header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-04-30 PROC 151

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1900)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good evening, and welcome to the 151st meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. I should also say good morning to our witness, who is in Canberra, where it's 9 a.m. on Wednesday.

As we continue our study of parallel debating chambers, we are pleased to be joined by Claressa Surtees, the Acting Clerk of the Australian House of Representatives, who is appearing via video conference. Before we get to your opening statement, the clerk and analysts, at my request, pulled together a few short clips from both Westminster Hall and the Federation Chamber, so we can have a better sense of what these second chambers actually look like. There are two videos from each chamber, the first being the opening of the sitting and the second showing the lead-up to a suspension for division bells in the main chamber.

[Video presentation]

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

That was Westminster Hall.

Next, you'll see the Federation Chamber in Australia.

An hon. member: Can the witness see this video?

The Chair:

She's there every day.

[Video presentation]

That was fascinating. Thank you very much, Mr. Clerk. That was great. It really gives us a sense of what they do there.

We have before us, Claressa Surtees, the Acting Clerk of the Australian House of Representatives. Hello, can you hear us now?

(1905)

Ms. Claressa Surtees (Acting Clerk of the House, House of Representatives of Australia):

Yes, I can hear you.

The Chair:

Perfect.

Thank you very much for being here for us.

We will give you some time to give us introductory remarks, and then some of the committee members will probably have questions for you.

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

Thank you very much, Chair.

Good evening, members.

My name is Claressa Surtees. I appear before the committee in my official capacity as Acting Clerk of the House of Representatives of the Parliament of Australia.

I'm pleased to be able to speak with you in relation to your committee's study of parallel debating chambers. In 1994 the House of Representatives amended the Standing Orders to establish the Main Committee, as it was then called, as a parallel debating chamber. This establishment gave effect to recommendations of the House procedure committee in a 1993 report. The Main Committee met for the first time on June 8, 1994, so as you see, it's coming up for it's 25th birthday next month.

The Main Committee was renamed the Federation Chamber in 2012. Over time its role has expanded, as have its hours of meeting. The parallel chamber allows extended time to debate mostly non-contentious bills, as well as committee and delegation reports and government papers. The agenda also permits private members, other than the Speaker and the ministers, opportunities to raise and debate matters of concern to them. Overall it assists the House with not only its legislative function but also government accountability, ventilation of grievances and matters of interest or concern.

The Standing Orders provide that the Deputy Speaker has principal authority in relation to the Federation Chamber in the same manner as the Speaker does in the House. With the establishment of the Main Committee, the office of Second Deputy Speaker was created to assist the Deputy Speaker in this regard. This office is filled through an election process and is held by a non-government member.

Through practice, the Deputy Clerk is the clerk of the Federation Chamber and has responsibilities for the minutes of proceedings.

The establishment of this second debating chamber has had an enduring impact on the work of the House of Representatives. Aside from the additional opportunities it has provided to members to speak on proposed legislation and matters of their own choosing, it has had an impact on resourcing. Just like the chamber, the Federation Chamber must be supported by chairs and clerks and broadcasting and Hansard services.

Of course, the other aspect of this is that those requirements have contributed to building capability. The Federation Chamber has been a valued initial venue for the professional development of chairs and of clerks.

The venue itself must be suitable for the purpose. For us, this meant the adaptation of a committee room, but that means that room is alienated for most other purposes for which it had previously been used.

The Federation Chamber meets every day the House sits, for 21.5 hours each sitting week.

It meant a fundamental change to the legislative process. Prior to the establishment of the Main Committee, detailed consideration of bills was taken by a committee of the whole membership of the House in the chamber. However, with the establishment of the Main Committee, the name of this stage of the legislative process was changed to consideration in detail. The key motivating factor for the establishment of the Main Committee was to provide a second legislative stream to ease pressure on the legislative business of the House, because the guillotine had been increasingly used and, therefore, debate often was limited.

In particular, the parallel debating chamber may consider bills referred to it for the second reading stage and the consideration-in-detail stage. An immediate improvement was noted by the reduction of the use of the guillotine in 1994. Only 14 bills were guillotined in that year, compared to 132 in the previous year.

Originally only bills where there was no disagreement were to be considered in the Main Committee. However, before long, more controversial bills were referred, as long as there was agreement to this end. The role of the Main Committee has expanded over the years.

(1910)



The enduring feature of the Federation Chamber is that it operates on the principle of consensus, and from the beginning, procedures were designed to strongly encourage co-operative debate. In particular, the quorum requirements—the Deputy Speaker or the chair, one government member and one non-government member—mean that quorum can be lost easily. The requirement for unanimous decisions provides any member with the ability to have a question considered unresolved and the matter then reported to the House for a decision.

Although it is formally the government's decision which bills and other matters are referred to the Federation Chamber, the co-operative nature of operations in this second chamber makes referral of government business items also contingent on agreement with the opposition.

There have been several reviews into the operation of the second chamber. The procedure committee's 2015 inquiry labelled the Federation Chamber an unparalleled success and concluded that it had earned its permanent place in the functioning of the House, having met the aims first put forward and evolved with the needs of the House. Review and recommendations designed to increase effectiveness have continued, including in relation to providing for a more interactive debate.

Some of the measures that are trialled in the Federation Chamber are later confirmed in the standing orders and then introduced into the House itself.

Thank you, Chair. Those are my opening remarks.

The Chair:

Thank you very much. This is very interesting.

Before I go to questions, I'll ask a quick one.

In our system, when a bill is passed at second reading, it then goes to one of 30 different committees, depending on the subject. Are you saying that detailed study of your bills used to be in committee of the whole, but the bills now go to a main committee that sits in the Federation Chamber?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

Our system is a little bit different, Chair. The stage you have of referral to the investigative committees doesn't happen in the House of Representatives as a matter of course. It is possible for individual bills to be referred to committees, but it isn't a common practice in our House.

The way the legislative process takes place is that the bill is presented in the House and read a first time. The sponsoring minister moves the second reading and makes the significant second reading speech, and after that, a bill may be referred to the Federation Chamber for the remainder of the second reading debate and then the consideration-in-detail stage, at the conclusion of which it must be referred back to the House for the final process.

(1915)

The Chair:

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Thank you, Madam. We really appreciate this.

I'm going to follow up on the Chair's questioning, because it fascinates me that consideration-in-detail stage.

We have a committee system. We have 24 standing committees here. Once bills have passed second reading stage, they go into the committee stage for detailed study. What you're telling us is that consideration in detail now takes place in that chamber, and it is similar to the process of committee of the whole.

Is that correct?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

That is correct. There is no strong practice in our House for bills to be referred to standing committees for inquiry.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That leads to my question.

So there is no voting at second reading; it automatically goes there. Is that correct, or do they vote to send it there?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

There is a vote when the question on the second reading is put. If a bill is to be referred to the Federation Chamber, that would usually happen before the conclusion of the second reading stage.

It is possible for a bill to be referred to a committee, and that would also happen before the conclusion of the second reading stage. The expectation would be that the committee's report back to the House would then be a matter to be considered during the second reading debate. If any amendments were to be moved, they would be moved on the bill during the consideration-in-detail stage.

Our two processes between the two Houses are really quite different, I think

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes, it is, and I find it fascinating.

I want to go back to the comment you made about the guillotining of certain bills. Here we call it “time allocation”. The current government receives criticism about time allocation; the former government probably received even more. However, it is quite common, and we do it for that reason.

It seems that we don't have the mechanism by which to quell that. For instance, I know that in Great Britain in the mid-1990s, in the Westminster system, they introduced bill programming.

Your answer to that, though, is the parallel chamber. You went from over 100 guillotining motions down to about 14.

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

That's correct.

These days we also refer to them slightly differently. We refer to “debate management motions” these days, but they're not as common as they used to be. The process for them is usually by a notice on the Notice Paper. Even though we still have provisions in the Standing Orders for these arrangements, they're no longer relied upon.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I see.

You said that you have certain committees that deal with this. You can refer to an actual standing committee.

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

We do. We have quite an extensive list of standing committees established under the Standing Orders, and some other committees that are established through resolution. The Standing Order committees reflect, in a general sense, the portfolio areas of the government. If a bill were to be referred to a committee, it would go to the related subject matter committee.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you for that.

There are two themes we're getting from our debate here about a parallel chamber. Yours obviously is the originator and the U.K. followed shortly thereafter. There are two schools of thought, for me, anyway. One would be allowing other material to be addressed through the parallel chamber, such as with petitions, with other forms of debate, something that's not being talked about in the primary chamber. What fascinates me more is the fact that we can ease the pressure on the main chamber so that more people can have a say in the debate.

Was that the genesis of your Federation Chamber?

(1920)

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

If I understand your question, the genesis of the Federation Chamber was that because of the pressure on the legislative program, members were very unhappy that they had no opportunity to take part in the debate.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Is that the case?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

That was the case.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Interesting. That's what I was looking for, because I think in our case that is of a great deal of interest, or at least it is to me personally.

With regard to the other aspects of the Federation Chamber, is it say, open to petitions? Can you debate certain petitions that come to the House?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

The process we have in place for petitions is that when they are presented, there is a petitions committee that considers whether or not to accept petitions. They are approved by that committee. They can be physically presented by a member during a short speech in the Federation Chamber or in the House, but we don't have a period during which the petitions are routinely debated.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay.

You also brought up this prospect. If I want to introduce a topic into the legislature, the most common way for me as a Canadian member of Parliament is to introduce it through a motion or a private member's bill. Then I have to wait my turn to talk about it within the main chamber.

If I want to bring up a specific topic to discuss in the Federation Chamber, whether it's a motion or a bill, how would I do that?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

I think the processes sound a bit similar.

In the House of Representatives, a member would give notice of a motion or a bill. We have a selection committee that chooses the agenda for the next sitting Monday. There are periods set aside in the House itself and in the Federation Chamber for private members' business. At those opportunities, the scheduled selected items are available for debate by the sponsor and, if the amount of time is sufficient, then for other speakers on the debate.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Madam Clerk, for joining us. I understand you're in the middle of an election down there, so I guess it might be a little slower for you at this point in time. We appreciate your expertise and your wisdom on this subject matter.

I want to start with a bit of a simple question. In terms of proximity to the main chamber, exactly how far away is it? How long would it take to walk from the Federation Chamber to your main chamber?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

I've not tried it on a sitting day, but I would think it would take perhaps two minutes to walk from the Federation Chamber to the chamber.

In our case, the amount of time available for a division is four minutes for the ringing of the bells. This time was set when the building was first occupied by the Parliament as providing an opportunity for someone walking, but not running, from the furthest point from the chamber in order to be able to get there in time to take part in the vote.

Mr. John Nater:

This is fascinating. We're lazy with 30-minute bells here.

I want to go to some of the timing of the Federation Chamber. You mentioned 21.5 hours per week in terms of the sitting of the Federation Chamber. For the House of Representatives itself, how long does it sit per week? Is it four days a week?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

Yes. The usual pattern of sitting for the House has been, for many years, four days: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. At the moment, the current timing for the sittings is 36 hours a week. We don't sit any later than 8 p.m. these days. It has been a lot later in the past, but at the moment it's 8 p.m.

The Federation Chamber initially was scheduled to meet for two periods of about three hours on two days of the sittings, but it has grown over the years, and now there's an indicative order of business that sees the Federation Chamber meeting on each of the sitting days, on each day the House sits.

(1925)

Mr. John Nater:

That's fascinating. Basically, then, I'm to infer that despite the increase in sittings in the Federation Chamber, it hasn't taken time away from the House of Representatives itself. It has still maintained its full sitting schedule.

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

Yes and no, I suppose, is the answer to that.

The House used to sit until 11 p.m. on Mondays and Tuesdays. Clearly, it no longer sits that late. It sits until 8 p.m., but at the same time, we don't have a dinner break, so there's time saved. There has been no diminution in the overall number of hours available for the business of the House.

Mr. John Nater:

You mentioned in the opening comments that typically the Federation Chamber is used for less contentious debates on government legislation. You also mentioned that from time to time more contentious debates could be conducted in the Federation Chamber, but that it is done with agreement from the opposition.

Is that a formal process whereby the official opposition agrees to a more contentious debate? What process or procedure is in place in terms of scheduling both the less contentious and also, more importantly, the more contentious debates? How is that agreement reached?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

This sort of negotiation takes place outside the chamber, so we don't have a great visibility on it. I know what happens. The leader of the House and the manager of opposition business will negotiate over the matters to be scheduled for the agenda for the Federation Chamber, so there is agreement.

As I tried to indicate, if there weren't agreement, if there were a great deal of unhappiness, it would be very easy to withdraw the quorum because the quorum is the chair, one government member and one non-government member. If the opposition were unhappy, it could simply leave the chamber and the proceedings would immediately suspend.

The issue of how contentious some of the legislation is, or some of the other items perhaps, I think is quite interesting. We've always had the main appropriation bills considered in the Federation Chamber. There's always been an opportunity for members to take quite opposing views about policy during the course of the debate on the budget bills. That hasn't prevented the bills being debated in the Federation Chamber, and it's actually regarded as quite a successful aspect of the operations there.

Mr. John Nater:

I want to follow up very briefly about the concept of the quorum. It's basically a safeguard against a government using the Federation Chamber.... Was that designed that way, that quorum was meant as a safeguard, or has that just developed organically as a safeguard?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

No, you're right. It was designed that way. It was designed so that the Federation Chamber could be regarded as operating on a consensus basis. There is no fixed seating in the Federation Chamber. In the House itself, members have identified seats with their names attached. In the Federation Chamber that's not the case. Members can sit wherever they like. Although the usual convention of government to the right of the chair and non-government to the left of the chair is usually followed, it's not a requirement. In fact, members can sit wherever they wish.

Mr. John Nater:

You mentioned near the beginning of your remarks that the recommendations for the Federation Chamber came out of a report from your procedure committee. Was there an effort there in terms of a consensus report? Was that a consensus report from the outset? Was there all-party agreement to create the chamber at the beginning in terms of developing it in the first place?

(1930)

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

Yes, it was. It was developed in the context of there being a great deal of unhappiness of members not having an opportunity to debate. Of course, the options to solve this problem are quite limited. It meant extra sitting days, so coming to Canberra for more days, or longer sitting days—at the time they were already quite long days—or to develop this second stream, this second debating chamber. I think members were very [Technical difficulty—Editor]

The Chair:

We are not suspended.

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

I understand that we're trying to address the problem, but I'm happy to continue if that would be appropriate.

The Chair:

Yes, that's okay. We can hear you. We just can't see you. You can just finish what you were saying.

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

I think we were talking about the consensus nature of the operation of the Federation Chamber.

The members don't have individual seating in the Federation Chamber, so that means they can sit anywhere they would like to, although there is a tendency to maintain the government to the right and opposition to the left arrangements, reflective of the chamber. This contributes to the more co-operative approach to the way the proceedings are conducted.

The Chair:

I think the question was whether there was consensus with all parties to create the chamber.

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

Okay. Yes, in terms of the report of the procedure committee, the committee had membership from all parties in the House and there was a great deal of satisfaction with the solution that was proposed in the report. There's not a great desire to come to Canberra for extra sitting days or to, indeed, have longer sitting days, but certainly the parallel debating stream was something they were quite pleased with proposing.

(1935)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we're going to change our questioner. We're going to Mr. David Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Madam Clerk, for your time. This is very informative and very helpful. Thank you again.

John and I were wondering whether any of your states have adopted the parallel chamber process.

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

I've had an opportunity to discuss it with a number of the Speakers from the state parliaments. I'm not aware that any of them have actually put the arrangements in place. They're certainly always very interested to come and observe proceedings when they visit Canberra. We often talk about the impact the second chamber might have on the overall ability of the House to conduct its business, but I'm not aware that any of them have actually established a second chamber at this stage.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

I have a couple of quick questions before I delve into a little more minutiae.

Are they televised?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

Yes, they are. All the meetings of the Federation Chamber are televised in the same way the proceedings of the House are. We don't have a parliamentary television channel. When I say “televised”, it's through the website. All the proceedings are streamed through the website.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I used to be a deputy speaker, and tasks aren't all that onerous. You're doing a lot of the grunt work for the Speaker. On the big stuff, the Speaker calls the shots, as they should.

You said that in this chamber, the Deputy Speaker is treated like the Speaker, and is the main official. I wonder, given the new responsibilities, did the Deputy Speaker get a pay increase when they upped the responsibilities?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

It was 25 years ago, so I wasn't in a position to observe what impact there was. However, with the introduction of a new position, I can only assume that would probably have been the case, because the new position—the Second Deputy Speaker—receives a certain level of remuneration as well. There is a recognition that it does provide an extra challenge for the Deputy Speaker, in terms of contribution to the roster and that sort of thing.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you.

The terminology is interesting. The guillotining and time allocation remind me of when I was much younger, in the 1970s, with the auto workers. We called it guided democracy. Everybody has a term for the hand on the throat.

The reason I raise this is that in my experience, governments will sometimes want to guillotine a bill because of the debate that's happening in the House, and the media attention, but at the end of the day, it's usually because of time management. The most expensive commodity for government vis-à-vis the House is House time. It's almost like an airport, where you have planes ready to take off. You have ministers lined up, all trying to cajole the House leader to get their bill in the House. It's often about that pressure, as opposed to the politics around the issue. There are exceptions.

You said there was less guillotining by a big number. You also said that you didn't deal with contentious issues, as a rule, although you're starting to now. Were there that many non-contentious issues that required guillotining? Why? Was it time management or was it more small-p politics?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

They're very good points.

The issue was time management. The government at the time had a big legislative agenda, and so a lot of bills were awaiting passage, or debate and then passage. It was about time management, and this was the solution proposed. The bills could be adequately debated and still be passed in a timely manner, so that the initiatives could be implemented, or the programs put in place.

(1940)

Mr. David Christopherson:

I have to say that, initially, I was attracted because of the non-partisan nature of the House. You wouldn't necessarily be giving the government more time, because that creates a political problem. You should have seen what we went through here around whether or not we would continue to sit on Fridays, and the fight's not over. These things have a significant impact.

How do the rules of that chamber facilitate the contentious issues they're dealing with? Here's my thinking: If we follow the idea that government's motivated more by time management than by trying to extinguish backbenchers' rights to get up and have their say, then this chamber would not necessarily hand the government more time. You're going to use the same amount of time in the House. It does allow more debate by more members, but it's under a different set of rules. With it being so easy to collapse the chamber, for instance, how are you managing to deal with some of the contentious issues, where right from the get-go, you're not getting agreement on what time you're going to order coffee, let alone on any amendments?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

What the operation of the Federation Chamber permits is for two streams of legislation to be debated at the same time. For example, at the time that a bill about higher education is being debated in the Federation Chamber, there can be a debate in the House about something to do with tax policy. Two separate bills are being debated at the same time. This means that the government can be progressing two bills over the course of a single day, whereas that may not have been possible in the past.

In our system, members have an opportunity to speak for 15 minutes in the second reading debate on a bill, so they're limited. I know that's not the case in some jurisdictions where they might be unlimited, but there is a limitation on the length of a member's speech in the second reading debate. If a lot of members wish to speak, then of course this will take hours. We have only 150 members, so it's a smaller chamber than yours; nevertheless, it's hours of debate.

It's not that the debate is going to be stopped because of the contentious nature of the legislation or the proposals, but it's just that if there were unhappiness about the bill being in the Federation Chamber at all, it is very easy to withdraw the quorum and then automatically the bill must be referred back to the House. I have to say this doesn't happen very often. It's usually because there has been quite careful negotiation between the leader of the House and the manager of opposition business to agree on the agenda for the Federation Chamber, so the bill will progress.

At the detail stage, if there are amendments being proposed by the opposition and they would like to record the formal division, then of course that must go back to the House. There are no divisions in the Federation Chamber.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Right.

Very good. Thank you very much for the fulsome answers.

The Chair:

Now we'll go to Mr. Graham, who speaks a little quickly so you'll have to listen carefully.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I will try to be cautious.

You say that all bills go to the secondary debating chamber to be looked at. Is each bill looked at clause by clause in that chamber, and do they go through each line of the bill, or is that another process altogether?

If we have 24 committees' worth of bills going as one committee, that seems impractical.

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

Not all bills go to the Federation Chamber. They can either go to the Federation Chamber or remain in the main chamber for debate. The stage of our legislative process in which bills may be considered clause by clause we now refer to as consideration in detail. We hardly ever have a clause-by-clause approach these days.

Although the Standing Orders recognize the default position as clause by clause, usually a bill is taken as a whole by leave. Then if there is a debate about particular aspects of the bill, that can occur. If there are amendments, they can be moved and then voted on during that debate.

For us, the clause by clause is the consideration-in-detail stage, where members have opportunities of five minutes at a time to speak to the issues, and as with the other debates in the House, the call will vary from side to side. It's five minutes for one.

(1945)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How much time would a typical bill spend in the Federation Chamber?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

Probably it would only be there for that day, and then it would be concluded to the consideration-in-detail stage and then referred back to the House.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Can a point of order of any sort be entertained?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

It can be, yes. The Deputy Speaker or the person in the chair would then consider that matter.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You said that the House does not sit later than 8 p.m. on any day. How long do votes take there? We have situations where voting could go 30 or 40 straight hours here. Does that ever happen there?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

Most of the decisions of the House go on the voices. If a division is called, then it will be considered immediately. Our votes are usually resolved within about 15 minutes, but that's just the count.

If there is a successive division, then, of course, that would be taken immediately after the first one.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If you have 20 successive divisions starting at 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., do you continue past 8 p.m., or does it suspend until the next day?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

Oh, I see what you mean.

Every evening we have an adjournment debate, so at 7:30 p.m. on the Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, the days conclude at 8 p.m. At 7:30 p.m. we have what we call an automatic proposal of the question to adjourn. Because of the Standing Orders, we would conclude the division that was in progress at the time in the House, and then the adjournment debate would commence.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It concludes just the vote that's taking place, and not the successive votes.

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

No. We just conclude the first division, and then, under the Standing Orders, the automatic adjournment would intervene.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's fascinating.

Is there anything bad about the Federation Chamber?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

Well, of course, that reference there was to the House because we don't have divisions in the Federation Chamber.

The Federation Chamber will always adjourn when the House is adjourned. It typically commences half an hour after the commencement of the House and adjourns half an hour before the scheduled adjournment of the main chamber.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Does the other House have any similar process, and is there ever any overlap between the two?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

Are you asking about the Senate?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes.

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

The Senate doesn't have a second debating chamber, no.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there any circumstance in which senators would attend the secondary debating chamber?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

They don't attend in a formal sense. Of course, if they are curious or interested in a matter that's before the Federation Chamber, they are able to attend as a visitor in the same way as members of the public, but I can't say I can recall having seen a senator in the Federation Chamber while I've been there.

(1950)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's all I have for the moment.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

I'm going to open it up now to an informal process for anyone who has one question. Don't take too long, so everyone gets a chance.

Go ahead, Stephanie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

Thank you very much, Madam Clerk, for joining us today.

I'm a little skeptical about the possibility of a secondary chamber. Do you have any opinions to share with the committee as to whether the newly created parallel debating chamber should be provisional or permanent? Do you think this is something that can be done on a test run, or do you think that, once it has been established, it's hard to rescind it?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

What I can say is that when our second debating chamber was first introduced, some members were skeptical. They weren't welcoming. Some of the ministers didn't like going there, so they'd send the junior ministers.

That level of resistance has completely disappeared. There is absolutely no sense that people resent having to go to the Federation Chamber. In fact, during the debate on the appropriation bills, the ministers go. We had the deputy prime minister there responding to issues during the consideration-in-detail stage of the budget bills.

It's grown in authority over the years. I guess with any change to long-established procedures, there is always concern about how valuable it will be and whether you will actually be able to achieve what you're trying to address to overcome the issues. An approach that allows some flexibility is probably a good one, and if there is a need to adjust whatever the original arrangements are, then I think that would be helpful. Certainly, in the case of our Federation Chamber, it has evolved since it first commenced. It's gone from two days for a few hours, if required, to each day on which the House sits, with indicative hours of business for the Federation Chamber.

Of course, if the business that's been allocated is concluded, then the Federation Chamber can conclude earlier. I think members appreciate, too, that it's not that people have to go there just because it's available. It's only going to be operating when there's actual business that needs to be addressed. That's the way it works.

I hope that addresses some of your issues.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, it does. Thank you.

Similar to what my colleague asked, can you think of any unintended consequences that could arise from establishing a parallel debating chamber? Is there something that doesn't seem obvious, which became apparent? Was there a residual outcome you didn't anticipate or that was not anticipated in establishing the parallel chamber?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

Inevitably, having another debating chamber means there can be greater demands on a member's time. It's a busy time for members of our Parliament. I can imagine it's the case with yours. A lot is going on on a sitting day. The committees are meeting. The House is operating. Visitors are coming in all the time. So members' diaries are quite full. The members need to be careful not to double-book themselves; by that I mean put their name on the list to speak at the same time as a matter comes up in both chambers, because of course they need to make sure that they can fulfill their commitments about speaking.

A little flexibility is necessary with things like speaking lists. Members might need to converse with their colleagues to adjust the order in which they're expecting to speak in the two chambers. It can be visible sometimes. Members literally dash from one chamber to meet a commitment in the other.

What perhaps wasn't anticipated was the evolution of the Federation Chamber itself and [Technical difficulty—Editor] that is conducted now in the Federation Chamber has really grown. Members in particular appreciate the short speaking [Technical difficulty—Editor]. It wasn't always the case, but every time the Federation Chamber meets on any day, the first period is set aside for constituency statements, so members have an opportunity to speak for three minutes. They can say a lot in three minutes, reflecting on the good work of people in their communities. They really value those opportunities.

At the moment, the members include ministers. Some ministers have an opportunity to speak about their constituencies during those three-minute periods. Ministers did not have an opportunity to do that before. The Standing Orders were changed about 10 years ago to enable ministers to have that opportunity as well as just private members having that opportunity, and I know the ministers have valued that. Otherwise, of course, they have the opportunities to speak as a minister, but not necessarily to talk about something in their constituencies. Those sorts of things have been very valued.

(1955)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Upon reflection of establishing the secondary chamber, I'm wondering if your Parliament has determined less severe democratic alternatives to establishing a secondary chamber that would have potentially achieved the same objectives that were set out for establishing the secondary chamber. I'm certain they could be wide and varied, but does anything immediately come to mind, such as, instead of setting up this entire secondary chamber they could just have...fill in the blank?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

I'm not aware of any other proposals for a procedural change that might have been considered at the time. As I mentioned before, the obvious issue is if you don't have enough time to debate legislation, so you need to create more time. How you create more time is perhaps through having more sitting days, longer sitting days or this second debating chamber.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you very much, Madam Clerk, for being here with us today and for providing this information.

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

Thank you.

The Chair:

I have two quick questions, just to finish off.

You said that most of the decisions were done by voice vote. Could you say roughly what percentage? Does that mean for most votes, how individual MPs voted is not recorded?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

What I should have said—if I didn't—was that most decisions of the House are taken on the voices. The chair will put the question, “All those of that opinion say 'aye', and of the contrary, 'no'. I think the ayes have it”. That will be the conclusion of the decision.

If the outcome is challenged and a division is called, then of course we go through the formal process, but yes, most decisions in the House will be taken on the voices. There is not a list of who voted which way because unless the announcement by the chair is challenged, then the presumption is that there is no challenge.

On the very rare occasions where only one member dissents, then of course that member can have the dissent recorded in the votes. One name would be there. We need two voices for division.

(2000)

The Chair:

This is my last question. Here we have 24 standing committees, based on the portfolios. They spend a lot of their time, maybe the majority of their time, doing a detailed review of legislation, of various bills.

If your committees don't do that, what do they do?

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

The House committees typically look at more long-term inquiries into public policy issues. They'll have terms of reference either directly from the House or perhaps referred from a minister and they'll be looking at issues of public policy.

That's the nature of our committee work.

The Chair:

Is that it for everyone?

Thank you very much. This has been fascinating. We'll definitely have to come and visit soon. You've given us lots of new ideas and uses of the second chamber, which is totally different, as Mr. Simms said, from Westminster.

Thank you very much for taking this time for us. It has been very, very helpful.

Ms. Claressa Surtees:

Thank you very much, Chair. It has been my privilege to be able to discuss these matters with you, and should there be anything you'd like to follow up on, I'd be only too pleased to respond.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1900)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonsoir et bienvenue à la 151e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Je devrais également dire bonjour à notre témoin, qui est à Canberra, où il est 9 heures du matin mercredi.

Alors que nous poursuivons notre étude sur les chambres de débat parallèles, nous sommes heureux d'accueillir Claressa Surtees, greffière par intérim de la Chambre des représentants australienne, qui nous parvient par vidéoconférence. Avant de passer à votre déclaration liminaire, madame Surtees, le greffier et les analystes ont à ma demande rassemblé quelques courts extraits de Westminster Hall et de la Chambre de la Fédération, afin que nous puissions avoir une meilleure idée de ce à quoi ressemblent ces secondes chambres. Il y a deux vidéos de chaque chambre, la première étant l'ouverture de la séance et la seconde montrant la préparation d'une suspension lorsque la sonnerie d'appel est activée par la chambre principale.

[Présentation audiovisuelle]

Le greffier du Comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

C'était Westminster Hall.

Ensuite, vous verrez la Chambre de la Fédération, en Australie.

Un député: Le témoin peut-il voir cette vidéo?

Le président:

Elle est là tous les jours.

[Présentation audiovisuelle]

C'était fascinant. Merci beaucoup, monsieur le greffier. C'était génial. Cela nous donne vraiment une idée de ce qu'ils font là-bas.

Accueillons maintenant Mme Claressa Surtees qui est greffière par intérim de la Chambre des représentants de l'Australie. Bonjour, est-ce que vous nous entendez?

(1905)

Mme Claressa Surtees (Greffière de la Chambre par intérim, Chambre des représentants d'Australie):

Oui, je vous entends.

Le président:

Très bien.

Merci beaucoup d'être ici pour nous.

Nous allons vous laisser un peu de temps pour nous faire part de vos observations préliminaires. Ensuite, certains membres du Comité auront probablement des questions à vous poser.

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Bonsoir, mesdames et messieurs les députés.

Je m'appelle Claressa Surtees. Je comparais devant le Comité en ma qualité officielle de greffière par intérim de la Chambre des représentants du Parlement de l'Australie.

Je suis heureuse de pouvoir m'entretenir avec vous au sujet de l'étude de votre comité sur les chambres de débat parallèles. En 1994, la Chambre des représentants a modifié le Règlement pour créer le Comité principal, comme on l'appelait à l'époque, en tant que chambre de débat parallèle. La création de cette entité donnait suite aux recommandations formulées par le Comité de la procédure de la Chambre dans un rapport publié en 1993. Le Comité principal s'est réuni pour la première fois le 8 juin 1994. Il fêtera donc son 25e anniversaire le mois prochain.

Le Comité principal a été rebaptisé Chambre de la Fédération en 2012. Son rôle s'est élargi au fil du temps, et ses heures de séance ont été prolongées. Cette chambre parallèle permet de débattre plus longuement de la plupart des projets de loi non controversés, des rapports de comités et de délégations ainsi que de documents gouvernementaux. L'ordre du jour permet également aux députés, autres que le Président et les ministres, de soulever des questions qui les préoccupent et d'en débattre. Dans l'ensemble, il aide la Chambre à s'acquitter de sa fonction législative, certes, mais aussi à rendre des comptes au gouvernement, à ventiler les griefs et à traiter de questions qui suscitent de l'intérêt ou des préoccupations.

Le Règlement stipule que c'est le vice-président qui exerce le pouvoir principal à la Chambre de la Fédération, au même titre que c'est le Président qui exerce le pouvoir principal à la Chambre. Parallèlement à l'établissement du Comité principal, on a pris soin de créer le bureau du deuxième vice-président pour prêter main-forte au vice-président à cet égard. Ce poste est pourvu au moyen d'un processus électoral et il est occupé par un membre non gouvernemental.

En pratique, le sous-greffier est le greffier de la Chambre de la Fédération et il est responsable des procès-verbaux des délibérations.

La création de cette deuxième chambre de débat a eu un impact durable sur les travaux de la Chambre des représentants. En plus des occasions supplémentaires qu'elle a offertes aux députés de s'exprimer sur les projets de loi et les questions de leur choix, elle a eu une incidence sur les ressources. Tout comme la Chambre des représentants, la Chambre de la Fédération doit pouvoir compter sur des présidents, des greffiers, des services de radiodiffusion et des services du hansard.

Bien sûr, l'autre aspect, c'est que ces besoins ont contribué au renforcement des capacités. La Chambre de la Fédération a été un lieu privilégié pour le perfectionnement professionnel des présidents et des greffiers.

Le lieu lui-même a dû être adapté à l'usage auquel on le destinait. Pour nous, cela signifie qu'il a fallu adapter une salle de comité, un processus qui l'a rendue inutilisable pour la plupart des autres fonctions qu'on lui prêtait jusque-là.

La Chambre de la Fédération se réunit tous les jours de séance de la Chambre, pour un total de 21,5 heures par semaine de séance.

Tout cela a nécessité une modification en profondeur du processus législatif. Avant la création du Comité principal, l'examen détaillé des projets de loi était effectué par un comité composé de tous les députés de la Chambre. Avec la création de cette instance, le nom de cette étape du processus législatif a été modifié et s'appelle maintenant « consideration in detail » ou, si vous préférez, « examen détaillé ». Le principal facteur qui a motivé la création du Comité principal a été de fournir une deuxième voie législative pour alléger la pression sur les travaux législatifs de la Chambre. En effet, le recours au bâillon était de plus en plus fréquent et, par conséquent, le débat était souvent limité.

En particulier, la chambre de débat parallèle peut examiner les projets de loi qui lui sont renvoyés à l'étape de la deuxième lecture et à l'étape de l'examen détaillé. Une amélioration a tout de suite été constatée. Dès 1994, le nombre de fois où le gouvernement a dû recourir au bâillon a diminué considérablement. Ainsi, cette année-là, le recours au bâillon s'est limité à 14 projets de loi, contre 132 l'année précédente.

À l'origine, le Comité principal ne devait examiner que les projets de loi pour lesquels il n'y avait pas de désaccord. Cependant, assez rapidement, il s'est vu confier des projets de loi plus controversés, la seule condition pour se faire étant qu'il y ait consensus à cette fin. Son rôle a été élargi au fil des ans.

(1910)



La caractéristique immuable de la Chambre de la Fédération est qu'elle fonctionne sur le principe du consensus. D'entrée de jeu, les procédures ont été conçues pour encourager fortement la coopération lors des débats. En particulier, les exigences en matière de quorum — le vice-président ou le président, un membre du gouvernement et un membre non gouvernemental — signifient que le quorum peut facilement être perdu. L'obligation de prendre des décisions à l'unanimité permet à tout député de faire examiner une question non résolue et d'en faire rapport à la Chambre pour qu'elle rende une décision.

Bien qu'il appartienne officiellement au gouvernement de décider quels projets de loi et quelles questions sont renvoyés à la Chambre de la Fédération, la nature coopérative des activités de cette deuxième chambre subordonne également le renvoi des affaires émanant du gouvernement à l'accord de l'opposition.

Le fonctionnement de la deuxième chambre a fait l'objet de plusieurs examens. L'enquête menée par le Comité de la procédure en 2015 a dit que la Chambre de la Fédération était une réussite sans précédent et qu'elle avait mérité sa place permanente dans le fonctionnement de la Chambre, puisqu'elle avait atteint les objectifs fixés et qu'elle avait su évoluer en fonction des besoins de la Chambre. L'examen et les recommandations visant à accroître l'efficacité se sont poursuivis, notamment en ce qui concerne la tenue d'un débat plus interactif.

Certaines des mesures mises à l'essai à la Chambre de la Fédération sont éventuellement confirmées dans le Règlement et subséquemment présentées à la Chambre elle-même.

Merci, monsieur le président. Voilà qui met fin à ma déclaration liminaire.

Le président:

Je vous remercie beaucoup. C'est très intéressant.

Avant de passer aux questions des députés, je vais vous en poser une rapide.

Dans notre système, lorsqu'un projet de loi est adopté en deuxième lecture, il est renvoyé à l'un de nos 30 différents comités, selon le sujet. Êtes-vous en train de dire que l'étude détaillée de vos projets de loi se faisait autrefois en comité plénier, mais qu'ils sont maintenant renvoyés à un comité principal qui siège à la Chambre de la Fédération?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Notre système est un peu différent, monsieur le président. L'étape du renvoi devant les comités d'enquête ne se fait pas à la Chambre des représentants comme il se doit. Il est possible que des projets de loi individuels soient renvoyés à des comités, mais ce n'est pas une pratique courante à la Chambre.

Le processus législatif se déroule de la façon suivante: le projet de loi est présenté à la Chambre et lu une première fois. Le ministre parrain propose la deuxième lecture et prononce l'important discours de deuxième lecture. Ce n'est qu'après cela qu'un projet de loi peut être renvoyé à la Chambre de la Fédération pour le reste du débat en deuxième lecture, puis à l'étape de l'étude détaillée. C'est au terme de cette étape que le projet de loi est renvoyé à la Chambre pour le processus final.

(1915)

Le président:

Monsieur Simms, vous avez la parole.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Merci, madame. Nous vous en sommes très reconnaissants.

Je vais faire suite à la question de la présidence, parce que cette étape de l'examen détaillé me fascine.

Nous avons un système de comités, système qui compte 24 comités permanents. Une fois que les projets de loi ont franchi l'étape de la deuxième lecture, ils sont renvoyés à l'étape de l'examen détaillé en comité. Ce que vous nous dites, c'est que l'examen détaillé a maintenant lieu dans cette enceinte, et que ce processus s'apparente à ce que ferait un comité plénier.

Est-ce exact?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

C'est tout à fait exact. Il n'y a pas de pratique bien établie à la Chambre pour le renvoi de projets de loi à des comités permanents aux fins d'enquête.

M. Scott Simms:

Cela m'amène à ma question.

Il n'y a donc pas de vote à l'étape de la deuxième lecture; le renvoi se fait automatiquement. Est-ce exact, ou le renvoi est-il effectivement assujetti à un vote de la Chambre?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Il y a un vote lorsque la question sur la deuxième lecture est mise aux voix. Si un projet de loi doit être renvoyé à la Chambre de la Fédération, cela se produit habituellement avant la fin de l'étape de la deuxième lecture.

Il est possible qu'un projet de loi soit renvoyé à un comité, et ce, également avant la fin de l'étape de la deuxième lecture. On s'attend à ce que le rapport du comité à la Chambre soit ensuite examiné à l'étape de la deuxième lecture. Si des amendements devaient être proposés, ils le seraient à l'étape de l'étude détaillée du projet de loi.

Je pense que nos processus respectifs entre les deux chambres sont vraiment très différents.

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, ils le sont, et je trouve cela fascinant.

Je souhaite revenir sur l'observation que vous avez formulée à propos de l'application de la guillotine à certains projets de loi. Ici, nous appelons cela l'« attribution de temps ». Le gouvernement actuel fait l'objet de critiques pour son recours à l'attribution de temps; l'ancien gouvernement a probablement été critiqué encore plus à ce sujet. Cependant, l'utilisation de ce mécanisme est assez fréquente, et elle est motivée par la même raison.

Nous ne semblons pas disposer d'un mécanisme pour réprimer cette utilisation. Je sais, par exemple, qu'en Grande-Bretagne, ils ont mis en œuvre la programmation des projets de loi au sein du système de Westminster, au milieu des années 1990.

Cependant, votre solution à ce problème est la chambre parallèle. Vous êtes passés de plus de 100 motions de guillotine à environ 14.

Mme Claressa Surtees:

C'est exact.

De plus, de nos jours, nous nommons ces motions un peu différemment. Nous les appelons des « motions de gestion des débats », mais elles ne sont pas utilisées aussi fréquemment qu'elles l'étaient auparavant. Habituellement, la procédure pour les utiliser consiste à publier un avis dans le Feuilleton des avis. Même si le Règlement prévoit toujours des dispositions pour le recours à ces motions, les parlementaires ne s'appuient plus sur ces dispositions.

M. Scott Simms:

Je vois.

Vous avez dit que vous disposiez de certains comités pour gérer ces situations. Vous pouvez renvoyer des projets de loi à un comité permanent en tant que tel.

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Nous le faisons. Nous disposons d'une liste assez longue de comités permanents établis en vertu du Règlement, et certains autres comités sont établis par le biais de résolutions. Les comités prévus par le Règlement rendent compte, en général, des différents domaines de responsabilité du gouvernement. Si un projet de loi devait être renvoyé à un comité, il serait renvoyé au comité responsable des sujets connexes.

M. Scott Simms:

Je vous remercie de votre réponse.

Les observations qui découlent de notre débat sur l'utilisation d'une chambre parallèle portent sur deux thèmes. Vous êtes évidemment à l'origine de la première chambre parallèle, et le Royaume-Uni a suivi votre exemple peu de temps après. Selon moi, il y a de toute façon deux écoles de pensée à cet égard. L'une d'elles permettrait que d'autres documents soient étudiés par le biais de la chambre parallèle, comme les pétitions ou d'autres formes de débat qui ne sont pas tenues dans la chambre principale. Ce qui me fascine encore plus, c'est le fait que nous puissions réduire la pression exercée sur la chambre principale en vue de permettre à un plus grand nombre de députés de participer aux débats.

Est-ce l'origine de votre Chambre de la Fédération?

(1920)

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Si je comprends bien votre question, la Chambre de la Fédération a été créée parce que les députés étaient très mécontents de ne pas avoir l'occasion de participer aux débats, en raison des pressions que subissait le programme législatif.

M. Scott Simms:

Est-ce le cas?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

C'était le cas.

M. Scott Simms:

Voilà qui est intéressant. C'est ce que je cherchais à comprendre parce qu'à mon avis, dans notre cas, cette chambre suscite beaucoup d'intérêt ou, du moins, elle suscite grandement mon intérêt.

En ce qui concerne les autres aspects de la Chambre de la Fédération, est-elle, disons, ouverte aux pétitions? Pouvez-vous débattre de certaines pétitions qui sont présentées à la Chambre?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Le processus que nous avons mis en place prévoit qu'un comité des pétitions détermine si les pétitions présentées seront acceptées ou non. Les pétitions sont approuvées par ce comité. Elles peuvent être présentées par un député au cours d'un bref discours prononcé à la Chambre de la Fédération ou à la Chambre. Toutefois, il n'y a pas de période pendant laquelle elles font régulièrement l'objet de débats.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord.

Vous avez également mentionné la possibilité suivante. Si je souhaite présenter un sujet à l'Assemblée législative, la façon la plus courante d'y parvenir, en tant que député du Parlement canadien, consiste à utiliser une motion ou un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire pour le présenter. Ensuite, je dois attendre mon tour pour en parler à la chambre principale.

Si je souhaitais soulever une question particulière à des fins de discussion à la Chambre de la Fédération, que ce soit au moyen d'une motion ou d'un projet de loi, comment est-ce que je m'y prendrais?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

À mon avis, nos procédures semblent légèrement semblables.

À la Chambre des représentants, un député donnerait avis d'une motion ou d'un projet de loi. Nous avons un comité de sélection qui choisit les points à l'ordre du jour pour le prochain lundi de séance. À la Chambre elle-même et à la Chambre de la Fédération, il y a des périodes prévues pour la présentation de projets de loi d'initiative parlementaire. En ces occasions, les points prévus à l'ordre du jour peuvent être débattus par le parrain du projet de loi puis, si le temps le permet, par d'autres parties concernées par le débat.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Nater, la parole est à vous.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président

Je vous remercie, madame la greffière, de vous être jointe à nous. Je crois comprendre que vous êtes en pleine campagne électorale là-bas. Par conséquent, je suppose que les choses fonctionnent un peu au ralenti pour vous en ce moment. Nous vous sommes reconnaissants de vos connaissances et de votre sagesse en la matière.

Je veux commencer par poser une question légèrement simple. En ce qui concerne la proximité des chambres, quelle est la distance exacte qui sépare la Chambre de la Fédération de la chambre principale? Combien de temps faut-il pour se déplacer à pied de la Chambre de la Fédération à votre chambre principale?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Je ne l'ai pas tenté pendant un jour de séance, mais je pense qu'il faudrait peut-être deux minutes pour parcourir la distance qui sépare la Chambre de la Fédération de la chambre principale.

Dans notre cas, la sonnerie retentit pendant quatre minutes pour annoncer un vote. Cet intervalle a été établi à l'époque où le Parlement occupait l'édifice pour la première fois. Il permet à quelqu'un qui se déplace à pied sans courir de partir du point le plus éloigné de la chambre et d'arriver à temps pour participer au vote.

M. John Nater:

C'est fascinant. Nous sommes paresseux ici, car la sonnerie retentit pendant 30 minutes.

Je veux maintenant parler de certaines des périodes liées à la Chambre de la Fédération. Vous avez mentionné que cette chambre siège pendant 21,5 heures par semaine. Pendant combien de temps la Chambre des représentants siège-t-elle hebdomadairement? Est-ce quatre jours par semaine?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Oui. Depuis de nombreuses années, la Chambre siège généralement quatre jours par semaine, soit les lundis, les mardis, les mercredis et les jeudis. À l'heure actuelle, la durée totale des séances s'élève à 36 heures par semaine. Nous ne siégeons pas plus tard que 20 heures ces temps-ci. Dans le passé, nous siégions beaucoup plus tard, mais, pour le moment, nous finissons à 20 heures.

Initialement, la Chambre de la Fédération était censée se réunir pendant deux périodes d'environ trois heures, réparties sur deux journées de séances, mais le nombre de périodes et leur durée se sont accrus avec les années. Maintenant, la Chambre de la Fédération se réunit tous les jours de séance et, plus précisément, chaque jour où la Chambre siège, conformément à l'ordre projeté des travaux.

(1925)

M. John Nater:

C'est fascinant. Alors, je dois essentiellement en déduire qu'en dépit de l'augmentation du nombre de séances tenues à la Chambre de la Fédération, les séances de la Chambre des représentants n'ont pas été écourtées. La Chambre maintient toujours son calendrier complet de séances.

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Je suppose que la réponse à cette question est oui et non.

La Chambre avait l'habitude de siéger jusqu'à 23 heures les lundis et mardis. Il est clair qu'elle ne siège plus aussi tard. Elle siège jusqu'à 20 heures, mais, en même temps, il n'y a plus de pauses prévues pour le dîner. Cela permet donc à la Chambre de gagner du temps. Le nombre total d'heures consacrées aux travaux de la Chambre n'a pas diminué.

M. John Nater:

Au cours de votre déclaration préliminaire, vous avez mentionné que la Chambre de la Fédération est habituellement utilisée pour débattre les mesures législatives d'initiative ministérielle les moins controversées. Vous avez également mentionné que, de temps en temps, des débats plus controversés peuvent être menés à la Chambre de la Fédération, mais seulement avec l'accord de l'opposition.

S'agit-il d'un processus officiel dans le cadre duquel l'opposition officielle accepte de mener un débat plus litigieux? Quel processus ou procédure est prévu pour programmer à la fois les débats moins controversés et, ce qui importe encore plus, les débats plus litigieux? Comment cette entente est-elle conclue?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Les négociations de ce genre se déroulent à l'extérieur de la chambre. Par conséquent, nous ne sommes pas bien placés pour les observer, mais je sais comment elles se déroulent. Le leader à la Chambre et le responsable de l'opposition négocient les points qui figureront à l'ordre du jour de la Chambre de la Fédération afin de tomber d'accord.

Comme j'ai essayé de l'indiquer, s'ils ne tombent pas d'accord ou s'ils sont très mécontents, il est très facile de retirer le signalement de la vérification du quorum, puisque le quorum est constitué du président, d'un député du parti ministériel et d'un député non ministériel. Si l'opposition est contrariée, elle peut simplement quitter la chambre, ce qui suspendra instantanément les délibérations.

La question de savoir à quel point certaines mesures législatives ou certains points sont litigieux est plutôt intéressante, selon moi. Les projets de loi de crédits ont toujours été étudiés à la Chambre de la Fédération. Par ailleurs, au cours des débats portant sur les projets de loi d'exécution du budget, les députés ont toujours eu l'occasion d'adopter des points de vue divergents à propos des politiques. Cela n'a pas empêché ces projets de loi d'être débattus à la Chambre de la Fédération et c'est, en fait, considéré comme un aspect plutôt réussi des activités exercées dans cette chambre.

M. John Nater:

Je tiens à assurer très brièvement un suivi au sujet du concept du quorum. Il empêche essentiellement un gouvernement d'utiliser la Chambre de la Fédération... Le quorum a-t-il été conçu de cette façon? Était-il censé faire fonction de mesure de protection, ou a-t-il évolué naturellement en ce sens?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Non, vous avez raison. Le quorum a été conçu ainsi, de manière à ce que l'on puisse considérer que les travaux de la Chambre de la Fédération se font par consensus. Dans cette chambre, les sièges ne sont pas attribués, alors qu'à la Chambre, chaque fauteuil est assigné à un député particulier et porte son nom. Ce n'est pas le cas à la Chambre de la Fédération, où les députés peuvent s'asseoir où bon leur semble. Même si la convention, selon laquelle le gouvernement siège à la droite du président alors que les partis de l'opposition siègent à sa gauche, est habituellement respectée, ce n'est pas une obligation. En fait, les députés peuvent s'asseoir là où ils le souhaitent.

M. John Nater:

Presque au début de votre déclaration préliminaire, vous avez mentionné que les recommandations relatives à la Chambre de la Fédération avaient été tirées d'un rapport produit par votre comité de la procédure. Des efforts ont-ils été déployés pour que le rapport soit le résultat d'un consensus? S'agissait-il d'un rapport de consensus dès le début? Tous les partis approuvaient-ils la création de la chambre en premier lieu?

(1930)

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Oui, c'était le cas. La chambre a été créée dans le contexte de la grande insatisfaction des députés par rapport à leur manque d'occasions de participer à des débats. Bien entendu, les solutions à ce problème étaient très limitées. Elles supposaient des journées de séance supplémentaires, des journées de séance plus longues — à l'époque, ces journées étaient déjà très longues —, ou la création de ce deuxième volet, de cette deuxième chambre de débat. Je pense que les députés étaient très [Difficultés techniques]

Le président:

Nous n'avons pas suspendu nos travaux.

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Je crois comprendre que nous tentons de régler le problème, mais je suis heureuse de poursuivre mon témoignage, si c'est approprié.

Le président:

Oui, cela ne pose pas de problème. Nous ne sommes pas en mesure de vous voir, mais nous pouvons vous entendre. Vous pouvez terminer vos propos.

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Je pense que nous parlions de la nature consensuelle du fonctionnement de la Chambre de la Fédération.

À la Chambre de la Fédération, les députés n'ont pas de fauteuil réservé. Cela veut dire qu'ils peuvent s'asseoir là où ils le souhaitent, même si le gouvernement a tendance à siéger du côté droit et l'opposition, du côté gauche, conformément à ce qui se passe à la Chambre. Cela contribue à la façon plus coopérative dont les débats sont menés.

Le président:

Je pense que l'intervention était liée à la question de savoir si tous les partis s'entendaient pour créer la chambre.

Mme Claressa Surtees:

D'accord. Oui, en ce qui concerne le rapport du comité de la procédure, tous les partis de la Chambre étaient représentés au sein de ce comité, et ils étaient très satisfaits de la solution proposée dans le rapport. Les députés n'étaient pas très enthousiastes à l'idée de passer un plus grand nombre de jours à siéger à Canberra ou à l'idée de prolonger les journées de séance, mais ils étaient assurément très heureux de proposer l'établissement d'un volet parallèle de débat.

(1935)

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons maintenant remplacer l'intervenant par M. David Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie, madame la greffière, du temps que vous nous consacrez. Votre témoignage est très instructif et utile. Je vous en remercie de nouveau.

M. Nater et moi nous demandions si certains de vos États ont adopté un processus de chambres parallèles.

Mme Claressa Surtees:

J'ai eu l'occasion d'en discuter avec un certain nombre de présidents des parlements étatiques. À ma connaissance, aucun d'entre eux n'a pris de dispositions en ce sens. Toutefois, il est clair que, lorsqu'ils visitent Canberra, ils aiment toujours venir observer nos délibérations. Nous parlons souvent de l'incidence que la deuxième chambre peut avoir sur la capacité générale de la Chambre à mener ses activités, mais, pour le moment, j'ignore si certains d'entre eux ont créé une deuxième chambre.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

J'ai deux ou trois brèves questions à vous poser avant d'étudier les menus détails de cet enjeu.

Vos séances sont-elles télévisées?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Oui, elles le sont. Toutes les séances de la Chambre de la Fédération sont télévisées, tout comme les délibérations de la Chambre. Toutefois, nous ne disposons pas d'une chaîne de télévision parlementaire. Quand je dis qu'elles sont « télévisées », je veux dire qu'elles sont diffusées sur notre site Web. Toutes les délibérations sont diffusées en temps réel sur notre site Web.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai été vice-président dans le passé, et je peux déclarer que toutes ses tâches ne sont pas lourdes. Le vice-président accomplit un grand nombre de tâches ingrates au nom du Président. Cependant, dans tous les dossiers importants, le Président mène la barque, comme il se doit.

Vous avez dit que, dans cette chambre, le vice-président est traité comme le Président et qu'il est le principal gestionnaire. Compte tenu de l'accroissement de ses responsabilités, je me demande si le vice-président bénéficie d'une hausse salariale.

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Comme c'était il y a 25 ans, je n'étais pas vraiment en mesure d'observer les impacts de cette décision. On peut toutefois sans doute présumer que c'était probablement le cas, étant donné la création du nouveau poste de second vice-président également assorti d'un certain niveau de rémunération. Il a fallu reconnaître qu'il s'agissait d'un mandat supplémentaire pour le vice-président, pour ce qui est notamment de la contribution à la rotation.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci.

La terminologie utilisée est intéressante. La guillotine et l'attribution de temps me rappellent mon passage chez les travailleurs de l'automobile alors que j'étais beaucoup plus jeune, dans les années 1970. Nous disions que c'était de la démocratie orientée. À chacun sa façon de décrire sa situation lorsqu'il est pris à la gorge.

Je soulève cette question pour une raison bien précise. Au fil des ans, j'ai pu constater qu'il arrive parfois que les gouvernements souhaitent guillotiner un projet de loi en raison des débats qui ont cours en Chambre et de l'attention suscitée dans les médias. C'est cependant généralement pour des considérations liées à la gestion du temps que de telles décisions sont prises. Le temps disponible à la Chambre est le bien le plus précieux pour un gouvernement. C'est un peu comme tous ces avions qui attendent de pouvoir décoller sur le tarmac d'un aéroport. Les ministres font la queue en essayant de flatter le leader du gouvernement à la Chambre dans le sens du poil pour que leur projet de loi puisse aller de l'avant. C'est souvent de ce côté que s'exerce la pression, plutôt que du point de vue politique des choses. Il y a toutefois des exceptions.

Vous avez indiqué que les projets de loi étaient beaucoup moins nombreux à passer sous la guillotine. Comme vous nous l'avez dit également, vos règles prévoient que vous ne traitez pas de projets de loi portant sur des sujets controversés, mais vous commencez tout de même à le faire. Y avait-il un si grand nombre de ces projets de loi controversés qui devaient être guillotinés? Pourquoi? Était-ce à des fins de gestion de temps ou est-ce que cela relevait davantage de la petite politique?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Voilà d'excellentes observations.

C'était un problème de gestion du temps. Le gouvernement au pouvoir avait un programme législatif très chargé si bien qu'un grand nombre de projets de loi étaient en attente d'un débat et d'une éventuelle adoption. Il fallait bien gérer le temps disponible, et c'est la solution qui a été proposée. Les projets de loi pouvaient ainsi faire l'objet d'un débat suffisant et être adoptés assez rapidement de manière à permettre la réalisation des initiatives ou des programmes prévus.

(1940)

M. David Christopherson:

Je dois avouer que cette formule m'a plu au départ en raison de la nature non partisane de la nouvelle chambre. On ne veut pas nécessairement accorder davantage de temps au gouvernement, car cela crée un problème politique. Vous auriez dû voir les débats qui ont eu cours ici quant à savoir si nous allions continuer ou non à siéger les vendredis, et les hostilités ne sont pas terminées. Ce sont des éléments qui ont un impact considérable.

En quoi les règles de cette nouvelle chambre facilitent-elles le traitement des dossiers controversés dont elle est saisie? Voici comment je vois les choses. Si nous nous en tenons à l'idée que le gouvernement est davantage motivé par la nécessité de bien gérer son temps que par la volonté d'empêcher les députés d'arrière-ban d'avoir leur mot à dire, alors cette nouvelle chambre ne permet pas nécessairement au gouvernement de disposer de plus de temps. Vous allez toujours avoir le même temps à votre disposition à la Chambre. Cela permet effectivement à un plus grand nombre de députés d'intervenir davantage, mais suivant un ensemble différent de règles. Comme il est par exemple si facile de dissoudre la chambre en question, comment va-t-on pouvoir traiter certains dossiers controversés alors qu'il est impossible de s'entendre au départ sur l'heure à laquelle on va commander du café, sans même parler d'éventuels amendements?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

La création de la Chambre de la Fédération a permis de faire en sorte que l'on puisse débattre de deux projets de loi en même temps. À titre d'exemple, pendant qu'un débat au sujet d'un projet de loi sur les études supérieures a lieu à la Chambre de la Fédération, on peut débattre à la Chambre principale d'un autre projet de loi portant sur la politique fiscale. Ainsi, le gouvernement peut progresser dans l'étude de deux projets de loi pendant la même journée, alors que cela n'était pas possible par le passé.

Dans notre régime, il y a une limite fixée à 15 minutes pour les interventions des députés lors du débat en deuxième lecture d'un projet de loi. Je sais qu'il y a certains parlements qui n'imposent aucune limite à ce chapitre, mais c'est ce que nous faisons pour l'allocution d'un député lors du débat en deuxième lecture. Si un grand nombre de députés souhaitent prendre la parole, le débat peut bien sûr se prolonger pendant des heures. Même si notre Chambre compte moins de députés que la vôtre, soit seulement 150, il n'en reste pas moins qu'il faudrait des heures de débat.

On ne va pas interrompre le débat en raison de la nature controversée des propositions mises de l'avant, mais c'est simplement qu'il est très facile, dans les cas où l'on préférerait que la Chambre de la Fédération ne soit pas saisie d'un projet de loi, de faire en sorte qu'il n'y ait plus quorum pour que le projet de loi en question soit automatiquement renvoyé à la Chambre principale. Je dois vous dire que cela n'arrive pas très souvent. C'est généralement le résultat de négociations intensives entre le leader du gouvernement à la Chambre et le gestionnaire des travaux de l'opposition relativement à l'ordre du jour de la Chambre de la Fédération pour que le projet de loi puisse aller de l'avant.

À l'étape de l'étude détaillée, si des amendements sont proposés par l'opposition qui demande un vote par appel nominal, un renvoi à la Chambre principale est bien sûr nécessaire. Il n'y a pas de vote par appel nominal à la Chambre de la Fédération.

M. David Christopherson:

Tout à fait.

Excellent. Merci beaucoup pour ces réponses très détaillées.

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à M. Graham. Comme son débit est un peu plus rapide, je vous invite à être attentive.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je vais essayer de faire attention.

Vous nous dites que cette chambre de délibération parallèle est saisie de tous les projets de loi. Est-ce qu'elle procède à un examen article par article de chacun d'eux, est-ce que l'on examine le projet de loi ligne par ligne, ou bien est-ce que le processus est totalement différent?

Il ne m'apparaît pas possible qu'un seul comité plénier puisse traiter des projets de loi correspondant à la charge de travail de 24 comités.

Mme Claressa Surtees:

La Chambre de la Fédération n'est pas saisie de tous les projets de loi. Ils peuvent être renvoyés à cette chambre ou demeurer à la Chambre principale pour que l'on en débatte. Nous parlons d'études détaillées pour l'étape de notre processus législatif pouvant exiger un examen article par article d'un projet de loi. Il est désormais très rare que nous procédions à un tel examen.

Bien que notre Règlement prévoie un examen article par article en l'absence d'indications contraires, nous demandons habituellement le consentement unanime pour examiner un projet de loi dans son ensemble. Il est alors possible de débattre de dispositions particulières du projet de loi en question. Des amendements peuvent être proposés et mis aux voix pendant ce débat.

Pour nous, l'examen article par article est en fait une étude détaillée où chaque député dispose de cinq minutes pour débattre des enjeux qui l'interpellent. Comme c'est le cas pour les autres débats en Chambre, les points de vue peuvent varier de part et d'autre, mais chacun a droit à cinq minutes.

(1945)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien de temps faut-il généralement pour traiter un projet de loi à la Chambre de la Fédération?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Cela se fait le plus souvent dans la même journée, après quoi le projet de loi peut passer à l'étape de l'étude détaillée et être renvoyé à la chambre principale.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Peut-on alors invoquer le règlement?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Oui. Le Vice-président ou la personne qui occupe le fauteuil décide de la suite à donner à de tels rappels au règlement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous nous avez dit que la chambre ne siège jamais après 20 heures. Combien de temps faut-il pour voter? Il nous est arrivé de devoir voter pendant 30 ou 40 heures consécutives. Est-ce que cela s'est déjà produit chez vous?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

La plupart des décisions de la chambre sont prises au moyen d'un vote de vive voix. Si quelqu'un demande un vote par appel nominal, on le fait immédiatement. Il faut généralement une quinzaine de minutes pour un tel vote.

Si un nouveau vote par appel nominal est demandé, on y procède tout de suite après le premier.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si vous avez 20 votes par appel nominal successifs à compter de 17 heures, allez-vous continuer si vous n'avez pas terminé à 20 heures ou plutôt suspendre vos travaux pour les reprendre le lendemain?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Oh, je vois où vous voulez en venir.

Chacun de nos soirs de séance qui se terminent à 20 heures, soit les lundis, mardis et mercredis, nous avons un débat d'ajournement à compter de 19 h 30. Nous avons à cette heure-là ce que nous appelons une proposition automatique de la motion d'ajournement. Notre règlement stipule que nous devons alors terminer le vote par appel nominal en cours avant de pouvoir commencer le débat sur la motion d'ajournement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

On termine uniquement le vote déjà en cours, et on ne procède pas à ceux qui sont prévus par la suite.

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Nous terminons seulement le premier vote par appel nominal et le débat sur la motion d'ajournement débute ensuite, conformément à notre règlement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est fascinant.

Est-ce qu'il y a des inconvénients à avoir une Chambre de la Fédération?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Les modalités dont nous venons de discuter concernaient bien sûr la chambre elle-même, car il n'y a pas de vote par appel nominal à la Chambre de la Fédération.

La Chambre de la Fédération ne siège jamais pendant que la chambre ne siège pas. Ses travaux débutent normalement une demi-heure après ceux de la chambre et s'interrompent une demi-heure avant l'ajournement prévu à la chambre principale.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que l'autre chambre a un processus similaire et il y a-t-il des chevauchements entre les deux?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Vous voulez parler du Sénat?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Le Sénat n'a pas de deuxième chambre de délibération.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Y a-t-il des situations où des sénateurs assistent aux débats dans votre seconde chambre de délibération?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Ils n'y assistent pas dans un rôle officiel. Il va de soi que si un dossier dont la Chambre de la Fédération est saisie les intéresse, ils peuvent assister aux débats en tant que visiteurs de la même manière que n'importe quel citoyen, mais je ne me souviens pas d'avoir vu un sénateur à la Chambre de la Fédération depuis que j'y suis.

(1950)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'ai pas d'autres questions pour l'instant.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Je vais profiter du temps qu'il nous reste pour donner la parole à quiconque aurait une question à poser. Ne prenez pas trop de temps, de telle sorte que chacun ait l'occasion de le faire.

À vous la parole, madame Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, madame la greffière, de votre participation à notre séance d'aujourd'hui.

Je suis un peu sceptique quant à la pertinence pour nous de créer une seconde chambre de délibération. Pourriez-vous nous dire si vous croyez qu'une telle chambre parallèle devrait être mise en place à titre provisoire ou permanent? Pensez-vous que c'est une formule qui peut être mise à l'essai ou croyez-vous plutôt qu'il peut être difficile de revenir en arrière une fois le processus enclenché?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Je peux vous dire que certains députés étaient également sceptiques lorsque nous avons mis en place notre seconde chambre de délibération. Ils ne voyaient pas cette nouveauté d'un bon œil. Certains ministres n'étaient pas chauds à l'idée de se présenter devant cette chambre, et ce sont les ministres de second rang qui s'y retrouvaient à leur place.

Cette réticence s'est totalement dissipée. Plus personne n'est contrarié de devoir se présenter à la Chambre de la Fédération. Même les ministres s'y rendent pour les débats sur les projets de loi d'exécution du budget. Le vice-premier ministre est venu y répondre à des questions à l'étape de l'examen détaillé de ces projets de loi.

Cette chambre parallèle a gagné en autorité au fil des ans. Je suppose que toutes les fois que l'on apporte des changements à des procédures établies de longue date, on se demande dans quelle mesure le jeu en vaut la chandelle et si on va effectivement parvenir à régler les problèmes visés. Il est sans doute préférable d'opter pour une approche offrant une certaine marge de manœuvre de telle sorte que les ajustements nécessaires puissent être apportés aux dispositions initiales lorsque la situation l'exige. Je peux vous dire que notre Chambre de la Fédération a assurément évolué depuis ses tout débuts. Alors qu'elle siégeait au départ pendant quelques heures à peine deux jours par semaine au besoin, elle a maintenant ses propres heures de séance chaque jour où la Chambre principale siège.

Il est bien certain que la Chambre de la Fédération peut terminer ses travaux plus tôt si elle a réglé les dossiers qui lui ont été confiés. Je crois que les députés apprécient également le fait qu'il ne s'agit pas d'un simple exercice de présence obligatoire. La Chambre de la Fédération ne siège que si des travaux lui ont été renvoyés. C'est notre mode de fonctionnement.

J'espère avoir répondu à quelques-unes de vos questions.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui. Merci.

J'ai une autre question, un peu dans le sens de celle posée par mon collègue. Pensez-vous que la mise en place d'une chambre de délibération parallèle pourrait avoir des conséquences non souhaitées? Est-ce qu'un problème est devenu manifeste alors qu'il ne semblait pas du tout se poser au départ? Est-ce que la création d'une chambre parallèle vous a conduit à un certain résultat qui n'était absolument pas prévu?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Il va de soi que la création d'une nouvelle chambre de délibération complique la situation des députés qui doivent gérer leur horaire. Les députés de notre Parlement sont actuellement très occupés. Je suppose que c'est un peu la même chose pour vous. Il se passe bien des choses pendant une journée de séance. Des comités se réunissent. La Chambre siège. Il y a toujours des visiteurs. Les députés ont donc un horaire très chargé. Ils doivent s'assurer de ne pas prévoir deux activités simultanément, comme par exemple inscrire leur nom sur la liste des intervenants à la même heure pour des débats dans chacune des chambres, car ils doivent pouvoir prendre la parole quand vient leur tour.

Il faut faire montre d'un peu de souplesse avec les formalités comme la liste des intervenants. Il peut être nécessaire pour les députés de discuter entre eux afin de modifier l'ordre d'intervention pour que l'un d'eux puisse prendre la parole dans les deux chambres. Il arrive que cette réalité se manifeste de façon très concrète. On voit ainsi des députés se précipiter d'une chambre vers l'autre pour aller y prendre la parole.

On n’avait par contre peut-être pas prévu la façon dont la Chambre de la Fédération allait elle-même évoluer et [Difficultés techniques] la mesure dans laquelle sa charge de travail allait augmenter. Les députés apprécient notamment le fait que le temps de parole est réduit [Difficultés techniques]. Ce n'était pas le cas auparavant, mais toutes les fois que la Chambre de la Fédération siège, la première période est maintenant consacrée aux déclarations des députés. Ils disposent alors de trois minutes, ce qui leur permet d'en dire beaucoup sur les réalisations des citoyens de leur circonscription. C'est une possibilité que les députés apprécient vraiment.

Parmi ces députés, il y a certains ministres qui peuvent profiter de ces périodes de trois minutes pour parler de ce qui se passe dans leur circonscription. Les ministres n'avaient pas cette option auparavant. Le Règlement a été modifié il y a environ 10 ans pour permettre aux ministres de le faire au même titre que les simples députés, et je sais que les ministres l'apprécient. Ils ont bien sûr l'occasion de prendre la parole par ailleurs dans leur rôle de ministre, mais ils ne peuvent pas nécessairement parler de ce qui arrive dans leur circonscription. Cela fait partie des changements qui ont été très bien accueillis.

(1955)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Lorsque votre Parlement s'est penché sur la possibilité d'établir une seconde chambre de délibération, a-t-il envisagé des solutions moins draconiennes du point de vue démocratique pour en arriver aux mêmes résultats? Je suis persuadée qu'il y a toutes sortes de possibilités très variées, mais est-ce qu'il y en a une qui vous viendrait à l'esprit parmi les options qui auraient pu être retenues au lieu de mettre en place cette chambre parallèle?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Je ne suis pas au fait d'autres propositions qui auraient pu être considérées au moment où nous avons décidé de modifier nos façons de faire. Comme je l'indiquais tout à l'heure, le problème à régler était bien sûr le manque de temps pour débattre des projets de loi. Il fallait donc trouver une solution permettant de bénéficier de temps supplémentaire. On pouvait par exemple avoir à choisir entre l'augmentation du nombre de jours de séance, la prolongation de ceux-ci ou la création de cette seconde chambre de délibération.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci beaucoup, madame la greffière, d'avoir bien voulu participer à notre séance d'aujourd'hui et de nous avoir communiqué tous ces renseignements.

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Merci.

Le président:

J'aurais moi-même deux brèves questions pour conclure la séance.

Vous nous avez dit que la plupart des décisions sont prises au moyen d'un vote de vive voix. Pourriez-vous nous indiquer à peu près dans quelle proportion? Est-ce que cela signifie que le vote des différents députés n'est pas consigné dans la plupart des cas?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

J'aurais dû vous dire — si je ne l'ai pas fait — que la plupart des décisions à la chambre sont prises au moyen d'un vote de vive voix. Le Président demande alors que tous ceux qui sont favorables disent « oui » et que les autres disent « non ». Il indique ensuite s'il croit que le oui ou le non l'emporte. La décision est dès lors considérée comme prise.

Si l'on conteste le résultat et que l'on demande un vote par appel nominal, on suit bien sûr alors le processus établi, mais il est effectivement vrai que la plupart des décisions sont prises à la chambre via un vote de vive voix. On ne dresse pas une liste de ceux qui ont voté d'un côté ou de l'autre, car on présume que la décision rendue par le Président n'est pas contestée, si une telle contestation n'est pas logée directement à la chambre.

Dans les très rares occasions où un seul député est en désaccord, sa dissension est inscrite au compte rendu pour le vote en question. Un seul nom apparaît alors. Il faut un minimum de deux voix dissidentes pour qu'un vote par appel nominal soit tenu.

(2000)

Le président:

Voici maintenant ma dernière question. Nous avons ici 24 comités permanents qui se consacrent à différents portefeuilles. Ces comités passent beaucoup de temps, et peut-être même la majorité de leur temps, à procéder à un examen détaillé de différents projets de loi.

Si vos comités ne se livrent pas à un tel exercice, que font-ils exactement?

Mme Claressa Surtees:

En général, les comités de la chambre mènent des études à plus long terme sur des enjeux liés aux politiques publiques. Ce sont des mandats qui leur sont confiés soit directement par la chambre soit parfois par un ministre.

C'est ainsi que nos comités fonctionnent.

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un d'autre aurait une question?

Merci beaucoup. Tout cela a été fort intéressant. Il faudrait vraiment que nous vous payions bientôt une visite. Vous nous avez présenté bien des idées nouvelles sur l'utilité d'une seconde chambre, une formule qui diffère totalement du système de Westminster, comme l'indiquait M. Simms.

Un grand merci pour le temps que vous nous avez consacré. Votre aide nous sera très précieuse.

Mme Claressa Surtees:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président. Ce fut un privilège de pouvoir discuter de ces questions avec vous, et n'hésitez surtout pas à me demander un complément d'information si vous le jugez nécessaire.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on April 30, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.