header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-11-15 SECU 42

Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security

(1540)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Robert Oliphant (Don Valley West, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, and welcome.

I'm calling to order this meeting of the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security, which is our 42nd meeting of the 42nd Parliament.

We are continuing our study of Bill C-22, an act to establish the national security and intelligence committee of parliamentarians and to make consequential amendments to other acts that are implicated.

We welcome Stephanie Carvin, assistant professor at The Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, and her class, which is with her today, both for learning, hopefully, and for moral support.

Thank you for joining us at our committee meeting today.

Justice John Major was meant to be a witness today as well; however, our time is Eastern Standard Time, and he is on Mountain Time, which puts him two hours out. We may be able to track him down, but if not, we will reschedule him at another meeting.

We will begin with Ms. Carvin. You have 10 minutes, and then the committee will ask you questions.

Professor Stephanie Carvin (Assistant Professor, The Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University, As an Individual):

I thank the committee for inviting me to speak today.

Before I begin, I would, in the interest of disclosure, state that from 2012 until 2015 I worked as an intelligence analyst with the Government of Canada. My views are shaped by this experience, as well as my academic research on national security issues.

However, with regard to the matter at hand, Bill C-22 and the question of intelligence oversight and review, I would like to speak to issues that have been somewhat less prominent. My presentation will therefore proceed in two parts. First, I will address three issues that I believe the committee should consider as this bill goes forward: efficacy review of intelligence analysis; counter-intelligence and foreign influence; and, communications with the public. Second, I will provide four recommendations.

The first issue is efficacy review and intelligence analysis. I am presenting these remarks almost two weeks after it was discovered that the CSIS operational data analysis centre, or ODAC, had illegally kept metadata and conducted assessments with it. While this issue largely refers to data collection and retention, it also speaks to the role of intelligence analysis within the Government of Canada.

We have frequently heard that CSIS's early 1980s mandate no longer reflects technological realities, but intelligence analysis was never discussed in the first place. Other than noting in subsection 12(1) that the service shall report to and advise the Government of Canada on national security threats, the role of intelligence analysis is barely given any consideration in the CSIS Act. There is no guidance as to how this role should be done, how intelligence should support operations, or in what way advice is to be given. There is no formal or consistent intelligence analysis review.

In short, there is little accountability within much of the intelligence community as to the delivery of intelligence products, how these products are produced, or whether those products are delivered in a timely manner. Additionally, there is no way of knowing how intelligence products are used, or if they adequately support internal operations or policy-making. Further, there is also no way of knowing if analysts have the proper equipment, tools, or training they need in order to produce their assessments.

I believe the committee proposed in Bill C-22 can play a role in helping to address these issues by becoming the first body dedicated to intelligence analysis efficacy review in Canada.

Second, thus far the discussion around reform of our intelligence agencies and oversight has largely referred to terrorism and surveillance, not espionage or foreign influence activities. Counter-intelligence work requires a different set of skills and activities than counter-terrorism does. For example, counter-intelligence activities can have an impact on foreign policy, and vice versa.

Therefore, the proposed committee could assess how well our foreign policy and national security agencies coordinate their activities, or whether intelligence services should be more frank regarding the activities of foreign governments on Canadian soil. Without a doubt, it is challenging to air these issues in public; espionage and foreign influence can be a source of diplomatic headaches and embarrassment. Nevertheless, they should not be left out of the conversation and the consideration of Parliament as Bill C-22 goes forward. This is especially the case as investigating these issues may require going outside the intelligence community in Canada as traditionally defined.

Third, the proposed committee has the potential to be one of the most important communication tools the government has with regard to providing Canadians information on national security. Unfortunately, at present, there are very few ways in which security agencies are able or willing to communicate with the broader public. Worse, in recent years, it has been a trend for national security agencies to publish their reports infrequently or erratically. For example, CSIS has not produced an annual—now a biennial—public report since May 2015, which covered the period of 2013-14. Public Safety Canada's public report on the terrorist threat, the sole multi-agency report on threat activity in Canada, appears on a more regular basis, but does not cover non-terrorism-related activity.

It is my hope that the committee's report will help remedy this gap and become a powerful communication tool that can help improve knowledge and generate trust. I see this manifesting in two ways.

First, it could become a central source of information on the current threat environment that Canada faces. That this would come from our elected parliamentarians would in my opinion contribute to an overall improvement in the understanding of national security issues in Canada. Second, an honest assessment of activities of our security agencies will generate confidence that our national security services are operating within the letter and spirit of the law.

For the second part of my presentation, I will now present four recommendations.

First, it is imperative that Parliament consider the wider context in which Bill C-22's committee will exist and the broader roles it can play in generating trust. Oversight and review of national security agencies is and should be the fundamental focus of the proposed committee; however, I would encourage parliamentarians to think broadly about the role it may play in communicating information and building trust.

Second, with regard to analysis, the committee should, as a part of its mandate, ensure the quality and timeliness of intelligence analysis to support the government and policy-making by holding the executives of national security agencies accountable. Additionally, it should also include review of innovative techniques, such as big data analytics. This would of course require a secretariat that is knowledgeable about these issues and that could advise committee members. This will help transform intelligence analysis from a second thought to core activities supporting policy-makers.

Third, while it might have to be done behind closed doors, the issues of counter-intelligence, foreign influence, and cyber-intrusions need to be given greater consideration in terms of how the committee will handle its mandate. This includes ensuring that these operations are well coordinated with other agencies and departments such as Global Affairs Canada, which might shape the scope and mandate of the proposed committee.

Fourth, the committee should be required to publish its findings every 365 days without exception. Everyone sitting here today knows how easy it is for government reports to fall through the cracks and miss deadlines. Nevertheless, as I have already stated, the committee's report will be a crucial tool in communicating to Canadians. The more frank and honest these reports are, the better informed the debate over measures to counter Canada's national security threats will be.

In this sense, I'm very much supportive of MP Murray Rankin's proposals regarding the committee, as stated in his speech to the House on September 27.

Thank you for your time. I'm happy to answer any questions or hear any comments you may have.

(1545)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

As you were speaking, I was thinking that we've had a number of witnesses who have not been able to come because they were teaching classes. That excuse is gone.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: We'll begin with Mr. Mendicino for seven minutes.

Mr. Marco Mendicino (Eglinton—Lawrence, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Ms. Carvin, for your presentation.

I want to pick up on your last recommendation, the fourth one, and turn your attention to subclause 21(1) of Bill C-22, which on the face of it would indicate that the Committee must submit to the Prime Minister a report of the reviews it conducted during the preceding year.

Do you see that as sufficient assurance that there is a reporting obligation on the committee of parliamentarians to provide information to the Prime Minister, and through the Prime Minister, to the House of Commons, about their activities for the preceding year? Or are you suggesting that there needs to be something else?

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

I would hope for something else, something a little bit more, almost statutory in terms of the regulations. I see that it's here in terms of how it must submit to the Prime Minister a report of the reviews in the preceding year, but there's no timeline on this.

I think it should say “every 365 days”, quite frankly, or, I suppose, 366 days in a leap year. I think that having it as clear as possible that this needs to be released on an annual basis, in law, is important, because this is going to be one of the few tools we have so that the government to communicate what it's seeing and what it believes Canadians should know.

Mr. Marco Mendicino:

You're saying, if I understand your recommendation, that after that first sentence, under subclause 21(1) the words “within 365 days of the preceding year” should be included.

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

Yes.

Mr. Marco Mendicino:

Or something to that effect?

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

Yes, I think that would be a great idea. I support it.

Mr. Marco Mendicino:

To get back to some of your testimony regarding operational activities, how do you interpret the proposed mandate of the committee of parliamentarians as articulated under clauses 4 and 8?

I took several notes during the course of your evidence, which would seem to suggest that you don't think there are sufficient tools currently within any of the existing civilian oversight—for example, SIRC—to shed some light on the intelligence products, as you've described them.

This is a two-part question. One, do you think the mandate of the committee of parliamentarians under Bill C-22 captures the exercise that you think needs to be there in the review of intelligence products? Two, if not, what do you recommend we do with the bill?

(1550)

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

Thank you for your question.

It's an issue that as a former analyst I feel very passionate about. Why I spoke to this issue is that intelligence analysis has tended to be a second thought in member organizations. These organizations are rightly focused on collecting intelligence, but over time they have developed analytical bodies that provide intelligence products to policy-makers with the appropriate clearances, but increasingly, they're also providing unclassified reports to their partners, such as police forces and provincial police forces, and we have no way of knowing how effective this is. As long as the committee understands its mandate to include efficacy review as part of its mandate.... You'll have to bear with me for a second as I flip through the—

Mr. Marco Mendicino:

To maybe give you some assistance, clause 8 says: The mandate of the Committee is to review (a) the legislative, regulatory, policy, administrative and financial framework for national security and intelligence; (b) any activity carried out by a department that relates to national security or intelligence; and it continues, and (c) any matter relating to national security or intelligence that a minister of the Crown refers to the committee.

As we've said before at this committee with other witnesses, the parameters are quite wide.

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

The parameters are wide, I would agree, but are people thinking about intelligence analysis?

I raise this issue because I haven't seen it raised prominently yet by a number of commentators on the subject. I can understand that. There are great concerns about other aspects of this bill with regard to what information MPs can see, who will be on it, and who will be the chair, but in making this as specific as possible, there's no harm in that. I would agree that it could technically be in there, but it's hard for me to see that these issues are being considered, because I haven't heard them discussed.

Mr. Marco Mendicino:

Am I right in interpreting from your answer that your concern is less about the language and more about the culture of accountability and oversight as we embark on this new era? Is that a fair statement?

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

I think that is a fair statement. To be fair, I'm not a lawyer, so speaking about the legalities is not my particular area. One of the things that I hope I conveyed in my talk today was that I want this committee, when looking at this bill, to not just look at the functions of oversight or even efficacy review, but to think about the kind of broader purpose that I think this committee can have in being a communication tool and in perhaps providing oversight for some of the things that just simply don't really take place right now.

Those are the two issues I feel particularly passionate about, which I tried to speak to today.

Mr. Marco Mendicino:

Lastly, before my time expires in our exchange, what do you say that the secretariat, the staff side of this committee, should be turning its mind toward in creating this culture that moves beyond the specific language of the bill, such that the committee starts to dig into some of these other facets of oversight like intelligence products? What should they be thinking about?

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

What they should be thinking about is talking to policy-makers and asking them how they are receiving the products. To be honest, we don't even know. As an analyst, I didn't know who was even receiving my products. Who is receiving the products? Who is using the products? Did they play a part in policy-making? If so, to whom?

Then, of course, they should be talking to the executives of the intelligence analysis bodies, or those who are responsible for them, whether it's the ADI at CSIS, or the head of ITAC, to ask them about—

Mr. Marco Mendicino:

I'm sorry, but what is ITAC?

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

It's the Integrated Terrorism Assessment Centre.

Mr. Marco Mendicino:

Okay.

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

They produce reports meant for the general public, but they also write very high-level documents as well. It's worth trying to find out how products were generated. Who was asking for them? Were they being used by more than one person? Were they all high-level products? Should we be thinking about distributing them more broadly?

Also, are the channels for distribution that we have effective? Sometimes as an analyst you have the feeling that perhaps your products are going into a black hole. You have a lot of smart people in these outfits, and I want to make sure that their knowledge is at least being seen, if not considered.

(1555)

The Chair:

Thank you, Dr. Carvin.

Mr. Clement.

Hon. Tony Clement (Parry Sound—Muskoka, CPC):

Thank you.

Thank you for being here, Madam Carvin. Marco stole almost my entire thunder, but I'm going to build on—

Mr. Marco Mendicino: Sorry.

Hon. Tony Clement: No, no. We were thinking along the same lines.

In my seven minutes, I want to engage with you on the practicalities of this.

This is going to be a committee of parliamentarians, parliamentarians who have other things to do in their lives, such as other committees to be on, or travelling around the country and sometimes around the world. Then we have this very specific role that you have identified in terms of the importance that it has. You've said that we have to get into data analytics and cybersecurity and that our findings have to be timely.

In your mind, how does that actually work? How are we going to be qualitatively able to do this? Also, what's the interaction? You mentioned the secretariat, and I'd like you to build upon that a little bit, but what's the interaction? How does this work? We're not there 24/7.

It's an open-ended question.

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

Thank you very much. I appreciate it.

I think it speaks to the issue of how over even the last five years we have seen this transition to where everyone is talking about big data. I know that the intelligence services are also struggling with big data, and not just for the reasons we saw last week, controversially, but also for cultural reasons. People who were from the first classes of CSIS, perhaps, don't understand how big data or Bayesian statistics work.

What I think we need is a kind of cultural shift. In terms of this particular committee, you're going to need to have a secretariat that is familiar with data analysis and analytic techniques generally. When I was an analyst, we used to talk about structured analytic techniques—that was one way—but it's also about having just a broad understanding of the way the intelligence cycle works. Third, it's about having some kind of background, hopefully, in how big data can be used and how it can support.

You wouldn't necessarily have to be an expert in it but be familiar enough with it so that if you saw it you would know what you were looking at. This is why I'm so pleased that the bill has considered a secretariat that could support the work.

Hon. Tony Clement:

Right. Yes, your point is—I'm dumbing it down for me—that the secretariat isn't there just to schedule meetings and compile a stack of briefing binders. It actually has to be engaging, maybe even on a proactive basis, with the security establishment in this country and developing their own expertise separate and apart from the security establishment expertise. I'm not trying to put words in your mouth, but is that where you're leading?

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

I appreciate it. I think you're saying it somewhat more eloquently than I did, but that's exactly it. The secretariat cannot be people who assemble briefing binders all the time. It has to be people who are actually knowledgeable about the intelligence cycle and process. I would agree with that. They have to be able to support the parliamentarians who are on the committee and be able to say, “This is some big data analysis, so I'm going to break it down for you in 30 seconds, and this is what it means, and this is what you need to know about it.”

Hon. Tony Clement:

Where do we find people like that? Would they be people who have already had some experience in the security establishment, or are they former academics, or...? Do I go to Jobmonster and monster.ca to find people like that? How does this work?

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

I don't know if this is the part where I'm supposed to suggest the Carleton Career Centre, but—

Voices: Oh, oh!

Hon. Tony Clement:

Oh, there they are. Look, my email is ringing already.

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

Right.

I believe that increasingly what we're seeing is particularly a part of professional policy programs, with students who are trained in these kinds of activities: quantitative and qualitative methods in statistics. I believe you could look for individuals who have that kind of professional training.

In addition, if the secretariat isn't necessarily staffed by former analysts, I would encourage you to at least talk to them about their experiences and some of the things they saw going forward, or to at least have some kind of mandate to go outside and ask former analysts for their advice on certain questions.

(1600)

Hon. Tony Clement:

How am I doing for time, Chair?

The Chair:

You have two and a half minutes.

Hon. Tony Clement:

Put yourself in a parliamentarian's shoes just for a second. You're an MP and you've been appointed to that committee. What sorts of things would you charge the secretariat with doing? How would you comport yourself with this committee? Just give me some tips on that.

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

Some of the things I tried to highlight in my talk are issues such as timeliness. When were products started and when were they released? Were intelligence analyses produced within six weeks? Maybe they were sat on for some period of time, so why was that? It's important that we brief people as quickly as possible so that Canadian policy-makers can make the best decisions possible. Timeliness is certainly one of the issues.

The second one is whether they are actually supporting policy objectives. Were people writing about relevant things that people needed to know? They talk about intelligence requirements, so were those products produced to meet what the government actually needed? Alternatively, did—

Hon. Tony Clement:

So timeliness, relevancy—

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

Timeliness, relevancy, and I would also look at distribution. I think that needs to be examined by this committee in particular. Who is getting these products, why, and how are they being used?

Hon. Tony Clement:

Right, because you as an analyst sometimes didn't.... You went into a black hole or a black box in the sausage factory.

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

It sometimes felt that way, if I'm honest.

Hon. Tony Clement:

Yes, okay. Fair enough.

The Chair:

Monsieur Dubé.

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Dr. Carvin, I think you know one of my former professors quite well, Professor Saideman, and as a McGill alumnus I will forgive you for poaching him, although I'm sure he's very happy here in Ottawa. I haven't had a chance to see him since, but I thought I would put that out there. I'm sure he'll be happy that he's in the committee Hansard now.

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

He will be.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Absolutely. I know the man well.

Kidding aside, I do appreciate your stated support for the amendments of my colleague Mr. Rankin. We do want to work positively on this bill. I think it's a good first step. We do think there are some things that need to be fixed.

If you don't mind, I want to get into some of the more technical details. In some of the stuff that came out of the testimony from two weeks ago, if we look at Ron Atkey's testimony, for example, there is the idea that in paragraph 8(b) of the bill the minister can veto an investigation by the committee, which is actually a barrier that is not even there for SIRC. We're having a difficult time understanding why this committee of parliamentarians would have an additional barrier imposed on it that's not already there for SIRC. Could I perhaps get your thoughts on that?

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

There is one thing I neglected to say. I did mean to congratulate the parliamentarians here. I can sometimes be a harsh critic of government, but I think the debate over this bill has been excellent, and I think the feedback on it has been constructive. As someone who observes these events and teaches about them, I think it's been absolutely wonderful. I want to make sure that I put that in the testimony.

With regard to the suggestions of Murray Rankin, I believe they're very good. In particular, to reiterate, I think his proposals on the committee's report are essential and should be incorporated.

With regard to paragraph 8(b), speaking as someone who has worked in a classified environment, I can understand the concern. In my notes that I have here, for the second part of the sentence, I believe there needs to be more guidance, if nothing else, where it says: unless the appropriate Minister determines that the review would be injurious to national security

I can understand why that line is there. If there is an imminent arrest or an imminent investigation, I can understand why you would need to perhaps say, okay, just hold on for a minute. That being said, I think it behooves the committee to put more guidance on that particular clause, perhaps by stipulating the conditions when that would be an appropriate move to make. Right now, I would agree with you that it seems to be unclear.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Speaking of the enumeration of the points that are injurious, one of them, which you have talked about in your remarks, is this idea of international relations and diplomacy and the headaches that can come out of that. I guess the thing I'm having a difficult time reconciling is this notion that just because a lot of what the bill states is what the parliamentarians can investigate, it doesn't mean that's going to be public.

I guess I'm having a hard time understanding why we would prevent the parliamentarians from receiving this information in camera and confidentially, when there's no guarantee that it will be in the report. What I'm getting at is that even if a parliamentarian is not a minister or the Prime Minister, we understand this notion that not everything can be public.

Is there any reason, really, for preventing the parliamentarians on that committee, who have sworn oaths, who have gone through this whole process, and who would face legal ramifications if they divulge this information, from having full access to that information?

(1605)

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

I agree with you that the stipulations for parliamentarians, should they divulge information, are very severe and very clear in this bill. I agree in the sense that those safe locks are there. I suppose where I would like to see more guidance is that you can always present an issue, but it depends on how specific you get with the issue.

For example, let's say there is an ongoing case. It's very rare, for example, that an intelligence organization would divulge the name of the people, or perhaps they would say it was in a city in a particular province. I think you could speak about an issue in sufficient generalities such that parliamentarians could still be briefed on an issue in more general terms, but it's not.... Do you see what I'm saying?

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Yes, I understand. I guess our concern is that—with all due respect—it's more than a briefing, right? The idea is to prevent tragic situations like the Maher Arar one, for example. What I'm having difficulty understanding is why, confidentially, we would not allow these parliamentarians to have full access. One of the examples that was raised was Bill C-622, which was actually a Liberal bill that Joyce Murray presented in the previous Parliament and allowed full access to information.

A lot of folks are saying that is the model to follow, at least internally with the committee, so that they can appropriately do their jobs, because it's difficult to do oversight when you're having to go on a leap of faith with a briefing. I don't know if that makes sense.

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

Yes, it's a tough issue. I would suggest that, if nothing else, there needs to be more guidance. Right now, I think, as it stands, that particular line is not clear enough. It should be more specific. It might help if active “ongoing investigation” were more narrowly defined, because an investigation can last for two to three years, quite frankly.

Again, I think it's important to be clearer and provide more guidance in that particular piece of legislation. I don't have a line on hand with me, and I wish I did, but I understand your concern, and I certainly agree that where we should be erring on this bill overall is on the side of transparency, as opposed to not....

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you.

My time is just about up, but I want one last quick question about the election of the chair. The government has told us that there's no point in speeding it up and that it took the U.K. a long time to get there. I don't really think that argument holds much water. That is one of our amendments as well.

May we perhaps have your thoughts quickly on that? It does influence the report afterwards, because if the chair is answering to whoever appointed him, as opposed to the parliamentarians, I think that might cause a bit of conflict.

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

It's my understanding that in the U.K. now the chair is elected, and I think we're probably going to end up going there anyway and I would suggest that—

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

We just do it now.

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

—it does make sense going forward.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I want to take a moment to welcome Justice Major. Thank you for joining us. Our apologies for the time problem. We're going to stop in the middle of our questioning, have a presentation from you, and then recommence our questioning.

Mr. John Major (As an Individual):

Let me begin by apologizing for getting the time confused. I was labouring under eastern time, and I should have known better.

I will be very brief. The only comment of consequence is with respect to subclause 13(2), where the “information” includes information that penetrates the solicitor-client confidentiality. I don't think that would pass charter scrutiny. I don't think you can pierce the solicitor-client privilege. Perhaps you might consider getting legal advice on that.

The only other comment that I would make is with respect to subclause 21(2), on reporting directly to the Prime Minister. That seemed to be a little too narrow, but as I read further on I think you have provided for eventually getting the report to Parliament.

That's the total of my observations.

(1610)

The Chair:

Thank you. We'll continue. To give you a heads-up, I suspect you're going to be asked a number of questions on that, because I think the committee will want to hear from you.

We're going to Mr. Spengemann now for seven minutes.

You can question either Dr. Carvin or Justice Major.

Mr. Sven Spengemann (Mississauga—Lakeshore, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Professor Carvin, thank you for your service as an analyst, and thank you for being here and for bringing your amazing students.

Justice Major, it's an honour to have you with us.

My questioning has two themes. One is to explore the nature of building trust, because I think public trust in government is one of the strongest assets that this committee is aimed at. I would like to get your views and a bit more detail on that. My second interest is in the relationship with defence issues. I serve on the Standing Committee on National Defence as well, and I think there are clear overlaps, and some teasing out of the details might be helpful.

I want to begin, Professor Carvin, by asking you, just generally, what do Canadians think and feel about national security? How up to speed are they? I know that there are a lot of things in the headlines, but understanding.... My anecdotal assessment is often not as detailed as it needs to be to fully harness or understand the opportunity that this committee represents. What challenges are there on the side of the Canadian public's understanding, and how can this committee work to close that gap?

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

Thank you for your question.

One of the issues that I think illustrated this was the debate over Bill C-51. A lot in Bill C-51 could perhaps have been criticized, but debate over it often came between individuals who were accusing those who did not want to support the bill as being in favour of child molesters, and, on the other hand, individuals who were accusing those who did support the bill of trying to create a 1984 surveillance state.

My concern is that the security environment in Canada has evolved considerably since the Cold War and I'm not convinced Canadians' understanding of that issue has. That's not to discredit the fabulous people working on this area, but let's just take the example of espionage. It's no longer about states trying to break into safes to steal designs for submarines or trying to steal the crown jewels of secrets. It's now about trying to get the health records of individuals through cyber-intrusions in order to use that information to exploit these individuals or to find out information on them where they may be vulnerable.

It's that kind of transition in terms of the scope of activities that we see some of these states doing that I think needs to be raised up. I would like to see this committee talk about the evolution of national security issues that this country faces and then communicate to the country what our services are doing in order to respond.

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

Maybe I'll ask two questions before turning to the committee.

How intertwined is the intelligence community in terms of data sharing and information sharing? I'm looking specifically at the Five Eyes, but even beyond that. Then, what are the changes that are most profound in terms of public perception of the sources of our intelligence?

Could you then add a quick comment on classification levels? How much of a constraint are they in terms of day-to-day work and in terms of what this committee could see and, most importantly, in terms of what this committee could or could not communicate onwards to Canadians?

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

These are some very interesting and challenging questions. With regard to data sharing, it's not.... I read an article yesterday which suggested that because the RCMP now has this operational centre they're sharing all their databases or bringing them all together. No, it doesn't work like that.

Services are bureaucracies, and they are very protective of their information and their people. They've been criticized in the past for not sharing information appropriately. I think there is a perception that it is a kind of free-for-all and that there is data sharing. I am supportive of putting more clarity on the process itself, such as, for example, in Bill C-51, even though that's not what we are talking about here specifically.

I also believe that there should be.... Perhaps this will get to some of your questions on defence. Craig Forcese, the professor at the University of Ottawa whose work I very much admire, talks about having a super-SIRC that would enable the organizations, or at least the committee or some body, to follow the information as it goes from one agency to another. I think there needs to be slightly more appreciation for the safeguards that are put in place within these organizations, as I understood them.

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

That's a fair point.

Can you comment on how much data and how much intelligence comes from open sources versus classified sources? We talk a lot about classification levels. Is that the tip of the pyramid? Or is most information actually classified and the Canadian public really cannot look over the shoulders of this committee to any greater extent than just a report that the committee may issue once a year?

(1615)

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

On the issue of open-source intelligence within the community, I would suggest that.... I've seen statistics that say that as much as 70% of information used by intelligence agencies is actually open-source information. I'm not talking just about databases or anything like that; I'm talking about people reading The New York Times or other articles. There is actually a fair similarity between the jobs of spies and journalists in terms of collecting information using sources and things like that. I think that would be one of the things to be considered.

With regard to the committee, could you repeat that part?

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

If you're saying that's right, then the committee could presumably communicate a fair bit outside of regular reports to the public. It could find some mechanism—you called them “innovative techniques”—to engage the public more so that the public has a better understanding of what the committee does and what our security and intelligence agencies actually do on a daily basis.

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

I absolutely and fundamentally believe that. There was a really good example today in the Toronto Star. The RCMP brought in two journalists to talk about some of the challenges they're facing with regard to encryption and data. They brought them in and talked about the cases. They didn't go into specifics, but they gave examples. This is exactly the kind of work that I would like to see the committee engage in to communicate to Canadians.

You're absolutely right: open-source information could be used to achieve this.

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

That's extremely helpful to our committee. Thank you so much.

In the remaining one minute, could you comment on a potential relationship between the Bill C-22 committee and the NCIU of the Canadian Forces?

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

Again, this is where Craig Forcese says we need to have some kind of super-SIRC that overlooks all the bodies and all the ways that intelligence information is shared. Given the differences in mandate, I would suggest that perhaps the information sharing isn't as great as some people think it is.

Where the challenge is going to be for the committee, in particular—and perhaps this goes back to Mr. Clement's question—is having people with the expertise to understand how military operations work, and how intelligence is used in military operations and how it is used in domestic investigations, because it's very different. These are very different activities. This is my one concern with this kind of larger body that Professor Forcese has suggested. It's that you would need people to have a kind of expertise that transcended that. That would be a challenge.

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

That's extremely helpful.

Thank you so much, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you, Dr. Carvin.

Mr. Miller, you have five minutes.

Mr. Larry Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Ms. Carvin and Mr. Major, for being here.

Mr. Major, I want to ask you to enlarge a bit. You mentioned subclause 13(2) in regard to solicitor-client confidentiality. Can you enlarge a little on what exactly your concerns are?

Mr. John Major:

The only absolute privilege that we have in Canada is the communication between solicitor and client. I think subclause 13(2) invades that, where they say specifically that: The information includes information that is protected by litigation privilege or solicitor-client privilege

That invades the confidentiality of that relationship, which has been part of our legal framework almost forever.

Mr. Larry Miller:

To carry that a little further, Mr. Major, I'm sure that you're probably aware of some framework models in place in other countries such as Britain and what have you. Does any other country have anything like that in terms of the concerns you have here as far as solicitor-client privilege goes?

Mr. John Major:

I would look to the U.K., and I would be surprised if.... Mind you, they do not have charter protection. We have. But I would think, based on the common law in the U.K. and tradition and what they call their “common law charter”, that they would not permit that disclosure.

Mr. Larry Miller:

You're saying that of any country out there, none of them have that clause, that you're aware of.

Mr. John Major:

Not that I'm aware of, but remember, I'm not particularly familiar with this. That stood out as soon as I read the act: that it would be very difficult to get that past constitutional scrutiny.

(1620)

Mr. Larry Miller:

Okay.

Mr. John Major:

I'm sure your legal advisers can be more specific, but I'd surprised if they didn't see that as a problem.

Mr. Larry Miller:

Thank you.

Ms. Carvin, on that note, are you aware of any country that has something in place that would give rise to the same concerns that Mr. Major has?

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

I regret that I am unfamiliar with.... That's not to say that there isn't, but I wouldn't want to speak to something that I'm not familiar with. My apologies.

Mr. Larry Miller:

Certainly, that's fair enough.

Early in your comments, Ms. Carvin, you mentioned working with foreign countries. I got the impression, and maybe wrongly, that you were hesitant about the sharing of information and what have you. Do I have the right assumption?

The reason I'm asking is that in this day and age, whether it's terrorism or whatever, we're living in a different world than we were not that many years ago, so it would seem to me that allies have to work together. Could you enlarge a bit on what you were saying there?

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

I wasn't speaking to the issue of sharing information with other countries specifically, but as you're asking that question, there are issues such as the foreign traveller issue. This has become a real issue. We have to work with other democracies and other countries in Europe as we look at the flow of travellers, for example, who are joining the Islamic State. I strongly suspect that those numbers are down, given the losses that the Islamic State has experienced, but that said, they often travel through Europe and countries like this. We need to be able to partner and work better with these countries.

The challenge is that no country likes giving information on their citizens. No country really likes exchanging names. What we've seen increasingly, particularly given Canada's experience in the 2000s with regard to some of the inquiries, is that more and more caveats are being attached to information and trying to have better systems in place and more regular communication going forward.

In some cases, it has proven to be very helpful. For example, there was the case of young girls from Toronto who were trying to go to the Islamic State, and they were stopped in Turkey. You must have some kind of coordinated information sharing.

This is a really great issue that I think parliamentarians on this committee could look at in terms of trying to help the security services find guidance and balance. I could add just one more thing to that, if I may. I think there's a perception in Canada that security services don't want more regulation or oversight. I can't stress to you how much that it's simply not the case. They want guidelines. They want to know where the boundaries are, so they don't cross them. I think this parliamentary committee could work with the security services on these challenging issues, such as sharing information.

I agree with the premise of your question. That's going to benefit everyone going forward.

The Chair:

Thank you, Dr. Carvin.

Mr. Erskine-Smith, for five minutes.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York, Lib.):

Thanks very much.

Justice Major and Ms. Carvin, you have the bill before you. If we could turn to clause 14, I want to start with paragraph 14(e). That's information relating directly to an ongoing investigation carried out by a law enforcement agency that may lead to a prosecution.

In the operation of clause 14, if it falls within these categories, it's excluded de facto. My worry here is that when we had the minister before us, we spoke about the bully pulpit. Where information is refused, the committee can actually refer to that information in the report and use that as a bully pulpit, but if it falls within clause 14, it's going to be very difficult to use the bully pulpit, because the minister can say, “Well, I'm obliged by the legislation.”

When we had Professors Roach and Forcese in front of us, Justice Major, and they in fact said that an ongoing investigation carried out by a law enforcement agency would in fact include the Air India bombing, because there's still an active investigation. I would put it to you that when we talk about access to information, should we have the provision of paragraph 14(e) in the act as an exclusion without any refusal related to “injurious to national security”? There's not that additional factor that exists in clause 16, and without any reasons provided by the minister.

The Chair:

I suggest that Mr. Major start.

Mr. John Major:

I think you could penetrate a lot of sources of information with warrants, and I think for the right of access under subclause 13(2), if you were to obtain a warrant from a Federal Court judge disclosing the reason why, you'd need to have, in my opinion, substantial grounds, but if the safety of the country were in some way endangered, you'd get a search warrant that would be similar to a warrant to search a residence. I think that with a warrant you could get this information.

For instance, solicitor-client information does not include the commission of a crime. If that communication discloses a crime, there's no protection. Similarly, I think a warrant would be sufficient. You'd need to have substantial grounds to convince a judge to give you the warrant, but once you had the warrant, you'd be entitled to that information.

(1625)

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Ms. Carvin, I'll give you an opportunity to respond as well, and again, could you speak more broadly to access to information? I would note that in the U.K., access to information can be refused for national security reasons. The minister is required in all cases to provide a refusal, unlike in this act, and there is a ministerial directive that it's expected to be required to be exercised rarely.

I would also note that in the U.S., for the Senate select committee on intelligence and the U.S. House permanent select committee on intelligence, the executive cannot withhold any information from them except temporarily and under extenuating circumstances, such as in relation to highly covert and time-sensitive operations. If you could, please speak to access to information with specific reference to clause 14.

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

Yes, I have that underlined a number of times.

I think that for me the issue is “ongoing investigation”. As I've already said, some of these investigations go on for years. There's the Air India inquiry, for example, but just your regular run-of-the-mill domestic terrorism investigation can take two to three years before you feel that you have the appropriate level of evidence against someone who you can bring in and actually prosecute.

Part of it might be how “ongoing investigation” is defined or understood in terms of this particular clause in paragraph 14(e). I like the suggestion of perhaps something along the lines of paragraphs 16(1)(a) and 16(1)(b). If you added something here in terms of “injurious to national security”, as in paragraph 16(1)(b), that might be appropriate.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I want to pick up on that. Paragraph 14(b) is duplicated. You'll see that in clause 16 there's a reference to “information constitutes special operational information”. I won't take you to the Security of Information Act, but trust me, paragraph 14(b) is duplicated in section 8 of the Security of Information Act, and paragraph 14(d) is also duplicated, largely.

If we were to remove paragraphs 14(b) and 14(d), and subject paragraph 14(e) to a refusal and to the additional criterion of !injurious to national security”, would that make good sense?

Prof. Stephanie Carvin:

Offhand, I would say yes.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I think I'm out of time.

The Chair:

You're out of time.

As chair, I just want to clarify something with Mr. Major. With respect to the exceptions in clause 14, you're talking about warrants that could be issued under clause 13. Just to clarify, are you saying, though, that the information that is excluded in clause 14 would be trumped by clause 13 powers?

Mr. John Major:

I'm not sure that I understand that question. Clause 14—

The Chair:

There are exceptions in clause 14.

Mr. John Major:

Do you have any particular subclause in mind?

The Chair:

I'd say all of them. For example, there is paragraph 14 (e), which mentions information relating directly to an ongoing investigation carried out by a law enforcement agency that may lead to a prosecution

That is an exception for material that would be available to the committee of parliamentarians. I might have misheard when I was trying to understand. You seemed to say that this could be gathered if under clause 13 a warrant is gained

Mr. John Major:

What I think I wanted to say was that the information sought under subclause 13(2) as it's presently drafted would not permit solicitor-client exchange, and that the solicitor-client privilege under our charter would preclude that disclosure without the benefit of a warrant.

(1630)

The Chair:

Okay. Thank you very much.

We started late, and I thought that because the New Democratic Party didn't have a chance to ask questions when Mr. Major was here, I could give another couple of minutes to Mr. Dubé.

That's if you have questions, Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Yes. Thank you, Chair. I just have one question, so I won't use up too much of that indulgence.

Justice Major, you spoke of the Prime Minister's ability to redact the report, that component of the bill. We have an amendment that, in what we see as the minimum standard, would make that report to at least be clear on where and by whom it was redacted. If I could just, with your indulgence, read the the key component of the amendment, that would be helpful. I'll paraphrase as much as I can.

If the committee has been directed by the Prime Minister to submit “a revised version”, under subclause 21(5), we say that “the report laid before each House of Parliament must be clearly identified as a revised version and must indicate the extent of, and reason for, the revision”. For us, despite the fact that we have issues with the definitions of what can be redacted and the subjectiveness of it, that is the minimum required to at least ensure that Canadians know the motivation behind “the use of the Sharpie”, if you'll allow me that turn of phrase. Perhaps I could quickly get your thoughts on that.

Mr. John Major:

Well, I agree with what you're proposing. What more can I say? I think that's appropriate.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

That's more than sufficient for me. Thank you very much, Justice Major.

The Chair:

That's pithy.

Thank you very much to both our witnesses. We're going to take a quick turnaround of three or four minutes to change panels.

We thank you, Justice and Dr. Carvin, for being with us.

(1630)

(1635)

The Chair:

I'd like to begin our second panel for today. We will try to end close to 5:30 p.m., splitting between the two panels the time we lost.

We have with us the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP, represented by its chair, Ian McPhail. I believe Mr. Evans is with him. We also have with us the Office of the Communications Security Establishment Commissioner, and the commissioner is here, as well as Mr. Galbraith.

Welcome.

I think we'll begin with Mr. McPhail for 10 minutes, move to Monsieur Plouffe, and then have the questioning.

Take it away.

Mr. Ian McPhail (Chairperson, Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. My remarks will take a bit less than 10 minutes.

I would like to first of all thank you and the committee for inviting me here today as a representative of the commission. Mr. Evans is the senior director of operations of the commission.

I welcome the opportunity to share my views on the proposed legislation and the role of expert review bodies.

As you know, in 2014, amendments to the RCMP Act resulted in the creation of the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission. At that time, the commission’s mandate was expanded beyond public complaints to include systemic reviews of RCMP activities to ensure they are carried out in accordance with legislation, regulations, ministerial direction, or any policy, procedure, or guideline.

The commission now has the ability to review any RCMP activity without having a complaint from the public or linking it to member conduct.

We are currently undertaking two such systemic reviews: one into workplace harassment, at the request of the Minister of Public Safety, and the other, which I initiated, into the RCMP’s implementation of the relevant recommendations contained in the report of the commission of inquiry into the actions of Canadian officials in relation to Maher Arar. The RCMP’s national security activities came under intense scrutiny during the O’Connor commission of inquiry. As such, I felt it was important to undertake an independent review of the RCMP’s implementation of Justice O’Connor’s recommendations.

As a key component of Canada’s security and intelligence framework, enhancing the accountability and transparency of the RCMP’s national security activities is the ultimate goal of the CRCC review. The commission’s review is examining six key areas based on the relevant recommendations of Justice O’Connor, namely: centralization and coordination of RCMP national security activities; the RCMP’s use of border lookouts; the role of the RCMP when Canadians are detained abroad; RCMP information sharing with foreign entities; RCMP domestic information sharing; and, training of RCMP members in national security operations.

The review is ongoing at this time, and it requires the examination of sensitive and classified information. Given that some experts and observers have previously raised concerns regarding whether the commission would get access to privileged information, it is important to note that we have reviewed classified material made available by the RCMP.

Upon completion of the investigation, a report will be provided to the Minister of Public Safety and the Commissioner of the RCMP. A version of the report will also be made public.

This ongoing investigation highlights the key role of the CRCC in reviewing RCMP national security activities. I believe that the expert review provided by the CRCC and its counterparts, including SIRC and the Office of the CSE Commissioner, will be complementary to the work of a committee of parliamentarians.

This bill highlights the critical role of parliamentarians in the national security accountability framework, while acknowledging the contribution of expert review bodies. In that regard, I look forward to a collaborative working relationship with the committee.

Thank you for giving me this opportunity to share my thoughts.

(1640)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[Translation]

Now we move on to Mr. Plouffe. [English]

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe (Commissioner, Office of the Communications Security Establishment Commissioner):

Chair and honourable members, I am pleased to appear before this committee on the subject of Bill C-22. I am accompanied by Mr. Bill Galbraith, the executive director of my office.

Before I make a few remarks about the bill this committee is examining, and since this is my first appearance before this committee, I will very briefly describe the role of my office.[Translation]

You have my biographical note and a summary of my mandate, so I won’t go over them here, but I would like to say that I have found that my decades-long experience as a judge has stood me in very good stead in more than three years as CSE Commissioner.

Being a retired or supernumerary judge of a superior court is a requirement set out in the National Defence Act, the legislation that mandates both my office and the Communications Security Establishment.

The CSE Commissioner is independent and arm’s length from government. My office has its own budget granted by Parliament.

I have all the powers under Part II of the Inquiries Act which gives me full access to all CSE facilities, files, systems and personnel, including the power of subpoena, should that be necessary.[English]

The commissioner's external, independent role, focused on CSE, assists the Minister of National Defence, who is responsible for CSE, in his accountability to Parliament, and ultimately to Canadians, for that agency.

Let me turn now to Bill C-22.

I have stated on numerous occasions that a greater engagement of parliamentarians in national security accountability is indeed welcome.[Translation]

In particular, following the disclosures by Edward Snowden of stolen classified information from the U.S. National Security Agency and its partners, including CSE, the public trust in the intelligence agencies, and in the review or oversight mechanisms, was called into question. Those disclosures dramatically changed the public debate.

(1645)

[English]

I believe that a security-cleared committee, along with the expert review bodies, such as my office and that of my colleagues at the Security Intelligence Review Committee, SIRC, which reviews the activities of the CSIS, along with the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission—the CRCC—for the RCMP, headed by Mr. McPhail, can provide a strong complementary and comprehensive framework for accountability of security and intelligence activities and can indeed enhance transparency.

I believe this committee will help restore and enhance public trust, but it will not be without challenges. Historically, the CSE commissioner was rarely invited to appear before parliamentary committees and the work of my office may not have received its full due. The committee of parliamentarians may help to focus attention on the important work of the expert review bodies. My office and I look forward to working with the committee and its secretariat.

For maximum effectiveness, however, the respective roles of the committee of parliamentarians and of the expert review bodies must be well defined, to avoid duplication of effort and wasting resources. In my view, this is of paramount importance.[Translation]

Avoiding duplication was an obvious theme and I was pleased to see it stated in the bill, in clause 9 entitled “Cooperation”. The words are straightforward but we will have to work closely with the committee secretariat to ensure this happens in practice. The objectives, to my mind, are to ensure comprehensive overall review and encourage as much transparency as possible.[English]

I have some thoughts on how we might begin a productive relationship with the committee and its secretariat. Perhaps we can explore this issue during our question period.

There are, however, some points that should be discussed. I have a number of observations about various parts of the bill. The three-part mandate of the committee, provided for in clause 8 of the bill, is very broad in relating to any activity that includes operations as well as administrative, legislative, and other matters. As written, this will be another reason why we must work closely with the committee from the outset to ensure the rules are defined in practice, and not just to avoid duplication, but to ensure complementarity.[Translation]

I am not privy to the government’s intentions with respect to this broad approach. However, the combination of this three-part mandate could adversely impact the effectiveness of the secretariat’s work. The committee will have to establish its priorities. And again, this is where the committee and the review bodies can work closely together for effective overall accountability.[English]

What is clear is that the government wants to have a review of the national security and intelligence activities of those agencies and departments not currently subject to review. It is critical for effective review to maintain the capacity for expert review that we have now and to develop it for those agencies and departments not currently subject to review. This could be done by establishing another review body or bodies, or dividing them among the existing review bodies. The committee of parliamentarians will, I expect, turn its attention to this issue.

As I read the bill in its current form, it is clear that the committee does not have the same freedom of access as my office or, for that matter, as SIRC. In paragraph 8(b) the committee can review “any activity” that relates to national security and intelligence “unless the appropriate Minister determines” otherwise. This provides a potential restriction on what the committee may or may not see.

(1650)

[Translation]

This is where I believe the complementarity between the committee and the existing review bodies comes in, with reassurance that the latter have unfettered access to the agencies they review. The gap is the departments and agencies not yet subject to review.[English]

In conclusion, I would suggest a couple of small changes to provide clarity, and I could provide these in writing subsequently, if you so wish, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for this opportunity to appear before you today. My executive director and I would be pleased to answer your questions.

The Chair:

Merci.

I should always mention to the witnesses that if at the end of the meeting there's anything that you wished you had said and didn't, it's very appropriate for you to submit that in writing to the clerk, and it will be considered by the committee. That is no problem.

We will begin with Mr. Erskine-Smith for seven minutes.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Thanks very much.

I want to start with the collaborative working relationship that you mentioned, Mr. McPhail, and the emphasis on the complementary nature of the parliamentary committee and the expert review bodies.

Mr. Plouffe, you mentioned that you have more access to information than certainly this committee would have as it's currently written, not only under paragraph 8(b), but also in terms of limitations on access to information under clauses 14 and 16.

We've had other witness testimony that has emphasized that this could be a problem for the collaborative working relationship and could actually get in the way of that complementary approach. I wonder if you have something to say about that.

Mr. Ian McPhail:

The access to information provisions aren't identical, as you point out, Mr. Erskine-Smith. For example, the RCMP Act gives the CRCC somewhat broader access to information on ongoing investigations, in that the RCMP commissioner is required to outline in writing why that would be inappropriate.

The reality is, though, that as a review body the last thing we would want to do would be to interfere with an ongoing criminal investigation, so definitely we would back away from that. Likewise, I would anticipate that the committee of parliamentarians, which is also a review body, would share that policy.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

I appreciate this if we want to establish a working relationship. We've heard other witness testimony that it's very important to establish a good working relationship, not just with the expert review bodies but with the agencies themselves, but of course, you would have that interaction directly with the commissioner and the commissioner would provide reasons. In this case, that conversation would be closed down from the outset pursuant to clause 14 in particular.

Mr. Ian McPhail:

That is possible, and I would say that the committee will have to feel its way. It may well be that amendments to the legislation could be made now. Over the next few years, you'll see how it works in practice—

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

But in your view, in practice, that working relationship—where you interact directly with the RCMP commissioner and the commissioner provides reasons for refusals and there's a bit of back and forth—works fairly well.

Mr. Ian McPhail:

As a matter of fact, the example I gave dealt with matters relating to ongoing criminal investigations. I mentioned in my opening remarks our review of the implementation of Justice O'Connor's recommendations. In that review, we have had access to privileged and classified information. The RCMP has been fully co-operative. We anticipate that this co-operation will continue. If it doesn't, the act does provide a mechanism to determine what processes should take place.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

It sounds like it works fairly well, that back and forth, and not having completely restricted access to information—

Mr. Ian McPhail:

If I can make one further comment, although the act prohibits the position of chairperson—my position—being held by a former member of the RCMP, fortunately we do have some former senior members of the RCMP on our staff, such as Mr. Evans for example, and because of that, our people also know where to go, what information is going to be kept, and where it's going to be kept. So it's not an uninformed request for material and, in that respect, getting back to the first part of your question, I think the commission could be of assistance to the committee of parliamentarians.

(1655)

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Mr. Plouffe, perhaps you could speak to that access-to-information disparity between the CSE commissioner and the parliamentarians committee.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

The way I see it is that as a CSC commissioner I have my own mandate to focus on, and the committee will have its own mandate to focus on. This is why I stressed in my remarks that complementarity between the two committees is very important, so that this problem of access in theory is not a problem in practice.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

But it may be a problem in practice, as pointed out by Professors Roach and Forcese, for example. They used a number of different examples. One example would be being precluded from ongoing law enforcement operations. They say that there's still an active ongoing law enforcement operation with respect to the 1985 Air India bombing. They also speak to the Afghan detainee affair.

Where the parliamentarians committee would be precluded from accessing information related to these issues, and where they may want to of their own volition engage in an inquiry that the public is certainly concerned about, isn't that something we should worry about? Couldn't the parliamentarians committee work together with the CSE commissioner on the same footing, with the same access to information?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

I think you are referring to the exceptions contained in clause 14.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

That's right.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

We might agree or disagree with those exceptions, but in my view they are not unreasonable, taking into account the bill as a whole, the purpose and scheme of the bill and the entire context. I also believe that another witness who appeared before you previously, Mr. Atkey, commented on this when he appeared before you, saying that he accepted them for the most part.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Yes, although he said we should eliminate clause 16 and the limitation in paragraph 8(b).

The Chair:

You have 15 seconds.

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Here's what my last question would be. If these are security-cleared parliamentarians, why should we feel more comfortable with your office having complete access and parliamentarians not having complete access?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

That's a good question, and I guess it's for the government to answer. I suspect, bearing in mind that this is a new committee and that it's the first time parliamentarians will be involved in those matters, that the government wants to go cautiously and slowly. We'll see as things develop what changes should be made to the bill. [Translation]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Plouffe.[English]

Mrs. Gallant—I'm struggling with Madam, Ms., and Mrs.—welcome back.

Mrs. Cheryl Gallant (Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, CPC):

“Mrs.” is fine.

The Chair:

I know. It just took me a minute.

Mrs. Cheryl Gallant:

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. My questions will be directed through you mostly to Mr. Plouffe.

First of all, in your comments, you mentioned that the government wants to have a review of the national security intelligence activities of those agencies and departments not currently subject to review. Would you please list the agencies and departments that you feel are not adequately reviewed at this time?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

I must admit that I don't have the list at hand right now to tell you exactly. The border agency, for example, is the first one that comes to mind. I think that agency should be reviewed by somebody. As an example, it could be SIRC, because the work that CSIS does on the one hand and the work that the border agency does on the other are somewhat similar. SIRC could be the review body for that agency.

With regard to other departments that are not subject to review, the option is for the government to divide them among the existing review bodies—for example, the CSE commissioner, SIRC, the CRCC—or to create a new review body or bodies. I think it's important that the agencies and departments that are not subject to review be reviewed.

(1700)

Mrs. Cheryl Gallant:

My concern is that we see from time to time in Parliament an issue that is sensitive, that is urgent—for example, the screening of Syrian refugees—and the system is in place may have some deficiencies. This committee may have wanted to study it, but were told no. We were just outnumbered by the tyranny of the majority. Do you see it as a concern that what parliamentarians possibly should be studying in standing committees could, by virtue of the government's wanting to keep it out of the public eye, be deferred to this special committee?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

If I understand your question correctly.... I'm sorry. Could you repeat that again, just the essence?

Mrs. Cheryl Gallant:

Do you see that the government might want to defer an issue that a committee might want to study to this special committee just so that it's kept out of the public domain?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

No, I don't see that at all. As I say, the mandates are different, but they are complementary. I think the important thing, as I said in my opening remarks, is to work together: the committee of parliamentarians on the one hand and the expert review bodies on the other. If we do that, I guess this will answer your question.

Mrs. Cheryl Gallant:

Okay. Now, you've said that the committee does not have the same freedom of access as your office or SIRC, though in a specific area it has more explicit access. Which area is that?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

That's the access with regard to the legal opinions, the client-lawyer privilege.

Mrs. Cheryl Gallant:

Okay. Very good. Paragraph 8(b) says unless the appropriate minister determines otherwise, so how would the members of the special committee be able to verify that there is actually a reason that the committee should not have access to certain information?

Mr. J. William Galbraith (Executive Director, Office of the Communications Security Establishment Commissioner):

The legislation sets out that if a minister refuses, or if information is refused to the committee, there has to be an explanation given. Is that what you're referring to?

Mrs. Cheryl Gallant:

We see this in the defence committee all the time when they say that something is a matter of operational security. We don't know whether it really is a matter of operational security. They could be just using this as a way to avoid providing the information. How would committee members know that there is actually a national security issue as opposed to the department or agency not wanting to be forthcoming with the information?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

In the bill, if I'm not mistaken, there's a provision whereby if a minister is refusing that type of information he has to give you reasons, the reason why he's not releasing that type of information.

Mrs. Cheryl Gallant:

In the bill, we're talking about paragraph 8(b). The witnesses could state how the—

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

It's 8(b)?

Mrs. Cheryl Gallant:

Yes. Are you certain that the government or the agency could not simply be using national security as an escape clause for not having to provide the information to the committee?

(1705)

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

I don't see why they would do that unless they are in bad faith, and I assume that everybody is acting in good faith unless the contrary is proven to me.

Mrs. Cheryl Gallant:

All right.

We'll go on to the procedure of the committee. It says: The Committee is to meet at the call of the Chair.

Do any of the witnesses see that there should be a provision whereby a certain number of the members of committee, a minimum number that would be equal to or less than the number of government members, would be able to call for a meeting of the committee?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Are you talking about a quorum?

Mrs. Cheryl Gallant:

Yes.

Hon. Tony Clement:

That's in clause 17.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Clause 17, is it? I notice there is no provision in the bill about a quorum in this committee. It says there are nine members, and clauses 18 and 19, for example, talk about voting, but they don't talk about a quorum. I think there should be a provision saying that the quorum for the committee, let's say, is five members or whatever.

The Chair:

I need you to end there.

Monsieur Dubé, please continue. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I would also like to thank the witnesses for being here today.

My question is for Mr. Plouffe.

Pursuant to the National Defence Act, part of your mandate is to report any CSE activities that are not in compliance with the law. For our part, we are introducing an amendment that would make this committee responsible for alerting the Minister of Public Safety and the Minister of Justice, so that is similar to your mandate.

I would ask you first to speak about the importance of this part of your mandate, and then to tell us whether you think our amendment is an appropriate proposal for this committee.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Part of my mandate is to ensure that CSE activities comply with the law. It goes without saying therefore that if they do not comply, I have to inform the Minister of National Defence, who is responsible for the CSE, as well as the Attorney General of Canada, in accordance with the National Defence Act. If you read the annual report I released last year that was tabled in both houses, you will find that I reported one case where this happened.

The committee's role is to ensure that the activities of the “agencies subject to review” comply with the law. I do not see why you could not also have the power to report such cases to the minister responsible for the agency in question and to the Attorney General of Canada.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Perfect, thank you very much.

We have spoken a great deal about paragraph 8b) and the minister's power to prevent an investigation by the committee, which is not the case for your office or for the SIRC ...

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

It is the Security Intelligence Review Committee, or SIRC.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Yes, thank you, it is hard enough to remember all the acronyms, let alone the acronyms in both languages.

You spoke about complementarity. That would be one example of how we could work together. I would like to take a different approach and hear your opinion of it.

You spoke about something that is very important to the committee of parliamentarians, namely, public trust. Do you not think that adding discretionary powers for a minister—even if we can rely on other, existing bodies to provide oversight—undermines the key objective of public trust? We know that the minister can prohibit investigations, which is not the case for other review committees.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

First of all, you have to understand the nature of the committee that the bill would create. It is a committee of parliamentarians, but not a committee of Parliament, it is a creature of the executive. I don't think this is the first time you have heard this. This is why the prime minister and the other ministers have a role to play. It would be different if it were a committee of Parliament.

It is a committee of parliamentarians, so it is a committee of the executive. This committee, by the way, must report to the prime minister in certain cases and to certain ministers in other cases. That's the philosophy.

Some day things might evolve, with practice, in the sense that we might realize—as is the case in England right now—that it is a committee of Parliament and not a committee of parliamentarians.

(1710)

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you.[English]

Mr. McPhail and Mr. Evans, you raised an interesting point about the importance of your not being a former member of the RCMP, Mr. McPhail, and the independence that comes with that. I'm just wondering about your thoughts on this. We had a similar thought process when it comes to the choice of the chair for this committee, in the sense that if the Prime Minister is naming the chair, I feel there's almost a similarity. It's as if you were a former member of the RCMP. There is a bit of a conflict that can be seen there. What's the importance of the independence that you have and ensuring that you can exercise proper oversight?

Mr. Ian McPhail:

My sense, Monsieur Dubé, is that it's not so much a matter of actual conflict, but rather public confidence.

I'll speak for Mr. Evans here, but I can also speak for all of the former RCMP members who are on our commission staff. They're all, I find, quite determined to proceed with the mandate of the commission, and they bring with them not just that determination, but their specialized and expert knowledge, which is frankly invaluable.

It would be my sense—and obviously this is beyond my authority or the commission's authority—that since the purpose of this bill is remedial and is designed to boost public confidence, I find it difficult to imagine that the Prime Minister or any number of parliamentarians would appoint as a chair someone whose appointment would detract from public confidence and trust.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Right. I appreciate that.

The Chair:

You have half a minute.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

As one last quick question, what was the importance of the ongoing review of Justice O'Connor's recommendations? How important was it that you had access to all that information? You mentioned that in your remarks, but just how important is that? That's something we're debating in regard to this bill, as well?

Mr. Ian McPhail:

It's critical, but as I said earlier, we haven't had to rely on any legal provision to date. I can't foretell the future, of course, but to date the RCMP has been fully co-operative in allowing our investigators full access.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

That full access is key to doing your job.

Mr. Ian McPhail:

Absolutely.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[Translation]

You have the floor, Mr. Di Iorio.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio (Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, gentlemen, for your cooperation and valuable testimony.

I would like to talk about clause 8 of the bill, which pertains to the Committee' s mandate. It states: “The mandate of the Committee is to review“

Paragraph b) states:[English] (b) any activity and it continues: unless the appropriate Minister determines that the review would be injurious to national security; [Translation]

Other witnesses have pointed out that there is repetition in the bill. I would like your opinion on that. Is there repetition in the bill?

Let us look first at clause 14.

Paragraph 14 b) no longer refers to review but rather information, which I consider much more limited.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

It that clause 14 or clause 15?

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

It is paragraph 14 b) that pertains to information and not review.

Paragraph 14 d) pertains to the identity of a person. Once again, it does not refer to review.

Paragraph 14 e) pertains to information, so once again it does not refer to review.

I would also draw your attention to clause 16, which once again pertains to information and not review.

Would you also agree that there is unnecessary duplication and that things are repeated for nothing? In your opinion, are the exceptions set out in clauses 14 and 16 justified?

(1715)

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Earlier, with Mr. Dubé, we touched on paragraph 8b). This paragraph is a restriction; how often will it be applied? We have to consider this. Based on what a minister said recently, this prerogative will be used very rarely.

I have a note in English that explains my thinking. I will read it out, if I may.[English]

It states, “My experience has been that often the fears we have are seldom realized to the same extent as we had thought.”[Translation]

It is a restriction, but is an exception. The principle of an exception is that it is used rarely.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

Do you agree that the minister could allow the review, although the bill stipulates that certain information cannot be disclosed to the committee?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

We have to understand—and I believe you understand this too—that there is a difference between review, which is part of the mandate, and access to the information referred to in clause 13 and in the following clauses. I would say it is not exactly the same thing.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

Very well.

Now, Mr. McPhail and Mr. Plouffe, I would draw your attention to clause 9.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Yes.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

Clause 9, which is entitled “Cooperation”, states the following:[English] The Committee and each review body are to take all reasonable steps to cooperate with each other to avoid any unnecessary duplication of work by the Committee and that review body in relation to the fulfillment of their respective mandates. [Translation]

Do you agree?

Mr. Plouffe, you yourself stated that it is a committee of parliamentarians many of whose members—the vast majority, but not all—are elected. These people go to the polls every four years to renew their mandate.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Yes.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

Do you agree that, in the event of a difference of opinion, this committee takes precedence over committees such as the one you chair?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Are you referring to committees of experts?

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

I am referring to committees of experts such as the one you chair, and the one Mr. McPhail also chairs. The question is also for Mr. McPhail, of course.

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

I don't see it that way. I do not think it is a question of taking precedence. I see what you are getting at, but each committee or body has its own mandate. I don't think it is a question of precedence. I do not see it that way at all.

The expert review mandate that we have, as regards the Communications Security Establishment, is one thing. This involves in-depth reviews several times per year and so forth. I imagine that the committee, by virtue of its mandate, will probably restrict itself to more general matters as opposed to the specific or detailed matters that we examine.

I think they are complementary mandates. It is not a question of precedence; both are important.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

Do you have the power to summons?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Yes.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

Should the committee have the power to summons?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

That might be useful. I do not see a problem in calling witnesses to appear if you wish.

For example, if you are conducting a review of a specific department and want access to documents and witnesses, but are being refused, it could be problematic if you do not have a power of coercion.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

So there would have to be a power subpoena duces tecum, that is, the power of subpoena to produce documents.

(1720)

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Yes, that is something to consider. That is the power to subpoena persons to appear with documents, known as duces tecum, as you said.

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

What are your thoughts, Mr. McPhail? [English]

Mr. Ian McPhail:

It's an excellent question, but I think it goes to the basic role of parliamentarians and review bodies. It's hardly up to me to say what the roles are, but I think you would agree with me that the key roles of parliamentarians are to consider, and if appropriate, pass legislation and to hold the executive to account. The role of review bodies is to carry out the instructions of Parliament in their respective fields.

I would anticipate that if that same philosophy were to carry over into this proposed committee of parliamentarians, it would probably not be the wish of the committee or any such committee to duplicate the work by conducting detailed reviews on specific matters, but rather to consider, for example, the issue that has just been raised today, that is, the question of what access should police have to supposedly confidential material on cellphones, to encrypted messages.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. McPhail.

Mr. Ian McPhail:

There's a very valid public debate on that, but that's not the role of a review body, quite clearly. I just use that as an example.

The Chair:

Thank you. We have to continue. That was eight and a half minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio:

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Clement.

Hon. Tony Clement:

I want to get back to what was described by previous deponents as the “triple lock” that is found in the legislation in clause 8, in clause 14, and in one other clause. I want to get a sense from the witnesses of how reasonable that is.

The triple lock means that you have these clauses that make it clear that the mandate of the committee can be circumscribed if there's a national security issue, something “injurious to national security”, as it says in clause 8. Then we have the whole kitchen sink list in clause 14 of things that cannot be before the committee, and the refusal of information. I guess clause 16 is the other one, which incorporates by reference the Security of Information Act. This has been described to this committee already as a triple lock on the ability of the committee to do its job.

I'm speaking as a member of the previous government, and we didn't want to have this committee in the first place, but it seems to me that if you're going to go to the trouble of having the committee, it should be a committee that is actually able and capable of doing something. This was described in negative terms by the deponents, Professor Kent Roach amongst others, as a triple lock.

Monsieur Plouffe, obviously you're the commissioner of an agency, and Mr. McPhail, you've dealt with these kinds of reviews in the past. There's a balance to be struck, and I get that, but how do we strike the right balance? Obviously, no one around this table wants to do something injurious to national security, Lord forbid. At the same time, if I may say so, all parliamentarians are honourable people, and they're busy people, so to have us go through the genuflection of having a committee without having a real committee seems to me to be a waste of time.

I would like to have your thoughts on this matter, gentlemen.

Mr. Ian McPhail:

Mr. Clement, your point is well taken, and I suspect that probably all of your colleagues on both sides of the table would agree with you.

I can only comment specifically with respect to information that's in paragraph 14(e): information relating directly to an ongoing investigation carried out by a law enforcement agency that may lead to a prosecution;

The language used in our enabling legislation is somewhat broader.

I will get back to the point that I was making a moment ago, which is that I don't believe that it would be your intention that the committee conduct its own investigations of particular actions of the RCMP in terms of its national security activities.

Let me give you an example, if I may. National security activities of the RCMP are actually far broader than I think the public realizes, because many national security provisions have been enshrined in the Criminal Code. As a result of that, there's a law enforcement mandate for the RCMP. The RCMP also works very closely, in many of these areas, with other federal government agencies, and with provincial and even municipal police services.

Our body has the—

(1725)

Hon. Tony Clement:

I hate to do this to you—

Mr. Ian McPhail: Am I getting a little off track?

Hon. Tony Clement: —but I only have 15 seconds and I want to hear from Mr. Plouffe as well. I do get your point.

Mr. Ian McPhail:

Okay. We can work with the provincial oversight bodies and with others.

The Chair:

I'm afraid that's the end of your time.

Mr. Ian McPhail:

Oh, I'm sorry.

The Chair:

Ms. Damoff, for five minutes.

Ms. Pam Damoff (Oakville North—Burlington, Lib.):

Thank you very much.

My colleague would like to ask a quick question as well, so I'll share my time with him. I probably have time for only one question.

To both of you, we know how important public trust is in our policing bodies. How do you believe this committee can work with your agencies to build on that trust and to make sure that the public is well equipped to understand the balancing of public safety with our rights and civil liberties? Is there anything in the bill that could be improved to build on that?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

I think one of the principal challenges to restore and enhance public trust will be transparency. The committee and also the expert review bodies must strive to provide as much information as possible to Parliament and to the public in general, so that there can be a better understanding of what is being done, why, and, particularly, what safeguards are in place to protect the privacy of Canadian citizens.

With regard to CSE, which I'm reviewing, I've been pushing this concept of transparency for the last three years and trying to convince the agency to release more and more information to the public, because for transparency, releasing more information is part of that concept. I think the emphasis should be put on transparency.

Ms. Pam Damoff:

Mr. McPhail.

Mr. Ian McPhail:

Ms. Damoff, I would agree with Justice Plouffe with respect to every point that he has made.

I would also add that there is a constant tension, as you point out, between not just our desire for but our commitment to civil liberties, and also to the protection of Canadians in terms of national security issues. Exactly how that balance should be reached I would see as being one of the key purposes of this committee, because the review bodies aren't able to perform that function. The committee, provided there's not undue partisanship, should be able to do so.

(1730)

Ms. Pam Damoff:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

I have one quick question for Mr. Plouffe, but I think it's an important one.

CSEC is an integral part of our national security establishment and deals with a much higher level of technology than most government departments, and overseeing mathematicians and cryptographers whose full-time job is obfuscation is necessarily difficult. It's one thing to have total access to everything; it's another to interpret that data. In signals intelligence, data mining, and so forth, and in the deliberate compromising of targeted machines, who conducts the accountability code audits?

To give you an example of what I'm wondering about, WIRED magazine reported that last year the Kaspersky Lab turned up a pretty fascinating operation called the “Equation Group” that remotely flashed hard-drive firmware and is believed to come from a Five Eyes partner of the National Security Agency. This is low-level assembly language-type work and requires very specific expertise.

What processes are in place to interpret this level of sophistication in oversight capacity, and how is it achieved or how could it be achieved?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Well, I suspect that this is why we are called expert review bodies. We have experts who work for us. I agree with you that it's not always easy to understand what CSE is doing and, believe me, I was appointed three years ago and I'm still trying to understand exactly, in all the details, what they are doing. It is very complex, but I rely on experts. I have eight or nine experts in my office working for me, and those experts have worked either for CSE beforehand, or for CSIS, or for the security department, whatever, so they are experts.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

These are people who get into weeds of the code and the actual technology of the stuff and not just the records that come out of it.

Mr. J. William Galbraith:

If I may, Commissioner...?

Mr. Jean-Pierre Plouffe: Yes.

Mr. J. William Galbraith: You're at a very granular level, a very deep level. We—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's an area that doesn't get talked about, and I want to make sure it does.

Mr. J. William Galbraith:

When we determine the activities that are to be reviewed and the priority of those activities, we're looking at risks to compliance and risk to privacy. For those that we go through, we receive the briefings from CSE, and where we identify activities, something like that may be part of those activities. We go down from there and determine what are the risks to privacy in that and what are the risks to compliance generally. We then determine what priority will be placed on that.

If there's a requirement to get into the kind of granular detail that you're talking about, we go to, as required, under the commissioner's authority, under-contract computer engineers, for example, to ensure that we're understanding what is going on. CSE, I have to say, is quite co-operative and transparent with the commissioner's office, as demonstrated in the metadata issue of last year.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Galbraith.

That brings our meeting to an end. Thank you, everybody, and thank you to our witnesses for your time with us.

I'll ask you to clear the room fairly quickly, because I'd like to have a brief subcommittee meeting.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale

(1540)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. Robert Oliphant (Don Valley-Ouest, Lib.)):

Bonjour et bienvenue.

Je déclare ouverte cette 42e  réunion de la 42e législature du Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale.

Nous poursuivons notre étude du projet de loi C-22, Loi constituant le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement et modifiant certaines lois en conséquence.

Nous accueillons Stephanie Carvin, professeur adjointe à la Norman Paterson School of International Affairs. Elle est accompagnée aujourd'hui de sa classe, laquelle est venue pour apprendre et — on l'espère — pour procurer un soutien moral à l'enseignante.

Merci de comparaître devant notre Comité aujourd'hui.

Le juge John Major était censé témoigner aujourd'hui également; toutefois, notre heure est l'heure normale de l'Est, et il fonctionne sur l'heure normale des Rocheuses, ce qui donne un décalage de deux heures. Nous allons peut-être réussir à le retrouver, mais sinon, nous l'entendrons à l'occasion d'une autre réunion.

Nous allons commencer par Mme Carvin. Vous avez 10 minutes, puis les membres du Comité vous poseront des questions.

Mme Stephanie Carvin (professeure adjointe, The Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University, à titre personnel):

Je tiens à remercier le Comité de m'avoir invitée à témoigner aujourd'hui.

Avant de commencer, j'aimerais, par souci de transparence, préciser que j'ai travaillé comme analyste du renseignement au gouvernement du Canada de 2012 à 2015. Mes opinions sont façonnées par cette expérience ainsi que par mes travaux de recherche sur les enjeux touchant la sécurité nationale.

Cela dit, en ce qui concerne le sujet qui nous occupe, à savoir le projet de loi C-22 et la question de la surveillance et de l'examen des activités de renseignement, j'aimerais aborder certains aspects qui ont été quelque peu négligés. Mon exposé comptera donc deux volets. Premièrement, je vais soulever trois enjeux qui, selon moi, devraient être pris en compte par le Comité dans le cadre de son étude du projet de loi: l'étude de l'efficacité de l'analyse du renseignement; le contre-espionnage et l'influence étrangère; et la communication avec le public. Deuxièmement, je formulerai quatre recommandations.

Le premier enjeu est l'étude de l'efficacité de l'analyse du renseignement. Je présente mes observations presque deux semaines après la révélation selon laquelle le Centre d'analyse de données opérationnelles — ou CADO — du SCRS avait illégalement conservé des métadonnées et les avait utilisées pour mener des évaluations. Même si cette question touche surtout la collecte et la conservation de données, elle concerne également le rôle de l'analyse du renseignement au sein du gouvernement du Canada.

Nous avons souvent entendu dire que le mandat du SCRS établi durant les années 1980 ne reflète plus la réalité technologique, mais l'analyse du renseignement n'a jamais été même abordée. À part le paragraphe 12(1), où il est précisé, au sujet des menaces à la sécurité nationale que le service en fait rapport au gouvernement du Canada et le conseille à cet égard, le rôle de l'analyse du renseignement est à peine pris en considération dans la Loi sur le SCRS. Il n'y a aucune orientation quant à la façon dont ce rôle devrait être rempli, dont le renseignement devrait soutenir les opérations et dont les conseils devraient être donnés. Il n'y a aucun examen officiel ou uniforme de l'analyse du renseignement.

En bref, le milieu du renseignement rend bien peu de comptes au sujet de la fourniture de rapports, de la façon dont ils sont produits ou du caractère opportun de ceux-ci. En outre, il n'y a aucune façon de savoir comment les produits de renseignements sont utilisés ou s'ils soutiennent adéquatement les opérations internes ou la prise de décisions. Enfin, il est également impossible de savoir si les analystes possèdent l'équipement, les outils ou la formation dont ils ont besoin pour produire leurs évaluations.

Je crois que le comité dont la création est proposée dans le projet de loi C-22 peut aider à régler ces questions en devenant le premier organe se consacrant à l'examen de l'efficacité de l'analyse du renseignement au Canada.

Deuxièmement, la discussion entourant la réforme de nos organismes du renseignement et de la surveillance a jusqu'à maintenant porté sur le terrorisme et la surveillance, pas sur les activités touchant l'espionnage ou l'influence étrangère. Or, le contre-espionnage n'exige pas le même ensemble de compétences et d'activités que la lutte contre le terrorisme. Par exemple, les activités de contre-espionnage peuvent avoir une incidence sur la politique étrangère, et vice versa.

Par conséquent, le comité proposé pourrait déterminer à quel point les organes responsables de la politique étrangère et de la sécurité nationale coordonnent leurs activités, ou si le service du renseignement devrait se montrer plus franc concernant les activités de gouvernements étrangers en sol canadien. Sans aucun doute, il est difficile de soulever ces questions en public; l'espionnage et l'influence étrangère peuvent mener à des ennuis diplomatiques et à des situations embarrassantes. Néanmoins, il ne devrait pas être exclu de la conversation et de l'étude du projet de loi C-22 par le Parlement. C'est d'autant plus vrai qu'enquêter sur ces enjeux peut exiger d'aller à l'extérieur du milieu du renseignement au Canada tel qu'on le définit habituellement.

Troisièmement, le comité proposé pourrait s'avérer le plus grand outil de communication du gouvernement au moment de fournir aux Canadiens de l'information sur la sécurité nationale. Malheureusement, à l'heure actuelle, il y a très peu de façons pour les organismes de sécurité de communiquer avec le grand public. Pis encore, au cours des dernières années, les rapports des organismes responsables de la sécurité nationale ont eu tendance à paraître de façon peu fréquente et sporadique. Par exemple, le SCRS n'a pas produit un rapport annuel — maintenant bisannuel — depuis mai 2015, et ce rapport visait la période 2013-2014. Le rapport public de Sécurité publique Canada au sujet de la menace terroriste, seul rapport multiorganismes relatif aux menaces au Canada, est publié de façon plus régulière, mais ne porte pas sur les activités ne touchant pas le terrorisme.

J'espère que le rapport du comité va aider à combler cette lacune et devenir un outil de communication puissant pouvant aider à accroître le savoir et à susciter la confiance. Je verrais cela se produire de deux façons.

La première est que ce rapport pourrait devenir une source d'information centrale sur le contexte de menace actuelle au Canada. Selon moi, le fait que celui-ci provienne de nos parlementaires élus contribuerait à une amélioration globale de la compréhension des enjeux touchant la sécurité nationale au Canada. La deuxième tient au fait qu'une évaluation honnête des activités de nos organismes de sécurité va convaincre la population que nos services de sécurité nationale mènent leurs activités dans le respect de l'esprit et de la lettre de la loi.

Pour le deuxième volet de mon exposé, maintenant, je vais présenter quatre recommandations.

Premièrement, il est impératif que le Parlement tienne compte du contexte d'ensemble dans lequel le comité prévu dans le projet de loi C-22 mènera ses activités ainsi que des rôles généraux qu'il pourra jouer pour ce qui est de susciter la confiance. La surveillance et l'examen des organismes de sécurité nationale est et devrait être le mandat fondamental du comité proposé; toutefois, j'encouragerais les parlementaires à songer au rôle général qu'ils pourraient jouer au chapitre de la communication d'information et du renforcement de la confiance.

Deuxièmement, en ce qui concerne l'analyse, le comité devrait, dans le cadre de son mandat, veiller à ce que de bonnes analyses du renseignement soient présentées en temps opportun afin de soutenir le gouvernement et les artisans des politiques en exigeant que les dirigeants des organismes de sécurité nationale rendent des comptes. Cela devrait également comprendre l'examen de techniques novatrices, comme l'analytique des métadonnées. Cela exigerait bien sûr l'établissement d'un secrétariat qui connaît ces enjeux et qui prodiguerait des conseils aux membres du comité. De cette façon, l'analyse du renseignement deviendra une activité fondamentale appuyant l'élaboration des politiques au lieu d'être une activité qu'on mène après coup.

Troisièmement, il faut songer à la façon dont le comité s'inquiétera de son mandat relativement aux enjeux touchant le contre-espionnage, l'influence étrangère et les cyberintrusions, quitte à le faire à huis clos. Cela comprend le fait de bien coordonner ces activités avec celles d'autres organismes et ministères, comme Affaires mondiales Canada, ce qui pourrait façonner la portée et le mandat du comité proposé.

Quatrièmement, le comité devrait être tenu de publier ses conclusions tous les 365 jours, sans exception. Tout le monde ici sait à quel point les rapports gouvernementaux sont susceptibles d'être négligés en faveur d'autres priorités et de ne pas paraître à temps. Néanmoins, comme je l'ai déjà dit, le rapport du comité sera un outil crucial pour communiquer avec les Canadiens. Plus le contenu de ces rapports sera franc et honnête, plus le débat sur les mesures à prendre pour contrer les menaces à la sécurité nationale du Canada sera éclairé.

En ce sens, j'appuie fermement les propositions au sujet du comité présentées par le député Murray Rankin lors d'un discours devant la Chambre le 27 septembre.

Je vous remercie de m'avoir accordé du temps. Je serai heureuse de répondre à toute question ou d'écouter tout commentaire que vous aurez.

(1545)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Pendant que vous parliez, je me disais qu'un certain nombre de témoins n'avaient pas pu témoigner parce qu'ils avaient un cours à donner. Cette excuse ne tient plus.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président: Nous allons commencer par M. Mendicino, pour sept minutes.

M. Marco Mendicino (Eglinton—Lawrence, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie de votre exposé, madame Carvin.

J'aimerais revenir sur votre dernière recommandation, la quatrième, et attirer votre attention sur le paragraphe 21(1) du projet de loi C-22, où il est indiqué que le Comité présente au premier ministre un rapport sur les examens effectués au cours de l'année précédente.

Est-ce que cela vous rassure quant à l'obligation redditionnelle du comité de parlementaires envers le premier ministre et, par l'intermédiaire de celui-ci, envers la Chambre des communes, au sujet de ses activités de l'année précédente? Ou êtes-vous plutôt d'avis qu'il faut autre chose?

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

J'envisage une disposition un peu plus contraignante en ce qui concerne la réglementation. Je vois ici qu'il faut soumettre au premier ministre un rapport sur les examens de l'année précédente, mais aucun délai n'est prévu.

Je crois qu'il faudrait ajouter « tous les 365 jours », pour tout dire, ou, je suppose, 366 jours dans le cas d'une année bissextile. Je crois qu'il importe de préciser le plus clairement possible dans la loi que ce rapport doit être produit chaque année, car ce sera l'un des rares outils à notre disposition pour veiller à ce que le gouvernement communique ce qu'il voit et ce qu'il estime devoir faire savoir aux Canadiens.

M. Marco Mendicino:

Si je comprends bien votre recommandation, vous dites qu'au tout début du paragraphe 21(1), il faudrait remplacer « chaque année » par « dans les 365 jours suivant la fin de l'année précédente ».

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Oui.

M. Marco Mendicino:

Ou quelque chose comme cela?

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Oui, je crois que ce serait une excellente idée. J'appuie cela.

M. Marco Mendicino:

Passons à ce que vous avez dit au sujet des activités opérationnelles. Comment interprétez-vous le mandat proposé du comité de parlementaires énoncé aux articles 4 et 8?

Durant votre témoignage, j'ai pris en note plusieurs choses qui donnent à penser que vous n'estimez pas qu'il y a suffisamment d'outils actuellement sur le plan de la surveillance civile — par exemple, le CSARS — pour faire la lumière sur les produits de renseignements, tels que vous les avez décrits.

C'est une question en deux volets: tout d'abord, croyez-vous que le mandat du comité de parlementaires prévu dans le projet de loi C-22 englobe l'exercice qui, selon vous, doit être mené dans le cadre de l'examen de rapports? Ensuite, si votre réponse est non, que recommandez-vous de faire avec le projet de loi?

(1550)

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Merci de poser la question.

C'est un enjeu qui me tient beaucoup à coeur, en tant qu'ancien analyste. Si j'ai soulevé cet enjeu, c'est que l'analyse du renseignement tend à se faire après coup au sein des organismes membres. Ces organismes insistent à juste titre sur la collecte de renseignements, mais, au fil du temps, ils ont établi des organes d'analyse chargés de fournir des rapports aux artisans des politiques possédant les autorisations de sécurité appropriées; toutefois, il leur arrive de plus en plus souvent de fournir des rapports non classifiés à leurs partenaires, comme les forces policières et les services de police provinciaux, et nous n'avons aucun moyen de déterminer si cette pratique est efficace. Tant que le comité comprend que son mandat englobe l'examen de l'efficacité... Je vais vous demander de patienter, le temps que je parcoure le...

M. Marco Mendicino:

Je vais vous donner un coup de main, voici le libellé de l'article 8: Le Comité a pour mandat: a) d’examiner les cadres législatif, réglementaire, stratégique, financier et administratif de la sécurité nationale et du renseignement; b) [...] d’examiner les activités des ministères liées à la sécurité nationale ou au renseignement; et il se poursuit comme suit: c) d’examiner toute question liée à la sécurité nationale ou au renseignement dont il est saisi par un ministre.

Comme nous l'avons dit au Comité et aux autres témoins, les paramètres sont très larges.

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Les paramètres sont larges, j'en conviens, mais les gens pensent-ils à l'analyse du renseignement?

Je soulève cette question parce qu'elle n'a pas encore été mise en lumière par un certain nombre de personnes qui se sont prononcées sur le sujet. Je peux comprendre cela. Il y a de grandes préoccupations à l'égard d'autres aspects du projet de loi concernant ce que les députés peuvent voir, qui pourra siéger au comité et qui pourra le présider, mais il n'y a pas de mal à veiller à ce que la disposition soit la plus précise possible. Je suis d'accord pour dire que cela pourrait être ajouté, en principe, mais il est difficile pour moi de me prononcer sur le fait que ces questions soient envisagées, car je n'ai pas entendu la discussion sur celles-ci.

M. Marco Mendicino:

Ai-je raison d'interpréter votre réponse comme voulant dire que vous n'êtes pas tant préoccupée par le libellé que par la culture de responsabilisation et de surveillance dans cette nouvelle ère qui s'ouvre? Est-il raisonnable d'affirmer cela?

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Je crois que c'est raisonnable. Cela dit, je ne suis pas avocate, alors les considérations juridiques ne s'inscrivent pas dans mes compétences. L'un des messages que j'espère avoir communiqués aujourd'hui, c'est que je souhaite que le Comité, au moment d'étudier ce projet de loi, ne se contente pas d'examiner les fonctions de surveillance ou même d'examen de l'efficacité et qu'il réfléchisse aussi au rôle général que le comité peut jouer, selon moi, en servant d'outil de communication et peut-être en surveillant certaines choses qui ne le sont tout simplement pas à l'heure actuelle.

Ce sont les deux enjeux qui m'interpellent particulièrement et que j'ai tenté de mettre en relief aujourd'hui.

M. Marco Mendicino:

Enfin, avant que mon temps et notre échange prennent fin, le secrétariat — c'est-à-dire le personnel de ce comité — devrait-il se concentrer afin de créer cette culture qui va au-delà du libellé précis du projet de loi afin que le comité commence à examiner ces autres facettes de la surveillance, comme les produits de renseignement? À quoi le personnel devrait-il penser?

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Il devrait songer à parler aux responsables des politiques et leur demander comment ils reçoivent les produits. Honnêtement, nous ne le savons même pas. En tant qu'analyste, je ne savais pas qui recevait mes rapports. Qui reçoit les rapports? Qui les utilise? Servent-ils à guider l'élaboration des politiques? Si oui, à qui vont-ils?

Bien entendu, le personnel devrait parler aux dirigeants des organes d'analyse du renseignement, ou à ceux qui en sont responsables — qu'il s'agisse du DAR au SCRS ou du chef du CIET — pour leur parler...

M. Marco Mendicino:

Excusez-moi, mais qu'est-ce que le CIET?

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

C'est le Centre intégré d'évaluation du terrorisme.

M. Marco Mendicino:

D'accord.

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Il produit des rapports destinés au grand public, mais aussi des documents pour les hauts dirigeants. Il serait utile de déterminer comment les rapports sont produits. Qui les demandait? Étaient-ils utilisés par plus d'une personne? S'agissait-il toujours de produits destinés à des personnes de haut niveau? Devrions-nous songer à les communiquer de façon plus étendue?

En outre, est-ce que nos voies de distribution sont efficaces? Parfois, en tant qu'analyste, on a l'impression que nos rapports finissent dans un trou noir. On a beaucoup de gens brillants dans ces organisations, et j'aimerais m'assurer que leur savoir est au moins vu, s'il n'est pas pris en considération.

(1555)

Le président:

Merci, madame Carvin.

Monsieur Clement.

L'hon. Tony Clement (Parry Sound—Muskoka, PCC):

Merci.

Merci d'être ici, madame Carvin. Marco m'a coupé l'herbe sous le pied, mais je vais poursuivre...

M. Marco Mendicino: Désolé.

L'hon. Tony Clement: Non, non. Nous pensions aux mêmes choses.

Au cours de mes sept minutes, je veux que nous parlions des considérations pratiques à cet égard.

Le comité sera formé de parlementaires, lesquels ont d'autres choses à faire dans leur vie; ils siègent à d'autres comités et voyagent partout au pays et parfois dans le monde. Maintenant, nous avons ce rôle très précis que vous décrivez comme étant très important. Vous dites que nous devons nous pencher sur l'analytique des données et sur la cybersécurité et que nos conclusions doivent être produites en temps opportun.

Dans votre esprit, comment cela fonctionnerait-il dans la réalité? Comment serons-nous qualitativement capables de faire cela? Et quelle est l'interaction? Vous avez mentionné le secrétariat, et j'aimerais en savoir un peu plus à ce sujet, mais quelle est l'interaction? Comment cela fonctionnerait-il? Nous ne sommes pas ici 24 heures sur 24, 7 jours sur 7.

C'est une question ouverte.

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Merci beaucoup. C'est une bonne question.

Je crois que cela nous ramène au fait que, au cours des cinq dernières années, nous avons vu cette évolution où tout le monde parle des mégadonnées. Je sais que les services du renseignement déploient des efforts considérables au chapitre des mégadonnées, et pas seulement pour les raisons exposées la semaine dernière — qui ont suscité la controverse —, mais aussi pour des raisons culturelles. Les membres de longue date du SCRS ne comprennent peut-être pas comment fonctionnent les mégadonnées ou les statistiques bayésiennes.

Je crois qu'il nous faut un changement culturel. Dans le cas de ce comité particulier, vous aurez besoin d'un secrétariat rompu à l'analyse de données et aux techniques analytiques en général. À l'époque où j'étais analyste, nous parlions de techniques analytiques structurées — c'était une façon de faire —, mais il s'agit également d'avoir une connaissance globale du fonctionnement du cycle du renseignement. Enfin, il faut pouvoir compter sur des gens qui savent — du moins, on l'espère — à quoi peuvent servir les mégadonnées et en quoi elles peuvent offrir du soutien.

Les membres du comité n'auraient pas nécessairement à être des experts en la matière, mais il faudrait qu'ils connaissent assez bien le domaine pour savoir ce qu'ils ont devant eux lorsqu'ils voient un produit de renseignement donné. C'est pourquoi je suis ravie que le projet de loi prévoie la création d'un secrétariat qui soutiendrait le travail du comité.

L'hon. Tony Clement:

D'accord. Ce que vous dites — je simplifie à outrance afin de m'assurer de bien comprendre —, c'est que le secrétariat n'est pas là seulement pour planifier des réunions et constituer une pile de cartables d'information. Il doit en fait communiquer — peut-être même de façon proactive — avec les organismes de sécurité du pays et perfectionner sa propre expertise, en marge de celle des gens du milieu de la sécurité. Je n'essaie pas de vous faire dire ce que vous n'avez pas dit, mais est-ce que cela reflète ce à quoi vous vouliez en venir?

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Merci. Je crois que vous exprimez la chose de façon un peu plus éloquente que je ne l'ai fait, mais c'est tout à fait ça. Le secrétariat ne saurait être constitué de personnes qui se contentent d'assembler des cartables d'information. Il faut que ces gens connaissent le cycle et le processus du renseignement. Je serais d'accord avec cela. Ils doivent être en mesure de soutenir les parlementaires qui siègent au comité et de pouvoir dire: « Il s'agit d'une analyse de mégadonnées, alors je vais vous expliquer cela en 30 secondes, vous dire ce que cela signifie et ce que vous devez savoir à ce sujet. »

L'hon. Tony Clement:

Où trouvons-nous des gens comme cela? S'agirait-il de personnes qui possèdent déjà de l'expérience dans le domaine de la sécurité, ou d'anciens universitaires, ou...? Puis-je consulter les sites Jobmonster et monster.ca pour trouver ces gens? Comment cela fonctionne-t-il?

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

J'ignore si c'est le moment où je suis censée suggérer le Carleton Career Centre, mais...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

L'hon. Tony Clement:

Oh, regardez cela. Je commence déjà à recevoir des courriels.

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Exactement.

Je crois que nous allons voir de plus en plus ce genre de chose dans les programmes relatifs aux politiques professionnelles, et les étudiants seront formés pour accomplir ce genre d'activités, à savoir l'application de méthodes statistiques quantitatives et qualitatives. Selon moi, vous pourriez chercher des gens qui possèdent ce genre de formation professionnelle.

En outre, si le secrétariat n'est pas nécessairement constitué d'anciens analystes, je vous encouragerais à au moins parler à d'anciens analystes de leurs expériences et de certaines choses qu'ils ont vues se produire, ou d'au moins d'avoir une sorte de mandat vous permettant d'aller à l'externe et de consulter d'anciens analystes à l'égard de certaines questions.

(1600)

L'hon. Tony Clement:

Combien de temps me reste-t-il, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Vous avez deux minutes et demie.

L'hon. Tony Clement:

Mettez-vous à la place d'un parlementaire pour un instant. Vous êtes députée, et vous êtes nommée pour siéger à ce comité. Quel genre de choses demanderiez-vous au secrétariat d'accomplir? Comment vous comporteriez-vous au sein de ce comité? Donnez-moi seulement quelques conseils à ce sujet.

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Dans ma déclaration, j'ai tenté de mettre en relief certains aspects, comme le caractère opportun des rapports. À quel moment a-t-on amorcé la rédaction des produits, et à quel moment ont-ils été communiqués? Est-ce que les analyses du renseignement ont été produites dans les six semaines? Peut-être a-t-on attendu un bon bout de temps pour les produire, alors pourquoi? Il importe d'informer les gens le plus vite possible afin que les décideurs canadiens puissent prendre les meilleures décisions possible. Le caractère opportun des rapports est certainement un des enjeux.

Le deuxième concerne le fait que ces produits appuient effectivement la réalisation des objectifs stratégiques. Est-ce que les rapports portaient sur des choses pertinentes que les gens devaient savoir? On parle de besoins en matière de renseignement, alors est-ce que ces produits répondaient bien aux besoins du gouvernement? À défaut, est-ce que...

L'hon. Tony Clement:

Alors, il y a le caractère opportun, la pertinence...

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Le caractère opportun, la pertinence et je dirais aussi la distribution. Je crois que cet aspect particulier devrait être examiné par le comité. Qui reçoit ces produits, pourquoi, et comment sont-ils utilisés?

L'hon. Tony Clement:

D'accord, car, en tant qu'analyste, il arrive que vous n'ayez... Vous aviez l'impression d'évoluer dans un trou noir, une boîte noire ou une usine de saucisses.

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

J'avais parfois cette impression, en effet.

L'hon. Tony Clement:

Oui, d'accord. Je comprends.

Le président:

Monsieur Dubé.

M. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame Carvin, je crois que vous connaissez très bien l'un de mes anciens professeurs, M. Saideman; en tant qu'ancien de l'Université McGill, je vais vous pardonner de nous l'avoir volé, mais je suis certain qu'il est très heureux ici, à Ottawa. Je n'ai pas eu l'occasion de le voir depuis cette époque, mais j'ai cru bon de le mentionner ici. Je suis sûr qu'il se réjouira de savoir que son nom figure maintenant dans le hansard du Comité.

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Il sera content.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Assurément. Je le connais bien.

Bon, assez plaisanté. Je suis heureux d'apprendre que vous appuyez les amendements proposés par mon collègue, M. Rankin. En effet, nous voulons travailler à l'amélioration de ce projet de loi. Je crois que c'est un bon premier pas. Nous croyons effectivement que certains aspects doivent être améliorés.

Si vous n'y voyez pas d'inconvénient, j'aimerais m'attarder à certains détails techniques. Parmi les choses qui sont ressorties des témoignages d'il y a deux semaines — comme celui de M. Ron Atkey —, il y a l'idée selon laquelle l'alinéa 8b) du projet de loi, qui permet au ministre d'opposer son veto à une enquête du comité, crée un obstacle qui, en fait, n'existe même pas dans le cas du CSARS. Nous avons du mal à comprendre pourquoi ce comité de parlementaires se verrait imposer un obstacle additionnel qui n'est pas actuellement imposé au CSARS. J'aimerais savoir ce que vous en pensez.

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Il y a une chose que j'ai oublié de dire. Je tenais à féliciter les parlementaires ici présents. Il m'arrive parfois de critiquer vertement le gouvernement, mais je crois que le débat entourant ce projet de loi a été excellent et que les commentaires formulés ont été constructifs. En tant que personne qui observe ces événements et qui en parle dans son enseignement, je trouve que c'est absolument merveilleux. Je tenais à ce que cela figure dans le compte rendu.

En ce qui concerne les suggestions de Murray Rankin, je crois qu'elles sont très bonnes. En particulier, je répète que ses propositions relatives au rapport du Comité sont essentielles et devraient être incorporées dans le projet de loi.

Au sujet de l'alinéa 8b), en tant que personne ayant occupé un poste classifié, je peux comprendre la préoccupation. J'ai mes notes devant moi ici et je crois, qu'il faudrait au moins préciser le passage de la disposition où l'on dit: à moins que le ministre compétent ne détermine que l'examen porterait atteinte à la sécurité nationale

Je peux comprendre pourquoi on dit cela. Je comprends qu'on puisse vouloir dire au Comité d'attendre un instant lorsqu'on sait qu'une arrestation ou une enquête est imminente. Cela dit, je crois qu'il appartient à votre comité de préciser un peu plus cette disposition particulière, peut-être en ajoutant les conditions à la lumière desquelles une telle décision serait appropriée. Pour l'instant, je conviendrais avec vous que cela ne semble pas clair.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Parmi les points qui posent problème et vous en avez parlé dans votre déclaration préliminaire, certains concernent les relations internationales et la diplomatie et les problèmes qui peuvent ressortir de cela. Ce qui m'embête, je suppose, c'est que même si le projet de loi énumère beaucoup de choses sur lesquelles les parlementaires peuvent enquêter, cela ne veut pas dire que l'information sera rendue publique.

Je suppose que j'ai du mal à comprendre pourquoi on empêcherait des parlementaires de recevoir cette information à huis clos, de façon confidentielle, alors qu'il n'y a aucune garantie que celle-ci finira dans le rapport. Ce à quoi je veux en venir, c'est qu'un parlementaire, même s'il n'est ni ministre ni premier ministre, comprend l'idée selon laquelle certains renseignements ne sont pas destinés à être rendus publics.

Y a-t-il une raison quelconque d'empêcher les parlementaires qui siègent à ce comité — qui ont prêté serment, qui ont subi tout ce processus et qui feraient face à des conséquences juridiques s'ils communiquaient cette information — de jouir d'un plein accès à ces renseignements?

(1605)

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Vous avez raison, les dispositions du projet de loi prévoient des conséquences très graves et très claires pour les parlementaires qui divulguent des renseignements. Je suis d'accord, dans la mesure où ces mesures de protection sont là. Je suppose que j'aimerais qu'on précise davantage le fait qu'on peut toujours présenter une question, mais que cela dépend à quel point on entre dans le détail à l'égard de cette question.

Disons qu'une affaire est en cours. Il est très rare, par exemple, qu'un organisme de renseignement divulgue le nom d'une personne, se contentant peut-être de dire qu'elle est dans une ville ou une province en particulier. Je crois qu'on pourrait aborder une question de façon suffisamment générale pour que les parlementaires puissent tout de même obtenir de l'information qui n'entre pas dans le détail, mais ce n'est pas... Voyez-vous ce que je veux dire?

M. Matthew Dubé:

Oui, je comprends. Je suppose que votre préoccupation est, avec tout le respect que je vous dois... il s'agit davantage d'une séance d'information, n'est-ce pas? L'idée, c'est de prévenir des situations tragiques comme le cas de Maher Arar, par exemple. Ce que j'ai du mal à comprendre, c'est pourquoi nous ne pourrions pas permettre à ces parlementaires de jouir d'un accès complet, sous le sceau du secret. L'un des exemples soulevés est celui du projet de loi C-622, qui avait en fait été présenté par la libérale Joyce Murray au cours de la législature précédente et qui prévoyait un accès complet à l'information.

Beaucoup de gens disent que c'est le modèle à suivre, du moins à l'intérieur du Comité, afin qu'il puisse bien faire son travail, car il est difficile de faire de la surveillance lorsque chaque séance d'information demande un acte de foi. Je ne sais pas si vous comprenez ce que je veux dire.

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Oui, c'est une question difficile. Je dirais qu'il faut à tout le moins offrir plus d'orientation. Selon moi, dans sa version actuelle, ce libellé n'est pas assez clair. Il devrait être plus précis. On pourrait déjà définir de façon plus étroite l'expression « enquête en cours », car une enquête peut en fait durer de deux à trois ans, en toute franchise.

Encore une fois, je crois qu'il importe d'être plus clair et d'offrir davantage d'orientation dans ce projet de loi particulier. Je n'ai pas préparé d'observations sur la question, et j'aimerais bien y avoir pensé, mais je comprends votre préoccupation, et je suis certainement d'accord pour dire qu'il vaut mieux, pour l'ensemble de ce projet de loi, pécher par excès de transparence au lieu de ne pas...

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci.

Mon temps est à peu près écoulé, mais j'aimerais vous poser rapidement une dernière question au sujet de l'élection du président. Le gouvernement nous a dit qu'il ne sert à rien d'accélérer le processus et que le Royaume-Uni a mis longtemps à se rendre à ce point. Je ne crois pas vraiment que cet argument tienne la route. C'est un autre amendement que nous avons proposé.

Pourriez-vous nous dire rapidement ce que vous pensez de cela? Cet aspect a une incidence sur le rapport qui est produit par la suite, car si le président doit rendre des comptes à quiconque l'a nommé, plutôt qu'aux parlementaires, je crois que cela pourrait causer un peu de conflit.

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Je crois savoir que le président du comité au Royaume-Uni est maintenant élu; je pense que nous allons probablement finir par faire la même chose de toute façon, et j'avancerais que...

M. Matthew Dubé:

... Nous le faisions maintenant.

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

... c'est la chose sensée à faire.

M. Matthew Dubé:

D'accord. Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je prends un instant pour souhaiter la bienvenue au juge Major. Merci de vous joindre à nous. Toutes nos excuses pour le problème de l'heure. Nous allons interrompre nos questions, écouter votre exposé, puis recommencer à poser nos questions.

L’hon. John Major (À titre personnel):

Je tiens tout d'abord à m'excuser d'avoir confondu l'heure de la réunion. J'avais du mal à m'aligner sur l'heure de l'Est, et j'aurais dû le savoir.

Je serai très bref. Mon seul commentaire d'importance concerne le paragraphe 13(2) où il est précisé que les « renseignements » comprennent les renseignements protégés par le privilège relatif au litige. Je ne crois pas que cette disposition résisterait à une analyse fondée sur la Charte. Je ne crois pas qu'on puisse porter atteinte au privilège relatif au litige. Vous devriez peut-être songer à obtenir un avis juridique sur cette question.

Le seul autre commentaire que je ferais touche le paragraphe 21(2), qui porte sur le rapport présenté directement au premier ministre. Cela me semblait un peu trop étroit, mais lorsque j'ai lu la suite, j'ai cru voir que des dispositions prévoient le dépôt du rapport devant le Parlement.

Ce sont là mes observations.

(1610)

Le président:

Merci. Nous allons continuer. Je soupçonne qu'on vous posera un certain nombre de questions sur ces observations, car je pense que le Comité voudra entendre ce que vous avez à dire.

La parole va maintenant à M. Spengemann, pour sept minutes.

Vous pouvez adresser vos questions à Mme Carvin ou au juge Major.

M. Sven Spengemann (Mississauga—Lakeshore, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame Carvin, je vous remercie d'avoir servi en tant qu'analyste, et merci d'être ici et d'avoir amené vos fantastiques étudiants.

Monsieur le juge, c'est un honneur de vous avoir parmi nous.

Ma question touche deux thèmes. L'un d'eux concerne le fait d'explorer les moyens de gagner la confiance de la population, car je crois que la confiance envers le gouvernement est l'un des plus gros atouts recherchés par la création de ce comité. J'aimerais avoir vos commentaires et en savoir un peu plus sur cette question. Le deuxième thème est le lien avec les enjeux touchant la défense. Je siège également au Comité permanent de la défense nationale, et je crois qu'il y a des chevauchements évidents, alors il serait peut-être utile d'explorer cela en détail.

J'aimerais commencer, madame Carvin, par vous demander, de façon générale, ce que pensent et ressentent les Canadiens, selon vous, au sujet de la sécurité nationale. À quel point sont-ils au courant de la situation? Je sais qu'il y a beaucoup de choses qui font les manchettes, mais comprendre... Mon appréciation informelle n'est souvent pas aussi détaillée qu'elle devrait l'être pour me permettre de tirer parti pleinement de l'occasion que ce comité représente ou de comprendre cette occasion. Quels sont les défis liés à la compréhension du grand public canadien, et comment ce comité peut-il travailler à combler ces lacunes?

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Merci de poser la question.

L'un des enjeux qui, selon moi, illustrent cette réalité est le débat touchant le projet de loi C-51. De nombreuses dispositions du projet de loi C-51 auraient pu essuyer des critiques, mais, bien souvent, le débat était limité à des échanges où, d'une part, certains accusaient les détracteurs du projet de loi de vouloir protéger les agresseurs d'enfants, alors que, d'autre part, d'autres accusaient les défenseurs du projet de loi de vouloir créer un État de type « 1984 » où tout est surveillé.

Ce qui me préoccupe, c'est que le contexte de la sécurité au Canada a beaucoup évolué depuis la guerre froide, et je ne suis pas convaincue que la compréhension des Canadiens a suivi cette évolution. Je ne veux pas jeter le discrédit sur les gens merveilleux qui travaillent dans ce domaine, mais prenons seulement l'exemple de l'espionnage. L'époque où les États tentaient de forcer des coffres-forts pour voler des plans de sous-marins ou tentaient de s'emparer de secrets d'une importance énorme est révolue. Aujourd'hui, il s'agit plutôt d'obtenir le dossier de santé d'une personne grâce à la cyberintrusion afin d'utiliser l'information pour exploiter cette personne ou pour cerner ses faiblesses.

C'est à l'égard de la transition touchant la portée des activités que nous voyons certains de ces États mener qu'il faut selon moi monter la barre. J'aimerais voir ce comité parler de l'évolution des enjeux en matière de sécurité nationale au pays, puis dire aux gens du pays ce que nos services de sécurité font pour y réagir.

M. Sven Spengemann:

Je vais peut-être poser deux questions avant de parler du comité.

À quel point les intervenants du milieu du renseignement sont-ils interreliés pour ce qui est de l'échange de données et de renseignements? Je pense particulièrement au Groupe des cinq, mais même au-delà de cela. Ensuite, quels sont les changements les plus profonds en ce qui concerne la perception du public quant aux sources de nos renseignements?

Pourriez-vous ensuite ajouter un bref commentaire sur les niveaux de classification? À quel point sont-ils contraignants à l'égard du travail au quotidien et de ce que le Comité pourrait voir et, fait plus important encore, de ce que le Comité pourrait ou ne pourrait pas communiquer aux Canadiens?

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Ce sont des questions très intéressantes et difficiles. Concernant l'échange de données, ce n'est pas... J'ai lu hier un article qui laissait entendre que la GRC, maintenant qu'elle possède ce centre opérationnel, communique l'information de toutes ces bases de données ou les rassemble toutes. Non, les choses ne fonctionnent pas de cette façon.

Les services sont des organes administratifs, et ils protègent farouchement leurs renseignements et leurs gens. On leur a reproché dans le passé de ne pas communiquer l'information de façon appropriée. Je crois que les gens ont l'impression que ces organisations font en quelque sorte tout ce qu'elles veulent et qu'il y a échange d'information. Je suis en faveur d'une plus grande clarté au sujet du processus lui-même — par exemple, au sujet du projet de loi C-51 —, même si ce n'est pas précisément ce dont nous parlons ici.

Je crois également qu'il devrait y avoir... Ceci va peut-être répondre à certaines de vos questions au sujet de la défense. M. Craig Forcese, professeur de l'Université d'Ottawa dont j'admire beaucoup le travail, parle d'un super-CSARS qui permettrait aux organisations — ou du moins le comité ou un organe quelconque — de suivre l'information qui passe d'un organisme à un autre. Je crois qu'il faut apprécier un peu plus les mesures de protection qui sont en place au sein de ces organisations, telles que je les comprends.

M. Sven Spengemann:

C'est juste.

Pouvez-vous formuler un commentaire sur la quantité de données et de renseignements qui proviennent de sources ouvertes par rapport aux sources classifiées? Nous parlons beaucoup des niveaux de classification. S'agit-il de la pointe de la pyramide? Ou bien est-ce que la plupart des renseignements sont classifiés et que le public canadien ne peut vraiment pas regarder par-dessus l'épaule du comité pour obtenir plus qu'un simple rapport qu'il pourrait produire une fois par année?

(1615)

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Concernant la question du renseignement de source ouverte au sein de la collectivité, à mon avis... j'ai vu des statistiques selon lesquelles jusqu'à 70 % de l'information utilisée par les organismes de renseignement provient de sources ouvertes. Je ne parle pas seulement des bases de données ou de quoi que ce soit qui s'y apparente; je parle des gens qui lisent The New York Times ou d'autres articles. Il y a en fait une bonne similitude entre le travail des espions et celui des journalistes en ce qui a trait à la collecte de renseignements au moyen de sources et de choses comme cela. Il s'agirait selon moi de l'un des éléments à prendre en considération.

En ce qui concerne le comité, pourriez-vous répéter cette partie?

M. Sven Spengemann:

Si vous dites que c'est exact, alors, le comité pourrait probablement communiquer pas mal de choses au public en dehors des rapports courants. Il pourrait trouver un certain mécanisme — vous les avez appelés « techniques novatrices » — pour mobiliser davantage le public afin qu'il comprenne mieux ce que fait le comité et ce que font nos organismes de sécurité et de renseignement au quotidien.

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Je le crois absolument et fondamentalement. Il y avait un très bon exemple, aujourd'hui, dans le Toronto Star. La GRC a fait venir deux journalistes afin de discuter de certains des défis auxquels ils font face en ce qui a trait au cryptage et aux données. Les agents les ont fait venir et ont parlé des affaires. Ils ne sont pas entrés dans le détail, mais ils ont donné des exemples. C'est exactement le genre de travail auquel je voudrais voir le comité participer afin de communiquer l'information aux Canadiens.

Vous avez tout à fait raison: les renseignements de source ouverte pourraient être utilisés à cette fin.

M. Sven Spengemann:

C'est extrêmement utile pour le Comité. Merci infiniment.

Durant la minute qu'il reste, pourriez-vous formuler un commentaire sur la possibilité d'un lien entre le comité prévu dans le projet de loi C-22 et l'UNCI des Forces canadiennes?

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Encore une fois, c'est là que Craig Forcese affirme que nous devons établir un certain genre de super-CSARS qui surveille tous les organismes et toutes les façons dont les renseignements sont communiqués. Compte tenu des différences au chapitre des mandats, je suis d'avis que la communication des renseignements n'est peut-être pas aussi excellente que certaines personnes le pensent.

Le défi consistera, pour le comité, en particulier — et peut-être que cela nous ramène à la question de M. Clement... à convoquer des gens possédant l'expertise nécessaire pour comprendre comment fonctionnent les opérations militaires, comment le renseignement est utilisé dans le cadre des opérations militaires et des enquêtes menées au pays, car c'est très différent. Il s'agit d'activités très différentes. Voilà ma préoccupation à l'égard du type de grand organisme auquel a fait allusion M. Forcese. Elle tient au fait qu'on aurait besoin de gens qui possèdent un genre d'expertise transcendant cela. Cela poserait problème.

M. Sven Spengemann:

C'est extrêmement utile.

Merci infiniment, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci, madame Carvin.

Monsieur Miller, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Larry Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame Carvin et monsieur Major, merci de votre présence.

Monsieur Major, je veux vous demander d'élargir un peu vos propos. Vous avez mentionné le paragraphe 13(2) relativement au secret professionnel de l'avocat. Pouvez-vous élargir un peu vos propos en nous expliquant exactement quelles sont vos préoccupations?

L’hon. John Major:

Le seul secret professionnel absolu dont nous jouissons au Canada, c'est la communication entre un avocat et son client. Je pense que le paragraphe 13(2) empiète là-dessus, c'est-à-dire qu'il prévoit précisément ce qui suit: Ces renseignements comprennent les renseignements protégés par le privilège relatif au litige [...] ou par le secret professionnel de l'avocat.

Cette disposition empiète sur la confidentialité de cette relation, qui fait partie de notre cadre juridique depuis presque toujours.

M. Larry Miller:

Pour approfondir un peu cette question, monsieur Major, je suis certain que vous connaissez probablement certains modèles de cadres en place dans d'autres pays, comme la Grande-Bretagne et je ne sais quoi. D'autres pays ont-ils quoi que ce soit qui ressemble à cela pour dissiper vos préoccupations quant au secret professionnel de l'avocat?

L’hon. John Major:

Je regarderais le Royaume-Uni, et je serais surpris si... remarquez, les Britanniques ne jouissent pas d'une protection conférée par leur charte. Nous, oui. Mais je pense bien — d'après la common law du Royaume-Uni et la tradition de ce pays, et ce que les Britanniques appellent leur « charte de la common law » — qu'ils ne permettraient pas cette communication.

M. Larry Miller:

Vous affirmez que, de tous les pays du monde, aucun n'a établi cette disposition, à votre connaissance.

L’hon. John Major:

Pas à ma connaissance, mais n'oubliez pas que je ne connais pas particulièrement cette question. Cela m'a sauté aux yeux dès que j'ai lu le projet de loi: il serait très difficile de faire résister cette disposition à un examen constitutionnel.

(1620)

M. Larry Miller:

D'accord.

L’hon. John Major:

Je suis certain que vos conseillers juridiques peuvent être plus précis, mais je serais surpris qu'ils ne voient pas cela comme un problème.

M. Larry Miller:

Merci.

Madame Carvin, sur cette note, connaissez-vous un pays qui a établi quelque chose qui soulève le même genre de préoccupations que celles de M. Major?

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Je regrette de ne connaître aucune... cela ne veut pas dire qu'il n'y en a pas, mais je ne voudrais pas parler de quelque chose que je ne connais pas bien. Mes excuses.

M. Larry Miller:

Certes, vous avez raison.

Dans vos premiers commentaires, madame Carvin, vous nous avez mentionné le travail avec des pays étrangers. J'ai l'impression — peut-être à tort — que vous étiez hésitante au sujet de l'échange de renseignements et de je ne sais quoi. Ma supposition est-elle exacte?

La raison pour laquelle je pose la question, c'est qu'à notre époque, qu'il s'agisse du terrorisme ou de quoi que ce soit, nous vivons dans un monde différent de celui où nous vivions il y a de nombreuses années, alors il me semblerait que les alliés doivent travailler ensemble. Pouvez-vous nous en dire un peu plus à ce sujet?

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Je ne parlais pas de la question de l'échange de renseignements avec d'autres pays précisément, mais, comme vous posez la question, il y a des problèmes comme celui des voyageurs étrangers. C'est devenu un problème réel. Nous devons travailler avec d'autres démocraties et avec d'autres pays de l'Europe au moment où nous examinons la circulation des voyageurs, par exemple, qui se joignent à l'État islamique. Je soupçonne fortement que leur nombre diminue, compte tenu des pertes qu'a essuyées l'État islamique, mais, cela dit, ces voyageurs passent souvent par l'Europe et par divers autres pays. Nous devons être en mesure d'établir des partenariats et de mieux travailler avec ces pays.

La difficulté tient au fait qu'aucun pays n'aime donner de l'information sur ses citoyens. Aucun pays n'aime vraiment échanger des noms. Ce que nous observons de plus en plus, plus particulièrement compte tenu de l'expérience du Canada dans les années 2000 relativement à certaines des demandes de renseignements, c'est qu'on joint de plus en plus d'avertissements aux renseignements et qu'on tente de mettre en place de meilleurs systèmes et une communication plus régulière, dorénavant.

Dans certains cas, cette communication s'est révélée très utile. Par exemple, il y a eu le cas de jeunes filles de Toronto qui tentaient d'aller vers l'État islamique, et elles ont été arrêtées en Turquie. Il faut qu'il y ait un certain genre d'échange de renseignements coordonné.

C'est vraiment une excellente question sur laquelle, selon moi, les parlementaires du comité pourraient se pencher en ce qui a trait au fait d'aider les services de sécurité et de trouver une orientation et un équilibre. Je pourrais ajouter une seule chose à cela, si je le puis. Je pense qu'il y a au Canada une perception selon laquelle les services de sécurité ne veulent pas plus de réglementation ou de surveillance. Je vous souligne que ce n'est absolument et tout simplement pas le cas. Ils veulent des lignes directrices. Ils veulent savoir où sont les limites, afin de ne pas les franchir. Je pense que votre comité parlementaire pourrait travailler avec les services de sécurité relativement aux enjeux problématiques, comme l'échange de renseignements.

Je suis d'accord avec la prémisse de votre question. Cela profitera à tout le monde dans l'avenir.

Le président:

Merci, madame Carvin.

Monsieur Erskine-Smith, pour cinq minutes.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur le juge Major et madame Carvin, vous avez le projet de loi sous les yeux. Si nous pouvions consulter l'article 14, je veux commencer par l'alinéa 14e). Il est ainsi libellé: Les renseignements qui ont un lien direct avec une enquête en cours menée par un organisme chargé de l'application de la loi et pouvant mener à des poursuites.

En application de l'article 14, si les renseignements appartiennent à ces catégories, ils sont exclus de ce fait. Mon inquiétude à cet égard, c'est que, quand le ministre a comparu devant nous, nous avons parlé du discours d'intimidation. Si les renseignements sont refusés, le comité peut les mentionner dans le rapport et les utiliser en tant que discours d'intimidation, mais s'ils sont visés à l'article 14, il sera très difficile d'avoir recours au discours d'intimidation, car le ministre pourra dire: « Eh bien, je suis obligé par la loi. »

Monsieur le juge Major, quand MM. Roach et Forcese ont comparu devant nous... et ils ont affirmé qu'en fait, une enquête en cours menée par un organisme d'application de la loi inclurait l'attentat à la bombe d'Air India, car il y a encore une enquête en cours. Je vous poserais la question ainsi: quand nous parlons d'accès à l'information, devrions-nous faire appliquer la disposition de l'alinéa 14e) du projet de loi en tant qu'exclusion sans aucun refus lié à ce qui « porterait atteinte à la sécurité nationale »? Le facteur supplémentaire qui est énoncé à l'article 16 est absent, et aucun motif n'est fourni par le ministre.

Le président:

Je propose que M. Major commence.

L’hon. John Major:

Je pense qu'on pourrait avoir accès à beaucoup de sources de renseignements grâce à des mandats, et, selon moi, en ce qui concerne le droit d'accès prévu au paragraphe 13(2), si vous obteniez d'un juge de la Cour fédérale un mandat qui en révélerait les motifs, à mon avis, il vous faudrait des motifs importants, mais, si la sécurité du pays était en péril d'une quelconque manière, vous obtiendriez un mandat de perquisition qui ressemblerait à un mandat servant à perquisitionner une résidence. Je pense que, muni d'un mandat, vous pourriez obtenir ces renseignements.

Par exemple, le secret professionnel de l'avocat ne comprend pas la perpétration d'un crime. Si cette communication révèle l'existence d'un crime, il n'y a aucune protection. Dans le même ordre d'idées, je pense qu'un mandat serait suffisant. Il vous faudrait des motifs importants pour convaincre un juge de vous l'accorder, mais, une fois que vous auriez le mandat, vous auriez droit à ces renseignements.

(1625)

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Madame Carvin, je vais vous donner la possibilité de répondre également et, encore une fois, pourriez-vous aborder de façon plus vaste l'accès à l'information? Je soulignerais qu'au Royaume-Uni, cet accès peut être refusé pour des motifs liés à la sécurité nationale. Le ministre est tenu dans tous les cas de donner un refus, contrairement au régime du projet de loi, et il y a une directive ministérielle qu'on est censé être tenu d'appliquer rarement.

Je soulignerais également qu'aux États-Unis, dans le cas du comité sur le renseignement du Sénat et du comité permanent sur le renseignement de la Chambre des représentants, le pouvoir exécutif ne peut pas dissimuler de renseignements à ces comités, sauf temporairement et en présence de circonstances atténuantes, comme relativement à des opérations hautement confidentielles et limitées dans le temps. Si vous le pouvez, veuillez aborder l'accès à l'information en faisant des renvois précis à l'article 14.

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Oui, j'ai souligné cet article un certain nombre de fois.

Je pense qu'en ce qui me concerne, le problème tient à l'« enquête en cours ». Comme je l'ai déjà dit, certaines de ces enquêtes se poursuivent pendant des années. Il y a l'enquête sur Air India, par exemple, mais seulement une enquête nationale ordinaire sur un acte terroriste peut durer deux ou trois ans avant qu'on ait l'impression de disposer d'une quantité appropriée d'éléments de preuve contre une personne qu'on pourrait arrêter et qu'on pourrait vraiment poursuivre.

Une partie du problème pourrait tenir à la définition ou à l'interprétation du terme « enquête en cours » dans le contexte de la disposition particulière de l'alinéa 14e). J'aime bien la suggestion de quelque chose qui pourrait ressembler aux alinéas 16(1)a) et b). Si on ajoutait quelque chose relativement à ce qui « porterait atteinte à la sécurité nationale », comme dans l'alinéa 16(1)b), ce pourrait être approprié.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Je veux revenir là-dessus. L'alinéa 14b) est un double. Vous verrez qu'à l'article 16, il y a une mention du fait que « le renseignement est un renseignement opérationnel spécial ». Je ne vous ferai pas consulter la Loi sur la protection de l'information, mais, faites-moi confiance, l'alinéa 14b) est un double de l'article 8 de cette loi, et l'alinéa 14d) en est aussi une reproduction, en grande partie.

Si nous devions retirer les alinéas 14b) et d) et que nous rendions l'alinéa 14e) sujet à un refus et aux critères supplémentaires de ce qui « porterait atteinte à la sécurité nationale », est-ce que ce serait judicieux?

Mme Stephanie Carvin:

Spontanément, je dirais que oui.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Je pense que mon temps est écoulé.

Le président:

Votre temps est écoulé.

En tant que président, je veux simplement clarifier quelque chose avec M. Major. En ce qui concerne les exceptions prévues à l'article 14, vous parlez de mandats qui pourraient être délivrés au titre de l'article 13. Simplement pour clarifier: affirmez-vous toutefois que les pouvoirs prévus à l'article 13 l'emporteraient sur l'exclusion des renseignements prévue à l'article 14?

L’hon. John Major:

Je ne suis pas certain de comprendre cette question. L'article 14...

Le président:

Des exceptions sont prévues à l'article 14.

L’hon. John Major:

Avez-vous un alinéa particulier en tête?

Le président:

Je dirais tous les alinéas. Par exemple, l'alinéa 14e), qui est ainsi libellé: Les renseignements qui ont un lien direct avec une enquête en cours menée par un organisme chargé de l'application de la loi et pouvant mener à des poursuites.

Il contient une exception visant les documents qui seraient accessibles au comité de parlementaires. J'ai peut-être mal entendu quand j'essayais de comprendre. Vous semblez dire que ces renseignements pourraient être recueillis si un mandat était obtenu au titre de l'article 13.

L’hon. John Major:

Je pense que, ce que je voulais dire, c'était que les renseignements recueillis en application de la version actuelle du paragraphe 13(2) ne seraient pas permis si les renseignements étaient protégés par le secret professionnel de l'avocat et que, sous le régime de notre charte, le secret professionnel de l'avocat interdirait cette communication sans l'avantage d'un mandat.

(1630)

Le président:

D'accord. Merci beaucoup.

Nous avons commencé tard, et j'ai pensé que, comme le Nouveau Parti démocratique n'avait pas eu l'occasion de poser des questions quand M. Major était là, je pourrais accorder deux ou trois autres minutes à M. Dubé.

C'est si vous avez des questions, monsieur Dubé.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Oui. Merci, monsieur le président. J'ai seulement une question à poser, alors je n'abuserai pas de votre indulgence.

Monsieur le juge Major, vous avez évoqué la capacité du premier ministre de modifier le rapport, cet élément du projet de loi. Nous avons un amendement qui, dans ce que nous considérons comme la norme minimale, rendrait ce rapport à tout le moins clair quant à l'endroit où il serait révisé et par qui. Si je pouvais simplement, avec votre permission, lire le passage clé de l'amendement, ce serait utile. Je vais le paraphraser du mieux que je le peux.

Si le Comité a reçu du premier ministre la directive de soumettre « une version révisée », conformément au paragraphe 21(5), nous disons que « le rapport déposé devant chaque chambre du Parlement doit être clairement désignée comme étant une version révisée et doit indiquer l'étendue et la raison de la révision ». À nos yeux, malgré le fait que les définitions concernant ce qui peut être modifié et le caractère subjectif de la modification nous posent problème, il s'agit du minimum requis pour que l'on puisse au moins s'assurer que les Canadiens connaissent la motivation qui sous-tend « l'utilisation du Sharpie », si vous me passez l'expression. Peut-être que je pourrais rapidement obtenir vos réflexions à ce sujet.

L’hon. John Major:

Eh bien, je suis d'accord avec ce que vous proposez. Que puis-je dire de plus? Je pense que c'est approprié.

M. Matthew Dubé:

C'est plus que suffisant pour moi. Merci beaucoup, monsieur le juge Major.

Le président:

C'est ce qu'on appelle aller à l'essentiel.

Merci beaucoup à nos deux témoins. Nous allons faire une pause rapide de trois ou quatre minutes pour changer de groupe de témoins.

Monsieur le juge et madame Carvin, nous vous remercions de votre présence.

(1630)

(1635)

Le président:

Je voudrais commencer en accueillant notre deuxième groupe de témoins de la journée. Nous allons tenter de terminer autour de 17 h 30, en répartissant le temps que nous avons perdu entre les deux groupes de témoins.

Nous accueillons la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la GRC, représentée par son président, Ian McPhail. Je crois que M. Evans l'accompagne. Nous accueillons également le Bureau du commissaire du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, représenté par le commissaire, de même que par M. Galbraith.

Bienvenue.

Je pense que nous allons commencer par M. McPhail, pour 10 minutes, passer à M. Plouffe, puis tenir la série de questions.

Vous avez la parole.

M. Ian McPhail (président, Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes relatives à la Gendarmerie royale du Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président. Ma déclaration durera un peu moins de 10 minutes.

Je voudrais d'abord vous remercier, ainsi que les membres du Comité, de m'avoir invité aujourd'hui en tant que représentant de la Commission. M. Evans est le directeur principal des opérations de la Commission.

Je suis heureux d'avoir la possibilité de vous faire part de mon point de vue sur mon projet de loi proposé et sur le rôle des organismes d'examen composés d'experts.

Comme vous le savez, en 2014, des modifications apportées à la Loi sur la GRC ont entraîné la création de la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes. À ce moment-là, le mandat de la Commission avait été élargi au-delà des plaintes du public afin d'inclure des examens systémiques des activités de la GRC afin de veiller à ce qu'elles soient menées conformément aux lois, aux règlements, aux directives ministérielles ou à toute politique, procédure ou ligne directrice applicables.

La Commission a maintenant la capacité d'examiner toute activité de la GRC sans qu'une plainte du public lui ait été présentée ou sans établir de liens avec la conduite d'un membre.

Nous entreprenons actuellement deux de ces examens systémiques: l'un portant sur le harcèlement au travail, à la demande du ministre de la Sécurité publique, et l'autre — que j'ai lancé —, qui porte sur la mise en oeuvre par la GRC des recommandations pertinentes contenues dans le rapport de la commission d'enquête sur les actes de responsables canadiens relativement à Maher Arar. Les activités liées à la sécurité nationale de la GRC ont fait l'objet d'un examen rigoureux durant la Commission d'enquête O'Connor. Ainsi, j'estimais qu'il était important d'entreprendre un examen indépendant de la mise en oeuvre par la GRC des recommandations du juge O'Connor.

En tant que composante clé du cadre de sécurité et du renseignement du Canada, l'amélioration de la responsabilisation et de la transparence des activités de sécurité nationale de la GRC est le but ultime de l'examen de la CCETP. L'examen de la Commission porte sur six domaines clés fondés sur les recommandations pertinentes du juge O'Connor, c'est-à-dire: la centralisation et la coordination des activités de sécurité nationale de la GRC; l'utilisation par la GRC d'avis de surveillance à la frontière; le rôle de la GRC lorsque des Canadiens sont détenus à l'étranger; l'échange de renseignements entre la GRC et des entités étrangères; l'échange de renseignements par la GRC à l'intérieur du pays; et la formation des membres de la GRC en ce qui a trait aux opérations de sécurité nationale.

L'examen est en cours, et il exige que l'on se penche sur des renseignements de nature délicate et classifiée. Comme certains experts et observateurs ont déjà soulevé des préoccupations concernant le fait que la Commission obtiendrait ou non l'accès à des renseignements protégés par le secret professionnel, il importe de souligner que nous avons examiné des documents classifiés rendus accessibles par la GRC.

Une fois l'enquête achevée, un rapport sera présenté au ministre de la Sécurité publique et au commissaire de la GRC. Une version du rapport sera également rendue publique.

Cette enquête en cours fait ressortir le rôle clé de la CCETP relativement à l'examen des activités de sécurité nationale de la GRC. Je crois que l'examen effectué par les experts de la CCETP et par ses homologues, notamment le CSARS et le bureau du commissaire du CST, servira de complément au travail d'un comité de parlementaires.

Le projet de loi fait ressortir le rôle crucial des parlementaires en ce qui a trait au cadre de responsabilisation à l'égard de la sécurité nationale, tout en reconnaissant la contribution des organismes d'examen composés d'experts. À cet égard, j'ai hâte qu'un lien de travail axé sur la collaboration soit établi avec le comité.

Merci de m'avoir donné cette occasion de vous faire part de mes réflexions.

(1640)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. [Français]

Nous continuons avec M. Plouffe. [Traduction]

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe (commissaire, Bureau du commissaire du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications):

Monsieur le président et honorables députés, je suis heureux de comparaître devant le Comité au sujet du projet de loi C-22. M. Bill Galbraith, le directeur exécutif de mon bureau, m'accompagne.

Avant de formuler quelques commentaires au sujet du projet de loi sur lequel se penche le Comité, et comme il s'agit de ma première comparution devant lui, je vais décrire brièvement le rôle de mon bureau. [Français]

Vous avez ma biographie et un sommaire de mon mandat, alors je ne m'attarderai pas là-dessus, mais j'aimerais souligner que mes décennies d'expérience en tant que juge m'ont été très utiles dans mon rôle de commissaire du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, ou CST, un rôle que j'assume depuis plus de trois ans.

La Loi sur la défense nationale, qui fixe le mandat de mon bureau et du CST, exige que le commissaire soit un juge à la retraite ou un juge surnuméraire d'une cour supérieure du Canada.

Le commissaire du CST est autonome et sans lien de dépendance avec le gouvernement. Mon bureau a son propre budget accordé par le Parlement.

J'ai tous les pouvoirs en vertu de la partie II de la Loi sur les enquêtes, qui m'accorde un accès complet à toutes les installations, tous les fichiers, tous les systèmes et tous les membres du personnel du CST, et qui me confie le pouvoir d'assignation, au besoin.[Traduction]

Le rôle externe et indépendant du commissaire, axé sur le CST, aide le ministre de la Défense nationale, qui est responsable du CST, à assumer sa responsabilité envers le Parlement et, finalement, envers les Canadiens, pour cet organisme.

Laissez-moi maintenant aborder le projet de loi C-22.

J'ai affirmé à de nombreuses occasions qu'une plus grande mobilisation des parlementaires concernant la responsabilité liée à la sécurité nationale est effectivement la bienvenue. [Français]

Plus particulièrement depuis la divulgation par Edward Snowden de renseignements classifiés volés provenant de la National Security Agency des États-Unis et de ses partenaires, dont le CST, la confiance du public envers les agences de renseignement et envers les organismes d'examen ou de surveillance a été mise à l'épreuve. Ces divulgations ont considérablement changé le discours public.

(1645)

[Traduction]

Je crois qu'un comité possédant l'autorisation de sécurité requise et les organismes d'examen composés d'experts, comme mon bureau et celui de mes collègues du Comité de surveillance des activités de renseignement de sécurité — le CSARS —, qui se penche sur les activités du SCRS et de la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes — la CCETP — relatives à la GRC, dirigée par M. McPhail, peut offrir un solide cadre complémentaire et complet de responsabilisation à l'égard des activités de sécurité et de renseignement et qu'il peut effectivement améliorer la transparence.

Je crois que le comité aidera à rétablir et à améliorer la confiance du public, mais ce ne sera pas sans difficulté. Dans le passé, le commissaire du CST a rarement été invité à comparaître devant des comités parlementaires, et le travail de mon bureau pourrait ne pas avoir reçu tout le mérite qui lui est dû. Le comité des parlementaires pourrait aider à cibler l'attention sur le travail important des organismes d'examen spécialisés. Mon bureau et moi-même avons hâte de travailler avec le comité et avec son secrétariat.

Toutefois, pour une efficacité maximale, les rôles respectifs du comité de parlementaires et des organismes d'examen spécialisés doivent être bien définis, afin d'éviter le chevauchement des efforts et le gaspillage de ressources. À mon avis, c'est d'une importance primordiale. [Français]

Éviter le double emploi est un thème évident, et je suis heureux de le voir abordé dans le projet de loi, à l'article 9 intitulé « Coopération ». Le message est clair, mais nous devons travailler en étroite collaboration avec le secrétariat du comité pour garantir sa concrétisation. Les objectifs sont, à mon avis, d'assurer un examen d'ensemble complet et d'encourager la plus grande transparence possible.[Traduction]

J'ai certaines réflexions concernant la façon dont nous pourrions entamer une relation productive avec le comité et avec son secrétariat. Peut-être que nous pourrons étudier cette question durant notre période de questions.

Cependant, certains éléments devraient être abordés. J'ai un certain nombre d'observations à formuler au sujet des diverses parties du projet de loi. Le mandat en trois volets du comité, prévu à l'article 8 du projet de loi, est très vaste du fait qu'il est lié à toute activité qui comprend les opérations ainsi que les affaires administratives, législatives et autres. Sous le régime de la version actuelle du projet de loi, il s'agira d'une autre raison pour laquelle nous devrons, dès le départ, travailler en étroite collaboration avec le comité afin de veiller à ce que les règles soient définies en pratique, et non seulement dans le simple but d'éviter les chevauchements, mais aussi pour assurer la complémentarité. [Français]

J'ignore les intentions du gouvernement quant à cette approche très large. Toutefois, la combinaison de ces mandats pourrait nuire grandement à l'efficacité du secrétariat. Le comité devra établir ses priorités. C'est là une autre occasion pour le comité et les organismes de surveillance de travailler en étroite collaboration pour assurer une reddition de comptes globale efficace.[Traduction]

Ce qui est clair, c'est que le gouvernement veut soumettre à un examen les activités de sécurité nationale et de renseignement des organismes et des ministères qui ne font actuellement pas l'objet d'un examen. Pour que l'examen soit efficace, il est essentiel de maintenir la capacité d'examen par des experts dont nous disposons maintenant et de l'étendre aux organismes et ministères qui ne font actuellement pas l'objet d'un examen. On pourrait le faire en établissant un autre ou d'autres organismes d'examen ou en les répartissant entre les organismes d'examen existants. Je m'attends à ce que le comité de parlementaires dirige son attention vers cette question.

Selon mon interprétation de la version actuelle du projet de loi, il est clair que le comité n'a pas la même liberté d'accès que mon bureau, ou bien que le CSARS. Au titre de l'alinéa 8b), le comité peut examiner « les activités » qui sont liées à la sécurité nationale ou au renseignement, « à moins que le ministre compétent ne détermine » qu'il en va autrement. Cette disposition prévoit une limite possible à ce que le comité pourrait ou ne pourrait pas voir.

(1650)

[Français]

À mon avis, c'est là que la complémentarité du comité et des organismes de surveillance existants entre en jeu avec l'assurance que ces derniers ont un accès sans entrave aux organismes qu'ils examinent. La lacune, c'est qu'il existe des ministères et des agences qui ne sont pas encore soumis à la surveillance. [Traduction]

En conclusion, je proposerais deux ou trois petites modifications afin de clarifier les éléments, et je pourrais les fournir par écrit, par la suite, si vous le souhaitez, monsieur le président.

Merci de m'offrir l'occasion de comparaître devant vous aujourd'hui. Mon directeur exécutif et moi-même serions heureux de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci.

Je devrais toujours mentionner aux témoins que, si, à la fin de la séance, il y a quoi que ce soit que vous souhaitiez avoir dit et ne l'avez pas fait, il est très approprié que vous soumettiez cette information par écrit au greffier, et tout sera pris en compte par le Comité. Cela ne pose aucun problème.

Nous allons commencer par M. Erskine-Smith, pour sept minutes.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Merci beaucoup.

Je veux commencer par la relation de collaboration que vous avez mentionnée, monsieur McPhail, et l'accent que vous avez mis sur la nature complémentaire du comité de parlementaires et des organismes d'examen spécialisés.

Monsieur Plouffe, vous avez mentionné que vous aviez davantage accès à l'information que ne l'aurait certainement le comité, sous le régime de la version actuelle du projet de loi, non seulement au titre de l'alinéa 8b), mais aussi des limites d'accès à l'information prévues aux articles 14 et 16.

Nous avons accueilli d'autres témoins qui ont insisté sur le fait qu'il pourrait s'agir d'un problème pour la relation de collaboration et qui pourrait en fait nuire à l'adoption d'une approche complémentaire. Je me demande si vous avez quelque chose à dire à ce sujet.

M. Ian McPhail:

Les dispositions concernant l'accès à l'information ne sont pas identiques, comme vous l'indiquez, monsieur Erskine-Smith. Par exemple, la Loi sur la GRC confère à la CCETP un accès un peu plus vaste à l'information sur les enquêtes en cours, du fait que le commissaire de la GRC est tenu de décrire par écrit pourquoi ce serait inapproprié.

Toutefois, la réalité, c'est qu'en tant qu'organisme d'examen, la dernière chose que nous voudrions serait de nuire à une enquête criminelle en cours, alors nous nous éloignerions assurément de cette information. De même, je prévois que le comité de parlementaires — qui est aussi un organisme d'examen — adopterait aussi cette politique.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Je comprends cela, si nous voulons établir une relation de travail. J'ai entendu le témoignage d'autres témoins selon lequel il est très important d'établir une bonne relation de travail, non seulement avec les organismes d'examen composés d'experts, mais aussi avec les organismes gouvernementaux, mais, bien entendu, on aurait cette interaction directement avec le commissaire, et il fournirait les motifs. Dans ce cas-là, cette conversation serait close dès le départ, conformément à l'article 14, en particulier.

M. Ian McPhail:

C'est possible, et je dirais que le comité devra avancer à tâtons. Il se pourrait bien que des amendements puissent être apportés au projet de loi maintenant. Au cours des prochaines années, on verra comment il fonctionne en pratique...

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Mais, à votre avis, en pratique, cette relation de travail — où on interagit directement avec le commissaire de la GRC, où il fournit les motifs de refus et où il y a un peu de compromis — fonctionne assez bien.

M. Ian McPhail:

En fait, l'exemple que j'ai donné portait sur les affaires liées aux enquêtes criminelles en cours. Dans ma déclaration préliminaire, j'ai mentionné notre examen de la mise en œuvre des recommandations du juge O'Connor. Dans le cadre de cet examen, nous avons eu accès à des renseignements protégés par le secret professionnel et classifiés. La GRC a collaboré pleinement. Nous prévoyons que cette collaboration se poursuivra. Si ce n'est pas le cas, la loi prévoit un mécanisme pour déterminer quels processus devraient avoir lieu.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

On dirait qu'ils fonctionnent assez bien, que, dans les deux sens, et sans que l'accès à l'information soit complètement limité...

M. Ian McPhail:

Si je puis formuler un autre commentaire, même si la loi interdit que le poste de président — mon poste — soit occupé par un ancien membre de la GRC, heureusement, nous comptons au sein de notre personnel d'anciens membres supérieurs de la GRC, comme M. Evans, par exemple, et, pour cette raison, nos membres savent aussi où aller, quels renseignements doivent être conservés et où ils le seront. Ainsi, il ne s'agit pas d'une demande de documents non éclairée et, à cet égard, pour revenir à la première partie de votre question, je pense que la commission pourrait être utile au comité de parlementaires.

(1655)

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Monsieur Plouffe, peut-être que vous pourriez parler de l'égard au chapitre de l'accès à l'information entre le commissaire du CST et le comité de parlementaires.

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

De mon point de vue, en tant que commissaire du SCC, j'ai mon propre mandat sur lequel me concentrer, et le comité aura son propre mandat sur lequel se concentrer. C'est pourquoi, dans ma déclaration, j'ai insisté sur l'importance de la complémentarité entre les deux comités, afin que le problème de l'accès, en théorie, n'en soit pas un en pratique.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Mais elle pourrait poser problème en pratique, comme l'ont indiqué MM. Roach et Forcese, par exemple. Ils ont utilisé un certain nombre d'exemples divers. Un exemple serait d'être exclu des opérations d'application de la loi en cours. Ils affirment qu'une opération d'application de la loi est encore en cours en ce qui a trait au bombardement d'Air India de 1985. Ils ont également parlé de l'affaire des détenus afghans.

Si on empêchait le comité de parlementaires d'accéder à l'information relative à ces enjeux, et s'il veut présenter de son propre chef une demande de renseignements au sujet de laquelle le public est certainement préoccupé, ne s'agit-il pas là de quelque chose dont nous devrions nous inquiéter? Le comité de parlementaires ne pourrait-il pas travailler avec le commissaire du CST, sur un pied d'égalité, et disposer du même accès à l'information?

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Je pense que vous faites allusion aux exceptions prévues à l'article 14.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

C'est exact.

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Nous pouvons être d'accord ou non avec ces exceptions, mais, de mon point de vue, elles ne sont pas déraisonnables, si on tient compte du projet de loi dans son ensemble, de son objet et son régime ainsi que du contexte en entier. Je crois également qu'un autre témoin qui a comparu devant vous auparavant — M. Atkey — a formulé un commentaire à ce sujet en disant qu'il en acceptait la plupart.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Oui, quoiqu'il a affirmé que nous devrions supprimer l'article 16 et la limite prévue à l'alinéa 8b).

Le président:

Vous avez 15 secondes.

M. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith:

Voici quelle serait ma dernière question. S'il s'agit de parlementaires possédant l'autorisation de sécurité nécessaire, pourquoi devrions-nous nous sentir plus à l'aise d'accorder un accès complet à votre bureau, mais pas à eux?

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

C'est une bonne question, et je suppose que c'est au gouvernement d'y répondre. Je soupçonne — en n'oubliant pas qu'il s'agit d'un nouveau comité et que c'est la première fois que des parlementaires participeront à ces affaires — que le gouvernement veut procéder avec prudence et lentement. Nous verrons, à mesure que les choses évolueront, quels changements devraient être apportés au projet de loi. [Français]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Plouffe.[Traduction]

Madame Gallant — je ne sais pas si je dois dire mademoiselle ou madame —, bon retour.

Mme Cheryl Gallant:

« Madame », c'est bien.

Le président:

Je sais. Il m'a simplement fallu une minute.

Mme Cheryl Gallant (Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président. Mes questions s'adresseront surtout à vous, monsieur Plouffe.

Tout d'abord, dans vos commentaires, vous avez mentionné que le gouvernement voulait soumettre à un examen les activités de sécurité nationale et de renseignement des organismes et des ministères qui ne font actuellement pas l'objet d'examens. Voudriez-vous nommer les organismes et les ministères que vous estimez ne pas faire l'objet d'examens adéquats actuellement?

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Je dois admettre que je n'ai pas la liste à portée de main, en ce moment, pour vous le dire exactement. L'Agence des services frontaliers, par exemple, est le premier qui me vient à l'esprit. Je pense que cette agence devrait être examinée par quelqu'un. En guise d'exemple, ce pourrait être le CSARS, car le travail que fait ce comité, d'une part, et celui que fait l'agence des services frontaliers, d'autre part, sont un peu semblables. Le CSARS pourrait être l'organisme d'examen pour cette agence.

En ce qui concerne les autres ministères qui ne font pas l'objet d'examens, le gouvernement a le choix de les répartir entre les organismes d'examen existants — par exemple, le commissaire du CST, le CSARS, la CCETP — ou de créer un nouvel organisme ou de nouveaux organismes. Je pense qu'il importe que les organismes et les ministères qui ne font pas l'objet d'examens soient examinés.

(1700)

Mme Cheryl Gallant:

Ma préoccupation tient au fait que nous voyons, de temps en temps, au Parlement, un enjeu qui est de nature délicate, qui est urgent — par exemple, la présélection des réfugiés syriens —, le système qui est en place pourrait présenter certaines lacunes. Le Comité a peut-être voulu l'étudier, mais s'est fait dire non. Nous avons tout simplement été dépassés par la tyrannie de la majorité. Considérez-vous qu'il soit préoccupant que ce que pourraient devoir étudier les parlementaires au sein de comités permanents puisse, parce que le gouvernement voudrait le cacher aux yeux du public, être renvoyé à ce comité spécial?

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Si je comprends bien votre question... je suis désolé. Pourriez-vous la répéter, seulement l'essentiel?

Mme Cheryl Gallant:

Pensez-vous que le gouvernement pourrait vouloir renvoyer une question qu'un comité pourrait vouloir étudier à ce comité spécial simplement afin qu'elle reste en dehors du domaine public?

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Non, je ne le pense pas du tout. Comme je le dis, les mandats sont différents, mais ils sont complémentaires. Selon moi, ce qui importe — comme je l'ai dit dans ma déclaration préliminaire — c'est le travail de collaboration: le comité de parlementaires, d'une part, et les organismes d'examen composés d'experts, d'autre part. Si nous faisons cela, je suppose que cela répondra à votre question.

Mme Cheryl Gallant:

D'accord. Vous avez affirmé que le comité n'a pas la même liberté d'accès que votre bureau ou le CSARS, quoique dans un domaine précis, son accès est plus explicite. De quel domaine s'agit-il?

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Il s'agit de l'accès aux opinions juridiques, le secret professionnel de l'avocat.

Mme Cheryl Gallant:

Très bien. Selon l'alinéa 8b), c'est à moins que le ministre compétent ne détermine qu'il en va autrement, alors comment les membres du comité spécial seront-ils en mesure de vérifier s'il existe un motif pour lequel le comité ne devrait pas accéder à certains renseignements?

M. J. William Galbraith (directeur exécutif, Bureau du commissaire du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications):

Le projet de loi établit que, si un ministre refuse, ou bien si l'accès à l'information est refusé au comité, une explication doit être donnée. Est-ce ce à quoi vous faites allusion?

Mme Cheryl Gallant:

Nous voyons cela tout le temps au comité de la défense, quand on dit que quelque chose est une question de sécurité opérationnelle. Nous ne savons pas s'il s'agit vraiment d'une affaire de sécurité opérationnelle. On ne fait peut-être qu'utiliser cela comme moyen d'éviter de fournir des renseignements. Comment les membres du comité sauraient-ils qu'il y a vraiment un problème de sécurité nationale et que ce n'est pas plutôt le ministère ou l'organisme qui ne veut pas donner accès à l'information?

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Le projet de loi — si je ne me trompe pas — contient une disposition selon laquelle, si un ministre refuse ce type de renseignements, il doit vous donner les motifs, la raison pour laquelle il ne communique pas ce type d'information.

Mme Cheryl Gallant:

Le projet de loi... il est question de l'alinéa 8b). Les témoins pourraient expliquer comment le...

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

C'est l'alinéa 8b)?

Mme Cheryl Gallant:

Oui. Êtes-vous certain que le gouvernement ou l'organisme ne pourrait pas simplement utiliser la sécurité nationale comme disposition de sauvegarde pour ne pas être tenu de fournir les renseignements au comité?

(1705)

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Je ne vois pas pourquoi ils feraient cela, sauf s'ils sont de mauvaise foi, et je présume que tout le monde agit de bonne foi, à moins qu'on me prouve le contraire.

Mme Cheryl Gallant:

Très bien.

Nous allons passer à la procédure du comité. Il est énoncé: Le président convoque les réunions du Comité.

Est-ce que l'un ou l'autre des témoins estime qu'il devrait y avoir une disposition permettant à un certain nombre des membres du comité — un nombre minimal qui équivaudrait ou serait inférieur au nombre de députés — de convoquer une réunion du comité?

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Parlez-vous d'un quorum?

Mme Cheryl Gallant:

Oui.

L'hon. Tony Clement:

C'est à l'article 17.

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

L'article 17, n'est-ce pas? Je remarque qu'il n'y a aucune disposition dans le projet de loi au sujet d'un quorum pour le comité. Il est mentionné qu'il y a neuf membres, et les articles 18 et 19, par exemple, traitent de la voix prépondérante, mais pas du quorum. Je pense qu'il devrait y avoir une disposition qui précise que le quorum du comité est, disons, de cinq membres ou peu importe.

Le président:

Vous devez vous arrêter ici.

Monsieur Dubé, veuillez poursuivre. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie également les témoins d'être parmi nous.

Ma question s'adresse à M. Plouffe.

En vertu de la Loi sur la défense nationale, une partie de votre mandat consiste à dénoncer toutes les activités du CST qui ne sont pas conformes à la loi. Nous présentons pour notre part un amendement qui donnerait à ce comité la responsabilité d'alerter le ministre de la Sécurité publique ainsi que le ministre de la Justice. C'est donc semblable à votre mandat.

J'aimerais d'abord que vous nous parliez de l'importance de cet aspect de votre mandat et que vous nous disiez ensuite si, selon vous, notre amendement est une proposition appropriée pour ce comité.

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Une partie de mon mandat consiste à m'assurer que les activités du CST sont conformes à la loi. Il va donc de soi que, si elles n'y sont pas conformes, je dois en aviser le ministre de la Défense nationale, qui est responsable du CST, ainsi que le procureur général du Canada, et ce, en vertu de la Loi sur la défense nationale. Si vous lisez le rapport annuel que j'ai publié l'année dernière et qui a été déposé devant les Chambres, vous constaterez que j'ai rapporté un cas où cela s'était produit.

Le rôle du comité est de s'assurer que les activités des « agences surveillées » sont conformes à la loi. Je ne vois pas pourquoi vous ne pourriez pas, vous aussi, avoir le pouvoir de dénoncer de tels cas au ministre responsable de l'agence en question ainsi qu'au procureur général du Canada.

M. Matthew Dubé:

C'est parfait, je vous remercie beaucoup.

On a beaucoup parlé de l'alinéa 8b) et du pouvoir que le ministre a d'empêcher une enquête du comité, ce qui n'est le cas ni chez vous ni auSIRC...

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

C'est le Comité de surveillance des activités de renseignement de sécurité, ou CSARS.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Oui, merci, c'est déjà difficile de connaître tous les acronymes, mais c'est encore plus compliqué avec les acronymes bilingues.

Vous avez parlé de la complémentarité. Cela pourrait être un exemple où on pourrait travailler ensemble. J'aimerais prendre un angle différent et j'aimerais avoir votre opinion là-dessus.

Vous avez parlé d'un point très important pour le comité des parlementaires, c'est-à-dire la confiance du public. Ne croyez-vous pas qu'en ajoutant des pouvoirs discrétionnaires à un ministre — même si on peut se fier à d'autres organismes déjà existants pour superviser la situation — on nuit à un objectif clé, soit la confiance du public? On sait que le ministre peut interdire des enquêtes, ce qui n'est pas le cas avec d'autres comités de surveillance.

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Tout d'abord, il faut comprendre quelle est la nature du comité que le projet de loi veut créer. C'est un comité de parlementaires, mais ce n'est pas un comité du Parlement, c'est une créature de l'exécutif. Je pense que ce n'est pas la première fois que vous entendez cela. C'est la raison pour laquelle le premier ministre et les ministres ont un rôle à jouer. Si c'était un comité du Parlement, ce serait différent.

C'est un comité de parlementaires, c'est donc un comité de l'exécutif. Ce comité, entre parenthèses, doit donc faire rapport au premier ministre dans certains cas et à certains ministres dans d'autres cas. C'est la philosophie.

Un jour, on évoluera peut-être dans un sens où, avec la pratique, on s'apercevra — un peu comme cela se passe en Angleterre actuellement — qu'on a un comité du Parlement et non un comité de parlementaires.

(1710)

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci.[Traduction]

Monsieur McPhail et monsieur Evans... Vous avez soulevé un point intéressant au sujet de l'importance de ne pas être un ancien membre de la GRC, monsieur McPhail, et de l'indépendance que cela procure. Je me demande simplement quelle est votre opinion à ce sujet. Nous avons suivi un processus semblable relativement au choix du président du comité, c'est-à-dire que, si le premier ministre nomme le président, je pense qu'il y a une certaine ressemblance. C'est comme si vous étiez un ancien membre de la GRC. Cela peut représenter un certain conflit d'intérêts. Quelle importance a votre indépendance et comment vous permet-elle de faire preuve d'une surveillance adéquate?

M. Ian McPhail:

Selon moi, monsieur Dubé, ce n'est pas vraiment une question de conflit réel; il s'agit plutôt de confiance du public.

Je vais parler au nom de M. Evans, mais je peux également parler pour tous les anciens membres de la GRC qui font partie du personnel de notre commission. Ils sont tous, selon moi, très déterminés à exécuter le mandat de la commission; ils mettent à profit non seulement leur détermination, mais également leurs connaissances spécialisées et leur expertise, ce qui est franchement inestimable.

Je pense que — et, évidemment, cela va au-delà de mon autorité ou de celle de la commission —, puisque le projet de loi vise le redressement et qu'il est conçu pour accroître la confiance du public, il est difficile de s'imaginer que le premier ministre ou un certain nombre de parlementaires puissent nommer comme président une personne dont la nomination nuirait à la confiance du public.

M. Matthew Dubé:

En effet. Je le reconnais.

Le président:

Vous avez 30 secondes.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Rapidement, ma dernière question est la suivante: Quelle était l'importance de l'examen continu des recommandations du juge O'Connor? À quel point était-ce important que vous ayez accès à tous les renseignements? Vous en avez parlé dans votre déclaration préliminaire, mais est-ce vraiment important? C'est quelque chose dont nous discutons au sujet du projet de loi, n'est-ce pas?

M. Ian McPhail:

C'est essentiel, mais comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, nous n'avons pas eu à nous en remettre à une quelconque disposition législative à ce jour. Je ne peux prédire l'avenir, bien évidemment, mais à ce jour, la GRC s'est montrée pleinement coopérative et a donné un accès complet à nos enquêteurs.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Cet accès complet est essentiel pour faire votre travail.

M. Ian McPhail:

Absolument.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Français]

La parole est à M. Di Iorio.

M. Nicola Di Iorio (Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie, messieurs, de votre collaboration et de votre précieux témoignage.

Je vais traiter de l'article 8 du projet de loi où il est question du mandat du comité. On peut lire: « Le Comité a pour mandat: »

À l'alinéa b), il est écrit:[Traduction] toute activité mais voici ce qui précède: à moins que le ministre compétent ne détermine que l'examen porterait atteinte à la sécurité nationale; [Français]

D'autres témoins ont porté à notre attention qu'il y avait répétition dans le projet de loi. Je veux avoir votre point de vue sur cela. Est-il question de répétition dans le projet de loi?

Allons tout d'abord à l'article 14.

À l'article 14, alinéa b), on ne parle plus d'un examen, mais de renseignements, ce qui m'apparaît beaucoup plus restreint.

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Est-ce l'article 14 ou l'article 15?

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

C'est l'alinéa 14b) dans lequel on parle de renseignements, et non plus d'un examen.

À l'alinéa 14d), on traite de l'identité d'une personne. Encore là, il n'est pas question d'un examen.

À l'alinéa 14e), il est question de renseignements et, encore là, il n'est pas question d'un examen.

J'attire aussi votre attention sur l'article 16 où, à nouveau, on nous parle d'un renseignement, et non pas d'un examen.

Êtes-vous aussi d'avis qu'il y a duplication inutile et qu'on répète des choses pour rien? D'après vous, ces exceptions faites aux articles 14 et 16 sont-elles justifiées?

(1715)

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Tout à l'heure, avec M. Dubé, nous avons parlé un peu de l'alinéa 8b). Cet alinéa est une restriction; combien de fois va-t-il être appliqué? Il faut se poser la question. Si je me fie à ce qu'un ministre a dit récemment, cette prérogative ne va être utilisée que très rarement.

J'avais une note en anglais qui exprime ma pensée. Permettez-moi de vous la lire. [Traduction]

Elle se lit comme suit: « Selon mon expérience, les craintes sont souvent pires que la réalité. »[Français]

C'est une restriction, mais c'est une exception. Le principe d'une exception, c'est d'être utilisée très rarement.

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Est-ce que vous êtes d'accord que le ministre pourrait laisser passer l'examen, alors que le projet de loi précise que certains renseignements ne peuvent pas être divulgués au comité?

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Il faut bien comprendre — et je pense que vous le comprenez aussi — qu'il y a une différence entre un examen, qui fait partie du mandat, et l'accès aux renseignements dont il est question à l'article 13 et aux articles suivants. Je crois que ce n'est pas tout à fait la même chose.

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

C'est bien.

Maintenant, monsieur McPhail et monsieur le juge, j'attire votre attention sur l'article 9.

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Oui.

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

À l'article 9, intitulé « Coopération », on peut lire ceci:[Traduction] Le Comité et chacun des organismes de surveillance prennent toute mesure raisonnable pour coopérer afin d'éviter que l'exercice du mandat du Comité ne fasse double emploi avec l'exercice du mandat de l'un ou l'autre des organismes de surveillance. [Français]

Est-ce que vous êtes d'accord?

Monsieur le juge, vous avez vous-même indiqué que c'est un comité de parlementaires dont une bonne partie des membres — la vaste majorité, mais pas tous — sont élus. Ce sont des gens qui tous les quatre ans se présentent devant le peuple pour faire renouveler leur mandat.

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Oui.

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Est-ce que vous êtes d'accord pour dire que, en cas de divergence, ce comité a préséance sur les comités comme celui que vous présidez?

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Vous parlez des comités d'experts?

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Je parle des comités d'experts comme celui que vous présidez, comme celui que M. McPhail préside. Je pose la question à M. McPhail aussi, évidemment.

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Je ne vois pas cela ainsi. Je ne pense pas que ce soit une question de préséance. Je comprends un peu le sens de votre question, mais chaque comité ou chaque organisme a son propre mandat. Je ne crois pas que ce soit une question de préséance. Je ne le vois pas comme cela du tout.

Le mandat d'examen par des experts que nous avons, par rapport au Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, c'est une chose. Cela implique des examens approfondis plusieurs fois par année et ainsi de suite. J'imagine que le comité, par son mandat, va probablement s'en tenir aux questions plus générales plutôt qu'aux questions particulières ou de détail comme nous le faisons.

Je pense que ce sont deux mandats qui se complètent. Il n'y a pas de question de préséance; les deux sont importants.

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Avez-vous un pouvoir de citation à comparaître?

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Oui.

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Le comité devrait-il avoir un pouvoir de citation à comparaître?

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Cela pourrait être utile. Je ne vois pas de problème à faire témoigner des gens si vous le voulez.

Par exemple, si vous êtes en train de faire un examen sur le ministère X, que vous voulez avoir accès à des documents et à des témoins et qu'on vous les refuse, cela peut être embêtant si vous n'avez pas de pouvoir de coercition,

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Il faudrait donc prévoir le pouvoir de subpoena duces tecum, c'est-à-dire le pouvoir d'assignation à produire des pièces.

(1720)

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Oui, c'est à prendre en considération. Il s'agit du pouvoir d'assignation des personnes ou des personnes avec des documents, ce qu'on appelle un duces tecum, comme vous le savez.

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Monsieur McPhail, qu'en pensez-vous? [Traduction]

M. Ian McPhail:

C'est une excellente question, mais je crois qu'elle concerne le rôle essentiel des parlementaires et des organismes d'examen. Ce n'est pas vraiment à moi de décrire ces rôles, mais je pense que vous serez d'accord avec moi pour dire que les rôles essentiels des parlementaires sont d'examiner, et, au besoin, d'édicter une loi et de demander au pouvoir exécutif de rendre des comptes. Le rôle des organes d'examen est de mettre en œuvre les directives du Parlement dans leur domaine respectif.

Je présume que, si la même philosophie devait s'appliquer au comité de parlementaires proposé, ce ne serait probablement pas le souhait du comité ou de tout autre comité du genre de faire double emploi avec le travail effectué en examinant en détail des questions particulières. Il faudrait plutôt examiner, par exemple, la question qui vient tout juste d'être soulevée aujourd'hui, c'est-à-dire celle qui concerne l'accès que devraient avoir les policiers à des documents supposément confidentiels contenus dans des téléphones cellulaires, à des messages chiffrés.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur McPhail.

M. Ian McPhail:

Il y a un débat public très pertinent à ce sujet, mais ce n'est pas le rôle d'un organisme d'examen, clairement. Ce n'était qu'un simple exemple.

Le président:

Merci. Nous devons poursuivre. Vous avez parlé pendant huit minutes trente. [Français]

M. Nicola Di Iorio:

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Clement.

L'hon. Tony Clement:

J'aimerais revenir sur ce qui a été décrit par des témoins antérieurs comme étant le « triple verrou » qui figure dans le projet de loi à l'article 8, à l'article 14 et dans un autre article. J'aimerais savoir à quel point les témoins estiment que cela est raisonnable.

Le triple verrou signifie qu'il existe des articles qui énoncent clairement que le mandat du comité peut être limité s'il y a un problème de sécurité nationale, quelque chose qui « porterait atteinte à la sécurité », comme le prévoit l'article 8. Puis il y a l'article 14, où figure une liste complète de tous les renseignements auxquels n'a pas accès le comité, et il est question du refus de communication. J'imagine que l'article 16 serait le dernier; il incorpore par renvoi la Loi sur la protection de l'information. Cela a déjà été décrit au Comité comme étant un triple verrou qui entrave la capacité du comité de faire son travail.

Je parle en tant que membre de l'ancien gouvernement, et nous ne voulions pas que le comité soit créé en premier lieu, mais il me semble que, si vous vous donnez la peine de mettre en place le comité, ce devrait être un comité qui est réellement apte et capable de prendre des mesures. Les témoins, M. Kent Roach, entre autres, ont décrit cela comme un triple verrou, en des termes peu élogieux.

Monsieur Plouffe, vous êtes évidemment le commissaire d'un organisme, et monsieur McPhail, vous avez eu affaire à ces genres d'examens par le passé. Il faut trouver un équilibre, et je comprends cela, mais comment pouvons-nous trouver le juste équilibre? Manifestement, personne autour de cette table ne veut porter atteinte à la sécurité nationale, grands dieux non! Par ailleurs, si je peux le dire ainsi, tous les parlementaires sont des gens honorables, et ce sont des gens occupés, donc le fait de nous astreindre à créer un comité dénué de pouvoirs réels me semble une perte de temps.

J'aimerais entendre votre point de vue à ce sujet, messieurs.

M. Ian McPhail:

Monsieur Clement, votre argument est très valable, et j'ai le sentiment que tous vos collègues, des deux côtés de la table, sont d'accord avec vous.

Je peux seulement ajouter quelques précisions au sujet de l'information qui figure à l'alinéa 14e): les renseignements qui ont un lien direct avec une enquête en cours menée par un organisme chargé de l'application de la loi et pouvant mener à des poursuites;

Le libellé utilisé dans notre mesure habilitante est un peu plus général.

Je vais revenir à ce que je disais il y a un moment, c'est-à-dire que je ne crois pas qu'il est dans votre intention que le comité effectue ses propres enquêtes au sujet de mesures particulières de la GRC en ce qui concerne ses activités liées à la sécurité nationale.

Je vais vous donner un exemple si vous me le permettez. Les activités de la GRC liées à la sécurité nationale ont une portée beaucoup plus étendue que ce que pense le public, selon moi, parce que de nombreuses dispositions en matière de sécurité nationale ont été enchâssées dans le Code criminel. Par conséquent, la GRC a un mandat d'application de la loi. La GRC travaille également en étroite collaboration, dans bon nombre de ces domaines, avec d'autres organismes du gouvernement fédéral et avec les services de police provinciaux et même municipaux.

Notre organisme a le...

(1725)

L'hon. Tony Clement:

Je suis désolé...

M. Ian McPhail: Est-ce que je m'éloigne du sujet?

L'hon. Tony Clement: ... mais je n'ai que 15 secondes et j'aimerais entendre l'opinion de M. Plouffe également. Je comprends ce que vous voulez dire.

M. Ian McPhail:

D'accord. Nous pouvons travailler avec les organismes provinciaux de surveillance et avec d'autres intervenants.

Le président:

J'ai bien peur que votre temps ne soit écoulé.

M. Ian McPhail:

Oh, je suis désolé.

Le président:

Madame Damoff, vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Pam Damoff (Oakville-Nord—Burlington, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Mon collègue aimerait poser une courte question également, donc je vais partager mon temps avec lui. Je n'aurai probablement assez de temps que pour une seule question.

Je m'adresse à vous deux. Nous savons à quel point il est important que le public ait confiance en nos corps policiers. Selon vous, comment le comité peut-il travailler avec vos organismes pour renforcer cette confiance et faire en sorte que le public soit bien outillé pour comprendre l'équilibre entre la sécurité publique et nos droits et libertés civiles? Y a-t-il quelque chose dans le projet de loi qui pourrait être amélioré pour continuer dans cette voie?

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Je pense que l'un des principaux obstacles au rétablissement et à l'accroissement de la confiance du public sera la transparence. Le comité, tout comme les organismes d'examen composés d'experts, doit s'efforcer de fournir le plus de renseignements possible au Parlement et au public en général afin qu'il y ait une meilleure compréhension de ce qui se fait, de la raison pour laquelle cela est fait et, plus particulièrement, des mesures en place pour protéger la vie privée des citoyens canadiens.

En ce qui concerne le CSTC, que j'examine, j'insiste sur le concept de la transparence depuis les trois dernières années et j'essaie de convaincre l'organisme de publier toujours plus de renseignements à l'intention du public, puisque la publication de plus de renseignements fait partie intégrante du concept de transparence. Je pense que l'accent devrait être mis sur la transparence.

Mme Pam Damoff:

Monsieur McPhail.

M. Ian McPhail:

Madame Damoff, je suis d'accord avec le juge Plouffe en ce qui concerne chaque point qu'il a soulevé.

Je voudrais aussi ajouter qu'il y a une tension constante, comme vous l'avez souligné, entre, d'une part, notre désir de préserver les libertés civiles et notre engagement à cet égard et, d'autre part, la protection des Canadiens du point de vue de la sécurité nationale. Selon moi, la façon exacte d'établir un équilibre est l'un des objectifs principaux du comité, parce que les organismes d'examen ne sont pas en mesure d'exercer cette fonction. Le comité, pourvu qu'il n'y ait pas de partisanerie indue, devrait être en mesure de le faire.

(1730)

Mme Pam Damoff:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

J'ai une petite question pour M. Plouffe, mais je pense qu'elle est importante.

Le CSTC fait partie intégrante de notre structure de sécurité nationale et gère un nombre beaucoup plus élevé de technologies que la plupart des ministères, et la surveillance de mathématiciens et de cryptographes dont l'emploi à temps plein consiste à chiffrer des messages est forcément une tâche complexe. C'est une chose d'avoir un accès complet à tout; c'en est une autre d'interpréter les données. Lorsqu'il est question de renseignements d'origine électromagnétique, d'exploration de données, et ainsi de suite, et en ce qui concerne l'atteinte délibérée de machines ciblées, qui effectue les vérifications des codes de responsabilité?

Voici un exemple de ce qui me préoccupe. Selon la revue WIRED, l'année dernière, Kaspersky Lab a mis au jour un projet assez fascinant mené par le « groupe Equation », qui peut mettre à jour un micrologiciel sur un lecteur de disque dur à distance, et on croit que le groupe relève d'un partenaire du Groupe des cinq de la National Security Agency. Ce sont des travaux de langage d'assemblage de bas niveau et ils requièrent des connaissances très spécialisées.

Quels sont les processus en place pour détecter une méthode aussi perfectionnée au chapitre de la capacité de surveillance et déterminer comment cela se fait ou comment cela a pu se faire?

L’hon. Jean-Pierre Plouffe:

Eh bien, j'ai le sentiment que c'est pour cette raison qu'on nous appelle des organismes d'examen composés d'experts. Des experts travaillent pour nous. Je suis d'accord avec vous pour dire que ce n'est pas toujours facile de comprendre ce que fait le CSTC et, croyez-moi, j'ai été nommé il y a trois ans et j'essaie toujours de comprendre exactement en quoi consistent ces activités. C'est très complexe, mais je peux compter sur des experts. Il y a huit ou neuf experts qui travaillent pour moi à mon bureau, et ces experts sont d'anciens employés du CSTC, du SCRS ou d'un service de sécurité, peu importe, alors ce sont des experts.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce sont des gens qui regardent de près les codes et la technologie en tant que telle, et pas seulement les dossiers qui en découlent.

M. J. William Galbraith:

Si vous me le permettez, commissaire...?

M. Jean-Pierre Plouffe: Oui.

M. J. William Galbraith: Vos propos sont très détaillés, très poussés. Nous...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est un domaine dont nous ne parlons pas, et je veux m'assurer que nous en parlions.

M. J. William Galbraith:

Au moment de déterminer les activités qui feront l'objet d'un examen et d'établir l'ordre de priorité de ces activités, nous nous penchons sur les risques au chapitre de la conformité et de la vie privée. En ce qui concerne les activités que nous examinons, nous recevons les comptes rendus du CSTC et, lorsque nous cernons les activités, il est possible qu'une considération du genre entre en ligne de compte. À partir de là, nous déterminons quels sont les risques pour la vie privée qui se posent et quels sont les risques liés à la conformité, de manière générale. Puis, nous déterminons quelle priorité doit être accordée à chaque aspect.

S'il faut entrer dans le genre de détails dont vous parlez, nous allons, au besoin, nous en remettre à l'autorité du commissaire, aux ingénieurs informatiques contractuels, par exemple, pour nous assurer de comprendre ce qui se passe. Je dois dire que le CSTC est assez coopératif et transparent avec le bureau du commissaire, comme on a pu le voir dans le cas des métadonnées l'année dernière.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Galbraith.

Cela conclut notre rencontre. Merci à tous et merci aux témoins d'avoir été présents avec nous.

Je vais vous demander de quitter la salle assez rapidement, car j'aimerais avoir une brève rencontre avec le sous-comité.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on November 15, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.