éducation gère le droit d'auteur.

Depuis 2012, les tribunaux continuent d'approfondir notre compréhension de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Un ensemble grandissant de décisions juridiques définit ce que signifie l'utilisation équitable et plusieurs affaires sont toujours devant les tribunaux.

Je prétends respectueusement que le Parlement devrait permettre aux tribunaux de poursuivre leur travail avant d'intervenir sur le plan législatif.

En terminant, il est vrai que certains secteurs de nos industries culturelles ont de la difficulté à s'adapter à la perturbation numérique qui touche la société canadienne. Les universités canadiennes ont été heureuses de participer à l'examen de 2016 de la politique culturelle canadienne et de recommander l'adoption de nouveaux outils afin de soutenir l'économie créative. Toutefois, modifier l'utilisation équitable n'est pas une réponse aux défis auxquels les propriétaires du droit d'auteur sont confrontés dans cette période de transition. La modification de l'utilisation équitable aurait un impact direct sur l'accès à l'éducation et la qualité du matériel didactique à tous les niveaux.

(1540)



Merci beaucoup de nous avoir donné l'occasion de venir témoigner aujourd'hui. Nous vous souhaitons la meilleure des chances dans vos délibérations. Nous serons heureux de répondre à toute question que vous aurez pour nous aujourd'hui ou tout au long du processus de consultation.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous entendrons maintenant Mme Kiddell, de la Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants.

Mme Charlotte Kiddell (vice-présidente, Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants):

Merci. Bonjour et merci de nous avoir invités à comparaître aujourd'hui.

Comme vous l'avez souligné, mon nom est Charlotte Kiddell et je suis la vice-présidente de la Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants. La Fédération est la plus grande et la plus vieille organisation étudiante nationale représentant plus de 650 000 étudiants de niveau universitaire ou collégial, y compris les 90 000 diplômés qui forment notre caucus national de diplômés et qui sont eux-mêmes des créateurs de contenu éducatif.

Le mandat de la Fédération est de défendre un système d'éducation postsecondaire de haute qualité et accessible à tous les Canadiens intéressés. Cela inclut la défense de la capacité de nos membres d'avoir un accès abordable et équitable à du matériel didactique à des fins de recherche et d'éducation.

Au cours des dernières années, le milieu universitaire s'est mis à accorder davantage la priorité aux possibilités d'apprentissage qui offrent plusieurs points d'accès à l'information. En ayant marre des prix abusifs demandés par les grandes organisations propriétaires de contenu, les universitaires se sont tournés vers des modèles permettant d'offrir le contenu directement au milieu de l'enseignement. Parmi ces modèles, on trouve l'utilisation de journaux à accès libre et le recours à des ressources didactiques ouvertes. D'ailleurs, de nos jours, près de la moitié de toutes les publications de recherche au pays sont accessibles gratuitement en ligne.

Il existe un autre facilitateur essentiel à l'accès à l'information: les dispositions actuelles de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur concernant l'utilisation équitable. L'utilisation équitable, que la Cour suprême considère depuis 2004 comme étant un des piliers de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, permet l'utilisation limitée de matériel protégé par le droit d'auteur, sans paiement ou permission, à des fins de recherche et d'éducation. Ces dispositions permettent aux éducateurs de partager des vidéos de courte durée, des articles de nouvelles ou des extraits de textes pertinents. L'utilisation équitable n'a pas entraîné la substitution du matériel didactique traditionnel. Elle permet plutôt aux éducateurs de compléter ce matériel de façon à offrir une expérience d'apprentissage plus riche et plus dynamique.

À maintes reprises, la Cour suprême du Canada a affirmé le rôle de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur pour le bien public. Le fait que les étudiants ont un accès équitable à une variété de matériel de recherche et didactique est essentiel non seulement à la qualité de l'éducation postsecondaire qu'ils reçoivent, mais aussi à leur capacité à contribuer à l'innovation et au développement au pays.

Le gouvernement actuel a affirmé son engagement envers le développement et l'innovation scientifiques en affectant, dans le Budget de 2018, des sommes importantes aux sciences fondamentales. Nous demandons au gouvernement de respecter cet engagement envers la recherche et le développement en protégeant l'utilisation équitable.

Au cours des derniers mois, les étudiants ont entendu des rumeurs, répandues par des intervenants du secteur privé de l'édition, selon lesquelles la défense des étudiants de l'utilisation équitable repose sur un manque de volonté à rémunérer de façon adéquate les créateurs de contenu pour leur travail. Je tiens à éloigner ces préoccupations, au cas où certains membres du Comité les partageraient.

Premièrement, permettez-moi d'affirmer que les étudiants et leurs familles ont payé et continuent de payer des sommes importantes pour le matériel didactique. Selon Statistique Canada, en 2015, le foyer moyen a dépensé 656 $ pour du matériel universitaire et 437 $ pour du matériel collégial. D'ailleurs, un rapport publié en 2014 sur l'industrie de l'édition révèle que le matériel didactique est l'une des deux plus importantes catégories commerciales en matière de ventes nationales de livres.

Deuxièmement, je suis consciente que les étudiants n'ont pas tous les moyens de se procurer des manuels scolaires. Une étude menée en 2015 en Colombie-Britannique révèle que 54 % des étudiants n'ont pas pu se procurer au moins un manuel scolaire nécessaire en raison des coûts; que 27 % se sont inscrits à moins de cours afin de réduire les coûts de manuels scolaires; et que 26 % ont choisi de ne pas s'inscrire à un cours en raison du prix des manuels scolaires. Toutefois, ces données ne témoignent pas d'une volonté à empêcher les créateurs de contenu de faire des profits. Lorsque les prix des manuels scolaires et les frais de scolarité augmentent chaque année à des taux bien au-delà de celui de l'inflation, les étudiants et leurs familles doivent prendre des décisions difficiles quant à l'accès à l'éducation postsecondaire.

De nos jours, l'étudiant de premier cycle moyen accumule 28 000 $ de dettes étudiantes pour terminer un programme d'études de quatre ans. Pour un étudiant qui compte sur des prêts pour faire ses études, l'achat d'un manuel scolaire de 200 $ constitue une dépense importante dans un budget hebdomadaire, ce qui le place dans la position impossible de devoir choisir entre se procurer le manuel scolaire et manger.

En terminant, je dirais que les décisions de la Cour suprême et l'adoption par le Parlement de la Loi sur la modernisation du droit d'auteur, en 2012, ont affirmé la sagesse et la justesse du régime actuel de droit d'auteur, y compris l'utilisation équitable. La Loi sur le droit d'auteur du Canada a fait du Canada un leader en matière d'échange équitable et dynamique de connaissances et d'idées. Nous demandons au Comité de protéger ces droits d'auteur dans l'intérêt des étudiants et éducateurs, mais aussi dans l'intérêt du public canadien en général. Les étudiants ont profité d'un bon système au cours des dernières années et souhaitent poursuivre la collaboration avec le gouvernement actuel afin de maintenir et renforcer ce système.

(1545)



Merci de votre attention. Je suis impatiente de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons amorcer immédiatement notre première série de questions.

Monsieur Longfield, vous avez la parole pour cinq minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à tous les témoins d'avoir accepté notre invitation. Le droit d'auteur est un sujet complexe qui fait ressortir des opinions différentes selon à qui l'on s'adresse.

Monsieur Davidson, vous avez parlé brièvement d'un des stress, soit l'équilibre entre payer les créateurs de contenu pour leur travail et permettre l'accès au contenu à des fins d'apprentissage. Concernant les plateformes en ligne, comme Cengage, ou d'autres plateformes qu'utilisent les enseignants et étudiants pour avoir accès à l'information, pourriez-vous nous expliquer comment Cengage fonctionne par rapport aux plateformes des universités?

M. Paul Davidson:

Je répète que la position de l'université est de tenter de trouver un équilibre entre les droits des utilisateurs et ceux des créateurs et propriétaires de contenu. Il s'agit d'un défi constant pour nous. Les décisions rendues au cours des dernières années par la Cour suprême, et l'adoption par le Parlement de la loi de 2012, ont précisé beaucoup de choses à cet égard.

Un des nouveaux développements en matière d'enseignement des étudiants de premier cycle et d'enseignement en général a été l'utilisation de systèmes de gestion de l'apprentissage. Celui dont vous parlez ne m'est pas familier, mais, encore une fois, les systèmes de gestion de l'apprentissage sont des outils qui permettent, dans bien des mesures, de réaffirmer les droits des propriétaires de contenu et ceux des utilisateurs à utiliser de façon efficace le contenu, tout en assurant une rémunération adéquate pour les créateurs et propriétaires de contenu. Ces systèmes de gestion de l'apprentissage renferment une foule de capacités, mais il s'agit d'une question distincte de celle du droit d'auteur dont il est question aujourd'hui.

(1550)

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci pour cette information.

J'ai participé, à Guelph, à une table ronde à laquelle participaient également différents intervenants: l'université, la librairie, des bibliothécaires, des chercheurs et des maisons d'édition. Les gens de la bibliothèque ont soulevé la question de la délivrance de permis institutionnels pour le matériel didactique et le fait que les bibliothèques doivent composer avec des coûts inflationnistes pour rester ouvertes. La bibliothèque de Guelph a reçu des fonds fédéraux pour agrandir ses locaux, mais ses coûts d'exploitation continuent d'augmenter.

Concernant la politique relative à la délivrance de permis institutionnels, que disent vos membres?

M. Paul Davidson:

J'aurais quelques commentaires à formuler à ce sujet. Encore une fois, alors que le Comité amorce son examen, j'invite les membres à visiter des campus un peu partout au pays afin de constater eux-mêmes l'environnement d'apprentissage dynamique qui existe et la façon dont les différents facteurs doivent être réunis à l'université pour travailler avec la nouvelle technologie et la nouvelle pédagogie et faire en sorte que les étudiants aient une expérience optimum et de qualité.

Concernant l'achat de contenu, je tiens à être clair que les universités achètent une quantité importante de contenu chaque année, soit plus de 300 millions de dollars par année pour les bibliothèques. C'est beaucoup et c'est une tendance qui s'amplifie. Nous sommes un consommateur majeur pour les propriétaires de droits. Il existe également une foule de nouvelles façons d'acheter des droits pour utiliser du contenu. Pendant de nombreuses années, Access Copyright était la principale source, mais il existe maintenant d'autres sources qui correspondent davantage aux besoins des étudiants et facultés.

Alors que le Comité amorce son examen, nous l'encourageons à analyser attentivement les nouveaux outils et nouvelles techniques disponibles, car ils sont nombreux dans le milieu universitaire à dire qu'ils n'ont aucun inconvénient à payer une somme appropriée pour se procurer du contenu; ce qu'ils souhaitent, c'est ne pas avoir à payer trois fois pour ledit contenu.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Très bien. Merci.

Charlotte, les étudiants à qui j'ai parlé m'ont dit trouver d'autres moyens d'obtenir leur matériel de cours. Il y a le site #textbooksbroke, que les étudiants utilisent. Il y a aussi des boutiques étudiantes qui voient le jour, des boutiques sur les campus qui font concurrence aux fournisseurs en ligne. Dans les années 1970, quand j'achetais des manuels de cours, je pouvais acheter des manuels usagés différemment d'aujourd'hui.

Pouvez-vous nous parler un peu de la forme que prend la créativité des étudiants? Vous l'avez mentionnée dans votre présentation, mais comment les étudiants font-ils pour avoir accès à l'information dont ils ont besoin pour leurs études?

Mme Charlotte Kiddell:

Je reconnais tout à fait que les étudiants ont de plus en plus de mal à se payer tout ce qui est lié à l'éducation postsecondaire, y compris les manuels. Comme les étudiants sont confrontés à une augmentation exponentielle des frais de scolarité chaque année, ils doivent nécessairement faire des choix difficiles, mais je pense qu'il serait faux de parler d'un déclin des revenus chez les créateurs de contenu pour les étudiants.

D'abord, les étudiants dépensent beaucoup d'argent pour l'achat de manuels scolaires, soit plus de 600 $ en moyenne par ménage. De plus, un financement adéquat pour les arts et les auteurs n'exclut pas nécessairement un traitement juste. Nous sommes absolument favorables à cela, mais nous ne voulons pas que ce financement se fasse sur le dos des étudiants. Les autres mécanismes dont j'ai parlé, dont les ressources éducatives libres de droit et les journaux libres d'accès sont autant de mécanismes favorisant des échanges d'information plus dynamiques entre les membres du milieu de l'éducation, mais absolument pas au détriment des créateurs de contenu. Bien au contraire, beaucoup de créateurs de contenu du milieu universitaire les privilégient.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Je vous remercie tous deux de votre temps.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Nous allons maintenant entendre M. Jeneroux cinq minutes.

M. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, PCC):

Très bien. Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie d'être ici. Je suis bien content d'amorcer avec les membres de vos deux organisations cette étude qui me semble susceptible de durer longtemps.

J'aimerais poser une question rapidement sur une chose qu'a faite l'un de mes prédécesseurs, le ministre Holder, au début de 2015, quand il a annoncé la politique de libre accès aux publications des trois organismes subventionnaires.

Monsieur Davidson, j'aimerais savoir ce que vous pensez de cette politique, qui prescrit que les rapports des recherches subventionnées doivent être rendus publics dans les 12 mois suivant leur publication.

(1555)

M. Paul Davidson:

Nous avons déjà une formidable conversation aujourd'hui, parce qu'on constate un changement de dynamique. Cette mesure du gouvernement précédent afin que les résultats des recherches financées à l'aide de fonds publics soient rendus accessibles nous a bien aidés. Nos membres suivent l'évolution de la situation avec beaucoup d'intérêt. Je sais que cette mesure profite aux étudiants et aux chercheurs diplômés et qu'elle vient répondre à l'une de nos préoccupations sur la création de contenu et l'accessibilité des recherches réalisées.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Son application pourrait-elle être élargie? Elle se limite aux organismes subventionnaires. Croyez-vous qu'elle pourrait s'appliquer plus largement?

M. Paul Davidson:

Comme je l'ai déjà dit, la question de la publication libre d'accès évolue très rapidement à l'échelle internationale. Les universités du monde suivent la situation de près. C'est un effort visant à atténuer les coûts exorbitants, excessifs, que les éditeurs peuvent exiger pour la publication de journaux scientifiques, de publications scientifiques, comme on l'a dit.

J'espère que le Comité saura, dans le cadre de cette étude, se pencher sur l'évolution de la publication scientifique dans le monde, sur la concentration de la propriété et sur l'effet de tout cela sur l'accès à l'information produite à l'aide de fonds publics.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Très bien.

Je change un peu de sujet, compte tenu du temps limité dont je dispose. J'aimerais savoir ce que vous pensez, Charlotte et Paul, du temps que met la Commission du droit d'auteur pour traiter les dossiers qui lui sont soumis. Je m'arrêterai là, je vous demande votre avis général sur la Commission du droit d'auteur.

Mme Charlotte Kiddell:

Allez-y.

M. Paul Davidson:

Très bien.

Bien des gens, ici même et ailleurs, suivent la question du droit d'auteur depuis très longtemps, et je pense qu'il y aura unanimité partout au pays quant à l'importance d'une réforme de la Commission du droit d'auteur, afin qu'elle puisse prendre des décisions rapidement. C'est le principal problème. Nous étions contents de participer aux consultations du gouvernement du Canada à ce sujet. Nous nous attendons à ce que ces délibérations se terminent sous peu.

L'une des grandes difficultés consiste à accroître la certitude pour tous les acteurs. Comme la Commission du droit d'auteur est en sous-effectif depuis de nombreuses années, son aptitude à absorber toute cette charge et à traiter les dossiers est vraiment compromise. La solution pourrait en partie passer par l'établissement d'une Commission du droit d'auteur plus robuste, pour que ce genre de problèmes ne reviennent pas toujours devant le Parlement.

Mme Charlotte Kiddell:

Comme je le disais, bien que nous reconnaissions la robustesse du système actuel pour protéger le droit d'auteur, il y aurait évidemment lieu de renforcer la Loi sur le droit d'auteur. Les étudiants et les universitaires souhaiteraient particulièrement une révision de la loi en ce qui concerne le savoir autochtone et la propriété intellectuelle autochtone. Je pense qu'il y aurait vraiment lieu d'y réfléchir plus en profondeur pour renforcer cette loi déjà robuste.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Avez-vous quoi que ce soit à ajouter sur la Commission du droit d'auteur? Non? Très bien.

C'est très bien, monsieur le président. J'ai terminé.

Le président:

Il vous reste 30 secondes.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Non, j'ai terminé.

The Chair:

Très bien.

Monsieur Masse, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie nos témoins d'être parmi nous aujourd'hui.

On ne peut absolument pas faire fi du fait que dans le milieu universitaire, les étudiants constituent la clientèle ultime. Quand on y pense un peu, ce sont eux qui contractent des dettes personnelles et qui absorbent les dépenses; ils contribuent financièrement beaucoup à l'éducation par leurs frais de scolarité, leurs frais de matériel et tout ce qui découle du style de vie étudiant, parce qu'ils doivent consacrer beaucoup de temps à leurs études.

Ils absorberont aussi une dette provinciale, parce que la plupart des provinces sont actuellement en déficit. Ce sont eux qui devront rembourser cette dette, donc ce sont eux qui devront l'assumer.

Ils devront participer au remboursement de la dette fédérale, parce qu'il y a une dette fédérale, et là encore, ils devront payer pour les allocations et les programmes offerts dans le cadre de différents budgets.

Pour terminer, ils devront aussi absorber les coûts des incitatifs provinciaux, fédéraux et privés offerts parce que nous sommes endettés. Les réductions d'impôt, le crédit d'impôt à la recherche scientifique et au développement expérimental et tous les autres incitatifs du genre sont autant de coûts d'emprunt qu'ils devront rembourser.

Donc on parle de leur accorder un traitement juste, mais on ne tient toujours pas compte de leur contribution à l'économie canadienne en général. J'espère donc qu'à l'issue de cette étude, il y aura une certaine forme de reconnaissance qu'ils sont probablement l'un des plus grands groupes de consommateurs à ne pas recevoir la réciprocité à laquelle ils auraient droit.

Par ailleurs, j'ai pris bonne note de ce que vous avez dit sur le financement public et l'échange d'information quand des subventions sont consenties. Je pense qu'il devrait probablement y avoir une participation du secteur privé. Quand une personne ou une entité bénéficie de fonds publics du secteur privé, devrait-il y avoir des ententes de partage parce l'information a été produite grâce à des activités de recherche et de développement subventionnées? Ce financement peut prendre la forme de réductions ou de reports d'impôt ou encore de programmes gouvernementaux accordant des fonds de recherche, mais aussi de ressources humaines grâce à divers programmes de création d'emplois. Le secteur privé n'aurait-il pas un rôle à jouer pour assumer sa part quand il reçoit de l'argent des coffres publics?

(1600)

Mme Charlotte Kiddell:

Pouvez-vous préciser la dernière partie de votre question?

M. Brian Masse:

À votre avis, le secteur privé aurait-il sa part de responsabilité à assumer pour absorber les coûts liés au matériel, à l'information et aux produits, en fin de compte, quand il y a une contribution publique à une entité privée? Il peut s'agir d'un logiciel, d'une forme d'innovation, d'une oeuvre artistique, de n'importe quoi ayant bénéficié d'une contribution financière publique pour la réalisation de profits privés et l'enrichissement personnel.

Mme Charlotte Kiddell:

Il y a une tendance qui préoccupe les étudiants depuis longtemps, particulièrement les étudiants diplômés membres de la Fédération canadienne des étudiants et étudiants, et il s'agit des fonds publics réservés pour des intérêts privés. J'espère que nous nous en éloignerons à la faveur d'un réinvestissement dans la recherche fondamentale, comme nous l'avons vu dans le plus récent budget. Quoi qu'il en soit, il m'apparaît clair que quand on dépense de l'argent public en recherche et développement, il est essentiel, comme M. Davidson l'a affirmé, que les fruits de ces activités demeurent publiquement accessibles et qu'ils soient dans l'intérêt du public, en effet.

M. Brian Masse:

Monsieur Davidson.

M. Paul Davidson:

Vous parliez du dernier budget et des investissements transformateurs réalisés grâce aux organismes subventionnaires. Ce sont là de nouveaux développements très importants que le milieu universitaire accueille avec enthousiasme.

Pendant que vous parliez, je pensais aussi aux investissements entourant la stratégie des grappes industrielles.

M. Brian Masse:

C'est un bon exemple

M. Paul Davidson:

L'un des effets les plus probants de cet investissement, c'est qu'il rassemble des acteurs des secteurs privés et publics, ainsi que des étudiants et des jeunes chercheurs dans des projets de collaboration, pour accélérer l'échange d'information et d'idées, afin que toute l'économie canadienne en bénéficie. Cela se voit déjà. Comme je l'ai dit, au cours de vos prochaines semaines et de vos prochains mois d'audiences, vous entendrez parler de la transition numérique qui s'opère dans l'économie, de son incidence et des précautions à prendre pour préserver notre mission centrale qui consiste à offrir une éducation de grande qualité aux étudiants.

Je suis déjà frappé par toutes les différences entre l'expérience des étudiants de premier cycle aujourd'hui et celle des étudiants d'il y a 20 ou 30 ans. Pensons aux dépôts électroniques, où les étudiants peuvent accéder à leurs lectures obligatoires en tout temps ou à l'affranchissement des droits d'auteur pour certains usages appropriés sur les appareils à domicile. Bref, dans cette conversation, qui ratisse très large, n'oubliez pas la transformation qui s'est opérée au cours des 20 dernières années et les possibilités qu'elle présente pour l'élaboration d'une politique publique très réfléchie.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Sheehan, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Terry Sheehan (Sault Ste. Marie, Lib.):

Je remercie beaucoup nos témoins d'aujourd'hui de donner ainsi le coup d'envoi à notre étude sur le droit d'auteur. C'est la 101e séance du Comité, donc nous en sommes déjà au Droit d'auteur 101, je suppose.

Paul, votre organisation, Universités Canada, a fait des déclarations fortes sur l'importance de l'éducation autochtone dans une perspective de vérité et de réconciliation. Vous en avez fait une priorité. Vous reconnaissez les obstacles auxquels les Autochtones du Canada sont confrontés (les membres des Premières Nations, les Métis comme les Inuits) lorsque vient le temps d'obtenir un diplôme universitaire. Dans ma circonscription, on trouve l'Université Algoma, qui fait partie d'Universités Canada et qui a subi une transition importante. Il s'agit d'un ancien pensionnat devenu une université. Le gouvernement fédéral vient justement d'investir dans l'entretien de l'infrastructure de cette université, ainsi que dans le nouveau centre de découverte Anishinabek, dans le cadre d'un projet de 10,2 millions de dollars pour l'établissement des bibliothèques des chefs, qui présenteront toutes sortes d'artéfacts, d'enseignements, etc. Ce projet suit son cours. L'infrastructure est en construction. Le chef Shingwauk rêvait d'un wigwam d'enseignement.

Nous savons que les Autochtones expriment toutes sortes de préoccupations à l'égard du droit d'auteur depuis longtemps. Comment pouvons-nous aider les Autochtones à mieux protéger leurs savoirs traditionnels et leurs expressions culturelles?

(1605)

M. Paul Davidson:

Je vous remercie infiniment de cette question, et je vous remercie de reconnaître les efforts déployés par les universités canadiennes depuis près de 10 ans pour améliorer l'accès à l'éducation et la réussite scolaire pour les Autochtones, favoriser de véritables recherches collaboratives et assurer notre pleine participation au processus de réconciliation découlant des recommandations de la CVR. En fait, cette semaine même, nous avons envoyé un communiqué à nos membres et à tous les Canadiens sur les progrès réalisés au cours des dernières années à cet égard.

En fait, l'un des grands enjeux sur lesquels nous devrons tous nous pencher est celui du savoir autochtone, de sa reconnaissance dans le milieu universitaire, de sa reconnaissance dans la société et des droits qui l'entourent, outre le droit d'auteur et les autres formes de propriété intellectuelle. À cet égard, le Comité pourrait souhaiter se pencher sur la stratégie de recherche récemment annoncée par ITK, le groupe qui représente les Inuits, une stratégie qui aborde ces questions très en détail. C'est d'ailleurs un groupe qui souhaiterait comparaître devant le Comité.

Le projet de réconciliation ne se comptera pas en mois, en années ni même en décennies. Il est intéressant que dès le début de cette conversation, vous souleviez la question autochtone. Je pense que c'est un ajout très important.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Je vous remercie beaucoup. Merci.

J'aimerais rappeler à la représentante de la Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et des étudiants une déclaration faite par l'ancien président national de la Fédération le 10 avril 2013 au sujet de la poursuite judiciaire d'Access Copyright contre l'Université York. Il a qualifié la démarche de « tentative désespérée d'Access Copyright de s'arroger l'adhésion d'institutions publiques » à des ententes de licences désuètes qui font fi de l'étendue des dispositions sur l'utilisation équitable.

J'ai quelques questions à vous poser à ce sujet. Premièrement, quelles modifications la Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants souhaiterait-elle voir apporter au régime de licences collectives du Canada?

Mme Charlotte Kiddell:

D'abord et avant tout, je vous dirais que la Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants reconnaît que le régime de droit d'auteur actuellement en vigueur est très solide. Nous souhaitons que les réformes dont vous venez de parler voient le jour pour mieux protéger la propriété intellectuelle des Autochtones et le savoir autochtone.

Je sais aussi qu'il y a des problèmes concernant la propriété de la Couronne dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, mais je pense que les étudiantes et étudiants souhaitent affirmer avant tout au Comité que le système actuel fonctionne bien et que nous croyons qu'il a la robustesse nécessaire pour protéger l'accès des étudiants au savoir et à l'information.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Merci.

Mon temps est-il écoulé? Très bien.

Le président:

Passons à M. Lloyd.

Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président. J'aimerais commencer par dire que je compte partager mon temps avec mon collègue.

Je crois que je suis probablement l'une des rares personnes à ce comité — je ne peux pas parler au nom de Matt -— à ne pas avoir terminé de rembourser son prêt étudiant. Cela dit, compte tenu de mon expérience récente de diplomation en 2014, je vous dirais que le crédit d'impôt pour manuels mis en place par le gouvernement précédent m'a été très utile pendant mes études universitaires.

J'aimerais demander à la représentante de la Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants de s'exprimer sur les effets de l'annulation de ce crédit d'impôt dans un budget récent.

(1610)

Mme Charlotte Kiddell:

La Fédération canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants milite pour l'adoption d'un modèle d'aide aux étudiants fondé sur des bourses versées en amont en fonction des besoins plutôt que sur des crédits fiscaux, parce que nous trouvons que les crédits d'impôt accordés après les études profitent démesurément à ceux et celles qui ont le plus d'argent à dépenser dans l'éducation postsecondaire et qui ont finalement le moins besoin d'aide.

Cependant, je comprends bien que ce n'est pas l'objet de l'étude du Comité aujourd'hui. Si vous souhaitez discuter avec nous de nos recommandations pour accroître l'accessibilité à l'éducation postsecondaire, c'est avec plaisir que je répondrai à votre invitation. Je vous dirai simplement aujourd'hui que le concept du traitement équitable semble peut-être secondaire, mais que c'est un élément très important pour améliorer l'accès des étudiants à l'éducation postsecondaire.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Absolument. J'y réfléchissais parce que d'après le document que nous avons reçu, le coût des manuels a un effet important sur les étudiants. Or, il y a toutes sortes de choses sur le marché de l'offre et de la demande qui peuvent contribuer à créer une demande chez les étudiants lorsqu'ils peuvent s'offrir ces choses.

Ma question suivante s'adresse davantage à M. Davidson et à Universités Canada.

Comment entrevoyez-vous l'avenir si la modernisation du droit d'auteur s'effectue comme vous le souhaitez? Les créateurs seraient-ils rétribués d'une manière ou d'une autre dans cet environnement?

M. Paul Davidson:

Dans mon exposé, j'ai réaffirmé la valeur des modifications apportées en 2012 par l'ancienne législature, ainsi que les poursuites intentées devant les tribunaux par la suite quant à l'interprétation de la loi, et nous encourageons le Comité à permettre aux tribunaux de continuer leur travail.

Votre grand défi, dans cette étude, sera de trouver le juste équilibre. Ce n'est pas évident. Je le reconnais. Je pense que les universités, qui sont à la fois des utilisatrices et des créatrices, saisissent bien l'ampleur du défi. Comme je le disais dans ma présentation, les universités sont également des centres d'énergie créatrice, de culture créatrice, de dynamisme culturel, donc nous voulons veiller à ce que les créateurs reçoivent une juste rétribution. Nous souhaitons du même coup que les utilisateurs ne paient pas plus d'une fois pour les oeuvres qu'ils ont le droit d'utiliser. Nous voulons nous assurer que les étudiants pourront se prévaloir de leur droit d'utiliser ces oeuvres et travaux. Nous voulons que les chercheurs aient le droit de les utiliser dans leurs recherches, mais c'est une question d'équilibre.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Une minute et 45 secondes.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Allez-y.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Merci.

Je veux simplement préciser pour le compte rendu que ma femme est médecin, donc je paie moi aussi des frais...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Matt Jeneroux: ... par procuration par elle.

Si l'on revient un peu à la première série de questions, monsieur Davidson, sur la publication des résultats de recherches financées à l'aide de fonds publics, êtes-vous d'avis que cette règle devrait s'appliquer à tous les bénéficiaires de fonds publics, y compris à ceux du secteur privé?

M. Paul Davidson:

Pour être honnête avec vous, nous n'avons pas de point de vue arrêté sur cette question précise. Encore une fois, nous participons activement au travail que vous voulez évaluer pour déterminer ce qui serait le plus indiqué dans ce contexte en évolution.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Très bien. Merci.

Pouvez-vous nous parler un peu plus des poursuites auxquelles vous avez fait allusion, qui suivent leurs cours dans le système judiciaire, et des changements législatifs que vous souhaiteriez en conséquence?

M. Paul Davidson:

Je dois vous dire d'emblée que nous avons demandé la permission d'intervenir dans l'affaire York, qui est à l'étude, donc je souhaite faire très attention de ne pas faire de commentaires explicites à ce sujet.

Encore une fois, pour revenir à la question de l'ancien comité, à la dernière législature, je pense qu'il y avait trois ministres touchés. Il y a eu trois séries de consultations pour en venir à la version actuelle de la Loi sur la modernisation du droit d'auteur, adoptée en 2012. C'était un projet ambitieux, et nous estimons qu'on a su trouver un juste équilibre, le bon équilibre. Nous croyons qu'il ne serait pas dans l'intérêt du public de venir brouiller les cartes au moment même où les universités investissent dans la conformité et les titulaires de droits essaient de concevoir de nouveaux produits et des services; nous ne souhaiterions pas de changement radical à ce qui nous semble actuellement constituer un bon équilibre.

(1615)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Baylis, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Frank Baylis (Pierrefonds—Dollard, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

D'abord, nous avons appris votre augmentation des frais relativement au droit d'auteur. Je pense que vous avez parlé de 370 millions cette année. Par contre, dans le même ordre d'idées, les petits éditeurs canadiens se plaignent beaucoup à nous d'une baisse radicale de leurs revenus. Où va l'argent? Vous en versez davantage et ils n'obtiennent rien. Ils ne sont pas satisfaits. Que se passe-t-il?

M. Paul Davidson:

C'est une question légitime. Et je suis d'accord avec ce diagnostic. Les moyens donnés à la politique publique, dans les années 1960 et 1970, pour créer une culture canadienne débordante de vitalité ont été extrêmement efficaces. Je pense que le véritable défi pour la politique publique est le suivant: comment nous assurer de la doter de nouveaux moyens qui répondent à la réalité nouvelle pour faire rayonner au loin les récits canadiens? Je pense que l'examen de la politique culturelle canadienne qui a porté sur les occasions d'exportation invite à un examen plus approfondi.

Pour répondre directement à votre question, 92 % des fonds documentaires des bibliothèques sont créés par des universitaires et non par les petits éditeurs canadiens ni par les auteurs littéraires. Je pense qu'il existe d'autres moyens pour répondre aux besoins des petites presses et ainsi de suite.

M. Frank Baylis:

Oui, je comprends, mais venons-en au point.

M. Paul Davidson:

Oui.

M. Frank Baylis:

Ils prétendent que, depuis l'avènement de la notion d'utilisation équitable, leurs revenus ont radicalement baissé. D'autre part, vous dites que vous versez davantage et de plus en plus d'argent. Où va-t-il? Vous ne leur remettez pas l'argent. Il doit aller quelque part, si vous en versez davantage, n'est-ce pas?

M. Paul Davidson:

Oui.

M. Frank Baylis:

Où va cet argent?

M. Paul Davidson:

À diverses formes de propriété intellectuelle d'une foule de sources, des éditeurs internationaux, des détenteurs de droits internationaux, d'autres sources...

M. Frank Baylis:

Voilà votre chance de vider votre sac, parce qu'ils vont rappliquer et nous conseiller de vous serrer la vis pour l'utilisation équitable. Nous devons dissiper leurs motifs de préoccupation. Ça ne fonctionne pas pour eux. À moins qu'ils ne m'induisent en erreur, ils affirment qu'ils pressentent même la faillite. Nous avons donc besoin de savoir.

Vous avez parlé de monopoles dans les publications, et je pense que Mme Kiddell a parlé de sources ouvertes. Où va l'argent, s'il ne va pas aux petites entreprises canadiennes?

M. Paul Davidson:

La propriété intellectuelle est achetée en quantité sans précédent par des universités canadiennes par l'entremise d'autres éditeurs, d'autres sources de fournisseurs de contenu. C'est la meilleure réponse que je puisse vous donner. Ce n'est pas...

M. Frank Baylis:

Savez-vous combien de plus vous verseriez si, en 2012, la notion d'utilisation équitable n'était pas arrivée?

M. Paul Davidson:

Encore une fois, je pense que certains essaient d'établir une causalité alors que ce n'est qu'une corrélation. Nous vivons dans un monde de ruptures. Voyez les changements dans le secteur du taxi depuis cinq ans. Voyez les ruptures subies par d'autres secteurs. Je pense qu'on peut employer toutes sortes de mesures et de mécanismes de politiques publiques pour appuyer les petits éditeurs et auteurs canadiens, mais pas par l'utilisation équitable. C'est le mauvais outil.

M. Frank Baylis:

D'accord. On est venu nous voir, des entreprises sont venues me voir au sujet de cette notion.

Revenons à ce que vous avez dit sur le test de la notion dans le système judiciaire. Je pense que vous faisiez allusion à l'affaire Access Copyright c. l'Université York. D'après ce que j'ai compris —  n'ayant lu que des résumés — York a perdu, et il a été dit qu'elle faisait un usage abusif de l'utilisation équitable en ne rémunérant pas les éditeurs. Mais, ensuite, dans votre témoignage, vous préconisez qu'on laisse les tribunaux se prononcer à ce sujet. Je sais que la décision du tribunal a été portée en appel. D'après vous, la Cour suprême renversera-t-elle la décision de la Cour fédérale?

M. Paul Davidson:

Un certain nombre d'affaires suivent leur cours. Celle de l'Université d'York en est une. Nous sommes susceptibles d'y être un intervenant. La prudence s'impose donc dans mes éventuelles observations sur des points particuliers de l'affaire. J'attire cependant votre attention sur des décisions de la Cour fédérale, celle d'il y a un an et celle, toute récente, d'il y a quatre semaines, qui ont solidement soutenu les principes de l'utilisation équitable à des fins d'éducation.

Les tribunaux sont donc saisis d'un certain nombre d'affaires, et...

M. Frank Baylis:

En un sens, ça finit par se résumer à une question d'équité: j'ai rédigé un livre, vous en utilisez un chapitre. Si ce livre ne compte que deux chapitres, vous en utilisez la moitié. S'il en compte 10, vous en utilisez 10 %.

Je vous demande à tous les deux, mais à vous d'abord, madame Kiddell, quelle serait l'opinion de votre monde sur l'utilisation équitable si, disons, on prenait une partie d'un livre sans verser de redevances? Qu'est-ce qui serait équitable d'après l'opinion de votre monde et celle des étudiants?

Mme Charlotte Kiddell:

Comme je l'ai dit, je pense que les dispositions en vigueur sur l'utilisation équitable dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur sont très impératives, mais, en fait, je tiens à répondre à ce que vous avez dit, plus tôt, relativement aux craintes des petits éditeurs concernant la baisse des profits découlant de l'utilisation équitable.

Je me range absolument à l'avis selon lequel il s'agit d'une corrélation et non d'une causalité. Je pense que des preuves solides le confirment, parce que, à l'étranger, les profits et les revenus des créateurs de contenu et des petits éditeurs indépendants diminuent, et ce n'est pas à cause de l'utilisation équitable. Ça survient dans de nombreux pays où cette notion n'existe pas dans le secteur de l'éducation. Je dirais que c'est beaucoup plus lié à une tendance mondiale de stagnation et de baisse des profits et des salaires.

M. Davidson et moi avons affirmé que le gouvernement a un rôle de premier plan à jouer dans le financement des arts et de la culture. En fait, je représente personnellement des étudiants qui aspirent à devenir créateurs de contenus ou qui le sont déjà, beaucoup d'entre eux, et je suis très inquiète à cause de l'absence de revenus dans cette profession. Mais l'investissement de l'État dans les arts et la culture de notre pays doit provenir d'un financement direct, par l'État, et non de subventions passant par le secteur de l'éducation et accordées, principalement, au détriment des étudiants.

(1620)

Le président:

Merci.

Nous revenons à M. Jeneroux.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Un expert de la loi sur le droit d'auteur d'Osgood, M. Vaver, s'est dit préoccupé de voir que la signification exacte de l'expression « utilisation équitable » relevait des tribunaux, étant donné l'ambiguïté de sa définition dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur.

Croyez-vous que le droit d'auteur doit être mis à jour afin de présenter une définition plus claire de l'utilisation équitable, ou que cela doit être la responsabilité des tribunaux?

M. Paul Davidson:

Permettez-moi tout d'abord de dire que l'utilisation équitable est un droit qui existe depuis des décennies. L'utilisation équitable pour l'éducation a été explicitée il y a cinq ans seulement dans une série de cinq décisions de la Cour suprême du Canada. C'est donc une loi complexe qui doit être déterminée.

Il existe diverses approches relatives à l'utilisation équitable. Certains veulent une définition très claire; d'autres ne voient pas les choses de la même façon. Je crois que vous êtes au début d'un très long processus, dans le cadre duquel vous allez entendre de nombreux témoignages contradictoires, et que vous avez une très grande tâche à accomplir.

Je crois que la loi de 2012 assure un juste équilibre. Nous avons un ensemble de lignes directrices utilisées par le secteur qui s'harmonisent à la loi, à mon avis, et qui sont mises à l'épreuve devant les tribunaux.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Voulez-vous dire quelque chose pour le compte rendu?

Mme Charlotte Kiddell:

Je suis d'accord.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

D'accord. Très bien.

Comment évalueriez-vous la valeur et l'incidence des contrats de licences collectives proposés par Access Copyright et Copibec, depuis 2010, pour les étudiants, les professeurs et les détenteurs de droits d'auteur?

Mme Charlotte Kiddell:

Allez-y.

M. Paul Davidson:

Je crois qu'Access Copyright était une solution créative pour le siècle dernier. Ce produit ne répond pas aux besoins des étudiants. Il ne répond pas aux besoins des établissements, qui les ont encouragés à être plus axés sur le marché et à travailler avec l'un de leurs plus grands clients en période de perturbation. Nous avons plutôt droit à des litiges constants.

Les expériences des universités canadiennes avec les agences de droits d'auteur n'ont pas toutes été positives. Nous voulons veiller à ce que les créateurs soient rémunérés de manière appropriée et à ce que les utilisateurs puissent exercer leurs droits de manière juste et équilibrée.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Êtes-vous du même avis?

Mme Charlotte Kiddell:

Oui. Comme je l'ai dit dans mon discours préliminaire, la tendance veut que la communauté universitaire choisisse des modèles plus ouverts qui permettent aux créateurs de contenu de produire l'information et de la transmettre directement à la communauté universitaire plutôt que d'être obligés de la vendre à de grands propriétaires de contenu puis de la racheter pour y avoir accès, à un prix plus élevé. Cela démontre que la priorité du milieu de l'éducation est de pouvoir accéder à l'information d'une manière qui permet l'échange dynamique de diverses formes de documents d'apprentissage, de divers médias et de diverses sources, ce qui est dans l'intérêt supérieur des chercheurs et des enseignants et, au au bout du compte, des étudiants.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Jowhari, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

(1625)

M. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Merci.

Je remercie les témoins de leur présence ici aujourd'hui.

J'aimerais revenir à certains chiffres que j'ai entendus et aussi revenir à la question de mon collègue M. Baylis, mais d'une façon différente.

J'ai entendu parler d'un investissement d'environ 1 milliard de dollars sur trois ans, et d'environ 370 millions de dollars cette année. J'ai entendu dire que nous avions fait une transition et qu'il y avait environ 20 % de contenu imprimé et 80 % de contenu numérique. J'ai aussi entendu dire que plus de 90 % des connaissances étaient générées par les universitaires.

En ce qui a trait à l'utilisation équitable et au contenu utilisé, est-ce qu'il s'agit de ces 20 % de publications imprimées ou est-ce qu'une partie provient des connaissances numériques qui sont là? Y a-t-il un lien entre les deux? J'essaie de voir quel est l'équilibre entre l'utilisation équitable par l'utilisateur et par le créateur et aussi de savoir où se trouvent les étudiants là-dedans. Pourriez-vous m'éclairer? Quelle est l'incidence de l'utilisation équitable sur vos frais de scolarité, en gros?

Mme Charlotte Kiddell:

Je ne suis pas certaine de comprendre votre question, mais je dirais que l'utilisation équitable permet aux étudiants d'avoir accès à un plus grand nombre de sources, puisque les professeurs peuvent leur offrir des ressources qui ne sont pas des documents d'apprentissage traditionnels, en plus du matériel scolaire.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Et les universités paient pour cela.

Mme Charlotte Kiddell:

C'est permis en vertu des contrats de licence des universités.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Pour revenir aux universités, vous nous avez donné le montant des investissements — 1 milliard de dollars sur deux ans, 370 millions de dollars — et aussi les sources, mais il y a toujours des divergences puisque les créateurs disent que leurs revenus baissent, tandis que vous dépensez plus d'argent.

Pour revenir à la question de mon collègue, où va l'argent, selon vous?

Mme Charlotte Kiddell:

Je dirais que les créateurs de contenu du monde entier connaissent une baisse de revenus, et ce, tant dans les pays qui prévoient une utilisation équitable que dans ceux qui ne le prévoient pas. C'est une tendance mondiale... les salaires stagnent ou diminuent; le financement public des arts et de la culture diminue également. Cela n'a rien à voir avec l'utilisation équitable et les dépenses dans le secteur de l'éducation qui, comme l'a fait valoir M. Davidson, sont en croissance.

Voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

M. Paul Davidson:

Bien sûr.

Access Copyright a notamment fait valoir que ses revenus diminuaient et que donc les universités ne payaient probablement pas. Les universités peuvent acheter la propriété intellectuelle ailleurs, de façon légale, que ce soit par l'entremise des sociétés de gestion collectives, des centres de liquidation...

M. Majid Jowhari:

Et c'est l'occasion pour vous de nous dire quelles sont ces autres sources, pour que nous le sachions.

M. Paul Davidson:

Bien sûr. Je pourrais vous renvoyer à l'Association des bibliothèques de recherche du Canada qui a demandé à témoigner devant vous, je crois, et qui pourrait vous parler des licences de plusieurs millions de dollars qu'elle négocie au nom d'un regroupement d'universités, afin de veiller à ce que les chercheurs et les étudiants aient accès facilement aux plus récents renseignements et aux plus récentes recherches, et à ce que les créateurs soient rémunérés de manière appropriée.

M. Majid Jowhari:

D'accord.

Vous avez aussi parlé de la Commission du droit d'auteur. En une minute, si vous pouviez changer une chose à la Commission du droit d'auteur, pour l'aider, quelle serait-elle?

M. Paul Davidson:

Nous avons fait une présentation par l'entremise du processus de consultation, où nous avons parlé du renouvellement opportun des membres de la Commission, de la dotation complète et de l'amélioration des ressources dont dispose la Commission pour faire son travail. Ce sont les deux ou trois suggestions qui me viennent en tête et je serai heureux de vous transmettre une copie de notre présentation.

M. Majid Jowhari:

D'accord. Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Masse, il nous reste deux minutes. Allez-y.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je crois que l'une des difficultés avec les créateurs, c'est que si nous changeons les choses à partir de maintenant, si nous remettons la rémunération entre les mains des universités et des organisations indépendantes du Parlement, il sera très compliqué de faire un suivi et d'obtenir de réels résultats.

Vous avez dit qu'on dépensait plus que jamais pour les documents, mais les plateformes que vous utilisez aujourd'hui pour accéder à l'information semblent avoir changé. Est-ce que c'est de cela qu'il faut discuter? Ils se demandent où va l'argent. Pour être clair, vous dépensez plus d'argent, mais il ne va plus à un seul endroit, comme c'était le cas avant. Est-ce exact?

(1630)

M. Paul Davidson:

Cela fait partie des perturbations numériques d'un paysage en évolution. Il faut répondre aux besoins des étudiants, qui veulent avoir accès à divers documents. Les éditeurs indépendants du Canada doivent être capables de produire des documents pertinents et importants aux fins des travaux de recherche des universités.

Je le répète: j'éprouve de la sympathie pour les petits éditeurs indépendants et pour les créateurs. Mais je crois que l'approche relative à l'utilisation équitable n'est pas le bon outil. Il existe d'autres mécanismes, comme le droit de prêt public, comme l'aide à la publication et comme d'autres programmes du ministère du Patrimoine canadien. Je ne crois pas que l'utilisation équitable soit en cause en ce qui a trait à la situation actuelle de l'édition canadienne.

M. Brian Masse:

Oui: je doute que le salut vienne uniquement de l'élimination de l'utilisation équitable de toute façon. C'est ce qui m'inquiète.

M. Paul Davidson:

En toute déférence, l'utilisation équitable est un droit qui existe depuis des décennies. Il a été appliqué au secteur de l'éducation non seulement par le Parlement, mais par la Cour suprême dans cinq décisions importantes de 2012. Je ne peux pas imaginer que les députés suggèrent qu'on élimine d'autres droits parce que ce ne sont que des droits.

Nous célébrons l'anniversaire de la Charte des droits et libertés. Allons-nous tout simplement renoncer à nos droits et libertés?

M. Brian Masse:

Enfin, pour les étudiants, a-t-on déterminé — ou y a-t-il une façon de déterminer — si les changements associés au droit d'auteur auraient une incidence... s'il y aurait une augmentation ou une diminution des coûts si l'on mettait en place un nouveau système ou un nouveau régime? Est-ce que c'est trop compliqué ou est-ce qu'on pourrait le demander au gouvernement? S'il modifiait la loi, on pourrait prévoir une sorte de mesure des coûts associés au changement pour les étudiants.

Le président:

Très rapidement, s'il vous plaît.

Mme Charlotte Kiddell:

Rapidement, si l'on se centre trop sur les économies relatives à l'utilisation équitable, on passe à côté du principal, c'est-à-dire que l'utilisation équitable permet aux étudiants d'accéder à divers documents d'apprentissage...

M. Brian Masse:

Ce n'est pas la question. La question est la suivante: si le changement donne lieu à une différence de coût, est-ce qu'on devrait en tenir compte dans la prise de décision, afin de mesurer les coûts réels pour les étudiants à l'avenir?

Mme Charlotte Kiddell:

Je ne comprends pas pourquoi vous associez les droits de scolarité au coût des documents d'apprentissage et autres.

M. Brian Masse:

Nous pourrons faire un suivi, mais vous dites que les coûts seront plus élevés si l'on procède au changement. C'est ce que nous tentons de déterminer. Existe-t-il une mesure réelle du coût des droits d'auteur pour les étudiants ou non?

Mme Charlotte Kiddell:

Les étudiants paieraient pour les documents supplémentaires présentés en classe et il y aurait une moins grande diversité, en gros.

Le président:

Merci.

C'est malheureusement tout le temps que nous avions pour notre premier groupe de témoins.

Il est important de comprendre que ce qui n'est pas consigné au compte rendu ne pourra pas être utilisé pour la préparation de notre rapport. Il faut donc poser les questions de toutes sortes de façons et ne rien présumer. C'est très important. Nous savons que ce sera compliqué.

Merci beaucoup de votre présence. Nous allons suspendre la séance deux minutes pour faire venir le prochain groupe de témoins.

(1630)

(1635)

Le président:

Pouvez-vous tous revenir? Nous avons un horaire serré. Nous reprenons les travaux.

Pour la deuxième partie de la séance, nous recevons les représentants de l'Association canadienne des professeures et professeurs d'université: la directrice de la recherche et de l'action politique, Mme Pamela Foster, et l'agent de la formation, M. Paul Jones.

Nous recevons également Shawn Gilbertson, directeur du matériel de cours de l'Université de Waterloo pour Campus Stores Canada.

Vous avez sûrement écouté la première partie de la réunion. L'important, c'est de pouvoir consigner ce que vous dites aux fins du compte rendu. C'est ce qui nous permettra de préparer un bon rapport.

Nous allons commencer par M. Jones. Vous disposez de cinq minutes, monsieur.

M. Paul Jones (agent de la formation, Association canadienne des professeures et professeurs d'université):

Merci. Je m'appelle Paul Jones et je travaille pour l'Association canadienne des professeurs d'université, l'ACPPU. Je suis accompagné de ma collègue, Pam Foster. Nous tenons tout d'abord à remercier le Comité de nous donner l'occasion de témoigner devant lui.

L'ACPPU représente 70 000 professeurs et bibliothécaires de 122 collèges et universités du Canada. Nos membres sont des rédacteurs, qui créent des dizaines de milliers d'articles, de livres et d'autres documents chaque année. Nous comprenons l'importance des droits d'auteur et à titre d'organisation syndicale, nous avons réussi à protéger ces droits par l'entremise du processus de négociation collective.

Nous comptons aussi des professeurs et des bibliothécaires parmi nos membres. Leur réussite repose sur leur capacité à présenter l'information aux autres. À ce titre, ils sont les premiers à utiliser de nouvelles façons de créer et d'échanger les connaissances entre eux, avec les étudiants et avec la population en général. La diversité de nos membres nous a appris que le droit d'auteur devrait servir à tous les Canadiens de manière égale. C'est dans cette optique que nous soulevons un premier point.

Dans leur lettre à l'intention du Comité, les honorables Navdeep Bains et Mélanie Joly ont fait valoir ceci: Au cours de vos audiences et de vos délibérations, nous vous invitons à porter une attention particulière aux besoins et aux intérêts des peuples autochtones dans le cadre des efforts tous azimuts du Canada pour faire avancer la réconciliation.

Nous voulons aborder ce point. Les collectivités autochtones ont parlé à l'ACPPU des dommages associés à l'appropriation de leur patrimoine culturel et de l'incapacité de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur de les protéger.

En fait, nous savons qu'une disposition de la Loi est directement responsable de la perte des histoires des collectivités. Les aînés autochtones travaillent en collaboration avec les universitaires pour aborder cette vaste question, tout comme le font certains experts de la fonction publique du Canada. Nous encourageons le Comité à appuyer ces efforts et à veiller à ce que la Loi sur le droit d'auteur reconnaisse le contrôle des Autochtones sur leurs connaissances traditionnelles.

L'autre point que nous aimerions aborder aujourd'hui a trait à l'utilisation équitable. Il n'y a pas si longtemps, l'objectif perçu de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur était principalement de protéger les auteurs d'oeuvres littéraires et artistiques. Cet objectif a changé avec la décision de 2002 de la Cour suprême dans l'affaire Théberge c. Galerie d'Art du Petit Champlain inc., qui a été un moment décisif.

Dans sa décision, le tribunal a fait valoir ce qui suit: On atteint le juste équilibre entre les objectifs de politique générale, dont ceux qui précèdent, non seulement en reconnaissant les droits du créateur, mais aussi en accordant l’importance qu’il convient à la nature limitée de ces droits. D’un point de vue grossièrement économique, il serait tout aussi inefficace de trop rétribuer les artistes et les auteurs pour le droit de reproduction qu’il serait nuisible de ne pas les rétribuer suffisamment.

Cette idée d'équilibre a été développée dans une série de décisions récentes de la Cour suprême, et a été affirmée par le Parlement dans la Loi sur la modernisation du droit d'auteur de 2012.

Cette approche, par laquelle on accorde la même importance aux droits des utilisateurs et aux droits des auteurs, a permis une grande innovation en ce qui a trait à la façon dont on crée et on partage les connaissances. Les bibliothécaires et les professeurs sont à l'avant-plan du mouvement pour le libre accès et pour des ressources pédagogiques libres, en permettant que les articles et les manuels scolaires qu'ils rédigent soient offerts librement en ligne.

L'utilisation équitable est un petit volet — mais un volet important — de cette innovation et permet aux étudiants, aux professeurs et aux chercheurs d'échanger facilement et rapidement les documents. Par exemple, elle permettrait à une classe de partager rapidement du contenu éditorial controversé, un extrait de film ou le chapitre d'un livre rare et épuisé. La reconnaissance de l'utilisation équitable à des fins éducatives par la Cour suprême et par le Parlement a profité au Canada.

Maintenant, comme vous le savez sûrement, l'utilisation équitable ne fait pas l'unanimité. Dans le cadre de votre étude, vous allez entendre — ou avez déjà entendu — deux choses. Premièrement, on vous dira que les poètes et les conteurs canadiens ont souvent de la difficulté à subvenir à leurs besoins ou se situent près du seuil de la pauvreté. C'est tout à fait vrai. Deuxièmement, on vous dira que l'utilisation équitable est en partie responsable de cela. C'est faux.

L'appauvrissement d'importants segments de la communauté artistique remonte bien avant l'utilisation équitable à des fins d'enseignement. C'est également un triste fait partout dans le monde, y compris dans les administrations où l'utilisation équitable n'existe pas. La réalité est que l'utilisation équitable vise une petite partie du contenu sur les campus, dont une toute petite partie est du contenu canadien. En fait, en ce qui a trait à l'appui offert aux auteurs et aux éditeurs, le secteur de l'enseignement postsecondaire du Canada affiche un très bon bilan.

Oui, nous trouvons de nouvelles façons de créer et de partager l'information et il est vrai qu'au cours des 10 dernières années, l'économie mondiale a connu de grandes perturbations. Il y a eu plus de perdants que de gagnants dans tous les secteurs, mais le secteur de l'enseignement postsecondaire continue de dépenser des centaines de millions de dollars par année pour le contenu.

En guise de conclusion, nous exhortons le Comité de confirmer le rôle de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur à titre de loi pour tous les Canadiens en répondant aux préoccupations des collectivités autochtones et en appuyant le secteur de l'enseignement postsecondaire, puisque les journaux et ressources pédagogiques en libre accès, l'utilisation équitable et les centaines de millions de dollars dépensés chaque année pour le contenu offrent le meilleur environnement d'apprentissage et de recherche.

Nous vous remercions une fois de plus de nous avoir invités à témoigner devant vous et nous vous remercions de réaliser cette importante étude.

(1640)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant passer à Shawn Gilbertson de Campus Stores Canada.

Vous disposez de cinq minutes. Allez-y, monsieur.

M. Shawn Gilbertson (directeur, matériel de cours, University of Waterloo, Campus Stores Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Bonjour. Je tiens à remercier le Comité de m'accueillir aujourd'hui. Je m'appelle Shawn Gilbertson. Je suis le directeur du matériel de cours à l'Université de Waterloo. Je témoigne aujourd'hui au nom de Campus Stores Canada, l'association professionnelle nationale des librairies de campus détenues et administrées par les établissements. Campus Stores Canada regroupe 80 librairies membres et plus de 150 fournisseurs affiliés partout au pays. Si vous connaissez un étudiant parmi le million environ qui font des études postsecondaires, vous connaissez donc sans doute quelqu'un qui obtient des services d'un membre de Campus Stores Canada.

Les librairies de campus sont au service des étudiants pour veiller à ce qu'ils aient accès à des ressources d'apprentissage de haute qualité. Elles servent de courroie de transmission pour le traitement et la distribution du matériel de cours imprimé et numérique. Notre message est simple aujourd'hui. L'utilisation équitable n'a pas nui aux ventes et à la distribution du matériel d'enseignement au Canada. En 2012, l'élargissement de la portée de l'utilisation équitable pour inclure l'utilisation à des fins pédagogiques dans les exemptions a permis une clarification importante du droit des utilisateurs. Il importe également que l'examen en cours tienne compte de l'évolution rapide du marché.

Pour être clair, le marché de l'édition du matériel universitaire a pris un virage important en passant des ressources imprimées aux produits numériques, souvent vendus à moindre coût. Cela pourrait clarifier certaines questions qui ont été posées un peu plus tôt. Les changements dans les habitudes des consommateurs et dans les politiques provinciales, de même que la concurrence venant du marché en ligne, ont accru les bouleversements. Ces changements sont le lot d'une industrie qui connaît une augmentation de la concurrence et un élargissement des options d'achat, d'accès et d'utilisation du matériel pour les consommateurs.

Je dois mentionner toutefois que les prix parfois inabordables du matériel ont entraîné une diminution de la demande pour des manuels chers qui n'avaient fait l'objet que d'une petite mise à jour. De plus, le matériel d'apprentissage imprimé a connu une saturation importante du marché en raison d'une hausse de la location du matériel, de l'importation d'éditions internationales, de la vente de gré à gré et d'un accroissement de la demande pour des éditions antérieures moins coûteuses.

Les étudiants, qui sont les utilisateurs finaux du matériel, ne voient plus l'intérêt d'acheter des ouvrages coûteux à usage unique. Comme c'est le cas dans d'autres industries comme celles de la musique et de la vidéo, les attentes des utilisateurs ont changé à cet égard. Les nouveaux modes de transmission, les nouveaux modèles d'affaires et les nouveaux venus sur le marché ont eux aussi perpétué les bouleversements dans les revenus tirés de l'impression traditionnelle et favoriser l'investissement dans le développement des produits numériques et les services d'abonnement, les premiers indicateurs pointant en direction d'une croissance importante dans ce domaine.

Cela étant dit, nous aimerions souligner un point important soulevé par les ministres responsables du droit d'auteur qui ont mentionné dans une lettre au Comité que la Loi sur le droit d'auteur pourrait ne pas être l'outil idéal pour répondre à toutes les préoccupations issues des bouleversements récents. Campus Stores Canada encourage les membres du Comité à garder cette idée à l'esprit lorsqu'ils examinent les mémoires et écoutent les témoignages des créateurs et des titulaires de droits d'auteur.

En terminant, il est essentiel que le Comité reconnaisse l'importance qu'il y ait un équilibre entre les droits des créateurs et des utilisateurs de propriété intellectuelle et la valeur de l'utilisation équitable. L'utilisation équitable demeure un droit fondamental et nécessaire pour préserver les intérêts des créateurs et des utilisateurs dans une industrie qui innove et évolue.

Au nom de Campus Stores Canada et des étudiants que nous servons, je vous remercie de m'avoir donné l'occasion de comparaître aujourd'hui.

(1645)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons passer directement aux questions.

Monsieur Sheehan, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Terry Sheehan:

Merci beaucoup.

Vos exposés étaient excellents.

Un peu plus tôt, j'ai demandé aux témoins quelles recommandations le Comité pourrait faire au gouvernement pour répondre aux préoccupations de longue date des Autochtones concernant les droits d'auteur.

Paul, je sais que vous en avez parlé dans votre exposé. Je ne sais pas si vous étiez ici quand j'ai mentionné cela, mais nous avons diverses activités de vérité et réconciliation en cours à Sault Ste. Marie et des initiatives en préparation au Centre de découvertes. Le centre est en construction et fonctionnera en collaboration avec l'Université Algoma, un ancien site où se trouvait également un pensionnat indien autrefois.

Les gens s'efforcent vraiment de remédier au problème de l'éducation des Autochtones, mais ils s'efforcent également de donner suite aux recommandations de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation. Ils veulent notamment accueillir beaucoup d'artefacts. Il y aura beaucoup d'enseignements, et on s'inquiète des droits d'auteur des Autochtones au Canada.

Pourriez-vous nous en dire un peu plus sur votre point de vue, ou le point de vue de votre organisation, sur ce que le Canada peut faire pour mieux protéger, dans la loi, les enseignements autochtones et les artefacts culturels, etc., au sein des établissements?

M. Paul Jones:

Je dois préciser tout d'abord que ce que nous savons provient de nos membres autochtones — notre personnel enseignant autochtone — qui nous a expliqué le problème. Nous nous efforçons de transmettre le message, mais ce sont eux qui seront les principaux porte-parole dans ce dossier et qui vous feront part de leurs préoccupations directement. Je ne voudrais pas sembler leur couper l'herbe sous le pied ou parler au nom d'un autre groupe.

Nous avons appris que les notions occidentales de propriété intellectuelle qui sont établies dans la Loi sur le droit d'auteur ou la Loi sur les brevets, ainsi que les définitions très précises de la propriété individuelle ou collective et les échéanciers très précis relatifs à la création du savoir et à sa durée ne cadrent pas très bien avec les différents systèmes de savoir qui existent dans les communautés autochtones. Il est très difficile d'amalgamer ces deux éléments — notre loi sur le droit d'auteur et les approches traditionnelles liées au savoir autochtone.

Nous avons entendu parler en particulier du cas d'un historien du Nouveau-Brunswick qui, dans les années 1970, avait enregistré les histoires des anciens. Quand la communauté a voulu avoir accès aux enregistrements et aux transcriptions, elle n'a pas pu le faire, car c'est la personne qui avait procédé aux enregistrements qui avait réclamé les droits d'auteur. Je pense que c'est maintenant l'article 18 de la loi qui accorde ces droits à la personne qui effectue l'enregistrement. Dans ce cas, la communauté n'a pas pu avoir accès aux histoires. Les anciens qui avaient raconté ces histoires étaient décédés, et la plupart de leurs enfants étaient aussi décédés. Ce n'est que maintenant qu'ils ont pu y avoir accès et ont pu les publier.

C'est un exemple précis d'un petit élément de la loi qui, dans ce cas, a causé beaucoup de tort à cette communauté, ainsi qu'un profond chagrin. Je pense que la même situation s'est produite ailleurs également.

Dans d'autres cas, comme la loi exige qu'il y ait un créateur précis — quelqu'un qui revendique la propriété — et une période de temps précise, cela ne cadre pas avec la notion de propriété communautaire ou encore la notion de propriété depuis des temps immémoriaux, remontant dans le passé et s'étirant dans l'avenir.

Nous n'entendons pas vous dire ce qu'il faut faire exactement. Nous savons que des experts et des anciens au sein des communautés autochtones sauront vous en parler. Nous voulons simplement appuyer leurs demandes pour protéger le savoir autochtone.

(1650)

M. Terry Sheehan:

Merci de ces renseignements, Paul.

Nous voulions être certains d'avoir l'information tout de suite. C'est notre première réunion sur cette étude, alors j'aimerais dire aux deux groupes de témoins que je suis très heureux de votre contribution à la discussion très importante que nous aurons par la suite.

Shawn, quelle est la position de Campus Stores Canada sur le litige en cours entre les sociétés collectives et les universités canadiennes? Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus à ce sujet?

M. Shawn Gilbertson:

Je peux seulement vous parler du rôle que Campus Stores Canada a joué avant 2012. Campus Stores Canada est responsable de l'impression des ensembles de cours. Ce que je comprends, c'est qu'environ 75 % des revenus provenaient du précédent accord de licence. Si nous comprenons bien, l'accord comprend deux parties, soit des frais généraux s'appliquant aux copies accessoires, puis 10 ¢ par page pour l'impression des ensembles de cours.

Une des principales différences que nous avons vues jusqu'en 2012 et depuis est le virage vers l'utilisation de la réserve électronique, en raison de l'augmentation des dépenses de licences des bibliothèques. Évidemment, on a moins besoin d'un accord de licence de ce genre quand les étudiants paieraient normalement le double pour le matériel de cours.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons à M. Bernier.[Français]

Vous disposez cinq minutes.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier (Beauce, PCC):

Merci beaucoup.

Ma question s'adresse à M. Gilbertson.[Traduction]

Merci beaucoup d'être avec nous.

J'aimerais en savoir un peu plus sur ce que vos membres font à l'heure actuelle pour respecter la loi.

De plus, quelles seraient les répercussions sur leurs activités s'ils voulaient faire valoir leurs droits? Pouvez-vous simplement répondre à la première partie?

M. Shawn Gilbertson:

Je ne peux probablement pas vous parler d'une façon plus générale du secteur de l'éducation.

Les activités de Campus Stores Canada sont axées sur la vente et la distribution du matériel de cours, pas nécessairement sur l'application du droit d'auteur. Toutefois, nous avons des gens au sein de notre personnel qui connaissent les licences de droit d'auteur. Nous adhérons encore, par exemple, aux licences transactionnelles qui sont exigées pour diverses utilisations permises, soit celles qui vont au-delà des exemptions à l'utilisation équitable.

Est-ce que cela répond à votre question?

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Quel est le changement important auquel nous devons procéder pour moderniser la loi? Si vous aviez une seule recommandation à faire, quelle serait-elle?

M. Shawn Gilbertson:

Ce serait de ne rien modifier au sujet de l'utilisation équitable. Il n'y a pas de raison de le faire.

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

D'accord, merci.

J'ai une autre question qui s'adresse à M. Jones.

Que peut-on faire pour s'assurer qu'un professeur d'université sera en mesure de respecter la loi et, en même temps, de voir ses droits protégés? Quelle est la principale préoccupation des professeurs d'université dans la loi actuelle?

M. Paul Jones:

Vous voulez une préoccupation, et nous en avons cinq à vous faire part — nos cinq principales. La première est de ne pas toucher à l'utilisation équitable. Vous le savez. Nous souhaitons aussi ardemment, comme nous l'avons mentionné dans notre exposé, qu'on remédie aux préoccupations des communautés autochtones. À part cela, la durée à l'heure actuelle est la durée de vie plus 50 ans, et c'est une approche raisonnable. S'il est possible de protéger cela dans les lois nationales, et que les accords commerciaux internationaux n'y portent pas atteinte, nous souhaitons que cela soit maintenu à la durée de vie plus 50 ans.

La Loi sur la modernisation du droit d'auteur de 2012 a beaucoup fait pour faire avancer les choses. Un domaine qui a connu moins de succès est celui des mesures techniques de protection. Une petite, mais simple, mesure en particulier serait de pouvoir briser les verrous numériques lorsqu'on ne viole pas la loi. Si on peut légalement reproduire quelque chose pour une raison et que c'est en format numérique et protégé, on devrait pouvoir aller de l'avant.

L'autre sujet dont nous aimerions discuter plus à fond, et nous allons en parler dans notre mémoire, c'est la question du droit d'auteur de la Couronne, que nous aimerions voir assouplir, pour donner un meilleur accès aux Canadiens à l'information que le gouvernement produit, dans le but ultime peut-être de l'abolir, mais en y allant à petits pas.

(1655)

L'hon. Maxime Bernier:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Masse, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais aborder la question des verrous numériques. Donnez-nous un exemple de situation problématique. Je pense que c'est un élément important de l'examen précédent dont on ne semble pas comprendre les répercussions. Pourriez-vous nous donner un exemple?

M. Paul Jones:

Je vais tenter de vous donner un exemple même s'il date déjà. Disons qu'un professeur veut faire une présentation en classe sur les professeurs dans la culture populaire ou les politiciens dans la culture populaire, et qu'il veut présenter des extraits d'un DVD ou d'une vidéo, ou encore d'un mécanisme de transmission en continu. Il pourrait devoir briser le verrou pour copier les extraits. Disons qu'il s'agit d'un film de deux heures et qu'il veut en montrer un extrait de deux minutes. Il se pourrait même que cela n'atteigne pas le seuil de l'utilisation équitable. Il pourrait s'agir d'une utilisation insignifiante et qui est en soi parfaitement légal du point de vue de la Loi sur le droit d'auteur, mais parce qu'il est interdit de briser un verrou numérique, ce serait une infraction.

M. Brian Masse:

C'est un petit élément, comme vous l'avez mentionné, et c'est en partie une application pratique. Les artistes n'auront pas nécessairement d'objection à ce sujet. Ce qui sera difficile, c'est de trouver le producteur du verrou, du matériel, etc., pour tenter d'obtenir l'accès. C'est bien cela?

M. Paul Jones:

Oui, c'est bien cela. Un des avantages de l'utilisation équitable est de permettre un accès simple et rapide au matériel pour le présenter en classe.

M. Brian Masse:

Oui.

Monsieur Gilbertson, au sujet de l'utilisation équitable, qu'est-ce qui a changé? Donnez-nous un aperçu du point de vue des étudiants de ce qui a changé pour eux dans les librairies au cours des cinq dernières années. Beaucoup de choses ont changé en général. Vous avez parlé d'un élément. Je pense que c'était la citation. J'ai dû la noter parce que vous avez dit qu'ils n'en voient plus l'intérêt. J'allais dire que je n'en voyais pas l'intérêt en 1991 lorsqu'un chapitre était modifié dans un manuel, et vous avez oublié ceux qui les vendaient à l'avance, etc.

Parlez-nous un peu de ce qui a changé au cours des cinq dernières années?

M. Shawn Gilbertson:

Ce que j'ai pu constater au cours de cette demi-décennie environ est que nous avons assisté à un virage important des produits traditionnels imprimés vers les produits d'apprentissage numériques liés à des évaluations. C'est là où les grandes maisons d'édition multinationales investissent le plus. Nous représentons bien sûr un intermédiaire particulier du numérique où les ventes ont atteint environ 50 millions de dollars depuis le début.

Lorsque ce type de produit est lié à une évaluation, les étudiants n'ont pas le choix essentiellement de payer. Ils n'ont pas nécessairement l'option d'emprunter le livre à quelqu'un ou d'utiliser l'exemplaire de la bibliothèque, pour vous donner un exemple. En Ontario, la politique a été modifiée pour autoriser l'utilisation de ces produits particuliers dans la mesure où les établissements ont des politiques ou des directives claires en place pour protéger les intérêts des étudiants.

M. Brian Masse:

Avez-vous pu observer une tendance en faveur des ententes individuelles au sujet de l'utilisation des ressources, du matériel, etc.? Est-ce qu'il y en a davantage, ou est-ce encore une politique générale? Avez-vous maintenant des produits différents dans les librairies universitaires qui pourraient entraîner des décisions différentes à l'égard des politiques d'utilisation?

M. Shawn Gilbertson:

Pour répondre à votre question simplement, je vais m'inspirer d'une question qui a été posée plus tôt cet après-midi.

Cengage Learning vient de lancer un produit qui permet aux étudiants d'avoir accès à tout le répertoire de leur catalogue. Il y a un prix par trimestre et pour l'année. Nous voyons les premiers signes de changements similaires à ceux qui se sont produits dans d'autres industries de contenu, où le contenu est omniprésent. Les utilisateurs paient un prix nominal et ont accès à beaucoup plus de contenu qu'autrement.

(1700)

Le président:

Merci.

C'est maintenant au tour de M. Baylis. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Frank Baylis:

Merci.

Vous avez tous les deux abordé un point soulevé par les témoins précédents, c'est-à-dire le fait de ne pas toucher à l'utilisation équitable, tout en reconnaissant que les auteurs et les petites maisons d'édition font moins d'argent.

Je vais commencer par vous, monsieur Jones, qui représentez les professeurs. Certains d'entre eux sont des auteurs et ils n'aiment pas l'utilisation équitable, si je comprends bien. Est-ce exact?

Où s'en va l'argent à l'heure actuelle? Il y a de plus en plus d'argent qui circule, mais il ne va pas dans les poches de nos créateurs ni dans celles de nos petites maisons d'édition.

M. Paul Jones:

J'ai entendu qu'on a posé la question plus tôt, et j'y ai réfléchi. J'ai une réponse à tout le moins, c'est-à-dire que 120 millions de dollars par année prennent la route du RCDR, le Réseau canadien pour la documentation de la recherche. Il s'agit d'un consortium d'universités qui achète une licence générale pour avoir accès au matériel numérique. Ce sont principalement des articles de journaux, je crois, mais il y a aussi d'autres choses. C'est un exemple du virage vers l'achat numérique.

M. Frank Baylis:

Vous avez parlé de cette nouvelle tendance vers le libre accès où les auteurs ne publient pas leurs travaux par l'entremise d'une revue; ils les publient tout simplement. Est-ce une tendance que votre association de professeurs préconise? Pouvez-vous nous dire quelques mots à ce sujet?

M. Paul Jones:

Cette question a fait l'objet de certaines discussions parmi nos membres; elle n'a pas fait l'unanimité au départ, mais il a fini par se dégager un consensus à l'égard du libre accès. Cette idée est née lorsque nous avons réalisé que nos membres, dont le salaire est payé par les contribuables canadiens, produisaient une grande quantité de la littérature et d'articles de revue. Nos membres envoyaient gratuitement leurs travaux à des éditeurs privés, et il arrivait même souvent que nos membres se chargent gratuitement de l'édition et de l'examen par les pairs pour s'assurer que c'était à la hauteur. Ensuite, ces travaux étaient rachetés aux frais des contribuables, et ce, à grands frais. Pensez aux augmentations salariales et à l'inflation. Le coût astronomique de ces revues dépasse tout simplement l'entendement. Nos membres ont des doctorats et ils ont réalisé que ce n'était peut-être pas la meilleure façon de procéder.

M. Frank Baylis:

Bref, selon ce modèle, nous faisons tout le travail; nous rédigeons les textes, nous les publions et nous nous occupons même de l'édition. Nous donnons ces travaux à une entreprise qui nous les revend ensuite, et cela ne nous rapporte pas d'argent.

M. Paul Jones:

Oui, et c'est de là que cette idée est née.

M. Frank Baylis:

Au départ, vos membres en ont discuté, mais le libre accès ne les a pas convaincus, puis de plus en plus de gens ont souscrit à cette idée en raison de cette réalité.

M. Paul Jones:

Oui.

M. Frank Baylis:

Monsieur Gilbertson, vous avez discuté des nouvelles façons de faire. Je crois que vous avez parlé des technologies perturbatrices, et vous avez également mentionné que vos étudiants en voient l'utilité ou n'en voient pas l'utilité.

Cela fait-il partie de cette tendance? Le constatez-vous? Cela découle-t-il de la mentalité des étudiants quant à ce qui en vaut la peine ou non?

M. Shawn Gilbertson:

Oui. Absolument.

Nous avons des technologies ou des outils d'apprentissage très récents pour lesquels des étudiants paient une somme modique. Cela peut leur coûter 20 $ par demi-cours, par exemple. J'ai l'exemple de Learning Catalytics qui me vient en tête. C'est semblable à Cengage Learning, et cela permet aux membres du corps professoral d'avoir accès à l'ensemble du répertoire dans le catalogue, et les étudiants paient 20 $ au lieu d'acheter un manuel à 200 $. Je crois que c'est là où nous commençons à voir un virage dans la manière dont les consommateurs ou les étudiants reconnaissent la valeur du matériel de cours; ils comprennent que c'est pour un seul demi-cours. De manière générale, à moins qu'ils soient des professionnels, ils n'ont pas tendance à les conserver.

M. Frank Baylis:

Nous avons vu des tendances similaires, par exemple, avec la musique où la jeune génération disait à un certain point qu'elle n'avait aucun remord à se procurer gratuitement de la musique. Les revenus dans l'industrie musicale chutaient, et des entreprises comme Spotify sont apparues. Il y a eu un virage, et les gens affirment maintenant être disposés à payer un abonnement mensuel, parce que le coût est raisonnable.

Est-ce la même chose que nous verrons dans le système d'éducation? Est-ce le cas?

M. Shawn Gilbertson:

Oui. Je crois que nous sommes actuellement à ce point. Je dois également mentionner — pas nécessairement pour le Comité, mais certainement pour le ministère du Patrimoine canadien — que nous avons des réserves au sujet de certains nouveaux modèles en vue de faire économiser les étudiants. L'un de ces modèles concerne les manuels et les frais de scolarité. Des frais accessoires peuvent être facturés dans le cas du matériel de cours numérique, et les étudiants ne peuvent pas se procurer ce matériel ailleurs.

(1705)



Nous craignons réellement qu'en fin de compte ce soit peut-être amalgamé aux frais de scolarité, puis nous nous mettons à penser à toutes les autres politiques qu'il faudrait modifier pour ce faire sur la scène fédérale. Cela nous préoccupe.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est maintenant à M. Lloyd. Vous avez trois minutes.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Ma première question s'adresse à MM. Jones et Gilbertson. Le précédent gouvernement en Colombie-Britannique a mis sur pied un programme peu connu qui s'appelle Creative Commons. Je n'ai malheureusement jamais vraiment eu l'occasion de l'utiliser, parce qu'il venait d'être mis en ligne au moment où je terminais mes études.

Pouvez-vous nous parler du rôle que joue Creative Commons dans la grande question du droit d'auteur?

M. Shawn Gilbertson:

La Colombie-Britannique a commencé à investir dans les ressources éducatives libres qui sont liées aux licences Creative Commons. Nous voyons également d'autres provinces emboîter le pas; l'Ontario a récemment mis en ligne sa bibliothèque de manuels libres.

Lorsque l'accent a commencé à être mis sur les cours de première et de deuxième année où il y a un grand nombre d'inscriptions, nous avons commencé à voir les gens délaisser les ressources traditionnelles du secteur privé à cet égard et tourner le dos au droit d'auteur dit « fermé ».

M. Paul Jones:

J'ai un article de journal ici. Le titre mentionne que la Colombie-Britannique est un chef de file au Canada pour ce qui est d'offrir gratuitement aux étudiants des manuels libres. L'article souligne que le programme provincial se penchera sur les ressources éducatives libres. Fait intéressant, l'article a été publié le 16 octobre 2012. Nous pouvons donc constater que la situation a évolué depuis cinq ans en ce qui a trait à la croissance des ressources éducatives libres.

Nous savons également que dans les diverses universités cette initiative a permis aux étudiants d'économiser des centaines de milliers de dollars. Dans l'ensemble, en Colombie-Britannique, nous estimons à 4 ou à 5 millions de dollars les économies réalisées au cours des dernières années grâce aux manuels libres et accessibles en ligne gratuitement qui ont remplacé les manuels dispendieux provenant d'éditeurs privés.

M. Dane Lloyd:

À ce sujet, comment les créateurs de contenu sont-ils rémunérés dans le cadre du modèle Creative Commons? En fonction de la réponse à cette question, est-ce une manière rentable non seulement de fournir des ressources aux étudiants, mais aussi de respecter les droits des créateurs?

M. Paul Jones:

Je peux parler de la rémunération. Certains créateurs de contenu sont des professeurs et des chercheurs dans les universités. Ils touchent un salaire annuel, et la production de contenu est considérée comme l'une de leurs tâches.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Est-ce inclus dans leur salaire? Lorsqu'ils publient quelque chose selon le modèle Creative Commons, reçoivent-ils quelque chose?

M. Paul Jones:

Il y a une multitude de façons différentes de procéder, mais l'idée de base est que c'est inclus dans leur salaire. Les professeurs d'université produisent du contenu et ils acceptent de consacrer du temps à ces projets.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Des fonds publics sont-ils investis dans cette initiative? Cet argent ne sert pas à payer les créateurs. Cela sert-il en gros à la mise sur pied du programme et à sa prestation?

M. Shawn Gilbertson:

Cela sert à payer en partie la création de matériel de cours.

M. Dane Lloyd:

Pour revenir à ma question, seriez-vous donc prêt à dire que c'est une manière rentable de fournir des ressources?

M. Shawn Gilbertson:

Oui. Je présume que cela dépend du point de vue de chacun. Je ferai peut-être des commentaires à ce sujet aujourd'hui, mais le Comité doit se pencher sur certains progrès récents dans le domaine, notamment la création de ressources éducatives libres.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

La parole est maintenant à M. Longfield. Vous avez trois minutes.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Monsieur le président, trois brèves minutes.

Ma première question s'adresse à M. Gilbertson. J'ai été heureux de vous entendre mentionner Cengage, parce que c'est l'une des entreprises qui changent la donne.

L'inclusion du coût des manuels dans les frais de scolarité est un autre modèle. Comme nous envisageons la possibilité d'offrir une aide pour les frais de scolarité, nous pourrions par le fait même aider pour les manuels.

Il y a deux autres éléments qui m'intéressent: les revues francophones en libre accès sur Érudit et le modèle des produits d'apprentissage numériques liés aux évaluations. Il en a aussi été question dans des conversations à Guelph.

Des politiques sont nécessaires à cet égard. Pouvez-vous nous dire les endroits où il y a des lacunes pour alimenter nos futures discussions?

M. Shawn Gilbertson:

Dans les provinces, je crois que nous n'avons pas nécessairement de prix plancher ou de limites, mais je crois que c'est un aspect sur lequel nous devrons un jour nous pencher, soit l'indexation des prix en fonction de l'inflation.

Je ne peux pas répondre à votre première question sur les revues francophones en libre accès, étant donné que je ne suis pas un expert en la matière.

Je peux laisser Paul vous répondre.

(1710)

M. Paul Jones:

Je ne peux pas non plus répondre à votre question, mais je peux m'engager à trouver la réponse, parce que nous pouvons mettre la main sur cette information.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

Lorsque nous voyons les grandes maisons d'édition américaines qui fournissent des manuels au Canada, je crois que c'est important que nous continuions d'avoir accès à du contenu canadien dans les deux langues ainsi qu'à l'information dont les étudiants canadiens ont besoin.

Avec la mesure ayant trait à la protection du droit d'auteur sur les oeuvres pour les étudiants — des étudiants qui contribuent à la création de contenu —, nous affectons plus de fonds pour que les étudiants participent à la recherche. S'il y a une possibilité pour les étudiants d'obtenir une aide pour les manuels... Je ne sais pas trop où je voulais en venir avec cela, mais les étudiants font partie de l'équation. Dans le domaine de la recherche, ils font partie de l'équation pour donner accès à l'information.

Cela revient peut-être au commentaire de M. Baylis sur les créateurs qui ne sont pas rémunérés pour leur contenu. Bon nombre d'entre eux ne sont vraiment pas motivés par l'appât du gain; ils souhaitent que leur contenu soit publié.

M. Paul Jones:

Votre commentaire nous rappelle que nous connaissons une période de très grandes perturbations, et de nouvelles méthodologies et de nouvelles approches sont mises à l'essai tout le temps. Ce que nous attendons de cet examen, c'est la protection du milieu et de cet écosystème. Quand il est question du libre accès, des ressources éducatives libres, de l'utilisation équitable, des réseaux du savoir, des licences sur site et de nouvelles approches, quelle est la voie à suivre?

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merveilleux. Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

La parole est maintenant à M. Jeneroux. Vous avez trois minutes.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Je remercie les témoins de leur présence ici aujourd'hui.

J'ai seulement une question pour vous, étant donné que vous avez déjà répondu à bon nombre de mes questions.

Ma question est similaire à celle que j'ai posée aux représentants d'Universités Canada en ce qui a trait à la politique de publication en libre accès qui exige que les rapports issus de travaux qui ont reçu des subventions soient librement accessibles par le public dans les 12 mois qui suivent leur publication.

Je présume que cela vous concerne davantage, monsieur Jones, mais je vous invite aussi à vous prononcer sur la question, monsieur Gilbertson.

Que pensez-vous de cette politique?

M. Paul Jones:

Notre organisation appuie le libre accès, et nous appuyons ces politiques, mais nous avons parlé de la perturbation et des bouleversements que cela entraîne. Le passage à un système en libre accès était quelque chose de nouveau pour nos membres qui l'ont accueilli avec intérêt et scepticisme. À mesure que le système se développe, les gens sont de plus en plus enclins à l'adopter.

Cela ne se fait pas sans heurts. Des frais de publication sont parfois imposés pour créer les systèmes de publication. Si vous voulez publier un article, cela peut vous coûter 500 ou 1 000 $. Nous cherchons des manières de payer ces frais à partir des subventions que reçoivent les professeurs et d'autres sources pour que les nouveaux universitaires et les gens qui sont dans des régions où il n'y a pas beaucoup de subventions puissent continuer de publier des articles.

Cela fonctionne bien. Nous approuvons et appuyons cette idée, mais il reste encore quelques petits problèmes à régler.

M. Matt Jeneroux:

Croyez-vous encore une fois que nous devrions étendre ce principe à toutes les recherches financées par l'État?

M. Paul Jones:

Je crois que nous serions favorables à l'idée de rendre aussi accessibles que possible les recherches et les connaissances qui ont été créées grâce à des fonds publics.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez les trois dernières minutes de la journée.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

J'aimerais poursuivre dans la même veine que M. Jeneroux. Vous avez parlé un peu plus tôt du droit d'auteur de la Couronne. Je trouve que c'est un sujet fascinant, mais beaucoup de personnes n'en ont jamais entendu parler.

J'irais un peu plus loin. Les travaux financés par l'État devraient-ils faire partie du domaine public?

M. Paul Jones:

Oui. Ce serait le but ultime. Ce serait l'orientation que nous aimerions prendre.

Je sais qu'il y a des domaines où il y a des questions de confidentialité qui peuvent restreindre cette publication immédiate. Il y a aussi des domaines où la vente de certains éléments génère des revenus. Il y a peut-être des questions à régler avant que certains travaux entrent immédiatement dans le domaine public ou que le droit d'auteur de la Couronne soit retiré dans de tels cas. Dans l'ensemble, par principe, nous aurions tendance à délaisser le droit d'auteur de la Couronne. Je sais qu'aux États-Unis il n'y a rien de comparable à cela.

(1715)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Par quoi remplaceriez-vous le droit d'auteur de la Couronne?

M. Paul Jones:

Par rien.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Tout ce qui est publié par le gouvernement ou qui lui appartient entrerait dans le domaine public. Est-ce ainsi que vous le voyez?

M. Paul Jones:

Ce serait le but ultime à viser, mais des mesures seront nécessaires pour y arriver.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Selon vous, comment les dispositions canadiennes sur l'utilisation équitable se comparent-elles avec les dispositions américaines?

M. Paul Jones:

Selon ce que j'en comprends, l'utilisation équitable aux États-Unis est en fait un droit plus large que ce que prévoient les dispositions en ce sens au Canada au sens où ce n'est pas restreint par un but et que les dispositions américaines prévoient moins de restrictions dans l'ensemble.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez dit dans votre exposé qu'il y a une disposition dans la Loi qui nuit aux droits des Autochtones. Pouvez-vous me dire l'article en question?

M. Paul Jones:

Je crois que c'est actuellement l'article 18 de la Loi. À l'époque où les enregistrements sonores ont été faits, soit il y a de nombreuses décennies, c'était peut-être un autre article.

C'est un droit qui, à mon avis, est plein de bon sens dans certains cas. Dans le cas d'un producteur d'un enregistrement sonore, cet enregistrement sonore lui appartient. Il détient le contrôle à ce sujet.

Dans un tel cas, cette disposition a permis à certains de s'approprier des histoires, des mythes et des légendes de cette communauté; ce n'était donc pas une application adéquate de la disposition. En ce qui a trait à certains éléments précis qui nuisent aux Autochtones, je crois qu'il y a peut-être l'article 18.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Voici la dernière question. Aux fins du compte rendu, quels systèmes avons-nous pour veiller au bon usage de l'utilisation équitable par les professeurs, les librairies universitaires, etc.? Cela repose-t-il entièrement sur un système d'honneur?

Cette question s'adresse à tous les témoins.

M. Shawn Gilbertson:

Je peux vous répondre.

Je sais que de nombreux établissements ont créé des bureaux du droit d'auteur qui ont une expertise en la matière, et nous avons entendu Paul en parler plus tôt. Même au sein de nos propres établissements et en particulier de nos boutiques universitaires, nous appliquons ce que nous appelons des « lignes directrices sur l'utilisation équitable » qui sont mises en oeuvre dans chacun de nos campus respectifs. Nous nous fondons sur l'interprétation des dispositions de la Loi en ce qui concerne l'utilisation équitable, et nous nous fions aux conseils d'Universités Canada en ce sens.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quelqu'un d'autre aimerait-il faire un commentaire à ce sujet?

Une voix: Non. C'est une bonne réponse.

Le président:

Sur cette note, merci beaucoup. Voilà qui met fin à la première journée de notre étude sur le droit d'auteur.

Je tiens à remercier tous nos témoins de leur présence aujourd'hui. Nous suspendrons nos travaux deux petites minutes. Des travaux du Comité nécessitent notre attention.

Merci.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on April 17, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.