header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-05-30 RNNR 137

Standing Committee on Natural Resources

(1530)

[English]

The Vice-Chair (Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC)):

I would like to bring this meeting to order and recognize Mr. Whalen.

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.):

Thank you, Ms. Stubbs.

In light of your motion, consideration of which was postponed on Tuesday, April 30, 2019, and which I understand you would like to debate now, I move for unanimous consent that David de Burgh Graham be appointed as acting chair of the committee for the duration of the consideration of Ms. Stubbs' motion only.

Do we have unanimous consent?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.)):

On the discussion, Ms. Stubbs.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

I appreciate the opportunity to be able to revisit this motion today. To remind everybody of the subject that we're talking about, I'll read the motion that I moved on April 30: That, pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), the Committee immediately invite the Minister of Natural Resources to appear before the committee on June 20, 2019, for no less than a full meeting, to advise the Committee of the government's plan to build the Trans Mountain Expansion; and that this meeting be televised.

I hope that this motion will receive support from all members of this natural resources committee. I want to make the case for why it's important and why I'm confident that we'll have the minister here to explain to Canadians exactly what the next steps will be after the June 18 decision.

Of course, the Trans Mountain expansion was already approved by the independent expert National Energy Board and then by the current Liberal government three years ago, and was recently recommended for approval a second time by the independent expert regulator. However, not a single inch of the Trans Mountain expansion has actually been built to date.

The majority of British Columbians, Albertans, Canadians and also indigenous communities directly impacted by the Trans Mountain expansion support it. However, the issue around the Trans Mountain expansion has become about more than just the pipeline itself, and even more than about the long-term sustainability of Canada's world-class oil and gas sector, which is, of course, the biggest Canadian export and the biggest private-sector investor in the Canadian economy. This is especially given the almost unprecedented flight of capital from the Canadian energy sector in the last three years, and the news again this week that yet another oil and gas operator in Canada has been bought out and will be leaving the country.

It's really about confidence in Canada, about the ability to build big projects and to ensure that major investment can be retained in Canada, and that when big projects are approved in the national interest, they can then go ahead and be built.

I want to make the case to all of my colleagues here that on June 18, Canadians expect, and I'm confident, that the Liberals will again approve the Trans Mountain expansion in the best interests of all of Canada.

However, I think at the same time that the Liberals must also present a concrete plan on how and when the Trans Mountain expansion will be built. I think it's the least that the Liberals owe Canadians, since they've spent $4.5 billion in tax dollars on the existing pipeline and said that would ensure the expansion would be built immediately.

I hope that the natural resources minister will join us to answer outstanding questions, like what will the Liberals do in response to immediate court challenges from anti-energy activists that will be launched as soon as the Trans Mountain expansion is approved again? What will the cost be to taxpayers? How will that litigation take place? How exactly will the Liberals exert federal jurisdiction to prevent construction from being obstructed or delayed by say, weaponizing bylaws and permits by other levels of government or other measures that other levels of government might take? When will construction start? When will it be completed? When will the Trans Mountain expansion be in service? What will be the total cost to taxpayers? What's the plan for ongoing operation and ownership of the Trans Mountain expansion? Will there be a private sector proponent? Will taxpayers be expected to provide a backstop for the costs?

There has been an ongoing discussion, started about a year ago and more recently, about potential split ownership between an investment fund and perhaps an indigenous-owned organization. I think we all know that there are at least four organizations seeking indigenous purchase and ownership of the Trans Mountain expansion right now. I hope that the Liberals will be able to answer how that will work.

If that is a possibility, will there be transparent and regular reporting to Canadians about both the progress of construction and also the total costs incurred? Will there be dividends paid to Canadians if the ownership of the Trans Mountain expansion is transferred and purchased by somebody else, since of course every single Canadian now owns the pipeline because of the Liberal's $4.5-billion expenditure?

I think those are, at the very least, a number of the issues that need to be addressed immediately after June 18, when we all hope and are confident that the Trans Mountain expansion will be approved by the Liberals once again.

(1535)



That's why I hope all members will support the natural resources minister's coming to committee on June 20 to let all Canadians know those answers.

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Thank you, Ms. Stubbs.

Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. It's good to see you there.

I had quite a bit to say, actually, but I do get the impression that there might be a positive response on the other side, so I will just support what Shannon Stubbs has said. I do agree with everything she has said. Hopefully, we can get some progress on this and, hopefully, the Liberals will support this motion and Canadians will be able to get a view of what the government's plan is to build that Trans Mountain expansion.

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Mr. Whalen.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

While I, obviously, take some issue with a lot of the axioms that underpin Ms. Stubbs' motion, the motion itself is largely fine.

I do want to reassure her that in a similar context, when investors had pulled out of the Hibernia oil field development back in the eighties and nineties, Canada came in and invested, and it turned out to be one of the best investments, from a return-on-capital perspective, that the Government of Canada ever made. Those investments now are, under the Atlantic Accord, paid back to Newfoundland and Labrador on an ongoing basis for the life of the field. Ultimately, I would like to see, at some point, a situation where British Columbians and Albertans get to benefit from this what I hope will be an excellent investment.

I also take some issue with the concerns about foreign direct investment because, of course, Canada's been a world leader in that now during our tenure in government.

Missing from her statement, of course, was Tsleil-Waututh Nation et al. v. Attorney General of Canada et al—the citation for that at the Federal Court of Appeal is 2018 FCA 153—which makes it pretty clear where the problems lie and whose process failed and had the injunction that required Canada to step in to save Albertans and this project.

We would be delighted to have the minister come to speak to all these matters and be able to give Canadians confidence that this was the right decision.

In fact, Ms. Stubbs has said June 20, 2019. I would propose to amend that slightly because it may be possible to do it earlier, and we would actually like to make it clear that it will happen as soon as possible following the announcement on the decision.

If she would accept that friendly amendment that he appear before the committee as soon as possible following the announcement of the decision by the Government of Canada on TMX....

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Ms. Stubbs, is that a friendly amendment?

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

I think it would be at little...to just say “on or before” June 20 since the decision is supposed to be rendered on June 18.

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Mr. Whalen.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Is it on June 18, 19, 20 or 21? I have no idea. I can't tell you what day it's going to be.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

The decision by the Liberal cabinet is supposed to be made on June 18.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Even if the decision is made on that date, I don't know what date it's going to be announced, so I wouldn't be prepared to commit to that. What I'm saying is as soon as possible after the announcement. I also want to make sure that it's televised, so if there's some requirement that all the television feeds are not available to us on June 20, we have June 21 so that this can be televised.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

The original decision—

Mr. Nick Whalen:

We ran into that issue at the Liaison Committee earlier today where other committees complained about the fact that television broadcasting facilities had been given to other committees. I'm not sure what's going to happen on June 20 in that regard. I do want to make sure that it's televised and that it happens as soon after as possible.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

I think it is important that we leave June 20 as the outside date since the Liberal cabinet was supposed to make the decision for approval on May 22 after the NEB's second recommendation for approval of the Trans Mountain expansion in the national interest. The Liberal cabinet requested the extension for the decision, delaying it by a month with even more uncertainty. The decision is supposed to be made on June 18, so “as soon as possible” would be after June 18, but before June 20.

(1540)

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Is somebody looking for the floor?

Mr. Nick Whalen:

I'm happy to have the question called on the amendment, and then we can have it on the motion as well.

Do you need me to read out my amendment again?

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Do you have any comments on the amendment, or are you ready to vote on the amendment? Do you want me to read the amendment?

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Can you say it again?

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Rather than saying “on June 20, 2019”, it would say “as soon as possible following the announcement of the decision on TMX by the Government of Canada”.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I would be more comfortable saying “no later than” somewhere in there.

Hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary Centre, Lib.):

We don't know when that is.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

We do know; it's June 18. This is concerning. The decision is supposed to be made on June 18. The Liberal cabinet is supposed to decide whether or not it is accepting the recommendation for approval of the Trans Mountain expansion in the national interest on June 18. You're already a month late.

We also know the approximate end of session. I think it is very reasonable that we've given two days after the decision is supposed to be rendered. I'm sure you guys have your act together. I'm sure there's somebody in there, in the Liberals, who can explain exactly how the Trans Mountain expansion is going to get built, when it's going to start, if shovels will be in the ground before the construction season, how much it's going to cost, and how this pipeline will finally be built.

I don't understand how there can possibly be an argument right now to try to make the language wishy-washy, with weasel words, and not to hold to a date. You're already a month behind, and that's damaging and undermining confidence in Canada.

The decision will be made on June 18, but the minister should be here on June 20 or before.

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Mr. Whalen.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

I appreciate Ms. Stubbs' frustration, but I'm not privy to the information. I know that actually oftentimes the opposition feels that we are privy to things that we aren't, but we really have tried to maintain this deferential view on the work of the committees and the work of the government. If Mr. Hehr has a better view on it, I'm happy to hear it, but I am not privy to it.

This is something that I think is actually even better than what Mrs. Stubbs has asked for, so I was quite surprised that it's causing a problem. Also, it gives us an opportunity to make sure that it's broadcast, which I know is very important for Mrs. Stubbs. Also, it allows us to handle any issues regarding whether if the House rises we can come back and have the meeting.

This is important. We want to debate this. We want to have this come before our committee as soon as possible following the announcement, but I don't want to commit to something when I don't know whether or not it's true. That's not the way I roll.

Thank you.

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Ms. Benson.

Ms. Sheri Benson (Saskatoon West, NDP):

Just to add to that, if the point is to have a conversation with the minister after a decision has been made, then the amendment makes more sense. I hear what Shannon is saying, and I hear her frustration. I know where the Conservatives are coming from, but if you just take a look at the committee, and you don't change the amendment, whether or not you think it's wishy-washy, or give them more time to do whatever they need to do, then it won't happen. Do you know what I mean?

Let's say in your life it doesn't happen, and they extend it. Then if you don't change the language in this motion, that conversation is never going to happen for you. If you change it to what they are saying, then it will happen, whether it happens on June 21 or July 21 or August 21.

I need to hear that it's important to have the conversation, or is it important just to say they failed; we've asked the minister and he's not coming, and—

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

I think it's extremely important to have the conversation—

Ms. Sheri Benson:

Okay.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

—especially on behalf of the thousands of unemployed oil and gas workers and contractors and the indigenous communities that I represent, who are involved in oil and gas, and on behalf of every Canadian who is waiting on this decision.

I think this is what I would say. Now we're actually in a world and having a conversation about how they might take even longer than June 18 to make the decision.

(1545)

Ms. Sheri Benson:

Yes.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

That would be very alarming and very concerning, I think, to every single Canadian, the vast majority of them, and certainly all those indigenous communities that are counting on the Trans Mountain expansion to be approved for the future of their communities, for their jobs, for their young people and for support for their elders long into the future.

I think this is exactly what Canadians are so frustrated about, that there's this ongoing uncertainty and delay, and I think, in good faith, that I will be surprised if the Liberals are not prepared to come out immediately with a plan for how to get the Trans Mountain expansion built, and if they aren't prepared to stick to the approval date of June 18.

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Ms. Stubbs, we do have a speakers list, so I can put you back on there.

Mr. Hehr.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I've been listening with great interest. I am supportive of Mr. Whalen's amendment. I believe it achieves not only the spirit but the intent, and it will have the goal of getting the minister here to speak to this august committee. This will allow us to move forward expeditiously after the federal cabinet makes its decision, after it does its announcement, after the minister is able to present what has been decided.

The motion put forward by Mr. Whalen achieves all that Ms. Stubbs wants. Ms. Stubbs wants some clarity around the Trans Mountain. Of course we've said we wanted to move forward on that project in the right way. Since the Federal Court of Appeal decision said we had to go back and do the indigenous consultation better and do our environmental reports off the coast better as a result of the process put in place by the former government, well, that's what we did.

I think the motion put forward by Mr. Whalen will give Canadians confidence that we will be able to achieve many of the goals put forward by Ms. Stubbs, and in this case in particular, have the minister speak to this committee.

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Thank you, Chair.

I guess what I need clarification on.... I get the wording, and I get the televised part, but by changing the wording that Ms. Stubbs had, without including a before date—“no later than” whatever—it just leaves it open.

That goes to Ms. Stubbs' point about potential concern regarding the fact that the timeline has been missed already. If we miss it again, or the session ends, that concerns us as the opposition. We do want this conversation to happen. There are points to....

Mr. Nick Whalen:

I can answer your question.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Can I get the floor back?

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Yes. It will be Simms method. Remember the Simms method, Jamie?

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Okay, great.

It wasn't just televised and making sure that the decision is already made, but also, if the decision is made at such a time that we couldn't have a televised hearing while the House is in session, we would actually be able to come back.

So, the way I've changed this, we will come back as soon as possible to have this meeting after the announcement. There are a lot of reasons why the decision might yet again need to be extended if it's to save us from the same fate that plagued us last September. I want this project to be passed with sufficient accommodation for indigenous people, like everybody else, but I also want this meeting to happen.

What I'm saying, without insider knowledge of any of what's going on, is that the way I've structured the amendment is to make sure we have a meeting with the minister after the decision is made. The way that Mrs. Stubbs proposes it, it could possibly be that the decision has not yet happened, the minister still comes, we have our meeting and it's really not getting us the answers to the questions we want.

I appreciate that, if it doesn't happen on the 20th as Mrs. Stubbs is hoping, or on the 18th, that will give her great fuel to do lots of press. She will still have those opportunities. But, what I want to see happen is a meeting with the minister after the decision has been announced, regardless of when that decision is announced, so that we have an opportunity to discuss things that are on the public record with the minister.

Thank you.

(1550)

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Mr. Schmale, you still have the floor.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Thank you. I like the Simms method.

That is the concern that we have right now. I appreciate what you had to say. I totally understand, but the issue we have now is the fact that when the announcement was made—I don't know how long ago—there was no plan. We think that, when the decision was made, the ministry should have had two plans—what to do either way. They didn't have that. They had to go back, and they missed another timeline in May.

I'd be fine with your amendment, but I do not.... That's why I said “no later than”, because if there is a delay, I would like the minister here to explain why there is a delay, and why the decision hasn't been made even though he has said publicly that it will be June 18.

So, leaving it open-ended, I do get your point about the fact that we'll be able to raise issue with this in the media, but I think either way the minister needs to be here before the end of session, for sure—either way.

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Ms. Stubbs.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

I would like clarity on whether the passage of this motion is dependent on the friendly amendment. If what our colleagues are saying is that they'll defeat the motion outright and not call on the Minister of Natural Resources to come to committee to answer all the questions that I have outlined and explain to Canadians how and when exactly the Trans Mountain expansion will be built, plus the ongoing operations, ownership and maintenance provisions, plus the overall costs and transparency around reporting and how this is all going to work in the long term, I find it very concerning that it's either this amendment is accepted or the motion is rejected.

To my colleague's point, that's actually exactly why I said that I'm hoping that members of the committee will press the minister on exactly what the Liberals' plans are in terms of dealing with the inevitable court challenges that will be launched against the Trans Mountain expansion, when we do hope the Liberals approve it for a second time.

The reality is, because of the failure to ask for a Supreme Court reference and because of the failure to take the opportunity to get indigenous consultation right on the northern gateway—instead, this Prime Minister of course chose to unilaterally veto it, despite the 31 indigenous equity partnership in the northern gateway—all that lost opportunity and time for the government to properly fulfill consultation with indigenous communities on pipelines....

Here we are and the reality is that now, after last year's court ruling on the Trans Mountain expansion that the Liberals' process of an additional six months of consultation failed, I think every single Canadian is hoping that this time it's been done right and that it will withstand challenges and that will lay the groundwork for the future. If not, Conservatives may have the opportunity to try to get this right six months from now. That is actually one of the issues that the minister must come and explain.

The reality is that whether that process worked will probably be tested and challenged in court, again. Canadians need to know exactly, very clearly, not just the cost, not just when the shovels will be in the ground, the timeline of construction and the in-service date, but also exactly how this time the Liberals will enforce federal jurisdiction, which they failed to do for the previous three years, to ensure that the Trans Mountain expansion will actually get up and get built, especially since he spent $4.5 billion in Canadian tax dollars on the existing pipeline and said that would get the expansion built immediately, which actually was a year ago.

I just need that clarity. Is it an either-or proposition here that the friendly amendment will be accepted or the entire motion will be rejected by the Liberals, therefore blocking the Minister of Natural Resources to have to come here to be accountable to Canadians?

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Ms. Benson.

Ms. Sheri Benson:

Yes, that's my question.

It's a different motion if you just want the minister to come before the session ends. Then to have the minister come after a decision has been made, which is sort of.... I appreciate the conversation. I haven't sat at the committee a long time, and I certainly hear the passion on either side about getting information.

But these are two different outcomes to me. The conversations will be very different. I'm neither here nor there. If you want to have the minister come before the end of the session, that should be the motion. If you want the minister to come after a decision has been made, to be able to ask different kinds of questions, I'd also be interested to hear how my colleagues will..... If the amendment has to be there for it to pass, it would be good to know that.

Thank you.

(1555)

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

The speakers list is empty. Are we ready for the question on the amendment?

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

No, we're not ready. I think we need to hear the answer from our colleagues.

Is it that you'll support the motion only on the condition that the amendment is accepted? Or will you support this motion?

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

Mr. Whalen, did you want to answer?

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Do you want to vote on the amendment?

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham):

If you're prepared to vote on the amendment, I am too.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham): Do you want to debate the main motion or go straight to a vote?

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Let's go straight to a vote.

(Motion as amended agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Do you want to keep chairing?

The Acting Chair (Mr. David de Burgh Graham): Do you want me to?

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs: Wouldn't that be against the rules?

Mr. Nick Whalen:

I'll seek unanimous consent that David de Burgh—

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs: It shuts me up more when I'm sitting over there.

The Clerk of the Committee (Ms. Jubilee Jackson):

The unanimous consent motion adopted indicated that Mr. Graham would chair for the duration of the consideration of Ms. Stubbs' motion, which has now come to an end.

The Vice-Chair (Mrs. Shannon Stubbs):

We'll now suspend the meeting briefly in order to go in camera.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent des ressources naturelles

(1530)

[Traduction]

La vice-présidente (Mme Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, PCC)):

Je déclare la séance ouverte, et j'aimerais céder la parole à M. Whalen.

M. Nick Whalen (St. John's-Est, Lib.):

Merci, madame Stubbs.

Le mardi 30 avril 2019, l'étude de votre motion a été reportée, et je crois comprendre que vous aimeriez qu'elle fasse maintenant l'objet d'un débat. Je propose donc que, par consentement unanime, nous nommions David de Burgh Graham président suppléant uniquement pendant la durée de l'étude de la motion de Mme Stubbs.

Y a-t-il consentement unanime?

Des députés: Oui.

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.)):

La parole est à vous, madame Stubbs.

Mme Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous suis reconnaissante de l'occasion qui m'est donnée aujourd'hui de réexaminer cette motion. Pour rappeler à tous le sujet dont nous parlons, je vais lire la motion que j'ai proposée le 30 avril: Que, conformément à l'article 108(2) du Règlement, le Comité invite immédiatement le ministre des Ressources naturelles à comparaître devant lui le 20 juin 2019, pendant au moins une réunion complète, afin d'informer le Comité sur le plan du gouvernement pour le projet d'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain; et que cette réunion soit télévisée.que cette réunion soit télévisée.

J'espère que ma motion recevra l'appui de tous les membres du Comité des ressources naturelles. Je tiens à faire valoir les raisons pour lesquelles la motion est importante et les raisons pour lesquelles je suis convaincue que le ministre comparaîtra devant nous pour expliquer aux Canadiens en quoi consisteront au juste les prochaines étapes qui suivront la décision du 18 juin.

Bien entendu, il y a trois ans l'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain avait déjà été approuvé par l'organisme de réglementation indépendant et expert qu'est l'Office national de l'énergie, puis par le gouvernement libéral actuel. De plus, l'organisme de réglementation a récemment recommandé pour la deuxième fois son approbation. Cependant, pas un seul tronçon du projet d'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain n'a été construit jusqu'à maintenant.

La majorité des Britanno-Colombiens, des Albertains, des Canadiens et des collectivités autochtones touchées directement par l'epxpansion du réseau Trans Mountain appuient le projet. Toutefois, l'enjeu lié à l'expansion de ce réseau dépasse maintenant la construction du pipeline en tant que tel et même la viabilité à long terme du secteur pétrolier et gazier canadien de calibre mondial, qui est, bien entendu, le plus important exportateur canadien et le principal investisseur du secteur privé dans l'économie canadienne. C'est particulièrement le cas compte tenu de la perte de capitaux sans précédent que le secteur énergétique canadien a connue au cours des trois dernières années et de l'annonce de cette semaine concernant l'achat d'une autre société pétrolière et gazière canadienne et son départ du Canada.

Cet enjeu est en réalité lié à la confiance qu'inspire le Canada et à la capacité d'entreprendre de grands projets d'intérêt national approuvés et de maintenir les principaux investissements dans l'économie canadienne.

Je tiens à faire valoir à tous mes collègues ici présents que les Canadiens s'attendent à ce que, le 18 juin, les libéraux approuvent de nouveau l'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain dans l'intérêt de tous les Canadiens, et je suis convaincue qu'ils le feront.

Toutefois, j'estime qu'en même temps, les libéraux doivent présenter aussi un plan concret sur la façon dont se déroulera l'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain et sur le moment où cette expansion aura lieu. Je pense que c'est le moins que les libéraux puissent faire pour les Canadiens, étant donné qu'ils ont consacré 4,5 milliards de dollars de l'argent des contribuables à l'amélioration du pipeline existant et qu'ils ont affirmé que cela garantirait la mise en œuvre immédiate du projet d'expansion.

J'espère que le ministre des Ressources naturelles se joindra à nous afin de répondre à des questions en suspens comme les suivantes: Quelles mesures les libéraux prendront-ils pour lutter contre les contestations devant les tribunaux que lanceront les militants opposés à l'énergie immédiatement après la nouvelle approbation du projet d'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain? Quels seront les coûts de ces mesures payées par les deniers publics? Comment ces poursuites se dérouleront-elles? Comment les libéraux exerceront-ils leur compétence fédérale pour empêcher que la construction soit bloquée ou retardée par, disons, des arrêtés ou des permis utilisés comme armes par d'autres ordres de gouvernement ou par d'autres mesures prises par ces ordres de gouvernement? Quand la construction commencera-t-elle? Quand prendra-t-elle fin? Quand la nouvelle partie du réseau Trans Mountain sera-t-elle opérationnelle? Quels seront les coûts totaux que les contribuables assumeront dans le cadre de ce projet? Quel est le plan des libéraux en ce qui concerne la propriété et l'exploitation de la nouvelle partie du réseau Trans Mountain? Un promoteur du secteur privé participera-t-il au projet? Les libéraux s'attendent-ils à ce que les contribuables garantissent les coûts de ce projet?

Des discussions ont lieu depuis environ un an à propos de la possibilité d'une propriété partagée entre un fonds d'investissement et une organisation appartenant à des Autochtones. Je pense que nous savons tous qu'il y a au moins quatre organisations autochtones qui cherchent en ce moment à devenir propriétaires de la nouvelle partie du réseau Trans Mountain. J'espère que les libéraux seront en mesure d'expliquer comment cela fonctionnera.

Si cette propriété partagée est une éventualité, des comptes seront-ils rendus aux Canadiens de façon régulière et transparente au sujet des progrès de la construction et des coûts totaux engagés? Si la nouvelle partie du réseau Trans Mountain est achetée par quelqu'un d'autre et que sa propriété lui est transférée, des dividendes seront-ils versés aux Canadiens, étant donné que tous les Canadiens sont maintenant propriétaires du pipeline existant, en raison des 4,5 milliards de dollars que les libéraux ont dépensés pour améliorer son état?

Je crois qu'à tout le moins, ce sont là plusieurs questions qui devront être cernées immédiatement après le 18 juin lorsque, nous l'espérons tous, les libéraux approuveront de nouveau l'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain.

(1535)



Voilà pourquoi j'espère que tous les membres du Comité appuieront la comparution du ministre des Ressources naturelles le 20 juin en vue de fournir à tous les Canadiens des réponses à ces questions.

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Merci, madame Stubbs.

Monsieur Schmale, la parole est à vous.

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président. C'est bien de vous voir jouer ce rôle.

En fait, j'avais pas mal de choses à dire, mais j'ai l'impression que l'autre côté accueillera favorablement cette motion. Je vais donc me contenter d'appuyer les paroles de Shannon Stubbs. J'approuve tout ce qu'elle a dit. Avec un peu de chance, nous pourrons obtenir quelques nouvelles à ce sujet et, avec un peu de chance, les libéraux appuieront la motion et les Canadiens seront en mesure de se faire une idée du plan que le gouvernement a élaboré pour agrandir le réseau Trans Mountain.

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Monsieur Whalen, la parole est à vous.

M. Nick Whalen:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Même si je conteste évidemment bon nombre des postulats qui sous-tendent la motion de Mme Stubbs, la motion elle-même est en grande partie acceptable.

Je tiens à la rassurer en lui expliquant que, dans un contexte semblable, quand des investisseurs se sont retirés du projet d'exploitation du champ pétrolifère Hibernia dans les années 1980 et 1990, le Canada est intervenu et a investi dans le projet. Cela s'est avéré être l'un des meilleurs investissements que le gouvernement du Canada ait jamais faits sur le plan du rendement. Ces investissements sont maintenant assujettis à l'Accord atlantique, qui permet à Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador d'être remboursé régulièrement pendant la durée de vie du champ pétrolifère. Au bout du compte, j'aimerais qu'à un moment donné, les Britanno-Colombiens et les Albertains bénéficient de ce qui, je l'espère, sera un excellent investissement.

De plus, je suis en désaccord avec les préoccupations liées aux investissements étrangers directs parce que, bien sûr, le Canada est un chef de file mondial à cet égard maintenant que nous sommes au pouvoir.

Sa déclaration omet aussi de mentionner l'affaire Tsleil-Waututh Nation et al. c. Procureur général du Canada et al, dont l'arrêt de la Cour d'appel fédérale est 2018 CAF 153, ce qui indique plutôt clairement à quand les problèmes remontent et qui a entrepris le processus qui a échoué et qui a fait l'objet d'une injonction, une injonction qui a forcé le gouvernement du Canada à intervenir pour sauver ce projet et protéger les intérêts des Albertains.

Nous serions ravis que le ministre vienne parler de toutes ces questions et donne aux Canadiens l'assurance que la bonne décision a été prise.

En fait, bien que Mme Stubbs ait mentionné le 20 juin 2019, je proposerais de modifier légèrement sa motion, car il se peut que cette comparution puisse avoir lieu plus tôt, et nous aimerions indiquer clairement qu'elle aura lieu le plus tôt possible après l'annonce de la décision.

Si elle accepte l'amendement favorable selon lequel le ministre comparaîtra devant le Comité le plus tôt possible après l'annonce de la décision du gouvernement du Canada au sujet du projet TMX...

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Madame Stubbs, est-ce un amendement favorable?

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Je pense qu'il serait un peu... de mentionner simplement « le 20 juin ou avant », étant donné que la décision est censée être rendue le 18 juin.

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Monsieur Whalen, la parole est à vous.

M. Nick Whalen:

Est-ce le 18, 19, 20 ou 21 juin? Je n'en ai aucune idée. Je ne peux pas vous dire la date à laquelle la décision sera rendue.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Le Cabinet libéral est censé prendre une décision le 18 juin.

M. Nick Whalen:

Même si la décision est prise à cette date, je ne sais pas quand elle sera annoncée. Je ne serais donc pas disposé à prendre un engagement à cet égard. Je dirais que cela aura lieu le plus tôt possible après l'annonce. Je tiens également à m'assurer que la séance sera télévisée. Donc, si certaines exigences font que toutes les chaînes de télévision ne sont pas disponibles le 20 juin, nous tiendrons la séance le 21 juin, afin qu'elle puisse être télévisée.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

La décision initiale...

M. Nick Whalen:

Nous, les membres du Comité de liaison, avons fait face à ce problème plus tôt aujourd'hui lorsque d'autres comités se sont plaints au cours de notre séance que les installations de télédiffusion avaient été fournies à d'autres comités. J'ignore ce qui se produira à cet égard le 20 juin, mais je tiens à m'assurer que la séance sera télévisée et qu'elle sera organisée le plus tôt possible.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Je pense qu'il importe que nous laissions le 20 juin comme date butoir, étant donné que le Cabinet libéral était censé prendre une décision concernant l'approbation du projet le 22 mai, après que l'ONE a recommandé pour la deuxième fois l'approbation de l'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain dans l'intérêt du Canada. Le Cabinet libéral a demandé une prolongation du délai, en reportant d'un mois sa décision, ce qui a créé encore plus d'incertitude. Les libéraux sont censés prendre une décision le 18 juin. Donc, si le ministre comparait « le plus tôt possible », il faudrait que ce soit après le 18 juin, mais avant le 20 juin.

(1540)

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Quelqu'un souhaite-t-il prendre la parole?

M. Nick Whalen:

Je serais satisfait que mon amendement soit mis aux voix et qu'ensuite, nous mettions aussi aux voix la motion.

Avez-vous besoin que je lise de nouveau mon amendement?

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Avez-vous des observations à formuler à propos de l'amendement, ou êtes-vous prêts à voter sur l'amendement? Voulez-vous que je lise l'amendement?

M. Jamie Schmale:

Pouvez-vous mentionner l'amendement de nouveau?

M. Nick Whalen:

Au lieu d'indiquer « le 20 juin 2019 », la motion indiquerait « le plus tôt possible après l'annonce de la décision prise par le gouvernement du Canada au sujet du projet TMX ».

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je serais plus à l'aise si la mention « au plus tard » figurait quelque part dans l'amendement.

L’hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary-Centre, Lib.):

Nous ne savons pas quelle sera cette date.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Nous le savons, puisqu'il s'agit du 18 juin. Cette situation est préoccupante. La décision est censée être prise le 18 juin. À cette date, le Cabinet libéral est censé décider s'il accepte la recommandation de l'ONE en ce qui concerne l'approbation de l'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain dans l'intérêt du pays. Vous accusez déjà un mois de retard.

Nous connaissons également la date approximative de la fin de la session. Je pense que le délai de deux jours que nous vous avons accordé après la date à laquelle la décision est censée être rendue est un laps de temps très raisonnable. Je suis sûre que vos violons sont accordés et que quelqu'un au sein du parti libéral peut expliquer exactement comment l'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain se déroulera, si les travaux commenceront avant la saison de la construction, combien le projet coûtera et comment le pipeline sera finalement construit.

Je ne comprends pas comment vous pouvez avancer un argument en ce moment pour tenter de rendre la formulation vague au moyen de termes ambigus et pour faire en sorte de ne pas avoir à respecter une date. Vous accusez déjà un mois de retard, ce qui est préjudiciable et ce qui mine la confiance des investisseurs à l'égard de l'économie canadienne.

La décision sera prise le 18 juin, mais le ministre devrait comparaître devant nous le 20 juin, ou plus tôt.

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Monsieur Whalen, la parole est à vous.

M. Nick Whalen:

Je comprends la frustration de Mme Stubbs, mais je n'ai pas accès à cette information. Je sais que l'opposition pense souvent que nous avons accès à certains renseignements que nous ne connaissons pas. Toutefois, nous essayons vraiment de maintenir une distance entre les travaux des comités et le travail du gouvernement. Si M. Hehr possède de meilleures connaissances à ce sujet, je serais heureux d'en entendre parler, mais, personnellement, je n'ai pas accès à ces renseignements.

À mon avis, ma proposition est meilleure que celle de Mme Stubbs. J'étais donc très étonné que cela cause un problème. De plus, cela nous donne l'occasion de nous assurer que la séance sera télévisée, un aspect qui compte énormément pour Mme Stubbs. Et, cela nous permet de gérer toutes les situations en ce qui concerne la question de savoir si nous pourrons revenir pour assister à cette réunion si la Chambre ajourne ses travaux.

Cet enjeu est important, et nous souhaitons en débattre. Nous voulons que cette comparution devant le comité se produise le plus tôt possible après l'annonce, mais je ne veux pas prendre un engagement sans savoir si ce que vous dîtes est vrai ou non. Ce n'est pas mon mode de fonctionnement.

Merci.

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Madame Benson, la parole est à vous.

Mme Sheri Benson (Saskatoon-Ouest, NPD):

Pour ajouter mon point de vue à cet échange, je préciserais que, si le but est d'avoir une conversation avec le ministre après qu'une décision a été prise, l'amendement est plus logique. Je comprends ce que Mme Stubbs soutient, et j'entends sa frustration. Je sais où les conservateurs veulent en venir, mais, si vous examinez la composition du comité, vous comprendrez que, si vous ne modifiez pas l'amendement, que sa formulation vous semble vague ou non, ou que vous ne leur donnez pas le temps de prendre les mesures qu'ils ont besoin de prendre, cette comparution n'aura pas lieu. Comprenez-vous ce que je veux dire?

Disons que cela ne se produit pas, et qu'ils reportent cette comparution. Si vous ne modifiez pas la formulation de votre motion, vous ne réussirez pas à obtenir cette conversation. Si vous modifiez la motion comme ils le souhaitent, cette conversation aura lieu, que ce soit le 21 juin, le 21 juillet ou le 21 août.

J'ai besoin de vous entendre dire qu'il est important d'avoir cette conversation, ou est-il simplement important de pouvoir dire qu'ils ont échoué? Nous avons demandé que le ministre comparaisse, et il ne le fera pas, et...

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Je pense qu'il est extrêmement important que cette conversation ait lieu...

Mme Sheri Benson:

D'accord.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

...en particulier au nom des milliers de chômeurs du secteur pétrolier et gazier, ainsi que des entrepreneurs et des collectivités autochtones que je représente et qui jouent un rôle dans l'industrie pétrolière et gazière, et enfin au nom de tous les Canadiens qui attendent de connaître cette décision.

Voilà, je pense, ce que je dirais. Nous sommes maintenant dans une situation où nous discutons de la possibilité qu'ils prennent la décision plus tard que le 18 juin.

(1545)

Mme Sheri Benson:

Oui.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Ce serait très préoccupant et alarmant, je crois, pour la grande majorité des Canadiens et certainement pour toutes les collectivités autochtones qui comptent sur l'approbation de l'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain pour assurer l'avenir de leurs communautés, pour fournir des emplois et pour appuyer les jeunes et les aînés pendant longtemps.

Selon moi, le fait que cette incertitude persiste et que la décision est retardée constitue exactement ce qui frustre les Canadiens. Et, en toute bonne foi, je crois que je serai étonnée si les libéraux ne sont pas disposés à respecter la date d'approbation du 18 juin et à présenter immédiatement un plan pour la mise en oeuvre du projet d'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain.

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Madame Stubbs, nous avons une liste d'intervenants. Je peux donc ajouter de nouveau votre nom à cette liste.

Monsieur Hehr, la parole est à vous.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai écouté les délibérations avec grand intérêt. Je suis favorable à l'amendement de M. Whalen. Je crois qu'il respecte non seulement l'esprit de la motion, mais aussi son intention, et il aura pour objet de faire comparaître le ministre devant nous pendant la séance du mois d'août. Cela nous permettra d'avancer rapidement une fois que le Cabinet fédéral aura pris sa décision et l'aura annoncée, et que le ministre aura été en mesure de présenter cette décision.

La motion présentée par M. Whalen accomplit tout ce que Mme Stubbs désire. Mme Stubbs souhaite obtenir certains éclaircissements à propos du réseau Trans Mountain. Bien entendu, nous avons indiqué que nous souhaitions que ce projet progresse de la bonne façon. Étant donné que, dans sa décision, la Cour d'appel fédérale a indiqué que nous devions faire marche arrière afin de mener de meilleures consultations auprès des peuples autochtones et de rédiger de meilleurs rapports environnementaux au sujet des impacts potentiels au large des côtes, en raison du processus mis en place par l'ancien gouvernement, eh bien, c'est ce que nous avons fait.

Je pense que la motion présentée par M. Whalen donnera aux Canadiens l'assurance que nous serons en mesure d'atteindre bon nombre des objectifs proposés par Mme Stubbs et, en particulier dans le cas présent, de faire comparaître le ministre devant notre comité.

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Monsieur Schmale, la parole est à vous.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'imagine que j'ai besoin d'obtenir des éclaircissements au sujet... Je comprends la formulation et la question de la télédiffusion, mais, en modifiant la formulation de Mme Stubbs sans préciser une date limite — sans mentionner les mots « au plus tard le » ou peu importe —, on laisse simplement la porte ouverte.

Cela reprend l'argument de Mme Stubbs à propos de l'inquiétude potentielle liée au fait que le gouvernement a déjà laissé passer l'échéance. S'il ne respecte pas la nouvelle échéance ou que la session se termine, cela préoccupera les membres de l'opposition. Nous voulons que cette conversation ait lieu. Il y a des questions à...

M. Nick Whalen:

Je peux répondre à votre question.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Puis-je avoir de nouveau la parole?

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Oui. Nous allons suivre la méthode Simms. Vous souvenez-vous de la méthode Simms, monsieur Schmale?

M. Nick Whalen:

D'accord. Formidable.

Mes préoccupations ne concernaient pas simplement la télédiffusion et le fait de s'assurer que la décision avait déjà été prise, mais aussi le fait que, si la décision était prise à un moment où il était impossible d'organiser une audience télévisée pendant que la Chambre siégeait, nous serions en fait en mesure de revenir pour organiser une audience.

J'ai donc modifié la motion de manière à ce que nous revenions organiser cette séance le plus tôt possible après l'annonce. Il y a de nombreuses raisons pour lesquelles la décision pourrait être reportée, comme le fait d'éviter de subir le même sort qu'en septembre dernier. Comme tout le monde, je veux que ce projet soit approuvé avec suffisamment de mesures d'adaptation pour satisfaire les peuples autochtones, mais je souhaite aussi que cette séance ait lieu.

Comme je n'ai accès à aucun renseignement privilégié sur ce dossier, j'ai structuré l'amendement de manière à garantir que nous rencontrerons le ministre après que la décision aura été prise. Selon la motion proposée par Mme Stubbs, le ministre pourrait comparaître avant que la décision ait été prise, et nous n'obtiendrions pas les réponses aux questions que nous souhaitons poser.

Je comprends que, si la comparution du ministre ne se déroule pas le 20 juin, comme Mme Stubbs l'espère, cela lui permettra de tenir de nombreuses conférences de presse à ce sujet. Mon amendement lui offrira encore ces possibilités, mais je tiens surtout à ce que la comparution du ministre se déroule après l'annonce de la décision, quelle que soit la date à laquelle la décision est annoncée. Ainsi, nous aurons l'occasion de discuter avec le ministre d'enjeux qui peuvent être rendus publics.

Merci.

(1550)

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Monsieur Schmale, vous avez toujours la parole.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Merci. La méthode Simms me plaît.

C'est ce qui nous préoccupe en ce moment. Je vous suis reconnaissant des paroles que vous avez prononcées, et je les comprends parfaitement, mais le problème auquel nous faisons face maintenant, c'est que, lorsque l'annonce a été faite — je ne sais pas à quand cela remonte —, le gouvernement n'avait aucun plan. Nous estimons que, lorsque la décision a été prise, le ministère aurait dû avoir deux plans — indiquant quoi faire dans un cas comme dans l'autre. Les responsables du ministère n'en avaient pas. Il leur a fallu s'informer, et ils ont laissé passer une autre échéance en mai.

Votre amendement ne poserait pas de problème, mais je ne... C'est la raison pour laquelle j'ai parlé de la mention « au plus tard le » parce que, si la décision est retardée, j'aimerais que le ministre comparaisse devant nous afin de justifier le retard et d'expliquer la raison pour laquelle la décision n'a pas été prise, même s'il a déclaré publiquement qu'elle le serait le 18 juin.

Il n'est donc pas acceptable de laisser la porte ouverte. Je comprends l'argument que vous faisiez valoir lorsque vous avez dit que nous pourrions soulever la question auprès des médias, mais, d'une manière ou d'une autre, le ministre doit comparaître sans faute devant nous avant la fin de la session.

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Madame Stubbs.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

J'aimerais confirmer si l'adoption de ma motion dépend de l'adoption de l'amendement favorable. Si mes collègues indiquent qu'ils rejetteront tout simplement la motion et qu'ils ne demanderont pas auministre des Ressources naturelles de comparaître devant notre comité afin de répondre à toutes les questions que j'ai énumérées et d'expliquer aux Canadiens exactement quand et comment le projet d'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain sera mis en oeuvre, en plus d'aborder les questions d'opérations permanentes, de dispositions relatives à la propriété et à l'entretien, de l'ensemble des coûts, de la transparence des comptes-rendus et de la façon dont le réseau fonctionnera à long terme, je trouverai très préoccupant le fait que ma motion sera rejetée si l'amendement n'est pas accepté.

Pour reprendre le point de mon collègue, je précise que c'est exactement la raison pour laquelle j'ai dit que j'espérais que les membres du comité exhorteraient leministre à expliquer comment, au juste, les libéraux planifient de gérer les inévitables contestations devant les tribunaux qui seront entreprises pour contrecarrer l'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain lorsque, nous l'espérons, les libéraux approuveront le projet pour la deuxième fois.

Le fait est qu'au lieu de demander un renvoi à la Cour suprême et de saisir l'occasion de mener des consultations efficaces avec les Autochtones au sujet de l'oléoduc Northern Gateway, le premier ministre a bien entendu décidé d'exercer unilatéralement son droit de veto pour rejeter le projet, en dépit des 31 partenariats avec participation financière conclus avec des Autochtones dans le cadre de ce projet — toutes ces occasions et ce temps que le gouvernement a gaspillés au lieu de mener des consultations appropriées sur les pipelines auprès des collectivités autochtones...

Voilà où nous en sommes maintenant, et le fait est qu'après que le tribunal a déclaré, l'année dernière, que les six mois de consultation supplémentaires organisés par les libéraux au sujet de l'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain avaient échoué, je pense que tous les Canadiens espèrent que les choses ont été faites correctement cette fois, qu'elles résisteront aux contestations et qu'elles prépareront le terrain pour l'avenir. Sinon, il se pourrait que les conservateurs aient l'occasion d'essayer de faire les choses correctement dans six mois. En fait, c'est l'une des questions que le ministre doit venir expliquer.

Que ce processus ait fonctionné ou non, il est probable qu'il sera contesté et éprouvé de nouveau devant les tribunaux. Les Canadiens doivent non seulement connaître exactement les coûts engagés, la date du début des travaux, l'échéancier de construction et la date d'entrée en service, mais ils doivent aussi savoir au juste comment, cette fois, les libéraux exerceront leur compétence fédérale — ce qu'ils n'ont pas réussi à faire au cours des trois dernières années — afin de veiller à ce que le projet d'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain soit mis en oeuvre, étant donné en particulier que le premier ministre a consacré 4,5 milliards de dollars de l'argent des contribuables à l'amélioration du pipeline existant en soutenant que cela garantirait la mise en oeuvre immédiate du projet d'expansion. En fait, il a fait cette déclaration il y a un an.

J'ai simplement besoin d'obtenir cet éclaircissement. Est-ce une proposition à prendre ou à laisser, en ce sens que soit l'amendement favorable est accepté, soit la motion en entier est rejetée par les libéraux, ce qui nous empêchera d'exiger que le ministre des Ressources naturelles comparaisse devant le comité afin de rendre des comptes aux Canadiens?

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Madame Benson, la parole est à vous.

Mme Sheri Benson:

Oui, c'est la question que je me pose.

Si vous souhaitez seulement que le ministre comparaisse devant le comité avant la fin de la session, cette motion différera de celle dans laquelle on fait comparaître le ministre après l'annonce de la décision, ce qui est en quelque sorte... j'apprécie la conversation. Je ne siège pas au sein du comité depuis longtemps, mais j'ai certainement entendu les deux côtés parler avec passion de l'importance d'obtenir des renseignements.

Toutefois, ces deux résultats me semblent différents. Ces conversations seront très différentes. Personnellement, je ne penche ni d'un côté ni de l'autre. Si vous voulez que le ministre comparaisse devant nous avant la fin de la session, la motion devrait l'indiquer. Si vous voulez que le ministre nous visite après la prise de la décision afin que nous puissions poser différents types de questions, j'aimerais également entendre la façon dont mes collègues... Si l'amendement doit être adopté pour que la motion soit adoptée, ce serait bien de le savoir.

Merci.

(1555)

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

La liste d'intervenants est vide. Sommes-nous prêts à mettre l'amendement aux voix?

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Non, nous ne sommes pas prêts. Je pense que nous devons entendre la réponse de nos collègues.

Appuierez-vous la motion seulement si l'amendement est accepté, ou apporterez-vous un appui inconditionnel à la motion?

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Monsieur Whalen, voulez-vous répondre à la question?

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Voulez-vous mettre l'amendement aux voix?

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham):

Si vous êtes prêts à voter sur l'amendement, je suis également prêt à le mettre aux voix.

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham): Voulez-vous débattre de la motion principale, ou passer directement au vote?

M. Nick Whalen:

Passons directement au vote.

(La motion modifiée est adoptée. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Voulez-vous continuer à présider la séance?

Le président suppléant (M. David de Burgh Graham): Voulez-vous que je continue à assurer la présidence?

Mme Shannon Stubbs: Cela ne contrevient-il pas au Règlement?

M. Nick Whalen:

Je vais demander le consentement unanime pour que David de Burgh...

Mme Shannon Stubbs: Je suis plus silencieuse lorsque j'occupe le fauteuil là-bas.

La greffière du comité (Mme Jubilee Jackson):

La motion adoptée à l'unanimité indiquait que M. Graham présiderait la séance pendant la durée de l'étude de la motion de Mme Stubbs, une étude qui a maintenant pris fin.

La vice-présidente (Mme Shannon Stubbs):

Nous allons maintenant suspendre brièvement la séance afin de passer à huis clos.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 30, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.