header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-02-26 RNNR 130

Standing Committee on Natural Resources

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everybody. Thank you for being with us this afternoon.

We have two witnesses. By video conference we have Liza Mack, from the Aleut International Association. With us in the room we have Chief Bill Erasmus, from the Arctic Athabaskan Council.

Thank you both for joining us today.

Chief, I know you travelled a long way. We're very grateful for that.

Each of you will be given 10 minutes to make a presentation, and then we are going to open the table to questions for about an hour. We have time for two full rounds today, so everybody will get lots of opportunity.

I know from our discussions earlier that Mr. Cannings is quite excited about that.

Ms. Mack, I was speaking with Chief Erasmus before you came on the line, and he kindly offered to let you go first, so the floor is yours.

Dr. Liza Mack (Executive Director, Aleut International Association):

Wonderful. Thank you so much.

Good afternoon, everybody. Qam agalaa. My name is Dr. Liza Mack. Qagaasakung for inviting me to speak with you today.

First I want to thank you for my being able to address this body about this very important topic of engaging indigenous communities when it comes to large energy projects.

As I begin, I would like to introduce myself and tell you a little bit about my background and the organization that I represent.

I am the executive director of the Aleut International Association. Aleut International is one of the six permanent participants on the Arctic Council. We represent the Aleut people, who live both in Russia and in Alaska, at the Arctic Council and all of its working groups and expert groups, and with many of their projects.

I was born and raised in the Aleutians. We grew up subsisting and living off the land. Our people are Unangan, or Aleut in English. We often say that when the tide is out, the table is set. We harvest. We preserve. We eat many things out of the tide pools and off the reefs. There's an abundance of seafood that actually sustains our communities. We are a coastal people. We've done this for thousands of generations. Some of the things that we harvest and eat include salmon—all five species—crab, halibut, cod and octopus; marine mammals such seals, whales and sea lions; and terrestrial animals such as caribou. We also eat different migratory birds as well as birds that live in and around our communities.

I left my hometown of King Cove when I was 15 to go to boarding school. This was the start of my education outside of our community. My educational background is in anthropology, cultural anthropology. I have both my bachelor's and my master's degrees in anthropology. Also, I just finished my doctorate in indigenous studies at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Most of the research that I did was with Aleut leaders and fishermen from around the state of Alaska. For my master's research, I analyzed the State of Alaska Board of Fisheries testimonies, and I also interviewed testifiers to see whether or not they felt their testimonies contributed to the regulations that were passed. In Alaska, the management of our resources, and especially fisheries, is sometimes very contentious, and the system is often daunting for people who are unfamiliar with the process.

Part of the reason this is important to the conversation today is that these types of decision-making processes are things that people in local communities around the Arctic need to be involved in as we move forward with some of these projects and some of these regulatory issues.

In my dissertation research, I was working with communities and also with Aleut leaders, and I helped to develop, implement and analyze a survey that had to do with natural resource management laws in Alaska. A lot of these laws actually affect local people in very unique ways. There are a lot of different boundaries, a lot of different guidelines, that people need to be aware of and cognizant of. There are also our cultural practices, the things we've done within our communities for generations. Understanding how these two worlds work together is very important.

Throughout the process of all of my background and research, and all of the things that I've been doing not only in this capacity but also as a researcher and as somebody who is involved with cultural revitalization and language within my community, there have been several issues that I think we could benefit from by mentioning them here.

We're starting to talk about energy projects and how to engage with indigenous communities. As I said, even though I am from the community, and that's where I did my research, there were certainly things that came up that I really hadn't put a lot of thought into until I was in the midst of that.

(1535)



I think you have some of my talking points in front of you. Really, I tend to just talk and not write things down. I hope the little points here are things you guys can see.

A big one was early engagement. Speaking to a community when a project is still an idea is very important. There are different issues about whether or not the community is even interested in projects.

Before I went back to school to pursue my bachelor's, my master's and my doctoral degrees, I worked as the economic development coordinator for the tribal council in my community. Part of that work led me to surveying people to see what kinds of things we were interested in pursuing as a community.

Some of the obvious things that came up were tourism and various things of that nature, but many people in my community weren't actually interested in those. They didn't want a lot of people coming into the community. Just having those kinds of conversations at the onset of some projects is really important and can't be stressed enough.

Also, there's the question whether or not various projects are appropriate. There are people who have different belief systems, and so understanding what is important at the community level is something that I think should also be looked at.

Also, with early engagement we could look at whether some people might be able to help with instruction about whether a plan is actually a good one. Looking at things from maps and other ways in which information is presented when you're starting the planning isn't necessarily the same as accessing the knowledge that is held within a community. A thing isn't going to be accessible just because the project is on, for instance, a flatter part of the topography; you may not know that this is where there are bears or where there's a swamp. Those kinds of things are really important for planning some bigger projects and planning for projects within a community.

The next point concerns communication. To us it would mean speaking with the community members and also being available to answer questions in more than a “check the box” kind of way. It's not just one-way communication, but also communicating and being accessible to not only describe what you see is going to happen but being available for those conversations is concerned. People put a lot of stock in being heard.

This speaks to the next point I noted regarding cultural expectations and whether we're looking at community participation and the resources that are around these projects and the way those resources are going to be affected. I alluded to the way people look at some energy projects. An elder once had told me that he didn't believe that all of the wind farms were actually important. He thought they were disrupting not only the flow of the way the birds were migrating, but other sorts of things like that.

It's just a matter of taking a minute to understand the potential effects. As indigenous people, in our communities we look at things from a very holistic perspective. Everything we do affects all other parts of our communities and cultures. The cultural expectation of what is important to the community is, I think, really important to think about. So is understanding of the goals of the project. Are the goals of the project to increase capacity? Are they to generate income? Are they to reduce the way we are dependent on fossil fuels? Having those goals set out with the community is certainly very important.

When we talk about the goals of a project and how they're going to affect people at the community level and how important it is to engage indigenous communities, one really big thing that we have to think about is that there's a very limited capacity to engage in our communities both financially and in terms of time.

(1540)



Even in my own research, being a very small project, some of the things that came up were that there are very small populations. Within these small populations, there's an even smaller subset of people who are kind of champions in the communities and who are trusted to fulfill leadership roles. People trust them to speak for them at different levels.

It's making sure that is looked at and also supported. By supported, I mean that it's important to give people funding so that they have both the time and the capacity to provide very thoughtful and meaningful engagement with the project.

Finally, the last note I had was that the timelines with these sorts of projects are culturally sensitive. It's understanding, for instance, that our region in the summertime is very busy. That's usually when people go out and do research, and they start building projects and different things. That's also when people are fishing, when the salmon are running. That's when these other things are happening.

As kind of an anecdote, when I was doing my dissertation research in my communities, I had planned to do the surveying in the summer. However, people were just not home. I would call, and people would say they were out berry picking and didn't expect to be home until the next day, or whenever. Unless I was willing to go and pick berries with them.... I mean, it may seem like you're not working or you're not doing what you have set out to do, but those kinds of things are [Technical difficulty—Editor]

I guess I would just say that a lot of these small—

The Chair:

I'm going to have to ask you to wrap up, if you could please, Ms. Mack.

Dr. Liza Mack:

Okay.

Thank you for letting me mention some of these things to you. These are some of the things that I thought about on the importance of engaging with indigenous communities.

I'd be happy to answer questions. Thanks.

(1545)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Chief Erasmus, the floor is yours.

Chief Bill Erasmus (International Chair, Arctic Athabaskan Council):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman, for the opportunity to present to you and have this discussion with this important committee.

I am the Arctic Athabaskan Council's international chair. We also are members of the Arctic Council as permanent participants. We represent approximately 50,000 people in Alaska, the Yukon and Northwest Territories. Generally in Canada we're called Dene, but in the books you'll find that the people in Alaska are called Athabaskans, so we have the name Arctic Athabaskan Council.

I want to focus on the existing agreements we already have that need to be put into practice and confirmed. Especially in Canada, we have, as you know, section 35 in the Canadian Constitution Act, 1982, which solidifies and makes clear that the rights we have are constitutional rights and are separate from the other rights that Canadian people have. Based on section 35, then, they are separate from the Constitution's section 91 powers that the federal government has or the section 92 powers that the provinces have.

The country is based on those three main areas. As such, when we're looking at developing a particular resource, whether it's in Canada or the United States, we have to look at the international instruments we have.

I'm originally from Yellowknife. I'm a member of Treaty No. 8. In the early 1970s, we took the treaties to the Canadian courts. Canada's position was that we may have had rights at one time, but because of the treaties and legislation, our rights were extinguished. The court case proved, in what is commonly called the Paulette case, that indeed we have rights, that they continue to exist. Our treaties were peace and friendship instruments between the Dene and the Crown—Great Britain—and not between Canada and the Dene, because Canada didn't have the authority to enter into treaties at that time.

The judgment also went so far as to say that the rights we have need to be protected by Canada and that we still retain title to our lands, so aboriginal title or Dene title exists. That was in 1973. Those agreements need to be put into practice by you as a government, and we include the opposition parties as part of the government when we talk about government.

With that, the relationship we have is based on trust. It's based on those early agreements. There are other agreements that you need to understand and look at.

There is the Jay treaty of 1794, which was more in the southern part of Canada but included all the tribes of North America and Great Britain and the United States. What it did was it encouraged continued trade, barter and sales across the Canada-U.S. border. Unfortunately, Canada no longer supports the agreement, although the United States does. That's primarily because of the War of 1812, when the U.S. tried to annex Canada, as you know. The whole thinking behind that treaty was to stabilize the economy, and that's what you're thinking about, so I think you have to understand that treaty and look at what the doctrine talks about.

There are other treaties that you need to be aware of. There's a recent court decision from December 2018 dealing with the Robinson-Huron treaty between the Anishinabe and Great Britain. They took the treaty to court, and the judgment came down a couple of months ago, a very important one. It talks about the annuities that the people receive through that agreement, which is an annual payment.

(1550)



The agreement said that the fee would increase over time. It has only increased once since 1874, and it increased from two dollars to four dollars. They took that to court. The judgment came down, saying that the intent was never for that amount to be a stale amount, that it was to be increased. The court agreed to raise the four dollar annuity. To quote an article, “The judge ruled the annuities are to now be unlimited in their scope as they are intended as a mechanism to share the wealth generated by the resources within the treaty territory.” In other words, there is no ceiling on the amount that people ought to get. What's happening now is that these first nations are negotiating with the Crown as to what the increases should look like.

The important aspect here is that these treaties were meant to afford some of the wealth from the land within their territory. It includes the Province of Ontario and the federal government. That whole arrangement now has to get sorted out.

I think you need to look at some of these court cases because it opens up some of the things you're thinking of. I can't provide you all of those answers, but I'll give you some other examples.

The Tla-o-qui-aht land claims and self-government agreement, which came into effect in 2004 after many decades of negotiating, and also the Déline self-government agreement in the Northwest Territories, which was put together in 2016, provides them with opportunities, whole chapters on economics. On international matters the Tla-o-qui-aht agreement provides a whole chapter on how Canada has to engage with them, so it's already spelled out within these constitutionally entrenched agreements. The Nisga'a self-government agreement in the province of B.C. is very similar. The Inuit also have that in the territories. The provincial settings, which are different, set up those arrangements.

There is great concern with the foreign investment promotion and protection agreement, commonly called FIPA, between Canada and China. This agreement gives sweeping authority to companies outside Canada and because of the mechanisms in place to settle disputes, that doesn't give us in Canada the authority we normally would have because of the structure of decision-making. This concerns a lot of our people.

The saving grace—and this is what I think you need to study—is that these original treaties were designed to not only protect indigenous peoples, but to protect everyone in the country. For example, Treaty 11, the last numbered treaty, which was in 1921, goes all the way up to the Arctic coast and beyond into international waters, which essentially settles the question of who owns the Northwest Passage.

Use those agreements to your advantage. That's what they are there for, and I am obviously encouraging you to do that with our people.

(1555)



It's a given that you're looking at this whole economic question with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, UNDRIP. It says that coming into our territories, you need the free, prior and informed consent of our people. I don't think we need to comment much on that.

As for some other thoughts, first, we know that some of our first nations, as Ms. Mack said earlier, really don't have the capacity to do the kind of work they want to do. They're slowly getting to the point where impact benefit agreements now are becoming common, but they're not really dealing with the question of wealth or the ownership of the resource. It's a short means to help the communities. It gives priorities to jobs and so on.

I think what we need to do is assist communities so that they can develop industrial development protocols. If an industry wants to come into a particular territory, the protocol defines who they ought to deal with. Is it the chief and council? Is it the elders council? Is it the tribal council and so on? Then there's a framework that everyone can work within.

I know I'm getting short on time, Mr. Chair, so I'll leave that for now. I can add comments as questions come forward.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you both very much.

Mr. Hehr, you're going to start us off.

Hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary Centre, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Chief Erasmus and Ms. Mack, for being with us today to discuss international best practices, how we can move forward on the duty to consult, and how we engage on energy projects that benefit all concerned.

I'll start with you, Ms. Mack. Given your work with the Arctic Council, can you comment on the differences you may have seen or observed in terms of the different ways in which council members integrate the different voices you're hearing from indigenous people and how they then bring them forward to make decisions on projects on a go-forward basis?

Dr. Liza Mack:

The Arctic Council is consensus-based. Unless there is consensus, it doesn't go forward.

I'm the head of delegation for the Aleut International Association on the Sustainable Development Working Group. A lot of the best practices, including some of the things I kind of touched on, are also reflected in a lot of the Sustainable Development Working Group projects. I think using that as a resource for some of the things you're looking for might be a good place to start. I would suggest them specifically as a working group that represents Arctic people and the human dimension within the Arctic. There are some really good examples there that you could look toward.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

You were mentioning in your discussion with us today that often there are different groups of people within a jurisdiction and that how you engage with them can be a little bit different on many occasions. In your relationship with the Alaskan government and your arrangements there, do they have any formal arrangements that guide their process that are working and that you feel have evolved over time in terms of how that jurisdiction has dealt with major energy projects to benefit both indigenous people and Alaska as a whole?

Dr. Liza Mack:

We have tribal sovereignty here in Alaska. That means that we are recognized. There is a tribal affairs committee that has been just established at the State of Alaska level. Our last governor, Bill Walker, recognized that tribal governments are our governments and so they do have the opportunity to be consulted. That is very important.

There are also Arctic protocols for engaging with communities, which are written down, and they are out there, especially on the north slope. I know there is basically a format, informed consent, as ways they would like to be engaged. Moving forward, I think that's something that we could all look to being more proactive about expanding, and also due diligence as to ensuring we're talking with local people and the governments there.

You're right that there are multiple stakeholders within a community, and so we appreciate your reaching out to us, as Aleut International. We could certainly help you to get a list of other people who should be involved in these kinds of topics. It's a matter of understanding that it's not only one organization that needs to be consulted, but it's a good starting point and it's also a good way to get that ball rolling and make sure people are informed. People do want to be involved, and they do want to have their voices heard and to be reached out to. Sometimes that's all it is. They want to know what's going on and they would like you to ask them specifically.

It's a good place to say that, as an indigenous organization, we don't speak for everybody, but we do have a way of being able to point you in the right direction, so that people feel their voices are heard.

(1600)

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Thank you.

Chief, you mentioned the tricky interlay between section 35 and sections 91 and 92 of our Constitution Acts. In your time working with these different interlays, and our government's nation-to-nation relationship efforts with indigenous people, have you seen on the international stage any other nations that wrestle with this interlay, which are doing it in a proactive, reasonable fashion that you can comment on?

Chief Bill Erasmus:

I think Canada most likely leads in terms of how to deal with indigenous peoples, depending on specific approaches, but then again in some respects we're behind in Canada. If you look at instances in Australia, for example, you'll see they're far ahead in how they deal with national parks. But generally Canada is regarded as a lead when dealing with indigenous peoples, and partly because of the agreements that I referred to. If we followed those agreements, then certainly we'd be the lead internationally.

As indigenous permanent participants in the Arctic Council, we've been able to work closely with the nation states. Generally, the way we look at each other is that we are nation governments, as first nations, indigenous peoples. We are there as nation governments sitting with the nation states. It's, as Ms. Mack said, based on consensus. So we participate to the extent that we can in all the committees and at all levels, and then at the main tables.

A number of the things they have instituted are to recognize us for who we are. Because we've been at the same table now since the mid-1990s, there's a certain trust and a working relationship that we have, which is unique. If you look at some of the ministerial declarations that have been passed—if you go to the website, you'll find all of the information—you'll see there's been a big focus on introducing traditional knowledge, for example, into all of the work of the Arctic Council. That's a huge gain.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Thank you very much, Chief.

The Chair:

Thanks, Mr. Hehr.

Ms. Stubbs.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thanks to both of our witnesses for being here.

I'm going to take a few moments to address something. I hope the witnesses will indulge me. Then I look forward to getting to a couple of questions. Also, in our second round, I can continue to explore these issues with you.

Chair, I need to move a motion, which I'm going to do, calling the minister to appear before our committee to discuss the supplementary estimates. As we all know, we have only one committee meeting left before the government tables its new budget. Given what happened last time, with a lack of commitment for the minister to come here and a last-minute cancellation, making it too late to discuss the supplementary estimates, which resulted in a general conversation about mandates and priorities, I'm certain that every member of this committee will support the motion to have the minister appear.

I know you've been back and forth with the minister. I understand that. I have a sense of when you're hoping he'll be able to be here. However, perhaps by moving this formal motion and with our unanimous support, it will compel the minister to respond to our chair and commit to a time to come here.

It's important because in estimates the minister has committed $1.5 billion from the Department of Natural Resources to the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development for engagement activities related to the Taltson hydroelectricity project to support indigenous engagement. Certainly in the context of our study on this very issue, having the minister appear to discuss it would be top of mind to all government members here.

Of course, the Minister of Natural Resources has also committed over $17 million for the National Energy Board reconsideration and the additional indigenous consultation they're required to do on the Trans Mountain expansion.

It's our view that Canadians obviously deserve to hear how that money is being used and if it's being used, and to ask questions. It's our responsibility to ask the minister questions on behalf of all Canadians, who we represent. If there is full confidence in the Minister of Natural Resources, there should be no hesitation in supporting this motion and calling him to appear, to be accountable for these funds. Of course, that's his duty, certainly in light, too, of the ongoing uncertainty around the Trans Mountain expansion and in the context of the recent report from the NEB, which was the longest, costliest and most redundant option that the minister chose after the Federal Court of Appeal ruling.

Also, in the context of the Liberal cabinet, it already seems to be indicating that they might take longer than the 90 days after the NEB report to make another decision and recommendation on the Trans Mountain expansion that now all Canadians own because of the Prime Minister's decisions.

I would expect that every member of this committee would vote yes to having the minister here as soon as possible. Of course, I would think, if any member does vote no, it would reflect a lack of confidence in the Minister of Natural Resources in an attempt to block him from coming here to be accountable to Canadians.

Therefore, I move

: That, pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), the Standing Committee on Natural Resources request the Minister of Natural Resources, and representatives from the National Energy Board appear, at their earliest possible convenience, on the Supplementary Estimates (B); and that this meeting be televised.

(1605)

The Chair:

Thank you.

As you know from previous meetings and a discussion I had with your colleague before we started today, I've already extended the invitation to the minister to come. I did that when you first raised it two weeks ago.

As you also know, we're only sitting for one week in the month of March. He is more than willing to attend the committee, which he has indicated in the past by appearing, as has the previous minister, every single time they've been invited. It's simply a matter of scheduling.

As soon as I get a date, you will be high on my list of people who find out after I do. He's prepared to come as soon as he's available, but because of our sitting schedule, it's a bit of a challenge.

I don't know if you want to vote on it or not. I don't know that we need to. I think everybody is agreed—

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Yes, I would like to vote on it.

The Chair:

Okay, then.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Exactly to your point, the points you just made are actually what I spoke to in the beginning, before I moved my motion.

The Chair:

Okay, so the answer is yes.

Let me finish.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

I'm aware of all that, but we don't seem to be making progress in getting an answer, so I'm hoping this will help compel the minister.

The Chair:

He's going to come; it's just a matter of when, whether we vote on it or not.

With respect to the second part of your motion, that the National Energy Board appear, they were just here as a witness on this study a few weeks ago. I don't know that there's any need to have them back.

If there are further questions you have for them, we can probably send them to them in writing.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

No, there is a need to have them here specifically on the line item in the supplementary estimates that is the allotment of the funding that goes to the National Energy Board for the reconsideration of the Trans Mountain expansion.

(1610)

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Whalen and Mr. Hehr, you both indicated interest in speaking.

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.):

My concern wasn't about who comes to talk about the estimates. It may be that it's after the budget. I don't know if we want to add the estimates and the budget.

As to whether or not the meeting gets televised, there are lots of committees that are trying to do that around this time of year. If our concern is trying to schedule that, I'd like a sense from Ms. Stubbs on whether that means we continue to defer it until a television slot is available, or whether that not be the consideration, but we try to get it if it's available. I know the citizenship and immigration committee is always trying to be televised; all the committees are.

My primary concern about the location of the room isn't whether or not television service is available, but that everyone can get there in a timely fashion after our votes following question period. I would prefer it be in this building. I'm not sure if any of the rooms in this building are television equipped.

The Chair:

Room 225 is television equipped.

I think there would be the additional problem of getting both somebody from the NEB and the minister here on the same date.

Mr. Hehr.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Of course, you want the minister to come and you'll extend that invitation. We just had the National Energy Board here, and I'm certain they could be contacted with any questions we have at this table. I don't really see the necessity of inviting them back at this time.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Can we bump this to the end of the meeting so we can deal with the witnesses?

The Chair:

Just so the witnesses are aware, Ms. Stubbs served notice of motion prior to today, and she's entitled to introduce the motion now. We're going to get back to you momentarily.

Ms. Stubbs, would you consider deferring this discussion until the end of the meeting so that we can continue with the witnesses? We'll set aside some time. The meeting's scheduled to run until five o'clock, and I think we'll finish before that, which will give us time to deal with it.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Sure, I'm fine with doing that.

The Chair:

On that note, the floor is still yours to ask questions.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Great. How much time do I have left?

The Chair:

You have six minutes.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Thank you.

The Chair:

I'm giving you extra time.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Thanks, I appreciate that.

Thank you to both of the witnesses for being here and for your testimony as we consider international best practices for engaging indigenous communities, particularly in Canada's context, with the challenges around indigenous consultation on major energy and other natural resource projects.

I wonder if each of you might be able to shed some light on a challenge relating to indigenous engagement on energy projects when it comes to who exactly would be the decision-makers or the ideal people at the table with the government representative, the government representative being one who has decision-making authority and can make reasonable accommodations based on concerns and feedback from indigenous communities.

I raise this because there have been a couple of examples recently that we heard about in this committee, for example, with the Lax Kw'alaams on the north coast of B.C., whose elected leaders had supported the establishment of an LNG project there. There were also individuals who claimed to be hereditary leaders of the community, and their perspective, which they certainly had a right to express, was opposed to the potential LNG project that the elected leaders supported. They claimed to be representatives of the band, and they opposed the LNG project against the will of the elected leadership. That matter was later settled in court, where a judge ruled that the person was not, in fact, a hereditary leader.

Sometimes there are differences in the Canadian context. For example, at this committee we've had representatives of the Assembly of First Nations come here to attempt to give an overarching perspective on behalf of indigenous communities, but there are many representatives of individual indigenous communities who say the representatives of the AFN don't speak for them or don't necessarily reflect their views or positions.

Chief Erasmus and Dr. Mack, do you have any feedback for us on how to sort through the complications with regard to who should be consulted with and who should be making the ultimate decisions in that consultation process?

Dr. Mack, Chief Erasmus is giving you the green light to go first.

(1615)

Dr. Liza Mack:

Thank you very much for the question. It's an important question. It's something that we deal with not only when we're talking about large energy projects, but also when we're talking about research and when we're talking about infrastructure within our communities, as to what's best.

I mentioned that in the past, I was doing economic development work in my community and also doing research in my community. It's a fine line. There are differences. There are the principles for conduct of research in the Arctic, and then within that, there are guidelines about ways to engage.

When we think about that, in Alaska, generally speaking, I would defer to my tribal council and the people who are elected leaders. You are going to have differing opinions. That speaks to giving yourself enough time to collect information to make an informed decision. That goes to the things I mentioned earlier, communication, early engagement and understanding the goals and the capacity you have within a community so that you get a holistic understanding of not only the cultural context, but also what's important economically.

In my hometown of King Cove, we have two energy projects. Ours was one of the first hydroelectric projects in all of Alaska to come on board. We've since put in a second one, so we've had some experience with this kind of thing.

As we talked about prior, on opening up the outer continental shelf, there were certainly two different sides and opposing views of how that should work and whether that should even happen. Being a coastal fishing community, and that being the cornerstone of our culture, of course there were people who did not think that was a good idea, and there were people who did. I think that it speaks to due diligence and making sure that you have the financial support to engage in those communities to feel it out for yourself and feel it out for what that project is.

In Alaska I would defer to my tribal leaders, and I would also talk to the leaders of the corporations to see that they also represent us as indigenous people. I would give yourselves enough time to talk to everybody to see what's important, as every community is different.

The Chair:

Thanks.

If you have a brief comment, you can make it.

Chief Bill Erasmus:

Thank you.

In Canada, at the pace we're going, it's going to take a long time to settle all of the outstanding differences between the first nations and the Crown. It takes decades to negotiate agreements, because Canada doesn't want to recognize the rights that we have within the Constitution.

That's why I was alluding to, in the meantime, developing protocols. You need to assist the communities so that they can develop the protocol that makes it really clear who is in charge. Who do you deal with and what is the process for them to come to agreement? In our instance, for example, we're organized by families. If you develop a land use plan over our territory, it will include all of our families, and our families then have to have a say as to how it ought to be developed. If someone wants to come in with a project, it has to meet the criteria within the land use plan.

I think that's the best way to look at it.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Cannings.

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP):

Thank you, both, for being here today. It's been very interesting, as usual.

I'll start with Chief Erasmus.

It's great to have you here today. I wonder if I could take advantage of your long standing in these matters to get a sense of the historical context. Specifically, I am curious about the role the Berger inquiry might have played both as an early example of how indigenous engagement could and perhaps should proceed, also how engagement like that affects in the long term the capacity of communities to deal with these issues and perhaps what we need to do more in that regard.

I know the Berger inquiry went to each village, used indigenous languages and things like that.

(1620)

Chief Bill Erasmus:

The Berger inquiry happened in the early seventies in the Northwest Territories and it actually happened because the Liberal government at the time was a minority government. They asked Justice Berger to travel throughout the Mackenzie Valley to speak to the Dene on the future of a potential pipeline. At the end of the day, after hearing everyone, Justice Berger decided that the issue of land claims needed to be dealt with, so he asked for a moratorium of 10 years.

As I said earlier, we still haven't settled. There are five communities out of 30 that have settled since then. That's why I'm saying it's going to take a long time. In the meantime there are ways to deal with the big questions. Those big questions are the following: Who has ownership of the resources? Who is receiving the lion's share of the wealth? Right now the resource revenue sharing goes generally to the federal government and some to the territorial government; very little goes to the first nation.

We can look at those big questions without solving the bigger picture, but I think we need to do that. We owe that to everyone to help stabilize the economy, to help stabilize the political future for all of us. In doing that, it then provides a different context to the whole discussion that takes place because the assumption right now is that Canada owns the resource and they have the right to go in and exploit. That whole question needs to be part of your equation that is looked at.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I'll put another question to you, and perhaps Ms. Mack would like to comment on this as well.

Having issues where there is disagreement either within a first nation's community or between first nations communities, or between nations, and how those issues get resolved, has been alluded to in some of the previous questions. Chief Erasmus, you mentioned talking amongst the different families throughout the territory. We've had examples of this on pipelines. You have a linear resource development project that goes through many first nations, and some are for and some are against.

In the last meeting I brought up an example between Alaska and the Yukon, where you have a first nation in the north coast of Alaska that is in favour of drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The Gwich'in and northern Yukon really rely on those porcupine caribou herds that calve there, so they are very concerned.

I'm just wondering if you have any thoughts on how those disputes or disagreements could and should be settled.

Chief Bill Erasmus:

As said earlier, people within their own territories have a certain degree of legal and political authority which has to be recognized. They also have overlapping interests. You will find that there's more than one community or one tribe that needs to be dealt with in a lot of instances, and each of them work quite differently based on their own historical makeup, so you have to approach them the way they are organized and develop a framework on how to deal with the issues. Don't expect it to get done as quickly as most would like because it is quite complicated. If you really want to develop a positive outcome, then you need to develop that relationship and agree on a process that both parties can follow.

(1625)

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Ms. Mack, do you want to comment on that as well?

Dr. Liza Mack:

Sure. Thank you very much.

I would just like to concur with what Chief Erasmus has already said regarding developing this framework and also creating the dialogue within the communities. I would then also just reiterate what I mentioned earlier on allowing the amount of time that it's going to need to not only gather multiple people's opinions, but to do it in a way that's culturally appropriate and sensitive to their time issues and your time issues. It's allowing the resources of time and funding, and it's also just being open-minded to the ways their communities work. A lot of western approaches to research and collecting information could be different from what they're used to.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Mr. Whalen.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thanks, Chief Erasmus. While thinking about Treaty 8, something tweaked me and I took a quick look online at the Long Term Oil and Gas Agreement between some of the Treaty 8 bands and British Columbia. It seems to be the type of protocol agreement that you're discussing. Doig River First Nation, Prophet River First Nation, West Moberly First Nation in Treaty 8 are within the agreement.

There are also protocols on how others can join. Is this the type of protocol agreement you're talking about? Is it a good example or a failed example? Is this a document we can learn from?

Chief Bill Erasmus:

Thank you for bringing that up. I'm not entirely familiar with the specifics of that agreement, but it looks like they're organizing themselves around that whole concept.

If you look at Treaty 8, it doesn't encompass all of the Treaty 8 area, because Treaty 8 was put into place before Alberta and Saskatchewan were provinces. Alberta and Saskatchewan were part of the Northwest Territories at that time.

There are pre-existing rights that need to be recognized. In other words, you might want to set up a protocol with the whole treaty area, which would now include present-day B.C., the Northwest Territories, part of Alberta and Saskatchewan. We'd welcome that because the tar sands development is in Treaty 8. We don't benefit from it. I won't get into all those details, but we'd be really eager to talk about developing a plan where we could look at getting rid of the tailings ponds.

In this day and age, 2019, there shouldn't be tailings ponds, because they leach into the environment, and they come north. It's proven that there are toxic chemicals like arsenic in the watershed that affect us and go all the way to the Beaufort Sea, which goes into international waters.

We would talk about that. We would talk about resource revenue sharing and how to look at international markets. That is an example and I encourage you to continue looking at it.

Thank you.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

If you familiarize yourself with it and come up with any additional commentary on whether or not it's a good model or a bad model for resource reclamation projects, we'd love to hear your further thoughts.

Ms. Mack, there's a lot in the news lately, with the new President, about the potential for oil and gas development off the north coast of Alaska. I'm wondering to what extent your group is involved and consulted with respect to that type of development.

(1630)

Dr. Liza Mack:

Well, we are not located there. It wouldn't be our indigenous group that you would need to speak to about that, and I wouldn't feel comfortable talking about it. I think that is something you would need to speak to the Inupiat, the Inuit Circumpolar Council, or possibly the North Slope Borough. They are organizations located there that would be better suited to talk about this, as would the Gwich'in Council International, as they are also involved in those conversations.

There was just a hearing here in Anchorage and Fairbanks, and I think this drew a lot of attention and a lot of opposition and people who were there to speak in support of that.

I don't know if you can see over my shoulder, but the map is of Alaska. The area that our organization represents in Alaska goes all the way to Russia. I had mentioned the outer continental shelf when we were talking about resource development. We would certainly expect to be spoken to about those kinds of things and involved in that dialogue. However, the dialogue you're mentioning is something I am not familiar with. It's kind of out of the scope of what we are involved in.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

You mentioned the Inuit Circumpolar Council. Chief Erasmus, you're part of that. To what extent is your organization aware of consultations with indigenous folks on Arctic exploration and drilling and the protocols around it?

Chief Bill Erasmus:

The Arctic Council doesn't get specifically involved in any of that. Those are more domestic matters, like what we're involved in here. We are able to sit down and develop ways to proceed.

I'm thinking about what you said earlier about maybe giving you some examples. Mr. Chair, we could compile some of our thoughts on paper, and present that to you, so that you have that when you compile your final study, and so on. We can come back with some ideas on how you might want to approach all of this.

Thank you.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

I think that would be extremely helpful.

I have a final question for Ms. Mack.

I was just taking some notes. I was trying to glean some best practices in indigenous consultation. If there's something I don't catch here in this little list, maybe you can add to it.

My list includes: early engagement; determine whether a community wants a project; determine whether the community believes that the activity is appropriate; look beyond topographical maps to access indigenous knowledge about the territory itself; make sure the process includes meaningful dialogue, and that people are prepared to speak in a two-way conversation about the project; be cognizant of the fact that the capacity of communities in time, money or talent isn't always there, so you need to offer support in one or more of those areas, or it's not going to be a good consultation. The last note I had was that the timing of the consultation is important, because people are only going to be available in their off-season. When they are working, they're not going to be available to be consulted.

Is there something you would like to add to that short list I put together from your presentation?

Dr. Liza Mack:

No, I think that sums it up very well. I think that does a good job of summarizing the things I was trying get across here.

Yes, thank you very much.

The Chair:

Good.

Mr. Whalen, you're right on time, too.

Mr. Schmale, you have five minutes.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you very much, Chair.

Thank you to our witnesses for appearing today on this very important study.

Ms. Mack, we are discussing the various ways we can include all people in this discussion. I believe in Alaska, if my research is correct, there's an industry-run advisory council that helps to deal with these types of resource projects.

Are you aware of anything like that?

Dr. Liza Mack:

Do you mean a state-run or indigenous-run advisory council?

(1635)

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Yes, that is correct.

Dr. Liza Mack:

No, I'm not familiar with anything like that.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

There is nothing that is industry-run? No? Okay.

I want to pick up where Mr. Cannings left off. I don't think you had a chance to respond to his question about how, when we're talking about land use, the nations or communities are able to have a say. I have the same question that he asked.

What happens when different communities disagree on a project or a path forward? How does it get resolved if there are communities pushing for a project and a few that say no?

Dr. Liza Mack:

It's time. I think you need to take the time to communicate with people. Have those really important, hard discussions. Sometimes, that's what it takes. It's not always comfortable. It's not always easy. Make sure you spend time communicating and listening to those multiple stakeholders, the community leaders and also to the people who are going to be affected by these resource projects. This is important. “Affected” is not a negative word. It can be positive or negative. Make sure you're taking the time to listen, and to go to people where they are, so you can engage with them in a way that's meaningful to them.

I think the framework that you set up is important. Every project is going to be different. Some of the differing views are going to be harder or easier to discuss, depending what you're talking about. My advice would be to make sure you give yourself enough time and resources to listen to the people who are going to be affected by any one project.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I do agree on meaningful consultation. What I'm really trying to understand and wrap my head around is if you have a project, say there are 31 communities that agree with this project and there are a few that don't—fewer than 31, say fewer than five, for example—how do we move forward? How do we say, “Look, the vast majority are in favour of this project?” Say it's a pipeline, for example, and the vast majority are in favour of it, especially the ones who are impacted by that pipeline. How do we move forward with that or do we move forward at all? Who gets the veto? How does that work?

Dr. Liza Mack:

You can't say. There's not a blanket answer for that.

One way forward that I would consider is maybe to take the people who do agree with it and have them go and speak to the people who oppose it to find out why, or what, or whether or not they're ever going to change their minds. Sometimes they won't, and that just has to also be acceptable.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay, I get what you're saying. I'm just trying to get to how we move past that.

Say you have a major resource project worth billions and billions of dollars, and it could supply jobs and opportunity for first nations communities, the province, or the States in your case, or the country as a whole, but there are, in some cases, small groups that oppose it, that may or may not be affected on the actual path of—since we used a pipeline—the pipeline. I just don't know how we move forward with it other than saying, “Well, this project doesn't go forward, and the resource stays in the ground.” I'm just looking to you for maybe a suggestion or two as to how we can move this forward.

The Chair:

You're going to have to look to them a little bit later, because you're out of time.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Already?

The Chair:

Already. I'm sorry.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay. Can she answer?

The Chair:

I'm mindful of the motion, that's all. You know I'm not averse to giving people extra time, but I don't want to go over. That's all.

Mr. Tan.

Mr. Geng Tan (Don Valley North, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Witnesses, I have a couple of questions for both of you.

Our committee has heard from previous witnesses that more and more indigenous communities have created so-called indigenous economic development corporations, also called EDCs, which were mentioned briefly in your presentation, Ms. Mack. What is your view of EDCs? Do you think an EDC can be a major economic driver in indigenous communities? How effective are these corporations?

(1640)

Dr. Liza Mack:

Well, I think it's a bit more complex than just answering whether or not economic development corporations can be effective. The corporations that were started in Alaska were actually started as part of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act which passed in 1971, and so we all, by default, became part owners in the land, as shareholders. It certainly changed the landscape of Alaska. It took a lot of our resources from being community-driven resources to being a fiduciary responsibility to a smaller portion of our population.

That being said, there are varying degrees of what “success” means. Some people and some corporations do have larger dividends, and they've been able to establish a bunch of infrastructure within their communities. Other ones have not been as successful. In some ways, that measurement of success we're talking about is very arbitrary. For one group, it might be one thing, and for another group, it might be something else.

I think there are ways that this has been good, and I think it's arguable that this isn't the right way. To go back to Mr. Schmale's question, it really depends on who you're talking to and what the goals are. That, really, is something else I brought up before: understanding what the goals of a project are in order to make sure the community buy-in is there and understanding what it does for the people who are going to be affected.

I do think that economic development is important in our communities. We have very few resources outside of our natural resources, and so using them in a way that is culturally appropriate and that also ensures we can remain in our landscape is very important. Striking a balance, I think, is certainly what we should keep in mind.

Mr. Geng Tan:

Thank you.

Chief, do you want to add something?

Chief Bill Erasmus:

Yes. Thank you.

The questions are very interesting. I'm going to try to deal with both of those questions in the answer.

I think when you approach the first nations, you have to approach them as a collective. Don't go to them as individual communities or bands, because they're part of a greater collective. I'll give you an example.

As recently as a couple of weeks ago, there was an announcement on Vancouver Island that they have put the proposed LNG facility on hold. The communities in that area gave a huge sigh of relief because what happened was the company came in and dealt with only one community, when there are many, many, many communities. They came in and chose one community to get onside, and then their job was to get everyone else onside. There was this huge discussion going on and people were beginning to dig their heels in and say, “Just a minute. We want to understand all of this and we have a say.” Now that it's on hold, everyone's going, “Thank God.” They can breathe again.

Say this proposal comes back. What they need to do is to go to that whole tribal council, which is the 15 communities, and say, “This is what we're looking at”, and ask them how to go about it, and they'd advise them. Yes, we have—and you'll find this right across the country—corporations in place. They've been well established over the years, but they will not proceed unless the leadership gives them the go-ahead, the political people tell the economic people to engage. Those practices are already in place.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Tan.

Mr. Schmale, are you going to pick up where you left off?

(1645)

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I think so.

Ms. Block?

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC):

No.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

No? Okay. I guess I am.

Thank you, Chair.

Dr. Mack, I know it's been a while. I can give you my question again if you need me to, but I wouldn't mind continuing where we left off.

Dr. Liza Mack:

I think, from what I just mentioned in the last question, it really kind of depends. I would agree with what Chief Erasmus has said as far as approaching people as a collective goes, and I think maybe if you just go in without an assumption about what has to happen that people will probably.... From the way the question has been presented, I feel as though I should only be able to tell you that, yes, this is how to get people to do something, but I think that just going in and also understanding that might not happen is also a possibility. When you come in with an assumption about what should happen in a community, it turns people off from listening to you and wanting to hear your side.

I would just say that I think that going in with a collective approach is a good way to go. Also, it's about understanding those cultural values, and how sometimes it's not about benefiting so many other people with money, I guess.

I don't know what else to talk about. It's really just working with the communities and, I would suggest, talking to people altogether and finding out why they're not supporting it to get to how they might.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I'll ask you one more question and then I'll leave you alone.

What I'm trying to get at is who gets the veto. If 31 communities say that yes, they're good to go and fewer than five that are not affected by a project say, “Not really”, who gets the final say? When do we say, “Yes, we'll move forward”? Would you say the vast minority gets all the power here? Obviously, we want consensus, and we want meaningful consultation. We should all sit down and have the best conversation we can, gather all the information, and present it. But if the ones that are affected directly by, say, a pipeline say yes—there are 31 that say yes, it's a go, and fewer than five say no—what happens? Who gets the veto? Who gets to say no? Do we say no on the fewer than five or do we say yes, that 31 say go?

Dr. Liza Mack:

That's not really something I'm at liberty to answer, and I think it is completely contingent upon—

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I'm just making this up because if we're doing best practices, we want this project to potentially go forward, but who gets to shut it down if we do?

Dr. Liza Mack:

Who is the “we”? This is a conundrum that could go round and round. Without knowing the people involved, that's not something I'm at liberty to answer. It's outside the scope of my expertise.

It's never the same. The veto is never the same. There's not a blanket answer. I get what you're looking for, but that's not something that I can answer in a way that is culturally appropriate. There's no answer. It's completely dependent on each issue.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay.

I'm sorry. I have one small question, and then I'll leave you alone.

If you were one of the five in that scenario, how would you like that to move forward?

Dr. Liza Mack:

I would like to have the people who are supporting it come to me and talk to me about why they support it. I would also like them to ask me why I don't support it and what I would be interested in, in terms of the ways I would like to move forward.

Chief Bill Erasmus:

I was trying to answer it by telling you that the approach is what's important. Deal with the whole collective. You sit all of them down. They all hear the same things. Then they can talk amongst themselves, and they'll develop a way to say yes or no—

(1650)

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Instead of one by one, separately.

Chief Bill Erasmus:

—instead of one by one. You're wasting time and energy, and you may be saying two different things to two different peoples.

If I had a proposal, I'd want all of you to hear it, and I would deal with all of you within this room. You're from your various constituencies, which are all different. It's very similar to us.

If you were a chief in your riding, you would have to deal with all those people you represent. In many ways it's the same. If you dealt with all of them and said, “This is what we would like to deal with, and we want to develop a dialogue with you,” then you can set that up within a framework that includes time, money and so on.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

I gave you a little extra time because I interrupted.

Mr. de Burgh Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Ms. Mack, if I understood correctly, in your opening remarks you said that you completed your Ph.D., so I should be calling you Dr. Mack. I'll go with that. Thank you.

You mentioned the function of the tribal affairs committee in one of your answers earlier on. I'd like to learn a little more about it, its level of power, its authority, its history and where it came from. Could you give us a bit of a background on it, and tell us what it is and what it can do?

Dr. Liza Mack:

It was established, I think, two days ago, so I need to do my research as well.

I know that Bryce Edgmon is the chairperson of that committee, which has just been established at the Alaska State Legislature. All that I know is that it has just been established and it will be working with the State of Alaska.

I apologize for mentioning something that I am not as familiar with as I could be. It's a newly established entity, and I think it's very exciting for that to be happening at the state legislature.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Does it replace anything in terms of structure?

Dr. Liza Mack:

No, it's new.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The Aleut territory goes, as far as you show on the map behind you, to the International Date Line. How does it work with Russia on the other side of that line? I imagine the Aleut people continue through there.

Dr. Liza Mack:

Yes, we do. They speak the Medny Island dialect of Unangam Tunuu. It is actually 17 hours ahead of us, so at 5 p.m. today I have a meeting with my board, which is actually at 1 p.m. tomorrow afternoon for them.

I have four board members in Alaska, and four board members in Russia. It's just a little bit of strategic planning, being able to have discussions with them and making sure we're lining up translators and getting documents back and forth to them in a language they understand.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

They're 17 hours ahead of you but they're right beside you.

Dr. Liza Mack:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. That's interesting too.

I was wondering more about their relationship with Russia. Since we're looking at international best practices, do you know what's actually happening over there?

Dr. Liza Mack:

We know a little bit. We know that a forum is happening in April in St. Petersburg. We have a lot of issues with getting our board members from Russia to different meetings because of visa issues. With the large time zone difference and the difficulties of getting people in and out, it's hard to have a firm grasp on exactly what's happening. Besides the time zone, the communication is pretty limited. There's also the weather in Nikolskoye, which is on the Commander Islands, the very last islands where the Aleuts live. It's pretty bad weather, so they don't get out a whole lot either.

I can't speak to exactly how well their government-to-government relations are with Russia specifically.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's interesting that you mentioned the weather. You talked about the traditional means of living in that area, which I imagine is essential given the supply chains out there. What is the effect of climate change on the communities?

Dr. Liza Mack:

It's been a lot stormier, for sure. We are experiencing a lot of coastal erosion, not only in our region but also I think further north as well. In my hometown just the other day I think the maximum wind gusts were blowing at 80 miles per hour. That happens every few weeks. We've also been reinforcing our shores in places where our buildings and things are.

Yes, it is certainly something that's on the minds of a lot of people, being able to get in and out safely from our communities. No roads connect any of our communities, really. It's by boat or by plane. Not only is it very dangerous, but it's also very costly. It does have both its benefits [Technical difficulty—Editor]

(1655)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My time is up, and so is our connection.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thanks, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Cannings, you have three minutes.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Thank you.

I'll be brief here. I have only three minutes, so I'll ask you both one question.

I think both of you mentioned the idea of capacity, where we have a lot of small communities, especially when confronted with having to deal with resource decisions that affect their communities, who often don't have the capacity to properly assess them. I would like to ask you both in turn about that issue around capacity. How is that improving in Canada? Is that something the government has to take consideration of? Is there something we should be doing to build that capacity?

Perhaps you could start, Chief Erasmus, and then Ms. Mack could comment on that as well.

Chief Bill Erasmus:

Thank you. That's a good question.

In terms of capacity, you'll find that the way our communities work is that they are broken into really two parts. In one you have the thinkers; if those people don't agree to something, then it's not going to work. In the other you have the people who actually do the action; if they don't have the capacity to understand a particular proposal or whatever it might be, then it's really difficult. If in your recommendations you could consider developing a capacity fund that could help communities in these instances, that would really help. There are some things they're doing now in the north where, for example, they've developed funds that they attach to proposals. If the lands are decimated, there's a fund set aside to restore afterwards. That is a big help.

The other thing we have in Canada that you need to be cognizant of is that in the Northwest Territories and Yukon, essentially we're not on reservations. The reservations were never set up as they were in the south. Because of that, we generally lose. For example, when the federal budget comes up, it will say, “for first nations on reserve”. Well, that eliminates us. If it goes to the north, then generally those monies will go to the territorial governments. The first nations are left out. If you would look at us all as if we were all on reservations, that would help us.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Could you comment on capacity issues?

Dr. Liza Mack:

Sure. Thanks.

I know that capacity isn't always about funding. It's also about being able to give people the time to properly engage with the ideas you're presenting and the projects being presented.

The people I talked to in my dissertation research all served on boards and their city councils, all these different things. Usually within a community you have a very small number of people participating in all these things.

For example, I think one man was on four or five boards for about 40 years. Think about all of the things he has had to read, to do and to be involved in, and a lot of those things are volunteer. A lot of times when we're talking about capacity and being invited to go to meetings and to speak on these things, a lot of those things are done out of the kindness of your heart.

When we're inviting people's opinions and for them to be consulted about things, they need to be compensated—and not just compensated because you're giving them good advice or different things, but also to be able to pay for the time they're spending to read reports about impact statements and to be able to do background so they can understand it.

[Inaudible—Editor] is multiple, not just in giving the time but also making sure that we give them the opportunity to give you good advice.

(1700)

The Chair:

We're going to have to stop there.

Thanks, Mr. Cannings.

Chief Erasmus and Ms. Mack, thank you both very much for taking the time to be here with us and contribute to the study. Your evidence is very helpful and I know I speak for all when I say that. I'm very grateful for your joining us. You're both free to go.

I think we can go five minutes longer to finish dealing with your motion, Ms. Stubbs.

You're free to stay and watch, Chief, if you want to, but I can't promise it will be any more exciting than the first time we discussed it. It's up to you.

Ms. Stubbs.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Can we have a recorded vote?

The Chair:

Are we ready to vote on the motion?

Hold on. Mr. Whalen has a question.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

I did ask whether or not it was okay, and if possible, that the meeting be televised. I just want to make it clear that it's more important that the meeting happen and that it be televised. We can't get both. Right now, it seems we could be stymied by the finance committee. It might also want to be televised at the same time as the justice committee. We might not get to it.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

I think you answered it, but go ahead.

The Clerk of the Committee (Ms. Jubilee Jackson):

I did suggest this when it was put on notice. Ultimately, it's up to the whips to decide which committees will be televised during a given time slot. There are a limited number of committees which can be televised at any given time. We could leave it up to the whips to decide. I leave it with you, or amend it, as you wish.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Okay.

The Chair:

If it's amended that way, are you okay with that?

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

No, I prefer not to amend the motion and just have it moved as written.

The Chair:

Okay. So we're voting on the motion as is and we'll have a recorded vote.

(Motion agreed to: yeas, 9; nays, 0 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: There's no further business. We will not be having a meeting on Thursday.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des ressources naturelles

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Je vous remercie d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Nous accueillons deux témoins. Par vidéoconférence, nous entendrons Liza Mack, de l'Aleut International Association. En personne, nous accueillons le chef Bill Erasmus, du Conseil des Athabascans de l'Arctique.

Nous remercions les témoins d'être avec nous aujourd'hui.

Chef, je sais que vous avez fait un long voyage pour venir ici. Nous vous en sommes très reconnaissants.

Chaque témoin disposera de 10 minutes pour livrer un exposé, et nous passerons ensuite aux questions pendant environ une heure. Aujourd'hui, nous avons le temps de faire deux séries complètes de questions, et tous les membres du Comité auront donc amplement le temps de poser des questions.

Selon ce que j'ai entendu plus tôt, cela réjouit beaucoup M. Cannings.

Madame Mack, je parlais avec le chef Erasmus avant le début de l'appel, et il a gentiment offert de vous laisser livrer votre exposé en premier. Vous avez donc la parole.

Mme Liza Mack (directrice exécutive, Aleut International Association):

C'est merveilleux. Merci beaucoup.

Bonjour. Qam agalaa. Je m'appelle Liza Mack. Qagaasakung de m'avoir invitée à vous parler aujourd'hui.

Tout d'abord, j'aimerais vous remercier de me permettre de parler au Comité de cet important enjeu lié à la participation des communautés autochtones dans les grands projets énergétiques.

J'aimerais d'abord me présenter et vous parler un peu de mes antécédents et de l'organisme que je représente.

Je suis directrice générale de l'Aleut International Association. Cet organisme est l'un des six participants permanents du Conseil de l'Arctique. Nous représentons les Aléoutes, qui vivent en Russie et en Alaska, au sein du Conseil de l'Arctique et de tous ses groupes de travail et ses groupes d'experts, ainsi que dans le cadre d'un grand nombre de leurs projets.

Je suis née et j'ai grandi dans les îles Aléoutiennes. Notre peuple vit de la terre. Nous sommes les Unagan ou Aléoutes en français. Nous disons souvent que lorsque la marée est basse, la table est mise. Nous prélevons des aliments et nous les mettons en conserve. Nous mangeons de nombreux aliments que nous prélevons dans les cuvettes de marée et sur les récifs. Nos communautés se nourrissent de l'abondance des poissons et des fruits de mer. Nous sommes un peuple côtier. Nous vivons de cette façon depuis des milliers de générations. Nous prélevons et mangeons notamment du saumon — les cinq espèces —, du crabe, du flétan, de la morue et de la pieuvre, des mammifères marins comme le phoque, la baleine et l'otarie, ainsi que des animaux terrestres tels le caribou. Nous mangeons également divers oiseaux migrateurs ainsi que des oiseaux qui vivent dans nos collectivités et à proximité.

À 15 ans, j'ai quitté ma collectivité, King Cove, pour fréquenter un pensionnat. C'était le début de mon éducation à l'extérieur de notre communauté. J'ai fait des études en anthropologie, c'est-à-dire en anthropologie culturelle. J'ai un baccalauréat et une maîtrise en anthropologie. De plus, je viens de terminer mon doctorat en études autochtones à la University of Alaska Fairbanks.

La plus grande partie de mes recherches ont été menées auprès de leaders et de pêcheurs aléoutes dans l'État de l'Alaska. Dans le cadre des recherches liées à ma maîtrise, j'ai analysé les témoignages entendus par le State of Alaska Board of Fisheries, et j'ai également mené des entrevues auprès de ces témoins pour vérifier s'ils croyaient ou non qu'on avait tenu compte de leurs témoignages dans l'élaboration des règlements qui ont été pris. En Alaska, la gestion de nos ressources — surtout les pêches — est un enjeu parfois très litigieux, et le système est souvent intimidant pour les gens qui ne connaissent pas bien le processus.

Si ce sujet est important pour la discussion d'aujourd'hui, c'est en partie parce que les habitants des petites collectivités de l'Arctique doivent participer à ces types de processus de prise de décisions au fil des progrès réalisés par certains de ces projets et de ces enjeux réglementaires.

Dans le cadre de ma thèse, j'ai travaillé avec des collectivités et des leaders aléoutes, et j'ai aidé à élaborer et à mener un sondage sur les lois liées à la gestion des ressources naturelles en Alaska, et j'ai ensuite participé à l'analyse des résultats. Un grand nombre de ces lois ont des répercussions concrètes et uniques sur la population locale. Les gens doivent connaître de nombreuses frontières et lignes directrices différentes. Il y a également nos pratiques culturelles, c'est-à-dire les traditions que suivent nos communautés depuis des générations. Il est donc très important de comprendre comment ces deux mondes cohabitent.

Tout au long de mes études et de mes recherches, et dans toutes les activités que j'ai menées non seulement dans le cadre de mon rôle actuel, mais également à titre de chercheuse et de participante à la revitalisation de la culture et de la langue au sein de ma communauté, plusieurs enjeux ont été soulevés, et je crois qu'il serait avantageux de les mentionner ici.

Nous commençons à parler des projets énergétiques et de la façon de mobiliser les collectivités autochtones. Comme je l'ai dit, même si je viens de la collectivité et que j'y ai mené mes recherches, on a certainement soulevé des enjeux auxquels je n'avais pas réfléchi de façon approfondie avant d'y être confrontée.

(1535)



Je crois que vous avez reçu une liste de certains des points que je vais aborder. J'ai plutôt tendance à parler sans rien écrire. J'espère que vous pouvez voir ces petits points.

Un point important concerne la mobilisation précoce. En effet, il est très important de parler aux membres d'une collectivité lorsque le projet n'est encore qu'une idée. En effet, plusieurs facteurs déterminent si un projet intéresse ou non les membres d'une collectivité.

Avant de retourner aux études pour obtenir mon baccalauréat, ma maîtrise et mon doctorat, j'ai travaillé à titre de coordonnatrice du développement économique pour le conseil tribal de ma collectivité. Dans le cadre de cet emploi, j'ai mené des sondages pour découvrir les types d'initiatives qui intéressent l'ensemble de la collectivité.

Certaines des réponses étaient manifestement liées au tourisme et aux diverses activités connexes, mais de nombreux membres de ma collectivité ne s'intéressaient pas à ces choses. Ils ne voulaient pas que la collectivité soit envahie par de nombreux visiteurs. Il est très important d'avoir ce type de conversations au début de certains projets. On ne saurait trop insister sur l'importance de cette démarche.

Il faut aussi se demander si certains projets sont appropriés ou non. Différentes personnes adhèrent à différents systèmes de croyances, et je pense donc qu'il faudrait également tenter de comprendre ce qui est important à l'échelle communautaire.

De plus, une mobilisation précoce nous donne l'occasion de vérifier si des personnes peuvent nous aider à évaluer la validité d'un plan. En effet, l'examen de cartes géographiques et d'autres sources d'information au début du processus de planification n'est pas nécessairement la même chose qu'accéder aux connaissances d'une collectivité. Une chose ne sera pas nécessairement accessible juste parce que le projet sera développé, par exemple, sur un terrain plat; il se peut qu'on ne sache pas qu'il y a des ours ou un marais dans les environs. Ces détails sont très importants lorsqu'on planifie un grand projet ou un projet dans une collectivité.

Ensuite, il y a les communications. Pour nous, cela signifie qu'il faut parler aux membres de la collectivité et être disponible pour répondre aux questions de façon approfondie. Il ne s'agit pas de communications à sens unique, car il faut aussi demeurer accessible non seulement pour décrire les différentes étapes du projet, mais également pour participer à des discussions sur le projet, car les gens tiennent à ce qu'on entende leur avis.

Cela m'amène au point que j'ai noté et qui concerne les attentes culturelles, la participation des membres de la collectivité, les ressources liées aux projets et la façon dont elles seront touchées. J'ai fait allusion à la façon dont les gens voient certains projets énergétiques. Un aîné m'a déjà dit qu'il ne croyait pas que les parcs éoliens étaient importants. À son avis, ils interféraient avec le parcours migratoire des oiseaux et d'autres phénomènes semblables.

Il s'agit seulement de prendre le temps de comprendre les répercussions potentielles. Les communautés autochtones voient les choses de façon très holistique. Cela signifie que toutes nos activités ont des répercussions sur l'ensemble de nos collectivités et de nos cultures. Je pense qu'il est très important de réfléchir aux attentes culturelles et aux éléments importants pour la collectivité. Il faut également comprendre les objectifs du projet. Le projet vise-t-il à renforcer la capacité? À générer des revenus? À réduire notre dépendance aux combustibles fossiles? Il est certainement très important d'établir ces objectifs avec les membres de la collectivité.

Lorsqu'on parle des objectifs d'un projet, de leurs répercussions sur les membres de la collectivité et de l'importance de mobiliser les collectivités autochtones, il ne faut surtout pas oublier que ces collectivités ont très peu de temps et de moyens financiers pour participer à ces initiatives.

(1540)



Même dans le cadre de mon propre travail de recherche — un projet de très petite envergure —, l'un des constats était qu'il y a de très petites populations. À l'intérieur de ces petites populations, on trouve une sous-catégorie encore plus petite d'individus qui sont, en quelque sorte, des porte-parole au sein des communautés et à qui l'on fait confiance pour assumer des rôles de leadership. Les gens comptent sur eux pour les représenter aux différents échelons.

Il faut s'assurer que cet aspect est pris en considération et appuyé. J'entends par là qu'il est important d'accorder aux gens les fonds nécessaires pour qu'ils aient le temps et la capacité de participer au projet, et ce, de manière très réfléchie et très valable.

Enfin, le dernier point que j'ai noté, c'est que les délais liés à ces types de projets doivent tenir compte de la réalité culturelle. Il s'agit de comprendre, par exemple, que l'été est une période de grande activité dans notre région. C'est d'habitude à ce moment-là que les gens vont sur le terrain, effectuent des recherches, entreprennent des projets de construction et tout le reste. C'est aussi à ce moment-là que les gens vont pêcher, lors de la remontée des saumons. C'est pendant cette période que ces autres activités ont lieu.

En guise d'anecdote, lorsque je préparais ma thèse auprès des communautés, j'avais prévu de mener des sondages en été. Cependant, les gens n'étaient pas chez eux. Je les appelais, et ils me disaient qu'ils étaient dehors en train de cueillir des baies et qu'ils ne comptaient pas rentrer avant le lendemain, ou peu importe. À moins que je sois prête à aller cueillir des baies avec eux... Là où je veux en venir, c'est qu'on peut avoir l'impression de ne pas travailler ou de ne pas faire ce qui est prévu, mais ce genre de choses sont [Difficultés techniques]

J'ajouterais que bon nombre de ces petites...

Le président:

Je vais devoir vous demander de conclure, si vous le pouvez, madame Mack.

Mme Liza Mack:

D'accord.

Je vous remercie de m'avoir permis de vous parler de certaines de ces questions. Voilà donc mes réflexions sur l'importance de mobiliser les communautés autochtones.

Je serai heureuse de répondre aux questions. Merci.

(1545)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Chef Erasmus, vous avez la parole.

Le chef Bill Erasmus (président international, Arctic Athabaskan Council):

Merci, monsieur le président, de me donner l'occasion de témoigner devant vous et de participer à cette discussion au sein de cet important comité.

Je suis le président international de l'Arctic Athabaskan Council. Nous sommes, nous aussi, membres du Conseil de l'Arctique à titre de participants permanents. Nous représentons environ 50 000 personnes en Alaska, au Yukon et dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest. De façon générale, au Canada, on nous appelle les Dénés, mais dans les livres, vous verrez que les gens de l'Alaska sont appelés les Athabascans. C'est pourquoi notre conseil porte le nom d'Arctic Athabaskan Council.

J'aimerais m'attarder sur les accords que nous avons déjà conclus et qui doivent être appliqués et confirmés. Comme vous le savez, tout particulièrement au Canada, nous avons l'article 35 de la Loi constitutionnelle de 1982, qui indique clairement et résolument que les droits dont nous disposons sont des droits constitutionnels et qu'ils sont distincts des autres droits dont jouissent les Canadiens. Aux termes de l'article 35, ces droits sont séparés des pouvoirs accordés au gouvernement fédéral en vertu de l'article 91 de la Constitution ou de ceux conférés aux provinces en vertu de l'article 92.

Le pays repose sur ces trois principaux domaines. À ce titre, lorsque nous envisageons d'exploiter une ressource particulière, que ce soit au Canada ou aux États-Unis, nous devons également tenir compte des instruments internationaux mis à notre disposition.

Je suis originaire de Yellowknife et membre d'une communauté visée par le traité no 8. Au début des années 1970, nous avions porté ces traités devant les tribunaux canadiens. La position du Canada était que nous avions sans doute eu des droits à un moment donné, mais qu'en raison des traités et des lois, nos droits avaient été abolis. La décision rendue dans ce qu'on appelle communément l'affaire Paulette a permis de prouver que nous avons bel et bien des droits et que ceux-ci continuent d'exister. En effet, nos traités tenaient lieu d'instruments de paix et d'amitié entre les Dénés et la Couronne — la Grande-Bretagne —, et non pas entre le Canada et les Dénés, parce que le Canada n'avait pas le pouvoir de conclure des traités à cette époque.

Dans le jugement, la cour va même jusqu'à dire que nos droits doivent être protégés par le Canada et que nous conservons le titre de propriété sur nos terres; autrement dit, le titre autochtone ou déné est reconnu. C'était en 1973. Ces accords doivent être mis en pratique par vous, le gouvernement, ce qui comprend aussi les partis de l'opposition.

Ainsi, les relations que nous entretenons sont fondées sur la confiance. Elles découlent de ces premiers accords. S'ajoutent à cela d'autres accords qu'il faut comprendre et examiner.

Mentionnons le traité de Jay de 1794, qui visait surtout la région du sud du Canada, mais qui englobait toutes les tribus d'Amérique du Nord, la Grande-Bretagne et les États-Unis. Ce traité encourageait le commerce, le troc et la vente continus entre le Canada et les États-Unis. Malheureusement, le Canada n'appuie plus l'accord, contrairement aux États-Unis. C'est surtout à cause de la guerre de 1812, lorsque les États-Unis ont essayé d'annexer le Canada, comme vous le savez. Ce traité est né de la volonté de stabiliser l'économie, ce qui correspond à votre intention. Voilà pourquoi j'estime que vous devez comprendre ce traité et examiner la doctrine à ce sujet.

Il y a d'autres traités dont vous devez prendre connaissance. Une récente décision judiciaire, rendue en décembre 2018, porte sur le traité Robinson-Huron entre le peuple anishinabe et la Grande-Bretagne. L'affaire a été portée devant les tribunaux, et le jugement rendu il y a quelques mois est d'une grande importance. Il y est question des rentes versées aux bénéficiaires de cet accord, sous forme d'un paiement annuel.

(1550)



L'accord disait que la valeur des rentes augmenterait au fil du temps. Or, le montant n'a augmenté qu'une seule fois depuis 1874, pour passer de 2 à 4 $. Les Premières Nations concernées se sont donc adressées aux tribunaux. D'après le jugement qui a été rendu, l'intention n'avait jamais été d'établir un montant fixe; au contraire, celui-ci était censé augmenter. La cour a donc convenu d'augmenter le paiement de 4 $. Voici un extrait d'un article: « La juge a déclaré que les rentes ont désormais une portée illimitée, car elles sont conçues comme un mécanisme permettant de partager la richesse générée par les ressources situées sur le territoire visé par le traité. » Autrement dit, il n'y a aucun plafond pour le montant auquel ont droit ces Premières Nations. Ce qui se passe maintenant, c'est que ces Premières Nations négocient avec la Couronne pour déterminer la valeur de ces augmentations.

L'aspect le plus important, c'est que ces traités visaient à répartir une partie de la richesse tirée des terres situées sur leur territoire. Cela comprend la province de l'Ontario et le gouvernement fédéral. Il reste maintenant à démêler toute cette entente.

À mon avis, vous devez passer en revue certaines de ces affaires parce qu'elles offrent des pistes de réflexion. Je n'ai pas toutes les réponses, mais permettez-moi de vous donner d'autres exemples.

L'accord sur les revendications territoriales et l'autonomie gouvernementale des Tla-o-qui-aht, qui est entré en vigueur en 2004 après plusieurs décennies de négociation, ainsi que l'accord sur l'autonomie gouvernementale de Déline dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest, qui a été conclu en 2016, contiennent des chapitres entiers sur l'économie pour offrir des possibilités à ces Premières Nations. En ce qui concerne les questions internationales, l'accord des Tla-o-qui-aht comporte tout un chapitre sur la façon dont le Canada doit les faire participer; c'est donc déjà exposé dans ces ententes qui ont un fondement constitutionnel. L'accord sur l'autonomie gouvernementale des Nisga'a dans la province de la Colombie-Britannique est très similaire. Les Inuits ont, eux aussi, conclu un tel accord dans les territoires. Ces ententes sont dictées par les circonstances propres à chaque contexte provincial.

De vives préoccupations ont été soulevées au sujet de l'accord sur la promotion et la protection des investissements étrangers, communément appelé l'APIE, entre le Canada et la Chine. Cet accord confère un pouvoir exorbitant aux entreprises à l'extérieur du Canada et, en raison des mécanismes en place pour régler les différends, il nous prive du pouvoir que nous aurions normalement au Canada, compte tenu de la structure décisionnelle. Cela inquiète beaucoup de personnes dans nos communautés.

Notre planche de salut — et c'est ce que vous devez étudier, selon moi —, c'est que les traités initiaux ont été conçus pour protéger non seulement les peuples autochtones, mais aussi tous les Canadiens. Par exemple, le traité no 11, soit le dernier traité numéroté, qui a été conclu en 1921, couvre une région qui s'étend jusqu'à la côte arctique et au-delà, jusque dans les eaux internationales. Voilà qui règle essentiellement la question de savoir à qui appartient le passage du Nord-Ouest.

Utilisez donc ces accords à votre avantage. Ils sont là pour cela, et je vous encourage évidemment à le faire en collaboration avec nos peuples.

(1555)



Il va sans dire que vous examinez toute la question économique à l'aune de la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones, laquelle précise que, pour entrer dans nos territoires, il faut le consentement libre, préalable et éclairé de nos peuples. Nul besoin d'en dire plus, à mon avis.

J'ai quelques autres observations à faire. Tout d'abord, nous savons que certaines de nos Premières Nations, comme Mme Mack l'a dit tout à l'heure, n'ont pas vraiment la capacité d'effectuer le type de travail qui les intéresse. Les ententes sur les répercussions et les avantages deviennent peu à peu une pratique courante, mais elles ne traitent pas vraiment de la question de la richesse ou de la propriété des ressources. Elles constituent un moyen à court terme d'aider les communautés, la priorité étant accordée aux emplois et à tout le reste.

Je crois que nous devons aider les communautés à élaborer des protocoles de développement industriel. Si une industrie veut s'installer dans un territoire particulier, le protocole définira à qui il faut s'adresser. Est-ce au chef et au conseil? Est-ce plutôt au conseil des aînés ou, encore, au conseil tribal, et ainsi de suite? De cette façon, il y a un cadre à l'intérieur duquel tout le monde peut travailler.

Je sais qu'il ne me reste plus beaucoup de temps, monsieur le président, alors je vais en rester là. Je pourrai en dire plus durant la période des questions.

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Hehr, c'est vous qui ouvrez le bal.

L’hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary-Centre, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, chef Erasmus et madame Mack, d'être des nôtres aujourd'hui pour discuter des pratiques exemplaires utilisées dans le monde, des mesures que nous pouvons prendre pour faire avancer l'obligation de consulter et de nos démarches pour assurer la participation aux projets énergétiques qui profitent à tous les intéressés.

Je vais commencer par vous, madame Mack. Compte tenu de votre travail auprès du Conseil de l'Arctique, pouvez-vous dire un mot sur les différences que vous avez peut-être notées ou observées quant à la façon dont les membres du conseil tiennent compte des différents points de vue des peuples autochtones pour ensuite prendre des décisions en conséquence sur des projets à long terme?

Mme Liza Mack:

Le Conseil de l'Arctique repose sur le consensus. Tant qu'il n'y a pas de consensus, un projet ne peut aller de l'avant.

Je suis à la tête d'une délégation pour I'Aleut International Association au sein du Groupe de travail sur le développement durable. Bon nombre des pratiques exemplaires, y compris certaines des questions que j'ai effleurées, se manifestent également dans beaucoup de projets menés par le Groupe de travail sur le développement durable. Je crois que vous pouvez vous en inspirer dans le cadre de votre étude, et ce pourrait être un bon point de départ. Je vous recommande donc de tenir compte de ce groupe de travail qui représente les gens de l'Arctique et la dimension humaine dans la région. Il y a là de très bons exemples que vous pourriez examiner.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Vous avez dit, dans le cadre de vos observations aujourd'hui, qu'il y a souvent différents groupes de personnes à l'intérieur d'une administration et que la façon de les mobiliser peut varier à bien des égards. Dans vos relations avec le gouvernement de l'Alaska et aux termes de vos ententes là-bas, y a-t-il des arrangements officiels qui guident le processus et qui fonctionnent bien? Avez-vous l'impression que les choses ont évolué avec le temps en ce qui concerne la façon dont l'administration s'occupe de grands projets énergétiques qui profitent aux peuples autochtones et à l'Alaska dans son ensemble?

Mme Liza Mack:

Nous jouissons de la souveraineté tribale ici, en Alaska. Cela signifie que nos droits sont reconnus. D'ailleurs, un comité des affaires tribales vient d'être établi au niveau de l'État de l'Alaska. Notre dernier gouverneur, Bill Walker, a reconnu que les gouvernements tribaux assument notre gouvernance et qu'ils ont donc la possibilité d'être consultés. C'est très important.

Il y a aussi des protocoles pour la mobilisation des communautés de l'Arctique. Il s'agit de protocoles écrits qui visent surtout le versant nord. Je sais qu'il existe, en somme, une formule de consentement éclairé quant à la façon dont ces communautés aimeraient être mobilisées. À l'avenir, je crois que nous pourrions tous envisager d'en étendre la portée de façon plus proactive, en plus de faire preuve de diligence raisonnable pour nous assurer de parler avec les habitants et les gouvernements locaux.

Vous avez raison de dire qu'il y a de multiples intervenants au sein d'une communauté et, à cet égard, nous vous sommes reconnaissants d'avoir communiqué avec notre association. Nous pourrions certainement vous aider à obtenir une liste de personnes qui devraient participer à ce genre de discussions. Il faut comprendre que ce n'est pas seulement une organisation qui doit être consultée, mais c'est un bon début, et c'est une bonne façon de faire avancer les choses et de s'assurer que les gens sont informés. Les gens veulent participer, et ils veulent se faire entendre et être consultés. Parfois, c'est tout ce dont il s'agit. Les gens veulent savoir ce qui se passe, et ils aimeraient que vous leur demandiez directement leur avis.

Il convient de dire qu'en tant qu'organisation autochtone, nous ne représentons pas tout le monde, mais nous sommes en mesure de vous orienter dans la bonne direction afin que les gens aient l'impression d'avoir une voix au chapitre.

(1600)

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Merci.

Chef, vous avez évoqué l'interaction délicate entre l'article 35 et les articles 91 et 92 de nos lois constitutionnelles. D'après votre expérience de travail concernant ces différentes subtilités et à la lumière des efforts déployés par le gouvernement pour établir des relations de nation à nation avec les peuples autochtones, avez-vous observé, sur la scène internationale, d'autres pays qui sont aux prises avec une telle situation et qui s'y prennent de manière proactive et raisonnable? Le cas échéant, pouvez-vous nous dire quelques mots à ce sujet?

Le chef Bill Erasmus:

Je pense que le Canada est probablement un meneur dans sa façon de traiter avec les peuples autochtones — et il a des méthodes particulières pour ce faire —, mais à d'autres égards, il est en retard. Par exemple, l'Australie a une longueur d'avance quant à l'administration de ses parcs nationaux. Il reste qu'en général, le Canada est considéré comme un chef de file en ce qui concerne les peuples autochtones, et en partie à cause des ententes dont j'ai parlé. Si ces ententes étaient suivies, nous serions certainement le chef de file à l'échelle mondiale.

En tant que participants autochtones permanents au Conseil de l'Arctique, nous avons pu travailler en étroite collaboration avec les États-nations. De façon générale, nous nous considérons comme des gouvernements nationaux, en tant que Premières Nations, en tant que peuples autochtones. Nous siégeons là en tant que gouvernements nationaux au côté d'États-nations. Comme l'a dit Mme Mack, cette dynamique est fondée sur le consensus. Nous participons donc dans la mesure du possible à tous les comités et à tous les niveaux, ainsi qu'aux tables principales.

Un certain nombre de choses qu'ils ont instituées visent à nous reconnaître pour ce que nous sommes. Comme nous sommes à la même table qu'eux depuis le milieu des années 1990, une certaine confiance s'est établie et nous avons noué des relations fonctionnelles, ce qui est tout à fait exceptionnel. Si vous examinez certaines des déclarations ministérielles qui ont été adoptées — vous pouvez aller sur le site Web, toute l'information y est —, vous allez constater qu'on insiste énormément sur l'intégration des connaissances traditionnelles dans tous les travaux du Conseil de l'Arctique, ce qui est un gain énorme.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Merci beaucoup, chef.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Hehr.

Madame Stubbs, nous vous écoutons.

Mme Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci à nos deux témoins d'être ici.

Je vais prendre un moment pour parler de quelque chose. J'espère que les témoins ne m'en tiendront pas rigueur. Ensuite, j'aurai quelques questions à poser. Également, je pourrai approfondir ces enjeux lors de notre deuxième série de questions.

Monsieur le président, je me dois de proposer une motion pour demander au ministre de comparaître devant nous afin de discuter du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses. Comme nous le savons tous, il ne nous reste qu'une réunion avant que le gouvernement dépose son nouveau budget. Étant donné ce qui s'est passé la dernière fois — il y avait eu un manque d'engagement de la part du ministre à venir ici et une annulation de dernière minute, ce qui fait que nous avions manqué de temps pour discuter du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses et qu'il a fallu, en lieu et place, avoir une discussion générale sur les mandats et les priorités —, je suis certaine que tous les membres du Comité vont appuyer cette motion pour demander au ministre de venir comparaître devant nous.

Je sais que vous n'avez pas cessé de relancer le ministre. Je comprends cela. Je sais que vous avez une idée du moment où vous aimeriez le voir comparaître. Toutefois, je crois qu'en proposant cette motion officielle — à plus forte raison, si elle obtient un appui unanime —, on obligera le ministre à répondre à notre président et à s'engager à venir nous rencontrer.

C'est quelque chose d'important, puisqu'aux termes du budget des dépenses, le ministre s'est engagé à verser 1,5 milliard de dollars au ministère des Affaires indiennes et du Nord canadien pour des activités de mobilisation visant à stimuler la participation des Autochtones au projet hydroélectrique Taltson. Étant donné la teneur de notre étude, je suis persuadée que tous les députés ministériels ici présents auront à coeur d'entendre ce que le ministre a à dire à ce sujet.

Évidemment, le ministre des Ressources naturelles s'est également engagé à affecter plus de 17 millions de dollars au réexamen que doit faire l'Office national de l'énergie et aux consultations supplémentaires qu'il doit mener auprès des Autochtones au sujet du prolongement du pipeline Trans Mountain.

Nous sommes d'avis que les Canadiens méritent évidemment de savoir comment cet argent est utilisé et, le cas échéant, de poser des questions sur la façon dont cet argent est dépensé. Au nom de tous les Canadiens que nous représentons, il est de notre responsabilité de questionner le ministre à ce sujet. Si les membres du Comité font pleinement confiance au ministre des Ressources naturelles, ils ne devraient pas hésiter à appuyer cette motion pour l'inviter à comparaître et à nous expliquer comment ces fonds seront utilisés. Bien sûr, c'est son devoir, et à plus forte raison si l'on tient compte de l'incertitude persistante qui entoure l'expansion de Trans Mountain et du récent rapport de l'Office national de l'énergie — qui était l'option la plus longue, la plus coûteuse et la plus redondante que le ministre aurait pu choisir après la décision de la Cour d'appel fédérale.

De plus, du côté du Cabinet libéral, on semble déjà indiquer qu'il faudra peut-être plus que le délai de 90 jours normalement prévu suivant la publication du rapport de l'Office national de l'énergie pour prendre une autre décision et formuler une autre recommandation quant à l'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain, lequel, en raison des décisions du premier ministre, appartient désormais à tous les Canadiens.

Je m'attends à ce que tous les membres du Comité votent pour que le ministre soit invité à comparaître le plus tôt possible. Évidemment, je pense que si un député vote non, cela signifiera qu'il y a un manque de confiance à l'égard du ministre des Ressources naturelles et que l'on cherche à l'empêcher de venir ici pour qu'il rende des comptes aux Canadiens.

Par conséquent, je propose: Que, conformément à l'article 108(2) du Règlement, le Comité permanent des ressources naturelles demande au ministre des Ressources naturelles et à des représentants de l'Office national de l'énergie de témoigner, le plus tôt possible, au sujet du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B); et que cette réunion soit télévisée.

(1605)

Le président:

Merci.

Comme vous le savez d'après les réunions précédentes et une discussion que j'ai eue avec votre collègue avant que nous commencions aujourd'hui, j'ai déjà invité le ministre à comparaître. Je l'ai fait quand vous en avez parlé la première fois, il y a deux semaines.

Vous êtes aussi bien consciente que nous ne siégeons qu'une semaine au mois de mars. Le ministre est tout à fait disposé à venir nous voir — ce qu'il a déjà montré dans le passé en comparaissant chaque fois qu'il a été invité, comme l'a fait le ministre précédent —, mais il y a la question de l'horaire.

Quand j'aurai une date, vous serez parmi les premières personnes que j'avertirai. Le ministre est prêt à venir dès que ce sera possible, mais à cause de l'horaire de nos séances, c'est un peu difficile.

Je ne sais pas si vous voulez procéder à une mise aux voix ou non. Je ne sais pas si nous en avons besoin. Je pense que tout le monde est d'accord...

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Oui, j'aimerais que la motion soit mise aux voix.

Le président:

Entendu.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Exactement comme vous l'avez dit, les points que vous venez de soulever sont en fait ceux dont j'ai parlé au début, avant que je ne présente ma motion.

Le président:

D'accord. Alors, la réponse est oui.

Laissez-moi terminer.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Je suis au courant de tout cela, mais nous ne semblons pas faire de progrès dans l'obtention d'une réponse, alors j'espère que cela l'incitera à donner suite.

Le président:

Que nous votions ou non, il va venir. Ce n'est qu'une question de temps.

Pour ce qui est de la deuxième partie de votre motion, c'est-à-dire la comparution de l'Office national de l'énergie, je vous rappelle que nous avons reçu des gens de cet organisme il y a quelques semaines, précisément dans le cadre de la présente étude. Je ne sais pas s'il est nécessaire de leur demander de comparaître à nouveau.

Si vous avez d'autres questions à leur poser, nous pouvons probablement leur envoyer cela par écrit.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Non, il faudrait qu'ils repassent devant le Comité pour qu'on puisse leur poser des questions précises sur le poste du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses où il est question des fonds affectés à l'Office national de l'énergie pour le réexamen du projet d'expansion de Trans Mountain.

(1610)

Le président:

D'accord.

Monsieur Whalen et monsieur Hehr, vous avez tous les deux signifié votre intérêt à prendre la parole.

M. Nick Whalen (St. John's-Est, Lib.):

Ce qui me préoccupe, ce n'est pas de savoir qui va venir parler du budget des dépenses. C'est plutôt le fait que cela pourrait être après le budget. Je ne sais pas si nous voulons cumuler le budget des dépenses et le budget.

Quant à savoir si la réunion devrait être télévisée ou non, disons qu'il y a beaucoup de comités qui essaient de faire cela en cette période de l'année. Le problème, c'est de coordonner tout cela. Alors, j'aimerais que Mme Stubbs nous dise si cela signifie que nous allons continuer de reporter cette rencontre jusqu'à ce qu'il y ait une ouverture permettant la diffusion. Conviendrait-il plutôt de procéder à la réunion de toute manière tout en essayant d'avoir cette ouverture, pour peu qu'il y en ait une? Je sais que le Comité de la citoyenneté et de l'immigration essaie de faire en sorte que toutes ses séances soient télédiffusées. C'est quelque chose que tous les comités recherchent.

Ma principale préoccupation au sujet de l'emplacement de la salle n'est pas de savoir si un service de télévision est disponible ou non, mais c'est de savoir si tout le monde pourra s'y rendre assez rapidement une fois que les votes suivant la période des questions se seront tenus. Je préférerais que ce soit dans le présent bâtiment. Je ne sais pas si l'une des pièces de ce bâtiment est équipée pour la télédiffusion.

Le président:

La pièce 225 est équipée pour la télédiffusion.

Je pense qu'il y a un autre problème. C'est celui de faire venir à la même date quelqu'un de l'Office national de l'énergie et le ministre.

Monsieur Hehr, vous avez la parole.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Bien sûr, vous voulez que le ministre vienne et vous allez l'inviter. Nous venons de recevoir les gens de l'Office national de l'énergie, et je suis certain que nous pourrions les joindre pour leur poser toutes les questions que nous avons à leur poser. Pour le moment, je ne vois pas vraiment la nécessité de les réinviter.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Pouvons-nous reporter ces questions à la fin de la séance, afin que nous puissions entendre nos témoins?

Le président:

Pour la gouverne de nos témoins, sachez que Mme Stubbs a signifié un avis de motion avant aujourd'hui, et qu'elle a le droit de présenter cette motion maintenant. Nous allons revenir à vous dans un instant.

Madame Stubbs, seriez-vous d'accord pour reporter cette discussion à la fin de la réunion afin que nous puissions continuer avec les témoins? Nous allons ménager un peu de temps à cette fin. La séance est censée se terminer à 17 heures, mais je pense que nous aurons fini avant cela, ce qui nous laissera du temps pour nous pencher sur cette question.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Oui, je n'y vois pas d'objection.

Le président:

Cela dit, si vous avez des questions à poser, vous avez encore la parole.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Formidable. Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Vous avez six minutes.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Merci.

Le président:

Je vous accorde un peu plus de temps.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Merci, je l'apprécie.

Je remercie nos deux témoins de leur présence et des témoignages qu'ils nous ont livrés pour étayer notre examen des pratiques exemplaires internationales en matière de participation des collectivités autochtones — notamment en ce qui a trait au contexte canadien — et des défis que pose la consultation des peuples autochtones dans le cadre de grands projets énergétiques et d'autres projets d'exploitation des ressources naturelles.

Je me demande si vous pourriez nous éclairer au sujet d'un problème découlant de la sollicitation des Autochtones lors de projets énergétiques, nommément la difficulté de déterminer qui seraient exactement les décideurs ou les personnes idéales qu'il conviendrait d'inviter à la table avec le représentant du gouvernement, c'est-à-dire avec cette personne qui, au nom de l'État, a le pouvoir de prendre des décisions et des mesures raisonnables en fonction des préoccupations et des observations exprimées par les collectivités autochtones.

Je pose cette question parce que le Comité s'est récemment fait rapporter deux exemples à cet égard. Il y a eu ce cas avec les Lax Kw'alaams, sur la côte nord de la Colombie-Britannique, dont les dirigeants élus avaient appuyé l'établissement d'un projet de gaz naturel liquéfié. Cependant, il y avait aussi des individus qui prétendaient être des chefs héréditaires de cette communauté, et qui étaient opposés à ce projet. C'était leur opinion et ils avaient assurément le droit de l'exprimer. Ils ont affirmé être des représentants de la bande et ils se sont opposés au projet contre la volonté des dirigeants élus. L'affaire a éventuellement été réglée en cour. Le juge a statué que la personne n'était pas, en fait, un chef héréditaire.

À l'intérieur du contexte canadien, il y a parfois des différences. Par exemple, des représentants de l'Assemblée des Premières Nations, l'APN, sont venus ici pour tenter de donner un point de vue global au nom des communautés autochtones, mais de nombreux représentants de ces diverses communautés ont affirmé que les représentants de l'APN ne parlaient pas en leur nom ou ne relayaient pas nécessairement leurs opinions ou leurs positions.

Chef Erasmus, madame Mack, avez-vous des observations à formuler sur la façon de régler les complications découlant du choix des représentants qui devraient être consultés et qui devraient être habilités à avoir le dernier mot lors de ce processus de consultation?

Madame Mack, le chef Erasmus vous prie de bien vouloir commencer.

(1615)

Mme Liza Mack:

Je vous remercie beaucoup de votre question. C'est une question importante. Lorsqu'il s'agit de déterminer ce qu'il y a de mieux à faire, c'est une chose à laquelle nous devons faire face non seulement lorsque nous parlons de grands projets énergétiques, mais aussi lorsque nous parlons de recherche ou d'infrastructures dans nos collectivités.

J'ai mentionné que, par le passé, je faisais du travail de développement économique dans ma collectivité et que j'y faisais aussi de la recherche. Entre les deux, la ligne est fine. Il y a des différences. Il y a les principes qui président à la conduite de la recherche dans l'Arctique, et dans ce contexte, il y a des lignes directrices sur la façon de procéder.

En Alaska, en général, je m'en remettrais à mon conseil tribal et aux dirigeants élus. Il va y avoir des opinions divergentes. Cela signifie qu'il faut se donner suffisamment de temps pour recueillir les renseignements nécessaires pour prendre une décision éclairée. Cela concerne les choses que j'ai mentionnées plus tôt, c'est-à-dire la communication, l'engagement précoce et la compréhension des objectifs et de la capacité dont dispose la collectivité. Il s'agit d'avoir une compréhension holistique non seulement du contexte culturel, mais aussi de ce qui est important sur le plan économique.

Dans ma ville natale de King Cove, nous avons deux projets énergétiques. Notre projet a été l'un des premiers projets hydroélectriques de l'Alaska à être mis en oeuvre. Depuis, nous en avons lancé un deuxième, alors nous avons de l'expérience avec ce genre de choses.

Comme nous l'avons déjà dit, en ce qui concerne l'ouverture du plateau continental externe, il y avait certainement deux points de vue divergents sur la façon dont cela devait fonctionner. On ne s'accordait pas non plus sur le fait que cela devait même se produire. En tant que communauté de pêcheurs côtiers — et la pêche était la pierre angulaire de notre culture —, il y avait bien sûr des gens qui pensaient que ce n'était pas une bonne idée, et il y en avait qui croyaient que ce l'était. Je pense que c'est une question de diligence raisonnable et qu'il faut veiller à avoir l'appui financier nécessaire pour s'investir dans ces collectivités afin de constater par soi-même l'état des lieux et de se faire une idée de ce que ce projet représente.

En Alaska, je m'en remettrais à mes chefs tribaux et je m'adresserais également aux dirigeants des entreprises pour qu'ils voient qu'ils nous représentent aussi en tant que peuple autochtone. Si j'étais vous, je me donnerais assez de temps pour parler à tout le monde afin de voir ce qui est important, car chaque communauté est différente.

Le président:

Merci.

Si vous avez une brève observation à formuler, allez-y.

Le chef Bill Erasmus:

Merci.

Au rythme où les choses progressent au Canada, le règlement de tous les différends en attente qui opposent les Premières Nations à la Couronne exigera beaucoup de temps. La négociation des ententes dure des dizaines d'années, parce que le Canada refuse de reconnaître les droits dont nous jouissons en vertu de la Constitution.

C'est la raison pour laquelle j'ai mentionné la possibilité d'élaborer des protocoles dans l'intervalle. Vous devez aider les collectivités, afin qu'elles puissent élaborer un protocole qui indique très clairement qui est responsable. Avec qui doivent-ils traiter, et quelle est la marche à suivre pour conclure une entente? En ce qui nous concerne, par exemple, nous sommes organisés par famille. Si nous élaborons un plan d'aménagement de notre territoire, il tiendra compte de toutes nos familles, et nos familles auront ensuite leur mot à dire sur la façon dont il devrait être élaboré. Si quelqu'un souhaite mettre en oeuvre un projet, le projet doit remplir les critères définis dans le plan d'aménagement du territoire.

Je pense que c'est la meilleure façon d'envisager la question.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Cannings.

M. Richard Cannings (Okanagan-Sud—Kootenay-Ouest, NPD):

Je vous remercie tous les deux de votre participation à la séance d'aujourd'hui. Comme d'habitude, ces délibérations sont très intéressantes.

Je vais commencer par interroger le chef Erasmus.

Il est merveilleux de vous avoir parmi nous aujourd'hui. Je me demande si je pourrais tirer parti de votre longue expérience dans ce domaine pour avoir une idée du contexte historique. Plus précisément, je suis curieux de connaître le rôle que l'enquête Berger a peut-être joué en tant qu'exemple précoce de la façon dont la participation des Autochtones pourrait ou devrait se dérouler. J'aimerais aussi connaître l'incidence à long terme qu'une participation de ce genre a sur la capacité des collectivités de gérer ces questions, et peut-être savoir ce dont nous avons besoin pour en faire davantage à cet égard.

Je sais que, dans le cadre de l'enquête Berger, chaque village a été visité, des langues autochtones ont été utilisées, etc.

(1620)

Le chef Bill Erasmus:

L'enquête Berger s'est déroulée au début des années 1970 dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest. Elle a eu lieu parce qu'à l'époque, le gouvernement libéral était minoritaire. Les libéraux ont demandé au juge Berger de parcourir la vallée du Mackenzie afin de parler aux Dénés de l'avenir d'un éventuel oléoduc. En fin de compte, après avoir entendu tous les intervenants, le juge Berger a estimé que la question des revendications territoriales devait être réglée avant. Il a donc demandé un moratoire de 10 ans.

Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, nos revendications territoriales n'ont toujours pas été réglées. Seulement 5 collectivités sur 30 ont conclu une entente depuis. C'est la raison pour laquelle je dis que cela prendra beaucoup de temps. Dans l'intervalle, il y a des façons de gérer les questions importantes, qui sont les suivantes: à qui appartiennent les ressources? Qui recevra la majeure partie de la richesse? À l'heure actuelle, les recettes liées aux ressources sont réparties de manière à ce que le gouvernement fédéral les reçoive en général, qu'une partie soit remise au gouvernement territorial et que très peu de ces recettes soient versées à la Première Nation.

Nous pouvons étudier ces importants enjeux, sans résoudre la situation dans son ensemble, mais je pense que nous devons le faire. Nous le devons à tous, afin de stabiliser l'économie et de contribuer à stabiliser notre avenir politique. En faisant cela, nous établirons un contexte différent pour l'ensemble des discussions qui auront lieu, parce qu'en ce moment, le Canada présume que les ressources lui appartiennent et qu'il a le droit de venir les exploiter. L'enjeu dans son ensemble doit faire partie de l'équation que vous examinerez.

M. Richard Cannings:

Je vais vous poser une autre question, et Mme Mack souhaitera peut-être formuler aussi des observations à ce sujet.

Certaines des questions précédentes ont fait allusion à des situations où un désaccord survient au sein de la collectivité de la Première Nation ou entre des collectivités des Premières Nations, et à la façon dont ces problèmes sont résolus. Chef Erasmus, vous avez mentionné le fait de parler aux différentes familles établies sur l'ensemble du territoire. Nous avons eu des exemples de ce processus relativement à des oléoducs. Notamment, un projet de développement linéaire des ressources traverse le territoire de nombreuses Premières Nations, et certaines d'entre elles s'opposent au projet.

Au cours de la dernière séance, j'ai mentionné un exemple qui oppose l'Alaska au Yukon. En effet, une première nation établie sur la côte Nord de l'Alaska s'est prononcée en faveur d'un projet de forage dans la Réserve faunique nationale de l'Arctique. Cependant, les Gwich'in et les habitants du Nord du Yukon comptent vraiment sur les hardes de caribous de la Porcupine qui mettent bas à cet endroit. Ils sont donc très inquiets.

Je me demande simplement si vous avez une idée de la façon dont ces désaccords ou ces différends pourraient ou devraient être réglés.

Le chef Bill Erasmus:

Comme je l'ai indiqué plus tôt, les gens ont un certain degré d'autorité juridique et politique sur leur propre territoire, et cette autorité doit être reconnue. Ils ont aussi des intérêts qui se recoupent. Dans bon nombre de cas, vous découvrirez que vous devez traiter avec plus d'une collectivité ou d'une tribu et que chacune d'elles fonctionne assez différemment, selon ses origines. Vous devez donc les aborder selon la façon dont elles sont organisées, et vous devez élaborer un cadre portant sur la manière de gérer les problèmes. Ne vous attendez pas à y arriver aussi rapidement que la plupart des gens le souhaiteraient, parce que ces situations sont très compliquées. Si vous voulez vraiment obtenir un bon résultat, vous devez établir une relation avec la collectivité et vous entendre sur un processus que les deux parties peuvent suivre.

(1625)

M. Richard Cannings:

Madame Mack, voulez-vous formuler aussi des observations à ce sujet?

Mme Liza Mack:

Bien sûr. Merci beaucoup.

J'aimerais simplement dire que j'approuve ce que le chef Erasmus a déjà déclaré à propos du cadre et aussi de l'établissement d'un dialogue à l'intérieur des collectivités. Ensuite, je tiens à répéter ce que j'ai mentionné à propos de la nécessité de prévoir le temps nécessaire non seulement pour recueillir l'opinion de plusieurs personnes, mais aussi pour le faire d'une façon adaptée à leur culture et attentive à leurs échéanciers et aux vôtres. Il faut affecter les ressources nécessaires en matière de temps et de financement et montrer une ouverture d'esprit à l'égard de la façon dont leurs collectivités fonctionnent. Bon nombre des approches occidentales en matière de recherche et de collecte de renseignements pourraient différer de ce à quoi ils sont habitués.

M. Richard Cannings:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Monsieur Whalen.

M. Nick Whalen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, chef Erasmus. Pendant que je réfléchissais au Traité no 8, quelque chose m'a interpellé et j'ai consulté le Web pour jeter un coup d'œil rapide sur la Long Term Oil and Gas Agreement qui a été conclue entre quelques bandes visées par le Traité no 8 et la Colombie-Britannique. Cela ressemble au type de protocoles d'entente dont vous parlez. Les Premières Nations de Doig River, de Prophet River et de West Moberly, qui sont visées par le Traité no 8, sont signataires de l'entente.

Il y a aussi des protocoles qui expliquent la façon dont d'autres bandes peuvent se joindre à l'entente. Est-ce le genre de protocoles d'entente dont vous parlez? Ai-je trouvé un bon exemple, ou un mauvais exemple? Est-ce un document dont nous pourrions tirer des enseignements?

Le chef Bill Erasmus:

Je vous remercie d'avoir soulevé cette question. Je ne suis pas entièrement au courant des détails de cette entente, mais ces gens semblent s'organiser en fonction de ce concept en entier.

Si vous étudiez le Traité no 8, vous constaterez que l'entente n'englobe pas la zone visée par le Traité no 8, parce que ce traité a été conclu avant que l'Alberta et la Saskatchewan soient des provinces. À cette époque, l'Alberta et la Saskatchewan faisaient partie des Territoires du Nord-Ouest.

Il faut donc que des droits préexistants soient reconnus. Autrement dit, vous pourriez souhaiter établir un protocole pour l'ensemble du territoire visé par le traité, qui comprendrait maintenant la province actuelle de la Colombie-Britannique, les Territoires du Nord-Ouest et une partie de l'Alberta et de la Saskatchewan. Nous accueillerions favorablement cette initiative parce que l'exploitation des sables bitumineux se déroule sur le territoire visé par le Traité no 8, une exploitation dont nous ne profitons pas. Je n'entrerai pas dans tous ces détails, mais nous serions très impatients de parler de l'élaboration d'un plan dans lequel nous envisagerions de nous débarrasser des bassins de décantation.

De nos jours, c'est-à-dire en 2019, il ne devrait pas y avoir de bassins de décantation, car ils contaminent l'environnement, et cette contamination se propage vers le nord. Il est prouvé que le bassin hydrographique contient des produits chimiques toxiques comme l'arsenic, qui ont des effets néfastes sur nous et qu'on retrouve jusque dans la mer de Beaufort, laquelle s'étend jusque dans les eaux internationales.

Nous parlerions de cela, du partage des recettes provenant des ressources naturelles et de la façon d'envisager les marchés internationaux. C'est là un exemple que je vous encourage à étudier encore.

Merci.

M. Nick Whalen:

Si vous vous familiarisez avec cette entente et que d'autres observations vous passent par la tête en ce qui concerne la question de savoir s'il s'agit d'un bon modèle pour des projets de revendication des ressources, nous aimerions entendre ces observations.

Madame Mack, dernièrement, en raison des projets du nouveau président, de nombreuses nouvelles paraissent à propos du potentiel de mise en valeur du pétrole et du gaz naturel au large de la côte nord de l'Alaska. Je me demande dans quelle mesure votre groupe joue un rôle dans ces projets et dans quelle mesure il est consulté en ce qui a trait au type de mise en valeur.

(1630)

Mme Liza Mack:

Eh bien, nous ne sommes pas situés à cet endroit. Ce n'est pas avec notre groupe d'Autochtones que vous devriez parler de cet enjeu, et je ne serais pas à l'aise d'en parler. Je pense que c'est un sujet que vous devriez aborder avec les Inupiat, le Conseil circumpolaire inuit et peut-être le North Slope Borough. Ces organisations exercent leurs activités là-bas et seraient mieux placées pour parler de ces questions, tout comme le Conseil international des Gwich'in, étant donné que ses membres participent aussi à ces conversations.

Une audience vient juste d'avoir lieu ici, à Anchorage et Fairbanks, et je crois qu'elle a attiré beaucoup d'attention — et suscité beaucoup d'opposition — ainsi que des gens qui étaient là pour parler en faveur de ces projets.

Je ne sais pas si vous pouvez voir la carte de l'Alaska qui se trouve derrière moi. La région que notre organisation représente en Alaska s'étend jusqu'en Russie. J'ai mentionné la zone externe du plateau continental lorsque nous parlions de la mise en valeur des ressources. Nous nous attendons certainement à entendre parler des projets de ce genre et à participer à ce dialogue. Toutefois, je ne suis pas au courant du dialogue que vous avez mentionné. Cela dépasse en quelque sorte la portée de nos activités.

M. Nick Whalen:

Vous avez mentionné le Conseil circumpolaire inuit. Chef Erasmus, vous êtes membre de ce conseil. Dans quelle mesure votre organisation est-elle informée des consultations menées auprès des Autochtones au sujet des projets d'exploration et de forage de l'Arctique, ainsi que des protocoles liés à ces projets?

Le chef Bill Erasmus:

Le Conseil de l'Arctique ne participe pas précisément à ces discussions. Ces questions ont un caractère plus national, comme les questions qui nous occupent en ce moment. Nous sommes en mesure de nous asseoir à la table des négociations et de concevoir des façons d'aller de l'avant.

Je pense à ce que vous avez dit plus tôt à propos de la possibilité de vous fournir quelques exemples. Monsieur le président, nous pourrions consigner quelques-unes de nos réflexions et vous les présenter, afin que vous les ayez lorsque vous mettrez au point votre étude finale. Nous pourrions vous fournir plus tard quelques idées de la façon dont vous pourriez aborder toutes ces questions.

Merci.

M. Nick Whalen:

Je pense que cela nous aiderait énormément.

J'ai une dernière question à poser à Mme Mack.

Je viens juste de prendre quelques notes. J'essayais de glaner quelques pratiques exemplaires en matière de consultation des Autochtones. S'il y a quelque chose que j’ai oublié de mentionner dans ma petite liste, vous pourriez peut-être l'ajouter.

La liste comprend les éléments suivants: assurer une participation précoce; déterminer si la collectivité est intéressée au projet; déterminer si la collectivité croit que l'activité est appropriée; mettre de côté les cartes topographiques afin de tirer parti des connaissances des Autochtones à propos du territoire en tant que tel; s'assurer que le processus comprend des échanges constructifs et que les gens sont disposés à participer à un dialogue au sujet du projet; avoir conscience que les capacités des collectivités en matière de temps, d'argent et de compétences peuvent être inexistantes et qu'il est nécessaire d'offrir aux collectivités un soutien dans un ou plusieurs de ces domaines si l'on souhaite que la consultation soit productive. Le dernier point que j'ai inscrit concerne le fait que le choix du moment où la consultation sera menée est important, car les gens ne seront libres que pendant la saison morte. Lorsqu'ils travaillent, ils ne peuvent être consultés.

Y a-t-il quelque chose que vous aimeriez ajouter à cette liste courte que j'ai dressée à partir de votre exposé?

Mme Liza Mack:

Non, je pense que cela résume très bien mon exposé et que vous avez réussi à faire un bon sommaire des points que je tentais de communiquer.

Oui, merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Bien.

Monsieur Whalen, vous vous êtes aussi interrompu juste à temps.

Monsieur Schmale, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je remercie tous nos témoins d'avoir accepté de comparaître aujourd'hui dans le cadre de cette étude très importante.

Madame Mack, nous discutons des diverses façons dont nous pouvons faire participer tous les gens à la discussion. Si mes recherches sont exactes, je crois qu'en Alaska, il y a un conseil consultatif dirigé par l'industrie qui aide à gérer les projets de ressources de ce genre.

Êtes-vous au courant de l'existence d'un groupe de ce genre?

Mme Liza Mack:

Voulez-vous dire un conseil consultatif dirigé par l'État ou par les Autochtones?

(1635)

M. Jamie Schmale:

Oui, c'est cela.

Mme Liza Mack:

Non, je ne suis pas au courant de quoi que ce soit de ce genre.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Il n'y a aucune organisation dirigée par l'industrie? Non? D'accord.

Je veux reprendre là où M. Cannings s'est arrêté. Je ne crois pas que vous ayez eu la chance de répondre à sa question concernant la façon de garantir que les Premières Nations ou les collectivités ont leur mot à dire lorsqu'il est question de l'aménagement du territoire. Je me pose la même question que lui.

Qu'advient-il quand des collectivités sont en désaccord en ce qui concerne un projet ou une voie à suivre? Comment réglez-vous le problème si des collectivités appuient un projet et quelques-unes s'y opposent?

Mme Liza Mack:

C'est une question de temps. Je pense qu'il faut prendre le temps de communiquer avec les gens, d'avoir ces discussions difficiles, mais très importantes. Parfois, c'est ce qui est requis. Ce n'est pas toujours plaisant ni facile. Assurez-vous de prendre le temps de communiquer avec les nombreux intervenants, notamment les dirigeants des collectivités ainsi que les gens qui seront touchés directement par ces projets de ressources, et de les écouter. Cela revêt une grande importance. Le mot « touché » n'est pas nécessairement négatif; il peut aussi avoir une connotation positive. Assurez-vous de vous rendre là où les gens se trouvent et de les écouter, afin de pouvoir vous porter à leur rencontre d'une façon qui leur paraît constructive.

Je pense que le cadre que vous établissez joue un rôle important. Chaque projet sera différent, et certains des points de vue divergents seront plus difficiles ou plus faciles à aborder, selon le sujet dont vous traitez. Je vous conseille de faire en sorte de disposer de suffisamment de temps et de ressources pour écouter les gens qui seront touchés par n'importe lequel des projets.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je conviens qu'il faut que les consultations soient constructives. Ce que j'essaie vraiment de comprendre, c'est comment nous devons procéder lorsqu'un projet est appuyé par, disons, 31 communautés, et que quelques autres s'y opposent, moins de 31, disons moins de cinq, par exemple? Comment pouvons-nous dire: « Écoutez, la grande majorité des communautés sont favorables à ce projet »? Disons qu'il s'agit d'un pipeline, par exemple, et que la grande majorité des communautés y sont favorables, en particulier celles sur lesquelles elle aura une incidence. Comment pouvons-nous faire avancer les choses ou devons-nous même le faire? Qui a le droit de veto? Comment cela se passe-t-il?

Mme Liza Mack:

C'est difficile à dire. Il n'y a pas de réponse unique à cette question.

L'une des solutions qui pourraient selon moi être envisagées serait de demander aux personnes qui sont favorables au projet de parler à celles qui s'y opposent afin de cerner leurs motifs et de déterminer si elles pourraient un jour changer d'avis. Parfois, elles resteront sur leur position, et nous devons l'accepter.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord, je comprends. J'essaie juste de comprendre comment nous pouvons surmonter cet obstacle.

Dans le cas, par exemple, d'un grand projet de ressources dont la valeur s'élève à des milliards de dollars et qui pourrait générer des emplois et des possibilités aux communautés des Premières Nations, à la province ou aux États dans votre cas, ou à l'ensemble du pays, mais auquel de petits groupes s'opposent, qui pourraient ou non être touchés par la construction d'un pipeline, pour continuer avec cet exemple. Je me demande comment nous pourrions procéder sans dire: « Eh bien, ce projet ne sera pas réalisé et les ressources resteront dans le sol ». J'aimerais juste que vous nous fournissiez une ou deux suggestions quant à la façon de surmonter cet obstacle.

Le président:

Vous devrez attendre un peu, car votre temps est écoulé.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Déjà?

Le président:

Oui, déjà. Désolé.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord. Est-ce qu'elle peut répondre?

Le président:

Je veux respecter la motion, c'est tout. Vous savez que je ne suis pas contre le fait d'accorder du temps supplémentaire, mais je ne veux pas dépasser les limites. C'est tout.

Monsieur Tan.

M. Geng Tan (Don Valley-Nord, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai quelques questions qui s'adressent aux deux témoins.

D'autres témoins ont dit au Comité qu'un nombre croissant de communautés autochtones créaient ce que l'on appelle des sociétés de développement économique, ou SDE, que vous avez brièvement mentionnées dans votre exposé, madame Mack. Que pensez-vous de celles-ci? Croyez-vous que les SDE puissent constituer un moteur économique important pour les communautés autochtones? Dans quelle mesure sont-elles efficaces?

(1640)

Mme Liza Mack:

Je pense qu'il ne s'agit pas simplement de déterminer si les sociétés de développement économique peuvent être efficaces. Celles qui ont été lancées en Alaska ont été créées dans le cadre de la Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, qui a été adoptée en 1971 et donc, à titre d'actionnaires, nous sommes tous devenus copropriétaires des terres par défaut. Il ne fait aucun doute que cela a modifié le paysage de l'Alaska. Une part importante de nos ressources qui étaient auparavant gérées par les communautés sont passées sous la responsabilité fiduciaire d'une plus petite partie de notre population.

Cela dit, la signification du terme « réussite » n'est pas la même pour tous. Certaines personnes et sociétés touchent des dividendes plus importants et ont été en mesure d'établir une infrastructure importante au sein de leur communauté. D'autres n'y sont pas arrivées. D'une certaine façon, cette mesure de la réussite est très arbitraire. Certains groupes pourraient la réaliser d'une certaine façon, et d'autres,d'une façon tout à fait différente.

Je pense que la méthode utilisée comporte des aspects positifs, mais on peut également dire qu'elle n'est pas adaptée. Pour en revenir à la question de M. Schmale, cela dépend vraiment de la personne à qui on s'adresse et des objectifs. Cela correspond à autre chose que j'ai mentionné plus tôt: comprendre les objectifs d'un projet afin d'assurer l'adhésion de la communauté et de comprendre les conséquences sur les personnes qui seront touchées.

Je pense que le développement économique est important pour nos communautés. Nous ne disposons que de très peu de ressources en dehors de nos ressources naturelles. Il est donc très important de les utiliser d'une façon qui soit adaptée sur le plan culturel et qui nous permette de préserver notre paysage. Je pense que nous devons toujours tenter d'établir un équilibre.

M. Geng Tan:

Merci.

Chef Erasmus, vous souhaitez ajouter quelque chose?

Le chef Bill Erasmus:

Oui, merci.

Voilà deux questions très intéressantes. Je vais tenter d'y répondre.

Je pense que lorsque vous vous adressez aux Premières Nations, vous devez adopter une perspective collective. Ne vous adressez pas à elles en tant que communautés ou bandes individuelles parce qu'elles font partie d'une collectivité plus large. Laissez-moi vous donner un exemple.

Il y a seulement quelques semaines, il a été annoncé sur l'île de Vancouver que le projet de construction d'une installation de GNL avait été suspendu. Les communautés de cette zone ont été très soulagées d'apprendre cette nouvelle, car lorsque l'entreprise était venue, elle n'avait parlé qu'à une seule communauté, alors qu'il en existe de nombreuses autres. Des représentants étaient venus et avaient choisi une communauté afin d'obtenir son adhésion, et celle-ci devait à son tour convaincre toutes les autres. Cela faisait l'objet d'une grande discussion, et certains commençaient à se camper sur leurs positions et à dire: « Attendez. Nous voulons bien comprendre la situation et nous avons notre mot à dire ». Maintenant que le projet est en suspens, tout le monde se dit: « Dieu merci ». Ils respirent.

Si l'on étudie de nouveau cette proposition, il faudra la soumettre à l'ensemble du conseil tribal, soit aux 15 communautés, et leur dire: « Voici ce qu'il en est », et leur demander comment nous devons procéder. Les membres du conseil fourniront ensuite des avis. Des sociétés ont en effet été créées. Vous en trouverez dans tout le pays. Elles ont été bien établies au fil des ans, mais elles n'agiront pas sans que les dirigeants leur donnent le feu vert, sans que les personnes chargées de l'aspect politique disent aux personnes responsables de l'aspect économique quand elles doivent agir. Ces pratiques sont déjà en place.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Tan.

Monsieur Schmale, vous allez reprendre là où vous vous êtes arrêté?

(1645)

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je pense que oui.

Madame Block?

Mme Kelly Block (Sentier Carlton—Eagle Creek, PCC):

Non.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Non? D'accord. Je suppose que je vais reprendre le fil de mes questions.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame Mack, je sais que j'ai posé ma question il y a un moment. Je peux vous la poser de nouveau si vous le voulez, mais j'aimerais poursuivre là où nous étions rendus.

Mme Liza Mack:

Comme je l'ai indiqué en répondant à la dernière question, je pense que cela dépend de la situation. Je serais d'accord avec le chef Erasmus quand il dit qu'il faut tenir compte de l'ensemble des personnes concernées, et je pense que si on intervient sans présumer savoir ce qu'il doit se passer, il est probable que les gens... À la manière dont la question a été formulée, j'ai l'impression de ne pouvoir répondre autre chose que oui, c'est ainsi qu'il faut procéder, mais je pense qu'il est aussi possible d'examiner la question et constater que ce n'est peut-être pas ainsi que les choses vont se passer. Quand on arrive en présumant savoir ce qu'il devrait se passer dans une communauté, cela décourage les gens de vous écouter et d'entendre votre point de vue.

Je pense qu'il conviendrait d'adopter une approche collective. Il faut aussi comprendre les valeurs culturelles et savoir que parfois, ce ne sont pas les retombées financières qui importent.

Je ne sais quoi dire d'autre. Il s'agit simplement de collaborer avec les communautés et, comme je l'ai proposé, de parler à tous afin de savoir pourquoi les gens n'appuient pas un projet afin de déterminer comment on pourrait les convaincre de le soutenir.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je vous poserai une autre question, puis je vous laisserai tranquille.

Ce que je cherche à savoir, c'est qui a le droit de veto. Si 31 communautés donnent leur accord, le projet peut aller de l'avant, mais si moins de cinq communautés qui ne sont pas touchées par le projet disent « pas vraiment », qui a le dernier mot? Quand peut-on dire qu'on peut aller de l'avant? Diriez-vous que la vaste minorité a tout le pouvoir à cet égard? De toute évidence, nous voulons réunir le consensus et mener des consultations sérieuses, dans le cadre desquelles nous aurions les meilleurs échanges possible, recueillerions tous les renseignements nécessaires et présenterions le projet. Si les 31 communautés directement touchées par le projet de pipeline donnent leur aval, tout va bien, mais si moins de cinq s'y opposent, que se passe-t-il? Qui a le droit de veto? Qui peut opposer un refus? Disons-nous non parce que moins de cinq communautés s'opposent au projet ou disons-nous oui parce que 31 communautés l'approuvent?

Mme Liza Mack:

Je n'ai pas vraiment la liberté de répondre à cette question. Je pense que tout dépend entièrement de...

M. Jamie Schmale:

C'est un cas hypothétique, car si nous nous appliquons des pratiques exemplaires, nous voulons que le projet puisse potentiellement aller de l'avant. Mais qui a le pouvoir d'y mettre un frein si nous le lançons?

Mme Liza Mack:

Qui est ce « nous »? C'est une question épineuse qui pourrait nous faire tourner en rond à l'infini. Si je ne sais pas qui sont les parties prenantes, je n'ai pas la liberté de répondre. Cela ne relève pas de mon champ d'expertise.

Ce n'est jamais pareil; le droit de veto n'est donc jamais le même. Il n'y a pas de réponse universelle. Je comprends ce que vous voulez savoir, mais je ne peux répondre à votre question de manière appropriée sur le plan culturel. Il n'y a pas de réponse. Tout dépend entièrement de la situation.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord.

Je suis désolé, j'ai une brève question, après quoi je vous laisserai tranquille.

Si vous étiez membre d'une des cinq communautés de ce scénario, comment voudriez-vous que les choses se passent?

Mme Liza Mack:

Je voudrais que les tenants du projet viennent me voir pour m'expliquer pourquoi ils le soutiennent. Je voudrais aussi qu'ils me demandent pourquoi je ne l'appuie pas et comment je souhaiterais que les choses se passent.

Le chef Bill Erasmus:

J'essayais de répondre en indiquant que c'est l'approche qui importe. Adressez-vous à tous les intéressés en même temps: ils entendront tous la même chose. Ils pourront ensuite discuter entre eux et trouver un moyen de dire oui ou non...

(1650)

M. Jamie Schmale:

Au lieu de le faire un par un, séparément.

Le chef Bill Erasmus:

... au lieu de le faire un par un. On perd du temps et de l'énergie, et on peut tenir des propos différents à deux personnes.

Si j'avais une proposition, je voudrais que vous l'entendiez tous, et je parlerais à toutes les personnes ici présentes. Vous venez de diverses circonscriptions, qui sont différentes les unes des autres. La situation s'apparente beaucoup à la nôtre.

Si vous étiez chef dans votre circonscription, vous devriez composer avec toutes personnes que vous représentez. À bien des égards, la situation est la même. Si vous vous adressez à tout le monde en leur faisant part de vos intentions et en leur indiquant que vous souhaitez un dialogue, vous pouvez alors vous appuyer sur un cadre qui inclut les questions de temps, d'argent, etc.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Je vous ai accordé un petit peu plus de temps parce que je vous ai interrompu.

Monsieur de Burgh Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Madame Mack, si j'ai bien compris, vous avez indiqué, dans votre exposé, que vous avez obtenu un doctorat. Vous êtes donc docteure, un titre honorable. Félicitations.

Dans une de vos réponses précédentes, vous avez parlé du rôle du comité des affaires tribales. J'aimerais en apprendre un peu plus à ce sujet. Quels sont ses pouvoirs, son autorité, son histoire et son origine? Pourriez-vous nous fournir quelques renseignements pour nous expliquer la nature et le rôle de ce comité?

Mme Liza Mack:

Ce comité a été établi il y a deux jours, il me semble. Je dois donc effectuer mes recherches également.

Je sais que Bryce Edgmon préside ce comité, qui vient d'être mis sur pied par l'Assemblée législative de l'Alaska. Tout ce que je sais, c'est qu'il vient d'être établi et qu'il collabore avec l'État de l'Alaska.

Veuillez m'excuser d'avoir évoqué un comité que je ne connais pas aussi bien que je le pourrais. C'est une entité nouvellement établie, et je suis enchantée que cela se passe au sein de l'Assemblée législative de l'État.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce comité remplace-t-il quelque chose sur le plan de la structure?

Mme Liza Mack:

Non, c'est nouveau.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Selon ce que vous nous avez montré sur la carte derrière vous, le territoire aléoute va jusqu'à la ligne internationale de changement de date. Comment les choses fonctionnent-elles avec la Russie de l'autre côté de cette ligne? J'imagine que les Aléoutes vivent des deux côtés de la ligne.

Mme Liza Mack:

Oui. Ils parlent le dialecte unangam tunuu de l'île Medny. L'endroit a 17 heures d'avance sur nous. Donc, quand je tiens une réunion avec mon conseil d'administration à 17 heures, il est en fait demain 13 heures pour les membres du comité.

Quatre de ces membres sont en Alaska et quatre sont en Russie. Les discussions avec eux exigent une certaine planification stratégique; il faut notamment retenir les services d'interprètes et diffuser les documents dans une langue qu'ils comprennent.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ils ont 17 heures d'avance sur vous, mais ils sont tout près de vous.

Mme Liza Mack:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. C'est intéressant également.

Je m'interrogeais davantage au sujet de la relation avec la Russie. Comme nous nous intéressons aux pratiques exemplaires dans le monde, savez-vous comment les choses se passent dans ce pays?

Mme Liza Mack:

Nous en savons un peu. Nous savons notamment qu'un forum doit se tenir en avril à Saint-Pétersbourg. Nous peinons à faire participer nos membres russes aux diverses réunions en raison de problèmes de visas. Avec la grande différence de fuseaux horaires et les difficultés que les gens ont à circuler, il nous est difficile de savoir exactement ce qu'il se passe. Outre les problèmes de fuseaux horaires, la communication est passablement limitée. À cela s'ajoute la température qui règne à Nikolskoïe, une localité des îles du Commandeur, sur la toute dernière île où habitent les Aléoutes. Le temps y étant inclément, les habitants n'en sortent pas beaucoup non plus.

Je ne peux donc pas dire exactement comment vont les relations intergouvernementales avec la Russie.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il est intéressant que vous évoquiez la température. Vous avez parlé des moyens de subsistance traditionnels dans la région, lesquels sont probablement essentiels, compte tenu de la chaîne d'approvisionnement là-bas. Quelles répercussions les changements climatiques ont-ils sur les communautés?

Mme Liza Mack:

Il y a certainement beaucoup plus de tempêtes. L'érosion côtière est considérable, non seulement dans notre région, mais aussi plus au nord. L'autre jour, je pense que le vent a atteint des pointes de 80 miles à l'heure dans ma ville. Ces vents frappent à quelques semaines d'intervalle. Nous avons en outre renforcé nos rives là où il y a des édifices et des structures.

Oui, les changements climatiques préoccupent certainement bien des gens, qui s'inquiètent de ne pouvoir se déplacer en sécurité entre les communautés. Ces dernières ne sont reliées par aucune route. Les gens se déplacent en bateau ou en avion. Ces moyens de transport sont non seulement très dangereux, mais aussi fort onéreux. Ils ont des avantages [Difficultés techniques].

(1655)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mon temps est écoulé et la connexion est coupée.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Cannings, vous disposez de trois minutes.

M. Richard Cannings:

Merci.

Je serai bref. Comme je ne dispose que de trois minutes, je poserai une question qui s'adresse à vous deux.

Je pense que vous avez tous les deux parlé de la capacité, étant donné que de nombreuses petites communautés n'ont souvent pas la capacité d'évaluer adéquatement les projets, particulièrement quand elles doivent composer avec des décisions en matière de ressources qui ont une incidence sur elles. Je voudrais que vous traitiez de la capacité à tour de rôle. Comment s'améliore-t-elle au Canada? Est-ce un facteur que le gouvernement fédéral doit prendre en compte? Y a-t-il quelque chose que nous devrions faire pour renforcer cette capacité?

Vous pourriez peut-être commencer, chef Erasmus, puis Mme Mack pourra intervenir également.

Le chef Bill Erasmus:

Merci. C'est une bonne question.

Sur le plan de la capacité, vous constaterez que nos communautés fonctionnent en fait en deux parties. D'une part, il y a les penseurs; si ces derniers n'approuvent pas un projet, cela ne fonctionnera pas. D'autre part, il y a ceux qui agissent; s'ils n'ont pas la capacité de comprendre une proposition ou un projet donné, alors c'est très difficile. Si vous pouviez recommander d'envisager l'établissement d'un fonds de renforcement de la capacité pour aider les communautés qui se trouvent dans cette situation, cela serait vraiment utile. Dans le Nord, par exemple, certains constituent des fonds associés à des propositions. Si les terres sont ravagées, des fonds ont été mis de côté pour les remettre en état. C'est très utile.

Sachez en outre que dans les Territoires du Nord-Ouest et au Yukon, nous ne vivons essentiellement pas sur des réserves. Les réserves n'y ont jamais été établies comme elles l'ont été dans le Sud. Voilà pourquoi nous perdons habituellement. Par exemple, quand le budget fédéral est déposé, il indique que les fonds sont destinés aux « Premières Nations sur les réserves ». Si des fonds sont transférés dans le Nord, ils iront habituellement aux gouvernements territoriaux, et les Premières Nations se retrouvent les mains vides. Si vous pouviez considérer que nous vivons tous sur des réserves, cela nous aiderait beaucoup.

M. Richard Cannings:

Pourriez-vous traiter des problèmes de capacité?

Mme Liza Mack:

Volontiers. Merci.

Je sais que la capacité n'est pas toujours une question de financement; il faut aussi pouvoir accorder aux gens le temps d'apprivoiser les idées et les projets qu'on leur présente.

Les gens auxquels j'ai parlé au cours de ma recherche de dissertation ont tous été membres de conseils d'administration, de conseils municipaux ou de ce genre de groupes. Habituellement, très peu de gens participent à ces activités dans une communauté.

Par exemple, je pense qu'un homme a été membre de quatre ou cinq conseils d'administration pendant une quarantaine d'années. Pensez à tout ce qu'il a pu devoir lire et faire, en grande partie à titre bénévole. Bien souvent, quand il est question de capacité et qu'on veut tenir des réunions pour discuter des projets, les gens agissent souvent par bonté de coeur.

Quand on consulte les gens pour connaître leurs opinions, il faut les rémunérer, pas seulement parce qu'ils fournissent de bons conseils ou autre chose, mais aussi pour rendre compte du temps qu'ils passent à lire des rapports sur les énoncés d'incidence et à se renseigner pour pouvoir comprendre le projet.

[Inaudible] est multiple. Il ne s'agit pas seulement d'accorder du temps, mais aussi de veiller à donner aux gens la possibilité de fournir de bons conseils.

(1700)

Le président:

Nous allons devoir arrêter ici.

Merci, monsieur Cannings.

Chef Erasmus et madame Mack, merci beaucoup d'avoir pris le temps de témoigner afin de contribuer à notre étude. Vos témoignages nous sont fort utiles, et je sais que je parle au nom de tous en disant cela. Je vous suis très reconnaissant d'avoir témoigné. Vous êtes libres de partir.

Je pense que nous pouvons prendre cinq minutes de plus pour examiner votre motion, madame Stubbs.

Vous pouvez rester pour regarder si vous le voulez, chef, mais je ne peux pas vous promettre que ce sera plus intéressant que la première fois où nous avons examiné la question. C'est à vous de décider.

Madame Stubbs.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Pouvons-nous tenir un vote par appel nominal?

Le président:

Sommes-nous prêts à tenir un vote par appel nominal?

Attendez; M. Whalen a une question.

M. Nick Whalen:

J'ai demandé s'il était possible que la réunion soit télévisée. Je veux qu'il soit clair qu'il importe plus que la réunion ait lieu et qu'elle soit télévisée. On ne peut gagner sur les deux tableaux. À l'heure actuelle, il semble que le Comité des finances pourrait contrecarrer nos plans, car la réunion que nous voulons téléviser pourrait avoir lieu en même temps que la sienne. Nous pourrions ne pas pouvoir téléviser la réunion.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Je pense que vous avez répondu à cette question, mais allez-y.

La greffière du comité (Mme Jubilee Jackson):

J'ai évoqué cette possibilité quand l'avis de motion a été préparé. Au bout du compte, c'est aux whips qu'il revient de décider quelle séance sera télévisée à un moment précis. Un nombre limité de séances peuvent être télévisées au cours d'une plage horaire. Nous pourrions laisser aux whips le soin de décider. Je vous laisse décider ou je peux modifier la motion, selon ce que vous voulez.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

D'accord.

Le président:

Acceptez-vous de modifier la motion?

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Non, je préfère ne pas la modifier et la proposer dans sa forme actuelle.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous mettons donc la motion aux voix dans le cade d'un vote par appel nominal.

(La motion est adoptée par 9 voix contre 0. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Il n'y a plus rien à l'ordre du jour. Nous ne nous réunirons pas jeudi.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on February 26, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.