header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2018-04-17 PROC 96

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1110)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. Welcome to the 96th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

Unfortunately, Mr. Christopherson's brother has passed away.

He won't be in town all week, so we are going to put off his election as vice-chair because he expects a big battle and he's going to have to defend himself as second vice-chair of the committee. We'll do that formality when he's here next week.

It's great to have you here again, Mr. Saganash.

As we continue our study on the use of indigenous languages in the proceedings of the House of Commons, we are pleased today to be joined by John Quirke, clerk of the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut.

Thank you for being here, and we really do thank you, because it means that we don't have to go over to the other building for our meeting. Thank you for coming all the way down from Nunavut. I'll turn the floor over to you for your opening remarks.

Nakurmiik.

Mr. John Quirke (Clerk of the Legislative Assembly, Legislative Assembly of Nunavut):

Mr. Chairman and committee members, thank you for the invitation to appear before you today on the occasion of your committee's hearings, as part of its study on the use of indigenous languages in the proceedings of the House of Commons. As requested by the committee, my submission today will discuss my office's experience in providing language services to the members of our legislative assembly.

First of all, I would like to begin by drawing the committee's attention to the photograph on the cover of the submission that is before you today.

Our legislature's chamber is characterized by a number of distinct features, two of which are prominently featured in this image. These are the elders' seats that are on the floor of the House and the interpreters' booths that are located above the visitor's gallery. Their prominence highlights the importance of culture and language to our institution and its members.

Data from Statistics Canada's 2016 population census indicates that Nunavut's total population is approximately 35,580. Approximately 85% of the territory's population are Inuit and approximately 85% of this number, or 25,755 people, reported being able to converse in the Inuit language.

Our legislature's membership has broadly reflected the demographics of the territory as a whole. The 22 members of the fifth assembly took office last November. Since the institution's first sitting of April 1, 1999, a total of 72 people have held or are presently holding elected office as members of the assembly. Sixty-one of the 72 current or former members are Inuit and 11 are non-Inuit.

Approximately 70% of the total number of current or former members were or are bilingual in both the Inuit language and English. Approximately 20% were or are unilingual English speakers and approximately 10% were or are unilingual speakers of the Inuit language.

All of our legislatures to date have included a mixture of language proficiencies on the part of the members. Consequently, the need to hold proceedings and to provide services to the members in more than one language has been with us since April 1, 1999.

The federal Nunavut Act formally provides for the existence of our legislative assembly. Our territorial Legislative Assembly and Executive Council Act is comparable to the Parliament of Canada Act, a statute with which the committee will be very familiar. Since April 1, 1999, the legislative assembly has also passed a new territorial Official Languages Act and a new Inuit Language Protection Act.

When the territory was created on April 1, 1999, we inherited a body of statues from the Northwest Territories, including its Official Languages Act. That jurisdiction's statute recognizes a number of first nations languages that are not widely spoken in Nunavut.

The federal Nunavut Act provided that any significant amendments to the territorial Official Languages Act required the concurrence of Parliament by way of resolution. Nunavut's new Official Languages Act was passed by the territorial legislature in 2008 and the required parliamentary resolutions were subsequently passed in the House of Commons and the Senate in 2009. These were necessitated by the removal of such languages as Dogrib and Slavey from the statute.

Read together, our territorial Official Languages Act and Inuit Language Protection Act define the Inuit language to include Inuktitut and Inuinnaqtun. There are a total of 25 municipalities in Nunavut. Inuktitut is the variant of the Inuit language that is predominantly spoken in 23 of these communities. Inuinnaqtun is the variant spoken in the communities of Kugluktuk and Cambridge Bay. Inuinnaqtun also differs from Inuktitut in that it is written in Roman orthography rather than in syllabics.

The territorial Official Languages Act guarantees the right of all members of the legislative assembly to use the Inuit language, English, or French during proceedings of the House. I should note that census data indicates that French is the mother tongue of approximately 1.6% of the territory's total population and that we have never had a francophone elected to the legislature. Consequently, the language is not used during proceedings.

The Rules of the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut, which are analogous to the Standing Orders of the House of Commons, provide for a number of the requirements in relation to the translation of certain official documents, including formal minister's statements, the annual budget address, and motions.

(1115)



As of today, we've had a total of 705 formal sittings of the house since April 1, 1999. Simultaneous interpretation between the Inuit language and English has been provided on a gavel-to-gavel basis at every single one of our 705 sittings. On average the legislature holds 35 sitting days per calendar year.

I should also note that although the Official Languages Act guarantees the right of all members of the assembly to use the Inuit language, English or French during proceedings of the house, there is actually no statutory requirement for the institution to provide simultaneous interpretation services in any language. As a practical matter, simultaneous interpretation services are required to ensure that all members can understand one another during their proceedings.

Our normal sitting hours are from 1:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, and on Friday the normal sitting hours are from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. However, the house frequently sits for extended hours, especially during budget season. For example, during our most recent sitting in March, the house sat past its normal hour of adjournment on eight of 11 sittings.

In addition to the formal sittings of the house, simultaneous interpretation between the Inuit language and English is provided on a gavel-to-gavel basis at all meetings of our full caucus, which consists of all 22 members of the legislative assembly, as well as at all meetings of our regular members' caucus, which consists of members who are not cabinet ministers or the speaker. This body serves as a kind of unofficial opposition in our non-partisan, consensus-style legislature.

Simultaneous interpretation between the Inuit language and English is also provided on a gavel-to-gavel basis at all meetings of standing and special committees, as well as all televised hearings and other assembly events at which the public is permitted to attend or participate, such as our annual investiture ceremony for recipients of the territorial Order of Nunavut. I note, for example, that a total of 15 different sets of televised hearings were held by committees during the most recent assembly on the annual reports of the Auditor General and other items of business.

From time to time, our assembly has hosted national and international events at which relay interpretation has been required. For example, when a ministerial-level meeting of the Arctic Council was held in the chamber a few years ago, relay interpretation was required so that the Inuit language comments of the meeting's chair, who was at that time our territorial member of Parliament, could first be interpreted into English, and then into Russian for the benefit of that jurisdiction's participant. I should also note that when our chamber is used to host meetings of federal, provincial, and territorial ministers organized under the auspices of the Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat, that organization will arrange for French-language interpreters to travel to Iqaluit for the meeting, as there is little to no local capacity to provide this service.

Our legislature's Hansard is one of only a few publications in Canada produced in more than one language. In our case, the daily Hansard is published in both English and Inuktitut. Approximately 41,000 pages of Inuktitut Hansard have been produced since April 1, 1999. Our Hansard production is contracted out to an Inuit-owned company that is located in Iqaluit. Transcripts of televised hearings of standing and special committees are also produced in both Inuktitut and English. For the committee's interest, I have brought two excerpts from such publications with me today.

Our territorial Official Languages Act requires that an Inuktitut version of a bill be made available at the time the bill is introduced. As of today, a total of 419 bills have been introduced in the legislative assembly since April 1, 1999. Responsibility for the translation of government bills falls under the territorial Department of Justice. Responsibility for translating house bills, which falls under the jurisdiction of the legislative assembly itself, falls to my office. Since April 1, 1999, a total of 39 house bills have been introduced and passed by the legislative assembly.

As I noted earlier, the Rules of the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut provide for various translation requirements of documents that come before the house. As of today, a total of over 2,519 documents have been formally tabled in the assembly since its first sitting of April 1, 1999. The vast majority of official publications, including statutory required annual reports, are tabled in both English and Inuktitut. Some documents are tabled in four languages.

(1120)



However, I wish to note that our rules do allow for documents to be immediately tabled when ready in only one language, with the requirement that translations follow. In many cases, it can take months for the translations of lengthy and technical documents to be produced, and we do not believe that it serves a useful purpose to prevent members from having any access at all to documents of interest.

The languages in which our televised proceedings are broadcast rotates on a daily basis. We recently reported to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, CRTC, that 37.5% of our total programming during each broadcast month is in Inuktitut, 37.5% is in English and 25% is in Inuinnaqtun.

It's important to recognize that the financial and human resources required to provide these language services are significant and I anticipate that the committee has taken note of the significantly different scale of operation between our legislature, which is one of the country's smallest, and the Parliament of Canada itself.

Between the start of the 2015-16 fiscal year and today we have spent roughly $3.7 million on language-related services, which includes the cost of producing Hansard and the cost of contracting the services of interpreters and translators.

The single greatest capacity challenge that we face is the very small number of humans being alive today who are able to provide quality Inuit language interpretation and translation services. We engage a core group of approximately 10 extremely hard-working and talented Inuktitut and Inuinnaqtun interpreter-translators to provide sessional and intersessional language services. However, we are in competition with other entities such as the court system, other levels of government, and the private sector to engage such professionals.

This capacity challenge is not one that can be resolved by simply spending more money. As I'm sure the committee recognizes from the excellent interpretation and translation services that are provided to Parliament in the English and French languages, the skills required to be a proficient interpreter-translator are not ones that can be developed overnight or by taking a three-day course. The challenge for us is further compounded by the significantly greater linguistic differences that exist between English and the Inuit language than those that exist between English and French. There are also significant dialectical differences between the variants of the Inuit languages that are spoken in different regions and communities.

As the committee would note from the Hansard excerpt that I distributed, we have been working with such partners as the Nunavut Arctic College to build local capacity in this profession, but it is important to recognize that this is a long-term process.

I wish to conclude by again thanking the committee for its invitation to appear before you today. I hope the information I have provided will be of use to you in your deliberations, and I welcome comments and questions.

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

The Chair:

Nakurmiik.

I just want to make sure everyone has that speech. Okay. As he said, he brought some samples of their Hansard, which is produced in English and Inuktitut. Is it okay if I distribute that? I need permission.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Please.

The Chair:

Okay, please distribute it around.

The way our committee works is each party gets a time-limited chance to ask some questions. Politicians will go on forever if we don't have limits.

We'll start out with Ms. Tassi.

Ms. Filomena Tassi (Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Quirke, for your opening statement and for being here with us today to share your experience and expertise on this.

You've spoken about the challenges you've faced, essentially financial and human resources. What can you offer to us as advice in terms of overcoming those challenges with the experience you have had?

The initiatives you have started are fantastic in terms of the differences in the language, but what are general pieces of advice that you could give us as we move forward?

Mr. John Quirke:

I mentioned how much we spend, but let me just put that in context: the money I'm spending is on par with what you are spending right now in English and French. We just happen to be doing it in Inuktitut.

The amount I quoted to you was for a couple of years. Last year, for example, we spent over $900,000 on those services. When I look at my non-discretionary and discretionary budgets, I see it represents 20% of my expenditures. After I take away all the members' salaries, the benefits, the budgets for independent officers, and my salary and that my staff, it represents 20.9% of my budget. We're doing it in Inuktitut, and you're doing it here in French and English, so your figures would be way bigger than my figures.

Obviously, what you will have to look for when the House of Commons board of management—whatever your process is after the standing committee—identifies the service you're going to provide.... That is just a question of budgeting. The question of budgeting will be one thing for those people to provide those translation services. Your biggest challenge, I think, will be to make sure that you get the proper, qualified interpreters to provide that service to the members who wish to speak indigenous languages in the House. To me, in many ways it's pretty black and white in terms of budgeting—that's the easy part. It's getting the people to provide that service to you.

(1125)

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay, so the human resource part is the more difficult part.

I notice here in the picture you have the translation booths right behind. Would you ever consider remote translation? Have you ever thought of that, as opposed to bringing the interpreters to you?

Mr. John Quirke:

No, we've never tried that. I don't think it would work for us. We have a big issue in Nunavut in just trying to have reasonable Internet services across the whole territory. It's horrendous. I don't think it would work.

I just went to a process recently of doing an interview for a staff member. The candidates wanted to speak Inuktitut, which was fine. The question came up: what if you want to do it by telephone interview? How would that work? We've never even considered it—I never even thought about it—but I would say it would be mission impossible for us to do that.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

What about here? Let's say, for example, Internet wasn't a problem. Do you see any problems with remote translation being provided?

Mr. John Quirke:

Off the top of my head, no. Again, if you go down that route, I would do it as a pilot project, but I can't foresee any issues you would have in doing that remotely.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

I notice here it looks as if you have a number of booths. Are each of those booths in the background translation booths? It looks like—

Mr. John Quirke:

The farthest one on your left is for the media. The next one is for Inuktitut and English. The next one is for Inuinnaqtun and English. The next booth is actually a sessional booth that I use for my staff, but it's a type of booth. It's a booth that is similar to the other ones, so that if we ever get to the situation where we provide French interpretation, that would be our booth. It would just be a matter of moving the equipment in and plugging it in.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

Okay.

With respect to the Hansard, you mentioned you contract that out. How does that work? What's the turnaround time for that?

Mr. John Quirke:

It's a tendered contract. As I mentioned, a company in Iqaluit won it. They've had it since 1999. I think they provide a very good product.

In terms of the English Hansard or the English blues, we will normally get them the following morning between 8:00 and 10:00. The Inuktitut usually comes late in the afternoon the following day. There always will be the odd hiccup, but normally it's fair to say that the English comes between 8:00 and 10:00 in the morning, and Inuktitut in the afternoon.

Ms. Filomena Tassi:

With respect to the trained interpreters you've had, you mentioned an initiative that you started. How big a challenge has that been, getting properly trained interpreters?

Mr. John Quirke:

Well since day one , April 1, 1999, I can count on my hand the interpreters we've used. Four of them are still there. We've gone through quite a few interpreters over that time. They have left us only because of health reasons, or they've retired. Some of our interpreters came from NWT when we split. Obviously with the Inuktitut interpreters, we inherited them. Some of them were living in Nunavut anyway, so we automatically contracted them. They've been with us since day one. The other Inuktitut interpreters who made Yellowknife their home were part of our team from the beginning, but, over time, they have retired, etc.

What we have seen in the past two assemblies, and actually began to recognize in the second assembly, is that we're having a lot of difficulty getting new people into the stream. We've been faced with that problem since day one. We have worked with Nunavut Arctic College to try to establish an interpreter-translation program, and it has slowly developed.

I'm looking forward to the current program, because I believe they have eight or 10 students. We have let them do simultaneous translation in the house. Of course, we alerted all the members to please be patient, that they may make mistakes, but it worked out very well. I think this is the year that they graduate, so I'm looking forward to seeing how many of them will come over as contractors, or go back to the communities to provide those services.

It's a continuing challenge, in that sometimes I wonder if interpreter-translator is a career path that a lot of people want in our young community in Nunavut. I'm keeping my fingers crossed, because it won't be long until a lot of our present interpreters will be retiring.

(1130)

The Chair:

Just so you know, Filomena, the Yukon legislature also contracts out Hansard.

Do you happen to know the hourly rate that you pay a translator, because we had that from one of our other witnesses?

Mr. John Quirke:

Yes, I do. I've been reading your transcripts.

We have four rates for our interpreters. The lowest rate is $650 per day, then $750, then $800 and $1,010 per day. A day is 7.5 hours long. When the interpreters come into the office in the morning, they're already doing translation of documents, or they're interpreting for committee meetings. Like I said, we start at 1:30 and they're in the booths doing translation.

We have those four rates, from $650 to $1,010 per day.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Maybe I could start with that question. You have quite a range of rates. Is that because there's a different rate for simultaneous interpreters versus those who are translating written documents?

Mr. John Quirke:

No, they all do the same functions. It's based on their competence. We judge their performance, and as we see how well they're doing, they will move up to the next rate.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The legislature sits on a limited number of days a year. Do they do other work for you when the house is not sitting?

Mr. John Quirke:

Yes, of course, when the house is not sitting, we're the employer of first choice—I like to say that—so they're always ready and available to do our committee work, our public hearings, and our day-to-day requirements. In terms of composing correspondence for a member who is writing in both languages, they will do the translation for us at a different hourly rate.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I want to ask about the Inuktitut and Inuinnaqtun. I gather that, depending on which scholar you ask, Inuktitut writ large is either a language group or a dialect continuum, with a series of dialects that should be considered part of the same language. Since I don't speak any of these dialects, I have to rely on you as my sole source of information.

Are Inuktitut and Inuinnaqtun mutually comprehensible?

Mr. John Quirke:

With difficulty, yes. The Inuktituk speakers will have an understanding of Inuinnaqtun. There will be big differences in the translation of a word. For example, our languages commissioner in Nunavut is Inuinnaqtun. One of the things she said to me when we hired her was that she was going to have to brush up on her Inuktituk because of the differences, besides brushing up on her French.

When the Inuinnaqtun people are speaking—and from my own personal experience because my wife is Inuk—the Inuktitut speakers have to listen very carefully to what they're saying. That's the same with the Inuinnaqtun speakers too. They all have to listen very carefully to what the Inuktituk speakers are saying, because there are differences in how they interpret a word.

(1135)

Mr. Scott Reid:

You went through and told us which translators you have there, in which booths. Are there translators for Inuinnaqtun and Inuktitut and the reverse when the legislators are sitting?

Mr. John Quirke:

Yes, it's the third booth in the picture. I should mention too that the Inuinnaqtun translators only come for the sittings of the House. We do not bring them in for the meetings of the standing committees, the in camera ones, unless a member asks us. In the first assembly, the use of the Inuinnaqtun language was pretty strong. We had a couple of members who spoke it freely, so when we had our committee meetings, we would bring them in. For the past couple of assemblies, Inuinnaqtun was not often used in the committee meetings. The Inuinnaqtun speaker was actually the premier, but he wouldn't be part of those meetings.

Mr. Scott Reid:

One of the issues we face when dealing with this at the level of the federal Parliament is that there are some indigenous languages, of which Inuktitut is the star example, that are doing very well in terms of remaining not only the mother tongue but the preferred home language—which I think is the most robust way of measuring the health of a language—for young people as well as for older people. We also have languages that are in peril and some that are in catastrophic decline, when we take the country as a whole.

I know the situation of Inuktitut, but with regard to Inuinnaqtun, is that a language that is endangered? Is it robust in terms of its demographic prospects? I'm asking you a demographer's question, not a value judgment question, from the point of view of the kinds of measures of peril that a linguist would use.

Mr. John Quirke:

I would say it's in danger. We're talking Kugluktuk and Cambridge Bay. Kugluktuk used to be called Copper Mine. There is a move to try to make it stronger. I mentioned that our language commissioner is Inuinnaqtun. That's going to help a lot and will send a message to those two communities that their language is important.

At the local level, there is of course a strong desire to preserve and promote it. The Inuktitut language, like you said, is very strong in all the other communities. Preservation of the language is very important to the culture. What I'm seeing of course is the pride. There's a lot of pride out there, with people saying, “I can speak Inuktitut. It's my mother tongue.” We've seen that all across Nunavut, especially outside of Iqaluit. I just came back from Pond Inlet, where we had a full caucus retreat, and I ran into and talked to any number of children who spoke Inuktitut. They are proud of their language.

It's going to survive, and with Inuinnaqtun, I'm just hoping there is a movement to ensure that it will survive. It has its difficulties.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I noticed that the Hansard you handed out is available in English and Inuktitut, but not in Inuinnaqtun. Is Hansard recorded in written form in Inuinnaqtun?

Mr. John Quirke:

No.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is that just a cost issue?

Mr. John Quirke:

We never looked at it as a cost issue. Back in 1999, it was a question of Inuktitut being the dominant language in the 23 or 25 communities, so we went with Inuktitut. In terms of getting people who could translate Inuinnaqtun, the number of people out there is very small.

It's been syllabics and English. If it ever becomes a standard Inuktitut language, which would allow all of Nunavut to read syllabics, then it probably would happen.

(1140)

The Chair:

I forgot to welcome Mr. Morrissey to the committee.

When you said you had a caucus retreat, was that the entire legislature—I know there are no parties—or was it just the cabinet or just the opposition?

Mr. John Quirke:

At Pond Inlet, it was the full caucus—all 22 members.

The Chair:

Just so the members know, in some of the territories, because they only sit 35 days, unlike us, they have a lot of committee meetings that are not at the same time as the legislature is sitting.

We'll go on to Mr. Saganash.

Mr. Romeo Saganash (Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. It's a great pleasure to be back here.

Welcome to Mr. Quirke, and thank you for your contribution. Your experience in Nunavut will certainly be of great assistance to the study this committee is doing right now.

I just want to clarify from the outset a figure that you mentioned: the $3.7 million for fiscal year 2015-16. You said that represents 20% of your budget. Is that correct?

Mr. John Quirke:

The figure that's in the document covers a couple of fiscal years.

During the last fiscal year ending March 31, 2017, I spent $980,795. That figure represents—and I'm sorry, I have to apologize, I gave the wrong percentage—21.9% of funding that I have direct control over. We have a budget of $26.8 million. I take away all the members' salaries, their pensions, premiums, all that stuff, my salary, and that of my staff and all the independent officers. The amount of money left over as discretionary that I can manage is $4.4 million—$4,474,000—and $980,000 of that money was spent for language services.

Like I mentioned before, we're doing it in English and Inuktitut. I know the figure in the House of Commons for English and French is much, much higher.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

There is another challenge that we may face in this regard, and you mentioned this in your presentation, and I want to quote you: “The single greatest capacity challenge that we face is the very small number of human beings alive today who are able to provide quality Inuit language....”

You qualify that quality. How important is that?

Mr. John Quirke:

It's very important. We all know that something is always lost in interpretation from one language to another.

My real experience from day one has been, “Oh, I didn't say that. Your interpreter got it wrong”, or vice versa. The dialect differences are significant enough to cause some grief.

There have been many times, especially in the second and third assemblies, where the quality of the interpretation was sufficient to cause a point of order. Now, let me explain a point of order—which I know you're all familiar with—but for our points of order, you can do a point of order the day after. One of the reasons you can do a point of order the day after, or even two days after, is that we have to go back to see what, in fact, was said in the translation.

I remember one case in the third assembly when a retired member had said something, and some member said, “Oh, I think I have a point of order”. I had three interpreters in my office going through the audio/video. What did he actually say? Three of them were all looking and saying, “He said, no, no”. At the end of the day we finally got it resolved, but that's what I mean by quality. You can get the highest quality interpreters around, but if your dialect doesn't agree with the dialect of the member who is speaking, that's what we ran into.

We always look for high quality, no matter what.

Thank you.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

I get it.

This brings me back to a question of the four rates that you have for interpreters. You said in your testimony that “we” judge their competence. Who is “we” in this context?

(1145)

Mr. John Quirke:

Either me or my deputy clerk and my clerk assistant, who are both Inuit, and the members. The members will let us know how well the interpretation is going, and we have faced situations where we knew we did not have the right person doing the job, so we get that type of feedback.

We get feedback from the public. Those are usually dialect issues, but the feedback is from my own Inuit staff and the members themselves, and like I said, that would be the best feedback also.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Finally, obviously our challenges are going to be greater, because I don't think eventually we'll have 338 indigenous MPs in this House of Commons. I would hope that would happen, but that's going to be for another time, after the revolution, but....

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Romeo Saganash: I think those challenges are attenuated by the fact that, for instance, there are about 10 or 12 indigenous MPs right now. I don't know how many of them speak fluently their language. I do, but I don't know how many others speak their language fluently, so I think the needs can be less in that sense.

I notice the syllabics. My mum can read syllabics, and I gave her Inuktitut text one day in syllabics, and she could read it without understanding what she was reading. Are syllabics taught in Nunavut?

Mr. John Quirke:

I'm sorry—are they what?

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Are syllabics taught in school?

Mr. John Quirke:

Yes, they are. The challenge, of course, and what the government is trying to do, is to standardize Inuktitut because of the dialects. I'm not super familiar with the education system because I don't have children going to school there, but from kindergarten to high school there are several levels of the Inuktitut language provided and taught. We found that a lot of members could speak the language perfectly but couldn't read syllabics. I know it's difficult when I look at it, but I know it is taught at home and in the schools.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We'll go now to Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, sir, for being with us here today.

I know that everyone tries to do the best they can. Even as a committee, we're looking at figuring out whether we can provide perfect interpretation services right off the bat or whether there will be some growing pains as we hopefully move forward with this. When you were giving your introduction, I couldn't help but notice that you said that some documents do not get translated for some time. I'm interested in knowing whether you have members who can speak only one language. That's my first question: are there members who can speak only one given language well?

Mr. John Quirke:

Yes, we do have members who are fluent in English and speak Inuktitut, and we do have some Inuktitut members who do not speak Inuktitut whatsoever, just English.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

And then you have Inuktitut members who cannot speak English?

Mr. John Quirke:

We have Inuktitut members who do not speak Inuktitut. That's correct.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

My question is around having meaningful debate, discussion, and conversations. If the interpretation is not simultaneous, or even if you're in committee and there's a document presented and another member on that committee cannot understand the document, doesn't democracy lose out and the system and the process fail due to the inability to provide that service as quickly as possible?

Mr. John Quirke:

That doesn't happen. When we're holding a committee meeting of the members, every document for the members will be in both languages. When a minister is tabling a document in the house and he has only the English or only the Inuktitut, we allow the minister to still go ahead, to table that document, with the understanding that the second language is coming. We follow up on that. We want to make sure we get that document, because that document could be subject to a standing committee review. In all our standing committee meetings there's never been an issue of not having the documents in both languages.

(1150)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Does this present delays? How long are the delays? If there is something a little bit more technical, and that's why the report from the ministers perhaps take more time, do proceedings also get held up because some language might be more technical?

Mr. John Quirke:

I can't give you a definitive answer in terms of a time frame, but I would say within a month. No meeting has ever been delayed for lack of a document being translated.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

You're able to get it within—

Mr. John Quirke:

When we have our meetings, all the stuff that comes from me and my staff is in English and Inuktitut. The government brings in their materials and it's made very clear to them that when they're coming in as a witness, their opening comments.... If I were doing this with one of my standing committees, they would be in both languages automatically. If they're not, if the minister does not bring his opening comments in the two languages, members will just say, “That's it. Come back in half an hour with your translation” type of thing. We have a very strong routine and process.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

When a minister tables a report, have there ever been any issues or problems—you said it could take a month—with members having the right notice of the intention in the legislation? Would it be a piece of legislation or would it be something else? I think at that point you would have the right to be able to comment and act on that legislation and have knowledge of it.

Mr. John Quirke:

It's never been an issue when it comes to the tabling of documents, and we're talking about annual reports that are required by legislation, etc.

In terms of the bills, now all bills have to come in three languages. In the first assembly, what happened in the first year of our operation was that the government was just bringing in bills in English and French, which it was required to do. However, at that time I had four unilingual members who said, “We don't understand what we're approving,” so then the government was forced to bring in an Inuktitut version in the next sitting.

Then, when the government changed the Official Languages Act, it allowed for the bills to come in. So, they come in on day one in the three languages: English, French, and Inuktitut.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

There was something else that you had said, something about a split in the day, language spoken in the morning versus in the afternoon. At the very end, you mentioned something about splitting days, and I didn't quite understand.

Mr. John Quirke:

In terms of interpreters, when they come into the office, that's from 8:30 until 6. The session is from 1:30 to 6, so they're in the booth. In the morning, they will either be doing translation of documents or doing simultaneous translation for committee meetings. That's what I meant by the split.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay, I was thinking of something else, and I didn't know how that would logistically work, but that makes a lot more sense.

Thank you.

I think my colleague, David Graham, has a question.

The Chair:

David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a couple of questions.

I'm not completely clear on the answer to Ruby's first question. Do any members not speak any English in the current legislature?

Mr. John Quirke:

All the members speak English. In the previous assembly, one member didn't speak English.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do you ever provide translation between the two languages other than English? Have there been circumstances where you've provided translation between Inuktitut and Inuinnaqtun, between the two languages and not to English?

Mr. John Quirke:

No.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Here on the Hill you can't get a job doing anything at all outside of political jobs if you don't speak both English and French. Are there hiring requirements like that in the Nunavut legislature? Are people required to speak at least one other language to work there?

Mr. John Quirke:

Okay, now we're getting into the Constitution and into the land claim agreement. In Nunavut, 85% of the people are Inuit. The government would want 85% of the civil service to be able to speak Inuktitut, and it's working towards that goal.

I just mentioned that I just did an interview for one of my staff, and I said that in that particular position Inuktitut is desirable. That was enough to screen out a lot of people.

There are positions where you definitely need Inuktitut. The government, of course, rewards those staff members by giving them a bilingual bonus. Obviously, when we hired the language commissioner, Inuktitut or Inuinnaqtun was extremely important to us.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, thank you.

(1155)

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'll just quickly follow up on that. How much is the bilingual bonus? Do you know if it's different for different positions or what the amount might be?

Mr. John Quirke:

It's a standard amount, and I'll have to get back to you on that. I'd like to say that it's $1,200 or $2,000 or something. Now there's a new incentive for people to learn Inuktitut and the bonus is going up, but I will get that information and pass it to Andrew later on.

Mr. John Nater:

That would be great. In the federal public service, it's been $800 for several decades, so it's hardly much of an incentive any more.

I'm curious about the language commissioner position. Does she actively investigate, does she only investigate upon a complaint, or does she do both? How does that position work?

Mr. John Quirke:

It's usually complaint driven, but she's very active in going out into the private sector to promote all four languages, including French. How active is she? Well, let me put it this way: she wants to take the Canada Revenue Agency to court for not providing income tax forms in Inuktitut.

Mr. John Nater:

That's interesting. I look forward to seeing that.

I think you mentioned that 1.3% speak French or have French as their initial language. Are there many requests from the general public for documents in French from the legislature?

Mr. John Quirke:

No, not from us, but quite a few of the government annual reports come in English and French. We've had French spoken in our legislature. It was pre-arranged. We got advance notice. It was for something special on an anniversary of the francophone association of Nunavut. When we have our public hearings on the Official Languages Act, we will do it in all four languages. I will fly up French interpreter-translators from Ottawa. That's a given. I hope that helps.

Mr. John Nater:

Yes, absolutely. Is that done through the translation bureau here at Parliament or through the private sector?

Mr. John Quirke:

I believe that in the beginning we got the names from the Clerk of the House of Commons. We've kept that inventory, so we would contact directly those contractors who provide the services to the House of Commons.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you.

The Chair:

In theory, our time is up. Does anyone else have any questions they'd like to ask?

Mr. Saganash.

Mr. Romeo Saganash:

I have a quick question.

You mentioned in your brief the competition with other entities, such as the court system and other levels of government. I'd like you to elaborate on that, because I think that's an important point that you've raised. Is the Nunavut legislature contemplating measures to correct that situation and to have those interpreters either exclusively or on a priority basis?

Mr. John Quirke:

That's a good question. I have 14 interpreters. I take great pleasure and pride in the fact that they consider us their first employer of choice, and they've become very dedicated to us. For 99% of the time, we can count on them to be there. We have our sessional calendar and they know when we're meeting, so they're committed to us.

For the other agencies, other government departments, and aboriginal organizations like NTI and the Nunavut Wildlife Management Board, I guess we have set the bar to the point where, when they see what we're paying, they have to raise their bar too. We've created those levels. Hopefully, as I said, when graduates come out of the Arctic College, there would be more of a supply, but right now the demand and supply are difficult. Like I say, we're very pleased that we're their employer of first choice.

(1200)

The Chair:

Anyone else?

David, were you finished?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm done.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Nakurmiik. It's been great and helpful for us. We appreciate your coming today with some very interesting information.

Committee members, now we're going to suspend so we can go in camera. If anyone who's not supposed to be here could leave, that would be great.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

[Énregistrement électronique]

(1110)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous. Bienvenue à la 96e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Malheureusement, le frère de M. Christopherson est décédé.

M. Christopherson sera donc absent toute la semaine, si bien que nous allons remettre son élection à titre de second vice-président du Comité. Il s'est préparé à livrer une rude bataille pour défendre sa position. Nous attendrons qu'il soit des nôtres la semaine prochaine pour remplir cette formalité.

Je me réjouis de vous voir de retour, monsieur Saganash.

Pour la poursuite de notre étude sur l'utilisation des langues autochtones dans les délibérations de la Chambre des communes, nous avons le plaisir d'accueillir aujourd'hui M. John Quirke, greffier de l'Assemblée législative du Nunavut.

Nous vous remercions vraiment d'être des nôtres, car cela nous a évité d'avoir à nous rendre à l'autre édifice pour tenir cette séance. Merci d'être venu nous rencontrer en partant d'aussi loin que le Nunavut. Je vais maintenant vous céder la parole pour vos observations préliminaires.

Nakurmiik.

M. John Quirke (greffier de l’Assemblée législative, Assemblée législative du Nunavut):

Monsieur le président, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité, je vous remercie de m'avoir invité à témoigner devant vous à l'occasion des audiences de votre comité dans le cadre de son étude sur l'utilisation des langues autochtones dans les délibérations de la Chambre des communes. À la demande du Comité, le mémoire que je présente aujourd’hui portera sur l’expérience de mon bureau au chapitre de la prestation de services linguistiques aux députés de notre Assemblée législative.

Je voudrais commencer par attirer l’attention des membres du Comité sur la photographie en page couverture du mémoire qui vous est présenté aujourd’hui.

La Chambre de notre Assemblée se distingue par certaines caractéristiques, dont deux sont bien en évidence sur cette image. Il s'agit des sièges des aînés sur le parquet, et des cabines des interprètes au-dessus de la tribune des visiteurs. La place prépondérante qu’ils occupent illustre l’importance de la culture et de la langue pour notre institution et les députés qui y siègent.

Selon les données du Recensement de 2016 de Statistique Canada, la population totale du Nunavut se situe aux alentours de 35 580 habitants. Les Inuits forment environ 85 % de la population du territoire et approximativement 85 % d’entre eux, soit 25 755 personnes, ont déclaré pouvoir soutenir une conversation en langue inuite.

La composition de notre Assemblée a toujours reflété d'une manière générale la composition démographique du territoire dans son ensemble. Les 22 députés de la 5e Assemblée législative sont entrés en fonction en novembre dernier. Depuis la première séance de l’institution qui s'est tenue le 1er avril 1999, 72 personnes ont occupé une charge de représentant élu à titre de députés de l’Assemblée législative. Parmi ces 72 députés actuels ou anciens, 61 sont des Inuits et 11 sont des non-Inuits.

Environ 70 % des députés actuels et anciens sont bilingues et parlent la langue inuite et l’anglais, environ 20 % sont unilingues anglophones et environ 10 % ne parlent que la langue inuite.

Toutes nos législatures ont été composées de députés s’exprimant en diverses langues, d’où l’importance de tenir les délibérations et d’offrir des services linguistiques en plus d’une langue aux députés depuis le premier jour, soit le 1er avril 1999.

La Loi sur le Nunavut fédérale prévoit officiellement l’existence de notre Assemblée législative. La Loi sur l’Assemblée législative et le Conseil exécutif adoptée par notre territoire est comparable à la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada, une loi que les membres du Comité connaissent très bien. Depuis le 1er avril 1999, l’Assemblée législative a adopté de nouvelles lois territoriales, dont la Loi sur les langues officielles et la Loi sur la protection de la langue inuit.

Lors de la création du territoire le 1er avril 1999, nous avons hérité d’un ensemble de lois des Territoires du Nord-Ouest, dont la Loi sur les langues officielles. Cette loi reconnaît certaines langues des Premières Nations qui sont peu parlées au Nunavut.

Selon la Loi sur le Nunavut fédérale, toute modification importante à la Loi sur les langues officielles territoriale nécessite l’agrément du Parlement, donné sous forme de résolution. La nouvelle Loi sur les langues officielles du Nunavut a été adoptée par l’Assemblée législative en 2008, puis les résolutions parlementaires requises ont été adoptées par la Chambre des communes et le Sénat en 2009. Ces résolutions étaient nécessaires étant donné que l'on retirait de la loi des langues comme le dogrib et l’esclave.

Considérées dans leur ensemble, nos Loi sur les langues officielles et Loi sur la protection de la langue inuit définissent la langue inuite comme comprenant l’inuktitut et l’inuinnaqtun. Il y a un total de 25 municipalités au Nunavut. L’inuktitut est la variante de la langue inuite qui est principalement parlée dans 23 d’entre elles. L’inuinnaqtun est la variante parlée dans les collectivités de Kugluktuk et de Cambridge Bay. L’inuinnaqtun diffère aussi de l’inuktitut en ce sens qu’il s’écrit en alphabet romain, plutôt qu’en caractères syllabiques.

La Loi sur les langues officielles territoriale garantit le droit de tous les députés de l’Assemblée législative d’utiliser la langue inuite, l’anglais ou le français lors des délibérations de la Chambre. Je dois souligner que, selon les données du recensement, le français est la langue maternelle d’environ 1,6 % de la population du territoire, et qu’aucun député francophone n’a été élu à ce jour à l’Assemblée législative. Par conséquent, le français n’est pas utilisé dans les délibérations.

Le Règlement de l’Assemblée législative du Nunavut, soit l’équivalent du Règlement de la Chambre des communes, prévoit des exigences relatives à la traduction de certains documents officiels, dont les déclarations ministérielles officielles, le discours annuel sur le budget et les motions.

(1115)



À ce jour, la Chambre a tenu 705 séances officielles depuis le 1er avril 1999. Les services d'interprétation simultanée entre la langue inuite et l'anglais ont été offerts pour chacune de ces 705 séances. En moyenne, l'Assemblée tient 35 jours de séances par année civile.

Je dois aussi souligner que même si la Loi sur les langues officielles garantit le droit de tous les députés de l'Assemblée législative d'utiliser la langue inuite, l'anglais ou le français lors des délibérations de la Chambre, il n'y a en fait aucune exigence législative qui oblige l'institution à offrir des services d'interprétation dans l'une ou l'autre de ces langues. En pratique, les services d'interprétation sont nécessaires pour que les députés puissent se comprendre les uns les autres durant leurs délibérations.

Les séances de l'Assemblée se tiennent normalement les lundis, mardis, mercredis et jeudis de 13 h 30 à 18 h 00. Le vendredi, les heures normales de séance sont de 9 h 00 à midi. Cependant, il arrive souvent que la Chambre prolonge ses heures de séance, surtout durant la période budgétaire. Par exemple, lors de notre dernière période budgétaire en mars, la Chambre a continué de siéger au-delà de l'heure d'ajournement habituelle lors de 8 des 11 séances tenues.

En plus des séances officielles de la Chambre, les services d'interprétation simultanée entre la langue inuite et l'anglais sont offerts durant toutes les réunions du caucus plénier, qui est composé des 22 députés de l'Assemblée législative, et durant toutes les réunions du caucus des députés ordinaires, lequel est composé des députés qui ne sont pas ministres et dont le Président de l'Assemblée ne fait pas partie. Ce caucus fait office d'opposition non officielle au sein de notre Assemblée non partisane fonctionnant par consensus.

Les services d'interprétation simultanée entre la langue inuite et l'anglais sont aussi offerts durant la totalité des réunions des comités permanents et spéciaux, des audiences télédiffusées et des événements de l'Assemblée auxquels le public peut assister ou participer, comme notre cérémonie annuelle de remise de l'Ordre du Nunavut. Par exemple, un total de 15 séries d'audiences télédiffusées différentes ont été tenues par les comités lors de notre dernière législature au sujet des rapports annuels du vérificateur général du Canada et d'autres questions à l'étude.

De temps à autre, notre Assemblée est l'hôte d'événements nationaux et internationaux au cours desquels des services d'interprétation à relais sont nécessaires. Par exemple, lorsqu'une réunion ministérielle du Conseil de l'Arctique a été tenue à la Chambre il y a quelques années, l'interprétation à relais s'est révélée nécessaire pour que les commentaires en langue inuite du président de la réunion, qui était à l'époque un député de notre territoire, puissent d'abord être interprétés en anglais et ensuite en russe afin d'être compris par le participant de ce pays. Je dois également souligner que lorsque notre chambre est l'hôte d'une réunion des ministres fédéral, provinciaux et territoriaux organisée sous les auspices du Secrétariat des conférences intergouvernementales canadiennes, c'est le Secrétariat qui organise l'envoi d'interprètes vers le français à Iqaluit pour la réunion, car il y a peu ou pas de capacité sur place pour offrir un tel service.

Le hansard de notre Assemblée est l'un des rares au Canada à être produit en plus d'une langue. Dans notre cas, l'édition quotidienne du hansard est publiée en anglais et en inuktitut. Environ 41 000 pages de hansard en inuktitut ont été produites depuis le 1er avril 1999. La production de notre hansard est confiée en sous-traitance à une entreprise d'Iqaluit appartenant à des Inuits. Les transcriptions des audiences télédiffusées des comités permanents et spéciaux sont également produites en inuktitut et en anglais. J'ai apporté deux extraits de ces publications à l'intention du Comité.

Notre Loi sur les langues officielles prévoit qu'une version en inuktitut des projets de loi doit être disponible au moment de leur présentation. Jusqu'à présent, 419 projets de loi ont été présentés à l'Assemblée législative depuis le 1er avril 1999. La responsabilité de traduire les projets de loi émanant du gouvernement incombe au ministère territorial de la Justice. La responsabilité de traduire les projets de loi émanant des députés, qui relève de l'Assemblée législative comme telle, incombe à mon bureau. Depuis le 1er avril 1999, 39 projets de loi émanant des députés ont été présentés à l'Assemblée législative puis adoptés par celle-ci.

Comme je l'ai mentionné précédemment, le Règlement de l'Assemblée législative du Nunavut prévoit diverses exigences relatives à la traduction de documents dont la Chambre est saisie. En tout, 2 519 documents ont été officiellement déposés à l'Assemblée législative depuis sa première séance, le 1er avril 1999. La grande majorité des publications officielles, y compris les rapports annuels exigés par la loi, sont déposées en anglais et en inuktitut. Certains documents sont même déposés en quatre langues.

(1120)



Je tiens à préciser toutefois que notre règlement permet que des documents unilingues soient déposés sur-le-champ dès qu'ils sont prêts, pourvu que la traduction appropriée soit déposée dans les plus brefs délais. Dans bien des cas, la production des traductions de longs documents techniques peut prendre des mois, et selon nous, il n'est pas utile d'empêcher les députés d'avoir accès à tous les documents d'intérêt dans l'intervalle.

La langue de diffusion de nos délibérations télédiffusées alterne quotidiennement. Nous avons récemment indiqué au Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes (CRTC) que 37,5 % de notre programmation totale au cours de chaque mois de télédiffusion est diffusée en inuktitut, 37,5 % en anglais, et 25 % en inuinnaqtun.

Il est important de reconnaître qu'il faut d'importantes ressources financières et humaines pour offrir ces services linguistiques, et je présume que le Comité a pris acte de la différence considérable entre le volume d'activités de notre Assemblée législative, qui est l'une des plus petites au Canada, et celui du Parlement du Canada lui-même.

Du début de l'exercice 2015-2016 jusqu'à aujourd'hui, nous avons dépensé environ 3,7 millions de dollars pour les services linguistiques, ce qui englobe le coût de production du hansard et le coût des contrats pour les services d'interprètes et de traducteurs.

Le plus important problème de capacité auquel nous sommes confrontés, c'est le très petit nombre de personnes dans le monde capables de fournir des services d'interprétation et de traduction de qualité en langue inuite. Pour offrir des services linguistiques durant les périodes de travaux et d'intersession, nous embauchons un groupe restreint de 10 interprètes et traducteurs en inuktitut et en inuinnaqtun qui sont extrêmement travaillants et talentueux. Mais pour embaucher de tels professionnels, nous sommes en concurrence avec d'autres entités, comme le système judiciaire, les autres ordres de gouvernement et le secteur privé.

Ce problème de capacité ne fait pas partie de ceux qui peuvent se régler tout simplement en dépensant plus d'argent. Comme je suis persuadé que le Comité est aussi à même de le constater au vu des excellents services d'interprétation et de traduction en anglais et en français qui sont offerts au Parlement, les compétences nécessaires pour devenir un interprète ou un traducteur compétent ne peuvent pas s'acquérir du jour au lendemain ou en suivant une formation de trois jours. Pour nous, le problème se complique davantage en raison des différences linguistiques beaucoup plus grandes entre l'anglais et la langue inuite que celles entre l'anglais et le français. Il y a aussi d'importantes différences de dialectes entre les variantes de la langue inuite parlées dans différentes régions et collectivités.

Comme les membres du Comité pourront le constater dans l'extrait du hansard que j'ai distribué plus tôt, nous nous sommes associés à des partenaires comme le Collège de l'Arctique du Nunavut en vue de renforcer les capacités locales dans ces professions, mais il faut bien reconnaître qu'il s'agit là d'un long processus.

Je voudrais conclure en remerciant encore une fois le Comité de son invitation à comparaître aujourd'hui. J'espère que les renseignements que j'ai fournis vous seront utiles dans le cadre de votre étude, et je serai heureux de réagir à vos commentaires et de répondre à vos questions.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Nakurmiik.

Je veux juste m'assurer que tout le monde a reçu une copie de ce mémoire. D'accord. Comme notre témoin l'a indiqué, il nous a apporté quelques échantillons du hansard qui est produit en anglais et en inuktitut. Êtes-vous d'accord pour que j'en fasse la distribution? J'ai besoin de votre permission.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je vous en prie.

Le président:

D'accord, si vous voulez bien le distribuer à tous les membres du Comité.

Suivant notre mode de fonctionnement habituel, chaque parti a droit à un temps précis pour poser ses questions. Si l'on n'imposait pas de limites semblables à des politiciens, nos travaux risqueraient de s'éterniser.

Nous commençons avec Mme Tassi.

Mme Filomena Tassi (Hamilton-Ouest—Ancaster—Dundas, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur Quirke, pour vos observations préliminaires. Merci également d'être des nôtres aujourd'hui pour nous faire bénéficier de votre expérience et de votre expertise à ce sujet.

Vous avez parlé des difficultés auxquelles vous êtes confrontés principalement pour ce qui est des ressources financières et humaines. À la lumière de votre propre expérience, quels conseils pourriez-vous nous donner pour surmonter de telles difficultés?

Les initiatives que vous avez lancées sont fantastiques, compte tenu des différences entre les langues, mais quels conseils généraux pourriez-vous nous donner pour la suite des choses?

M. John Quirke:

J'ai indiqué le montant de nos dépenses, mais permettez-moi de situer un peu les choses dans leur contexte. Les sommes que nous dépensons à cette fin sont difficilement comparables à celles que vous consacrez aux mêmes services pour l'anglais et le français. C'est simplement que nous offrons ces services en inuktitut.

Le montant que j'ai cité remonte à quelques années. À titre d'exemple, nous avons consacré l'an passé plus de 900 000 $ à ces services. Si je considère mes budgets discrétionnaires et non discrétionnaires, cela représente 20 % de mes dépenses. Une fois que l'on a enlevé les salaires et les avantages sociaux de tous les députés, les budgets des agents indépendants, mon propre salaire et celui de mon personnel, cela correspond à 20,9 % de mon budget. Comme nous offrons ces services en inuktitut et que vous le faites en anglais et en français, il est bien évident que vos chiffres vont être nettement supérieurs aux miens.

Il est bien évident qu'à partir du moment où le conseil de gestion de la Chambre des communes — ou en fait l'instance dont relève votre comité permanent — déterminera les services que vous allez offrir, il faudra bien sûr s'assurer de prévoir les budgets nécessaires à cette fin. Ce n'est toutefois pas la principale difficulté à mes yeux. Vous devrez surtout faire le nécessaire pour trouver les interprètes compétents capables d'offrir ces services aux députés qui souhaitent prendre la parole en Chambre dans une langue autochtone. À bien des égards, la question du budget est plutôt facile à régler, dans un sens ou dans l'autre. Il s'agit surtout de réussir à trouver les personnes capables d'offrir ces services.

(1125)

Mme Filomena Tassi:

C'est donc la question des ressources humaines qui est la plus difficile à régler.

Je constate sur la photo que vous avez les cabines d'interprétation juste derrière. Seriez-vous prêts à envisager l'interprétation à distance? Avez-vous déjà réfléchi à cette possibilité, ou préférez-vous vraiment avoir les interprètes sur place?

M. John Quirke:

Nous n'avons jamais essayé cette formule. Je ne crois pas que cela fonctionnerait pour nous. Nous avons un gros problème avec la connexion Internet au Nunavut. Il est déjà difficile de simplement essayer d'offrir un accès raisonnable aux services Internet dans l'ensemble du territoire. C'est vraiment horrible. Je ne crois donc pas que cela pourrait fonctionner.

J'ai mené récemment un processus de dotation pour pourvoir un poste au sein de notre personnel. Les candidats voulaient parler en inuktitut, ce qui est tout à fait légitime. Mais comment procéder si on veut faire l'entrevue par téléphone? Comment s'y prendrait-on? Nous ne l'avons jamais envisagé sérieusement — et je n'y ai moi-même pas réfléchi — mais je dirais que ce serait mission impossible dans notre cas.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Pourquoi pas à Ottawa? Supposons, par exemple, qu'il n'y ait pas de problème avec Internet. Est-ce qu'il y a quelque chose qui pourrait empêcher d'offrir des services d'interprétation à distance?

M. John Quirke:

À première vue, je dirais que non. Si vous choisissez d'emprunter cette avenue, il faudrait réaliser un projet pilote, mais je ne vois pas en quoi il pourrait être problématique d'offrir ces services à distance.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Il semble y avoir ici un certain nombre de cabines. Est-ce que toutes ces cabines que l'on voit en arrière-plan servent à l'interprétation? On dirait que...

M. John Quirke:

La cabine la plus à gauche sert pour les médias. La suivante est pour l'interprétation entre l'inuktitut et l'anglais. Il y a ensuite celle utilisée pour l'inuinnaqtun et l'anglais. La cabine suivante sert à mon personnel pendant les sessions, mais c'est également une cabine destinée à l'interprétation que nous pourrions utiliser si jamais il fallait offrir des services en français. Il s'agirait alors simplement d'y installer les équipements et les connexions nécessaires.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

D'accord.

Vous avez indiqué par ailleurs avoir recours à la sous-traitance pour la production du hansard. Comment est-ce que cela fonctionne? Quel est le délai de livraison?

M. John Quirke:

Comme je l'ai indiqué, il y a eu un appel d'offres qui a été remporté par une entreprise d'Iqaluit. Cette entreprise a le contrat depuis 1999. Je pense qu'elle nous offre d'excellents services.

Nous recevons normalement la version anglaise du hansard ou des bleus le lendemain matin entre 8 heures et 10 heures. La version en inuktitut nous arrive habituellement plus tard dans l'après-midi. Il arrive à l'occasion qu'il y ait des retards, mais on peut dire que la version anglaise est généralement livrée entre 8 heures et 10 heures le matin, suivie de l'inuktitut dans l'après-midi.

Mme Filomena Tassi:

Vous avez mentionné une initiative que vous avez lancée pour la formation des interprètes. Dans quelle mesure vous est-il difficile de trouver des interprètes ayant la formation voulue?

M. John Quirke:

Je peux compter sur les doigts d'une seule main le nombre d'interprètes qui sont là depuis le tout début, soit le 1er avril 1999. Il y en a quatre en fait. Nous en avons vu passer plusieurs autres depuis. Ils nous ont quittés pour des motifs de santé ou pour prendre leur retraite. Nous avons hérité de certains interprètes des Territoires du Nord-Ouest lors de la scission. Ce fut, bien sûr, le cas des interprètes en inuktitut. Certains d'entre eux vivaient déjà au Nunavut de toute manière, si bien que nous leur avons automatiquement offert des contrats. Ils sont avec nous depuis les tout débuts. D'autres interprètes en inuktitut qui ont choisi de s'installer à Yellowknife faisaient partie de notre équipe au départ, mais ont quitté depuis pour la retraite ou pour d'autres motifs.

Nous avons pu voir au cours des deux dernières législatures, un constat que nous avons d'ailleurs commencé à faire à compter de la deuxième, à quel point il est difficile de trouver de nouveaux interprètes. C'est un problème avec lequel nous avons dû composer depuis la création du Nunavut. Nous avons collaboré avec le Collège de l'Arctique du Nunavut pour essayer de mettre sur pied un programme de formation en interprétation et traduction, mais les progrès ont été plutôt lents.

Je me réjouis à la perspective de l'arrivée de la prochaine cohorte qui compte 8 ou 10 étudiants. Nous leur avons permis de faire de l'interprétation simultanée à la Chambre. Nous avons, bien sûr, demandé à nos députés de faire preuve de patience vu qu'il était possible que des erreurs soient commises, mais le tout a très bien fonctionné. Je crois qu'ils vont terminer le programme cette année et j'ai grand-hâte de voir combien d'entre eux pourront travailler pour nous ou retourner dans leurs collectivités respectives pour offrir ces services.

Cela demeure toujours difficile, car j'en viens parfois à me demander si une carrière d'interprète-traducteur est vraiment susceptible d'intéresser bien des jeunes du Nunavut. Je continue de croiser les doigts, car l'heure de la retraite sonnera bientôt pour plusieurs de nos interprètes actuels.

(1130)

Le président:

Pour votre gouverne, Filomena, l'Assemblée législative du Yukon a aussi recours à la sous-traitance pour le hansard.

Savez-vous à quel taux horaire vous rémunérez vos interprètes? Nous avons eu des indications à ce sujet d'un autre témoin.

M. John Quirke:

Oui, je sais. J'ai lu les transcriptions de vos délibérations.

Nous avons quatre taux différents pour les interprètes. Ils vont de 650 $ par jour jusqu'à 1 010 $, en passant par 750 $ et 800 $. Une journée compte 7,5 heures de travail. Lorsqu'un interprète se présente au bureau le matin, il doit traduire des documents ou interpréter des séances de comité. Comme je l'indiquais, notre Assemblée législative débute ses travaux à 13 h 30, et les interprètes se retrouvent alors en cabine.

Nous avons donc ces quatre taux, de 650 $ jusqu'à 1 010 $ par jour.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais peut-être commencer avec une question à ce sujet. Vous avez tout cet éventail de taux de rémunération. Est-ce pour faire la distinction entre les interprètes eux-mêmes et ceux qui traduisent des documents écrits?

M. John Quirke:

Non, ils accomplissent tous les mêmes tâches. Le taux varie en fonction de leurs compétences. Nous évaluons leur rendement, et ils progressent dans l'échelle salariale en conséquence.

M. Scott Reid:

Votre assemblée législative ne siège que pendant un nombre limité de journées par année. Est-ce que les interprètes accomplissent d'autres tâches pour vous lorsque l'Assemblée ne siège pas?

M. John Quirke:

Oui, bien sûr. Lorsque l'Assemblée ne siège pas, nous sommes pour eux, comme je me plais à le dire, l'employeur de premier choix. Ils sont donc toujours disponibles pour travailler lors des séances de comité ou des audiences publiques et pour répondre à nos différents besoins courants. Ainsi, ils pourront faire la traduction nécessaire à un taux horaire différent pour un député qui doit envoyer de la correspondance dans les deux langues.

M. Scott Reid:

J'aurais une question au sujet de l'inuktitut et de l'inuinnaqtun. Tout dépendant à quel spécialiste on pose la question, l'inuktitut au sens large est soit un groupe de langues ou un continuum de dialectes, soit un ensemble de dialectes pouvant être considérés comme faisant partie d'une même langue. Comme je ne parle aucun de ces dialectes, je dois m'en remettre à vous comme unique source d'information.

Est-ce que les locuteurs en inuktitut et en inuinnaqtun peuvent se comprendre les uns les autres?

M. John Quirke:

Oui, mais difficilement. Ceux qui parlent inuktituk ont une certaine compréhension de l'inuinnaqtun. Il y a d'importantes différences dans l'interprétation de certains termes. Notre commissaire aux langues parle d'ailleurs l'inuinnaqtun. L'une des premières choses qu'elle m'a dite lorsque nous l'avons embauchée, c'est qu'elle allait devoir peaufiner son inuktituk en raison des distinctions entre les deux langues, en plus d'améliorer son français.

Lorsque quelqu'un parle en inuinnaqtun — et je peux vous le dire d'expérience, car mon épouse est inuk — ceux qui s'expriment en inuktitut doivent redoubler d'attention. L'inverse est également vrai. Chacun doit bien écouter ce que l'autre dit, car il y a des différences quant au sens que l'on donne à certains mots.

(1135)

M. Scott Reid:

Vous nous avez indiqué quels interprètes travaillaient dans les différentes cabines. Est-ce qu'il y en a qui y font l'interprétation de l'inuinnaqtun vers l'inuktitut, et inversement, lorsque les députés siègent?

M. John Quirke:

Oui, c'est dans la troisième cabine sur la photo. Je dois aussi préciser que les interprètes en inuinnaqtun ne sont là que pour les séances de la Chambre. Nous n'avons pas recours à leurs services pour les réunions des comités permanents ou les séances à huis clos, à moins qu'un député n'en fasse la demande. Au cours de notre première législature, l'inuinnaqtun était beaucoup utilisé. Nous avions quelques députés qui le parlaient couramment, si bien que nous faisions appel aux interprètes pour nos séances de comité. Au cours des législatures plus récentes, l'inuinnaqtun n'est plus beaucoup utilisé pendant les réunions des comités. Notre premier ministre s'exprime en inuinnaqtun, mais il ne participe pas à ces séances.

M. Scott Reid:

La disparité dans la situation des différentes langues autochtones fait partie des éléments qui nous compliquent la tâche dans ce dossier à l'échelle du Parlement fédéral. Ainsi, certaines de ces langues, dont l'inuktitut est le meilleur exemple, se tirent très bien d'affaire en demeurant la langue la plus utilisée à la maison, en plus d'être la langue maternelle, pour les jeunes aussi bien que pour les aînés, ce qui est selon moi la meilleure façon d'évaluer la santé d'une langue. Nous avons par ailleurs des langues qui sont en péril et qui ont connu dans certains cas un déclin catastrophique, lorsque l'on considère le pays dans son ensemble.

Je sais à quoi m'en tenir concernant l'inuktitut, mais pourriez-vous me dire si l'inuinnaqtun est une langue qui est en danger? Est-ce que ses perspectives démographiques lui permettent d'espérer un avenir meilleur? Je pose la question en pensant à la situation démographique; il ne s'agit pas de porter un jugement de valeur en s'appuyant sur le genre de mesures de vulnérabilité qu'utiliserait un linguiste.

M. John Quirke:

Je dirais que c'est une langue en péril. On la parle à Cambridge Bay ainsi qu'à Kugluktuk, une collectivité connue auparavant sous le nom de Copper Mine. Il y a des efforts qui sont déployés pour favoriser une plus grande utilisation de cette langue. Je vous ai déjà indiqué que notre commissaire aux langues parle l'inuinnaqtun, ce qui va beaucoup nous aider en faisant comprendre à ces deux collectivités que leur langue est importante.

À l'échelon local, il y a bien sûr un désir très marqué de préserver la langue et d'en faire la promotion. Comme vous l'avez souligné, la situation de l'inuktitut est excellente dans toutes les autres collectivités. La préservation de la langue est primordiale pour la culture. Je peux constater que c'est une question de fierté. Les gens sont très fiers de pouvoir dire qu'ils parlent l'inuktitut, leur langue maternelle. Nous pouvons l'observer partout au Nunavut, et surtout à l'extérieur d'Iqaluit. Je reviens d'un séjour à Pond Inlet où l'ensemble du caucus s'est réuni. J'y ai croisé de nombreux enfants qui parlent inuktitut et qui sont fiers de leur langue.

Cette langue va survivre. Dans le cas de l'inuinnaqtun, j'espère simplement que l'on fera le nécessaire pour assurer sa survie, mais ce n'est pas chose facile.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai noté une chose. Le hansard que vous nous avez distribué est disponible en anglais et en inuktitut, mais pas en inuinnaqtun. Est-ce qu'il existe une version écrite du hansard en inuinnaqtun?

M. John Quirke:

Non.

M. Scott Reid:

Est-ce simplement une question de coûts?

M. John Quirke:

Nous n'avons jamais considéré que c'était une question de coûts. En 1999, comme l'inuktitut était prédominant dans 23 des 25 collectivités, nous avons opté pour cette langue. En outre, il y a très peu de gens qui sont capables de traduire en inuinnaqtun.

Il y a l'écriture syllabique d'un côté et l'anglais de l'autre. Si l'on en arrivait à une langue inuktitut normalisée de telle sorte que tous les citoyens du Nunavut liraient l'écriture syllabique, c'est sans doute celle que l'on utiliserait.

(1140)

Le président:

J'ai oublié de souhaiter la bienvenue à M. Morrissey.

Lorsque vous parlez de cette réunion du caucus, était-ce la totalité des députés — je sais qu'il n'y a pas de parti politique — ou seulement les membres du Cabinet ou encore juste l'opposition?

M. John Quirke:

À Pond Inlet, c'était l'ensemble du caucus, soit les 22 députés du Nunavut.

Le président:

Pour la gouverne de mes collègues, je précise que dans certains territoires, comme il y a seulement 35 jours de séance, on tient, contrairement à ce que nous faisons ici, de nombreuses réunions de comité pendant les périodes où l'Assemblée législative ne siège pas.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Saganash.

M. Romeo Saganash (Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je suis très heureux d'être de retour ici.

Bienvenue à vous, monsieur Quirke, et merci de votre contribution. L'expérience acquise au Nunavut va certes être d'une grande utilité au Comité dans l'étude qu'il mène actuellement.

Je veux d'abord m'assurer d'avoir bien saisi un montant que vous avez indiqué. Vous avez parlé de 3,7 millions de dollars pour l'exercice 2015-2016 en disant que cela représente 20 % de votre budget. Est-ce bien cela?

M. John Quirke:

Le montant indiqué dans le document s'applique à plus d'un exercice.

Au cours du dernier exercice financier qui s'est terminé le 31 mars 2017, j'ai dépensé 980 795 $. Cette somme représente — et je vous prie de m'excuser, car j'ai donné le mauvais pourcentage tout à l'heure — 21,9 % du financement qui relève directement de mon contrôle. Nous avons un budget de 26,8 millions de dollars. Si j'enlève les salaires de tous les députés, leurs pensions, leurs primes et tout le reste, mon propre salaire et celui de mon personnel ainsi que le budget des agents indépendants, il me reste un montant de 4,4 millions de dollars — 4 474 000 $ plus précisément — que je peux utiliser à ma guise. De cette somme, 980 000 $ ont été consacrés aux services linguistiques.

Comme je l'ai déjà souligné, nos services sont offerts pour l'anglais et l'inuktitut. Je sais que les montants dépensés à la Chambre des communes pour l'anglais et le français sont nettement plus élevés.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Il y a une autre difficulté que nous pourrions avoir à surmonter, comme vous l'avez mentionné dans votre exposé. Je veux d'ailleurs vous citer: « Le plus important problème de capacité auquel nous sommes confrontés, c'est le très petit nombre de personnes dans le monde capables de fournir des services d'interprétation et de traduction de qualité en langue inuite... »

Vous parlez de qualité. À quel point ce facteur est-il important?

M. John Quirke:

C'est très important. Nous savons qu'il y a toujours certaines pertes dans l'interprétation d'une langue vers une autre.

Depuis les tout débuts, il y a des gens qui se plaignent en prétendant ne pas avoir dit telle ou telle chose et en soutenant que notre interprète s'est trompé. Les différences entre les dialectes sont suffisamment marquées pour entraîner certaines récriminations de la sorte.

Il y a eu bien des occasions, surtout pendant les deuxième et troisième législatures, où la qualité de l'interprétation a suscité des rappels au Règlement. Je n'ai pas besoin de vous expliquer ce qu'est un rappel au Règlement, mais je dois vous préciser que nous n'avons pas à le faire le jour même. Si nous pouvons attendre au lendemain, ou même au surlendemain, pour faire un rappel au Règlement, c'est qu'il nous faut revenir en arrière pour voir ce que l'interprète a dit.

Je me souviens d'un cas qui est survenu lors de la troisième législature. À la suite d'une intervention d'un député maintenant à la retraite, un de ses collègues croyait bien pouvoir faire un rappel au Règlement. Nous avons repassé l'enregistrement audio et vidéo dans mon bureau avec trois interprètes pour déterminer ce qu'il avait effectivement dit sans que l'on puisse vraiment se mettre d'accord. En fin de compte, nous avons pu tirer les choses au clair, mais c'est un peu ce que je veux dire quand je parle de qualité. Vous pouvez bien avoir les meilleurs interprètes qui soient, mais s'il y a des divergences entre votre compréhension de la langue et celle du député qui a la parole, vous allez vous retrouver dans une impasse comme celle que j'ai citée en exemple.

Quoi qu'il en soit, nous sommes toujours en quête du meilleur niveau de qualité possible.

Merci.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Je vois.

Cela m'amène à une question au sujet des quatre taux de rémunération pour vos interprètes. Vous avez indiqué dans votre exposé que vous évaluiez leur compétence. Qui exactement procède à cette évaluation?

(1145)

M. John Quirke:

C'est moi ou mon sous-greffier et mon greffier adjoint, tous les deux Inuits, ainsi que les députés. Ceux-ci nous indiquent si les services d'interprétation sont satisfaisants, une rétroaction qui nous a permis de déterminer dans certains cas que les personnes en place n'avaient pas la compétence voulue.

Nous avons aussi des commentaires du public. Il s'agit habituellement de questions reliées aux divergences entre les dialectes. La rétroaction reçue de mon personnel inuit et des députés eux-mêmes est sans doute celle qui est la plus pertinente.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Il va de soi que les difficultés qui nous attendent risquent d'être encore plus grandes, car je ne crois pas que nous verrons le jour où la Chambre des communes accueillera 338 députés autochtones. Je souhaiterais bien que ce soit le cas, mais il faudra attendre une nouvelle ère, après la révolution, mais...

Des voix: Ah, ah!

M. Romeo Saganash: Je pense que ces difficultés risquent d'être moindres du fait qu'il n'y a actuellement qu'une douzaine de députés autochtones. Je ne sais pas combien d'entre eux parlent couramment leur langue. C'est mon cas, mais comme je ne sais pas si j'ai beaucoup de collègues dans la même situation, je crois que les besoins pourraient être moins grands que prévu.

Vous avez parlé de l'écriture syllabique. Ma mère est capable de la lire. Je lui ai déjà remis un texte en inuktitut, et elle a pu déchiffrer l'écriture syllabique sans toutefois comprendre ce qu'elle lisait. Est-ce que l'écriture syllabique est enseignée au Nunavut?

M. John Quirke:

Pardon — vous demandez si elle est?

M. Romeo Saganash:

Est-ce que l'écriture syllabique est enseignée à l'école?

M. John Quirke:

Oui, on l'enseigne. Il faudrait bien sûr parvenir, comme le gouvernement tente de le faire, à une version normalisée de l'inuktitut étant donné les différents dialectes qui composent cette langue. Je ne connais pas très bien le système d'éducation, car je n'ai pas moi-même d'enfant qui fréquente l'école, mais je peux vous dire que des cours d'inuktitut sont donnés à plusieurs niveaux entre la maternelle et la fin du secondaire. Nous avons constaté que de nombreux députés pouvaient parler la langue parfaitement, mais n'étaient pas capables de lire l'écriture syllabique. Je sais que c'est difficile à première vue, mais on l'enseigne bel et bien à la maison et dans les écoles.

M. Romeo Saganash:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous passons à Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur Quirke, de votre présence aujourd'hui.

Je sais que chacun s'efforce de faire de son mieux. Ainsi, notre comité essaie de déterminer s'il sera possible d'offrir dès le départ des services d'interprétation sans faille ou s'il y aura une période d'apprentissage un peu difficile si nous allons effectivement de l'avant avec cette initiative, comme je l'espère. Vous avez indiqué dans vos observations préliminaires qu'il fallait parfois attendre assez longtemps pour que des documents soient traduits. J'aimerais savoir si certains de vos députés ne parlent qu'une seule langue. C'est donc ma première question, est-ce que vous avez des députés unilingues?

M. John Quirke:

Oui, nous avons des députés qui parlent couramment l'anglais et qui peuvent s'exprimer en inuktitut, et nous avons certains députés inuktituts qui ne parlent pas du tout l'inuktitut, mais seulement l'anglais.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Et vous avez des députés inuktituts qui ne parlent pas l'anglais?

M. John Quirke:

Nous avons des députés inuktituts qui ne parlent pas leur langue. C'est bien cela.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je pose la question étant donné qu'il est important de pouvoir avoir des débats et des échanges éclairés. S'il n'y a pas d'interprétation simultanée, ou même si l'on présente en comité un document qu'un autre député n'est pas capable de lire, la démocratie ne se retrouve-t-elle pas perdante du fait que l'on est incapable d'offrir assez rapidement les services de traduction nécessaires?

M. John Quirke:

Ce n'est pas quelque chose qui arrive. Lorsque nous tenons une séance de comité, tous les documents sont produits par les membres dans les deux langues. Nous permettons à un ministre de déposer un document en Chambre lorsqu'il n'existe qu'en version anglaise ou inuktitut. Il est alors entendu que la traduction suivra. Nous veillons à ce que cela se fasse. Nous tenons à obtenir le document dans les deux langues, car il pourrait faire l'objet d'un examen par un comité permanent. Les travaux de nos comités permanents n'ont jamais été entravés du fait qu'un document n'était pas produit dans les deux langues.

(1150)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Est-ce que cela cause des retards? Combien de temps faut-il attendre? Si la traduction d'un document exige plus de temps du fait qu'il est de nature plus technique, comme les rapports des ministres, est-ce que les travaux peuvent être retardés en conséquence?

M. John Quirke:

Je ne peux pas vous répondre de façon précise au sujet des délais, mais je dirais que cela se fait en moins d'un mois. Aucune séance n'a été reportée en raison d'une traduction manquante.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous pouvez l'obtenir dans un délai...

M. John Quirke:

Tous les documents produits pour nos séances par moi-même et mon personnel sont en anglais et en inuktitut. Le gouvernement fournit ses propres documents et nous indiquons très clairement aux témoins qui comparaissent que leurs observations préliminaires... Si j'avais soumis un mémoire comme celui-ci à l'un de nos comités permanents, il aurait été automatiquement dans les deux langues. Si un ministre devait se présenter sans produire le texte de ses observations préliminaires dans les deux langues, les membres du comité pourraient lui dire par exemple de revenir dans une demi-heure avec la traduction. Nous avons un processus bien établi dont nous ne dérogeons pas.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Est-ce que les délais de traduction d'un rapport déposé par un ministre — vous avez indiqué qu'il fallait compter parfois jusqu'à un mois — ont déjà été problématiques du fait que certains députés n'étaient pas informés correctement des intentions visées par un projet de loi? Parliez-vous d'un projet de loi ou d'un autre document? À mon sens, chacun devrait pouvoir intervenir au sujet d'un projet de loi en pleine connaissance de cause.

M. John Quirke:

Cela n'a jamais posé de problème en ce qui concerne le dépôt de documents, et on parle de rapports annuels qui sont exigés par la loi, etc.

Pour ce qui est des projets de loi, dans l'état actuel des choses, toutes les lois doivent être présentées en trois langues. Lors de la première législature, c'est-à-dire au cours de notre première année d'activité, le gouvernement avait l'habitude de présenter des projets de loi uniquement en anglais et en français, comme il était tenu de le faire. Toutefois, à l'époque, nous comptions quatre députés unilingues, et ces derniers disaient: « Nous ne comprenons pas ce que nous approuvons. » Le gouvernement était alors obligé de présenter une version en inuktitut à la prochaine séance.

Ensuite, lorsque le gouvernement a modifié la Loi sur les langues officielles, il a permis que les projets de loi soient présentés ainsi. Par conséquent, nous les recevons, dès le premier jour, dans les trois langues: anglais, français et inuktitut.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous avez indiqué par ailleurs que le travail était divisé en fonction de la langue parlée le matin et l'après-midi. À la toute fin, vous avez mentionné quelque chose sur la division des journées, et je n'ai pas bien compris ce que vous vouliez dire.

M. John Quirke:

En ce qui concerne les interprètes, lorsqu'ils se présentent au bureau, ils sont là de 8 h 30 à 18 heures. Les séances se tiennent de 13 h 30 à 18 heures, et ils sont alors en cabine. Le matin, ils font soit de la traduction de documents, soit de la traduction simultanée pour les réunions de comité. C'est ce que je voulais dire.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord; j'avais compris autre chose et je ne savais pas comment cela fonctionnerait logiquement, mais c'est beaucoup plus sensé maintenant.

Merci.

Je crois que mon collègue, David Graham, a une question à poser.

Le président:

David.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai deux ou trois questions.

Je ne suis pas tout à fait certain d'avoir compris la réponse à la première question de Ruby. Dans la législature actuelle, certains députés parlent-ils anglais?

M. John Quirke:

Tous les députés parlent anglais. Au cours de la législature précédente, il n'y avait qu'un député qui ne parlait pas anglais.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous arrive-t-il d'offrir des services de traduction entre les deux langues autres que l'anglais? Y a-t-il eu des circonstances où vous avez offert des services de traduction entre l'inuktitut et l'inuinnaqtun, c'est-à-dire dans cette combinaison de langues, plutôt que vers l'anglais?

M. John Quirke:

Non.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ici, sur la Colline, on ne peut pas décrocher un emploi en dehors des postes politiques si on ne parle pas l'anglais et le français. Y a-t-il ce genre d'exigences d'embauche à l'Assemblée législative du Nunavut? Les gens sont-ils tenus de parler au moins une autre langue pour pouvoir travailler là-bas?

M. John Quirke:

En fait, nous entrons là dans la Constitution et l'Accord sur les revendications territoriales. Au Nunavut, 85 % des habitants sont des Inuits. Le gouvernement voudrait que 85 % des fonctionnaires puissent parler l'inuktitut, et il prend des mesures pour atteindre cet objectif.

Je viens de mentionner que j'ai fait une entrevue dans le cadre d'un processus de dotation au sein de notre équipe, et j'ai dit que la connaissance de l'inuktitut était souhaitable pour ce poste. Il y avait suffisamment de candidats, même après avoir exclus un grand nombre de personnes.

Il y a des postes où l'inuktitut est absolument nécessaire. Bien entendu, le gouvernement récompense ces membres du personnel en leur accordant une prime au bilinguisme. Évidemment, lorsque nous avons embauché la commissaire aux langues, la maîtrise de l'inuktitut ou de l'inuinnaqtun était un critère extrêmement important pour nous.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien, merci.

(1155)

Le président:

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais poser une brève question complémentaire à ce sujet. À combien s'élève la prime au bilinguisme? Savez-vous si elle varie d'un poste à l'autre, ou avez-vous une idée du montant?

M. John Quirke:

C'est un montant standard, et je vais devoir vous revenir là-dessus. Je serais porté à dire que c'est de l'ordre de 1 200 $ ou de 2 000 $. Il y a maintenant une nouvelle mesure pour inciter les gens à apprendre l'inuktitut, et le montant de la prime va en augmentant, mais je vais chercher cette information et la transmettre à Andrew plus tard.

M. John Nater:

Ce serait génial. Dans la fonction publique fédérale, la prime est de 800 $, un montant qui n'a pas changé depuis plusieurs décennies; ce n'est donc plus vraiment une mesure incitative.

J'aimerais en savoir plus sur les fonctions de la commissaire aux langues. Est-ce qu'elle mène des enquêtes de façon active ou seulement en réponse à une plainte ou encore, dans les deux cas? Comment ce poste fonctionne-t-il?

M. John Quirke:

Les enquêtes sont habituellement déclenchées par des plaintes, mais la commissaire joue un rôle très actif pour ce qui est de promouvoir les quatre langues, y compris le français, auprès du secteur privé. À quel point la commissaire joue-t-elle un rôle actif? Eh bien, je dirai simplement ceci: elle veut intenter une poursuite contre l'Agence du Revenu du Canada parce que celle-ci ne fournit pas de formulaires de déclaration de revenu en inuktitut.

M. John Nater:

C'est intéressant. J'ai hâte de voir la suite des choses.

Je crois que vous avez mentionné que le français est la langue parlée ou la langue maternelle de 1,3 % de la population du territoire. L'Assemblée législative reçoit-elle de nombreuses demandes de la part du grand public pour des documents en français?

M. John Quirke:

Non, pas de notre côté, mais un grand nombre de rapports annuels gouvernementaux sont présentés en anglais et en français. Le français a déjà été utilisé au cours de notre législature. C'était organisé d'avance. Nous avions reçu un préavis. C'était pour une occasion spéciale afin de souligner l'anniversaire de l'association francophone du Nunavut. Lorsque nous tenons des audiences publiques sur la Loi sur les langues officielles, le tout se déroule dans les quatre langues. Je fais venir des traducteurs-interprètes de langue française d'Ottawa. Cela va de soi. J'espère que cette réponse vous est utile.

M. John Nater:

Oui, absolument. Cela se fait-il par l'entremise du Bureau de la traduction ici, au Parlement, ou par l'intermédiaire du secteur privé?

M. John Quirke:

Je crois qu'au début, nous avions obtenu des noms de la part du greffier de la Chambre des communes. Nous avons gardé ce répertoire, de telle sorte que nous communiquons directement avec les entrepreneurs qui offrent des services à la Chambre des communes.

M. John Nater:

Merci.

Le président:

En théorie, notre temps est écoulé. Quelqu'un d'autre veut-il poser des questions?

Monsieur Saganash.

M. Romeo Saganash:

J'ai une brève question à poser.

Vous avez parlé, dans votre mémoire, de la concurrence avec d'autres entités comme le système judiciaire et les autres ordres de gouvernement. J'aimerais que vous nous en disiez plus à ce sujet, car je trouve que vous soulevez là un point important. L'Assemblée législative du Nunavut envisage-t-elle de prendre des mesures pour corriger la situation et pouvoir ainsi recourir à ces interprètes de façon exclusive ou prioritaire?

M. John Quirke:

C'est une bonne question. J'ai 14 interprètes. Je suis très heureux et très fier du fait qu'ils nous considèrent comme leur employeur de premier choix, et ils font preuve d'un grand dévouement à notre égard. Dans 99 % des cas, nous pouvons compter sur leur présence. Nous avons notre calendrier de la session, et ils savent quand nous nous réunissons; ils s'engagent donc à nous aider.

En ce qui concerne les autres organismes, les autres ministères gouvernementaux et les organisations autochtones comme la société NTI et le Conseil de gestion des ressources fauniques du Nunavut, je suppose que nous avons haussé la barre, si bien qu'ils doivent en faire autant lorsqu'ils voient ce que nous payons. Il est à espérer, comme je l'ai dit, que les diplômés qui sortiront du Collège de l'Arctique contribueront à agrandir le bassin, mais à l'heure actuelle, il est difficile de gérer l'offre et la demande. Je le répète, nous sommes très heureux d'être leur employeur de prédilection.

(1200)

Le président:

Qui d'autre?

David, aviez-vous terminé?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nakurmiik. Nous avons eu droit à une discussion formidable et bien utile. Nous vous sommes reconnaissants d'avoir été des nôtres aujourd'hui et de nous avoir fourni des renseignements très intéressants.

Chers collègues, nous allons faire une pause avant de poursuivre la séance à huis clos. Je demanderais à toutes les personnes non autorisées de bien vouloir quitter la salle.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on April 17, 2018

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.