header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-04-30 RNNR 134

Standing Committee on Natural Resources

(1535)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

Good afternoon, everybody. Thank you for joining us. Our apologies for the last-minute room change. Apparently there are some technical difficulties upstairs which necessitated the move, but we're all here now. It all worked out thanks to our clerk and everybody else who made the change work out so quickly.

This afternoon, pursuant to Standing Order 81(4), we're considering the main estimates for 2019-20: vote 1 under Atomic Energy of Canada Limited; vote 1 under Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission; votes 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 under Department of Natural Resources; votes 1 and 5 under National Energy Board; and, vote 1 under Northern Pipeline Agency. These were referred to the committee on Thursday, April 11, 2019.

Minister, I want to start by thanking you for taking the time to join us today. We all know how incredibly busy you are. We're always grateful to you for making time in your schedule to be here with us. I'd like to also welcome your colleagues who are joining us as well.

You all know the process, so I don't need to give any explanation. I will turn the floor over to you. Following that, we will be going to a period of questions and answers.

Minister, the floor is yours. Thank you.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi (Minister of Natural Resources):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Good afternoon, everyone.

It's great to be here again to talk about what important investments our government has made in forestry, mining and the energy sector since October 2015, and how we can continue to invest in the future of Canada's natural resource sectors. This is a critically important time for our resource sectors and, more importantly, for Canadian workers.

As we all know, the world's energy needs are changing. Countries are increasingly looking to import sustainably sourced products. There is a growing consensus on the need to take immediate and sustained action on climate change. Some may choose to ignore these changes, keep their heads in the sand and hope for the best, but that is not the Canadian way. We are innovators.

Let's not forget that it was Canadians who first discovered how to get oil out of the oil sands. It was Canadians who created the first all-electric, battery-powered gold mine. It was Canadians who first built the largest North American passive house.

So how do we prepare for the future while also responding to the needs of today?

It starts with listening. In 2015, Canadians made it clear that protecting the environment and growing the economy could no longer be treated by the government as opposing goals.

Through Generation Energy, over 380,000 workers and leaders from renewable energy and clean tech, from oil and gas, from municipalities, indigenous leaders and Canadians helped build the idea of what our energy future could look like and how we can get there. We listened, and we have taken action to deliver for middle-class Canadians and those working hard to join the middle class.

We have done this by attracting new investment, extending the mineral exploration tax credit for five years, which is the first ever multi-year extension, and unveiling a plan that will position Canada as the world's undisputed mining leader. It is creating tens of thousands of jobs by supplying the minerals that will drive the clean growth economy.

We are reimagining the forest sector so our vast forests continue to play an essential role in our economy, not just here in Canada but around the world.

Through our investment of over $1 billion in energy efficiency, we are helping Canadians save money on their energy bills while fighting climate change.

We are building our energy future with a clear focus on expanding our renewable sources of energy, gaining access to global markets and making our traditional resources, such as oil and gas, more sustainable than ever.

Continuing this work and building on our progress to date is the big picture behind our main estimates. It mirrors a lot of what you have studied in your work as a parliamentary committee and the valuable recommendations you have provided to our government. I want to thank you for your work on behalf of Canadians.

The funding contained in this year's main estimates would support our department as we address the challenges in front of us, but also the opportunities ahead. This funding includes: advancing the use of new, clean technologies in the resource sector; helping remote, northern indigenous communities reduce their reliance on diesel; combatting the spruce budworm outbreak through early intervention; and extending our support to the many communities impacted by the unjustified tariffs on softwood lumber.

It will also give us the funds needed to implement key pillars of budget 2019. This includes new investments to encourage more Canadians to buy zero-emission vehicles; engage indigenous communities in major resource projects; improve our energy data, a key study from your committee; and enhance our ability to prepare for and respond to disasters that increasingly require federal action.

(1540)



As I noted at the beginning of my remarks, this is a pivotal moment in our country's history and it is not without its challenges, whether they are building pipeline capacity in the west, fending off protectionist measures to our south or changes across our economy in all regions of our country.

Canada's unemployment rate may be at a 40-year low, but we need to be mindful of Canadians who are anxious about their future. ln my home province of Alberta, we have seen ongoing challenges for many workers because of fluctuating commodity prices. Our government sees all of these challenges, and we are taking them head-on.

That is why we announced a $1.6-billion action plan to support workers and enhance competitiveness in our oil and gas sector. That is why our government is providing up to $2 billion to respond to the U.S. tariffs that are threatening Canadian workers in our steel and aluminum sectors. lt is why we built on the $867 million through our softwood lumber action plan with continued support to the forest sector in budget 2019.

lt is why we are providing $150 million to ensure a just transition for workers and communities affected by the phasing out of coal-powered electricity. lt is why we are improving the way we make decisions on major projects, so that all Canadians have trust in their reviews, ensuring that we can advance nation-building projects that will grow our economy without putting our health, environment or communities in harm's way.

It is also why we have been doing the hard work necessary to follow the path set out in the Federal Court of Appeal's decision on the proposed Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. While that decision was a disappointment to many, it provided clear guidance on how the process could move forward in the right way, in a specific and focused way.

Some argue we should ignore that guidance, disregard the court and respond with lengthy appeals designed to avoid our obligations to the environment and to indigenous peoples. Our government took the responsible and more efficient path. We directed the National Energy Board to conduct a review of marine shipping and committed to getting phase three consultations right.

That important work is well under way. The NEB report was delivered on time on February 22. ln parallel, our consultation teams have been hard at work on phase three consultations. These teams, nearly double their original size, have been engaging in meaningful, two-way dialogue to discuss and understand priorities of indigenous communities and to offer responsive accommodations where appropriate. I have also personally met with many indigenous communities to help build a relationship based on trust.

Our work to date has put us in the strong position we are in today to deliver this process for all Canadians. Our work on TMX, our historic investments in solar, wind, geothermal and other forms of energy and our commitment to innovation and the development of new technologies are laying the foundation for a strong Canada both for today and for tomorrow.

Mr. Chair, our government sees our resource industries playing a key role in driving Canada's clean growth economy. We value the expertise and experience at Natural Resources and the drive of all Canadians to help make it happen.

These main estimates are a down payment on Canada's future, a future that our children will inherit with pride and build upon with confidence, a future that will continue to create well-paying, middle-class jobs for Canadians and future generations.

With that, I would be happy to take your questions.

Thank you for having us here.

(1545)

The Chair:

Minister, thank you for your remarks.

The honourable Kent Hehr is going to start us off.

Hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary Centre, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Minister, thank you so much for coming. You have explained how Albertans figured out the oil sands. It was 1975 when Premier Peter Lougheed, Premier Bill Davis and our Liberal government invested in the modern oil sands. In 1997 it was Premier Klein and then prime minister Chrétien investing in the oil sands and expanding them once again.

You rightfully point out the purchase and the going ahead with Trans Mountain pipeline in the right way, but in my riding of Calgary Centre there are many oil companies and in fact energy workers from whom I continue to hear questions about the industry's competitiveness. They are concerned about a potential layering effect from the various environmental regulations and how they might make our oil and gas industry less competitive. We want to ensure that Canada is the supplier of choice for oil and gas around the world. How do we make sure that we are protecting our environment and yet ensuring that we remain competitive globally?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Through you, Mr. Chair, I thank the member so much for that question.

As you know, we were in Calgary last week announcing funding support for a very promising new technology that is investing in testing a prototype for geothermal. When you talk to companies like that, they know that if they are successful in commercializing that technology, it can create 40,000 jobs in western Canada, mainly for people who are currently working in the oil sector, people who are drilling and doing that work. We're investing in new technology and investing in our traditional oil and gas sector to make it more clean and green, with the provisions of the accelerated capital allowance announced in last Year's fall economic statement as well as the $100 million allocated in budget 2019 to foster collaboration and innovation amongst the oil and gas sector.

I can give you a number of examples that make our energy sector competitive. We will continue to keep an eye on it so that we remain competitive. We want to make sure our oil and gas sector, our renewable sector, remains a source of well-paying middle-class jobs for Canadians for decades to come. We will continue to make sure our support is there.

(1550)

Hon. Kent Hehr:

It's my understanding that the Trans Mountain pipeline consultations and review are continuing. I saw the announcement that there will be a further extension in consultations. I'm wondering if you can give us an update on where we are in this process.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

We have eight teams consisting of 60 individuals, professionals who have been engaging in meaningful two-way dialogue with indigenous communities over the last number of months. During that consultation, indigenous communities requested an extension to the timelines. In order to accommodate that reasonable request, we extended the timeline by three weeks. This week we sent out a draft copy of the Crown's consultation and accommodation report to all the communities who engaged with us. Now they're able to comment on that draft report. We want to make sure they have enough time to actually read it and go through it and analyze it and give us good input.

Our goal is to make a decision on this project by June 18. The way things are going, I think we're in a good position to achieve that.

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Market access is the key, Minister. I think with moving forward on Trans Mountain the right way, obviously with Enbridge Line 3 and hopefully with Keystone XL, are you confident that this will be enough to allow us to have our supply from Alberta oil taken care of in the short and medium terms?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Well, we all know—members of this committee have raised this issue a number of times—and Albertans, people in the energy sector and workers in that sector understand that the lack of pipeline capacity is costing our economy jobs. It is costing potential growth in the sector. That's why from day one when we got into office we focused on expanding that pipeline capacity.

We are the government that gave approval to the Nova gas pipeline, which is built in Alberta. We are the government that gave approval to Enbridge Line 3, and the construction of that project in Canada is almost complete. We are working with the U.S. government in alleviating some of the challenges that are being faced in that country. I was in Houston meeting with Secretary Perry to advocate building of the Keystone XL pipeline.

We will continue to work with the private sector to advance their shared goal of moving forward on that project, and taking the right approach to get the process right on the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project is a strong commitment. We are the government that invested $4.5 billion when that project could have possibly fallen apart because of the uncertainty that existed at that time.

(1555)

Hon. Kent Hehr:

In your conversations with oil companies, I know that Suncor, Synova, CNRL and companies like that were very supportive of putting a price on pollution. They understood that climate change is real and we need to be part of that solution.

Is that still your conversation with oil executives? Do they understand the need to move forward in this way?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

In the conversations we have with our energy sector partners, they absolutely understand that choosing between the economy and the environment is a false choice and that we can do both. We can protect our environment and we can continue to grow our economy in a way which at the same time makes sure that indigenous communities are partners, that they are able to participate in the process, and at the same time also participate in the economic opportunities that these projects provide.

The Chair:

Minister, I have to ask you to wrap it up, please. Thank you.

Mr. Schmale, I understand you're going to go first, but you're splitting your time with Ms. Stubbs. Is that right?

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC):

That's correct.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Thank you, Minister, for being here. I appreciate your testimony. I have a lot of questions to get through, as you can imagine, so I'm going to try to keep them brief. Maybe you can be equally tight with your answers, and we'll try to get through as many as possible.

The first is with regard to TMX. The Federal Court of Appeal said, “The concerns of the Indigenous applicants, communicated to Canada, are specific and focussed. This means that the dialogue Canada must engage in can also be...brief and efficient...”.

Between October and February, the National Energy Board conducted extensive consultations with indigenous communities, including hearing oral testimony in multiple cities in both Alberta and British Columbia. The courts never questioned the consultation process of the NEB.

You say June 18 is your goal. What assurances can Canadians have, given that so far, every deadline set has been missed?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

First of all, through you, Mr. Chair, there were two issues the Federal Court identified in the ruling of August 30, 2018. One was the issue of not conducting the review of marine safety related to marine tanker traffic. That was the process which the NEB had undertaken, and they have made a decision and a recommendation to approve this project.

The other issue is the indigenous consultation that my department has been undertaking. We have been clear from day one that our goal is to get the process right, so we never set a deadline on the conclusion of those consultations. We've always said that we will make a decision when we feel that we have adequately discharged our constitutional obligation for meaningful consultation with the indigenous communities. Now we feel with the work that has been done that our goal is to make that decision by June 18.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Minister, thank you.

By pushing off the decision date to June 18.... The Prime Minister confirmed to Premier Kenney on April 18 that, quote, he just needed two more weeks to complete consultations with indigenous communities. Obviously, it's been longer than two weeks. Can you confirm that shovels will be in the ground this summer?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

We extended the consultation process by three weeks at the request of the indigenous communities. I think it is a reasonable request coming from our partners who we are engaging. Cabinet would have to make a decision on this project, and I cannot predetermine the decision of cabinet. Once that decision is made, the next part of the process will unfold.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Okay. I have more, but I have to cede my time to Ms. Stubbs.

Thank you, Minister.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC):

Minister, I think what's concerning is the judge in the court ruling specifically said that the renewed consultations with indigenous communities can be brief and efficient. Instead of that happening, you were threatening very recently that you will not meet the June 18 deadline for the final cabinet decision. That's why we're asking these questions.

The National Energy Board, even with the expanded scope of course, has said twice that the project is in the national interests, with two exhaustive, independent, scientific assessments of the expansion.

You said last year that not building Trans Mountain is not an option. The Prime Minister said 11 months ago that we're going to get that pipeline built. Your predecessor said you were buying the pipeline to get the expansion built right away. The finance minister said you were doing that to build it immediately. Your Liberal cabinet had already approved the pipeline previously.

Given what I'm sure is our shared value of the evidence-based, science-based, expert-based and independent regulator's recommendation, can you commit that the cabinet will approve the TMX on June 18 and indicate when shovels will be in the ground?

(1600)

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

I think it is important to understand that, when we undertook the analysis of the court ruling, we also engaged former Supreme Court justice Iacobucci to give us the advice to ensure that we are properly understanding the direction of the court, but also whatever decision is made in the future, that the process can withstand the challenges of the commitments that we have made under the constitutional obligations the Crown has to indigenous communities.

My goal is to ensure that the process is properly followed, that we do not cut corners on that process.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Thank you, Minister. You confirm that the cabinet will approve the TMX again. That's fine.

On a different topic, last week you publicly threatened to include in situ oil sands projects under Bill C-69's project lists, in a political response to the election in Alberta. Of course, I'm sure you know and feel just as strongly as I do, as an Albertan, that oil extraction and upstream resource development is provincial jurisdiction, and of course a threat is only a threat if there's a negative consequence.

Now that you've finally admitted what industry, economists, first nations, premiers and other groups have been saying for a year, that Bill C-69 is meant to harm oil and gas development, will you commit to repealing Bill C-69 before it's too late and ensure that in situ oil sands projects will not face federal review?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Through you, Mr. Chair, when the draft discussion paper was launched regarding what goes on the project list, it was mentioned in the draft discussion that in situ projects will be exempt from Bill C-69 federal review as long as there is a cap on emissions in the jurisdiction where they are being proposed. We have been clear, as part of the pan-Canadian framework on climate change and clean growth, we want to ensure that our oil and gas sector continues to grow in a sustainable way and that they're able to continue to innovate. We will continue to support them investing in new clean technologies. The sector can continue to grow, and at the same time we want to make sure that emissions are controlled as well.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

You will risk provincial jurisdiction being intervened and in situ oil sands development in Alberta potentially being exposed to a federal review.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

We look forward to—

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

That's seven minutes, Chair.

Yes, it is. That was my concluding comment.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

—working with the new government.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

Mr. Cannings.

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP):

Thank you, Minister, for being here today.

I'm just going to start with some follow-up questions. The last time you were here, I gave you three suggestions that you might want to consider in the budget. Having now seen the budget, I just wanted to follow up with those.

One is about home retrofits. We all know that energy efficiency is one of the best ways to reduce our greenhouse gas footprints in Canada. We had a very successful program here started by the Conservative government in the previous parliaments, the eco-energy retrofit program. Its last iteration had $400 million in the 2011 budget. Unfortunately it was cancelled and hasn't been brought up again by this Liberal government. First, it seemed that retrofits were kicked over to the provinces in the pan-Canadian framework, and in this budget, there's an item for $300 million that is being put down under the municipalities through the FCM.

I'm rather confused and concerned that the federal government hasn't taken it upon itself to actually do this itself. This is leadership that I think Canadians expect from the federal government. With something as serious as climate action, we really need to do things quickly and boldly. It seems that this is just another example of putting things down onto the municipalities.

I'm confused. For one thing, in the book here, it says in one place that this is to be spent in the 2018-19 fiscal year. In another place it says it's to be spent in the 2019-20 year. That's not what I'm concerned about here. It's just one more confusion.

I guess now that this money has been transferred, I assume to FCM, how long will they have to spend this? Is this a one-year pot, like the $400-million pot that the Conservatives put up? Will municipalities have to sign on individually? I don't live in a municipality. How do I access this program? If we had done it nationally, those questions would not have to be asked.

(1605)

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Through you, Mr. Chair, thank you so much for that question because we believe that energy efficiency is one of the ways that we can reduce the impact of climate change and make our communities more resilient and reduce emissions.

The funding that you are referring to, the $1 billion that is being transferred—

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Well, it's $300 million for retrofits.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

A portion of that is going to the FCM. Then there's a gas tax transfer to municipalities as well that directly goes to municipalities. Funding is also available for energy efficiency through, as you mentioned, the bilateral agreements that we signed with the provinces, plus $300 million is to be managed by the FCM.

We're trying to supplement and not duplicate. We are trying to ensure that programs are already effectively working. FCM has managed a green municipal fund for the last decade or maybe longer, so we are just supplementing the good work the FCM is doing.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I'm thinking about my riding. It's mainly tiny communities of 500 people, 1,000 people. These are not communities that have the resources, the people resources, the administration resources, to manage these programs on their own. Why are you putting it on them or the FCM rather than doing it through the federal government?

I'll move on now because I have a few more questions.

The last time I asked, I was looking for ways the federal government could support the forest industry. As you know, it's having hard times. We still have softwood lumber tariffs hanging over it. There are mills in my riding that are closing for periods of time this spring to save money because they've been hit as lumber prices have fallen.

The last time you were here, I suggested that the federal government could put up bold funding to help these communities and this industry and also keep them protected. We've had two years of forest fires in British Columbia alone that cost $1 billion a year just to fight the fires, and perhaps $10 billion in costs to deal with the aftermath.

The forest experts I've talked to suggest that we should be spending $1 billion each year in British Columbia to mitigate those actions. I see small, various programs to help the forest industry in this budget, but I don't see anything significant that will go after the safety of communities in forest environments. With most of the communities in British Columbia, for instance, and many communities across Canada, where the federal government could provide funding that would help the provinces and municipalities thin the forests in the interface areas, it would provide fibre for local mills, provide work and keep people safe.

I met with a community group in my riding a couple of weeks ago. They're one of Canada's top fire safe communities. They are desperate for any government help they can find. Right now, they get $500 a year. If they got $1,000 a year, they'd be happy. They're just a tiny community. I'm wondering why I don't see anything in this budget that is a significant help in terms of fire smarting these forest communities.

The Filmon report suggested an amount for British Columbia, an amount that has not even.... Only 15% has been sent. We're talking about billions of dollars here.

I'm wondering if there's any hope for the future that this federal government will step up and make some really meaningful contribution in this regard.

(1610)

The Chair:

Minister, he didn't leave you very much time to answer that question, so if you could be very brief, I'd be grateful.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Yes. I look forward to engaging more on specific communities and projects, or ideas that you may have in mind.

I spoke with my counterparts, all the forestry ministers, a few months ago about having a joint working group to develop some proposals on how we can work together on those issues.

I can definitely follow up with you on that.

The Chair:

Thank you.

You're out of time.

Mr. Whalen.

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thanks for coming, Minister.

In Mr. Cannings' remarks, he got almost to the point of asking you a question on how the Government of Canada is helping rural and remote communities in this budget.

I am looking at table A.2, Natural Resources Canada's 2019-20 transfer payments. It says that we're increasing those amounts from last year to this year from $14.2 million to $21.4 million.

Can you or your officials provide us with some colour as to how this money is going to help rural and remote communities access clear energy programs, and what type of administrative support might be available for smaller communities that don't have the in-house capacity to necessarily think through all the options themselves?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Through you, Mr. Chair, there are a number of programs available for rural, isolated and northern communities, whether they are in the area of getting those communities off diesel to new renewable sources of energy, or using waste wood to turn that into biofuels, or investments in indigenous communities to encourage indigenous economic development.

I'll ask my officials to elaborate a little more on that particular program.

Ms. Cheri Crosby (Assistant Deputy Minister and Chief Financial Officer, Corporate Management and Services Sector, Department of Natural Resources):

I'm happy to do that.

Through you, Chair, the particular thing you're referring to is the clean energy for rural and remote communities program, which is increasing by $7 million from last year. It was launched in budget 2017, the year before, so we've been ramping it up.

In terms of some of the details, we have committed to supporting the deployment of renewable electricity technologies for $89 million.

We're going to be getting into demonstrating renewable technologies in electricity and heating, deploying bioheat technologies in rural and remote communities, supporting capacity building as well, and just encouraging energy efficiency through a variety of ways.

I'll leave it there, unless you want more detail.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

For the record, I think that probably responds to Mr. Cannings' earlier statement.

In terms of the extension of time in order to fully complete the consultation process with indigenous groups for the Trans Mountain expansion, you indicated that you've engaged former justice Iacobucci on this. My own province was obviously quite anxious about our own indigenous consultations with respect to offshore exploratory drilling, which have come to what we understand to be a successful conclusion.

Maybe you can provide us with some context on why it's important to provide this extension and what confidence you can give us, based on the experience of the government thus far, that our new processes in this regard are working, are compliant and will survive a court challenge.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Through you, Mr. Chair, we are very serious about how we engage with indigenous communities. We learn new things and look for new opportunities to engage in a meaningful way.

In this particular case, those drilling projects had a number of conditions that were imposed, and rightfully so. I think we have a lot of expertise in our offshore authorities and the bodies that do the consultations. We've continued to learn how to engage, and in some cases, some processes are better than others, so we will continue to explore and learn.

(1615)

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Is there anything in particular you'd like to elaborate on in terms of the three-week extension that might be able to give us some comfort that this is the right thing to do?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

I would say one of the ways of being open and responsive is to listen to your partners in a sincere way. They made a sincere request to us for an extension and we responded. I think our responding to the request that indigenous communities made to us shows our commitment.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

In terms of making Canada a global leader in mining, at a conference in Toronto just a couple of months ago I heard from mining leaders that they want to make sure that when they engage in scientific discussions with the government, they and the government are learning from past practice, moving forward and not reinventing the wheel.

Can you provide us some clarity on how your department is ensuring we're learning from past practice and continually improving our environmental regulatory process?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Through you, Mr. Chair, we were very happy to launch the Canadian mineral and metals plan. I'm pretty sure some of you have seen it. If you haven't, I would encourage you to look at it. We can provide copies. This work is a collaboration with industry and many stakeholders.

In an economy where more investments are being put into solar, wind and electric vehicles, the minerals and metals we have as Canadians have a huge potential for us to create thousands and thousands of well-paying jobs throughout the country and will help transition to a more clean and green economy.

This helps deal with climate change. It allows us to move forward on creating jobs as well as investments in new technologies, for example, in the extraction area. The first-ever all-electric gold mine, the Borden gold mine, is a good example of how we can work with industry to support that.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Mr. Schmale, I understand you're splitting your time again. You have five minutes this time.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Thank you very much.

Thank you, Minister. I will be very quick.

Minister, I want to talk about your subsidies for zero-emission vehicles. As I'm sure you know, we have seen that none of the total electric vehicles are made in Canada. The only hybrid made in Canada is the Chrysler Pacifica.

Having said that, I went on the Nissan Canada website and I built myself the most basic Nissan Leaf, one of the best-selling electric vehicles on the planet, with no toys, nothing. It costs $817.74 a month.

Given that this is a mortgage payment for some, can you please explain this to me? I don't understand why we're subsidizing the very rich to purchase these vehicles that aren't even made in Canada.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Through you, Mr. Chair, there's a cap on the price for the vehicles that can be purchased through this incentive, and that price is to ensure that middle-class Canadians are able to access this incentive and that the wealthy Canadians, who can probably afford to buy—

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Yes, but that $817 includes the discount.

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

The other goal is to spur more innovation and investment in zero-emission vehicles as part of our overall climate change plan. That's the reason this incentive is provided.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

Thank you.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Thank you, Minister.

By how many cents will your government's new fuel standard increase the cost of a litre of diesel, a litre of gasoline and a cubic metre of natural gas?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

The discussion around fuel standards is being led by Minister McKenna at ECCC. They are in discussions with industry stakeholders. We will make sure that we always keep our competitiveness in mind when we launch any policy, making sure that middle-class Canadians who work hard every day to be part of the middle class, that their living remains affordable. That's why—

(1620)

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

The policy has been posted on your department's website for months, and I just find it incredible that after two years of developing the policy, Liberal ministers don't seem to be able to answer how much it would cost Canadians.

The Chemistry Industry Association of Canada says the fuel standard will be the equivalent of a $200 a tonne carbon tax. Industry is saying anywhere between $150 to $280 a tonne carbon tax, and your government provided a 95% exemption from the carbon tax for large emitters, as the environment minister said, “to stay competitive and keep good jobs in Canada”.

If those companies, according to that analysis, will do what Conservatives have been warning about for years, shut down their businesses and kill jobs in Canada if they pay more than 5% of your carbon tax, how can you rationalize imposing these dramatic costs on those same businesses in the new fuel standard?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

I look forward to meeting with the association tomorrow. We have been working very closely with the petrochemical industry as well. I was back home in Alberta last week announcing $49 million that is going to generate $4.5 billion of new investment in Alberta's economy.

It is in the best interest of all that our industry remain competitive.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

To that end, I hope you will advocate very aggressively that the government know what it's doing before it imposes this policy since the cost-benefit analysis says there are no models to determine emissions reductions credit supply or the economic impacts of the fuel standard.

Mr. Chair, I would like to move a motion: That, pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), the Committee immediately invite the Minister of Natural Resources to appear before the Committee on Thursday, June 20, 2019, for no less than a full meeting, to advise the Committee of the government’s plan to build the Trans Mountain Expansion; and that this meeting be televised.

The Chair:

I would propose we set aside some time for committee business this Thursday because we have time in our schedule. We can deal with the motion then and that doesn't eat into our time here.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Yes, I look forward to that. I'm sure the minister will be more than willing to come to tell Canadians about the start date of construction, the timeline for construction, the in-service date of the Trans Mountain expansion, how much it will cost taxpayers, and also the plans on whether or not the Trans Mountain expansion will be built and then operated in the long term by the private sector.

The Chair:

Thank you. We'll discuss that on Thursday, then.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Great.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, the floor is yours to finish it off.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I have a couple of quick questions before I get into the forestry industry, which is obviously important to my riding.

This is just a quick question. Eight years ago the Conservatives sold AECL, or a chunk of it, for $15 million. I'm wondering how we did on our investment. We sold it for $15 million, but we still have to put quite a lot of money into AECL. Was it a good idea to sell it eight years ago, or sell a chunk of it?

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

I would have to get back to you on that question.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I think my point is made.

I want to build on Mr. Cannings' question earlier. As you know, forestry is a very important industry in my large rural riding not far from here. I want to thank you first of all for the helpful announcement to Uniboard two weeks ago, which will be an enormous help in greening the factory we have in a very défavorisée part of the riding that has a lot of economic issues. It will help save a lot of jobs in this area. It's one of the biggest players I have in my riding.

The forestry industry has faced a lot of challenges in the last few years. In 1987 in my riding we lost the railways. They were ripped out and they were sold for scrap. In 1990 we lost the ability to log drive. Also, we've had a lot of problems with the American trade sanctions on forest products that have caused untold trouble. We have only one road in and out of the riding that can be used for logging, and we have now a worker shortage, which is impacting the ability to keep the businesses running.

What can you tell us about what we can do for the forestry sector, short term and long term, and also in terms of expanding second and third transformation, which we do very little of in my area?

(1625)

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Through you, Mr. Chair, I can highlight a number of things. Some are related to my ministry, and some are not.

For example, there is the $2-billion rural infrastructure fund that allows roads to be constructed in the rural communities, or the $2-billion trades corridor fund that communities can access. An investment of $250 million was allocated in budget 2019 to foster more innovation and diversify the sector and help it grow. The forestry sector is a very important sector for Canada, and yes, it is facing challenges as far as relations with the U.S. are concerned. The three trade agreements that our government has signed absolutely open up so much potential for our products to be imported because we have the best product. We have the way we harvest and environmental sustainability in the practices. I think that absolutely those are some of the things we have been doing.

I don't know, DM, if you want to elaborate on some of the other support systems that we have in place in the forestry sector.

Ms. Christyne Tremblay (Deputy Minister, Department of Natural Resources):

Thank you, Chair. We're recognizing the importance of the forest sector and we're working on many fronts. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You can answer in French if you want.

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Okay.

We are working on several fronts, the first of which is the competitiveness of the sector. Together with all provinces and territories, we have developed a forest bioeconomy framework, which will allow us to diversify forest products and add to their value. The framework is actually the first item on the agenda for the Canadian Council of Forest Ministers meeting, which starts this evening.

Second, we are making huge investments in innovation. The most recent budget devoted the major sum of $100 million to the area. The money comes from strategic investment funds for promising projects, such as biofuels and high value-added wood products.

Third, we are making substantial investments in market diversification so that Canadian wood can be used overseas. Major projects are underway in China, including Tianjin, where we are demonstrating ways to include wood in construction and how that contributes to our efforts to fight climate change.

Fourth, as the minister mentioned, the government is providing significant assistance to the softwood lumber industry. His plan was not only to help the workers and the companies targeted by the countervailing duties, but also to encourage market and product diversification. The plan has worked very well. Also today, the minister will chair a working group, made up of all ministers with responsibility for forests, that is monitoring the health of our forestry sector and ensuring that measures are in place to assist local communities, workers and the industry.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My time is up.

Thank you very much. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Minister, thank you very much. That's all the time we have in the first hour. It goes by very quickly. We're very grateful to you for taking the time and making yourself available to join us today, as always.

We're going to suspend for just two minutes, and then Ms. Tremblay and Ms. Crosby are going to stay, and some other officials will be joining us for the second hour.

Thank you, Minister.

(1625)

(1630)

The Chair:

Welcome back, everybody. Thank you for being so good with the time. We are continuing now.

We have six departmental officials with us.

Thank you for staying and being with us here today. We have the deputy minister and five assistant deputy ministers. I would think that would be a pretty hard panel to stump when we're talking about this, not to set the bar too high, of course.

We're going to jump right into questions and having put that out there, Mr. Hehr, it's your job to try to stump them first.

(1635)

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I doubt I will be able to do that.

I know that with increased climate change we're seeing the ravages of flooding and environmental impacts throughout the country. We see an increase in those in ever-increasing numbers. I think it was stated that a rise in contributions from the federal purse is going out to cover these damages each and every day.

In any event, I know that in the estimates NRCan is seeking $11.1 million to ensure better disaster management preparation, response and improved emergency management in Canada.

Can you describe what these will go towards funding? [Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Thank you.

I am very pleased that you raised that question, which unfortunately is very much in the news, given the flooding we are seeing in Quebec and Ontario. They cause major costs in economic terms, but also in human terms that must be considered. Often these natural disasters threaten the safety and resilience of people as well as the protection of their possessions. This is important. We have to be very responsible in the way we deal with these disasters.

We are increasingly realizing that we have to build communities that are much more resilient in the face of disasters such as floods or forest fires. In the last budget, the Department of Natural Resources received $88 million over five years so that we can work with the provinces and territories on measures to increase the resilience of communities. A major part of that funding will go to forest fire prevention.

I am pleased that I have been asked a number of questions on the forests today. In the last year, all provinces and territories have focused on ways to fight forest fires and to ensure that communities are better prepared to face those disasters. A Canada-wide plan on forest fires has just been developed. All provinces and territories support it, but there are also initiatives that have to be considered.

Some people may not be able to hear me. Do you want me to stop, Mr. Chair? [English]

The Chair:

Yes, for Mr. Cannings.

Mr. Richard Cannings: It's okay now.

The Chair: All right. All systems are working now. [Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

I am happy to answer your question about natural disasters, Mr. Cannings. My department is actually going to receive $88 million to ensure that communities are resilient to natural disasters. A large part of that amount will be used in fighting forest fires. As you know, British Columbia saw major forest fires last year. The money will also be used to increase our forecasting and mapping abilities. The goal is for us to be more proactive and better prepared, so that we are able to see the disasters coming. [English]

Hon. Kent Hehr:

Thank you for that answer.

We heard some questioning by Mr. Schmale around our new incentive program to encourage people to look at electric vehicles. I'm hoping that you can tell me a bit more about that program.

As well, Hannah Wilson from my office stated that about 80% of cars in that marketplace would be available for that price point. Are there cars available at the $45,000 cap? Would those be available? How does the program work?

(1640)

[Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Thank you for the question.

Increasing sales of zero-emission vehicles is a major objective for the government. As you mentioned, a new incentive program is designed to encourage consumers to choose those vehicles. Transport Canada, not Natural Resources Canada, is responsible for the program. However, we have to make sure that the cars can be driven and recharged. So we have to make sure that the infrastructures are in place.

We are already working to establish a network of more than 1,000 charging stations across Canada. In some cases, these will be electric charging stations and in others the stations will work on hydrogen or natural gas. In the most recent budget, we received funds to add 20,000 charging stations. This time, they will be installed near where Canadians live. In other words, stations will be in their homes, and near where they work and play, even in the parking lots they use. For us, therefore, this is a major investment.

In addition, we are continuing to work very hard for the stations to be more effective. If I may, I will give the floor to Frank Des Rosiers, our assistant deputy minister responsible for everything related to clean technologies in our department. He works specifically with certain technologies in order to ensure that Canadians who own vehicles of that kind are able to drive them.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers (Assistant Deputy Minister, Innovation and Energy Technology Sector, Department of Natural Resources):

Exactly.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[English]

Perhaps to add to the deputy's remark, this is actually one of those areas that is important for Canada. We've seen all those cars on the road. They account for roughly a quarter of our GHG emissions in the country. Making a dent in this actually matters a great deal.

We have not only an opportunity to deploy existing technology, but also to develop new ones. We have a number of innovators in the country. I'm thinking about AddÉnergie, for instance, based in Shawinigan, Quebec. They are in the process of developing, thanks to our support and the support of the provincial government as well, new infrastructure, for instance, to have a solution for those residing in condos and multi-residential units. Right now there aren't a lot of solutions being offered in the marketplace, and we're looking for those kinds of solutions.

Another angle that we've been exploring is what the impact is of having thousands, tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of vehicles on the grid. Picture if you are running a utility and a sizable electrical grid, and you suddenly have this large amount of demand out there. How do you manage this? What's the cybersecurity consideration around having such a large amount of new demand in the marketplace?

These are the kinds of solutions and issues we've been striving to resolve.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Falk.

Mr. Ted Falk (Provencher, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you to department officials for attending.

I have a whole bunch of questions. I'll try to fire through them and we'll see how it goes. I don't care who answers.

We've bought a pipeline. Have we paid for it? That is the question. Have we paid for the pipeline?

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Mr. Labonté will answer.

Mr. Jeff Labonté (Assistant Deputy Minister, Major Projects Management Office, Department of Natural Resources):

Have we paid for the pipeline, meaning has the transaction been closed?

Mr. Ted Falk:

Correct.

Mr. Jeff Labonté:

I believe the transaction has been closed, but I think the Minister of Finance is responsible for the execution through CDIC, the Crown agency that's responsible for delivering and operating the pipeline.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Okay.

Would the Crown agency also incur all the costs associated with it now in order to proceed towards the expansion, or would that be a departmental cost?

Mr. Jeff Labonté:

The Crown agency is run through its own separate board of directors, but I'm getting to the margins of my knowledge base here, given that it's the Minister of Finance's officials and whatnot. It's run through, as I understand it, a separate board of directors. It has its own, if you will, financial regime under which it operates.

Of course at this point there's no certificate for an expansion to occur, so it's operating the pipeline that exists today and waiting for the decision that will come—should it come—related to the project decision on the expansion part.

(1645)

Mr. Ted Falk:

Okay. Very good.

The carbon tax was implemented in my province recently. I saw just over a 4.5¢ per litre increase on the price of gas, and just over 5¢ per litre on the price of diesel fuel. Do you have projected revenues on what that will bring in? [Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

That is a question for Environment and Climate Change Canada. [English]

Mr. Ted Falk:

So your department hasn't been tasked at all with calculating the amount of fuel that's going to be burned. You have not been involved in that at all. [Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

There has certainly been collaboration between the departments, but the question should go to another department. [English]

The Chair:

There's your answer.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Okay. Can you give me the volumes, then, of fuel that you expect to be taxed with this carbon tax, either gasoline or diesel? Have you done that calculation? [Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

As I have already said, the question should be addressed to Environment and Climate Change Canada, which is responsible for the carbon tax, or to the Department of Finance Canada, which is responsible for calculating the revenue from that tax. [English]

Mr. Ted Falk:

Mr. Chair, I'm not looking anymore for the dollar amounts; I can do the math myself. I'm looking for volume. That, I think, would be something that would fall under this department's jurisdiction.

The Chair:

I understood the question, and I think they did too, but the answer's the answer, Mr. Falk.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Okay.

Getting back to my colleague's question on the Canadian fuel standard, have there been any calculations done by the department on the effect of that? [Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Department of Natural Resources is collaborating with the industry on the work being done on the clean fuel standard. A consultation is under way. Our department is working with various companies, the industry, as well as Environment and Climate Change Canada to analyze the effects of the scenarios that come up and that are of concern to the industry and to companies on an individual basis. When the regulations are published, the stakeholders will provide cost estimates, as always. [English]

Mr. Ted Falk:

On the large emitters of carbon that are being exempted with the 95% rule, you've obviously done some calculations. Can you tell me how many tonnes of emissions have been exempted? [Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

The same answer goes for that question as well. [English]

Mr. Ted Falk:

Okay, I'll go to something easy here.

Let's talk about the spruce budworm. What are the objectives and expected results of phase one of the spruce budworm early intervention strategy? [Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

I am very pleased that that question has been asked, Mr. Chair. With your permission, I will yield the floor to Beth MacNeil, our assistant deputy minister for the Canadian Forest Service. [English]

Ms. Beth MacNeil (Assistant Deputy Minister, Canadian Forest Service, Department of Natural Resources):

I'm not sure whether the question was about phase one or phase two, because the early intervention strategy is actually phase two. Could I get some clarity on that?

Mr. Ted Falk:

Yes, sorry, I meant phase two.

Ms. Beth MacNeil:

The Government of Canada allocated approximately $74.5 million for phase two. We are just beginning year two.

I'm very happy to report that early signs show that this is very successful. Many of the resources are going to spraying operations to attack hot spots as well as to monitoring. Since 2014 we've seen a reduction of 90% of the spruce budworm populations in New Brunswick. We believe if we're successful there, it will not spread into Nova Scotia, P.E.I. or Newfoundland and Labrador.

(1650)

The Chair:

You have 20 seconds.

Mr. Ted Falk:

Yes, I have questions; I just might get an answer sometime.

The Chair:

Okay, that will take us to Mr. Cannings.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Thank you, Chair, and thank you to all of you for being here.

I'm going to start with a question that I meant to ask the minister, but I ran out of time because I rambled on too much, I guess.

A few weeks ago, I was here in this room, or a room very like it, listening to the commissioner on the environment and sustainability give her final report of her tenure here. In that report she said, “For decades, successive federal governments have failed to reach their targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and the government is not ready to adapt to a changing climate. This must change.”

Part of the report that she was presenting at that meeting was about fossil fuel subsidies. I don't have the quote right in front of me, but one of the breakout headlines of that report was to the effect that this government, after four years, couldn't even define what an inefficient fossil fuel subsidy was, yet it went on in the next breath to say that we don't have any.

I remember being in Argentina with the former minister when the big topic at the G20 meeting was about whether this government would commit to removing all subsidies for fossil fuels and instead put in significant incentives for renewable energy.

I'm just wondering if Mr. Khosla or somebody could.... [Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[English]

A clean environment and a strong economy go hand in hand. There is a lot of work that is being done on inefficient fossil fuel subsidies, and I think it's very key to understand and highlight inefficient fossil fuel subsidies. We believe that what we're doing in Canada doesn't fall under this, but we agreed to conduct a peer review with Argentina. The Minister of Finance is responsible for that.

Recently, the Minister of Environment and Climate Change launched a consultation. She appointed a commissioner who is going to consult Canadians about fossil fuel subsidies. There are some definitions that exist that can be used and are referred to in the discussion paper that's being published at the same time as we launch this consultation.

If you want to speak more about this definition, I would turn to Mr. Des Rosiers, who is in charge of this file.

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

Maybe I'll just add that the purpose of that consultation is precisely to see the views of Canadians and parliamentarians, should they have views in terms of what should be involved or not. There are lots of definitions out there.

In Europe, they have adopted some model within the European Commission. The commissioner actually referenced the multiplicity of definitions present and captured it in that consultation paper, which is fairly thorough.

The government wants to have that open dialogue with Canadians to seek their views on it.

Michael Horgan, former deputy minister of finance is involved in this consultation. He's a very respected senior official. Their work has just been kicked off recently. We look forward to hearing Canadians' views.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Moving on then, there was a brief discussion of electric vehicles. Mr. Schmale tried to make the point about how expensive they are for the average Canadian. From the studies I've seen, if you take into account the very little money you spend maintaining them and fuelling them, it works out to be about the same.

My first question is, because I have the figure of $10 million written down here and I fear it might be low, how much money is in the budget for building charging infrastructure across the country? Is it $10 million or $100 million?

(1655)

Ms. Cheri Crosby:

According to the budget 2019 announcement, there was an additional $435 million, of which $130 million comes to NRCan over five years, with $10 million this year.

Our package in terms of building the infrastructure will be closer to $130 million over the five years, but in the main estimates this year, it will show up as $10 million.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Getting back to my point, we have to be bold with this. By my calculations, $10 million will build about 100 charging stations if they're the fast-charging stations that people would want. We're already getting reports in cities like Vancouver of people waiting a long time because there are.... If you can imagine, 100 gas pumps across Canada wouldn't fuel too many cars.

I would urge the government to put more effort into that department. That said, I'm glad there are charging stations out there now. If I did buy an electric car now, I think I could get around my riding with that.

Coming back to the retrofits, I wanted to try to get some more clarity on that about this new program. FCM, Federation of Canadian Municipalities, has now been given $300 million for home retrofits for private homes.

How can Canadians get involved in that? Do they have to contact FCM? Do their own municipalities have to get involved? If they're not in a municipality, how can they access that? Is it this year, or is it last year? [Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

If I may, Mr. Chair, I will give a partial answer before I hand over to Mr. Khosla.

Your first concern is correct, Mr. Cannings. The Federation of Canadian Municipalities, or FCM, is a national voice and has been our partner since 1901. So we are used to working with that partner. It is established in large cities, but also in small municipalities and rural communities. We are going to be working with 19 provincial and territorial associations responsible for reaching out not only to the major centres, but also to small towns and rural municipalities.

The envelope even includes an amount for community action and for work with not-for-profit organizations in small communities so that investments can be made in public buildings. The FCM and its affiliates therefore allow us to ensure that the program will not simply be deployed only in major urban centres.

I will now give Mr. Khosla the floor so that he can explain the program itself. [English]

The Chair:

Very, very quickly.

Mr. Jay Khosla (Assistant Deputy Minister, Energy Sector, Department of Natural Resources):

Okay.

I don't have a whole lot more to add, but to come to the question of retrofits and whether there are residential retrofits contained within...first of all, there's $1 billion that's going to the FCM.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

Oh, I know. There's $300 million for residential retrofits.

Mr. Jay Khosla:

I would say it's closer to $600 million.

We can come back on the figure, but there is retrofit money in there and it's going directly to housing.

Mr. Richard Cannings:

I'm more concerned with how that rolls out to people who don't live in Montreal or Vancouver.

Mr. Jay Khosla:

I understand—

The Chair:

I'm going to have to interrupt.

I gave you some of that three minutes you got last time but didn't think you did.

Mr. Graham, it's over to you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If you'd cut me off with three minutes left to hand it over to Mr. Whalen, I'd appreciate it.

The Chair:

Okay, no problem. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a question for you, Ms. Tremblay.

Vote 35 is to “support a new critical cyber systems framework to protect Canada's critical infrastructure against cyber threats, including in the finance, telecommunications, energy and transport sectors”. Could you tell us a little more about what you are doing? What is Natural Resources Canada's cyber security plan?

I will let you choose who will answer.

(1700)

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Your question is about cyber security, correct?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes. A little more than $800,000 is identified for that and I would like to know what the plans are.

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

You ask an excellent question.

Cyber security is more and more of a concern. Being responsible for a country's energy infrastructure means that it is very important to be on the cutting-edge of cyber security. This is a major concern in our relations, not only with the United States, because a huge amount of infrastructure crosses our border, but also with our partner in Mexico.

We are working with our partners in the private sector, meaning the major public utilities, electricity associations, and oil and gas companies, because pipelines are now the target of attacks. We were recently in discussion with mining sector representatives, who told us that their strategic data had been attacked. Such attacks may well become more common as our economy becomes more and more digitally based.

Canada has minerals, rare ores and metals like lithium that generate a lot of interest. So this is a natural resources sector that we have to protect.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I do not have a lot of time left.

Can I ask you which form this is taking? Are we talking about developers or our own cyber security experts? Are we subsidizing companies that want to work on cyber security?

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

I will start before I give the floor to my colleague, Mr. Khosla.

These are principally investments in critical infrastructures in order to strengthen their resilience. We are also working with our partners, industry and associations, to ensure that we can respond to this concern. Finally, specific amounts are set aside for our work with our American partner.

Mr. Jay Khosla:

I would just like to add that the government wishes to introduce a bill to oversee, and tighten its collaboration with, the industry. [English]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there time left for Mr. Whalen?

The Chair:

You have 30 seconds left until the three-minute mark.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll take it back later.

The Chair:

All right.

Mr. Whalen, are you going to use the rest of the time?

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Yes. Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

On the notion of spending $130 million on charging stations over five years, I was at a local hockey rink on the weekend in Paradise, in part of my riding of St. John's East in Newfoundland. It's a neighbouring community. They had a couple of charging stations out front that are fairly new, but they're already deteriorating from weather and salt in the parking lots.

When I was knocking on doors on the weekend, I met a constituent who was concerned. He wanted to buy an electric vehicle, but they live in a multi-unit dwelling and his parking spot is in a parking lot next to the building. He's concerned that even if he spends the money to have his own charging station installed next to his spot, the plow would knock it or it would get damaged.

What type of money within this envelope is there for operation, maintenance and repair of these assets? Who owns the assets? Is there going to be any sort of comparative analysis done across multiple vendors of these? Are you going to sole-source to a single vendor, or are you going to take this opportunity to do a consumer advocacy piece where you could test and measure hundreds of different suppliers against each other to see whose units last longer and whose are more resilient? What type of work is this and how does this relate to other departments in terms of national building code development around the residential installation of these units? [Translation]

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

That is an excellent question.

An amount of $76 million over six years has been devoted to demonstration projects of the next-generation recharging stations, to make sure that they are resilient and stand up to our Canadian climate.

Mr. Des Rosiers can tell you more about some of those projects.

(1705)

Mr. Frank Des Rosiers:

I mentioned some of the technologies that have been developed.[English]

You're referring to some of the multi-residential units. This was actually one of the market-based focus areas that we heard about. There was not actually a solution that was robust enough to meet our needs.

You mentioned the issues around weather, but there are also challenges around high voltage. As you know, the tendency among users and manufacturers is to go with fast-charging units, which can have an impact in terms of not only the battery system but also the electrical systems, affecting both homes and commercial entities or larger operators. This was also a clear area of focus.

In terms of the details of the implementation of the program, which is the second element of your question, I don't know if the deputy or Jay may wish to elaborate on that.

Mr. Jay Khosla:

Yes, I'm happy to. That is a great question.

As you know, we have already had previous experience with this. In 2016-17, we received about $180 million to administer the first stage. We're into the second stage now. Through that, we've actually deployed 532 fast chargers around the country. We have about 1,000 that need to go to that, and then the second stage, as the deputy mentioned, is more residential, municipal and local.

As a result of that, we know what's out there in terms of technology. We know the kinds of firms that are out there. It's a competitive process that we enter into to do all of this. We will continue to do that, but we've gained a very good understanding of what some of the best firms are within the industry and continue to pursue that.

I would say that's pretty good for the Government of Canada to roll out with that many charging stations so quickly. I'm sorry to toot our own horn, but I'm really proud of the fact that we're moving so quickly in this space.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Who maintains these systems now that they're deployed? How much of this money is directed to O and M? Are consumers going to be given this information? You've done all this research. It would be great if it were made available to the purchasing public.

Mr. Jay Khosla:

Very rapidly, it is a private sector exercise. We do go to the best firms that we possibly can, but it's a competitive thing. It's not up to the government to maintain. We're working with the private sector on that. I think that makes sense.

Yes, we can make the information available. We do have good websites that are up and running, and people can access some of our information. I'm happy to provide other information to the committee as they need it.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Ms. Stubbs.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Thank you, Chair.

Thanks to all the officials for being available for us today.

I have a question about the transition as a result of Bill C-69.

The 2019-20 estimates show an allocation of $3.7 million under vote 5 for the purpose of disbanding Canada's world-leading and historically renowned National Energy Board and replacing it with the new Canadian energy regulator. Since the allotment for that transition is already here even before the bill has become law, I'm hoping that, if possible, you can tell us exactly how long it will take to completely establish the proposed Canadian energy regulator and what year that will be complete, given, of course, the certainty that will be required for investors or proponents of major resource projects. What is the timeline of that transition?

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Mr. Chair, it's a good question, and, as I already mentioned in front of the Senate committee, I believe the implementation will be very crucial if we want to meet the expectations of the industry, so we are already preparing for the transition. It's difficult to have a specific game plan since the bill is not passed yet and is still under discussion, but I can assure you that the agency, the NEB, and all the departments are preparing for the transition. In our case, we received some money to develop a platform and offered to share the science for the impact assessment. There is an emerging concern above all about the cumulative effects, and we are in charge of developing the platform that's going to address this.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Okay. That's interesting. Canada, of course, for decades has been noted as a world leader in terms of measuring the cumulative effects of responsible ownership. That's good.

(1710)

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Thank you.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

If in the coming days or weeks you do end up having any details regarding my specific question, it would be great if you could provide those to all of us.

The 2018 fall fiscal update said the now taxpayer-owned Trans Mountain expansion is on track to earn $200 million annually, but internal documents, as you probably know, indicate that annual interest payments for the $1-billion loans the government took out to pay for it could be costing $255 million per year. That's a $55-million difference. I wonder if you're able to confirm the size of the loans the Government of Canada is liable for related to the Trans Mountain expansion and what the monthly cost to carry those loans is.

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Mr. Chair, it's the finance department that is in charge of this.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Okay.

As you know, on February 22, 2019, the National Energy Board recommended again the approval of the Trans Mountain expansion in the national interest of Canada. The supplementary estimates (B) for 2018-19 show $6 million allocated for the NEB's 22-week reconsideration. Of course, an option for the government at that time, which Conservatives suggested, was emergency retroactive legislation to affirm that the Transport Canada assessment of tanker traffic as a result of the Trans Mountain expansion was sufficient, and the government could have done that, which did feed into the original recommendation by the NEB of approval of the Trans Mountain expansion. Of course, in the 22-week-long redundant duplicative reconsideration of the NEB, they had to appoint two experts from Transport Canada to do that part since Transport Canada is the jurisdiction responsible for that area. Of course, exactly the same information was reviewed; exactly the same mitigation measures were reviewed, and exactly the same recommendation for approval was made from the NEB reconsideration.

Can you tell me if there ever was a cost-benefit analysis done internally to determine the best option for Canadians between emergency retroactive legislation to affirm Transport Canada's original analysis and this 22-week-long NEB reconsideration?

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Mr. Chair, the government made a decision to follow the advice of the Federal Court of Appeal and to ask the NEB to do the review of the marine and to redo the phase three consultations.

The Chair:

Thank you. We're out of time.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Okay, if you find out if there was a cost assessment, that would be great, too.

The Chair:

Mr. Tan, you're last up.

Mr. Geng Tan (Don Valley North, Lib.):

Thank you. It's five minutes, right?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Geng Tan:

I have only one question, so if there is time left, I am willing to share with my colleagues.

Mr. Jamie Schmale:

I'm right over here.

Mr. Geng Tan:

In the main estimates there is funding to AECL to be used as support to nuclear R and D and waste management in Canada.

Having worked in nuclear myself for almost 10 years, I have deep respect for Canada's nuclear talents and our nuclear legacy. Our CANDU R and D has been at the leading edge, for sure, of the peaceful application of nuclear technology in the world. We have nuclear reactors generating electricity to meet the needs of Canadians in Ontario, in New Brunswick and formerly in Quebec.

Right now, the reactor in Quebec has been closed, and the Pickering station will be decommissioned quickly. The chance that they'll have a new build with the CANDU design in the foreseeable future is very low, if I am correct. There is a strong probability that our Canadian nuclear capacity in the future will be significantly impacted.

I use one example. The United Kingdom's experience shows how, in a very similar situation, it lost its ability to design and supply reactors and is now dependent only on importing the design and the equipment.

I wonder what your vision is for the future of nuclear research and the nuclear industry in Canada. Do you see it moving in a positive direction or not?

Thank you.

(1715)

Ms. Christyne Tremblay:

Mr. Chairman, I am very pleased that the member is raising a question on this sector.

For sure, now the nuclear sector is part of the energy mix of this country. He raised that we have expertise. We have a lot of energy coming from that source. The government is investing this year in AECL. Just in this budget it's $1.2 billion.

As a country and as a department, we have a full unit working on that sector in particular. We did a lot of work in the last year on new technology, for example, SMRs that can be used for remote communities, where Canada can have a leading edge, a competitive advantage.

Perhaps I can pass to my colleague, Mr. Khosla, who is in charge of this sector, who can give you some of the progress we've made and maybe address your question about decommissioning and waste management.

Mr. Jay Khosla:

Yes, there are a lot of questions embedded within that primary question of whether there is a future for nuclear.

I could spend a bit of time, but we're very cognizant, as the deputy said, of the fact that Canada is a tier one nuclear nation, and that is really important for the country of Canada.

We're also mindful of the CANDU technology that we have developed here, homegrown, just as we are with every other form of energy that we've developed here. We have been working very hard around the world internationally with the vendors to try to find whether there is uptake in various other countries.

We know that China is growing massively in this area, as is India. We continue to do that. We partner with some other countries, for example, to try to find other markets in Argentina and so on and so forth.

That is a quick answer on CANDU.

The $1.2 billion in the labs is exactly right. That is a huge investment for this government to make sure that the R and D is protected, that the IP is protected and that we're moving forward. I can say lots more on that. I won't at this moment, recognizing the time.

I would say that in terms of SMRs, if you want to talk about the future, really we're seeing a lot of activity in this space right now, and it is in some ways not surprising but in many ways refreshing to see that the world is coming to Canada for a potential play on SMRs, small modular reactors.

That primarily could help the north, we think. We're looking at that. We did a road map, a year-long exercise. We consulted Canadians, and in that road map we found that Canada is one of the best places to do it. We have one project before the regulator, the CNSC, that is going through right now. We have nine proposals.

New York came calling the other day. We went to New York to talk to Bloomberg because they're interested in investing, so I would encourage this committee to continue to look at that element.

The last thing I would say—and there is lots more, as I said—is let's not forget that we have uranium supplies here, too. When it comes to a one-stop shop for nuclear, we have some good things to say, but waste and cost are big issues and we have to get our heads around them in this country, and so does the world. We're working hard toward that end as well.

I hope that's a helpful answer.

The Chair:

It's a good thing you didn't have two questions. That's all your time.

He is out of time. I don't like to be difficult, but I think we need to move on. I think that's all the time we have for witnesses.

We do have some voting to do on the estimates, which will take anywhere from two to 10 minutes depending on the level and spirit of co-operation around the table. I wasn't looking in any particular direction when I said that, Mr. Schmale, just so we're clear.

Thank you very much for taking the time to be here today and answering all our questions. Nobody stumped you on areas of expertise.

We'll suspend briefly.

(1715)

(1720)

The Chair:

We are back on the record.

For the record, Mr. Schmale was sitting in his seat first, to my left. To my right, nobody left their seat.

We now have to vote on the estimates. We have two choices. We can vote on them collectively if we get unanimous consent, or we can vote on them individually if we don't.

Now I am looking to my left, Mr. Schmale.

Mr. Ted Falk:

It's on division for everything.

The Chair:

Okay. I anticipated that. ATOMIC ENERGY OF CANADA LIMITED ç Vote 1—Payments to the corporation for operating and capital expenditures..........$1,197,282,026

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) CANADIAN NUCLEAR SAFETY COMMISSION ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$39,136,248

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$563,825,825 ç Vote 5—Capital expenditures..........$13,996,000 ç Vote 10—Grants and contributions..........$471,008,564 ç Vote 15—Encouraging Canadians to Use Zero Emission Vehicles..........$10,034,967 ç Vote 20—Engaging Indigenous Communities in Major Resource Projects..........$12,801,946 ç Vote 25—Ensuring Better Disaster Management Preparation and Response..........$11,090,650 ç Vote 30—Improving Canadian Energy Information..........$1,674,737 ç Vote 35—Protecting Canada's Critical Infrastructure from Cyber Threats..........$808,900 ç Vote 40—Strong Arctic and Northern Communities..........$6,225,524

(Votes 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 agreed to on division) NATIONAL ENERGY BOARD ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$82,536,499 ç Vote 5—Canadian Energy Regulator Transition Costs..........$3,670,000

(Votes 1 and 5 agreed to on division) NORTHERN PIPELINE AGENCY ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$1,055,000

(Vote 1 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Shall I report vote 1 under Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, vote 1 under Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, votes 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 under Natural Resources, votes 1 and 5 under National Energy Board and vote 1 under Northern Pipeline Agency to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: That is all of our business for today.

Thursday we have the delegation of German parliamentarians coming in. We have no formal meeting, but we're meeting with them in conjunction with the trade committee. I understand that most of you have already agreed to attend. Let's hope everybody can make it. We don't have the room assignment yet.

The Clerk of the Committee (Ms. Jubilee Jackson):

It's room 025B, next door.

The Chair:

Room 025B, next door, at 3:30 p.m. on Thursday.

Mr. Whalen has a question.

Mr. Nick Whalen:

Ms. Stubbs raised an issue about scheduling the June 20 meeting to receive....

We might be able to deal with that right now.

The Chair:

I was going to suggest we deal with it on Tuesday, actually. Tuesday is the last scheduled day for this current study. I think it's only for an hour. We could deal with it then.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

Yes, I like Tuesday better.

The Chair:

Tuesday is better. That gets us out of here.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs:

It gives them more time to know what's happening.

The Chair:

It gives people some time to think about it, and it gets us out of here right now, too.

On that note, thank you everybody.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent des ressources naturelles

(1535)

[Traduction]

Le président (M. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)):

Bonjour à tous. Je vous remercie de vous joindre à nous. Je suis désolé pour ce changement de salle de dernière minute. Il y a semble-t-il des problèmes techniques dans l'autre salle qui ont fait en sorte que nous avons dû nous déplacer, mais nous sommes tous ici maintenant. Tout s'est bien réglé grâce à notre greffière et à tous ceux qui ont fait en sorte que ce changement se fasse rapidement.

Cet après-midi, conformément au paragraphe 81(4) du Règlement, nous examinons le Budget principal des dépenses 2019-2020: crédit 1 sous la rubrique Énergie atomique du Canada limitée; crédit 1 sous la rubrique Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire; crédits 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 et 40 sous la rubrique Ressources naturelles; crédits 1 et 5 sous la rubrique Office national de l'énergie et crédit 1 sous la rubrique Administration du pipeline du Nord. Tout cela a été renvoyé au Comité le jeudi 11 avril 2019.

Monsieur le ministre, je veux d'abord vous remercier de prendre le temps de comparaître devant nous aujourd'hui. Nous savons tous que vous êtes extrêmement occupé. Nous vous sommes toujours reconnaissants de prévoir dans votre horaire du temps pour témoigner devant le Comité. Je tiens aussi à souhaiter la bienvenue à vos collègues.

Vous savez tous comment nous fonctionnons, alors je n'ai pas besoin de vous l'expliquer. Je vais donc vous céder la parole. Après votre exposé, nous allons passer aux questions.

Monsieur le ministre, la parole est à vous. Je vous remercie.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi (ministre des Ressources naturelles):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Bonjour à tous.

Je suis très heureux d'être de nouveau ici. Je parlerai des investissements importants faits par notre gouvernement dans les domaines de la foresterie, de l'exploitation minière et de l'énergie depuis octobre 2015, ainsi que de la façon dont nous pouvons continuer d'investir dans l'avenir des secteurs des ressources naturelles du Canada. C'est un moment très important pour les secteurs des ressources naturelles et, surtout, pour les travailleurs canadiens.

Comme nous le savons tous, les besoins énergétiques de la planète sont en train de changer. Les pays cherchent de plus en plus à importer des produits provenant de sources durables. Il y a un consensus croissant sur la nécessité de prendre des mesures immédiates et durables relativement aux changements climatiques. Certains peuvent choisir de ne pas tenir compte de ces changements, de garder la tête dans le sable et d'espérer pour le mieux, mais ce n'est pas la façon de faire du Canada. Nous sommes des innovateurs.

N'oublions pas que ce sont les Canadiens qui ont découvert la façon d'obtenir du pétrole des sables bitumineux. Ce sont les Canadiens qui ont créé la première mine d'or entièrement alimentée en électricité par batterie. De plus, ce sont les Canadiens, qui, les premiers, ont construit la plus grande maison passive en Amérique du Nord.

Alors, comment allons-nous nous préparer pour l'avenir tout en répondant aux besoins d'aujourd'hui?

Cela commence par l'écoute. En 2015, les Canadiens ont clairement indiqué que la protection de l'environnement et la croissance de l'économie ne pouvaient plus être considérées par le gouvernement comme étant des objectifs opposés.

Dans le cadre de Génération Énergie, plus de 380 000 travailleurs et chefs de file des domaines de l'énergie renouvelable, des technologies propres et du pétrole et du gaz, des municipalités, des dirigeants autochtones et des Canadiens ont aidé à élaborer l'idée de ce à quoi notre avenir énergétique pourrait ressembler et de la façon d'y arriver. Nous avons écouté et nous avons pris des mesures pour obtenir des résultats pour les Canadiens de la classe moyenne et ceux qui travaillent dur pour rejoindre la classe moyenne.

Nous avons attiré de nouveaux investissements, prolongé le crédit d'impôt pour l'exploration minière de cinq ans, la première prolongation pluriannuelle, et dévoilé un plan qui fait du Canada un chef de file mondial incontesté du secteur minier. Nous avons créé des dizaines de milliers d'emplois en fournissant les minéraux qui stimuleront l'économie à croissance propre.

Nous réimaginons le secteur forestier afin que nos vastes forêts continuent de jouer un rôle essentiel dans notre économie, non seulement ici, au Canada, mais partout dans le monde.

Grâce à notre investissement de plus de 1 milliard de dollars dans l'efficacité énergétique, nous aidons les Canadiens à économiser de l'argent sur leur facture d'énergie tout en combattant les changements climatiques.

Nous bâtissons notre avenir énergétique en nous concentrant sur l'expansion de nos sources d'énergies renouvelables, en obtenant l'accès aux marchés mondiaux et en rendant nos ressources traditionnelles, comme le pétrole et le gaz, plus durables que jamais.

La poursuite de ce travail et le fait de s'appuyer sur nos progrès à ce jour constituent le tableau d'ensemble de notre Budget principal des dépenses. Cela reflète une grande partie de ce que vous avez étudié dans le cadre de votre travail en tant que comité parlementaire et les recommandations précieuses que vous avez fournies à notre gouvernement. Je tiens à vous remercier pour votre travail au nom des Canadiens.

Le financement contenu dans le Budget principal des dépenses de cette année appuiera notre ministère alors que nous relevons les défis qui se trouvent devant nous, mais aussi alors que nous voulons saisir les possibilités à venir. Le financement vise ceci: faire progresser l'utilisation de nouvelles technologies propres dans le secteur des ressources; aider les collectivités autochtones éloignées du Nord à réduire leur dépendance à l'égard du diesel; combattre l'épidémie de tordeuse des bourgeons de l'épinette au moyen d'une intervention précoce et étendre notre appui aux nombreuses collectivités touchées par les droits de douane injustifiés visant l'industrie du bois d'œuvre.

Ce financement nous donnera également les fonds nécessaires pour mettre en œuvre les principaux piliers du budget de 2019. Cela comprend de nouveaux investissements pour encourager un plus grand nombre de Canadiens à acheter des véhicules à émission zéro; faire participer les collectivités autochtones dans de grands projets de ressources naturelles; améliorer nos données sur l'énergie, une étude clé de votre comité, et améliorer notre capacité de nous préparer et de réagir aux catastrophes, qui exigent de plus en plus des mesures fédérales.

(1540)



Comme je l'ai fait remarquer au début de mon exposé, c'est un moment charnière dans l'histoire de notre pays, qui comporte son lot de difficultés, qu'il s'agisse de l'augmentation de la capacité des pipelines dans l'Ouest, du fait de se défendre contre les mesures protectionnistes de notre voisin du Sud ou des changements dans l'ensemble de notre économie et dans toutes les régions de notre pays.

Le taux de chômage au Canada est à son plus bas depuis 40 ans, mais nous devons garder à l'esprit les Canadiens qui sont inquiets au sujet de leur avenir. Dans ma province, l'Alberta, nous avons constaté des défis constants pour de nombreux travailleurs en raison de la fluctuation des prix des produits de base. Notre gouvernement voit tous ces défis et nous les affrontons directement.

C'est la raison pour laquelle nous avons annoncé un plan d'action de 1,6 milliard de dollars pour appuyer les travailleurs et accroître la compétitivité de nos secteurs pétrolier et gazier. C'est la raison pour laquelle également notre gouvernement fournit jusqu'à 2 milliards de dollars pour répondre aux tarifs américains qui menacent les Canadiens qui travaillent dans les secteurs de l'acier et de l'aluminium. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous nous servons des 867 millions de dollars obtenus par l'entremise de notre plan d'action du bois d'œuvre pour continuer d'appuyer le secteur forestier dans le budget de 2019.

C'est la raison pour laquelle aussi nous fournissons 150 millions de dollars pour assurer une transition équitable pour les travailleurs et les collectivités touchés par l'élimination progressive de l'électricité produite par les centrales au charbon. C'est la raison pour laquelle nous améliorons la façon dont nous prenons les décisions sur de grands projets, de sorte que tous les Canadiens aient confiance dans les examens qui sont effectués. Nous veillons à pouvoir faire progresser les projets d'édification de la nation qui contribueront à la croissance de notre économie, sans mettre en péril notre santé, notre environnement ou les collectivités.

De plus, c'est également la raison pour laquelle nous avons fait le travail nécessaire pour respecter la décision de la Cour d'appel fédérale sur le projet proposé d'agrandissement du réseau Trans Mountain. Même si cette décision a été une déception pour beaucoup de personnes, elle a fourni des directives claires sur la façon dont le processus pourrait aller de l'avant de la bonne façon et dans un contexte précis et ciblé.

Même si certaines personnes ont fait valoir que nous devrions faire fi de ces directives, ne pas tenir compte de la cour et répondre à l'aide de longs appels conçus de façon à éviter nos obligations envers l'environnement et les peuples autochtones, notre gouvernement a choisi la voie responsable et plus efficace. Nous avons ordonné à l'Office national de l'énergie d'effectuer un examen du transport maritime et nous nous engageons à effectuer la phase trois des consultations de la bonne façon.

Ce travail important est en cours. Le rapport de l'Office national de l'énergie a été livré à temps, le 22 février. Parallèlement, nos équipes de consultation ont travaillé avec acharnement sur la phase trois des consultations. Ces équipes, qui ont presque doublé par rapport à leur taille originale, ont participé à un dialogue bilatéral significatif visant à discuter des priorités des collectivités autochtones et à les comprendre ainsi qu'à offrir des mesures d'adaptation adaptées, le cas échéant. J'ai aussi personnellement rencontré de nombreuses collectivités autochtones pour les aider à établir des relations fondées sur la confiance.

Notre travail à ce jour nous a placés dans la solide position que nous occupons aujourd'hui pour effectuer ce processus pour tous les Canadiens. Notre travail sur le projet Trans Mountain, nos investissements historiques dans l'énergie solaire, l'énergie éolienne, l'énergie géothermique et d'autres formes d'énergie, ainsi que notre engagement à l'égard de l'innovation et de l'élaboration de nouvelles technologies jettent les fondements pour un Canada fort, tant aujourd'hui que demain.

Monsieur le président, notre gouvernement voit que nos industries des ressources naturelles jouent un rôle clé dans la stimulation de la croissance d'une économie propre au Canada. De plus, nous apprécions l'expertise et l'expérience du ministère des Ressources naturelles et la volonté de tous les Canadiens de nous aider à y arriver.

Le Budget principal des dépenses est un versement initial sur l'avenir du Canada, un avenir dont nos enfants hériteront avec fierté et qu'ils mettront à profit avec confiance, un avenir qui continuera de créer de bons emplois bien rémunérés pour les Canadiens de la classe moyenne ainsi que pour les générations à venir.

Maintenant, je répondrai volontiers à vos questions.

Je vous remercie de m'avoir invité.

(1545)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre, pour votre exposé.

La parole est d'abord à l'honorable Kent Hehr.

L’hon. Kent Hehr (Calgary-Centre, Lib.):

Je vous remercie beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, je vous remercie beaucoup pour votre présence. Vous avez expliqué que les Albertains ont découvert la façon d'obtenir du pétrole des sables bitumineux. C'est en 1975 que le premier ministre Peter Lougheed, le premier ministre Bill Davis et notre gouvernement libéral ont investi dans l'exploitation des sables bitumineux. En 1997, le premier ministre Klein et ensuite le premier ministre Chrétien ont investi dans les sables bitumineux afin d'accroître leur exploitation.

Vous avez mentionné à juste titre l'achat du pipeline Trans Mountain, mais dans ma circonscription, celle de Calgary-Centre, de nombreuses sociétés pétrolières et des travailleurs du secteur de l'énergie ne cessent de me poser des questions à propos de la compétitivité de l'industrie. Ils craignent un possible effet de stratification des divers règlements environnementaux, qui risquent de rendre notre industrie pétrolière et gazière moins compétitive. Nous voulons nous assurer que le Canada soit le fournisseur de choix pour le pétrole et le gaz dans le monde. Comment pouvons-nous nous assurer de protéger notre environnement tout en demeurant compétitifs à l'échelle mondiale?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Par votre entremise, monsieur le président, je remercie beaucoup le député pour sa question.

Comme vous le savez, nous avons annoncé à Calgary la semaine dernière du financement pour une nouvelle technologie très prometteuse utilisée pour tester un prototype de système de production d'énergie géothermique. Lorsqu'on discute avec des entreprises de la sorte, on constate qu'elles savent que si elles parviennent à commercialiser cette technologie, on pourra créer 40 000 emplois dans l'Ouest canadien, principalement pour des personnes qui travaillent actuellement dans le secteur pétrolier, notamment dans le forage. Nous investissons dans de nouvelles technologies et dans le secteur traditionnel du pétrole et du gaz afin de le rendre plus propre et plus écologique grâce aux dispositions visant la déduction pour amortissement accéléré, que nous avons annoncées dans l'énoncé économique de l'automne dernier ainsi qu'aux 100 millions de dollars prévus dans le budget de 2019 pour favoriser la collaboration et l'innovation au sein du secteur pétrolier et gazier.

Je peux vous citer un certain nombre de mesures qui visent à rendre notre secteur de l'énergie compétitif. Nous allons continuer de surveiller ce secteur pour nous assurer qu'il demeure compétitif. Nous voulons faire en sorte que notre secteur pétrolier et gazier et notre secteur des énergies renouvelables demeurent une source d'emplois bien rémunérés pour les Canadiens de la classe moyenne au cours des prochaines décennies. Nous allons veiller à continuer d'offrir du soutien.

(1550)

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Je crois savoir que les consultations et l'examen relatifs au projet Trans Mountain se poursuivent. J'ai vu qu'on a annoncé que la période des consultations sera à nouveau prolongée. Pourriez-vous faire le point à ce sujet?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Nous avons huit équipes composées de 60 personnes, des professionnels qui ont procédé à un dialogue significatif avec des collectivités autochtones au cours des derniers mois. Durant ces consultations, des collectivités autochtones ont demandé que la période prévue pour les consultations soit prolongée. Pour accéder à cette demande raisonnable, nous avons prolongé de trois semaines la période des consultations. Cette semaine, nous avons fait parvenir à toutes les collectivités avec lesquelles nous avons discuté une copie du rapport provisoire sur la consultation et l'accommodement de la Couronne. Les collectivités sont maintenant en mesure de formuler des commentaires au sujet de ce rapport provisoire. Nous voulons nous assurer qu'elles disposent de suffisamment de temps pour le lire et l'analyser, afin de nous donner de bons commentaires.

Notre objectif est de prendre une décision au sujet du projet d'ici le 18 juin. Vu le bon déroulement des choses, je pense que nous serons en mesure d'atteindre cet objectif.

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

L'accès aux marchés est la clé, monsieur le ministre. Si nous allons de l'avant correctement avec le projet Trans Mountain, et bien entendu avec la canalisation 3 d'Enbridge et, je l'espère, avec Keystone XL, pensez-vous que ce sera suffisant pour acheminer le pétrole de l'Alberta à court et à moyen termes?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Eh bien, nous savons tous — des membres du Comité l'ont souligné à de nombreuses reprises —, ainsi que les Albertains, que les gens qui travaillent dans le secteur de l'énergie comprennent bien que la capacité insuffisante des pipelines coûte des emplois à l'économie. Cela prive le secteur d'une croissance potentielle. C'est pourquoi, dès que nous avons pris le pouvoir, nous nous sommes concentrés sur l'accroissement de la capacité des pipelines.

C'est notre gouvernement qui a approuvé le gazoduc de Nova Gas, qui est construit en Alberta. C'est notre gouvernement qui a approuvé la canalisation 3 d'Enbridge, dont la construction au Canada est presque terminée. Nous travaillons avec le gouvernement américain pour aplanir certaines des difficultés qui existent aux États-Unis. Je me suis rendu à Houston pour faire valoir auprès du secrétaire Perry la construction du pipeline Keystone XL.

Nous allons continuer de travailler avec le secteur privé afin d'atteindre notre but commun, qui consiste à aller de l'avant avec ce projet, et nous nous sommes fermement engagés à adopter la bonne approche pour que le processus relatif au projet d'expansion du pipeline Trans Mountain se déroule bien. C'est notre gouvernement qui a investi 4,5 milliards de dollars au moment où ce projet aurait pu être abandonné en raison de l'incertitude qui existait à ce moment-là.

(1555)

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Vous avez discuté avec des sociétés pétrolières, et je sais que Suncor, Synova, CNRL et d'autres sociétés comme celles-là appuyaient fortement l'idée de la tarification de la pollution. Elles comprenaient bien que les changements climatiques sont une réalité et que nous devons faire partie de la solution.

Lorsque vous discutez avec les sociétés pétrolières, est-ce qu'elles tiennent toujours le même discours? Est-ce qu'elles comprennent qu'il est nécessaire d'aller de l'avant avec cette mesure?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Lorsque nous discutons avec nos partenaires du secteur de l'énergie, ils nous disent qu'ils comprennent tout à fait qu'il n'y a pas lieu de choisir entre l'économie et l'environnement, car nous pouvons choisir les deux. Nous pouvons protéger l'environnement et nous pouvons continuer à faire croître l'économie tout en veillant à inclure les collectivités autochtones parmi nos partenaires, afin qu'elles puissent participer au processus et profiter en même temps des débouchés économiques qu'offrent ces projets.

Le président:

Monsieur le ministre, vous allez devoir vous arrêter là. Je vous remercie.

Monsieur Schmale, je crois savoir que vous allez partager votre temps de parole avec Mme Stubbs, est-ce exact?

M. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, PCC):

C'est exact.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre, pour votre présence. Je vous suis reconnaissant de témoigner devant le Comité. J'ai beaucoup de questions à poser, comme vous pouvez l'imaginer, alors je vais essayer d'être bref. Si vous pouviez répondre brièvement à mes questions, je pourrai en poser le plus grand nombre possible.

Ma première question concerne le pipeline Trans Mountain. La Cour d'appel fédérale a dit ceci: « Les préoccupations des demandeurs autochtones communiquées au Canada sont précises et circonscrites, et le dialogue auquel le Canada est tenu peut être [...] bref et efficace... ».

Entre les mois d'octobre et février, l'Office national de l'énergie a tenu de vastes consultations auprès de collectivités autochtones, dans le cadre desquelles il a notamment entendu des témoignages de vive voix dans de nombreuses villes en Alberta et en Colombie-Britannique. Les tribunaux n'ont jamais remis en question le processus de consultation de l'Office.

Vous avez dit que vous visez le 18 juin. Comment les Canadiens peuvent-ils avoir confiance que ce délai sera respecté, étant donné que jusqu'à maintenant aucun des délais fixés n'a été respecté?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Premièrement, par votre entremise, monsieur le président, j'aimerais répondre que la Cour fédérale a souligné deux problèmes dans le jugement qu'elle a rendu le 30 août 2018. Le premier est le fait de ne pas avoir mené un examen de la sécurité maritime liée à la circulation des pétroliers. C'est un processus que l'Office national de l'énergie avait entrepris, au terme duquel il a décidé de recommander d'approuver le projet.

L'autre problème concerne les consultations avec les Autochtones menées par mon ministère. Dès le début, nous avons dit clairement que notre objectif était de bien faire les choses à cet égard, alors nous n'avons jamais fixé un délai pour la fin des consultations. Nous avons toujours dit que nous allons prendre une décision lorsque nous estimerons que nous nous serons adéquatement acquittés de notre obligation constitutionnelle de tenir des consultations en bonne et due forme avec les collectivités autochtones. Compte tenu du travail qui a été fait, nous nous sommes donné comme objectif de prendre une décision d'ici le 18 juin.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre.

En repoussant la décision au 18 juin... Le premier ministre a fait savoir au premier ministre Kenney, le 18 avril, qu'il avait besoin seulement de deux autres semaines pour terminer les consultations avec les communautés autochtones. Bien entendu, il faudra plus de deux semaines. Pouvez-vous confirmer que les travaux commenceront cet été?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Nous avons prolongé de trois semaines la période des consultations à la demande des collectivités autochtones. Je crois qu'il s'agit d'une demande raisonnable de la part de nos partenaires. C'est le cabinet qui devra prendre une décision, et je ne peux pas déterminer à l'avance quelle sera cette décision. Une fois que la décision aura été prise, la prochaine étape s'enclenchera.

M. Jamie Schmale:

D'accord. J'ai d'autres questions à poser, mais je dois céder la parole à Mme Stubbs.

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Mme Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, PCC):

Monsieur le ministre, ce qui est préoccupant à mon avis, c'est que le juge, dans la décision, a dit précisément que le processus de consultation corrigé peut être bref et efficace. Ce ne sera pas le cas, car vous avez prévenu très récemment que le délai du 18 juin pour la décision finale du cabinet ne sera pas respecté. C'est pourquoi nous posons ces questions.

L'Office national de l'énergie a affirmé à deux reprises qu'il est dans l'intérêt national d'aller de l'avant avec ce projet, s'appuyant sur deux évaluations scientifiques exhaustives et indépendantes de l'expansion du pipeline.

Vous avez déclaré l'année dernière que de ne pas aller de l'avant avec le projet Trans Mountain n'était pas une option. Le premier ministre a affirmé il y a 11 mois que le pipeline serait construit. Votre prédécesseur a expliqué que le gouvernement achetait le pipeline pour qu'on procède immédiatement à l'expansion. Le ministre des Finances a dit que le but était de le construire immédiatement. Le cabinet avait déjà approuvé le projet d'expansion.

Étant donné que nous accordons tous de la valeur à la recommandation formulée par cet organisme de réglementation indépendant, fondée sur l'avis d'experts ainsi que sur des données probantes et des données scientifiques, pouvez-vous confirmer que le cabinet approuvera le 18 juin le projet Trans Mountain et nous dire quand les travaux commenceront?

(1600)

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Je pense qu'il est important de savoir que, lorsque nous avons entrepris l'analyse du jugement de la cour, nous avons également demandé au juge Iacobucci, un ancien juge de la Cour suprême, de nous donner ses conseils afin de nous assurer de bien comprendre la directive de la cour, mais aussi toute décision qui sera prise dans l'avenir, et nous assurer que le processus puisse résister à une contestation fondée sur les engagements que nous avons pris en vertu des obligations constitutionnelles de la Couronne à l'égard des collectivités autochtones.

Mon objectif est de faire en sorte que le processus se déroule correctement et qu'on évite de tourner les coins ronds.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Merci, monsieur le ministre. Vous confirmez que le Cabinet approuvera de nouveau le projet TMX. Bien.

Passons à un autre sujet. La semaine dernière, vous avez publiquement menacé d'inclure les projets de sables bitumineux in situ dans les listes de projets du projet de loi C-69. Il s'agissait d'une réaction politique à l'élection en Alberta. Bien entendu, je suis certaine que vous savez et sentez, aussi fortement que moi, à titre d'Albertain, que l'extraction du pétrole et l'exploitation des ressources en amont relèvent des compétences provinciales et que, bien entendu, une menace n'est efficace que si elle a une conséquence négative.

Maintenant que vous avez enfin admis ce que l'industrie, des économistes, des Premières Nations, des premiers ministres et d'autres groupes affirment depuis un an, c'est-à-dire que le projet de loi C-69 vise à nuire à l'exploitation pétrolière et gazière, vous engagerez-vous à rejeter cette mesure législative avant qu'il ne soit trop tard et à veiller à ce que les projets de sables bitumineux in situ ne soient pas soumis à l'examen du gouvernement fédéral?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Monsieur le président, lors de la publication de l'ébauche de document de discussion relatif à la liste de projets, le gouvernement a précisé que les projets in situ seraient exclus de l'examen fédéral réalisé en vertu du projet de loi C-69 à condition que les émissions soient plafonnées dans la province où le projet est proposé. Nous avons clairement indiqué qu'au titre du cadre pancanadien sur la croissance propre et les changements climatiques, nous voulons être certains que le secteur pétrolier et gazier continue de croître de manière durable tout en pouvant continuer d'innover. Nous continuerons d'aider ce secteur à investir dans les nouvelles technologies propres. Il peut poursuivre sa croissance, mais en même temps, nous voulons nous assurer que les émissions sont contrôlées.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Vous risquez d'empiéter dans la sphère de compétences provinciale et de soumettre des projets de sables bitumineux de l'Alberta à un examen fédéral.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Nous souhaitons...

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Cela fait sept minutes, monsieur le président.

Oui, mon temps est écoulé. C'était mon dernier commentaire.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

... collaborer avec le nouveau gouvernement.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur Cannings, vous avez la parole.

M. Richard Cannings (Okanagan-Sud—Kootenay-Ouest, NPD):

Merci de témoigner aujourd'hui, monsieur le ministre.

Je commencerai avec quelques questions de suivi. Lors de votre dernière comparution, je vous ai fait trois suggestions pour que vous envisagiez de les inclure dans le budget. Maintenant que j'ai vu le budget, je voulais faire le suivi à ce sujet.

L'une de ces questions concerne les rénovations domiciliaires. Nous savons tous que l'efficacité énergétique constitue un des meilleurs moyens de réduire l'empreinte des gaz à effet de serre au Canada. Au cours des législatures précédentes, le gouvernement conservateur a lancé un programme qui a connu un succès retentissant, soit celui d'écoÉnergie Rénovation, dont la dernière version a reçu 400 millions de dollars dans le budget de 2011. Ce programme a malheureusement été éliminé et n'a pas été rétabli par le présent gouvernement libéral. Premièrement, dans le cadre pancanadien, il semble que les rénovations aient été pelletées dans la cour des provinces. En outre, dans le présent budget, une somme de 300 millions de dollars est accordée aux municipalités par l'entremise de la Fédération canadienne des municipalités.

Je suis plutôt mêlé, et je trouve préoccupant que le gouvernement fédéral n'ait pas cru bon d'intervenir lui-même en faisant preuve du leadership que la population canadienne attend de lui. Avec quelque chose d'aussi sérieux que l'action pour le climat, il faut vraiment agir rapidement et oser. Il semble que nous ayons là un autre exemple de dossier que le gouvernement renvoie aux municipalités.

Me voilà mêlé. Dans le livre, ici, il est indiqué quelque part que les fonds doivent être dépensés au cours de l'exercice 2018-2019, alors qu'ailleurs, il faut le dépenser en 2019-2020. Ce n'est pas ce qui me préoccupe ici, mais cela ne fait qu'ajouter à la confusion.

Maintenant que les fonds ont été transférés — à la Fédération canadienne des municipalités, je présume —, de combien de temps les municipalités disposeront-elles pour les dépenser? S'agit-il d'un financement annuel, comme la somme de 400 millions de dollars que les conservateurs avaient accordée? Les municipalités devront-elles signer une entente individuelle? Je ne vis pas dans une municipalité. Comment puis-je accéder à ce programme? Si nous avions agi à l'échelle nationale, ces questions n'auraient pas lieu d'être.

(1605)

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Par votre entremise, monsieur le président, je vous remercie de cette question, car nous pensons que l'efficacité énergétique est un moyen grâce auquel nous pouvons réduire l'impact des changements climatiques, rendre nos communautés plus résilientes et réduire les émissions.

Le transfert de 1 milliard de dollars auquel vous faites référence...

M. Richard Cannings:

Eh bien, c'est un montant de 300 millions de dollars destiné aux rénovations.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Une partie de ce financement va à la Fédération canadienne des municipalités. Il y a aussi un transfert de taxe sur l'essence que reçoivent directement les municipalités. Des fonds sont également disponibles pour l'efficacité énergétique, comme vous l'avez souligné, au titre des ententes bilatérales que nous avons conclues avec les provinces. À ce montant s'ajoutent 300 millions de dollars qui seront gérés par la Fédération canadienne des municipalités.

Nous tentons d'étoffer les mesures et non d'y faire double emploi. Nous essayons de veiller à ce que les programmes fonctionnent déjà efficacement. La Fédération canadienne des municipalités gère un fonds municipal vert depuis une décennie, voire plus longtemps. Nous ne faisons qu'appuyer le bon travail qu'elle accomplit.

M. Richard Cannings:

Je pense à ma circonscription, laquelle est principalement composée de petites communautés de 500 à 1 000 habitants qui ne disposent pas des ressources humaines et administratives pour gérer ces programmes toutes seules. Pourquoi transférez-vous ces responsabilités à la Fédération canadienne des municipalités au lieu de laisser le gouvernement fédéral les assumer?

Je dois maintenant continuer, car j'ai d'autres questions.

La dernière fois que j'ai posé cette question, je cherchais des manières dont le gouvernement fédéral pourrait appuyer l'industrie forestière, qui est en difficulté, comme vous le savez. Elle est toujours visée par les tarifs sur le bois d'oeuvre. Certaines usines de ma circonscription ont fermé leurs portes pendant certaines périodes ce printemps par souci d'économie, car elles subissent les contrecoups de la baisse des prix du bois d'oeuvre.

Lors de votre dernière comparution, j'ai proposé que le gouvernement fédéral accorde un financement audacieux afin d'aider et de protéger ces communautés et cette industrie. En Colombie-Britannique seulement, les incendies de forêt des deux dernières années ont coûté 1 milliard de dollars par année juste pour combattre les flammes, et peut-être 10 milliards de dollars pour composer avec les conséquences.

Les experts en forêt auxquels j'ai parlé ont proposé de dépenser 1 milliard de dollars par année en Colombie-Britannique afin d'atténuer ces effets. Le budget comprend divers petits programmes visant à aider l'industrie forestière, mais je n'y vois aucune initiative d'envergure qui permettrait d'assurer la sécurité des communautés situées en milieu forestier. Dans la plupart des communautés de la Colombie-Britannique, par exemple, et dans bien des communautés du pays où le gouvernement fédéral pourrait fournir du financement pour aider les provinces et les municipalités à élaguer la forêt dans les régions limitrophes, ces mesures pourraient alimenter les usines locales en fibres, fournir du travail et garder la population en sécurité.

Il y a quelques semaines, j'ai rencontré un groupe communautaire de ma circonscription, qui venait d'une des communautés les mieux protégées contre les incendies au Canada. Ces gens souhaitent désespérément obtenir toute l'aide possible du gouvernement. À l'heure actuelle, la communauté reçoit 500 $ par année. Si elle recevait 1 000 $ par an, les habitants seraient bien contents. C'est une toute petite communauté. Je me demande pourquoi je ne vois rien dans le budget qui pourrait aider de manière substantielle les communautés forestières à se protéger contre les incendies.

Le rapport Filmon proposait un montant pour la Colombie-Britannique, mais seulement 15 % ont été envoyés, alors que nous parlons de milliards de dollars ici.

Je me demande si nous pouvons espérer que dans l'avenir, le gouvernement fédéral interviendra et fera une contribution vraiment substantielle à cet égard.

(1610)

Le président:

Monsieur le ministre, il ne vous a pas laissé beaucoup de temps pour répondre à la question; je vous serais donc reconnaissant d'être très bref.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Oui. J'aurai plaisir à examiner les diverses communautés et les projets ou les idées que vous avez en tête.

Il y a quelques mois, j'ai parlé à tous mes homologues ministres des Forêts afin de constituer un groupe de travail mixte pour élaborer des propositions sur la manière dont nous pouvons nous attaquer ensemble à ces problèmes.

Je peux certainement assurer le suivi avec vous à ce sujet.

Le président:

Merci.

Votre temps est écoulé.

Monsieur Whalen.

M. Nick Whalen (St. John's-Est, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie de témoigner, monsieur le ministre.

Lors de son intervention, M. Cannings en est presque venu à vous demander comment le gouvernement fédéral aide les communautés rurales et éloignées dans le présent budget.

J'examine le tableau A.2, qui concerne les paiements de transfert à Ressources naturelles Canada en 2019-2020. Il est indiqué que le montant passe de 14,2 à 21,4 millions de dollars entre l'an dernier et cette année.

Vos fonctionnaires peuvent-ils nous expliquer comment cet argent aidera les communautés rurales et éloignées à accéder aux programmes énergétiques, et quel genre de soutien administratif pourraient obtenir les petites communautés qui ne possèdent pas nécessairement la capacité interne d'analyser toutes les options elles-mêmes?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Monsieur le président, un certain nombre de programmes s'offrent aux communautés rurales, isolées et du Nord, qu'ils visent à les aider à abandonner le diesel au profit de sources d'énergie renouvelables ou à utiliser les rebuts ligneux comme biocarburants, ou à investir afin d'encourager le développement économique des communautés autochtones.

Je demanderai à mon personnel de vous en dire un peu plus au sujet de ce programme.

Mme Cheri Crosby (sous-ministre adjointe et dirigeante principale des finances, Secteur de la gestion et des services intégrés, ministère des Ressources naturelles):

Je le ferai volontiers.

Monsieur le président, l'initiative dont il est question ici est le programme d'énergie propre pour les collectivités rurales et éloignées, dont le financement augmente de 7 millions de dollars cette année. Nous renforçons donc ce programme lancé l'année dernière, dans le budget de 2017.

Pour ce qui est des détails, nous nous sommes engagés à soutenir le déploiement des technologies électriques renouvelables à hauteur de 89 millions de dollars.

Nous nous emploierons à faire la démonstration de technologies renouvelables dans les domaines de l'électricité et du chauffage, à déployer des technologies de biothermie dans les communautés rurales et éloignées, à appuyer le renforcement de la capacité et à simplement encourager l'efficacité énergétique de diverses manières.

Je m'en tiendrai là, à moins que vous ne vouliez obtenir plus de détails.

M. Nick Whalen:

Je dirai, aux fins du compte rendu, que je pense que cela répond probablement à la question précédente de M. Canning.

Pour ce qui est de la prolongation du délai afin d'achever le processus de consultation auprès des groupes autochtones au sujet de l'expansion du projet Trans Mountain, vous avez indiqué que vous faisiez appel à l'ancien juge Iacobucci à ce sujet. De toute évidence, ma propre province s'inquiétait considérablement des consultations menées auprès des Autochtones sur les forages exploratoires extracôtiers. Selon ce que nous comprenons, ces démarches en sont arrivées à une conclusion favorable.

Peut-être pouvez-vous nous expliquer pourquoi il importe de prolonger le délai. En vous fondant sur l'expérience du gouvernement jusqu'à maintenant, quelles garanties pouvez-vous nous offrir que les nouveaux processus fonctionnent, sont conformes et résisteront à une contestation judiciaire?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Monsieur le président, nous sommes très sérieux quant à la manière dont nous consultons les communautés autochtones. Nous apprenons de nouvelles choses et nous sommes à l'affût de nouvelles occasions de faire participer les parties prenantes de manière constructive.

Dans ce cas précis, les projets de forage étaient assujettis à un certain nombre de conditions, et avec raison. Je pense que les autorités extracôtières et les organes qui mènent les consultations possèdent une expertise considérable. Nous continuons d'apprendre comment faire participer les parties prenantes et, dans certains cas, certains processus sont meilleurs que d'autres. Nous allons donc continuer d'explorer et d'apprendre.

(1615)

M. Nick Whalen:

Voudriez-vous ajouter quelque chose de particulier au sujet de la prolongation de trois semaines afin de peut-être nous assurer que nous faisons la bonne chose?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Je dirais qu'une des manières d'être ouvert et souple consiste à écouter ses partenaires avec sincérité. Les communautés autochtones nous ont sincèrement demandé une prolongation, que nous leur avons accordée. Je pense qu'en agréant leur demande, nous avons fait la preuve de notre engagement.

M. Nick Whalen:

Pour ce qui est de faire du Canada un chef de file mondial du domaine minier, j'ai entendu, il y a quelques mois à l'occasion d'une conférence tenue à Toronto, des dirigeants de ce secteur déclarer qu'ils veulent s'assurer que lorsqu'ils entreprennent des discussions scientifiques avec le gouvernement, les deux parties s'inspirent des pratiques exemplaires, vont de l'avant et ne réinventent pas la roue.

Pouvez-vous nous expliquer comment votre ministère fait en sorte que nous nous inspirons toujours des pratiques exemplaires et que nous améliorons continuellement notre processus de réglementation de l'environnement?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Monsieur le président, sachez que nous avons eu le grand plaisir de lancer le Plan canadien pour les minéraux et les métaux, que certains d'entre vous auront vu, j'en suis assez certain. Si vous ne l'avez pas vu, je vous encourage à le consulter. Nous pouvons vous en fournir des exemplaires. Ce plan est le fruit d'une collaboration entre l'industrie et de nombreuses parties prenantes.

Dans une économie où on investit davantage dans l'énergie solaire et éolienne et les véhicules électriques, les minéraux et les métaux que recèle le Canada nous offrent le potentiel colossal de créer des milliers d'emplois bien rémunérés au pays et de faciliter la transition vers une économie plus propre et plus verte.

Cela nous aide à lutter contre les changements climatiques, à créer des emplois et à investir dans les nouvelles technologies, dans le domaine de l'extraction, par exemple. La mine aurifère Borden, la toute première mine entièrement alimentée à l'électricité, constitue un bon exemple de la manière dont nous pouvons collaborer avec l'industrie afin d'appuyer ces efforts.

M. Nick Whalen:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Monsieur Schmale, je crois comprendre que vous partagerez votre temps une fois encore. Vous disposez de cinq minutes.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Merci beaucoup.

Je vous remercie, monsieur le ministre. Je serai très bref.

Monsieur le ministre, je veux parler de vos subventions pour les véhicules sans émissions. Comme vous le savez certainement, nous avons constaté qu'il ne se construit aucun véhicule entièrement électrique au Canada. Le seul véhicule hybride qui y est construit est le modèle Pacifica de Chrysler.

Cela étant dit, j'ai visité le site Web de Nissan Canada et me suis constitué une Leaf de base, un des véhicules électriques qui se vendent le mieux dans le monde. Mon modèle ne comprend aucun joujou, rien, et il coûte 817,74 $ par mois.

Comme ce montant correspond pour certains à un versement hypothécaire, auriez-vous l'obligeance de m'expliquer pourquoi nous subventionnons les nantis pour qu'ils achètent des véhicules qui ne sont même pas construits au Canada?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Monsieur le président, le prix des véhicules qui peuvent être achetés grâce à cette mesure incitative est plafonné, et ce, afin de veiller à ce que les Canadiens de la classe moyenne puissent se prévaloir de cet incitatif et que les Canadiens riches, qui ont probablement les moyens d'acheter...

M. Jamie Schmale:

Oui, mais le rabais est inclus dans le prix de 817 $.

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

L'autre objectif consiste à encourager l'innovation et l'investissement dans les véhicules sans émissions dans le cadre de notre plan global de lutte contre les changements climatiques. Voilà pourquoi nous offrons cet incitatif.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Merci.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

De combien de cents la nouvelle norme en matière de carburants de votre gouvernement augmentera-t-elle le coût d'un litre de diesel, d'un litre d'essence et d'un mètre cube de gaz naturel?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

C'est la ministre McKenna, d'Environnement et Changement climatique Canada, qui dirige la discussion sur les normes relatives aux carburants. Le ministère discute avec les parties prenantes de l'industrie. Nous veillerons à toujours garder notre compétitivité à l'esprit quand nous instaurerons des politiques afin de permettre aux Canadiens de la classe moyenne qui travaillent dur chaque jour pour demeurer dans cette classe de maintenir un niveau de vie abordable. Voilà pourquoi...

(1620)

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Je trouve tout simplement incroyable qu'au bout de deux années consacrées à l'élaboration de cette politique qui a été affichée sur le site Web de votre ministère pendant des mois, les ministres libéraux ne semblent pas capables de nous dire combien tout cela va coûter aux Canadiens.

Selon l'Association canadienne de l'industrie de la chimie, la norme sur les combustibles propres correspondra à l'équivalent d'une taxe sur le carbone de 200 $ la tonne. L'industrie situe ce montant entre 150 et 280 $ la tonne, et votre gouvernement exempte les grands émetteurs de la tarification du carbone à hauteur de 95 % pour les inciter, comme l'indiquait la ministre de l'Environnement, à demeurer concurrentiels et à préserver de bons emplois au Canada.

Si l'on estime, à la lumière de cette analyse, que ces entreprises feraient ce que les conservateurs craignent depuis des années en fermant leurs portes et en supprimant des emplois au Canada si on leur demandait de payer une proportion supérieure à 5 % de la taxe sur le carbone, comment justifiez-vous que l'on puisse leur imposer des coûts aussi considérables en application de la nouvelle norme sur les combustibles propres?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

J'aurai l'occasion de rencontrer les représentants de cette association dès demain. Nous travaillons aussi en très étroite collaboration avec l'industrie pétrochimique. J'étais la semaine dernière chez moi en Alberta pour annoncer un financement de 49 millions de dollars qui va générer 4,5 milliards de dollars en nouveaux investissements dans l'économie de ma province.

Il est dans l'intérêt de tous que notre industrie demeure concurrentielle.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

J'ose espérer que vous pourrez nous indiquer de façon très convaincante que le gouvernement sait ce qu'il fait en imposant cette politique, car l'analyse coûts-avantages du ministère indique qu'il n'existe aucun modèle permettant de quantifier les réductions d'émissions, l'offre de crédits ou les répercussions économiques de la norme sur les combustibles propres.

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais présenter la motion suivante: Que, conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement, le Comité invite immédiatement le ministre des Ressources naturelles à comparaître devant lui le jeudi 20 juin 2019, pendant au moins une réunion complète, afin d'informer le Comité sur le plan du gouvernement pour le projet d'expansion du réseau Trans Mountain; et que cette réunion soit télévisée.

Le président:

Je proposerais que nous prévoyions un peu de temps lors de notre séance de jeudi pour discuter des travaux du Comité, car notre horaire nous le permettra. Nous pourrons alors débattre de cette motion sans empiéter sur le temps à notre disposition aujourd'hui.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Oui, je me réjouis à la perspective de pouvoir en débattre. Je suis persuadée que le ministre sera tout à fait disposé à venir annoncer aux Canadiens la date du début des travaux de construction, l'échéancier de ces travaux, la date d'entrée en service du nouveau tronçon de Trans Mountain, les coûts qui en découleront pour les contribuables ainsi que les plans du gouvernement quant à savoir si cette expansion ira bel et bien de l'avant et si son exploitation sera éventuellement confiée au secteur privé.

Le président:

Merci. Nous en discuterons donc jeudi.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Formidable.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, c'est vous qui avez la parole pour conclure.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

J'ai quelques brèves questions avant de m'intéresser de plus près à l'industrie forestière, laquelle occupe bien évidemment une place importante dans ma circonscription.

Il y a huit ans, les conservateurs ont vendu EACL, ou tout au moins une portion de cette entreprise, au montant de 15 millions de dollars. Je me demandais comment on pouvait évaluer cette transaction. Nous l'avons vendue pour 15 millions de dollars, mais nous devons encore investir des sommes considérables dans EACL. Était-ce une bonne idée de vendre cette entreprise, en tout ou en partie, il y a huit ans?

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Je vais devoir faire quelques vérifications avant de pouvoir vous répondre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je pense que nous savons à quoi nous en tenir.

Je veux poursuivre dans le sens de la question posée par M. Cannings tout à l'heure. Comme vous le savez, la foresterie est une industrie très importante dans ma grande circonscription rurale située pas très loin d'ici. Je tiens d'abord à vous remercier pour l'aide financière à Uniboard qui a été annoncée il y a deux semaines. Ce soutien facilitera grandement les choses à l'entreprise pour l'écologisation de son usine installée dans une portion très défavorisée de ma circonscription où les problèmes économiques sont légion. De nombreux emplois seront ainsi préservés dans la région. C'est l'une des plus grandes entreprises de ma circonscription.

L'industrie forestière a vécu sa large part de difficultés au cours des dernières années. Ma circonscription a perdu en 1987 ses voies ferrées qui ont été démantelées et vendues à la ferraille. Depuis 1990, la drave n'est plus autorisée. Nous avons également de nombreux problèmes découlant des sanctions commerciales américaines sur les produits forestiers. Il y a seulement une route entrant et sortant de la circonscription qui peut servir pour l'exploitation forestière, et nous nous retrouvons maintenant aux prises avec une pénurie de main-d’œuvre telle qu'il est difficile pour certaines entreprises de poursuivre leurs activités.

Pouvez-vous nous dire ce qu'il nous est possible de faire pour aider le secteur forestier à court et à long terme ainsi que pour développer davantage les activités de deuxième et troisième transformations qui sont très rares dans ma région?

(1625)

L’hon. Amarjeet Sohi:

Je pourrais vous parler de différentes mesures. Certaines relèvent de mon ministère et d'autres non.

On peut penser par exemple au Fonds sur l'infrastructure municipale rurale qui prévoit 2 milliards de dollars pour la construction de routes dans les collectivités rurales, ou encore au Fonds national des corridors commerciaux, une autre enveloppe de 2 milliards de dollars à laquelle les municipalités ont accès. Le budget de 2019 prévoyait par ailleurs un investissement de 250 millions de dollars pour favoriser davantage l'innovation dans le secteur forestier et faciliter sa diversification et sa croissance. C'est un secteur qui revêt une importance capitale au Canada et qui connaît effectivement des difficultés dans le contexte de nos relations avec les États-Unis. Les trois ententes commerciales que notre gouvernement a conclues ouvrent de nouveaux débouchés très prometteurs pour nos produits qui se distinguent nettement en raison de nos méthodes d'exploitation assurant notamment la viabilité de l'environnement. C'était donc un échantillon des mesures que nous prenons pour appuyer ce secteur.

Je ne sais pas si ma sous-ministre pourrait vous en dire davantage au sujet de quelques-uns des autres mécanismes de soutien que nous avons mis en place pour l'industrie forestière.

Mme Christyne Tremblay (sous-ministre, ministère des Ressources naturelles):

Merci, monsieur le président. Nous reconnaissons l'importance de l'industrie forestière et nous nous efforçons de l'appuyer de différentes manières. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous pouvez répondre en français, si vous le voulez.

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

D'accord.

Nous travaillons sur plusieurs fronts, dont le premier est la compétitivité du secteur. Avec l'ensemble des provinces et des territoires, nous avons élaboré un cadre de la bioéconomie forestière, qui va faire nous permettre d'en diversifier les produits et d'augmenter leur valeur ajoutée. Ce cadre est d'ailleurs le premier élément à l'ordre du jour de la rencontre des sous-ministres du Conseil canadien des ministres des forêts qui débute ce soir.

Deuxièmement, nous investissons énormément dans l'innovation. Le dernier budget a consacré un important montant de 100 millions de dollars à ce secteur, provenant de fonds stratégiques d'investissement dans des projets prometteurs, comme le biocarburant ou les produits du bois à haute valeur ajoutée.

En troisième lieu, nous investissons de façon substantielle dans la diversification des marchés dans le but que le bois canadien soit utilisé à l'étranger. D'importants projets sont en cours en Chine, notamment à Tianjin, où l'on démontre les façons d'intégrer le bois dans la construction et en quoi cela contribue à nos efforts de lutte contre les changements climatiques.

Quatrièmement, comme M. le ministre l'a mentionné, le gouvernement a versé des sommes importantes pour soutenir l'industrie du bois d'oeuvre. Son plan était non seulement d'aider tant les travailleurs que les entreprises visées par les droits compensateurs, mais aussi de favoriser la diversification des marchés et des produits. Ce plan a très bien fonctionné. Encore aujourd'hui, M. le ministre préside un groupe de travail comprenant l'ensemble des ministres responsables des forêts pour suivre la santé de notre secteur forestier et s'assurer d'avoir en place des mesures permettant de venir en aide aux communautés locales, aux travailleurs et à l'industrie.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Mon temps de parole est écoulé.

Merci beaucoup. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le ministre. Nous en sommes arrivés à la fin de la première heure de notre séance. Le temps passe tellement vite. Nous vous sommes très reconnaissants pour le temps que vous nous avez consacré et la disponibilité dont vous nous faites toujours bénéficier.

Nous allons interrompre nos travaux deux minutes à peine, le temps que d'autres fonctionnaires se joignent à Mmes Tremblay et Crosby pour la seconde heure de notre réunion.

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

(1625)

(1630)

Le président:

Nous sommes de retour. Merci d'avoir été aussi rapides. Nous reprenons nos travaux.

Pas moins de six représentants du ministère sont des nôtres.

Merci de votre présence aujourd'hui. Nous accueillons la sous-ministre qui est accompagnée de cinq sous-ministres adjoints. Je pense qu'il risque d'être un peu difficile de prendre ces gens-là au dépourvu, sans vouloir bien sûr leur mettre trop de pression.

Nous allons passer directement aux questions des membres du Comité. Monsieur Hehr, c'est à vous d'essayer de les piéger en premier.

(1635)

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Merci, monsieur le président. J'ai bien peur de ne pas être capable de les coincer.

Avec l'intensification des changements climatiques, nous sommes tous témoins des ravages que peuvent causer les inondations et des impacts environnementaux qui se font ressentir partout au pays. La situation ne cesse de se détériorer. Je crois que quelqu'un a d'ailleurs indiqué que les indemnisations versées par le gouvernement fédéral au titre des dommages ainsi causés augmentent chaque jour.

Quoi qu'il en soit, Ressources naturelles Canada demande dans le Budget principal des dépenses un montant de 11,1 millions de dollars pour améliorer la préparation et les interventions pour la gestion des catastrophes au Canada.

Pouvez-vous nous indiquer à quoi vont servir ces fonds? [Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Je vous remercie.

Je suis très contente que vous ayez soulevé cette question, qui est malheureusement d'actualité, vu les inondations que nous connaissons au Québec et en Ontario. Elles engendrent des coûts importants sur le plan économique, mais également des coûts humains dont il faut tenir compte. Souvent, ces catastrophes naturelles menacent la sécurité et l'intégrité des personnes de même que leurs biens. C'est important. Il faut être très responsable quant à la façon dont on aborde ces catastrophes.

De plus en plus, nous réalisons qu'il faut bâtir des communautés beaucoup plus résilientes face à la récurrence de ces catastrophes naturelles, qu'il s'agisse d'inondations ou de feux de forêt. Lors du dernier budget, le ministère des Ressources naturelles a reçu 88 millions de dollars sur cinq ans pour travailler avec les provinces et les territoires à des mesures destinées à augmenter la résilience des communautés. Une grande partie de ces fonds ira à la prévention des feux de forêt.

Je suis contente qu'on m'ait posé plusieurs questions reliées à la forêt aujourd'hui. Au cours de la dernière année, toutes les provinces et les territoires se sont penchés sur les façons de combattre les feux de forêt et de s'assurer que les communautés sont mieux préparées à faire face à ces désastres. Un plan pancanadien sur les feux de forêt vient d'être élaboré. L'ensemble des provinces et des territoires y souscrivent, mais il y a également des initiatives dont il faut tenir compte.

Il y a peut-être des gens qui ne m'entendent pas. Voulez-vous que j'arrête de parler, monsieur le président? [Traduction]

Le président:

Oui, pour M. Cannings.

M. Richard Cannings: Tout va bien maintenant.

Le président: Très bien. Tout fonctionne pour le mieux. [Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Monsieur Cannings, je suis heureuse de répondre à cette question sur les désastres naturels. En effet, mon ministère va recevoir 88 millions de dollars afin d'assurer la résilience des communautés face aux catastrophes naturelles. Une grande partie de cette somme servira à combattre les feux de forêt. On sait qu'en Colombie-Britannique il y a eu des feux très importants l'année dernière. Cette somme servira également à rehausser notre capacité en matière de prévisions et à l'égard de tout ce qui concerne le repérage géospatial, ou mapping. Le but est que nous soyons plus proactifs, mieux préparés et en mesure de voir venir ces catastrophes. [Traduction]

L’hon. Kent Hehr:

Merci pour cette réponse.

M. Schmale vous a posé des questions au sujet de votre nouveau programme d'incitatifs pour l'achat de véhicules électriques. J'espère que vous pouvez m'en dire davantage au sujet de ce programme.

À mon bureau, Hannah Wilson m'indiquait qu'environ 80 % des véhicules sur le marché seraient vendus à un prix inférieur au seuil établi. Y a-t-il des voitures électriques que l'on peut acheter pour moins de 45 000 $? Est-ce que ces véhicules seraient admissibles? Comment fonctionne le programme?

(1640)

[Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Je vous remercie de la question.

Augmenter la vente de véhicules à zéro émission est un objectif important pour le gouvernement. Comme vous l'avez mentionné, il y a un nouveau programme d'incitatifs destiné à encourager les consommateurs à opter pour ces véhicules. Cependant, c'est Transports Canada, et non Ressources naturelles Canada, qui est responsable de ce programme. Cela dit, nous devons pour notre part nous assurer que ces voitures roulent et qu'elles peuvent être rechargées. Nous devons donc nous assurer que les infrastructures sont en place.

Nous nous employons déjà à mettre en place un réseau de plus de 1 000 bornes de recharge, partout au Canada. Il s'agira dans certains cas de bornes de recharge électriques et dans d'autres cas de bornes fonctionnant à l'hydrogène ou au gaz naturel. Lors du dernier budget, nous avons reçu des fonds pour ajouter 20 000 bornes de recharge. Or cette fois-ci, elles seront installées à proximité des lieux où vivent les Canadiens. Autrement dit, il y aura des bornes à leurs résidences, près de leurs lieux de travail ou de loisir ou encore dans les stationnements auxquels ils ont accès. Il s'agit donc pour nous d'un important investissement.

En outre, nous continuons à faire des efforts importants pour que ces bornes soient plus efficaces. Si vous le permettez, je vais passer la parole à notre sous-ministre adjoint M. Frank Des Rosiers, qui est responsable de tout ce qui est lié aux technologies propres dans notre ministère. Il travaille plus particulièrement à certaines technologies pouvant assurer aux Canadiens propriétaires de tels véhicules de pouvoir rouler.

M. Frank Des Rosiers (sous-ministre adjoint, Secteur de l'innovation et de la technologie de l'énergie, ministère des Ressources naturelles):

Tout à fait.

Merci, monsieur le président.[Traduction]

Pour ajouter à ce que disait notre sous-ministre, il faut avouer que c'est un secteur d'intervention qui est important dans le contexte actuel où l'on voit tous ces véhicules sur nos routes qui sont responsables du quart des émissions de gaz à effet de serre au Canada. Si l'on parvenait à réduire un tant soit peu les émissions provenant de cette source, ce serait un grand pas en avant.

Non seulement avons-nous l'occasion de mettre en service des technologies déjà existantes, mais nous pouvons également en développer de nouvelles. Ce n'est pas la capacité novatrice qui manque au Canada. Je pense par exemple à AddÉnergie, une entreprise installée à Shawinigan, au Québec. Grâce à notre soutien financier et à celui du gouvernement provincial, on est en train d'y concevoir une nouvelle infrastructure de recharge pour les condominiums et les immeubles multilogements, un secteur pour lequel très peu de solutions sont actuellement offertes sur le marché. C'est justement le genre d'innovation que nous recherchons.

Nous essayons par ailleurs de déterminer quel pourrait être l'impact du branchement de milliers, voire de dizaines de milliers ou de centaines de milliers de véhicules sur le réseau. Mettez-vous à la place d'un service public responsable d'un réseau électrique assez important qui doit composer avec un tel accroissement soudain de la demande. Comment gérer le tout? Est-ce que ce nouvel afflux de demande sur le marché peut avoir des conséquences en matière de cybersécurité?

Voilà le genre de questions auxquelles nous cherchons à répondre.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Falk.

M. Ted Falk (Provencher, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci aux représentants du ministère de leur présence aujourd'hui.

J'ai toute une série de questions que je vais essayer de vous poser et nous verrons ce qu'il en ressortira. Vous pouvez tous répondre.

Nous avons acheté un pipeline. L'avons-nous payé? C'est ma question. Avons-nous payé ce pipeline?

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

M. Labonté va vous répondre.

M. Jeff Labonté (sous-ministre adjoint, Bureau de gestion des grands projets, ministère des Ressources naturelles):

Vous voulez savoir si nous avons payé le pipeline, c'est-à-dire si le dossier de cette transaction est réglé?

M. Ted Falk:

Exactement.

M. Jeff Labonté:

Je crois que le dossier est réglé, mais il relève en fait du ministère des Finances par l'entremise de la Corporation de développement des investissements du Canada (CDIC), la société d'État responsable de la construction et de la mise en service du pipeline.

M. Ted Falk:

D'accord.

Est-ce que cette société d'État va aussi éponger tous les coûts associés à l'expansion de ce pipeline, ou est-ce que c'est le ministère qui devra s'en charger?

M. Jeff Labonté:

Je ne suis peut-être pas le mieux placé pour vous parler de ces questions, car cela relève du ministre des Finances, mais je peux vous dire que la société d'État est dirigée par un conseil d'administration distinct. Elle fonctionne donc à l'intérieur d'un cadre financier qui lui est propre.

Comme aucune autorisation n'a encore été donnée pour une éventuelle expansion, on gère pour l'instant le pipeline dans sa forme actuelle dans l'attente d'une décision dans un sens ou dans l'autre.

(1645)

M. Ted Falk:

D'accord. C'est très bien.

Ma province vient de mettre en place une tarification sur le carbone. Le prix de l'essence a alors augmenté d'un peu plus de 4,5 ¢ le litre pendant que la hausse dépassait de peu les 5 ¢ pour le diesel. Avez-vous établi des projections quant aux revenus qui seront tirés de cette tarification supplémentaire? [Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

C'est une question qui relève d'Environnement et Changement climatique Canada. [Traduction]

M. Ted Falk:

Vous nous dites donc que votre ministère n'a pas le mandat de calculer la quantité de carburant consommé. Vous n'avez aucun rôle à jouer à cet égard. [Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Je dirais qu'il y a une collaboration entre les ministères, mais que la question relève d'un autre ministère. [Traduction]

Le président:

Vous avez votre réponse.

M. Ted Falk:

D'accord. Pouvez-vous alors m'indiquer la quantité de carburant qui devrait selon vous être assujettie à cette tarification du carbone, qu'il s'agisse d'essence ou de diesel? Avez-vous effectué ce calcul? [Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Comme je l'ai dit déjà, la question devrait être adressée à Environnement et Changement climatique Canada, qui est responsable de la taxe sur le carbone, ou au ministère des Finances Canada, qui est chargé de calculer les revenus de cette taxe. [Traduction]

M. Ted Falk:

Monsieur le président, je n'essaie plus de connaître les sommes en cause; je peux faire moi-même le calcul. Je veux savoir quelles sont les quantités. Selon moi, cela devrait relever de la compétence de ce ministère.

Le président:

J'ai compris la question, et je crois que nos témoins l'ont comprise également, mais j'ai bien peur que vous alliez devoir vous contenter de cette réponse, monsieur Falk.

M. Ted Falk:

D'accord.

Si l'on revient à la question de mon collègue concernant la norme sur les combustibles propres, pouvez-vous me dire si votre ministère a effectué des calculs à ce sujet? [Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le ministère des Ressources naturelles collabore avec l'industrie pour ce qui est des travaux réalisés dans le cadre de la Norme sur les combustibles propres. Une consultation est en cours. Notre ministère travaille avec diverses compagnies, l'industrie, ainsi qu'Environnement et Changement climatique Canada pour analyser les effets des scénarios qui sont présentés et qui concernent l'industrie et diverses compagnies, de façon individuelle. Lorsque la réglementation sera publiée, il y aura comme toujours une évaluation des coûts par les parties prenantes. [Traduction]

M. Ted Falk:

Vous avez assurément fait certains calculs dans le cas des grands émetteurs de gaz carbonique qui sont exemptés dans une proportion de 95 %. Pouvez-vous me dire combien de tonnes d'émissions ont ainsi été exemptées? [Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Je vais réitérer ma réponse pour cette question également. [Traduction]

M. Ted Falk:

D'accord, essayons avec une question plus facile.

Parlons de la tordeuse des bourgeons de l'épinette. Quels sont les objectifs et les résultats attendus de la deuxième étape de la Stratégie d'intervention en amont contre la tordeuse des bourgeons de l'épinette? [Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Monsieur le président, je suis très contente que cette question soit posée. Avec votre permission, je vais céder la parole à notre sous-ministre adjointe du Service canadien des forêts, Mme Beth MacNeil. [Traduction]

Mme Beth MacNeil (sous-ministre adjointe, Service canadien des forêts, ministère des Ressources naturelles):

Je ne suis pas certaine si la question portait sur la première ou la deuxième étape, car la Stratégie d'intervention en amont correspond en fait à l'étape deux. Pourriez-vous me dire ce qu'il en est exactement?

M. Ted Falk:

Oui, je suis désolé, je voulais parler de la deuxième étape.

Mme Beth MacNeil:

Le gouvernement du Canada a alloué environ 74,5 millions de dollars pour la deuxième étape. Nous amorçons à peine la deuxième année de cette stratégie.

Je suis ravie de pouvoir vous dire que les premiers résultats semblent indiquer que la stratégie fonctionne très bien. Une grande partie des ressources servent à des opérations d'épandage dans les secteurs les plus touchés de même qu'au suivi nécessaire. Depuis 2014, nous avons noté une diminution de 90 % des populations de tordeuse des bourgeons de l'épinette au Nouveau-Brunswick. Nous croyons que si nous parvenons à enrayer l'épidémie dans cette province, elle ne s'étendra pas à la Nouvelle-Écosse, à l'Île-du-Prince-Édouard et à Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador.

(1650)

Le président:

Il vous reste 20 secondes.

M. Ted Falk:

J'ai effectivement bien des questions; j'aimerais seulement avoir des réponses de temps à autre.

Le président:

D'accord, nous allons passer à M. Cannings.

M. Richard Cannings:

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à tous de votre présence aujourd'hui.

Je vais débuter avec une question que je souhaitais poser au ministre. J'ai toutefois manqué de temps, sans doute parce que j'ai parlé trop longtemps.

Il y a quelques semaines, j'étais dans cette salle, ou dans une autre en tout point semblable, à écouter la commissaire à l'environnement et au développement durable nous présenter son rapport final à l'expiration de son mandat. Voici ce que l'on peut notamment lire dans ce rapport : « Pendant des décennies, les gouvernements fédéraux ont invariablement échoué dans leurs efforts pour atteindre les cibles de réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre, et le gouvernement n'est pas prêt à s'adapter à un climat changeant. Tout ceci doit changer. »

Une partie du rapport qu'elle nous a alors présenté portait sur les subventions aux combustibles fossiles. Je n'ai pas le texte sous les yeux, mais l'une des grandes constatations du rapport était que le gouvernement actuel ne pouvait même pas, après quatre ans, définir avec précision ce qu'on entend par une subvention inefficace aux combustibles fossiles, mais n'hésitait pas malgré tout à affirmer du même souffle que nous ne versions pas de subventions semblables.

Lorsque j'ai accompagné l'ancien ministre en Argentine pour la réunion du G20, on voulait d'abord et avant tout savoir si notre gouvernement allait s'engager à éliminer toutes les subventions aux combustibles fossiles pour les remplacer par de véritables incitatifs pour le recours à l'énergie renouvelable.

Je ne sais pas si M. Khosla ou quelqu'un d'autre pourrait... [Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Merci, monsieur le président.[Traduction]

Un environnement sain et une économie forte vont de pair. De nombreuses mesures sont prises dans le dossier des subventions inefficaces aux combustibles fossiles, et j'insiste sur le fait que l'on parle de subventions inefficaces. Nous croyons que les subventions versées au Canada n'entrent pas dans cette catégorie, mais nous avons tout de même accepté de mener un examen par les pairs conjointement avec l'Argentine. C'est le ministre des Finances qui est responsable de cet exercice.

La ministre de l'Environnement et du Changement climatique vient pour sa part de lancer une consultation à ce sujet. Elle a nommé un commissaire qui consultera les Canadiens au sujet des subventions aux combustibles fossiles. Le document de discussion rendu public au moment où cette consultation a été lancée propose certaines définitions déjà existantes qui pourront servir de référence.

Si vous voulez traiter plus à fond de la définition à proprement parler, je vais laisser la parole à M. Des Rosiers qui est responsable de ce dossier.

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

J'ajouterais seulement que cette consultation a pour but de connaître les points de vue des Canadiens et des parlementaires qui souhaiteraient se prononcer quant à ce qui devrait être visé ou non par cette définition, car il en existe effectivement de nombreuses versions.

Il y a un modèle qui a été adopté par la Commission européenne. Le commissaire a recensé les différentes définitions utilisées et les présente de façon assez exhaustive dans le document de consultation.

Le gouvernement tient à discuter ouvertement de ces questions avec les Canadiens pour connaître leurs points de vue à ce sujet.

Michael Horgan, ancien sous-ministre des Finances, est responsable de cette consultation. C'est un haut fonctionnaire qui jouit d'une excellente réputation. Le travail vient tout juste de s'amorcer. Nous avons grand-hâte de connaître les opinions des Canadiens.

M. Richard Cannings:

Nous avons eu par ailleurs un bref échange au sujet des véhicules électriques. M. Schmale a essayé de faire valoir que ces véhicules pouvaient être fort dispendieux pour le Canadien moyen. D'après les études dont j'ai pris connaissance, si l'on tient compte des économies réalisées pour l'entretien et le carburant, on arrive en fin de compte à peu près au même résultat.

J'ai noté ici un montant de 10 millions de dollars et je crains fort que ce soit peut-être un peu bas. Alors, pourriez-vous m'indiquer quel montant est prévu dans le budget pour la construction d'infrastructures de recharge partout au pays? S'agit-il de 10 millions de dollars ou de 100 millions de dollars?

(1655)

Mme Cheri Crosby:

Selon ce qui a été annoncé dans le budget de 2019, c'est un montant additionnel de 435 millions de dollars, dont 130 millions de dollars iront à Ressources naturelles Canada au cours des cinq prochaines années, y compris 10 millions de dollars cette année.

Le financement global dont nous bénéficierons pour la construction de ces infrastructures se rapprochera de 130 millions de dollars sur une période de cinq ans, mais le Budget principal des dépenses de cette année indique bel et bien une somme de 10 millions de dollars.

M. Richard Cannings:

Pour revenir à ce que je disais, nous devons être audacieux. Selon mes calculs, avec 10 millions de dollars, nous construirons environ une centaine de stations de recharge rapides comme celles que les gens veulent. On entend déjà dire que dans des villes comme Vancouver, les gens attendent longtemps parce qu'il y a... Imaginez-vous une centaine de stations d'essence au Canada: elles ne pourraient pas ravitailler tellement de voitures.

J'exhorte le gouvernement à redoubler d'efforts sur ce plan. Cela dit, je suis content qu'il y ait des stations de recharge maintenant. Si j'achetais une voiture électrique aujourd'hui, je pense que je pourrais m'en servir pour faire le tour de ma circonscription.

Pour ce qui est des rénovations, j'aimerais avoir quelques précisions sur le nouveau programme. La FCM, la Fédération canadienne des municipalités, recevra 300 millions de dollars pour la rénovation résidentielle.

Comment les Canadiens peuvent-ils en profiter? Doivent-ils communiquer avec la FCM? Est-ce que ce sont leurs municipalités qui doivent en faire la demande? S'ils ne vivent pas dans une municipalité, comment peuvent-ils avoir accès à ces fonds? Sont-ils pour cette année ou l'année dernière? [Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Si vous me le permettez, monsieur le président, je vais répondre en partie avant de passer la parole à M. Khosla.

Votre première préoccupation est bonne, monsieur Cannings. La Fédération canadienne des municipalités, ou FCM, est une voix nationale et notre partenaire depuis 1901. Nous avons l'habitude de travailler avec cette partenaire qui est établie dans les grandes villes, mais aussi dans les petites municipalités et dans les communautés rurales. Nous allons travailler avec 19 associations provinciales et territoriales responsables de rejoindre non seulement les grands centres, mais aussi les petites villes et les municipalités rurales.

Cette enveloppe comprend même un montant pour l'action communautaire et pour travailler avec les organismes à but non lucratif établis dans les petites communautés afin que des investissements soient faits dans les édifices publics. La FCM et ses ramifications nous permettent donc de nous assurer que le déploiement ne sera pas cantonné aux grands centres urbains.

Je passe la parole à M. Khosla pour qu'il vous explique le programme lui-même. [Traduction]

Le président:

Très, très brièvement.

M. Jay Khosla (sous-ministre adjoint, Secteur de l'énergie, ministère des Ressources naturelles):

D'accord.

Je n'ai pas grand-chose à ajouter, mais sur la question des rénovations de nature résidentielle prévues dans le... Premièrement, c'est plutôt 1 milliard de dollars que la FCM recevra.

M. Richard Cannings:

Oui, je le sais. Elle recevra 300 millions de dollars pour les rénovations résidentielles.

M. Jay Khosla:

Je dirais que c'est plus près de 600 millions de dollars.

Nous pourrons revenir au montant exact, mais il y a de l'argent pour les rénovations et il ira directement au logement.

M. Richard Cannings:

Je me demande surtout comment pourront en profiter les personnes qui ne vivent pas à Montréal ni à Vancouver.

M. Jay Khosla:

Je comprends...

Le président:

Je vais devoir vous interrompre.

Je vous ai donné une partie des trois minutes que vous aviez eues la dernière fois, mais que vous ne pensiez pas avoir eues.

Monsieur Graham, la parole est à vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si vous pouvez m'arrêter quand il me restera trois minutes pour les laisser à M. Whalen, je vous en serais reconnaissant.

Le président:

Sans problème. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une question pour vous, madame Tremblay.

Le crédit 35 vise à « protéger les infrastructures essentielles du Canada contre les cybermenaces: afin de soutenir un nouveau cadre de cybersystèmes essentiels pour protéger les infrastructures essentielles du Canada, notamment dans les secteurs des finances, de l'énergie, des télécommunications et du transport. » Pourriez-vous nous en dire un peu plus sur ce que vous faites? Quel est le plan de cybersécurité du côté de Ressources naturelles Canada?

Je vous laisse choisir qui va répondre.

(1700)

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Votre question porte bien sur la cybersécurité, n'est-ce pas?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui. Un peu plus de 800 000 $ sont prévus pour cela et j'aimerais savoir quels sont les plans.

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Vous posez une excellente question.

La cybersécurité est de plus en plus à l'ordre du jour. Quand on est responsable des infrastructures énergétiques d'un pays, il est très important d'être à la fine pointe de la cybersécurité. Il s'agit d'une préoccupation majeure dans nos relations avec non seulement les États-Unis, puisqu'il y a énormément d'infrastructures qui traversent notre frontière, mais aussi avec notre partenaire mexicain.

Nous travaillons avec nos partenaires du secteur privé, c'est-à-dire les grands services publics, les associations du secteur de l'électricité, ainsi que les entreprises pétrolières et gazières, puisque les pipelines sont maintenant la cible d'attaques. Nous discutions récemment avec des représentants du secteur minier, qui nous disaient subir des attaques sur leurs données stratégiques. Pareilles attaques risquent de devenir plus nombreuses alors que notre économie repose de plus en plus sur le numérique.

Le Canada possède des minéraux, des minerais rares et des métaux comme le lithium, lesquels suscitent beaucoup d'intérêt. Il s'agit donc d'un secteur des ressources naturelles qu'il faut protéger.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il ne me reste pas beaucoup de temps.

Puis-je vous demander quelle forme cela prend? S'agit-il de promoteurs ou d'experts en cybersécurité de chez nous? Est-ce qu'on subventionne les entreprises ou les compagnies qui veulent faire de la cybersécurité?

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Je vais commencer avant de passer la parole à mon collègue M. Khosla.

Il s'agit principalement d'investissements dans les infrastructures critiques pour renforcer la résilience. Nous travaillons aussi avec nos partenaires, l'industrie et les associations pour nous assurer de répondre à cette préoccupation. Enfin, des montants précis sont consacrés à notre travail avec notre partenaire américain.

M. Jay Khosla:

Je voudrais simplement ajouter que le gouvernement souhaite déposer un projet de loi pour surveiller l'industrie et resserrer sa collaboration avec elle. [Traduction]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Reste-t-il du temps pour M. Whalen?

Le président:

Il vous reste 30 secondes avant d'atteindre la barre des trois minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je les prendrai plus tard.

Le président:

Très bien.

Monsieur Whalen, utiliserez-vous le reste de ce temps?

M. Nick Whalen:

Oui, merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Concernant l'idée de dépenser 130 millions de dollars dans les stations de recharge au cours des cinq prochaines années, je suis allé dans un aréna local la fin de semaine dernière, à Paradise, dans ma circonscription de St. John's-Est, à Terre-Neuve, près de chez moi. Il y avait quelques stations de recharge assez récentes devant le bâtiment, mais elles ont déjà commencé à se détériorer à cause des intempéries et du sel épandu dans le stationnement.

Quand je suis allé frapper aux portes, pendant la fin de semaine, j'ai rencontré un électeur frustré. Il aimerait acheter un véhicule électrique, mais il habite dans une habitation multifamiliale, et son stationnement se trouve à côté de l'édifice. Il a peur que même s'il dépense de l'argent pour faire installer sa propre borne de recharge près de son espace de stationnement, elle sera abîmée ou détruite par les déneigeurs.

Quelle part de l'argent prévu dans cette enveloppe servira à l'exploitation, à l'entretien et à la réparation de l'infrastructure? À qui appartient-elle? Y aura-t-il une quelconque analyse comparative des produits offerts par les divers fournisseurs? Aurez-vous recours à un fournisseur unique ou saisirez-vous l'occasion pour évaluer l'offre aux consommateurs, puis tester et comparer les produits des centaines de fournisseurs différents pour déterminer quelles unités durent le plus longtemps et lesquelles sont les plus résilientes? Quel genre de travail effectuerez-vous et comment ferez-vous le lien avec les autres ministères pour ajouter au Code national du bâtiment des dispositions sur l'installation résidentielle de telles unités? [Français]

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Merci, monsieur le président.

C'est une excellente question.

Un montant de 76 millions de dollars sur six ans a été consacré à des projets de démonstration de la prochaine génération de bornes de recharge, afin de s'assurer qu'elles sont résilientes et qu'elles résistent au climat canadien.

M. Des Rosiers peut vous en dire davantage sur certains de ces projets.

(1705)

M. Frank Des Rosiers:

J'ai mentionné certaines des technologies qui ont été développées.[Traduction]

Vous parlez des habitations multifamiliales. C'est justement un des problèmes du marché qui nous a été mentionné. Il n'y a pas de solution assez robuste pour répondre à nos besoins.

Vous avez mentionné les problèmes de résistance au climat, mais il y a aussi les difficultés liées aux systèmes à haute tension. Comme vous le savez, les utilisateurs et les fabricants ont tendance à préférer les unités de recharge rapide, ce qui peut avoir une incidence non seulement sur le type de pile privilégié, mais aussi sur les systèmes électriques, et c'est un problème qui touche à la fois les entités résidentielles, commerciales et les grands exploitants. C'est un autre problème qui est ressorti clairement.

Pour ce qui est des détails de la mise en oeuvre du programme, pour répondre à la deuxième partie de votre question, la sous-ministre ou Jay pourrait peut-être vous en parler plus en détail.

M. Jay Khosla:

Je me ferai un plaisir de le faire. C'est une excellente question.

Comme vous le savez, nous avons de l'expérience. En 2016-2017, nous avons reçu environ 180 millions de dollars pour administrer la première étape du programme. Nous en sommes maintenant à la deuxième. À la première étape, nous avons installé 532 bornes de recharge rapide au pays. Il y en a environ 1 000 qui doivent s'y ajouter, et à la deuxième étape, comme la sous-ministre le mentionnait, nous nous concentrerons davantage sur les besoins résidentiels, municipaux et locaux.

Nous connaissons donc les technologies qui existent. Nous connaissons les entreprises qui existent. Nous utilisons un processus concurrentiel. Nous continuerons de le faire, mais nous avons déjà une très bonne idée des meilleures entreprises qui existent dans l'industrie, et nous continuerons sur notre lancée.

Je dirais que c'est très bien que le gouvernement du Canada fasse installer autant de stations de recharge si vite. Je ne veux pas me vanter, mais je suis très fier que nous ayons réussi à agir si vite dans ce domaine.

M. Nick Whalen:

Qui s'occupe de l'entretien des unités une fois qu'elles sont installées? Quelle partie des sommes allouées servira à l'exploitation et à l'entretien? Les consommateurs en seront-ils informés? Vous faites beaucoup de recherches. Ce serait fantastique si vous en diffusiez les résultats au public, aux consommateurs.

M. Jay Khosla:

Très rapidement, tout cela se joue dans le secteur privé. Nous retenons les services des meilleures entreprises possible, mais c'est une question de concurrence. Ce n'est pas au gouvernement d'en effectuer l'entretien. Nous travaillons avec le secteur privé pour cela. Je pense que cela tombe sous le sens.

Oui, nous pouvons diffuser l'information. Nous avons de bons sites Web déjà accessibles où l'on peut trouver beaucoup d'information. Je pourrai faire parvenir d'autres renseignements au Comité s'il le souhaite.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Madame Stubbs.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie les fonctionnaires d'être ici pour nous aujourd'hui.

J'ai une question à vous poser sur la transition qui suivra l'adoption du projet de loi C-69.

On voit dans le budget de 2019-2020 une attribution de 3,7 millions de dollars au crédit 5 pour le démantèlement de l'Office national de l'énergie, une organisation canadienne reconnue dans le monde depuis longtemps, et son remplacement par la nouvelle Régie canadienne de l'énergie. Comme des fonds sont déjà prévus pour cette transition avant même que le projet de loi n'ait acquis force de loi, j'espère que vous pourrez nous dire, si possible, exactement combien de temps il faudra pour établir complètement la Régie canadienne de l'énergie et en quelle année elle sera pleinement fonctionnelle compte tenu, bien sûr, de la certitude dont les investisseurs et les promoteurs auront besoin pour réaliser leurs grands projets d'exploitation des ressources. Quel est l'échéancier prévu pour cette transition?

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Monsieur le président, c'est une bonne question. Et comme je l'ai déjà mentionné devant le comité sénatorial, je pense que la mise en oeuvre sera déterminante si nous voulons répondre aux attentes de l'industrie, donc nous nous préparons déjà en vue de la transition. Il est difficile d'avoir un plan de match précis, puisque le projet de loi n'a pas encore été adopté et qu'il y a encore beaucoup de discussions en cours, mais je peux vous assurer que la Régie, l'ONE et tous les ministères se préparent pour la transition. Dans notre cas, nous avons reçu de l'argent pour concevoir une plateforme et avons offert notre expertise scientifique pour l'évaluation d'impact. On s'inquiète de plus en plus des effets cumulatifs, et nous avons la responsabilité de concevoir une plateforme à ce sujet.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

D'accord. C'est intéressant. Bien sûr, depuis des dizaines d'années, le Canada est cité en exemple dans le monde pour sa façon de mesurer les effets cumulatifs d'une propriété responsable. C'est bien.

(1710)

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Merci.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Si vous avez plus d'informations au cours des prochains jours ou des prochaines semaines pour répondre à ma question, vous seriez très aimable de nous les faire parvenir.

Selon la mise à jour économique de l'automne 2018, l'agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain, qui appartient désormais aux contribuables, devrait nous rapporter 200 millions de dollars par année, mais selon des documents internes, comme vous le savez probablement, il en coûterait 255 millions de dollars par année au gouvernement en intérêts sur le prêt de 1 milliard de dollars qui l'a contracté. C'est une différence de 55 millions de dollars. Je me demande si vous pouvez confirmer l'ampleur du prêt qu'a contracté le gouvernement du Canada pour le projet d'agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain et ce qu'il lui en coûtera chaque mois en intérêts.

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Monsieur le président, c'est le ministère des Finances qui est responsable de cet aspect.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

D'accord.

Comme vous le savez, le 22 février 2019, l'Office national de l'énergie a recommandé de nouveau l'approbation de l'agrandissement du réseau de Trans Mountain dans l'intérêt national du Canada. Dans le Budget supplémentaire des dépenses (B) de 2018-2019, 6 millions de dollars ont été alloués à l'ONE pour un réexamen de 22 semaines. Bien sûr, l'une des options à la disposition du gouvernement, à l'époque, que les conservateurs recommandaient, aurait été d'adopter un projet de loi d'urgence rétroactif afin d'affirmer que l'évaluation du trafic de pétroliers réalisée par Transports Canada en vue du projet d'agrandissement de Trans Mountain était suffisant, et le gouvernement aurait pu le faire, puisque l'ONE s'est appuyé sur cette évaluation dans sa recommandation d'origine pour approuver le projet Trans Mountain. Bien sûr, pour ce réexamen redondant de 22 semaines, il a fallu nommer deux experts de Transports Canada, puisque c'est le ministère responsable en la matière. Bien sûr, ce sont exactement les mêmes informations qui ont été examinées de nouveau, exactement les mêmes mesures d'atténuation, et l'ONE a fait exactement la même recommandation d'approbation à l'issue de son réexamen.

Pouvez-vous me dire s'il y a une analyse des coûts-avantages qui a été faite à l'interne pour déterminer ce qui serait le mieux pour les Canadiens, entre l'adoption d'un projet de loi d'urgence rétroactif pour affirmer la validité de l'analyse originale de Transports Canada et ce réexamen de 22 semaines par l'ONE?

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Monsieur le président, le gouvernement a décidé de suivre les conseils de la Cour d'appel fédérale puis de demander à l'ONE de réexaminer la question maritime et de recommencer les consultations de la phase trois.

Le président:

Merci. Nous n'avons plus de temps.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Très bien, si vous découvrez qu'il y a eu une évaluation des coûts, j'aimerais bien l'obtenir aussi.

Le président:

Monsieur Tan, vous serez le dernier intervenant.

M. Geng Tan (Don Valley-Nord, Lib.):

Merci. J'ai cinq minutes, n'est-ce pas?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Geng Tan:

Je n'ai qu'une question à poser, donc s'il reste du temps après, je suis prêt à le laisser à mes collègues.

M. Jamie Schmale:

Je suis là.

M. Geng Tan:

Le Budget principal des dépenses octroie un financement à EACL pour la R-D sur les questions nucléaires et la gestion des déchets au Canada.

Ayant travaillé moi-même presque 10 ans dans le domaine nucléaire, j'ai beaucoup de respect pour les spécialistes canadiens et nos compétences en matière nucléaire. Notre CANDU est à n'en pas douter un chef de file de la R-D sur les applications pacifiques des technologies nucléaires dans le monde. Nous avons des réacteurs nucléaires qui génèrent de l'électricité pour répondre aux besoins des Canadiens en Ontario, au Nouveau-Brunswick, et nous en avons eu longtemps au Québec.

Le réacteur du Québec est désormais fermé, et la station de Pickering sera bientôt déclassée. Les chances qu'un nouveau réacteur soit construit selon les plans du CANDU dans un avenir rapproché sont très faibles, si je ne me trompe pas. Il y a une forte probabilité que les capacités nucléaires du Canada en souffrent beaucoup à terme.

Je vais vous donner un exemple. L'expérience du Royaume-Uni nous montre que dans des circonstances très semblables, le pays a perdu son aptitude à concevoir et à fabriquer des réacteurs, et qu'il dépend désormais de l'importation pour la conception de plans et l'achat d'équipement.

Je me demande comment vous entrevoyez l'avenir de la recherche nucléaire et de l'industrie nucléaire au Canada. Considérez-vous qu'elles évoluent dans la bonne direction ou non?

Merci.

(1715)

Mme Christyne Tremblay:

Monsieur le président, je suis très heureuse que le député pose une question sur ce secteur.

Le secteur nucléaire fait évidemment partie du paysage énergétique du Canada. Il mentionnait nos compétences. Nous tirons beaucoup d'énergie de cette source. Le gouvernement investit dans l'EACL cette année et lui octroie 1,2 milliard de dollars dans ce budget seulement.

Notre pays et notre ministère ont une unité complète qui se consacre à ce secteur. Nous avons fait beaucoup de travail au cours de la dernière année sur les nouvelles technologies, notamment sur les PRM, qui pourraient servir dans les communautés éloignées, où le Canada pourrait jouir d'un avantage concurrentiel en étant à la fine pointe de la technologie.

Je peux peut-être céder la parole à mon collègue, M. Khosla, qui est responsable de ce secteur et qui pourra vous parler un peu des progrès que nous avons réalisés, puis peut-être répondre à votre question sur le déclassement et la gestion des déchets.

M. Jay Khosla:

Oui, il y a beaucoup de questions sous-jacentes à votre question principale sur l'avenir du nucléaire.

Je pourrais en parler longtemps, mais nous savons très bien, comme la sous-ministre l'a dit, que le Canada est un pays nucléaire de premier plan et que c'est très important pour lui.

Nous savons aussi que les technologies conçues ici par le CANDU sont tout aussi importantes que toutes les autres formes de technologies énergétiques conçues ici. Nous déployons beaucoup d'efforts auprès des fournisseurs du monde entier pour sonder l'intérêt de divers autres pays pour ces technologies.

Nous savons que c'est un domaine qui connaît une croissance exponentielle en Chine, comme en Inde. Nous continuons notre travail. Nous travaillons en partenariat avec d'autres pays pour essayer de trouver d'autres marchés, comme en Argentine.

C'est la réponse que je peux donner rapidement sur le CANDU.

Vous avez tout à fait raison, le budget alloue 1,2 milliard de dollars aux laboratoires. C'est un énorme investissement de la part de ce gouvernement, pour protéger la R-D, ainsi que la propriété intellectuelle, et que nous restions tournés vers l'avenir. Je pourrais en dire beaucoup plus à ce sujet, mais je ne le ferai pas pour l'instant, puisque je suis sais qu'il reste peu de temps.

Concernant les PRM, si vous voulez parler de l'avenir, il y a beaucoup de choses qui se passent dans ce domaine, et d'une certaine façon, ce n'est pas surprenant, mais c'est aussi très rafraîchissant de voir que le monde se tourne vers le Canada pour le rôle qu'il pourrait jouer dans le domaine des PRM, soit des petits réacteurs modulaires.

Ceux-ci pourraient surtout être utiles dans le Nord, à notre avis. Nous étudions la question. Nous avons établi une feuille de route, un exercice qui nous a pris un an. Nous avons consulté les Canadiens, et nous avons constaté que le Canada est l'un des meilleurs endroits où mettre cette technologie en pratique. Nous avons soumis un projet à l'organisme de réglementation, la CCSN, qui est en train de l'examiner. Nous avons neuf propositions à l'étude.

Nous avons reçu un appel de New York l'autre jour. Nous nous y sommes rendus pour aller parler à Bloomberg, qui serait intéressée à investir dans ce domaine, donc j'encourage le Comité à continuer d'étudier la chose.

Pour terminer, je vous dirais — et comme je le disais, je pourrais vous en parler bien plus longuement —, qu'il ne faut pas oublier que nous avons aussi de l'uranium. Pour tout trouver au même endroit dans le domaine nucléaire, nous avons de bonnes choses à dire, mais les coûts et la gestion des déchets sont de grands défis, auxquels nous devons trouver des solutions au Canada, comme ailleurs dans le monde. Nous travaillons fort en ce sens.

J'espère que ma réponse vous aide.

Le président:

C'est une bonne chose que vous n'aviez pas deux questions à poser. C'est tout le temps que vous aviez.

Il n'a plus de temps. Je n'aime pas être sévère, mais je pense que nous devons poursuivre. C'est tout le temps que nous avions pour les témoins.

Nous devons voter sur le budget, ce qui devrait nous prendre entre 2 et 10 minutes, selon l'esprit de coopération dont nous saurons faire preuve. Je ne regardais ni dans une direction ni dans l'autre quand je l'ai dit, monsieur Schmale, que ce soit bien clair.

Je vous remercie beaucoup d'avoir pris le temps d'être avec nous aujourd'hui et d'avoir répondu à toutes nos questions. Personne n'a su vous piéger dans vos domaines d'expertise.

Nous allons suspendre la séance brièvement.

(1715)

(1720)

Le président:

Reprenons la séance.

Pour le compte rendu, je tiens à dire que M. Schmale a été le premier assis, à ma gauche. À ma droite, personne n'a quitté son siège.

Nous devons maintenant voter sur le Budget principal des dépenses. Nous avons deux choix. Nous pouvons voter sur tous les éléments en bloc, si nous avons le consentement unanime du Comité, ou nous pouvons voter sur chacun individuellement.

Je regarde maintenant vers la gauche, monsieur Schmale.

M. Ted Falk:

Tous les crédits seront adoptés avec dissidence.

Le président:

Très bien. Je m'y attendais. ÉNERGIE ATOMIQUE DU CANADA, LIMITÉE ç Crédit 1—Paiements à la société pour les dépenses de fonctionnement et les dépenses en capital..........1 197 282 026 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.) COMMISSION CANADIENNE DE SÛRETÉ NUCLÉAIRE ç Crédit 1—Dépenses du programme..........39 136 248 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.) MINISTÈRE DES RESSOURCES NATURELLES ç Crédit 1—Dépenses de fonctionnement..........563 825 825 $ ç Crédit 5—Dépenses en capital..........13 996 000 $ ç Crédit 10—Subventions et contributions..........471 008 564 $ ç Crédit 15—Encourager les Canadiens à utiliser des véhicules à émission zéro..........10 034 967 $ ç Crédit 20—Mobiliser les communautés autochtones dans le cadre de grands projets de ressources..........12 801 946 $ ç Crédit 25—Veiller à une meilleure préparation et intervention pour la gestion des catastrophes..........11 090 650 $ ç Crédit 30—Améliorer l'information sur l'énergie canadienne..........1 674 737 $ ç Crédit 35—Protéger les infrastructures essentielles du Canada contre les cybermenaces..........808 900 $ ç Crédit 40—Des collectivités arctiques et nordiques dynamiques..........6 225 524 $

(Les crédits 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 et 40 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) OFFICE NATIONAL DE L'ÉNERGIE ç Crédit 1—Dépenses du programme..........82 536 499 $ ç Crédit 5—Coûts de transition pour la Régie canadienne de l'énergie..........3 670 000 $

(Les crédits 1 et 5 sont adoptés avec dissidence.) ADMINISTRATION DU PIPE-LINE DU NORD ç Crédit 1—Dépenses du programme..........1 055 000 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Puis-je faire rapport à la Chambre du crédit 1 sous la rubrique Énergie atomique du Canada limitée, du crédit 1 sous la rubrique Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire, des crédits 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 et 40 sous la rubrique Ressources naturelles, des crédits 1 et 5 sous la rubrique Office national de l'énergie et du crédit 1 sous la rubrique Administration du pipe-line du Nord?

Des voix: D'accord.

Le président: C'est tout ce que nous avions à l'ordre du jour d'aujourd'hui.

Jeudi prochain, nous recevrons une délégation de parlementaires allemands. Nous n'avons pas prévu de séance officielle, mais nous les rencontrerons avec le comité du commerce. Je pense que la plupart d'entre vous avez déjà accepté d'être présents. Espérons que tout le monde pourra y être. Nous ne savons pas encore dans quelle salle cette rencontre se tiendra.

La greffière du Comité (Mme Jubilee Jackson):

Ce sera dans la pièce 025B, juste à côté.

Le président:

Ce sera dans la pièce 025B, juste à côté, à 15 h 30, jeudi.

M. Whalen a une question.

M. Nick Whalen:

Mme Stubbs avait évoqué la possibilité de changer la date de la réunion du 20 juin pour recevoir...

Nous pourrions peut-être en parler maintenant.

Le président:

J'allais en fait vous proposer que nous en discutions mardi. Nous tiendrons mardi notre dernière séance prévue dans le cadre de cette étude. Elle ne devrait pas dépasser une heure. Nous pourrions en parler à ce moment-là.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Oui, je préfère que nous parlions mardi.

Le président:

C'est mieux mardi. Ce serait donc tout pour aujourd'hui.

Mme Shannon Stubbs:

Cela leur laissera plus de temps pour comprendre ce qui se passe.

Le président:

Cela laissera plus de temps à tous pour y réfléchir, et ce sera aussi tout pour aujourd'hui maintenant.

Sur ce, je vous remercie toutes et tous.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on April 30, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.