header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2016-11-17 PROC 40

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. Welcome to meeting 40 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

Today, the committee is studying order-in-council appointments to the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments.

With us today are three provincial members of the advisory board. We have Chief Brian Francis, from Prince Edward Island; Jeannette Arsenault, from Prince Edward Island; and by video conference, Vikram Vij, from British Columbia.

The meeting is being held pursuant to Standing Order 111, which states: The committee, if it should call an appointee or nominee to appear pursuant to section (1) of this Standing Order, shall examine the qualifications and competence of the appointee or nominee to perform the duties of the post to which he or she has been appointed or nominated.

I would remind the committee to be mindful of this in their questioning of the witnesses. Members can also refer to pages 1011 and 1013 of the House of Commons Procedure and Practice for additional guidance.

The committee members know this, but just for the witnesses, we're only mandated to ask you about your qualifications. If someone asks you something else, I may allow them to ask it, but you don't have to answer it if you don't want to.

Quickly, for the record, for committee members, and you can take it back to any committee members who aren't here, there are two things. One is—and I don't want to discuss it now—there's a Kenyan delegation that will be asking for time with procedure and house affairs in the near future. I'm going to suggest we do the same as we did with Austria, and have a meeting that's not in our regular time slot, which would use up our time. If anyone objects to that, get back to me later.

Second, I would just like a motion from the committee to approve the expenses for our witnesses who have travelled, which are roughly.... How much is it?

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

It's $3,900.

The Chair:

Anita, you're going to second it.

Is anyone opposed?

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: What I think we'll do, because we're going to have to come back, is that we'll get all three witnesses to do their opening statements, but we'll concentrate our time on the video conference. Hopefully, we can finish that, because we have to leave for a vote and come back later.

Vikram, would you like to make some opening comments?

Mr. Vikram Vij (Provincial Member, British Columbia, Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments):

Sure.

My name is Chef Vikram Vij. I am from Vancouver. I was quite honoured to be appointed as an independent member.

We worked extremely hard and went through all the applications by the Privy Council. I was very well notified about everything that took place, what I needed to study, and what I needed to educate myself on. It was a bipartisan-style process. To choose a senator from this province was a great honour bestowed upon me. I'm humbled and honoured by the process. Hopefully, the choices that we have made were and are quite focused and thorough.

That's all I have to say.

(1105)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, and thank you for making yourself available.

Ms. Arsenault, could you give any opening remarks, please.

Ms. Jeannette Arsenault (Provincial Member, Prince Edward Island, Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I also was honoured to be asked to sit on this committee. I will just give you a little bit of background, which you do have in my resumé.

I was born on Prince Edward Island and I've spent most of my life there, except for one year in New Brunswick at a community college and then five years in Toronto working for a firm. After that, I moved back to Prince Edward Island, where I started my own business, which I've been running for 27 years. I've taken a lot of risks in life. There have been ups and downs, and as a result I have a lot of life experience. I've done a lot of volunteering with different committees. My parents brought me up to believe that if you volunteer and you give some of your time, a lot of that will come back and you will learn how to live a good life by doing that.

Thank you for your time.

The Chair:

Thank you, and thank you for taking another risk and coming here today. Anita's a really tough questioner.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: Chief Brian Francis, could you give any opening remarks, please.

Mr. Brian Francis (Provincial Member, Prince Edward Island, Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments):

Good morning, everyone.

Thank you for having me here. It's an honour to be here. It's an honour to be a part of the whole independent Senate advisory process.

You have my CV, but I want to give you a bit of background on my life journey to where I am today. I was born on a small first nation in the Malpeque Bay off Prince Edward Island. The only way off the island in the summertime was by a small ferry. The only way to get off in the wintertime was by ice. The living conditions were very hard, but we learned some good ethics and strengths from those days. During those times, the residential school era and the sixties scoop both had effects on my small community.

I left the island because I had to go to high school, and I became the first Mi’kmaq person from P.E.I. to get a Red Seal trade certificate. Following that, I worked for a few years with my first nation, and then I went to apply for a job with the federal government. I was at the lowest end, as a CR-2 registry clerk. Nineteen years later, I was in a senior management position, and I worked my way up the ladder, learning as I went. Life has been a learning journey for me. I've gained a lot of skills. I was on many merit-based selection board processes in my time at the federal government. That certainly helped me to do what I have done here on the independent Senate advisory board.

Following that, I became the elected chief of the Abegweit First Nation in 2007, again in 2011, and again in 2015. I'm going into my 10th year as a first nation leader. That's where I'm at.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We appreciate your being here today, and your unique set of skills will be great.

If we're proceeding in the normal rounds, I'm going to cut the time back from seven minutes to five minutes because we're losing some, and I'd like to finish with the B.C. one at least, so that he can go off the video conference.

If people on the first round can limit their comments to B.C., we'll get to the other witnesses when we get back from the vote.

Mr. Graham is first, with only five minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

That shouldn't be a problem.

Thank you, Vikram, for being here. I'm familiar with your recipe book. When my ex and I split up, it was the only thing we fought over.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Vikram Vij:

There is no reason to fight; just share.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We couldn't immediately get a second copy.

I appreciate your experience and knowing who you are, because I saw the name and I thought it was familiar, and then I figured out why. Thank you for that.

I want to tie this back into the Senate, which is much more interesting for the purpose of this committee. You have an incredible depth of experience in the food industry, far more than the rest of us, except for eating. I would like to know, in that career have you had a lot of opportunities to choose people? How do you do merit selection in your experience in that industry?

Mr. Vikram Vij:

I think the key process, having had businesses and having had a one-man show such as a restaurant and then up to 180 people now, is that you have to choose really solid leaders and people who can see your vision, who are pragmatic, and who can follow through with what you want and what your goals are.

With that experience of having been in the business for 35 years, you can bring that to the table, read a curriculum vitae of somebody, and create a picture of that person in your mind without having to have that person in front of you. It's the way the person writes, the way the person has expressed themselves, the reference letters, what points to look for, how long they have worked at that position, where they have worked, and what they have been. Those human resources skills come to you from being in the business for such a long time and creating your own team of advisers, CFOs, and CEOs.

I was able to apply that pragmatism to the Senate applications and to read those applications and say, “Okay, this person has done this for how long?”, and I was able to sift through some of the ones where I thought, “Okay, this is great, but it doesn't fit in perfectly,” or, “I think this fits in perfectly”. It was a narrowing down process from where we started, a process of elimination and of slowing saying this person doesn't fit or this person fits the bill properly.

That pragmatism comes just from being practical, by being in the business for so long, and by having run your own organizations. How would I want this person to be? I knew exactly what the position required and what a senator's position is supposed to be. I had done my homework on that. I was able to say, “Okay, if I were a senator, what would I want to be done, or what would I do?” I was able to see through those applications and say that this person fits the bill or does not fit the bill.

That comes just through experience, and it comes from being in the business for such a long time.

(1110)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It makes it hard to ask more questions. It's clear that you meet our requirements for being qualified. The purpose of our discussion here is to test the qualifications of those appointed by the Governor in Council.

I don't have any great doubts from that conversation about your CV and your comments.

Do any of our colleagues have a quick question?

Ms. Vandenbeld.

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.):

Thank you very much.

I agree with my colleague. I think all your qualifications are quite remarkable.

In your experience, obviously you've had to be a good judge of character, be able to see people's potential, and see whether or not they're qualified for different positions. One of the most important things in doing that is being able to see past the surface, and look at diversity perspectives, differences in life experiences that people can bring to the table.

Can you tell me a little about how you go about ensuring that when you are selecting people you really are looking at all the variety of things they can bring to the table, including different backgrounds?

Mr. Vikram Vij:

One of the things I exercised in my own mind was to never look at the name right off the bat. I looked at the curriculum vitae of the person. I looked at what they had done. I read the reference letters of that person. I built a character of that person. Sometimes I just had a piece of paper there and I would write down points that wowed me a little. If someone said this person has volunteered at so-and-so. I would say this is a great point. I would write that down right off the bat. I would go back to it afterwards and wonder if I had looked at it properly. It was never about where they came from, the colour of their skin, the political affiliation.

My position was to find the best person for that job. I was not going to allow anybody to make me make a decision, saying they are Indo-Canadian or Indo-French or Indo-this or Indo-that or any of that stuff.

I was just in South Africa and I gave a speech to some of the House of Commons people there. I said I came from the largest democracy, India, but I live in the best democracy, Canada.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Richards, you have five minutes.

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC):

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

I'll apologize to our witnesses because I have something else I wanted to touch on briefly. It's a notice of motion that I wanted to give to the committee. I'll do that very quickly, then I will have some time for some questions for you. I apologize that I'll use a little of our time.

The motion that I am putting on notice here is: That the Committee invite Paul Szabo, Sven Spengemann, Veena Bhullar, Jamie Kippen, and a representative from the Parkhill Group to appear to answer all questions related to the correspondence sent to the Chair of the Procedure and House Affairs Committee on October 28, 2016, regarding alleged breaches of the Canada Elections Act in Mississauga-Lakeshore.

I just wanted to put that verbally on notice, Mr. Chair. Obviously we would return to that at a later date.

I appreciate the witnesses' indulgence for that.

I'll move now to some questions for you. My understanding is that you want us to focus on our B.C. representatives.

(1115)

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Will you be sending us that motion in writing?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes. I've just read it in, of course. I can provide you a copy if you like.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you. That would be great.

Mr. Blake Richards:

How did you find that process to work in the interface with the other members of the committee? You mentioned how you evaluated, but then of course you have to come to a decision as a group. Do you have any recommendations as to how it might be improved in the future?

The Chair:

To the witness, just remember we're only here to ask about your qualifications. You can answer this if you want, but you don't have to because it's not in our mandate.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I appreciate what the chair has just said. It would be helpful to Parliament to know those things. If you think you can answer, that would be appreciated.

Mr. Vikram Vij:

Chair, and Mr. Richards, the process was very simple but very well done. We were versed beforehand on one of the initial meetings when we all met. Everybody from Prince Edward Island to New Brunswick, to everybody else, we all met. We were all given a nice binder to read and studied what it constituted. We all read it . We all had time to ask any questions of the chair of the independent council, the three independent ones. We were given enough information to study and go through it to see if there was something that stood out and we were not comfortable with. First of all, I should say that.

Secondly, when the process took place, we were sent, in confidentiality, all the information, which was only read by us. If I had a question about something, I was allowed to call up my counterpart, Anne Giardini, and have a conversation with her about it, but I didn't have to because it was quite well put together. The flow chart worked really well.

There were a couple of questions I had at first about the computer when I wasn't able to figure it out. I was able to get somebody on the phone in Ottawa, and they were able to guide me through the process right off the bat.

Then once we met, once we had made our decisions, we all sat—British Columbia and the national committee—and went through the process. We went through each and every name, basically, and had points, and discussed. It was a full-on, full-day conversation within this process. The conversation took place on why we felt this was a great qualification, what we felt about it, and we had some conversations between each other. The chairperson asked us enough questions, saying things like, “Why do you think this person is qualified?”

They were also asking us why we were choosing who we were choosing. Anne Giardini chose so many, and I chose so many. Then we convened on that again.

It was a very thorough process that took place. Again, we were aware of what was required of us and we wanted to deliver the best candidate possible, or the best five candidates possible. When we walked away from that room, we did not know which individual it was going to be at the end. It depended on the PMO basically to make that decision. We had done our job of making sure that we presented the top five we felt qualified as such.

The Chair:

Mr. Richards, you have just a minute.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Was that something you found a struggle with, the fact that, as you just mentioned, the Prime Minister's Office would make that decision?

(1120)

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota, on a point of order....

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I guess the bells are going, but even if we come back to that line of questioning, I think we've given a lot of leeway here on the questions about process. We're not here to ask them about process.

I think all of the committee members appreciate Mr. Vij's contribution to explaining how thorough the process was, but we're here to ask him about his competence, his skills, and qualifications.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Mr. Chair, on the point of order as well, let's deal with the bells first. We have to get unanimous consent to keep on going for a while, including Ms. Sahota's intervention. Let's deal with that first and then we can come back to her.

The Chair:

Okay. Is there unanimous consent to—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We are quite far from Centre Block.

The Chair:

There is no consent.

Okay, we'll come back as soon as the bells are over. I'll mostly ask the opposition members. Do we need the witness from B.C.? Do you have any specific questions? Your time was almost up.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I still had some time and still had a question I wanted to ask. I'd like to have him here.

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault (Sherbrooke, NDP):

For our part, I would like to ask a question of our witness from B.C.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

I understand there's no unanimous consent to go forward. I would entertain to ask for it again so that I can ask a question or two.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

I need unanimous consent.

The Chair:

We'll try to get you back here. We'll be at least a half hour before we're back.

Mr. Vikram Vij:

I'm sorry. I didn't hear what happened there.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We have to go to a vote in the parliamentary chamber right now, so we'll be back in about 45 minutes to an hour.

Mr. Vikram Vij:

Okay. Will I just keep waiting?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There's a vote called in the House so the bells are ringing.

Mr. Vikram Vij:

Right.

The Chair:

Are you available in 45 minutes or an hour?

Mr. Vikram Vij:

I'm available until 10 o'clock. I was told 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.

The Chair:

If you could do some other work for 45 minutes or an hour. The technicians will be in touch with you.

Mr. Vikram Vij:

Okay, thank you.

The Chair:

We will suspend.

(1120)

(1210)

The Chair:

We're back.

We were just in discussion on a point of order when we broke. We will call Mr. Richards to reply to the point of order that was being made.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thanks, Mr. Chair. I appreciate the opportunity to respond.

Although I appreciate the attempts being made by the Liberal member to prevent the questioning, I think it is quite relevant to the witness's qualifications, and I'll explain why.

A very standard and typical question on a job interview—and this isn't exactly a job interview, but it's assessing someone's qualifications so it's a similar type of situation—and a very common question, which I use and many people use in job interviews, is to assess the candidate's ability to deal with conflict. You ask them how they deal with a conflict situation. It's very typical. I know Mr. Vij would have hired many people, and it may even be a question that he himself uses to assess a candidate.

Given that, what I was obviously asking about is a situation with potential conflict, or it may even be a situation that has already occurred and in which there has been real conflict, because they have actually undertaken some assessment of potential senatorial candidates already.

What we're faced with is a situation in which I'm using this to determine the candidate's ability to deal with a conflict situation, whether it be a perceived one or a potential one, by virtue of which the PMO would not choose to appoint the candidate who had been recommended by him and other members of the board; or it may be, a situation that has actually already occurred in respect to which he may be able to tell us how he addressed that situation in reality.

Maybe the PMO didn't choose to appoint the people who were put forward. It would be about my ability to assess the ability to deal with that potential conflict, or what may have been a real conflict already, if the PMO has not appointed the candidates who were recommended by him or his fellow board members.

I think it is a very pertinent question to be able to assess the candidate's qualifications. Frankly, Mr. Chair, as much as I respect your position and I like you as a person, I think if you choose to rule anything other than to allow the question, it would seem to me to show a lack of impartiality here and something that would be seen to protect the government. I really hope, Mr. Chair, that you'll allow the question to proceed.

The Chair:

I'm not going to allow this debate to go on too long and take time from the witnesses, but we'll have Ruby respond.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I think what should be appreciated is the leniency shown on the first question. There was a point of order right there as well, but some leeway was given. There was a good response that I think was beneficial to this committee.

However, the question, if we go back into the record, that Mr. Richards has asked was not, “How would you deal with conflict in any situation?” The question was a lot more pointed at what has happened in the process, and it was very particular to what the PMO did or did not do.

This is not the place for a question of that sort. This is not under our mandate—what we have according to the Standing Orders—which is asking about their qualifications.

If the question is “What would you do in a conflict situation?”, go ahead and ask that question. But that was not the question asked.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Mr. Chair, if you could give me an opportunity to respond, I would need, obviously, an equal opportunity.

The question was obviously driven to determine the ability of the candidate to deal with conflict. That is a very typical question. In this case, the reality of the matter is, Mr. Chair, that the board has already undertaken some of the work we're doing of assessing their qualifications, so it may be in fact that this situation has already occurred; or it may be something that's hypothetical. Either way, I would want to be able to have the witness's take on how he has or how he would deal with the situation.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, we've dealt with this in the past. On the previous occasion, it was me rather than Mr. Richards who found himself being denied the right to ask a question.

If a witness chooses not to answer a question, that's the witness's business. But the rules, as far as I'm aware, do not preclude our asking questions. I would recommend to you that you could pass that advice on to the witnesses, that if they choose not to answer, that's their business. But that does not, as I say, extend to prohibiting the freedom of speech of members of Parliament.

(1215)

The Chair:

I did pass that on to them at the beginning.

Mr. Richards, you have one minute left. I'm going to give you a chance to rephrase the question. We'll see whether it's acceptable, and then I'll rule.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I have a point of order on that as well, Mr. Chair.

This leaves me with a limited amount of time, given that you've asked me to rephrase the question. I know that you were lenient with the time allowed for the witness to respond to the Liberal member who asked the first set of questions, so I would assume you'll be giving the same leniency to allow the witness to fully respond, given that there won't be a lot of time left for him to respond. I assume that would be correct.

The Chair:

Sure.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

What I'm asking, and I think you have a pretty good sense of what it is—

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

On a point of order, if I may.... For the record, I've been timing our rounds and in actual fact, Mr. Richards used up over his five minutes. He used a minute and 20 seconds for his point of order, and that wasn't counted.

Mr. Blake Richards:

A point of order is not part of my questioning time. I was responding to a point of order that your side made. That does not count as part of my questioning time. The chair had indicated I had a minute or more at the time that I asked the question, so I know there is time left.

The Chair:

I'm going to rule against that and allow you to get your question in. We have to have some respect for the witnesses here, guys.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Of course. Exactly.

The Chair:

We can do points of order when they're not here.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I appreciate that, Mr. Chair.

I think you have a pretty good sense of what I'm trying to ask here. It's judging your ability to deal with a conflict situation. It may have arisen already. If so, you can respond to how it has arisen. If not, how would you deal with it if it did arise?

If the PMO has not chosen, or does not choose in the future to appoint the people you have recommended as part of the board, how would you deal with that situation? What would your advice be on that?

Mr. Vikram Vij:

Fortunately, there was no conflict that arose from our deliberations.

As a true leader, if I were asking somebody to do something and they didn't agree with me, I would still want to have the last word, because I am the leader of what I'm doing. In a true democracy, that's what it takes.

If I gave my recommendations and the PMO was not accepting them, then I would humbly accept their decision. At the end of the day, I would know full well that my job was to give the recommendations, to narrow it down to five people. That's what I did and that's what I gave him.

There was no conflict at all, and as a person of integrity, I wouldn't want to have conflict, even if I disagreed. At the end of the day, it is a democracy and the right is his and his office's to choose.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Before we go to Mr. Dusseault, now that we're back, you can ask your questions of any of the witnesses.

You have five minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I thank the witnesses for being here this morning. We apologize for the setback. This was due to a vote in the House.

Let's get back to our topic, starting with Mr. Vij, in British Columbia.

Why do you think you were chosen for this position? Did you propose your name when you heard about this process, or did the government contact you? Why do you think you were approached for this? [English]

Mr. Vikram Vij:

Thank you for the question.

I believe my role as an immigrant who came to this country, having started as a commoner and still as a common human being who was a chef and now has done entrepreneurial work, has given me the way of thinking, of understanding somebody who is in the grassroots of our communities in northern British Columbia, or in British Columbia, and has gone through those ranks.

For me, I felt that honour was given to me because I had done, pragmatically, a service to the nation and I was going to do a service by making sure that the best candidate would be put forward by me. Bestowing the honour upon me was, I think, in recognition of my contributions to Canada and to the community, and also to my ability to siphon through the best people who would apply for this honour and this great position.

(1220)

[Translation]

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Thank you.

I would also like to ask the witnesses who are here why they think they were chosen.

Did you submit your candidacy? Do you know someone in government who could have recommended you? Do you have any idea of how your name came up and why it was put forward?

Ms. Arsenault, do you want to begin?

Ms. Jeannette Arsenault:

I received a call from the provincial government, from the office of our minister. I was asked to answer a few questions and than I read in the newspaper that five names had been submitted to your committee. That is how I was appointed. I took no steps personally, as I did not even know that candidates were being sought. I am one of the people whose names were put forward.

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

I presume that the same thing happened in the Mr. Francis' case.

What do you know about the Senate and the work of parliamentarians here in Ottawa, in our federal institution? What do you know about the Senate in order to prepare yourselves to propose the names of persons who are qualified to become senators?

I would like to hear Ms. Arsenault's reply and then Mr. Francis.

Ms. Jeannette Arsenault:

Does Mr. Vij understand French?

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

I think he has access to the interpretation service. [English]

Ms. Jeannette Arsenault:

I can answer in English. It might be just as easy. As for working with the Senate and that, I have never been a government employee, so I don't know all the rules and regulations that they all have. But as a citizen of Prince Edward Island, I can tell you that, if you look at my resumé, you'll see that I have been on many different boards, from a chamber of commerce president to a lot of different boards and committees that have prepared me to look at a lot of the policies and things that happen in government. For sure, I keep aware of what's happening.

I know that the Senate is a very important House that should continue, because the work they do is very important for Canada. We need that second House that looks at the bills to make sure that things are not just put through because a group of people want them. If it's debated and everybody agrees with it, then I know it's good. It has to be good for all of Canada. It can't just be good for a little group. By all these committees and things, that's how I kept abreast of what happens in government.

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Mr. Francis—

The Chair:

I'm sorry, your time has expired.

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Already...?

The Chair:

It's a little over.

Ms. Petitpas Taylor, go ahead, please. [Translation]

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you once again for appearing before this committee today. Thank you for the time you are granting us.

My questions are for Ms. Arsenault.

Ms. Arsenault, it is always nice to welcome an Acadian from back home. I thank you once again greatly for your presence.

In preparing for this meeting, I read your resume. It is extremely impressive and includes a lot of community work. I will do a brief overview of it.

I see that you own a small business in your region.

Regarding your volunteer work, the list of your achievements and the efforts you have put into your community is incredible. I am impressed.

You have done a lot of work at the chamber of commerce, as you mentioned, with small and medium businesses. You are also the spokesperson for the Acadian and Francophone Chamber of Commerce of Prince Edward Island, an organisation that is very important to maintain our francophone and acadian culture. I am happy to see that.

I also see that you have done a lot of work in the area of tourism, which is extremely important for your province, and for all provinces.

You have been the director of the Acadian and Francophone Community Advisory Committee.

You have worked in the arts and culture sector.

We see that you have an impressive resume and that you are well positioned to do the work for which you have been chosen.

How have all of your achievements, all of your professional work, as well as all of the volunteer work you have done, equipped you to become a member of this committee?

(1225)

Ms. Jeannette Arsenault:

Thank you very much for your comments.

When you do a lot of volunteer work, you can learn a lot. Whenever I sat on a committee, I left knowing more than when I arrived. When you work with a lot of people, you find out what they do, how they do it, what works and what doesn't. I think I have a lot of common sense and intuition.

If you have to advise the Prime Minister on Senate appointments, clearly you have to determine if the candidates will be capable of making the right decisions for Canada. After all, every decision that is made ultimately affects us. I think that all of my experience has given me what I need to make good decisions.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Absolutely. You have worked with a lot of people over the years. Because of your years of experience and the many working groups you have been a part of, I am sure you have acquired a good capacity for assessing people and working with them.

Ms. Jeannette Arsenault:

Yes, I have.

I have 15 employees in my business. When we hire, of course we look for people who have the necessary skills. You have to be able to judge whether they will be able to do the job in the enterprise or not. As Mr. Vij said, we need to know, when we hire, if the person will be able to do the work we need them to do. Over the years, we have acquired the capacity to assess people and determine if they are the right people for the job.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

You have honed that skill thanks to the experience you acquired over the years.

Ms. Jeannette Arsenault:

Yes.

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

I thank you very much for the contribution you have made throughout your career, and that you continue to make, to your province and your country.

We simply want to say thank you very much for your good work.

Ms. Jeannette Arsenault:

Thank you very much. [English]

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'm going to share some time.

I have a question for you, Mr. Francis. You've done a lot of work. You're currently a chief of a first nation, and you've done a lot of intergovernmental relations work. I find that really fascinating. You've achieved quite a lot in those areas. The Senate and the government are constantly dealing with this relationship with the first nations.

With your experience, how do you think that affected or complemented being able to make recommendations for senators?

Mr. Brian Francis:

I think over the years I've gained a wide range of experience in the various jobs and positions that I've had. I feel that I have a strong reputation in the province of Prince Edward Island. I have personal integrity, sound judgment, confidentiality, and all those kinds of attributes. I've worked over the years to develop them and feel very competent to have done the roles that I have done by selecting the five nominees.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What kinds of skills—

The Chair:

Sorry, you are over your time.

Mr. Richards, you have five minutes.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

As I reflected on the response that I received in my last question from Mr. Vij, he's technically correct. I think he certainly answered the question appropriately. It really reminded me of what a sham this so-called reform to the Senate is by the Prime Minister. Listening to the response that I received, although technically accurate, really points to the problems behind the process being set up. Still it's the Prime Minister making the appointments. It was made very clear in the response I received that, should there be conflict, the board would have to obviously accept that the Prime Minister has that right to just go ahead and appoint whoever he wants, whether the people have been recommended by the board or not.

It really points to the fact that this is no kind of reform at all. In fact, all it's doing is adding another layer and another appointment process to the board. No doubt they are conducting their work diligently and they are doing the best job they can. They're quality people; there's no question about that. They offer something. But at the end of the day, their decisions are not binding. Their decisions have no weight at all. If the Prime Minister chooses to appoint whoever the heck he wants to appoint, he can go ahead and appoint whoever it is he wants.

Clearly, there's not really any reform in this at all. It's the Prime Minister making appointments to the Senate just like it's always been in this country. That isn't reform, and it isn't what Canadians want to see. It isn't going to really change anything about how the Senate functions or operates. That's something that was made very clear. I want to take the opportunity to point that out because it's a really unfortunate situation.

We've got a Prime Minister who, like with many things, claims to be one thing and he's actually something completely other than that. In this case, he's choosing to use his dictatorial powers to be able to appoint whoever he wants to the Senate. Unfortunately, this board, no matter how great their qualifications—and I would certainly say from what I'm hearing that we have qualified people who have really worked hard to diligently do their job—at the end of the day, their recommendations are ignored. They can be ignored, and there's nothing anyone can do. The Prime Minister is in charge, and he does whatever it is he wants. If he wants to appoint good Liberals, he appoints good Liberals.

Having said that, I've had a chance to ask Mr. Vij some questions, and I'll ask our other witnesses some questions.

I'll start with you, Madame Arsenault. I'll confess, I was listening to the interpretation when you were speaking in response to Mr. Dusseault. The way it came across in the interpretation, at least, when you were asked about how you had been appointed, you said you had received a call from our minister. There may have been a problem with the interpretation, but who were you referring to when you said “our minister” when you received a call?

(1230)

Ms. Jeannette Arsenault:

I received a call from the Premier's office.

Mr. Blake Richards:

From your Premier, okay.

Ms. Jeannette Arsenault:

Yes and I was asked a bunch of questions, as I'm sure the others were. I think he picked five names, at least that's what was on our paper, so it was our Premier's office.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Okay, thank you for the clarification, because obviously, if it was “our minister” I wondered who that was.

Ms. Jeannette Arsenault:

Yes, I thought of that after.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I assumed it was probably just a translation issue.

Maybe I can ask you both the same question that I asked previously. In terms of the process itself, now that you've gone through it, this is about being able to assess your ability to think critically and your qualifications. What would your opinion be of the process and what can be done to improve it in the future?

Ms. Jeannette Arsenault:

I think Mr. Vij pretty well answered those questions because—

The Chair:

We have a point of order.

Just before we go to the point of order, I remind the witnesses that all the comments we had on process are irrelevant to this discussion. It's on qualifications, which is the only reason that we're allowed to call you.

On the point of order, Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'm going to sound like a broken record, but I don't see what else to do other than.... We keep going down the line of asking questions about the process and that's not why the witnesses are here. I'd like a fair ruling, actually this time, on the fact that we're not here to ask about process. We're here to ask about their skills.

If Mr. Richards wants to reformat that question, he is obviously free to do so, but the way he stated it, at this point, it is a direct question on process and it's not within the purpose of this meeting today.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Could I respond, Chair?

The Chair:

You can have one response and then I'll rule.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

If one were to listen to the question that I asked it was to assess their critical thinking skills and their ability to analyze a process. That was the way I formulated the question.

You permitted the question previously, obviously. I think it's really unfortunate. I don't know what the sensitivity is over there. I know I've pointed out that this process is no reform, and it's really just a sham that the Prime Minister can just go ahead and appoint whoever he wants. Why are they so sensitive? I guess it's because of that. They're trying to defend the Prime Minister, even though it's indefensible, in my mind.

At the end of the day, Mr. Chair, the question was to assess the critical thinking skills of the witnesses and—

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Can I be allowed to respond for even 30 seconds?

Mr. Blake Richards:

Mr. Chair, I thought it was one response and you would rule. This is actually getting kind of ridiculous. Why are they so scared?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's not about sensitivity.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Why are they so scared to allow questions?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's about our standing orders. It's about the rules. The rules are the rules. It's not about the Prime Minister and it's not about—

Mr. Blake Richards:

There is no malice intended in the question, and I really wish I would not be interrupted. There is no malice in the question. It's simply trying to get a sense of their assessment of the process—

(1235)

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Blake Richards:

—and what they think could be done to improve it and that would obviously go to an assessment of their judgment and their critical thinking skills. I don't understand what the sensitivity is here in defending the Prime Minister so—

The Chair:

Okay, this is enough.

When we started the point of order you had one minute left. You did ask specifically about the process, so I'm going to give you a chance to ask your question along the lines of what you were just talking about—critical thinking—so ask and you have one minute left.

Mr. Blake Richards:

I did ask it in that fashion previously, Mr. Chair, so I'm not sure what you're seeking to have me do differently.

The Chair:

You asked specifically for their comments on the process.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Yes, based on determining their critical thinking skills. That's a very typical interview question, Mr. Chair, to ask people about a scenario to be able to assess their skills.

I don't see what the sensitivity is around the question. I guess I'll put it to the witnesses.

You heard the question. Would you care to respond?

The Chair:

On your critical thinking skills....

Mr. Blake Richards:

In terms of assessing the process....

Mr. Vikram Vij:

Can I just answer that for a second, Mr. Richards?

Mr. Blake Richards:

I'd like to give them a chance if they could—

Mr. Vikram Vij:

Okay, sorry.

Mr. Blake Richards:

—because I know you had a chance to respond to it previously. If you want to add to it at the end, I'd be happy to give you that opportunity as well because they haven't had that opportunity.

Ms. Jeannette Arsenault:

I'm sorry, Mr. Chair, but I feel that we were asked here to defend our CVs and I feel we were not prepared for those questions. Had we been given different information....

The Chair:

That's fine. That's exactly correct.

Ms. Jeannette Arsenault:

With what's already been said, I feel that is enough.

The Chair:

Mr. Francis, is it the same?

Mr. Brian Francis:

I agree.

The Chair:

Okay, you can go because he has about 15 seconds left.

Go ahead, Mr. Vij.

Mr. Vikram Vij:

I think we do understand that choosing the right person or recommending the right person, whether it is to anyPrime Minister—it doesn't matter which party they belong to—reflects on us. It is our legacies and it is our names that are on it. We are the people who are in the community, day to day, upon whom it will be reflected if we, even remotely, chose somebody who was not up to the qualification. Therefore, our legacy is important. My personal name is very important to me. My last name is very important to me, which I will not allow to be tainted by anything.

To prod a little bit further and say, “Well, the PM can do whatever he wants”, it shows that the people he has chosen were recommended by us in that fashion. I feel that there might be a little too much prodding happening there. I may have stepped over, but I totally agree with my other partners. My role was to defend what I have done for this country and what I do in this country on a daily basis. That was what I was asked to do and that is what I am here for.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Blake Richards:

Just to be really clear, I was by no means questioning any of your qualifications or your integrity in any way. I do believe that you're doing this as best you can. You're trying to undertake it. I agree that your name needs to be.... I think we would all want to ensure that. It needs to be ensured that its integrity remains. That's actually why I make the points I do. I think it should be your decision, and not something that could be overruled by the Prime Minister. That's what I was trying to get at. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Richards.

Ms. Sahota, you have five minutes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

This isn't because of any kind of sensitivity; it's because we want to get to know our witnesses well and the contribution they've made to this process. I'm sure they don't view kindly when the whole process they have been through and all the hard work that they have done is called a sham. I really value all the hard work that you have put in. As a member of Parliament this year who's gone through all the processes that we have in committees, I can tell you it's a lot of work. It takes a lot of effort. I can only imagine how much effort you've put into this.

Going back to some of my questioning with you, Mr. Francis, you have a certificate in conflict resolution. I imagine that some of the areas in which you have negotiated with the government as a coordinator for aboriginal programs, as an employment counsellor, and when talking about fisheries and oceans, can become contentious issues at times, and ones that people are very passionate about.

How do you use those conflict resolution skills and the passion that you have in selecting and recommending senators?

Mr. Brian Francis:

I use those kinds of skills on a daily basis in the job I do as a first nations leader. It's a very complex role.

Sorry, could you repeat the question again? I lost my train of thought.

(1240)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Regarding your skills in conflict resolution, how did you use them within this process? There were some similar questions asked before, but I felt they were asked in a different fashion. How were those skills and the passion that you have towards some of the work you've done applied directly in this process?

Mr. Brian Francis:

I certainly used reasoning skills, decision-making skills, and those kinds of things in critiquing the applications and the support letters. Also, as I mentioned earlier, I was on numerous merit-based competitive processes throughout the 19 years I worked for the federal government, and that has prepared me really well for this merit-based competitive process.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

We had the chance to hear from Mr. Vij about what he was looking for, or what kind of internal process he went through when looking at resumés and the skills of the potential senators. What were you looking for when you were going through that process?

Mr. Brian Francis:

I was looking for someone who had provided a lot of contributions to their province. I looked at people who had professional backgrounds and had done a lot of work for their communities and so on. I rated them, basically on a rating scale. I prioritized and picked out the common elements, and critiqued and assessed them from there.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

One common thing I see from all the resumés is that all of you are very involved in your communities and very active in your communities. How did that affect your judgment as to the candidates you were looking for?

Mr. Brian Francis:

As for me, I'm seen in my community as a person with a strong reputation and personal integrity. I've had many people compliment me on the fact that I was appointed to the role. I was humbled by that because it tells me that people have respect for me in the province. They know that I'm an independent, stand-alone, first nation leader. I think that went a long way.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Does anybody else want to chime in?

Mr. Vikram Vij:

May I?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes, Mr. Vij, go ahead.

Mr. Vikram Vij:

Having a restaurant means that people come to your restaurant all the time, and having the amount of restaurants that I have.... People come to the restaurants, and there were a lot of people who had applied, and I knew they were applying for it because there was an element of.... Okay, I would see this person applying and see that person applying, but to be able to do that pragmatically, to say that I understand that you're applying and that everybody can apply—and that is what democracy is, to apply—and to be able to just put on that hat and ask if this person is the best person for the role, that was the hat we had to wear.

We were the captains of these resumés that were given to us, basically, and we wanted to make sure that the top people, who have contributed to their society and contributed to their own work in their field, were going to be great human beings down the road and were going to be creating legacies for which people will remember them, for the work they have done not only for the community but for British Columbia as such.

That was what I was looking for. Those are all things that we looked through these resumés for. We were honoured to have resumés from the far north of British Columbia right through to Vancouver. It was not just Vancouver- or Victoria-centric. It was British Columbia-centric.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.[Translation]

Mr. Schmale, you have five minutes. [English]

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you very much.

I'd like a quick clarification. You said something, Ms. Arsenault, that I didn't quite catch, and it might have been a translation. You were saying something to the effect that you obviously take your job very seriously but you do recognize the importance, because otherwise laws without two chambers just get passed by a bunch of people, if I heard you correctly. If you recall what you said, could you clarify that for me?

Ms. Jeannette Arsenault:

The government could be all on one side some day and they could pass what they want, but with having the Senate there, it's for sure going to be, as they call it, the House of sober thought. You can't have somebody pass laws that are not good for all of Canada because a group of people decide that they want to do it. It has to be well balanced, well judged, and well discussed. That's what I meant by that.

(1245)

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay. I thought that's what you meant. That's my problem with this whole thing. The people passing the laws are elected by the people. We knock on doors. We ask for support. We attend events. We meet with people and try to help them. The senators—and this has gone on for 150 years plus—now are being selected at Prime Ministerrandom. It was mostly partisan in the past, obviously, and Mr. Richards pointed to that, but still, the final say is done by the , and the Senate, as has been pointed out many times by Mr. Christopherson, who is not here, has more weight than the House of Commons because there are less of them.

I'm actually quite troubled by what you've just said. I'm quite taken aback, actually, by the fact that the people have chosen their elected representatives and that this somehow is just a bunch of people passing laws that may or may not be for the well-being of Canadians.... I guess we in the opposition can argue that what we're voting on today is not good for the Canadian public, and they'll vote that it's good for the public. I'm actually quite troubled by that.

In saying that, again, my whole concern is this whole process. It's just one more layer. I'm not saying that no one is doing their job. Everyone is very well qualified.

I hope that when I'm in Vancouver I can eat at one of your restaurants, Mr. Vij. It sounds amazing.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Where is the food truck? That sounds really amazing.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Yes, it does, and I hope to be a patron of yours someday.

It's this whole process. I know Ms. Sahota took offence when Mr. Richards said it was a sham, but it's the Prime Minister who has the final say. It's unfortunate, but I guess this is what we have to do, and the Prime Minister can say they gave me the names. If you look at who has been appointed....

Mr. Vij, this is perfect for you. In your experience, you meet a lot of people, and I guess so does Mr. Francis. When I look at who has been appointed, they look very similar to people who have been appointed in the past, and the problem I had at the beginning of this whole process, the people... They are very well educated, I'm not questioning that. Okay, please get that first. You two meet a lot of people—and I call them regular everyday Canadians—in the your job. I'd love to see someone from the agriculture community appointed to the Senate. I'd like to see more people from the business community appointed to the Senate. In your experience, and both of you have met many people, and I guess you have too, Ms. Arsenault, how can you help balance that out and get regular everyday Canadians participating in this process, and not the ex-bureaucrats or those from academia, just to add another view to the Senate?

Mr. Vikram Vij:

Is that question for me?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

We can start with you. I've asked everyone.

Mr. Vikram Vij:

I think the independent board does represent the academic, with Anne Giardini, who was the chancellor of SFU, and me as the commoner, chef, and businessman, as part of it. It represents those two people, and I think if I look around the independent board, we were very well chosen and from different parts of it. We were not just going to choose an academic professor, or just a business person, or just an immigrant, or anybody else. We chose those people based on their qualifications. We were broadly chosen, and so we chose broadly.

We passed on that same baton further down, and we recommended based on what we knew and our academics. We had enough discussions between Anne and myself about what she thought and what I thought. We would discuss things about a reference letter or a curriculum vitae and say, “Okay, this person has done this, so what do you think of that?” There was a lot of conversation, and the main national committee asked us questions, just as you are asking these questions. “Why did you think this person would work well? Why did you think this person should be recommended?” It was not just another layer, I have to say, of bureaucracy that was added on to it. It was a totally different process.

(1250)

The Chair:

Do the other two witnesses want to respond to that?

Mr. Francis.

Mr. Brian Francis:

I have nothing to add, other than to say that we used merit-based criteria and everything was applied equally.

The Chair:

Ms. Arsenault, do you have anything to add?

Ms. Jeannette Arsenault:

I agree we did that.

The Chair:

Now we're going on to M. DeCourcey.[Translation]

You have five minutes.

Mr. Matt DeCourcey (Fredericton, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I thank the three witnesses for the work they have done for Canadians. As a member from New Brunswick, I am aware that Canadians are proud of the decisions made by these advisors from all over the country.[English]

Ms. Arsenault, in responding to my colleague's question from the other side, I gathered and sensed that—and it's the same thing with Mr. Vij—there's a great concern among people here that parliamentarians tasked with making decisions do so with regard to the welfare of the entire country, the diversity of the whole country, and the diversity that exists across different demographics of Canadians. Diversity can express itself in ethnicity, upbringing, and those sorts of experiences and socio-economics, just to name a few areas. I think that all parliamentarians have a role to ensure that we are making decisions that are in the interests of a diversity of Canadians.

Can you each take a moment to speak to how your experience has provided you with the capacity to assess and understand the diversity of the regions with which you were tasked to make a decision? Take one example from an experience over the course of your professional or leisure experiences that will paint a picture for us as to how you are able to make decisions, understanding that there's a diversity of views that exist in any region of the country.

Ms. Jeannette Arsenault:

The first thing we had to look at was who applied. I've been in my own business for 27 years. For sure, you learn a lot of skills. I've been on many committees, and I've been the Summerside chamber president. You gain a lot of expertise, because you are dealing with all kinds of different things. Just the fact that we are not somebody who is 16 years old and who hasn't really lived yet and doesn't have all the experience.... We don't have all the answers, but as a group, together, when we see what we have, we were as well qualified as anybody else in Canada to take on this task.

We are well respected in our community, as Mr. Francis said. We are people whom people come to sometimes, whether it's for advice on entrepreneurship or for different things. We are looked upon as leaders in our community. Just our CVs speak for themselves. I believe we were quite capable of making this decision. We're used to evaluating people. We're used to making decisions. That's what we were tasked with, and I feel that we were quite good at doing that. It showed right across the country. The people on the board, we were from all different walks of life, yet we all came together and made decisions based on our expertise, what we'd done in our lives, and all the experience we'd gained.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Chief Francis, go ahead.

Mr. Brian Francis:

I think Jeannette said it very well. As a first nation leader for 10 years, I have a good understanding of diversity and feel that I can make independent decisions based on the information before me, confidential and with sound judgment. These are the kinds of things that I've gained over the years, along with personal integrity. Within the province and outside the province, I feel that I am very suited to have made the choices that we did. We worked together very well in making the choices, and I'm proud of the job that we did.

Thank you.

(1255)

The Chair:

Mr. Vij, go ahead.

Mr. Vikram Vij:

I left India at the age of 19, and I went to Austria. I didn't speak a word of German, and now I speak fluent German. Being multicultural or having learned different languages, you learn to understand and respect the others' boundaries and who they are. I think that teaches you to be really pragmatic and able to make the right decisions. I think we have built reputations in our society, in our areas of what we do, so that people look at us as not just role models but also people they would ask advice from. I think that's the flag that we carried with pride.

The mosaic of people I have come across in my 25 years of living in this country and 35 years outside of India has given me a wealth of knowledge to be able to judge people based on who they are as human beings—not just on what kind of car they drive or what kind of house they have, but more on what kind of human being they are. It teaches you that way of thinking, of knowing when that person is able to make the right decisions. I think those qualifications for us were extremely important. I do hope that people will see that the process was absolutely beautiful and very well executed.

Mr. Matt DeCourcey:

I appreciate those comments. I certainly wouldn't want anyone to pass judgment on me based on the kemptness of my house, so I appreciate that.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Dusseault, you have our last intervention. Because there is another committee coming in here, I won't let you go much over your three minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Fine.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Mr. Francis, I'd like to get back to your knowledge of the Senate and the role of senators.

The situation is similar for all of us, when we choose our employees. Of course it is important to have some knowledge of the work that needs to be done to know if the candidate is qualified to do it.

What do you know about the Senate? Have you met any senators, seen the Senate debates or taken part in such debates before your appointment? [English]

Mr. Brian Francis:

I've met senators within my own province before. I haven't been to a Senate debate. I know that the Senate is a very important institution in Canadian democracy. It's the chamber of sober second thought, and I think it's a very important part of Canadian democracy. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

I am going to put the same question to Mr. Vij.

I would like to know what you know about the role of senators, in order to determine who is best qualified to occupy that position. [English]

Mr. Vikram Vij:

Again, I will say, in India you learn democracy. You learn the role that senators and the Senate play. Obviously you have a total understanding of what their role is. Before that, we were briefed all together, all of us with the role. We were given a binder and we were given all the roles of what they're supposed to do, what roles they're supposed to fulfill, and how we can look at it. If we had any questions that we were unclear about, we were given the opportunity to ask the right questions. We did ask the right questions. Based on those answers, we were able to do it.

I do not know any senators personally. But for me, even if I did know, it was not an issue. I was purely looking for the best person, who had the experience, understanding, empathy, and knowledge of Canada, and how they were going to represent British Columbia. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

I think that you all went through the same process, finally. After your appointment, you were given a briefing on the role of senators and the work they do, but you did not necessarily have an in-depth knowledge of the Senate from the outset.

(1300)

[English]

Mr. Vikram Vij:

I did deep enough. We were briefed. We were given paperwork to see and read what the role of it was. We were given a book that we had to read beforehand that talked about the role of the Senate. I read it through and through to understand what it actually meant. The book was extremely important to understand the role of it.

I think we all did the role to the best of our ability.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I'd like to thank the witnesses for coming. It's a long haul, a long way to come. For two hours, there were a lot of questions.

Thank you very much. We really appreciate the job you're embarking on for Canada. We appreciate all the qualifications that came out during this session and in your biographies. Thank you very much.

This meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour et bienvenue à la 40e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Aujourd'hui, le Comité se penche sur les nominations par décret au Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat.

Nous recevons aujourd'hui trois membres provinciaux du comité consultatif, le chef Brian Francis, de l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard, Jeannette Arsenault, également de l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard et, par vidéoconférence, Vikram Vij, de la Colombie-Britannique.

Cette réunion est tenue conformément à l'article 111 du Règlement qui prévoit ceci: Le comité, s'il convoque une personne nommée ou dont on a proposé la nomination conformément au paragraphe (1) du présent article, examine les titres, les qualités et la compétence de l'intéressé et sa capacité d'exécuter les fonctions du poste auquel il a été nommé ou auquel on propose de le nommer.

Je demanderais aux membres du Comité de garder cet article à l'esprit lorsqu'ils poseront des questions aux témoins. Je les invite également à consulter les pages 1011 et 1013 de l'ouvrage La procédure et les usages de la Chambre des communes pour plus de précisions.

Les membres du Comité le savent déjà, mais je voudrais rappeler aux témoins que nous sommes seulement habilités à vous interroger sur vos qualifications. Si un membre vous pose une question sur un autre sujet, et je peux les autoriser à le faire, vous n'êtes pas tenus d'y répondre si vous ne le souhaitez pas.

Aux fins du compte rendu, je rappelle rapidement deux points aux membres du Comité, et vous pouvez en informer vos collègues absents. Premièrement — et je ne vais pas m'y attarder pour l'instant —, c'est qu'une délégation kenyenne nous demandera de lui consacrer du temps bientôt pour discuter de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Je propose que nous procédions exactement de la même manière qu'avec l'Autriche et que nous prévoyions une séance en dehors de notre horaire habituel pour ne pas perdre de temps. Si quelqu'un s'y oppose, qu'il me le fasse savoir plus tard.

Deuxièmement, j'aimerais que le Comité propose une motion pour approuver les dépenses de nos témoins qui se sont déplacés et qui s'élèvent à environ... À combien?

Le greffier du Comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

À 3 900 $.

Le président:

Anita, vous appuierez la motion.

Quelqu'un s'y oppose?

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: Comme nous allons devoir nous absenter, voici comment nous procéderons. Nous allons inviter nos trois témoins à prononcer leur allocution d'ouverture, en commençant par la vidéoconférence. Espérons que nous aurons le temps de la terminer, parce que nous devrons quitter la salle pour un vote et revenir après.

Vikram, voulez-vous commencer?

M. Vikram Vij (membre provincial, Colombie-Britannique, Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat):

Avec plaisir.

Je suis le chef cuisinier Vikram Vij, de Vancouver. C'est un grand honneur d'avoir été nommé au sein du comité consultatif indépendant.

Nous avons travaillé très fort pour faire l'examen de toutes les candidatures proposées par le Conseil privé. J'ai reçu beaucoup d'information sur le processus, sur ce que je devais étudier et sur ce que j'avais besoin d'apprendre. Ce fut un processus à deux sens. Je considère que c'est un grand honneur d'avoir été désigné pour choisir un sénateur de ma province. J'accepte avec humilité et fierté de participer à ce processus. Les choix que nous avons faits sont le résultat d'un examen ciblé et approfondi.

Voilà, c'est tout ce que j'avais à dire.

(1105)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup pour vos commentaires et pour votre disponibilité.

Madame Arsenault, vous pouvez prononcer votre allocution.

Mme Jeannette Arsenault (membre provincial, île du Prince-Édouard, Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je suis moi aussi honorée de faire partie de ce comité. Je vais faire un bref survol de mes compétences qui sont décrites plus en détail dans mon curriculum vitae.

Je suis née à l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard et j'y ai passé presque toute ma vie, à l'exception d'une année d'études dans un collège communautaire du Nouveau-Brunswick et de cinq ans de travail à Toronto au sein d'une entreprise. Je suis ensuite revenue à l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard pour y démarrer ma propre entreprise que je dirige depuis maintenant 27 ans. J'ai pris beaucoup de risques dans la vie, j'ai eu des hauts et des bas, mais cela m'a donné une grande expérience de vie. J'ai fait beaucoup de bénévolat au sein de différents comités. Mes parents m'ont élevée dans l'idée que si vous faites du bénévolat et donnez de votre temps, vous serez récompensés en retour et aurez une vie satisfaisante.

Je vous remercie de votre attention.

Le président:

Merci. Je vous remercie également d'avoir pris un autre risque aujourd'hui, en venant ici. Anita est une questionneuse coriace.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président: Chef Brian Francis, c'est à votre tour de prononcer votre allocution d'ouverture.

M. Brian Francis (membre provincial, île du Prince-Édouard, Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat):

Bonjour à tous.

Je vous remercie de votre invitation. C'est un honneur pour moi d'être ici. C'est un honneur de participer au processus consultatif indépendant de nominations au Sénat.

Vous avez mon CV, mais j'aimerais vous donner un peu plus de détail sur mon parcours jusqu'à aujourd'hui. Je suis né dans une petite Première Nation de la baie Malpeque au large de l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard. En été, le seul moyen de sortir de notre petite île était un petit traversier et l'hiver, le chemin de glace. Les conditions de vie étaient très difficiles, mais cette époque nous a inculqué de bonnes valeurs morales et des forces. Les pensionnats et la rafle des années 1960 ont eu de lourdes répercussions sur ma petite communauté.

J'ai quitté mon île pour aller à l'école secondaire et je suis devenu le premier Micmac à obtenir un certificat commercial Sceau rouge. Par la suite, j'ai travaillé pendant quelques années au sein de ma Première Nation, puis j'ai posé ma candidature pour un emploi au gouvernement fédéral. J'ai commencé tout au bas de l'échelle, à titre de commis au dépôt des dossiers de niveau CR-2. Dix-neuf ans plus tard, j'occupais un poste de cadre supérieur. Tout en gravissant les échelons, j'ai enrichi mes connaissances. La vie a été un terrain d'apprentissage pour moi. J'ai acquis une foule de compétences. Au gouvernement fédéral, j'ai participé à de nombreux processus de sélection au mérite. Cela m'a certes été d'une grande utilité pour faire mon travail au sein du Comité consultatif indépendant sur les nominations au Sénat.

En 2007, j'ai été élu chef de la Première Nation Abegweit, puis j'ai été réélu en 2011 et en 2015. J'entame ma 10e année à titre de chef d'une Première Nation. Voilà qui je suis.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Je vous remercie.

Nous sommes ravis de vous accueillir ici aujourd'hui. Vos excellentes compétences seront très utiles.

Nous commencerons nos rondes habituelles de questions, mais je vais les réduire de sept à cinq minutes parce que nous aurons un peu moins de temps. J'aimerais que nous entendions, à tout le moins, notre témoin de la Colombie-Britannique afin de le libérer de la vidéoconférence.

Je demanderais aux témoins qui participeront au premier tour de limiter leurs commentaires à la Colombie-Britannique. À notre retour du vote, nous passerons aux autres témoins.

Nous commençons par vous, monsieur Graham, cinq minutes seulement.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Cela ne devrait pas poser de problème.

Vikram, je vous remercie d'être ici. Je connais bien votre livre de recettes. Lorsque je me suis séparé de mon ex-conjointe, c'est la seule chose qui a fait l'objet d'une dispute entre nous.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Vikram Vij:

Ce n'est pas une raison pour vous disputer; partagez-le tout simplement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'était impossible d'en obtenir un deuxième exemplaire immédiatement.

Je connais bien votre expérience et je sais qui vous êtes. Quand j'ai vu votre nom, il m'a semblé familier. J'ai vite compris pourquoi. Merci.

Je voudrais établir un lien avec le Sénat, ce qui est encore plus intéressant vu le mandat de notre comité. Votre expérience incroyablement vaste du secteur de la restauration dépasse de loin la nôtre qui se résume à manger. J'aimerais savoir si au cours de votre carrière, vous avez souvent eu l'occasion de choisir des gens. Pouvez-vous nous décrire le processus de sélection au mérite utilisé dans ce secteur?

M. Vikram Vij:

Ayant eu des entreprises et ayant officié seul comme directeur d'un restaurant qui compte maintenant 180 employés, je pense que le facteur clé consiste à choisir de solides chefs de file qui partagent votre vision, des personnes pragmatiques capables de comprendre ce que vous voulez et quels sont vos objectifs.

Après avoir passé 35 ans dans le secteur, je peux faire profiter le Comité de mon expérience, lire un curriculum vitae et me faire une idée de la personne dans ma tête, sans même l'avoir devant moi. Tout est dans la manière dont elle écrit et s'exprime, dans les lettres de recommandation, les qualités recherchées, depuis combien de temps elle occupe son poste, dans quel domaine elle a travaillé et quelles ont été ses responsabilités. Nous pouvons acquérir ces compétences en ressources humaines en travaillant dans le domaine durant une longue période et en créant notre propre équipe de conseillers, de directeurs financiers et de directeurs généraux.

J'ai été en mesure de démontrer ce pragmatisme dans mon examen des candidatures au Sénat en vérifiant depuis combien de temps le candidat effectuait son travail; j'ai pu faire un tri en éliminant les candidatures qui, bien que fort intéressantes, ne convenaient pas parfaitement, et en gardant celles qui répondaient aux exigences. Nous avons procédé par élimination afin de choisir les personnes qui feraient l'affaire.

J'ai acquis ce pragmatisme durant mes longues années de pratique au sein du secteur et du fait que j'ai dirigé mes propres entreprises. Quel est le genre de personne que je souhaite? Je connaissais les exigences du poste et je sais ce qu'est censée être la fonction de sénateur. J'ai fait mes devoirs à cet égard. En analysant les candidatures, j'étais capable de dire quels candidats faisaient l'affaire et lesquels ne répondaient pas aux exigences.

C'est une question d'expérience; et cette expérience s'acquiert en oeuvrant longtemps dans le secteur.

(1110)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il est difficile de vous poser d'autres questions. Il est évident que vous possédez les compétences requises. Le but de la discussion est de vérifier les qualifications des personnes nommées par décret.

Je n'ai pas beaucoup de doutes après votre description de vos compétences et vos commentaires.

Est-ce qu'un ou une de nos collègues souhaite poser une brève question?

Madame Vandenbeld.

Mme Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa-Ouest—Nepean, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Je suis d'accord avec mon collègue. Vous possédez des compétences vraiment remarquables.

Tout au long de votre expérience, vous avez été appelé à être un bon juge du tempérament et du potentiel de différentes personnes et à voir si elles étaient qualifiées ou non. L'une des choses les plus importantes est de voir au-delà des apparences, d'examiner une diversité de points de vue et d'expériences de vie que les personnes peuvent amener dans la fonction.

Pouvez-vous me dire brièvement comment vous vous assurez que vos choix reposent sur la diversité des avantages qu'ils peuvent apporter dans leur fonction, notamment leurs différentes expériences.

M. Vikram Vij:

L'une des choses que je me suis exercé à faire, c'était de ne jamais regarder le nom du candidat dès le début. Je lisais d'abord son curriculum vitae pour savoir ce qu'il avait accompli. Je lisais les lettres de recommandation. Je me faisais une idée de la personne. Parfois, je notais simplement sur un bout de papier les points qui m'impressionnaient. Par exemple, si la personne avait fait du bénévolat, des choses du genre. Je le notais comme un plus, dès le départ. Ensuite, je faisais un nouvel examen pour être certain de n'avoir rien oublié. Je ne m'arrêtais jamais à l'origine, à la couleur de la peau ou à l'affiliation politique.

Mon but, c'était de trouver la meilleure personne pour le poste. Je ne me laissais pas influencer par personne sous le prétexte qu'elle était indo-canadienne ou indo-française ou indo-ci ou indo-ça.

Je reviens tout juste d'Afrique du Sud où j'ai prononcé un discours devant des députés de la Chambre des communes. Je leur ai dit que j'étais originaire de la plus vaste démocratie qui soit, l'Inde, mais que je vivais dans la meilleure, le Canada.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Richards, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je m'excuse auprès de nos témoins, mais je voudrais d'abord aborder brièvement un autre sujet. Je voudrais déposer un avis de motion devant le Comité. Je vais le faire très rapidement et il me restera du temps pour vous poser des questions. Je suis désolé de ce contretemps.

Il s'agit de la motion suivante: Que le Comité invite Paul Szabo, Sven Spengemann, Veena Bhullar, Jamie Kippen et un représentant du Parkhill Group à témoigner afin de répondre à toutes les questions sur la correspondance envoyée au président du Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre le 18 octobre 2016 relativement aux infractions présumées à la Loi électorale du Canada dans Mississauga-Lakeshore.

Je voulais simplement l'inscrire verbalement au Feuilleton des avis, monsieur le président. Nous y reviendrons de toute évidence plus tard.

Je remercie les témoins de leur indulgence.

J'ai maintenant quelques questions à vous poser. Je crois comprendre que vous voulez que nous nous intéressions d'abord aux représentants de la Colombie-Britannique.

(1115)

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Allez-vous nous faire parvenir cette motion par écrit?

M. Blake Richards:

Bien entendu, je vous en ai seulement fait lecture. Je peux vous en fournir une copie, si vous le souhaitez.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci, ce serait parfait.

M. Blake Richards:

Que pensez-vous de cette interface de travail avec les autres membres du comité? Vous avez expliqué comment vous évaluez les candidatures, mais vous devez bien entendu prendre une décision en tant que groupe. Avez-vous des recommandations à faire pour améliorer ce processus à l'avenir?

Le président:

Je rappelle au témoin que nous sommes ici pour vous poser des questions au sujet de vos qualifications seulement. Vous pouvez répondre à cette question si vous le souhaitez, mais vous n'êtes pas obligé parce qu'elle dépasse notre mandat.

M. Blake Richards:

Je comprends ce que vient de dire le président, mais il serait utile que le Parlement soit informé de ces choses. Si vous pensez pouvoir répondre à la question, nous en serions ravis.

M. Vikram Vij:

Monsieur le président, monsieur Richards, le processus était très simple, mais très bien préparé. On nous en avait informés à l'avance pendant l'une des toutes premières réunions du comité consultatif au complet. Tout le monde était présent, de l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard, du Nouveau-Brunswick, de partout. On nous a remis un beau classeur à anneaux contenant tout le matériel à lire pour bien comprendre le processus. Tout le monde l'a lu. Nous avons eu le temps de poser des questions à la présidente du comité consultatif indépendant et aux trois indépendants. On nous a fourni toute l'information nécessaire pour être en mesure de bien examiner le tout et de relever les points qui nous frappaient ou avec lesquels nous n'étions pas très à l'aise. Voilà ce que je tenais à préciser en premier lieu.

Deuxièmement, lorsque le processus a eu lieu, on nous a envoyé, en toute confidentialité, de l'information que nous étions les seuls à lire. Si j'avais une question, je pouvais appeler mon homologue, Anne Giardini, pour en discuter avec elle, mais je n'ai pas eu à le faire, car tout était très bien articulé. L'organigramme était vraiment bien conçu.

Au début, il y avait quelques points que je ne comprenais pas par rapport à l'ordinateur, mais j'ai pu parler au téléphone avec quelqu'un d'Ottawa, qui m'a tout de suite guidé à travers tout le processus.

Ensuite, lorsque nous nous sommes rencontrés, une fois chacun nos décisions prises, nous nous sommes assis — la Colombie-Britannique et le comité national — et nous avons appliqué le processus. Essentiellement, nous avons passé chaque nom en revue, nous avons attribué des points, puis nous avons discuté. La discussion a duré une journée entière. Nous avons discuté des raisons pour lesquelles tel ou tel candidat nous semblait particulièrement qualifié, nous avons échangé nos impressions et tenu quelques conversations entre nous. La présidente nous a posé beaucoup de questions. Elle nous a demandé, par exemple: « Pourquoi croyez-vous que cette personne est qualifiée? »

On nous a également demandé de justifier notre choix. Anne Giardini en a choisi un certain nombre, moi de même. Puis nous nous sommes rencontrés à nouveau à partir de cela.

Le processus qui a eu lieu était très exhaustif. Nous savions clairement ce qu'on attendait de nous et nous voulions proposer le meilleur candidat possible, ou les cinq meilleurs candidats possible. En sortant de la salle de réunion, nous ne savions pas quel candidat allait être retenu au bout du compte. La dernière décision revient au Cabinet du premier ministre. Nous avions fait notre travail pour nous assurer de présenter les cinq candidats que nous croyions les mieux qualifiés pour occuper cette fonction.

Le président:

Monsieur Richards, il vous reste une minute seulement.

M. Blake Richards:

Avez-vous éprouvé des difficultés avec le fait que, comme vous venez tout juste de le mentionner, c'est le Cabinet du premier ministre qui allait prendre la décision?

(1120)

Le président:

Madame Sahota invoque le Règlement...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je crois que la sonnerie se fait entendre, mais même si nous revenons à ces questions, je trouve que nous nous attardons un peu trop sur les questions relatives au processus. Nous ne sommes pas ici pour poser des questions sur le processus.

À mon sens, tous les membres du Comité sont reconnaissants de l'explication exhaustive de M. Vij quant au processus, mais nous sommes ici pour lui poser des questions sur sa compétence, ses aptitudes et ses qualifications.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Monsieur le président, au sujet du rappel au Règlement, occupons-nous d'abord de la sonnerie. Nous avons besoin du consentement unanime pour poursuivre, y compris pour l'intervention de Mme Sahota. Occupons-nous d'abord de la sonnerie, nous pourrons revenir à Mme Sahota par la suite.

Le président:

D'accord. Y a-t-il consentement unanime pour...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous sommes très loin de l'édifice du Centre.

Le président:

Nous n'avons pas le consentement.

Ça va, nous y reviendrons dès que la sonnerie s'arrêtera. Je m'adresserai surtout aux députés de l'opposition. Avons-nous besoin du témoin de Colombie-Britannique? Avez-vous des questions précises pour lui? Votre temps était presque écoulé.

M. Blake Richards:

Il me restait un peu de temps et j'avais encore une question à poser. J'aimerais qu'il reste.

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault (Sherbrooke, NPD):

J'aimerais moi aussi poser une question à notre témoin de Colombie-Britannique.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Je crois comprendre qu'il n'y a pas consentement unanime pour poursuivre. J'aimerais le solliciter de nouveau pour pouvoir poser une ou deux questions.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

J'ai besoin du consentement unanime.

Le président:

Nous allons essayer de vous avoir à nouveau parmi nous. Nous en avons au moins pour une demi-heure avant de reprendre la séance.

M. Vikram Vij:

Excusez-moi, je ne comprends pas ce qui se passe chez vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La Chambre doit passer au vote immédiatement; nous reviendrons donc dans environ 45 minutes ou une heure.

M. Vikram Vij:

D'accord. Est-ce que je reste à vous attendre?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y aura un vote à la Chambre, c'est pourquoi la sonnerie se fait entendre.

M. Vikram Vij:

Je vois.

Le président:

Serez-vous encore libre dans environ 45 minutes ou une heure?

M. Vikram Vij:

Je suis libre jusqu'à 10 h. On m'avait dit de 8 h à 10 h.

Le président:

Si vous pouviez vous occuper à autre chose pendant 45 minutes ou une heure. Les techniciens seront en communication avec vous.

M. Vikram Vij:

Ça va, merci.

Le président:

Nous allons suspendre la séance.

(1120)

(1210)

Le président:

Nous reprenons nos travaux.

Nous étions en train de discuter d'un rappel au Règlement lorsque nous nous sommes arrêtés. Nous allons demander à M. Richards de répondre au rappel au Règlement qui a été soulevé.

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, je vous remercie de me donner l'occasion de répondre.

Je comprends les tentatives du député libéral pour empêcher les questions, mais j'estime que ces questions sont tout à fait pertinentes pour évaluer les qualifications du témoin. Permettez-moi de vous expliquer pourquoi.

Une question tout à fait typique et habituelle, qui revient constamment dans toutes les entrevues d'emploi — nous ne sommes pas en train de faire une entrevue d'embauche, mais nous cherchons à évaluer les qualifications d'une personne, ce qui revient au même —, en est une qui consiste à évaluer la capacité du candidat à composer avec le conflit. On demande au candidat comment il réagirait dans telle ou telle situation de conflit. C'est tout ce qu'il y a de plus courant. J'imagine que M. Vij, qui a sûrement embauché beaucoup de personnes tout au long de sa carrière, utilise lui-même cette question pour évaluer un candidat.

Cela dit, il est clair que ma question portait sur une situation de conflit potentiel, ou peut-être même une situation passée dans laquelle il y a effectivement eu conflit, puisque les conseillers du comité consultatif ont déjà entrepris une évaluation des candidats potentiels au Sénat.

Si j'utilise cet exemple pour déterminer la capacité du candidat à composer avec une situation de conflit, perçu ou potentiel, c'est pour établir un parallèle avec la situation qui nous préoccupe et le conflit potentiel qui pourrait surgir si le Cabinet du premier ministre décidait de ne pas choisir le candidat recommandé par notre témoin et par d'autres membres du conseil. Peut-être que monsieur s'est déjà trouvé dans une situation semblable et qu'il pourrait nous dire comment il a composé avec ce conflit, dans la réalité.

Il se peut que le CPM n'ait pas choisi de nommer les candidats recommandés par le comité consultatif, ce qui rejoint mon idée sur ma propre capacité à évaluer la capacité du témoin à composer avec ce conflit potentiel, ou possiblement réel, soulevé par le fait que le CPM n'aurait pas choisi les candidats recommandés par lui ou ses collègues.

Ma question me semble tout à fait pertinente pour l'évaluation des qualifications du témoin. Honnêtement, monsieur le président, avec tout le respect que j'ai pour votre fonction et toute la sympathie que j'ai pour vous en tant que personne, je pense que si vous choisissez de rendre une décision autre que de permettre la question, j'y verrais un manque d'impartialité, un geste qui serait interprété comme une tentative pour protéger le gouvernement. J'espère sincèrement, monsieur le président, que vous permettrez que la question soit posée.

Le président:

Je ne vais pas permettre que ce débat se prolonge trop longtemps et qu'il accapare le temps des témoins, mais nous demanderons à Ruby de répondre.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je pense que ce qu'il faut bien comprendre, c'est l'indulgence qui a été démontrée lors de la toute première question. Il y a bien eu un rappel au Règlement, mais une certaine latitude a été accordée. Et le témoin a donné une réponse qui, à mon avis, a été utile au Comité.

Toutefois, si nous revenons en arrière, la question que M. Richards a posée n'était pas: « Comment réagiriez-vous au conflit en général? » La question était beaucoup plus pointue et visait directement ce qui s'est passé dans le processus, à savoir ce que le CPM a fait ou n'a pas fait.

Ce n'est pas l'endroit pour une question de ce genre. Ce type de considération ne relève pas de notre mandat — ce n'est pas ce qui est prévu au Règlement — qui est de poser des questions sur les qualifications des témoins.

Si la question était: « Que feriez-vous dans une situation de conflit? », allez-y et posez-la. Mais ce n'était pas la question posée.

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, me donnez-vous la possibilité de répondre? Je devrais certainement avoir une chance égale.

De toute évidence, ma question visait à déterminer la capacité du candidat à faire face au conflit. C'est une question très typique. Dans ce cas-ci, monsieur le président, la réalité est que le comité consultatif a déjà entrepris une partie du travail pour lequel nous sommes en train d'évaluer les qualifications de ses membres, de sorte qu'il n'est pas impossible qu'une situation de conflit se soit vraiment produite, ou puisse, hypothétiquement, se produire. Quoi qu'il en soit, j'aimerais entendre le témoin nous raconter comment il a — ou aurait — composé avec la situation.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Nous avons abordé ce sujet par le passé. La dernière fois, c'est moi qui me suis trouvé dans la situation de M. Richards de me voir refuser le droit de poser une question.

Si un témoin choisit de ne pas répondre à une question, c'est son affaire. Mais pour autant que je sache, les règles ne nous empêchent pas de poser des questions. Je vous recommanderais de transmettre cette information aux témoins, de les informer qu'ils ont le choix de répondre ou non à une question, mais que cela ne va pas jusqu'à interdire la liberté d'expression des députés.

(1215)

Le président:

J'ai informé les témoins à ce sujet au début de la séance.

Monsieur Richards, il vous reste une minute. Je vous donne la possibilité de reformuler votre question. Nous verrons si elle est acceptable, puis je rendrai une décision.

M. Blake Richards:

J'invoque le Règlement sur ce point également, monsieur le président.

Cela me laisse très peu de temps, étant donné que vous m'avez demandé de reformuler la question. Vous avez été indulgent pour le temps que vous avez accordé au témoin qui a répondu à la question du député libéral dans la première série de questions. Je m'attends donc à la même clémence de votre part pour permettre au témoin de donner une réponse complète, étant donné qu'il n'aurait pas beaucoup de temps pour répondre. Je pense que ce serait la bonne chose à faire.

Le président:

Bien sûr.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Ma question est — je pense que vous en avez déjà une très bonne idée...

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe, Lib.):

J'invoque le Règlement, si vous me le permettez... J'ai chronométré nos tours pour le compte rendu et en fait, M. Richards a déjà utilisé plus que ses cinq minutes. Il a utilisé une minute et 20 secondes pour son rappel au Règlement, et ce temps n'a pas été compté.

M. Blake Richards:

Ce rappel au Règlement ne fait pas partie du temps de questions. Je répondais à un rappel au Règlement invoqué par votre côté de la Chambre. Cela ne fait pas partie de mon temps de questions. Le président avait indiqué que j'avais une minute ou plus au moment où j'ai posé la question, alors je sais qu'il reste du temps.

Le président:

Je me prononce contre ce rappel et je vous permets de poser votre question. Nous devons respecter les témoins, chers collègues.

M. Blake Richards:

Évidemment. Tout à fait.

Le président:

Nous pouvons invoquer des rappels au Règlement lorsque les témoins ne sont pas présents.

M. Blake Richards:

Je vous en suis reconnaissant, monsieur le président.

Je pense que vous avez une très bonne idée de la question qui me préoccupe. Il s'agit pour nous de juger de votre capacité à gérer une situation de conflit. Cette situation s'est peut-être déjà produite. Si tel est le cas, pouvez-vous nous dire dans quelles circonstances elle s'est produite, sinon qu'auriez-vous fait si une situation de conflit était survenue?

Si le CPM n'a pas choisi de nommer les candidats recommandés par le comité consultatif, ou s'il ne le fait pas dans le futur, comment réagiriez-vous? Quelle serait, selon vous, une réaction appropriée?

M. Vikram Vij:

Heureusement, nos délibérations n'ont donné lieu à aucun conflit.

En tant que dirigeant dans la vie réelle, si je demande à quelqu'un de faire une chose avec laquelle il n'est pas d'accord, je veux quand même avoir le dernier mot, parce que c'est moi le chef de mon entreprise. Dans une vraie démocratie, c'est ça qu'il faut.

Si je formulais mes recommandations et que le CPM ne les acceptait pas, j'accepterais humblement sa décision. Au bout du compte, je me dirais que mon rôle consistait à recommander des candidats et à en réduire le nombre à cinq. C'est ce qu'on m'avait demandé, et c'est ce que j'ai livré.

Il n'y a eu absolument aucun conflit, et comme je suis une personne intègre, je ne voudrais pas créer de conflit, même si j'étais en désaccord. En fin de compte, nous vivons dans une démocratie et c'est au premier ministre et à son Cabinet que revient le choix final.

Le président:

Merci.

Avant de passer à M. Dusseault, maintenant que nous sommes de retour, vous pouvez poser des questions à n'importe lequel des témoins.

Vous avez cinq minutes. [Français]

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les témoins d'être ici ce matin. Nous nous excusons du contretemps. C'est à cause d'un vote qui a eu lieu à la Chambre.

Revenons au sujet, en commençant par M. Vij, en Colombie-Britannique.

Pourquoi croyez-vous avoir été choisi pour occuper ce poste? Est-ce que vous avez proposé votre nom lorsque vous avez su qu'un tel processus allait s'enclencher ou est-ce que le gouvernement vous a sondé? Pourquoi croyez-vous que vous avez été pressenti pour cela? [Traduction]

M. Vikram Vij:

Merci pour cette question.

Je crois que mon expérience en tant qu'immigrant qui a commencé au bas de l'échelle, qui est arrivé ici comme le commun des mortels avec son diplôme de chef en poche et qui, aujourd'hui, contribue à enrichir le tissu entrepreneurial de ce pays, a modelé ma façon de penser et de comprendre les personnes qui représentent les fondements de nos collectivités du nord de la Colombie-Britannique, ou de toute la Colombie-Britannique, et qui ont gravi ces échelons.

Pour ma part, j'ai le sentiment que cet honneur me vient du fait que j'ai rendu service à la nation de manière pragmatique, et pour que je le fasse à nouveau en m'assurant de présenter le meilleur des candidats. À mon sens, on m'accorde cet honneur en reconnaissance de mes contributions au Canada et à la collectivité, et aussi de ma capacité à pouvoir discerner, parmi tous les candidats, les personnes les plus aptes à se voir confier cette honorable et importante fonction.

(1220)

[Français]

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Merci.

J'aimerais aussi demander aux témoins qui sont ici pourquoi, selon eux, ils ont été choisis.

Avez-vous soumis votre candidature? Connaissez-vous quelqu'un au gouvernement qui aurait recommandé votre nom? Avez-vous une idée de la façon dont votre nom a été évoqué et qu'il a été proposé?

Madame Arsenault, voulez-vous commencer?

Mme Jeannette Arsenault:

J'ai reçu un appel du gouvernement provincial, du bureau de notre ministre. On m'a posé quelques questions et, ensuite, j'ai lu dans le journal que cinq noms avaient été soumis à votre comité. C'est ainsi que j'ai été nommée. Je n'ai pas fait de démarches personnellement, parce que je ne savais pas qu'on cherchait des candidats. Je suis l'une des personnes dont le nom a été proposé.

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Je présume que la même chose s'est produite dans le cas de M. Francis.

Quelles sont vos connaissances du Sénat et du travail de parlementaire ici, à Ottawa, au sein de notre institution fédérale? Quelle connaissance du Sénat avez-vous pour vous préparer à proposer des noms de personnes qualifiées pour occuper un poste de sénateur?

J'aimerais entendre la réponse de Mme Arsenault et ensuite celle de M. Francis.

Mme Jeannette Arsenault:

Est-ce que M. Vij peut comprendre le français?

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Je crois qu'il a accès au service d'interprétation. [Traduction]

Mme Jeannette Arsenault:

Je peux répondre en anglais. Ce sera tout aussi bien. En ce qui a trait au travail au Sénat, je n'ai jamais travaillé pour le gouvernement, ce qui fait que je ne connais pas tous les règlements et les règles qui s'appliquent. Toutefois, comme citoyenne de l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard, je peux vous dire que, si vous regardez mon curriculum vitae, vous verrez que j'ai siégé à de nombreux conseils différents, comme présidente de la Chambre de commerce ou à la tête de différents conseils et comités, qui m'ont préparée à étudier de nombreuses politiques et questions gouvernementales. Il va sans dire que je me tiens au courant de ce qui se passe.

Je sais que le Sénat est une chambre très importante, qui devrait être maintenue, parce que son travail joue un rôle essentiel au Canada. Nous avons besoin d'une deuxième chambre qui examine les projets de loi, afin de s'assurer qu'ils ne sont pas adoptés uniquement parce que cela fait l'affaire d'un groupe de personnes. Lorsque ces projets sont débattus et obtiennent l'assentiment de tous, cela me dit qu'il s'agit de bons projets. Ils doivent profiter à l'ensemble du Canada, et non pas uniquement à un petit groupe. Tous ces comités et ces différentes activités auxquels je participe font en sorte que je me tiens au courant de ce qui se passe au gouvernement.

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Monsieur Francis...

Le président:

Je suis désolé, votre temps est écoulé.

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Déjà...?

Le président:

Vous l'avez même un peu dépassé.

Madame Petitpas Taylor, allez-y, s'il vous plaît. [Français]

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Merci encore une fois de vous présenter devant ce comité aujourd'hui. Merci du temps que vous nous accordez.

Mes questions vont s'adresser à Mme Arsenault.

Madame Arsenault, il est toujours agréable de recevoir une Acadienne de chez nous. Je vous remercie encore une fois grandement de votre présence.

Afin de me préparer à la rencontre, j'ai parcouru votre curriculum vitae, qui est extrêmement impressionnant et qui inclut beaucoup de travail communautaire. Je vais en faire un bref survol.

Je vois que vous êtes propriétaire d'une petite entreprise de votre région.

En ce qui concerne le bénévolat, la liste de vos réalisations et des efforts que vous avez fournis dans votre communauté est incroyable. Cela m'impressionne.

Vous avez fait beaucoup de travail à la chambre de commerce, comme vous l'avez mentionné, avec des petites et moyennes entreprises. Vous êtes aussi la porte-parole de la Chambre de commerce acadienne et francophone de l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard, un organisme très important pour le maintien de notre culture francophone et acadienne. Je suis heureuse d'apprendre cela.

Je vois aussi que vous avez fait beaucoup de travail dans le domaine du tourisme, ce qui est extrêmement important pour votre province, et pour toutes les provinces.

Vous avez dirigé le Comité consultatif de la communauté acadienne et francophone.

Vous avez travaillé dans le domaine des arts et de la culture.

Nous constatons que vous avez un curriculum vitae impressionnant et que vous êtes bien placée pour faire le travail pour lequel vous avez été choisie.

De quelle façon est-ce que toutes vos réalisations, tout le travail professionnel ainsi que tout le bénévolat que vous avez effectué vous ont équipée pour devenir membre de ce comité?

(1225)

Mme Jeannette Arsenault:

Merci beaucoup de vos commentaires.

Lorsqu'on fait beaucoup de bénévolat, on peut apprendre beaucoup. Chaque fois que j'ai siégé à un comité, j'en suis partie avec un bagage plus grand que celui que j'avais à mon arrivée. En travaillant avec beaucoup de personnes, on apprend ce qu'elles font, comment elles le font, ce qui fonctionne et ce qui ne fonctionne pas. À mon avis, je possède beaucoup de bon sens et d'intuition.

Lorsqu'il s'agit de conseiller le premier ministre quant aux nominations au Sénat, il est entendu qu'il faut déterminer si les candidats sont aptes à prendre les bonnes décisions pour le Canada. Après tout, chaque décision qui est prise nous touche, au bout du compte. Je crois que toute mon expérience m'apporte ce dont j'ai besoin pour prendre de bonnes décisions.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Absolument. Vous avez travaillé avec beaucoup de gens au cours des années. En raison de vos années d'expérience et des nombreux groupes de travail dont vous avez fait partie, je suis certaine que vous avez acquis une bonne capacité à évaluer les gens et à travailler avec eux.

Mme Jeannette Arsenault:

Oui, c'est certain.

Au sein de mon entreprise, il y a 15 employés. Il est entendu que lorsque nous recrutons du personnel, nous cherchons des personnes ayant les compétences nécessaires. Il faut être apte à juger si elles feront l'affaire ou non au sein de l'entreprise. Comme M. Vij l'a dit, nous avons besoin de savoir, quand nous embauchons, si la personne sera capable de faire le travail que nous demandons. Avec les années, nous avons acquis la capacité d'évaluer une personne et de déterminer si c'est d'elle que nous avons besoin à ce poste.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Vous avez amélioré cette compétence grâce à l'expérience que vous avez acquise au cours des années.

Mme Jeannette Arsenault:

Oui.

L’hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor:

Je vous remercie beaucoup de la contribution que vous avez apportée tout au long de votre carrière et que vous continuez à apporter à votre province et à votre pays.

Nous voulons tout simplement vous dire un gros merci pour votre beau travail.

Mme Jeannette Arsenault:

Merci beaucoup. [Traduction]

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je vais partager mon temps de parole.

J'ai une question pour vous, monsieur Francis. Vous avez accompli beaucoup de choses. Vous êtes actuellement chef d'une Première Nation, et vous avez beaucoup oeuvré dans le domaine des relations intergouvernementales. Je trouve cela réellement fascinant. Vous avez fait de grandes réalisations dans ces domaines. Le Sénat et le gouvernement traitent constamment de ce genre de rapports avec les Premières Nations.

Comment votre expérience vous a-t-elle permis de recommander des candidats aux postes de sénateurs ou a-t-elle influencé ces recommandations?

M. Brian Francis:

Je crois qu'au fil des ans, j'ai acquis une vaste expérience dans les divers emplois et postes que j'ai occupés. Je crois avoir une très bonne réputation à l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard. Je suis intègre, j'ai un bon jugement, et je suis discret, et ce ne sont là que quelques-unes de mes qualités. Au fil des ans, j'ai travaillé à développer ces qualités et je me considère comme très compétent dans le rôle que j'ai joué pour la sélection des cinq candidats.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Quels types de compétences...

Le président:

Désolé, vous avez dépassé votre temps de parole.

Monsieur Richards, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Après avoir réfléchi à la réponse de M. Vij à ma dernière question, j'ai conclu qu'il avait techniquement raison. Je crois qu'il a sans nul doute répondu à la question de façon appropriée. Cela m'a rappelé aussi à quel point cette soi-disant réforme du Sénat est une imposture de la part du premier ministre. La réponse que j'ai obtenue, même si elle est techniquement exacte, fait réellement ressortir les problèmes que suscite le processus qui a été établi. C'est encore le premier ministre qui fait les nominations. Il a été clairement précisé dans la réponse que j'ai reçue que, s'il y avait un conflit, le comité devrait accepter que le premier ministre a le droit d'aller de l'avant et de nommer qui il souhaite, que ces personnes aient été recommandées par le comité ou non.

Cela fait réellement ressortir le fait que nous ne sommes pas du tout en présence d'une réforme. En fait, cela ne fait qu'ajouter un palier supplémentaire et un autre processus de nomination. Il ne fait aucun doute que les membres du comité s'acquittent de leur tâche avec diligence et s'efforcent de faire de leur mieux. Il s'agit de gens de qualité; là n'est pas la question. Ils ont quelque chose à offrir, mais au bout du compte, leurs décisions ne sont pas exécutoires. Leurs décisions n'ont pas de poids du tout. Si le premier ministre choisit de nommer qui diable il veut, il peut aller de l'avant et le faire.

De toute évidence, cela ne représente en aucun cas une réforme. Il s'agit du premier ministre qui fait des nominations au Sénat, comme cela a toujours été le cas dans ce pays. Ce n'est pas une réforme, et ce n'est pas ce à quoi les Canadiens s'attendent. Cela ne changera pas réellement la façon dont le Sénat fonctionne. C'est ce qui a été dit très clairement, et je profite de l'occasion pour le souligner, parce qu'il s'agit réellement d'une situation regrettable.

Nous avons un premier ministre qui, comme beaucoup d'autres, prétend être quelqu'un, alors qu'il est une personne complètement différente dans les faits. Dans ce cas, il choisit d'utiliser son autorité pour être en mesure de nommer qui il veut au Sénat. Malheureusement, les recommandations de ce comité pourraient ne pas être prises en compte, malgré les immenses compétences des membres qui le composent, et je dirais certainement, compte tenu de ce que j'ai entendu, que nous sommes en présence de gens qualifiés, qui se sont réellement acquittés de leur tâche avec diligence. Cela peut arriver, et personne n'y peut rien. Le premier ministre a les pouvoirs et il fait ce qu'il veut. S'il veut nommer de bons libéraux, il nommera de bons libéraux.

Ceci étant dit, j'ai eu la chance de poser quelques questions à M. Vij, et je vais maintenant m'adresser aux autres témoins.

Je commencerai avec vous, madame Arsenault. Je dois avouer que j'ai écouté l'interprétation lorsque vous avez répondu à M. Dusseault. Selon l'interprétation, à tout le moins, lorsqu'on vous a demandé comment vous aviez été nommée, vous avez dit avoir reçu un appel de notre ministre. Il y a peut-être eu un problème d'interprétation, mais à qui faisiez-vous référence lorsque vous avez dit « notre ministre », de qui vous avez reçu un appel?

(1230)

Mme Jeannette Arsenault:

J'ai été appelée par le bureau du premier ministre provincial.

M. Blake Richards:

Votre premier ministre, d'accord.

Mme Jeannette Arsenault:

Oui, et on m'a posé quelques questions, tout comme aux autres, j'imagine. Je crois qu'il a choisi cinq noms, à tout le moins c'est ce qui était écrit. Il s'agissait donc bien du bureau de notre premier ministre.

M. Blake Richards:

D'accord, merci pour la précision parce que, je me demandais bien qui était « notre ministre ».

Mme Jeannette Arsenault:

Oui, je me suis rendu compte de cela par la suite.

M. Blake Richards:

J'ai présumé qu'il s'agissait probablement seulement d'un problème de traduction.

J'aimerais vous poser à tous les deux la même question que celle que j'ai posée précédemment. En ce qui a trait au processus proprement dit, maintenant qu'il est terminé pour vous, il s'agit de pouvoir évaluer votre esprit critique et vos qualifications. Quelle opinion avez-vous du processus et comment pourrait-il être amélioré à l'avenir?

Mme Jeannette Arsenault:

Je crois que M. Vij a répondu assez bien à ces questions, parce que...

Le président:

On invoque le Règlement.

Juste avant, je rappelle aux témoins que tous les commentaires qui ont été faits au sujet du processus ne sont pas pertinents dans le cadre de la présente discussion. Celle-ci porte sur les qualifications, la seule raison pour laquelle nous avons été autorisés à vous inviter.

Sur le recours au Règlement, madame Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous allez penser que je répète toujours la même chose, mais je ne vois pas comment je pourrais faire autrement... Nous ne cessons, en fin de compte, de poser des questions concernant le processus, ce qui n'est pas la raison de la présence des témoins ici. J'aimerais qu'une décision juste soit rendue, cette fois-ci, concernant le fait que nous ne sommes pas ici pour nous interroger sur le processus. Nous sommes ici pour en apprendre davantage au sujet des compétences des témoins.

Si M. Richards veut reformuler cette question, il est évidemment libre de le faire, mais de la façon dont il vient de l'énoncer, il s'agit d'une question directe sur le processus, qui ne fait pas partie de l'objectif de la réunion d'aujourd'hui.

M. Blake Richards:

Puis-je répondre, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Vous pouvez répondre, puis je rendrai une décision.

M. Blake Richards:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Si on avait bien écouté la question que j'ai posée, on saurait qu'elle visait à évaluer l'esprit critique des témoins et leur capacité d'analyser un processus. C'est dans ce sens-là que j'ai formulé ma question.

Vous avez autorisé cette question précédemment, de toute évidence. Je crois que cela est réellement malheureux. Je ne vois pas en quoi ma question pose un problème. Je sais que j'ai mentionné que ce processus n'est en aucun cas une réforme, et qu'il s'agit seulement de poudre aux yeux et que le premier ministre peut aller de l'avant et nommer qui il veut. Pourquoi est-on aussi sensible? Je crois que c'est à cause de cela. On tente de défendre le premier ministre, même si sa position est indéfendable, dans mon esprit.

Au bout du compte, monsieur le président, la question visait à évaluer l'esprit critique des témoins et...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Puis-je répondre, même si ce n'est qu'en 30 secondes?

M. Blake Richards:

Monsieur le président, je croyais qu'on se limiterait à une réponse et que vous rendriez une décision. Cela devient un peu ridicule. Pourquoi ont-ils si peur?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Cela n'a rien à voir avec la sensibilité.

M. Blake Richards:

Pourquoi ont-ils si peur des questions?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Cela a à voir avec notre règlement, nos règles. Les règles sont les règles. Il ne s'agit pas du premier ministre, ni non plus...

M. Blake Richards:

La question ne partait pas d'une mauvaise intention, et j'aimerais réellement pouvoir poursuivre sans être interrompu. La question ne se veut pas malveillante. Il s'agit simplement d'avoir une idée de leur évaluation du processus...

(1235)

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Blake Richards:

... et de ce qui pourrait, selon eux, être fait pour l'améliorer, ce qui de toute évidence passe par une évaluation de leur jugement et de leur esprit critique. Je ne vois pas à quoi rime cette défense du premier ministre de cette façon...

Le président:

D'accord, cela suffit.

Lorsque nous avons invoqué le Règlement, il ne vous restait qu'une minute. Vous avez posé une question particulière au sujet du processus, ce qui fait que je vais vous donner la possibilité de poser votre question dans le contexte de ce dont vous venez de parler, l'esprit critique, alors posez votre question. Il vous reste une minute.

M. Blake Richards:

C'est de cette façon que j'ai formulé ma question précédemment, monsieur le président. Je ne sais donc pas ce que vous voulez que je fasse différemment.

Le président:

Vous leur avez demandé de façon particulière qu'ils commentent le processus.

M. Blake Richards:

Oui, afin d'évaluer leur esprit critique. Il est très courant en entrevue, monsieur le président, de soumettre un scénario pour pouvoir évaluer les compétences des candidats.

Je ne vois pas en quoi cette question est délicate. J'imagine que je vais m'en remettre aux témoins.

Vous avez entendu la question. Êtes-vous prêt à répondre?

Le président:

Au sujet de votre esprit critique...

M. Blake Richards:

En ce qui a trait à l'évaluation du processus...

M. Vikram Vij:

Puis-je répondre en une seconde, monsieur Richards?

M. Blake Richards:

J'aimerais leur donner la chance, s'ils le pouvaient...

M. Vikram Vij:

D'accord, désolé.

M. Blake Richards:

... parce que vous avez eu l'occasion de répondre précédemment. Si vous voulez ajouter quelque chose à la fin, je serai heureux de vous donner cette possibilité, ce qu'ils n'ont pas eu.

Mme Jeannette Arsenault:

Je suis désolée, monsieur le président, mais je crois qu'on nous demande ici de défendre notre curriculum vitae et je pense que nous n'étions pas prêts pour ces questions. Si l'information qui nous a été donnée avait été différente...

Le président:

C'est bien. Vous avez raison.

Mme Jeannette Arsenault:

Je crois que ce qui a déjà été dit suffit.

Le président:

La même chose pour vous, monsieur Francis?

M. Brian Francis:

Je suis d'accord.

Le président:

D'accord, vous pouvez y aller parce qu'il lui reste 15 secondes.

Allez-y, monsieur Vij.

M. Vikram Vij:

Je crois que nous comprenons que le choix de la bonne personne ou la recommandation de la bonne personne au premier ministre, peu importe le parti auquel il appartient, a des répercussions pour nous. C'est ce que nous laisserons, et nos noms y seront associés. Si, même vaguement, nous avons choisi quelqu'un qui n'est pas qualifié, c'est sur nous que cela retombera, dans la communauté, au quotidien. C'est là que ce que nous léguons prend toute son importance. Mon nom est très important pour moi. Il est si important que je ne permettrai pas qu'il soit entaché par quoi que ce soit.

Si on poussait un peu plus loin en disant: « Le premier ministre peut faire ce qu'il veut », cela pourrait être interprété comme la preuve que les personnes choisies lui ont été recommandées de cette façon. Je crois que nous poussons les choses un peu trop loin ici. Je me suis peut-être laissé emporter, mais je suis totalement d'accord avec mes autres collègues. Je me devais de défendre ce que j'ai fait pour ce pays, et ce que je continue de faire sur une base quotidienne. C'est ce que l'on m'a demandé et c'est ce pour quoi je suis ici aujourd'hui.

Le président:

Merci.

M. Blake Richards:

Pour être bien clair, je ne remettais aucunement vos qualifications ou votre intégrité en question. Je crois que vous vous acquittez de votre tâche du mieux que vous le pouvez. Vous vous efforcez de la mener à bien. Je suis d'accord que votre nom doit... Je crois que nous sommes tous d'accord avec cela. Il faut nous assurer que cette intégrité demeure. C'est exactement pour cela que j'ai soulevé ces points. Je crois qu'il devrait s'agir de votre décision et non pas de quelque chose qui pourrait être renversé par le premier ministre. C'est cela que je tentais de démontrer. Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Richards.

Madame Sahota, vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Cela n'a rien à voir avec la sensibilité; je pense plutôt que nous voulons apprendre à connaître nos témoins et prendre connaissance de leur contribution à ce processus. Je suis certaine qu'ils ne sont pas heureux que l'on qualifie d'imposture l'ensemble du processus auquel ils ont participé et tout le travail qu'ils ont accompli. Je reconnais réellement tous les efforts que vous avez consacrés à cette tâche. En tant que députée ayant participé cette année à tous les processus liés aux comités, je peux vous dire que la tâche est énorme. Il faut beaucoup d'effort. Je peux à peine imaginer tous les efforts que vous avez consacrés à cela.

Pour revenir aux questions que j'ai pour vous, monsieur Francis, vous avez un certificat en études sur la résolution des conflits. J'imagine que certains des domaines dans lesquels vous avez négocié avec le gouvernement comme coordonnateur des programmes autochtones et comme conseiller en emploi, de même que dans le domaine des pêches et océans, peuvent parfois être assez controversés et susciter des débats passionnés chez les gens.

Comment utilisez-vous ces compétences en résolution des conflits et cette passion dont vous faites preuve au moment de la sélection et de la recommandation de sénateurs?

M. Brian Francis:

J'utilise ce type de compétences sur une base quotidienne dans mes tâches comme chef d'une Première Nation. Il s'agit d'un rôle très complexe.

Désolé, pouvez-vous répéter la question? J'ai perdu le fil de ma pensée.

(1240)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je vous ai demandé comment vous avez utilisé vos compétences en résolution des conflits dans le cadre du processus. Des questions similaires ont été posées auparavant, mais j'avais l'impression qu'elles avaient été posées différemment. Comment avez-vous appliqué directement à ce processus les compétences et la passion dont vous faites montre dans votre travail?

M. Brian Francis:

Il est évident que j'utilise des compétences de raisonnement, des compétences de prise de décisions, ce genre de compétences, pour évaluer les candidatures et les lettres d'appui. Comme je l'ai mentionné précédemment, j'ai participé à de nombreux processus de concours fondés sur le mérite, pendant mes 19 années au gouvernement fédéral, et cela m'a réellement bien préparé pour ce processus fondé aussi sur le mérite.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Nous avons eu l'occasion d'entendre M. Vij nous parler de ce qu'il recherchait et du type de processus interne auquel il a participé, au moment de l'examen des CV et des compétences des sénateurs potentiels. Que recherchiez-vous lorsque vous avez participé à ce processus?

M. Brian Francis:

J'étais à la recherche de quelqu'un ayant apporté une grande contribution à sa province. Je recherchais quelqu'un ayant des antécédents professionnels et ayant accompli beaucoup de travail pour sa communauté, notamment. J'ai essentiellement évalué ces personnes selon une échelle. J'ai établi un ordre de priorité et, en partant d'éléments communs, j'ai procédé à une analyse critique et à une évaluation.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Un élément commun se dégage de tous vos curriculum vitae, à savoir que vous êtes tous très engagés dans vos communautés, et très actifs. Comment cela a-t-il influencé votre jugement en ce qui a trait aux candidats que vous recherchiez?

M. Brian Francis:

Pour ma part, je suis perçu dans ma communauté comme une personne ayant une excellente réputation et une grande intégrité. De nombreuses personnes m'ont complimenté au sujet de ma nomination à cette fonction. J'ai été honoré, parce que cela montre que les gens me respectent dans la province. Ils savent que je suis un chef de Première Nation indépendant et autonome. Je crois que cela a beaucoup joué.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Est-ce que quelqu'un d'autre veut intervenir?

M. Vikram Vij:

Puis-je?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui, monsieur Vij, allez-y.

M. Vikram Vij:

Lorsque vous êtes propriétaire d'un restaurant, vous rencontrez beaucoup de gens et, compte tenu du nombre de restaurants que j'ai... J'ai eu l'occasion de rencontrer un grand nombre de personnes qui avaient posé leur candidature, et je savais qu'elles le faisaient parce qu'il y avait un élément de... C'est vrai, j'ai vu une telle personne poser sa candidature, une telle autre personne le faire aussi, mais pour pouvoir agir de façon aussi pragmatique, pour pouvoir dire que l'on comprend qu'une personne pose sa candidature et que n'importe qui peut le faire, qu'il est démocratique de le faire, et pour pouvoir endosser ce rôle et se demander si cette personne est la meilleure personne pour cette fonction, il a fallu porter ce chapeau.

Essentiellement, nous devions piloter les curriculum vitae qui nous avaient été soumis, et nous souhaitions faire en sorte que les meilleures personnes, celles qui avaient contribué à la société et accompli quelque chose dans leur domaine, se révèlent en fin de compte être des personnes exceptionnelles, qui laisseront un héritage dont on se rappellera, pour le travail qu'elles ont fait non seulement pour la communauté, mais pour l'ensemble de la Colombie-Britannique.

C'est cela que je recherchais. C'est ce genre de choses que nous souhaitions trouver dans les curriculum vitae. Nous avons été honorés de recevoir des curriculum vitae de l'extrême nord de la Colombie-Britannique jusqu'à Vancouver. Les candidatures ne se sont pas limitées à Vancouver ou à Victoria, mais sont venues de partout en Colombie-Britannique.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.[Français]

Monsieur Schmale, vous disposez de cinq minutes. [Traduction]

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci beaucoup.

J'aimerais obtenir une précision rapide. Vous avez dit quelque chose, madame Arsenault, que je n'ai pas réellement saisi, mais il peut s'agir d'un problème de traduction. Vous avez mentionné que vous avez pris votre tâche très au sérieux, que vous reconnaissez l'importance du Sénat, parce qu'autrement, les lois ne seront adoptées que par quelques personnes, si je vous ai bien comprise. Si vous vous rappelez de ce que vous avez dit, pourriez-vous préciser cela pour moi?

Mme Jeannette Arsenault:

Il pourrait arriver un jour que l'ensemble du gouvernement soit du même côté et adopte tout ce qu'il veut, mais la présence du Sénat permet de disposer de ce que l'on appelle la chambre de second examen objectif. Il ne faut pas que des lois qui ne sont pas bonnes pour l'ensemble du Canada soient adoptées, parce qu'un groupe de personnes souhaitaient les adopter. Il doit y avoir un équilibre, une dose de jugement et de bonnes discussions. C'est ce que je voulais dire par là.

(1245)

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord. Je pensais bien que c'est ce que vous vouliez dire. C'est là que ce processus me pose un problème. Les gens qui adoptent les lois ont été élus. Nous cognons aux portes. Nous demandons du soutien. Nous participons à des événements. Nous rencontrons des gens et nous tentons de les aider. Les sénateurs, et c'est ce qui se produit depuis plus de 150 ans, sont maintenant sélectionnés de façon aléatoire par le premier ministre. J'ai une attitude partisane, de toute évidence, et M. Richards l'a souligné, mais en fin de compte, qui a le dernier mot, et les sénateurs, comme l'a souligné à maintes reprises M. Christopherson, qui n'est pas présent ici, ont plus de poids que les députés de la Chambre des communes parce qu'ils sont moins nombreux.

Je suis en fait assez troublé par ce que vous venez de dire. Je suis assez surpris, en fait, que des personnes élisent leurs représentants, mais qu'on dise d'eux qu'ils adoptent des lois qui peuvent ou non contribuer au bien-être des Canadiens... J'imagine que nous, dans l'opposition, pouvons prétendre que ce sur quoi nous nous prononçons aujourd'hui n'est pas bon pour les Canadiens, alors qu'ils voteront dans le sens contraire, et cela me trouble beaucoup en fait.

Je dis cela, toutefois, parce que mes préoccupations vont entièrement à ce processus. Il s'agit uniquement d'une étape de plus. Je ne dis pas que personne ne fait son travail. Tous sont très bien qualifiés.

J'espère que lorsque je serai à Vancouver, je pourrai manger dans un de vos restaurants, monsieur Vij, qui ont très bonne réputation.

M. Scott Reid:

Où se trouve le camion de cuisine de rue? Les échos que nous en avons sont élogieux.

M. Jamie Schmale:

C'est le cas, en effet, et j'espère être votre client un jour.

Je veux parler de l'ensemble du processus. Je sais que Mme Sahota a été insultée lorsque M. Richards a dit qu'il s'agissait d'une imposture, mais c'est le premier ministre qui a le dernier mot. C'est malheureux, mais j'imagine que c'est ce que nous devons faire, le premier ministre pouvant toujours se défendre en disant que les noms lui ont été recommandés. Si vous regardez qui a été nommé...

Monsieur Vij, cette tâche était parfaite pour vous. Votre expérience vous a fait rencontrer beaucoup de gens, et j'imagine qu'il en va de même pour vous monsieur Francis. Lorsque je regarde qui a été nommé, je vois des personnes qui ressemblent beaucoup à celles qui l'ont été par le passé, et c'est là que se situe mon malaise à l'égard de l'ensemble de ce processus, les gens... Ils sont scolarisés, je ne remets pas cela en question. D'accord, parlons de cela d'abord. Vous rencontrez tous les deux beaucoup de gens, que j'appellerais des Canadiens ordinaires, dans votre travail. J'aimerais que quelqu'un du secteur de l'agriculture soit nommé au Sénat. J'aimerais voir davantage de gens d'affaires nommés au Sénat. Selon votre expérience, et tous les deux vous avez rencontré de nombreuses personnes, et j'imagine vous aussi, madame Arsenault, comment pouvez-vous arriver à un équilibre et faire participer des Canadiens ordinaires à ce processus, et non pas des anciens bureaucrates ou des universitaires, pour donner une autre perspective au Sénat?

M. Vikram Vij:

Est-ce que cette question s'adresse à moi?

M. Jamie Schmale:

Nous pouvons commencer avec vous. Ma question s'adresse à tous.

M. Vikram Vij:

Je crois que les universitaires sont représentés au comité indépendant, avec Anne Giardini, qui a été chancelière de SFU, tout comme moi-même, comme simple citoyen, chef et homme d'affaires. Nous sommes deux personnes représentatives, et je crois que lorsque l'on examine le comité indépendant, on constate que nous avons été très bien choisis et que nous provenons de divers horizons. Nous n'allions pas sélectionner seulement un professeur d'université, une personne du monde des affaires, un immigrant, ou quelqu'un d'autre. Nous avons fait notre choix selon les qualifications de ces personnes. Nous avons été choisis de façon large, et c'est de cette façon que nous avons choisi les candidats.

Nous avons passé le témoin et nous avons fait des recommandations en fonction de ce que nous savions et de notre formation. Nous avons suffisamment discuté, Anne et moi, de ce qu'elle pensait et de ce que je pensais. Nous avons examiné des lettres de recommandation ou des curriculum vitae en disant: « D'accord, cette personne a fait cela, mais que penses-tu de cela? » Il y a eu de nombreuses discussions, et le comité national principal nous a posé des questions, tout comme vous nous en posez maintenant. « Pourquoi croyez-vous que cette personne ferait du bon travail? Pourquoi croyez-vous que cette personne devrait être recommandée? » Je dois dire qu'il ne s'agit pas seulement d'un autre niveau de bureaucratie qui s'est ajouté. Il s'agit d'un processus totalement différent.

(1250)

Le président:

Est-ce que les deux autres témoins veulent répondre à cela?

Monsieur Francis.

M. Brian Francis:

Je n'ai rien à ajouter, sauf que nous avons utilisé des critères de mérite et que nous les avons appliqués également.

Le président:

Madame Arsenault, avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter?

Mme Jeannette Arsenault:

C'est exactement ce que nous avons fait.

Le président:

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. DeCourcey.[Français]

Vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Matt DeCourcey (Fredericton, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les trois témoins du travail qu'ils ont fait pour les Canadiens. En tant que député du Nouveau-Brunswick, je suis conscient que les Canadiens sont fiers des décisions prises par ces conseillers de partout au pays.[Traduction]

Madame Arsenault, en répondant à la question de mon collègue de l'autre côté, j'ai eu l'impression et j'ai constaté, et il en va de même pour M. Vij, qu'il existe de grandes préoccupations chez les gens ici au sujet des parlementaires qui sont chargés de prendre des décisions, quant à savoir s'ils le feront dans l'intérêt de l'ensemble du pays, en tenant compte de la diversité de l'ensemble du pays, ainsi que de celle qui existe entre les différents groupes démographiques au Canada. La diversité peut prendre plusieurs formes: l'origine ethnique, l'éducation, et les différentes expériences et valeurs socioéconomiques, notamment là. Je crois que tous les parlementaires ont un rôle à jouer pour que les décisions prises le soient dans l'intérêt des Canadiens et des Canadiennes provenant de tous les horizons.

Pouvez-vous chacun prendre un moment pour décrire comment votre expérience vous a rendu capable d'évaluer et de comprendre la diversité des régions pour lesquelles vous étiez chargés de prendre une décision? Servez-vous d'un exemple d'une expérience de votre vie professionnelle ou personnelle qui nous donnera un aperçu de la façon dont vous pouvez prendre des décisions, en reconnaissant qu'il existe une diversité de points de vue dans les diverses régions du pays.

Mme Jeannette Arsenault:

Les candidats représentent le premier élément sur lequel nous avons dû nous pencher. Je possède ma propre entreprise depuis 27 ans. Il est évident que j'ai acquis beaucoup de connaissances. J'ai siégé à de nombreux comités et j'ai été présidente de la Chambre de commerce de Summerside. Cela m'a permis d'acquérir une grande expertise, parce que j'ai dû traiter beaucoup de dossiers différents. Ne serait-ce que le fait que nous ne sommes pas des jeunes de 16 ans, qui n'ont pas une grande expérience de la vie... Nous n'avons pas toutes les réponses, mais en tant que groupe, compte tenu de ce que nous possédons, nous étions aussi qualifiés que quiconque d'autre au Canada pour assumer cette tâche.

Nous sommes très respectés dans notre communauté, comme l'a dit M. Francis. Les gens viennent à nous parfois, que ce soit pour avoir des conseils d'entrepreneur ou pour différentes autres choses. Nous sommes considérés comme des leaders dans notre communauté. Nos CV parlent d'eux-mêmes. Je crois que nous étions assez bien outillés pour prendre cette décision. Nous avons l'habitude d'évaluer des gens. Nous avons l'habitude de prendre des décisions. C'est ce genre de tâche qui nous a été confiée, et j'ai l'impression que nous nous en sommes assez bien acquittés. Cela a été manifeste dans l'ensemble du pays. Nous, les membres du comité, provenions de différents horizons, ce qui ne nous a pas empêchés de nous réunir et de prendre des décisions en fonction de notre expertise, de ce que nous avons fait dans la vie et de l'expérience que nous avons acquise.

Le président:

Merci.

Chef Francis, allez-y.

M. Brian Francis:

Je crois que Jeannette a très bien résumé la question. En tant que chef d'une Première Nation pendant 10 ans, j'ai acquis une bonne compréhension de la diversité et je crois pouvoir prendre des décisions indépendantes sur la base des renseignements dont je dispose, en toute confidentialité et en faisant preuve d'un jugement sûr. Il s'agit de qualités que j'ai acquises au fil des ans, auxquelles s'ajoute mon intégrité personnelle. Dans la province et à l'extérieur de celle-ci, je crois que je suis tout désigné pour les choix que nous avons dû faire. Nous avons très bien collaboré au moment de faire ces choix, et je suis fier du travail accompli.

Merci.

(1255)

Le président:

Monsieur Vij, allez-y.

M. Vikram Vij:

J'ai quitté l'Inde à l'âge de 19 ans pour me rendre en Autriche. Je ne parlais pas un mot d'allemand, mais c'est une langue que je parle couramment maintenant. Le multiculturalisme ou l'apprentissage de différentes langues nous apprend à comprendre et à respecter les limites des autres et qui ils sont. Je crois que cela vous apprend à être réellement pragmatique et à prendre les bonnes décisions. Je crois que notre réputation est bien établie dans notre milieu, dans les domaines où nous travaillons, ce qui fait que les gens nous considèrent non seulement comme des modèles, mais aussi comme des personnes de qui ils peuvent obtenir des conseils. Je crois que c'est l'étendard que nous avons porté avec fierté.

La mosaïque de gens que j'ai croisés pendant mes 25 ans de vie dans ce pays et mes 35 années à l'extérieur de l'Inde m'a permis d'acquérir toute une somme de connaissances pour pouvoir juger les gens sur la base de ce qu'ils sont comme êtres humains, et non pas uniquement en fonction de la voiture qu'ils conduisent ou de la maison qu'ils possèdent, mais bien d'un point de vue humain. Cela m'a permis d'acquérir ce genre d'esprit, qui me permet de savoir quand une personne est apte à prendre les bonnes décisions. Je crois que ces qualités étaient extrêmement importantes pour nous. J'espère que les gens verront que le processus a été absolument exceptionnel et très bien mené.

M. Matt DeCourcey:

J'apprécie ces commentaires, d'autant plus que je n'aimerais certainement pas que quelqu'un me juge sur ma maison.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Dusseault, vous avez droit à votre dernière intervention. Comme il y a un autre comité qui s'en vient, je ne vous laisserai pas dépasser beaucoup vos trois minutes. [Français]

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Très bien.

Le président:

Merci.

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Monsieur Francis, j'aimerais revenir sur la connaissance du Sénat et du rôle des sénateurs.

C'est un peu comme pour chacun d'entre nous, lorsque nous choisissons nos employés. Évidemment, il est important de connaître les tâches qui doivent être accomplies pour savoir si le candidat est qualifié pour les faire.

Que connaissez-vous du Sénat? Aviez-vous rencontré des sénateurs, vu des débats du Sénat ou participé à de tels débats avant votre nomination? [Traduction]

M. Brian Francis:

J'ai rencontré des sénateurs dans ma province auparavant. Je n'ai jamais participé à un débat du Sénat. Je sais que le Sénat est une institution très importante dans la démocratie canadienne. Ce n'est pas pour rien qu'on l'appelle la chambre de second examen objectif, et je crois qu'il joue un rôle très important dans la démocratie canadienne. [Français]

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Je vais poser essentiellement la même question à M. Vij.

J'aimerais savoir ce que vous savez sur le rôle des sénateurs pour déterminer qui est le mieux qualifié pour occuper ce poste. [Traduction]

M. Vikram Vij:

Encore une fois, j'aimerais mentionner qu'en Inde, on apprend la démocratie. On apprend le rôle que les sénateurs jouent au Sénat. Il est évident que nous comprenions complètement leur rôle. Avant le processus, nous avons tous participé à une séance d'information; tous ceux à qui ce rôle avait été confié. On nous a remis un cartable et on nous a informés de toutes les fonctions des sénateurs et des tâches dont ils doivent s'acquitter, ainsi que de la façon nous pouvions évaluer cela. Si des aspects n'étaient pas clairs, on nous a donné la possibilité de poser les bonnes questions. C'est ce que nous avons fait. À partir des réponses que nous avons obtenues, nous avons pu mener notre mandat à bien.

Je ne connais aucun sénateur personnellement. Et même si j'en avais connu, cela n'aurait pas posé de problème pour moi. J'étais uniquement à la recherche de la bonne personne, avec l'expérience, la compréhension, l'empathie et la connaissance requise du Canada, la meilleure personne pour représenter la Colombie-Britannique. [Français]

M. Pierre-Luc Dusseault:

Je pense que vous avez tous suivi le même processus, en fin de compte. Après votre nomination, vous avez reçu un breffage sur le rôle des sénateurs et sur les tâches qu'ils effectuent, mais vous n'aviez pas nécessairement une connaissance approfondie du Sénat au départ.

(1300)

[Traduction]

M. Vikram Vij:

J'ai suffisamment approfondi la chose. Nous avons été informés et on nous a remis des documents à lire pour avoir une idée du rôle des sénateurs. On nous a remis un livre que nous avons dû lire avant le début du processus et qui parlait du rôle du Sénat. Je l'ai lu et relu pour comprendre ce que l'on attendait de nous. Ce livre a été extrêmement important pour ma compréhension du rôle du Sénat.

Je crois que nous nous sommes tous acquittés de nos fonctions de notre mieux.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

J'aimerais remercier les témoins qui se sont présentés. L'exercice est long; on parle d'un travail de longue haleine. Pendant deux heures, un grand nombre de questions ont été posées.

Merci beaucoup. Nous apprécions réellement la tâche dont vous allez vous acquitter pour le Canada. Nous reconnaissons toutes les qualifications qui sont ressorties pendant cette séance et dans vos biographies. Merci beaucoup.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:43 on November 17, 2016

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.