header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-02-19 RNNR 128

Standing Committee on Natural Resources

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everybody. Welcome back. I hope everybody had an enjoyable and interesting break week or non-sitting week.

We have two groups of witnesses with us for the first hour. From Oxfam Canada, we have Mr. Ian Thomson.

Thank you, sir, for joining us.

From the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, we have Rumina Velshi and Liane Sauer.

You probably all know the process. Each group will be given up to 10 minutes for a presentation, and after both of you have completed your presentations, we will open the floor to questions from around the table.

Since you've been waiting patiently, why don't the two of you start?

Ms. Rumina Velshi (President and Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission):

Thank you.[Translation]

Good afternoon, Mr. Chair and members of the committee.

My name is Rumina Velshi. I am the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission.[English]

I am joined this morning by Liane Sauer, director general of the strategic planning directorate at the CNSC.

Before beginning my remarks, I would like to acknowledge that the land on which we gather is the traditional unceded territory of the Algonquin people.

Thank you for inviting me to provide comments on best practices for engaging with indigenous communities regarding major energy projects.

Before giving you my thoughts on that subject, I will provide a bit of background about our organization.

The CNSC is Canada's nuclear life-cycle regulator and is responsible for regulating everything nuclear in Canada. Our mandate is, one, for the protection of health, safety, security and the environment; two, to respect Canada's international obligations on the peaceful use of nuclear energy; and three, to disseminate information to the public. It is a clear mandate and one that we have fulfilled faithfully for over 70 years.

The commission is an independent quasi-judicial tribunal, comprised of up to seven members, that makes licensing and environmental assessment decisions for major nuclear facilities and activities.

Canada's nuclear sector is broad and ranges from uranium mining, nuclear reactors, nuclear medicine and industrial applications of nuclear technology to the safe management of nuclear waste. Our focus is safety at all times; however, we have many priorities. One of our top priorities is ensuring the meaningful participation of indigenous peoples in our processes.

During my six years as a commission member, I have had the opportunity to hear the perspectives of many different indigenous peoples and leaders during commission proceedings. Now, as president, I'm committed to meet with indigenous community leaders with a view to further enhance the CNSC's relationship-building efforts.

As an agent of the Crown, the CNSC fully embraces its responsibilities respecting engagement and consultation. Those responsibilities include acting honourably in all interactions with indigenous peoples. This means that we appropriately consult on, and accommodate when necessary, indigenous rights and interests when our regulatory decisions may adversely impact them. That is a responsibility we take very seriously.

We have mechanisms in place to ensure that indigenous peoples are consulted on projects that might have an impact on their rights. One important consultation mechanism is the commission's public hearing process. Leading up to a hearing, and beginning very early in a project, CNSC staff meet with potentially impacted indigenous communities to better understand potential impacts and identify ways to avoid, reduce or mitigate them.

Applicants are intimately involved in that process as well, whether in concert with CNSC staff, or separate from them. In fact, we have had a regulatory document in place since 2016, REGDOC-3.2.2, Aboriginal Engagement, which sets out various requirements and guidance for applicants. For example, applicants are required, before an application for a major project is even submitted, to identify potentially impacted indigenous communities and meaningfully engage with them throughout the process.

The outcome of those consultation and engagement activities, and any measures taken or committed to, are then presented to the commission in an open and transparent public hearing. During these hearings, CNSC staff, applicants and indigenous peoples each present to the commission. The commission considers all information presented, and before making a licensing decision, satisfies itself that what is required to uphold the honour of the Crown and to discharge any applicable duty to consult has been done.

We have recently published on our website a compendium of indigenous consultation and engagement best practices, which I have provided to this committee. It builds on our experiences with indigenous communities, as well as those of federal, provincial and international counterparts.

I have mentioned our regulatory document and meaningful participation in commission public hearings, but there are a few other practices that I would like to highlight as well.

Having a mechanism to assist indigenous groups with financial capacity to participate is key. We have a flexible and responsive participant funding program or PFP that we administer and that is funded by licensees. The PFP supports the participation of indigenous peoples as well as other eligible recipients in our regulatory processes. Recently it has been expanded to support indigenous knowledge and traditional land use studies, which will provide important information for the commission to consider in its deliberations.

The PFP also directly supports several other best practices, one of which is multi-party meetings. These meetings bring together indigenous groups, CNSC staff, licensees or applicants, and other governmental representatives, when appropriate, so many issues can be heard and addressed at once. These meetings are often held in indigenous communities, and they allow CNSC staff to get a better perspective of the issues of interest or concern to community members and their leadership. The PFP also supports participation in commission meetings, which are non-licensing proceedings.

The commission has recently decided to provide indigenous intervenors the opportunity to make oral submissions, whereas other intervenors are invited to make written submissions only. That decision was made in recognition of the indigenous oral tradition for sharing knowledge and in the spirit of reconciliation.

The PFP can also be used to support participation in our independent environmental monitoring program or IEMP, which is another best practice. Our IEMP takes environmental samples from public areas around nuclear facilities to independently verify whether the public and the environment are safe. In recent years we have supported the participation of indigenous peoples in sampling activities under the program, including the design of sampling campaigns so it reflects their values and interests.

A final best practice I would like to mention is the CNSC's ongoing engagement throughout the life of nuclear facilities and activities, not just during the licensing phase.

We are committed to building long-term, positive relationships with indigenous communities with a direct interest in nuclear facilities or on whose territory nuclear facilities or activities are found.

As a life-cycle regulator we want to understand all issues of interest or concern and work to address anything that is within our authority throughout the life of a project. We are committed to that and are currently implementing a long-term indigenous engagement strategy with 33 indigenous groups who represent 90 indigenous communities in eight regions in Canada. We welcome the opportunity to partner and work with these groups for many years to come.

I believe we are on a journey in Canada as we continue to explore how best to engage indigenous peoples in relation to major energy projects. Expectations and best practices are evolving, and it is critical that we continue to stay abreast of these developments. We have learned many lessons over time and continue to learn. We value and are committed to long-lasting and positive relationships with indigenous peoples in Canada and look forward to continuing to work together in the spirit of respect and reconciliation. This is how we will move forward together.

Thank you.

(1540)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Thomson.

Mr. Ian Thomson (Policy Specialist, Extractive Industries, Oxfam Canada):

Good afternoon, committee members. Thank you for inviting Oxfam Canada to be part of this study today.

I'd like to join my fellow witness in acknowledging the Algonquin territory on which we're meeting.

My name is Ian Thomson. I'm a policy specialist with Oxfam Canada focused on the extractive industries.

Oxfam in an international NGO. We're active in more than 90 countries, working through humanitarian relief, long-term development programs and advocacy to end global poverty.

At Oxfam, we firmly believe that ending poverty and reducing inequality begins with gender justice and women's rights. Oxfam works with indigenous people's organizations in many parts of the world to support their struggles, to defend their rights and to protect their lands, territories and resources.

In 2015, Oxfam surveyed 40 leading oil, gas and mining companies to assess their commitments around indigenous engagement and community consent. Our community consent index revealed that extractive sector companies are increasingly adopting policies with commitments to seek and obtain community consent prior to developing major projects. It has become a recognized and accepted industry norm. It's good development and good business all at the same time.

Further research, however, has identified major gaps in the ways these commitments are being implemented. In several countries our indigenous partners have found that women face systemic barriers in participating fully and equally in decision-making by governments or companies around major resource development projects.

We have two recommendations for the committee to consider today.

First, indigenous engagement processes, whether by the Crown or by private sector actors in the energy sector, should become more gender-responsive and conducted in accordance with international human rights standards, including the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Second, the Canadian government should be proactive in promoting gender-responsive and rights-based engagement internationally through our trade, aid and diplomatic relations.

I would like to share some research and findings from two indigenous partners in Peru and Kenya that illustrate both the real challenges and opportunities in this area.

A decade ago, social conflicts over energy projects in Peru boiled over into violent confrontations. The conflicts revealed deep failures on the part of both governments and companies to engage indigenous peoples in a meaningful way in decisions around major projects.

In 2011, Peru adopted a new law on indigenous consultation or consulta previa. To date, 43 consultation processes have been recorded by the Peruvian government, 30 of them related to energy or natural resource projects. The Ministry of Energy and Mines reports that only 29% of the participants were women.

In December, with the support of Oxfam, ONAMIAP, the indigenous women's federation of Peru, published a study examining women's participation in these consultation processes over the past seven years. The study was aptly named “Without Indigenous Women, No Way!”. ONAMIAP had conducted surveys with indigenous women in different parts of the country to identify barriers to their participation. Women's participation was hindered by their limited experience of participating in public spaces, the domestic care work that was not taken into account by those organizing when and where consultations were held, the very technical content presented without adequate time or support for people to make sense of projects, lower literacy rates and language barriers, failure to recognize women's rights with respect to communal lands and forests, consultation methods that did not address gender needs, and a lack of genuine dialogue with processes directed at convincing communities to accept projects and conditions.

ONAMIAP recommends that governments and project proponents should be explicit about the differentiated impacts of projects on women and men. Women must be included fully and equally at all stages of decision making processes. Finally, public policy reforms are needed to recognize women's rights and access to communal lands and forests, which would facilitate their participation in these processes.

(1545)



Last April, Oxfam invited the president of ONAMIAP to an indigenous women's gathering in Montreal, spearheaded by Quebec Native Women. Indigenous women leaders from a dozen countries gathered together to share their experiences, and they quickly learned that their experiences shared striking similarities. Everywhere they recognized that they were tackling an entrenched gender bias in how decisions are made around energy and natural resources.

Turning now to Kenya, where Oxfam is also researching indigenous rights, and in particular the free, prior and informed consent standard, our 2017 study called “Testing community consent” focused on Turkana County, one of the poorest and most remote regions of the country, where significant oil and gas deposits have been discovered.

While most people noted that company engagement practices though initially poor were steadily improving, many key ingredients of free, prior and informed consent were not present. In particular, we noted that pastoralist women who engaged in traditional livelihoods of nomadic herding had been unable to participate in community meetings over oil and gas development projects. Their livelihoods would be affected by the well pads and pipelines and roads being built in the area, but they were least likely to participate due to how the engagement process had been conducted. This year, Oxfam is planning to do follow-up research to look more closely into how those gender justice gaps can be addressed.

Our first recommendation to this committee would be to ensure that indigenous engagement is conducted in a manner that is gender responsive, advances gender equality, and that is consistent with international human rights standards, including the UN declaration. We believe that energy projects must go beyond “do no harm” and actually be transformative and positive changes to advance gender equality where they're being developed. This also means listening to and respecting indigenous people when they say no to certain projects. Project reviews that listen to women and men and take into account the differentiated impacts will result in better-designed projects and share benefits more equitably.

Oxfam is pleased that gender responsiveness could soon be added to federal impact assessment processes through Bill C-69, currently under review in the Senate. Oxfam supports this bill and hopes that gender-based analysis in project reviews will establish this norm across all industries and unlock even more systemic change. Likewise, we welcome Bill C-262, which would ensure that Canadian law is consistent with the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Interestingly, our stories from Peru and Kenya also have a direct connection with the Canadian energy sector. Peru's largest oil concession, known as Block 192, is operated by a Toronto-based company, Frontera Energy. In Kenya, the oil project in Turkana County that we studied is a joint venture that involves a Vancouver-based company, Africa Oil Corporation. Both of these companies, within the past two years, have had to temporarily suspend their operations due to indigenous protests over unresolved community grievances. Canadian companies operating internationally risk losing their social licence to operate if they can't foster positive and respectful relationships with indigenous peoples.

Our second recommendation is for the Canadian government to take action and raise the bar for Canadian companies operating internationally. The long-awaited Canadian ombudsperson for responsible enterprise, announced by the international trade minister over a year ago, should be appointed without delay and granted the necessary powers to investigate corporate practices internationally.

Canadian embassies should provide more support to women human rights defenders who are working to defend their rights and participate in major decisions around energy projects.

Export Development Canada should have a statutory requirement to respect human rights and gender equality in all of its business transactions.

Finally, Canada's international assistance should support indigenous peoples organizations to engage in and transform natural resource governance, particularly indigenous women's organizations like ONAMIAP in Peru, which have identified many of the solutions but are sorely under-resourced.

I would like to conclude by saying that we believe major energy projects in the future will look very different when they genuinely engage indigenous peoples and respect their inherent rights and title. An energy transition is under way, and Canada can position itself as a leader in the new energy economy.

(1550)



I'd like to thank the committee for engaging in this study and would welcome any questions you may have.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Thomson.

Mr. Tan, are you going to start us off?

Mr. Geng Tan (Don Valley North, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

I have a couple of questions for CNSC. As you mentioned in your presentation, the CNSC has been actively engaging in indigenous consultations by organizing public hearings and meetings. The CNSC also applies some other means like notification letters and emails, and organizes open houses, not hearings, and also face-to-face meetings.

Are these also effective means in your opinion?

Ms. Rumina Velshi:

Yes, the CNSC uses many different mechanisms to engage with indigenous communities. I'll list some of them, the ones that you have listed. When we have any hearings or meetings coming up, we do send out emails, and we recognize that for some of these communities that's not the best way to communicate with them. So we use phone calls or personal contacts with them. We have meetings within the community itself where it's convenient to meet with them.

We also have what we call “CNSC 101” sessions within the community where we can talk about their concerns, their needs, and explain to them nuclear risks and try to address their concerns. Then there are some of the other ones that I have told you about within our proceedings and our hearings as well.

We apply multiple ways and are always open to any more that they suggest.

Mr. Geng Tan:

How often does the CNSC organize this kind of direct contact with the indigenous groups?

(1555)

Ms. Rumina Velshi:

Certainly, prior to any hearings or meetings that affect certain communities, we would definitely be in touch with them months and months before that. What we now try to do is establish ongoing relationships with them. It varies.

Maybe I'll ask Ms. Sauer to give some more details on how often those happen.

Ms. Liane Sauer (Director General, Strategic Planning Directorate, Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission):

As President Velshi mentioned, we do engage quite frequently in meetings in communities. Often they're either one-on-one meetings, or if we're invited to participate in a community event, we will do so. The number of meetings per year does vary because it's reactive. It's based on invitation from the groups. We've had some years where there have been 30 or 40, and there was one year where it was up to 70. So it does vary.

We're very responsive when we get an invitation; we make best efforts to go out.

Mr. Geng Tan:

I assumed that CNSC was incorporating the national best practices for regulating the nuclear industry and even generating some of its own.

Internationally, in your opinion, what counterparts of CNSC in other countries do a particularly good job of incorporating the views of indigenous people in the early assessment process?

Ms. Rumina Velshi:

We have done some benchmarking with other nuclear regulators internationally. None of them have an approach similar to ours. They really look towards us for best practices, particularly when it comes to our processes, which are very open and transparent. Also, our participant funding is very flexible.

I think that's fairly limited or in a very nascent stage, certainly, for other nuclear regulators.

Mr. Geng Tan:

Another question is about the SMR, because we're talking about the nuclear industry.

In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in the nuclear industry, nuclear energy solutions for North America to meet the energy needs of North America. You're involving a new generation of SMRs.

How might these SMRs be a solution for Canada's north? Have you received any expressions of interest among the indigenous communities in the north for this kind of solution?

Ms. Rumina Velshi:

I'll give you my perspective as a nuclear regulator. One of the things we have tried to do as a regulator is to make sure that we are prepared for any SMR applications that come our way. One of the things we have done is to offer a service that we call a “vendor design review”, whereby vendors can come in front of the regulator and get their different designs assessed to see if there are any regulatory concerns. Right now we've got 10 different vendors who've submitted their designs to us for our review.

As far as expressions of interest go, it's not what we look at, but we are ready. If we were to actually receive an application today, from a regulator's perspective we are ready for it. SMRs, as most of you know, have many different applications. Whether it's on-grid, or—certainly for indigenous communities—off-grid, remote community applications are extremely positive. That would be very helpful.

Mr. Geng Tan:

Let me address a quick question to Oxfam. A couple of weeks ago, our committee heard from a witness from Norway who spoke of a third model, which is actually being developed a little bit in Canada. Under this model, indigenous people or the local communities take ownership of their energy production and the use of it for local development, and possibly some income. Do you know of any examples in Canada's north of this so-called third model being used?

Mr. Ian Thomson:

I'm not aware of any specific examples on which Oxfam has done research. I know that's a live debate within Canada around indigenous ownership of natural resource development projects. Certainly, in some of the exchanges I mentioned between indigenous women's organizations that we help to support and convene, that is part of the debate. When indigenous peoples' role is no longer as people impacted by settler projects, but as actual proponents of projects and developers of the resources on their territories, I think that's the exciting new direction indigenous peoples are going in and that we as a country will be embarking on in the future.

(1600)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you very much, everyone, for attending. We do appreciate your time.

Mr. Thomson, could you just clarify something for me? When you say that any plan in Canada needs to be “gender-responsive”, can you tell me your exact meaning? I just want to be clear on what you meant by that.

Mr. Ian Thomson:

Yes, as I was alluding to earlier, there are moves under way to bring more systematic approaches to doing federal impact assessments. At the moment, it's done on occasion, depending on the project, but Bill C-69 would have it as a factor in impact assessments. Looking at the gender-differentiated economic, social and health impacts would be part of any federal study of a project. The approval process and the mitigation strategies that would be attached to a project, if approved, would take into account those gender-differentiated impacts.

Now, that would necessarily involve the participation of men and women in expressing how they understand what those impacts would be. The fact that it's participatory, I think, would also open up avenues for people to express their views on the project and to have that sort of analysis brought to bear. It's our hope also that the analysis will actually develop within regulators and federal institutions, so that the more gender-based analysis is applied to understanding and evaluating projects and developing mitigation strategies, the more expertise there would be, both within our regulators and in our approval processes. It is also our hope that project proponents would come forward having done more of this analysis from the outset. Increasingly, it would just be expected that industry would take into account and mitigate gender impacts.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I'm curious. Are there any situations you're aware of in which indigenous women were not heard from in our current consultation process?

Mr. Ian Thomson:

The examples I was giving in other countries were more—

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I mean in Canada.

Mr. Ian Thomson:

In Canada, we haven't statistically studied who is participating and who isn't. That's not our research.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Would you not say we have a fairly open consultation process?

Mr. Ian Thomson:

I'd say the women who were at this gathering that we sponsored felt that the systems were not open to hearing from all of their views.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Were they the ones directly impacted by potential projects?

Mr. Ian Thomson:

Yes.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

What was the issue, not enough time?

Mr. Ian Thomson:

Often it was a resourcing question. It was about there not being enough time or not enough resources to fully understand, appreciate and analyze the project. In other cases, they mentioned there was a difference in world views. They felt that their knowledge and understanding was not able to fit into the meetings and the consultations to which they were being invited.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

What do you mean by “world views”?

Mr. Ian Thomson:

Different peoples have different world views, understandings and values, and some of those world views and understandings weren't necessarily being accommodated. There were certain assumptions built into certain processes where, hearing from other cultures, they did not feel that they were being welcomed into the room as equals.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay.

Throughout the consultation process, if you look at northern Alberta, in a lot of cases where there is resource going through them, the companies are employing indigenous communities, are probably one of the largest employees in some of these areas. I would also argue that we're a world leader in environmental and labour standards.

Are there any examples you have throughout northern Alberta where communities were not consulted? Do you have any examples you can give us that show there were first nations communities that felt they weren't listened to?

We have examples of first nations communities taking the government to court because of a shipping ban. They did not want this legislation to go forward, and they were not consulted.

Do you have examples?

(1605)

Mr. Ian Thomson:

The example I'd be interested in sharing is actually from northern B.C., not northern Alberta. It's more about the conditions for workers in the industry and how to create industry camps that are more welcoming and safe for both men and women. If we are serious in talking about increased women's employment in these sectors, more has to be done both by government and by the private sector to deal with some of the safety issues that women face when they work in industrial camps and are still in the minority, looking at what is the culture, what are the safety protocols, how can we make them the most accepting workplaces possible and what occupations are open to women. These are more the priority issues that I've heard of in that part of the world.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Mr. Thomson, you mentioned an ombudsperson to look at best practices worldwide. You mentioned that they would have the ability to investigate those that are the bad actors outside the boundaries of the Canadian border. What authority do you see this office or this person having?

Mr. Ian Thomson:

The ombudsperson, as announced by the government, was to have the power to investigate, to ask for testimony and documents, when allegations are brought before them, from Canadian companies operating internationally, to determine whether they are living up to the human rights and environmental standards that Canadians would expect our companies to adhere to when they operate abroad.

The Chair:

Mr. Schmale, you're right on time. It's like you timed it.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay.

The Chair:

Mr. Cannings.

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP):

Thank you.

Thank you all for being here today.

I'm going to turn to Mr. Thomson and pick up where Mr. Schmale left off.

You talked a lot about what's happening abroad, in various examples. We were just talking about the proposed ombudsperson. We still haven't seen that person yet, for some reason, after a year, but coincidentally there was an article in The Globe and Mail today about Canadian resource companies abroad and their actions.

We've heard around this committee room that within Canada we have some of the best indigenous engagement and consultation processes around the globe. We still have a long way to go, I think, but here we have Canadian companies acting one way within Canada and yet, many of them, acting quite differently abroad.

Some may say they're just trying to do what's in their best interest, but it's clear from this article that it would be in their best interest to act as responsible corporate citizens abroad.

We have an example of Tahoe Resources in Guatemala, which now has had a very large mine shut down—they are in dire straits because of that—because the Guatemalan government said that they didn't consult with indigenous peoples properly. There are other examples of the same sort of thing happening.

I wonder whether you could comment on the interests of Canadian companies acting abroad and what indigenous engagement policies they're using, what they should be doing and how it can be brought back to this office of an ombudsperson that we're still waiting to see.

(1610)

Mr. Ian Thomson:

It's clear that indigenous engagement is becoming a major risk for Canadian investors operating abroad. Among the examples you just cited, that of mines being suspended over their failure to adequately consult indigenous populations offers a perfect example of this risk. This is an example in which there is a shared responsibility between the Guatemalan state and the company in question to have done adequate consultations.

I don't think this is entirely on the company, but they're obviously partly responsible for this mine's being shut down and for not having done adequate consultation.

The hope with an ombudsperson, which is different from bringing a particular company to court, would be that some of the learnings from ombudsperson investigations could actually lead to more industry-wide changes. The ombudsperson may be called to investigate a particular case, but if he or she finds that there are patterns developing in the problems that Canadian companies are either creating or are subject to internationally, then some of the prescriptions from the ombudsperson wouldn't only apply to the case they were specifically investigating but could be more wide-ranging.

The hope would be that the ombudsperson would understand what a problem is from a particular context, but that their advice and recommendations would have a ripple effect. Their rulings wouldn't be binding—you're not in a court of law—but I think they would have a certain authority to make pronouncements and recommendations that would be heard across the industry.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Some of these cases are in the courts right now. I think there are at least three in Canada that are in the courts. I'm wondering whether you might speculate or comment on the effect that rulings there would have not only upon the Canadian industry but also upon the resource industries around the world concerning the way companies should be acting and the way they should be carrying out indigenous engagement and consultation.

Mr. Ian Thomson:

It's not only NGOs like Oxfam that are watching these court cases closely to see what their outcomes are. I know that many industry players are watching and that governments are watching to understand, if companies can be held legally liable for not respecting human rights internationally, what the consequences will be for their operations, for their investors and for the jurisdictions in which they're operating. It's yet to be seen what the outcomes will be.

The ombudsperson offers a non-judicial path to have allegations investigated and to have cases heard. I don't think we want to close off the option of seeking justice in the Canadian justice system, but not everybody necessarily has the resources to bring a case forward to the Canadian justice system. The ombudsperson would provide a parallel path that would lead to different outcomes.

I am curious to see what the court cases reveal—the ones around Eritrea and around Guatemala. They're ground-breaking, and it's hard to tell exactly what the consequences will be.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

You also mentioned the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, how that would be applied to Canadian law and, within that, the concept of free, prior and informed consent. I guess it's a two-part question.

How do you see that effort being applied globally and also even here within Canada—this idea of consent? Does that imply a veto—that indigenous communities would have vetos over resource projects—or is it just the informed consent, the engagement, that is most important?

Mr. Ian Thomson:

Nowhere in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is the word “veto” used. I don't think free, prior and informed consent is a veto. I do think it is a standard to protect the human rights of indigenous peoples. As such, meeting that standard ensures that their rights will be adequately protected. I wouldn't equate it to a veto. I think, in Canada, to the extent that Canada is taking a rights-based approach to its engagement with indigenous peoples....

As Oxfam, we think that is the path that has been called for by indigenous peoples' organizations themselves and by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's call on both governments and the private sector to use the UN declaration as the framework for reconciliation.

(1615)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Whalen.

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.):

It's an interesting panel. I wasn't really sure what to expect, but it seems like there's some pretty good synergy here between the two groups who are coming at this issue from interesting ways.

When you talk about trying to engage in—and this is really for both groups—the gender-based analysis and gendered intersectionalities within indigenous groups themselves to make sure that the groups are properly heard, what approaches do your two organizations take to the problem of bypassing the elected representatives within those groups and looking past the band councils to get to the subgroups within that population? Do you have best practices to suggest in that regard?

Ms. Rumina Velshi:

Let me start off with our processes, and I'm sure Ms. Sauer will want to add to that.

Our commission processes are open to everyone, so we don't necessarily go just through the leaders. Anyone can appear. We get participation from all aspects of the indigenous communities. Certainly, women are just as well represented, if not better represented, in our proceedings.

In order to address some of the concerns that Mr. Thomson has identified, one of the things we do with our proceedings is have them in the evenings, if that's what's more amenable. We've heard, not just from indigenous women, but from women generally, that to make our processes more accessible, that would be helpful. There are other things that we do. As I said, it's open to everyone, and we do hear from all aspects and get different perspectives.

Similarly, when we meet within the community, we make sure that we meet not just with the leaders, but with different representatives within the groups.

Did you have anything to add? No.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Mr. Thomson.

Mr. Ian Thomson:

Yes, as Oxfam, we've developed a tool for the private sector to guide how to conduct a gender impact assessment for a project. It's something that was developed by colleagues at Oxfam Australia, and it's been rolled out in various energy-related projects, including some hydro dams and some more extractive sector projects.

It's a four-step process, but the first step, really, is establishing that baseline of what the gender power dynamics are within a local community at the starting point and what impact a project would have to ameliorate or reduce inequalities, or to exacerbate inequalities. So, understanding that starting point is important. I think that each context is going to have a different starting point and different concerns and considerations, depending on what sort of project or development is being proposed.

It's about understanding that starting point and what some of the possible gender impacts of the project are. The gender impact assessment tool that we've developed has sometimes been used before a project is in place. At other times, it's been used after the project has been running for a number of years and local populations are better able to express and document what the gender impacts have been.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Ms. Velshi, does the CNSC have a gender-based analysis framework it is engaged in? I know the federal government has some online webinars and most of us have been encouraged, both ourselves and our staff, to take a course in gender-based analysis for policy review. Is there anything specific that CNSC does and should it be part of your compendium?

(1620)

Ms. Rumina Velshi:

It's new territory for us. I, too, have had staff who've gone through the training, and certainly when it comes to the development of our regulatory documents and requirements, we're now using gender-based analysis plus for doing so.

Going forward, with Bill C-69 and impact assessments it will be a requirement that gender-based analysis get done then.

As far as our licensing decisions right now are concerned, we don't specifically do gender-based analysis in that systematic way, but one of my personal priorities is around gender representation. As a commission we very much pursue that and explore the impact of our licensing decisions and ask our applicants and licensees how they're addressing that.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

My experience with participant funding is really with respect to the Newfoundland and Labrador offshore, and in that case, all the recipients of participant funding were bands. Do you have any examples in your world where participant funding has been given by CNSC to indigenous groups other than the band councils or their corporate arms, to women's groups, for instance?

Ms. Rumina Velshi:

I'll get Ms. Sauer to answer that.

Ms. Liane Sauer:

We do have examples, for sure. We support any group that has a good application. We don't differentiate between whom they might be.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

I'll end with you, Mr. Thomson. Are you getting the sense that the system that's in place and CNSC's approach to international best practices.... Do you have any other suggestions that might help make our system here better, at least with respect to nuclear safety?

Mr. Ian Thomson:

I take the president's point that as legislative change is under way expectations will be raised. We're hopeful that Bill C-69 will pass the Senate and that this will become the new norm in Canada. I think all agencies, CNSC and the impact assessment agency, will have to develop their own internal expertise around this and more capacity-building is needed within these federal institutions.

I think equally important is looking at the organizations at the grassroots, like you were just referring to. Do women's organizations that are close to the community concerns, that understand the local context, that sort of baseline what I was talking about, that understand of where you're starting from and what some of the existing gender gaps might be.... If we're not resourcing them, then it doesn't matter how much the federal agencies do. We do need them to do more, but we also have to ensure that the affected people and their organizations are resourced to be able to participate fully in these processes.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Falk, you have five minutes.

Mr. Ted Falk (Provencher, CPC):

Thank you to our witnesses for attending committee here today and for your presentations.

I'll start with you, Ms. Velshi. You're the regulator of the nuclear industry. You've obviously worked with indigenous groups before when it comes to regulatory issues.

Ms. Rumina Velshi:

Yes.

Mr. Ted Falk:

In your experience with these groups, what are the issues that are important to them?

Ms. Rumina Velshi:

One of the primary ones we hear is the impact on their traditional way of life, particularly when it comes to country foods, of potential radioactive contamination. It's usually issues around this that we hear at our proceedings.

We at the CNSC have an independent environmental monitoring program, and as a priority we have made sure that we've engaged with the indigenous groups to help us come up with a sampling program, because there are certain foods that are more important and that they want reassurance about it being safe for them to consume. They help us come up with a sampling program and are actually now involved in the monitoring itself, which gives them greater confidence that it is safe. That's usually a very high priority for them.

The other one is just the general risks associated with nuclear power and being able to understand that in understandable language that is not highly technical. We try to do that. We have interpreters. In fact, in our proceedings we have interpretation available for that. With our CNSC 101, that's another area where we try to help address their concerns around nuclear safety and the risks associated with nuclear facilities.

(1625)

Mr. Ted Falk:

In your process with indigenous groups, safety and risk are the number one issues they are concerned with.

Ms. Rumina Velshi:

It would be safety and risk as they then manifest, whether with their food or waste management. The issues are safety and risk associated with nuclear....

Mr. Ted Falk:

When you conduct these consultations, do you meet with the communities as a whole? Do you have town hall meetings in the communities? Do you meet with band elders? Do you meet with the chief? Do you meet with their administrative people, or outside consultants? Whom do you meet with? Who are the decision-makers?

Ms. Rumina Velshi:

We meet with whoever asks to meet with us. Similarly, with our proceedings, we will have all of those you listed. We will have general members of the community. We'll have their consultants. We'll have their chiefs. It's the full spectrum.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Okay.

Ms. Rumina Velshi:

We hear all of the different perspectives, and the concerns are very similar.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Who would be the decision-makers?

Ms. Rumina Velshi:

When it comes to any licensing decision, it's the commission, which is an independent tribunal.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Also, from the indigenous perspective, who are the decision-makers there?

Ms. Rumina Velshi:

In our proceedings, they are not really decision-makers. They inform the commission, and they'll provide their perspective.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Okay.

You're having consultations with them, but at some point they get an approval from you. Who do you give that approval to?

Ms. Rumina Velshi:

Our approval is our decision on whether or not a project should proceed, and the conditions associated with that. It is not an approval to a band, if that's what you are asking. It is for the project, and to the proponent.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Okay.

Typically, is there a process the bands follow when communicating their concerns to you?

Ms. Rumina Velshi:

I think that varies. Ms. Sauer can give you the details. As I have told you, we would meet with whoever asks to meet with us and [Inaudible—Editor].

Mr. Ted Falk:

How often do they ask for a gender analysis?

Ms. Rumina Velshi:

I'm not aware of any time they have asked for that. They have not.

Mr. Ted Falk:

I think you answered my questions. Thank you.

I'm done, sir.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, you have about two minutes, including an answer to your question.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I will take them and make them count. Thank you.

Ms. Velshi, you talked about the 70-year history of CNSC. I'm wondering if you can give us a sense of that history. At what point did these consultations start? What prompted them and how did that process happen? I'm assuming these consultations did not happen 70 years ago.

Ms. Rumina Velshi:

I have been a commission member for six years and a president for six months, so I can tell you what's happened in that period of time. Even within the six years, I have seen that it's a moving thing: expectations keep on changing and our processes become a lot more inclusive.

Yes, it is a constantly evolving process. Even as we speak today, we have identified ways that we can do a better job and are continually improving on that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. I think that's all the time I have. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, all, very much, for joining us today, and for your evidence. It's greatly appreciated.

We've run short of time every session, but that is the format.

We're very grateful to you for taking the time to be here. We will suspend for two minutes and then reconvene.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

(1625)

(1630)

The Chair:

Welcome back, everybody.

We have two groups of witnesses for this hour. From the Canadian Electricity Association, we have Ian Jacobsen and Channa Perera. Thank you, gentlemen, for being here today. By video conference, we have Professor Dwight Newman. Can you see us and hear us?

You are nodding. That's a good sign.

Professor Dwight Newman (Professor of Law and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Rights, University of Saskatchewan, As an Individual):

Yes.

The Chair:

Thank you. You are from Saskatoon. Is that right?

Prof. Dwight Newman:

That's correct.

The Chair:

Great.

The process is that each group will be given up to 10 minutes for their presentation and then we'll open the floor to questions.

Gentlemen, you are here. Why don't we start with you?

Mr. Channa Perera (Vice-President, Policy Development, Canadian Electricity Association):

Thank you, Mr. Chair and members of the committee, for the invitation.

My name is Channa Perera. I'm the vice-president of policy development at the Canadian Electricity Association. I am joined by my colleague, Mr. Ian Jacobsen, the director of indigenous relations at Ontario Power Generation. We are very pleased to be here today to share our perspective on indigenous engagement.

CEA is the national voice of the Canadian electricity industry. Our members represent generation, transmission and distribution companies, as well as technology and service providers from across the country.

Electricity is indispensable to the quality of life of Canadians and to the competitiveness of our economy. The sector employs approximately 81,000 Canadians and contributes $30 billion to Canada's GDP.

As a major economic sector, we are uniquely positioned to help advance Canada's clean energy future and indigenous reconciliation. As we work toward reconciliation with indigenous people, CEA recognizes the importance of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. However, it is imperative for the government to ensure that there is no ambiguity in the implementation of these policy instruments, so that we can work toward genuine reconciliation.

The electricity industry is already at the forefront of indigenous engagement. In 2016, CEA and our member companies developed a set of core national principles for indigenous engagement, further codifying our long-standing commitment to work with local indigenous communities across the country.

Our work with indigenous communities has led to major partnerships and joint ventures, impact benefit agreements, supply chain business opportunities and direct investments in indigenous education, training and employment.

Let me highlight a few examples of these initiatives by CEA members. One example of a joint venture is the 200-megawatt Wuskwatim Power Partnership signed by Manitoba Hydro in 2006. This marked the first time that Manitoba Hydro and a first nation had entered into a formal equity partnership, ensuring the community of important business income, training, employment and other opportunities.

The industry also works with many local indigenous communities in the development of impact benefit agreements. IBAs have become an important instrument, allowing these communities to fully participate in projects carried out within the traditional territory. An example of this is the Lower Churchill project, an IBA between Nalcor Energy and the Innu Nation. These types of IBAs allow companies to work with indigenous communities on many project elements, from mitigating environmental impacts to facilitating education, training, employment and procurement opportunities.

Our efforts do not end there. We are also investing in a new generation of indigenous leaders, through specific education and training initiatives. That's why companies such as ATCO based in Alberta are taking leadership roles. In 2018, ATCO launched an indigenous youth leadership and career development pilot program for grade 9 students across Alberta. This allows indigenous students to explore local work sites and connect with skilled professionals to learn about employment options and how to build a career of their own. In addition, ATCO and other CEA member companies also support indigenous students across Canada, through financial assistance to pursue higher education.

Now, let me turn to my colleague, Ian, who will provide a practitioner's perspective on indigenous engagement at Ontario Power Generation.

(1635)

Mr. Ian Jacobsen (Director, Indigenous Relations, Ontario Power Generation, Canadian Electricity Association):

Great. Thank you, Channa.

OPG is the largest electricity generator in Ontario, providing about a half of the province's power. Our diverse generating fleet includes two nuclear stations, 66 hydroelectric stations, two biomass stations, one thermal station and later this year, one solar facility.

With operations that span the province, OPG's commitment to building long-term, respectful and mutually beneficial relationships with indigenous communities is based on the acknowledgement that our assets are all situated on the traditional territories of indigenous peoples in Ontario.

OPG and its successor companies have generated electricity in Ontario for over a century. However, we also recognize that hydro development over the better part of the 20th century had significant impacts upon many indigenous communities in Ontario. With this understanding, OPG developed a formal voluntary framework to assess and resolve historic grievances largely related to the illegal flooding of reserve lands. Over the past 27 years, OPG has reached grievance settlements with 21 first nation communities through a respectful, non-adversarial and community-driven process. This process has led to some successful equity partnerships. In fact, this spring OPG and Lac Seul First Nation will celebrate the 10-year anniversary of our partnership on the Lac Seul generating station.

The station was completed in 2009, with OPG and Lac Seul forming a historic equity partnership, the first for OPG, in which the first nation is an equity owner in the Lac Seul generating station, a 12-megawatt unit capable of generating enough electricity to meet the yearly demand of 5,000 homes.

Building on that model, in 2016, OPG completed the $2.6-billion Lower Mattagami River project, an equity partnership with the Moose Cree First Nation. This project was completed ahead of time and on budget. Approximately 250 local indigenous people worked on the project. Moreover, Moose Cree benefited from over $300 million in contracting opportunities. Throughout the project, OPG worked closely with Moose Cree and other surrounding communities on a number of employment, environmental and cultural initiatives. These included the development of the Sibi employment and training initiative, which provided a number of client support services to maximize community employment on the project, as well as undertaking traditional ecological knowledge studies. They also included the creation of the Mattagami extensions coordinating committee in collaboration with Moose Cree, Taykwa Tagamou Nation, and MoCreebec to monitor the completion of the terms and conditions of the environmental assessment approvals. As well, they included supporting the development of the dictionary of the Moose Cree.

More recently, in the spring of 2017, OPG completed the Peter Sutherland Sr. generating station, another equity partnership with Taykwa Tagamou Nation. Named after a respected TTN elder, this new $300-million generating station was placed in service on budget and ahead of schedule. Fifty TTN members worked on the project, which employed about 220 individuals at the peak of construction. In addition, approximately $53.5 million in subcontracts were awarded through competitive processes to TTN joint venture businesses during the construction phase of the station.

In May 2016, OPG announced an equity partnership with the Six Nations development corporation to build a solar generation facility at the Nanticoke generating station on Lake Erie. This was formerly a coal-fuelled power station that was retired in 2013.

The Nanticoke solar park will be capable of generating 44 megawatts of clean, renewable power for Ontario when it is placed in service later this year. In 2018, OPG launched the indigenous opportunities in nuclear program, also known as ION, to support the Darlington refurbishment project and to fill the widening skilled trades availability gap. Working in collaboration with Kagita Mikam Aboriginal Employment and Training and the Electrical Power Systems Construction Association, the ION program seeks to recruit qualified indigenous workers and set them on exciting projects such as the Darlington refurbishment project.

Since the program's launch, ION achieved its 2018 targets for successful placements and we are on track for continued success in 2019. From a project development context, we believe these types of partnerships and collaborative relationships with indigenous communities and the mutual benefits they bring can be excellent models for reconciliation and for OPG to demonstrate what providing power with purpose is all about.

Channa.

(1640)

Mr. Channa Perera:

Thank you, Ian.

In conclusion, I want to reiterate our commitment to advancing indigenous reconciliation in Canada. Let's work together and create a brighter future for our indigenous people.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Excellent. Thank you.

Professor.

Prof. Dwight Newman:

Good afternoon.

My name is Dwight Newman. I work as a professor of law and Canada research chair in indigenous rights in constitutional and international law at the University of Saskatchewan. In this role, I carry on a broad-based program of research on indigenous rights law, with one significant focus within that being on global intersections of indigenous rights and resource development. I also serve in related policy discussion roles, including as a member of the International Law Association committee on the implementation of the rights of indigenous peoples, and I've engaged in some related practice roles. However, I appear today as an individual simply to assist the committee in whatever ways I can.

I'll begin by commending the committee for its attention to this issue framed in broad ways. There's both room and need for broad, strategic thinking in the context of reconciliation in general, and economic reconciliation specifically, and trying to find good ways to move forward together.

I'm going to do two things in my opening remarks. First, while appreciating the committee's efforts to think creatively, I will probably sound somewhat of a cautionary note on the idea of going out and finding international best practices elsewhere, and will urge ongoing attention to the need to keep doing sophisticated policy work and developing the best ways forward that work for Canada and the indigenous peoples of Canada.

Second, I will try to refer to some promising practices present in emerging ways in Canada and in other jurisdictions. I'll suggest learning on a smaller scale, more so than hoping to find one perfect international best practice that we can import.

On my first point, then, we need to be cautious about seeking the perfect international best practice. Let me offer a few examples of some risks that can arise in trying to transplant best practices between very different contexts.

Consider something such as the Sami Parliament in Norway, often cited as a powerful example of an institution for consultation with indigenous peoples. There's a mechanism within the procedures by which Norwegian legislative and policy development processes work so that issues that could affect the Sami people of Norway trigger an alert to the Sami Parliament and consultation may proceed from there at a full countrywide level. However, the Sami Parliament operates in a very different context in which, first, the Sami people are more linguistically and culturally unified than the diverse indigenous peoples of Canada.

A key issue for Canada, were it to think about moving toward some larger scale consultation mechanism as part of Canadian policy, going beyond the duty to consult, in thinking about anything similar to the Sami Parliament, would be the need to see the indigenous peoples of Canada decide in what ways, through what more complex combination of institutions, they could present their interests analogous to the way the Sami present through the Sami Parliament.

Second, we also shouldn't glamorize Norway for its indigenous engagement on energy issues. Most Norwegian energy development and the source of Norway's immense wealth has been North Sea oil, which the Norwegian government took the view had nothing to do with the Sami people whatsoever.

If we're thinking just within Scandinavia, in neighbouring Sweden where resource development questions centre on potential mining development that almost inevitably interferes with the Sami people's reindeer herding—which I think this committee heard a bit about in prior testimony—there's a much more tense situation on indigenous rights generally. Sweden hasn't found the same solutions as Norway, but it operates in a very different context.

In Alaska, which I think has been referred to before in this committee, many indigenous communities have prospered from north slope oil and the foundations it provided for a set of regional economic development corporations. Today, there's meaningful support for the Alaskan system within the state. However, the origins of the system came effectively from a top-down decision that aboriginal title claims in the state were to be resolved on a statewide basis all at once. While there were some negotiations with the Alaska Federation of Natives, which also contributed ideas such as that of a corporate structure in which native Alaskans would be stockholders, the 1971 Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act adopted by the U.S. Congress to implement a resolution to all aboriginal title claims in Alaska at the same time has met with mixed reactions over the years due to its top-down character. Therefore, even while some tout what the Alaskan system achieved, its origins came from a process that would not fit with many Canadian expectations of engagement with indigenous peoples in policy development and claims resolution.

(1645)



I could go on with more examples along similar lines showing why it's very important to be cautious in transplanting ideas, but I want to turn to smaller-scale best practices that are already emerging in Canada and elsewhere, and that have a lot of potential.

Successful engagement is probably best said to exist when all involved can say they've had a successful process and a successful result. Two jurisdictions in the world stand out, from large numbers, of win-win agreements in the form of indigenous industry agreements to facilitate particular developments. Those are Australia and Canada itself.

Indigenous industry agreements have received much less scholarly study than one might hope, although there is an Australian scholar who has done some important comparative work on agreements in both Canada and Australia. He identifies a lot of contextual factors for what makes for successful agreements and what doesn't.

A colleague and I ran a workshop recently and are working on an edited collection on indigenous industry agreements. I think we would agree with much of that. Facilitating indigenous industry agreements is probably one of the best ways of finding engagement that works.

Here, I deliberately use the term “indigenous industry agreements” as a broader term than just “impact benefit agreements” or IBAs, a concept that has drawn much attention over the years. Some IBAs have brought significant resources into indigenous communities, and some have enabled building for the future, particularly when they have included strong provisions supporting business development that outlasts a particular non-renewable resource or that builds from the base of an existing renewable resource.

There are other, further models to consider, however, including joint venture agreements, equity partnerships—as referenced already in this session—and even indigenous-led development that may be significant parts of the future of indigenous industry agreements more generally. When some indigenous communities themselves seek to undertake particular energy developments, their doing so provides a strong sign of successful engagement or even something going beyond mere engagement.

Here, though, we need to think of many different policy issues, including sound financing mechanisms. We also need to be very attentive to the fact that indigenous communities in Canada are highly diverse. Some wish to ensure strong protections for traditional lifestyles. Others are very enthusiastic to participate in energy development and even to be leaders in energy development.

One of the risks of too much legislation in Canada is framed around our adopting some assumptions rather than others. Too much is framed around old assumptions that development is going to occur or not occur after a bit of consultation with indigenous communities who are assumed to be “in the road”. Then, even in current legislation we continue to see legislation putting obstacles in the road of those indigenous communities that want to carry out indigenous-led development.

There is, then, a lot of complexity at stake.

I'll refer just briefly in closing to the 2013 report of the United Nations special rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, which concerned extractive industries. Even while cautioning against some types of development, the special rapporteur commended the idea of indigenous-led development. I would suggest it is the practice that we should seek to foster in any context in which it works, because it's certainly one that brings everyone together. Wherever it can work, just as constructive indigenous industry agreements work but going even beyond them, indigenous-led development represents a real win-win in resource development, bringing a lot of alignment between otherwise competing interests.

Making it work requires a lot of ongoing and important policy work, on finance issues, opening opportunities for indigenous business and economic success more generally, and all kinds of other policy issues that are different from the traditional concerns we've tended to focus on. I think they speak to the future.

I'll end on what I hope is an optimistic note. It may be possible to learn some things from various practices that have been developed, and I again commend the committee for doing so. In my own view, the best practices are probably still ahead of us and are ones to keep seeking.

(1650)

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Professor.

Mr. Hehr, you're going to start us off.

Hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary Centre, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thanks to the guests for coming and taking part in this very important study on how we engage with our indigenous peoples both in the duty to consult and in the way we move projects forward. I appreciated the commentary on how we move from a discussion on the duty to consult, and how people are adversely impacted, to how we make them proponents of projects and part of the apparatus that sees projects through and communities thrive.

On that note, can you discuss the topic of early engagement? It seems to me that this has to be one of the ways that successful projects happen. With early engagement, people can get everything out on the table concerning how we move forward.

Mr. Jacobsen, do you mind starting us off on that?

(1655)

Mr. Ian Jacobsen:

Absolutely.

As a practice, OPG undertakes early engagement and consultation on all of our projects, primarily with a goal of achieving a common understanding of the project, of potential impacts and of mitigation strategies, as well as finding mutual interest in common objectives.

As demonstrated in our equity partnerships, I think we've been successful in doing that. It's a standard process for us at OPG. We're unique in that some of our assets are over one hundred years old, so we have long-term relationships with many of the communities that are in our operation. We do have the benefit of having those ongoing relationships.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Do you have anything to add, Mr. Perera?

Mr. Channa Perera:

Yes. The association of members is currently working with other organizations as well to promote indigenous capacity-building. That way, they can actually be some of the project proponents. We're working with 20/20 catalysts, a program based in Ottawa. Their main mandate is to promote clean energy projects across the country.

CEA is very much involved with them. We've been working with members to send potential indigenous candidates to participate in their programs so they get the skills and information they need to go back into their communities and initiate run-of-river projects and similar, smaller-scale projects, and to work with the community leaders to make some of these ideas prosper and happen over time.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Perfect.

Manitoba Hydro has international operations in Scandinavia and South America. How have those projects incorporated indigenous voices, and what can we learn from those endeavours?

Mr. Channa Perera:

Are you referencing Manitoba Hydro?

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Yes.

Mr. Channa Perera:

I do not have a lot of information as to what they're doing outside the country. However, Manitoba Hydro, as I mentioned in my remarks, has engaged indigenous communities for about two decades. They were one of the first to sign an agreement with first nations, going back to 2006, the Wuskwatim Power Limited Partnership. That took a long time. Although they signed that in 2006, it went through many years of negotiations. It's not easy to do, but it takes the building of mutual trust and capacity.

We need to ensure that indigenous peoples have that capacity to bring companies and project proponents, such as Manitoba Hydro, to the table for discussions about how to move forward, equity partnerships, and so forth.

I'm sure Ian can speak to that more, if you're interested.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

I do have a question for Dr. Newman.

I'm interested in the difference between an indigenous benefit agreement and an impact benefit agreement. Can you go more into detail to allow me to understand the distinction that you find between those two?

Prof. Dwight Newman:

Sure. There would be a distinction between an indigenous industry agreement, the broader category, and the category of an impact benefit agreement, which is usually one type of indigenous industry agreement. However, indigenous industry agreements could be a broader category.

Some joint venture agreements might also be impact benefit agreements, but some might not be. Some types of equity arrangements might be an indigenous industry agreement, but they're not necessarily oriented towards impacts and benefits. They're just oriented towards striking a deal.

Indigenous industry agreements are simply a broader category.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Have you looked at how courts in other countries have shaped the state of indigenous rights and the best practices we should be taking from what has been said out there in the court systems?

(1700)

Prof. Dwight Newman:

On the issue of consultation, I think the Canadian courts have said more than probably any other court system in the world, in many ways. There are particular decisions from other jurisdictions that may be inspiring in particular ways. There's an ongoing judicial conversation that takes place between jurisdictions, and so the Canadian courts have heard about New Zealand decisions recently and considered them in the context of some of their indigenous rights cases. The New Zealand courts have heard about Canadian cases. I don't think anything jumps out, though, as something Canada needs to start considering specifically out of foreign courts' case law.

There are some very different models elsewhere. I'll just highlight that Canada, in having a constitutional provision on indigenous rights, is also situated differently from some other countries. Australia does many similar things on indigenous rights in some ways, and not in others, but it does those in the context of title under a statute passed by the Commonwealth parliament in Australia rather than out of an accumulation of court decisions, as in Canada. That's the structure under which indigenous industry agreements arise: under provisions that they have shaped and reshaped within a statute rather than within court decisions, as has often occurred in Canada.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Hehr.

Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Thank you, everyone, for attending.

I guess I'll start with my friends here.

I want to talk about the process to ensure that indigenous communities make their way off diesel. I know a lot of progress has been made and that there are many options.

Is there a preferred option that OPG or anyone has to move the community forward to ensure they get off diesel? Is there a preferred option?

Mr. Ian Jacobsen:

I can respond to that. Thank you for the question.

I don't think there's necessarily a preferred option. Of course, I think we'd be interested in exploring all technology options. We have a good example, actually.

We're working with Gull Bay First Nation at the moment to develop a new renewable microgrid project that will help reduce the community's dependency on diesel fuel. We're just in the midst of completing that project, in collaboration with first nations. The project will offset approximately 100,000 litres of diesel fuel per year, which should offset around 300 tonnes of emissions. It is a project we're working on in collaboration with the first nation. It's certainly of interest to see what comes out of it.

I don't think, though, that there's a preferred technology at this point.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay.

Right now, I'm guessing, you see storage as one of the main issues that would be a bit of a hurdle to cross. Is that the case? I know that technology is coming on board, but once we get to the point that it is readily available and affordable—that type of thing—this may change. You would maybe look at wind and solar more.

Mr. Ian Jacobsen:

Yes. The Gull Bay project is a solar microgrid project, and storage is a part of it. Certainly there are factors you would have to consider. I'm by no means a subject-matter expert on storage—

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

No, for sure.

Mr. Ian Jacobsen:

—but certainly you would have to look at factors around climate, cold weather and things such as those.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

In some of the remote communities, as we look to move them off diesel—and as I said at the beginning, progress has been made—covering the base load.... Obviously, the wind isn't always blowing and the sun isn't always shining. This is just wind and solar, for example, not hydroelectricity.

What would you use as a backup in that case? I just had and lost an article about investment in wind and solar in some first nations communities in northern Ontario. What is being used as the backup when such production doesn't happen?

Mr. Ian Jacobsen:

Right now I think diesel is the backup.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Diesel is still the backup. Okay.

Mr. Ian Jacobsen:

It's still the backup, yes, as far as I know.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay. But it would be used as an emergency...?

Mr. Ian Jacobsen:

Right now, our microgrid project is meant to offset diesel. Diesel will still be used, but this will significantly reduce the dependency, by about 25% in that particular project.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay.

Concerning a consultation process with the communities involved, I noticed in your testimony that you mentioned that jobs and the training are there as well. I think that's a good first step, and congratulations for taking it. I think that's great. Are there any other opportunities available for members of indigenous communities that you are able to work with to ensure that the learning is lifelong?

(1705)

Mr. Ian Jacobsen:

Absolutely.

I can use the example of the Lower Mattagami project. We had about 250 people employed on that project. There was significant training and capacity-building in developing the Sibi employment and training. In some cases, people received education upgrading, developed lifelong skills—transferable skills. In some cases, folks went on to work with other companies to further develop their careers.

Procurement also has a huge impact. In our work with the communities, the local businesses and our contractors were able to develop capacity by building relationships between some of the local businesses as well as some of the larger vendors. In some cases, those relationships continue, and we were able to build on other work in the regions.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

It's interesting. You raised a good point.

In some of those communities, there are the people available who have the skills and it would be an easy start up.

Are there any communities you've approached that the skilled trades or the knowledge to deal with such a complex system wasn't readily there and you would have to basically start from scratch?

Mr. Ian Jacobsen:

That example with Sibi was something that was built from scratch in collaboration with the community, OPG and a number of other partners. Our unions, our contractors, helped to build that capacity. There was a lack of capacity, as I understand it, at that time.

That's a great example of where in our discussions on the projects, certainly jobs, employment and training were a big priority for the community. So through collaboration, we developed that program initiative.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Right.

Obviously, that's a great model to chose.

When you come together like that, is the word spreading that this is a great opportunity for first nations communities that may still be on diesel and may be investigating whether or not to move forward?

Mr. Ian Jacobsen:

I'm reluctant to speak on behalf of the remote communities that are looking at this.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

But just as you expand, I guess—

Mr. Ian Jacobsen:

I think that project was a model project in Ontario.

Certainly, in talking with other communities, people are aware of the good work that was done in collaboration with the community. So it's certainly looking at similar opportunities, or similar programs and initiatives.

I referenced the indigenous opportunities in nuclear program that we launched in 2018. That's in partnership with Kagita Mikam. Similarly, we're tapping into the capacity that exists currently in some of the communities in being able to broaden our outreach and our relationships. We provide the need, and the communities supply the interested candidates to work in the project.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Excellent. Thank you.

Professor, I have a quick question on your testimony concerning the Sami people.

In terms of what we heard in our last meeting a week or so ago, one thing that wasn't clear in my mind at the end of it—I think that was on my part—is that when the consultations are taking place with the Sami people, are they speaking with one voice, or is it kind of a fractured voice when you're talking about energy consultations?

Prof. Dwight Newman:

Well, as in any community, there can be some differing viewpoints obviously, and any human community has differing views. The voices get unified together in some ways through the Sami parliament. Insofar as it's drawn into commenting on particular issues, there's a unified voice.

I'll add that there is more linguistic, more cultural cohesion amongst the Sami people than amongst the very diverse indigenous peoples of Canada. You do potentially get more of a unified voice there, but even then, you have divisions within any human community.

The Chair:

Thanks.

Mr. Cannings.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Thank you all for being here before us today. It's been very interesting.

I'm going to start with Dr. Newman and try to take advantage of some of his obvious legal expertise on this big subject.

Some of the testimony we've heard—and not just here in this committee, but across the country—about indigenous engagement and consultation is that it's not rocket science. We know how it should be done. It involves, as Mr. Hehr said, early engagement and developing respectful relationships. If we are consulting with indigenous communities and governments, we should not just write down what their concerns are, but try to make meaningful attempts to address those concerns.

Obviously, there are some situations that are more complex than others, especially when we've heard today some examples—and perhaps you might have mentioned it—of where some indigenous communities have one viewpoint on a project and others that are equally as affected have another.

One example that comes to mind is an international situation. You have the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska. The Inupiat people who live in Alaska are in favour of drilling there, but the Gwich'in of northern Yukon, who subsist on the caribou that calve in Alaska, are against it.

Could you make some comments on those complex issues and how they can be addressed legally?

(1710)

Prof. Dwight Newman:

I'll just say that, in general, yes, there's a lot of clarity on a lot of issues on consultation in Canada in terms of what's legally required.

You've highlighted two of the issues that actually give rise to complexities.

One of those is early engagement. In one way, that's actually very straightforward for a lot of contexts. A lot of industry proponents take that on board as a given—that they would pursue early engagement—but those that do that tend to be larger companies, those engaged in the development of a resource.

Early engagement can actually be quite challenging at the exploration stage, for example, which often involves smaller enterprises. That's been one of the contexts where we've actually seen conflicts emerge around what can or can't be expected of small exploration stage-type companies. However, there can be ongoing attempts to develop ways of moving together respectfully there.

Meaningful consultation has, of course, been in the news in recent months. A very important principle is that there be meaningful consultation, yet somehow there have been failures to achieve this in the context of the court challenge on Trans Mountain, identifying problems in what the Government of Canada did, even with the guidance that was available from the northern gateway decision. The government has had to go back and do more there.

It highlights the situation that has generated a lot of complexity, which is something like a linear infrastructure project that involves a lot of communities along the route, where some take one view and some take another. You've highlighted this in the context of an international difference between communities, but it, of course, exists even within Canada. It's going to be one of the very challenging things to sort out. How do we sort out situations where there is not unanimity among different indigenous communities that are all potentially affected by a project, some of which, indeed, may be proponents and equity partners in that very project, while other indigenous communities express ongoing concerns about it? That's not something that actually has an easy answer, but it's going to be one of the things that need to be sorted out.

Ironically, the situation that you have raised, I think, might have made for easier answers—where there is the possibility of international law coming into play from the effects in one country of developments that have effects on another country. To put claims based on transboundary harm and principles of international law around transboundary harm, I think, becomes probably the way to deal with some of those types of situations. However, the particular harms would need to be identified very specifically in a way that would engage the international law doctrines that pertain to them. If specific harms weren't clearly identified, they couldn't be taken before an international body.

Obviously, the hope is to fend off the harm before it occurs, so there needs to be a deep international conversation that takes place in the context of that issue to try to find a way forward. The fact that there's one state on each side of it, potentially, actually opens up more possibility for a clearer route forward than in some of the more complex situations that occur even within the country.

So, there are no easy answers, but maybe some answers on some of these.

(1715)

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Here's another easy difficult question. You mentioned the series of cases that have been brought forward in Canada that have framed and somehow defined the way that we go at indigenous engagement. In Canada, we've had more of that perhaps than other countries. You know them all, from Delgamuukw all the way up to the Federal Court of Appeal decision on Trans Mountain.

Do you see it as almost a chain of decisions, with each one citing previous ones? First of all, is there some lesson that we as legislators or the government can take from those decisions to avoid falling into those situations again? Or do you see this more as just a gradual refinement of the legal framework of our engagement with indigenous peoples?

Prof. Dwight Newman:

In terms of lessons to take from the chain, I would highlight particularly the chain from Haida onwards, on the proactive duty to consult. I would distinguish it a bit from Delgamuukw and other cases prior to Haida, which were focused on consultation as part of the test for whether a particular infringement of an aboriginal or treaty right was justified.

Haida and the cases following it say that in every instance where there might be an impact on an indigenous right, there ends up being this proactive duty to consult that arises. That arises in Canada hundreds of thousands of times per year. Most of those situations move forward fairly successfully, but a few end up in challenges and litigation in some instances.

One of the key lessons that I would identify is the need to try to get beyond the uncertainty that Haida and its subsequent cases are dealing with. Haida was put forward as an interim case to try to deal with situations where there is not yet certainty on the final shape of indigenous rights in a particular situation, and if greater certainty could be achieved, whether it's through the courts if need be, but ideally through negotiation between governments and indigenous communities.

Some of that doctrine on consultation can become a lot clearer than it is right now. Otherwise, I guess, there's guidance in the cases on just trying to take all of the steps involved in meaningful consultation, and there can be ongoing work to try to follow that. However, there may be things still to be clarified in law. There may be ways for governments to move that along and to seek answers from the courts faster than those that have been received thus far in the context of that ongoing interim doctrine.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I had another good one.

The Chair:

You're only allowed so many good ones in one day, Mr. Cannings.

Mr. Whalen, I think you're going to share your time with Mr. Graham.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Yes, of course. Thank you very much.

I just have one question. It was really interesting to hear about the environmental impacts and early engagement with indigenous people in the previous panel. You guys are looking at some of the economic impacts. We heard some incisive testimony on February 5 from Chief Byron Louis of the Okanagan Indian Band, who was representing the Assembly of First Nations. He pointed out quite rightly that indigenous groups need to benefit economically from projects in meaningful ways.

What best practices should there be in IBAs, and what other incentives should there be? What would you suggest be included in an indigenous consultation processes to allow us to achieve Chief Louis' laudable goal that we “rebuild, not only socially but economically.”

I guess I'll start with the panel here. Mr. Perera.

Mr. Channa Perera:

Sure. IBAs are one of the things that CEA member companies are doing. I mentioned Nalcor earlier. Among some of the activities or things they included are environmental impact mitigation. That's a major, important thing for indigenous communities, that you will equip them to protect the environment and the local community.

On the economic side, I would say that employment is the top priority for those communities. Many of the CEA member companies put a lot of emphasis on ensuring that the local indigenous people have first priority when it comes to employment. Then, procurement on the supply chain side is very important as well.

Again, Ian can speak to this for OPG. We put a lot of emphasis on procurement efforts. As I said before, education and training are very important to our member companies, because we want to make sure that it's not just about what is there now but also about the future.

(1720)

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Should those education and employment strategies be baked right into the benefits agreements?

Mr. Channa Perera:

Yes. Some of those are included. In the case of Nalcor the training and education components are included.

That's important, because we also need to think about the future. It's not just during the construction phase of a project, but what's going to happen five, 10 or 15 years from now. We need to be sustainable as we look at delivering value to these communities. It's not a one-time thing, but over time—

Mr. Nick Whalen:

It's over the life cycle of the project.

Mr. Newman, before we hand it back over to Mr. Graham, do you have anything to add?

Prof. Dwight Newman:

No, nothing specific on this particular point.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How much time do I have, four minutes? Thanks.

You said the Canadian Electricity Association has existed since 1891, which I believe would make it among the oldest industry associations in the country.

At what point did the CEA start worrying about indigenous rights and consultations?

Mr. Channa Perera:

Even before the association, I must mention that our members have been working with local indigenous communities for decades. OPG is a very good example of that, and Manitoba Hydro, Nalcor, Nova Scotia Power and B.C. Hydro. Many companies across the country are working with indigenous communities.

In 2016, the CEA board of directors, the CEOs of all of these companies, agreed to go beyond their local activities. They wanted to indicate their commitment at the national level.

One of the things we do at the association is to bring these members together and share best practices, somewhat like what you are doing right now, trying to understand what's happening across the country in terms of best practices. We do that with these members around the table and we share what each other is doing.

I would say the commitment goes back many decades, but at the association level, during the last five years, we have been putting a lot of emphasis on indigenous activities. We have been meeting with indigenous leaders. I personally had the opportunity to go to Yukon and meet with people such as Peter Kirby, who has a great hydro-power project in northern B.C.

We try to learn and we try to educate our members about what's happening across the country as well.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Speaking of your members, are all the CEA members on the same page on consultation, or do you have a wide diversity of opinion among your members? For that matter, how many members do you have?

Mr. Channa Perera:

We have a very diverse membership, 37 member companies. They are mostly large-scale companies such as OPG, Hydro-Québec, and so forth.

I'm not in a position to say that we agree on every single point. One of the issues that came up was one approach to dealing with diesel.

The point I want to make when we look at these communities is that every community is different. If you go to northern Canada and you see one northern community, the next community is totally different. There isn't one cookie-cutter approach. We need to understand what's important to those local communities and the indigenous leaders there.

Again, going back to your question, I'm not able to say we're on the same page on every single thing, but it's about developing mutually respectful relations with individual indigenous communities.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Have you found any consultations that have directly resulted in the project being cancelled or significantly changed?

Mr. Channa Perera:

For the most part, because of that relationship and because we have invested in talking to community leaders and working with them and building trust, we have been quite successful in our relations with indigenous people. OPG again is a very good example of that success.

Ian can speak to the fact that they have settled some 22 grievances—

(1725)

Mr. Ian Jacobsen:

Twenty-one.

Mr. Channa Perera:

They've settled 21 grievances, out of 23 or so. That goes to show how much we have invested in developing good relations with these communities and ensuring that our projects are supported.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

All right. Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Falk, you can finish us off. You have about three minutes.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Okay. Thank you, Mr. Chair. Thank you to all of our panellists here, our committee presenters.

In my home province of Manitoba, Manitoba Hydro, with its Keeyask dam project, its generating station there, has worked very well with four separate indigenous communities.

You talked about the diversity among indigenous communities, Mr. Perera. Mr. Newman has also mentioned that there's not the same cohesiveness as in the Sami community in Norway, from what we've learned about at the committee. I appreciate that.

I'm going to focus my questions on you, Mr. Newman. When you have all these different communities on a major project.... You're from Saskatchewan, where I think there are seven or eight indigenous communities involved as partners in a large mining operation there. Who makes these decisions? Does every community make them? Is it the individual chiefs? Is it the band members or council members? How is it determined that they come together to form partnerships?

Prof. Dwight Newman:

Well, it ends up being a decision at the band council level to enter into agreements. Obviously, there's a democratic process within the community. This is a simpler context, perhaps, than some of those in British Columbia, where we've seen divisions between the Indian Act leadership and the hereditary leadership, which present additional challenges when there's a stronger division that way.

Within a community in Saskatchewan, there would end up being a decision, ultimately, at the band council level. In some instances, there's an economic development corporation that's at play as well, so things can be a little more complicated than this, too.

In terms of different communities coming together, they would choose to do that. That conversation might be initiated in various ways. If there is ultimately an impact on other communities, they're either going to need to be brought in, or there would need to be consultation with those communities. It's probably a better win-win scenario for everyone if all of the potentially affected communities can be brought in, as well as any communities that are interested in investing in the project and participating, even if they're not directly affected. It's like different communities that might collaborate together in a non-indigenous context as well.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Right. For indigenous communities, are the contact points through the chief or through the band councils? Obviously, the decision is typically made at the band council level, but would it be the chief or would it be people in the administrative office?

You also mentioned the economic development corporations. Many bands have those as well. We're looking for best practices for indigenous engagement, so who do people need to work with?

Prof. Dwight Newman:

I would say that some first nations in Saskatchewan have issued consultation or engagement policies that specify how they want to be worked with. Certainly, these identify their preferred ways, and might be very helpful where they exist.

There's a huge diversity of communities within Saskatchewan in terms of size. Some of the larger communities such as the Lac La Ronge Indian Band and Peter Ballantyne Cree Nation are up in the range of 10,000 members. There are other communities in the province that have 200 or 300 members.

The larger communities will have a consultation office. They may have a consultation manager. That might be more of the contact point, as opposed to going directly through the chief. However, on a larger project, the chief is going to be involved and the band council will ultimately be involved. In a smaller community, it may be a more centralized function.

It's really a case of having to learn how each specific community's processes work. Certainly, there can be information available on that from the Government of Saskatchewan, for example, and industry can draw upon that.

(1730)

Mr. Ted Falk:

I think I'm out of time.

Thank you, sir.

The Chair:

I want to thank you all very much for joining us today. That's all the time we have, unfortunately. We'll see everybody on Thursday.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des ressources naturelles

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous. Bon retour. J'espère que vous avez tous eu une belle et intéressante semaine de relâche, ou semaine sans séance à la Chambre.

Nous accueillons deux groupes de témoins pendant la première heure. Nous avons M. Ian Thomson, d'Oxfam Canada.

Merci d'être avec nous, monsieur.

Nous avons également Mme Rumina Velshi et Mme Liane Sauer, de la Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire.

Vous connaissez sans doute la procédure. Chaque groupe dispose d'au plus 10 minutes pour faire sa déclaration liminaire, et une fois que vous aurez tous les deux fait vos déclarations, les députés vous poseront des questions.

Comme vous attendez patiemment depuis un moment, pourquoi ne commenceriez-vous pas toutes les deux?

Mme Rumina Velshi (présidente et première dirigeante, Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire):

Merci.[Français]

Monsieur le président, membres du Comité, bonjour.

Je m'appelle Rumina Velshi. Je suis présidente et première dirigeante de la Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire.[Traduction]

J'ai avec moi ce matin Liane Sauer, directrice générale de la Direction de la planification stratégique à la Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire.

Avant d'amorcer mon exposé, je tiens à souligner que nous sommes réunis sur le territoire traditionnel non cédé du peuple algonquin.

Merci de m'avoir invitée à fournir des commentaires sur les pratiques exemplaires que nous utilisons pour discuter de projets énergétiques d'envergure avec des communautés autochtones.

Avant de présenter mes idées sur le sujet, je vais vous parler brièvement du contexte de notre organisation.

La Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire est l'organisme de réglementation du cycle de vie nucléaire du Canada et est responsable de la réglementation de tout ce qui touche le secteur nucléaire au Canada. Nous avons le mandat, premièrement, de préserver la santé, la sûreté et la sécurité et de protéger l'environnement, deuxièmement, de respecter les engagements internationaux du Canada à l'égard de l'utilisation pacifique de l'énergie nucléaire, et troisièmement, de communiquer l'information au public. Il s'agit d'un mandat clair, que nous remplissons fidèlement depuis plus de 70 ans.

La Commission est un tribunal quasi judiciaire indépendant composé d'un maximum de sept commissaires qui rendent des décisions en matière de permis ou d'évaluation environnementale touchant les principales activités des installations nucléaires.

Le secteur nucléaire au Canada est vaste et comprend une gamme d'activités, notamment l'extraction minière de l'uranium, les centrales nucléaires, la médecine nucléaire, les applications industrielles de la technologie nucléaire et la gestion sûre des déchets nucléaires. Nous mettons en tout temps l'accent sur la sûreté, mais nous avons de nombreuses priorités. Une de nos grandes priorités est d'assurer la participation significative des peuples autochtones à nos processus.

Au cours de mes six ans à titre de commissaire, j'ai eu l'occasion d'entendre les points de vue de nombreux peuples et dirigeants autochtones lors des séances de la Commission. À titre de présidente, je m'engage à rencontrer des dirigeants de communautés autochtones en vue de renforcer les efforts d'établissement de relations que déploie la Commission.

À titre de mandataire de la Couronne, la Commission assume pleinement ses responsabilités à l'égard de la mobilisation et la consultation. Il faut notamment agir de façon honorable pendant toutes les interactions avec les peuples autochtones. Nous organisons donc des consultations appropriées sur les droits et intérêts des Autochtones lorsque nos décisions réglementaires peuvent avoir des conséquences négatives pour eux et, s'il y a lieu, nous prenons des mesures d'adaptation. Il s'agit d'une responsabilité à laquelle nous accordons une très grande importance.

Nous avons en place des mécanismes pour nous assurer de consulter les peuples autochtones au sujet des projets qui peuvent avoir une incidence sur leurs droits. Un des mécanismes de consultation d'importance est le processus d'audiences publiques de la Commission. Dans les semaines qui précèdent une audience et tout au début d'un projet, le personnel de la Commission rencontre des représentants des communautés autochtones susceptibles d'être touchées pour mieux comprendre les répercussions éventuelles et trouver des façons d'éviter, de diminuer ou d'atténuer ces répercussions.

Les demandeurs participent étroitement au processus, de concert avec le personnel de la Commission ou de manière indépendante. D'ailleurs, nous avons en place depuis 2016 un document d'application de la réglementation, le REGDOC-3.2.2, Mobilisation des Autochtones, qui énonce les exigences et les directives à l'intention des demandeurs. Par exemple, avant même la soumission d'une demande de projet d'envergure, les demandeurs doivent déterminer les communautés autochtones susceptibles d'être touchées et entamer un dialogue avec elles tout au long du processus.

Les résultats de ces activités de consultation et de dialogue et de toute mesure prise ou prévue sont alors présentés à la Commission lors d'une audience publique ouverte et transparente. Pendant ces audiences, le personnel de la Commission, les demandeurs et les peuples autochtones font tous une présentation à la Commission. La Commission examine toute l'information présentée et, avant de rendre une décision relative à la délivrance d'un permis, s'assure que ce qui est requis pour préserver l'honneur de la Couronne et pour s'acquitter de toute obligation de consultation applicable a été effectué.

Nous avons récemment affiché sur notre site Web un recueil des pratiques exemplaires sur la consultation et la mobilisation des Autochtones. J'en ai transmis un exemplaire au Comité. Le recueil met à profit notre expérience avec les communautés autochtones, ainsi que celle des homologues fédéraux provinciaux et internationaux.

J'ai fait mention de notre document d'application de la réglementation et de la participation importante aux audiences publiques de la Commission, mais il y a certaines autres pratiques que je tiens également à souligner.

Tout d'abord, il est essentiel d'avoir un mécanisme qui permet de s'assurer que les groupes autochtones disposent de la capacité financière de participer. Nous avons un programme de financement des participants souple et adapté aux besoins, que nous gérons et qui est financé par les titulaires de permis. Le Programme de financement des participants favorise la participation des peuples autochtones et d'autres bénéficiaires admissibles à nos processus de réglementation. Depuis peu, il a été élargi pour tenir compte des études portant sur les connaissances autochtones et l'utilisation traditionnelle des terres, qui donneront à la Commission des renseignements importants à examiner lors de ses délibérations.

Le Programme de financement des participants donne également un appui direct à plusieurs autres pratiques exemplaires, dont les réunions multipartites. Ces réunions rassemblent des groupes autochtones, du personnel de la Commission, des titulaires de permis ou des demandeurs de permis, ainsi que d'autres représentants gouvernementaux, s'il y a lieu, pour pouvoir entendre et résoudre de nombreux problèmes simultanément. Ces réunions ont souvent lieu dans des communautés autochtones et permettent au personnel de la Commission de mieux comprendre les questions qui intéressent ou préoccupent les membres de ces communautés et leurs dirigeants. Le Programme encourage également la participation aux réunions de la Commission qui ne sont pas liées à la délivrance de permis.

La Commission a récemment décidé de donner aux intervenants autochtones l'occasion de faire une présentation orale, tandis qu'elle invite les autres intervenants à faire une présentation écrite. La décision a été prise dans un esprit de réconciliation, pour tenir compte de la tradition autochtone selon laquelle les connaissances se transmettent de vive voix.

On peut également utiliser le Programme pour favoriser la participation à notre programme indépendant de surveillance environnementale, qui constitue une autre pratique exemplaire. Dans le cadre de ce programme, nous prélevons des échantillons environnementaux dans des zones publiques situées à proximité des installations nucléaires afin de vérifier de manière indépendante que le public et l'environnement sont en sécurité. Au cours des dernières années, nous avons encouragé la participation des peuples autochtones aux activités d'échantillonnage de ce programme, notamment la conception de campagnes d'échantillonnage, pour qu'il tienne compte de leurs valeurs et intérêts.

Une dernière pratique exemplaire dont je souhaite faire mention est l'engagement que prend la Commission de surveiller les activités et installations nucléaires tout au long de leur cycle de vie, pas uniquement pendant la phase de délivrance de permis.

Nous nous engageons à établir des relations positives à long terme avec les communautés autochtones qui ont un intérêt direct à l'égard des installations nucléaires, ou celles sur le territoire duquel se trouvent des installations nucléaires ou se déroulent des activités nucléaires.

À titre d'organisme de réglementation du cycle de vie nucléaire, nous voulons comprendre tous les enjeux d'intérêt et toutes les préoccupations et prendre tous les moyens à notre disposition pour régler tout problème qui survient au cours du cycle de vie d'un projet. Nous y sommes engagés et mettons actuellement en oeuvre une stratégie de mobilisation autochtone à long terme avec 33 groupes autochtones qui représentent 90 communautés autochtones dans huit régions du Canada. Nous saisissons donc avec plaisir l'occasion de travailler en partenariat avec ces groupes pendant de nombreuses années encore.

Je crois qu'on peut affirmer qu'au Canada, nous continuons à chercher la meilleure façon de mobiliser les peuples autochtones à l'égard de nos projets énergétiques d'envergure. Les attentes et les pratiques exemplaires évoluent et il est essentiel que nous nous tenions au courant de ces développements. Nous avons appris bien des leçons au fil du temps et nous poursuivons notre apprentissage. Nous accordons une grande importance aux relations positives avec les peuples autochtones au Canada et nous nous engageons à ce qu'elles soient durables. Nous avons hâte de poursuivre notre collaboration dans un esprit de respect et de réconciliation. C'est ainsi que nous poursuivrons la route, ensemble.

Merci.

(1540)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Thomson.

M. Ian Thomson (spécialiste des politiques, Industries d'extraction, Oxfam Canada):

Bonjour, mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité. Je vous remercie d'avoir invité Oxfam Canada à participer aujourd'hui à votre étude.

Tout comme ma collègue qui vient de témoigner, j'aimerais souligner que nous sommes réunis sur le territoire du peuple algonquin.

Je m'appelle Ian Thomson. Je suis spécialiste des politiques à Oxfam Canada, plus particulièrement dans les industries d'extraction.

Oxfam est une ONG internationale. Nous sommes présents dans plus de 90 pays pour fournir de l'aide humanitaire, défendre les intérêts de la population et mettre en place des programmes de développement à long terme afin de mettre fin à la pauvreté dans le monde.

À Oxfam, nous sommes fermement convaincus que l'élimination de la pauvreté et la réduction des inégalités passent d'abord par la justice entre les hommes et les femmes et le respect des droits des femmes. Oxfam travaille avec des organisations autochtones dans de nombreuses régions du monde pour les soutenir dans leurs luttes, défendre leurs droits et protéger leurs terres, leurs territoires et leurs ressources.

En 2015, Oxfam a réalisé une enquête auprès de 40 grandes sociétés minières, gazières et pétrolières pour évaluer leurs engagements à l'égard de la participation des Autochtones et du consentement des collectivités. Selon notre indice de consentement communautaire, les sociétés extractives se dotent de plus en plus de politiques dans lesquelles elles s'engagent à obtenir le consentement des collectivités avant d'entreprendre de grands projets. C'est devenu une norme reconnue et acceptée dans l'industrie, ce qui sert bien à la fois le développement et l'industrie.

Des recherches plus poussées ont toutefois mis au jour des lacunes importantes dans la mise en oeuvre des engagements. Dans plusieurs pays, nos partenaires autochtones ont constaté que des obstacles systémiques empêchent les femmes de participer pleinement et équitablement aux prises de décisions des gouvernements ou des sociétés dans les grands projets d'exploitation des ressources.

Nous avons deux recommandations à soumettre au Comité à ce sujet.

Premièrement, les processus de mobilisation des Autochtones, qu'ils soient entrepris par la Couronne ou par des acteurs du secteur privé dans l'industrie de l'énergie, devraient mieux tenir compte de l'égalité entre les sexes et respecter les normes internationales en matière de droits de la personne, y compris la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones.

Deuxièmement, le gouvernement du Canada devrait promouvoir proactivement sur la scène internationale les engagements qui tiennent compte de l'égalité entre les sexes et sont basés sur les droits dans ses échanges commerciaux, son aide et ses relations diplomatiques.

J'aimerais maintenant vous faire part des conclusions de quelques études menées par deux de nos partenaires autochtones au Pérou et au Kenya qui témoignent bien des vrais défis et des vraies possibilités qui existent dans ce domaine.

Il y a une décennie, des conflits sociaux liés à des projets énergétiques au Pérou ont dégénéré en émeutes. Ces conflits ont révélé de graves manquements tant de la part des gouvernements que des sociétés à faire participer activement les peuples autochtones à la prise de décisions dans les projets de grande envergure.

En 2011, le Pérou a adopté une nouvelle loi sur la consultation des Autochtones, ou Consulta Previa. À ce jour, le gouvernement péruvien a enregistré 43 processus de consultation, dont 30 portaient sur des projets d'exploitation des ressources naturelles ou énergétiques. Selon les données du ministère de l'Énergie et des Mines, à peine 29 % des participants étaient des femmes.

En décembre, avec le soutien d'Oxfam, ONAMIAP, la fédération des femmes autochtones du Pérou, a publié une étude sur la participation des femmes dans les processus de consultation menés au cours des sept dernières années. L'étude a été baptisée avec raison: « Sans les femmes autochtones, c'est non! ». ONAMIAP avait effectué des sondages auprès des femmes autochtones dans diverses régions du pays pour recenser les obstacles à leur participation. Leur participation était freinée par leur expérience limitée dans la vie publique, l'absence de prise en compte par les organisateurs des travaux domestiques au moment de fixer l'heure et le lieu des consultations, le contenu très technique de la documentation sans leur laisser suffisamment de temps ou leur offrir du soutien pour comprendre les projets, les faibles taux d'alphabétisation, les barrières linguistiques, l'absence de reconnaissance des droits des femmes à l'égard des terres et des forêts communales, des méthodes de consultation qui ne tenaient pas compte des besoins de chaque sexe et l'absence d'un vrai dialogue dans des processus qui visaient à convaincre les communautés d'accepter les projets et les conditions.

ONAMIAP recommande donc que les gouvernements et les promoteurs expliquent clairement les répercussions différentes des projets sur les hommes et les femmes. Les femmes doivent participer pleinement et équitablement à toutes les étapes des processus décisionnels. Enfin, on doit procéder à des réformes des politiques publiques pour reconnaître les droits des femmes et leur accès aux terres et aux forêts communales, afin de favoriser leur participation à ces processus.

(1545)



En avril dernier, Oxfam a invité la présidente d'ONAMIAP à un rassemblement de femmes autochtones à Montréal, piloté par Femmes autochtones du Québec. Des dirigeantes autochtones d'une dizaine de pays se sont rassemblées pour parler de leurs expériences, et elles se sont vite rendu compte de leurs similarités frappantes. Partout, elles devaient lutter contre des préjugés sexistes profondément enracinés pour pouvoir participer à la prise de décisions sur les ressources naturelles et énergétiques.

Transportons-nous au Kenya maintenant, où Oxfam mène également des études sur les droits autochtones, en particulier la norme du consentement préalable, libre et éclairé. Nous avons réalisé une étude en 2017 sur le consentement communautaire dans le comté de Turkana, une des régions les plus pauvres et les plus reculées du pays, où on a trouvé d'importants gisements de gaz et de pétrole.

Bien que la plupart des gens aient constaté que les pratiques de mobilisation à l'origine médiocres des sociétés s'amélioraient progressivement, nous nous sommes rendu compte que de nombreuses composantes du consentement libre, préalable et éclairé étaient absentes. Nous avons constaté, en particulier, que les femmes dont l'élevage nomade est le mode de vie traditionnel n'ont pas été en mesure de participer aux réunions communautaires sur les projets d'exploitation gazière et pétrolière. Même si leur mode de vie était touché par les plateformes, les pipelines et les routes construits dans la région, la façon dont le processus de mobilisation a été mené ne favorisait pas leur participation. Oxfam prévoit cette année réaliser une étude de suivi pour examiner plus attentivement comment remédier aux problèmes liés à l'égalité des sexes.

Notre première recommandation au Comité serait de veiller à ce que les processus de mobilisation des Autochtones tiennent compte de l'égalité entre les sexes, en fassent la promotion, et respectent les normes internationales en matière de droits de la personne, y compris la Déclaration des Nations unies. Nous croyons que les projets énergétiques doivent aller au-delà du principe voulant qu'on ne cause pas de tort et soient transformateurs et porteurs de changements positifs pour promouvoir l'égalité entre les sexes dans les régions où ils sont menés. Cela signifie également qu'il faut écouter et respecter le point de vue des peuples autochtones lorsqu'ils s'opposent à certains projets. En écoutant les points de vue des femmes et des hommes et en tenant compte des répercussions différentes qu'ils peuvent avoir pour eux, on concevra de meilleurs projets et leurs avantages seront répartis de manière plus équitable.

Oxfam se réjouit à l'idée que la sexospécifité pourrait bientôt faire partie du processus d'évaluation d'impact fédéral grâce au projet de loi C-69, actuellement à l'étude au Sénat. Oxfam appuie ce projet de loi et espère que l'analyse comparative entre les sexes dans les examens de projet deviendra une norme dans toutes les industries et ouvrira la porte à d'autres changements systémiques. Nous appuyons également le projet de loi C-262, qui ferait en sorte que les lois canadiennes respectent la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones.

Fait intéressant, les études concernant le Pérou et le Kenya ont des liens directs avec le secteur de l'énergie au Canada. La plus importante concession pétrolière au Pérou, connue sous le nom de bloc 192, est exploitée par une société basée à Toronto, Frontera Energy. Au Kenya, le projet pétrolier dans le comté de Turkana qui a fait l'objet de notre étude est une entreprise conjointe à laquelle participe une société basée à Vancouver, Africa Oil Corporation. Au cours des deux dernières années, ces deux sociétés ont dû suspendre temporairement leurs activités face aux protestations des Autochtones au sujet de griefs des communautés non résolus. Les sociétés canadiennes présentes à l'étranger risquent de perdre l'approbation sociale d'exploiter des ressources si elles n'arrivent pas à établir des relations positives et respectueuses avec les peuples autochtones.

Notre deuxième recommandation serait que le gouvernement du Canada hausse les normes pour les sociétés canadiennes menant des activités à l'étranger. L'ombudsman canadien pour la responsabilité sociale des entreprises, annoncé par la ministre du Commerce international il y a plus d'un an, devrait être nommé sans délai et avoir les pouvoirs nécessaires pour faire enquête sur les pratiques des sociétés présentes à l'étranger.

De plus, les ambassades canadiennes devraient offrir plus de soutien aux femmes qui veulent défendre leurs droits et participer aux grandes décisions sur les projets énergétiques.

Exportation et Développement Canada devrait avoir l'obligation légale de respecter les droits de la personne et l'égalité entre les sexes dans toutes ses transactions commerciales.

Enfin, l'aide internationale du Canada devrait aider les organisations autochtones à participer à la gouvernance des ressources naturelles et à la transformer, en particulier les organisations de femmes autochtones comme ONAMIAP au Pérou, qui ont trouvé beaucoup de solutions, mais qui manquent cruellement de ressources.

En terminant, j'aimerais mentionner que nous croyons que les futurs grands projets énergétiques auront une tout autre allure lorsque les peuples autochtones y participeront réellement et que leur titre et leurs droits inhérents seront respectés. Une transition énergétique est en cours, et le Canada peut devenir un chef de file dans la nouvelle économie de l'énergie.

(1550)



J'aimerais remercier le Comité de mener cette étude et je serai heureux de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Thomson.

Monsieur Tan, allez-vous ouvrir le bal?

M. Geng Tan (Don Valley-Nord, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai des questions pour les représentantes de la Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire. Comme vous l'avez mentionné dans votre exposé, la Commission mobilise activement les communautés autochtones en organisant des rencontres et des audiences publiques. La Commission utilise aussi d'autres moyens comme l'envoi d'avis par la poste ou par courriel et elle tient des journées portes ouvertes, pas des audiences, et des rencontres en personne.

Selon vous, ces moyens sont-ils aussi efficaces?

Mme Rumina Velshi:

Oui. La Commission a recours à de nombreux mécanismes pour mobiliser les communautés autochtones, comme ceux que vous avez mentionnés. Avant la tenue d'audiences ou de rencontres, nous envoyons des avis par courriel, et nous sommes conscients que pour certaines de ces communautés ce n'est pas le meilleur moyen de communiquer avec elles. Par conséquent, nous les appelons et nous allons à leur rencontre. Nous rencontrons les membres à un endroit propice dans la communauté.

Par ailleurs, nous avons aussi ce que nous appelons des séances d'information « CCSN 101 » au sein de la communauté où nous pouvons discuter avec les membres de la communauté de leurs inquiétudes et de leurs besoins, leur expliquer les risques liés à l'énergie nucléaire et essayer de répondre à leurs préoccupations. Il y a aussi les autres moyens dont je vous ai parlé dans le cadre de nos procédures et de nos audiences.

Nous avons recours à divers moyens et nous sommes toujours prêts à adopter tout autre moyen que les peuples autochtones nous proposent.

M. Geng Tan:

Arrive-t-il souvent que la Commission organise de telles rencontres en personne avec les groupes autochtones?

(1555)

Mme Rumina Velshi:

Avant toute audience ou rencontre qui touche certaines communautés, nous communiquons évidemment avec elles des mois à l'avance. Ce que nous essayons maintenant d'établir, ce sont des relations continues avec elles. Cela varie.

Je pourrais demander à Mme Sauer de vous donner plus de détails sur la fréquence de ces rencontres.

Mme Liane Sauer (directrice générale, Direction de la planification stratégique, Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire):

Comme notre présidente l'a mentionné, nous consultons très fréquemment les communautés en y organisant des rencontres. Cela prend souvent la forme de rencontres privées ou nous nous rendons dans la communauté si nous sommes invités à participer à une activité. Le nombre de rencontres par année varie parce que c'est réactif. Ce sont les groupes qui nous invitent. Nous avons eu des années où il y en a eu 30 ou 40, et nous avons connu une année où nous en avons eu 70. Bref, le nombre varie.

Nous nous montrons très réceptifs lorsque nous recevons une invitation; nous nous efforçons d'y aller.

M. Geng Tan:

Je présumais que la Commission adoptait les pratiques exemplaires nationales en matière de réglementation de l'industrie nucléaire et qu'elle en créait même certaines.

Selon vous, ailleurs dans le monde, quels sont les homologues de la Commission qui réussissent particulièrement bien à tenir compte des points de vue des peuples autochtones dans le processus d'évaluation précoce?

Mme Rumina Velshi:

Nous avons fait une analyse comparative avec d'autres organismes de réglementation nucléaire dans le monde. Aucun d'entre eux n'a une approche semblable à la nôtre. Ces organismes se tournent vraiment vers nous pour les pratiques exemplaires en ce qui concerne en particulier nos processus, qui sont très ouverts et très transparents. Par ailleurs, notre financement des participants est très souple.

Je crois que cela se fait de manière assez limitée ou que c'est certainement encore au stade très embryonnaire pour les autres organismes de réglementation nucléaire.

M. Geng Tan:

Mon autre question traite des petits réacteurs modulaires, étant donné que nous parlons de l'industrie nucléaire.

Nous avons constaté un intérêt renouvelé au cours des dernières années dans l'industrie nucléaire et les solutions pour répondre aux besoins énergétiques en Amérique du Nord. Vous participez à la conception d'une nouvelle génération de petits réacteurs modulaires.

Comment ces petits réacteurs modulaires peuvent-ils être une solution pour le Nord canadien? Des communautés autochtones du Nord canadien ont-elles manifesté leur intérêt pour ce type de solution?

Mme Rumina Velshi:

Je vais vous donner mon point de vue à titre de représentante d'un organisme de réglementation nucléaire. L'une des choses que nous avons essayé de faire à titre d'organisme de réglementation nucléaire, c'est de nous assurer de nous préparer à toute application des petits réacteurs modulaires. Nous offrons notamment un service que nous appelons un « examen de la conception des fournisseurs », ce qui permet aux fournisseurs de se présenter devant l'organisme de réglementation et de faire évaluer leurs diverses conceptions pour vérifier s'il y a des préoccupations sur le plan réglementaire. Actuellement, il y a 10 fournisseurs différents qui nous ont présenté leurs conceptions aux fins d'examen.

En ce qui concerne les manifestations d'intérêt, ce n'est pas ce que nous regardons, mais nous sommes prêts. Si nous recevions en fait une demande aujourd'hui, du point de vue de l'organisme de réglementation, nous serions prêts à y donner suite. Comme la majorité d'entre vous le sait, les petits réacteurs modulaires ont diverses applications. Que ce soit à l'intérieur d'un réseau ou — certainement pour les communautés autochtones — hors réseau, les applications dans les collectivités éloignées sont extrêmement positives. Ce serait très utile.

M. Geng Tan:

J'aimerais poser une brève question au représentant d'Oxfam. Il y a deux semaines, nous avons entendu au Comité un témoin de la Norvège qui nous a parlé d'un troisième modèle, qui est en fait un peu élaboré au Canada. Dans le troisième modèle, les peuples autochtones ou les communautés locales s'approprient la production énergétique et l'utilisent pour le développement local et possiblement pour engendrer des revenus. Êtes-vous au courant d'exemples d'endroits dans le Nord canadien où ce troisième modèle est utilisé?

M. Ian Thomson:

Je ne connais aucun exemple précis sur lequel Oxfam a réalisé des travaux de recherche. Je sais qu'il y a un débat au Canada concernant la prise en charge de projets de mise en valeur des ressources naturelles par des Autochtones. Dans certains échanges dont j'ai parlé avec des organisations de femmes autochtones que nous soutenons et que nous aidons à tenir des rassemblements, il est certainement question de cet aspect. Lorsque les peuples autochtones ne seront plus un groupe qui est touché par des projets d'une société colonisatrice, mais bien des promoteurs de projets et des exploitants des ressources sur leur territoire, je crois que c'est la nouvelle voie intéressante sur laquelle les peuples autochtones s'engagent et sur laquelle nous nous engagerons aussi en tant que pays.

(1600)

Le président:

Merci.

La parole est à M. Schmale.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Je remercie énormément tous les témoins de leur présence. Nous vous sommes reconnaissants de nous accorder votre temps.

Monsieur Thomson, pourriez-vous préciser quelque chose pour moi? Lorsque vous dites que tout plan au Canada doit tenir compte de « l'égalité entre les sexes », pouvez-vous me dire ce que vous entendez exactement par cela? Je tiens seulement à bien comprendre ce que vous entendez par cela.

M. Ian Thomson:

Oui. Comme j'y ai fait allusion plus tôt, il y a des initiatives en cours pour adopter des approches plus systématiques dans les évaluations d'impact fédérales. À l'heure actuelle, c'est fait à l'occasion, selon le projet, mais le projet de loi C-69 prévoit de tenir compte de cet élément dans les évaluations d'impact. Il faudrait tenir compte des différences selon le sexe des effets sur la santé et des effets sociaux et économiques dans toute étude fédérale d'un projet. Le processus d'approbation et les stratégies d'atténuation liés à un projet qui est approuvé devraient tenir compte des effets différents selon le sexe.

Pour ce faire, il serait nécessaire que des hommes et des femmes participent au processus pour exprimer ce qu'ils pensent que ces effets pourraient être. À mon avis, comme cela fait appel à la participation des gens, les personnes auront aussi l'occasion d'exprimer leurs points de vue sur le projet et de contribuer à cette analyse. Nous espérons aussi que des organismes de réglementation et des institutions fédérales adoptent cette analyse; plus cette analyse comparative entre les sexes est utilisée pour comprendre et évaluer les projets et élaborer des stratégies d'atténuation et plus l'expertise se développe en la matière dans nos organismes de réglementation et nos processus d'approbation. Nous espérons aussi que les promoteurs qui se manifesteront auront déjà fait plus souvent cette analyse dès le départ. Le résultat sera que nous nous attendrons de plus en plus à ce que l'industrie tienne compte des effets différents selon le sexe et qu'elle prenne des mesures pour les atténuer.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je suis curieux. Y a-t-il des situations dont vous êtes au fait où des femmes autochtones n'ont pas pu s'exprimer dans le cadre de nos processus de consultation actuels?

M. Ian Thomson:

Les exemples que j'ai donnés dans d'autres pays étaient plus...

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je veux dire au Canada.

M. Ian Thomson:

Au Canada, nous n'avons pas réalisé d'études statistiques sur les personnes qui participent aux processus et celles qui n'y participent pas. Ce n'est pas le sujet de nos travaux.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Diriez-vous que nous avons un processus de consultation assez ouvert?

M. Ian Thomson:

Je dirais que les femmes qui étaient présentes lors du rassemblement que nous avons parrainé avaient l'impression que les systèmes n'étaient pas disposés à entendre tous leurs points de vue.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Ces femmes étaient-elles directement touchées par les projets?

M. Ian Thomson:

Oui.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Quel était le problème? Était-ce un manque de temps?

M. Ian Thomson:

C'était souvent une question de ressources. Il n'y avait pas suffisamment de temps ou de ressources pour bien comprendre et évaluer le projet. Dans d'autres cas, les femmes ont mentionné qu'il y avait une divergence d'opinions quant à la façon de voir le monde. Elles avaient l'impression que leurs connaissances et leur compréhension n'étaient pas compatibles avec les rencontres et les consultations auxquelles elles étaient invitées.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Que voulez-vous dire par la « façon de voir le monde »?

M. Ian Thomson:

Les gens ont différentes façons de voir le monde, différentes connaissances et différentes valeurs, et le processus ne tenait pas nécessairement compte de certaines de ces façons de voir le monde et de ces connaissances. Certains processus reposaient sur des hypothèses, et les participants d'autres cultures n'avaient pas l'impression d'être considérés comme des égaux.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord.

Tout au long du processus de consultation, si vous prenez l'exemple du nord de l'Alberta, dans bon nombre de cas où il est question de ressources, les entreprises embauchent des membres de communautés autochtones, et ce sont probablement les principaux employeurs dans certaines de ces régions. Je dirais aussi que nous sommes un chef de file dans les normes environnementales et les normes du travail.

Pouvez-vous nous donner des exemples dans le nord de l'Alberta où des communautés n'ont pas été consultées? Pouvez-vous nous donner des exemples de communautés autochtones qui ont eu l'impression de ne pas avoir été écoutées?

Nous avons des exemples de communautés autochtones qui poursuivent le gouvernement devant les tribunaux en raison d'une interdiction ayant trait au transport maritime. Elles ne voulaient pas que cette mesure législative soit adoptée, et elles n'ont pas été consultées.

Avez-vous des exemples?

(1605)

M. Ian Thomson:

L'exemple que j'aimerais vous donner concerne en fait le nord de la Colombie-Britannique et non le nord de l'Alberta. Il a davantage trait aux conditions des travailleurs dans l'industrie et à la façon de créer des camps industriels qui sont plus accueillants et plus sécuritaires pour les hommes et les femmes. Si nous voulons vraiment qu'il y ait plus de femmes dans ces secteurs, le gouvernement et le secteur privé doivent mettre les bouchées doubles pour s'attaquer à certains problèmes de sécurité auxquels les femmes se heurtent lorsqu'elles travaillent dans des camps industriels où elles sont encore en situation minoritaire. Nous devons examiner la culture, les protocoles de sécurité et la façon de rendre ces milieux de travail aussi ouverts que possible et nous devons cerner les emplois qui s'offrent aux femmes. Voilà vraiment les enjeux prioritaires que j'ai entendus dans cette région du monde.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Monsieur Thomson, vous avez parlé de la création d'un poste d'ombudsman pour examiner les pratiques exemplaires dans le monde. Vous avez mentionné que cette personne pourrait mener des enquêtes sur les entreprises qui ont des comportements répréhensibles à l'étranger. Selon vous, quels pouvoirs aurait cet organisme ou le titulaire de ce poste?

M. Ian Thomson:

Selon ce qu'a annoncé le gouvernement, l'ombudsman devrait avoir le pouvoir d'enquêter et de demander des témoignages et des documents lorsqu'il est saisi d'allégations concernant des activités d'entreprises canadiennes à l'étranger en vue de déterminer si ces entreprises respectent les normes environnementales et les droits de la personne auxquels les Canadiens s'attendent que nos entreprises respectent dans leurs activités à l'étranger.

Le président:

Monsieur Schmale, vous êtes pile à temps. Nous avons pratiquement l'impression que c'était calculé.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord.

Le président:

La parole est à M. Cannings.

M. Richard Cannings (Okanagan-Sud—Kootenay-Ouest, NPD):

Merci.

Je remercie tous les témoins de leur présence ici aujourd'hui.

Ma question s'adresse à M. Thomson, et je vais reprendre là où s'est arrêté M. Schmale.

Vous avez beaucoup parlé de ce qui se passe à l'étranger dans vos divers exemples. Nous parlions à l'instant du projet de la création d'un poste d'ombudsman. Pour une raison quelconque, nous n'avons pas encore vu cet ombudsman après un an, mais il y a aujourd'hui, comme par hasard, un article dans le Globe and Mail sur les entreprises canadiennes de l'industrie des ressources et leurs agissements à l'étranger.

Nous avons entendu au Comité qu'au Canada nous avons certains des meilleurs processus de mobilisation et de consultation des peuples autochtones dans le monde. Je crois que nous avons encore beaucoup de pain sur la planche, mais nous avons ici des sociétés canadiennes qui agissent d'une certaine manière au Canada, alors que bon nombre d'entre elles agissent de manière totalement différente à l'étranger.

Certains affirment que ces sociétés essaient seulement de faire ce qui est dans leur intérêt supérieur, mais cet article montre clairement qu'il serait dans l'intérêt supérieur des entreprises d'avoir une conduite responsable à l'étranger.

Nous avons l'exemple de Tahoe Resources au Guatemala, et l'exploitation d'une très grande mine de cette entreprise est maintenant suspendue, ce qui place cette entreprise dans une situation extrêmement difficile, parce que le gouvernement guatémaltèque affirme que l'entreprise n'a pas consulté adéquatement les peuples autochtones. Il y a d'autres exemples d'agissements similaires.

J'aimerais vous entendre au sujet de la conduite des entreprises canadiennes à l'étranger, de leurs politiques en matière de consultation des Autochtones, de ce qu'elles devraient faire et de la façon d'en saisir le bureau d'un ombudsman dont nous attendons encore la création.

(1610)

M. Ian Thomson:

Il est évident que la consultation des Autochtones devient un grand risque pour les investisseurs canadiens qui ont des activités à l'étranger. Parmi les exemples que vous venez de citer, l'exemple de mines dont l'exploitation est suspendue parce que des sociétés n'ont pas consulté adéquatement les peuples autochtones est un exemple parfait de ce risque. C'est un exemple d'une responsabilité partagée entre l'État guatémaltèque et la société en question au sujet de la tenue de consultations adéquates.

Je ne crois pas que ce soit entièrement la responsabilité de la société, mais elle est évidemment partiellement responsable d'avoir entraîné la suspension de l'exploitation de cette mine et de ne pas avoir adéquatement consulté les peuples autochtones.

Ce que nous espérons avec un ombudsman, ce qui n'est pas la même chose que d'intenter des poursuites devant les tribunaux contre une entreprise, c'est que les leçons tirées des enquêtes de l'ombudsman entraînent des changements à l'échelle de l'industrie. L'ombudsman sera peut-être appelé à enquêter sur une situation précise, mais certaines de ses recommandations, s'il constate des tendances dans les problèmes que les sociétés canadiennes créent ou vivent à l'étranger, ne s'appliqueraient pas seulement à la société visée par l'enquête; elles pourraient avoir une plus grande portée.

Nous espérons qu'une situation précise permette à l'ombudsman de comprendre un problème et que ses conseils et ses recommandations aient un effet d'entraînement sur l'ensemble de l'industrie. Ses décisions ne seraient pas exécutoires — ce n'est pas un tribunal —, mais l'ombudsman pourrait faire des déclarations et formuler des recommandations dont tiendrait compte l'industrie.

M. Richard Cannings:

Certains de ces dossiers sont actuellement devant les tribunaux. Je crois qu'au moins trois affaires au Canada se trouvent en ce moment devant les tribunaux. Je me demande si vous pourriez formuler des hypothèses ou des observations sur les effets éventuels de ces décisions non seulement sur l'industrie canadienne, mais aussi sur les industries primaires dans le monde entier en ce qui concerne la façon dont les entreprises devraient agir et mener des activités de mobilisation et de consultation auprès des Autochtones.

M. Ian Thomson:

Les ONG comme Oxfam ne sont pas les seules à suivre de près ces procès pour connaître leur issue. Je sais que de nombreux intervenants de l'industrie et des gouvernements suivent, eux aussi, la situation pour comprendre si les entreprises peuvent être tenues légalement responsables de ne pas avoir respecté les droits de la personne à l'échelle internationale et, le cas échéant, pour savoir quelles en seront les conséquences pour leurs activités, leurs investisseurs et les pays où elles sont établies. Il reste à voir à quoi cela aboutira.

L'ombudsman offre une voie non judiciaire pour enquêter sur des allégations et entendre des causes. Je ne pense pas que nous voulions éliminer toute possibilité de réclamer justice dans le système de justice canadien, mais ce n'est pas nécessairement tout le monde qui a les ressources voulues pour porter une cause devant les tribunaux canadiens. L'ombudsman fournirait donc une voie parallèle qui mènerait à des résultats différents.

Je suis curieux de voir ce que révéleront les poursuites judiciaires concernant l'Érythrée et le Guatemala. Il s'agit d'affaires sans précédent, et il est difficile de dire au juste quelles en seront les conséquences.

M. Richard Cannings:

Vous avez également expliqué comment la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones s'appliquerait au droit canadien et, dans le même contexte, vous avez parlé de la notion de consentement libre, préalable et éclairé. Je suppose qu'il s'agit d'une question à deux volets.

D'après ce que vous avez observé, comment cet effort est-il déployé partout dans le monde et même ici, au Canada — cette idée de consentement? Est-ce que cela suppose un droit de veto — c'est-à-dire, les communautés autochtones exerceraient un veto sur les projets d'exploitation des ressources —, ou est-ce seulement le consentement éclairé et la mobilisation qui comptent le plus?

M. Ian Thomson:

Le mot « veto » n'apparaît nulle part dans la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones. Je ne crois pas qu'un consentement libre, préalable et éclairé soit synonyme de veto. Selon moi, la norme consiste à protéger les droits fondamentaux des peuples autochtones. À ce titre, le respect de cette norme fait en sorte que leurs droits soient bien protégés. Je ne dirais pas que c'est la même chose qu'un veto. Je crois qu'au Canada, dans la mesure où le gouvernement adopte une approche fondée sur les droits dans ses interactions avec les peuples autochtones...

À Oxfam, nous estimons que c'est la voie préconisée par les organisations autochtones, ainsi que par la Commission de vérité et de réconciliation dans son appel à l'action demandant aux gouvernements et au secteur privé de se servir de la Déclaration des Nations unies comme cadre de la réconciliation.

(1615)

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Whalen.

M. Nick Whalen (St. John's-Est, Lib.):

C'est une table ronde intéressante. Je ne savais pas trop à quoi m'attendre, mais on dirait bien qu'il y a une assez bonne synergie entre les deux groupes parce qu'ils abordent cette question sous des angles intéressants.

Quand vous parlez d'essayer de tenir compte — et ma question s'adresse aux deux groupes — de l'analyse comparative entre les sexes et des intersectionnalités en fonction du sexe au sein des communautés autochtones elles-mêmes pour veiller à ce que les groupes se fassent entendre comme il se doit, quelles approches vos deux organisations adoptent-elles au sujet du problème qui consiste à contourner les représentants élus de ces groupes et à aller au-delà des conseils de bande pour interpeller plutôt les sous-groupes au sein de cette population? Avez-vous des pratiques exemplaires à nous proposer à cet égard?

Mme Rumina Velshi:

Permettez-moi de parler d'abord de nos processus, et je suis sûre que Mme Sauer voudra ajouter d'autres observations.

Les processus de notre commission sont ouverts à tous; ainsi, les dirigeants ne sont pas nécessairement les seuls à y participer. Tout le monde peut comparaître. Nous recevons des participants qui représentent tous les aspects des communautés autochtones. Bien sûr, les femmes sont tout aussi bien représentées, voire mieux représentées, dans le cadre de nos séances.

Pour dissiper certaines des préoccupations soulevées par M. Thomson, nous prenons la peine, entre autres, d'organiser nos séances en soirée, si cela s'avère plus commode. Nous avons entendu de la part non seulement des femmes autochtones, mais des femmes en général, que cela serait utile pour rendre nos processus plus accessibles. Il y a d'autres mesures que nous prenons. Comme je l'ai dit, c'est ouvert à tout le monde, et nous tenons compte de tous les aspects et des différents points de vue.

Dans le même ordre d'idées, lorsque nous organisons des réunions au sein de la communauté, nous nous assurons de rencontrer non seulement les dirigeants, mais aussi différents représentants au sein des groupes.

Avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter? Non.

M. Nick Whalen:

Monsieur Thomson.

M. Ian Thomson:

Oui, à Oxfam, nous avons mis au point un outil pour le secteur privé afin de montrer comment effectuer une évaluation des effets sexospécifiques d'un projet. C'est quelque chose qui a été élaboré par nos collègues d'Oxfam en Australie, et nous l'avons mis en pratique dans le cadre de divers projets liés au secteur de l'énergie, notamment pour un certain nombre de barrages hydroélectriques et quelques autres projets du secteur de l'extraction.

C'est une démarche en quatre étapes, dont la première consiste vraiment à établir une base de référence quant à la dynamique des pouvoirs entre les hommes et les femmes au sein de la communauté locale, dès le point de départ, et à déterminer les répercussions d'un projet, c'est-à-dire évaluer si ce dernier a pour effet de réduire les inégalités ou de les aggraver. Il est donc important de comprendre en quoi consiste ce point de départ. À mon avis, chaque contexte aura un point de départ différent, conjugué à différentes préoccupations et considérations, selon le type de projet ou de développement qui est proposé.

Il s'agit de comprendre ce point de départ et de déterminer quelles sont certaines des répercussions éventuelles du projet sur les hommes et les femmes. Notre outil d'évaluation des effets sexospécifiques a parfois été utilisé avant la mise en place d'un projet. À d'autres occasions, on s'en est servi plusieurs années après la mise en oeuvre d'un projet, et les populations locales sont alors mieux à même d'exprimer et de consigner les effets sexospécifiques.

M. Nick Whalen:

Madame Velshi, la Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire a-t-elle un cadre d'analyse comparative entre les sexes? Je sais que le gouvernement fédéral offre des webinaires en ligne, et on encourage la plupart d'entre nous — aussi bien les députés que leur personnel — à suivre un cours sur l'analyse comparative entre les sexes pour l'examen des politiques. La Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire fait-elle quelque chose de particulier, et cela devrait-il faire partie de votre recueil?

(1620)

Mme Rumina Velshi:

C'est un terrain nouveau pour nous. J'ai, moi aussi, des employés qui ont suivi la formation et, assurément, quand vient le temps d'élaborer nos documents de réglementation et nos exigences, nous nous servons maintenant d'une analyse comparative entre les sexes à cette fin.

À l'avenir, dans le cadre du projet de loi C-69 et des évaluations d'impact, il sera obligatoire de mener une analyse comparative entre les sexes.

En ce qui a trait à nos décisions actuelles en matière de délivrance de permis, nous n'effectuons pas vraiment d'analyse comparative entre les sexes de façon systématique, mais une de mes priorités personnelles est la représentation des deux sexes. Notre commission tient beaucoup à poursuivre cet objectif et à examiner les répercussions de nos décisions relatives à la délivrance de permis; à ce titre, nous demandons aux demandeurs et aux titulaires de permis comment ils abordent cette question.

M. Nick Whalen:

Mon expérience du financement des participants concerne vraiment les zones extracôtières de Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador et, dans ce cas, tous les bénéficiaires du financement étaient des bandes. Avez-vous des exemples de cas où la Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire a accordé un tel financement à des groupes autochtones autres que les conseils de bande ou leurs divisions corporatives, par exemple, à des groupes de femmes?

Mme Rumina Velshi:

J'invite Mme Sauer à répondre à cette question.

Mme Liane Sauer:

Nous avons certainement des exemples. Nous appuyons tout groupe qui présente une bonne demande. Nous ne faisons pas de distinction entre les demandeurs.

M. Nick Whalen:

Je vais terminer avec vous, monsieur Thomson. Avez-vous l'impression que le système qui est en place et l'approche de la Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire en ce qui a trait aux pratiques internationales... Avez-vous d'autres suggestions qui pourraient aider à améliorer notre système, à tout le moins au chapitre de la sûreté nucléaire?

M. Ian Thomson:

Je souscris à l'observation faite par la présidente, à savoir que toute modification législative imminente fait augmenter les attentes. Nous espérons que le projet de loi C-69 sera adopté au Sénat et que cette pratique deviendra la nouvelle norme au Canada. Je crois que tous les organismes, la Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire et l'Agence canadienne d'évaluation d'impact devront acquérir leur propre savoir-faire en la matière, d'où la nécessité de renforcer les capacités au sein de ces institutions fédérales.

Je trouve qu'il est tout aussi important de tenir compte des organisations à l'échelle locale, comme vous venez de le dire. Les organisations de femmes qui sont à l'écoute des préoccupations communautaires, qui comprennent le contexte local, c'est-à-dire la base de références dont j'ai parlé, et qui savent quel est votre point de départ et quelles pourraient être certaines des lacunes actuelles en matière d'égalité entre les sexes... Si nous ne leur accordons pas les ressources nécessaires, alors la contribution des organismes fédéraux ne servira à rien. Oui, nous avons besoin que ces derniers en fassent plus, mais je dois également m'assurer que les gens touchés et leurs organisations disposent des ressources nécessaires pour être en mesure de participer pleinement aux processus.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Falk, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Ted Falk (Provencher, PCC):

Merci à nos témoins de leur présence ici aujourd'hui et de leurs exposés.

Je vais commencer par vous, madame Velshi. Vous représentez l'organisme de réglementation de l'industrie nucléaire. Vous avez évidemment déjà travaillé avec des groupes autochtones sur des questions liées à la réglementation.

Mme Rumina Velshi:

Oui.

M. Ted Falk:

D'après votre expérience avec ces groupes, quels enjeux sont importants pour eux?

Mme Rumina Velshi:

Un des principaux enjeux dont nous entendons parler, c'est l'incidence d'une contamination radioactive potentielle sur leur mode de vie traditionnel, surtout en ce qui concerne les aliments traditionnels. Voilà habituellement le genre de questions que nous entendons dans le cadre de nos séances.

À la Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire, nous avons un programme indépendant de surveillance environnementale et, à titre prioritaire, nous nous sommes assurés de consulter les groupes autochtones afin qu'ils nous aident à élaborer un programme d'échantillonnage, parce que certains aliments sont plus importants que d'autres et les Autochtones veulent avoir la certitude qu'ils peuvent les consommer sans danger. Ils nous aident donc à concevoir un programme d'échantillonnage et, d'ailleurs, ils participent maintenant à la surveillance proprement dite, ce qui leur donne une plus grande assurance quant à la salubrité de ces aliments. Cette question figure habituellement très haut dans la liste de leurs priorités.

L'autre enjeu concerne tout simplement les risques généraux associés à l'énergie nucléaire et la possibilité d'obtenir des explications dans un langage facile à comprendre, sans trop de termes techniques. C'est ce que nous tâchons de faire. Nous avons recours à des interprètes. En fait, dans le cadre de nos séances, nous offrons des services d'interprétation à cette fin. Nos séances d'information « CCSN 101 » comportent un autre volet, dans le cadre duquel nous essayons d'aider à apaiser leurs inquiétudes au sujet de la sûreté nucléaire et des risques associés aux installations nucléaires.

(1625)

M. Ted Falk:

Dans vos démarches auprès des groupes autochtones, la sûreté et les risques constituent donc les principaux enjeux qui les préoccupent.

Mme Rumina Velshi:

En effet, la sûreté et les risques seraient à l'ordre du jour, selon la façon dont ces questions se manifestent par la suite, que ce soit sur le plan de la nourriture ou de la gestion des déchets. Les enjeux sont la sûreté et les risques associés au nucléaire...

M. Ted Falk:

Quand vous menez ces consultations, rencontrez-vous les communautés dans leur ensemble? Organisez-vous des assemblées publiques au sein des communautés? Rencontrez-vous les aînés, les chefs, leurs responsables administratifs ou, encore, leurs consultants externes? Bref, qui rencontrez-vous? Qui sont les décideurs?

Mme Rumina Velshi:

Nous rencontrons quiconque en fait la demande. D'ailleurs, dans le cadre de nos séances, nous recevons toutes les personnes que vous venez d'énumérer. Il y aura donc les membres de la communauté en général, leurs consultants et leurs chefs. Tout le monde est au rendez-vous.

M. Ted Falk:

D'accord.

Mme Rumina Velshi:

Nous entendons les différents points de vue, et les préoccupations sont très similaires.

M. Ted Falk:

Qui seraient les décideurs?

Mme Rumina Velshi:

Pour ce qui est de la délivrance de permis, la décision revient à la Commission, en sa qualité de tribunal indépendant.

M. Ted Falk:

Par ailleurs, du point de vue des Autochtones, qui sont les décideurs?

Mme Rumina Velshi:

Dans le contexte de nos travaux, ils ne jouent pas vraiment le rôle de décideurs. Ils sont là pour informer la Commission et lui faire part de leur point de vue.

M. Ted Falk:

D'accord.

Vous tenez des consultations auprès d'eux, mais à un moment donné, ils obtiennent une approbation de votre part. À qui donnez-vous cette approbation?

Mme Rumina Velshi:

Notre approbation repose sur notre décision d'autoriser ou non la réalisation d'un projet et les conditions connexes. Ce n'est pas la bande qui obtient l'approbation, si c'est ce que vous voulez savoir. C'est plutôt le promoteur du projet.

M. Ted Falk:

D'accord.

En général, y a-t-il une marche à suivre lorsque les bandes vous font part de leurs préoccupations?

Mme Rumina Velshi:

Je crois que cela varie. Mme Sauer peut vous en donner les détails. Comme je vous l'ai dit, nous sommes disposés à nous entretenir avec tous les gens qui demandent à nous rencontrer et [Inaudible].

M. Ted Falk:

À quelle fréquence demandent-ils une analyse comparative entre les sexes?

Mme Rumina Velshi:

Pour autant que je sache, ils n'en ont pas encore fait la demande.

M. Ted Falk:

Je crois que vous avez répondu à mes questions. Merci.

J'ai terminé, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, vous avez environ deux minutes, réponse comprise.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

J'utiliserai mon temps à bon escient. Merci.

Madame Velshi, vous avez évoqué les 70 ans d'existence de la Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire. Je me demande si vous pouvez nous en dire plus au sujet de son histoire. À quel moment ces consultations ont-elles débuté? Quel en a été l'élément déclencheur, et comment le processus a-t-il pris son envol? Je suppose que ces consultations n'existent pas depuis 70 ans.

Mme Rumina Velshi:

Étant donné que je suis commissaire depuis six ans et présidente depuis six mois, je peux vous parler uniquement de cette période. Même au cours de ces six ans, j'ai constaté que c'est une situation qui évolue: les attentes changent sans cesse, et nos processus deviennent beaucoup plus inclusifs.

Oui, c'est un processus en évolution constante. Même au moment où nous nous parlons aujourd'hui, nous avons pu repérer des moyens de faire mieux, et nous nous améliorons continuellement à ce chapitre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Je pense que c'est tout le temps dont je dispose. Merci.

Le président:

Merci à vous tous d'avoir été là, et merci de vos témoignages. C'est très apprécié.

Nous manquons toujours de temps, mais c'est à cause du format des séances.

Nous vous sommes très reconnaissants d'avoir pris le temps de vous déplacer pour être parmi nous. Nous allons suspendre la séance pendant deux minutes, puis nous allons reprendre nos travaux.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

(1625)

(1630)

Le président:

Je souhaite de nouveau la bienvenue à tout le monde.

Pour la prochaine heure, nous accueillons deux groupes de témoins, nommément M. Ian Jacobsen et M. Channa Perera, de l'Association canadienne de l'électricité. Merci, messieurs, d'être ici aujourd'hui. Par vidéoconférence, nous avons le professeur Dwight Newman. Monsieur Newman, pouvez-vous nous voir et nous entendre?

Vous hochez la tête. C'est bon signe.

M. Dwight Newman (professeur de droit et titulaire de la Chaire de recherche du Canada sur les droits des Autochtones, University of Saskatchewan, à titre personnel):

Oui.

Le président:

Merci. Je crois que vous êtes de Saskatoon. Est-ce bien vrai?

M. Dwight Newman:

C'est tout à fait exact.

Le président:

Formidable.

Chaque groupe dispose d'un maximum de 10 minutes pour livrer sa déclaration liminaire. Ensuite, il y aura une période de questions.

Messieurs, comme vous êtes là, nous allons commencer par vous.

M. Channa Perera (vice-président, Élaboration des politiques, Association canadienne de l'électricité):

Monsieur le président, membres du Comité, merci de votre invitation.

Je m'appelle Channa Perera. Je suis vice-président de l'élaboration des politiques à l'Association canadienne de l'électricité, l'ACÉ. Je suis ici avec mon collègue, M. Ian Jacobsen, qui est directeur des relations avec les Autochtones à Ontario Power Generation. Nous sommes très heureux d'être ici pour vous faire part de notre point de vue sur la mobilisation des Autochtones.

L'ACÉ est le porte-parole national de l'industrie canadienne de l'électricité. Nos membres sont des entreprises de production, de transport et de distribution, ainsi que des fournisseurs de technologie et de services de partout au pays.

L'électricité est indispensable à la qualité de vie des Canadiens et à la compétitivité de notre économie. Le secteur emploie environ 81 000 Canadiens et contribue à hauteur de 30 milliards de dollars au PIB du Canada.

Étant donné l'importance primordiale de notre secteur pour l'économie, nous sommes particulièrement bien placés pour contribuer à l'avenir des énergies propres au Canada et à la réconciliation avec les peuples autochtones. Dans le cadre du travail que nous faisons à cette fin, nous reconnaissons l'importance de la Déclaration des Nations unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones ainsi que celle des recommandations de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada. Cependant, si notre objectif est d'atteindre une véritable réconciliation, il est impératif que le gouvernement veille à ce qu'il n'y ait aucune ambiguïté dans la mise en oeuvre de ces instruments de politique.

L'industrie de l'électricité est déjà une force d'avant-garde pour la mobilisation autochtone. En 2016, l'ACÉ et ses sociétés membres ont élaboré un ensemble de principes nationaux de base relativement à cette mobilisation, ce qui a permis de baliser encore davantage l'engagement que nous avons pris il y a longtemps de travailler avec les communautés autochtones locales, partout au pays.

Notre travail avec les communautés autochtones s'est traduit par la constitution d'importants partenariats et d'importantes coentreprises, par des ententes sur les répercussions et les avantages, par des possibilités d'affaires dans la chaîne d'approvisionnement et par des investissements directs dans l'éducation, la formation et l'emploi autochtones.

Permettez-moi de souligner quelques exemples de ces initiatives. Au chapitre des coentreprises, il y a lieu de mentionner le partenariat de Wuskwatim Power de 200 mégawatts que Manitoba Hydro a signé en 2006. C'était la première fois que Manitoba Hydro et une première nation s'engageaient dans un partenariat avec prise de participation officiel, assurant à la collectivité d'importantes possibilités sur le plan des revenus, de la formation et de l'emploi, notamment.

L'industrie travaille également avec de nombreuses communautés autochtones locales à l'élaboration d'ententes sur les répercussions et les avantages, les ERA. Ces ententes sont devenues un mécanisme important pour permettre aux communautés visées de participer pleinement aux projets réalisés sur le territoire ancestral. L'ERA conclue entre Nalcor Energy et la nation innue dans le cadre du projet du cours inférieur du fleuve Churchill en est un exemple. Ces types d'ERA permettent aux entreprises de travailler avec les communautés autochtones sur de nombreux aspects du projet, comme l'atténuation des impacts environnementaux et la mise en place de conditions propices en matière d'éducation, de formation, d'emploi et d'approvisionnement.

Nos efforts ne s'arrêtent pas là. Nous misons également sur la constitution d'une nouvelle génération de dirigeants autochtones grâce à diverses initiatives ciblées en matière d'éducation et de formation. C'est dans cette optique que des entreprises comme ATCO — dont le siège social est situé en Alberta — ont pris les devants. En 2018, ATCO a lancé un programme pilote de leadership et de cheminement professionnel à l'intention des jeunes autochtones albertains de la 9e année. Grâce à cette initiative, les étudiants autochtones peuvent aller visiter les chantiers locaux et entrer en contact avec des professionnels compétents, ce qui leur permet de se renseigner au sujet des possibilités d'emplois et de se tracer un plan de carrière bien à eux. ATCO et d'autres entreprises membres de l'ACÉ viennent aussi en aide aux étudiants autochtones de l'ensemble du pays par l'octroi d'aide financière pour la poursuite d'études supérieures.

Je vais maintenant laisser la parole à mon collègue, Ian, qui vous exposera la perspective d'un praticien en ce qui a trait à la mobilisation des Autochtones chez Ontario Power Generation.

(1635)

M. Ian Jacobsen (directeur, Relations autochtones, Ontario Power Generation, Association canadienne de l'électricité):

Très bien. Merci, Channa.

Avec environ la moitié de la production provinciale, l'Ontario Power Generation, l'OPG, est le plus important producteur d'électricité de l'Ontario. Nos installations diversifiées comprennent deux centrales nucléaires, soixante-six centrales hydroélectriques, deux centrales à biomasse et une centrale thermique. S'ajoutera à cela, plus tard cette année, une installation solaire.

Comme ses activités s'étendent aux quatre coins de la province, l'engagement de l'OPG quant à l'établissement de relations à long terme respectueuses et mutuellement bénéfiques avec les communautés autochtones s'appuie sur la reconnaissance que ses actifs sont tous situés sur les territoires ancestraux des peuples autochtones de l'Ontario.

L'OPG et ses sociétés remplaçantes produisent de l'électricité en Ontario depuis plus d'un siècle. Or, nous reconnaissons que le développement hydroélectrique qui s'est fait au cours de la majeure partie du XXe siècle a eu des répercussions importantes sur de nombreuses collectivités autochtones de l'Ontario. L'OPG a donc élaboré un cadre facultatif officiel pour évaluer et régler les griefs historiques liés en grande partie à l'inondation illégale des terres de réserve. Au cours des 27 dernières années, l'OPG est arrivée à conclure des règlements de griefs avec 21 communautés des Premières Nations au moyen d'un processus respectueux et non accusatoire axé sur la communauté. Ce processus a mené à la constitution de fructueux partenariats avec prise de participation. En fait, ce printemps, l'OPG et la Première Nation du lac Seul célébreront le 10e anniversaire de leur partenariat concernant la centrale du lac Seul.

Au moment où la centrale fût achevée, en 2009, l'OPG et la communauté du lac Seul ont formé un partenariat significatif sur le plan historique — c'était le premier pour l'OPG — aux termes duquel la Première Nation a pu s'attacher une participation dans la centrale du lac Seul, une unité de 12 mégawatts capable de produire suffisamment d'électricité pour répondre aux besoins annuels de 5 000 foyers.

En s'inspirant de ce modèle, l'OPG a terminé en 2016 un projet de 2,6 milliards de dollars sur le cours inférieur de la rivière Mattagami, un projet effectué en partenariat avec la Moose Cree First Nation. Ce projet a été achevé avant la date prévue et sans dépassement de coûts. Environ 250 autochtones de l'endroit ont travaillé sur ce projet, lequel a également donné lieu à des occasions de marché évaluées à plus de 300 millions de dollars pour cette communauté. Tout au long du projet, l'OPG a travaillé en étroite collaboration avec Moose Cree et d'autres collectivités avoisinantes à un certain nombre d'initiatives en matière d'emploi, d'environnement et de culture. Il convient entre autres de mentionner l'élaboration de l'initiative Sibi d'emploi et de formation qui vise à fournir un certain nombre de services de soutien pour maximiser l'emploi dans la communauté, ainsi que les études qui ont été réalisées au sujet des connaissances écologiques traditionnelles. Il y a également eu la création du comité de coordination des extensions de Mattagami — qui s'est faite en collaboration avec la Première Nation Moose Cree, la nation Taykwa Tagamou et MoCreebec — pour surveiller le respect des conditions des approbations des évaluations environnementales. Entre autres initiatives, on ne saurait passer sous silence le soutien reçu pour l'élaboration du dictionnaire cri de Moose.

Plus récemment, au printemps 2017, l'OPG a terminé la construction de la centrale Peter Sutherland Sr., qui a donné lieu à un partenariat participatif avec la nation Taykwa Tagamou. Nommée en l'honneur d'un aîné respecté de cette nation, la nouvelle centrale de 300 millions de dollars a été mise en service plus tôt que prévu et sans dépassement de coûts. Cinquante membres de la nation Taykwa Tagamou ont travaillé sur le projet qui, au plus fort de la construction, employait environ 220 personnes. Des contrats de sous-traitance d'environ 53,5 millions de dollars ont également été attribués par voie de concours à des coentreprises de la nation Taykwa Tagamou durant la phase de construction de la station.

En mai 2016, nous avons annoncé un partenariat avec la Six Nations Community Development Corporation pour la construction d’un générateur d’électricité solaire à la centrale électrique de Nanticoke, sur le lac Érié, une ancienne centrale au charbon qui a été mise hors service en 2013.

À sa mise en service — plus tard cette année —, le parc solaire de Nanticoke sera en mesure de produire 44 mégawatts d'énergie propre et renouvelable pour l'Ontario. En 2018, l'OPG a lancé, à l'intention des Autochtones, un programme pour la création d'ouvertures dans le secteur du nucléaire, aussi connu sous le nom d'ION, afin d'appuyer le projet de remise à neuf de Darlington et de pallier le manque grandissant de travailleurs spécialisés. En collaboration avec l'organisme Kagita Mikam Aboriginal Employment and Training et l'Electrical Power Systems Construction Association, le programme ION cherche à recruter des travailleurs autochtones qualifiés et à les faire participer à des projets intéressants comme le projet de remise à neuf de Darlington.

Depuis son lancement, ION a atteint ses objectifs de 2018 en matière de placement et l'on s'attend à ce qu'il continue sur cette lancée en 2019. Dans le contexte de l'élaboration d'un projet, nous croyons que ces types de partenariats et de relations de collaboration avec les collectivités autochtones et les avantages mutuels qu'ils procurent peuvent être d'excellents modèles de réconciliation. Nous pensons en outre qu'ils peuvent nous permettre de démontrer à quel point il est essentiel d'accompagner l'acquisition de pouvoirs d'intentions concrètes.

Channa, pour le mot de la fin.

(1640)

M. Channa Perera:

Merci, Ian.

En terminant, je tiens à réitérer toute l'importance que nous attachons à l'avancement de la réconciliation avec les peuples autochtones du Canada. Nous devons travailler ensemble afin de créer un avenir meilleur pour nos peuples autochtones.

Merci.

Le président:

C'est très bien. Merci.

Professeur Newman, nous vous écoutons.

M. Dwight Newman:

Bonjour.

Je m'appelle Dwight Newman. Je suis professeur de droit et titulaire d'une chaire de recherche du Canada sur les droits autochtones en droit constitutionnel et international à l'Université de la Saskatchewan. À ce titre, je poursuis un vaste programme de recherche sur le droit relatif aux droits des Autochtones, en mettant l'accent sur les aspects où se recoupent les droits des Autochtones et l'exploitation des ressources, ici et ailleurs dans le monde. J'ai également participé à des discussions sur les politiques afférentes, notamment à titre de membre du comité de l'Association de droit international sur la mise en oeuvre des droits des peuples autochtones, et j'ai assumé certains rôles connexes dans la pratique. Toutefois, je comparais aujourd'hui à titre personnel simplement pour aider le Comité du mieux que je peux.

Je commencerai en félicitant le Comité de l'attention qu'il porte à cette question, question que l'on a pris soin de formuler en termes généraux. En matière de réconciliation, il est à la fois nécessaire et possible d'opter pour une réflexion stratégique globale et de penser la réconciliation économique de manière particulière, et d'essayer de trouver de bonnes façons d'avancer sur ces deux plans.

Ma déclaration liminaire a deux objectifs. Premièrement, bien que j'apprécie les efforts de créativité déployés par le Comité, je ferai probablement une mise en garde quant à l'idée d'aller chercher les meilleures pratiques à l'extérieur du pays, et j'insisterai sur la nécessité de poursuivre le travail complexe d'élaboration de politiques et de façons de faire qui fonctionnent pour le Canada et les peuples autochtones du Canada.

Deuxièmement, j'essaierai de parler de certaines pratiques prometteuses qui sont en train d'émerger au Canada et dans d'autres pays. Je suis d'avis qu'il faut chercher nos leçons à plus petite échelle plutôt que de rechercher une pratique exemplaire idéale à importer.

Donc, en ce qui concerne mon premier point, nous devons être prudents quant à la possibilité de trouver la pratique exemplaire idéale à l'étranger. Permettez-moi de donner quelques exemples de certains risques qui peuvent survenir lorsque l'on essaie de transposer des pratiques exemplaires dans des contextes très différents les uns des autres.

Prenons l'exemple du Parlement sami, en Norvège, souvent cité comme un exemple puissant d'institution de consultation avec les peuples autochtones. Les processus sur lesquels se fonde l'élaboration des lois et des politiques norvégiennes sont dotés d'un mécanisme pour faire en sorte que les questions susceptibles d'avoir une incidence sur le peuple sami de Norvège soient portées à l'attention du Parlement sami et cautionnent la tenue d'une consultation à l'échelle du pays. Or, le Parlement sami fonctionne dans un contexte très différent du nôtre. Rappelons au premier chef que le peuple sami est plus unifié linguistiquement et culturellement que les divers peuples autochtones du Canada.

Dans l'éventualité où, à l'instar du Parlement sami, le Canada décidait de se doter d'un mécanisme de consultation à plus grande échelle dans le cadre de ses politiques — quelque chose qui irait au-delà de l'obligation de consulter —, il faudrait que les peuples autochtones du Canada décident de quelle façon, au moyen d'une combinaison plus complexe d'institutions, ils pourraient présenter leurs intérêts comme le font les Samis par l'intermédiaire du Parlement sami.

Deuxièmement, nous ne devrions pas encenser la Norvège pour son rapport aux autochtones en matière d'énergie. La majeure partie du développement énergétique du pays et la source de l'immense richesse de la Norvège sont attribuables au pétrole de la mer du Nord, que le gouvernement norvégien a considéré comme n'ayant rien à voir avec le peuple sami.

Toujours dans le contexte scandinave, pensons à la Suède voisine, où les questions de développement des ressources sont centrées sur le développement minier potentiel qui nuit presque inévitablement à l'élevage des rennes du peuple sami — ce dont je pense que le Comité a entendu parler un peu plus tôt —, il y a une situation beaucoup plus tendue sur les droits autochtones en général. La Suède n'a pas trouvé les mêmes solutions que la Norvège, mais il convient de rappeler qu'elle évolue dans un contexte très différent de celui de sa voisine.

En Alaska, dont il a déjà été question au Comité, je crois, de nombreuses communautés autochtones ont prospéré grâce au pétrole du versant nord et aux assises que ce pétrole a procurées à un ensemble de sociétés de développement économique régional. Aujourd'hui, le système de l'Alaska bénéficie d'un soutien significatif au sein de l'État. Toutefois, le système doit son existence à une décision imposée selon laquelle les revendications de titres aborigènes de l'Alaska devaient être réglées d'un seul coup et à l'échelle de l'État. Bien qu'il y ait eu des négociations avec l'Alaska Federation of Natives — qui a également apporté des idées comme celle d'une structure d'entreprise dans laquelle les autochtones seraient actionnaires —, la Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act — la loi adoptée par le Congrès américain en 1971 pour résoudre d'un seul coup toutes les revendications territoriales autochtones en Alaska — a suscité des réactions mitigées au fil du temps, notamment parce qu'il s'agissait d'une décision imposée. Par conséquent, même si certains vantent les mérites du système de l'Alaska, ses origines viennent d'un processus qui ne correspondrait pas aux nombreuses attentes des Canadiens quant à la participation des peuples autochtones à l'élaboration des politiques et au règlement des revendications.

(1645)



Je pourrais continuer de vous citer d'autres exemples dans la même veine qui montrent la raison pour laquelle il est très important d'être prudent avant de transplanter les idées, mais je tiens à parler de pratiques exemplaires à plus petite échelle qui font déjà leur apparition au Canada et ailleurs et qui ont beaucoup de potentiel.

On peut probablement parler d'une participation réussie lorsque toutes les parties concernées peuvent dire que le processus a été fructueux et qu'il a donné de bons résultats. Il y a deux pays au monde qui se démarquent compte tenu de leur grand nombre d'ententes gagnant-gagnant qui prennent la forme d'ententes conclues entre les Autochtones et l'industrie afin de faciliter des développements particuliers. Ces deux pays sont l'Australie et le Canada.

Les ententes entre les Autochtones et l'industrie ont fait l'objet de beaucoup moins d'études universitaires qu'on pourrait l'espérer, bien qu'un universitaire australien ait effectué d'importants travaux comparatifs sur les ententes canadiennes et australiennes. Il a distingué de nombreux facteurs contextuels qui caractérisent la réussite ou non des ententes.

Un collègue et moi avons organisé un atelier récemment, et nous avons travaillé à l'élaboration d'un recueil révisé sur les ententes entre les Autochtones et l'industrie. Je pense que nous serions d'accord avec la plupart de ces observations. L'un des meilleurs moyens de trouver une participation qui fonctionne consiste probablement à favoriser la conclusion d'ententes entre les Autochtones et l'industrie.

En ce moment, j'utilise délibérément le terme « entente entre les Autochtones et l'industrie » comme un terme plus général que les « ententes sur les répercussions et les avantages », ou les ERA, qui ont beaucoup attiré l'attention au fil des ans. Certaines ERA ont apporté d'importantes ressources dans les collectivités autochtones, et certaines d'entre elles ont permis de bâtir l'avenir, en particulier lorsqu'elles comportaient des dispositions robustes visant à soutenir le développement d'entreprises qui survivraient plus longtemps qu'une ressource non renouvelable particulière ou qui reposeraient sur une ressource renouvelable existante.

Toutefois, il y a d'autres modèles à prendre en considération, notamment les accords de coentreprise, les partenariats à participation accrue — qui ont déjà été mentionnés au cours de la séance — et même des développements dirigés par des Autochtones qui, de façon plus générale, pourraient représenter des éléments importants des futures ententes entre les Autochtones et l'industrie. Lorsque certaines collectivités autochtones cherchent elles-mêmes à entreprendre des projets de développement énergétique, cela indique clairement une participation réussie ou même quelque chose qui va au-delà d'une seule participation.

Nous devons maintenant penser à de nombreuses questions stratégiques différentes, y compris de solides mécanismes de financement. Nous devons également être très attentifs au fait que les collectivités autochtones canadiennes sont très diversifiées. Certaines collectivités souhaitent s'assurer que de robustes mesures de protection de leurs modes de vie traditionnels existent. D'autres sont très enthousiastes à l'idée de participer à des projets de développement énergétique et même de les diriger.

L'un des risques que nous courons au Canada en mettant en oeuvre trop de lois est lié au fait d'adopter certaines présomptions plutôt que d'autres. Trop de ces lois reposent sur d'anciennes présomptions selon lesquelles les projets de développement iront de l'avant ou non après quelques consultations avec des collectivités autochtones que l'on considère comme des « obstacles ». De plus, nous voyons même les lois actuelles faire obstacle aux collectivités autochtones qui souhaitent entreprendre des projets de développement dirigés par des Autochtones.

Puis, de nombreuses complications entrent en jeu.

En conclusion, je vais faire brièvement allusion au rapport de 2013 du rapporteur spécial de l'ONU sur les droits des peuples autochtones, qui concerne les industries extractives. Tout en mettant les pays en garde contre certains types de développement, le rapporteur spécial salue l'idée de mettre en oeuvre des projets de développement dirigés par des Autochtones. Je soutiens que c'est la pratique que nous devrions chercher à favoriser dans tous les contextes où elle fonctionne, car c'est certainement l'une des pratiques qui rassemblent les gens. Dans toutes les situations où elle peut fonctionner, tout comme les ententes entre les Autochtones et l'industrie peuvent fonctionner, mais en allant plus loin, les projets de développement dirigés par des Autochtones représentent une entente gagnant-gagnant dans le domaine de la mise en valeur des ressources, une entente qui harmonise grandement des intérêts qui seraient opposés autrement.

Pour faire fonctionner ces projets, il faut déployer des efforts politiques continus et importants relativement à des questions de financement et, de façon plus générale, il faut offrir des possibilités de réussite commerciale et économique aux Autochtones, et cerner toutes sortes d'autres questions stratégiques qui diffèrent des préoccupations traditionnelles dont nous avons tendance à nous soucier. Je pense que ces questions stratégiques traitent de l'avenir.

Je vais terminer sur une note qui est optimiste, je l'espère. Il est peut-être possible d'apprendre certaines choses des diverses pratiques qui ont été élaborées, et je félicite de nouveau votre comité de tenter de le faire. Toutefois, selon moi, les pratiques exemplaires sont probablement encore à venir, et ce sont celles que nous devons continuer de rechercher.

(1650)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur.

Monsieur Hehr, vous allez amorcer la série de questions.

L’hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary-Centre, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je remercie également nos invités d'être venus et de participer à cette étude très importante portant sur la façon dont nous pouvons faire participer nos peuples autochtones, à la fois dans le cadre de notre obligation de les consulter et dans notre façon de faire avancer des projets. Je me suis réjoui d'entendre les commentaires, qui ont été formulés au sujet de la façon de passer d'une discussion sur l'obligation de consulter et sur la façon dont les gens sont durement touchés, à une discussion sur la façon de les transformer en promoteurs de projets et en participant à l'appareil qui veille à ce que les projets soient menés à bien et à ce que les collectivités prospèrent.

Cela dit, pouvez-vous aborder le sujet de la mobilisation précoce? Il me semble que ce doit être l'une des façons d'assurer la réussite des projets. Grâce à la mobilisation précoce, les gens peuvent jouer cartes sur table en ce qui concerne la façon d'aller de l'avant.

Monsieur Jacobsen, voyez-vous une objection à lancer le débat?

(1655)

M. Ian Jacobsen:

Absolument.

OPG a pour pratique d'entreprendre une mobilisation et une consultation précoces dans le cadre de tous ses projets, surtout dans le but de parvenir à une compréhension commune du projet, des répercussions potentielles et des stratégies d'atténuation, ainsi que de trouver des intérêts mutuels dans des objectifs communs.

Comme nos partenariats à participation accrue l'ont démontré, je pense que nos démarches ont donné de bons résultats. À OPG, il s'agit d'un processus normalisé que nous suivons. Notre situation est unique en ce sens que certains de nos actifs datent de plus de 100 ans. Nous entretenons donc des relations à long terme avec un grand nombre de collectivités qui font partie de notre exploitation. Nous avons effectivement l'avantage d'avoir ces relations continues.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter, monsieur Perera?

M. Channa Perera:

Oui. L'association des membres travaille actuellement avec d'autres organisations afin de favoriser le développement des capacités des Autochtones. Ainsi, ils pourront en fait être parmi des promoteurs de projets. Nous collaborons avec le programme 20/20 Catalysts, qui est offert à Ottawa. Leur principal mandat est de promouvoir des projets d'énergie propre à l'échelle nationale.

L'ACE fait fréquemment affaire avec eux. Nous collaborons avec des membres afin d'envoyer d'éventuels candidats autochtones participer à leurs programmes afin d'acquérir les compétences et les connaissances dont ils ont besoin pour retourner dans leur collectivité et entreprendre un projet d'hydroélectricité au fil de l'eau ou d'autres projets à petite échelle semblables, et pour travailler avec les dirigeants des collectivités afin de faire fructifier certaines de ces idées et de les réaliser avec le temps.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Parfait.

Hydro-Manitoba exerce des activités internationales en Scandinavie et en Amérique du Sud. Comment ces projets ont-ils permis aux Autochtones d'exprimer leurs opinions, et que pouvons-nous apprendre de ces projets?

M. Channa Perera:

Faites-vous allusion à Hydro-Manitoba?

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Oui.

M. Channa Perera:

Je ne dispose pas de beaucoup de renseignements concernant leurs activités à l'extérieur du pays. Cependant, comme je l'ai mentionné au cours de mon exposé, Hydro-Manitoba mobilise les collectivités autochtones depuis deux décennies. Ils étaient parmi les premiers à signer une entente avec des Premières Nations, qui porte le nom de Wuskwatim Power Limited Partnership et qui remonte à 2006. Ce projet a nécessité beaucoup de temps. Bien qu'ils aient signé cette entente en 2006, le projet a fait l'objet de plusieurs années de négociations. Ce n'est pas facile à faire, mais il faut établir une confiance mutuelle et développer des capacités.

Nous devons nous assurer que les Autochtones ont la capacité de réunir les entreprises et les promoteurs de projets, comme Hydro-Manitoba, afin de discuter de la façon de faire avancer les choses, d'établir le partenariat à participation accrue, etc.

Je suis certain qu'Ian peut parler davantage de ces aspects, si cela vous intéresse.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

J'ai une question à poser à M. Newman.

J'aimerais comprendre la différence qui existe entre une entente sur les avantages des Autochtones et une entente sur les répercussions et les avantages. Pourriez-vous entrer davantage dans les détails afin de me permettre de saisir la distinction que vous faites entre ces deux ententes?

M. Dwight Newman:

Bien sûr. Il y a une distinction entre une entente entre les Autochtones et l'industrie, c'est-à-dire la catégorie générale, et la catégorie des ententes sur les répercussions et les avantages, qui englobe habituellement un seul type d'ententes entre les Autochtones et l'industrie. Cependant, les ententes entre les Autochtones et l'industrie pourraient faire partie d'une catégorie plus vaste.

Certains accords de coentreprise pourraient également être des ententes sur les répercussions et les avantages, alors que d'autres pourraient ne pas l'être. En effet, certains types d'accords de coentreprise pourraient être des ententes entre les Autochtones et l'industrie, mais ils ne seraient pas nécessairement axés sur les répercussions et les avantages. Ils mettraient uniquement l'accent sur l'entente à conclure.

Les ententes entre les Autochtones et l'industrie représentent simplement une catégorie plus vaste.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Avez-vous examiné la façon dont les tribunaux des autres pays ont façonné l'état des droits des Autochtones et les pratiques exemplaires, qui devraient nous permettre de déduire ce qui a été dit devant les tribunaux de ces pays?

(1700)

M. Dwight Newman:

En ce qui concerne la question des consultations, je pense que, de bien des façons, les tribunaux canadiens se sont probablement prononcés à cet égard plus que tout autre système judiciaire à l'échelle mondiale. Toutefois, certaines décisions rendues dans d'autres pays pourraient inspirer des approches particulières. Les pays entretiennent constamment des discussions judiciaires avec les autres pays. Par conséquent, les tribunaux canadiens ont entendu parler des décisions rendues récemment en Nouvelle-Zélande et les ont examinées dans le contexte de certaines de leurs affaires portant sur les droits des Autochtones. De plus, les tribunaux de la Nouvelle-Zélande ont entendu parler des causes canadiennes. Toutefois, je crois qu'il n'y a rien dans la jurisprudence des tribunaux étrangers qui saute aux yeux et que le Canada devrait commencer à examiner.

Certains des modèles utilisés ailleurs sont très différents. Je vais simplement souligner qu'en ayant des dispositions sur les droits des Autochtones dans sa constitution, le Canada est également positionné différemment de certains autres pays. Au chapitre des droits des Autochtones, l'Australie prend de nombreuses mesures semblables à certains égards, mais pas à d'autres égards. Cependant, il le fait en vertu d'un titre qui figure dans une loi adoptée par le Parlement du Commonwealth en Australie, plutôt qu'une accumulation de décisions rendues par des tribunaux, comme c'est le cas au Canada. C'est le cadre dans lequel les ententes entre les Autochtones et l'industrie sont conclues, c'est-à-dire en vertu des dispositions d'une loi qui ont été façonnées encore et encore, plutôt qu'en vertu de décisions rendues par des tribunaux, comme cela se produit souvent au Canada.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Hehr.

Monsieur Schmale.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je vous remercie tous de votre présence.

J'imagine que je commencerai par interroger mes amis ici présents.

J'aimerais parler du processus visant à faire en sorte que les collectivités autochtones cessent d'utiliser le diesel. Je sais que de nombreux progrès ont été réalisés et que de nombreuses options s'offrent à nous.

OPG ou n'importe quelle autre organisation privilégie-t-elle une option en particulier pour s'assurer que les collectivités passent du diesel à autre chose? Y a-t-il une option privilégiée?

M. Ian Jacobsen:

Je peux répondre à cette question, que je vous remercie d'avoir posée.

Je ne crois pas qu'il y ait nécessairement une solution privilégiée. Bien entendu, je pense que nous aimerions étudier toutes les options technologiques. En fait, nous avons un bon exemple à vous donner.

Nous travaillons en ce moment avec la Première Nation de Gull Bay à l'élaboration d'un nouveau projet de mini-réseau d'énergie renouvelable qui contribuera à réduire la dépendance au diesel de la collectivité. Nous sommes justement en train de mettre au point ce projet, en collaboration avec des Premières Nations. Le projet permettra d'éliminer la consommation d'environ 100 000 litres de diesel par année, ce qui devrait supprimer environ 300 tonnes d'émissions. Il s'agit d'un projet que nous exécutons en collaboration avec la Première Nation. Il sera certainement intéressant de voir les résultats qu'il aura.

Cependant, je ne crois pas qu'une technologie soit privilégiée en ce moment.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord.

À l'heure actuelle, j'imagine que vous considérez le stockage de l'énergie comme l'un des principaux obstacles légèrement difficiles à surmonter. Est-ce le cas? Je sais que des technologies sont en voie d'adoption, mais une fois qu'elles seront, entre autres, faciles d'accès et abordables, la situation pourrait avoir changé. Dans ce cas, vous envisageriez peut-être davantage l'énergie éolienne ou l'énergie solaire.

M. Ian Jacobsen:

Oui. Le projet de Gull Bay et un mini-réseau d'énergie solaire, qui est doté d'un système de stockage. Certes, il y aurait des facteurs à prendre en considération, et je ne suis nullement un expert en matière de stockage...

M. Jamie Schmale:

Non, bien sûr.

M. Ian Jacobsen:

...mais il faudrait certainement que vous teniez compte de facteurs liés aux conditions climatiques, au froid et à d'autres considérations de ce genre.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Alors que nous examinons la possibilité d'éliminer la consommation de diesel de certaines collectivités éloignées — et comme je l'ai dit au début, des progrès ont été réalisés à cet égard —, il faut penser à garantir la charge minimum... Évidemment, le vent ne souffle pas toujours, et le soleil ne brille pas toujours. Il s'agit d'énergie solaire et éolienne, par exemple, et non d'hydroélectricité.

Dans ce cas, qu'utiliseriez-vous comme alimentation électrique de secours? Je viens de trouver et de perdre un article portant sur les fonds que les collectivités des Premières Nations du Nord de l'Ontario ont investis dans l'énergie éolienne et solaire. Quelle technologie de secours est utilisée lorsque la production d'une telle énergie est interrompue?

M. Ian Jacobsen:

En ce moment, je pense que le système de secours est alimenté au diesel.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Le système de secours est toujours au diesel. D'accord.

M. Ian Jacobsen:

Oui, à ma connaissance, c'est toujours le système de secours.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord. Mais il serait utilisé seulement en cas d'urgence...?

M. Ian Jacobsen:

À l'heure actuelle, notre projet de micro-réseau est conçu pour réduire la consommation de diesel. Le diesel sera quand même utilisé, mais leur dépendance à l'égard du diesel sera réduite d'environ 25 % dans le cadre de ce projet.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord.

En ce qui concerne le processus de consultation avec les collectivités concernées, j'ai remarqué qu'au cours de votre témoignage, vous avez mentionné que de la formation et des emplois seraient également offerts. Je pense que c'est une excellente première étape, et je vous félicite de l'avoir franchie. J'estime que c'est formidable. Y a-t-il d'autres possibilités d'emploi pour les membres des collectivités autochtones avec lesquels vous êtes en mesure de travailler, en vue d'assurer un apprentissage à vie?

(1705)

M. Ian Jacobsen:

Absolument.

Je peux utiliser l'exemple du projet hydroélectrique du cours inférieur de la rivière Mattagami. Nous employions environ 250 travailleurs dans le cadre de ce projet. Des efforts importants de formation et de développement des capacités ont été déployés pour accroître le niveau d'emploi et de formation des habitants de Sibi. Dans certains cas, les gens ont suivi des cours de recyclage et ils ont acquis des compétences qui leur serviront toute leur vie — des compétences transférables. Dans d'autres cas, les gens sont partis travailler pour d'autres entreprises afin de développer davantage leurs possibilités de carrière.

L'approvisionnement a également eu une énorme incidence. Dans le cadre de notre travail avec les collectivités, les entreprises locales et nos entrepreneurs ont été en mesure de développer les capacités en nouant des relations avec certaines entreprises locales et certains fournisseurs plus importants. Dans certains cas, ces relations se poursuivent, et nous avons été en mesure de nous appuyer sur d'autres projets dans la région.

M. Jamie Schmale:

C'est intéressant. Vous avez soulevé un bon argument.

Dans certaines de ces collectivités, il y a des travailleurs disponibles qui possèdent les compétences requises et qui faciliteraient le démarrage d'un projet.

Y a-t-il des collectivités que vous avez abordées où les connaissances spécialisées qui sont requises pour gérer un système d'une telle complexité n'étaient pas disponibles, ce qui veut dire que vous auriez été forcé de commencer à la case zéro?

M. Ian Jacobsen:

Dans l'exemple de Sibi, nous avons tout construit à partir de zéro, en collaboration avec la communauté, l'OPG et quelques autres partenaires. Nos syndicats et nos fournisseurs ont également mis la main à la pâte. Nous manquions de ressources à l'époque, d'après ce que je comprends.

C'est un bon exemple où l'emploi et la formation constituaient une grande priorité pour la communauté dans les discussions. Ainsi, grâce à notre collaboration, nous avons mis ce programme en place.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Très bien.

De toute évidence, c'est un excellent modèle.

Quand vous réussissez à vous rassembler comme cela, est-ce que le mot se répand que c'est une excellente occasion pour les Premières Nations toujours dépendantes du diesel qui se demanderaient si cela vaut la peine?

M. Ian Jacobsen:

J'hésite un peu à parler au nom des habitants des communautés éloignées à ce sujet.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Mais dans vos projets d'expansion, je suppose...

M. Ian Jacobsen:

Je pense que c'est un projet modèle en Ontario.

Je peux vous assurer que quand j'en parle avec des membres d'autres communautés, ils sont au courant du bon travail réalisé en collaboration avec la communauté. C'est donc toujours bon de regarder ce qui se fait de semblable ailleurs, les programmes similaires.

J'ai parlé des possibilités que présente le programme nucléaire que nous avons lancé en 2018 pour les Autochtones. Il s'agit d'un partenariat avec Kagita Mikam. De même, nous misons sur les ressources qui existent déjà dans certaines communautés pour élargir notre portée et approfondir nos relations. Nous répondons aux besoins, et les communautés nous fournissent des candidats intéressés à travailler au projet.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Excellent. Merci.

Monsieur, j'aurais une petite question à vous poser sur votre témoignage concernant le peuple sami.

Après ce que nous avons entendu lors de notre dernière réunion, il y a environ une semaine, il n'était pas clair dans mon esprit (et je pense que c'est de ma faute) si le peuple sami parle d'une seule et même voix quand il est consulté ou s'il a plutôt une voix fracturée dans les consultations sur l'énergie.

M. Dwight Newman:

Eh bien, comme dans n'importe quelle communauté, il y aura évidemment des points de vue divergents; il y en a dans toute communauté humaine. Ces voix s'unifient un peu par le Parlement sami jusqu'à maintenant. Quand il est appelé à se prononcer sur des enjeux particuliers, il le fait d'une voix unifiée.

J'ajouterais qu'il y a plus de cohésion linguistique et culturelle au sein du peuple sami qu'il y en a parmi les peuples autochtones du Canada, qui sont très diversifiés. Il est donc probablement plus facile pour le peuple sami de parler d'une même voix, mais même là, il y a des divisions, comme dans toute communauté humaine.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Cannings.

M. Richard Cannings:

Je vous remercie tous d'être ici aujourd'hui. C'est très intéressant.

Je m'adresserai d'abord à M. Newman, pour essayer de profiter de ses compétences juridiques évidentes sur cette grande question.

D'après le témoignage que nous avons entendu sur la mobilisation et la consultation des Autochtones, non seulement au Comité mais partout au pays, ce n'est pas sorcier. Nous savons comment faire. Il faut, comme M. Hehr l'a dit, les mobiliser très tôt et établir des relations fondées sur le respect. Quand nous consultons les communautés et les gouvernements autochtones, il ne suffit pas de noter leurs préoccupations, il faut véritablement essayer d'y répondre.

Évidemment, il y a des situations plus complexes que d'autres, et nous en avons entendu quelques exemples aujourd'hui, c'est peut-être même vous qui les avez donnés. Il peut arriver que des communautés autochtones aient un point de vue sur un projet, alors que d'autres groupes tout aussi touchés en aient un totalement différent.

Il y a un exemple de divergence internationale qui me vient à l'esprit. Je pense à l'Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, en Alaska. Le peuple Inupiat, qui vit en Alaska, est en faveur du forage là-bas, mais pas les Gwich'in du Nord du Yukon, qui vivent du caribou qui met bas en Alaska.

Pouvez-vous nous parler de ces questions complexes et de la façon de les aborder sous l'angle juridique?

(1710)

M. Dwight Newman:

Je vous dirai seulement qu'en général, ce qu'il faut sur le plan juridique concernant la consultation au Canada est effectivement très clair.

Vous avez toutefois souligné deux enjeux qui complexifient les choses.

Il y a d'abord la mobilisation précoce. D'une certaine façon, c'est en fait très simple dans beaucoup de contextes. Beaucoup de promoteurs en tiennent automatiquement compte — ils tiennent pour acquis qu'ils devront mobiliser très tôt la population —, mais il s'agit généralement de grandes entreprises qui se consacrent à l'exploitation d'une ressource.

Or, la mobilisation précoce peut être assez difficile au stade de l'exploration, par exemple, qui relève souvent de plus petites entreprises. C'est l'un des contextes dans lesquels on voit des conflits émerger sur ce à quoi on peut s'attendre ou non de petites sociétés d'exploration. Cependant, il est possible de multiplier les efforts pour trouver des façons d'avancer ensemble dans le respect.

Bien sûr, on parle beaucoup de consultation véritable dans les nouvelles depuis quelques mois. Il s'agit d'un principe très important, mais pour une raison ou une autre, il ne semble pas avoir été respecté dans le contexte de la contestation judiciaire du projet Trans Mountain. On a relevé des problèmes dans les décisions prises par le gouvernement du Canada, et ce, malgré les leçons qu'il pouvait tirer de Northern Gateway. Le gouvernement a alors dû reculer et en faire plus.

Cela met en lumière la situation à la source de toute cette complexité, c'est-à-dire que le projet vise une infrastructure linéaire qui touche beaucoup de communautés en cours de route, et que leurs points de vue divergent. C'est la même chose dans la situation internationale que vous avez mentionnée, où les communautés n'ont pas la même opinion, mais bien sûr, il se passe la même chose à l'intérieur même du Canada. Ce sera l'une des grandes difficultés à surmonter. Comment réglerons-nous le sort des projets où il n'y a pas unanimité entre les différentes communautés autochtones potentiellement touchées, compte tenu du fait que certaines pourraient même en être des parties prenantes ou des partenaires financiers, alors que d'autres s'en inquiètent? Il n'y a pas de réponse facile à cette question, mais il faudra trouver une solution.

Ironiquement, dans l'exemple que vous avez donné, il pourrait être assez facile de trouver un règlement, parce que le droit international pourrait s'appliquer aux effets dans un pays de l'exploitation des ressources dans un autre pays. Les revendications fondées sur les dommages transfrontières et les principes du droit international en la matière seraient probablement le meilleur angle d'approche dans ce cas. Cependant, il faudrait définir ces dommages de façon très précise, sur la base des doctrines pertinentes en droit international. Si l'on ne peut pas cibler clairement des dommages en particulier, la question ne pourra pas être soumise à un tribunal international.

Évidemment, on espère toujours prévenir les dommages en amont, donc il doit y avoir une conversation internationale en profondeur pour essayer de trouver une solution. Le fait que les deux protagonistes soient deux États pourrait simplifier les choses; elles pourraient être plus claires que dans d'autres circonstances très complexes à l'intérieur d'un même pays.

Il n'y a donc pas de réponse simple, mais il y a peut-être quelques pistes de solution.

(1715)

M. Richard Cannings:

Voici une autre question facile difficile. Vous avez mentionné la série d'affaires survenues au Canada qui structurent et définissent, en quelque sorte, notre façon d'aborder la mobilisation autochtone. Au Canada, il y en a peut-être plus que dans d'autres pays. Vous les connaissez toutes, de l'affaire Delgamuukw jusqu'à la décision de la Cour d'appel fédérale sur le projet Trans Mountain.

Voyez-vous ces décisions presque comme une suite, dans laquelle chacune cite les précédentes? Premièrement, y a-t-il des leçons que les législateurs ou le gouvernement peuvent tirer de ces décisions pour éviter de se replacer dans le même genre de situations? Ou y voyez-vous plutôt l'amélioration graduelle du cadre juridique entourant nos relations avec les peuples autochtones?

M. Dwight Newman:

Quelles leçons pouvons-nous en tirer? Je soulignerais particulièrement la série de décisions rendues à partir de l'arrêt Haïda sur l'obligation de consulter proactivement les groupes autochtones. Je ferais une petite distinction entre les décisions contemporaines et celles rendues entre la décision Delgamuukw et l'arrêt Haïda, qui mettaient l'accent sur la consultation afin de déterminer s'il était justifié de conclure à la violation d'un droit autochtone ou issu de traité.

Dans l'affaire Haïda et les suivantes, le tribunal conclut que chaque fois qu'il y a un risque d'atteinte à un droit autochtone, il y a obligation de consulter proactivement les groupes autochtones concernés. La situation se pose au Canada des centaines de milliers de fois par année. Dans la plupart des cas, on réussit à le faire assez bien, mais quelques-uns donnent lieu à des contestations et aboutissent devant les tribunaux.

Je pense que l'une des principales leçons que nous devons en tirer, c'est qu'il faut aller au-delà de l'incertitude propre à l'affaire Haïda et aux affaires subséquentes. L'affaire Haïda portait sur la doctrine provisoire, quand il n'y a pas encore de certitude quant à la définition finale des droits autochtones dans une situation donnée, pour voir s'il serait possible d'accroître le degré de certitude, par la voie des tribunaux, au besoin, mais idéalement par la négociation entre les gouvernements et les communautés autochtones.

Cette doctrine sur la consultation pourrait être beaucoup plus claire qu'elle ne l'est actuellement. Autrement, on peut probablement dire que ces décisions nous guident sur toutes les mesures à prendre pour mener des consultations véritables, mais il y a encore du travail à faire pour respecter ces recommandations. Cela dit, il reste probablement des choses à clarifier dans la loi. Les gouvernements pourraient probablement aller chercher des réponses des tribunaux plus vite qu'ils n'en reçoivent jusqu'à maintenant à l'égard de la doctrine provisoire.

Le président:

Merci.

M. Richard Cannings:

J'avais une autre bonne question.

Le président:

Vous ne pouvez en poser que quelques-unes par jour, monsieur Cannings.

Monsieur Whalen, je pense que vous partagerez votre temps avec M. Graham.

M. Nick Whalen:

Oui, bien sûr. Merci beaucoup.

Je n'ai qu'une question à poser. C'était très intéressant d'entendre le groupe de témoins précédent parler des effets environnementaux et de la mobilisation précoce des Autochtones. De votre côté, vous vous penchez sur les effets économiques. Nous avons entendu un témoignage assez incisif du chef Byron Louis de la Bande indienne d'Okanagan, qui représentait l'Assemblée des Premières Nations le 5 février dernier. Il soulignait à juste titre que les groupes autochtones devaient tirer de véritables avantages économiques des projets.

Quelles sont les pratiques exemplaires à préconiser dans les ERA et quels autres incitatifs devrait-il y avoir? Que devrions-nous inclure dans des consultations autochtones, selon vous, pour atteindre l'objectif louable que mentionnait le chef Louis que les Premières Nations puissent se « reconstruire sur le plan social mais aussi sur le plan économique ».

Je commencerai par ce groupe-ci. Monsieur Perera.

M. Channa Perera:

Certainement. Les ERA sont l'un des outils que les sociétés membres de l'ACE utilisent. J'ai déjà mentionné l'exemple de Nalcor. Elle a inclus à son entente des activités d'atténuation des répercussions environnementales. C'est un élément de premier plan pour les groupes autochtones, il faut les outiller pour qu'ils puissent protéger l'environnement et leur communauté.

Sur le plan économique, je dirais que l'emploi est la grande priorité de ces groupes. Beaucoup de sociétés membres de l'ACE insistent beaucoup pour que les Autochtones de la région aient la priorité en matière d'emploi. Ensuite, les éléments de la chaîne d'approvisionnement sont très importants aussi.

Encore une fois, Ian pourra vous parler au nom de l'OPG. Nous mettons beaucoup l'accent sur l'approvisionnement. Comme je l'ai déjà dit, le volet éducation et formation est très important pour nos membres, parce que nous voulons penser non seulement aux besoins actuels, mais aussi à l'avenir.

(1720)

M. Nick Whalen:

Les stratégies d'éducation et d'emploi devraient-elles faire partie intégrante des ententes sur les avantages?

M. Channa Perera:

Oui. Elles y sont parfois incluses. Il y en a une dans l'entente de Nalcor, qui comprend un volet formation et éducation.

C'est important, parce que nous devons penser à l'avenir. Il faut voir au-delà de la phase de construction d'un projet et tenir compte de ce qui se passera dans 5, 10 ou 15 ans. Nous devons nous assurer que les communautés en tirent des avantages à long terme, qu'elles en profitent non seulement ponctuellement, mais à long terme...

M. Nick Whalen:

Pendant tout le cycle de vie du projet.

Monsieur Newman, avant que nous ne redonnions la parole à M. Graham, voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

M. Dwight Newman:

Pas sur cet élément.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai combien de temps? Quatre minutes? Merci.

Vous avez dit que l'Association canadienne de l'électricité existe depuis 1891, ce qui en fait probablement l'une des plus vieilles associations professionnelles au pays.

À quel moment l'ACE a-t-elle commencé à se soucier des droits des Autochtones et des consultations autochtones?

M. Channa Perera:

Je dois mentionner qu'avant même la création de l'Association, nos membres travaillaient avec les communautés autochtones depuis des décennies. L'OPG en est un excellent exemple, tout comme Manitoba Hydro, Nalcor, Nova Scotia Power et B.C. Hydro. Beaucoup d'entreprises travaillent avec les communautés autochtones un peu partout au Canada.

En 2016, le conseil d'administration de l'ACE, qui se compose des PDG de toutes ces entreprises, a convenu d'aller au-delà de ses activités locales pour exprimer son engagement à l'échelle nationale.

Notre association rassemble ces entreprises, pour que leurs dirigeants échangent sur les pratiques exemplaires, un peu comme vous le faites en ce moment, afin de comprendre ce qui se fait dans le pays. Nous le faisons avec nos membres, et chacun fait part aux autres de ce qu'il fait.

Je vous dirais que notre engagement date de nombreuses dizaines d'années, mais que l'association elle-même consacre particulièrement d'attention aux activités autochtones depuis cinq ans. Nous rencontrons des dirigeants autochtones. J'ai personnellement eu l'occasion de me rendre au Yukon pour y rencontrer des personnes comme Peter Kirby, qui a un grand projet d'hydroélectricité dans le Nord de la Colombie-Britannique.

Nous essayons d'apprendre les uns les autres et de nous instruire de ce qui se fait ailleurs au pays.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous parlez de vos membres, sont-ils tous au diapason sur les consultations ou y a-t-il une diversité d'opinions entre eux? D'ailleurs, combien de membres votre association compte-t-elle?

M. Channa Perera:

Notre association est très diversifiée et regroupe 37 entreprises. Ce sont surtout de grandes entreprises comme l'OPG, Hydro-Québec et les autres.

Je ne pourrais pas vous dire que nous sommes d'accord sur tout. Nous avons notamment des divergences sur l'approche à privilégier à l'égard du diesel.

Ce que je veux surtout vous dire, c'est que chaque communauté est différente des autres. Si vous vous rendez dans le Nord du Canada, dans une communauté nordique, vous verrez que la communauté voisine est totalement différente. On ne peut pas utiliser de solution à l'emporte-pièce. Il faut comprendre ce qui est important pour chaque communauté et ses dirigeants autochtones.

Pour répondre à votre question, je ne pourrais pas vous dire que nous sommes au diapason sur tout, mais nous travaillons à établir des relations fondées sur le respect mutuel avec chaque communauté autochtone.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-il déjà arrivé que des consultations causent directement l'annulation d'un projet ou sa refonte en profondeur?

M. Channa Perera:

Dans la plupart des cas, grâce à cette relation et parce que nous nous investissons beaucoup dans nos discussions avec les dirigeants des communautés, que nous travaillons avec eux et que nous nous assurons d'acquérir leur confiance, nous avons de très bonnes relations avec les peuples autochtones. Encore une fois, l'OPG l'illustre bien.

Ian pourra vous raconter que nous avons réglé 22 griefs...

(1725)

M. Ian Jacobsen:

Vingt-et-un.

M. Channa Perera:

Nous avons réglé 21 griefs sur 23, environ. Cela montre à quel point nous avons investi dans de bonnes relations avec ces groupes, pour que nos projets reçoivent leur appui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien. Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Falk, le dernier tour de parole est à vous. Vous avez environ trois minutes.

M. Ted Falk:

D'accord. Merci, monsieur le président. Je remercie nos témoins ici présents, tous ceux qui ont pris la parole devant le Comité.

Dans ma province, le Manitoba, Manitoba Hydro a su très bien collaborer avec quatre communautés autochtones différentes dans le cadre de son projet de barrage Keeyask, pour sa centrale hydroélectrique.

Vous parliez de la diversité qui caractérise les communautés autochtones, monsieur Perera. M. Newman a également mentionné qu'il n'y a pas chez elles la même cohésion qu'on trouve dans la communauté samie, en Norvège, d'après ce que nous avons entendu au Comité. Je le comprends.

Je m'adresserai à vous, monsieur Newman. Quand autant de communautés différentes sont touchées par un grand projet... Vous venez de la Saskatchewan, où je crois qu'il y a sept ou huit communautés autochtones partenaires dans un grand projet minier. Qui prend ce genre de décisions? Est-ce que toutes les communautés ont leur mot à dire? Est-ce que ce sont les chefs qui décident? Est-ce que ce sont les membres de la bande ou du conseil de bande? Comment décident-ils de former des partenariats?

M. Dwight Newman:

Au final, c'est le conseil de bande qui décide de signer ou non une entente. Évidemment, il y a tout un processus démocratique au sein de la communauté. C'est peut-être un peu plus simple que dans certaines communautés de la Colombie-Britannique, où il y a des divisions entre les dirigeants selon la Loi sur les Indiens et les chefs héréditaires, ce qui peut présenter des difficultés supplémentaires.

En Saskatchewan, cela relèverait du conseil de bande, au bout du compte. Il y a parfois une société de développement économique qui intervient aussi, donc cela peut aussi être un peu plus compliqué chez nous.

Pour ce qui est des partenariats, les communautés qui se rassemblent le font parce qu'elles l'ont choisi. La conversation peut s'amorcer de différentes façons. Si le projet a une incidence sur d'autres communautés, elles devront être consultées aussi ou être appelées à participer. L'idéal pour tous est probablement que toutes les communautés potentiellement touchées se joignent au partenariat, de même que les communautés qui souhaitent investir dans le projet et y participer, même s'il ne les touche pas directement. C'est comme quand différentes communautés collaborent dans un contexte non autochtone.

M. Ted Falk:

Oui. Dans les communautés autochtones, la communication passe-t-elle par le chef ou le conseil de bande? Bien sûr, c'est habituellement le conseil de bande qui prend la décision, mais la communication passe-t-elle par le chef ou par le personnel administratif?

Vous avez également mentionné les sociétés de développement économique. Beaucoup de bandes en ont. Nous cherchons à connaître les meilleures façons de mobiliser les groupes autochtones, donc avec qui faut-il travailler?

M. Dwight Newman:

Je vous dirais que certaines Premières Nations de la Saskatchewan ont adopté des politiques sur la consultation ou la mobilisation qui précisent comment elles souhaitent qu'on travaille avec elles. Elles y indiquent leurs préférences, et ce peut être très utile quand ce genre de politique existe.

La taille des communautés de la Saskatchewan varie énormément. Les plus grandes, comme celles de la Bande indienne du Lac La Ronge et de la Nation crie de Peter Ballantyne, comptent à peu près 10 000 membres. En revanche, d'autres communautés de la province ont entre 200 ou 300 membres.

Les plus grandes communautés auront un bureau de consultation. Elles peuvent avoir un gestionnaire des consultations. Il peut alors devenir la personne-ressource, plutôt que le chef, directement. Cependant, pour les grands projets, le chef interviendra, tout comme le conseil de bande, finalement. Dans les plus petites communautés, ce peut être une fonction plus centralisée.

Il faut vraiment apprendre comment chaque communauté fonctionne. D'ailleurs, on peut trouver de l'information à ce sujet au gouvernement de la Saskatchewan, par exemple, et l'industrie peut s'en inspirer.

(1730)

M. Ted Falk:

Je pense que je n'ai plus de temps.

Merci, monsieur.

Le président:

Je tiens à vous remercier tous de vous être joints à nous aujourd'hui. C'est tout le temps que nous avions, malheureusement. Nous nous reverrons jeudi.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on February 19, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.