header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-02-19 PROC 142

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning, everyone. Welcome back after constituency week. Welcome to the 142nd meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. This meeting is being televised.

Our first order of business today is the consideration of the votes of the interim estimates 2019-20 for the House of Commons and the Parliamentary Protective Service.

We are pleased to be joined by the Honourable Geoff Regan, Speaker of the House of Commons. Accompanying the Speaker from the House of Commons are Charles Robert, Clerk of the House; Michel Patrice, deputy clerk, administration; and Daniel Paquette, chief financial officer.

Also, from the Parliamentary Protective Service, we welcome Superintendent Marie-Claude Côté, interim director; and Robert Graham, administration and personnel officer.

Thank you all for being here. I will now turn the floor over to you, Mr. Speaker, for your opening statement.

Hon. Geoff Regan (Speaker of the House of Commons):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman and committee members. Thank you for welcoming us here today. [Translation]

I am pleased to be here to present the 2019-20 interim estimates and to address the funding required to maintain and enhance the House Administration's support to members of Parliament and the institution.

I am joined today by members of the House Administration's executive management team, who you know well: Charles Robert, clerk of the House of Commons; Michel Patrice, deputy clerk, Administration; and Daniel Paquette, chief financial officer.

I will also be presenting the interim estimates for the Parliamentary Protective Service. Therefore, I am also accompanied by Marie-Claude Côté, acting director of PPS, and Robert Graham, the service's Administration and Personnel Officer.[English]

The interim estimates for 2019-20 include an overview of spending requirements for the first three months of the fiscal year, with a comparison to the 2018-19 estimates, as well as the proposed schedules for the first appropriation bill.

The interim estimates of the House of Commons, as tabled in the House, total approximately $87.5 million and represent three-twelfths of the total voted authorities that will be included in the upcoming 2019-20 main estimates. Once the main estimates are tabled in the House, I anticipate that we will meet again in the spring, at which time I will provide an overview of the year-over-year changes.

Today, I'll give you a brief overview of the House of Commons' main priorities.

Ensuring that members and House officers have the services and resources to meet their needs is essential in supporting them in the fulfillment of their parliamentary functions.

By the way, Mr. Chairman, I will of course try to speak at a rate where it's possible for the interpreters to interpret, because we all appreciate the wonderful work they do, and I don't wish to make it more difficult.

(1105)

[Translation]

The House Administration's top priority is to support members in their work as parliamentarians by focusing on service-delivery excellence and ongoing modernization. As an example, this past year, we have seen the opening of four multidisciplinary Source plus service centres, which are ready to provide members and their staff with in-person support.

A team of House of Commons employees is available to provide assistance related to finance, human resources, information technology and various operational services offered by the House Administration. If members ever have any comments about this, I would be very interested in hearing them.

Another service-delivery initiative has been the implementation of a standardized approach for computer and printing equipment in constituency offices across the country. This initiative was launched as a pilot project this year. Its purpose is threefold: to ensure parity between Hill and constituency computing services; to enhance IT support and security; and to simplify purchasing and life-cycling of equipment in the constituency offices.

In addition, all constituency offices will now be provided with a complete set of standard computer devices and applications following the next general election.[English]

The House administration aims to provide innovative, effective, accountable and non-partisan support to members. To do so, it must attract and retain an engaged, qualified and productive workforce that acts responsibly and with integrity.

Cost-of-living increases are essential to recruitment efforts for members, House officers and the House administration as employers, and funding for these increases is accounted for in the estimates.

Members will know that employee support programs are also a priority. These programs, which are offered to employees of members, House officers, research offices and the administration, include an employee and family assistance program and other resources and events, such as those taking place this February for Wellness Month.

The renewal of our physical spaces and the services provided within them is another priority for the House administration.

The opening of West Block and the visitor welcome centre is the most significant change to date to the parliamentary precinct. We believe that West Block is a model to other parliaments tackling similar challenges with respect to aging facilities. In fact, I know many of you are aware that, at Westminster, they're planning to move out and have a major renovation to the Palace of Westminster, which of course is an immense undertaking. That will be a few years away still.

The House of Commons works closely with its parliamentary partners and with Public Services and Procurement Canada in support of the long-term vision and plan.

For the coming years, the focus will be on decommissioning and restoring Centre Block. We will also continue to review and update the House of Commons' requirements and guiding principles for future renovations to the parliamentary precinct. The administration of the House of Commons will continue to look at ways to best engage members in the Centre Block project moving forward and to ensure they continue to be part of discussions on the design and operational requirements for that building.

An ongoing priority is the operation, support, maintenance and life-cycle management of equipment and connectivity elements in all buildings. This work is essential to providing a mobile work environment for members and the administration, which is something that we all, of course, now expect.[Translation]

I now turn to the interim estimates for the Parliamentary Protective Service. The Parliamentary Protective Service is requesting access to $28 million in these interim estimates.

The funding requirements align with the four key strategic priorities of the service: protective operational excellence; engaged and healthy employees; balanced security and access; and sound stewardship.

The majority of the PPS annual budget is attributed to its first priority, protective operational excellence, which includes personnel salaries and overtime costs.

In keeping with the service's aim to allocate existing resources as judiciously as possible, several posts were added to the overall security posture in response to the opening of the interim accommodations. I would suggest that, if members have any questions with respect to the security posture, the committee may wish to go in camera for that exchange.

(1110)

[English]

The service recently reclassified the positions of all protection officers, which led to an increase in their salaries retroactive to April 1, 2018.

PPS has also successfully reached a bargaining agreement with the Senate Protective Service Employees Association and an extension of the previous agreement with the Public Service Alliance of Canada. For this reason, funding has been earmarked to make payments for retroactive economic increases as a result of these negotiations.

As PPS evolves, the service is gradually reducing the presence of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in certain areas on Parliament Hill and within the parliamentary precinct and, in turn, increasing the resources and presence of PPS officers.

The remainder of the PPS budget ensures that the administration, which supports the operations of the service, is adequately equipped and resourced. This means ensuring that security assets and technology are properly managed and that employees are continuously supported in their health and well-being. As PPS approaches its fourth anniversary this June, its administration is becoming more agile and responsive to the needs of Parliament and of its own workforce.[Translation]

Mr. Chair, this concludes my overview of the 2019-20 interim estimates for the House of Commons and Parliamentary Protective Service.

My officials and I would be pleased to answer any questions from members.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Mr. Graham, you may go ahead. [English]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Mr. Speaker, every time you come here, you apologize for the speed at which you speak, and I keep looking around and feeling all these eyes looking at me.[Translation]

Ms. Côté, you are the fourth interim director of the PPS since it was established. There have been many conflicts with the unions, all of which were based on an application to the Labour Relations and Employment Board, a response to which is still outstanding.

Do you have a new vision that could bring peace to the PPS?

Superintendent Marie-Claude Côté (Interim Director, Parliamentary Protective Service):

Thank you for your question.

I would first like to thank the chair[English] for welcoming me today to my first committee appearance, and also the Speaker for his support.

My vision is the same as my predecessor's. We always want to work in harmony with our employees. That is what my goal will be as the interim director.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

As you probably have seen in the last few years, my primary concern is that when PPS was created after the October 22 shooting, it brought in an element of the security reporting to the executive branch. There's an element of that. By virtue of being an RCMP officer under the definition of the RCMP Act, you report by necessity to the commissioner. For me, that is a long-term concern in terms of protecting the democracy of this country.

Here's what I'd like to know, from both the Speaker and PPS. Is there a long-term desire to keep the RCMP directly involved on the Hill in this capacity? Is that the objective in the long term, or would you like to see a different approach?

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

According to the legislation, I report to the Speaker; however, when it comes to operations, I report to the commissioner of the RCMP. That's, of course, how it has been done. In terms of changing anything like that, it's not for me to change the legislation.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

It's a matter for Parliament to determine how that should operate. Obviously, as the Speaker, I will live—quite happily, of course—with whatever Parliament decides in that regard.

(1115)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

Do you find that you have the authority you need over PPS in your capacity as Speaker?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I would say that I find that, when I raise concerns with PPS, I get swift action, and that they work hard to try to make any improvement that members feel is necessary. I haven't felt a problem with that. I appreciate very much the co-operation of the superintendent, as well as her predecessor, who is now, of course, head of the RCMP in Manitoba, for which we congratulate her.

As I say, I don't think it's appropriate for me to comment on what Parliament ought to decide in terms of legislation. If Parliament decides to pass new legislation—if a future or current government decides to bring in legislation to change the act so that the PPS is not headed by a member of the RCMP—that's a matter for Parliament, and I don't think it's appropriate for me to comment on something like that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fair.

You mentioned in your opening remarks that you would invite us to go in camera at some point to discuss some operational matters. With the consent of my colleagues, I'd like to do that later on in the questioning. There are some questions I'd like to ask that are more appropriate in that vein. In the interim, I do have a couple more for you.

Ms. Côté, I've suggested to your predecessor in the past that RCMP units that are assigned to PPS, division 4, support some form of identification to show that they are PPS, to help with the force cohesion. I know that's difficult with the RCMP uniform, but are there any efforts to look at possibilities of adding the PPS insignia or a PPS unit pin of some sort to show that the RCMP officers assigned to the Hill are part of PPS?

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

That could be a possibility. It's not something we are looking at right now, because they're still employed by the RCMP, so this is why we have two different uniforms. The easiest way to see it is as a contract—we're being contracted to work on the Hill—so it could be a possibility.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

You will recall that one of us said that we have seen already and will continue to see a reduction in the number of RCMP personnel on the Hill, and therefore people will be replaced by members of PPS.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My privilege concern on that one is that there are any members of the RCMP, who necessarily report to the commissioner. That goes to the minister, which is a separate type of—

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I understand your concern.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have one last question on PPS, before I go on to discuss this beautiful new building we're in. The PPS budget is about $90 million a year, about 20% of the entire House budget, as compared to Gatineau, in which police and fire together are about $109 million for the entire kit.

How does this compare to what it cost prior to amalgamation? Are we getting our money's worth from it, just very directly?

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

We use our resources effectively, and we use different strategies to ensure that we optimize them and that we deploy them to always ensure that the House can go on with its business and that we also do our protective mandate so that everybody feels safe.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In the last few seconds I have.... Have we had any difficulties with establishing security in this new building, while still having officers assigned to Centre Block, for example? We expanded fairly quickly the footprint that we need to cover.

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

On that, we made the request for the main estimates in order to be able to accommodate the new buildings. We're pleased with what we have right now, and we utilize those resources as we need—

Hon. Geoff Regan:

As I understand it, there is less requirement for security in Centre Block because members of Parliament and visitors to Parliament Hill and employees aren't over there. It's primarily going to be Public Services and Procurement Canada employees and the contractors who are there, so it's not the same requirement, although after the small leak we had, as you may recall, the cabinet was meeting there for a period of time, so that required some personnel there during that relatively short period.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

(1120)

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

It is appropriate under the circumstances to differentiate between the small leak and the large leak that's on everybody's mind, so I appreciate that point of distinction.

I had a series of questions, which I gave to you, Mr. Speaker, but just before I start going down that road I wanted to say that I thought Mr. Graham had a thoughtful comment with regard to the idea of separate insignia. With regard to contracting, of course the RCMP contracts with the provinces all the time, so I suspect there are some useful precedents we can look at that are at least partly relevant.

My questions are about the upcoming changes to Centre Block—which will presumably extend beyond the careers of most of the people in this room today—and how we can ensure ongoing oversight. I was hoping, Mr. Speaker, that I could ask you to give us a little bit of information about your role in that and about what you think our role should be.

The first question I had was this. Can you describe your role and the role of the Board of Internal Economy up to this point with regard to the governance and oversight of the parliamentary precinct renovations for West Block and projecting forward to those that will take place for Centre Block?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Thank you very much.

First, I want to tell you basically how it works. Integrated multi-level governance has been established within the administration of Public Services and Procurement Canada and the parliamentary partners—us, and of course the Senate—to oversee the project. The Minister of Public Services and Procurement Canada is the official custodian of the parliamentary precinct buildings and grounds. Think of PSPC as the landlord, and we're the tenants.

In fact, the House of Commons will turn over or relinquish control of Centre Block to PSPC officially in a few months. They're already there working. We are still extracting some things that we require from that building to store or renovate, whatever. I think I've had good co-operation so far in terms of being able to express my views and ensure that the views of members are heard in relation to the renovation that will take place.

However, as I've stated before here, I think it's incumbent upon us as members, and in particular on this committee I would say, to continue to insist on being part of that process. I have not had any indication that there isn't a willingness and desire from PSPC or from the architects involved in the renewal to ensure that our concerns are heard and recognized in what is done over at Centre Block. There are architects in the House of Commons administration who are also involved and will continue to be involved. I am pleased there is this process, which I described at the beginning, of a joint management of that, involving the House of Commons administration and the Senate.

As I said, I think it's vital that we continue to insist on that, and that we insist on things like access for the media to members of Parliament, as they've had in the past in Centre Block, and access, of course, for the public as much as possible. We're all aware of the need to have protection, but also the need to have maximum access possible for members of the public, because we want this to continue to be a democracy.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

I concur with your feelings about there being no desire to keep us out of the oversight capacity, nor would there logically be at this stage of the process of renovating Centre Block. We're early into that, so nobody's had the opportunity yet to make mistakes that they hope nobody will notice.

Here's a question. When funds are required for parliamentary precinct renovations, including for the remediation of such problems as will arise, to the best of your knowledge, does the spending authority come through the main and supplementary estimates for the House of Commons, or does it go through Public Services and Procurement Canada or some other process? Do they flow through you or the Board of Internal Economy?

Mr. Michel Patrice (Deputy Clerk, Administration):

To answer your question, I would say it would come from both sources, Public Services and Procurement and also from the House of Commons main estimates.

In terms of the House of Commons main estimates, a lot of it would be about staff, in terms of assisting or helping, and also about replacing certain pieces of equipment. But mainly it would be from procurement services.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Which committee does that mean? Do you know?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I mean from the Public Works—

(1125)

Hon. Geoff Regan:

That's the primary place. Therefore, I presume it would go through the main and supplementary estimates of the department, as opposed to the House.

Our involvement, once we hand it over.... At some point, there will be requirements for us to deal with things like equipment, as Michel mentioned, but the renovation and reconstruction of the place is of course primarily up to the department.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

Do you sit on any non-parliamentary advisory groups related to the parliamentary precinct renovations?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I don't, personally.

Michel, how does that work?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

There's no such group that exists at the present time, so the Speaker obviously doesn't sit on any such group.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

Obviously, it's intended that we're going to have a discussion with the board later this week in terms of the governance and oversight that members of Parliament must and should have in terms of the Centre Block requirements.

Mr. Scott Reid:

There was a parliamentary precinct oversight advisory committee that obviously was not a formal part of the funding approval process, but it did exist. It was established in 2001, and it was chaired by former speaker John Fraser. Does that still exist, as far as you know?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

It doesn't exist anymore. I believe, at that time, that group was reporting to the Minister of Public Works.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Are you aware of any successor that reports to the minister?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

No. There is none at this moment. In terms of a going-forward process, we are having discussions with Public Works to ensure that members of Parliament, the board and committees such as this one can have meaningful input on the requirements.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have just a few seconds left.

Do you have any idea when you would be getting back to us with suggestions as to what that process might look like?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

It will be as soon as possible. As I said, we're going to start that discussion with the Board of Internal Economy, which has the main oversight, I would suggest, in terms of the requirements and the needs of the House and its members.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

The board meets Thursday.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you for being here, Mr. Speaker, as well as the Clerk and everyone else.

I'd like to pick up where Mr. Reid was. I know, Mr. Speaker, that you're aware of the reaction to this committee when it came forward, when we had reflected on West Block and felt there was a real absence of individual MPs collectively having a say. I understand you're going to talk to the Board of Internal Economy.

My question is for you, Mr. Speaker—and I'm not holding you to anything; it's just off the top of your head. We've talked about this a little bit. We've just begun the process of saying we need to be more involved, and we're now talking about how we can do that.

I'm not aware of a formal mechanism per se between us and/or you and/or BOIE. We could create something ad hoc—there's nothing to stop us from communicating with each other—but Chair, it's my understanding that we don't have any formal process per se.

What are your thoughts, Mr. Speaker, as we go through this? Do you have any advice, concerns or ideas that you'd like to leave with us as we do our part of it? I'm looking more at process. How do you see us playing that useful role in a meaningful way without being both irrelevant and too big a problem?

It is a tall order, but just give your thoughts, sir.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Mr. Christopherson, I don't see you as a big problem. I want to assure you.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You say that as I'm leaving.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I appreciate your interest on issues like this.

Obviously, you know that the committee is a master of its own affairs and can examine the things it wants to examine. I would hope that on an ongoing basis, this committee will pursue this topic and will not only, of course, have visits from me as Speaker—or Speakers and administrations in the future—to discuss this, but that you might also want to call folks from Public Services and Procurement to talk about the renovation at Centre Block and how it's going, and to make sure that the concerns of MPs are being heard.

So far, I have found that when, in the process, I have raised issues with the architects and others, from both the House and PSPC, they have been very attentive and anxious to hear what the concerns of MPs are, to understand how the building operates. When John Pearson and Jean-Omer Marchand designed the building, back in 1916, and over the ensuing period, they clearly sought to understand how Parliament worked, how members of Parliament operated, what they needed to do their jobs well, the access that was needed for the public, etc. They didn't have the security concerns that we have today, but they were anxious to do all those things. And I'm impressed that the architects seem to be concerned about all those things.

While I expect the Board of Internal Economy will seek some type of formal mechanism on an ongoing basis, I think this committee might have a less formal, but continuing, interest in this matter, making sure that it has witnesses to talk about this on an ongoing basis and that it is able to express its concerns.

(1130)

Mr. David Christopherson:

I liked it all, except the end part. You were watering down our role there. I'm not keen on that.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Well, you know, if you want to take a formal role, go ahead.

Mr. David Christopherson:

If I might change gears, I have some questions too about PPS, which won't come as a surprise. This is my last kick at the cat. After this, I won't be here when this comes up again. I just want to emphasize that I do hope that Mr. Graham and others grab onto this issue and refuse to let go. It is absolutely unacceptable that the guns in Parliament are controlled by the Prime Minister, by the executive branch. That's the structure right now, and it's wrong. It needs to change. I suspect, based on being around here for a while, that it's really not going to happen until there's a minority and somebody puts it on an agenda and says, “You want a deal? Then we go back and do things the right way.”

It breaks my heart to leave here, having spent time on the security committee at Queen's Park, having been a solicitor general, and having been a parliamentarian now for far too long, and then to see this kind of aberration and abuse of the parliamentary system. I say this as the House just voted to deny a member from having their say, based on politics, not on the reality, in my humble opinion. Too many times Parliament is allowing the continuing immigration of power from Parliament to the executive, and it's a struggle to get it back.

That's my last rant on that, and I just hope that in the future it does get changed.

I have one last question, if I may. I'm short on time. I'm just curious on this one; it's just me. I'm curious to know how the Black Rod process is going to work now. Is she or he actually going to have to march all that way, or will it be set up in here as if they had? I'm just curious, being an avid parliamentarian.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

First of all, let me indicate my appreciation for your insistence that members of Parliament continue to insist on the notion that Parliament, and not the executive, is paramount, and that the executive reports to Parliament, not the other way around. As you can imagine, in my role, I consider that fundamentally important.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You do a good job of emphasizing that, too, and I've seen you do it internationally.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Clerk.

Mr. Charles Robert (Clerk of the House of Commons):

Actually, we had a dry run to experiment with the process, and within 20 minutes we were able to bring the Black Rod to the House of Commons and send over to the Senate the contingent from the House that would be part of a royal assent ceremony. We presume that process would be followed for the Speech from the Throne, although we would expect that there would be higher participation on the part of the members.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Touché.

Thanks, Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Considering the Board of Internal Economy is going to discuss this soon, and each party here has members on that board, you might want to speak to your member on the board as to what your feelings are.

Now we'll go on to Mr. Bittle, who's sharing his time with Ms. Sahota, I think.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thanks so much.

I have only one topic I'd like to bring up. Mr. Speaker, perhaps this isn't a fair question to you, but you mentioned the constituency office IT pilot. Our office was selected—lucky us—

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Me too....

Mr. Chris Bittle:

—as was Madam Lapointe's. I understand a standardization of services, but MPs' offices aren't necessarily standardized. For example, one service that my office provides is a low-income tax clinic, and we require software from the Canada Revenue Agency to operate that tax clinic. We were initially told, “No, you can't have that.” To my mind, having that is fundamental to what I do and what my office does. We do about 2,000 tax returns a year, so eliminating that service....

The suggestion from IT was to have a second set of computers, which I don't think anyone who came into our office would find acceptable. We received a laptop to try this software. It didn't work, and we sent it back. If this is the case for Government of Canada software—that it cannot be used in the pilot program—I'm worried about what other MPs are going to do with other pieces of software that they deem necessary for the operation of their office.

(1135)

Hon. Geoff Regan:

You're using Government of Canada software, I presume, that any member can use in their constituency office, provided they can put it on the computer, which IT is saying you can't do.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

They're unable to do it at this point, yes.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I bet they're working on it, but I'm delighted that the head of IT, Stéphan Aubé, is here, because I can see he's dying to give you an explanation.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you.

Mr. Stéphan Aubé (Chief Information Officer, House of Commons):

I'm sorry to disappoint you, Mr. Speaker.

I wasn't aware of the issue, Mr. Bittle. We will take note of it.

Just to clarify, we wouldn't want you to use another set of computers. We feel that you can use the House computers. That being said, the question for us is, will that computer be connected to the House infrastructure? For security reasons, we'll have to determine that, but we shouldn't have any issues in allowing you to use that software on one of the pieces from the House without your having to buy a second PC.

I'll take note of that, and I'll have someone in my group get back to you today, sir. If that's also the case for Madam Lapointe, I'll be proactive in my answer.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

As you know, in Quebec we have two taxes on income, so we don't do that.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I don't know if Mr. Christopherson would want to have Government of Canada software—

Voices: Oh, oh!

Hon. Geoff Regan: —with House of Commons.... I mean, you know.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Mr. Speaker, this morning you gave your decision about the incident of racial profiling that occurred on February 4 in one of our parliamentary precinct buildings. As you're aware, there were Black History Month celebrations going on that week, and we had a whole bunch of young people—because that was the theme of Black History Month on the Hill this year—advocating and lobbying different MPs and ministers. It was called Black Voices on the Hill. I understand that the incident was deemed not to be a point of privilege because it did not happen to a member, but you did mention that it was one that you take very seriously and one of great concern.

I was wondering if you could shed a little light as to what you discovered when you looked into the matter and how we can prevent this from happening, because we absolutely want to make sure that these young people feel that this is their place and they do belong here. It's definitely quite an upsetting incident for all who heard about this. We want to make sure that they do feel boundless, and with this incident having occurred, I think they must be feeling quite the opposite right now.

Could you give me some information on that?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

First of all, I would have to say that I would refer you to my ruling. That's the encapsulation of what I'm saying on this topic.

As you understand, of course, the question of what is and what isn't a question of privilege is pretty clear. Strictly speaking, I suppose you could say that there is no way to raise this issue under a point of order or question of privilege, because it's not about the rules and the procedure of the House or an impact upon a member's ability to do the job in the House and so forth. I think, and hope, that everyone would agree, however, that it's an important matter and that it's important that it be dealt with and responded to. That's what I've attempted to do.

I'm going to ask Madam Superintendent to respond concerning the issue.

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

Thank you.

I'm truly sorry for what happened. We apologize for what was experienced. Upon learning of the incident, I asked for an immediate investigation and I gave the report of my investigation to the Speaker.

My expectation is for all of my employees to be respectful and professional, and we are looking at how we can improve to ensure that such an incident does not reoccur.

(1140)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

Were any measures taken to contact the young people who experienced this incident on the Hill?

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

We apologized publicly about this incident in the media.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

But not personally to them...?

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

When we receive complaints, we contact the complainants. The complaint we received was from a senator. We went back to the senator with the report and the information, and we're continuing to have discussions.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Did you find through your investigation that any kind of incorrect protocol was used in this circumstance, or is a change in protocol needed?

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

For me, the constable was asked to perform a duty. It was more than just the constable who was involved. I look after my employees, so I'm addressing the PPS employees only.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Well, we hope it doesn't occur again.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Sahota.

Now we go to Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you.

I want to be respectful here and supportive of the time necessary to allow us to go in camera to deal with the matter that Mr. Graham wanted to raise.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I gave a series of questions to the Speaker at the beginning of the meeting. The next question on my list has already been partly answered, so I will go through it and then make a meta-question out of it to allow him to answer it.

On December 11, 2018, we met with officials dealing with the Centre Block rehabilitation. They indicated that a consultation process with parliamentarians would be created. I had three subsidiary questions coming from that.

Number one is, would that be coming via the Board of Internal Economy? The answer I think I got was yes, but you can correct me if I've misunderstood it.

The second subsidiary question was, are you able to tell us anything about when this process might be proposed? To this I think the answer was “soon”, but it was rather an uncertain soon.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

It's on Thursday.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thursday? Thursday is very soon.

Okay. That is very precise.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

It will be at the board.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Then, to what extent will MPs have input into the structure of these changes before they go forward? Is it purely going to be via the Board of Internal Economy—I'm now looking post-Thursday, obviously—or are there other mechanisms by means of which MPs will have a say in the initial configuration of the ongoing consultations that presumably would last for a decade or more, as we try to implement all the different things we would collectively like to see implemented in this renovation?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

It seems to me that this may be pre-empting—or not pre-empting, but.... You know that the board will make a decision, and I'm not going to prejudge what decision it will make on Thursday. Between now and Thursday, I think members should be encouraged to express their views to the members from their party who sit on the Board of Internal Economy. Of course, they can express their views to other members of the board as well. The board will decide how to do this, but your comments would, I imagine, be taken into account by the board in that deliberation, so keep it up.

Mr. Scott Reid:

A recent media report stated that changes to the initial plans for the West Block renovation, which I think also encompasses the visitor welcome centre, generated over 100,000 pages of communications “regarding deficiencies in construction, engineering, design and architecture at Parliament's West Block and the new Senate chamber.” That is a lot of material.

When construction problems of that nature are identified—I'm looking to the past now, but as a model for the future—to whom would that information have gone? I'm thinking in terms of people who are actually members of Parliament. Would that material have gone to members of the Board of Internal Economy? Would any of you know the answer to that question?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I haven't seen that information, so I cannot answer that question. I cannot say that any members of the board or the administration were aware of those 100 pages of communications.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That was 100,000.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

A hundred thousand pages.... I certainly haven't seen it.

In terms of construction problems, I'm going to state the obvious. There are some that have occurred—for example, the south and west doors of this building. As far as I'm concerned, there have been construction deficiencies. Those doors have not been working properly since the building was operationalized. The south door has been fixed and replaced, but we're still having issues with the west door. I understand that it's going to be fixed this weekend. We had to take some interim measures to make it accessible to members this week, for example.

(1145)

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Mr. Reid, you're talking about the whole time West Block was being renovated, aren't you?

Mr. Scott Reid:

This is my way of opening up the point that there are many, many detailed documents that emerge, and there are many changes and compromises that have to be made as one goes forward. It is in the nature of the process. I would be surprised if Centre Block generates less than 100,000 pages. I suspect it will be a good deal more, and it's not because of anybody doing anything wrong. It's the nature of this kind of complex, multi-stage, multi-year process that involves many players.

Looking forward, the real question is how we can ensure that we have maximum openness to these problems as they arise. We need to be able to deal in a business-like manner with these issues: number one, how much the various compromises are going to cost; number two, what will have to be sacrificed when we make a compromise, and whether we are willing to give up on some feature we wanted; and finally, how it will affect the timing of our return.

Mr. Speaker, rather than pursue the details of how it was done in the past, maybe I could just ask if you have any thoughts on the best way to deal with this. I recognize that you and I are likely to be out playing golf in our retirement by the time this is done.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

We can look forward to that. You'll probably beat me, but I can look forward to one of those games someday.

It seems to me that it will be important that the board create a process whereby input is ongoing, those discussions can take place and members can have input to that process. How exactly it's going to unfold remains to be seen, but I appreciate your thoughtfulness and the concern you express about this. You are concerned that this be done in a responsible way, and I think you're right. Undoubtedly, decisions that we make may require compromises from time to time. However, it's up to us as members—whether we are representatives of the Board of Internal Economy, of this committee or generally—to make sure that our concerns are heard and that our desire to ensure that the public is served properly and Parliament functions the way it ought to is understood.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker and all of you.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, you have time for a quick question, and then we'll go in camera.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I just want to follow up on Mr. Bittle's question for Mr. Aubé on the technology in our offices.

I declined to participate in the pilot project for the new computers in our constituency offices. When I asked if I could install whatever I needed to on my computers—which I could do on the old ones—they said no. This is more of a request than a question, but it would be very helpful if you could have a much more efficient process for approving software for our computers. There's an awful lot of software that we might want to use that isn't on your very narrow list of proprietary, not-very-secure software that is nominally secure. All the Windows stuff is proprietary, and there is no way of doing proper security oversight.

Meanwhile, there are open-source solutions that are much more secure and much more affordable. I'd like you to look at that. Thank you.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

It's interesting that many of us use the Windows system on computers along with iPads or iPhones and the iOS. In those cases, there is a firewall between the two sides—the House side and the other side of that. You can put on other things, other apps and so forth. It's an interesting distinction between the two systems. It seems to me more difficult to manage that within the Windows environment, which works well in many ways.

That's not really an answer, but it's an observation.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Technological security is a whole field in itself. It could be quite a long discussion.

The Chair:

We'll suspend for a few seconds while we go in camera.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

(1145)

(1155)



[Public proceedings resume]

The Chair:

Shall vote 1 under the House of Commons in the interim estimates carry? HOUSE OF COMMONS ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$87,453,121

(Vote 1 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Shall vote 1 under Parliamentary Protective Service in the interim estimates carry? PARLIAMENTARY PROTECTIVE SERVICE Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$27,262,216

(Vote 1 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Thank you very much. We appreciate your coming again. I'm sure we'll see you again when we get to the main estimates.

We'll suspend while we change witnesses.

(1155)

(1205)

The Chair:

Good afternoon, Minister.

Good afternoon and welcome back to the 142nd meeting of the committee.

As we consider the votes in estimates under the Leaders' Debates Commission, we are joined by the Honourable Karina Gould, Minister of Democratic Institutions. She is accompanied by the following officials from the Privy Council Office: Allen Sutherland, assistant secretary to the cabinet, machinery of government; and Matthew Shea, assistant deputy minister, corporate services.

Thank you for making yourselves available today. I will now turn the floor over to you, Minister, for your opening statement.

Hon. Karina Gould (Minister of Democratic Institutions):

Thank you very much, Chair, and thank you to the committee.

I am pleased to be here today to discuss with you the supplementary estimates (B), 2018-19, and the interim estimates 2019-20 for the Leaders' Debates Commission.

I am pleased to be joined by my officials. As you mentioned, they are Al Sutherland, assistant secretary to the cabinet, machinery of government and democratic institutions; and Matthew Shea, assistant deputy minister of corporate services.[Translation]

Leaders' debates play an essential role in Canadian democracy. Indeed, this is a key moment in the election campaigns. They provide voters with a unique opportunity to observe the personalities and ideas of the leaders seeking to become the Prime Minister of Canada on the same stage.[English]

It is important that we realize that leaders' debates are much more than just media events. They're a fundamental exercise in democracy. As such, they may be organized in a way that is open and transparent and puts the public interest first. They must also be entrenched as a public good that Canadians can count on in each and every election to help inform their voting decisions. [Translation]

Traditionally, leaders' debates in Canada were organized and funded by a consortium of major broadcasters, including CBC/Radio-Canada, Global, CTV and TVA. The consortium held private negotiations with political parties regarding dates, participation and format of the debates.[English]

The closed-door nature of debate negotiations has been the subject of criticism for many years. Moreover, there were no consistent, clearly defined participation criteria applied in the 2015 debates, with some leaders participating in all the debates, while others participated only in a few. [Translation]

The accessibility of the debates was also limited. For instance, we had debates in French that were not accessible to some francophone communities.[English]

In response, as Minister of Democratic Institutions, I was asked to bring forward options to establish an independent commissioner to organize leaders' debates during future federal election campaigns, which was reaffirmed through a budget 2018 commitment for $5.5 million over two years, recurring each election cycle, to support a new process that would ensure that leaders' debates are organized in the public interest. [Translation]

Our government sought input from Canadians through an online consultation and a series of round tables involving representatives from the media, academia and public interest groups.

I also welcomed the committee's study launched in November 2017, in which it heard from 34 witnesses, myself included, during eight meetings. The committee also received written comments from political parties and stakeholders.[English]

The vast majority of stakeholders expressed that leaders' debates make an essential contribution to the health of Canadian democracy. There is broad support for and value in the creation of a debates commission that is guided by the public interest, and there is a need for open and transparent information on the organization of the debates and especially the debate participation criteria.

Stakeholders also expressed that the permanent debates commission needs to be built to last, and that it is important to get it right. During my November 2017 appearance before PROC, I outlined a series of guiding principles that would inform the government's policy development for the leaders' debates commission: independence and impartiality, credibility, democratic citizenship, civic education and inclusion.

(1210)

[Translation]

The commission exercises its independence and impartiality in carrying out its responsibilities and any associated expenses. The commissioner has the independence to determine how best to spend the allocated funds, while maintaining the funding envelope of $5.5 billion over two years.[English]

As identified in the estimates, the commission has started to use these funds for items such as salary, including the hiring of an executive director. Additional costs are expected for the contracting of a production entity, the operation of the commissioner's advisory board, awareness-raising and engagement with Canadians, and administrative costs.

During his appearance before PROC on November 6, 2018, the debates commissioner, the Right Honourable David Johnston, stated that it would be his intention and duty to use funding in a responsible manner and that he would seek every opportunity to reduce costs while also recognizing the need to make debates available to the largest possible audience.

The commission will continue to be fully independent and impartial as it prepares to execute its primary mandate to organize two leaders' debates, one in each official language, for the 2019 general election. [Translation]

The commission is headed by a commissioner and supported by a seven-member advisory board. It is expected to be fully operational by spring 2019. Following the 2019 general election and no later than March 31, 2020, the commission will be mandated to submit a report to Parliament outlining findings and recommendations to inform the possible creation of a permanent commission.[English]

I am confident the proposed approach will ensure that two informative, high-quality, engaging leaders' debates are broadcast on TV and on other platforms in 2019.

In conclusion, I would reiterate that leaders' debates are a public good. The commission will help ensure that the interests of Canadians are central to how leaders' debates are organized and broadcast. I look forward to hearing your feedback and welcome your questions.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'm just curious, Mr. Chair, to know if there's a particular reason the minister didn't give us the courtesy of a copy of her remarks, as is customary.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I apologize. There is no reason, and I'd be happy to share them with you. I will check with my staff as to what happened.

Mr. David Christopherson:

They should have known.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes, I apologize.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

The Chair:

We'll start with Madam Lapointe. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I would like to welcome you, Ms. Gould, and thank you for being here.

I listened carefully to your presentation. One of the responsibilities of the Leaders' Debates Commissioner is “engaging with Canadians to raise awareness about debates”.

In terms of official languages, you said that we must reach everyone, no matter where they are in the country. Could you give us more details on that? How will you reach all Canadians, including linguistic minorities, no matter where they are across all provinces?

The commission is also mandated to provide “free of charge, the feed for the debates” that it organizes.

I am a mother of four children. They are now grown and live in homes where they don't have access to cable.

How will you reach people in similar situations and ensure that they are informed of the debates? How could they get free access to these debates?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you, Ms. Lapointe.

I would like to emphasize the commissioner's independence in terms of decision-making and action. For our part, we have ensured that he has the necessary resources to enable him to assume his responsibilities, based on his own methods.

Our goal is to ensure that all Canadians, wherever they are in the country, have access to debates in both official languages.

For example, during the consultations, representatives of a francophone community in Nova Scotia stated that they were unable to access the leaders' debates. So we have added the issue of accessibility to the commissioner's mandate.

We have heard about another important fact across the country. Many of the new generation of adults and voters don't have access to cable. They don't watch TV in the traditional way.

Therefore, the commissioner's mandate is also to ensure that debates are available in a variety of formats and on a variety of platforms: not only through traditional media, but also on social media, on the platforms of digital giants and on the Internet in general.

Canadians will have access to the feed for debates in a format that suits them.

(1215)

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Do you have anything to add, Mr. Sutherland?

Mr. Allen Sutherland (Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet, Machinery of Government, Privy Council Office):

I fully agree.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you.

In my opinion, it's very important to circulate information about the availability of debates. That was just for context.

Earlier, you mentioned the commissioner's independence in decision-making and the methods to be adopted. You also mentioned that he and his team would be on the job in spring 2019.

Do you think he will be able to count on all the staff he needs to train his team and fulfill his mandate?

Hon. Karina Gould:

As I said earlier, we have ensured that the commissioner has the necessary resources, but I am not aware of Mr. Johnston's activities because the commission must remain independent.

Mr. Johnston is extremely competent, and I am convinced that he is currently working very hard to get his team together, a task that is entirely his responsibility, to fulfill his mandate.

I have full confidence in Mr. Johnston, and I am certain that he will do an excellent job.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

There is the commissioner who will organize the debates, but can you suggest other ways we could strengthen our democracy?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Do you mean ways to strengthen our democracy in general?

(1220)

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Yes. How can we go even further?

Hon. Karina Gould:

The creation of the Leaders' Debates Commissioner position is a very important initiative. These debates are key moments for people because they can see how leaders interact spontaneously and know what they think.

There are many things we could do to strengthen our democracy. The announcement we made two or three weeks ago is also important. It relates to protecting our democracy from cyber threats and threats from abroad. We must talk about our democratic system and ensure that people have the tools to be well-informed and know where the information comes from. It's important.

Together with the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness and the Minister of National Defence, I also announced an investment of $7 million in digital, media and civic education programs. In a more digital world, this is important. We know that a lot of information is circulating on the Internet and digital platforms. People must have the necessary tools to know what to believe and what not to believe.

The study of Bill C-76 conducted by this committee was very important to ensure transparency in political advertising.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We will now go to Mr. Nater. [English]

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for joining us today. Actually, I want to begin by thanking you as well for your service as Minister of Democratic Institutions. I understand that you won't be seeking re-election this fall in Burlington, so I wanted to thank you for your service to Burlington.

Hon. Karina Gould:

No? Why not?

Mr. John Nater:

Oh, it was just my assumption that you weren't. Since you are here defending an independent debates commissioner, it was my assumption that somehow you've removed yourself from the partisan process. I suppose that's not the case, then.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I am here because I'm the Minister of Democratic Institutions and you invited me to come, and because the debates commission is supported through PCO. That's why I'm here, because of your invitation, but it is absolutely an independent process.

I am very much looking forward to seeking re-election and serving the good people of Burlington in 2019 and beyond. Thank you for the opportunity for me to mention my amazing constituents and how proud I am to serve them.

Mr. John Nater:

It is a great riding, Burlington. I have been there several times.

Mr. David Christopherson:

The whole neighbourhood is great.

Mr. John Nater:

The whole greater Hamilton area—

Hon. Karina Gould:

That's true. The bay is a good community.

Mr. John Nater:

You mentioned in your opening comments that an executive director had been hired. Could you inform the committee who that is?

Hon. Karina Gould:

The executive director who has been hired is Michel Cormier, formerly of Radio-Canada.

Mr. John Nater:

What pay level will they be at? Are they at a deputy minister level, or an assistant deputy minister level?

Mr. Matthew Shea (Assistant Deputy Minister, Corporate Services, Privy Council Office):

I could get back to the committee on the pay level. I'm not sure. They would not be at a deputy head level. The commissioner is in that type of role. They would likely be an executive, somewhere between EX-02 and EX-04.

Mr. John Nater:

Yes, could you provide that to the committee?

Was it Michel Cormier? Would he be a full-time member or will it just be on a contract? How long will that person serve in that role?

Mr. Matthew Shea:

I don't have that level of information.

This is a good opportunity to remind the committee that they are independent, so we don't get overly involved in their HR or their finance. We just make sure their bills are paid and they have HR support, but we don't really get into that level of detail, and we make it a point to not get overly involved in that level of detail.

Mr. John Nater:

Has PCO or your minister's office had any consultations with Mr. Johnston on potential appointees to the seven-person advisory board? Have any names been provided—either to your office, Minister, or to PCO—on potential appointees to that panel?

Hon. Karina Gould:

The only thing I would be aware of—just like the rest of the public—is all of the individuals who participated in the round table, but that's not something that has been provided. That's just public information.

Mr. John Nater:

Will those members be appointed via order in council?

Mr. Matthew Shea:

They will be hired as per diem appointees under professional services.

Mr. John Nater:

Has PCO or the minister's office had any consultations with the major broadcasters or the social media companies—Facebook, Twitter—on the potential distribution of this leaders' debate?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Only as part of the round table discussions that happened last spring....

Mr. John Nater:

So there have been no efforts by any of these groups to lobby either PCO or your minister's office on the outcome of this. Would the chair, the commissioner, be subject to the overview by the Commissioner of Lobbying in terms of the reporting of lobbying having been undertaken in regard to either the commissioner or the executive director? Would lobbyists have to report any of those interactions?

Mr. Matthew Shea:

I can confirm that for lobbying they have the same obligations for reporting that any department does. They're set up as a separate department, so they have full reporting obligations, like any other deputy head across the government.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Chair. I believe Mrs. Kusie will take the remaining time.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

Thank you very much, Mr. Nater.

Thank you very much, Minister, for being here today.

I know that something that has been of great importance to you has been to have participation in this process from all the other political parties. Could you please expand on what consultation process has taken place to this point with the other political parties to further this process?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Since the appointment of the commissioner...?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's correct.

Hon. Karina Gould:

My office has not been involved since the appointment of the commissioner. The commissioner is responsible for his work since being appointed.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay. I have to say that this is the second time you have mentioned this. You mentioned it within your opening statement as well, and my colleague did make a remark, a joke, to open up, but I don't believe that independence can be used as an excuse for not having knowledge of the process and not being able to share information with this committee in regard to the process. I guess I would just ask you to please consider that for future visits here.

(1225)

Hon. Karina Gould:

That's your point of view, but I think that actually independence means independence, so that means the minister is not directing or involved in the commissioner's ability to make those decisions. I really do believe in the definition of independence, so we have not been involved whatsoever, but I'm happy to be here to answer the questions to the best of my ability.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure. My point of view would be that the purpose of your being here, Minister, is to provide the committee with a fulsome update, and when you tell us that you do not have the information.... I'm not sure if your colleagues who are here with you today can provide further information on that. That is what we expect as the opposition and as the committee. We expect to have that information in some capacity or another.

My colleague touched briefly upon the seven-person advisory panel. The public information you mentioned is the only information that has been provided so far in regard to appointees to this panel. Can you elaborate further on whether one of the individuals will be from the PCO and who that might be?

Hon. Karina Gould:

On the independent advisory panel...?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes.

Hon. Karina Gould:

As I said, it's up to the commissioner to make a decision as to who they are, and I do not have knowledge of whom he is thinking about at this time.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay.

My colleague also made reference to some of the costs. When the debates commission was announced, it was also publicized that it would be given a budget of $5.5 million for the two debates.

Again, since it is the government that is responsible for dispensing these funds, have you been given any information in regard to a budget or an itemized budget? Again, being that as a committee we are here discussing the estimates, I feel that we have the privilege and the obligation to review the expenditures. If you could provide any additional information in regard to a budget, as specific as possible, we would appreciate that information.

Mr. Matthew Shea:

I'll handle that.

I would maybe just take you back to when that $5.5-million figure was come up with.... That was a best estimate, and that was an “up to” amount. I think the debates commissioner has made it clear that his goal is to actually live below that budget. Any interactions I've had with him from an internal service perspective have certainly been along that line.

I can tell you that probably in the realm of $900,000 to a million of that will be salaries, with the lion's share being for other operating...for things such as professional services, which will include the advisory committee, advertising services and communications services. There will likely be a large contract that would be related to actually holding the two debates. That's where the lion's share of the costs will be.

The debates commissioner's office has made it clear they're still finalizing that exact budget, but that's what our $5.5-million estimate was based on, and I think it won't be far off that. From an overall split, there may be differences between what they spend on professional services versus advertising, but I think the salaries I mentioned are pretty bang on.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mrs. Kusie.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Chair.

Minister, thank you very much for being here. Starting on a positive, let me just say how impressed I am that not once in the entire term since you've been a minister have you played games, jerked us around, or dodged any invitation to come here, no matter how difficult the subject. That's appreciated and respected.

Having said that, we're on that file again. I just need to make a statement and then I'll move on.

Again, the undemocratic nature of the democratic reform ministry still takes my breath away. It's still not acceptable.... Well, I should say it is acceptable, because we have no choice, but it's not warmly accepted that the government unilaterally appointed someone who plays such a key role in our democracy. It leaves open the argument, for those who didn't want the leaders' debates commission, to have a legitimate broadside. Again, the lack of respect for the commitment of this government to independent committees and the importance of committees in the main.... In large part, it's just been talk, talk, talk. We haven't seen the walk, walk, walk.

Having said all of that, I accept the rule of Parliament, which decided that this is now in place, so we'll move forward. We'll deal with any changing after the fact. I will speak to that a bit in terms of accountability, but we do accept that this is now in place.

I have to tell you that on a personal basis, the only thing that saved the day for you was the integrity of the person you picked. I mean, that papered up a lot of the cracks in the walls, but those cracks are there. The election's coming, and you folks are going to have to wear it on these things.

Having said that, I will move on. In terms of the members, I respect the independence you're alluding to. By the sounds of it, I believe that's being respected, but at what point does independence meet accountability? What exactly is the vehicle, as you see it, given that there's no guarantee who the government is next time? How do you see it right now in terms of the accountability back to this committee or some other entity? Having given people all this independence, all this power and all this money, what's the accountability? As well, will that include a detailed budget next time, rather than just a macro number?

(1230)

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you for those questions.

Perhaps I can first put this on the record. I know that my colleague is not seeking re-election next time, and I don't know if I'll have another chance. I know I'm always welcome to come back to the committee, and I know you'll invite me back, but I'd like to say now how much of a pleasure it's been to work with my colleague Mr. Christopherson. I think Parliament will be missing him next time around, because he does serve with a lot of integrity.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You're very kind. Thank you.

Hon. Karina Gould:

It's not just because you're my neighbour—

Mr. David Christopherson:

It helps.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Hon. Karina Gould:

It does help, but I have a lot of admiration for you.

At any rate, if I can just get that on the record, I'm glad to say that.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

Hon. Karina Gould:

With regard to accountability, I think that's a really important question. It was something we did try to build into the process with regard to the debates commissioner coming back to this committee within six months of the election—or I guess a bit less, with March 2020—to talk about how things went and to provide an update and the plans moving forward. I was—

Mr. David Christopherson:

Sorry, is that including a detailed budget?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I don't know if it said “detailed budget” in it.

Mr. Allen Sutherland:

As per the OIC, the debates commissioner is required to provide a report on an in-depth analysis of the experience of the 2019 debates, the organization of the debates, and advice for the future form of a leaders' debates commission. That report is to be tabled in Parliament.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I do think, though, that with regard to the next estimates, that's something that could be explored definitely by this committee. I also think that one thing the committee.... Of course, you make your own decisions, but I think one thing that should be asked is whether the budget that was in place for 2019 was sufficient, or too great, or whatever the experience was.

I would imagine that the debates commissioner, when he tables that report—and he would ultimately like, I believe, to come back to Parliament—will have suggestions in terms of how a budget could be allocated, given our experience this time. This is the first one. We're hoping we're providing sufficient resources to be able to deliver on the mandate. I think the experience of this first time will serve greatly in terms of a more built-to-last model.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

The advisory board is obviously key. Are you aware—or is it public—what the criteria are for acceptance, and is it the intention of the commissioner to make public the names of these members as they are appointed?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes. The original order in council document, under “Advisory Board”, section 8(2), reads: The Advisory Board is to be composed of seven members, and its composition is to be reflective of gender balance and Canadian diversity and is to represent a range of political affiliations and expertise.

With regard to a specific job description, that would be up to the commissioner to decide, and it would be his responsibility to publicize the names of these individuals.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Will that be in a timely fashion? Will they be appointed one at a time, or as a lump appointment? How would that work?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Again, that would be a question that the commissioner would have to answer. Our understanding is that we can anticipate it in the spring of 2019.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Going forward, what is the relationship between you and the commissioner, given the sensitivity around election debates? There has to be a reporting mechanism, so there is something. I assume you're respecting independence.

How is that going to work?

(1235)

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes, I am respecting independence.

Essentially, since his appointment we have not had a conversation and we do not intend to have one. The accountability, of course, will be through the budgetary process, and PCO is providing back-office support. But in terms of the decisions that are being made, we've provided the broad outline, the expected objectives, and it's up to the commissioner to deliver those.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay, that's great. Thanks very much, Minister, I appreciate it.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Christopherson.

We'll go to Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you so much, Minister, for being here. I hope you're feeling well and that you will feel better soon. As a fellow parent of a toddler, I know that they touch everything, and that does not necessarily assist with parental health. Thank you so much for being here anyway.

I know the answer to my question will likely be that Mr. Johnston will be responsible for this. It's something that really touched me during our study. As able-bodied individuals, we don't think about persons with disabilities and how they access debates. I was wondering if you could comment on that, the framework and what you've heard on that subject.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Certainly. It's a good thing I'm this far away from all of you. Hopefully, you won't catch the day care plague.

We heard a lot about accessibility during the consultations, particularly in terms of those who are hearing or vision impaired. One of the interesting conversations we had during the consultations was with an advocacy group for the vision impaired. They were talking about making the soundtrack of the debates available, having it broadcast on the radio or in podcast style, that it would be very interesting for them. They also talked about ensuring there is sign-language interpretation during the broadcast. Of course, this is all in the report, which the debates commissioner has access to, but one of the mandates is really to make sure the feed is accessible to people of all abilities.

The other interesting thing that came up was with regard to making the feed available in different languages. Obviously, with regard to our two official languages, we make sure we have a main debate in English and a main debate in French, but there is also the possibility to work with groups of diverse backgrounds to make sure that people whose first language is not English or French can also access the debates.

I think it's a really important question, one that I know the commissioner is seized with. Accessibility has always been a passion of his, so I have confidence that he will be able to deliver that.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I'm going to switch gears—probably dramatically.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Okay.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I saw on the news that a report came out in Australia—I believe it was announced by the prime minister—that major political parties had been hacked by a “sophisticated foreign actor”. As we head into an election, I know this is something about which concern has been raised by all parties and all members around the table.

How do you see things as we move forward in an election year? There are nations out there that seek to cause harm, sow doubt, and are willing to act against the democracies of our allies. We've seen that in Britain. We've seen it in the United States. We've now seen it in Australia, and we're up next.

Could you comment on that?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think this is an extremely important topic. It goes to show that you can't be too careful in this space. I'm very pleased that we have had a very productive working relationship on this with all of the main political parties represented in the House of Commons. They've been engaged with the Communications Security Establishment, and CSE is there to provide advice. We've had some really good conversations about protecting our democracy writ large. I have to say that, at least until now, people and parties have put partisanship aside in this specific area and have been focusing on ensuring that we're protecting Canada first.

That's been very positive. The Australian example goes to show that we have to take this seriously here in Canada. One of the things I announced during the protecting democracy announcement on January 30 was the fact that we will be extending security clearance to all political leaders represented in the House of Commons, and also to up to four of their aides and advisers, so that they can be briefed and up to speed. Ultimately, this is a Canada-first policy.

We're prepared. We obviously can't protect against every eventuality, but I have been really encouraged by the fact that so far everyone is working together on this file.

(1240)

Mr. Chris Bittle:

We had Facebook and Twitter before our committee in regard to Bill C-76. We raked them over the coals a bit, but my worry is that they said, “Oh, don't worry. We'll be good. We'll have things in place, maybe, possibly, hopefully, possibly, maybe in the future sometime, maybe.”

Have you had any discussions with the social media companies as we're moving forward to the election?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes, I've had conversations with both Facebook and Twitter. I'm going to be meeting with Microsoft this week and hopefully Google in the coming weeks as well.

I think Canadians are rightly concerned. They are rightly feeling uneasy about the role of social media in our upcoming election. It's going to play an even bigger role than it did in 2015. While there have been some positive steps taken by the platforms to deal with fake accounts and inauthentic behaviour, particularly from foreign sources, there is a lot more that can and should be done. We're having conversations to that effect.

One thing that's interesting to me is that all the major platforms have signed on to a code of practice for the upcoming EU parliamentary elections in May. We're following that very closely and trying to determine if that's something that would be both effective and worthwhile to bring here.

One of the biggest challenges with regard to social media companies is precisely that accountability factor, in that, at the moment, they are saying, “Just trust us. We're doing things.” But we don't necessarily have the mechanisms to be sure that they are, apart from the items that were passed in Bill C-76 with regard to ad transparency and not knowingly accepting foreign funding on platforms for political advertisement.

This issue is one that continues to evolve, and we continue to learn a lot about it. We need to be certain that the companies are acting in good faith and taking this issue seriously. We are ensuring that the loopholes that have existed are now closed, understanding that our adversaries are always evolving as well.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you, Minister.

The Chair:

Mrs. Kusie. [Translation]

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I would first like to address a point that Ms. Lapointe raised earlier.[English]

Facebook recently announced there are three online video channels in the U.S. that are watched by billions of millennials. In fact, these are backed by the Russian government. More appropriate to this conversation, and to Canada, is the recent CBC story regarding the number of tweets put out by foreign trolls. In fact, 9.6 million tweets were put out, and they are having a significant impact not only on our debates' processes, our electoral processes, but also very significantly on our democratic processes. In fact, these tweets have been shown to influence such things as thoughts in Canada on both immigration and pipeline approval.

I am wondering what you are doing, what your government is doing, in regard to foreign interference and influence that goes beyond our electoral processes to our democratic processes.

(1245)

Hon. Karina Gould:

It's a very interesting question, actually, and one that I would welcome the committee looking into as well, because I think it's very important. It's one where there are a lot of grey areas. It's not a grey area when you know it's coming from a foreign source. That's not something we want. I always talk about the overt and covert influence campaigns. There's overt influence, which is diplomacy, essentially, trying to achieve a certain outcome, and all countries in the world participate in that. Then there's covert influence, where you're perhaps posing as a Canadian or as an organization that's Canadian, but you are really funded from elsewhere. Knowing about that can be quite challenging and difficult. I think that's something we saw in the lead-up to the 2016 presidential election. This was something very new that we hadn't really seen before, although foreign interference has always existed. It's just existing in different channels now.

We want to ensure that we're providing space for legitimate debate in Canada. There are ongoing issues, particularly when there isn't an election. That was very much part of my thinking with regard to third party advertising during the pre-writ period and not doing it before then, because while Parliament is in session, you want to ensure that Canadians can be in a sense unfettered in their ability to interact with parliamentarians and to raise and discuss important issues.

The question—and the tricky zone—is, how do you know where that initial information is coming from? I think civic media and digital literacy are really important to help Canadians inform themselves of what kinds of markers to look for in terms of where information is coming from. If you're seeing a Twitter account that maybe has only 15 followers but is tweeting non-stop on a whole range of issues that are kind of weird, then maybe that's not a legitimate account. Maybe that's coming from somewhere else. It's those kinds of conversations that we need to get started on.

Twitter and Facebook have been taking down accounts, millions of fake accounts, that they can confirm are coming from foreign sources and posing as domestic actors.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Minister, my apologies. I'll have to interrupt you there.

I agree, and I've often said that it's like radiation or free radicals: You know it's out there, but you certainly can't see it. I'm just concerned. In the U.S., we've seen the establishment of the Global Engagement Center, which is in charge of looking for fake information. As well, U.K. lawmakers recently put forward the necessity of “a compulsory code of ethics”, so this is obviously something that's of importance to the committee.

With that, Mr. Chair, I would like to put forward the following motion on notice: That the Minister of Democratic Institutions be invited to appear before the Committee to discuss the government’s plan to safeguard the 2019 election and the Security and Intelligence Threats to Elections Task Force.

The minister has already welcomely stated she would be happy to return.

The Chair:

Thank you.

That's good. That's your time as well.

Mr. Hardie.

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

I have a concern. It relates to a story that I heard directly from Marshall McLuhan, which means it was a long time ago. It was a story about an attempt by the Russian government to modernize and lighten up. They started a big nightclub in Moscow, which failed after about six months. They had a big commission looking into it. Somebody asked, “Well, was it the booze?” “Oh—the best stuff.” “The food?” “Fantastic.” “What about the chorus line?” “Everyone a good party member since 1917.”

So, do we have confidence that Commissioner Johnston is going to glue together something that will actually resonate with Canadians, the ones we're actually trying to serve here? Do we have any oversight of this at all, or have we just basically told the commissioner to go forth without any kind of leadership? Are there broadcasters in his group? I'm not talking about Mr. Cormier, because Mr. Cormier sounds like senior management who probably never saw the business end of a camera. I'm talking about people who actually have the skills and demonstrated ability to present a program that engages the public.

(1250)

Hon. Karina Gould:

I have a lot of confidence in Mr. Johnston to hire the right people for this. I think his storied career speaks to his passion for the public interest, but also his most recent experience as Governor General has enabled him to engage with such a diverse cross-section of Canadians that I really feel he will understand and appreciate how to ensure that these debates are put together and accessible to as broad a range of Canadians and interests as possible.

I also think that the public report from the consultations that we did with the IRPP really emphasizes the need to make sure that there are skilled and qualified people on his team. I have every confidence that he will do that. The OIC does lay out important principles and a guiding mandate for him. I have full confidence that he'll be able to deliver that.

I'm going to turn it over to Matt with regard to the specifics.

Mr. Ken Hardie:

Be very brief, please, because I have another question.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Okay, sure.

Mr. Matthew Shea:

Well, maybe I can just touch really quickly on the accountability. I've heard mention a couple of times of accountability and detailed budget plans. I just want to be clear that the debates commission, like any department, will have to come forward with a departmental plan, which gets tabled in Parliament. It has to go forward to main estimates, which get tabled in Parliament, and in both—

Mr. Ken Hardie:

No, I understand. That's all financial accountability. I'm just talking about putting on a program that Canadians will want to watch and be engaged in. In all the debates I've witnessed, since black and white television and just banging rocks together, we've never, in fact, come up with a format that has really seemed to work. In some cases, it's a big cat fight between the various candidates. In others, you have journalists operating from their echo chambers trying to suppose what's interesting to the public.

Have we actually received any leadership or inclination from the public about what they would like to see covered and how they would like to see it covered?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think your question gets to the point of why we've put forward a debates commission in the first place, because over the past decades, and particularly in recent history, it's been a political exercise, a partisan exercise, or a strictly journalistic exercise. The key point here that I think is important in his mandate is that they are to be done in the public interest.

I think Mr. Johnston is uniquely positioned to be able to draw on experts in broadcasting, academia and civil society to really ensure that the product that will be delivered is one that speaks to Canadians. That's one of the things we heard time and time again through our round tables and conversations across the country, to do exactly what you're talking about—put together a product that will be interesting for Canadians, that Canadians will want to engage with, but also one that can be used freely, which I think is really the most important part of it. The feed should be made available to whoever wants to use it, because then they can share it on diverse platforms or use different parts. I'm just speculating here, but let's say there's a group that's interested in the environment and climate change. If there's a question on the environment and climate change, that's something they can focus on.

I'm a bit of a political geek myself, but I think this is really exciting.

The Chair:

Thank you.

David, you have a short question.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thanks, Chair. I appreciate that.

The Chief Electoral Officer has.... There's a technical term and I don't know it. What it means is that his budget is unlimited. Once he gets into running an election, he can access the funding he needs. Would the debates commissioner have the same thing, given the fact that there's an artificial number? If he runs into a wall in terms of expenses, what happens?

(1255)

Mr. Matthew Shea:

It is a set amount, approved by Parliament. If the debates commissioner were to run into a wall—and they've given no indication—there would be a process as with any department, whereby the debates commissioner would put in a funding request to the minister and it would go from there. Again, there has been no indication that they feel they don't have enough money, but if they did, there are mechanisms.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It could happen quickly, just a paper thing.

Mr. Matthew Shea:

Absolutely. I'll finish what I started to say earlier. The reason I was mentioning the departmental plan and main estimates is that when they're tabled, this committee has the opportunity to call the debates commissioner. Unlike PCO, where we're limited in what we can say, he could go into details about exactly how he plans to spend, if he has enough money—all those questions that I think you're asking.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

Thank you, Chair, for your indulgence.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mrs. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you, Chair.

Mr. Bittle touched on raking over the coals. I'm not sure that's what we ended up doing, and I certainly don't feel that's what we ended up doing for the Canadian public with Bill C-76. I'm hearing from you and the government that you want to make a real commitment to protecting Canadians and our electoral processes from foreign interference and influence. But all we got out of Bill C-76 was an interference process where there's a tap on the hand if there is foreign funding. Again, we tried as Conservatives to legislate amendments that would make it impossible for this to happen, with segregated bank accounts and doing more than the tap on the hand.

In addition, with the platforms, all we ended up with was some lame registries. It concerns me very much. In addition, frankly, when you go to the mainstream media, Minister.... When you went on The West Block, you said that you expect social media platforms to do more to protect the 2019 federal election from foreign interference, and you asked them to take lessons learned from around the world and apply them in Canada. It is very disturbing to me that you are asking corporations, of their own goodwill, to try to protect Canadians and our electoral processes, rather than taking responsibility yourself, both as the minister and the government.

Given the weak outcomes of Bill C-76 and your comments in the media, can you please provide any more assurance to the committee here today and to all Canadians that the 2019 election will have the most assurances possible to be kept safe from foreign influence?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I actually think that Bill C-76 was a good example of taking suggestions from all the different political parties represented around the table, particularly with regard to the ad registry and many of the items relating to third parties. Several of the suggestions and recommendations taken were put forward by the Conservatives and the NDP. Actually, a number of them were put forward by all of the political parties. That's really a testament to parliamentary democracy.

I would encourage this committee to do a study of the role of social media and democracy, if that's something you think is interesting, to hold the social media companies to account. I would welcome suggestions and feedback in terms of how to appropriately regulate or legislate that behaviour. One of the biggest challenges—and you can see this around the world—is that the path forward is not clear. This is something Canadians would certainly appreciate.

Maybe it was Mr. Bittle who mentioned.... Actually, no, there was a study that came out today saying that six in 10 Canadians don't feel good about Facebook and the upcoming election. This is another example of where we can work together, put partisanship aside and come up with the appropriate path forward. We want to ensure that we are providing the important public space that social media provides for people to express themselves, but also mitigating some of the negative impacts that can arise through social media. This would be something very interesting for the committee to work on, if you chose to do that. I'm also happy to speak with any of you individually about ideas or thoughts that you have.

The program that we put forward on January 30 with regard to protecting our democracy is quite comprehensive and tries to tackle the issue from many different sides to provide Canadians with the assurance that the government is taking this seriously. We're looking at it from both a hard and a soft angle.

Ultimately, we have to work together as Canadians. The ultimate target for our democracy is the Canadian voter, because Canadian voters are the ones who hold the power in terms of the votes they cast. What we need to do—both I and the government but also parliamentarians—is to ensure that Canadians have the information they need to make informed choices.

(1300)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you, Minister.

As a former foreign service officer and security officer, I would just counsel you to get as much information as you can from your counterparts. As a member of this committee, I hope that you would share it with us.

Thank you.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mrs. Kusie.

We'll now go to vote 1b under the Leaders' Debates Commission in supplementary estimates (B). LEADERS' DEBATES COMMISSION ç Vote 1b—Program expenditures..........$257,949

(Vote 1b agreed to on division)

The Chair: Shall vote 1 under the Leaders' Debates Commission in the interim estimates carry? LEADERS' DEBATES COMMISSION Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$2,260,388

(Vote 1 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Shall I report the votes in supplementary estimates (B) and the interim estimates to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Okay, thank you.

Thank you very much, Minister and your colleagues, for coming.

There is another committee coming here, but just before we break, I have two quick things. Maybe I'll read this. We're doing the two-House study, and normally the clerk tweets out something. Basically it says: The Committee is studying whether it would be advantageous for the House of Commons to establish a parallel debating chamber. Parallel debating chambers can serve as additional forums for debate on certain kinds of parliamentary business and have been used by the Parliaments of Australia and the United Kingdom since the 1990s.

Is there any problem with that? Okay.

Thursday is our lunch. Hopefully you can all make it.

Next Tuesday, Bruce Stanton will be here from 11:00 to 12:00. From 12:00 to 1:00, we had the Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure, but we talked about also doing the report on the privilege motion. In that hour, too, we'll discuss the final report, and the researcher will send that out.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

What day is that?

The Chair:

That is next Tuesday.

Is everyone okay with that?

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous et bon retour de la semaine que vous avez passée dans vos circonscriptions. Bienvenue à la 142e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre, qui est télévisée.

Le premier point à l'ordre du jour de la séance d'aujourd'hui est l'examen des crédits du budget provisoire des dépenses 2019-2020 de la Chambre des communes et du Service de protection parlementaire.

Nous avons le plaisir de recevoir l'honorable Geoff Regan, Président de la Chambre des communes, qui est accompagné de Charles Robert, greffier, de Michel Patrice, sous-greffier, Administration, et de Daniel Paquette, dirigeant principal des finances, de la de la Chambre des communes.

Nous entendrons également Marie-Claude Côté, directrice intérimaire, et Robert Graham, officier responsable de l'administration et du personnel, du Service de protection parlementaire.

Je vous remercie tous de témoigner. Je vais maintenant vous laisser la parole, monsieur le Président, pour que vous fassiez votre exposé.

L'hon. Geoff Regan (président de la Chambre des communes):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président et distingués membres du Comité, de nous recevoir aujourd'hui.[Français]

J'ai le plaisir d'être ici pour vous présenter le budget provisoire des dépenses pour 2019-2020 et pour parler des fonds nécessaires pour que l'Administration de la Chambre puisse continuer de soutenir les députés et notre institution, ainsi que d'améliorer les services offerts.

Je suis en compagnie de membres de la haute direction de l'Administration de la Chambre, que vous connaissez bien: Charles Robert, greffier de la Chambre des communes, Michel Patrice, sous-greffier, Administration, et Daniel Paquette, dirigeant principal des finances.

Je vais aussi présenter le budget provisoire des dépenses du Service de protection parlementaire. Je suis donc accompagné de la surintendante Marie-Claude Côté, directrice intérimaire du Service de protection parlementaire, et de l'agent de l'administration et du personnel du Service, Robert Graham.[Traduction]

Le budget provisoire 2019-2020 comprend un aperçu des besoins de dépenses pour les trois premiers mois de l'exercice, accompagné d'une comparaison avec le budget des dépenses 2018-2019, ainsi que les annexes proposées pour le premier projet de loi de crédits.

Le budget provisoire de la Chambre des communes, tel que déposé à la Chambre des communes, totalise approximativement 87,5 millions de dollars et constitue les trois douzièmes des crédits votés totaux que comprendra le prochain budget principal des dépenses 2019-2020. Une fois que le budget principal des dépenses aura été déposé à la Chambre, je prévois que nous nous rencontrerons de nouveau au printemps. Je vous présenterai alors un aperçu des modifications d'une année à l'autre.

Aujourd'hui, je vous donnerai un bref aperçu des principales priorités de la Chambre des communes.

Il est primordial que les députés et les agents supérieurs de la Chambre disposent des services et des ressources nécessaires pour combler leurs besoins dans le cadre de l'exécution de leurs fonctions parlementaires.

Soit dit en passant, monsieur le président, je vais, bien entendu, tenter de parler avec un débit permettant aux interprètes de traduire mes propos, car nous leurs sommes tous reconnaissants du travail qu'ils accomplissent et je ne veux pas leur compliquer la tâche.

(1105)

[Français]

L'Administration cherche avant tout à aider les députés à assumer leurs fonctions parlementaires en misant sur l'excellence de la prestation des services et sur la modernisation continue. Au cours de la dernière année, par exemple, quatre centres de services multidisciplinaires Sourceplus ont été créés. Ces centres offrent sur place de l'aide aux députés et à leur personnel.

Une équipe d'employés de la Chambre des communes est à leur disposition pour leur offrir de l'aide en ce qui concerne les finances, les ressources humaines, les technologies de l'information et les divers services opérationnels offerts par l'Administration de la Chambre. Si jamais des députés ont des commentaires à faire à ce sujet, je serai très intéressé de les entendre.

Toujours dans le domaine de la prestation des services, l'Administration a aussi mis en œuvre des mesures de normalisation du matériel informatique et d'impression dans les bureaux de circonscription, aux quatre coins du pays. Ce projet pilote a été lancé cette année et il vise trois buts: harmoniser les services informatiques offerts sur la Colline du Parlement et dans les circonscriptions; améliorer le soutien technique et la sécurité informatique; et simplifier l'achat du matériel utilisé dans les bureaux de circonscription et faciliter la gestion de son cycle de vie.

De plus, après la prochaine élection générale, tous les bureaux de circonscription disposeront de la série complète des appareils et des applications informatiques standards.[Traduction]

L'Administration de la Chambre souhaite offrir aux députés des services novateurs, efficaces, responsables et impartiaux. Pour ce faire, elle doit attirer et maintenir à son service une main-d'oeuvre motivée, qualifiée et productive qui agit de manière responsable et intègre.

Les augmentations du coût de la vie constituent un élément crucial des efforts de recrutement pour les employeurs que sont les députés, les agents supérieurs de la Chambre et l'Administration de la Chambre, et le financement pour ces augmentations est pris en compte dans le budget.

Les membres du Comité sauront que les programmes de soutien aux employés constituent également une priorité. Ces programmes, offerts aux employés des députés, des agents supérieurs de la Chambre, des bureaux de recherche et de l'Administration, comprennent un programme d'aide destiné à l'employé et à sa famille, ainsi que d'autres ressources et activités, comme celles qui se déroulent en ce mois de février dans le cadre du Mois du bien-être.

Le renouvellement de nos espaces physiques et les services qui y sont fournis sont une autre priorité de l'Administration de la Chambre.

L'ouverture de l'édifice de l'Ouest et le centre d'accueil des visiteurs sont, à ce jour, le changement le plus notable apporté dans la Cité parlementaire. Nous considérons que l'édifice de l'Ouest constitue un modèle pour d'autres Parlements qui s'attaquent à des défis semblables aux nôtres au chapitre du vieillissement des installations. En fait, je sais qu'un grand nombre d'entre vous savent qu'à Westminster, les responsables entendent déménager et effectuer des rénovations majeures du palais de Westminster, ce qui représente évidemment une entreprise d'envergure. Ces travaux ne commenceront toutefois pas avant quelques années.

La Chambre des communes collabore étroitement avec ses partenaires parlementaires et avec Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada pour soutenir la vision et le plan à long terme.

Dans les prochaines années, nous mettrons l'accent sur le déclassement et la réfection de l'édifice du Centre. Nous continuerons aussi de revoir et de mettre à jour les besoins de la Chambre des communes et les principes directeurs encadrant des rénovations futures apportées dans la Cité parlementaire. L'Administration de la Chambre des communes continuera d'examiner des manières de mieux faire participer les députés au projet de l'édifice du Centre dans l'avenir et de faire en sorte qu'ils continuent de participer aux discussions sur l'aménagement et les besoins opérationnels relatifs à cet édifice.

Nous accordons toujours la priorité à l'utilisation, au soutien, à l'entretien et à la gestion du cycle de vie du matériel et des éléments de connectivité dans l'ensemble des édifices, car ce travail est essentiel pour pouvoir offrir un environnement de travail mobile aux députés et à l'Administration. C'est, bien entendu, quelque chose à laquelle nous nous attendons tous maintenant. [Français]

Je passe maintenant au budget provisoire des dépenses du Service de protection parlementaire, par la voie duquel le Service sollicite 28 millions de dollars.

Les besoins financiers correspondent aux quatre principales priorités stratégiques du Service: l'excellence des opérations de protection, des employés mobilisés et en santé, l'équilibre entre la sécurité et l'accès, ainsi que la saine intendance.

La majeure partie du budget annuel du SPP est affectée à la première de ces priorités, soit l'excellence des opérations de protection, ce qui englobe les salaires du personnel et la rémunération des heures supplémentaires.

Conformément à l'objectif du Service d'allouer les ressources existantes aussi judicieusement que possible, plusieurs postes ont été ajoutés au dispositif de sécurité globale à la suite de l'ouverture des locaux provisoires. Si les membres ont des questions au sujet du dispositif de sécurité, le Comité pourrait vouloir passer à huis clos pour les aborder, naturellement.

(1110)

[Traduction]

Le service a récemment reclassifié les postes de tous les agents de protection, entraînant dans la foulée une augmentation de leurs salaires rétroactive au 1er avril 2018.

Le Service de protection parlementaire a aussi réussi à négocier une convention collective avec L'Association des employés du Service de sécurité du Sénat et une prolongation de la convention précédente avec l'Alliance de la Fonction publique du Canada. Voilà pourquoi des fonds ont été réservés pour effectuer des paiements pour les augmentations économiques rétroactives résultant de ces négociations.

Au fil de son évolution, le Service de protection parlementaire réduit graduellement la présence de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada à certains endroits sur la Colline parlementaire et à l'intérieur de la Cité parlementaire, augmentant du même coup les ressources et la présence de ses propres agents.

Le reste du budget du Service de protection parlementaire permet à l'administration, qui appuie les activités du service, d'être adéquatement équipée et dotée de ressources. Cela signifie qu'il faut veiller à ce que l'équipement et la technologie de sécurité soient correctement gérés et que les employés bénéficient d'un soutien constant sur les plans de la santé et du bien-être. À l'approche du quatrième anniversaire du Service de protection parlementaire, qui aura lieu en juin, l'administration du service devient plus apte à réagir aux besoins du Parlement et de son effectif.[Français]

Monsieur le président, voilà ce qui conclut mon aperçu du budget provisoire des dépenses pour 2019-2020 pour la Chambre des communes et le Service de protection parlementaire.

Mes collaborateurs et moi serons heureux de répondre aux questions des membres du Comité.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le Président.

Monsieur Graham, vous pouvez commencer. [Traduction]

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Monsieur le Président, chaque fois que vous témoignez, vous vous excusez de votre débit de parole, et je regarde autour de moi avec l'impression que tous les yeux sont fixés sur moi.[Français]

Madame Côté, vous êtes la quatrième directrice intérimaire du SPP depuis sa création. Il y a eu beaucoup de conflits avec les syndicats, qui étaient tous basés sur une demande à la commission des relations de travail et de l'emploi, pour laquelle on attend toujours une réponse.

Avez-vous une nouvelle vision qui pourrait ramener la paix au SPP?

Surintendante Marie-Claude Côté (directrice intérimaire, Service de protection parlementaire):

Merci de votre question.

Je voudrais d'abord remercier M. le président[Traduction]de m'accueillir ici aujourd'hui pour ce qui est ma première comparution devant le Comité. Je remercie également le Président de la Chambre de son soutien.

Ma vision est la même que celle de ma prédécesseure: nous voulons toujours travailler en harmonie avec nos employés. Ce sera là mon objectif à titre de directrice intérimaire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comme vous l'avez probablement constaté au cours des dernières années, je me préoccupe principalement du fait que la création du SPP après la fusillade du 22 octobre fait en sorte qu'un élément de la sécurité relève du pouvoir exécutif. La sécurité comprend un élément relevant de ce pouvoir. Comme vous êtes agente de la GRC selon la définition de la Loi sur la GRC, vous relevez nécessairement du commissaire. C'est pour moi une source constante de préoccupation en ce qui concerne la protection de la démocratie dans notre pays.

Voici ce que j'aimerais savoir du Président et du SPP; à long terme, veut-on que la GRC continue d'assurer directement la sécurité sur la Colline? Est-ce l'objectif à long terme ou souhaiteriez-vous adopter une approche différente?

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

La loi stipule que je relève du Président; cependant, sur le plan des opérations, je relève du commissaire de la GRC. C'est, bien entendu, ainsi que nous fonctionnons. Pour ce qui est des changements, ce n'est pas à moi qu'il incombe de modifier la loi.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

C'est au Parlement qu'il revient de déterminer comment les choses devraient fonctionner. De toute évidence, en ma qualité de Président, je composerai —  avec grand bonheur, bien entendu — avec tout ce que le Parlement décide à cet égard.

(1115)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Fort bien.

Considérez-vous que vous avez l'autorité nécessaire sur le SPP à titre de Président?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je constate que le Service de protection parlementaire réagit rapidement à mes motifs de préoccupation et qu'il répond sérieusement aux idées d'améliorations que les députés jugent nécessaires. Je n'ai pas perçu là de problème. J'apprécie beaucoup la collaboration de la surintendante comme j'ai apprécié celle de sa prédécesseure, qui, bien sûr, dirige maintenant la GRC au Manitoba, ce dont nous la félicitons.

Comme je le dis, il ne convient pas que je fasse des observations sur les décisions législatives du Parlement. Si le Parlement décide d'adopter des lois — si le gouvernement actuel ou un prochain gouvernement décide de modifier la loi, pour que le SPP ne soit plus dirigé par un agent de la GRC — c'est ses affaires, et je ne me sens pas autorisé à formuler des observations sur ce genre de décision.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien.

Vous avez dit dans votre déclaration préliminaire que vous nous inviteriez, le moment venu, à aller discuter à huis clos de certaines questions opérationnelles. Avec le consentement de mes collègues, je voudrais le faire, plus tard, pendant la période de questions. Je voudrais vous poser des questions qui conviennent mieux dans cet esprit. Entretemps, j'en ai d'autres.

Madame Côté, j'ai proposé à votre prédécesseure qu'elle attribue aux unités de la GRC affectées au SPP, division 4, des signes d'identification montrant leur appartenance au SPP, pour en favoriser la cohésion. Je sais que l'uniforme de la GRC s'y prête peu, mais cherche-t-on à ajouter l'insigne ou une épinglette d'unité du service pour montrer l'appartenance au SPP des agents de la GRC affectés à la Colline?

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

Ce serait une possibilité. Nous ne l'envisageons pas actuellement, parce qu'ils sont toujours employés par la GRC. Voilà pourquoi nous avons deux uniformes différents. Le plus facile est de le considérer comme un contrat — nous travaillons sous contrat sur la Colline — ce qui pourrait présenter une possibilité.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Vous vous rappellerez que l'un d'entre nous a dit que nous assistions déjà, et ce n'est pas fini, à une réduction du nombre de membres du personnel de la GRC sur la Colline et que, en conséquence, il y aura des remplacements par les membres du SPP.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ma principale crainte, à ce sujet, est que les agents de la GRC sont nécessairement sous les ordres du commissaire. Ça se rend au ministre, ce qui est un type distinct de...

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je comprends.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dernière question sur le SPP, avant de passer à ce magnifique immeuble dans lequel nous logeons. Le budget annuel du SPP est d'environ 90 millions de dollars, soit environ 20 % de tout le budget de la Chambre, alors que le budget global de la police et des pompiers de Gatineau se chiffre à environ 109 millions.

Comment ce montant se compare-t-il à ce que ça coûtait avant la fusion? Très brutalement, en avons-nous pour notre argent?

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

Nous employons nos ressources efficacement et nous utilisons différentes stratégies pour les optimiser et les déployer de façon à toujours assurer le déroulement régulier des travaux de la Chambre et la délivrance de notre mandat de protection de manière à ce que tout le monde se sente en sécurité.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans les quelques secondes qui me restent... L'établissement de la sécurité dans ce nouvel édifice pendant qu'on continuait d'affecter des agents à l'édifice du Centre, par exemple, a-t-il posé des difficultés? Nous avons augmenté assez rapidement le périmètre de protection.

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

À ce sujet, nous avons fait une demande pour le Budget principal des dépenses, pour nous occuper des nouveaux édifices. Nous nous accommodons de ce que nous avons maintenant, et nous utilisons ces ressources conformément à nos besoins...

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Si j'ai bien compris, on a besoin de moins de sécurité dans l'édifice du Centre, parce qu'il est vide de députés, de visiteurs de la Colline du Parlement et d'employés. On y assure surtout la sécurité à des employés de Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada ainsi qu'aux entrepreneurs sur place. Les exigences ne sont pas les mêmes, bien que, après la petite fuite qui s'est produite, vous vous le rappellerez, le Cabinet s'y est réuni quelque temps, ce qui a exigé la présence de personnel.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

(1120)

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Il convient, dans les circonstances, de distinguer la petite fuite et la grosse, à laquelle tous pensent. Je goûte donc particulièrement cette distinction.

Je me proposais de poser une série de questions, que je vous ai communiquées monsieur le Président, mais avant, je tenais à dire que M. Graham a émis une idée pleine d'attention, pour un insigne distinct. En ce qui concerne les contrats, comme, bien sûr, la GRC en signe tout le temps avec les provinces, je soupçonne l'existence de précédents utiles, dont nous pourrions nous inspirer.

Mes questions concernent les modifications à venir à l'édifice du Centre, qui, je suppose, s'étireront plus longtemps que les carrières de la plupart des personnes ici présentes, et sur la façon d'en assurer la surveillance permanente. J'espérais, monsieur le Président, vous demander de nous informer un peu sur votre rôle en la matière et sur ce qu'il devrait être, d'après vous.

Ma première question était: pouvez-vous décrire votre rôle et le rôle du Bureau de régie interne, jusqu'ici, concernant la gouvernance et la surveillance des rénovations dans la Cité parlementaire, pour l'édifice de l'Ouest et, désormais, concernant celles de l'édifice du Centre?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Merci beaucoup.

D'abord, je tiens à préciser comment, essentiellement, ça marche. Pour la surveillance des travaux, on a créé une gouvernance intégrée multiniveaux, entre l'administration de Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada, d'une part, et ses partenaires parlementaires — nous et, bien sûr, le Sénat, d'autre part. Le ministre de Services publics et Approvisionnement est le gardien officiel des bâtiments et terrains de la Cité parlementaire. Le ministère est le propriétaire; nous sommes les occupants.

En fait, la Chambre des communes cédera officiellement le contrôle de l'édifice du Centre au ministère dans quelques mois. Le ministère y fait déjà des travaux. Nous sommes encore en train de sortir de l'édifice des objets dont nous aurons besoin pour les entreposer ou les rénover et que sais-je? Jusqu'ici, la collaboration est bonne, puisque je peux m'exprimer et faire entendre les opinions des députés sur les rénovations qui auront lieu.

Mais, comme je l'ai déjà dit ici, il nous incombe, à nous les députés, et, en particulier, à votre comité, je dirais, de continuer à insister pour participer à ce processus. Le ministère ou les architectes chargés des travaux dans l'édifice du Centre n'ont pas semblé sourds à nos motifs de préoccupation. Des architectes de l'Administration de la Chambre des communes y travaillent et continueront de le faire. Je suis heureux de ce processus de cogestion, que j'ai décrit au début, auquel participent l'Administration de la Chambre des communes et le Sénat.

Comme je l'ai dit, je pense qu'il est essentiel pour nous de continuer d'insister sur ce point et sur des éléments comme l'accès des médias aux députés, comme par le passé, dans l'édifice du Centre, et l'accès, bien sûr, du public, autant que possible. Nous sommes tous conscients de la nécessité d'une protection, mais aussi de celle d'un accès maximal du public, si c'est possible, parce que nous voulons demeurer une démocratie.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

J'éprouve les mêmes sentiments que vous sur notre inclusion dans le rôle de surveillance et, comme vous, je trouve que le contraire ne serait pas logique à ce stade-ci des rénovations de l'édifice du Centre. Comme elles débutent, personne n'a encore pu faire des erreurs qu'il espérerait inaperçues de tous.

Autre question: Quand des fonds sont nécessaires aux rénovations de la Cité parlementaire, y compris pour la résolution d'éventuels problèmes, au mieux de votre connaissance, le pouvoir de dépenser provient-il du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses pour la Chambre des communes, de celui de Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada ou d'ailleurs? Est-ce que ça passe par vous ou par le Bureau de régie interne?

M. Michel Patrice (sous-greffier, Administration):

Il provient de deux sources: du Budget principal de Services publics et Approvisionnement et de celui de la Chambre des communes.

Dans ce dernier cas, ça concernerait en grande partie le personnel, pour l'assistance ou l'aide, mais ça engloberait aussi le remplacement de certaines pièces d'équipement. Mais il proviendrait principalement des services d'approvisionnement.

M. Scott Reid:

Quel est le comité compétent? Le savez-vous?

M. Michel Patrice:

Je veux dire de Travaux publics...

(1125)

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

C'est la principale source. Je suppose donc que ça passerait par le Budget principal et le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses du ministère, plutôt que par ceux de la Chambre.

Notre participation, dès que nous céderons... À un moment donné, il nous faudra nous occuper de choses comme l'équipement, comme Michel l'a dit, mais la rénovation et la reconstruction des lieux relèvent bien sûr du ministère surtout.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Faites-vous partie de groupes consultatifs non parlementaires qui s'occupent des travaux de rénovation dans la Cité parlementaire?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Moi, personnellement, non.

Michel, comment est-ce que ça se passe?

M. Michel Patrice:

Actuellement, un tel groupe n'existe pas. Visiblement, le Président de la Chambre ne fait partie d'aucun de ces groupes.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

M. Michel Patrice:

De toute évidence, nous avons l'intention d'avoir une discussion avec le Bureau de régie interne, plus tard cette semaine, sur la gouvernance et la surveillance que les députés doivent et devraient exercer relativement aux exigences touchant l'édifice du Centre.

M. Scott Reid:

Un comité consultatif de surveillance de la Cité parlementaire qui, visiblement, ne faisait officiellement pas partie du processus d'approbation du financement a existé. Constitué en 2001, il était présidé par l'ancien Président de la Chambre John Fraser. À votre connaissance, existe-t-il toujours?

M. Michel Patrice:

Non. Je crois que, à l'époque, il relevait du ministre des Travaux publics.

M. Scott Reid:

Êtes-vous au courant d'un successeur qui relève du ministre?

M. Michel Patrice:

Non. Il n'y en a pas, actuellement. Pour l'avenir, nous discutons avec Travaux publics pour que des députés, le Bureau de régie interne et des comités comme le vôtre puissent participer sérieusement à la présentation des exigences.

M. Scott Reid:

Il ne me reste que quelques secondes.

Avez-vous une idée du moment où vous nous recontacterez avec des idées sur ce à quoi le processus pourrait ressembler?

M. Michel Patrice:

Ce sera le plus tôt possible. Comme je l'ai dit, nous entamerons cette discussion avec le Bureau de régie interne, l'instance principalement chargée de la surveillance, je dirais, des exigences et des besoins de la Chambre et des députés.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Le Bureau se réunit jeudi.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie d'être ici, monsieur le Président de la Chambre, monsieur le greffier et tous les autres.

Reprenons là où M. Reid s'est arrêté. Je sais, monsieur le Président de la Chambre, que vous étiez au courant de la réaction de notre comité quand ça s'est su, mais, en réfléchissant à l'édifice de l'Ouest, nous avions l'impression d'une véritable absence de députés qui, collectivement, auraient leur mot à dire. Si j'ai bien compris, vous vous adresserez au Bureau de régie interne.

Je n'ai pas l'intention de vous prendre au mot sur quoi que ce soit; une réponse au pied levé me suffit. Nous en avons parlé un peu. Nous venons d'entamer le processus d'affirmation de notre besoin de participer davantage et nous parlons maintenant de la manière que nous pouvons nous y prendre.

Je ne suis au courant d'aucun mécanisme officiel en soi entre nous et vous ou le Bureau de régie interne. Nous pourrions en créer un spécial — rien ne nous empêche de nous parler — mais, monsieur le président du Comité, à ce que je sache, nous n'avons aucun processus officiel en soi.

Monsieur le président de la Chambre, qu'en pensez-vous, alors que nous entamons ce processus? Avez-vous des conseils, des motifs de préoccupation ou des idées à nous communiquer pour notre contribution? Je vois surtout un processus. En quoi nous voyez-vous jouer sérieusement ce rôle utile sans être à la fois inutiles ou trop encombrants?

Grosse commande, mais donnez-nous seulement des idées.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Rassurez-vous, je ne vous considère pas comme un problème encombrant.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est maintenant que vous le dites, sur mon départ.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

J'apprécie votre intérêt pour ces questions.

Visiblement, vous savez que c'est votre comité qui commande et qui peut examiner les questions qu'il lui plaît d'examiner. J'espère que, dorénavant, votre comité approfondira cette question et qu'il ne se contentera pas seulement de mes visites — en ma qualité de Président de la Chambre —, de celles de mes successeurs et de celles de représentants d'administrations, pour en discuter, mais qu'il pourra aussi convoquer des fonctionnaires de Services publics et Approvisionnement pour discuter de l'évolution des rénovations de l'édifice du Centre et pour s'assurer qu'on est à l'écoute des députés.

Jusqu'ici, j'ai bien vu que les architectes et autres responsables de la Chambre et du ministère ont été très attentifs à mes questions et très désireux d'entendre les motifs de préoccupation des députés, pour comprendre le fonctionnement de l'édifice. Quand John Pearson et Jean-Omer Marchand ont dessiné les plans de l'immeuble, en 1916 et dans la période qui a suivi, ils ont visiblement cherché à comprendre le fonctionnement du Parlement, les méthodes de travail des députés, leurs besoins pour bien faire leur travail, l'accès à prévoir pour le public, etc. À l'époque, la sécurité n'était pas aussi préoccupante qu'aujourd'hui, mais ils étaient soucieux de ne négliger aucun de ces détails. Aujourd'hui, les architectes semblent partager le même souci, et ça m'impressionne.

Tout en m'attendant à ce que le Bureau de régie interne cherche à établir un mécanisme officiel et permanent, je pense que votre comité pourrait manifester un intérêt moins officiel mais constant pour cette question, en s'assurant de convoquer des témoins pour en discuter en permanence et exprimer ses inquiétudes.

(1130)

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai tout aimé dans cette réponse, sauf la fin. Vous avez dilué notre rôle. Ça ne m'emballe pas.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Eh bien, vous savez, si vous tenez à jouer un rôle officiel, libre à vous.

M. David Christopherson:

Pour passer à autre chose, j'ai des questions aussi sur le SPP, ce qui n'a rien d'étonnant. C'est ma dernière chance d'en parler. Après, je ne serai plus ici quand la question reviendra sur le tapis. Je tiens seulement à souligner que j'espère que M. Graham et les autres ne lâcheront pas le morceau. Il est absolument inacceptable que les armes à feu au Parlement soient sous le contrôle du premier ministre, de l'exécutif, comme elles le sont actuellement. C'est à proscrire, à changer. Ma longue expérience, ici, me dit que ça ne se produira pas vraiment que sous un gouvernement minoritaire, plus enclin à négocier, mieux disposé à faire les choses de la bonne façon.

Ça me brise le coeur de vous quitter ici, ayant longtemps fait partie du comité de la sécurité, à Queen's Park, ayant été procureur général, puis parlementaire beaucoup trop longtemps, pour finir témoin de ce genre d'aberration et d'abus du système parlementaire. Je le dis alors que la Chambre vient de refuser à un des siens son droit de parole, pour des motifs politiques, irréels, d'après mon humble opinion. Trop souvent, le Parlement tolère la fuite de ses pouvoirs vers l'exécutif. Il faut se battre pour qu'il les récupère.

C'est la dernière fois que je tempête sur le sujet et j'espère seulement que ça changera un jour.

J'ai une dernière question, si vous permettez. J'ai peu de temps. Question de curiosité personnelle, comment se déroulera désormais le cérémonial de l'huissier du bâton noir? Devra-t-il parcourir à pied la nouvelle distance ou est-ce que ça se déroulera ici, comme si rien n'avait changé? Simple curiosité d'un parlementaire passionné par la question.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Laissez-moi d'abord vous remercier d'insister pour que les députés continuent de mettre l'accent sur la notion voulant que le Parlement, pas l'exécutif, ait préséance, que ce soit l'exécutif qui fasse rapport au Parlement, pas l'inverse. Comme vous pouvez l'imaginer, dans mon rôle, j'estime que c'est d'une importance capitale.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous êtes d'ailleurs doué pour le souligner, et je vous ai vu le faire à l'échelle internationale.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Merci beaucoup.

Allez-y, monsieur le greffier.

M. Charles Robert (greffier de la Chambre des communes):

Nous avons mis le processus à l'essai, et en 20 minutes, nous avons été en mesure de faire venir à la Chambre des communes l'huissier du bâton noir et d'envoyer au Sénat le contingent de la Chambre qui doit prendre part à la cérémonie de la sanction royale. Nous présumons que le processus serait suivi pour le discours du Trône, quoique nous nous attendons à ce qu'un plus grand nombre de députés participent.

M. David Christopherson:

Touché.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci.

Comme les membres du Bureau de régie interne doivent en discuter bientôt, et que chaque parti a un député qui y siège, vous voudrez peut-être faire part de votre opinion au vôtre.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Bittle, qui partage son temps avec Mme Sahota, je crois.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

J'aimerais n'aborder qu'une question, monsieur le Président. Elle est peut-être injuste pour vous, mais vous avez mentionné le projet pilote des services de TI pour les bureaux de circonscription. Notre bureau a été choisi — que de chance...

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Le mien aussi...

M. Chris Bittle:

... comme celui de Mme Lapointe. Je comprends l'utilité d'une normalisation des services, mais les bureaux des députés n'offrent pas nécessairement les mêmes services. Par exemple, parmi les services offerts par mon bureau, il y a un atelier sur la déclaration pour les contribuables à faible revenu, et nous avons besoin à cette fin du logiciel de l'Agence du revenu du Canada. On nous a d'abord dit que c'était impossible. À mon avis, c'est essentiel à ce que mon bureau et moi faisons. Nous faisons environ 2 000 déclarations de revenus par année, ce qui signifie que l'élimination de ce service...

Ce que les services de TI ont proposé, c'est un deuxième ensemble d'ordinateurs, et quiconque est déjà entré dans notre bureau sait que c'est inacceptable. Nous avons reçu un portable pour essayer le logiciel. Il ne fonctionnait pas, et nous l'avons retourné. Si c'est ainsi pour le logiciel du gouvernement du Canada, à savoir qu'il ne peut pas servir dans le programme pilote, je m'inquiète de ce que d'autres députés feront avec d'autres logiciels qu'ils jugent nécessaires pour mener leurs activités dans leur bureau.

(1135)

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je suppose que vous utilisez le logiciel du gouvernement du Canada, celui dont tous les députés peuvent se servir dans leur bureau de circonscription, pourvu qu'on puisse l'installer sur l'ordinateur, et les services de TI disent que c'est impossible.

M. Chris Bittle:

En effet, on ne peut pas l'installer pour le moment.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je parie qu'ils travaillent là-dessus, et je suis ravi que le chef des services de TI, Stéphan Aubé, soit ici, car je pense voir qu'il meurt d'envie de vous donner une explication.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci.

M. Stéphan Aubé (dirigeant principal de l'information, Chambre des communes):

Je suis désolé de vous décevoir, monsieur le Président.

Je n'étais pas au courant du problème, monsieur Bittle. Nous allons le prendre en note.

À titre de précision, nous ne voudrions pas que vous utilisiez un autre ensemble d'ordinateurs. Nous estimons que vous pouvez utiliser les ordinateurs de la Chambre. Cela dit, la question pour nous est de savoir s'ils seront branchés à l'infrastructure de la Chambre. Pour des raisons de sécurité, nous devons déterminer cela, mais nous ne devrions pas avoir de difficultés à vous permettre d'utiliser ce logiciel sur un des appareils de la Chambre sans qu'il soit nécessaire d'acheter un autre ordinateur.

Je vais le noter, et je demanderai à quelqu'un dans mon groupe de communiquer avec vous aujourd'hui, monsieur. Si c'est également la situation de Mme Lapointe, je serai proactif dans mes démarches.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Comme vous le savez, nous avons au Québec deux déclarations de revenus, et nous n'offrons donc pas ce service.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je ne sais pas si M. Christopherson voudrait un logiciel du gouvernement du Canada...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

L'hon. Geoff Regan: ... avec la Chambre des communes... Vous voyez ce que je veux dire.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Monsieur le Président, vous avez rendu ce matin votre décision concernant l'incident de profilage racial qui s'est produit le 4 février dans un des édifices de la Cité parlementaire. Comme vous le savez, des célébrations du Mois de l'histoire des Noirs se déroulaient cette semaine-là, et un groupe de jeunes — car c'était le thème du Mois de l'histoire des Noirs sur la Colline cette année — présentaient leurs demandes et exerçaient des pressions auprès de différents députés et ministres. Le groupe s'appelait Black Voices on the Hill. Je comprends que l'incident n'ait pas été jugé comme une question de privilège, car cela n'est pas arrivé à un député, mais vous avez mentionné que vous le prenez très au sérieux et que c'est une grande source de préoccupation.

Je me demandais si vous pouviez jeter un peu de lumière sur ce que vous avez découvert en étudiant la question et sur ce que nous pouvons faire pour éviter cela, car nous devons absolument veiller à ce que ces jeunes se sentent à leur place ici. Cet incident est sans aucun doute très choquant pour toutes les personnes qui en ont entendu parler. Nous voulons que ces jeunes aient l'impression de n'être aucunement limités, et je pense qu'ils doivent plutôt penser le contraire après cet incident.

Pouvez-vous me donner des éclaircissements à ce sujet?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Tout d'abord, je vous demanderais de consulter ma décision. Elle résume ce que je dis à ce sujet.

Comme vous le savez, on sait très bien ce qui est une question de privilège et ce qui ne l'est pas. À strictement parler, je suppose que vous pourriez dire qu'il est impossible de soulever la question en invoquant le privilège, car il n'est pas question des règles et de la procédure de la Chambre ou de répercussions sur la capacité d'un député à faire son travail à la Chambre et ainsi de suite. Je crois toutefois, et je l'espère, que tout le monde s'entendrait pour dire que c'est une question importante et qu'il est important de s'y attaquer et d'y donner suite. C'est ce que j'ai tenté de faire.

Je vais demander à la surintendante de donner une réponse à ce sujet.

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

Merci.

Je suis sincèrement désolée de ce qui s'est produit. Nous nous excusons de la situation. Après avoir été informée de l'incident, j'ai demandé immédiatement qu'une enquête soit menée et j'ai donné le rapport de mon enquête au Président.

Je m'attends à ce que tous mes employés soient respectueux et professionnels, et nous cherchons des moyens de nous améliorer pour éviter qu'un autre incident de ce genre se reproduise.

(1140)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Bien.

A-t-on pris des mesures pour communiquer avec les jeunes qui ont vécu cet incident sur la Colline?

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

Nous nous sommes excusés publiquement de l'incident dans les médias.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Mais pas personnellement à eux...

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

Quand nous recevons des plaintes, nous communiquons avec les plaignants. La plainte que nous avons reçue venait d'un sénateur. Nous lui avons présenté le rapport et l'information, et nous poursuivons les discussions.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Dans le cadre de votre enquête, avez-vous conclu qu'on a eu recours au mauvais protocole dans les circonstances, ou qu'il faut changer le protocole?

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

Selon moi, on a demandé à l'agent de remplir une fonction. Ce n'est pas que l'agent qui était impliqué. Je m'occupe de mes employés, et je parle donc seulement du personnel du Service de protection parlementaire.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Eh bien, nous espérons que cela ne se reproduira plus.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, madame Sahota.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Reid.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci.

Je tiens à être respectueux et à contribuer à ce que nous ayons le temps nécessaire pour siéger à huis clos et nous pencher sur la question que M. Graham voulait soulever.

Le président:

Bien.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai donné une suite de questions au Président au début de la séance. On a répondu en partie à la prochaine sur ma liste, et je vais donc la passer en revue et en faire une métaquestion pour lui permettre d'y répondre.

Le 11 décembre 2018, nous avons rencontré des fonctionnaires responsables de la réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre. Ils ont mentionné qu'un processus de consultation des parlementaires serait établi. J'avais trois questions complémentaires.

Premièrement, est-ce que ce serait fait par l'entremise du Bureau de régie interne? Je crois que la réponse qu'on m'a donnée était affirmative, mais vous pouvez me reprendre si je me trompe.

La deuxième question complémentaire visait à savoir s'ils pouvaient nous dire quelque chose sur le moment où ce processus pourrait être proposé? Je crois qu'on m'a répondu que c'était pour bientôt, mais de manière plutôt incertaine.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

C'est jeudi.

M. Scott Reid:

Jeudi? C'est très bientôt.

Bien. C'est très précis.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Ce sera au Bureau.

M. Scott Reid:

Alors, dans quelle mesure les députés seront-ils informés de la structure de ces changements avant leur mise en oeuvre? Est-ce que ce sera strictement par l'entremise du Bureau de régie interne — de toute évidence, je parle d'après jeudi — ou y aura-t-il d'autres mécanismes qui permettront aux députés d'avoir leur mot à dire dans la configuration initiale des consultations permanentes qui dureront vraisemblablement 10 ans ou plus, alors que nous tenterons de mettre en oeuvre les différentes choses que nous aimerions collectivement voir dans le cadre de ces rénovations?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Il me semble qu'il pourrait être trop tôt, ou non, mais... Vous savez que le Bureau prendra une décision, et je ne vais pas me prononcer à l'avance sur la décision qui sera rendue jeudi. D'ici à jeudi, je pense que les députés devraient être encouragés à exprimer leurs points de vue aux membres de leur parti qui siègent au Bureau de régie interne. Le Bureau décidera de la façon de procéder, mais j'imagine qu'il tiendra compte de vos commentaires dans le cadre de ces délibérations. Vous pouvez donc continuer.

M. Scott Reid:

Les médias ont affirmé récemment que les changements apportés aux plans initiaux pour la rénovation de l'édifice de l'Ouest, qui, je crois, comprend le centre d'accueil des visiteurs, ont généré plus de 100 000 pages de communications concernant des lacunes dans la construction, l'ingénierie, la conception et l'architecture à l'édifice de l'Ouest du Parlement et à la nouvelle enceinte du Sénat. Cela fait beaucoup.

Quand des problèmes de construction de ce genre sont trouvés — je parle du passé, mais comme modèle pour l'avenir —, à qui transmet-on cette information? Je parle de députés. Ces renseignements ont-ils été transmis aux membres du Bureau de régie interne? L'un de vous connaît-il la réponse?

M. Michel Patrice:

Je n'ai pas vu l'information, et je ne peux donc pas répondre à la question. Je ne peux pas dire si les membres du Bureau ou de l'Administration étaient au courant de ces 100 pages de communications.

M. Scott Reid:

Il y en avait 100 000.

M. Michel Patrice:

Cent mille pages... Je ne les ai certainement pas vues.

Pour ce qui est des problèmes de construction, je vais énoncer une évidence. Il y en a eu certains, par exemple les portes sud et ouest de cet édifice. À mon avis, il y a eu des lacunes dans la construction. Ces portes n'ont pas bien fonctionné depuis la mise en service de l'édifice. La porte sud a été réparée et remplacée, mais la porte ouest nous pose encore des problèmes. J'ai cru comprendre qu'elle sera réparée en fin de semaine. Nous avons dû prendre des mesures provisoires pour que les députés puissent circuler cette semaine, par exemple.

(1145)

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Monsieur Reid, vous parlez de toute la période pendant laquelle l'édifice de l'Ouest a été rénové, n'est-ce pas?

M. Scott Reid:

C'est ma façon de faire remarquer que de très nombreux documents détaillés font surface, et que de nombreux changements et compromis sont nécessaires à mesure qu'on progresse. C'est dans la nature du processus. Je serais surpris que l'édifice du Centre génère moins de 100 000 pages. Je soupçonne que ce sera beaucoup plus, et pas à la suite d'actes répréhensibles. C'est la nature de ce genre de processus complexe, à plusieurs étapes et pluriannuel dans lequel il y a beaucoup d'intervenants.

Pour l'avenir, la vraie question est de savoir comment nous pouvons faire preuve d'une ouverture maximale à mesure que ces problèmes surviennent. Nous devons être en mesure de les gérer comme le fait une entreprise: premièrement, combien coûteront les divers compromis; deuxièmement, que devrons-nous sacrifier lorsque nous faisons un compromis, et sommes-nous disposés à renoncer à certains éléments que nous voulions; et enfin, quelle sera l'incidence sur le moment de notre retour?

Monsieur le président, plutôt que de discuter en détail de la façon dont on a procédé dans le passé, je pourrais peut-être juste vous demander si vous avez une idée de la meilleure façon de procéder. Je suis conscient que vous et moi allons probablement être retraités et jouer au golf d'ici la fin des travaux.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Nous pouvons nous en enthousiasmer à l'avance. Vous allez probablement gagner, mais je peux me réjouir à l'idée de jouer une ronde un jour.

J'estime qu'il sera important que le Bureau crée un processus dans lequel la rétroaction est ininterrompue, où ces discussions peuvent avoir lieu et où les députés peuvent se prononcer sur les démarches. Reste à voir comment cela se fera, mais je vous suis reconnaissant de votre discernement et des préoccupations que vous exprimez à ce sujet. Vous craignez que cela ne se fasse pas de manière responsable, et je pense que vous avez raison. Il ne fait aucun doute que les décisions que nous prenons peuvent nécessiter des compromis de temps à autre. Cependant, il revient à nous en tant que députés — que nous soyons des représentants du Bureau de régie interne, de ce comité ou de manière générale — de veiller à ce que nos préoccupations soient entendues et à ce que l'on comprenne notre désir de bien servir la population et de faire fonctionner le Parlement comme il se doit.

M. Scott Reid:

Je vous remercie beaucoup, monsieur le président, et vous tous.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, vous avez le temps de poser une brève question, et nous siégerons ensuite à huis clos.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je veux juste donner suite à la question que M. Bittle a posée à M. Aubé à propos de la technologie dans nos bureaux.

J'ai refusé de participer au projet pilote concernant de nouveaux ordinateurs dans nos bureaux de circonscription. Quand j'ai demandé si je pouvais installer ce qu'il me fallait sur mes ordinateurs — comme je pouvais le faire sur les vieux —, on m'a dit non. C'est plus une demande plus qu'une question, mais il serait très utile que vous ayez un processus beaucoup plus efficace pour approuver les logiciels que nous voulons installer sur nos ordinateurs. Il y a énormément de logiciels que nous pourrions vouloir utiliser qui ne figurent pas sur votre très courte liste de logiciels privés et pas très sûrs, mais qui le sont en principe. Tout ce qui vient de Windows est privé, et il n'existe aucun moyen d'exercer une bonne surveillance pour s'assurer qu'ils sont sûrs.

Pendant ce temps, il existe des solutions provenant de sources ouvertes qui sont beaucoup plus sûres et abordables. J'aimerais que vous vous penchiez là-dessus. Merci.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Il est intéressant de voir que nous sommes nombreux à utiliser le système Windows en même temps que des iPad ou des iPhone, le système iOS. Lorsque c'est le cas, il y a un coupe-feu entre les deux, à savoir entre la Chambre et l'autre côté. On peut installer d'autres dispositifs, d'autres applications et ainsi de suite. C'est une distinction intéressante entre les deux systèmes. Il me semble plus difficile de gérer cela dans l'environnement Windows, qui fonctionne bien à de nombreux égards.

Ce n'est pas vraiment une réponse; c'est plutôt une observation.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La sécurité technologique est un domaine en soi. La discussion pourrait être longue.

Le président:

Nous allons passer à huis clos pendant quelques secondes.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

(1145)

(1155)



[La séance publique reprend.]

Le président:

Le crédit 1 sous la rubrique Chambre des communes dans le Budget provisoire des dépenses est-il adopté? CHAMBRE DES COMMUNES ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme... 87 453 121 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Le crédit 1 sous la rubrique Service de protection parlementaire dans le Budget provisoire des dépenses est-il adopté? SERVICE DE PROTECTION PARLEMENTAIRE Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme... 27 262 216 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Je vous remercie beaucoup. Nous vous sommes reconnaissants d'avoir comparu devant le Comité. Je suis certain que nous vous reverrons lorsque nous examinerons le Budget principal des dépenses.

Nous allons faire une pause pour permettre aux prochains témoins de s'installer.

(1155)

(1205)

Le président:

Bonjour, madame la ministre.

Bonjour à tous. Soyez les bienvenus à la 142e séance du Comité.

Pour examiner les crédits sous la rubrique Commission aux débats des chefs, nous bénéficions de la présence de l'honorable Karina Gould, ministre des Institutions démocratiques. Elle est accompagnée par des représentants du Bureau du Conseil privé, à savoir Allen Sutherland, secrétaire adjoint du Cabinet, Appareil gouvernemental; et Matthew Shea, sous-ministre adjoint, Services ministériels.

Nous vous remercions pour votre présence aujourd'hui. Je vous laisse la parole, madame la ministre, pour votre déclaration liminaire.

L'hon. Karina Gould (ministre des Institutions démocratiques):

Je vous remercie beaucoup, monsieur le président, et je remercie les membres du Comité.

Je suis ravie d'être ici aujourd'hui pour discuter avec vous du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) 2018-2019, et du Budget provisoire des dépenses 2019-2020, précisément de la rubrique Commission aux débats des chefs.

Je suis heureuse d'être accompagnée par des fonctionnaires. Comme vous l'avez mentionné, il s'agit d'Al Sutherland, secrétaire adjoint du Cabinet, Appareil gouvernemental; et de Matthew Shea, sous-ministre adjoint, Services ministériels.[Français]

Les débats des chefs jouent un rôle essentiel dans la démocratie canadienne. En effet, il s'agit d'un moment clé des campagnes électorales. Ils offrent aux électeurs une occasion unique d'observer sur la même scène les personnalités et les idées des chefs qui cherchent à devenir le premier ministre du Canada.[Traduction]

Il est important de comprendre que les débats des chefs sont beaucoup plus que de simples événements médiatiques. Ils sont fondamentaux dans notre démocratie. Par conséquent, il faut faire preuve d'ouverture et de transparence dans l'organisation de ces débats et accorder la priorité à l'intérêt public. Ces débats doivent également devenir un bien public sur lequel les Canadiens peuvent compter à toutes les élections pour les aider à éclairer leur vote.[Français]

Traditionnellement, les débats des chefs au Canada étaient organisés et financés par un consortium des grands diffuseurs, incluant CBC/Radio-Canada, Global, CTV et TVA. Le consortium tenait des négociations privées avec les partis politiques concernant les dates, les critères de participation et le format des débats.[Traduction]

Le fait que les négociations concernant les débats se déroulent derrière des portes closes suscite des critiques depuis de nombreuses années. En outre, les critères de participation aux débats de 2015 n'étaient pas toujours les mêmes et n'étaient pas clairement définis. Certains chefs ont participé à tous les débats tandis que d'autres ont participé à seulement quelques-uns.[Français]

L'accessibilité des débats était également limitée. Nous avons eu, par exemple, des débats en français qui n'étaient pas accessibles à certaines communautés francophones.[Traduction]

À titre de ministre des Institutions démocratiques, on m'a demandé de présenter des options pour créer un poste de commissaire indépendant chargé d'organiser les débats des chefs lors des futures campagnes électorales fédérales. Le gouvernement a d'ailleurs prévu dans le budget de 2018 un investissement de 5,5 millions de dollars sur deux ans, pour chaque cycle électoral, afin d'appuyer un nouveau processus visant à faire en sorte que les débats des chefs soient organisés dans l'intérêt du public.[Français]

Notre gouvernement a sollicité les commentaires des Canadiens lors d'une consultation en ligne et d'une série de tables rondes auxquelles ont participé des représentants des médias, du monde universitaire et des groupes d'intérêt public.

J'ai également salué l'étude du Comité lancée en novembre 2017, dans le cadre de laquelle il a entendu 34 témoins, dont moi-même, au cours de huit réunions. Le Comité a également reçu des observations écrites de partis politiques et de personnes intéressées.[Traduction]

La vaste majorité des intervenants ont affirmé que les débats des chefs sont essentiels à la santé de la démocratie canadienne. Il y a un vaste soutien en faveur de la mise sur pied d'une commission aux débats des chefs axée sur l'intérêt public, et il est nécessaire de faire preuve d'ouverture et de transparence en ce qui a trait à l'organisation des débats, et particulièrement aux critères de participation.

Les intervenants ont également souligné que la Commission aux débats des chefs doit être une entité permanente, alors il est important de bien faire les choses. Lorsque j'ai comparu devant le Comité en novembre 2017, j'ai énoncé des principes directeurs destinés à orienter les politiques du gouvernement régissant la Commission aux débats des chefs, c'est-à-dire l'indépendance et l'impartialité, la crédibilité, la citoyenneté démocratique, l'éducation civique et l'inclusion.

(1210)

[Français]

La Commission exerce son indépendance et son impartialité dans l'exercice de ses responsabilités et de toutes dépenses associées. Le commissaire a l'indépendance nécessaire pour déterminer la meilleure façon de dépenser les fonds alloués, tout en maintenant l'enveloppe de financement de 5,5 milliards de dollars sur deux ans.[Traduction]

Comme l'indique le budget, la Commission a commencé à utiliser ces fonds, notamment pour la rémunération, dont celle d'un directeur général. Des dépenses supplémentaires sont prévues en raison de l'octroi d'un contrat à une entreprise de production, de la mise sur pied d'un comité consultatif auprès du commissaire, de l'initiative de mobilisation des Canadiens pour les sensibiliser et des coûts administratifs.

Lorsqu'il a comparu devant le Comité le 6 novembre 2018, le commissaire aux débats, le très honorable David Johnston, a affirmé qu'il avait l'intention et le devoir d'utiliser les fonds de façon responsable et qu'il chercherait à réduire les coûts, tout en tenant compte de la nécessité de rendre les débats accessibles au plus grand nombre de personnes possible.

La Commission continuera d'être entièrement indépendante et impartiale dans l'exécution de son mandat principal, à savoir organiser deux débats des chefs, un dans chaque langue officielle, pour les élections générales de 2019.[Français]

La Commission est dirigée par un commissaire et soutenue par un conseil consultatif composé de sept membres. Elle devrait être pleinement opérationnelle d'ici le printemps 2019. À la suite de l'élection générale de 2019 et au plus tard le 31 mars 2020, la Commission aura pour mandat de remettre un rapport au Parlement décrivant les conclusions et les recommandations pour éclairer la création éventuelle d'une commission permanente.[Traduction]

Je suis certaine que l'approche proposée permettra de faire en sorte que deux débats des chefs de grande qualité, instructifs et captivants seront diffusés à la télévision et sur d'autres plateformes en 2019.

Pour terminer, je vais réitérer que les débats des chefs sont un bien public. La Commission veillera à ce que les intérêts des Canadiens soient au coeur de l'organisation et de la diffusion des débats. J'ai bien hâte d'entendre vos commentaires et je serai ravie de répondre à vos questions.

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Je vous remercie beaucoup.

M. David Christopherson:

J'aimerais savoir, monsieur le président, s'il y a une raison particulière pour laquelle la ministre ne nous pas remis sa déclaration liminaire, comme les témoins ont l'habitude de le faire.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je suis désolée. Il n'y a aucune raison, et je serai heureuse de vous la remettre. Je vais voir avec les membres de mon personnel ce qui s'est passé.

M. David Christopherson:

Ils auraient dû le savoir.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui, je suis désolée.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Le président:

La parole est d'abord à Mme Lapointe. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous souhaite la bienvenue, madame Gould, et vous remercie de votre présence.

J'ai écouté votre présentation avec attention. Le commissaire aux débats des chefs a pour tâche, entre autres responsabilités, de « mobiliser les Canadiens pour les sensibiliser aux débats ».

En ce qui concerne les langues officielles, vous avez dit qu'il fallait toucher tous les gens, où qu'ils soient au pays. J'aimerais que vous nous donniez plus de détails à ce sujet. Comment allez-vous faire pour toucher tous les Canadiens, y compris les minorités linguistiques, peu importe où ils se trouvent dans l'ensemble des provinces?

Par ailleurs, la Commission a aussi pour mandat de « fournir gratuitement le signal pour les débats » qu'elle organise.

Je suis une mère de quatre enfants. Ils sont grands maintenant et ils habitent des logements où ils n'ont pas accès au réseau câblé.

Comment ferez-vous pour atteindre les personnes dans une semblable situation et pour faire en sorte qu'elles soient informées de la tenue des débats? De quelle façon pourraient-elles avoir gratuitement accès à ces débats?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Merci, madame Lapointe.

J'aimerais souligner l'indépendance du commissaire pour ce qui est de la prise de décisions et de mesures. De notre côté, nous nous sommes assurés qu'il dispose des ressources nécessaires pour lui permettre d'assumer ses responsabilités, suivant ses propres méthodes.

Notre objectif est de veiller à ce que tous les Canadiens, où qu'ils soient au pays, aient accès aux débats dans les deux langues officielles.

Par exemple, lors des consultations, des représentants d'une communauté francophone de la Nouvelle-Écosse ont affirmé être dans l'impossibilité d'accéder aux débats des chefs. Nous avons donc ajouté la question de l'accessibilité au mandat du commissaire.

Nous avons entendu parler d'un autre fait important partout au pays. Nombreux sont ceux qui, parmi la nouvelle génération d'adultes et de votants, n'ont pas accès au réseau câblé. Ils ne regardent pas la télévision de manière traditionnelle.

En conséquence, le mandat du commissaire consiste également à faire en sorte que les débats soient disponibles dans divers formats et sur différentes plateformes: non seulement dans les médias traditionnels, mais aussi dans les médias sociaux, sur les plateformes des géants du numérique et dans Internet en général.

Les Canadiens auront accès au flux des débats, suivant le format qui leur convient.

(1215)

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter, monsieur Sutheland?

M. Allen Sutherland (secrétaire adjoint du Cabinet, Appareil gouvernemental, Bureau du Conseil privé):

Je suis complètement d'accord.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Merci.

Selon moi, il est très important de faire circuler l'information relative à la disponibilité des débats. Il s'agissait d'une simple mise en contexte.

Tantôt, vous avez évoqué l'indépendance du commissaire quant à la prise de décision et aux méthodes à adopter. Vous avez aussi mentionné que lui et son équipe seraient à pied d'oeuvre au printemps 2019.

Pensez-vous qu'il pourra compter sur tout le personnel dont il a besoin pour former son équipe et accomplir son mandat?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Comme je le disais plus tôt, nous nous sommes assurés que le commissaire dispose des ressources nécessaires, mais je ne suis pas au courant des activités de M. Johnston, car la Commission doit demeurer indépendante.

M. Johnston est extrêmement compétent, et je suis persuadée qu'il travaille actuellement très fort à la mise sur pied de son équipe, tâche qui est entièrement de son ressort, en vue de s'acquitter de son mandat.

J'ai pleinement confiance en M. Johnston et je suis certaine qu'il accomplira un excellent travail.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Il y a le commissaire qui s'occupera d'organiser les débats, mais pouvez-vous nous suggérer d'autres façons dont nous pourrions renforcer notre démocratie?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Parlez-vous de façons de renforcer notre démocratie en général?

(1220)

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Oui. Comment pouvons-nous aller encore plus loin?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

La création du poste de commissaire des débats nationaux est une initiative très importante. Ces débats sont des moments clés pour les gens, car ils peuvent voir comment les chefs interagissent spontanément et savoir ce qu'ils pensent.

Il y a beaucoup de choses que nous pourrions faire pour renforcer notre démocratie. L'annonce que nous avons faite il y a deux ou trois semaines est aussi importante. Elle concerne la protection de notre démocratie des cybermenaces et de celles qui viennent de l'étranger. Il faut parler de notre système démocratique et nous assurer que les gens ont des outils pour bien s'informer et savoir d'où vient l'information. C'est important.

J'ai aussi annoncé, avec le ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile et le ministre de la Défense nationale, un investissement de 7 millions de dollars dans des programmes d'éducation numérique, médiatique et civique. Dans un monde plus numérique, c'est important. On sait que beaucoup d'information circule sur Internet et les plateformes numériques. Il faut que les gens aient les outils nécessaires pour savoir quoi croire et ne pas croire.

L'étude du projet de loi C-76 menée par ce comité a été très importante pour s'assurer qu'on fait preuve de transparence dans les annonces politiques.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci.

Passons maintenant à M. Nater. [Traduction]

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie, madame la ministre, de votre présence aujourd'hui. Je tiens moi aussi à vous remercier pour le travail que vous accomplissez en tant que ministre des Institutions démocratiques. Je crois comprendre que vous ne vous porterez pas candidate à nouveau cet automne dans Burlington, alors je tenais à vous remercier pour le travail que vous avez accompli pour les gens de Burlington.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Non? Pourquoi pas?

M. John Nater:

Eh bien, j'ai seulement présumé que c'était le cas. Puisque vous êtes ici pour justifier le poste de commissaire indépendant aux débats, j'ai présumé que vous ne participeriez pas à un processus partisan. Je suppose que ce n'est pas le cas, alors.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je suis ici parce que je suis la ministre des Institutions démocratiques, que vous m'avez invitée à comparaître et que le Bureau du Conseil privé appuie la Commission aux débats des chefs. C'est pourquoi je suis ici, parce que vous m'avez invitée, mais je dois vous dire qu'il s'agit tout à fait d'un processus indépendant.

Il est certain que je vais me porter à nouveau candidate et que je souhaite représenter encore les bonnes gens de Burlington en 2019 et ultérieurement. Je vous remercie de m'avoir donné l'occasion de parler de mes électeurs extraordinaires et de mentionner à quel point je suis fière de les représenter.

M. John Nater:

Burlington est une très belle circonscription. J'y suis allé à quelques reprises.

M. David Christopherson:

Toute la région est fantastique.

M. John Nater:

La grande région d'Hamilton...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

C'est vrai. C'est une belle localité.

M. John Nater:

Vous avez mentionné dans votre déclaration liminaire qu'on avait embauché un directeur général. Pouvez-vous dire au Comité de qui il s'agit?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le directeur général qui a été embauché est Michel Cormier, qui travaillait auparavant à Radio-Canada.

M. John Nater:

À quel niveau son poste se situe-t-il? Est-ce au niveau de sous-ministre ou de sous-ministre adjoint?

M. Matthew Shea (sous-ministre adjoint, Services ministériels, Bureau du Conseil privé):

Je pourrais fournir cette information ultérieurement au Comité. Je ne suis pas certain. Il ne s'agit pas du niveau d'administrateur général. C'est le niveau du poste de commissaire. Il s'agirait d'un niveau de cadre supérieur, entre EX-02 et EX-04.

M. John Nater:

Oui, pourriez-vous fournir cette information au Comité?

Vous avez dit Michel Cormier? Est-ce qu'il sera un membre permanent de la Commission ou un contractuel? Pendant combien de temps occupera-t-il ce poste?

M. Matthew Shea:

Je n'ai pas ce genre d'information.

J'en profite pour rappeler au Comité qu'il s'agit d'une entité indépendante, alors nous n'intervenons pas sur le plan des ressources humaines ou des finances. Nous veillons seulement à ce que les factures soient payées et à ce que le soutien nécessaire en matière de ressources humaines soit fourni. Nous n'intervenons pas vraiment dans ce genre de chose. Nous veillons à ne pas trop intervenir à ce niveau-là.

M. John Nater:

Est-ce que le Bureau du Conseil privé ou votre bureau a eu des entretiens avec M. Johnston au sujet des personnes qui pourraient être nommées au comité consultatif formé de sept personnes? Est-ce que des noms de candidats potentiels ont été fournis à votre bureau, madame la ministre, ou au Bureau du Conseil privé?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je sais seulement — au même titre que le reste de la population — qui a participé à la table ronde, mais cela constitue de l'information publique, ce n'est pas un renseignement qui m'a été fourni.

M. John Nater:

Est-ce que les membres de ce comité seront nommés par décret?

M. Matthew Shea:

Ils seront embauchés comme professionnels et ils bénéficieront d'une allocation journalière.

M. John Nater:

Est-ce que le Bureau du Conseil privé ou le bureau de la ministre a eu des entretiens avec des représentants des principaux radiodiffuseurs ou des médias sociaux — Facebook, Twitter — au sujet de la diffusion des débats des chefs?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Seulement dans le cadre de la table ronde qui a eu lieu au printemps dernier...

M. John Nater:

Donc, aucun d'eux n'a exercé des pressions auprès du Bureau du Conseil privé ou de votre bureau à ce propos. Est-ce que le commissaire fera l'objet d'un examen par le commissaire au lobbying en ce qui a trait aux rapports sur le lobbying auprès du commissaire ou du directeur général? Est-ce que les lobbyistes devront faire rapport de ces entretiens?

M. Matthew Shea:

Je peux confirmer qu'en ce qui a trait au lobbying, le commissaire a les mêmes obligations de déclaration que n'importe quel autre cadre supérieur au sein d'un ministère. Il fait partie d'un organisme distinct, alors il a toutes les mêmes obligations que tout autre administrateur général au sein du gouvernement.

M. John Nater:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président. Je pense que Mme Kusie va prendre le reste du temps.

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Je vous remercie beaucoup, monsieur Nater.

Je vous remercie beaucoup, madame la ministre, pour votre présence aujourd'hui.

Je sais que vous accordez beaucoup d'importance à la participation au processus de tous les autres partis politiques. Pouvez-vous nous expliquer le processus de consultation qui a eu lieu jusqu'à maintenant avec les autres partis politiques pour faire avancer les choses?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Depuis la nomination du commissaire...?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Mon bureau n'est pas intervenu depuis la nomination du commissaire. Il est lui-même responsable de son travail depuis qu'il a été nommé.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord. C'est la deuxième fois que vous mentionnez cela. Vous l'avez aussi mentionné dans votre déclaration liminaire, et mon collègue l'a souligné, en faisant une blague, mais je ne crois pas que l'indépendance peut être utilisée pour justifier le manque de connaissances au sujet du processus et l'incapacité de transmettre de l'information au Comité à propos du processus. Je vous demanderais de prendre cela en compte pour vos comparutions futures.

(1225)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

C'est votre point de vue, mais je crois en fait que l'indépendance signifie que la ministre n'intervient pas dans les décisions du commissaire. Je respecte le principe de l'indépendance, alors nous ne sommes pas intervenus, mais je serai ravie de répondre aux questions au meilleur de ma connaissance.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord. Mon point de vue est que vous êtes ici, madame la ministre, pour faire entièrement le point à l'intention du Comité, et lorsque vous nous dites que vous n'avez pas l'information... Je ne suis pas certaine que vos collègues qui vous accompagnent aujourd'hui peuvent donner davantage de renseignements. C'est ce que l'opposition et le Comité s'attendent à obtenir. Nous nous attendons à obtenir ces renseignements d'une personne ou d'une autre.

Mon collègue a parlé brièvement du comité consultatif formé de sept personnes. L'information publique que vous avez mentionnée est la seule information qui a été fournie jusqu'à maintenant en ce qui concerne les nominations à ce comité. Pouvez-vous nous dire si l'une des personnes proviendra du Bureau du Conseil privé et nous dire de qui il pourrait s'agir?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le comité consultatif indépendant...?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Comme je l'ai dit, il appartient au commissaire de déterminer quelles personnes seront nommées, et je ne sais pas quelles personnes il a en tête en ce moment.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord.

Mon collègue a également parlé des dépenses. Lorsqu'on a annoncé la mise sur pied de la Commission aux débats des chefs, on a aussi annoncé qu'elle disposerait d'un budget de 5,5 millions de dollars pour les deux débats.

Étant donné que c'est le gouvernement qui octroie ces fonds, est-ce qu'on vous a donné de l'information concernant un budget ou un budget détaillé? Puisque le Comité se penche en ce moment sur le budget, j'estime que nous avons le privilège et l'obligation d'examiner les dépenses. Nous vous serions reconnaissants de nous fournir des renseignements supplémentaires relativement au budget, des renseignements aussi précis que possible.

M. Matthew Shea:

Je vais répondre.

Je vais revenir au moment où on a annoncé cette somme de 5,5 millions de dollars... Il s'agissait de la meilleure estimation que nous pouvions faire, et c'était la somme maximale. Je crois que le commissaire aux débats a affirmé clairement que son objectif est de ne pas dépenser toute cette somme. Tous les entretiens que j'ai eus avec lui ont certes confirmé cela.

Je peux vous dire que probablement entre 900 000 $ et un million de dollars seront consacrés à la rémunération, et que la part du lion sera consacrée aux dépenses de fonctionnement, dont les services professionnels, notamment le comité consultatif, la publicité et les communications. Un contrat important sera également octroyé pour la tenue des deux débats. Voilà ce qui constituera la majeure partie des dépenses.

Le bureau du commissaire aux débats a expliqué clairement qu'il était encore en train de mettre la dernière main au budget exact, mais je peux vous dire que c'est sur ces dépenses qu'est fondée la somme de 5,5 millions de dollars que nous avons estimée, et je crois que le montant final se rapprochera de cette somme. En ce qui concerne la répartition, il pourrait y avoir une différence pour ce qui est des services professionnels et de la publicité, mais en ce qui concerne la rémunération, je ne crois pas me tromper.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci, madame Kusie.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre, je vous remercie beaucoup pour votre présence. Pour commencer sur une note positive, permettez-moi de dire à quel point je suis impressionné que vous n'ayez à aucun moment, depuis que vous occupez le poste de ministre, joué à des petits jeux, essayé de nous berner ou refusé une invitation à comparaître, même s'il s'agissait d'un sujet difficile. Nous vous en sommes reconnaissants et nous vous respectons pour cela.

Cela étant dit, revenons au sujet. Je vais faire un commentaire avant de poser mes questions.

Je suis encore estomaqué par la nature antidémocratique de la réforme démocratique. Ce n'est toujours pas acceptable... Eh bien, je devrais dire que c'est acceptable parce que nous n'avons pas le choix, mais ce n'est pas très bien accepté que le gouvernement ait nommé unilatéralement cette personne qui joue un rôle clé dans notre démocratie. Cela ouvre la porte à la critique de la part de ceux qui ne voulaient pas d'une commission aux débats des chefs. Je le répète, le non-respect de l'engagement du gouvernement à l'égard de comités indépendants ou l'importance des comités dans... Il y a eu principalement de belles paroles, mais nous n'avons pas vu d'actions.

Cela dit, je respecte la primauté du Parlement, qui a décidé de mettre cela en place, alors, nous allons aller de l'avant. Nous allons faire face à ce changement. Je vais parler un peu de la reddition de comptes et dire que nous acceptons que cela ait été mis en place.

Je dois vous dire que, personnellement, j'estime que la seule chose qui a sauvé la situation, c'est l'intégrité de la personne que vous avez choisie. Cela a permis de camoufler certains défauts, mais ces défauts existent encore. Les élections s'en viennent, et vous devrez alors l'assumer.

Je vais passer aux questions. Je comprends l'indépendance dont vous parlez en ce qui concerne les membres. D'après ce que vous me dites, je crois qu'on respecte leur indépendance, mais où se trouve la limite entre l'indépendance et la reddition de comptes? Comment envisagez-vous la reddition de comptes, étant donné qu'on ne sait pas quel parti formera le prochain gouvernement? Comment envisagez-vous la reddition de comptes au Comité ou à une autre entité? Ces personnes sont indépendantes, elles ont obtenu tout ce pouvoir et tout cet argent, alors qu'en est-il de la reddition de comptes? Est-ce que la prochaine fois vous allez nous présenter un budget détaillé au lieu de nous fournir simplement une somme globale?

(1230)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je vous remercie pour vos questions.

Je vais d'abord dire ceci aux fins du compte rendu. Je sais que mon collègue ne se portera pas à nouveau candidat, et je ne sais pas si j'aurai une autre occasion. Je sais que je suis toujours la bienvenue au Comité et je sais que vous allez m'inviter à nouveau, mais j'aimerais dire à quel point j'ai eu du plaisir à travailler avec mon collègue, M. Christopherson. Je crois que son absence se fera sentir au Parlement, parce qu'il accomplit son travail avec beaucoup d'intégrité.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous êtes bien gentille. Je vous remercie.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je ne dis pas cela seulement parce que vous êtes mon voisin...

M. David Christopherson:

Ça aide.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

L'hon. Karina Gould:

En effet, mais j'ai beaucoup d'admiration pour vous.

Quoi qu'il en soit, je suis heureuse de le dire.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vous remercie.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

En ce qui concerne la reddition de comptes, je crois que c'est une question très importante. Nous avons essayé de l'intégrer au processus, soit que le commissaire aux débats retourne devant votre comité dans les six mois après l'élection — ou peut-être un peu avant, en mars 2020 — pour dire comment les choses se sont déroulées et pour faire le point et parler de la suite des choses. J'étais...

M. David Christopherson:

Excusez-moi, mais est-ce qu'un budget détaillé sera présenté?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je ne sais pas si on a dit « budget détaillé ».

M. Allen Sutherland:

Conformément au décret, le commissaire aux débats est tenu de présenter un rapport comprenant une analyse approfondie sur l'expérience et l'organisation des débats de 2019, et des conseils sur la forme que prendra la Commission des débats des chefs dans l'avenir. Le rapport sera déposé au Parlement.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Toutefois, je crois qu'en ce qui concerne le prochain budget des dépenses, c'est certainement quelque chose que votre comité pourrait explorer. Je pense également que ce que votre comité... Bien entendu, vous prenez vos propres décisions, mais à ce moment-là, on devrait déterminer si le budget prévu en 2019 était suffisant, ou trop important, ou peu importe.

J'imagine que lorsque le commissaire aux débats déposera le rapport — et je pense qu'il voudra, au bout du compte, revenir au Parlement —, il aura des suggestions sur la façon dont un budget pourrait être alloué, compte tenu de l'expérience que nous aurons eue. Ce sera la première fois. Nous espérons fournir suffisamment de ressources pour pouvoir remplir le mandat. Je pense que cette première expérience, ce modèle conçu pour durer, sera grandement utile.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Le comité consultatif est, évidemment, un élément essentiel. Connaissez-vous — ou s'agit-il d'information publique — les critères d'acceptation, et le commissaire a-t-il l'intention de rendre public le nom des membres lorsqu'ils seront nommés?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui. Voici ce qui est indiqué dans le document de décret initial, au paragraphe 8(2), sous « comité consultatif »: Le comité consultatif est composé de sept membres et sa composition reflète la parité entre les sexes et la diversité de la population canadienne et représente un éventail d’allégeances politiques et d’expertises.

En ce qui a trait à la description de travail, la décision appartiendrait au commissaire, et il lui incomberait d'annoncer le nom des personnes.

M. David Christopherson:

Est-ce que ce sera fait rapidement? Nommera-t-on un membre à la fois? Nommera-t-on tous les membres en même temps? Comment cela fonctionnera-t-il?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Encore une fois, c'est une question à laquelle le commissaire devrait répondre. Nous croyons comprendre que ce serait au printemps de 2019.

M. David Christopherson:

Pour la suite, quels seront vos liens avec le commissaire, étant donné le caractère délicat des débats électoraux? Il doit y avoir un mécanisme de reddition de comptes, de sorte qu'il y ait quelque chose. Je présume que vous respectez son indépendance.

Comment cela fonctionnera-t-il?

(1235)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui, je respecte son indépendance.

Essentiellement, depuis sa nomination, nous n'avons pas eu de discussions et nous n'avons pas l'intention d'en avoir. Bien entendu, la reddition de comptes se fera dans le cadre du processus budgétaire, et le Bureau du Conseil privé fournit un soutien administratif. Or, pour ce qui est des décisions qui sont prises, nous avons établi les grandes orientations, les objectifs, et il appartient au commissaire de mettre cela en oeuvre.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord. C'est très bien. Je vous remercie beaucoup, madame la ministre.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Christopherson.

C'est maintenant au tour de M. Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Madame la ministre, je vous remercie beaucoup de votre présence. J'espère que vous allez bien et que vous vous sentirez mieux bientôt. En tant que père d'un petit enfant, je sais que les enfants touchent à tout et que cela n'aide pas nécessairement les parents à rester en santé. Je vous remercie d'être venue témoigner malgré tout.

Je sais que vous me répondrez probablement que ce sera la responsabilité de M. Johnston. Quelque chose m'a vraiment touché au cours de notre étude. Puisque nous ne sommes pas des personnes handicapées, nous ne pensons pas aux personnes handicapées et à leur accès aux débats. Je me demandais si vous pouviez dire quelque chose à cet égard, à propos du cadre et de ce que vous avez entendu à ce sujet.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Certainement. C'est une bonne chose que je sois aussi loin de vous. J'espère que vous n'attraperez pas les microbes de la garderie.

Au cours des consultations, on nous a dit beaucoup de choses au sujet de l'accessibilité, en particulier concernant les personnes malentendantes ou aveugles. L'une des conversations intéressantes que nous avons eues durant les consultations a eu lieu avec un groupe de défense des droits des personnes aveugles. Il disait que si l'on rendait la trame sonore des débats accessibles à ces personnes, si on les diffusait à la radio ou par la baladodiffusion, ce serait très intéressant pour elles. Il disait également qu'il fallait veiller à ce qu'on prévoie le recours à l'interprétation gestuelle pendant la diffusion. Bien entendu, tout cela figure dans le rapport, auquel le commissaire aux débats a accès, mais l'un des mandats consiste vraiment à s'assurer qu'on rend les débats accessibles à tous les gens, quelles que soient leurs capacités.

L'autre chose intéressante qui a été soulevée, c'était de les rendre accessibles en différentes langues. Évidemment, pour ce qui est des deux langues officielles, nous nous assurons de tenir un débat principal en anglais et un débat principal en français, mais il y a également la possibilité de travailler avec des groupes d'origines diverses pour que les gens dont la langue maternelle n'est ni l'anglais ni le français puissent également avoir accès aux débats.

Je pense que c'est une question très importante, et je sais que le commissaire y est sensible. L'accessibilité a toujours été une question importante pour lui et je suis donc convaincue qu'il sera capable de mettre cela en oeuvre.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je vais maintenant changer de sujet — radicalement probablement.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

D'accord.

M. Chris Bittle:

J'ai vu dans les médias qu'un rapport a été publié en Australie — je crois que cela a été annoncé par le premier ministre — selon lequel les principaux partis politiques avaient été victimes de piratage dont le coupable serait un « intervenant étranger astucieux ». Puisque nous nous dirigeons vers une élection, je sais que tous les partis et tous les membres du Comité ont soulevé des préoccupations à cet égard.

Quelle est votre façon de voir les choses étant donné que nous sommes dans une année électorale? Des nations cherchent à faire du tort, à semer le doute et elles sont prêtes à nuire aux démocraties de nos alliés. Nous l'avons constaté en Grande-Bretagne, aux États-Unis, puis en Australie, et notre pays est le prochain.

Pourriez-vous donner votre point de vue là-dessus?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je pense que c'est un sujet extrêmement important. Cela montre qu'on ne peut être trop prudent à cet égard. Je suis très heureuse que dans ce dossier, nous ayons des relations de travail très productives avec tous les principaux partis politiques représentés à la Chambre des communes. Ils ont des conversations avec le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, qui est là pour fournir des conseils. Nous avons eu de très bonnes conversations sur la protection de notre démocratie en général. Je dois dire que, du moins jusqu'à maintenant, les gens et les partis ont mis la partisanerie de côté pour se concentrer avant tout sur la protection du Canada.

C'est très positif. L'exemple australien montre que le Canada doit prendre le problème très au sérieux. L'une des choses que j'ai dites lors de l'annonce sur la protection de la démocratie, le 30 janvier dernier, c'est le fait qu'il y aura des autorisations de sécurité pour tous les leaders politiques représentés à la Chambre des communes, et également pour jusqu'à quatre de leurs aides et conseillers, de sorte qu'ils puissent être informés. Au bout du compte, il s'agit d'une politique « le Canada d'abord ».

Nous sommes prêts. Évidemment, nous ne pouvons pas nous protéger contre toutes les situations possibles, mais je trouve très encourageant de constater que jusqu'à maintenant, tout le monde collabore dans ce dossier.

(1240)

M. Chris Bittle:

Des représentants de Facebook et de Twitter ont comparu devant notre comité au sujet du projet de loi C-76. Nous leur avons passé un savon en quelque sorte, mais ce qui m'inquiète, c'est qu'ils ont dit « oh, ne vous inquiétez pas, nous mettrons des choses en place peut-être, nous l'espérons, possiblement, à un moment donné ».

Avez-vous discuté avec les entreprises de médias sociaux à un moment où l'élection se prépare?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui, j'ai eu des conversations tant avec Facebook qu'avec Twitter. Je vais rencontrer des représentants de Microsoft cette semaine et, je l'espère, de Google au cours des prochaines semaines.

Les Canadiens ont raison de s'inquiéter. Ils ont raison d'être inquiets au sujet du rôle que joueront les médias sociaux au cours de la prochaine élection. Ils joueront un rôle encore plus important qu'en 2015. Bien que les plateformes aient pris des mesures positives au sujet des faux comptes et des faux comportements, surtout de sources étrangères, de nombreuses autres mesures peuvent et doivent être prises. Nous avons des discussions à cet effet.

Ce que je trouve intéressant entre autres, c'est que toutes les principales plateformes ont signé un code de bonnes pratiques en prévision des élections européennes qui auront lieu en mai. Nous suivons très attentivement ce dossier et nous essayons de déterminer si c'est une mesure efficace et s'il vaudrait la peine de le faire ici.

L'un des grands défis au sujet des entreprises de médias sociaux, c'est justement le facteur de reddition de comptes, en ce sens qu'actuellement, elles disent « faites-nous confiance, nous prenons des mesures ». Or, nous n'avons pas nécessairement les mécanismes qui permettaient de nous en assurer, mis à part les éléments qui ont été adoptés dans le cadre du projet de loi C-76 pour ce qui est de la transparence des publicités et du fait de ne pas accepter sciemment des fonds de l'étranger sur ces plateformes pour des publicités politiques.

Le dossier continue d'évoluer, et nous en apprenons toujours davantage à ce sujet. Nous devons avoir la certitude que les entreprises agissent de bonne foi et prennent la question au sérieux. Nous veillons à ce que les échappatoires qui existent soient éliminées, étant entendu que nos adversaires continuent d'évoluer également.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci, madame la ministre.

Le président:

Madame Kusie. [Français]

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

J'aimerais d'abord traiter d'un point que Mme Lapointe a soulevé plus tôt.[Traduction]

Facebook a annoncé récemment qu'aux États-Unis, trois chaînes vidéo en ligne sont regardées par des milliards de milléniaux. En fait, elles sont soutenues par le gouvernement russe. Ce qui est plus pertinent pour la discussion, et pour le Canada, c'est le récent article de CBC sur le nombre de gazouillis publiés par des trolls étrangers. En fait, 9,6 millions de gazouillis ont été publiés, et ils ont non seulement de grandes répercussions sur nos processus de débats et nos processus électoraux, mais également de très grandes répercussions sur nos processus démocratiques. En fait, on a constaté que les gazouillis influencent ce que les gens au Canada pensent de l'immigration et de l'approbation des pipelines par exemple.

Je me demande ce que vous faites, ce que fait votre gouvernement, concernant l'ingérence et l'influence étrangères qui vont au-delà de nos processus électoraux et touchent nos processus démocratiques.

(1245)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

C'est une question très intéressante, en fait, et je serais ravie que le Comité l'examine également, car elle est très importante. Elle comporte beaucoup de zones grises. On ne parle pas de zone grise quand on sait que cela provient d'une source étrangère. Ce n'est pas quelque chose que nous voulons. Je parle toujours des campagnes d'influence manifeste et déguisée. Il y a l'influence ouverte, qui consiste à utiliser des moyens diplomatiques, essentiellement, pour essayer d'arriver à un certain résultat, et tous les pays y ont recours. Ensuite, il y a l'influence déguisée, qui consiste à se faire passer pour un Canadien ou un organisme canadien, alors qu'en réalité, on est financé d'ailleurs. Il peut être assez difficile de le savoir. Je crois que c'est quelque chose que nous avons vu pendant la période précédant l'élection présidentielle de 2016. C'était un tout nouveau phénomène que nous n'avions jamais vraiment vu auparavant, bien que l'ingérence étrangère ait toujours existé. C'est simplement que les moyens sont différents maintenant.

Nous voulons nous assurer de fournir l'espace qu'il faut pour que se tiennent des débats légitimes au Canada. Il y a toujours des questions, surtout lorsqu'il n'y a pas d'élection. C'était un aspect important dans ma réflexion sur la publicité faite par des tiers durant la période préélectorale et non auparavant, parce que lorsque le Parlement siège, on veut s'assurer que les Canadiens, dans un sens, sont libres de communiquer avec des parlementaires et de soulever des questions et de discuter de questions importantes.

La question — et c'est là que les choses se corsent —, c'est de déterminer comment savoir d'où provient cette information initiale? Je crois que la connaissance des médias et du numérique est essentielle pour que les Canadiens sachent quels types d'indicateurs ils doivent chercher pour déterminer d'où vient l'information. Si un compte Twitter n'a que 15 abonnés, mais qu'il ne cesse de publier des gazouillis sur toute une série de sujets qui sont un peu bizarres, alors il ne s'agit peut-être pas d'un compte légitime. Il vient peut-être d'ailleurs. C'est ce type de discussions qu'il nous faut lancer.

Twitter et Facebook éliminent des comptes, des millions de faux comptes, lorsqu'ils peuvent confirmer qu'ils proviennent de sources étrangères et qu'ils se font passer pour des acteurs nationaux.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Madame la ministre, je suis désolée, mais je dois vous interrompre.

Je suis d'accord avec vous, et je dis souvent que c'est comme les radicaux libres: on sait qu'ils existent, mais on ne peut certainement pas les voir. Je suis simplement inquiète. Aux États-Unis, on a établi le Global Engagement Center, qui est responsable de chercher de la fausse information. De même, au Royaume-Uni, des législateurs ont récemment fait valoir qu'un code d'éthique obligatoire était nécessaire. C'est donc évidemment une question importante pour le Comité.

Cela dit, monsieur le président, j'aimerais présenter un avis de motion: Que la ministre des Institutions démocratiques soit invitée à comparaître devant le Comité pour discuter du plan du gouvernement visant à protéger les élections de 2019 et du groupe de travail sur les menaces en matière de sécurité et de renseignements visant les élections.

La ministre a déjà dit qu'elle serait ravie de comparaître à nouveau.

Le président:

Merci.

C'est bien. Votre temps est écoulé également.

Monsieur Hardie.

M. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Quelque chose me préoccupe. C'est en rapport avec une histoire que j'ai entendue directement de Marshall McLuhan, c'est donc dire que cela remonte à loin. Il était question d'une tentative du gouvernement russe de se moderniser et d'alléger la bureaucratie. On a ouvert une grande boîte de nuit à Moscou, qui a fait faillite au bout de six mois environ. On a chargé une grande commission d'enquêter sur l'affaire. Quelqu'un a demandé: « Était-ce l'alcool? » « Oh, c'était le meilleur. » « La nourriture? » « Fantastique. » « Qu'en était-il de la troupe? » « Chaque personne était un bon membre du parti depuis 1917. »

En conséquence, estimons-nous que le commissaire Johnston réussira à rassembler des éléments qui seront parlants pour les Canadiens, ceux que nous essayons de servir ici, en fait? » Exerçons-nous le moindre contrôle sur tout cela ou avons-nous, en gros, simplement dit au commissaire de procéder comme il l'entend sans lui donner la moindre consigne? Y a-t-il des diffuseurs dans son groupe? Je ne parle pas de M. Cormier, car il a l'air du type de gestionnaire qui ne s'est jamais trouvé du côté opérationnel d'une caméra. Je parle de personnes qui ont vraiment les compétences et qui se sont montrées capables de présenter un programme qui rejoint le public.

(1250)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je fais vraiment confiance à M. Johnston pour embaucher les bonnes personnes pour le faire. Je pense que ses antécédents de carrière témoignent de sa passion pour ce qui est dans l'intérêt du public, mais aussi que son expérience récente comme gouverneur général lui a permis de rejoindre un échantillon tellement diversifié de Canadiens que j'estime vraiment qu'il comprendra comment s'assurer que ces débats sont organisés et accessibles à un éventail de Canadiens et d'intérêts aussi large que possible.

Je pense aussi que le rapport public qui a découlé des consultations que nous avons tenues avec l'IRPP insiste vraiment sur le besoin de s'assurer qu'il y a des personnes compétentes et qualifiées dans son équipe. Je suis convaincue qu'il le fera. Le CIC lui donne des principes importants et un mandat directeur. Je suis persuadée qu'il sera en mesure de le faire.

Je vais laisser à Matt le soin de vous donner les détails.

M. Ken Hardie:

Soyez très bref, je vous prie, car j'ai une autre question.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

D'accord. Bien sûr.

M. Matthew Shea:

Peut-être que je peux parler très brièvement de la responsabilité. J'ai entendu quelques mentions de responsabilité et de plans budgétaires détaillés. Je veux juste que ce soit clair que la commission des débats, comme tout ministère, devra présenter un plan ministériel, qui sera déposé au Parlement. Il doit passer par le Budget principal des dépenses, qui est déposé au Parlement, et dans les deux...

M. Ken Hardie:

Non, je comprends. C'est une question de responsabilité financière. Je parle simplement de diffuser un programme que les Canadiens voudront regarder et qui saura les intéresser. Dans tous les débats que j'ai vus, depuis la télévision en noir et blanc et à l'époque où on cognait des pierres ensemble, nous n'avons jamais, en fait, trouvé un format qui a vraiment semblé marcher. Dans certains cas, il s'agit d'une grande bataille de coqs entre les divers candidats. Dans d'autres, les journalistes essaient de deviner, depuis leurs chambres d'écho, ce qui intéresse le public.

Avons-nous reçu la moindre idée ou suggestion du public concernant les éléments qu'ils aimeraient qu'on couvre et la façon dont ils aimeraient qu'on les couvre?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je pense que votre question aborde la raison initiale pour laquelle nous avons mis en place une commission des débats, car au cours des dernières décennies, et particulièrement des dernières années, cela a été un exercice politique, partisan ou strictement journalistique. L'élément clé qui, selon moi, est important dans le cadre de son mandat est qu'ils doivent être tenus dans l'intérêt du public.

Je pense que M. Johnston est dans une position unique pour pouvoir faire appel à des experts de la radiodiffusion, du milieu universitaire et de la société civile afin de vraiment s'assurer que le produit qui sera offert rejoint les Canadiens. C'est une des choses qu'on nous a répétées à maintes reprises dans le contexte des tables rondes et des discussions que nous avons tenues à la grandeur du pays, pour faire exactement ce dont vous parlez — créer un produit qui sera intéressant pour les Canadiens et auquel ils voudront prendre part, mais aussi un produit qui pourra être utilisé librement, ce qui, selon moi, est vraiment ce qui compte le plus. L'enregistrement devrait être accessible à quiconque souhaite l'utiliser, car les gens pourront ensuite le partager sur diverses plateformes ou en reprendre différentes parties. Je fais des conjectures ici, mais disons qu'il y a un groupe qui s'intéresse à l'environnement et aux changements climatiques. S'il y a une question à ce sujet, ils pourront s'y attarder.

Je suis moi-même un peu maniaque de politique, mais je pense que c'est vraiment excitant.

Le président:

Merci.

David, vous avez une question brève.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je vous en sais gré.

Le directeur général des élections a... Il existe un terme technique que je ne connais pas pour dire que son budget est illimité. Une fois qu'une campagne électorale est lancée, il peut obtenir le financement dont il a besoin. Le commissaire des débats jouirait-il du même avantage compte tenu de la présence d'un chiffre artificiel? S'il se heurte à un mur côté financement, qu'est-ce qui se passera?

(1255)

M. Matthew Shea:

Il s'agit d'un montant fixe, approuvé par le Parlement. Si le commissaire aux débats devait se heurter à un mur — et rien n'indique qu'il va le faire —, il devrait suivre un processus comme dans le cas de n'importe quel ministère: il présenterait une demande de financement à la ministre, et on verrait ensuite. Encore une fois, rien n'indique que le commissaire estime ne pas avoir suffisamment d'argent, mais si tel était le cas, il existe des mécanismes pour remédier à la situation.

M. David Christopherson:

Cela pourrait se passer rapidement, ce n'est qu'une question administrative.

M. Matthew Shea:

Absolument. Je vais terminer ce que j'ai commencé à dire plus tôt. La raison pour laquelle je mentionnais le plan ministériel et le budget principal des dépenses est que, lorsqu'ils sont déposés, le Comité a l'occasion d'appeler le commissaire aux débats. Contrairement au Bureau du Conseil privé, où nous ne pouvons pas parler librement, il pourrait entrer dans les détails de la façon dont il prévoit faire ses dépenses, s'il a suffisamment d'argent — toutes les questions que je pense que vous posez.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

Merci, monsieur le président, pour votre indulgence.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci, monsieur le président.

M. Bittle a brièvement parlé de réprimande. Je ne suis pas certaine que c'est ce que nous ayons fini par faire, et je ne pense assurément pas que ce soit ce que nous ayons fini par faire pour la population canadienne avec le projet de loi C-76. Le gouvernement et vous-même affirmez que vous voulez prendre un engagement réel envers la protection des Canadiens et de nos processus électoraux contre l'ingérence et l'influence étrangères. Mais tout ce que nous a apporté le projet de loi C-76 a été un processus relatif à l'ingérence dans le cadre duquel, en cas de financement étranger, les personnes en cause se font simplement un peu taper sur les doigts. Encore une fois, en tant que conservateurs, nous avons tenté de légiférer en proposant des amendements qui auraient fait que cela ne puisse pas se produire, grâce à des comptes bancaires distincts, et en faisant plus que leur taper sur les doigts.

En outre, les plateformes n'ont servi qu'à produire des registres peu originaux. Cela m'inquiète grandement. De plus, pour être honnête, lorsque vous vous adressez aux médias grand public, madame la ministre... Lorsque vous avez donné une entrevue à The West Block, vous avez déclaré que vous attendiez des plateformes des médias sociaux qu'elles en fassent davantage pour protéger les élections fédérales de 2019 contre les ingérences étrangères, et vous leur avez demandé de s'appuyer sur les leçons tirées dans le monde entier et de les appliquer au Canada. Cela me trouble beaucoup que vous demandiez à des sociétés d'essayer, de leur propre chef, de protéger les Canadiens et nos processus électoraux plutôt que de prendre vous-même cette responsabilité, en tant que ministre et membre du gouvernement.

Étant donné les résultats décevants du projet de loi C-76 et les commentaires que vous avez faits aux médias, auriez-vous l'amabilité de fournir au Comité et à l'ensemble de la population canadienne des garanties supplémentaires que les élections de 2019 feront l'objet de toutes les mesures possibles pour éviter toute influence étrangère?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je pense en fait que le projet de loi C-76 est un bon exemple de projet dans lequel on a recueilli des suggestions de tous les partis politiques représentés autour de la table, en particulier au sujet du registre des annonces et de nombreux sujets liés aux tierces parties. Plusieurs des suggestions et recommandations retenues ont été proposées par les conservateurs et les néo-démocrates. En fait, un certain nombre d'entre elles ont été proposées par tous les partis politiques. Cela témoigne réellement de la démocratie parlementaire.

J'encourage le Comité à réaliser une étude sur le rôle des médias sociaux et la démocratie, s'il estime que ce sujet l'intéresse, afin de tenir les médias sociaux responsables de leurs actes. J'apprécierais que vous formuliez des suggestions et des commentaires relativement à la façon de bien réglementer ce comportement ou de faire des lois qui y sont adaptées. L'une des principales difficultés — et vous le voyez dans le monde entier — est que la marche à suivre n'est pas claire. Voilà quelque chose que la population canadienne peut certainement comprendre.

Je pense que c'était M. Bittle qui a mentionné... Non, en fait il s'agit d'une étude qui est parue aujourd'hui et qui indique que 6 Canadiens sur 10 ne se sentent pas à l'aise relativement à Facebook et aux élections à venir. Voilà un autre exemple de question dans le cadre de laquelle nous pouvons collaborer, mettre de côté la partisanerie et établir la marche à suivre. Nous voulons nous assurer que nous offrons l'espace public essentiel que fournissent les médias sociaux pour que les personnes puissent s'exprimer, tout en atténuant certaines des conséquences négatives qui peuvent découler des médias sociaux. Ce serait un travail très intéressant pour le Comité, si vous choisissez de le faire. Je me ferai également un plaisir de discuter avec vous de vos idées ou de vos réflexions.

Le programme lié à la protection de notre démocratie que nous avons présenté le 30 janvier est très complet et tente d'aborder ce problème de différentes façons pour offrir aux Canadiens l'assurance que le gouvernement prend cela au sérieux. Nous examinons cette question d'un point de vue à la fois général et spécialisé.

Au bout du compte, nous devons travailler ensemble en tant que Canadiens. La cible ultime pour notre démocratie est l'électeur canadien, car c'est lui qui détient le pouvoir en exerçant son droit de vote. Ce que nous devons faire — le gouvernement et moi-même, mais également les parlementaires — est de nous assurer que les Canadiens disposent des renseignements dont ils ont besoin pour faire des choix éclairés.

(1300)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci, madame la ministre.

En tant qu'ancienne agente du service extérieur et agente de sécurité, je vous conseillerais simplement d'obtenir autant de renseignements que possible auprès de vos homologues. En tant que membre de ce comité, j'espère que vous nous les communiquerez.

Merci.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Merci, madame Kusie.

Nous allons maintenant passer au crédit 1B dans la rubrique Commission aux débats des chefs du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B). COMMISSION AUX DÉBATS DES CHEFS ç Crédit 1b — Dépenses de programmes... 257 949 $

(Le crédit 1b est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Le crédit 1 dans la rubrique Commission aux débats des chefs du Budget provisoire des dépenses est-il adopté? COMMISSION AUX DÉBATS DES CHEFS Crédit 1b — Dépenses de programmes... 2 260,388 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Puis-je faire rapport des crédits du Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) et du Budget provisoire des dépenses à la Chambre?

Des députés: Oui.

Le président: D'accord, merci.

Merci à vous, madame la ministre, et à vos collègues, d'être venus.

Il y a un autre comité qui va se tenir ici, mais avant de partir, deux petites choses. Je vais peut-être lire ceci. Nous effectuons l'étude dans les deux chambres, et le greffier affiche généralement un message sur Twitter qui dit en gros ceci: Le Comité tente de déterminer s'il serait avantageux pour la Chambre des communes d'établir une chambre de débats parallèle. Les chambres de débats parallèles peuvent servir de forum supplémentaire pour la tenue de débats sur certains types d'affaires parlementaires et sont utilisées par les parlements de l'Australie et du Royaume-Uni depuis les années 1990.

Est-ce que ça va? D'accord.

Jeudi, nous avons notre dîner. J'espère que vous y serez tous.

Mardi prochain, Bruce Stanton sera ici de 11 heures à midi. De midi à 13 heures, nous avions prévu la réunion du Sous-comité du programme et de la procédure, mais nous avons également parlé de faire le rapport sur la motion de privilège. Au cours de cette heure, nous discuterons également du rapport final, et le chercheur enverra ce document.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

De quel jour parle-t-on?

Le président:

Ce sera mardi prochain.

Est-ce que cela convient à tout le monde?

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on February 19, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.