header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-02-28 PROC 144

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Vice-Chair (Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC)):

I call the meeting to order.

Good morning, and welcome to meeting 144 of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

Today, as we begin our study of parallel debating chambers, we are pleased to be joined by Sir David Natzler, the Clerk of the United Kingdom House of Commons, who is appearing by video conference from London, and who is retiring.

Congratulations on your retirement, sir.

Thank you, Mr. Natzler, for making yourself available. Please go ahead with your opening statement.

Sir David Natzler (Clerk of the House, United Kingdom House of Commons):

Thank you.

It's a great pleasure for me to be talking to you. I think I did talk to your committee some years ago on the subject of child care.

Today is indeed my last day as a Clerk. This is practically my last hour, and there is nowhere I would rather be.

You've had a paper from us about Westminster Hall. What I thought I would do is just make a few general points, and then I'm happy to answer any questions.

My first point is that 20 years ago when this started, a lot of people thought it was a pretty batty idea. How could the House sit in two places at once? Either everybody would go to Westminster Hall and the chamber would be empty, or nobody would bother to go to the parallel chamber in Westminster Hall. There's no possibility of having votes there, so what's the point of having parliamentary business when you can't come to any decisions that are at all controversial? They thought the thing would be a dead duck.

It wasn't an original British idea, as you probably know and as the memo sets out. It actually comes from our Australian cousins, who'd had a parallel chamber for some years, which we'd observed. It was a straight steal from them. Therefore, if you do take it on, please remember where the parliamentary copyright belongs: It is in Canberra, and you might like to ask my colleague in Canberra for his experiences over a longer period.

Over the last 20 years it has become an absolutely understood part of our parliamentary life here. As with you, we have a lot of members. We have more than you; we have 650. You're all members; many members have speeches and issues they want to raise, and they don't have enough opportunity to do it. Westminster Hall offers them that possibility through a series every week of around 12 debates of different lengths, but most importantly, all of them are answered by ministers.

In other words, it is not a graffiti wall. This is a series of policy issues that are answered by ministers. In the longer debates, the opposition has a slot, as does indeed the second-largest opposition party.

It has also proven a popular space for doing slightly new or different things. It has always been a little more relaxed than the main chamber, partly because it's smaller and partly because of the layout. It was a deliberate decision to lay it out not in the face-to-face style that I know you have and that we have in the main chamber, but in a couple of horseshoes so that there is less of the sense of party. I wouldn't overstate that, but there's less of a sense of party. It's also slightly better lit and less panelled and forbidding, particularly for new members, who often start by making a speech in Westminster Hall before they make a speech in the main chamber. The Speaker allows that, so their maiden speech is in the chamber, but they can, as it were, get used to the idea of speaking in front of colleagues in Westminster Hall.

It's also, on a very domestic note, a good breeding ground for our clerks. Our more junior clerks are in charge there, sitting next to the chair, and both the chairman and the clerks benefit from that.

It has, to my mind, no downsides. There's no real evidence that it sucks people out of the chamber. The two buildings are very near one another. It is true that the chamber retains a type of seniority in that people will have a debate in Westminster Hall sometimes for an hour or 90 minutes, and then a couple of weeks later you hear in the chamber, “Well, we've had a debate in Westminster Hall, but it's time we had a debate in the chamber”, as if that were somehow slightly higher status.

In terms of the debates raised by backbenchers, it has no more or no fewer practical consequences, but there is that inherent pecking order. I'm not sure that's a bad thing. As I say, it has massively increased opportunities for individual backbenchers or groups of backbenchers to have debates heard and answered in reasonable time.

(1105)



I'll add one more thing. We have an e-petition system that you may know about. If more than 100,000 people sign a petition online, it's not guaranteed, but they're given a very strong steer that it is likely to be debated. Those are debated on Monday evenings. It's the only thing we do on Mondays between 4:30 and 7:30 in Westminster Hall.

It is very popular with the public. It's not that they come along, but they watch online in astonishing numbers. It is, of course, a subject they themselves have chosen, an often slightly unexpected one—slightly off centre, if you like. We tell the petitioners that this is when the debate is going to be and that they might want to watch or listen to it, and they do.

In the last few years, I think eight of the 10 most-watched debates in Parliament here have been in fact on e-petitions at Westminster Hall. The most watched was not the debate as to whether we should extend our bombing campaign of northern Iraq into Syria, as you might expect, but a debate, which sounds facetious, on whether we should exclude President Trump from visiting the United Kingdom. He wasn't at that time a president, but that was a very heavily signed petition. Something like, from my memory, 300,000 people watched it, and not just from the U.K., but from literally almost every corner of the world, including southern Sudan, so don't imagine that Westminster Hall, because it doesn't have the main party debates on second readings or report stages of controversial bills, is not of interest to the public.

That's probably enough.

Did you hear all of that?

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Yes. Thank you very much. That was very helpful.

We're excited to have you with us on the last day of your 43 years in office. Hopefully if you come to Canada, you'll visit us. You could probably tell us a lot more. You're welcome to come to our committee.

Thanks, Stephanie, for filling in for me.

We're going to have some questions now to see what we can mine from your 43 years of experience.

Go ahead, Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Yes, and I have a very short period of time to do it, Mr. Natzler.

My name is Scott Simms. I'm from Newfoundland and Labrador. Thank you so much for being here.

I have a couple of specific questions, but before I get into the specifics, I want to ask you about participation rates in the parallel chamber. I've read quite a bit about Australia and the experience in Westminster.

Would you say that since its inception, participation rates have been better than expected, lower than expected, or as expected?

(1110)

Sir David Natzler:

It's very nice to meet you.

I don't think anything in particular was expected, and that's not being evasive.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I understand.

Sir David Natzler:

Most of the debates are in a standard format. A member puts in for a half-hour debate, makes a 15-minute speech, and is then answered by a minister for 15 minutes. The minister is normally accompanied by a parliamentary private secretary—in other words, another member—an unpaid assistant, and/or a whip. However, the party representative from the opposition is not allowed to take part, and other members are not expected to take part. You only expect three members, and it would be unusual if there weren't, and there nearly always have been.

There were some misunderstandings early on with the government—they perhaps didn't take it with the full seriousness that they later realized they should—in that they were either supplying the wrong minister or mentioning that a whip could answer the debates. That was a very brief early misunderstanding, and they're now fully answered by sometimes senior ministers at Westminster Hall.

For the longer debates—and there are about three 90-minute debates and two 60-minute debates a week—other members can be expected to join in, and they do. In the application, the member is meant to show a belief that there are going to be people there, because it is a competitive process to get the slots. When that has happened, there have nearly always been more than enough people to have a decent number of speakers, if I can put it that way.

What we don't do is keep an exact count of who is there for any one debate. We have at times done that—about 10 years ago, I think—and it showed unexpectedly high participation. Members like going there. It's easy to drop in. It's easier, psychologically, to drop in to Westminster Hall than it is to the chamber. You're still meant to be there for the opening speech, but there's slightly less of the atmosphere of going to church, which we still have with the chamber.

I don't know if you have that in Newfoundland, but—

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes, we do. It's my cabin in the woods.

I want to ask you about something brought in that's not part of the Canadian Standing Orders, but it is part of the British. I want to see how it fits with the second chamber, and that is government programming. I believe it was in the 1990s when you programmed the bills. We don't have programming per se. You call it guillotining, I believe, when it comes to a certain debate; we call it time allocation.

When it comes to programming of the bill, when you proceed in the main chamber, will that go over into the second chamber, the parallel chamber, and be part of the debate on the legislation?

Sir David Natzler:

No. The Standing Orders originally conceived that non-controversial orders of the day—that's to say government business, predominantly bills—might be taken in Westminster Hall. In practice, in 20 years it has never happened, and I think it never will.

Two provisions make that inappropriate for anything that's at all controversial and that also requires a decision, which is different from being controversial, and there's a really important distinction.

One is that you can't have a vote. If the question is opposed at the end of the business, if somebody shouts “no” and other people shout “yes”, the chair can simply say, “We can't decide it.” In theory, we remit it to the chamber. In practice, because the business doesn't require any decision, it's just been a take-note debate, in effect, on the motion that this House has considered a particular matter. Only on one occasion has time ever been found to have a pro forma division in the main chamber. In sum, no controversial business is ever put there.

In terms of bills, you're right. Nearly all government bills are now programmed, which means that after second reading there is a motion put to the House, and generally agreed to, that says how long the public bill committee has to look at it—in other words, the date by which it must be reported—and it also usually provides one or, occasionally, two days for the report—that's the consideration stage—back on the chamber. Virtually all bills are programmed.

Guillotining was something slightly different, because it tended to cover how long you would have for second reading as well. We still have that for bills that are introduced in a great hurry and go through all stages in a day. We may be having two next week to do with Northern Ireland. They often come up in a hurry. That's the guillotine. It's a motion that you do before you've even got on to the bills. It's a really interesting point, but it has nothing to do with Westminster Hall.

I just stress that you can have controversial subjects there that can be debated, but they're not decided. You can have a debate on abortion, which is a really controversial subject; or on organ donation, but simply on the motion that this House has considered organ donation. You have a vigorous debate and speeches, but at the end of the day there's no decision expected.

(1115)

Mr. Scott Simms:

Is the parallel chamber used for a lot of the subjects that you just brought up? If I were to say that I want to have a take-note debate on my particular opinion on the backstop for the Brexit situation, would that be done in a parallel chamber? Can I do that, or is it frowned upon?

Sir David Natzler:

You could do that. It wouldn't be frowned upon. We've had quite a lot of debates on that subject.

I should have brought the Order Paper with me. Somebody may be going to get an Order Paper for today. The director of broadcasting has nimble feet—

Mr. Scott Simms:

I hope it arrives before you retire.

Sir David Natzler:

Sorry?

Mr. Scott Simms:

I said that I hope it arrives before you retire.

Sir David Natzler:

Yes, and I have about seven hours.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Sir David Natzler: The source of subject might be more like.... I can tell you what is on, which is much easier than giving notional examples.

It might be a particular education issue in Newfoundland—in other words, a local issue of some national significance—or it might be a national issue, but one that not everybody wants to get passionately excited about, but some people do. There are a range of issues that members want to debate and want to build up interest in, as it were, but don't expect a decision on.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you, sir.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Clerk, for supporting our bow tie Thursdays, which the next speaker was instrumental in starting.

It is Mr. Scott Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Thank you.

Sir David, it's a pleasure to have you with us.

It looks as if the Order Paper just arrived, by the glance you gave to the side. If you need to—

Sir David Natzler:

No. That was because of the reference to bow tie Thursdays. I'm wearing a bow tie and I'm about to go back into the chamber, but it's also the name of the television company that is running this service for us. It's called Bow Tie television. They're terribly pleased to have you on their trailers.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's a little extra service that we offer.

I just want to make sure that I understand this.

As I understand it, from what you said there would never be a vote in the House of Commons on an item of business that had been debated in the parallel chamber. Is that correct?

Sir David Natzler:

This is a technical misunderstanding.

If something is debated in the parallel chamber, the Standing Order says that if, when the chairman puts the question, it is opposed, then it cannot be decided then and there and it stands over to the main chamber. However, there is in fact no provision for putting the question in the main chamber. It's not put automatically. It doesn't just appear on the Order Paper that you have to suddenly vote whether or not the House has considered the matter of organ donation. There would have been no further debate, and it would be a quite pointless vote. Nobody would know whether to vote yes or no. It would have no meaning—although we do have some of those votes sometimes. In this case, we've only ever had it once in 20 years, for a political reason, a bit of a stunt, and it wasn't popular. Members asked why we were voting on it.

It is simply a votable matter. It isn't debated in the parallel chamber. We only have these debates where the House has considered a particular matter.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Regarding the Hansards of the debates that take place in Westminster Hall, how are they recorded?

I know that everything is put online nowadays, but in my head I think of Hansard as a paper document. Would one read through the debates of the day in the House of Commons, and then separately find the debates of the parallel chamber, much as someone would have to search separately if looking for the debates of one of the committees? Why don't you tell me how it's done?

Sir David Natzler:

As you say, there are two forms of publication—well, actually three.

There's the written record, the Hansard, as you say. Then there are the records of Westminster Hall. In this case, the decision has been taken to circulate and print them with the Hansards, the daily parts of the chamber.

Each day, you get your Hansard, and at the back is the full transcript of Westminster Hall, which you would not get of committees on bills or delegated legislation, so it is given that status. It is the sitting of the House. That wasn't uncontroversial and obviously costs a bit extra. However, it's a very interesting point and it shows that it is taken seriously.

Anyone flicking through the Hansard...and obviously, there are still old-fashioned types like me who actually read things on paper and don't necessarily go online. Online, you'd find it as easily as you would the main chamber, but it would obviously be under a separate heading.

The third one is the full audiovisual record, which is streamed and is accessible through parliamentlive.tv, for all proceedings of the House.

(1120)

Mr. Scott Reid:

What would happen if I were to go to the online Hansard to search for a debate using certain keywords? Let's imagine I was looking for “organ donation”.

Sir David Natzler:

It was what, sorry?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm just throwing out organ donation as an example.

Let's imagine that this subject has been debated on one day in the Commons, and on some other day it's been debated in Westminster Hall. Would I use the search same process, and would it turn up results differently?

Sir David Natzler:

It is completely integrated into the proceedings of the House for the purpose of archiving, of transcribing, of recording—everything. It has exactly the same status and therefore is as reachable.

Mr. Scott Reid:

One of the issues that is constantly on our minds in Canada is our century-long and completely unsuccessful battle against excessive partisanship. There was some hope being expressed by members, including me, that a parallel chamber might be a venue where there would be less partisanship than there is in the main House. You made comments indicating that might be a vain hope.

I am wondering if you could indicate whether or not partisanship is in fact lessened in your parallel chamber. If it hasn't been lessened to the extent that it could have been, what suggestions would you have as to how that situation could be improved?

Sir David Natzler:

As ministers say, that's a very good question.

It is still partisan. These are debates sometimes on matters of party controversy, but sometimes not. However, if they are on matters of party controversy, the language will be as strong, the debate will be as vigorous, and the opposition will be as strongly expressed from one side to another as in the main chamber.

There is a slight difference of atmosphere, but one must remember that the end of each day is a half-hour adjournment debate in the chamber, which the whip sits in on but plays no part in. That's really between a member and a minister. That is the format in Westminster Hall, and those have never been partisan.

People have introduced elements of partisanship when members, or indeed the minister in replying, tend to get a rather frosty response, but there is a feeling that here is where you try to put party aside. It obviously depends a bit on the subject. Sometimes you can't, when the subject has been raised in a partisan spirit. Because other members are not present and supporting and encouraging, as it were, it is more like a private match of singles and not one of your ice hockey games where everyone is shouting. The nature of the debate makes it less partisan.

I think people have observed over the years in Westminster Hall a slight relaxation of tone. It's hard to put a finger on it. It's partly because of sitting in the horseshoe. Sometimes, if there are more than five or six, some people will have to sit not definitely on one side or another, whichever party they're from, and might be a little more co-operative in debate. I do urge you to think of the layout of the chamber. I think it makes a huge difference in how people behave, and I am not alone in this. Obviously every behavioural psychologist will tell you it makes a difference. I think it has in Westminster Hall.

I have here the five subjects that are being debated on Tuesday in Westminster Hall.

On the future of Catholic sixth form colleges, there's an hour and a half, meaning quite a lot of people want to join in there. Religious education is highly controversial in some ways, but it will not necessarily be massively one party against another. I suspect there will be people from both parties making similar views, probably in support of their Catholic sixth form colleges.

U.K. relations with Kosovo will be debated for half an hour. That is not a partisan issue.

Investment in regional transport infrastructure will predominantly be people from the opposition complaining that the north of England doesn't get enough, but there will also be one or two from the government side complaining they don't get enough either.

There will be a half an hour on the effect on the solar industry of the replacement of the feed-in tariff. That is something that is critical of the government, because they replaced the feed-in tariff. That again will be non-partisan, in the sense that a Conservative member is raising it, but there may well be Labour members asking to have permission, which they will get, to intervene. The minister will then make a very vigorous defence.

Finally, there will be half an hour regarding the effect of leaving the EU without a deal on public sector catering. I don't understand that. That is probably quite a factious affair.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Sir David Natzler: I do understand. It's about the public procurement directive in public sector catering, including the House of Commons. We have to comply with that, so we aren't allowed a “buy British” policy. However, once we leave the EU, we would possibly be allowed a “buy British” policy, or indeed, if we get “Canada-plus” plans, a “buy Canada” policy.

(1125)

The Chair:

Thank you. That was very edifying.

Mr. Christopherson is next.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you very much for your presentation. It was not only informative but enjoyable.

I wish you all the best in your retirement. As somebody else getting ready to join that club, I wish you a good one.

Sir David Natzler:

I'm sorry to hear that.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Well, I'm not, and neither is my family. All good things come to an end.

I have three questions. I'll outline them, and you can answer them as you feel would be best.

The first one, in no particular order, is about the slots. You said there were x number of speaking spots, or slots. Who fills those?

One of the controversies that we continue to have is the expanding power of whips' offices over individual members. Questions and everything else are preordained by the whip and the Speaker, who in some cases are acting like a traffic cop rather than using their discretion as to who gets to speak. I would be interested in your comments on that.

Two, what changes to your standing orders, as you can recall, did you have to make to bring about the chamber and to find its place in the organization of things?

Lastly, you made reference to the agenda today. I think you said there were five things. How does the agenda get set?

Sir David Natzler:

I'll take one and three together—the agenda-setting and the slots.

The whips in the government have absolutely no power in this at all, so it is in the hands—equivalent to the Standing Order—of the chairman of ways and means, who is the Deputy Speaker. That is not notional, and he exercises the same sort of paternal control that the Speaker exercises over the chamber.

That doesn't mean he's there much of the time. The chairman of ways and means doesn't normally preside in Westminster Hall; other chairs do, from the panel of chairs who do public bill committees, and so on. It is, rather, his baby and not the Speaker's baby; that was the idea 20 years ago.

The actual decision as to how many slots there are is a tricky one, oddly enough. It changes occasionally, but it is decided, ultimately, by the chairman of ways and means; it isn't in the Standing Order.

Currently we have 13 hours. Some longer slots are an hour and a half, and there are some shorter slots, and each day is a mixture of the two. The chairman can vary that, and as the years go by, occasionally they do. We're experimenting now with 60-minute slots, that being the compromise, as you will grasp, between a 30-minute slot and a 90-minute slot.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's very Canadian of you.

Sir David Natzler:

The important thing is that it's not the whips who decide any of this, nor, interestingly, is it the House itself; it is actually the Deputy Speaker.

The subject matter is largely decided by a ballot. You put in a new ballot for a particular slot. You can put in for 30, 60 or 90 minutes, and take your chance on what comes out.

Now, I don't think it's a secret that in addition to being a ballot, there are some informal aspects—what one might call speaker's choices. In other words, some subjects that come out of the ballot are perhaps not entirely through the process of sortition. I don't know how it's done, but the subjects somehow turn up. I think members are able to make a particularly strong case for a subject.

There is also, I think, an informal party balance kept through the week, so that if there are more tickets going into the ballot than there are places, there's a reasonable balance among the various parties as to which member of which party gets which slot. That has nothing to do with the whips. It would simply mean that on a given day, it isn't coincidence that on the Tuesday I spoke of.... Well, we actually have one Conservative and four Labour members, but I don't know who put in or who wanted those particular days. I notice the balance is different the next day. There are three Conservative, one Labour and one SNP member on Wednesday of next week. We don't generally have all the same party, as far as I can see. I've never asked.

The standing order is very simple. In Standing Order No. 10, we just said there shall be...well, you can read it. It wasn't difficult to set it up by Standing Orders, because all the Standing Orders, except those specifically excluded, apply in Westminster Hall. There are a few excluded, which probably are not of interest to you, and I'm sure that Charles Robert will be able to construct one for you. It was partly about the powers of the Chair being potentially slightly different.

The procedures are the same and the conventions are the same. They are about having to turn up at the beginning and come back at the end, how you speak, where you speak from—you speak from your place. If you see what I mean, it wasn't as though we were setting up a completely new style of debating chamber. The powers of the Chair to.... We have time limits now in Westminster Hall, which there weren't originally. There were time limits that were introduced in the chamber, and then after a few years the chairman of ways and means himself said he thought we should have time limits in Westminster Hall. There was a little difficulty in introducing them, for electronic reasons.

Otherwise it broadly reflects the chamber. There's very little difference.

(1130)

Mr. David Christopherson:

I have one last question.

Was it unanimous to create your Standing Order No. 10?

Sir David Natzler:

You have me there. I will correct myself, or someone else will when I'm gone.

Yes. It was not a political issue. It was done first, as the memorandum points out—which I must admit I had forgotten—on a pilot basis, as we often do. In other words, we often set something up for a year. It only lasts for a year, so it's a sessional order. At the end of it, if it works we can change it, adapt it, and come back with it. That is the way that nearly all innovations have come forward, because of that sense of caution.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Very good.

That's good for me in this round, Chair. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Christopherson.

Now we will go to the wooden bow tie, with Mr. de Burgh Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

I'm curious about a whole lot of things. I'll see what I can get through in the time I have.

As you're probably aware, the House of Commons in Canada is undergoing renovations. I understand that Westminster itself is going to be under renovations soon.

I'm curious about the physical structure of the two chambers in relation to each other, where they are geographically, how big Westminster Hall is in terms of the number of seats, physically, and what your plan is, if you close the main chamber for renovations, for a main chamber and secondary chamber.

That's my first question.

Sir David Natzler:

Shall I answer the first one?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

By all means.

Sir David Natzler:

I have a very little brain. I won't remember them otherwise.

That is an issue. Currently, what we call Westminster Hall is actually the Grand Committee Room. It is a late 19th century construct, like a sort of pimple on the northwestern corner of Westminster Hall, which is our great medieval hall. It is extremely easily reached from the chamber nowadays, even for those with disabilities. It used to be a major problem. People had to go up some stairs. We finally got our lifts in, which was really important. It was a block that we couldn't overcome.

I suspect that it takes a member about three minutes to get from the chamber to Westminster Hall. When there's a vote in the main chamber, as I explained, the sittings are suspended so that the members can go to vote in and around the main chamber.

I've never heard of any difficulty with members getting away from Westminster Hall when the sitting is suspended and getting to the chamber. It holds about 70 people. I think that's right. There are technically 70 seats, from memory.

It has actually had almost that many people, amazingly. There can be this big debate in Westminster Hall, and you get dozens of members. There's very little public gallery space. There's only room for about 25, and they are seated as in a select committee room, like your room, at the back. There are just three or four rows of chairs that are very near the members, which is slightly unusual for us, but it is the same in our committee rooms. We have the full audiovisual set-up, which was quite an expensive ask.

Indeed, we are moving out, as you are, and redoing the main palace. We haven't published our plans for how we're going to provide for Westminster Hall sittings. However, you can be assured that we will have a very large committee room very near the main chamber, which will indeed be designed to ensure that we can have Westminster Hall sittings.

When we go back into the main building—which I know you are planning to do as well—the more interesting issue will be whether we will resume using the Grand Committee Room for Westminster Hall sittings. Some members are saying, “Why don't we use the lovely new chamber, the big one, the temporary one that we'll just have left? We could always go and sit there.”

The answer is that the whole idea is that it should be smaller. The Grand Committee Room is a very pleasantly sized room, nearly Gothic, but well lit. If there are four or five people, you don't feel that you're in a completely empty room.

(1135)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there any quorum requirement for Westminster Hall?

Sir David Natzler:

Yes. It's in the paper, and you have it there. It's either two or three; I can't remember. In other words, effectively no.

There are no quorum requirements in the chamber either, unless you have a vote. You have to have a certain number of people to vote, which is 40, but if you aren't having any voting, you often just have three or four members there.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned the petitions with 100,000 signatures. How often do those happen? Have there been quite a lot of them?

Sir David Natzler:

We only have about 28 or 29 sitting Mondays in a year. Again, it's my impression that it is most unusual now to have a sitting Monday without having a petition debate in Westminster Hall. There was a bit of a slow start, but the word got around that it was really worth going and that we would have petitions introduced.

The issue is that they've not been arranged by a member. A member of the Petitions Committee introduces them. They're not necessarily in favour of or against what's being discussed, but it's to get the debate going. Most of them are successful, in the sense that they attract half a dozen members who are willing to take part.

There's the occasional dud, a petition about which members don't really feel they have very much that they can usefully say, but as you can imagine, that's quite rare.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned that debate length is based on the projected interest in a debate. That's why you get some that are 30 minutes and some that are 90 minutes.

I know that around here, RSVPs from MPs are notoriously unreliable. They often say that they're coming and they often don't. How do you prejudge attendance at a debate?

Sir David Natzler:

We don't; the member has to, and it is a slight problem. The member takes responsibility. If she or he puts in for a 60- or 90-minute debate, it says very plainly that you shouldn't do this, and if you want to say which other members are putting in, please put it in on the form.

You can't force them to turn up; you're absolutely right. I guess maybe about once a week or once a fortnight, we do get what's meant to be a longer debate, but even with a long speech from the member starting, other members have not turned up in the event, and the thing falls short. We suspend so as to know when we're starting the next one with a new minister and new cast.

I don't think there's a public black mark against the member, but there's certainly a private one to note that they are not meant to go for the longer debates unless they think they can fill the space, not just with themselves, but with colleagues.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned that chairs of Westminster Hall are committee chairs as opposed to chamber chairs. Is that correct?

Sir David Natzler:

We have a two-tier committee system, so that may be misleading. We have our select committees, which look into subjects of their own choice, the so-called scrutiny committees that have chairs elected by the chamber. That's a different issue. They are not involved.

These are the committees that are smaller versions of the chamber, of maybe 17 or 20 members who look at legislation in detail on the committee stage off the floor, or look at delegated legislation, statutory instruments and so on. They are chaired in a neutral manner from a panel of about 35 members who are nominated by the Speaker on a party balance. They are senior members who are paid extra. They chair public bill committees and general committees, but they also chair Westminster Hall.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In a typical week, how long does Westminster Hall sit, how many hours?

Sir David Natzler:

It sits on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, and Mondays for three hours if there's a petition. For the Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, my math produced 13 hours, but my math may be wrong. I think it's 13 hours plus a possible three hours for a Monday sitting, which is quite a lot by our standards or anybody's standards. That's a lot of paper.

On a Tuesday or Wednesday Hansard, Westminster Hall is a pretty significant wodge at the back.

(1140)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm out of time. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

The clerk has to go in about 10 minutes, so if it's okay, I will go to Mr. Nater. If people who are interested could ask one question, that would be great.

Go ahead, Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and again, thank you, Sir David, for joining us on the day of your retirement. It is much appreciated.

I'm going to divert very slightly from Westminster Hall. I'm taking advantage of your expertise on a slightly different matter.

It's on the subject of the Backbench Business Committee. Would you be able to very briefly describe the purpose of the Backbench Business Committee, who sits on it, and how those members are appointed to that committee?

Sir David Natzler:

Okay. I will try to be brief.

The purpose of the Backbench Business Committee, which was recommended in 2009 by the House of Commons reform committee, was to ensure that on days when the government didn't need the floor for its agenda, rather than filling it with boring debates in which junior ministers would make long statements and nobody wanted to debate them, the backbenchers would have a decision as to what they debated, and to some extent put that to the House for decision, because these are potentially decisive resolutions.

The idea was to set up a committee of backbenchers, chaired by a member chosen by the House as a whole from the opposition, to act as a jury, if you like. Members come and pitch to that committee and say they would like to have a three-hour debate if possible on X. They now sit in public to hear these applications. They then meet in private to decide which ones to give, and for approximately how long and on which days.

They are nominated theoretically by the House and in practice by parties. It was originally a whole-House selection, but that rather fell away after some difficulties early on, which are behind us now.

It's a real success. It means Thursdays are now by and large not voting days. Today is, obviously. For Thursday we've had the business still going on, thank goodness, on two backbench topics. One is about Welsh affairs, because tomorrow is St. David's Day, and we always have a Welsh affairs debate near St. David's Day. The other one is on the U.K.'s progress towards net-zero carbon emissions.

I'm watching my own annunciator on this as well. I notice how many members are speaking on that. They will turn up and speak about that. It's backbenchers who have chosen it. Ministers respond, and the opposition joins in, and so you have debates that are purposeful. Sometimes they are controversial and can lead to votes, and they are resolutions of the House. They are perfectly the same, in theory, as any other decision of the House. Just because it came on a backbench day doesn't make it less valid.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you for that. That's very helpful.

I note that St. David's Day and your first day of retirement fall on the same day. That's somewhat coincidental, or perhaps it's on purpose that it happened, but that's wonderful.

Sir David Natzler:

It's not a coincidence.

Mr. John Nater:

Well, that's wonderful. Happy St. David's Day.

Sir David Natzler:

Thank you.

Mr. John Nater:

I just want to clarify something. You had mentioned earlier that no government legislation is dealt with in Westminster Hall. Am I right to assume, then, that Westminster Hall in no way speeds up a government's agenda, and in the same way, Westminster Hall is no way for opposition to thwart the business of government? Thus, it has no impact, one way or the other, in speeding up or slowing down legislation.

Sir David Natzler:

That is absolutely correct. It is neutral. As far as I know, other than ensuring ministers turn up, the government's business managers—who I do know fairly well—take very little interest in Westminster Hall at all, and that's a good thing.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you so much.

The Chair:

Mr. Simms, you have one question.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you, Chair.

Very quickly, I understand that in 2009 or 2010, or shortly thereafter, you made a huge change in Westminster, whereby your select committee chairs are chosen by all members of the House. How is that going?

Sir David Natzler:

It has gone well. This was a recommendation from the House of Commons reform committee, to which I was the clerk.

As it's in my last hour, I can be candid. Most members favoured this idea. They thought it was a really good idea. It would give the chairs of the committees more standing in the House.

There had been a habit of the members being appointed to select committees to include one senior member from the party who, it was understood, would take the chair of that committee, and then the committees were expected to just elect them.

It didn't always work. Sometimes they chose some other member as their chair, which was fine too, as it was a good sign of independence. However, the government would then also try to leave the person off. There was a row in 2001-2002, when the government party tried to have two senior chairs not appointed to the committee at all.

Follwing that failed coup, the Wright committee said, “Why doesn't the House choose chairs? We will divide up the parties in advance; the parties meet in a small room and decide who gets which committee, on a arm-wrestling basis, which has always worked perfectly well so far. They then come forward to report that X committee is Conservative, X is Liberal Democrat, X is Labour, and then only members of that party can stand for election, with the electoral college—the House as a whole—voting by an alternative vote system.” Members absolutely love it.

Well, you are members; members enjoy voting. They don't seem to mind competing against one another within parties, so for some chairs, we would have four or five candidates. You would think the caucus might say, “No, this is our Labour candidate for X committee”, but it doesn't seem to work like that. They quite happily compete, without visible hard feelings, and then they have to canvass, of course, the other parties to get them to vote for them in a secret ballot.

The only voice on the Wright committee that said this would never work because, first, there wouldn't be any elections and it would all be sorted out by the caucuses and we would look ridiculous, was me, and I was completely wrong. It has been a really great success.

I hope that's helpful.

(1145)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes, it's extremely helpful.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's not really helpful; it's provocative.

I want to ask a question to follow up on that.

First of all, are the chairs elected for the life of the entire Parliament?

Sir David Natzler:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

There must have arisen a situation in some committee of members of that committee expressing dissatisfaction at the chairmanship of their chair.

Sir David Natzler:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

At that point, is there any recourse, either for them or for the House of Commons as a whole, with regard to that chair?

Sir David Natzler:

There isn't for the House of Commons as a whole.

Of course, in the Standing Orders, if they give due notice and there are members from both the two largest parties on the committee voting that way, they can express a lack of confidence in the chair. You can look in detail at the way we set it up in the Standing Orders. In other words, to prevent a party coup, you can say, “We're not happy with the chair.”

Sure, we have had difficulties. It was my fear, to be honest, that these would be chairs parachuted in, and my experience with select committees was that they like choosing their own chair and feeling comfortable with them because they had chosen them and they could at any time unchoose them just by a vote, with notice. However, by and large, this has not happened, and chairs and committees have rubbed along together. Possibly the chairs are a little more powerful than they used to be, but members know they have that in reserve.

Evidently, we've had chairs resigning or wanting to step down. I'm not sure if we've had chairs dying. We do have changes of chairs, and then you have a by-election.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is the by-election again by the House as a whole?

Sir David Natzler:

Yes, that is the same electoral college, the House as a whole.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Effectively, if the committee finds a want of confidence in the chair, at that point the committee can no longer meet until such time as the by-election has occurred in the House as a whole, which might take a period of time, perhaps a day or two.

Sir David Natzler:

No, we would be very quick. We can get a by-election going very quickly, and the Standing Orders were drafted quite carefully to give some freedom to the Speaker to abbreviate intervals. However, sure, you have to have time for people to agree to stand, because to stand as chair, you need a certain number of supporters and from more than one party.

If that did happen, the committee would not be completely helpless. These are scrutiny committees. They're not holding up legislation or anything. Their program might be briefly interrupted, but they can appoint a temporary chair at any time, and they do when the chair is away. Other people can take the chair, as happened this morning in your meeting.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right, but we have a system of deputy chairs to allow us to do that. We'd have two deputy chairs in addition to the chair.

Sir David Natzler:

We don't appoint deputy chairs in advance, but every committee knows that it's usually, obviously, one of the senior members from the other side who will take the chair if for whatever reason the chair isn't there.

(1150)

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have one last question.

You said this is not for legislative committees, but only committees that are not dealing with legislation.

Sir David Natzler:

Right. “Scrutiny committees” is what we call them, including, for example, the procedure committee. The chair of our procedure committee is directly elected by the House as a whole.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We'll go to Mr. Graham for the last question.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I have one final line of questioning. You said that Westminster Hall is very much independent, that it doesn't have much interference from the parties' structure.

Do the whips of the different parties try, or have they tried over the years, to interfere in the background with the operation of that chamber or take control of it in different ways? Have they just left it on its own all this time?

Sir David Natzler:

As far as I'm aware, they haven't, but I don't want to be naive. It may be that they stipulate their members to put in particular subjects for debate, but I really doubt it. I think members spot that and don't like it on either side. This is their place. It is their home, more than the chamber in many ways, which is inevitably dominated by whips of both sides, by the government and by the opposition, who have 20 days a year, and by the parties. Backbenchers would resent it if the whips did do that.

It may occasionally be attempted. I detect that a smaller party may have tried to get a slot in Westminster Hall for what is really a pretty partisan debate, because they have less chance, so they raise a subject that is of interest mainly to them.

I think that is seen as fair enough, but by and large, this is backbench territory and it's respected as such.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Happy retirement. Thanks very much for this.

The Chair:

As you'll have lots of time after retirement, if we needed you, could you appear again?

Sir David Natzler:

I do have a successor who is taking over at one minute past midnight tomorrow and who will be at least as well qualified to answer, but when Canada calls, I will always do my best to help.

My very best to all of you, and thank you.

The Chair:

We wish you the best in your last sitting in 45 years today. Thank you.

The clerk is here and can start early, but we'll suspend for a couple of minutes and start right after that.

(1150)

(1155)

The Chair:

Welcome back to the 144th meeting of the committee. Our next order of business is a briefing on the implementation of changes to the petition system.

Members will recall that our 75th report, which was concurred in by the House on November 29, 2018, contains several recommendations concerning changes to the petition system. While some of these changes have already been implemented, others will take effect at the beginning of the next Parliament.

Here to brief us today from the House of Commons are André Gagnon, who is the Deputy Clerk of Procedure, and Jeremy LeBlanc, who is the Principal Clerk of Chamber Business and Parliamentary Publications.

Thank you both for being here. We look forward to hearing how our suggestions are being implemented.

Mr. André Gagnon (Deputy Clerk, Procedure):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[Translation]

Thank you, everyone.

I won’t be retiring today.[English]

This is not my last day.

Mr. David Christopherson:

So you think. That's as far as you know.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. André Gagnon:

That's as far as I know. Thank you for the vote of confidence. That starts the meeting very well.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You're well on your way to 45 years in your own right—not bad.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Yes. Thank you.

Our objective today, as Mr. Bagnell indicated, is to go through the different follow-ups to the 75th report, which was adopted last fall.[Translation]

Today we will be discussing five very specific points, and we will conclude with a presentation of the Web drafts, which will be accessible at the start of the next Parliament.[English]

The first item has to do with the number of days that petitions remain open on the website. Mr. Bagnell has referred to some items that have already been put in place. This one has already been put in place. It started on January 28, I think.[Translation]

The fact that petitioners may ask that the petition stay open for 30, 60, 90 or 120 days makes things even more flexible for the different petitioners.

The first petition submitted by a member of Parliament was that of Mr. Blake Richards, who was a member of this committee at the time. That petition was authorized on January 28 and[English]essentially was closed for signatures yesterday, and it met the 500-signature threshold.

The second item had to do with sponsors. Members of this committee had indicated that having sponsors associated with a member of Parliament and associated with a petition could, in some instances, be understood differently by different people. This change has been made as well, so members are now authorizing the publication of a petition on the website.

The third item has to do with the format of paper petitions.[Translation]

For those of you who remember, the origin of this recommendation by the committee was a point of order raised by Ms. Finley in the House. The objective of the recommendation is to have various types of petitions accepted, certified and tabled in the House. Obviously, this will increase the number of petitions submitted by members, and their representation of citizens’ interests. This process has begun.

The fourth point we wish to draw to your attention is dissolution. When the committee, during the 41st Parliament, adopted the changes to allow electronic petitions, it asked that anything on the electronic petitions website at the time of the dissolution be considered to have lapsed. There are cases where ongoing petitions amass a large number of signatures.

(1200)

[English]

Once dissolution arrives, the website is closed, and all of that is essentially moved. If you compare that to paper petitions, for instance, you see that paper petitions continue throughout the year, but clearly if we have a paper petition that has been certified by Journals Branch and provided to a member of Parliament and the member of Parliament doesn't table it in the House before dissolution, that member of Parliament or another member of Parliament can have it recertified for the next Parliament. Essentially, the signatures that were on that petition are not lost.

The committee could consider the idea of having, let's say, any e-petitions that had met the 500-signature threshold at the time of dissolution certified afterwards. This would not be possible now, but they could be certified afterwards for the next Parliament. That could be a possibility, or any e-petitions that were certified but never tabled before dissolution could also be recertified for the other Parliament. This is a possibility that the committee could consider.

For instance, if today you had someone put a petition on the website asking that the petition be open for 120 days, essentially that would mean this petition would never be tabled in the House, because 120 days would bring us past the June 21 deadline. Let's say we only sit until that time and don't sit any later. That petition could not be tabled in the House, even though that petition could have met the 500-signature threshold. This is something that we wanted to bring to your attention.[Translation]

The matter of the paper petitions that have been placed online is the topic of a large part of the 75th report we are presenting today, to provide information on what has been done.[English]

We have worked very closely with the Privy Council Office to establish a way that all those paper petitions could be dealt with as efficiently as possible, and that's what we want to present to you today. This collaboration has worked very well, and we're very happy to say that this system will be in place at the beginning of the 43rd Parliament.

In a very practical way, this is how we propose it would work. As usual, any member of Parliament having a paper petition would send it to the Journals Branch to have it certified. The clerk of petitions in the Journals Branch would get the text of that petition translated right away. Rarely are petitions bilingual, so that text would be immediately translated and verification would take place to see if it's certified. Once it was certified, the clerk of petitions would download a certificate on the MP portal for petitions. That means the individual, the member, could immediately table the certificate in the House, exactly the same way we do for e-petitions.

Once the certificate is tabled in the House regarding a paper petition, the text of that paper petition would appear on the website, exactly as we do for e-petitions, and PCO would be informed so that a response could be worked on immediately, respecting again the 45 days afterwards that the government would have to respond to it, to table a response in the House, and that response to the paper petition would appear on the website as well. The response would be put with it at that time.

That would meet the request put forward by the committee, but in a much more efficient manner than having the paper petition circulating from the office of the member to the office of the clerk of petitions, back to the office of the member, then tabled in the House and then sent to the PCO, which was the case previously. Now what would happen is that only the certificate would be sent to the PCO, and only the certificate would be sent to members. Journals Branch would keep the paper copy of the petition until it's tabled in the House, as with e-petitions. On a regular basis, those petitions would be destroyed so that the private personal information found on those petitions would remain unaccessible to all.

That covers most of it.

To illustrate all of that, Jeremy is going to do a short presentation with mock-ups, and we'll be more than happy to answer all of your questions.

(1205)

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc (Principal Clerk, Chamber Business and Parliamentary Publications):

Thank you, André.

You have paper copies of those mock-ups in front of you, and they're on the screens as well. I want to take you briefly through what the new site will look like at the launch of the 43rd Parliament.

The look and feel of the petitions website is very much like what we have currently for electronic petitions. The difference is that we've rebaptized it so that it's just called “petitions” rather than “e-petitions”, since we'll be having both paper and electronic petitions. You'll see very obvious buttons that stand out, quick-access buttons that allow you to get to the more popular sections of the website, notably the one in purple that brings you to all e-petitions that are open for signature, since we expect that's what the vast majority of people will be coming to the website to do, to sign an e-petition. That will take them there relatively quickly. [Translation]

Next, there is a section that allows you to do a search in any of the petitions. There is more information on this site than on the actual petitions site. Also, the information is presented in a more user-friendly way so as to better respect access standards for websites, for instance for visually impaired persons.

We added a button to the right to identify the Parliament concerned. We will archive the petitions of the 42nd Parliament, which is the current one. You will thus have access to them, as well as to those of the 43rd Parliament. At this time, since the site only contains petitions from the current Parliament, there is no information near the button on the right, but it will be possible eventually to do a search in the petitions of a given Parliament.

There are also icons that will allow you to quickly find paper or electronic petitions. In the list, the small icon that looks like a computer screen indicates an electronic petition, and the icon that looks like a sheet of paper is for paper petitions.[English]

Next, if you go to the detailed page for each petition, again it has a layout very similar to what we have currently. There are some small changes to improve a bit of the look and feel of it and make it more accessible. Most notably, we've added a few other elements as well. We've added what language the petition was originally submitted in. As André mentioned, it's very rare for us to receive petitions in both official languages. Usually they're in one or the other language. We'll indicate what the source language is, giving people an idea of whether the text is a translation or the original language.

We've also integrated the text of the government response to the petition directly on that page. Currently there's a PDF version of the response that you can click on, and it opens a new version. This is not great from an accessibility perspective. The text of responses is usually relatively short, a few paragraphs, so it's possible to integrate that text directly in the page of the petition. As we mentioned in the fall, the last time we appeared before the committee, we have an agreement with the Privy Council Office whereby the responses to petitions are going to be transmitted to us electronically, so we'll be doing away with the reams of paper that represents.

As soon as a response is presented in the House by the parliamentary secretary, the Privy Council Office can transmit that text to us electronically. We can quickly upload it to the website, and there's an alert that is sent to the office of the member who presented that petition to let the member know that the government response is available. Rather than having to wait for a paper response to be sent to your office by messenger, which takes a day or two, you'll get an email alert that the response has been uploaded to the website and is available. That's something you can very easily share with people who may have been involved in organizing that paper petition through your own contacts. That's an improvement. The information will be available much more rapidly than is currently the case.

There's also an interesting feature at the bottom of the page. I'm sure you realize that there are often situations of the same paper petition being presented by multiple members or by the same member multiple times. We'll keep a running total of identical petitions at the bottom of the page.

In this example, it concerns health services. This is all fictitious data, but we've created examples of other members who may have presented that same petition, the date when they presented it, and a running total of the number of signatures collected. There were 148 signatures in this example, but also others that had been collected, for a grand total of 568, as you can see at the bottom of the page. It's a way of keeping track of the number of identical petitions that are presented, and also of the total number of signatures collected for them.

(1210)

[Translation]

The next slide shows what the petitions website will look like on a mobile device. Since it was designed for the current site, it easily adapts to mobile devices, so that people will be able to consult it from various locations.

The next slide shows the government response section, which has now been integrated into the research section. This makes it possible to do a search in all petitions to which the government provided a reply. Here as well, we improved the display, and we provide more information on the status of the petition.

I also want to draw your attention to the small green button that is at the top of the page, right next to the menu. It is the “MP” button.[English]or “Member of Parliament” in English. That is the button that will allow members to access the MP portal, where they can find information about both paper and electronic petitions.

As André was mentioning, the process we envisage is that when we receive a paper petition in the Journals Branch and it's certified, we will send an electronic certificate that will become available in the member's portal. Rather than the entire petition being returned to your office through internal mail, which takes a day or two, it's uploaded electronically. You'll get an alert automatically to let you know there's a certified petition that's available. You just have to go to this MP portal. You or your delegated staff can then print the certificate and present that petition in the House. It will have the text of the petition and the number of signatories in the same way we do for electronic petitions, on a single sheet of paper.

Once the petition is presented in the House, that certificate will disappear from this section of the portal, so it's not possible to re-present the same petition over and over again.

Once it's presented, the certificate disappears and will instead be added to another new section, for the information of members, which gives you all the petitions that you have presented and information about them, including the latest update and where they are in the process. Has a response been received, and on what date? What date was the petition presented? You have that information there. You can also click on any of those petitions to get more detailed information about them.

That concludes what we want to show you. We're happy to answer any questions you might have for us.

The Chair:

If it's okay, we'll just do this by open questions and answers.

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a number of questions to get through.

You're probably aware, André and Jeremy, of the study that's been at the BILI committee for the last five years about getting sessional papers onto the Internet. Can this process be used to get all sessional papers to the general public, and is there any intention of doing that?

Mr. André Gagnon:

You have to understand the different categories of sessional papers.

You have those special and easy reports, let's say, from the Energy Council of Canada or whatever, which are tabled by the minister. There are responses to petitions, responses to questions on the Order Paper. There are responses to different categories of reports, committee reports, pursuant to Standing Order 109. Those different items are all considered sessional papers, and there are also orders for returns that are massive. This is clearly a start to the process of considering whether we could eventually envisage all of the information tabled by the government in the House of Commons, all documents tabled by the government, to be made accessible in an electronic format.

What we're doing here today is the first stage. As you can imagine, the documents tabled in the House—I think it's around 3,000 every year—amount to a lot of documents. As well, as we understand it—and people from Treasury Board and the Privy Council would be in a better position to answer that—sometimes, for instance, the format is not the same from one department to another, or perhaps there are tables in the documents that make it more difficult for people who have accessibility issues.

Those issues are not small. They're really not small. To get to that point could be a good long-term objective, but clearly what we've done today is just the first step. This committee, I think, has looked at that. The Library of Parliament has looked at part of that, asking for some sessional papers to be scanned, which is a completely different issue and certainly less accessible for people from the outside.

This is a first step, to answer your question.

(1215)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the same vein, if PCO returns a response to a petition that includes a spreadsheet, for example, and they happen to send you the Excel, would the Excel go up, or do you have to print that into a PDF to table it? How would you do that?

Mr. André Gagnon:

The idea is that the information we would get—and I'm talking here about responses to petitions—from PCO would not be modified in any way, either for format or content, from the House of Commons. That's what we're working on: to have something agreed upon in terms of the software and the look and feel of what would be presented.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

While a petition is open, can anything happen to it? Can someone withdraw it? Can it be corrected if it has a mistake in it, or is it set in stone, and for those 120 or 60 days it is completely untouchable?

Mr. André Gagnon:

Jeremy can correct me, but I think that's why the committee has decided to adopt the changes and permit the 30, 60, 90, 120 days. The idea is you're locked into those, and it's to have that initial choice.

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

I think the idea is that once it's published, it's very difficult to withdraw or change the text. If you were changing the text, then the people who signed it previously may not have signed the same thing. The change may seem insignificant, but for some people it might be a big deal, so we don't change the text and we generally don't withdraw petitions once they're published.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Even an Oxford comma might be enough to mess up the whole meaning of the thing, so yes, I get that.

When you log in as an MP to the financial portal and a number of other places, it accepts the identification of your browser and carries on. Is this going to have the same system, or are we going to have to have a separate log-in for it?

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

It's the same system. It will recognize you based on the account that you've logged in with.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Or your delegate.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay, that's helpful.

If someone prints off an electronic petition and gathers signatures on paper, can those be used for anything, or does it have to be certified as a paper petition?

Mr. André Gagnon:

It would have to be a paper petition.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The two are completely separate processes? Is there no way of amalgamating the two processes?

Mr. André Gagnon:

No.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. This will be my last question for the moment. I might have more later.

When a petition is certified, does anyone check that the addresses are valid?

Mr. André Gagnon:

Do you mean a paper petition or an e-petition?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I mean either one—or both, for that matter.

Mr. André Gagnon:

This issue was considered at length during the last Parliament. Essentially we looked at how to attest to the quality of the signature, or the legitimacy of the signature, and at that time the committee adopted certain elements to determine which types of signatures are not acceptable, such as, for instance, all signatures that end with gc.ca, meaning people signing from their offices in government. A couple of filters like that exist to attest to the legitimacy of the signatures.

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

I would add that for e-petitions, when someone attempts to sign, they enter an email address. There's an email that's sent by the system to that address to validate that the address actually exists, and the person has to click on the link sent to that address before their signature will be counted. For an e-petition, there's a validation that the address exists.

For paper petitions, we don't go and see that Jeremy LeBlanc lives at whatever address was given. We don't verify to that degree. We just verify that the address format is accepted, the signature seems legitimate and doesn't look like it's in the same handwriting as all the other signatures on the page, and those sorts of things.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If you find them all in the same handwriting, would you come back to say that you think they're all from the same person? You can't prove that either.

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

No, we can't, but there are suspicions.

Quite honestly, it would only matter in the case of a petition that was very close to the 25-signature threshold. Once you pass 25 valid signatures, whether there are 26, 226 or 2,026, it doesn't make a huge difference in terms of certification or not.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have one final question on the electronic signatures.

Who receives the signatories' data? When somebody has signed a petition, who is going to have access to that data?

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Staff in the Journals Branch are the only ones who would have access to it, and as André mentioned, it's destroyed at regular intervals. We have access to it for the purpose of validating or verifying if there's something suspicious about it, but outside the staff who are managing the process, nobody does.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The members who have actually contributed the petitions won't have access to that data either.

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

They do not.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Just before we go to Mr. Reid, can you tell me how you go back a screen from the one you have up now? If you go to the start, do you click on the petitions website thing at the top?

(1220)

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

To get to the portal on the petitions website, if you're logged in as a member of Parliament, there's a button that appears at the top that says in green either “Member of Parliament” or “Député”, en français. Clicking on that button will bring you to the MP portal from the petitions website.

Also, whenever there's something that appears in your portal, you'll also get an email alert and you can click on a link that will bring you there.

The Chair:

On that opening screen, if you click on “Create”, is that where you get the choice of paper or electronic?

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

That would be for creating an electronic petition. There's information available to people in the “About” section that has templates for creating paper petitions, but the “Create” link—

The Chair:

You would go to the “About” section first.

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

There are links to a guide on paper petitions that gives you templates and information there. “Create” would really be for creating an electronic petition.

The Chair:

This is just an idea, but don't you think it might make it clearer on that opening screen if it were to say “Create Paper” or “Create Electronic”, or something? It's something to think about.

Mr. Reid is next.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you both for being here. I congratulate you on these very thoughtful improvements. I particularly like the idea of keeping a running count of the number of signatures that have been accumulated so far.

There's a process that goes on at Parliament Hill that I think is ultimately frustrating. If I get a petition with several thousand signatures, I divide it up into the minimum number of pages possible and distribute it as widely as possible. Anybody who sits through the petitions period in the House knows that the same petition will be mentioned over and over again, presumably for the purpose of creating the illusion that there's a greater level of support for this concern than for the other competing concerns that are being expressed in other petitions.

In a type of tragedy of the Commons, similar to what happens when fishing grounds get overfished, we see people wasting a bunch of the House of Commons' time reiterating the same item over and over again. This change helps to perhaps get around that by showing how much actual support there is for each topic, so congratulations on that.

By the way, I'm as guilty as anybody else of participating in that type of thing in the House of Commons.

I want to ask some questions regarding a couple of technical areas.

If a petition is submitted in one official language, it's then translated. Does the originator of the petition get the opportunity to see the translation prior to it going up, or is it simply assumed that it is...?

Mr. André Gagnon:

Are we talking here about the e-petition, or the—

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm sorry; it's the e-petition I'm referring to.

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

In neither case would we send the translation back for validation unless we received a particular request from the petitioner to validate it in advance. Typically, we don't.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Let me ask something slightly different. If you get it in both official languages—I'm speaking of e-petitions, not paper petitions—do you confirm to make sure that it says the same thing in both languages? The obvious question is that if it doesn't, how would you deal with that?

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

If it is an e-petition, the user doesn't have the opportunity to enter it in both languages. The screen doesn't allow them to enter the text in English and in French. It's whatever—

Mr. Scott Reid:

They must choose one language.

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

They choose the language that they submit it in, and there are rules prohibiting people from having two petitions open simultaneously that are on the same topic. If you tried to enter the same petition in another language, that wouldn't be allowed because it's the same petition, so they're stuck submitting it in one language.

However, as I say, if a petitioner expresses an interest in verifying the translation or wants to have a say in what the translation looks like, we can certainly co-operate with them. There's an email address that they can send questions to, and we get back to them.

Mr. Scott Reid:

This committee held extensive hearings and published a report on the use of indigenous languages in Canada, and there has been considerable interest in the House in particular in the use of indigenous languages in the proceedings of the House of Commons.

As a practical matter, I've expressed my own reservations as to how easy it actually is to achieve a utopia in which a member of Parliament can pop up and begin speaking a non-official language in the House and expect to be understood. Although we've done our best to find a workable solution, the reality is that there are limits to what can be done.

When it comes to the issue of submitting a petition or having a petition available in one of our indigenous languages, is that an option that exists at the moment? If it doesn't exist, is it the sort of thing that could be made to exist if you got appropriate direction from the House?

(1225)

Mr. André Gagnon:

Clearly, today the only two languages that can be used in a petition would be French or English. That said, when a petition is tabled in the House, nothing would prevent an individual from speaking in an indigenous language.

In terms of having it appear on the website, if we're talking about—

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's what I'm asking about.

Mr. André Gagnon:

—having it in another language, that would probably necessitate a change to the Standing Orders and certainly in practice, and also the different languages that would be permitted would need to be identified.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I ask this in part because we just had a debate at second reading on the indigenous languages act. I can't remember what the bill number is, but I'm sure you're familiar with it.

Mr. André Gagnon:

It's Bill C-91.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes. My own intervention was to draw the attention of the House to the fact that in the case of one indigenous language in particular, Inuktut, a very high proportion of people who speak that language are unilingual speakers. Not every indigenous language has a written form, or a consensus written form, but that's not true with Inuktut, where there is a consensus written form in syllabics that are pretty much universally understood among Inuktut speakers, who are numerous. It's literally the only language that many of these people understand or can read. If someone wanted to have a petition on something that's relevant to Nunavut, it would literally be not presentable, as things stand, in the language that is the only language spoken by a substantial proportion of the population of that territory, to give a real-life example.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Let's talk about a paper petition, where it's much easier to implement. If that paper petition were written in an indigenous language and, on the side, in English or French, that petition could be received in the House. If we're talking here about e-petitions, that would probably require intervention from this committee in the form of a recommendation from this committee that was adopted by the House.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's really helpful, and as you've probably guessed, my comments were directed less at you than they were at the rest of the committee to think about. I very much appreciate that.

I have one last question. Not on this screen but on another screen, you showed keywords associated with a petition. I assume it's the case that if I were to search for a keyword such as “cannabis”, for example, I would essentially get to see all the petitions that have that keyword in them.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Yes, or it could be “marijuana”, for instance, because there are some other terms associated with the different—

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes.

Now the screen's back up. I look down, and “cannabis” is a nice easy one. That was E-1528, the first petition. If I look at the second one, it has some keywords that might be non-intuitive.

How do you go about selecting keywords? Is there a protocol you follow?

Mr. André Gagnon:

The same people who work on our parliamentary publications help us as well. We call them information management officers. They have a terminology book, if I could put it that way. Essentially, when we're talking about cannabis, you would also have “marijuana” or “drugs”, the different words associated with the different terminology presented.

Clearly, if the petition being prepared has defined terminology in it, this would appear there, as you imagine.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right, and that's a really good example of what I'm getting at. I'm glad you said that. An example here is that if I'm trying to encourage people to sign a petition, and the petition I have in mind is over pharmacare, and I'm directing towards something about.... You can see how “drugs” is an issue, but they are prescription drugs, not illegal drugs, whereas somebody else is trying to get a petition signed that is dealing with the issue of LSD or heroin or whatever. You can see how there's a certain overlap that is inherently problematic.

I'm just throwing that out again as more of a comment than a question, but can I ask if the book they use is a source that's available for us to see if we ask for it? Is it the sort of thing we could take a look at? I don't doubt their objectivity or their best efforts; I'm just genuinely curious as to what it contains.

(1230)

Mr. André Gagnon:

This is a living document. I shouldn't have used the word “book”, because it's more of a living document.

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

It's more of a database, really.

Mr. André Gagnon:

It's more of a database to permit them to identify different terminology, and it evolves with the nature of the debates in the House. It's clearly related to the work done in the House and in committees.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's very helpful. Thank you very much.

The Vice-Chair (Mrs. Stephanie Kusie):

Are there further questions?

Mr. de Burgh Graham, go ahead, please.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a couple of questions.

You were here for the previous panel when we discussed a secondary debating chamber and the idea of the 100,000 signatures to create a debate. Has there ever been any kind of practice like that in Canada in the past?

Mr. André Gagnon:

In the last Parliament this issue was discussed significantly, and if I remember well, in this Parliament as well, when Mr. Kennedy Stewart presented a motion regarding that issue.

Regarding the possibility of having a debate in Canada on different legislatures in Canada, I'm not too sure if that is the case.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Would that require changes to the Standing Orders? I imagine it would.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Most probably, yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm going to go slightly off topic to build on what Scott was asking about.

One of the things that's always driven me nuts as a bilingual person is that Hansard is available in either English or French, and there's no untranslated Hansard available anywhere online. It would be really helpful if there were English, French and floor as online options. I put that to you as a “please do this one of these years”. I'd very much appreciate it.

In the same vein, when you're looking at an MP's profile page on the parliamentary website, motions are virtually impossible to track. They're not run through LEGISinfo, which they should be. Most of our private members' motions, which fall under private members' business, should be under LEGISinfo. If you could fix that too, I'd appreciate it.

Those are my comments. I don't know if you have comments on that.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Jeremy's responsible, as his title indicates, for parliamentary publications, so he could speak to—

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

I've taken notes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We may chat longer.

Thank you.

Mr. André Gagnon:

You're in trouble.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

He's used to it anyway.

Thank you. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mrs. Stephanie Kusie):

Thank you Mr. Graham.[English]

Does anyone have any further questions for our guests?

I will leave it to the chair.

The Chair:

Thank you, Stephanie.

I sensed from your presentation that there's one item the committee could discuss and make a decision on, and that is what happens at dissolution. At the moment, you said that paper petitions can carry over, but electronic petitions can't.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Paper petitions can be recertified. As for all the electronic petitions, they cannot. They're moot on the day of dissolution.

The Chair:

If this committee was in favour of making them equal either way, would that require a change to the Standing Orders?

Mr. André Gagnon:

Most probably it would just be a report to the House. Having that report adopted would be sufficient. It's not right now in the Standing Orders. It was in the report that was adopted by the House in the last Parliament.

The Chair:

Do committee members have a view on that? Paper petitions can be carried over; electronic petitions can't. It would make sense to have some symmetry. It would make sense to have them both either yes or no, I would think.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a question about that.

On the issue of paper petitions, there are no dates on them, so you don't know when they were from. We just recertify them because there's a petition. You do know the date when they are created as an electronic petition, so there's always been the question of one Parliament binding the next one. Is there any impact of that with this question? Do you see it as one Parliament binding the next one, or is the petition such a separate issue that it doesn't fall under that precedent?

Mr. André Gagnon:

That could be easily understandable, in the sense that if there's a change in government and one of the issues that is part of a petition from the previous Parliament has nothing to do with the next Parliament—because the new government decided to proceed otherwise—then it would be—

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Or it deals with a bill, which would no longer be before the House.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Exactly.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Perhaps the middle ground could be that the petition would still be available on the website and available for somebody to adopt, as opposed to automatically carrying over. I don't think it would require any rule changes to do that.

Is that something that you could do without a rule change? The website could simply say, “These are orphan petitions because Parliament dissolved. If you'd like to claim one of them as opposed to starting it afresh”—because it's already been translated and things—“click here”.

(1235)

Mr. André Gagnon:

That could be a possibility, yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is that something that requires us to direct it, or is it something you guys can just do?

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

As André mentioned, the previous committee in the last Parliament issued a report on how to set up the e-petition system that was very prescriptive. One of those clear directives was that at dissolution, the site was to be completely deactivated. All of those signatures were to be closed and there was to be no further action taken on them. I think to change that, which was a clear directive, would probably take another clear directive to us.

They're not necessarily orphaned either, I would say. If a member is very much championing a particular cause and is involved or associated with a petition, which may or may not be the case, but sometimes is, and that member is re-elected, it may not really be orphaned. That member may still very much care about that issue and may still want to present the petition, or there could even be someone in their constituency who wants to do it. They're not necessarily orphaned, although some will be, because there are members who won't be returning to the next Parliament.

Mr. André Gagnon:

But the signatures would be lost.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think it makes sense to lose the signatures. If somebody really wants that petition to go forward, there's nothing stopping them from taking the text and resubmitting it, if the text is still available.

Would an incomplete past petition still have the text available on the website, or is it clearly gone?

Mr. André Gagnon:

It would be available.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: That's all it needs.

Mr. André Gagnon: The issue at this point is the question of the signatures.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The signatures have to go. I think that's okay, in my opinion.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Jowhari.

Mr. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

When it's electronic, and let's say it's past 120 days.... I specifically ask the question because I have a petition that I have chosen not to submit for a response because I'm looking for a right time to table it. If the House rises on the 21st, that petition is now gone, whereas if it was a paper petition, that petition would still hold, correct? Is it because the signatures on that are supporting that petition after it's been verified, and then it's lost?

Mr. André Gagnon:

The difference is that the paper petition can be recertified, which is not the case for—

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Is it because the signatures are there that it can be recertified?

Mr. André Gagnon:

It's because that's the practice that has always existed.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Okay. It does not have anything to do with the fact that the signatures are there that it could be recertified; it's a procedural matter.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Yes, it's a decision the committee has—

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Just as a point of clarification, are we trying to bring parity between digital and paper petitions, or we are saying the digital petition is going to stay as is regardless?

Mr. André Gagnon:

This has been a concern of the committee from the beginning. In the last Parliament, this issue was there. With the changes that were brought forward in the 75th report, for instance, saying that the text of both paper and electronic petitions should be on the website, it has always been quite a concern of this committee to make sure that the practices regarding those different types of petitions are as similar as possible. Going ahead with a change to permit those e-petitions that have gathered 500 signatures to be presented in the next Parliament would go exactly in that same vein.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Just so people understand the mechanics, if Parliament rises on June 21, petitions can still be presented on petition Wednesday, right?

Mr. André Gagnon:

No.

The Chair:

I thought petitions didn't have to be presented in the House. I thought there was an avenue for that.

Mr. André Gagnon:

The third Wednesday of each month when the House is not sitting—I think that's the third Wednesday—

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

That would be the Wednesday after the 15th—

Mr. André Gagnon:

Yes.

On that day, the government can table a response and it can table documents with the Journals Branch that are needed pursuant to either the Standing Orders or different acts.

The government cannot table documents that they wish to just share if these documents are not requested or based on acts. Similarly, paper petitions cannot be tabled with the Journals Branch on that third Wednesday of each month.

The Chair:

I thought, in the old days—

Mr. André Gagnon:

You can table petitions in the House with the Clerk. You can come to the table and give us petitions. Those petitions that are tabled with the Clerk are deemed to have been tabled in the House, but that's only when the House is sitting.

(1240)

The Chair:

You're saying you can't mail it to the Clerk when the House isn't sitting.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Exactly.

The Chair:

If we rise on June 21 and don't come back, and then the writ drops in September before we come back, the paper petitions can be recertified in the next Parliament, but the electronic petitions can't.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Exactly.

The Chair:

Okay.

I would like to get the committee's opinion and a decision or a recommendation to the House.

Go ahead, Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My recommendation on the signatures carrying over is status quo. I don't see the reason to change it.

The Chair:

Why is your reason for having two different systems?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Signatures on a paper petition are undated. It's a simple form. If you have the form, you can resubmit it. Because we have the prescriptive timelines for the electronic petitions, the 120 days will for sure expire between parliamentary sessions. I don't see why we would bring it back and say, “This one is special because of the timing it had.” You can resubmit the same text and ask for the same signatures again. I don't see the problem with that.

Unless someone else has a different opinion, I'm all ears, but that's my position.

The Chair:

Are you saying that if the paper petition doesn't go through, it's sent back to the person and they can just bring it back to the next Parliament?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

They can bring it back once the new Parliament is in place. After dissolution, the new government is not in place the next day. There's a fairly significant period of time. There's no way a petition can generally span that time anyway. There are a small number of exceptions. I don't see why it would survive.

Go ahead.

Mr. Scott Reid:

If I understand correctly, what you're saying is that a petition that as been started and has collected signatures but has been sent here for certification ought at that point to be sent back if the House has risen for whatever reason, as long as it has gone through all of those stages. That's the only condition under which it would get sent back. Is that correct?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If the House is dissolved, it would be sent back, and if the person wanted to resubmit it following the election, they would be welcome to do so.

At the beginning I had the opposite perspective, but André made the point about the government changing, for example, and the issues no longer being pertinent. You don't want those things to automatically go through. There needs to be a way of saying—

Mr. Scott Reid:

I agree. If the issue is something like, let's say, climate change, and there is change in government, a general petition that climate change be made an issue of priority might not be effective.

Who would it be sent back to?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The original submitter, I would assume, would be notified that it had been killed, and the member of Parliament who sponsored it would be notified that it had been killed.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Obviously, the member of Parliament might not be back.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right, so a new member of Parliament would have to sponsor it in any case. Again it goes back to the issue we had before, about binding one Parliament from the previous one.

Mr. Scott Reid:

We're talking about paper petitions right now, right?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

No, we're talking about digital ones.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay, sorry.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't see any reason to change the status quo on either digital or paper on this one.

The Chair:

The digital ones you can keep in your office and they can be recertified, right?

For paper, you hang on to them. In the new Parliament, if someone wants to recertify them, they come to you, and they can be recertified.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If you submit a paper petition for certification, it comes back to you, signatures and all.

The Chair:

They're just saying that you don't have to come back. You keep it and recertify it in the next Parliament if someone so requests.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Once it's certified, it comes back to us. We have it in our hands, and it's up to us to table it. Once it's tabled, it's a moot point, and if it hasn't been tabled, it's still yours. You take off the green sheet and you give it back to the clerk and you do it again.

It doesn't work the same way, because there's no time limit on petitions. The whole structure is different. There are 25 signatures, not 1,000, and there's no time limit. They are two totally different systems. I don't seen why one should influence the other.

The Chair:

It's in the MP's hands at dissolution.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Exactly.

The Chair:

How do you know it's one you're recertifying? Do they have a number or something on them?

Mr. André Gagnon:

Yes. When you receive a certified petition, there is a number associated with it. I suspect that when members resubmit it for recertification, the green page is usually still on it, and if it's not, there are no issues about that, because the clerk of petitions will look at it in the usual fashion.

The Chair:

If on June 20 a petition that had 120 days to go has 499 signatures, and Parliament's dissolved and we rise on June 20, and there's an election in the fall, those 499 people have lost it. They have to start all over again under the present system.

Mr. André Gagnon:

The electronic petitions would continue during the summer until, let's say, September 1 or whenever—

The Chair:

Parliament's dissolved.

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

It's not even if it's at 499. If it's at 40,000, and it hasn't been presented, those 40,000 signatures are lost.

The Chair:

You'd have to start all over again.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

A hundred and twenty days after June 20 is October 17, I think, which is before the election in any case. In those 120 days, it's going to die no matter what.

(1245)

The Chair:

It's going to what?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It's not going to happen in any case. Perhaps the compromise here, André and Jeremy, is for the petition system to say, “Warning: If you submit this petition, it has no chance of being presented”, with this parameter. The website just says, “You can submit it if you want, but it's going to die.”

A voice: We could have nicer words than that, but....

Mr. André Gagnon:

That's a positive way to encourage public participation.

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

As André mentioned in his presentation, if someone were to open a petition today, February 28, and have it open for 120 days, it could never be presented, so we'd have to put that warning up now.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, now, and that's my point.

Mr. Jeremy LeBlanc:

It's seven months before the election.

The Chair:

If you guys were not clerks at the moment, do you have a personal opinion on...?

Mr. André Gagnon:

We're always clerks, Mr. Chair.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We should call David back.

The Chair:

Do you see any rationale or fairness for the petitions not being the same?

Mr. André Gagnon:

The question you may want to ask yourself is whether citizens see the difference. What we're talking about here, certification of paper petitions, is something that's probably not known by a lot of people, I would say. The difference between this type of petition and the electronic type of petition is a detail that's probably not known by the vast majority of the population.

The Chair:

But is there any rationale, in terms of fairness, to have different systems for the two?

Mr. André Gagnon:

That's for the committee to decide.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Jowhari.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

Yes, thank you.

If I wanted to hedge, I would always go to the paper and make sure that I have more than 120 days left, because now that petition is always there. If the House rises, I get that petition back and I can give it to another MP or myself to table without having to go and get the signatures, whereas if I have an e-petition, as in the case that I explained, and now I've decided not to, there's no way it's going to be able to be tabled, so now, when it comes to the next Parliament, if and when I'm back, I have to launch another petition to be able to do that, whereas I wouldn't need to do that with the paper.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Yes, that could be a—

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

I'll just resubmit it for recertification.

Mr. André Gagnon:

We're talking here about a very small window of time. It's usually at the end of a Parliament—

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

No, I realize that, but what I'm saying is that with the paper, I always have the opportunity to recertify it, whereas with the electronic petition, it's gone.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Yes. Some would say, however, that you're in a position to gather many more signatures with an electronic petition. I think around 1,300 people a day sign petitions on the website. It's up to members.

Mr. Majid Jowhari:

No, no, I agree. It is easier because it's across the country, while being able to get the paper across the country.... I totally understand and support digital.

The Chair:

I'll take David's proposal as a motion that the status quo stay, and I'll open for debate on that.

Go ahead, Stephanie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

I believe we're in support of the idea.

The Chair:

Is there anyone else?

I will call the question. All those in favour of leaving the status quo in place so that paper petitions can be reinstated in the next Parliament but electronic petitions cannot, please signify.

(Motion agreed to: yeas 4; nays 3 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: That doesn't preclude our revisiting the matter, but that's your decision for now.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Changing it would have required changing the Standing Orders, right?

The Chair:

No, it would just be a report from us to Parliament, and Parliament would have to approve it.

(1250)

Mr. John Nater:

Chair, we talked briefly about that letter to the next committee, our letter to our future selves. That could be something we could include for further consideration at the next Parliament.

The Chair:

Sure.

Gentlemen, thank you very much. We always appreciate the great work you've done. This system is going to make it a lot more apparent to people.

Mr. André Gagnon:

Thank you.

The Chair:

On the Tuesday we come back, we have Bruce Stanton, Deputy Speaker of the House, who was here earlier today, for the first hour. The second hour will be the Centre Block rehabilitation witnesses from administration, related—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Why is he here?

The Chair:

He did a big article on this before we started the study.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, it was on the chamber. Okay, fine.

The Chair:

The second hour will be our initial meeting on the Centre Block rehabilitation, and people from administration will report back from BOIE if they've met on this.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's actually happening right now. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

When we come back on March 19, we will hear Mr. Stanton. Who else is there, afterwards?

The Chair:

We will hear Mr. Stanton during the first hour.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Yes.

The Chair:

During the second hour, the topic will be[English]project rehabilitation[Translation]

from the Centre Block.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Fine.

The Chair:

We will also discuss administration, and we will hear the witnesses’ statements.[English]

Related to Stephanie's study, the minister said she's available to come on April 9. Would that be okay?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

If that's when she's available, that's great.

The Chair:

It would be Tuesday, April 9.

Go ahead, David.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have another topic. It's a question for the analyst. In the fall of 2016 we started a study on the Standing Orders, which resulted in that famous meeting 55. I'm just curious as to whether the standing order study is still technically open.

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

This committee has a permanent mandate to study the Standing Orders. Any element of the Standing Orders that interests the committee is open to study.

The Chair:

Scott, can you remind me where your motion is?

Mr. Scott Reid:

You mean the motion about the long-term vision and stuff. I have it right here. If you have a second, we can put it on notice.

A voice: It's not on paper, though.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You can put it on notice early, Scott.

Mr. Scott Reid:

We have it in both official languages.

The Chair:

If we have unanimous consent, we can just discuss it. It's the one about carrying forward the study.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It was about the committee's long-term vision and plan.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

I asked Mr. Reid if he could send us an electronic copy. I don't perceive there being an issue, but if we can just get the copy sent to us, we can come back next time with an answer.

Mr. Scott Reid:

We'll send it out to all members of the committee by email in both official languages today.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I mentioned at an earlier gathering that in terms of the Standing Orders, the public accounts committee may be looking at forwarding a recommendation for change to this committee.

The meeting before this one was public accounts. I asked again if a majority is interested in getting those changes through. There is, so I would expect that shortly after we get back we will be receiving a request from that committee to look at some standing order changes vis-à-vis public accounts. It's not complicated and it shouldn't take a lot of time.

The Chair:

In 10 words or less, could you give us a sense of what they're about?

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, I can. There are two changes.

One is to insert into the mandate the word “non-partisan” to make it clear that public accounts is a different creature because of its oversight responsibilities.

Then the second one is to ensure that we don't repeat the absolute democratic nightmare that we went though—I won't say when—when a new government came in and wiped out all of the work that was being done by the public accounts committee.

There's a lot of tracking that goes on. There are commitments that are made from departments when they come, and some of those have timelines that can take up to a couple of years to be fulfilled. We have a system now that allows us to track every utterance, every promise and every commitment made, and we were halfway through developing some draft reports when all of that was just wiped out, based on the argument from the new members that they didn't know anything about it, so they weren't going to deal with it.

We want to bring in some changes so that no government can ever do that again when it comes to the oversight capacity of public accounts to hold the government of the day to account.

Those are the two major items.

(1255)

The Chair:

Could you try to urge people to do that quickly during the break time? Then we could do it on the 21st of April, maybe.

Mr. David Christopherson:

All right. As fortune would have it, I've been tasked with bringing back the recommendations to the committee, so I'll get on that post-haste and see if I can meet that deadline.

The Chair:

You can table them with the clerk so we have the 48 hours, and then....

Mr. David Christopherson:

We're on it, Chair.

The Chair:

Thanks.

Is there anything else for the good of the nation?

That was a good meeting. The meeting is now adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

La vice-présidente (Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC)):

Je déclare la séance ouverte.

Bonjour, et bienvenue à la 144e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Aujourd'hui, alors que nous entamons notre étude des chambres de débat parallèles, nous sommes heureux d'accueillir M. David Natzler, greffier de la Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni, qui se joint à nous par vidéoconférence de Londres et qui prendra sa retraite.

Félicitations pour votre retraite, monsieur.

Merci, monsieur Natzler, de vous être libéré. Vous pouvez commencer votre déclaration préliminaire.

M. David Natzler (Greffier de la Chambre, Chambre des communes du Royaume-Uni):

Merci.

C'est un grand plaisir pour moi de vous parler. Je pense que j'ai parlé de la garde d'enfants à votre comité il y a quelques années.

Aujourd'hui est effectivement ma dernière journée à titre de greffier. C'est pratiquement ma dernière heure de travail, et je ne voudrais pas être ailleurs.

Nous vous avons remis un document sur Westminster Hall. J'ai pensé faire quelques observations générales, après quoi je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions.

Tout d'abord, il y a 20 ans, quand tout a commencé, beaucoup de gens pensaient que c'était une idée assez folle. Comment la chambre peut-elle siéger à deux endroits en même temps? Soit tout le monde se rendait à Westminster Hall et la chambre était vide, soit personne ne se donnait la peine de se rendre à la chambre parallèle à Westminster Hall. Il n'y a aucune possibilité de tenir des votes là-bas, alors à quoi bon procéder à des travaux parlementaires si l’on ne peut pas prendre de décisions sur des sujets le moindrement controversés? On pensait que c'était voué à l’échec.

Ce n'était pas une idée britannique à l’origine, comme vous le savez probablement et comme le dit le document déposé. L’idée vient en fait de nos cousins australiens, qui avaient une chambre parallèle depuis quelques années, laquelle nous avons observée. Nous leur avons volé l’idée directement. Par conséquent, si vous pensez reprendre l’idée, rappelez-vous à qui revient le droit d'auteur parlementaire, c'est-à-dire à Canberra, et vous voudrez peut-être demander à mon collègue de Canberra de vous parler de sa plus longue expérience.

Au cours des 20 dernières années, c’est devenu un volet de notre vie parlementaire ici qui est bien compris de tous. Comme vous, nous avons beaucoup de députés. Nous en avons plus que vous; nous en avons 650. Vous êtes tous députés; de nombreux députés veulent faire des discours et soulever des questions, mais ils n'ont pas suffisamment de temps pour le faire. Westminster Hall leur offre cette possibilité grâce à une série d’une douzaine de débats de différentes durées chaque semaine et il est important de mentionner que des ministres sont présents pour répondre à toutes les questions.

Autrement dit, ce n'est pas comme un mur de graffitis. Il s'agit d'une série de questions stratégiques auxquelles les ministres répondent. Dans les débats plus longs, l'opposition a un créneau, tout comme le deuxième parti d'opposition en importance.

Ces débats se sont également révélés un endroit populaire pour faire des choses légèrement nouvelles ou différentes. Ils sont toujours un peu plus détendus que ceux à la chambre principale, en partie en raison de leur plus petite taille et de la façon dont ils sont aménagés. Nous avons choisi délibérément de ne pas utiliser le format face à face comme vous avez ici et comme nous avons à la chambre principale, mais de disposer les chaises en deux fers à cheval pour qu’on ait moins l’impression d'une division entre les partis. Je n'exagérerais pas, mais l'esprit de parti est moins présent. L'éclairage est également meilleur et l’ambiance moins rigide et menaçante, surtout pour les nouveaux députés, qui commencent souvent par faire un discours à Westminster Hall avant de faire un discours à la chambre principale. Le président le permet, alors leur discours inaugural est à la chambre, mais ils peuvent, pour ainsi dire, s'habituer à l'idée de parler devant des collègues à Westminster Hall.

C'est aussi, pour notre pays, un endroit formateur pour nos greffiers. Nos greffiers moins expérimentés sont responsables et s’assoient à côté du président; tant le président que les greffiers en profitent.

À mon avis, cette façon de faire n'a aucun inconvénient. Il n'y a pas vraiment de preuve qu’elle incite les gens à ne pas aller à la chambre. Les deux édifices sont très proches l'un de l'autre. Il est vrai que la chambre conserve une certaine ancienneté; parfois, les gens tiennent un débat d'une heure ou de 90 minutes à Westminster Hall, puis, quelques semaines plus tard, on entend dire à la chambre: « Eh bien, nous avons eu un débat à Westminster Hall, mais il est temps que nous ayons un débat à la chambre », comme si elle était supérieure.

En ce qui concerne les débats soulevés par les députés d'arrière-ban, il n'y a ni plus ni moins de conséquences pratiques, mais il y a un ordre hiérarchique inhérent. Je ne suis pas certain que ce soit une mauvaise chose. Comme je l’ai dit, cette façon de faire donne aux députés d'arrière-ban ou aux groupes de députés d'arrière-ban plus de possibilités pour tenir des débats et obtenir des réponses dans un délai raisonnable.

(1105)



J'aimerais ajouter une chose. Nous avons également un système de pétitions électroniques que vous connaissez peut-être. Si plus de 100 000 personnes signent une pétition en ligne, ce n'est pas garanti, mais elles peuvent s’attendre à ce que la pétition soit très probablement débattue. Ces pétitions sont débattues le lundi soir. C'est la seule chose que nous faisons le lundi de 16 h 30 à 19 h 30 à Westminster Hall.

C'est une mesure très populaire auprès du public. Le public n’assiste pas, mais beaucoup de gens regardent les séances en ligne. Ces séances portent bien sûr sur un sujet qu'ils ont eux-mêmes choisi, un sujet souvent un peu inattendu, un peu en marge, si vous voulez. Nous disons aux pétitionnaires que c'est à ce moment-là que le débat aura lieu et qu'ils voudront peut-être le regarder ou l'écouter, et c'est ce qu'ils font.

Au cours des dernières années, je crois que 8 des 10 débats les plus regardés au Parlement ont porté sur des pétitions électroniques à Westminster Hall. Le débat le plus suivi ne visait pas à décider si oui ou non nous prolongions notre campagne de bombardement du nord de l'Irak jusqu’en Syrie, comme on pourrait s’y attendre, mais plutôt à décider si nous devrions interdire au président Trump de visiter le Royaume-Uni. Il n'était pas président à l'époque, mais c'est une pétition qui a reçu beaucoup de signatures. Si je me souviens bien, 300 000 personnes l'ont regardé, et pas seulement du Royaume-Uni, mais de presque tous les coins du monde, y compris du Sud du Soudan, alors ne vous imaginez pas que Westminster Hall n'intéresse pas le public, parce que les principaux partis n’y tiennent pas de débat à l’étape de la deuxième lecture ou de rapport sur les projets de loi controversés.

C'est probablement suffisant.

Avez-vous tout entendu?

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Oui. Merci beaucoup. C’était très utile.

Nous sommes ravis que vous soyez parmi nous le dernier jour de vos 43 années de service. J'espère que si vous venez au Canada, vous viendrez nous rendre visite. Vous pourriez probablement nous en dire beaucoup plus. Vous êtes le bienvenu à notre comité.

Merci, Stephanie, de m’avoir remplacé.

Nous allons maintenant passer aux questions pour voir quels enseignements nous pourrons tirer de vos 43 années d'expérience.

Allez-y, monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Oui, et j’ai très peu de temps pour le faire, monsieur Natzler.

Je m’appelle Scott Simms. Je viens de Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador. Merci beaucoup d’être ici.

J'ai quelques questions plus précises, mais avant d'entrer dans les détails, j'aimerais vous poser une question au sujet du taux de participation à la chambre parallèle. J'ai beaucoup lu sur l'Australie et l'expérience de Westminster.

Diriez-vous que depuis la création de la chambre, le taux de participation a été meilleur que prévu, plus faible que prévu ou comme prévu?

(1110)

M. David Natzler:

Je suis ravi de vous rencontrer.

Je ne pense pas qu'on s'attendait à quoi que ce soit, et je ne le dis pas pour vous donner une réponse évasive.

M. Scott Simms:

Je comprends.

M. David Natzler:

La plupart des débats se déroulent dans un format standard. Un député participe à un débat d'une demi-heure, fait un discours de 15 minutes et reçoit une réponse d'un ministre pendant 15 minutes. Le ministre est normalement accompagné d'un secrétaire parlementaire privé, c'est-à-dire d'un autre député, d'un adjoint non rémunéré ou d'un whip. Toutefois, le représentant du parti de l'opposition n'est pas autorisé à participer, et l’on ne s'attend pas à ce que les autres députés participent. On ne s'attend qu'à ce que trois députés participent, et ce serait inhabituel s'il n'y en avait pas; il y en a presque toujours eu.

Il y a eu des malentendus au début avec le gouvernement — celui-ci ne prenait peut-être pas la chose très au sérieux et s’est rendu compte plus tard qu’il devait le faire —, il envoyait souvent le mauvais ministre ou mentionnait qu'un whip pouvait répondre aux débats. Ce malentendu au départ a été de très courte durée, et les ministres de haut niveau participent maintenant pleinement au débat à Westminster Hall.

Pour les débats plus longs — il y a environ 3 débats de 90 minutes et 2 débats de 60 minutes par semaine —, d'autres députés peuvent participer, et ils le font. Dans sa demande, le député doit montrer qu'il croit que les gens seront au rendez-vous, parce que l’attribution des créneaux est un processus concurrentiel. Lorsque cela s'est produit, il y a presque toujours eu assez de gens pour avoir un nombre suffisant d'intervenants, si je peux m'exprimer ainsi.

Ce que nous ne faisons pas, c'est de tenir un compte exact des personnes présentes à un débat. Nous l’avons fait parfois — il y a une dizaine d'années, je crois — et cela a montré une participation étonnamment élevée. Les députés aiment aller là-bas. C’est facile d’y faire un saut. Psychologiquement, c’est plus facile de faire un saut à Westminster Hall qu'à la chambre. Les députés sont toujours censés être là pour le discours d'ouverture, mais on y retrouve moins l’ambiance d’église que nous avons encore avec la chambre.

Je ne sais pas si vous avez cela à Terre-Neuve, mais...

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, nous le faisons. C'est à mon chalet dans les bois.

J'aimerais vous poser une question au sujet d'une disposition qui ne fait pas partie du Règlement canadien, mais qui fait partie du Règlement britannique. Je veux voir comment cela cadre avec la deuxième chambre, c'est-à-dire l'établissement du calendrier du gouvernement. Je crois que c'est dans les années 1990 lorsque vous établissiez le calendrier des projets de loi. Nous n'avons pas de calendrier proprement dit. Vous appelez cela guillotiner, je crois, lorsqu'il s'agit d'un certain débat; nous appelons cela attribuer le temps.

Lorsqu'il s'agit d’établir le calendrier pour un projet de loi, lorsque vous procédez à l'étude à la chambre principale, est-ce que le projet est renvoyé à la deuxième chambre, la chambre parallèle, pour que celle-ci en débatte?

M. David Natzler:

Non. Au départ, le Règlement prévoyait que les éléments non controversés de l’ordre du jour — c'est-à-dire les affaires du gouvernement, surtout les projets de loi — pourraient être renvoyés à Westminster Hall. En pratique, en 20 ans, ce renvoi ne s'est jamais produit, et je pense qu’il ne se produira jamais.

Deux dispositions rendent cette mesure inappropriée pour tout élément qui est controversé et qui exige également une décision, ce qui est différent d'être controversé, et il y a une distinction très importante.

Premièrement, on ne peut pas voter. Si la question est rejetée à la fin des travaux, si quelqu'un crie « non » et que d'autres crient « oui », le président peut simplement dire « nous ne pouvons pas décider ». En théorie, nous nous en remettons à la chambre. En pratique, la question ne nécessite pas de décision, il s'agit simplement d'un débat exploratoire sur une motion que la chambre a examinée. À une seule occasion, on n'a trouvé le temps d'avoir une division sur la forme dans la chambre principale. En somme, aucune question controversée n'y est renvoyée.

Pour ce qui est des projets de loi, vous avez raison. Presque tous les projets de loi d'initiative ministérielle sont maintenant programmés, ce qui signifie qu'après la deuxième lecture, une motion est présentée à la chambre, et est généralement adoptée, pour indiquer combien de temps le comité doit examiner le projet de loi d'intérêt public — autrement dit, la date à laquelle il doit en faire rapport — et elle prévoit aussi habituellement un ou à l'occasion deux jours pour le rapport — c'est-à-dire l'étape de l'étude — à la chambre. Presque tous les projets de loi sont programmés.

Guillotiner fait référence à une mesure un peu différente, parce qu'elle prévoyait généralement la durée de la deuxième lecture également. Nous le faisons toujours pour les projets de loi qui sont présentés à la hâte et qui franchissent toutes les étapes en une journée. Nous en aurons peut-être deux la semaine prochaine pour parler de l'Irlande du Nord. Ces projets de loi sont souvent déposés avec empressement. C'est la guillotine. C'est une motion que vous présentez avant même d'avoir examiné les projets de loi. C'est un élément très intéressant, mais il n'a rien à voir avec Westminster Hall.

Permettez-moi seulement d’insister sur le fait que des sujets controversés peuvent être débattus, mais qu’aucune décision ne peut être prise. Vous pouvez avoir un débat sur l'avortement, qui est un sujet vraiment controversé; ou sur le don d'organes, mais simplement sur la motion voulant que la chambre se penche sur le don d'organes. Il y a des débats et des discours enflammés, mais au bout du compte, aucune décision n'est attendue.

(1115)

M. Scott Simms:

Est-ce que beaucoup de sujets comme ceux que vous venez de mentionner sont débattus à la chambre parallèle? Si je dis que je veux tenir un débat exploratoire sur ma propre opinion sur le filet de sécurité pour le Brexit, est-ce qu’il aurait lieu à la chambre parallèle? Puis-je le faire, ou est-ce mal vu?

M. David Natzler:

Vous pourriez le faire. Cela ne serait pas mal vu. Nous avons eu beaucoup de débats à ce sujet.

J'aurais dû apporter le Feuilleton. Quelqu'un va peut-être aller chercher le Feuilleton d’aujourd'hui. Le directeur de la radiodiffusion est habile...

M. Scott Simms:

J'espère qu'il arrivera avant que vous ne partiez à la retraite.

M. David Natzler:

Pardon?

M. Scott Simms:

J'ai dit que j'espérais qu'il arrive avant que vous ne partiez à la retraite.

M. David Natzler:

Oui, et il me reste environ sept heures.

Des voix : Oh, oh!

Sir David Natzler: La source du sujet pourrait ressembler davantage... Je peux vous dire ce qu'il en est, ce qui est beaucoup plus facile que de donner des exemples théoriques.

Ce peut être un enjeu lié à l'éducation à Terre-Neuve — autrement dit, un enjeu local, mais d'importance nationale — ou ce peut être un enjeu national, mais qui ne suscite pas un vif intérêt pour tout le monde, mais seulement pour certains. Les députés veulent débattre de tout un éventail de questions qui suscitent un intérêt, pour ainsi dire, mais ils ne s'attendent pas à ce qu'une décision soit prise.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci, monsieur.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le greffier, d'avoir pris part à notre jeudi noeud papillon; le prochain intervenant a joué un rôle clé dans le lancement de cette tradition.

C’est au tour de M. Scott Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Merci.

Monsieur Natzler, c'est un plaisir de vous avoir parmi nous.

Il semble que le Feuilleton vient d'arriver, d'après le regard que vous venez de jeter à côté de vous. Si vous avez besoin de...

M. David Natzler:

Non, c'était à cause de la mention des jeudis noeud papillon. Je porte un noeud papillon et je suis sur le point de retourner à la chambre, mais c'est aussi le nom de l'entreprise de télévision qui nous offre le service. Il s'agit de la chaîne de télévision Bow Tie. Ils sont très heureux de vous avoir dans leurs bandes-annonces.

M. Scott Reid:

C’est un petit service supplémentaire que nous offrons.

Je veux simplement m’assurer de bien comprendre.

D'après ce que je comprends, d'après ce que vous avez dit, il n'y aurait jamais de vote à la Chambre des communes sur une question qui a été débattue à la chambre parallèle. Est-ce exact?

M. David Natzler:

C’est un malentendu de nature technique.

Si une question est débattue à la chambre parallèle, le Règlement stipule que si, lorsque le président met la question aux voix, on s’y oppose, alors elle ne peut pas être tranchée à ce moment-là et elle est renvoyée à la chambre principale. Toutefois, il n'y a en fait aucune disposition permettant de mettre la question aux voix à la chambre principale. Ce n'est pas mis aux voix automatiquement. Il n'est pas simplement indiqué au Feuilleton que vous devez tout à coup voter pour décider si la chambre s'est penchée sur la question du don d'organes. Il n'y aurait pas eu d'autre débat, et ce serait un vote tout à fait inutile. Personne ne saurait s'il faut voter oui ou non. Le vote n'aurait aucun sens, bien que nous tenions parfois certains votes du genre. Dans ce cas-ci, nous ne l'avons fait qu'une seule fois en 20 ans, pour une raison politique, un genre de ruse, et cette méthode n’a pas été populaire. Les députés ont demandé pourquoi nous votions.

C'est simplement une question qui peut faire l'objet d'un vote. Il n'y a pas de débat à la chambre parallèle. Ces débats n’ont lieu que si la chambre a examiné la question.

M. Scott Reid:

Comment sont consignés les comptes rendus des débats qui ont lieu à Westminster Hall?

Je sais que tout est mis en ligne de nos jours, mais dans ma tête, le hansard est un document papier. Peut-on lire les débats du jour à la Chambre des communes, puis trouver à un autre endroit les débats de la chambre parallèle, tout comme il faut faire une recherche distincte pour les débats de l'un des comités? Dites-moi comment on procède?

M. David Natzler:

Il y a deux formes de publication — en fait, trois.

Il y a le compte rendu écrit, le hansard, comme vous dites. Il y a aussi les comptes rendus de Westminster Hall. Ici, on a décidé de les distribuer et de les imprimer ensemble, les débats au quotidien.

Chaque jour, vous recevez le hansard, et au verso il y a la transcription intégrale de Westminster Hall, ce que vous n’obtiendriez pas des comités sur les projets de loi ou la législation déléguée. C’est la séance de la chambre, on la traite comme telle. Cela ne s'est pas fait sans heurts et cela coûte évidemment un peu plus cher. Toutefois, c’est un point très intéressant et cela montre qu’on le prend au sérieux.

Quiconque parcourt le hansard... bien sûr, il y a encore des gens comme moi qui préfèrent lire sur papier et qui ne vont pas nécessairement en ligne. En ligne, vous le trouvez aussi facilement que les débats de la chambre principale, mais évidemment sous une rubrique distincte.

La troisième forme est l’enregistrement audiovisuel complet, qui est diffusé en continu et accessible sur parliamentlive.tv, pour toutes les délibérations de la chambre.

(1120)

M. Scott Reid:

Que se passerait-il si je consultais le hansard en ligne pour trouver un débat en utilisant certains mots clés? Imaginons que je cherche « don d’organes ».

M. David Natzler:

Pardon?

M. Scott Reid:

Je lance cela comme exemple: don d’organes.

Imaginons que ce sujet ait été débattu un jour à la Chambre des communes et un autre jour à Westminster Hall. Est-ce que j’utiliserais la même méthode de recherche, et est-ce que cela donnerait des résultats différents?

M. David Natzler:

C'est complètement intégré dans les travaux de la chambre aux fins d’archivage, de transcription, d’enregistrement... absolument tout. C'est traité exactement pareil et c'est donc aussi accessible.

M. Scott Reid:

Un des problèmes que nous avons constamment à l’esprit au Canada, c’est la lutte contre les excès de partisanerie que nous menons sans aucun succès depuis un siècle. Certains députés, dont moi-même, espéraient qu’une chambre parallèle serait une tribune où il y aurait moins de partisanerie que dans l'enceinte principale. Vous sembliez dire que c’était un vain espoir.

Pourriez-vous nous dire s'il y a, oui ou non, moins de partisanerie dans votre chambre parallèle? Si elle n'a pas diminué autant qu'elle aurait dû, avez-vous des suggestions pour améliorer la situation?

M. David Natzler:

Comme disent les ministres, c’est une très bonne question.

La partisanerie est toujours présente. Il y a des débats parfois qui dressent les partis l'un contre l'autre, mais parfois non. Si c'est le cas, cependant, le langage sera aussi fort, le débat aussi vigoureux et les passes d'armes aussi acharnées d’un côté à l’autre qu’à la chambre principale.

L'ambiance est un peu différente, mais il ne faut pas oublier que chaque journée se termine par un débat d’ajournement d’une demi-heure, auquel le whip assiste, mais sans y prendre part. Cela se passe vraiment entre un député et un ministre. C’est la formule à Westminster Hall, et ces débats-là ont toujours échappé à la partisanerie.

Il arrive qu'elle se manifeste lorsque des députés, ou même le ministre avec sa réponse, obtiennent une réaction plutôt glaciale, mais on sent que c'est ici qu'on essaie de mettre le parti de côté. Évidemment, cela dépend un peu du sujet. Parfois, on n'y arrive pas, si le sujet a été soulevé dans un esprit partisan. Mais vu que d’autres députés ne sont pas là pour appuyer et encourager, cela ressemble plus à un combat singulier qu'à un de vos matchs de hockey sur glace où tout le monde crie. La nature du débat le rend moins partisan.

Je pense qu'on a observé au fil des ans un léger relâchement de ton à Westminster Hall, sans trop qu'on sache exactement pourquoi. C’est en partie à cause de la configuration en fer à cheval. Parfois, s'ils sont plus de cinq ou six, les gens doivent s’asseoir d’un côté ou de l’autre sans que ce soit vraiment défini, quel que soit leur parti, et ils peuvent se monter un peu plus coopératifs dans le débat. Je vous exhorte à réfléchir à la disposition du lieu. Je pense que cela fait une énorme différence dans le comportement des gens, et je ne suis pas seul à le penser. N'importe quel psychologue du comportement vous le dira. Je crois que c’est ce qui arrive à Westminster Hall.

J’ai ici les cinq sujets qui seront débattus mardi à Westminster Hall.

Il y a l’avenir des collèges catholiques de classe terminale, un débat d'une heure et demie, ce qui veut dire que beaucoup de gens veulent y être. L’éducation religieuse suscite beaucoup de controverse parfois, mais on ne verra pas nécessairement les partis faire bloc l'un contre l'autre. Je soupçonne qu’il y aura des gens de part et d'autre qui exprimeront des points de vue semblables, probablement pour appuyer leurs collèges catholiques.

Les relations du Royaume-Uni avec le Kosovo seront débattues pendant une demi-heure. Ce n’est pas un sujet qui prête à la partisanerie.

Il y a ensuite les investissements dans les infrastructures de transport régionales. On verra surtout des députés de l’opposition se plaindre que le nord de l’Angleterre n’en a pas assez, mais on en verra aussi un ou deux du parti ministériel se plaindre qu’ils n’en ont pas assez non plus.

On débattra pendant une demi-heure de l’effet du remplacement du tarif de rachat garanti sur l’industrie solaire, une question cruciale pour le gouvernement, parce que c'est lui qui a remplacé le tarif. Là encore, il n'y aura pas de partisanerie, vu que la question est soulevée par un député conservateur, mais il se peut fort bien que des députés travaillistes demandent la permission d'intervenir, ce qu’ils obtiendront. Le ministre présentera alors une défense très vigoureuse.

Enfin, il y aura un débat d'une demi-heure concernant la sortie de l’Union européenne sans accord sur les services de restauration du secteur public. Je ne comprends pas cela. C’est probablement une affaire qui sème la discorde.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

Sir David Natzler: Je comprends. Il s’agit de la directive sur les marchés publics en restauration du secteur public, qui comprend la Chambre des communes. Nous devons nous y conformer, alors nous n'avons pas droit à une politique d'achat préférentiel en Grande-Bretagne. Mais lorsque nous aurons quitté l’Union européenne, nous aurons peut-être droit à une politique « Achetez britannique » ou, bien sûr, si nous signons une entente sur le modèle « Canada plus », à une politique du genre « Achetez canadien ».

(1125)

Le président:

Merci. C’était très instructif.

C’est au tour de M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci beaucoup de votre exposé. C’était non seulement instructif, mais aussi agréable.

Je vous offre aussi mes meilleurs voeux pour votre retraite. Comme je m'apprête aussi à me joindre au club, je vous en souhaite une bonne.

M. David Natzler:

Je suis désolé d’entendre cela.

M. David Christopherson:

Eh bien, pas moi, ni ma famille d'ailleurs. Toute bonne chose a une fin.

J’ai trois questions. Je vais les énoncer et vous pourrez y répondre comme vous le jugerez bon.

La première, sans ordre particulier, concerne les périodes d'intervention, les créneaux. Vous avez dit qu’il y avait x nombre de créneaux. Qui les remplit?

Une des controverses qui perdure chez nous concerne le pouvoir grandissant des bureaux des whips sur les députés. Les questions et tout le reste sont établis à l'avance par le whip et le Président, qui dans certains cas se comportent en agents de circulation au lieu d'user de leur pouvoir discrétionnaire pour décider qui a la parole. J’aimerais savoir ce que vous en pensez.

Deuxièmement, quels changements avez-vous dû apporter à votre règlement, d'après ce que vous vous rappelez, pour que la chambre parallèle prenne sa place dans l’ordre des choses?

Enfin, vous avez parlé de l’ordre du jour. Je crois que vous avez dit qu’il y avait cinq sujets. Comment l’ordre du jour est-il établi?

M. David Natzler:

Je vais prendre les questions une et trois ensemble: l'ordre du jour et les créneaux.

Les whips du gouvernement n’ont absolument aucun pouvoir à cet égard, alors c’est entre les mains — l’équivalent du Règlement — du président du Comité des voies et moyens, qui est aussi le vice-président. Ce n’est pas théorique: il exerce le même genre de contrôle paternel que le Président exerce sur la chambre.

Cela ne veut pas dire qu’il est là souvent. Le président du Comité des voies et moyens ne préside pas normalement à Westminster Hall; d’autres le font, désignés par le groupe des présidents des comités qui traitent des projets de loi d’intérêt public, et ainsi de suite. C’est plutôt son « bébé » et non le bébé du Président; c’était l’idée il y a 20 ans.

La décision quant au nombre de créneaux est assez difficile, étrangement. Cela change à l’occasion, mais c’est finalement le président du Comité des voies et moyens qui a le dernier mot; cela ne figure pas dans le Règlement.

À l’heure actuelle, nous disposons de 13 heures. Il y a des créneaux d'une durée d’une heure et demie et d'autres plus courts, et le programme de chaque jour est un mélange des deux. Le président peut modifier cela et, au fil des ans, il arrive que cela se produise. Nous avons actuellement à l'essai des créneaux de 60 minutes, c’est-à-dire un compromis, vous voyez bien, entre ceux de 30 minutes et de 90 minutes.

M. David Christopherson:

Voilà qui est très canadien.

M. David Natzler:

Ce qu'il faut retenir, c'est que les whips ne décident rien de tout cela, ni la chambre elle-même, curieusement. C'est en réalité le vice-président.

Le sujet est déterminé en grande partie par un scrutin. Vous déposez un nouveau bulletin pour obtenir un créneau particulier. Vous pouvez y aller pour 30, 60 ou 90 minutes et voir ce qui en sortira.

Je ne crois pas que ce soit un secret pour personne, mais en plus d'avoir un scrutin, il y a certains aspects officieux — on pourrait appeler cela des « choix du Président ». Autrement dit, certains sujets qui sortent de la boîte ont peut-être échappé en partie au processus de sélection. Je ne sais pas comment cela se produit, mais ils se retrouvent de quelque façon à l'ordre du jour. Il y a des députés qui peuvent être très convaincants pour obtenir l'inscription d'un sujet.

Il y a aussi, je crois, un équilibre tacite à tenir entre les partis au cours de la semaine: s’il y a plus de bulletins dans la boîte qu’il y a de créneaux, on vise un équilibre raisonnable dans l'attribution des créneaux entre les différents partis. Cela n’a rien à voir avec les whips. Cela veut dire simplement que ce n’est pas une coïncidence si le mardi dont j’ai parlé... Eh bien, nous avons en fait un conservateur et quatre travaillistes, mais je ne sais pas qui a déposé un bulletin ou qui voulait cette journée-là en particulier. Je vois que la répartition est différente le lendemain. Il y a trois conservateurs, un travailliste et un député du SNP mercredi prochain. En général, d’après ce que je peux voir, nous n'avons pas tout le temps le même parti. Je n’ai jamais posé la question.

Le Règlement est bien simple. À l’article 10, nous venons de dire que... eh bien, vous pouvez le lire. Le Règlement n’a pas été difficile à établir parce que, sauf quelques articles, c'est le Règlement de la chambre qui s’applique à Westminster Hall. Quelques articles font exception, qui ne vous intéressent probablement pas, et je suis sûr que Charles Robert pourra vous en monter un. Il s'agissait en partie des pouvoirs de la présidence qui pouvaient différer légèrement.

Les procédures et les conventions sont les mêmes. Il s’agit de se présenter au début et de revenir à la fin, de la façon de s'exprimer, de l'endroit où s'exprimer — c'est-à-dire depuis votre siège. Ce n’était pas comme si nous mettions en place un nouveau style de chambre de débat, vous voyez ce que je veux dire. Le pouvoir de la présidence de... Nous avons maintenant des limites de temps à Westminster Hall, ce qui n’était pas le cas au début. Des limites de temps ont été imposées à la chambre, puis au bout de quelques années, le président du Comité des voies et moyens lui-même a dit qu’il serait bon d'en avoir à Westminster Hall. Nous avons eu un peu de mal à les appliquer, pour des raisons électroniques.

Sinon, c'est comme à la chambre. Il y a très peu de différence.

(1130)

M. David Christopherson:

J’ai une dernière question.

Étiez-vous unanimes à vouloir créer votre article 10 du Règlement?

M. David Natzler:

Vous me prenez au dépourvu. Je vais me corriger, ou quelqu’un d’autre le fera quand je serai parti.

Oui. Ce n’était pas une question politique. Cela a commencé par un projet pilote, comme le mémoire l’indique — ce que j’avais oublié, je dois l’admettre. Il nous arrive souvent d'établir quelque chose pour une année. Cela ne dure qu’un an, alors c’est un ordre sessionnel. À la fin, si cela fonctionne, nous pouvons le modifier, l’adapter et revenir avec. C’est comme cela que presque toutes les nouveautés ont été adoptées, avec un grand souci de prudence.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien.

C’est bon pour moi, monsieur le président. Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Christopherson.

Nous allons maintenant passer au noeud papillon en bois, avec M. de Burgh Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Beaucoup de choses m’intéressent. Je vais voir ce que je peux faire dans le temps dont je dispose.

Comme vous le savez sans doute, la Chambre des communes du Canada est actuellement en rénovation. Je crois savoir que Westminster le sera aussi bientôt.

Je suis curieux de connaître la structure physique des deux chambres l'une par rapport à l’autre, où elles sont situées géographiquement, quelle est la taille de Westminster Hall, combien il y a de sièges, physiquement, et quels sont vos plans pour avoir deux enceintes si la principale doit fermer pour cause de rénovation.

C’est ma première question.

M. David Natzler:

Est-ce que j'y réponds maintenant?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vous en prie.

M. David Natzler:

J’ai un petit cerveau. Je ne m’en souviendrai pas autrement.

C’est un problème. À l’heure actuelle, ce que nous appelons Westminster Hall est en fait la grande salle de comité. C’est une construction de la fin du XIXe siècle, une sorte de saillie à l’angle nord-ouest de Westminster Hall, qui est notre grande salle médiévale. Il est très facile d’y accéder à partir de la chambre de nos jours, même pour les personnes handicapées. Auparavant, c’était un problème majeur. Il fallait grimper des marches. Nous avons finalement obtenu nos ascenseurs, auxquels nous tenions vraiment. C’était un obstacle que nous n'arrivions pas à surmonter.

J'imagine qu’il faut environ trois minutes à un député pour se rendre de la chambre à Westminster Hall. S’il y a un vote à la chambre principale, comme je l’expliquais, les séances sont suspendues pour que les députés puissent aller voter à l’intérieur et autour de la chambre principale.

Je n’ai jamais entendu dire que des députés ont eu de la difficulté à s’échapper de Westminster Hall lorsque la séance était suspendue et qu'ils devaient se rendre à la chambre. Environ 70 personnes peuvent y prendre place. Je pense que c’est exact. De mémoire, on compte techniquement 70 sièges.

Étonnamment, il y a déjà eu presque autant de monde. Il peut y avoir un grand débat à Westminster Hall, et les députés se comptent par dizaines. Il y a très peu d’espace pour accueillir le public. Environ 25 personnes peuvent prendre place à l'arrière, comme dans une salle de comité spécial, semblable à la vôtre. Il y a trois ou quatre rangées de chaises qui sont très près des députés, ce qui est un peu inhabituel pour nous, mais c’est la même chose dans nos salles de comité. Nous avons tout l'équipement audiovisuel voulu, ce qui a coûté très cher.

En effet, nous déménageons, comme vous, et nous refaisons le palais principal. Nous n’avons pas publié nos plans quant à l'organisation des séances de Westminster Hall. Vous pouvez être assurés, toutefois, que nous aurons une très grande salle de comité tout près de la chambre principale, qui sera effectivement aménagée pour accueillir les séances de Westminster Hall.

Lorsque nous retournerons dans l’édifice principal — ce que vous prévoyez de faire aussi —, la question la plus intéressante sera de savoir si les séances de Westminster Hall se tiendront à nouveau dans la grande salle de comité. Certains députés disent: « Pourquoi ne pas utiliser la belle grande chambre neuve, la chambre temporaire que nous aurons tout juste quittée? Nous pourrions toujours aller siéger là. »

La réponse, l’idée générale, c’est qu’il faudrait que ce soit plus petit. La grande salle de comité est très agréable, presque gothique, mais bien éclairée. S’il y a quatre ou cinq personnes, on n’a pas l’impression d’être dans une pièce complètement vide.

(1135)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Y a-t-il un quorum à établir à Westminster Hall?

M. David Natzler:

Oui. C’est dans le document, et vous l’avez ici. Il faut deux ou trois personnes, je ne me rappelle plus. Autant dire qu'il n'y en a pas.

Il n’y a pas non plus de quorum exigé à la chambre, à moins qu’il y ait un vote. Il faut un certain nombre de personnes pour voter, soit 40, mais s'il n'y a pas de vote, on y voit souvent trois ou quatre députés seulement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez parlé des pétitions de 100 000 signatures. À quelle fréquence est-ce que cela se produit? En avez-vous eu beaucoup?

M. David Natzler:

Nous ne siégeons pas plus de 28 ou 29 lundis par année. Encore une fois, j’ai l’impression qu’il est très rare maintenant de siéger un lundi sans qu'il y ait un débat sur une pétition à Westminster Hall. Après un début un peu lent, le mot s'est passé que cela valait la peine d'y aller parce que des pétitions seraient présentées.

Le problème est qu’elles n’ont pas été organisées par un député. Elles sont présentées par un membre du Comité des pétitions, qui n'est pas nécessairement pour ou contre leur contenu, mais c’est pour lancer le débat. La plupart réussissent, en ce sens qu’ils attirent une demi-douzaine de députés qui sont disposés à en débattre.

Il arrive que ce soit un pétard mouillé, une pétition sur laquelle les députés n’ont pas l’impression d’avoir grand-chose à dire, mais comme vous pouvez l’imaginer, c’est assez rare.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez dit que la durée des débats varie selon l'intérêt que l'on s'attend qu'ils soulèvent. C'est la raison pour laquelle vous en avez de 30 minutes et d'autres de 90 minutes.

Je sais qu'ici les réponses de nos députés sont notoirement peu fiables. Souvent, ils annoncent qu'ils seront là mais ne viennent pas. Comment prévoir la participation à un débat?

M. David Natzler:

Nous ne faisons pas de prévisions. Cela appartient au député, ce qui pose un léger problème. Il prend la responsabilité. S'il demande un débat de 60 ou 90 minutes, il est très clair qu'il ne devrait pas et qu'il devrait inscrire sur le formulaire le nom des autres députés qui y participeront.

Impossible de les obliger à être là; vous avez parfaitement raison. Je suppose qu'environ une fois par semaine ou une fois par quinzaine, nous avons droit à un débat qui se veut plus long, mais même avec un long discours de la part du premier député, d'autres députés ne se sont pas manifestés et les attentes sont déjouées. Nous suspendons le débat pour savoir quand nous commencerons le prochain avec un nouveau ministre et une nouvelle distribution des interventions.

Je ne pense pas qu'il y ait une tache noire publique contre le député, mais il y a certainement une note privée pour indiquer qu'on n'est pas censé opter pour un débat plus long sauf si l'on pense pouvoir occuper tout l'espace, pas seulement avec soi-même, mais avec des collègues également.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez dit que les présidents de Westminster Hall sont des présidents de comité par opposition à des présidents à la chambre. C'est bien cela?

M. David Natzler:

Nous avons un système de comités à deux paliers, ce qui peut être trompeur. Nous avons nos comités spéciaux, qui étudient des sujets de leur choix, les comités dits d'examen, dont le président est élu par la chambre. Mais c'est une autre histoire. Ils ne sont pas concernés.

Ce sont les comités qui sont des versions réduites de la chambre; ils sont formés de 17 ou 20 députés, qui font l'examen détaillé des projets de loi à l'étape de l'étude en comité, ou qui étudient les projets de loi délégués, les textes réglementaires et ainsi de suite. Ils ont un président neutre choisi parmi un groupe d'environ 35 députés proposés par le Président de la Chambre des communes proportionnellement à la représentation des partis. Ce sont des députés chevronnés, qui touchent un supplément de rémunération. Ils président les comités pour l'étude des projets de loi d'intérêt public et les comités généraux, de même que Westminster Hall.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Au cours d'une semaine typique, combien d'heures siège-t-on à Westminster Hall?

M. David Natzler:

Westminster Hall siège le mardi, le mercredi et le jeudi, ainsi que le lundi pour trois heures s'il y a une pétition. Pour le mardi, le mercredi et le jeudi, mes calculs, qui sont peut-être erronés, donnent 13 heures. Je pense que c'est 13 heures plus une possibilité de 3 heures pour une séance du lundi, ce qui est beaucoup selon nos normes ou les autres normes existantes. Cela donne beaucoup de papier.

En fin de journée, les mardis ou les mercredis à Westminster Hall, le volume de papier est énorme.

(1140)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mon temps est écoulé. Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Le greffier doit nous quitter dans une dizaine de minutes. Si cela vous convient, je vais donner la parole à M. Nater. Si les personnes intéressées pouvaient s'en tenir à une seule question, ce serait formidable.

Allez-y, monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président, et encore une fois, merci, sir David, de vous être joint à nous le jour de votre retraite. C'est très apprécié.

Je vais m'éloigner très légèrement de Westminster Hall pour profiter de votre expertise sur un sujet légèrement différent.

Je veux parler du Comité des affaires des députés de l'arrière-ban. Pourriez-vous expliquer très brièvement la raison d'être du Comité des affaires des députés de l'arrière-ban, en précisant qui en fait partie et comment ses membres sont nommés?

M. David Natzler:

D'accord. Je vais tâcher d'être bref.

L'objet du Comité des affaires des députés de l'arrière-ban, qui est né de la recommandation du comité de réforme de la Chambre des communes en 2009, est de veiller à ce que, les jours où le gouvernement n'a rien à présenter pour son programme, plutôt que d'occuper son temps avec des débats stériles au cours desquels des ministres de second rang font de longues déclarations qui n'intéressent personne, il donne aux députés de l'arrière-ban le choix du débat, quitte à laisser la chambre décider, vu qu'il peut s'agir de résolutions qui pourraient être décisives.

L'idée était de mettre sur pied un comité de députés de l'arrière-ban, présidé par un député choisi par la chambre parmi les rangs de l'opposition, pour faire office de jury, si vous voulez. Les députés se présentent et font leur boniment devant ce comité en disant qu'ils aimeraient avoir un débat de trois heures, si possible, sur X. Ils siègent alors en public pour recevoir ces demandes. Ils se réunissent ensuite en privé pour décider lesquelles accepter, et combien de temps environ leur consacrer et quels jours.

Ils sont nommés en principe par la chambre et en pratique par les partis. C'était à l'origine un choix de la chambre, mais la formule a été abandonnée après certaines difficultés initiales, qui sont maintenant chose du passé.

C'est un véritable succès. Cela veut dire que le jeudi n'est généralement plus jour de vote. C'est le cas aujourd'hui, manifestement. Jeudi, il y avait encore des travaux en cours, Dieu merci, sur deux sujets émanant de l'arrière-ban. Le premier concerne les affaires galloises, parce que demain est la Saint-David, et que nous avons toujours un débat sur les affaires galloises à l'occasion de la Saint-David. Le débat concerne les progrès réalisés par le Royaume-Uni en matière d'émissions nettes de carbone.

Je regarde mon avertisseur à ce sujet aussi. Je remarque combien de députés prennent la parole sur la question. Ils se présenteront pour en parler. Ce sont les députés de l'arrière-ban qui ont choisi. Les ministres répondent, et l'opposition se joint au groupe, ce qui donne des débats qui veulent dire quelque chose. Parfois, les propositions sont litigieuses et peuvent mener à des votes et deviennent des résolutions de la chambre. En théorie, ces résolutions sont exactement la même chose que n'importe quelle autre décision de la chambre. Ce n'est pas parce qu'elle a été adoptée lors d'une journée de l'arrière-ban qu'elle est moins valable.

M. John Nater:

Je vous remercie. C'est très utile.

Je remarque que la Saint-David et le début de votre retraite tombent le même jour. C'est peut-être une coïncidence, ou peut-être à dessein, mais c'est merveilleux.

M. David Natzler:

Ce n'est pas une coïncidence.

M. John Nater:

Eh bien, c'est merveilleux. Bonne Saint-David!

M. David Natzler:

Merci.

M. John Nater:

Une simple clarification, s'il vous plaît. Vous avez dit tout à l'heure qu'aucun projet de loi du gouvernement ne passe par Westminster Hall. Est-ce à dire que Westminster Hall n'accélère en rien le programme du gouvernement, et que, de la même façon, Westminster Hall n'est pas un moyen pour l'opposition de bloquer les travaux du gouvernement? Donc, il n'a aucune incidence sur l'accélération ou le ralentissement de l'étude des projets de loi.

M. David Natzler:

C'est tout à fait exact. C'est neutre. À ce que je sache, à part s'assurer que les ministres se présentent, les gestionnaires des affaires du gouvernement — que je connais très bien — s'intéressent très peu à Westminster Hall, et c'est une bonne chose.

M. John Nater:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Monsieur Simms, vous avez une question.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Très rapidement, je crois comprendre qu'en 2009 ou 2010, ou peu après, vous avez apporté un énorme changement à Westminster, en faisant en sorte que l'ensemble des députés participent au choix des présidents de vos comités spéciaux. Comment cela se passe-t-il?

M. David Natzler:

Cela s'est bien passé. C'était une recommandation du comité de réforme de la Chambre des communes, dont j'étais le greffier.

Comme c'est ma dernière heure, je peux être franc. La plupart des députés étaient en faveur de l'idée. Ils y voyaient une très bonne idée. Cela ferait une plus grande place aux présidents des comités à la chambre.

Selon la coutume, les députés nommés à des comités spéciaux comprenaient un député chevronné du parti qui, c'était entendu, assumerait la présidence du comité, après quoi on s'attendait que le comité l'élise.

Cela n'a pas toujours fonctionné comme prévu. Parfois, ils ont choisi un autre député comme président, ce qui était bien aussi, et c'était un bon signe d'indépendance. Par contre, le gouvernement essayait ensuite d'exclure la personne. Il y a eu du grabuge en 2001-2002 lorsque le parti ministériel a voulu empêcher deux présidents chevronnés d'être nommés au comité.

Après ce coup d'État raté, le comité Wright a dit: « Pourquoi la chambre ne choisit-elle pas les présidents? Nous allons diviser les partis d'avance; les partis se réunissent dans une petite salle pour décider, dans un bras de fer, qui obtiendra tel ou tel comité, ce qui a toujours bien fonctionné jusqu'ici. Ils viennent ensuite déclarer que le comité X est conservateur, le X libéral-démocrate, le X travailliste, et que seuls les membres de tel parti peuvent être élus, le collège électoral — la chambre — votant selon un système de vote préférentiel. » Les députés adorent cela.

Ma foi, vous êtes députés, et les députés aiment voter. Ils ne semblent pas réfractaires la concurrence au sein des partis, si bien que, pour certaines présidences, nous avons quatre ou cinq candidats. On pourrait croire que le caucus dirait: « Non, c'est notre candidat travailliste pour le comité X », mais cela ne fonctionne pas ainsi. Ils sont très heureux de se faire concurrence, sans éprouver de ressentiment visible; ils doivent ensuite consulter, bien sûr, les autres partis pour les convaincre de voter pour eux par scrutin secret.

Une seule voix au sein du comité Wright a dit que cela ne fonctionnerait jamais parce que, d'abord, il n'y aurait pas d'élections et que tout serait décidé par les caucus et que nous aurions l'air ridicule; c'était la mienne, et j'avais complètement tort. Cela a vraiment été un succès éclatant.

J'espère que cela vous est utile.

(1145)

Le président:

Merci.

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, c'est extrêmement utile.

M. Scott Reid:

Ce n'est pas vraiment utile; c'est provocateur.

J'aurais une question de suivi.

Tout d'abord, les présidents sont-ils élus pour toute la durée de la législature?

M. David Natzler:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Il doit bien y avoir déjà eu une situation dans un comité ou l'autre où des membres du comité ont marqué leur mécontentement à l'égard de la présidence.

M. David Natzler:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

À ce moment-là, y a-t-il un recours, soit pour eux, soit pour la Chambre des communes, contre le président?

M. David Natzler:

Il n'y en a pas pour la Chambre des communes.

Bien sûr, dans le Règlement, s'ils donnent le préavis réglementaire et s'ils votent dans ce sens, les députés des deux plus grands partis membres du comité peuvent retirer leur confiance à leur président. Vous pouvez voir en détail la façon dont nous avons formulé cela dans le Règlement. Autrement dit, pour éviter le coup d'État d'un parti, on peut dire: « Nous ne sommes pas satisfaits du président. »

Bien sûr, nous avons connu des difficultés. Pour être franc, je craignais qu'il y ait des présidents parachutés et, d'après mon expérience de certains comités spéciaux, ils aiment choisir eux-mêmes leur président et être à l'aise avec lui parce qu'ils l'ont choisi eux-mêmes et qu'ils peuvent à tout moment s'en débarrasser par un simple vote, avec préavis. Mais, en général, cela n'est pas arrivé, et les présidents et les comités se sont bien entendus. Les présidents sont peut-être un peu plus puissants que jadis, mais leurs députés savent qu'ils ont cela en réserve.

À l'évidence, des présidents ont démissionné ou ont voulu démissionner. Je ne sais pas si certains sont décédés. Nous avons des changements de présidents, ce qui entraîne une élection partielle.

M. Scott Reid:

L'élection partielle est-elle, encore une fois, une élection par la chambre?

M. David Natzler:

Oui, c'est le même collège électoral, la Chambre des communes.

M. Scott Reid:

En fait, le comité qui constate un manque de confiance envers son président ne peut plus se réunir avant l'élection partielle par la chambre, ce qui peut prendre un certain temps, un jour ou deux peut-être.

M. David Natzler:

Non, nous irions très vite. Nous pouvons déclencher une élection partielle en très peu de temps, et le Règlement a été rédigé très soigneusement pour donner au Président de la chambre la liberté d'abréger les délais. Cependant, bien sûr, il faut du temps pour susciter des candidatures, car, pour obtenir la présidence, il faut un certain nombre d'appuis, de plus d'un parti.

Si cela arrivait, le comité ne serait pas totalement impuissant. Nous parlons ici de comités d'examen. Ils ne retardent pas l'adoption d'un projet de loi ou quoi que ce soit. Leur programme pourrait être brièvement interrompu, mais ils ont toujours la possibilité de nommer un président temporaire, comme ils le font en l'absence de leur président. D'autres personnes peuvent occuper le fauteuil, comme on l'a vu ce matin à votre réunion.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, mais nous avons un système de vice-présidents qui nous permet de faire la même chose. Nous aurions deux vice-présidents, en plus du président.

M. David Natzler:

Nous ne nommons pas de vice-présidents d'avance, mais tous les comités savent que c'est habituellement, de toute évidence, un des principaux membres de l'autre camp qui assumera la présidence si, pour une raison ou pour une autre, le président est empêché.

(1150)

M. Scott Reid:

Une dernière question.

Vous avez dit que ce n'est pas pour les comités législatifs, mais seulement pour les comités qui n'étudient pas de projets de loi.

M. David Natzler:

Juste. Ce sont nos « comités d'examen », comme nous disons, y compris, par exemple, le comité de la procédure. Le président de notre comité de la procédure est élu directement par la chambre.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous allons donner la parole à M. Graham pour la dernière question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

J'ai une dernière série de questions. Vous avez dit que Westminster Hall est très indépendant, qu'il ne subit pas beaucoup d'ingérence de la part des partis.

Les whips des différents partis essaient-ils, ou ont-ils essayé au fil des ans, de s'ingérer dans le fonctionnement de cette chambre ou d'en prendre le contrôle de différentes façons? Est-ce qu'ils l'ont toujours laissée agir à sa guise?

M. David Natzler:

À ma connaissance, non, mais je ne suis pas naïf. Il se peut qu'ils exigent que leurs députés proposent divers sujets de débat, mais j'en doute. À mon avis, les membres du comité n'aiment pas cela, ni d'un côté ni de l'autre. C'est leur place. C'est leur territoire, plus que la chambre à bien des égards, que dominent inévitablement les whips des deux camps, par le gouvernement et l'opposition, qui ont 20 jours par année, et par les partis. Les députés de l'arrière-ban s'offusqueraient si les whips agissaient ainsi.

Cela peut arriver. J'ai l'impression qu'un petit parti a peut-être essayé d'obtenir une place à Westminster Hall pour ce qui est en fait un débat très partisan, car il a moins de chance, si bien qu'il soulève un sujet qui l'intéresse surtout.

Je pense que c'est assez juste, mais, dans l'ensemble, le territoire est réservé aux députés de l'arrière-ban et il est respecté comme tel.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Bonne retraite, merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Comme vous aurez beaucoup de temps à votre retraite, si nous avions besoin de vous, pourriez-vous comparaître de nouveau?

M. David Natzler:

J'ai un successeur qui prendra la relève demain à minuit et une minute et qui sera au moins aussi qualifié que moi pour vous répondre, mais si le Canada appelle, je ferai toujours de mon mieux pour l'aider.

Je vous souhaite la meilleure des chances, et je vous remercie.

Le président:

Nos meilleurs voeux à l'occasion de votre dernière séance aujourd'hui, après 45 ans. Merci.

Le greffier est ici et il peut commencer tout de suite, mais nous suspendrons notre séance et reprendrons dans quelques minutes.

(1150)

(1155)

Le président:

Bienvenue à la 144e réunion du Comité. Notre prochain point à l'ordre du jour est une séance d'information sur la mise en oeuvre des changements au système des pétitions.

Les députés se souviendront que notre 75e rapport, que la Chambre a adopté le 29 novembre 2018, renferme plusieurs recommandations concernant des changements au système des pétitions. Certains de ces changements ont déjà été mis en oeuvre, et d'autres entreront en vigueur au début de la prochaine législature.

Nous accueillons aujourd'hui, de la Chambre des communes, André Gagnon, sous-greffier pour la procédure, et Jeremy LeBlanc, greffier principal pour les affaires de la Chambre et les publications parlementaires.

Merci à vous deux d'être là. Nous avons hâte de savoir comment nos suggestions seront mises en oeuvre.

M. André Gagnon (sous-greffier, Procédure):

Merci, monsieur le président.[Français]

Merci à tous.

Je ne prends pas ma retraite aujourd'hui.[Traduction]

Ce n'est pas ma dernière journée.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est ce que vous croyez. Pour autant que vous sachiez, peut-être.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. André Gagnon:

Pour autant que je sache. Merci de votre vote de confiance. Cela commence très bien la réunion.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous êtes bien parti pour atteindre vos 45 ans. Pas mal.

M. André Gagnon:

Oui. Merci.

Notre objectif aujourd'hui, comme l'a indiqué M. Bagnell, est de passer en revue les différents suivis du 75e rapport, qui a été adopté l'automne dernier.[Français]

Aujourd'hui, nous allons traiter essentiellement de cinq points très précis, et nous allons conclure par une présentation des esquisses du site Web, qui sera accessible au début de la prochaine législature.[Traduction]

Le premier point concerne le nombre de jours pendant lesquels les pétitions demeurent ouvertes sur le site Web. M. Bagnell a parlé de certains points qui ont déjà été mis en place. Celui-ci est déjà en place, depuis le 28 janvier, je crois.[Français]

Le fait que les pétitionnaires peuvent demander que la pétition reste ouverte pour 30, 60, 90 ou 120 jours rend les choses encore plus flexibles pour les différents pétitionnaires.

La première pétition autorisée par un député a été celle de M. Blake Richards, un député qui était membre de ce comité à ce moment-là. Cette pétition a été autorisée le 28 janvier 2019 et[Traduction]et la période réservée au recueil des signatures s’est terminée hier, après que le seuil de 500 signatures a été dépassé.

Vient ensuite la question des parrains. Les membres du Comité ont indiqué que l'association parrain-député-pétition pourrait, dans certains cas, être comprise de différentes manières par différentes personnes. Ce changement aussi a été apporté, de sorte que les députés autorisent désormais la publication des pétitions sur le site Web.

Troisièmement, les pétitions en format papier.[Français]

Pour ceux qui s'en souviennent bien, c'est un rappel au Règlement fait par Mme Finley à la Chambre qui est à l'origine de cette recommandation du Comité. Cette recommandation vise à ce que différents formats de pétitions soient acceptés, certifiés et déposés à la Chambre. Évidemment, cela augmente le nombre de pétitions qui peuvent être présentées par des députés et, certainement, la représentation des intérêts des citoyens. Cela aussi a été mis en branle.

Le quatrième élément que nous voulons porter à votre attention est la dissolution. Lorsque le Comité, à la 41e législature, a adopté les changements visant à permettre les pétitions électroniques, il a demandé à ce que tout ce qu'il y a sur le site Web des pétitions électroniques au moment de la dissolution devienne caduc. Il y a des cas où des pétitions en cours recueillent un nombre important de signatures.

(1200)

[Traduction]

Après la dissolution, le site Web est fermé et tout le contenu est déplacé. En revanche, dans le cas des pétitions sur papier qui demeurent tout au long de l’année, il est clair que si l'une d'elles a été certifiée par la Direction des journaux et remise à un député qui ne la dépose pas à la Chambre avant la dissolution, ce député ou un autre peut la faire renouveler lors de la législature suivante. Donc, les signatures qui figuraient sur cette pétition ne sont pas perdues.

Le Comité pourrait, par exemple, envisager de faire certifier après coup toute pétition électronique ayant atteint le seuil de 500 signatures au moment de la dissolution. Ce n'est pas actuellement possible, mais les pétitions pourraient être certifiées après coup, pour la législature suivante. Ce serait une possibilité. En outre, toute pétition électronique ayant été certifiée mais non déposée avant la dissolution pourrait être recertifiée pour l’autre législature. C’est une possibilité que le Comité pourrait envisager.

Par exemple, si quelqu’un versait aujourd'hui une pétition sur le site Web en demandant qu'elle demeure ouverte pendant 120 jours, celle-ci ne serait finalement jamais déposée à la Chambre, parce que 120 jours plus tard, nous aurions dépassé la date limite du 21 juin, à supposer qu'il n'y ait pas de prolongation. En fin de compte, elle ne pourrait pas être déposée à la Chambre, même si elle recueillait le minimum exigé de 500 signatures. Nous voulions vous le signaler. [Français]

Finalement, c'est toute la question des pétitions papier mises en ligne qui a fait l'objet, pour une large part, du 75e rapport que nous voulions vous présenter aujourd'hui pour vous montrer en quelque sorte le chemin parcouru.[Traduction]

Nous avons travaillé en étroite collaboration avec le Bureau du Conseil privé pour trouver une façon de traiter le plus efficacement possible toutes ces pétitions papier, et c’est ce que nous voulons vous présenter aujourd’hui. La collaboration a été efficace et nous sommes très heureux de dire que ce système sera en place au début de la 43e législature.

C’est ainsi que nous proposons de procéder d'un point de vue pratique. Comme d’habitude, tout député qui présente une pétition sur papier l’envoie à la Direction des journaux pour qu’elle soit certifiée. Le greffier chargé des pétitions, à la Direction des journaux, ferait traduire immédiatement le texte de cette pétition, car il est rare que les pétitions soient bilingues, puis effectuerait une vérification pour voir si elle est certifiée. Cela fait, le greffier chargé des pétitions téléchargerait un certificat sur le portail des députés. Cela signifie que le député pourrait déposer immédiatement le certificat à la Chambre, exactement comme nous le faisons pour les pétitions électroniques.

Une fois le certificat déposé à la Chambre au sujet d’une pétition papier, le texte de cette pétition apparaîtrait sur le site Web, exactement comme nous le faisons pour les pétitions électroniques, et le BCP en serait informé afin qu’une réponse puisse être préparée immédiatement — encore une fois dans la limite des 45 jours pour le dépôt de la réponse du gouvernement — de sorte que cette réponse soit déposée à la Chambre et puisse être en même temps affichée sur le site Web. La réponse serait alors présentée.

Cela répondrait à la demande du Comité, mais de façon beaucoup plus efficace que de faire circuler la pétition papier du bureau du député à celui du greffier chargé des pétitions, avant qu'elle ne revienne au député, puis soit déposée à la Chambre et ensuite envoyée au BCP, comme c'était le cas auparavant. Désormais, seul le certificat serait envoyé au BCP et ensuite renvoyé au député concerné. La Direction des journaux conserverait la copie papier de la pétition jusqu’à ce qu’elle soit déposée à la Chambre, comme c’est le cas pour les pétitions électroniques. Ces pétitions seraient régulièrement détruites, de sorte que les renseignements personnels y figurant demeureraient inaccessibles à tous.

Cela couvre presque tout.

Pour illustrer tout cela, Jeremy va faire une brève présentation à l'aide des maquettes, et nous serons très heureux de répondre à toutes vos questions.

(1205)

M. Jeremy LeBlanc (greffier principal, Travaux de la Chambre et Publications parlementaires):

Merci, André.

Vous avez des copies papier de ces maquettes devant vous, et elles sont également sur les écrans. J’aimerais vous expliquer brièvement à quoi ressemblera le nouveau site lors du lancement de la 43e législature.

La présentation du site Web des pétitions ressemble beaucoup à ce que nous avons actuellement pour les pétitions électroniques. La différence, c’est que nous avons rebaptisé le grand titre pour simplement « Pétitions » plutôt que « Pétitions électroniques », puisque nous aurons des pétitions papier et des pétitions électroniques. Vous verrez des boutons très évidents, des boutons d’accès rapide qui vous permettront d’accéder aux sections les plus visitées du site Web, notamment celle en violet qui vous amènera à toutes les pétitions électroniques ouvertes pour signature, puisque nous nous attendons à ce que la grande majorité des gens se rendent sur le site Web pour signer une pétition électronique. Cela leur permettra d’y arriver assez rapidement. [Français]

Ensuite, une section vous permet de faire des recherches dans toutes les pétitions. Sur ce site, il y a davantage d'information sur les pétitions qu'il y en a sur le site actuel. De plus, l'information est présentée de manière plus conviviale afin de mieux respecter les normes d'accessibilité des sites Web, par exemple pour les personnes ayant des problèmes de vision.

On a ajouté un bouton à droite pour affiner ou préciser la législature en cours. On va archiver les pétitions de la 42e législature, qui est en cours. Vous y aurez donc accès, ainsi qu'à celles de la 43e. En ce moment, comme il n'y a que les pétitions de la législature en cours, le bouton à droite n'affiche rien, mais il sera possible éventuellement de faire une recherche dans une législature en particulier.

Il y a aussi des icônes qui permettront de trouver rapidement des pétitions papier et des pétitions électroniques. Dans la liste, la petite icône qui ressemble à un écran d'ordinateur indique si c'est une pétition électronique, et l'icône qui ressemble à une feuille de papier, si c'est une pétition papier.[Traduction]

Ensuite, la page détaillée de chaque pétition est, elle aussi, très semblable à ce que nous avons actuellement. Quelques petits changements ont été faits pour améliorer un peu la présentation et la convivialité et pour faciliter l'accès. Nous avons également ajouté quelques autres éléments. Nous avons ajouté la langue dans laquelle la pétition a été présentée à l’origine. Comme André l’a mentionné, il est très rare que nous recevions des pétitions dans les deux langues officielles. Habituellement, elles sont dans l’une ou l’autre langue. Nous indiquerons quelle est la langue source, ce qui donnera aux gens une idée si le texte est une traduction ou la langue originale.

Nous avons directement intégré le texte de la réponse du gouvernement à la pétition, sur cette page. À l’heure actuelle, on peut cliquer sur une version PDF de la réponse qui déclenche l'ouverture d'une nouvelle version. Ce n’est pas une bonne chose du point de vue de l’accessibilité. En général, le texte des réponses est relativement court, quelques paragraphes sans plus; il est donc possible d’intégrer ce texte directement à la page de la pétition. Comme nous l’avons mentionné la dernière fois que nous avons comparu devant le Comité, l'automne dernier, nous avons signalé avoir conclu une entente avec le Bureau du Conseil privé selon laquelle les réponses aux pétitions nous seront transmises par voie électronique, de sorte que nous allons pouvoir nous débarrasser des tonnes de documents que cela représente.

Dès qu’une réponse est déposée à la Chambre par le secrétaire parlementaire, le Bureau du Conseil privé peut nous la transmettre par voie électronique. Nous pouvons la télécharger rapidement sur le site Web, et envoyer une alerte au bureau du député qui a présenté la pétition pour lui faire savoir que la réponse du gouvernement est disponible. Plutôt que d’avoir à attendre qu’une réponse papier soit envoyée à votre bureau par messager, ce qui prend un jour ou deux, vous recevrez une alerte par courriel indiquant que la réponse a été téléchargée sur le site Web et qu’elle est disponible. C’est quelque chose que vous pourrez très facilement partager avec les gens ayant éventuellement participé à l’organisation de cette pétition papier par l’entremise de vos propres contacts. C’est une amélioration. L’information sera disponible beaucoup plus rapidement qu’à l’heure actuelle.

Il y a aussi une caractéristique intéressante au bas de la page. Vous êtes conscients, j'en suis sûr, qu’il arrive souvent que la même pétition papier soit présentée par plusieurs députés ou par le même député à plusieurs reprises. Nous inscrirons le nombre total de pétitions identiques au bas de la page.

Dans cet exemple, il s’agit des services de santé. Ce sont toutes des données fictives, mais nous avons créé des exemples d’autres députés qui ont peut-être présenté la même pétition, la date à laquelle ils l’ont présentée, et un total cumulatif du nombre de signatures recueillies. Il y avait 148 signatures dans cet exemple, mais d’autres également avaient été recueillies, pour un grand total de 568, comme vous pouvez le voir au bas de la page. C’est une façon de suivre le nombre de pétitions identiques qui sont présentées, ainsi que le nombre total de signatures recueillies.

(1210)

[Français]

Dans la prochaine diapositive, vous pouvez visualiser la façon dont s'affiche le site Web des pétitions sur un appareil mobile. Comme il a été conçu pour le site actuel, il s'adapte facilement aux appareils mobiles afin que les gens puissent le consulter à partir de différents endroits.

La suivante montre la section des réponses du gouvernement, qui est maintenant intégrée à la section des recherches. Cela permet de faire une recherche dans toutes les pétitions ayant obtenu une réponse du gouvernement. Encore une fois, l'affichage a été amélioré et on présente un peu plus d'information sur l'état de la pétition.

Je veux également attirer votre attention sur le petit bouton vert qui est situé en haut de la page, juste à côté du menu. Je parle du bouton « député » [Traduction]ou « Member of Parliament » en anglais. C’est le bouton qui permettra aux députés d’accéder à leur portail, où ils pourront trouver de l’information sur les pétitions papier et électroniques.

André vous a parlé du processus que nous envisageons. Quand nous recevrons une pétition papier dûment certifiée à la Direction des journaux, nous enverrons un certificat électronique qui sera accessible dans le portail des membres. Au lieu que toute la pétition soit renvoyée à votre bureau par courrier interne, ce qui prend un jour ou deux, elle sera téléchargée électroniquement. Vous recevrez automatiquement une alerte vous informant qu’une pétition certifiée est disponible. Il vous suffira de consulter votre portail de député. Vous-mêmes ou votre personnel délégué pourrez alors imprimer le certificat et présenter la pétition à la Chambre. Il mentionnera le texte de la pétition et le nombre de signataires, comme nous le faisons pour les pétitions électroniques, sur une seule feuille de papier.

Une fois la pétition présentée à la Chambre, le certificat disparaîtra de cette section du portail, de sorte qu’il ne sera pas possible de présenter la même pétition à répétition.

Après avoir été présenté, le certificat sera retiré ou plutôt versé dans une nouvelle section, pour informer les députés. On y trouvera toutes les pétitions présentées et les informations les concernant, y compris la dernière mise à jour et leur progression dans le processus. A-t-on reçu une réponse et à quelle date? À quelle date la pétition a-t-elle été présentée? Vous aurez cette information ici. Vous pourrez également cliquer sur l’une ou l’autre de ces pétitions pour obtenir des renseignements plus détaillés à leur sujet.

Cela conclut ce que nous voulons vous montrer. Nous serons heureux de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Si vous êtes d’accord, nous allons nous contenter de questions et réponses ouvertes.

Allez-y, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J’ai un certain nombre de questions à poser.

André et Jeremy, vous êtes probablement au courant de l’étude qui a été menée par le comité BILI au cours des cinq dernières années au sujet de la publication de documents parlementaires sur Internet. Ce processus peut-il être utilisé pour faire parvenir tous les documents parlementaires au grand public, et a-t-on l’intention de le faire?

M. André Gagnon:

Il faut comprendre les différentes catégories de documents parlementaires.

Par exemple, il y a des rapports spéciaux, ne posant pas de problème, du Conseil canadien de l’énergie, qui sont déposés par le ministre. Il y a les réponses aux pétitions, aux questions inscrites au Feuilleton. Il y a des réponses à différentes catégories de rapports de comité, conformément à l’article 109 du Règlement. Ces différents documents sont tous considérés comme des documents parlementaires, et il y a aussi des ordres de dépôt de documents qui sont massifs. Il s’agit clairement d’un début en vue de déterminer si nous pourrons éventuellement envisager que toute l’information déposée par le gouvernement à la Chambre des communes, tous les documents déposés par le gouvernement, soient accessibles en format électronique.

Ce que nous faisons ici aujourd’hui correspond à la première étape. Comme vous pouvez l’imaginer, les documents déposés à la Chambre — je crois qu’il y en a environ 3 000 par année — représentent un énorme volume. De plus, d’après ce que nous avons compris — et les gens du Conseil du Trésor et du Conseil privé seraient mieux placés pour répondre à cette question —, il arrive que le format varie d’un ministère à l’autre, ou que les documents comportent des tableaux qui compliquent la tâche des personnes ayant des problèmes d’accessibilité.

Ces problèmes ne sont pas négligeables. Ils n'ont rien de bénin. Les régler pourrait être un bon objectif à long terme, mais il est clair que ce que nous avons fait aujourd’hui n’est que la première étape. Je crois que le Comité s’est penché sur la question. La Bibliothèque du Parlement a examiné une partie de la question, demandant que certains documents parlementaires soient numérisés, ce qui est une question complètement différente et certainement moins accessible pour les gens de l’extérieur.

C’est une première étape, pour répondre à votre question.

(1215)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans le même ordre d’idées, si le BCP renvoyait une réponse à une pétition comportant une feuille de calcul, par exemple, et qu’il vous envoie le fichier Excel, celui-ci serait-il affiché tel quel ou faudrait-il le transformer en PDF imprimable pour le déposer? Comment procéderiez-vous?

M. André Gagnon:

L’idée est que l’information reçue du BCP — et je parle ici des réponses aux pétitions — ne serait aucunement modifiée par la Chambre des communes, pas plus pour la forme que pour le contenu. C’est là-dessus que nous travaillons: nous voulons nous entendre sur le logiciel et l’aspect de ce qui sera présenté.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Que pourrait-il arriver à une pétition pendant la période d'ouverture? Quelqu’un pourrait-il la retirer, la corriger si elle comporte une erreur, ou est-ce que ce serait coulé dans le béton et que, pendant 60 ou 120 jours, elle serait absolument intouchable?

M. André Gagnon:

Jeremy peut me corriger, mais je pense que c’est la raison pour laquelle le Comité a décidé d’adopter les changements et de permettre 30, 60, 90 ou 120 jours. L’idée de ce blocage pendant un certain temps est de permettre ce choix initial.

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Je pense que l’idée, c’est qu’une fois qu’elle est publiée, il est très difficile de la retirer ou de la modifier. Si vous changiez le texte, les gens qui auraient signé la pétition auparavant n’auraient peut-être pas paraphé la version modifiée. Le changement peut sembler insignifiant, mais pour certaines personnes, ce peut être une grosse affaire. Ainsi, nous ne modifions pas les textes et nous ne retirons normalement pas les pétitions une fois qu’elles ont été publiées.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Une toute petite virgule pourrait être suffisante pour brouiller tout le sens, alors oui, je comprends.

Lorsque vous ouvrez une session en tant que député sur le portail financier et à plusieurs autres endroits, il accepte l’identification de votre navigateur et continue. Le système sera-t-il le même ou faudra-t-il ouvrir une session distincte?

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Ce sera la même procédure. Le portail vous reconnaîtra d'après le compte avec lequel vous aurez ouvert la session.

M. André Gagnon:

Ou d'après celui de la personne que vous aurez déléguée.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Bien, c’est utile.

Si quelqu’un imprime une pétition électronique et recueille des signatures sur papier, peut-on s’en servir ou doit-on certifier qu’il s’agit d’une pétition sur papier?

M. André Gagnon:

Il faudrait que ce soit une pétition sur papier.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce sont deux processus complètement distincts? N’y a-t-il pas moyen de fusionner les deux processus?

M. André Gagnon:

Non.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D’accord. Ce sera ma dernière question pour le moment. J’en aurai peut-être d’autres plus tard.

Lorsqu’une pétition est certifiée, est-ce que quelqu’un s'assure que les adresses sont valides?

M. André Gagnon:

Parlez-vous d’une pétition sur papier ou d’une pétition électronique?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

L’une ou l’autre ou les deux, d’ailleurs.

M. André Gagnon:

Cette question a été longuement examinée au cours de la dernière législature. Nous nous sommes penchés sur la façon d’attester la qualité ou la légitimité de la signature, et à ce moment-là, le Comité a adopté certains éléments pour déterminer quels types de signatures ne sont pas acceptables. Par exemple, ce serait le cas de toutes les signatures qui se terminent par gc.ca, voulant dire que les gens signent à partir de leur bureau au gouvernement. Quelques filtres de ce genre existent pour attester de la légitimité des signatures.

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

J’ajouterais que, pour les pétitions électroniques, la personne qui veut signer doit entrer une adresse courriel. Le système envoie un courriel à cette adresse pour confirmer que l’adresse existe bel et bien et la personne doit cliquer sur le lien envoyé à cette adresse avant que sa signature soit prise en compte. Pour une pétition électronique, il y a une validation de l’adresse.

Pour les pétitions papier, nous n’allons pas vérifier que Jeremy LeBlanc vit bien à l'adresse qu'il a indiquée. La vérification ne va pas jusque-là. Nous vérifions simplement si le format d’adresse est acceptable, si la signature semble légitime et si elle ne s'apparente pas à l'écriture de toutes les autres signatures de la page, et ce genre de choses.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si vous constatez que c'est la même écriture, diriez-vous que, selon vous, c'est la même personne? Vous ne pourriez pas le prouver non plus.

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Non, nous ne le pourrions pas, mais il y aurait des soupçons.

Honnêtement, cela n’aurait d’importance que dans le cas d’une pétition qui se rapproche beaucoup du seuil de 25 signatures. Une fois dépassé le seuil des 25 signatures valides, qu’il y en ait 26, 226 ou 2 026, cela ne changerait pas grand-chose sur le plan de la certification.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J’ai une dernière question sur les signatures électroniques.

Qui reçoit les données des signataires? Quand quelqu’un a signé une pétition, qui a accès à ces données?

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Le personnel de la Direction des journaux est le seul à avoir cet accès et, comme André l’a mentionné, les pétitions sont détruites à intervalles réguliers. Nous y avons accès pour valider ou vérifier s’il y a quelque chose de suspect, mais en dehors du personnel qui gère le processus, personne n'y a accès.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les députés qui ont contribué aux pétitions n’auront pas non plus accès à ces données.

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Non, ils n'y ont pas accès.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Avant de donner la parole à M. Reid, pouvez-vous me dire comment retourner à l'écran précédent? Faut-il aller au début et cliquer sur le site Web des pétitions en haut?

(1220)

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Pour accéder au portail sur le site Web des pétitions, si vous êtes connecté comme député, il y a un bouton en haut qui indique en vert « Député », ou « Member of Parliament » en anglais. Il suffit de cliquer dessus pour accéder au portail des députés à partir du site Web des pétitions.

De plus, chaque fois que quelque chose apparaît dans votre portail, vous recevrez un avis par courriel et vous pourrez cliquer sur un lien qui vous y mènera.

Le président:

Sur cet écran d’ouverture, est-ce en cliquant sur « Créer », que l'on a le choix entre le papier ou l’électronique?

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Ce serait pour créer une pétition électronique. La section « À propos » contient des modèles pour la création de pétitions papier, mais le lien « Créer »...

Le président:

Vous devez aller d’abord à la section « À propos ».

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Il y a des liens vers un guide sur les pétitions papier qui contient des modèles et de l’information. « Créer » serait vraiment pour créer une pétition électronique.

Le président:

Ce n’est qu’une idée, mais ne croyez-vous pas que ce serait plus clair si à l’écran d’ouverture on précisait « Créer pétition papier » ou « Créer pétition électronique », ou quelque chose dans ce genre? Il s'agirait d'y penser.

C’est au tour de M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci à tous deux d’être ici. Je vous félicite de ces améliorations très judicieuses. J’aime particulièrement l’idée de comptabiliser le nombre de signatures accumulées.

Il y a un processus à la Colline du Parlement que je trouve frustrant. Si je reçois une pétition avec plusieurs milliers de signatures, je la comprime en un nombre minimal de pages et je la distribue le plus largement possible. Quiconque siège à la période des pétitions à la Chambre sait que la même pétition sera mentionnée à maintes reprises, probablement dans le but de créer l’illusion qu’il y a un plus grand appui pour cette préoccupation que pour celles qui sont exprimées dans d’autres pétitions.

Ce qui est un peu la tragédie de la Chambre des communes, c'est de voir des gens gaspiller beaucoup de temps à répéter sans cesse la même chose. Je le compare à faire de la surpêche dans les lieux de pêche. Ce changement aidera peut-être à contourner ce problème en montrant le soutien réel qu’il y a pour chaque sujet, alors je vous en félicite.

Soit dit en passant, je suis aussi coupable que n’importe qui de participer à ce genre de choses à la Chambre.

J’aimerais poser quelques questions d'ordre technique.

Si une pétition est présentée dans une langue officielle, elle est traduite. L’auteur de la pétition a-t-il l’occasion de voir la traduction avant qu’elle ne soit présentée, ou est-il simplement présumé que c’est...

M. André Gagnon:

Parlons-nous ici de la pétition électronique ou de la...

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis désolé; je parle de la pétition électronique.

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Dans les deux cas, nous ne renverrons pas la traduction à des fins de validation à moins que le pétitionnaire nous le demande expressément à l’avance. Habituellement, ce n’est pas le cas.

M. Scott Reid:

Permettez-moi de poser une question légèrement différente. Si vous l’avez dans les deux langues officielles — je parle des pétitions électroniques et non des pétitions papier —, vérifiez-vous s'il s'agit d'une traduction fidèle? La question évidente est la suivante: en cas d'inexactitude, que feriez-vous?

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

S’il s’agit d’une pétition électronique, l’utilisateur n’a pas la possibilité de l’entrer dans les deux langues. L’écran ne lui permet pas d’entrer le texte en anglais et en français. C’est n’importe...

M. Scott Reid:

Ils doivent choisir une langue.

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Ils choisissent la langue dans laquelle ils présentent la pétition, et il y a des règles qui interdisent aux gens d’avoir deux pétitions ouvertes simultanément sur le même sujet. Si vous tentiez de présenter la même pétition dans une autre langue, ce ne serait pas permis parce qu’il s’agit de la même pétition. On est donc obligé de la présenter dans une seule langue.

Toutefois, comme je l’ai dit, si un pétitionnaire souhaite vérifier la traduction ou avoir son mot à dire sur sa qualité, nous pouvons certainement collaborer avec lui. Il y a une adresse courriel à laquelle il peut envoyer des questions, et nous lui répondons.

M. Scott Reid:

Ce comité a tenu de longues audiences et a publié un rapport sur l’utilisation des langues autochtones au Canada, et il y a eu un intérêt considérable à la Chambre, en particulier pour l’utilisation des langues autochtones dans les délibérations.

D’un point de vue pratique, j’ai exprimé mes propres réserves quant à la facilité avec laquelle il est possible de parvenir à une utopie dans laquelle un député peut commencer à parler une langue non officielle à la Chambre et s’attendre à être compris. Bien que nous ayons fait de notre mieux pour trouver une solution viable, la réalité est qu’il y a des limites à ce qui peut être fait.

Présenter une pétition ou avoir une pétition disponible dans l’une de nos langues autochtones, est-ce une option à l’heure actuelle? Sinon, est-ce le genre de chose que l’on pourrait faire à condition d'avoir des directives appropriées de la Chambre?

(1225)

M. André Gagnon:

De toute évidence, aujourd’hui, les deux seules langues qui peuvent être utilisées dans une pétition sont le français ou l’anglais. Cela dit, lorsqu’une pétition est déposée à la Chambre, rien n’empêche une personne de s'exprimer en une langue autochtone.

Pour ce qui est de l’affichage sur le site Web, si nous parlons de...

M. Scott Reid:

C’est ce que je veux savoir.

M. André Gagnon:

... le fait de l’avoir dans une autre langue exigerait probablement un changement au Règlement et certainement dans la pratique, et il faudrait aussi préciser les différentes langues qui seraient permises.

M. Scott Reid:

Je pose cette question en partie parce que nous venons d’avoir un débat à l’étape de la deuxième lecture sur la Loi sur les langues autochtones. Je ne me souviens pas du numéro du projet de loi, mais je suis sûr que vous le connaissez.

M. André Gagnon:

C’est le projet de loi C-91.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui. Ma propre intervention visait à attirer l’attention de la Chambre sur le fait que, dans le cas d’une langue autochtone en particulier, l’inuktitut, une très forte proportion de personnes qui parlent cette langue sont unilingues. Ce ne sont pas toutes les langues autochtones qui ont une forme écrite ou une forme d'écriture consensuelle, mais ce n’est pas le cas de l’inuktitut, qui a une forme d'écriture syllabaire qui est généralement comprise par les nombreux locuteurs de cette langue. C’est littéralement la seule langue que beaucoup de ces gens comprennent ou peuvent lire. Si quelqu’un voulait présenter une pétition sur quelque chose qui concerne le Nunavut, à ce stade-ci il ne serait pour ainsi dire pas possible de la présenter dans la langue, qui est la seule langue parlée par une proportion importante de la population de ce territoire, pour donner un exemple concret.

M. André Gagnon:

Parlons d’une pétition sur papier, qui est beaucoup plus facile à mettre en oeuvre. Si cette pétition était rédigée dans une langue autochtone et, sur le côté, en anglais ou en français, elle pourrait être reçue à la Chambre. Si nous parlons ici de pétitions électroniques, il faudrait probablement que le Comité intervienne en formulant une recommandation qui serait éventuellement adoptée par la Chambre.

M. Scott Reid:

C’est très utile et, comme vous l’avez probablement deviné, mes commentaires s’adressaient moins à vous que pour donner matière à réflexion aux autres membres du Comité. Je l’apprécie beaucoup.

J’ai une dernière question. Pas sur cet écran, mais sur un autre, vous avez montré des mots clés associés à une pétition. Je suppose que si je cherchais un mot clé comme « cannabis », par exemple, je verrais essentiellement toutes les pétitions qui contiennent ce mot clé.

M. André Gagnon:

Oui, ou ce pourrait être « marijuana », par exemple, parce qu’il y a d’autres termes associés aux différentes...

M. Scott Reid:

Oui.

Voilà, l’écran s'est affiché de nouveau. Je regarde vers le bas, et le mot « cannabis » est facile à comprendre. C’était la première pétition. E-1528. Si je regarde la deuxième, il y a des mots clés qui ne sont peut-être pas intuitifs.

Comment choisissez-vous les mots clés? Suivez-vous un protocole?

M. André Gagnon:

Les mêmes personnes qui travaillent à nos publications parlementaires nous aident aussi. Nous les appelons des agents de gestion de l’information. Ils ont un livre de terminologie, si je peux m’exprimer ainsi. Essentiellement, lorsqu’il est question de cannabis, il y aurait aussi « marijuana » ou « drogues », les différents mots associés à la terminologie présentée.

De toute évidence, si la pétition en cours de préparation comporte une terminologie définie, elle y figurera, comme vous pouvez l’imaginer.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, et c’est un très bon exemple de ce que je veux dire. Je suis heureux que vous l’ayez mentionné. Par exemple, si j’essaie d’encourager les gens à signer une pétition, et que la pétition que j’ai en tête porte sur l’assurance-médicaments, et si je veux en venir à... Vous pouvez voir à quel point le terme « drogue » pose problème, mais il s’agit de médicaments d’ordonnance, et non de drogues illégales, alors que quelqu’un d’autre essaie de faire signer une pétition portant sur le LSD, l’héroïne ou autre. Vous pouvez voir qu’il y a un certain chevauchement qui est problématique en soi.

Je lance cela comme un commentaire plutôt qu’une question, mais puis-je demander si le livre qu’ils utilisent est une source dont nous puissions disposer sur demande? Est-ce le genre de chose que nous pourrions examiner? Je ne doute pas de leur objectivité ni de leurs efforts; je suis simplement curieux de savoir ce qu’il contient.

(1230)

M. André Gagnon:

Il s’agit d’un document évolutif. Je n’aurais pas dû utiliser le mot « livre », parce qu’il s’agit plutôt d’un document évolutif.

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

À vrai dire, il s’agit plutôt d’une base de données.

M. André Gagnon:

Il s’agit plutôt d’une base de données dont ils peuvent dégager diverses terminologies, et qui évolue en fonction de la nature des débats à la Chambre. C’est clairement lié au travail qui se fait à la Chambre et dans les comités.

M. Scott Reid:

C’est très utile. Merci beaucoup.

La vice-présidente (Mme Stephanie Kusie):

Y a-t-il d’autres questions?

Monsieur de Burgh Graham, vous avez la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J’ai quelques questions à poser.

Vous étiez ici pour le groupe de témoins précédent lorsque nous avons discuté d’une chambre de débat parallèle et de l’idée des 100 000 signatures pour créer un débat. Y a-t-il déjà eu une telle pratique au Canada?

M. André Gagnon:

Au cours de la dernière législature, cette question a fait l’objet de nombreuses discussions, et si je me souviens bien, c'est également arrivé au cours de la présente législature, lorsque M. Kennedy Stewart a présenté une motion à ce sujet.

En ce qui concerne la possibilité d’avoir un débat au Canada sur différentes législatures, je ne suis pas certain que ce soit le cas.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Faudrait-il modifier le Règlement? J’imagine que oui.

M. André Gagnon:

Très probablement, oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais m’écarter un peu du sujet pour poursuivre dans la même veine que Scott.

L’une des choses qui m’a toujours rendu fou comme personne bilingue, c’est que le hansard est disponible en anglais ou en français, mais il n’y a pas de hansard non traduit disponible en ligne. Pour les options en ligne, il serait vraiment utile d'offrir les débats en anglais, en français et tels que prononcés. Je vous demande de bien vouloir finir par le faire. Je vous en saurais gré.

Dans la même veine, lorsqu’on regarde la page de profil d’un député sur le site Web du Parlement, les motions sont pratiquement impossibles à suivre. Elles ne passent pas par LEGISinfo comme il se devrait. La plupart de nos motions d’initiative parlementaire, qui relèvent des affaires émanant des députés, devraient figurer dans LEGISinfo. Si vous pouviez régler cela aussi, je vous en serais reconnaissant.

Voilà ce que j’avais à dire. Je ne sais pas si vous avez des commentaires à ce sujet.

M. André Gagnon:

Comme son titre l’indique, Jeremy est responsable des publications parlementaires, alors il pourrait vous dire...

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

J’ai pris des notes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous pourrions discuter plus longtemps.

Merci.

M. André Gagnon:

Vous êtes en difficulté.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y est habitué de toute façon.

Merci. [Français]

La vice-présidente (Mme Stephanie Kusie):

Merci, monsieur Graham.[Traduction]

Quelqu’un a-t-il d’autres questions à poser à nos invités?

Je m’en remets au président.

Le président:

Merci, Stephanie.

J’ai cru comprendre, d’après votre exposé, qu’il y a un point dont le Comité pourrait discuter et sur lequel il pourrait prendre une décision; il porte sur ce qui se passe à la dissolution. À l’heure actuelle, vous avez dit que les pétitions papier peuvent être reportées, mais pas les pétitions électroniques.

M. André Gagnon:

Les pétitions sur papier peuvent être recertifiées. Quant aux pétitions électroniques, elles ne le peuvent pas. Elles perdent leur pertinence le jour de la dissolution.

Le président:

Si le Comité était en faveur de leur accorder une valeur égale, cela exigerait-il une modification du Règlement?

M. André Gagnon:

Il suffirait probablement simplement d’un rapport à la Chambre. Ce n’est pas actuellement prévu dans le Règlement. C’était dans le rapport qui a été adopté par la Chambre au cours de la dernière législature.

Le président:

Les membres du Comité ont-ils une opinion à ce sujet? Les pétitions sur papier peuvent être reportées; les pétitions électroniques ne le peuvent pas. Il serait logique d’avoir une certaine symétrie. Il me semble qu’il serait logique d’avoir les deux, ou ni l'une ni l'autre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J’ai une question à ce sujet.

Pour ce qui est des pétitions papier, il n’y a pas de date, alors on ne sait pas à quand elles remontent. On les renouvelle simplement parce qu’il y a une pétition. Quant aux pétitions électroniques, on connaît la date de leur création, et il a donc toujours été question de les reporter à la législature suivante au besoin. Cela a-t-il une incidence sur cette question? Pensez-vous qu’une législature soit tenue de reprendre ce qu'a laissé la précédente ou que la pétition est à ce point distincte qu’elle est sans précédent?

M. André Gagnon:

Ce serait tout à fait compréhensible, car s’il y a un changement de gouvernement et un des enjeux qui font partie d’une pétition de la législature précédente n’a rien à voir avec la suivante — parce que le nouveau gouvernement a décidé de procéder autrement —, alors ce serait...

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Ou il traite d’un projet de loi, qui ne serait plus devant la Chambre.

M. André Gagnon:

Exactement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il serait peut-être préférable que la pétition soit toujours disponible sur le site Web et que quelqu’un puisse l’adopter, plutôt que de la reporter automatiquement. Je ne crois pas qu’il faudrait modifier le Règlement pour cela.

Est-ce quelque chose que l'on peut faire sans modifier les règles? Le site Web pourrait simplement dire: « Ces pétitions sont orphelines en raison de la dissolution du Parlement. Si vous voulez en récupérer une au lieu d'avoir à recommencer — parce qu’elle a déjà été traduite —, cliquez ici ».

(1235)

M. André Gagnon:

Ce serait une possibilité, oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce quelque chose où nous devons intervenir ou pouvez-vous le faire tout simplement?

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Comme André l’a mentionné, le comité précédent, au cours de la dernière législature, a publié un rapport très prescriptif sur la façon de mettre en place le système des pétitions électroniques. L’une de ces directives claires était qu’au moment de la dissolution, le site devait être complètement désactivé. Toutes ces signatures devaient être fermées et aucune autre mesure ne devait être prise à leur égard. Je pense que pour changer cela, qui était une directive claire, il nous faudrait probablement une autre directive claire.

Je ne dirais pas non plus que les pétitions sont nécessairement orphelines. Si un député défend une cause en particulier et est impliqué ou associé à une pétition, ce qui n’est peut-être pas le cas, mais qui l’est parfois, et que ce député est réélu, la pétition n’est peut-être pas vraiment orpheline. Il se peut que le député se préoccupe encore beaucoup de cette question et qu’il veuille toujours présenter la pétition, ou qu’il y ait même quelqu’un dans sa circonscription qui veuille le faire. Elles ne sont pas nécessairement orphelines, même si certaines le seront, simplement parce qu’il y a des députés qui ne seront plus là pour la prochaine législature.

M. André Gagnon:

Mais les signatures seraient perdues.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je pense qu’il est logique de perdre les signatures. Si quelqu’un veut vraiment que la pétition aille de l’avant, rien ne l’empêche de prendre le texte et de le présenter de nouveau, si le texte est toujours disponible.

Le texte d’une pétition antérieure incomplète serait-il toujours disponible sur le site Web, ou l'aura-t-on complètement effacé?

M. André Gagnon:

Il serait disponible.

M. David de Burgh Graham: C’est tout ce qu'il faut.

M. André Gagnon: Il s’agit maintenant de la question des signatures.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les signatures doivent disparaître. Je pense que c’est correct, à mon avis.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Jowhari.

M. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.):

Quand c’est électronique, et disons que cela fait plus de 120 jours... Je pose la question précisément parce que j’ai une pétition que j’ai décidé de ne pas soumettre parce que j'attends le bon moment pour la déposer. Si la Chambre ajourne ses travaux le 21, cette pétition n'est plus, alors que, s’il s’agissait d’une pétition imprimée, elle serait toujours valable, n’est-ce pas? Est-ce que c'est à cause des signatures qui appuient cette pétition après vérification, et que c'est perdu ensuite?

M. André Gagnon:

La différence, c’est que la pétition imprimée peut être recertifiée, ce qui n’est pas le cas pour...

M. Majid Jowhari:

Est-ce que c'est parce qu’il y a des signatures qu’elle peut être recertifiée?

M. André Gagnon:

C’est parce que c’est toujours ainsi qu'on a procédé.

M. Majid Jowhari:

D’accord. Cela n’a rien à voir avec le fait qu’elle pourrait être recertifiée parce qu'il y a des signatures; c’est une question de procédure.

M. André Gagnon:

Oui, c’est une décision du Comité...

M. Majid Jowhari:

À titre de précision, est-ce que nous essayons d’assurer la parité entre les pétitions numériques et les pétitions imprimées, ou est-ce que nous disons que la pétition numérique restera telle quelle de toute façon?

M. André Gagnon:

C’est une préoccupation du Comité depuis le début. La question a été soulevée cours de la dernière législature. Compte tenu des changements proposés dans le 75e rapport, par exemple, selon lesquels le texte des pétitions imprimées et électroniques devrait être affiché sur le site Web, le Comité s’est toujours beaucoup soucié de veiller à ce que les pratiques relatives à ces différents types de pétitions soient aussi semblables que possible. Si on adoptait un changement permettant que des pétitions électroniques ayant recueilli 500 signatures soient présentées au cours de la prochaine législature, on irait exactement dans le même sens.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Pour que les gens comprennent bien la mécanique, si le Parlement ajourne ses travaux le 21 juin, les pétitions pourront quand même être présentées mercredi, n’est-ce pas?

M. André Gagnon:

Non.

Le président:

Je croyais qu’il n’était pas nécessaire de présenter des pétitions à la Chambre. Je pensais qu’il y avait une possibilité en ce sens.

M. André Gagnon:

Le troisième mercredi de chaque mois où la Chambre ne siège pas — je crois que c’est le troisième mercredi...

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Ce serait le mercredi suivant le 15...

M. André Gagnon:

Oui.

Ce jour-là, le gouvernement peut déposer une réponse et déposer, auprès de la Direction des journaux, les documents nécessaires en vertu du Règlement ou de différentes lois.

Le gouvernement ne peut pas déposer de documents qu’il souhaite simplement partager si ces documents ne sont pas demandés ou fondés sur des lois. De même, les pétitions imprimées ne peuvent pas être déposées à la Direction des journaux le troisième mercredi de chaque mois.

Le président:

Je pensais que dans le bon vieux temps...

M. André Gagnon:

Vous pouvez déposer des pétitions à la Chambre auprès du greffier. Vous pouvez venir à la table et nous présenter des pétitions. Les pétitions déposées auprès du greffier sont réputées avoir été déposées à la Chambre, mais seulement lorsque la Chambre siège.

(1240)

Le président:

Vous dites que vous ne pouvez pas la poster au greffier lorsque la Chambre ne siège pas.

M. André Gagnon:

Exactement.

Le président:

Si nous ajournons le 21 juin et que nous ne revenons pas, et si les élections sont déclenchées en septembre avant notre retour, les pétitions imprimées pourront être recertifiées au cours de la prochaine législature, mais pas les pétitions électroniques.

M. André Gagnon:

Exactement.

Le président:

D’accord.

J’aimerais avoir l’opinion du Comité, ainsi qu'une décision ou une recommandation à la Chambre.

Allez-y, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ma recommandation sur le report des signatures est le statu quo. Je ne vois pas de raison de changer.

Le président:

Pourquoi avez-vous deux systèmes différents?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les signatures d'une pétition imprimée ne sont pas datées. C’est un simple formulaire. Si vous avez le formulaire, vous pouvez le soumettre de nouveau. Comme nous avons des délais normatifs pour les pétitions électroniques, les 120 jours expireront certainement entre les sessions parlementaires. Je ne vois pas de raison de la rapporter en disant: « Celle-ci est spéciale à cause du moment où elle a été faite. » On peut présenter de nouveau le même texte et demander de nouveau les mêmes signatures. Je ne vois pas le problème.

À moins que quelqu’un d’autre ait une opinion différente, je suis tout ouïe, mais c’est ma position.

Le président:

Est-ce que vous êtes en train de dire que, si la pétition imprimée n’est pas adoptée, elle est renvoyée à la personne, qui peut simplement la présenter de nouveau à la législature suivante?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

On peut la présenter de nouveau dès que le nouveau Parlement est en place. Le nouveau gouvernement n’est pas en place dès le lendemain de la dissolution. Il y a un intervalle de temps assez long. De toute façon, une pétition ne peut généralement pas couvrir cette période. Il y a un petit nombre d’exceptions. Je ne vois pas pourquoi elle survivrait.

Allez-y.

M. Scott Reid:

Si je comprends bien ce que vous dites, une pétition qui a recueilli des signatures, mais qui a été envoyée ici pour être certifiée devrait être renvoyée si la Chambre a ajourné ses travaux pour une raison quelconque, pourvu qu’elle ait franchi toutes ces étapes. C’est la seule condition en vertu de laquelle elle serait renvoyée. C'est bien cela?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si la Chambre est dissoute, elle sera renvoyée; et, si la personne veut la présenter de nouveau après les élections, elle pourra le faire.

Au début, j’avais le point de vue opposé, mais André a expliqué que, quand un gouvernement change, par exemple, les questions ne sont plus d'actualité. On ne veut pas que ces choses soient traitées automatiquement. Il faut pouvoir dire...

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis d’accord. S’il s’agit, par exemple, des changements climatiques, et que le gouvernement change, une pétition générale demandant que les changements climatiques deviennent une priorité pourrait ne pas être efficace.

À qui le document serait-il alors renvoyé?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je suppose que l’auteur initial de la demande serait informé que la pétition est morte au Feuilleton, et le député qui la parraine en serait également informé.

M. Scott Reid:

Évidemment, le député pourrait ne pas revenir.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Effectivement. Dans ce cas, un nouveau député devrait parrainer la pétition de toute façon. Cela nous renvoie, une fois de plus, à la question de la possibilité de lier une législature à la précédente.

M. Scott Reid:

Nous sommes en train de parler de pétitions imprimées, n’est-ce pas?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Non, nous parlons des numériques.

M. Scott Reid:

D’accord, désolé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne vois aucune raison de changer la procédure actuelle, que ce soit pour les pétitions numériques ou les pétitions imprimées.

Le président:

On peut garder les pétitions numériques au bureau et les faire recertifier, n’est-ce pas?

Quant aux pétitions imprimées, on les garde. Au cours de la nouvelle législature, si quelqu’un veut les faire recertifier, il s’adresse à vous, et elles peuvent être recertifiées.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si on présente une pétition imprimée pour obtenir une certification, elle vous revient, avec les signatures et tout.

Le président:

Ce qu'on dit, c'est qu'il n'est pas nécessaire de revenir. On les garde et on les fait recertifier à la législature suivante si quelqu’un en fait la demande.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Une fois certifiée, la pétition nous revient. Nous l’avons entre les mains, et c’est à nous de la déposer si nous le voulons. Une fois la pétition déposée, la question ne se pose plus; si elle n’a pas été déposée, elle vous appartient encore. Vous enlevez la feuille verte et vous la rendez au greffier; et vous recommencez.

Cela ne fonctionne pas de la même façon, parce qu’il n’y a pas de limite de temps pour les pétitions. Toute la structure est différente. Il y a 25 signatures, pas 1 000, et il n’y a pas de limite de temps. Ce sont deux systèmes totalement différents. Je ne vois pas pourquoi l’un devrait influencer l’autre.

Le président:

C’est entre les mains du député au moment de la dissolution.

M. André Gagnon:

Exactement.

Le président:

Comment savez-vous qu'il s'agit d'une pétition en cours de recertification? Est-ce qu'il y a un numéro ou quelque chose qui les identifie?

M. André Gagnon:

Oui. Quand on reçoit une pétition certifiée, il y a un numéro qui y est associé. Je suppose que, quand des députés présentent une demande de recertification, la page verte est habituellement toujours là, et, si ce n’est pas le cas, il n’y a pas de problème, parce que le greffier des pétitions l’examinera de la façon habituelle.

Le président:

Si, le 20 juin, une pétition qui devait être envoyée dans un délai de 120 jours contient 499 signatures, que le Parlement est dissous et que nous ajournons nos travaux le 20 juin, et, s’il y a des élections à l’automne, ces 499 personnes l’ont perdue. Il faut tout recommencer dans le système actuel.

M. André Gagnon:

Les pétitions électroniques se prolongeraient durant l’été, et ce jusqu’au, disons, 1er septembre ou quand...

Le président:

Le Parlement est dissous.

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Ce n’est même pas s'il y en a 499. S'il y en a 40 000 et que la pétition n’a pas été présentée, ces 40 000 signatures sont perdues.

Le président:

Il faudra recommencer à zéro.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cent vingt jours après le 20 juin, cela donne le 17 octobre, je crois, c’est-à-dire avant les élections de toute façon. Au cours de ces 120 jours, la pétition va mourir au Feuilleton quoi qu'il en soit.

(1245)

Le président:

Cela va quoi?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela n'arrivera pas de toute façon. Le compromis dans ce cas, André et Jeremy, serait peut-être que le système précise: « Attention, si vous proposez cette pétition, elle n’a aucune chance d’être présentée », avec tel paramètre. Le site Web dit simplement: « Vous pouvez la soumettre si vous le voulez, mais elle va mourir au Feuilleton. »

Une voix: On pourrait employer un vocabulaire plus agréable, mais...

M. André Gagnon:

C’est une façon positive d’encourager la participation du public.

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Comme André l’a dit dans son exposé, si quelqu’un lance une pétition aujourd’hui, le 28 février, et qu’elle reste ouverte pendant 120 jours, elle ne pourra jamais être présentée; il faudrait donc placer cet avertissement dès maintenant.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, dès maintenant, et c’est ce que je veux dire.

M. Jeremy LeBlanc:

Sept mois avant les élections.

Le président:

Si vous n’étiez pas greffiers en ce moment, pensez-vous, personnellement, que...

M. André Gagnon:

Nous sommes greffiers en tout temps, monsieur le président.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il faudrait rappeler David.

Le président:

Est-ce que vous voyez une justification ou une équité quelconque au fait que les pétitions ne soient pas traitées de la même façon?

M. André Gagnon:

Vous voulez peut-être savoir si les citoyens voient la différence. Ce dont nous parlons ici, la certification des pétitions imprimées, est probablement quelque chose que beaucoup de gens ne savent pas, à mon avis. La différence entre ce type de pétition et les pétitions électroniques est un détail dont la grande majorité de la population n'a probablement aucune idée.

Le président:

Mais est-ce qu'il y a une raison, du point de vue de l’équité, d’avoir des systèmes différents pour les deux?

M. André Gagnon:

C’est au Comité d’en décider.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Jowhari.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Oui, merci.

Si je voulais me protéger, je consulterais toujours le Feuilleton pour m’assurer qu’il me reste plus de 120 jours, parce que, maintenant, cette pétition est toujours là. Si la Chambre ajourne ses travaux, on me renverra la pétition, et je pourrai la remettre à un autre député ou la déposer moi-même sans avoir à aller chercher les signatures, alors que, si j’ai une pétition électronique, comme dans le cas que j’ai expliqué, et que j’ai maintenant décidé d'y renoncer, il est impossible qu’elle puisse être déposée; à partir de là, à la législature suivante, si je suis de retour et quand je le serai, je devrai lancer une autre pétition, alors que je n’aurais pas besoin de le faire si elle est imprimée.

M. André Gagnon:

Oui, cela pourrait être un...

M. Majid Jowhari:

Je vais simplement la faire recertifier.

M. André Gagnon:

Nous parlons ici d’une période très courte. C’est généralement à la fin d'une législature.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Non, je comprends cela, mais ce que je dis, c’est que j’aurai toujours la possibilité de faire recertifier la pétition imprimée, alors que, pour la pétition électronique, c'est terminé.

M. André Gagnon:

En effet. Mais certains diraient que vous êtes en mesure de recueillir beaucoup plus de signatures au moyen d’une pétition électronique. Je pense qu’environ 1 300 personnes par jour signent des pétitions sur le site Web. C’est aux députés de décider.

M. Majid Jowhari:

Non, non, je suis d’accord. C’est plus facile parce que cela couvre tout le pays, alors que la distribution document imprimé partout au pays... Je comprends tout à fait et je suis en faveur de la version numérique.

Le président:

Je vais considérer la proposition de David comme une motion pour maintenir le statu quo, et je vais ouvrir le débat là-dessus.

Allez-y, Stephanie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Je crois que nous sommes en faveur de cette idée.

Le président:

Quelqu’un d’autre?

Je vais mettre la question aux voix. Que tous ceux qui sont en faveur du maintien du statu quo pour que les pétitions imprimées puissent être rétablies à la législature suivante, contrairement aux pétitions électroniques, veuillent bien le faire savoir.

(La motion est adoptée par 4 voix contre 3. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Cela ne nous empêchera pas de réexaminer la question, mais c’est votre décision pour l’instant.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il aurait fallu modifier le Règlement pour changer le statu quo, n’est-ce pas?

Le président:

Non, il s’agirait simplement d’un rapport adressé au Parlement pour le faire approuver.

(1250)

M. John Nater:

Monsieur le président, nous avons parlé brièvement de cette lettre adressée au prochain comité, de la lettre adressée à notre homologue à venir. C'est quelque chose que nous pourrions soumettre à examen au cours de la prochaine législature.

Le président:

Certainement.

Messieurs, merci beaucoup. Nous apprécions toujours l’excellent travail que vous faites. Ce système va permettre de rendre les choses beaucoup plus claires pour les gens.

M. André Gagnon:

Merci.

Le président:

Le mardi de notre retour, nous accueillerons Bruce Stanton, vice-président de la Chambre, qui était ici plus tôt aujourd’hui, pour la première heure. La deuxième heure permettra de recevoir les témoins de la restauration de l’édifice du Centre, des employés du service administratif, au sujet de...

M. David Christopherson:

Pourquoi vient-il?

Le président:

Il a écrit un article important à ce sujet avant que nous commencions l’étude.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est vrai, on en a parlé à la Chambre. D’accord, très bien.

Le président:

Au cours de la deuxième heure, nous aurons notre première réunion sur la restauration de l’édifice du Centre, et les employés du service administratif rendront compte de leur réunion avec le BRI si elle a eu lieu.

M. Scott Reid:

Elle est justement en cours. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

À notre retour le 19 mars, ce sera M. Stanton. Qui d'autre, ensuite?

Le président:

Dans la première heure, nous entendrons M. Stanton.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Oui.

Le président:

Dans la deuxième heure, le sujet traité sera[Traduction]projet de restauration[Français]de l'édifice du Centre.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord.

Le président:

Il y sera aussi question d'administration et nous entendrons les présentations de témoins.[Traduction]

Concernant l’étude de Stephanie, la ministre a dit qu’elle pourrait venir le 9 avril. Est-ce que cela vous convient?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Si c’est à ce moment-là qu’elle est disponible, c’est parfait.

Le président:

Ce serait le mardi 9 avril.

Allez-y, David.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J’ai une question sur un autre sujet, à l'intention de l’analyste. À l’automne 2016, nous avons entrepris une étude du Règlement, qui a donné lieu à cette fameuse 55e réunion. J'aimerais juste savoir si cette étude est toujours techniquement ouverte.

Le greffier du comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

Le Comité a le mandat permanent d’étudier le Règlement. Tout élément du Règlement qui intéresse le Comité peut être étudié.

Le président:

Scott, pouvez-vous me rappeler où se trouve votre motion?

M. Scott Reid:

Vous parlez de la motion sur la vision à long terme et tout cela. Je l’ai ici. Si vous avez une seconde, nous pouvons en donner avis.

Une voix: Mais ce n’est pas au Feuilleton.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous pouvez en donner avis à l'avance, Scott.

M. Scott Reid:

Nous l’avons dans les deux langues officielles.

Le président:

Si nous avons le consentement unanime, nous pouvons simplement en discuter. C’est celle qui concerne la poursuite de l’étude.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il s’agissait de la vision et du plan à long terme du Comité.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

J’ai demandé à M. Reid s’il pouvait nous envoyer une copie électronique. Je ne crois pas qu’il y ait de problème, mais, si on peut simplement nous faire parvenir la copie, nous pourrons revenir avec une réponse la prochaine fois.

M. Scott Reid:

Nous l’enverrons à tous les membres du Comité par courriel, dans les deux langues officielles, dès aujourd’hui.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai dit dernièrement, à une réunion, que, pour ce qui concerne le Règlement, le Comité des comptes publics pourrait envisager de recommander des changements à notre comité.

La réunion qui a précédé celle-ci était celle des comptes publics. J’ai redemandé si une majorité souhaite que ces changements soient adoptés. C'est le cas, et je m’attends donc à ce que, peu après notre retour, nous soyons invités par ce comité à examiner certaines modifications du Règlement concernant les comptes publics. Ce n’est pas compliqué et cela ne devrait pas prendre beaucoup de temps.

Le président:

En 10 mots ou moins, pourriez-vous nous donner une idée de ce dont il s’agit?

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, certainement. Il y a deux changements.

L’un consiste à insérer dans le mandat les mots « non partisan » pour indiquer clairement que les comptes publics sont une créature différente en raison de leurs responsabilités de surveillance.

L'autre vise à s'assurer de ne pas répéter le véritable cauchemar démocratique que nous avons vécu — je ne dirai pas quand — à une époque où un nouveau gouvernement est arrivé et a fait disparaître tout le travail accompli par le Comité des comptes publics.

Il se fait beaucoup de suivi. Les ministères prennent des engagements quand ils viennent, et certains d’entre eux ont des échéanciers qui peuvent prendre jusqu’à deux ans à respecter. Nous avons maintenant un système qui nous permet de faire le suivi de chaque énoncé, de chaque promesse et de chaque engagement pris, et nous étions à mi-chemin de l’élaboration de certains projets de rapport quand tout cela a été purement et simplement éliminé, compte tenu de l'argument des nouveaux députés, selon lequel ils ne savaient rien à ce sujet et qu'ils n’allaient donc pas s’en occuper.

Nous voulons apporter des changements pour qu’aucun gouvernement ne puisse plus jamais faire cela quand il s'agit de la capacité de surveillance des comptes publics, qui leur permet de demander des comptes au gouvernement en place.

Ce sont les deux principaux éléments.

(1255)

Le président:

Pourriez-vous essayer d’exhorter les gens à faire cela rapidement pendant la pause? Nous pourrions peut-être le faire le 21 avril.

M. David Christopherson:

D’accord. Il se trouve justement qu'on m’a demandé de présenter les recommandations au Comité; je vais donc me dépêcher et voir si je peux respecter cette échéance.

Le président:

Vous pouvez les déposer auprès du greffier pour que nous ayons les 48 heures, après quoi...

M. David Christopherson:

Ce sera fait, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci.

Autre chose pour le bien du pays?

C’était une bonne réunion. La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on February 28, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.