header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-05-01 SECU 159

Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

Ladies and gentlemen, it's 3:30, we have quorum, and I want to respect witnesses' and members' time, so we are now in session. This is the 159th meeting. My goodness, this is a hard-working committee if I've ever seen one.

We have two witnesses for the first hour, the first from the Canadian Police Association, and the second from Campaign for Cannabis Amnesty.

At the end of the first hour, I'm going to ask someone to move acceptance of the subcommittee report. I'm going to ask Mr. Eglinski to be ready, since he's been so friendly.

With that, we'll simply ask the witnesses to speak in the order in which they're listed.

From the Canadian Police Association, we have Mr. Stamatakis.

Mr. Tom Stamatakis (President, Canadian Police Association):

Good afternoon, Mr. Chair and members of the committee. Thank you for inviting me to appear before you this afternoon as part of your committee's ongoing study of Bill C-93.

I'm appearing this afternoon on behalf of the Canadian Police Association, which, as many of you know, is the largest policing advocacy organization in the country, representing over 60,000 front-line civilian and sworn law enforcement professionals from coast to coast to coast. Our members are the proverbial “boots on the ground” when it comes to issues of public safety and are the first to feel the effects of decisions made by elected officials at all levels of government.

As is my usual habit, I want to keep my opening remarks relatively brief to allow for as much time as possible for your questions and comments, particularly given that the subject matter in Bill C-93 is relatively straightforward.

At the outset, let me say that the Canadian Police Association is generally supportive of the goal of Bill C-93. While obviously we have seen a significant change in the legal status of cannabis within the last year, there is no doubt that social attitudes towards marijuana have been changing for quite some time. We certainly see it with the policing level and with the general public as well. While we often hear the popular term “war on drugs” with respect to policing attitudes around these substances, which aren't just limited to cannabis, most police services in Canada, in my experience, if not all, have long since de-emphasized enforcement for simple possession.

Now that the legal framework has caught up to the social attitudes, there isn't any good reason, in my opinion, to deny people who have otherwise been law-abiding members of society being given a clean record and a chance to fully participate in areas that might otherwise have been denied to them on the basis of a past mistake. On that basis alone, our association is generally supportive of this legislation.

That said, we would like to take this opportunity to express some concern about the automatic nature of record suspensions being proposed by this bill. There's absolutely no doubt that the overwhelming majority of applications that will be made under these amendments will be from individuals who pose no ongoing risk to public safety, and they should certainly be dealt with as expeditiously as possible.

However, I would note that there will also be some applications made by offenders where simple possession may have been a charge that was arrived at based on a plea agreement with the Crown and down from a more serious charge. In those circumstances, it is possible that both the Crown and the court may have accepted the plea agreement based on the assumption that the conviction would be a permanent record of the offence and would not have accepted the lesser charge if they knew this would be cleared without any possibility of review at a future date.

While I understand that it would be both impossible and entirely unfair to hold unproven charges against someone, even in the case of a plea bargain, I do believe that this legislation could be quite easily amended to ensure that the proposed changes to the Criminal Records Act— specifically, the addition to section 4.1, which bars the Parole Board from conducting any evaluation of the applicant's history—don't allow habitual offenders to slip through the cracks.

An amendment that would allow the Parole Board to retain at least a slight amount of discretion to consider an applicant's conduct since conviction, or certainly any subsequent convictions, would alleviate any concerns police might have about ensuring community safety isn't compromised by the small number of repeat offenders who might take advantage of this legislation, and it will maintain the reputable administration of justice.

As I mentioned, I do want to keep these opening remarks brief. The legalization of cannabis has certainly been a significant change for front-line law enforcement, and I should note that it is a testament to the professionalism of our members that the transition to this new regime has been remarkably seamless over the eight months since the changes were enacted.

This legislation on the whole seems like a common-sense approach toward ensuring that criminal records reflect the new consensus around cannabis in Canada. We appreciate that the government has been very forthright in consulting with law enforcement experts as they've proceeded with this policy change, and we look forward to continuing that consultation.

We believe that Bill C-93, with a few small amendments to ensure that the Parole Board retains some amount of discretion to ensure long-term and habitual offenders are held accountable, will allow people to avoid the stigma of a criminal conviction and give those who deserve it a much-deserved second chance.

Thank you very much for inviting me appear before you today.

(1535)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Stamatakis.

For Campaign for Cannabis Amnesty, we have Annamaria Enenajor. You have 10 minutes.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor (Founder and Director, Campaign for Cannabis Amnesty):

Thank you.

Good evening, Mr. Chair, and members. My name is Annamaria Enenajor. I am a criminal defence lawyer and the founder and campaign director for the Campaign for Cannabis Amnesty.

The Campaign for Cannabis Amnesty is a not-for-profit advocacy group focused on righting the historical wrongs caused by decades of cannabis prohibition. It was founded in April 2018, not too long ago, in response to the absence of federal legislation addressing the stigma of previous convictions for offences that would not longer be illegal under the Cannabis Act. Since then, the campaign has been calling on the government to enact legislation to delete criminal records relating to the simple possession of cannabis. We believe that no Canadian should be burdened with a criminal record for minor, non-violent acts that are no longer a crime.

It is an honour to appear before you today, and I offer you some observations and modest recommendations with respect to Bill C-93. The campaign supports the implementation of measures to remove the stigma of past cannabis convictions that disproportionately impact marginalized Canadians. As it is currently drafted, however, Bill C-93 does not go far enough.

The story of enforcement of cannabis possession offences in Canada is one of historical injustice and inequality. Canadians of different backgrounds consume and possess cannabis at comparable rates. In fact, Canada has one of the highest rates of cannabis consumption in the world. In 2017, 46.6% of Canadians—almost half of Canadians—admitted to using cannabis at some point in their lives.

Despite this widespread consumption, a growing body of social science evidence has shown that not all Canadians face the same consequences for these actions. Racial profiling and suspicion of specific groups on the basis of stereotypes means that some Canadians are more likely to be closely scrutinized by law enforcement than others. Black Canadians, indigenous people of Canada and low-income Canadians are more likely to be stopped, searched, arrested, prosecuted and incarcerated for cannabis possession offences than white Canadians. This is not a tragic and accidental phenomenon. This is a historical injustice and a systemic charter violation that cries out for redress.

The equality provision of the charter was intended to ensure a measure of substantive, and not merely formal, equality. The Supreme Court of Canada has consistently held, beginning with the case of Eldridge, 1997, that a discriminatory purpose or intention is not a necessary condition to finding a violation of the equality provision of the charter. It is sufficient if the effect of the legislation, while neutral on its face, is to deny someone equal protection and benefit of the law. To the extent that the government seeks to draw distinction between laws that are discriminatory on their face and laws that are discriminatory in their effects, a distinction is illegitimate for the purpose of our constitutional protections.

While historical cannabis protection laws were not discriminatory on their face, they most certainly produced discriminatory effects in their enforcement. They perpetuated disadvantage on the basis of race, ethnic origin and colour, all of which are prohibited grounds under the charter.

The unequal and disproportionate enforcement of cannabis-related offences on this scale and of this magnitude encourages distrust and resentment of law enforcement, cynicism towards the administration of justice and an understandable sentiment that the promise of substantive equality under the charter is a myth for many Canadians. An appropriately powerful response to this shameful history is therefore also necessary to maintain the integrity of our justice system.

While the campaign applauds the government's willingness to recognize the disproportionate stigma and burden that results from the retention of conviction records for historical simple cannabis possession, we believe the bill does not go far enough.

Given the serious consequences of a cannabis possession conviction on the lives of Canadians and the legacy of inequality through disproportionate and discriminatory enforcement, the federal government must respond to this historical injustice with a measure sufficiently powerful to denounce a shameful history. People with simple cannabis possession records should be put in the same position as those millions of Canadians who did and who continue to do the exact same thing.

(1540)



While it was criminal, they did not face any consequences because of factors that have no bearing on their moral culpability or criminality—factors such as their race, income, family connections and their neighbourhood of residence. As a result of that, they were never arrested and never convicted and were able to proceed through their lives with opportunities that were not available to other Canadians. As a result, Bill C-93 should be amended to provide for free, automatic, simple and permanent records deletions for simple cannabis possession offences.

If the government is not willing to go that far, then we suggest that there are other aspects of that kind of regime that the government could tap into that would still be satisfactory. For example, the government could incorporate aspects of an expungement scheme that could improve the bill's utility and allow for the implementation in a way that would benefit as many people as possible.

For example, on Monday when this committee met last, we heard that because of our decentralized and often archaic record-keeping practices, attempting to find and then destroy all relevant records would simply be too arduous. Just because we can't do this for all records doesn't mean we can't do it for some, and in fact, for the most important. As the honourable Ralph Goodale mentioned on Monday, while records relating to criminal offences do not exist in a single national database, records for convictions that have the greatest impact on jobs, volunteering and travel, in fact do.

The Canadian Police Information Centre, CPIC, is a national database maintained by the RCMP. If someone is arrested, charged and convicted of a crime, this record exists in the CPIC database. When an employer asks for a background check, for example, and requests it from the RCMP, the RCMP doesn't dispatch agents to rummage through courthouses to get all these disparate court records and information about an individual. They scan CPIC. When Canada discloses conviction information about its citizens to the United States, it also doesn't send photocopies of papers in boxes that are all across the country in disparate jurisdictions. It shares one database: CPIC.

Whereas we can't delete all records, what we can do is target one extraordinarily important database. Automatically removing all simple cannabis possession offences from CPIC would go a long way to alleviate the impact of a conviction from the lives of Canadians, even though this would not constitute a full expungement.

The automatic deletion of CPIC entries in relation to simple cannabis offences is also a cost-effective way to provide immediate relief to Canadians. An application process involving the collection of records from provincial, territorial and local police databases involves delays and hidden costs. Even if Bill C-93 eliminates the $631 application fee ordinarily required for record suspension applications, applicants may still need to pay for fingerprinting, court information and local police record checks, which can add up to hundreds of dollars.

There has been some discussion in this committee about whether record suspensions assist Canadians when crossing the border to the United States. I'd like to speak very briefly about that, and I could be asked more questions about that later. Record suspensions do not assist Canadians seeking to cross the border to the United States. The United States does not recognize any foreign pardon, irrespective of the effect of conviction. In fact, neither foreign pardons nor foreign expungement are effective in preventing inadmissibility to the United States. They are essentially equally useless.

I have provided to this committee fulsome submissions in writing that outline further recommendations, points and observations about this law. However, I wish to conclude with our primary recommendation, which is this: Bill C-93 should provide for the permanent and automatic deletion of all conviction entries for cannabis simple possession in the CPIC database.

Our subsidiary recommendations are outlined in our written briefs.

(1545)



We hope that the recommendations that we proposed would increase the bill's utility, assist in achieving its stated goals and allow for implementation that would benefit as many people as possible.

Thank you for your time.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

With that, we turn to Ms. Sahota. Seven minutes, please.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

First, I'd like to find out a little bit more about cannabis amnesty. I guess I didn't get a chance to really do my homework.

You are the founder of that organization. When was it created and what was its purpose at the time?

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

It was created around April 2018.

I am a criminal defence lawyer. A lot of my clients face criminal charges with respect to cannabis. One thing that you can tell is that I'm a relatively recently called lawyer. I haven't been practising for very long, but one thing that quite surprised me is that often when it comes to offences, people are less afraid of the actual sentence and more afraid of what it will do for them for the rest of their lives. That stunned me. I thought that you do your crime, you do your time and you move on. I found it particularly disheartening that people who were trying to get their lives back on track were essentially being sabotaged by a system of information disclosure that prevented them from getting jobs, getting volunteer placements or travelling, for example, because of the stigma attached to having previously committed a criminal offence.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Where is this organization based?

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

It's based out of my office in Toronto.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I found it interesting. We were exploring on Monday that.... You've obviously been through the costs of fingerprints and court records and police record checks. I was wondering if either of you could give us some insight as to how much a police record check and obtaining court documents would cost in the regions where you practise.

Mr. Tom Stamatakis:

I couldn't give you a specific answer. It varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

The jurisdiction that you are working from....

Mr. Tom Stamatakis:

My home service is in Vancouver, and to be very blunt about it, I haven't dealt with a record check or any fingerprinting for some time in that jurisdiction. I don't know what the cost is at the moment.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

I don't have the answer for that, but I know where I can get it. I've been speaking to a group of young entrepreneurs who work out of the Ryerson legal innovation centre in Toronto, who have designed an app that tries to help people streamline and manage better the costs of doing a pardon application. It's called ParDONE.

Through my association with them, they've done a lot of the research about the disparity across the board in the application for pardons.

(1550)

Mr. Tom Stamatakis:

I will get you a few examples from a few jurisdictions. I don't know if you want me to send them on to the committee.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes, that would be useful. Thank you.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

I could reach out to them as well because I know they've created a database for the cause. It varies. I know in my jurisdiction it's around $50 for a local police check. I can't remember whether it's Regina or Winnipeg, but I think it may be Winnipeg where it can be up to $125.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Does ParDONE represent people in filling out their pardon paperwork? Do they have a cost associated with that?

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Yes, they do.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Do you know what their cost is?

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

I'm not sure. I haven't really talked to them about the cost model because our discussions were focused on providing it pro bono because we are not-for-profit. They did mention that even with attempting to reduce the costs as much as possible because of the ancillary costs of fingerprinting.... Even if you get rid of the $631, there's fingerprinting, a local police check and a background check.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Would your organization be able to provide services as pro bono work in helping people go through the process?

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

That's certainly one thing we're contemplating, once the government has passed legislation on pardons. We would be very much interested in assisting people as much as possible. However, until we see the model the government is implementing for the purpose of pardons, it will be difficult for us to know whether we are capable of doing that.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

You talked about automatic deletion. We were informed on Monday that automatic deletion would be very difficult to do. Because of the way the charge is listed in CPIC, prior to 1996, it would be a narcotics possession charge or conviction, and post 1996, it would be seen as a possession of a substance in schedule II.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Yes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

How would they be able to pick out...They would basically have to pick out all of those charges which could be for various different narcotics or different substances in schedule II and then go through all the court documents and police records. It would be quite extensive.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Yes, that's correct. It would be very difficult for those prior to the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, but schedule II of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act is only cannabis.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Is it only cannabis?

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

It's cannabis, cannabinoid, cannabis derivatives, cannabidiol. It's the schedule of cannabis derivatives. There is a list of around 10, 11 or 12, and of those there may be only one that is presently not legal.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

So, that's what you meant by saying some people can still be helped. You're saying those that are coming after that change in the law are they the ones that we can automatically delete?

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Yes.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Motz, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, CPC):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair, and thank you to both witnesses for being here today. I want to ask you both the same question.

Were either one of your organizations consulted in the drafting of this bill? I know your answer to my second question, were your objectives met in this bill? Obviously, they weren't. From the Police Association, you answered both. Were either of your groups consulted before the drafting of this bill?

Mr. Tom Stamatakis:

Were we directly consulted? Not in an extensive way. We had some exchanges, but we didn't have a specific consultation with respect to this bill.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

I would say the same thing. We had an open line of communication with Mr. Goodale's office to the extent that we would send him information and ideas. His office would acknowledge the receipt, but we weren't consulted about the actual substance of the bill. The first time we saw it was when it was released to the public.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Officials briefed us when they were here on Monday. There are about 250,000 individuals, according to the records that they relied upon, who might be eligible for this process. Do those figures align with what you have heard or believe to be a true and accurate number of Canadians who have a minor possession of marijuana as a criminal record?

(1555)

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

My understanding is that it is half that number that reflects people who have a previous cannabis conviction record or a previous criminal record for simple cannabis possession. You said something that might be the reason for that. You said there are about 250,000 people who would eligible. The number of people who are eligible for pardons, under this piece of legislation, is different from the number of people who have previous cannabis conviction records.

The eligibility pares down the number of people and it may be reasonable to suspect that one of the requirements for eligibility is that individuals have to have only simple cannabis possession records. You can imagine that a vast number of people who have simple cannabis possession also have another offence on their record, be it an administrative offence, a fine or another drug-related offence. That would automatically disqualify them. I can see that the number of people who might be able to benefit from this would be substantially less than the number of people who actually have simple cannabis possession on their records.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Any comments from the Canadian Police Association, sir?

Mr. Tom Stamatakis:

I couldn't comment specifically on the number, but that doesn't surprise me that the number would be relatively low. As I said in my remarks, in my experience police organizations have de-prioritized targeting people for simple possession, particularly cannabis, for quite some time.

Mr. Glen Motz:

One of the other things the officials told us on Monday was that based on the 250,000, they anticipate there will be potentially up to only 10,000 individuals who would take advantage of this record suspension opportunity.

Are you hearing anything different on either part? Is that something you can speak to?

Mr. Tom Stamatakis:

Anecdotally, it's not unusual in my experience that people don't pursue getting a pardon or having a record expunged. It's a step that people have to take, so it's not uncommon for me to come across people in my work who could apply for a pardon, or an expungement of some other record, but don't for whatever reason.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

I think that's correct.

It doesn't surprise me that the number is so low. I'm surprised because I hope it would have benefited more people, which is one of the reasons we are asking for it to be automatic. If it's just the push of a button, you don't have to go through the process.

There is a difficulty in getting people to take advantage of a scheme that's developed where there's a historical documentation provision requirement. It's quite difficult to get these documents. You have to physically go to the court; they may not have them there; they have to order them from storage and that's only one of maybe two, three, four or five documents that you have to obtain.

The process in itself could be a deterrent simply because it is too cumbersome and difficult to do. There is also the additional cost that may weed out people as well and make them think it's not worth it.

Mr. Glen Motz:

We talked about that on Monday. There are the fingerprinting costs and the application for a record from the local police jurisdiction where that offence was committed and potentially other costs associated with that as well. It really doesn't make this a cost-neutral venture.

You mentioned, and it was talked about the last time briefly as well, the challenge of obtaining past records. We know in policing that sometimes these offences occurred in jurisdictions where the record-keeping was not as we would be accustomed to today, or in larger municipalities or organizations, and it's a problem.

Do you have solutions on how we might address that? We may not find them because they're in a box in the basement somewhere. They're not modernized or digitized, so how do we go about this?

(1600)

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

I agree it's very challenging, but that challenge can be turned on its head, I think, and that's what I was suggesting in my earlier remarks.

We don't have to focus on all the records. Why don't we focus on the ones that matter, the ones that impede people from getting jobs, volunteering or crossing the border? Nobody is going into the basement of a courthouse and using those documents to prevent someone from getting a job. The CPIC database is the impediment.

The Chair:

Mr. Motz, I'm going to have to owe you 11 seconds for the next round.

Mr. Dubé, you have seven minutes, please.

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP):

Thank you very much.

First of all, I want to thank you both for being here.

I want to continue on this idea about CPIC that you mentioned in your testimony, and correct me if I'm not understanding this correctly. In other words, any time a potential landlord, employer or whoever is asking any question that requires some kind of background check, their verification would occur through CPIC, is that correct?

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

That's my understanding of how it happens.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Okay.

I just want to back up a little to the question about historical injustice, because this seems to have been the grounds on which the government is distinguishing between the injustices committed on the members of the LGBTQ community through Bill C-66, the individuals who would be affected by this legislation, and who have been affected by criminal records for simple possession.

The numbers you've cited in your brief, that I've cited and that many have cited about the disproportionate impact, are essentially government numbers, if I can phrase it that way. Is that correct?

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

They are numbers that have been provided through either freedom of information requests and that have been processed by academics or Statistics Canada.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

So in other words, the government would be aware of that information when drafting this type of legislation.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

I would imagine that it wouldn't surprise them.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

That brings me to this. You referenced a Supreme Court case, so there really is no legal foundation for what constitutes a historical injustice. Obviously that decision you referenced goes into it, but when the minister tries to create a standard—and he was very careful in his testimony Monday to not use that phrase again, although others like Minister Blair have—there's no real precedent. There's no measuring stick as to what would reach that threshold.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Right, yes. The case I was referring to wasn't about historical injustices. It was about equality.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Right.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

The definition of equality under the charter is a definition that has been developed through case law, and it's a term of art. When you say “equality”, you don't mean formal equality, you mean substantive equality, and that has a meaning. It has content.

Historical injustice is not a legal term of art. You could use it to describe anything that you deem to be a historical injustice, but I think what Minister Goodale was doing in his testimony was being very careful, because the government in essence has created it to be a term of art because of the way that it has structured Bill C-66. I think Bill C-66 was designed to address it with the term “historical injustice”. There was a schedule, and on that schedule they put offences they deemed to be historical injustices. In order for them to have an argument to exclude certain offences from that schedule, they would have to define them as something other than historical injustices.

So I think it's a term of art that's artificially constructed, but you can define historical injustice in any way that you choose to.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

So ultimately what you're positing by using the discussion about equality is that there is clearly an inequity in how these individuals were treated and such. If you're going to use this term of art, as you say, then it could easily fall under the same sort of construct, but ultimately, it's unnecessary to go forward with expungement. If it's perceived in a particular way, if the social acceptance does exist for this activity now, which is now legal, then there's no reason why it couldn't just simply be expunged.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Well, what I was trying to lay out had to do with the harm that was done by the historical injustices, the offences that essentially were homophobic in nature. They discriminated against individuals on the basis of sexual orientation. That is a violation of the charter, and it is false to try to draw a distinction, if you're looking at what is a violation of the charter, between laws that are discriminatory on their face and those that are discriminatory in their effect.

(1605)

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Perfect.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

So it's a false distinction if your objective is to try to define things that would violate section 15 of the charter.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I appreciate that. So some of the issues that people would have that would qualify for the process laid out in Bill C-93—and we've had confirmation from officials on this—would include things like those you've mentioned, some of these administrative offences, such as failure to appear in court, unpaid fines, which some would say could be fines of as low as $50. Even then “low” is a relative term, naturally.

In your experience, would it not be the same marginalized individuals who would be targeted by those criteria that we're seeking to remediate with this legislation?

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

In my experience, and I believe in the experience of many of my colleagues who defend these people on a daily basis, there's not necessarily any correlation between the number of offences on a person's rap sheet, a person's record, and the extent to which the person poses a real and true danger to society.

In fact, my clients who have the longest conviction records are the ones who have the greatest mental health challenges. They cannot understand, and for that reason they miss court dates. They are compulsive in their behaviour in terms of not showing up for court or compulsively stealing and things like that. That doesn't necessarily correlate with the people we are seeking to target as being the most dangerous and reckless people in society.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

And so there's a big distinction between achieving a public safety objective by not wanting to give someone a way out when there might be more serious issues and someone who might have an unpaid fine or this type of administrative offence.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Exactly. It's not necessarily the existence of another offence on their record that speaks to the danger they pose to society, but really the nature of the offence.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Ultimately we favour expungement; it seems that the government doesn't.

However, even if they were to remain with the pardon called the record suspension system, would it not be preferable for it to be automatic to avoid this application process that, despite being expedited on the federal government's side, is still costly and drawn out, given what's been raised here today and on Monday?

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Yes, absolutely.

One of my primary concerns is that this legislation, while well-meaning and much better than the status quo.... I'm not here to completely dismantle it. I think it's fantastic that the government has taken this initiative. My concern is that people will not take it up.

Mr. Tom Stamatakis:

If it is automatic, how do you determine the nature of those additional offences to determine whether there is a public safety risk or not?

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

I think if there are other offences, you wouldn't qualify for this.

The Chair:

I have to leave it there.

This is an interesting point in the debate, so maybe Monsieur Picard can pick it up in the next seven minutes.

Mr. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

No, I won't. I'll change the subject. [Translation]

Madam, do you think consuming cannabis is a basic right? [English]

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

No. [Translation]

Mr. Michel Picard:

Do you think an activity that is prohibited and then becomes permissible is worthy of an administrative correction—without getting into the administrative aspect—where the correction does not necessarily relate to a basic right? [English]

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

No. [Translation]

Mr. Michel Picard:

On Monday, we heard from department officials, and they explained the difference between a suspension and….[English]

What's “expungement” in French? I don't know.

On the difference between expungement and suspension, the pardon has a paper trail, but there's no such document to explain an expungement, so no one can arrive with a document.

Do you agree with that?

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

I do not. I make reference to that in my written submission, but I can respond right now.

Essentially, what Minister Goodale was trying to say was that pardons are more beneficial for government crossings to the United States, because a successful applicant will have documented proof of a pardon while an expungement does not. This would only be the case where the government creates a regime that results in that objective.

This question was raised in this committee when the government was studying Bill C-66, which was a bill to create expungement for historically unjust sentences. When the CEO of the Parole Board, Talal Dakalbab, testified before this committee, he was asked this very same question.

Talal Dakalbab testified that those who receive an expungement pursuant to Bill C-66 could carry with them the Parole Board of Canada's expungement decision. This is a quote from that testimony: This document shows that their offence has been expunged or that they have obtained a pardon or a record suspension. This is usually how this information can be removed from the systems of other countries.

There is a mechanism—if the government constructs the legislation in that way—to provide a document that is equally as useful in the process of an expungement but that is not in a criminal record database. With something, for example, like a birth certificate, there is meaning and weight to its significance, but it's not in a police database; it doesn't prevent you from getting a job.

Where it can be created, as Minister Goodale mentioned in the case of a suspension, it can also be created in the case of an expungement, and that was suggested by the CEO of the Parole Board when testifying about Bill C-66.

(1610)

Mr. Michel Picard:

What's the point of creating something new when you already have something that works and is understood by other police forces, namely U.S. customs?

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

What are you suggesting?

Mr. Michel Picard:

The pardon and the document that accompanies the pardon and everything is based on something that exists already with the exact same result, and it works. This is the language that's used daily with other police forces in other countries. Why are we recreating the wheel when we have something that is perfectly efficient and achieves the objective at stake?

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

It's for the same reason that we have Bill C-93 proposed, as opposed to just the Criminal Records Act. There's a specific mischief that the government is responding to, which is a historical injustice, in my submission. The government has recognized that there's a history of disproportionate impact of cannabis convictions, of cannabis prohibition and enforcement of this law, on specific people in Canada. That's why the government is implementing, in addition to what it already has.... It's saying let's do something a little bit more. They're saying that little bit more is that they're going to remove the fee associated with it and remove the waiting period. They're not recreating the wheel, but responding to a specific mischief.

What I'm proposing is also a response to that specific mischief, but my suggestions are going a bit further. There is room to construct something where there is a unique mischief that the government is responding to, particularly when it pertains to historical injustice that will result in people losing faith and confidence in our justice system because it doesn't treat people fairly.

In terms of recreating the wheel, there are currently approximately 23 states in the United States that have either decriminalized or legalized cannabis, and of those 23, seven implemented some kind of measure for expungement or pardons or amnesty for cannabis-related offences, and of those seven, six are expungements.

In the United States, it is standard pro forma to approach things by way of expungement. The United States will understand that language better than they would understand a pardon, because it means something different in the United States. A presidential or a congressional pardon is something different from what we call a pardon. [Translation]

Mr. Michel Picard:

During your opening statement, you talked about focusing on the most important records.

I completely agree that someone who is looking for a job needs their pardon in order to find employment. You're saying that the government, or at least an administrative body, should do the work. How is someone in an administrative organization supposed to decide which records on the list or in the database are most important? [English]

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

I think in my description of what was important, I didn't mean important in the sense of a qualitative assessment of the content of the file or the record. What I meant by important is the location of the document that has the most impact on the person's life.

Let's say that there's an individual who had a conviction in 1983 of simple cannabis possession. The entry would be in CPIC, and that entry may also be contained in physical documents in a courthouse, in a storage facility somewhere. If we want to spend our resources to rid that person of the stigma associated with the criminal record, we should go after the digital record in CPIC rather than the paper record in the basement of a courthouse, because the digital record is the one that's most likely to have an impact on that person's ability to find employment.

Maybe I wasn't clear, and I apologize for that, but it wasn't the content of the document that's most important. It was really trying to discern which types of records we want to target for the purpose of making sure that our efforts and our resources are expended only where they will be the most effective in assisting people to get their lives back on track.

(1615)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Picard.

There was reference to Bill C-66 coming before this committee. I don't think it actually came before this committee. It was some other committee, but it wasn't this one, I'm pretty sure. It was probably justice.

Mr. Eglinski, you have five minutes.

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC):

Thank you.

I'd like to thank both witnesses for being here.

I'll start with you, ma'am.

I'm going to go back in history a little bit because I was there. I started policing in the 1960s and drugs just started to filter into Canada's community in about the mid-1960s. I was there when we started an active enforcement program, regardless of whether it was Edmonton city police or Vancouver RCMP. I watched the progression as it came up to today. I've been there and watched it.

One thing that you mentioned—and I do agree with you—is that we can not rely on anything out there for this record thing other than CPIC because CPIC didn't start when the drugs started. There are lots of records that are lost who knows where. We discussed that a little bit.

We've had discussions here by our parole people who say they have to look at it and decide whether that person should be eligible or shouldn't be eligible. They say that they're going to be able to do it quite quickly. It should be immediately, but when they sit it here they say it may take some time. To me, that's not going to be cheap and fast.

I've brought this up a number of times. I think everybody here in this room kind of knows that I think pressing a button is the way to do it for simple possession charges. It was very clear to this committee the other day that if the charge was reduced 15 or 20 years ago from something else to simple possession and that's what the Crown decided to go on and that's what the person was convicted of, then all we can rely on is that simple possession charge.

In this day and age of artificial intelligence, some of the best minds in the world here in Canada could not develop a program that would connect the CPIC program held by the RCMP with a computer going through that thing faster than we can with a group of people. You'd think a logical way of doing it would be where the computer would go and kick out the ones that should be kicked out and delete them.

I wonder what are your feelings on that.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

I think there's definitely room to develop a program like that. I think an even more complex algorithm could be developed to determine whether there are aspects of a person's record in its entirety that warrant further inspection to respond to some of the concerns of the Police Association, which may be valid with respect to.... You don't want to expunge the records or delete the records of somebody who should probably be followed, but for simple possession....

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you for that. I think we're thinking the same way.

Could you send us a list of the six states that are doing the system because I would like to find out if any of them are doing it by computer or if they're trying to do it the manual way.

I would be very interested to know that.

(1620)

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Yes.

Mr. Tom Stamatakis:

I agree with what you're suggesting. The only concern I would raise is that the problem with just expunging that record—or deleting that record, to use your term—is that there are records that exist elsewhere in other databases. You need to still have some kind of an accompanying document or record that says that the CPIC entry has been deleted, so that—

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

A properly produced program with the proper agencies working on it would be able to do that.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

There are a number of jurisdictions in the United States—they're municipalities—that are using artificial intelligence and predictive coding to identify records and eliminate them. I'm just on our web site right now because we have listed some of them there, but I can certainly provide this to the committee.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you.

Tom, just to let you know, it's $25 for a check in your city and $25 if they want to add a fingerprint check. Ottawa is $42 for a criminal check, $99 if you want fingerprints and $139 if you're a company.

Mr. Tom Stamatakis:

Thank you.

The Chair:

You're done your five minutes.

My ever-vigilant clerk has corrected me. Bill C-66 did come before this committee. The benefit of getting old is that everything seems fresh again.

Ms. Dabrusin, you have five minutes, please.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Thank you to both of you. It has been helpful to get your perspectives on things, especially in the context of what we heard on Monday as well.

Ms. Enenajor, first, you stated that this bill shows a recognition of historical injustices. If this bill passed as is, unamended, would you be happy to see it go through as a first step in righting those historical injustices?

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Absolutely.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

I want to speak to you about some other points.

One of the issues that came up on Monday was really about tracking down all the records. The question seemed to be, in what was suggested to us by the officials, that if it was upon them to do all the work themselves as opposed to putting the onus on the person seeking the pardon, they would have to go and check records that might be in basements to see if it was actually simple possession of cannabis as opposed to something else.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Yes.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

However, if I understand what you've suggested today, these would all be schedule II. Would that be how it's marked in CPIC, as schedule II?

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Yes, schedule II.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

At that point, all but one of those items would be in fact legal today.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

It has been a while since I've juxtaposed schedule II and the schedule of the Cannabis Act, but I do believe it's almost identical.

I know for sure that schedule II of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act is only cannabis and cannabis-derived substances.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Then one simplified process might not get everyone, especially because laws change and schedules change over time. However, if there was a way to date it back, one way would be to actually make it somehow automatic for schedule II possession—and I'm not using the right legal terminology because I don't have the act in front of me—

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Yes.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

—and then maybe have to do something else for those when you have perhaps different items and schedules and it's different legislation.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Yes, exactly. One of the things we proposed in one of the documents we sent to the government was a multi-tiered system that responded to different kinds of offences.

For example, it makes sense if you have only one conviction for simple cannabis possession that's over 40 years old and you've never done anything since then. Who cares? Just expunge it. It's so useless to have that.

In terms of the risk of it being anything more serious than simple cannabis possessions, if they're 40 years old, why don't we just get rid of all those ones? Different tiers of types of offences can attract different responses.

(1625)

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

You have outlined what that would look like. At this point, we're looking at legislation, and I guess you would agree with me that it's important that we pass this legislation quickly.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Yes.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

It would be helpful, then, if you have any suggestion as to proper wording.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Yes.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

I don't know if you've already provided that to the committee.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

I have not. I think we have a draft piece of legislation. However, I can provide that to the committee.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

That would be wonderful. I'd appreciate that, if you'd be able to send in what you would propose as a draft.

The other question that has been on my mind is when we'd looked at record suspensions previously with a motion—I think it was M-161—one of the witnesses mentioned that one of the largest barriers was outstanding fines. The time didn't start clicking for a lot of people because of it.

Here, the time isn't a factor anymore under this bill, but my understanding is that you can't qualify under Bill C-93 if you still have outstanding fines. How do you feel about that piece, about the outstanding fines? Would it be helpful if people were not required to pay their outstanding fines to qualify for the pardon or record suspension?

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

I actually thought there was no relationship between the presence of an outstanding fine and eligibility for Bill C-93, so I'm—

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

My understanding was that all penalties, any time that had to be served, if there was time that had to be served, or any outstanding fines, would have to have been completed before you would be able to quality.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Yes, completed. That's right.

That was a difficulty in access on this issue. Many times the people who don't pay their fines are unable to do so. These are the same people who are unable to afford pardons, ultimately. We're trying to target those people who have, as a result of their criminal convictions, become marginalized and are unable to be gainfully employed and contribute to society. Then we're doubly punishing them by preventing the only mechanism by which they can actually go out and be employed and contribute to society and gain the type of income that would allow them to pay the fine. It's a contradiction in terms to not have contemplated a way to go around that.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Motz, you have five minutes.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you, Chair.

I'd like to continue on with the issue of fines. I think it's important to appreciate that if you have an outstanding fine, and if there's a significant timeline, it's turned into a warrant. You have a certain amount of time to pay your fine, and if you don't, it goes to warrant. The moment you start dealing with that, then, you have an outstanding warrant. Generally, if it's for minor possession, with a $150 or $200 fine generally, you get picked up and you're released, because really you've paid your fine. That's kind of how things generally work for minor possession.

I want to also talk about CPIC for a second. CPIC is a database that identifies to law enforcement that an individual has been dealt with with a record. I'm splitting hairs here, but CPIC doesn't actually contain the record.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Right.

Mr. Glen Motz:

The way the government has looked at Bill C-93 is that there's still a requirement for the department to go and verify through fingerprints and the actual record, not just CPIC. It's not as simple as hitting a button and removing it off CPIC. Now you can do that on the database that contains the actual criminal record.

But that's a different story. I want to ask you specifically about the fact that right now, the process from the department's perspective is to try to do it inexpensively from.... It's free for an applicant. It's not free for the department. They figure it will cost a couple of hundred dollars per person if their numbers are accurate in terms of the number of people who are going to be applying. I still have questions as to how well that might be done. If I'm applying for a record suspension because of a minor possession of marijuana, the onus is on me to go to “a” jurisdiction; it's not multiple but one conviction. That's all I'm allowed to deal with.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Yes.

Mr. Glen Motz:

I have to go back to that place of jurisdiction and I have to go and find the actual conviction from the courthouse.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Yes.

Mr. Glen Motz:

I have to give my fingerprints, to verify that I'm me, and confirm that I have that record. Then I submit that as part of the package that the Crown has put together for people to apply for this.

I mean, do you think that's an efficient way of doing this? Really, in terms of what we're asking, I have to apply through a process online. I have to follow a sequence where I check the boxes. The onus is on me to do those things. Then the department, the Parole Board, has a clerical function where they might say, yes, this person's fingerprints match up through the C-216Cs or the new systems now, or, yes, this is the record, and there's nothing else that impedes this person from becoming or being.... They only have one conviction; they've qualified. To me, that seems like a really long process, potentially, and it will limit people who want to get this conviction.... I'm wondering whether this will actually benefit the people we're expecting it to benefit—those who are prohibited from getting the type of job they want because of a simple possession charge.

What are your thoughts on that?

(1630)

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

I think your instincts are correct. Even today, the largest number of applications for pardons.... The process that you describe, which is the Bill C-93 process, is better and less onerous than the process we currently have for record suspension.

Mr. Glen Motz:

With a full pardon.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

For a full pardon.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

That's because it eliminates the requirement that you demonstrate good conduct and it eliminates the requirement that you have to show a measurable benefit that the pardon will give to you. They're all qualitative aspects. Often people obtain counsel to help them do that, because you're presenting a case for yourself. It's not really just running around a courthouse trying to find specific documents and putting in your fingerprints. You're making an argument for yourself. The discretionary element is no longer there in Bill C-93.

Mr. Glen Motz:

I have just a minute or so left, and I'm curious to know something. I've asked some individuals that I know who are in business this question: Listen, as an employer, if someone applies for a position with you, and you ask them for a records check or they come in with it, now that marijuana is legalized, are you concerned that the individual has a previous conviction for simple possession of marijuana? The answer I've gotten back from them is that, no, they don't care.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Yes.

Mr. Glen Motz:

I think most employers don't care about whether something that's been legalized will have an impact on them. I know it impacts the individual.

I don't know if you have any thoughts on that particular issue.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

I haven't really thought about that specific issue.

The decision whether or not to hire someone on the basis of a criminal record is discretionary. My concern is about who the people are who are being most impacted as a result of the exercise of that discretion. There's always the potential for it to harm an individual and to limit them.

While a lot of employers may not ultimately care, I think we're not there yet. That may happen in a couple of years. Mr. Stamatakis mentioned that there have been sweeping cultural changes in our perception and our understanding of cannabis, and I think that's only going to continue. But until we get there we still have people who are being denied employment and volunteer opportunities.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Our next witness is on his way from court, and the lawyers among us know exactly what that means, so I'm going to stretch this session a little bit further. Before I ask Mr. Graham for the next five minutes, I'll take a question from our analysts with respect to testimony on the schedule.

Go ahead.

Ms. Julia Nicol (Committee Researcher):

You may not be able to answer this, but if I understand correctly, you said that in CPIC it will say this is a schedule II offence. Item 1 of that schedule, natural cannabis and derivatives, is no longer an issue, but item 2, the synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist, remains a criminal offence. Would the item number have been listed in CPIC in every case, because if not, we have an issue with figuring it out.

(1635)

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

I don't think so. It's not that detailed.

Ms. Julia Nicol:

That's what I thought. That's where we have a problem. You can't tell by relying just on CPIC.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Yes.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Graham, for five minutes, please.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

That was my first question, so thank you for that.

Mr. Stamatakis, when you're looking at an electronic record, what do you know? When you pull up somebody's criminal record, what do you see?

Mr. Tom Stamatakis:

It gives you a very brief description of the offence. There's no context or additional information.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Of all our historical criminal records in this country—I imagine there are quite a few of them—how many have been digitized? Do we have any sense of that?

Mr. Tom Stamatakis:

No, and I would agree with my co-panellists here that record-keeping is an issue. The other issue is that while we all rely on CPIC nationally, provincially there are different databases that capture information as well. Even if you delete a record from CPIC, it doesn't mean the record is automatically going to delete from those other databases that different police agencies use in different jurisdictions.

I say this from a policing perspective.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are police databases generally synchronized in any way? Is there some way of doing so, or is everyone their own little island?

Mr. Tom Stamatakis:

No, they're not synchronized. Policing falls under provincial jurisdiction, and each province will make their own decisions with respect to provincial databases that might be used to capture law enforcement-generated data.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

While I appreciate the sentiment, is there any way we can implement Mr. Eglinski's idea of using AI to find these data?

Mr. Tom Stamatakis:

I think you could. I agree with the sentiment that in today's world, there should be some way of quickly managing records, at least with CPIC. If you came up with a process where there was a document that a person could be given that confirms that the record has been deleted or expunged, it would be helpful. If you focus just on CPIC, it's not going to solve the problem when it comes to simple possession.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Do all police forces feed into CPIC?

Mr. Tom Stamatakis:

Yes, it's a national database. All police services across the country have access to CPIC.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So, as we were saying before, CPIC doesn't do the reverse. That's why there's no coordination. It's a one-way situation.

Mr. Tom Stamatakis:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

If someone has multiple possession charges but nothing else, would they have to apply for each one individually? What's your take on that? Or could they apply once for the 10 or 20 times they got caught?

Mr. Tom Stamatakis:

That's a good question.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm not sure either. That's why I'm asking.

Mr. Tom Stamatakis:

Yes. I think my reading of it is that it's specifically talking about simple possession. If there aren't those other circumstances, then I don't see why you couldn't apply it once. But I don't think it's clear.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. But as we said earlier, if you have any other record, then it's moot anyway.

In your opening remarks, you expressed concern about people who had their plea bargains down to a simple possession, but I think the underlying hint of that was that if that was the case, they probably also had an additional criminal record, and that's why there would be a concern. If that's the case, then that criminal record would make it a moot point, would it not?

Mr. Tom Stamatakis:

It would just be my concern that the board wouldn't have access to that information, because my experience as a police officer is that there are often those plea arrangements made for good reason. As I said in my opening remarks, those agreements are arrived at for a reason, and this changes the landscape, obviously. To be frank, if all someone has is a simple possession charge as a result of a plea agreement from 10 years ago or five years ago and there's nothing else, I have no issue with that. But our experience, from a policing perspective, is that these people often are involved in a lot of other things. I agree with you: if that's the case, then they wouldn't be eligible to apply, but it's just giving that little bit more discretion to be able to confirm that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

To do that, we'd have to have the Parole Board subjectively look at each record as it comes up, which is sort of the opposite extreme from what your colleague here is suggesting. Would that be a fair assessment?

(1640)

Mr. Tom Stamatakis:

I suppose what I would say is that I'm advocating for them to have the ability to do that where they believe there's a reason to do so. I'm not suggesting you create a mechanism where they have to do it in every case.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Chair.

I just wanted to come back to where cannabis amnesty is at, in terms of this bill, because certainly it's better than nothing but ultimately the fact remains that the best outcome for the individuals you're seeking justice and remediation for would be expungement. Is that fair?

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Yes, that's the best outcome.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Okay. And then it's a little more than the bare minimum, but another good step would be it being automatic in some way. We're getting bogged down in how that would occur, but if the government was willing to do so...?

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Yes.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Even if it wasn't automatic, would a model like what was proposed in Bill C-66 be feasible? We talked about the language being used there, the historical injustice language being applied, but ultimately the Bill C-66 model could very easily have been—or still be—applied in this case, potentially, correct?

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Potentially, but Bill C-66 is actually a little bit more complex than what I'm proposing, because the offences listed in Bill C-66 were not only used to prosecute consensual homosexual activities, they were also used to prosecute non-consensual homosexual activities. So with Bill C-66, in your application, you have to either find information that would demonstrate that it was a consensual act, or swear an affidavit to that effect, so it's actually a lot more homework with Bill C-66.

Maybe there's a mirror to what the analyst was asking me before, where you're not sure what the nature of the underlying offence may be and whether it qualifies for what the objective you're trying to accomplish is. In those cases, you may actually have to go back to not just the court documents, to find those, but you may have to order the court transcript. Because oftentimes, even the court documents won't say the nature of the substance. You have to get the evidence.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I just want to go back to a question that was posed earlier about travel at the border. I think there are domestic concerns that are important enough when it comes to things like jobs and volunteering and so forth. I just want to make sure we're distinguishing something here, because there seems to be an argument that a pardon or a record suspension is better because it provides documentation.

I have two comments about that. One is there's nothing that would prevent the government from keeping a record of records that were expunged if people so requested. It seems like a bit of a contradiction, but ultimately, that would be feasible. The other piece is that in your testimony you were referring not so much as to whether it is important or not to have documentation, but to the fact that even if you have a record suspension, it is not necessarily recognized by the Americans, so there's no guarantee even there that your travel would be facilitated.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

At most, a record suspension would buttress your application for an entry waiver to the United States. You would still be required to make an application for an entry waiver if you've been denied entry. The pardon and the record suspension or an expungement would not prevent you from being deemed inadmissible.

The Chair:

Thank you.

I would like to go back to the issue of the U.S. border officer. Your testimony was that a pardon and an expungement as far as that officer is concerned are equally useless.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Yes.

The Chair:

With either one, you're essentially in exactly the same position as the person who has a conviction or any outstanding charge because the question is the same.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Yes.

The Chair:

Whether it's a charge, a conviction, an expungement or a pardon, it's all useless as far as the U.S. border officers are concerned.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

That's correct.

The Chair:

Thank you. That's comforting.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Unfortunately, we can't pass laws that impact the United States.

The Chair:

That's been one of the sales points of the bill.

Ms. Annamaria Enenajor:

Yes.

The Chair:

Before we suspend I'll ask Mr. Eglinski in his generous way to move that we accept the report of the subcommittee.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I move that we accept the report of the subcommittee.

The Chair:

That's excellent. I thank you for that.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I'm just trying to co-operate with you and be part of the team.

The Chair:

It's democracy in action.

Thank you very much. With that we'll suspend briefly.

(1645)

(1645)

The Chair:

We are going to be running up against bells, colleagues. Apparently they're half-hour bells so with your indulgence, and it will have to be unanimous indulgence, and given our late start I would like to run 15 minutes into the bells and then we'll adjourn.

Thank you.

Mr. Friedman, I'll ask you to begin your testimony. If you could cut it down from 10 minutes that would be appreciated.

Mr. Solomon Friedman (Criminal Defence Lawyer, As an Individual):

Good afternoon, Mr. Chair and committee members.

Thank you for inviting me to address you today on the subject of Bill C-93.

First, let's start with the positive. The philosophy behind this proposed legislation is sound. It is fundamentally unjust for individuals to suffer under the continued stigma of a criminal record for conduct that is no longer illegal.

As we are all well aware, a criminal record is indeed a significant barrier to success in our society. It compromises a person's ability to obtain employment, education, housing, financing, volunteer opportunities and travel. These are all roadblocks, individually and cumulatively, to a person's ability to integrate into society, contribute positively to the larger community and lead a productive, prosocial life.

The injustice of maintaining the criminal convictions for individuals previously convicted for simple possession of cannabis is further compounded when we examine the uneven and discriminatory effect of the criminalization of cannabis on already marginalized groups in Canada. In Toronto, for example, where black people make up 8% of the population, they account for 25% of all persons charged with possession of marijuana between 2003 and 2013. The same is true with respect to indigenous persons. Take Regina, Saskatchewan, where 9% of residents are indigenous but were 41% of all persons charged with cannabis possession.

Historically, these offences have disproportionately impacted the most vulnerable in our society: the poor, the marginalized, the mentally ill, the racialized and indigenous people. If the statistics aren't enough, I can tell you from the unfortunately steady stream of clients through my office that those charged with simple possession of marijuana share these traits. They generally derive from marginalized groups and, in a cruel twist of irony, these criminal convictions themselves further marginalize those same groups, perpetuating a cycle of criminalization, stigma and inequality.

Bill C-93 undoubtedly comes from a good place, and the government should be applauded for that. However, while well intentioned and a positive first step—there's always a “however”, especially when you bring in a lawyer—it remains, in my respectful view, deeply flawed. I will address each of these flaws in turn.

First, the bill requires that affected individuals apply to the Parole Board of Canada for a record suspension. This requires that a formal application be filled out and sent into the Parole Board for review. While the bill explicitly provides that no fee is payable for this particular application, unlike the ordinary record suspension fee, I suspect that for many Canadians this process will not be free.

There are numerous companies that for a significant fee will, quote, “assist” individuals in completing record suspension applications. In fact, as of today, the top ad under the Google search results for “cannabis pardon Canada” was a for-profit website offering their services for the low monthly price of $72 and $116 per month if expedited. To be clear, that is a monthly price on a 16-month payment plan. Who do you think this website is targeting to pay $72 or $116 per month on a 16-month payment plan?

We're talking about the low, low price of somewhere between $1,152 and $1,856, and that, of course, is irrespective of whether or not the government charges a fee for these applications. Recall that persons most likely affected by these criminal records are those already at the margins of society: people who have faced systemic barriers to success in education, employment and elsewhere. This bill, intentionally or otherwise, may serve as a barrier for people to obtain the very benefits it purports to offer.

Surely, in our age of electronic data, these records of criminal convictions for simple possession of cannabis can be proactively located by the Parole Board of Canada and identified for whatever action is ultimately legislated, be it record suspension expungement or otherwise. The burden, in my view, should be on government to rectify these records. While for those of us in this room the prospect of completing a government application may not be particularly daunting, it might be near impossible to those facing financial, educational, mental health or other challenges.

Second, Bill C-93 requires that individuals have completed their sentence prior to applying for a record suspension. Why? Why should an individual continue to be penalized, whether it is by a real jail sentence, a conditional sentence, probation conditions or otherwise, for conduct that is no longer illegal?

(1650)



Why should an individual have to await the expiry of a lengthy term of probation for an offence that no longer exists under our law?

In my view, the injustice created by these criminal convictions should be addressed immediately, without waiting for expiration of any sentence, whether it is a prescribed period of probation, payment of a fine or some other sanction. And if you're too poor to pay your fine, well, you can never complete your sentence and you can never apply for this record suspension.

Third, I turn to the most fundamental issue of all with respect to Bill C-93: the very nature of the record suspensions mechanism. A record suspension is exactly what it sounds like. It is not a pardon; those don't exist anymore. It is not amnesty or expungement. It is a statutory process whereby the record of an offence is “suspended”, that is, “kept separate and apart from other criminal records”. A record suspension can be revoked. This happens automatically upon the commission of virtually all Criminal Code or controlled drugs and substances offences.

But it is broader than that. A record suspension may be revoked if the board is satisfied that the person “is no longer of good conduct”. Let me give you real-life examples of individuals I have assisted who have been served with applications from the Parole Board to revoke their record suspension: people who have been the subject of numerous police checks, intelligence, or otherwise, or have received highway traffic offences such as careless driving. They were found to no longer be of good conduct. Now, I am happy to say we successfully defended those applications to revoke the record suspension.

But there you are. This will be hanging over your head for the rest of your life. Moreover the minister retains the discretion to approve the disclosure of such a record where he or she is satisfied that disclosure is “in the interests of the administration of justice or for any purpose related to the safety or security of Canada or any state allied or associated with Canada.”

I can think of a state allied or associated with Canada that might be very interested in the otherwise criminal records of individuals convicted for the simple possession of cannabis.

In other words, the offence always hangs over the individual's head, record suspension notwithstanding. Most importantly, unlike expungement which requires notification to the RCMP and all other federal agencies to destroy all records to which the expungement order relates, there is no such broad requirement for a record suspension.

In review, the proposed application is itself a barrier to access, particularly for an already marginalized population. The bill requires individuals to complete their sentences before applying. In my respectful view, this is illogical, counterproductive and unnecessary. The record suspension is not a deletion of the conviction record itself; it is a suspension, a temporary suspension, one that can be revived by either administrative or statutory process.

What, then, is the alternative?

I should first note that Bill C-93 is better than nothing. But better than nothing is a mighty low bar for our Parliament. You can do better. You must do better. Instead, I would urge a scheme of expungement along the lines already provided for in the Expungement of Historically Unjust Convictions Act. The record of these convictions for the simple possession of cannabis should be expunged permanently and automatically.

In this regard, I would propose a private member's bill, Bill C-415, sponsored by Mr. Murray Rankin and introduced last October. It comes much closer to the goal of achieving true justice and relieving the disproportionate criminalization and stigmatization for those convicted of a now legal act of simple possession of cannabis.

The government has maintained in its backgrounder to this bill that expungement is only appropriate “where the criminalization of the activity in question and the law never should have existed, such as in cases where it violated the Charter.”

While the first clause of that requirement is debatable when it comes to cannabis. I can tell you as a criminal defence lawyer that the criminal prohibition of cannabis has caused much more harm than good. There is no doubt that the disproportionate application of the law violates the charter guarantee of equality and runs contrary to our most fundamental constitutional values.

It is a historical wrong that ought to be redressed. Parliament can do so via the remedy of expungement. I would urge you to do exactly that.

Thank you very much for your kind attention.

(1655)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Friedman.

We essentially have a half an hour. I'm thinking five minutes, five minutes, five minutes, five minutes, that will take us to 20 after. Then maybe we'll get in a couple more four-minute rounds, if that's all right with people.

Ms. Dabrusin, you have five minutes.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Thank you for setting out what you saw as the basis of some of your concerns about this bill.

One of my first questions—because I asked this in the last panel—is: looking at Bill C-93, would it be an improvement to this bill if we removed the requirement that a person pay any outstanding fine to qualify?

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

Absolutely.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

I believe you said this, but I just want to be really clear. Would it be an improvement if we remove the need to complete any of their outstanding probation?

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

Absolutely.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

One of the things you raised, which I raised on Monday when we had people here, was that I also did the Google search and saw the same thing. How would you recommend we inform people that this is a free process?

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

I was speaking this morning to one of my colleagues who used to work at the Canadian Civil Liberties Association. She said they had people all the time saying they were in communication with Pardons Canada and were told to spend $2,000. There's a serious information gap.

My best suggestion, respectfully, is to remove the application requirement. We're in a digital era, these records can be accessed. I don't know how much government databases cost and how easy they are to manage, so maybe I'm making some assumptions there, but I know that we have statistics as to how many records of conviction there are.

I say to the Parole Board of Canada, do it yourself. Maybe I'm just a practical guy. I don't see a possible benefit of having individuals apply. Vet them, if there's some question they don't meet the standards, then engage them.

(1700)

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

One of the things that was raised as a concern by the department when they came on Monday was that, if they were going to dig through all the records to figure out if this was a qualifying record, people would be waiting 10 years to do this record search, as opposed to it being faster if somebody made the applications person by person.

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

I suspect tens of thousands of people don't even know if they have a criminal conviction for the possession of cannabis, who don't understand the implications of it. Colour me extremely skeptical that the Government of Canada can't do a search through their own conviction database.

I deal with police officers every day in my professional employment; they all have access to CPIC, that is their centralized database. They put someone's name in, they get the records of conviction. Surely as it's a database, you can do the opposite, put in the records of conviction to get the names.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

When I read it, Bill C-415 doesn't look as if it proposes an automatic system as well.

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

It does not. I think that's a flaw that should be addressed, automatic and expungement.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

The other thing I was wondering is it looks as if it goes to members of the Parole Board, as opposed to the administrative process of Bill C-93.

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

Yes.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Which process do you prefer, the administrative or going to the Parole Board?

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

I'm a little agnostic about that. If you're going to the Parole Board anyway and they have the specialty in processing pardons...but then again, I've heard about the backlog for pardons. If you're not going to do it automatically, if you have some administrative process that can short-circuit the already long waiting list for record suspensions, that's probably better.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

The last witness spoke about the fact that if you were looking through CPIC, if you were going to try to do this automatic search, CPIC would pull up that it's a schedule II possession, and that schedule II was essentially all cannabis, and one item is now still illegal. Could you confirm that? Her suggestion was to just pull those out.

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

Yes, I tend to agree with that. My frame of reference here is having seen hundreds or thousands of criminal record printouts from some of my clients. The nature of the offence is very clearly delineated. That's why I said if you can go one way, that is, put a person's name to get a list of offences, those offences are listed right there and they're listed with enough specificity in my view that you could engage the record suspension or expungement process.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

All right, thanks.

The Chair:

Welcome to the committee, Mr. Cooper, you have five minutes.

Mr. Michael Cooper (St. Albert—Edmonton, CPC):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Friedman.

I agree with you that Bill C-415 is not a perfect piece of legislation, but in my view, it is a far better piece of legislation than this legislation. I look forward to voting in favour of it in about 45 minutes.

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

Good for you.

Mr. Michael Cooper:

As you noted in your testimony, a pardon is not a deletion, but rather a suspension. Therefore, if one were asked by an employer or if they were looking for housing or looking to volunteer as a coach of their kid's soccer team or whatever it may be, if they'd been convicted of a criminal offence, they'd have to answer yes, would they not?

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

Well, if they have received a record suspension, that removes any effects of conviction. My view would actually be that an effective conviction is having to answer yes to the fact that you've been convicted.

The vulnerable sector is different. I direct your attention to section 6.3 in the Criminal Records Act where the vulnerable persons issue is raised. There is a schedule of offences there, and that schedule of offences would not apply to a possession of cannabis charge. In my view, I don't think a record suspension would, necessarily, trigger an issue with the vulnerable sector. But of course, the trouble with the record suspension is, because the record is there, some future legislature can come and change that rule, right? Some future legislature can come and say, no, this should fall under a vulnerable sector. Or when I said that a record suspension can be revoked statutorily or administratively, I mean statutorily. If the record still exists, then a future parliament can decide, hey, all those record suspensions are right back to convictions.

That's why, in my view, an expungement is far preferable.

(1705)

Mr. Michael Cooper:

Right. In terms of the application process to the Parole Board, you talked about it being quite onerous. We saw, with Bill C-66, passed by the government, a process where someone could get an expungement but they would have to apply. I think approximately 9,000 or 10,000 Canadians were thought to be eligible. I think at last count it's something like seven or eight people who've bothered to apply or have been able to get through all of the paperwork. We're looking at about 250,000 people who might be eligible, and the estimate is that 10,000 might apply. Isn't even that, perhaps, a little optimistic?

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

I think 10,000 is extremely optimistic. Remember, when it comes to this category of convictions, we're dealing with a disproportionate population in terms of marginalization. We're talking about individuals with mental health or educational deficits. I think you're going to have an even lower proportion than under the historically unjust convictions.

Maybe I'm an eternal optimist. This is an age of electronic databases. I understand there might be some people whose records might be difficult to access; maybe there was a paper database converted to an electronic one; great. We'll put asterisks next to those people and they can get letters from the Parole Board saying, “Hey, maybe you should apply and clear this up for us”, but I'm certain that out of that 250,000, the vast majority can be simply rectified electronically and automatically.

Mr. Michael Cooper:

It's been done in other jurisdictions—San Francisco. Automatic [Inaudible—Editor] system.

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

San Francisco; snap of the fingers.

Mr. Michael Cooper:

Yes.

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

I don't know. Do they have much better computers than the Government of Canada? We're talking about the City of San Francisco there. Surely this can be done.

Mr. Michael Cooper:

I guess what really bothers me is that we've got 33 sitting days left in this Parliament. This bill is not going to be passed. It's been a number of months since legalization came into effect. I voted against legalization, but I agree with you that it's fundamentally unjust to be burdened with a criminal record for committing an offence that is perfectly legal today and, frankly, a vast majority of Canadians have no objection to it.

Shouldn't this really have been part and parcel of the government's legalization legislation?

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

That might be a little outside of my can. I'm a lawyer without an opinion on something. I'll say this. You're doing a lot of good work here and when it comes to the private member's bill, Bill C-415, I hope that the work and the research this committee does, if this bill doesn't pass in the present Parliament, goes on to the next parliament that can handle it and address all of these concerns with respect to the application process, expungement versus record suspension, and ensure that this is the most just version of this bill possible, whenever it gets passed.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Chair.

Just for the record, and in defence of Mr. Rankin who's not here to defend his bill, I will say that our position, and his, is that it should be automatic, but there's some consternation as to whether royal recommendation is required. If there's a certain amount of cost, we'll definitely see what the rulings are in this committee when we present similar amendments to this legislation. I do want that to be clear. Certainly the expungement that's proposed in the bill is definitely a vast improvement, so we'll see, as Mr. Cooper said, how the vote goes in the next few minutes.

Mr. Friedman, thank you for being here. I appreciate it.

I did want to ask about the statistics, the 10,000 out of 250,000 and then the seven out of 9,000 or whatever it is for Bill C-66. Obviously, based on your comments, I think there might be a safe assumption—if there's such a thing to make here. I'm just wondering, do you think the 240,000 others who won't apply would likely not be applying because they fall into some category of marginalization or because of the different exemptions that exist relating to, for example, unpaid fines in the legislation?

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

Yes, I think there are a number of factors here. First of all, it's all well and good to think that, when Parliament passes an act, it's somehow simultaneously transmitted, maybe telepathically or otherwise, to every Canadian.

There are people who have no idea what it is that you guys are up to on a whole number of fronts—

(1710)

The Chair:

Neither do we.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

—present company excluded, of course. That's number one.

You're going to have people who simply won't know, and you know why? When you look at what's important in their lives, they might just not care. They might have learned to live with a criminal conviction and its consequences. That's number one; you have a communications problem.

That problem is further compounded when you look at the population groups that are disproportionately affected by the criminal prohibition of cannabis, people who have educational challenges or mental health challenges who might live on the margins of society. If we can improve their lives by removing a barrier to employment, financing, travel, etc., in my respectful view, Parliament should do everything it possibly can to reach those people, because the people who will be reached and will know about it can probably hire lawyers like me.

Forget hiring your predatory pardon application people. They'll probably have counsel, and they have probably dealt with this a long time ago, and they probably got a proper record suspension by going through that process a long time ago. We want to reach the people who really need to be reached.

In my respectful view, the bill needs to be amended significantly.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

The officials who were here on Monday talked about non-traditional means, and it almost sounds like some kind of Twitter strategy. I'm not trying to be glib about it; it's very unclear what they're actually going to do.

From what we've been discussing and what we discussed when we did a study on record suspension as a broader issue and the reforms that are required, we talked about these sorts of bad actors trying to act in this realm.

Basically, the government would have to develop some kind of strategy to compete against these individuals, and ultimately, the amount of work that it would require could easily be the work that would be applied to finding the records, deleting them and going through expungement.

Do you think that is a fair assessment of that type of situation?

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

I'm not an expert on government databases, but as I said, it boggles the mind that a bunch of smart people can't get together, get a software developer here or there, look at the database and just pick out these records.

As a self-employed criminal lawyer, I know I get a lot of unwanted automatic mail from various Government of Canada agencies. They find me, and they know exactly what I am up to, what taxes I've paid and when my installments are due, so the Government of Canada is really good at those automatic record-accessing databases. Surely when it comes to helping out some poor, marginalized, mentally ill people who are really in need of this assistance, for whom this could make a big difference in whether or not they reintegrate into society, I have to think—and I'm not being glib, either—that some smart people can sit down in a room and get it done.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I think it's safe to say that expungement would be the best option. If that doesn't come to pass, would it still be better to have the record suspension be automatic and just remove the burden of applying?

My sense from what you've said is yes. Am I understanding you correctly?

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

Yes, and I say that with all of the bill. It's better than nothing, but you guys can do better than nothing, for sure, and you can do better than better than nothing.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota, you have five minutes, please.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

It's my understanding—and I am quite hopeful that this bill will pass, hopefully with some improvements that have been suggested by our witnesses—that the bill will pass before the House rises, unless the Conservatives don't want to see it pass. I don't know what will happen in the months to come, but the hope is that this will pass.

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

I feel like I'm at an uncomfortable family dinner here.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes, well....

The Chair:

Let's not make this any more uncomfortable.

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

I just had my Passover Seder last week, and I've had more than enough of that.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay, I'm sorry about that, but I don't know—

The Chair:

Would you go on to the question?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

When Mr. Cooper mentioned that, I just thought it was strange.

You have specifically stated that you see the pardon or record suspension versus expungement as a big difference.

The witness before had come and stated.... Some arguments have been made about how people are treated when crossing the border and that it would be different in the two instances. She said it makes no difference whatsoever. That was Campaign For Cannabis Amnesty: It makes absolutely no difference whatsoever.

My understanding from some of the witnesses on Monday is that, when a record has been suspended, it no longer shows up in CPIC, and a police officer doing a records check would not be able to see it. An employer would also not be able to see it once a record has been suspended.

What obstacles do you still think would stand in the path of these marginalized or vulnerable people with a record suspension versus an expungement?

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

As I noted, the real issue to me...and I agree there is a difference of opinion when it comes to travel. That really goes to what version of the CPIC registry we have given to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. They don't get it every day, as I understand it. They may have an outdated version.

For me the issue is that a record suspension can be revoked at any time. It can be revoked for something that reasonable people might disagree about, as to whether or not it's a good reason. As I said, a serious Highway Traffic Act offence.... Do you want somebody who otherwise wouldn't have a criminal record to have a criminal conviction hanging over their head if they get convicted of careless driving—which is a provincial offence, not a criminal offence? All of a sudden your criminal record is right back over your head.

If the records are deleted, they can't be brought back. That's the difference between expungement and a record suspension. It's in the name. It's just a suspension, it's not gone.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's my understanding from the witnesses who have come before us that they actually want that mechanism to be there in cases where there has been a mistake. This is because it is so complex to do the reverse situation, where people have to figure out whether they have a simple charge of possession or whether there were other charges involved.

The minister did also state that 95% of those records that have been suspended in the past for other situations are never revoked, so why is this such a big concern? Do you see this as something that would happen differently in this case?

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

I'm a criminal defence lawyer. I'm concerned about the 5%. That's a serious concern.

Like I said, you have a marginalized individual who has a conviction for cannabis possession who then, let's say, is noted by...and this is a real-life example. Their car is pulled over and they're found to be in the company of individuals who have serious criminal records or they are just found to be somewhere where serious criminal activity is being committed. They're not charged, never mind convicted, or they're charged and then charges are withdrawn. That can be the basis for revoking a record suspension.

Remember, what are we talking about here? We're not talking about something that is still an offence and for which you've been pardoned because of your good behaviour now and for which you've repented. We're talking about something that is not illegal anymore. How can someone even have it hanging over their head, I would respectfully ask? It's not illegal anymore. Why do we still want it in the system? What right case could there be to restore the conviction for something that's no longer a crime? Frankly, I fail to see that.

(1715)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

The Chair:

The bells are ringing, but with consent I'm going to run this to 5:30. It's agreeable to all, I hope.

Mr. Motz, you have four minutes.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you.

First of all, you have some ideas in mind and some recommendations. Is it possible that you could provide this committee with a list of recommendations that—

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

I have them right here.

Mr. Glen Motz:

—would improve this legislation?

That would be great if you could provide this list to the committee.

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

I'd be happy to do it.

Mr. Glen Motz:

We confirmed yesterday with officials that individuals charged with minor possession of more than 30 grams in public before October 17, 2018, will be eligible for this expedited record suspension. However, right now, possession of more than 30 grams is still an offence.

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

You have to ask the government that passed the Cannabis Act. There was a fight about it and I wasn't a big fan of that provision either.

Mr. Glen Motz:

That's inconsistent. What are the consequences of that?

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

As I said, that has to be directed to whoever drafted the legislation. I looked at that. I looked at this legislation and to me it doesn't make a whole lot of sense. To me, that's actually a fundamental flaw with the way the Cannabis Act was drafted. If we're doing better than the Cannabis Act then I think we're ahead. I find the silver lining.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay.

Hopefully your recommendations have something to address that with.

I have one last question. Do you think that this record suspension process could potentially create some precedent for other charges down the road?

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

I think that any time Parliament decriminalizes activity that was previously criminal in the code—in other words, now it's no longer criminal—people shouldn't suffer the stigma of a criminal record for having engaged in that behaviour in the past. If Parliament today says it's not illegal, I don't understand why you should suffer the effects of it.

(1720)

Mr. Glen Motz:

We looked at a study—I think it was M-161, which Mr. Long brought—where we talked about how there are some individuals who we all know who have conviction for other offences, like theft and whatever else.

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

Those offences won't be suspended. The cannabis possession—

Mr. Glen Motz:

Right, under this legislation.... What I'm referring to is, should there be some mechanism whereby we can make that easier? Do you see this process maybe impacting that conversation?

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

Like I said, if somebody has multiple criminal convictions, this legislation is only going to suspend the possession of cannabis.

That's not insignificant, by the way. If a criminal record is disclosed to someone, where before it had theft under $5,000 and a drug possession, now it will just have a theft under $5,000. That changes the conversation about what kind of criminal history you have. It's not a drug conviction you have anymore; it's just a theft under $5,000. To me, what—

Mr. Glen Motz:

If you have both of those convictions, you don't qualify for a suspension.

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

Yes. That's fair enough, right? I hear that. My view is that all of these should disappear. Whether you have one or five or 10 other convictions, why should you have the stigma of this conviction when it's not a crime anymore?

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Picard, you have four minutes.

Mr. Michel Picard:

I will pass my time to Mr. Spengemann.

Mr. Sven Spengemann (Mississauga—Lakeshore, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Mr. Friedman, thanks very much. It's great to have you back.

I have two questions before I pass it to my colleague.

Can you zoom in a bit more on the vulnerable persons section under current current law and describe what kind of checks are being done beyond those of an average criminal record check?

Secondly, do you have any other jurisdictions in mind, other than the U.S., that have gotten this right or have taken us, in your mind, as close to the answers as we should be?

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

If you take a look at the Criminal Records Act, there's a link to section 6.3, which defines “vulnerable person”. In section 6.3, it provides that, at the request of a person who is responsible for the well-being of a vulnerable person, they can essentially disclose these records through a request process.

Then there's schedule 1. Schedule 1 sets out the kinds of offences that would still be disclosed even when you've received a record suspension. They're largely sexual offences, and that makes a good deal of sense. You're talking about somebody who is applying to work in the care of vulnerable people. Even though they may now be of good character, I certainly understand that.

There are, however—and I'm sure you have studied this—what are called non-conviction records. That is, even though you don't have a conviction, you can be barred from certain opportunities because you've been in contact with police, you have provincial offences, you're on bail conditions or a whole number of things.

This offence, however—the possession of cannabis—is not listed in schedule 1. It wouldn't fall under that disclosure mechanism for vulnerable people set out in section 6.3.

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

Very briefly, are there other jurisdictions that we should look at that have gotten this right, beyond the U.S.?

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

I'm not in a position to comment beyond the U.S. I'd comment specifically on San Francisco, where it was automatic. No application was done; they went through the database and just erased the records of conviction.

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

Thanks very much.

Michel.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Thank you, sir.

Let's say that a pardon—or whatever name we use under this bill—resulted in the fact that, since it's no longer illegal, past experience doesn't count because it's supposed to be suspended. When someone goes for a job interview and all that, since it's not illegal now, do you think that a company should look for past experience related to cannabis? For example, have they been sentenced for cannabis possession? Whereas somewhere, in fact, it's no longer illegal and they should not be concerned about that.

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

You and I might agree they shouldn't be concerned about it, but the government is not in a position to set internal company policies. If a company has a policy that if you have a drug conviction then you're not getting hired, if they get that record, you're not getting hired.

There are also other factors at play. Some of this has to do with bonding or insurance issues. Their insurance provider might say that they can't have somebody working on a job site if they have a conviction record. There's nothing—at least that I can see—that Parliament could do about that. The simple thing to do is to remove that record.

While we may all have a very enlightened view, saying that it was in the past and it's now legal, so come work for me—I'd probably feel that way about a prospective employee—you can't legislate that, other than removing the record of conviction.

(1725)

Mr. Michel Picard:

Yes, but let's say, for example, in the trucking industry, you couldn't care less whether they have been convicted or not. The concern is whether the driver is using cannabis or not. Legal or not, the industry cannot have a driver under the influence of cannabis while he or she is working and for a certain period of time there should not be any traces of it. This is, as you said, in our policy for companies.

It comes to a point where people who will obviously really need this suspension will ask, with the process we propose, to get this result, because they need a paper to prove that they don't have a criminal record. So, using a system that already exists, where you have a paper confirming that the pardon has been obtained, what is the need to go much further, based on your testimony, since the objectives have been achieved?

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

I look at the nature of the population that's disproportionately targeted by these convictions. Those are not people who may have the sophistication or the education to know about the record suspension process or to be able to go through it without undue hardship, like engaging the services of one of these predatory companies for thousands of dollars.

If what we are trying to ensure here is justice and fairness for people who are convicted of an offence that no longer exists, then surely there is no need to have them jump through the hoops, the same hoops that we've put someone through minus the fee and approval process. We'd have to go through the hoops for people who are convicted of an offence that is still on the books.

Remember, it is not a crime anymore, so, in my view, the government should do everything it can to remove every obstacle, every burden, that's put on someone for having committed something that is no longer illegal.

The Chair:

Before I adjourn, do you have an opinion with respect to an individual who has multiple convictions for possession over a number of years? Is that one application for all, or is it one application for each conviction?

Mr. Solomon Friedman:

My view is these should happen automatically. If you're going to do an application process, then it should be one application for all of these. It should apply to people regardless of what other history they may have. These convictions, in my view, should simply disappear.

The Chair:

With that, the meeting is adjourned.

Thank you.

Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

Mesdames et messieurs, il est 15 h 30. Nous avons le quorum, et je ne veux pas faire perdre de temps aux témoins et aux membres, alors la séance est ouverte. Il s'agit de la 159e réunion. Bon sang, c'est l'un des comités les plus travaillants qu'il m'ait été donné de voir.

Nous avons deux témoins durant la première heure; le premier représente l'Association canadienne des policiers, et l'autre, Campaign for Cannabis Amnesty.

À la fin de la première heure, je vais demander à quelqu'un de présenter une motion d'acceptation du rapport du Sous-comité. En fait, je vais demander à M. Eglinski d'être prêt, puisqu'il a été si gentil.

Cela dit, je vais tout simplement demander aux témoins de prendre la parole dans l'ordre figurant sur l'avis de convocation.

Nous commençons par M. Stamatakis de l'Association canadienne des policiers.

M. Tom Stamatakis (président, Association canadienne des policiers):

Bonjour, monsieur le président, et bonjour aux membres du Comité. Merci de m'avoir invité à comparaître devant vous cet après-midi dans le cadre de l'étude actuelle du Comité sur le projet de loi C-93.

Je comparais cet après-midi au nom de l'Association canadienne des policiers, qui, comme bon nombre d'entre vous le savent déjà, est la plus importante organisation de défense des policiers au pays, représentant plus de 60 000 civils qui travaillent sur la première ligne et professionnels assermentés de l'application de la loi des quatre coins du pays. Nos membres sont nos « troupes sur le terrain » comme on dit lorsqu'il est question de sécurité publique, et ce sont eux qui ressentent en premier les répercussions des décisions des élus de tous les ordres de gouvernement.

Comme j'ai l'habitude de le faire, je vous présenterai une déclaration préliminaire relativement brève afin qu'on ait le plus de temps possible pour vos questions et vos commentaires, surtout que l'objet du projet de loi C-93 est relativement simple.

D'entrée de jeu, je tiens à dire que, de façon générale, l'Association canadienne des policiers soutient l'objectif du projet de loi C-93. Même si, évidemment, nous avons constaté un important changement quant au statut juridique du cannabis au cours de la dernière année, il ne fait aucun doute que les attitudes sociales à l'égard de la marijuana changeaient depuis très longtemps. C'est quelque chose qu'on a de toute évidence constaté parmi les policiers ainsi qu'au sein du grand public. Même si on a souvent entendu la fameuse expression de la « guerre contre la drogue » au sujet des attitudes des policiers concernant ces substances — qui ne se limitent pas au cannabis —, d'après mon expérience, la plupart des services de police au Canada, sinon l'ensemble, ont depuis longtemps arrêté de mettre l'accent sur l'application de la loi en cas de possession simple.

Maintenant que le cadre juridique a rattrapé les attitudes sociales, il n'y a selon moi aucune bonne raison de refuser d'expurger les casiers judiciaires des gens qui, autrement, ont toujours été des citoyens respectueux des lois et de leur donner l'occasion de participer pleinement dans des domaines où, sinon, l'accès leur aurait été refusé en raison d'une erreur commise dans le passé. Ne serait-ce que pour cette raison, notre association soutient de façon générale le projet de loi.

Cela dit, nous voulons profiter de l'occasion pour exprimer une certaine préoccupation au sujet de la nature automatique du processus de suspension du casier proposé dans le projet de loi. Il ne fait absolument aucun doute qu'une écrasante majorité de demandes qui seront présentées en vertu de ces modifications viendront de personnes qui ne représentent pas un risque permanent pour la sécurité publique, raison pour laquelle leur demande devrait être traitée le plus rapidement possible.

Cependant, je tiens à dire qu'il y aura aussi certaines demandes présentées par des délinquants où l'accusation de possession simple a été le fruit d'une transaction en matière pénale avec la Couronne alors que le chef d'accusation initial était plus grave. Dans de telles situations, il est possible que la Couronne et le tribunal aient accepté une entente sur plaidoyer en raison du fait que la déclaration de culpabilité allait témoigner de façon permanente de l'infraction. En outre, ils n'auraient pas accepté un chef d'accusation moindre s'ils avaient su que le chef d'accusation pourrait être éliminé par la suite sans possibilité d'examen.

Même si je comprends qu'il sera à la fois impossible et tout à fait injuste d'attribuer des accusations non prouvées à quelqu'un — même en cas de négociation de plaidoyer —, je crois que le projet de loi pourrait être facilement modifié pour que l'on puisse s'assurer que les changements proposés à la Loi sur le casier judiciaire — et précisément l'ajout de l'article 4.1, qui empêche la Commission des libérations conditionnelles de réaliser une évaluation des antécédents du demandeur — ne permettent pas à des récidivistes de passer entre les mailles du filet.

Un amendement qui permettrait à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles de conserver ne serait-ce qu'un infime pouvoir discrétionnaire d'évaluer le comportement d'un demandeur depuis la déclaration de culpabilité — ou, assurément, toute déclaration de culpabilité subséquente — dissiperait les préoccupations des policiers, qui veulent s'assurer que la sécurité communautaire ne sera pas compromise par un petit nombre de récidivistes qui pourraient tirer profit de la loi, tout en s'assurant de maintenir une administration de la justice digne de confiance.

Comme je l'ai mentionné, je ne veux pas que ma déclaration préliminaire traîne en longueur. La légalisation du cannabis a assurément constitué un changement important pour les agents d'application de la loi sur le terrain, et je tiens à souligner que la transition remarquablement sans heurts au nouveau régime au cours des huit derniers mois — depuis l'entrée en vigueur des changements — témoigne du professionnalisme de nos membres.

Dans l'ensemble, le projet de loi semble une solution pleine de bon sens pour garantir que les casiers judiciaires reflètent le nouveau consensus au sujet du cannabis au Canada. Nous apprécions le fait que le gouvernement ait consulté directement des experts de l'application de la loi tandis qu'il procédait à ce changement stratégique, et nous avons hâte de poursuivre cette consultation.

Nous croyons que le projet de loi C-93, avec quelques légers amendements visant à s'assurer que la Commission des libérations conditionnelles conserve un certain pouvoir discrétionnaire pour que les délinquants de longue date et les récidivistes soient tenus responsables de leurs actes, permettra aux gens d'éviter la stigmatisation associée à une déclaration de culpabilité tout en donnant à ceux qui le méritent vraiment une deuxième chance.

Merci beaucoup de m'avoir invité à comparaître devant le Comité aujourd'hui.

(1535)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Stamatakis.

Nous passons à Mme Annamaria Enenajor de Campaign for Cannabis Amnesty. Vous avez 10 minutes.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor (fondatrice et directrice, Campaign for Cannabis Amnesty):

Merci.

Bonsoir, monsieur le président, et bonsoir aux membres du Comité. Je m'appelle Annamaria Enenajor. Je suis avocate criminaliste et fondatrice et directrice de campagne de Campaign for Cannabis Amnesty.

Campaign for Cannabis Amnesty est un groupe de défense sans but lucratif qui veut réparer les erreurs du passé causées par des décennies d'interdiction du cannabis. L'organisation a été fondée en avril 2018, il n'y a pas très longtemps, en réaction à l'absence de lois fédérales sur la stigmatisation des déclarations de culpabilité précédentes associées à des infractions liées à des gestes qui ne seraient plus illégaux en vertu de la Loi sur le cannabis. Depuis, la campagne demande au gouvernement d'adopter une loi pour effacer les casiers judiciaires liés à la possession simple de cannabis. Selon nous, aucun Canadien ne devrait avoir un casier judiciaire pour des actes mineurs et non violents qui ne constituent plus des crimes.

C'est un honneur de comparaître devant vous aujourd'hui, et je tiens à formuler à votre intention quelques observations et de modestes recommandations relativement au projet de loi C-93. La campagne soutient la mise en œuvre des mesures visant à éliminer la stigmatisation des déclarations de culpabilité passées liées au cannabis qui ont une incidence disproportionnée sur les Canadiens marginalisés. Cependant, dans son libellé actuel, le projet de loi C-93 ne va pas assez loin.

L'histoire de l'application des infractions liées à la possession de cannabis au Canada en est une d'injustice et d'inégalité historiques. Les Canadiens ayant des antécédents différents consomment du cannabis et sont en possession de cette drogue à des taux similaires. En fait, le Canada affiche l'un des plus hauts taux de consommation de cannabis du monde. En 2017, 46,6 % des Canadiens — près de la moitié des Canadiens — avaient admis avoir consommé du cannabis à un moment de leur vie.

Malgré cette consommation généralisée, de plus en plus de données probantes des sciences sociales révèlent que ce ne sont pas tous Canadiens qui ont été confrontés aux mêmes conséquences associées à de tels actes. Le profilage racial et les soupçons relativement à certains groupes précis en raison de stéréotypes ont fait en sorte que certains Canadiens étaient plus susceptibles d'être épiés par les responsables de l'application de la loi que d'autres. Les Canadiens noirs, les Autochtones du Canada et les Canadiens à faible revenu étaient plus susceptibles d'être interpellés, fouillés, arrêtés, poursuivis et incarcérés pour des infractions liées à la possession de cannabis que les Canadiens blancs. Ce n'est pas un phénomène tragique et accidentel. C'est une injustice historique et une violation systémique de la Charte qui exige réparation.

La disposition sur l'égalité de la Charte visait à assurer une égalité concrète, pas seulement théorique. La Cour suprême du Canada a établi constamment, à commencer par l'affaire Eldridge, en 1997, qu'une fin ou une intention discriminatoire n'est pas une condition nécessaire à une conclusion de violation de la disposition sur l'égalité de la Charte. Il suffit que l'application d'une loi, même si cette dernière semble neutre à première vue, ait pour effet de refuser à quelqu'un une protection équivalente et un bénéfice équivalent. Dans la mesure où le gouvernement tente de faire une distinction entre les lois qui sont discriminatoires à première vue et celles qui le sont dans leur application, une distinction n'a pas sa place aux fins de nos protections constitutionnelles.

Même si, historiquement, les lois liées au cannabis n'étaient pas discriminatoires à première vue, il est évident qu'elles l'étaient dans leur application. Elles ont perpétué des désavantages liés à la race, à l'origine ethnique et à la couleur de la peau, tous des motifs de distinction illicites en vertu de la Charte.

L'application inégale et disproportionnée des infractions liées au cannabis d'une telle ampleur et d'une telle envergure encourage la méfiance et le ressentiment à l'égard des responsables de l'application de la loi, le cynisme à l'égard de l'administration de la justice et un sentiment compréhensible que la promesse d'une égalité concrète en vertu de la Charte est un mythe pour de nombreux Canadiens. Une réponse forte appropriée à cette histoire honteuse est par conséquent nécessaire pour maintenir l'intégrité de notre système de justice.

Même si la campagne se réjouit de la volonté du gouvernement de reconnaître la stigmatisation et le fardeau disproportionné découlant du maintien de casiers judiciaires pour d'anciens cas de possession simple de cannabis, nous estimons que le projet de loi ne va pas assez loin.

Vu les graves conséquences des condamnations pour possession de cannabis sur la vie des Canadiens et l'héritage d'inégalité découlant de l'application disproportionnée et discriminatoire de la loi, le gouvernement fédéral doit réagir à cette injustice historique au moyen d'une mesure assez forte pour dénoncer cette histoire honteuse. Les gens qui ont des casiers judiciaires pour possession simple de cannabis devraient se retrouver dans la même position que les millions de Canadiens qui faisaient et continuent de faire exactement la même chose.

(1540)



Même si le geste était criminel, ces gens n'étaient pas confrontés aux mêmes conséquences en raison de facteurs qui n'ont rien à voir avec la culpabilité morale ou la criminalité, des facteurs comme la race, le revenu, les liens familiaux ou le quartier où ils vivent. Par conséquent, ils n'ont jamais été arrêtés et n'ont jamais été déclarés coupables et ils ont pu poursuivre leur vie et avoir des occasions auxquelles n'avaient pas accès d'autres Canadiens. Par conséquent, le projet de loi C-93 devrait être modifié pour permettre l'élimination gratuite, automatique, simple et permanente des infractions pour possession simple de cannabis dans les casiers judiciaires.

Si le gouvernement n'est pas prêt à aller aussi loin, alors selon nous il y a d'autres aspects de ce genre de régime sur lesquels le gouvernement pourrait miser afin que la mesure soit tout de même satisfaisante. Par exemple, le gouvernement pourrait intégrer certains aspects d'un régime de radiation qui permettrait d'améliorer l'utilité du projet de loi et de le mettre en oeuvre d'une façon qui serait bénéfique pour le plus de personnes possible.

Par exemple, lundi, au moment de la dernière réunion du Comité, nous avons entendu que, en raison de nos pratiques de tenue de dossiers, qui sont décentralisées et souvent archaïques, il serait tout simplement trop ardu de tenter de trouver, puis de détruire tous les dossiers pertinents. Le simple fait qu'on ne puisse pas le faire pour tous les dossiers ne signifie pas qu'on ne peut pas le faire pour certains et, en fait, pour les plus importants. Comme l'honorable Ralph Goodale l'a mentionné lundi, même si les dossiers liés aux infractions criminelles n'existent pas dans une seule base de données nationale, les dossiers des déclarations de culpabilité qui ont la plus grande incidence sur l'emploi, le bénévolat et les déplacements sont conservés au même endroit.

Le Centre d'information de la police canadienne, le CIPC, est une base de données nationale tenue par la GRC. Si une personne est arrêtée, accusée et déclarée coupable d'un crime, il en existe une trace dans la base de données du CIPC. Lorsqu'un employeur demande une vérification des antécédents, par exemple, et qu'il la demande à la GRC, cette dernière n'envoie pas des agents fouiller dans les tribunaux pour obtenir tous les dossiers disparates des tribunaux et tous les renseignements au sujet de la personne. Elle effectue une recherche dans le CIPC. Lorsque le Canada communique des renseignements sur les déclarations de culpabilité au sujet de ses citoyens aux États-Unis, il n'envoie pas non plus des photocopies de documents dans des boîtes conservées un peu partout au pays dans différentes administrations. Il communique l'information d'une base de données: le CIPC.

Si nous ne pouvons pas éliminer tous les dossiers, nous pouvons cibler une base de données qui revêt une importance extraordinaire. Éliminer automatiquement toutes les infractions pour possession simple de cannabis du CIPC contribuerait beaucoup à éliminer l'impact d'une déclaration de culpabilité sur la vie des Canadiens, même si cela ne constituerait pas une radiation totale.

L'élimination automatique des entrées du CIPC relativement aux infractions de possession simple de cannabis est aussi une façon économique de fournir un soulagement immédiat aux Canadiens. Un processus de demande qui inclut la collecte de dossiers des bases de données provinciales, territoriales et locales des forces de l'ordre comporte des retards et des coûts cachés. Même si le projet de loi C-93 élimine les frais de demande de 631 $ habituellement requis dans le cadre des demandes de suspension du casier, les demandeurs devront peut-être tout de même avoir à payer pour les empreintes digitales, les renseignements des tribunaux et les vérifications des dossiers des services de police locaux, et les frais pourraient atteindre plusieurs centaines de dollars.

Dans certaines discussions au sein du Comité, on s'est demandé si les suspensions du casier allaient aider les Canadiens qui veulent se rendre aux États-Unis. J'aimerais vous en parler très rapidement, et vous pourrez me poser plus de questions à ce sujet plus tard. Les suspensions du casier n'aident pas les Canadiens qui tentent de traverser la frontière pour se rendre aux États-Unis. En effet, les Américains ne reconnaissent pas les pardons accordés à l'étranger, peu importe l'effet de la déclaration de culpabilité. En fait, ni les pardons étrangers ni les radiations étrangères ne permettent efficacement de prévenir une inadmissibilité aux États-Unis. Essentiellement, ces deux mesures seront tout aussi inutiles l'une que l'autre.

J'ai fourni au Comité des observations complètes par écrit qui contiennent d'autres recommandations, points et observations au sujet de cette loi. Cependant, je tiens à conclure en formulant ma recommandation principale, qui est la suivante: le projet de loi C-93 devrait prévoir l'élimination permanente et automatique de toutes les entrées de déclaration de culpabilité pour possession simple de cannabis dans la base de données du CIPC.

Nos recommandations secondaires sont formulées dans notre mémoire.

(1545)



Nous espérons que les recommandations que nous proposons permettront d'accroître l'utilité du projet de loi, d'aider à atteindre les objectifs énoncés et de favoriser une mise en œuvre bénéfique pour le plus de personnes possible.

Merci de votre temps.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous allons maintenant passer à Mme Sahota. Vous avez sept minutes, s'il vous plaît.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Pour commencer, j'aimerais en savoir un peu plus au sujet de Cannabis Amnesty. J'imagine que je n'ai pas vraiment eu l'occasion de faire des recherches.

Vous êtes la fondatrice de l'organisation. Quand a-t-elle été créée et quel était l'objectif à ce moment-là?

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Elle a été créée vers avril 2018.

Je suis avocate criminaliste. Beaucoup de mes clients font face à des accusations criminelles liées au cannabis. Une des choses que vous avez probablement remarquées, c'est que je ne suis pas avocate depuis longtemps. Je ne pratique pas le droit depuis très longtemps, mais l'une des choses qui m'ont beaucoup surprise, c'est que, souvent, lorsqu'il est question d'infractions, les gens craignent moins la peine en tant que telle que l'impact que tout ça aura pour le reste de leur vie. C'est quelque chose qui m'a frappée. Je pensais qu'une personne commet un crime, qu'elle purge sa peine, puis que la vie continue. J'ai trouvé particulièrement troublant que des gens qui tentaient de ramener leur vie sur la bonne voie voyaient leurs efforts essentiellement sabotés par un système de communication d'information qui les empêchait d'obtenir un emploi, de faire du bénévolat ou de voyager, par exemple, en raison de la stigmatisation associée au fait d'avoir commis dans le passé une infraction criminelle.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Où est située l'organisation?

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Dans mon bureau, à Toronto.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je trouve ça intéressant. Lundi, nous nous sommes penchés sur... De toute évidence, vous avez examiné les coûts liés aux empreintes, aux dossiers des tribunaux et aux vérifications de la police. J'aimerais savoir si l'un de vous pourrait nous fournir de l'information sur le coût d'une vérification des dossiers de police et de l'obtention des documents des tribunaux dans les régions où vous exercez.

M. Tom Stamatakis:

Je ne pourrais pas vous fournir une réponse précise. C'est différent d'une administration à l'autre.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

L'administration dans laquelle vous travaillez...

M. Tom Stamatakis:

Je travaille à Vancouver, et, pour être honnête, je n'ai pas eu à m'occuper d'une vérification des dossiers ou d'empreintes digitales depuis un certain temps dans cette administration. Je ne sais pas quels sont les coûts actuellement.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Je n'ai pas de réponse à vous donner, mais je sais où je peux obtenir l'information. J'ai parlé à un groupe de gens entrepreneurs qui travaillent à la Legal Innovation Zone de l'Université Ryerson, à Toronto; ils ont conçu une application qui pourrait aider les gens à rationaliser le processus et à mieux gérer les coûts associés à une demande de pardon. L'application s'appelle ParDONE.

Par l'intermédiaire de notre partenariat, ils ont réalisé beaucoup de recherche sur les disparités partout dans le cadre des demandes de pardon.

(1550)

M. Tom Stamatakis:

Je vais vous fournir quelques exemples de certaines administrations. Je ne sais pas si vous voulez que j'envoie l'information au Comité.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui. Ce serait utile. Merci.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Je pourrais communiquer avec eux moi aussi, parce que je sais qu'ils ont créé une base de données pour la cause. Ça varie. Je sais que, dans mon administration, c'est environ 50 $ pour une vérification de la police locale. Je ne me rappelle plus si c'est à Regina ou à Winnipeg, mais je crois que, à Winnipeg, le prix peut atteindre 125 $.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

ParDONE représente-t-il les gens qui remplissent la documentation pour obtenir un pardon? Y a-t-il un coût associé à tout ça?

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui, c'est ce qu'ils font.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Savez-vous exactement quel est le coût?

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Je ne suis pas sûre. Je ne leur ai pas parlé du modèle tarifaire, parce que nos discussions portaient sur la possibilité d'offrir les services à titre bénévole, parce que nous sommes une organisation sans but lucratif. Ils ont cependant mentionné que, même s'ils tentent de réduire les coûts le plus possible, en raison des coûts accessoires liés à la prise des empreintes... Même si on élimine les 631 $, il reste la prise des empreintes, la vérification par la police locale et la vérification des antécédents.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Votre organisation pourrait-elle fournir les services gratuitement pour aider les gens dans le cadre de ce processus?

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

C'est assurément l'une des choses que nous envisageons, une fois que le gouvernement aura adopté la loi sur les pardons. Nous aimerions beaucoup aider les gens le plus possible. Cependant, tant qu'on ne voit pas le modèle que le gouvernement met en œuvre aux fins des pardons, c'est difficile pour nous de savoir si nous pourrons le faire.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous avez parlé d'une élimination automatique. On nous a dit lundi qu'une élimination automatique serait très difficile à faire. En raison de la façon dont les accusations sont consignées dans le CIPC, avant 1996, il s'agirait d'une accusation ou d'une déclaration de culpabilité pour possession de stupéfiants, et, après 1996, il s'agirait plutôt de possession d'une substance désignée à l'annexe II.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

De quelle façon les responsables pourraient-ils trier... Essentiellement, il faudrait réunir toutes les accusations qui peuvent être liées à différents stupéfiants ou à différentes substances désignées à l'annexe II, puis examiner tous les documents des tribunaux et les dossiers de police. Ce serait beaucoup de travail.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui, c'est exact. Ce serait très difficile pour les cas qui relèvent de la Loi réglementant certaines drogues et autres substances, mais pour ce qui est de l'annexe II de la Loi, il s'agit seulement du cannabis.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est seulement le cannabis?

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

C'est le cannabis, les cannabinoïdes, les produits dérivés du cannabis, le cannabidiol. C'est l'annexe des dérivés du cannabis. Il y a une liste d'environ 10, 11 ou 12 substances, et, du nombre, il y en a peut-être seulement une qui n'est pas légale à l'heure actuelle.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Par conséquent, c'est ce que vous voulez dire lorsque vous dites que certaines personnes peuvent encore être aidées. Vous dites que ceux dont les dossiers datent d'après les changements apportés à la loi sont ceux que nous pouvons effacer automatiquement?

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Motz, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président, et merci à nos deux témoins d'être là aujourd'hui. Je tiens à vous poser à tous les deux la même question.

Vos organisations ont-elles été consultées dans le cadre de la rédaction du projet de loi? Je connais la réponse à ma deuxième question: vos objectifs ont-ils été atteints grâce au projet de loi? Évidemment que non. Pour ce qui est de l'association des policiers, vous avez répondu aux deux. Vos groupes ont-ils été consultés avant la rédaction du projet de loi?

M. Tom Stamatakis:

Nous a-t-on consultés directement? Pas de façon poussée. Il y a eu certains échanges, mais il n'y a pas eu de consultation précise relativement au projet de loi.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

J'abonde dans le même sens. Nous avons eu une ligne de communication ouverte avec le bureau de M. Goodale dans la mesure où nous lui avons envoyé des renseignements et des idées. Son bureau accusait réception, mais nous n'avons pas été consultés au sujet du contenu proprement dit du projet de loi. La première fois que nous l'avons vu, c'est lorsqu'il a été rendu public.

M. Glen Motz:

Des fonctionnaires nous ont informés lorsqu'ils sont venus ici, lundi. Selon les dossiers sur lesquels ils se sont appuyés, 250 000 personnes pourraient être admissibles dans le cadre du processus. Ce chiffre correspond-il à ce que vous avez entendu ou croyez être le nombre réel et exact de Canadiens qui ont un dossier criminel pour possession simple de marijuana?

(1555)

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

D'après ce que j'ai compris, la moitié de ces gens ont un dossier de condamnation ou un casier judiciaire précédent pour une infraction de possession simple de cannabis. Vous avez dit quelque chose qui explique peut-être la situation. Vous avez dit qu'environ 250 000 personnes seraient admissibles. Le nombre de personnes admissibles à un pardon en vertu du projet de loi est différent du nombre de personnes qui ont des casiers judiciaires faisant état d'infractions associées au cannabis.

Les critères d'admissibilité réduisent le nombre de personnes admissibles, et on peut raisonnablement avancer qu'une des exigences d'admissibilité, c'est que les personnes doivent seulement avoir des dossiers pour possession simple de cannabis. On peut imaginer qu'un grand nombre de personnes qui ont été déclarées coupables de possession simple de cannabis ont aussi été condamnées pour d'autres infractions, que ce soit une infraction administrative, une amende ou une autre infraction liée à la drogue. Ces personnes seraient donc automatiquement disqualifiées. Je peux très bien imaginer que le nombre de personnes pouvant bénéficier de ces mesures serait beaucoup moins élevé que le nombre de personnes qui ont réellement une infraction pour possession simple de cannabis dans leur casier judiciaire.

M. Glen Motz:

Monsieur, voulez-vous formuler des commentaires au nom de l'Association canadienne des policiers?

M. Tom Stamatakis:

Je ne veux pas parler précisément du nombre, mais ça ne me surprend pas que le nombre soit relativement peu élevé. Comme je l'ai dit dans ma déclaration, d'après mon expérience, les organisations policières ont arrêté de mettre la priorité sur l'arrestation de personnes pour possession simple, particulièrement du cannabis, et ce, depuis assez longtemps.

M. Glen Motz:

Une autre des choses que les fonctionnaires nous ont dites lundi, c'était que, à la lumière du chiffre de 250 000, ils prévoyaient qu'il y aurait peut-être jusqu'à 10 000 personnes à peine qui tireraient parti de l'occasion d'obtenir une suspension du casier. Entendez-vous des choses différentes de votre côté?

Est-ce quelque chose dont vous pouvez parler?

M. Tom Stamatakis:

D'un point de vue anecdotique, il n'est pas inhabituel, à la lumière de mon expérience, de constater que les gens n'entreprennent pas un processus pour obtenir un pardon ou pour faire radier leur dossier. C'est un processus que les gens doivent réaliser, et il n'est pas rare selon moi de rencontrer des gens dans le cadre de mon travail qui pourraient présenter une demande de pardon ou une demande de radiation d'un autre dossier quelconque, mais qu'ils ne le font pas pour une raison ou une autre.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Je crois que c'est exact.

Ça ne me surprend pas que le chiffre soit aussi bas. Je suis surprise parce que j'aurais espéré que la mesure profite à plus de personnes, et c'est la raison pour laquelle je demande que le processus soit automatique. S'il faut simplement appuyer sur un bouton, il n'est pas nécessaire de mettre en place tout le processus.

Il est difficile de pousser les gens à tirer parti d'un cadre qui est mis en place et qui exige la communication de documents historiques. C'est très difficile d'obtenir de tels documents. Il faut se rendre physiquement au tribunal. Le document peut ne pas être là. Il faut alors demander le document qui a été archivé, et on ne parle là qu'un des peut-être deux, trois, quatre ou cinq documents que la personne doit obtenir.

Le processus en lui-même pourrait être un facteur dissuasif tout simplement parce qu'il est trop lourd et difficile. Il y a aussi les coûts supplémentaires qui peuvent pousser plusieurs personnes à estimer que le jeu n'en vaut pas la chandelle.

M. Glen Motz:

Nous en avons parlé lundi. Il y a les coûts de la prise des empreintes et ceux liés à la demande de dossiers du service de police local où l'infraction a été commise. Il y a aussi possiblement d'autres coûts associés à tout ça. Ce n'est vraiment pas un processus libre de coûts.

Vous avez mentionné — et c'est quelque chose qui avait été soulevé rapidement la dernière fois aussi — la difficulté liée au fait d'obtenir des dossiers historiques. Nous savons dans le milieu policier que, parfois, les infractions ont été perpétrées dans des administrations où la tenue des dossiers n'est pas celle à laquelle nous sommes habitués aujourd'hui ou à laquelle on est habitués dans de grandes municipalités ou de grandes organisations, et ce peut être un problème.

Avez-vous des solutions ou savez-vous de quelle façon nous pourrions régler ce problème? On pourrait ne pas trouver les documents parce qu'ils sont dans une boîte, dans un sous-sol quelque part. Les systèmes ne sont pas modernes ni numérisés, alors de quelle façon pourrait-on procéder?

(1600)

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Je suis d'accord: c'est très difficile, mais c'est un défi qu'on peut éliminer, selon moi, et c'est ce que j'ai suggéré de faire dans ma déclaration précédemment.

Nous n'avons pas à trouver tous les dossiers. Pourquoi ne pas tout simplement mettre l'accent sur ceux qui sont importants, ceux qui empêchent les gens d'obtenir un emploi, de faire du bénévolat ou de traverser la frontière? Personne ne va dans le sous-sol d'un tribunal et ni n'utilise de tels documents pour empêcher quelqu'un d'obtenir un emploi. L'obstacle, c'est la base de données du CIPC.

Le président:

Monsieur Motz, je vais vous devoir 11 secondes au prochain tour.

Monsieur Dubé, vous avez sept minutes, s'il vous plaît.

M. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NPD):

Merci beaucoup.

Tout d'abord, je vous remercie tous les deux d'être ici.

J'aimerais poursuivre sur cette idée au sujet du CIPC que vous avez mentionnée dans votre témoignage, et corrigez-moi si je n'ai pas bien compris. Autrement dit, chaque fois qu'un propriétaire possible, un employeur ou quiconque pose une question qui nécessite un certain type de vérification des antécédents, cette vérification serait faite par l'entremise du CIPC, est-ce exact?

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

C'est ma compréhension du fonctionnement.

M. Matthew Dubé:

D'accord.

J'aimerais juste revenir un peu sur la question concernant l'injustice historique, parce que cela semble servir de fondement au gouvernement pour établir la distinction entre les injustices commises à l'endroit des membres de la communauté LGBTQ dans le cadre du projet de loi C-66, les personnes qui seraient touchées par cette législation et qui ont été touchées parce qu'elles ont un casier judiciaire pour possession simple.

Les chiffres que vous avez cités dans votre mémoire, que j'ai cités et que de nombreuses personnes ont cités concernant les répercussions disproportionnées, sont essentiellement des chiffres du gouvernement, pour ainsi dire. Est-ce exact?

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Ce sont des chiffres qui ont été fournis dans le cadre de demandes d'accès à l'information et qui ont été traités par des chercheurs ou par Statistique Canada.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Donc, autrement dit, le gouvernement aurait connaissance de cette information au moment de rédiger ce type de loi.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

J'imagine que cela ne le surprendrait pas.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Cela m'amène à ceci. Vous avez fait allusion à un cas devant la Cour suprême, et il n'y a donc aucun fondement juridique pour ce qui constitue une injustice historique. Évidemment, cette décision que vous avez mentionnée s'inscrit là-dedans, mais lorsque le ministre essaie de créer une norme — et il a pris grand soin, dans son témoignage lundi, de ne pas utiliser cette expression de nouveau, bien que d'autres comme le ministre Blair l'aient fait — il n'y a pas de réel précédent. Il n'y a pas d'instrument de mesure pour déterminer ce qui permettrait d'atteindre ce seuil.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Exact, oui. Le cas auquel je faisais allusion ne concernait pas les injustices historiques. Il s'agissait d'égalité.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Exact.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

La définition d'égalité en vertu de la Charte est une définition qui a été élaborée grâce à la jurisprudence, et c'est un terme technique. Lorsque vous dites « égalité », vous n'entendez pas par là une égalité formelle, vous entendez l'égalité réelle, et cela a une signification. Cela a un contenu.

L'injustice historique n'est pas un terme juridique technique. Vous pourriez l'utiliser pour décrire tout ce que vous jugez être une injustice historique, mais je crois que ce que le ministre Goodale faisait dans son témoignage était très prudent, car le gouvernement l'a essentiellement créé pour que ce soit un terme technique, en raison de la façon dont il a structuré le projet de loi C-66. Je crois que ce projet de loi a été conçu pour qu'on l'examine au regard du terme « injustice historique ». Il y avait une annexe dans laquelle on inscrivait les infractions qu'on jugeait être des injustices historiques. Pour pouvoir avoir un argument permettant d'exclure certaines infractions de cette annexe, il faudrait les définir comme quelque chose qui ne correspond pas à des injustices historiques.

Je crois donc que c'est un terme technique qui a été construit de façon artificielle, mais vous pouvez définir l'injustice historique comme bon vous semble.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Donc, au final, ce que vous affirmez, c'est qu'en utilisant la discussion au sujet de l'égalité, il y a clairement une inégalité dans la façon dont ces personnes ont été traitées et ainsi de suite. Si vous décidez d'utiliser ce terme technique, comme vous le dites, cela pourrait facilement faire partie du même genre de concept, mais au final, il n'est pas nécessaire d'aller de l'avant avec la radiation. Si c'est perçu d'une façon particulière, si l'acceptation sociale existe maintenant pour cette activité, qui est maintenant légale, alors il n'y a aucune raison pour laquelle ce ne pourrait être simplement radié.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Eh bien, ce que j'essayais d'exprimer avait trait aux dommages qui ont été causés par les injustices historiques, les infractions qui étaient essentiellement de nature homophobe. On a fait preuve de discrimination à l'endroit de personnes en se fondant sur l'orientation sexuelle. Il s'agit d'une violation de la Charte, et il est faux d'essayer d'établir une distinction, si vous examinez ce qui constitue une violation de la Charte, entre des lois qui sont discriminatoires à première vue et d'autres qui sont discriminatoires en réalité.

(1605)

M. Matthew Dubé:

Parfait.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

C'est donc une fausse distinction si votre objectif est de tenter de définir des choses qui pourraient contrevenir à l'article 15 de la Charte.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je le reconnais. Donc certains des problèmes avec lesquels des gens seraient aux prises qui satisferaient au processus énoncé dans le projet de loi C-93 — et nous avons eu la confirmation des représentants à cet égard — incluraient des choses comme celles que vous avez mentionnées, certaines de ces infractions administratives, comme le défaut de comparaître en cour et des amendes impayées, qui, d'après certaines personnes, pourraient être d'aussi peu que 50 $. Même le terme « peu » est relatif, naturellement.

D'après votre expérience, ne serait-ce pas les mêmes personnes marginalisées qui seraient ciblées par ces critères auxquels nous cherchons à remédier avec le projet de loi?

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

D'après mon expérience, et j'ai foi en l'expérience de nombre de mes collègues qui ont défendu ces gens au quotidien, il n'y a pas nécessairement de corrélation entre le nombre d'infractions sur le casier d'une personne, son casier judiciaire, et la mesure dans laquelle la personne présente un danger réel pour la société.

En fait, mes clients qui détiennent les casiers judiciaires les plus longs sont ceux qui présentent les problèmes de santé mentale les plus importants. Ils ne peuvent pas comprendre, et pour cette raison, ils ratent des dates de comparution en cour. Ils ont des comportements compulsifs lorsqu'ils ne se présentent pas en cour, ou bien ils volent de façon compulsive et font d'autres choses du genre. Cela ne correspond pas nécessairement aux gens que nous cherchons à cibler comme étant les gens les plus dangereux et irresponsables de la société.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Et il y a donc une grande distinction à faire entre l'atteinte d'un objectif de sécurité publique en ne voulant pas donner à quelqu'un une échappatoire, même lorsqu'il pourrait y avoir des enjeux plus graves, et le fait de ne pas sanctionner quelqu'un qui pourrait ne pas avoir payé une amende ou avoir commis ce type d'infraction administrative.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Exactement. Ce n'est pas nécessairement l'existence d'une autre infraction dans son casier qui témoigne du danger que la personne présente pour la société: tout tient vraiment à la nature de l'infraction.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Au final, nous préconisons la radiation; il semble que le gouvernement ne soit pas de cet avis.

Toutefois, même si on devait conserver le pardon qu'on appelle le système de suspension du casier, ne serait-il pas préférable qu'il soit automatique afin d'éviter ce processus de demande qui, malgré qu'il soit accéléré du côté du gouvernement fédéral, demeure coûteux et interminable, compte tenu de ce qu'on a soulevé ici aujourd'hui et lundi?

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui, absolument.

Une de mes principales préoccupations, c'est que cette législation, bien que ses intentions soient bonnes et qu'elle soit bien meilleure que le statu quo... je ne suis pas ici pour la démanteler complètement. Je crois que c'est fantastique que le gouvernement ait pris cette initiative. Ma préoccupation, c'est que les gens ne vont pas l'adopter.

M. Tom Stamatakis:

Si c'était automatique, comment détermineriez-vous la nature de ces infractions additionnelles pour savoir s'il y a un risque ou non pour la sécurité du public?

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Je crois que s'il y a d'autres infractions, vous n'y seriez pas admissible.

Le président:

Je dois vous arrêter ici.

C'est un point intéressant dans le débat, donc peut-être que M. Picard peut le reprendre dans les sept prochaines minutes.

M. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Non, je ne le ferai pas. Je vais changer de sujet. [Français]

Madame, est-ce que les activités de consommation, en général, représentent pour vous un droit fondamental? [Traduction]

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Non. [Français]

M. Michel Picard:

Est-ce qu'une activité qui est interdite et qui, après coup, devient permise mérite une correction administrative — sans décrire la nature administrative —, de sorte que la correction n'implique pas nécessairement la notion de droit fondamental? [Traduction]

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Non. [Français]

M. Michel Picard:

Lundi dernier, nous avons reçu les témoins du ministère et on nous a expliqué que la différence entre la suspension et...[Traduction]

Comment dit-on « expungement » en français? Je l'ignore.

Par rapport à la différence entre l'« expungement » en anglais et la suspension, le pardon a une trace écrite, mais il n'y a pas de tels documents pour expliquer un « expungement », donc personne ne fournit de document.

Êtes-vous d'accord avec cela?

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Non. J'en parle dans mon mémoire écrit, mais je peux répondre tout de suite.

Essentiellement, ce que le ministre Goodale essayait de dire, c'est que les pardons sont plus avantageux pour les passages frontaliers vers les États-Unis, parce qu'un demandeur dont la demande a été acceptée aura une preuve documentée d'un pardon, tandis que ce n'est pas le cas avec une radiation. Ce ne serait le cas que si le gouvernement créait un régime qui entraînerait cet objectif.

Cette question a été débattue au Comité lorsque le gouvernement étudiait le projet de loi C-66, qui était un projet de loi visant à créer la radiation pour certaines peines constituant des injustices historiques. Lorsque Talal Dakalbab, l'administrateur en chef des opérations de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada, a témoigné devant le Comité, on lui a posé la même question.

Talal Dakalbab a déclaré que ceux qui ont reçu une radiation conformément au projet de loi C-66 pourraient garder sur eux la décision de radiation de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada. Voici une citation de ce témoignage: Ce document démontre que leur infraction a été radiée ou encore qu'ils ont obtenu un pardon ou une suspension de casier. C'est habituellement de cette façon que cette information peut être retirée des systèmes d'autres pays.

Il y a un mécanisme — si le gouvernement construit la législation de cette façon-là — pour fournir un document qui est tout aussi utile dans le cadre du processus de radiation, mais qui ne figure pas dans une base de données des casiers judiciaires. Un document comme, par exemple, un certificat de naissance, a un sens, un poids et une certaine importance, mais cela ne se trouve pas dans une base de données policière; cela ne vous empêche pas d'obtenir un emploi.

Quand ça peut être créé, comme l'a dit le ministre Goodale dans le cas d'une suspension, ça peut l'être aussi dans le cas d'une radiation, et c'est ce qui a été suggéré par l'administrateur en chef des opérations de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada lorsqu'il a témoigné au sujet du projet de loi C-66.

(1610)

M. Michel Picard:

Quel est le but de créer quelque chose de nouveau lorsque vous avez déjà quelque chose qui fonctionne et qui est compris par d'autres forces de police, notamment les douanes américaines?

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Que voulez-vous dire?

M. Michel Picard:

Le pardon et le document qui l'accompagne et tout le reste reposent sur quelque chose qui existe déjà et qui produit exactement le même résultat, et cela fonctionne. C'est le langage qui est utilisé au quotidien avec d'autres forces de police dans d'autres pays. Pourquoi réinventer la roue lorsque nous avons quelque chose qui est parfaitement efficace et qui atteint l'objectif visé?

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

C'est pour la même raison que celle pour laquelle nous avons proposé le projet de loi C-93, plutôt que simplement la Loi sur le casier judiciaire. Il y a un méfait particulier auquel le gouvernement remédie, qui est une injustice historique, dans mon mémoire. Le gouvernement a reconnu qu'il y a un historique de répercussions disproportionnées des condamnations liées au cannabis, à l'interdiction du cannabis et à l'application de la loi sur des personnes particulières au Canada. C'est pourquoi il met en œuvre, en plus de ce qu'il a déjà... Il dit qu'il fait quelque chose de plus. Il dit qu'il va en plus éliminer les frais connexes et éliminer la période d'attente. Il ne réinvente pas la roue, mais il remédie à un méfait particulier.

Ce que je propose, c'est aussi de remédier à ce méfait particulier, mais ma suggestion va un peu plus loin. Il est possible de construire quelque chose où il y a un méfait unique auquel le gouvernement remédie, particulièrement lorsqu'il s'agit d'une injustice historique qui ferait en sorte que les gens perdront foi et confiance en notre système de justice parce qu'il ne traite pas les gens de manière équitable.

Pour ce qui est de réinventer la roue, en ce moment même, environ 23 États aux États-Unis ont ou bien décriminalisé ou bien légalisé le cannabis, et sur ces 23 États, 7 ont adopté un certain type de mesures de radiation, de pardon ou d'amnistie concernant des infractions liées au cannabis, et sur les 7, 6 ont opté pour des radiations.

Aux États-Unis, c'est la norme d'envisager les choses au moyen d'une radiation. Les États-Unis comprendront mieux ce libellé qu'un pardon, car cela veut dire quelque chose de différent aux États-Unis. Un pardon accordé par le président ou le Congrès est quelque chose de différent de ce que nous appelons un pardon. [Français]

M. Michel Picard:

Dans votre présentation, vous avez parlé de mettre l'accent sur les dossiers importants.

Je suis tout à fait d'accord qu'une personne qui cherche un emploi doit avoir son pardon pour obtenir cet emploi. Vous demandez que le travail soit fait par le gouvernement ou du moins l'administration. Comment une personne de l'administration peut-elle décider, à partir de sa liste de dossiers et de sa base de données, quels sont justement les dossiers les plus importants? [Traduction]

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Je crois que, dans ma description de ce qui était important, je ne voulais pas dire important dans le sens d'une évaluation qualitative du contenu du dossier ou du casier. Ce que je voulais dire par important, c'est que l'endroit où se trouve le document est ce qui a le plus d'incidence sur la vie de la personne.

Disons qu'une personne a été condamnée en 1983 pour possession simple de cannabis. L'entrée figurerait dans le CIPC et elle pourrait aussi être contenue dans des documents physiques dans un palais de justice, quelque part dans un entrepôt. Si nous voulons dépenser nos ressources pour libérer cette personne de la stigmatisation associée au casier judiciaire, nous devrions aller chercher le dossier numérique au CIPC plutôt que le dossier papier dans le sous-sol d'un palais de justice, parce que le dossier numérique est celui qui pourrait le plus avoir une incidence sur la capacité de la personne de trouver un emploi.

Je n'ai peut-être pas été claire, et je m'en excuse, mais ce n'était pas le contenu du document qui est le plus important. Il s'agissait vraiment d'essayer de discerner quels types de dossiers nous voulons cibler afin de nous assurer que nos efforts et nos ressources sont dirigés uniquement là où ils seront le plus efficaces pour aider les gens à remettre leur vie sur la bonne voie.

(1615)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Picard.

On a dit que le projet de loi C-66 avait été renvoyé au Comité. En fait, je ne crois pas que cela ait été le cas. C'était un autre comité, mais pas celui-ci, j'en suis assez sûr. C'était probablement celui de la justice.

Monsieur Eglinski, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, PCC):

Merci.

J'aimerais remercier les deux témoins d'être ici.

Je vais commencer par vous, madame.

Je reviens un peu en arrière dans l'histoire, parce que j'étais là. J'ai commencé à travailler dans les services de police dans les années 1960, et les drogues commençaient à peine à s'infiltrer dans la communauté du Canada vers le milieu des années 1960. C'est à ce moment-là que nous avons lancé un programme d'application de la loi actif, et il importait peu que ce soit la police de la Ville d'Edmonton ou la GRC de Vancouver. J'ai observé la progression jusqu'à aujourd'hui. J'étais là et je l'ai observée.

Une des choses que vous avez mentionnées — et je suis d'accord avec vous — c'est que nous ne pouvons pas nous appuyer sur quoi que ce soit en ce qui concerne cette question du casier, sauf le CIPC, parce qu'il n'était pas là lorsque le problème des drogues a commencé. Beaucoup de dossiers se perdent Dieu sait où. Nous en avons discuté un peu.

Des gens de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada ont dit ici qu'ils doivent examiner le casier et décider si la personne est admissible ou ne devrait pas l'être. Ils disent qu'ils seront en mesure de le faire assez rapidement. Cela devrait être immédiat, mais lorsqu'ils s'assoient ici, ils disent que cela pourrait prendre un certain temps. Pour moi, cela ne sera pas bon marché et rapide.

J'en ai parlé à un certain nombre d'occasions. Je crois que tout le monde ici dans la salle sait que je suis d'avis que le fait d'appuyer sur un bouton est la façon de faire pour les accusations de possession simple. Il était très clair pour le Comité l'autre jour que si l'accusation a été réduite il y a 15 ou 20 ans, passant de quelque chose à la possession simple, et que c'est ce que la Couronne a choisi de faire et c'est de quoi la personne a été accusée, alors nous pourrons tous nous fier à cette accusation de possession simple.

En ces temps d'intelligence artificielle, certains des meilleurs esprits du monde ici, au Canada, n'ont pas réussi à élaborer un programme qui pourrait rattacher le programme du CIPC détenu par la GRC à un ordinateur qui passerait en revue cette chose plus rapidement que ce que nous pouvons faire avec un groupe de gens. On pourrait penser que la façon logique de le faire serait de suivre l'ordinateur et de cerner ceux qui devraient être éliminés et les supprimer.

Je me demande ce que vous en pensez.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Je crois qu'il est certainement possible d'élaborer un programme comme celui-là. Un algorithme encore plus complexe pourrait être conçu pour déterminer s'il y a des aspects du casier d'une personne dans son intégralité qui justifient une inspection approfondie pour réagir à certaines des préoccupations de l'Association canadienne des policiers, lesquelles peuvent être valides relativement à... Vous ne voulez pas supprimer le casier d'une personne qui devrait probablement être suivie, mais pour possession simple...

M. Jim Eglinski:

Merci. Je crois que nous voyons les choses de la même façon.

Pourriez-vous nous faire parvenir une liste des six États qui utilisent le système, parce que j'aimerais savoir s'ils fonctionnent avec un ordinateur ou s'ils essaient de le faire de façon manuelle.

J'aimerais beaucoup le savoir.

(1620)

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui.

M. Tom Stamatakis:

Je suis d'accord avec ce que vous proposez. La seule préoccupation que je soulèverais, c'est que le problème avec la seule radiation du casier — ou la suppression de ce casier, pour reprendre votre terme — c'est que certains casiers existent ailleurs dans d'autres bases de données. Il vous faut tout de même un certain type de document connexe ou de dossier qui dit que l'entrée dans le CIPC a été supprimée, de sorte que...

M. Jim Eglinski:

Un programme bien produit avec les bons organismes qui travaillent dessus serait en mesure de faire cela.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Il y a un certain nombre d'administrations aux États-Unis — ce sont des municipalités — qui utilisent l'intelligence artificielle et le codage prédictif pour repérer les casiers et les éliminer. Je suis justement sur notre site Web en ce moment, parce que nous avons énuméré certaines d'entre elles, mais je peux certainement fournir cela au Comité.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Merci.

Monsieur Stamatakis, juste pour que vous soyez au courant, c'est un chèque de 25 $ pour votre ville et de 25 $ si elle veut ajouter une vérification des empreintes digitales. C'est 42 $ à Ottawa pour une vérification judiciaire, 99 $ si vous voulez des empreintes digitales et 139 $ si vous êtes une entreprise.

M. Tom Stamatakis:

Merci.

Le président:

Vos cinq minutes sont écoulées.

Mon greffier toujours vigilant m'a corrigé. Le projet de loi C-66 a été présenté devant le Comité. L'avantage, quand on vieillit, c'est que tout semble nouveau.

Madame Dabrusin, vous avez cinq minutes, s'il vous plaît.

Mme Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Merci à vous deux. J'ai trouvé utile d'entendre votre point de vue, particulièrement dans le contexte de ce que nous avons entendu lundi également.

D'abord, madame Enenajor, vous avez affirmé que ce projet de loi montre une reconnaissance des injustices historiques. Si le projet de loi est adopté tel quel, sans amendement, seriez-vous heureuse de le voir franchir la première étape pour corriger ces injustices historiques?

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Absolument.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

J'aimerais vous parler de quelques autres points.

Une des questions qui sont ressorties lundi concernait vraiment le suivi de tous les casiers. Selon ce que les représentants nous ont laissé entendre, la question semblait être la suivante: s'il revenait à eux de faire tout le travail, plutôt que d'imposer le fardeau à la personne qui demande le pardon, ils iraient vérifier les casiers qui pourraient se trouver dans les sous-sol pour voir s'il s'agissait en fait de possession simple de cannabis plutôt que d'autre chose.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Cependant, si je comprends ce que vous avez suggéré aujourd'hui, tous ces cas auraient trait à l'annexe II. Est-ce que c'est ainsi que c'est inscrit dans le CIPC, que l'infraction est liée à l'annexe II?

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui, l'annexe II.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

À ce moment-là, tous ces éléments sauf un seraient en fait légaux aujourd'hui.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Cela fait un certain temps que j'ai juxtaposé l'annexe II et celle de la Loi sur le cannabis, mais je crois que c'est presque identique.

Je sais avec certitude que l'annexe II de la Loi réglementant certaines drogues et autres substances ne concerne que le cannabis et les substances dérivées du cannabis.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Alors un processus simplifié ne pourrait peut-être pas rejoindre tout le monde, tout particulièrement en raison du fait que les lois et les annexes changent au fil du temps. Toutefois, s'il y avait une façon de remonter jusque là, un moyen consisterait en fait à le rendre automatique pour la possession au titre de l'annexe II — et je n'utilise pas la bonne terminologie juridique, car je n'ai pas la loi sous les yeux...

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

... et peut-être faire autre chose lorsque vous avez des articles et des annexes différents et que c'est une législation différente.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui, exactement. Une des choses que nous avons proposées dans un des documents que nous avons fait parvenir au gouvernement, c'était un système à plusieurs niveaux qui répondait à des types d'infractions différents.

Par exemple, c'est logique si vous n'avez qu'une seule condamnation pour possession simple de cannabis vieille de plus de 40 ans et que vous n'avez rien fait de mal depuis. Qui s'y intéresse? Radiez-la. C'est vraiment inutile de l'avoir.

En ce qui concerne le risque qu'il s'agisse de quelque chose de plus grave que la possession simple de cannabis, si la condamnation date de 40 ans, pourquoi nous ne pouvons pas juste nous débarrasser de toutes ces condamnations? Des niveaux différents de types d'infractions peuvent attirer des réponses différentes.

(1625)

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Vous avez décrit à quoi cela ressemblerait. En ce moment, nous examinons la législation, et j'imagine que vous diriez comme moi que c'est important que nous l'adoptions rapidement.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Il serait donc utile d'avoir des suggestions concernant un libellé approprié.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Je ne sais pas si vous en avez déjà fourni un au Comité.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Je ne l'ai pas fait. Je crois que nous avons l'ébauche d'un texte de loi. Toutefois, je peux la fournir au Comité.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Ce serait fantastique. Je vous serais reconnaissante de nous envoyer ce que vous proposez comme ébauche.

L'autre question qui me préoccupe, c'est lorsque nous avons examiné les suspensions du casier auparavant avec une motion — je crois que c'était la motion M-161 — un des témoins a mentionné qu'un des plus grands obstacles tenait aux amendes impayées. La période ne commençait pas à courir pour beaucoup de gens en raison de cela.

Ici, la période n'est plus un facteur en vertu de ce projet de loi, mais selon ma compréhension des choses, vous ne pouvez pas demander le pardon en vertu du projet de loi C-93 si vous avez des amendes impayées. Que pensez-vous de cet élément, les amendes impayées? Serait-il utile que les gens ne soient pas tenus de régler leurs amendes impayées pour demander le pardon ou la suspension du casier?

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Je croyais en fait qu'il n'y avait aucune relation entre la présence d'une amende impayée et l'admissibilité au projet de loi C-93, donc je...

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Ce que je comprends, c'est que toutes les sanctions, toute peine qui devait être purgée, s'il y avait une peine à purger, ou toute amende à payer, devait l'être avant que vous soyez admissible.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui, ça devrait être réglé. C'est exact.

Il y avait une difficulté d'accès à cet égard. Très souvent, les gens qui ne paient pas leurs amendes sont incapables de le faire. Ce sont les mêmes personnes qui ne peuvent pas se payer des pardons, au final. Nous essayons de cibler ces gens qui sont, en raison de leurs condamnations criminelles, devenus marginalisés et qui sont incapables d'obtenir un emploi rémunéré et de contribuer à la société. Puis, nous les punissons doublement en leur interdisant l'accès au seul mécanisme grâce auquel ils peuvent enfin sortir, obtenir un emploi et contribuer à la société, et toucher le type de revenu qui leur permettrait de payer l'amende. C'est une contradiction de n'avoir pas envisagé une façon de contourner cela.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Motz, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Glen Motz:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais poursuivre sur la question des amendes. Je pense qu'il est important de comprendre que, si vous avez une amende en souffrance et que le délai est important, un mandat est émis. Vous avez un certain temps pour payer votre amende, et si vous ne le faites pas, cela devient un mandat. À ce stade, il s'agit alors d'un mandat non exécuté. Généralement, c'est pour possession simple, avec une amende de 150 à 200 $ en général; vous êtes interpellé puis relâché, car vous avez payé votre amende. C'est un peu comme ça que les choses fonctionnent généralement pour la possession simple.

Je veux aussi parler du CIPC un instant. Le CIPC est une base de données qui indique aux responsables de l'application de la loi si une personne a écopé d'un casier judiciaire. Je coupe les cheveux en quatre, mais le CIPC ne contient pas le casier.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Correct.

M. Glen Motz:

Selon le gouvernement, le projet de loi C-93 indique que le ministère doit toujours vérifier les empreintes digitales et le casier proprement dit, et pas seulement le CIPC. Ce n'est pas aussi simple que d'appuyer sur un bouton et de le retirer du CIPC. Vous pouvez le faire dans la base de données qui contient le casier judiciaire proprement dit.

Mais c'est une autre histoire. J'aimerais vous poser une question précise sur le fait que, à l'heure actuelle, le processus, du point de vue du ministère, consiste à essayer de le faire à moindre coût, à partir de... C'est gratuit pour un demandeur. Ce n'est pas gratuit pour le ministère. Les responsables pensent que cela coûtera quelques centaines de dollars par personne si leurs chiffres sont exacts quant au nombre de personnes qui vont présenter une demande. J'ai encore des questions sur la façon dont cela pourrait être fait. Si je demande la suspension du casier en raison d'une possession simple de marijuana, il m'incombe de me rendre auprès d'« une » administration; il s'agit non pas de condamnations multiples, mais d'une seule condamnation. C'est tout ce que je suis autorisé à traiter.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui.

M. Glen Motz:

Je dois retourner auprès de cette administration et trouver la déclaration de culpabilité auprès du palais de justice.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui.

M. Glen Motz:

Je dois fournir mes empreintes digitales, pour vérifier mon identité et confirmer que j'ai écopé de ce casier judiciaire. Je soumets ensuite ces renseignements dans le cadre de la trousse que la Couronne a créée afin que les gens puissent faire une telle demande.

Pensez-vous que c'est un moyen efficace de procéder? En réalité, en ce qui concerne ce que nous demandons, je dois faire la demande en suivant un processus en ligne. Je dois suivre une séquence où je coche les cases. C'est à moi qu'il incombe de faire ces choses. Ensuite, le ministère, la Commission des libérations conditionnelles, remplit une fonction administrative, au cours de laquelle elle peut affirmer, oui, que les empreintes digitales de cette personne correspondent bien à celles figurant sur le formulaire C-216C ou dans le nouveau système maintenant ou bien, oui, c'est bien le casier judiciaire, et rien n'empêche cette personne de devenir ou d'être... La personne n'a qu'une seule condamnation; elle est qualifiée. À mes yeux, cela semble être un processus très long, potentiellement, et il limitera le nombre de personnes qui veulent que cette condamnation... Je me demande si le processus profitera réellement à ceux à qui nous pensons qu'il bénéficiera — ceux à qui il est interdit d'obtenir le type d'emploi qu'ils souhaitent en raison d'une accusation de possession simple.

Qu'en pensez-vous?

(1630)

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Je pense que vous avez vu juste. Même aujourd'hui, le plus grand nombre de demandes de pardon... Le processus que vous décrivez, celui prévu par le projet de loi C-93, est meilleur et moins exigeant que le processus actuel de suspension du casier judiciaire.

M. Glen Motz:

Avec un pardon complet.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Pour un pardon complet.

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

C'est parce que cela élimine l'obligation de démontrer une bonne conduite ainsi que celle de démontrer un avantage mesurable que le pardon vous apportera. Ce sont tous des aspects qualitatifs. Souvent, les gens obtiennent des conseils pour les aider dans cette démarche, parce qu'ils présentent leur cas. Il ne s'agit pas de simplement parcourir en tous sens un palais de justice pour trouver des documents spécifiques et de faire prendre vos empreintes digitales. Vous présentez un argument en votre faveur. L'élément discrétionnaire n'existe plus dans le projet de loi C-93.

M. Glen Motz:

Il ne me reste qu'une minute, à peu près, et une chose pique ma curiosité. J'ai posé la question suivante à des personnes que je connais qui sont en affaires: en tant qu'employeur, si une personne postule au sein de votre entreprise et que vous lui demandez une vérification des antécédents ou qu'elle vous présente ces renseignements, maintenant que la marijuana est légalisée, craignez-vous que la personne ait déjà été condamnée pour possession simple de marijuana? Leur réponse est non, ils s'en moquent.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui.

M. Glen Motz:

Je pense que la plupart des employeurs se moquent de savoir si quelque chose qui a été légalisé aura une incidence sur eux. Je sais que cela a une incidence sur la personne.

Je ne sais pas si vous avez des idées sur cette question.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Je n'ai pas vraiment réfléchi à cette question particulière.

La décision d'engager ou non une personne en fonction d'un casier judiciaire est discrétionnaire. Ce qui me préoccupe, c'est de savoir qui sont les personnes les plus touchées par l'exercice de ce pouvoir discrétionnaire. Il est toujours possible que cela nuise à une personne et la limite.

Bien que beaucoup d'employeurs ne s'en soucient peut-être pas au bout du compte, je pense que nous n'en sommes pas encore là. Cela peut arriver dans quelques années. M. Stamatakis a mentionné que notre perception et notre compréhension du cannabis avaient subi de profonds changements culturels et que cela ne ferait que continuer. Mais jusqu'à ce que nous en arrivions là, nous avons encore des personnes à qui on refuse des emplois et des possibilités de bénévolat.

Le président:

Merci.

Notre prochain témoin est sur le point d'arriver du tribunal, et les avocats parmi nous savent exactement ce que cela signifie. Je vais donc prolonger un peu plus la séance. Avant de demander à M. Graham de prendre la parole pour les cinq prochaines minutes, je vais laisser nos analystes poser une question concernant les témoignages inscrits à l'horaire.

Allez-y.

Mme Julia Nicol (attachée de recherche auprès du Comité):

Vous ne pourrez peut-être pas répondre à cette question, mais si je comprends bien, vous avez dit que le CIPC indiquerait qu'il s'agit d'une infraction visée à l'annexe II. L'item 1 de cette annexe, cannabis naturel et dérivés, n'est plus un problème, mais l'item 2, l'agoniste de synthèse des récepteurs cannabinoïdes, demeure une infraction criminelle. Le numéro d'item aurait-il été indiqué dans le CIPC dans tous les cas, car sinon, nous aurons du mal à le déterminer.

(1635)

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Je ne le pense pas. Ce n'est pas si détaillé.

Mme Julia Nicol:

C'est ce que je pensais. C'est là que nous avons un problème. Vous ne pouvez pas le dire en vous fiant uniquement au CIPC.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

C'était ma première question. Alors, merci de votre intervention.

Monsieur Stamatakis, que savez-vous lorsque vous consultez un dossier électronique? Que voyez-vous lorsque vous extrayez le casier judiciaire d'une personne?

M. Tom Stamatakis:

Vous obtenez une brève description de l'infraction. Il n'y a pas de contexte ni de renseignements supplémentaires.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Parmi tous nos casiers judiciaires historiques — j'imagine qu'ils sont assez nombreux —, combien ont été numérisés? Avons-nous une idée de leur nombre?

M. Tom Stamatakis:

Non, et je conviens avec mes collègues ici que la tenue de registres est un problème. L'autre problème est que, bien que nous dépendions tous du CIPC à l'échelle nationale, il existe à l'échelle provinciale différentes bases de données qui permettent également de répertorier de l'information. Même si vous supprimez un dossier dans le CIPC, cela ne signifie pas qu'il va automatiquement être supprimé des autres bases de données utilisées par différents services de police dans différentes administrations.

Je le dis du point de vue de la police.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les bases de données de la police sont-elles généralement synchronisées? Y a-t-il un moyen de le faire, ou chacun a-t-il sa propre petite île?

M. Tom Stamatakis:

Non, elles ne sont pas synchronisées. Les services de police relèvent de la compétence des provinces, et chaque province prendra ses propres décisions concernant les bases de données provinciales pouvant être utilisées pour la saisie des données générées par les responsables de l'application de la loi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Même si je comprends le point de vue, pouvons-nous mettre en œuvre l'idée de M. Eglinski d'utiliser l'intelligence artificielle pour trouver ces données?

M. Tom Stamatakis:

Je pense que vous pourriez le faire. Je suis d'accord avec le point de vue selon lequel, dans le monde d'aujourd'hui, il devrait exister un moyen de gérer rapidement les dossiers, du moins avec le CIPC. Si vous proposiez un processus au moyen duquel une personne pourrait recevoir un document confirmant que le casier a été supprimé ou radié, cela serait utile. Si vous vous concentrez uniquement sur le CIPC, cela ne résoudra pas le problème de la possession simple.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que toutes les forces de police contribuent au CIPC?

M. Tom Stamatakis:

Oui, c'est une base de données nationale. Tous les services de police du pays ont accès au CIPC.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Donc, comme nous le disions précédemment, le CIPC ne fait pas l'inverse. C'est pourquoi il n'y a pas de coordination. C'est une situation à sens unique.

M. Tom Stamatakis:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Si quelqu'un a fait l'objet de plusieurs chefs d'accusation pour possession, sans plus, devrait-il présenter une demande pour chaque chef d'accusation, individuellement? Quelle est votre opinion à cet égard? Ou pourrait-il présenter une seule demande pour les 10 ou 20 fois où il s'est fait prendre?

M. Tom Stamatakis:

C'est une bonne question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je ne suis pas sûr non plus. C'est pourquoi je pose la question.

M. Tom Stamatakis:

Oui. Je pense que, si je comprends bien, il est spécifiquement question de possession simple. S'il n'y a pas d'autres circonstances, je ne vois pas pourquoi vous ne pourriez pas faire une demande unique. Mais je ne pense pas que ce soit clair.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Mais comme nous l'avons dit plus tôt, si vous avez un autre casier, la question est donc purement théorique.

Dans votre déclaration liminaire, vous avez exprimé votre inquiétude à propos des personnes qui négocient leur plaidoyer pour ramener l'infraction à la possession simple, mais je pense que l'idée sous-jacente était que, si tel était le cas, elles auraient probablement un casier judiciaire supplémentaire, et c'est pourquoi ce serait une préoccupation. Si tel est le cas, le casier judiciaire rendrait l'argument purement théorique, n'est-ce pas?

M. Tom Stamatakis:

Je crains simplement que la Commission n'ait pas accès à cette information, car selon mon expérience en tant que policier, ces négociations de plaidoyer sont souvent conclues pour une bonne raison. Comme je l'ai dit dans mes remarques liminaires, ces accords sont conclus pour une raison, et cela change le portrait, évidemment. Pour être franc, si tout ce qu'une personne a est une accusation pour possession simple résultant d'une négociation de plaidoyer conclue il y a dix ou cinq ans et qu'il n'y a rien d'autre, cela ne me pose aucun problème. Or, d'après notre expérience, du point de vue de la police, ces personnes sont souvent impliquées dans beaucoup d'autres choses. Je suis d'accord avec vos propos: si tel est le cas, elles ne pourraient pas présenter de demande, mais il s'agit juste de donner un peu plus de pouvoir discrétionnaire pour qu'on puisse le confirmer.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Pour ce faire, il faudrait que la Commission des libérations conditionnelles examine chaque dossier au fur et à mesure, ce qui est un peu à l'opposé de ce que laisse entendre votre collègue ici. Serait-ce une évaluation juste?

(1640)

M. Tom Stamatakis:

Je dirais donc que je préconise qu'ils aient au moins la possibilité de le faire quand ils croient qu'il y a une raison de le faire. Je ne dis pas qu'il faut créer un mécanisme pour que ce soit fait dans tous les cas.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord. Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Dubé, allez-y.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais simplement revenir sur la position de Cannabis Amnesty, pour ce qui est de ce projet de loi, parce que c'est certainement mieux que rien, mais au bout du compte, il n'en demeure pas moins que la meilleure issue pour les personnes pour lesquelles vous cherchez à obtenir justice et réparation, ce serait la radiation des condamnations. N'est-ce pas?

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui, ce serait l'issue la plus favorable.

M. Matthew Dubé:

D'accord. C'est un peu plus que le strict minimum, et l'étape suivante,ce serait que ce soit en quelque sorte automatique. Nous nous enlisons dans la recherche d'une solution, mais si le gouvernement était prêt à le faire...?

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Même si ce n'était pas automatique, un modèle comme celui qui a été proposé dans le projet de loi C-66 aurait-il été réalisable? Nous avons parlé du libellé utilisé, de l'injustice historique du langage utilisé, mais au final, le modèle du projet de loi C-66 aurait très facilement pu être — ou pourrait toujours être — appliqué dans le cas qui nous occupe, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui; mais le projet de loi C-66 est en fait un peu plus complexe que ce que je propose, car les infractions énumérées dans le projet de loi C-66 n'ont pas seulement servi à intenter des poursuites pour des activités homosexuelles consensuelles, elles ont également intenté des poursuites pour des activités homosexuelles non consensuelles. Donc, dans le cadre du projet de loi C-66, vous devez, dans la demande, soit trouver des informations démontrant que c'était un acte consensuel, soit une déclaration sous serment en ce sens, et le projet de loi C-66 représente beaucoup plus de travail.

C'est peut-être un peu la même chose que ce que l'analyste m'a demandé plus tôt, dans les cas où vous n'êtes pas certain de la nature de l'infraction sous-jacente et que vous ne savez pas si elle répond à l'objectif que vous essayez d'atteindre. Vous devriez peut-être non seulement revoir les documents de la Cour pour trouver cette information, mais peut-être aussi demander les transcriptions de la Cour. Car bien souvent, même les documents de la Cour ne mentionnent pas la nature de la substance. Vous devez avoir cet élément de preuve.

M. Matthew Dubé:

J'aimerais revenir sur une question qui a été posée tout à l'heure sur la circulation à la frontière. Je pense qu'il existe des préoccupations nationales assez importantes, quand il s'agit de choses comme l'emploi, le bénévolat et ainsi de suite. J'aimerais être certain que nous faisons bien la distinction, car il semble, selon certains qu'il vaut mieux obtenir un pardon ou une suspension du casier judiciaire, car cela fournit plus de documentation.

J'ai deux commentaires à faire à ce sujet. Le premier, c'est que rien n'empêcherait le gouvernement de monter un dossier sur les casiers qui ont été effacés, si les gens le demandent. Cela semble être un peu contradictoire, mais au bout du compte, ce serait faisable. L'autre commentaire, c'est que, dans votre témoignage, vous n'avez pas dit s'il était important ou non d'avoir de la documentation, vous avez dit que, même si votre casier judiciaire a été suspendu, les Américains ne reconnaîtront pas nécessairement cette suspension, et donc rien ne garantit que votre voyage sera facilité.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Dans la plupart des cas, une suspension du casier judiciaire appuierait votre demande de dispense pour entrer aux États-Unis. Vous devrez quand même présenter une demande de dispense pour entrer, si l'entrée vous a été refusée. Le pardon, la suspension du casier judiciaire ou la radiation des condamnations ne vous empêcheront pas d'être déclaré interdit de territoire.

Le président:

Merci.

J'aimerais revenir sur la question de l'agent des services frontaliers des États-Unis. Dans votre témoignage, vous avez dit que, pour cet agent, le pardon ou la radiation des condamnations sont tout aussi inutiles.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui.

Le président:

Dans l'un ou l'autre cas, vous êtes exactement dans la même situation qu'une personne qui a été condamnée ou fait l'objet d'une accusation en instance, car la question est la même.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui.

Le président:

Que ce soit une accusation, une condamnation, une radiation ou un pardon, tout ça est inutile dans l'esprit des agents des services frontaliers des États-Unis.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

C'est exact.

Le président:

Merci. C'est rassurant.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Malheureusement, nous ne pouvons pas adopter de lois qui ont une incidence sur les États-Unis.

Le président:

Et c'est un des arguments de vente du projet de loi.

Mme Annamaria Enenajor:

Oui.

Le président:

Avant de suspendre la séance, je demanderais à M. Eglinski de faire preuve de générosité et de proposer que nous acceptions le rapport du sous-comité.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Je propose que nous acceptions le rapport du sous-comité.

Le président:

C'est excellent. Je vous en remercie.

M. Jim Eglinski:

J'essaie simplement de coopérer avec vous et de faire partie de l'équipe.

Le président:

C'est la démocratie en marche.

Merci beaucoup. Sur ce, nous allons brièvement suspendre la séance.

(1645)

(1645)

Le président:

Mesdames et messieurs, on s'attend à ce que la sonnerie d'appel se fasse entendre. Apparemment, elle va retentir 30 minutes avant le vote. Avec votre permission, laquelle devra être unanime, et étant donné que nous avons commencé en retard, j'aimerais continuer pendant 15 minutes, et ensuite nous ajournerons la séance.

Merci.

Monsieur Friedman, je vous demanderai de commencer votre témoignage. Si vous pouviez le faire en dix minutes, je vous en serais reconnaissant.

M. Solomon Friedman (avocat criminaliste, à titre personnel):

Bonjour, monsieur le président et membres du Comité.

Merci de m'avoir invité aujourd'hui pour parler du projet de loi C-93.

Tout d'abord, j'aimerais commencer par les aspects positifs. La philosophie du projet de loi proposé est bonne. Il est fondamentalement injuste que des gens traînent le boulet d'un casier judiciaire pour une conduite qui n'est plus illégale.

Comme nous le savons tous, dans notre société, un casier judiciaire est un obstacle considérable à la réussite. Il compromet la capacité d'une personne à décrocher un emploi, à étudier, à trouver un logement, à obtenir du financement, à faire du bénévolat et à voyager. Ce sont des obstacles, pris individuellement ou ensemble, à la capacité d'une personne d'intégrer la société, de contribuer positivement à la grande collectivité et de mener une vie productive et prosociale.

À l'injustice qui consiste à maintenir la condamnation au criminel de personnes ayant déjà été déclarées coupables de possession simple de cannabis s'ajoutent les effets inégaux et discriminatoires de la criminalisation du cannabis dans les groupes déjà marginalisés du Canada. À Toronto, par exemple, les Noirs représentent 8 % de la population, mais 25 % des personnes accusées de possession de cannabis entre 2003 et 2013. C'est vrai aussi pour les Autochtones. Prenons Regina, en Saskatchewan, où 9 % des résidants sont des Autochtones, mais où ils représentent 41 % des personnes accusées de possession de cannabis.

Historiquement, ces infractions ont eu des répercussions disproportionnées sur les personnes les plus vulnérables de notre société: les pauvres, les marginalisés, les personnes atteintes de maladies mentales, les personnes racialisées et les Autochtones. Si ces statistiques ne sont pas suffisantes, je peux vous dire que, d'après le flot continu — malheureusement — des clients dans mon bureau, les personnes qui sont accusées de possession simple de cannabis possèdent ces mêmes caractéristiques. Elles sont généralement issues de groupes marginalisés et, cruelle ironie du sort, ces condamnations au criminel marginalisent elles-mêmes davantage ces mêmes groupes, perpétuant ainsi le cycle de la criminalisation, de la stigmatisation et de l'inégalité.

Le projet de loi C-93 est sans aucun doute plein de bonnes intentions, et on devrait applaudir le gouvernement pour cela. Toutefois, même s'il s'agit d'une première étape positive et bien intentionnée — il y a toujours un « mais », surtout quand il y a un avocat — il demeure que le projet de loi comporte, à mon humble avis, de graves lacunes. Je vais vous les exposer tour à tour.

D'abord, le projet de loi exige que les personnes concernées présentent une demande de suspension de casier judiciaire auprès de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada. Une demande officielle doit être remplie et envoyée à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles pour examen. Certes, le projet de loi indique clairement qu'aucuns frais ne sont à payer pour cette demande particulière, contrairement aux demandes de suspension de casier ordinaires, je soupçonne que ce processus ne sera pas gratuit pour bon nombre de Canadiens.

Il existe de nombreuses sociétés qui, je cite, « aident » les gens à remplir leur demande de suspension de casier, pour des frais élevés. En fait, à ce jour, le premier site annoncé lorsqu'on lance une recherche sur Google avec les mots « cannabis pardon Canada », c'est un site à but lucratif offrant ses services pour un prix mensuel modique de 72 $ ou de 116 $ pour une procédure accélérée. Pour que ce soit bien clair, il s'agit d'un prix mensuel d'un plan de paiement sur 16 mois. Selon vous, quelles sont les personnes que le site Web cible et qui pourront payer 72 $ ou 116 $ par mois, selon un plan de paiement sur 16 mois?

Nous parlons d'un prix bas, très bas, de 1 152 $ à 1 856 $, et cela, bien sûr, sans tenir compte des frais que le gouvernement impose ou non pour ces demandes. N'oublions pas que les personnes les plus touchées par ces casiers judiciaires sont déjà en marge de la société: les personnes qui ont fait face à des obstacles systémiques nuisant à leur réussite à l'école, au travail ou ailleurs. Ce projet de loi, intentionnellement ou non, pourrait être un obstacle pour les personnes qui voudraient se prévaloir des avantages qu'il prétend offrir.

Bien sûr, à l'ère des données électroniques, la Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada peut de façon proactive trouver les casiers judiciaires liés aux condamnations criminelles pour possession simple de cannabis et les associer à toute mesure prévue par la loi, qu'il s'agisse d'une suspension du casier judiciaire, d'une radiation ou de quoi que ce soit d'autre. Selon moi, le fardeau de ces casiers devrait incomber au gouvernement. Si la perspective de remplir une demande du gouvernement n'est peut-être pas particulièrement intimidante, pour nous, mais pour les personnes qui font face à des difficultés sur le plan financier, éducatif ou de la santé mentale ou à d'autres difficultés, ce peut être une tâche pratiquement impossible.

Ensuite, le projet de loi C-93 exige que les personnes aient purgé leur peine avant de présenter une demande de suspension de casier judiciaire. Pourquoi? Pourquoi une personne resterait pénalisée, que ce soit par une véritable peine d'emprisonnement, par une peine d'emprisonnement avec sursis, par des conditions de probation ou d'une autre manière, pour une conduite qui n'est plus illégale?

(1650)



Pourquoi les gens devraient-ils être obligés d'attendre la fin d'une longue période de probation, alors que l'infraction qu'ils ont commise n'existe même plus sous le régime de la loi?

Je suis d'avis qu'il faut immédiatement réparer l'injustice qui découle de ces condamnations, sans attendre la fin prévue de la période de probation, sans imposer d'amende ni n'importe quel autre type de pénalité. Les gens qui n'ont pas les moyens de payer leur amende ne pourront jamais finir de purger leur peine et ne pourront donc jamais demander une suspension de leur casier judiciaire.

Troisièmement, je veux parler de l'enjeu le plus important du projet de loi C-93: la nature même du mécanisme de suspension du casier. Le mot le dit: une suspension de casier judiciaire n'est pas un pardon. Le pardon n'existe plus. Ce n'est pas non plus une amnistie ni une radiation. C'est un processus prévu par la loi selon lequel le casier judiciaire est « suspendu », c'est-à-dire qu'il doit « être classé à part des autres dossiers [...] relatifs à des affaires pénales ». Une suspension du casier peut être révoquée, ce qui arrive automatiquement dès que la personne commet n'importe quelle infraction prévue au Code criminel ou dans la Loi réglementant certaines drogues et autres substances.

Cela va même plus loin. Une suspension du casier peut être révoquée si la Commission est convaincue que l'intéressé « a cessé de bien se conduire ». Je vais vous donner des exemples réels de gens que j'ai aidés parce que la Commission avait demandé la révocation de la suspension de leur casier. Ce sont des gens qui ont fait l'objet de nombreuses vérifications policières, fondées sur des renseignements ou non, ou qui ont été accusés d'infractions au code de la route, par exemple de conduite imprudente. À cause de cela, la Commission a conclu qu'ils allaient cesser de bien se conduire. Je suis cependant heureux de pouvoir vous dire que nous avons contesté la révocation de la suspension du casier et que nous avons gagné.

Malgré tout, le problème est entier. Pour ces gens, le casier judiciaire restera comme une épée de Damoclès toute leur vie. En outre, le ou la ministre conserve le pouvoir discrétionnaire d'autoriser la communication du dossier dans le cas où il ou elle est convaincu que cela « sert l'administration de la justice ou est souhaitable pour la sûreté ou sécurité du Canada ou d'un État allié ou associé au Canada. »

Je peux penser à un État allié ou associé au Canada qui serait très intéressé par les casiers judiciaires des personnes qui ont été reconnues coupable de possession simple de cannabis.

Autrement dit, même si leur casier est suspendu, l'infraction continue de peser sur les personnes qui ont été reconnues coupables. Aussi, et c'est le plus important, contrairement à ce qui est fait dans le cas d'une radiation, où la GRC et les autres organismes fédéraux doivent détruire tous les documents visés par l'ordre de radiation, rien de tel n'est exigé dans le cas d'une suspension du casier.

En résumé, le processus de demande qui est proposé élève en réalité un obstacle, en particulier pour les populations déjà marginalisées. Le projet de loi prévoit que les gens devront finir de purger leur peine avant de présenter une demande. À mon avis, et avec tout le respect que je vous dois, cette approche est illogique, contre-productive et inutile. Une suspension du casier n'équivaut pas à la destruction du casier judiciaire lui-même, ce n'est qu'une suspension — une suspension temporaire —, dont la révocation est prévue dans la loi ou tient à la discrétion de l'administration.

Quelle est donc la solution, dans ce cas?

Je devrais d'abord dire que le projet de loi C-93 est mieux que rien. Cependant, « mieux que rien », c'est demander très peu au Parlement. Vous pouvez, et devez, faire mieux. Je vous recommande donc vivement d'adopter un modèle de radiation similaire à celui que prévoit la Loi sur la radiation de condamnations constituant des injustices historiques. Les dossiers judiciaires relatifs aux condamnations pour possession simple de cannabis devraient être radiés automatiquement et de façon permanente.

Par conséquent, je vous propose d'étudier le projet de loi C-415, c'est un projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire parrainé par M. Murray Rankin. Il a été présenté par M. Rankin en octobre dernier. Ce projet de loi remplit beaucoup mieux son objectif, la véritable justice, en soulageant les personnes qui ont été condamnées pour possession simple de cannabis — quelque chose de légal, aujourd'hui — de leur stigmatisation et des conséquences disproportionnées de leur condamnation au criminel.

Dans son document d'information accompagnant le projet de loi, le gouvernement affirme que « la radiation est une mesure extraordinaire réservée aux cas où la criminalisation de l'activité en question et la loi n'auraient jamais dû exister, par exemple dans les cas où elle contrevenait à la Charte ».

Même si l'on pourrait débattre longtemps du premier élément de cette exigence, en ce qui concerne le cannabis, je peux vous dire, en tant qu'avocat criminaliste, que l'interdiction pénale du cannabis a causé beaucoup plus de tort que de bien. Il ne fait aucun doute que l'application beaucoup trop lourde de la loi brime le droit à l'égalité garanti par la Charte et va à l'encontre de nos valeurs constitutionnelles et fondamentales.

Le Canada doit réparer un tort historique, et le Parlement peut le faire au moyen de la radiation. Je vous demande instamment de suivre exactement cette voie.

Je vous remercie de votre bienveillante attention.

(1655)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Friedman.

Il nous reste environ une demi-heure. Je crois que je vais accorder cinq minutes, cinq minutes, cinq minutes et cinq minutes, ce qui devrait faire un peu plus de 20 minutes. Ensuite, je pourrais peut-être accorder deux fois quatre minutes, si tout le monde est d'accord.

Madame Dabrusin, vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Je vous remercie d'avoir exposé vos motifs de préoccupation par rapport à ce projet de loi.

L'une des questions que je veux poser en premier — et je l'ai aussi posée au dernier groupe de témoins — est la suivante: pourrait-on améliorer le projet de loi C-93 en supprimant l'exigence qu'une personne paie toutes ses amendes impayées avant d'être admissible à une suspension du casier?

M. Solomon Friedman:

Absolument.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Je crois que vous l'avez déjà dit, mais je tiens à ce que ce soit très clair: améliorerait-on le projet de loi en supprimant l'exigence selon laquelle les gens doivent attendre la fin de leur période de probation?

M. Solomon Friedman:

Absolument.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

L'une des questions que vous avez abordées... C'est également un sujet que j'ai abordé lundi, lorsque nous interrogions les témoins. J'avais fait une recherche sur Google, et j'ai constaté la même chose. Selon vous, comment devrions-nous informer les gens que le processus est gratuit?

M. Solomon Friedman:

J'ai discuté ce matin avec l'une de mes collègues qui a déjà travaillé pour l'Association canadienne des libertés civiles. Selon elle, les gens qui communiquent avec Pardons Canada se font dire constamment qu'ils devront dépenser 2 000 $. Il y a vraiment un manque de communication.

Avec tout le respect que je vous dois, je crois que la meilleure façon de procéder serait d'éliminer le processus de demande. Nous vivons à l'ère des ordinateurs, et c'est ainsi que nous accédons à ces dossiers. J'ignore combien coûtent les bases de données gouvernementales et si elles sont faciles à gérer, alors je dois faire certaines suppositions, mais je sais qu'il existe des données sur le nombre de dossiers de condamnation.

Je dirais qu'il incombe à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada de régler le problème. Peut-être suis-je trop terre à terre, mais je ne vois pas l'avantage de demander aux gens de présenter eux-mêmes une demande. La Commission peut vérifier les dossiers, et, s'il y a quelque chose qui ne satisfait pas aux normes, communiquer avec les personnes concernées.

(1700)

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Lundi, nous avons accueilli la représentante du ministère, qui nous a exposé ses préoccupations. Entre autres choses, elle nous a dit que le processus est beaucoup plus rapide lorsque les gens présentent des demandes individuelles. Si le ministère doit fouiller tous les dossiers afin de voir qui est admissible, la question ne sera pas réglée avant 10 ans.

M. Solomon Friedman:

Je soupçonne qu'il y a des dizaines de milliers de personnes qui ne savent même pas qu'elles ont été reconnues coupables de possession de cannabis et qui n'en comprennent pas les conséquences. Qualifiez-moi de sceptique si vous voulez, mais j'ai peine à croire que le gouvernement du Canada est incapable d'effectuer une recherche dans sa propre base de données sur les condamnations.

Chaque jour, j'interagis avec des agents de police dans le cadre de ma profession. Ils ont tous accès au Centre d'information de la police canadienne. C'est une base de données centralisée. Il leur suffit d'entrer le nom d'une personne pour voir si elle a eu des condamnations. Puisque c'est une base de données, vous pouvez sûrement faire le processus inverse et effectuer une recherche à partir des dossiers de condamnation pour obtenir des noms.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Je ne me rappelle pas avoir lu dans le projet de loi C-415 quoi que ce soit à propos d'un système automatique.

M. Solomon Friedman:

Il n'en propose pas, non. Je crois que c'est une lacune qui devrait être corrigée. Il faudrait un processus de radiation automatique.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Une autre chose; il semble que le processus fait intervenir les membres de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles. Ce n'est pas le processus administratif qui est prévu dans le projet de loi C-93.

M. Solomon Friedman:

Exact.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Quel processus préférez-vous, le processus administratif ou celui qui fait intervenir la Commission des libérations conditionnelles?

M. Solomon Friedman:

Je n'ai pas vraiment d'opinion. La Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada a l'expertise nécessaire pour traiter les demandes de pardon, alors, si on lui demande d'intervenir... D'un autre côté, j'ai entendu parler de son retard dans le traitement des demandes de pardon. Si vous ne mettez pas en place le processus automatique, mais que vous avez un processus administratif qui permettrait aux gens de contourner la liste d'attente déjà bien longue pour la suspension du casier, ce serait encore mieux.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

L'un des témoins du groupe précédent nous a dit que, lorsqu'on fait une recherche automatique dans le Centre d'information de la police canadienne, le système peut afficher les infractions de possession d'une substance prévue à l'annexe II. Les substances prévues à l'annexe II étaient, essentiellement, toutes du cannabis; il reste une seule substance qui est encore illégale. Pouvez-vous confirmer que cela fonctionne bien ainsi? Elle a recommandé de simplement récupérer ces dossiers.

M. Solomon Friedman:

Oui, je crois que je suis d'accord. Mon cadre de référence, par rapport à cela, est que j'ai vu, pour certains de mes clients, des centaines ou des milliers de pages de casiers judiciaires. La nature de l'infraction est très clairement indiquée. C'est pourquoi j'ai dit qu'avec cette méthode, il suffit d'entrer le nom de la personne pour obtenir une liste de ces infractions. Les infractions sont énumérées à l'écran, et elles sont assorties de suffisamment de détails, selon moi, pour qu'on puisse ensuite procéder à la suspension du casier ou à la radiation.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

D'accord, merci.

Le président:

Le Comité vous souhaite la bienvenue, monsieur Cooper, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Michael Cooper (St. Albert—Edmonton, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur Friedman.

Je suis d'accord avec vous: le projet de loi C-415 n'est pas un projet de loi parfait, mais à mon avis, il est de loin supérieur au projet de loi à l'étude. J'ai hâte de voter en sa faveur dans 45 minutes environ.

M. Solomon Friedman:

Grand bien vous fasse.

M. Michael Cooper:

Comme vous l'avez dit dans votre témoignage, une suspension n'équivaut pas à une radiation. Dans ce cas, disons qu'une personne qui a été reconnue coupable d'une infraction au criminel cherche un emploi ou un logement ou veut être entraîneur bénévole de l'équipe de soccer de ses enfants, et qu'on lui demande si elle a un casier judiciaire, cette personne devra répondre oui, n'est-ce pas?

M. Solomon Friedman:

Eh bien, une suspension du casier judiciaire a pour effet d'effacer toutes les conséquences de la condamnation. Selon moi, une des conséquences d'une condamnation est d'avoir à répondre oui à ce genre de question.

Ce n'est pas la même chose pour les personnes vulnérables. J'aimerais attirer votre attention sur l'article 6.3 de la Loi sur les casiers judiciaires, où il est question des personnes vulnérables. La liste des infractions est donnée en annexe, et la liste ne comprend pas la possession de cannabis. Je ne crois pas qu'une suspension du casier poserait un problème pour les personnes vulnérables. Cependant, puisque le dossier existe toujours, un gouvernement futur pourrait toujours décider de modifier la loi, n'est-ce pas? Un prochain gouvernement pourrait décider que la possession simple devrait être visée à même dans le cas des personnes vulnérables. J'ai aussi mentionné que la loi prévoit les conditions de révocation de la suspension du casier, et c'est bien le cas, c'est dans la loi. La décision peut aussi être prise au niveau administratif. Puisque le casier existe toujours, un gouvernement futur pourrait décider de révoquer toutes ces suspensions.

Voilà pourquoi, à mon avis, la radiation est de loin la meilleure solution.

(1705)

M. Michael Cooper:

D'accord. À propos du processus faisant intervenir la Commission des libérations conditionnelles, vous avez dit que cela pouvait être très lourd. Le projet de loi C-66, qui a été adopté par le gouvernement, prévoit un processus permettant aux gens d'obtenir une radiation, sous réserve de la présentation d'une demande. Je crois qu'on estime qu'environ 9 000 ou 10 000 Canadiens sont admissibles, mais, aux dernières nouvelles, seulement sept ou huit personnes ont pris la peine de présenter une demande ou ont réussi à s'y retrouver dans toute la paperasse. On parle ici de quelque 250 000 personnes qui sont admissibles, et on estime que 10 000 vont peut-être présenter une demande. Selon vous, n'est-ce pas un peu trop optimiste?

M. Solomon Friedman:

Je pense que 10 000 est un chiffre extrêmement optimiste. N'oubliez pas que, lorsqu'il est question de cette catégorie de condamnations, on a affaire à une population disproportionnée du point de vue de la marginalisation. Il est question de personnes ayant des problèmes de santé mentale ou un déficit sur le plan de l'éducation. Je pense que la proportion sera encore moins élevée qu'au titre des condamnations constituant des injustices historiques.

Je suis peut-être un optimiste éternel. Nous sommes à une époque de bases de données électroniques. Je comprends qu'il pourrait être difficile d'accéder aux dossiers de certaines personnes; peut-être que c'était une base de données papier qui a été convertie en base de données électronique; excellent. Nous mettrons un astérisque à côté du nom des personnes à qui on peut envoyer une lettre de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles leur disant: « Hé, peut-être que vous devriez présenter une demande et régler cette question pour nous », mais je suis certain que, de ces 250 000 cas, la grande majorité pourra simplement être rectifiée par voie électronique et automatiquement.

M. Michael Cooper:

Cela été fait dans d'autres administrations, notamment à San Francisco. Un système [Inaudible] automatique.

M. Solomon Friedman:

San Francisco; en un claquement de doigts.

M. Michael Cooper:

Oui.

M. Solomon Friedman:

Je ne sais pas. Les ordinateurs de cette administration sont-ils bien meilleurs que ceux du gouvernement du Canada? Il est question de la Ville de San Francisco. C'est sûrement faisable.

M. Michael Cooper:

Je suppose que ce qui me dérange vraiment, c'est qu'il nous reste 33 jours de séance dans cette législature. Le projet de loi ne sera pas adopté. Cela fait un certain nombre de mois que la légalisation est entrée en vigueur. J'ai voté contre la légalisation, mais je souscris à votre opinion selon laquelle il est fondamentalement injuste que l'on soit accablé par un casier judiciaire parce qu'on a commis une infraction qui est parfaitement légale aujourd'hui et, honnêtement, à laquelle la grande majorité des Canadiens ne s'opposent aucunement.

En réalité, cette mesure n'aurait-elle pas dû faire partie intégrante du projet de loi du gouvernement pour la légalisation?

M. Solomon Friedman:

Cette question sort peut-être un peu de mon champ de compétences. Je suis avocat sans opinion sur quoi que ce soit. J'affirmerai ceci: vous faites beaucoup de bon travail ici et, en ce qui concerne le projet de loi d'initiative parlementaire C-415, j'espère que le travail et la recherche effectués par le Comité... si le projet de loi n'est pas adopté dans la législature actuelle, j'espère qu'il sera reporté à la prochaine législature, où on pourra s'en occuper et régler tous ces problèmes en ce qui a trait au processus de demande — la radiation par rapport à la suspension de casier — et s'assurer qu'il s'agit de la version la plus juste possible du projet de loi, peu importe quand il sera promulgué.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Dubé, vous avez la parole.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Aux fins du compte rendu, et à la défense de M. Rankin qui n'est pas là pour défendre son projet de loi, je déclare que notre position — et la sienne — est que ce devrait être automatique, mais il y a une certaine consternation quant à la question de savoir si une recommandation royale est requise. Si certains coûts doivent être engagés, nous verrons assurément quelles sont les décisions prises au sein du Comité, quand nous présenterons des amendements semblables au projet de loi. Je veux que ce soit clair. Il est certain que la radiation qui est proposée dans le projet de loi constitue assurément une grande amélioration, alors nous verrons, comme l'a dit M. Cooper, quel sera le résultat du vote au cours des prochaines minutes.

Monsieur Friedman, je vous remercie de votre présence.

Je voulais vous poser des questions au sujet des statistiques: les 10 000 sur 250 000, puis les 7 sur 9 000 ou je ne sais quoi dans le cas du projet de loi C-66. Manifestement, à la lumière de vos commentaires, je pense qu'on pourrait présumer sans craindre de se tromper... s'il y a une telle supposition à faire. Je me demande tout simplement: pensez-vous que les 240 000 autres personnes qui ne présenteront pas de demande ne le feront probablement pas parce qu'elles appartiennent à une certaine catégorie de personnes marginalisées, ou bien est-ce en raison des diverses exemptions, par exemple, relativement à des amendes non payées, qui sont prévues dans le projet de loi?

M. Solomon Friedman:

Oui, je pense qu'il y a un certain nombre de facteurs. Tout d'abord, il est bien beau de croire que, quand le Parlement adopte une loi, l'information est je ne sais trop comment transmise simultanément — peut-être par télépathie ou autrement — à tous les Canadiens.

Certaines personnes n'ont aucune idée de ce que vous faites sur un grand nombre de fronts...

(1710)

Le président:

Nous non plus.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. Solomon Friedman:

... le groupe ici présent exclu, bien entendu. C'était le premier facteur.

Il y aura des gens qui ne seront tout simplement pas au courant, et vous savez pourquoi? Si on regarde ce qui est important dans leur vie, ils ne s'en préoccupent peut-être tout simplement pas. Ils ont peut-être appris à vivre avec un casier judiciaire et ses conséquences. C'est la première raison; vous avez un problème de communications.

Ce problème est exacerbé davantage si on regarde les groupes de la population qui sont disproportionnellement touchés par l'interdiction criminelle du cannabis, des gens qui ont des problèmes de scolarisation ou de santé mentale, qui pourraient vivre en marge de la société. Si nous pouvons améliorer leur vie en retirant un obstacle à l'emploi, au financement, aux voyages, etc., à mon humble avis, le Parlement devrait faire tout en son possible pour joindre ces personnes, parce que les gens avec qui on communiquera et qui seront au courant de la mesure pourront probablement retenir les services d'avocats comme moi.

Oubliez vos spécialistes des demandes de pardon qui profitent des gens. Ils auront probablement un avocat, et auront probablement réglé cette question il y a longtemps et obtenu une suspension de casier appropriée. Nous voulons joindre les personnes qui en ont réellement besoin.

À mon humble avis, le projet de loi doit faire l'objet d'amendements importants.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Les représentants qui ont comparu lundi ont parlé de moyens non traditionnels, et on dirait presque un genre de stratégie axée sur Twitter. Je n'essaie pas d'aborder la question avec désinvolture; on ne sait vraiment pas très bien ce que ces gens vont faire.

D'après les discussions que nous avons tenues et les sujets que nous avons abordés quand nous avons mené une étude générale sur la suspension de casier et sur les réformes requises, nous avons parlé de ces genres de mauvais joueurs qui tentent d'agir dans ce domaine.

Essentiellement, il faudrait que le gouvernement élabore une certaine stratégie qui lui permettra de livrer concurrence à ces personnes. En fin de compte, le travail qui serait requis pourrait facilement servir à trouver les casiers, à les supprimer et à procéder à la radiation.

Pensez-vous qu'il s'agit d'une évaluation équitable de ce type de situation?

M. Solomon Friedman:

Je ne suis pas expert en bases de données gouvernementales, mais, comme je l'ai dit, il est ahurissant qu'un tas de gens intelligents ne puissent pas se concerter, faire venir un développeur de logiciel, examiner la base de données et simplement en extraire ces casiers.

En ma qualité d'avocat criminaliste indépendant, je sais que je reçois beaucoup de correspondance automatique indésirable de divers organismes du gouvernement du Canada. Ils me trouvent, et ils savent exactement ce que je trame, combien d'impôts j'ai payés et d'ici quelle date je dois payer mes acomptes provisionnels, alors le gouvernement du Canada est vraiment doué pour utiliser ces bases de données afin d'accéder automatiquement aux dossiers. Je suis certain que, lorsqu'il s'agit d'aider des personnes pauvres, marginalisées et atteintes de maladie mentale qui ont vraiment besoin de cette aide, pour qui cela pourrait changer considérablement la donne en ce qui a trait à leur réinsertion dans la société — et je ne suis pas désinvolte, moi non plus —, des gens intelligents peuvent se réunir dans une salle et arriver à le faire.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je pense qu'on peut affirmer sans crainte de se tromper que la radiation serait la meilleure option. Si cette disposition n'est pas adoptée, vaudrait-il tout de même mieux que la suspension de casier soit automatique et que l'on retire simplement le fardeau d'avoir à présenter une demande?

D'après les propos que vous avez tenus, j'ai l'impression que c'est le cas. Est-ce que je vous comprends bien?

M. Solomon Friedman:

Oui, et je l'affirme en ce qui concerne l'ensemble du projet de loi. C'est mieux que rien, mais vous pouvez faire mieux que rien, c'est certain, et vous pouvez faire mieux que mieux que rien.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci.

Le président:

Madame Sahota, vous disposez de cinq minutes; allez-y.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

Je crois comprendre — et j'espère vraiment que le projet de loi sera adopté, espérons-le, après que certaines des améliorations qui ont été proposées par nos témoins y auront été apportées — que le projet de loi sera promulgué avant l'ajournement de la Chambre, à moins que les conservateurs ne veuillent pas qu'il soit adopté. Je ne sais pas ce qui arrivera au cours des mois à venir, mais j'espère qu'il sera promulgué.

M. Solomon Friedman:

J'ai l'impression d'être à un souper familial où règne un malaise.

Des députés: Ha, ha!

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui, eh bien...

Le président:

Ne rendons pas cette situation encore plus malaisante.

M. Solomon Friedman:

Je viens tout juste d'avoir mon seder de la Pâque la semaine dernière, et j'ai eu plus qu'assez de ces situations.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord, je suis désolée pour ce malaise, mais je ne sais pas...

Le président:

Voudriez-vous passer à la question?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Quand M. Cooper a mentionné cela, j'ai simplement trouvé cela étrange.

Vous avez précisé que vous considérez le pardon ou la suspension de casier comme étant très différents de la radiation.

Le témoin qui a comparu avant vous est venu déclarer... Certains arguments ont été formulés au sujet de la façon dont les gens sont traités lorsqu'ils traversent la frontière et du fait que ce serait différent dans les deux cas. La dame a affirmé que cela ne change absolument rien. C'était l'avis de la Campaign For Cannabis Amnesty: cela ne change absolument rien.

Je crois comprendre d'après les déclarations faites par certains des témoins qui ont comparu lundi que, lorsqu'un casier a été suspendu, il ne s'affiche plus au CIPC et qu'un agent de police qui effectuerait une vérification du casier ne pourrait pas le voir. Un employeur ne pourrait pas non plus voir un casier une fois qu'il a été suspendu.

Selon vous, à quels obstacles ces personnes marginalisées ou vulnérables feraient-elles encore face dans le cas d'une suspension de casier par rapport à une radiation?

M. Solomon Friedman:

Comme je l'ai mentionné, le vrai problème, à mes yeux... et je conviens qu'il y a une divergence d'opinions en ce qui concerne les voyages. Cela dépend en réalité de quelle version du registre du CIPC nous avons fournie au département de la Sécurité intérieure des États-Unis. Il ne le reçoit pas tous les jours, à ce que je crois savoir. Sa version est peut-être désuète.

À mes yeux, le problème tient au fait qu'une suspension de casier peut être révoquée à tout moment. Elle peut l'être pour des raisons qui pourraient sembler appropriées ou non, selon des personnes raisonnables. Comme je l'ai dit, une infraction grave au titre du Code de la route... Voulez-vous qu'une personne qui, autrement, n'aurait pas de casier judiciaire soit considérée comme ayant fait l'objet d'une condamnation criminelle si elle est reconnue coupable de conduite imprudente, une infraction provinciale, et non criminelle? Soudainement, votre casier judiciaire réapparaît; c'est comme une épée de Damoclès au-dessus de votre tête.

Si les casiers sont supprimés, ils ne pourront pas être ramenés. Voilà la différence entre la radiation et la suspension de casier. C'est dans le nom. Ce n'est qu'une suspension; il ne disparaît pas.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je crois comprendre d'après les déclarations des témoins qui ont comparu devant nous qu'ils veulent que ce mécanisme soit là dans les cas où une erreur a été commise. C'est parce qu'il est très complexe d'inverser la situation, lorsque des gens doivent découvrir s'ils sont simplement accusés de possession ou si d'autres accusations étaient en cause.

Le ministre a également déclaré que 95 % des casiers qui ont été suspendus dans le passé pour d'autres situations ne font jamais l'objet d'une révocation, alors pourquoi est-ce une si grande préoccupation? Envisagez-vous que les choses se passeraient différemment dans ce cas-ci?

M. Solomon Friedman:

Je suis avocat criminaliste. Je me préoccupe des 5 %. Il s'agit d'une grave préoccupation.

Comme je l'ai mentionné, des personnes marginalisées qui ont été reconnues coupables de possession de cannabis et qui, ensuite, disons, se font remarquer par... et il s'agit d'un exemple de la vraie vie. La personne se fait arrêter en voiture et se trouve à être en compagnie de personnes qui ont un casier judiciaire grave, ou bien elle se trouve à un endroit où une activité criminelle grave est exercée. Elle n'est pas accusée et encore moins reconnue coupable; elle ne fait pas non plus l'objet d'accusations qui sont ensuite retirées. Ces situations pourraient être le fondement de la révocation d'une suspension de casier.

N'oubliez pas de quoi il est question. Il ne s'agit pas de quelque chose qui constitue encore une infraction pour laquelle on a obtenu un pardon parce qu'on a maintenant adopté un bon comportement et qu'on s'est repenti. Il est question de quelque chose qui n'est plus illégal. Comment une personne peut-elle même avoir encore cette épée de Damoclès au-dessus de la tête? Je vous pose la question respectueusement. Ce n'est plus illégal. Pourquoi le voulons-nous encore dans le système? Pour quelle bonne raison pourrait-on vouloir rétablir une condamnation pour quelque chose qui n'est plus un crime? Bien franchement, la raison m'échappe.

(1715)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

Le président:

J'entends la sonnerie d'appel, mais avec le consensus, je vais poursuivre la séance jusqu'à 17 h 30. J'espère que tout le monde est d'accord.

Monsieur Motz, vous avez quatre minutes.

M. Glen Motz:

Merci.

Tout d'abord, vous avez des idées et des recommandations à l'esprit. Vous serait-il possible de fournir au Comité une liste de recommandations qui...

M. Solomon Friedman:

Je les ai devant moi.

M. Glen Motz:

... amélioreraient ce projet de loi?

Ce serait fantastique si vous pouviez transmettre cette liste au Comité.

M. Solomon Friedman:

Je serais heureux de le faire.

M. Glen Motz:

Nous avons confirmé hier avec les fonctionnaires que des personnes accusées de possession simple de plus de 30 grammes de cannabis en public avant le 17 octobre 2018 seront admissibles à cette procédure accélérée de suspension de casier judiciaire. Toutefois, à l'heure actuelle, la possession de plus de 30 grammes est encore une infraction.

M. Solomon Friedman:

Vous devez poser la question au gouvernement qui a adopté la Loi sur le cannabis. Il y a eu un vif débat à cet égard, et je n'aime pas beaucoup non plus cette disposition.

M. Glen Motz:

C'est incohérent. Quelles sont les conséquences de cette disposition?

M. Solomon Friedman:

Comme je l'ai dit, il va falloir parler aux personnes qui ont rédigé le projet de loi. J'ai examiné le projet de loi, et il ne me semble pas très logique. À mon avis, la rédaction de la Loi sur le cannabis comporte une lacune fondamentale en réalité. Si nous faisons mieux que la Loi sur le cannabis, alors je crois que nous sommes en avance. J'essaie de voir le bon côté des choses.

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord.

J'espère que vos recommandations pourront régler cela.

J'ai une dernière question. Est-ce que vous pensez que le processus de suspension de casier judiciaire pourrait créer un précédent pour d'autres accusations dans l'avenir?

M. Solomon Friedman:

Selon moi, chaque fois que le Parlement décriminalise une activité qui était criminelle auparavant dans le Code criminel — autrement dit, qu'elle n'est plus criminelle —, les gens ne devraient pas subir la stigmatisation associée à un casier judiciaire en raison de ce qu'ils ont fait par le passé. Si le Parlement dit aujourd'hui que ce n'est plus illégal, je ne comprends pas pourquoi il faudrait qu'on assume les conséquences d'une infraction passée.

(1720)

M. Glen Motz:

Nous avons examiné une étude — je crois que c'était la motion M-161 qu'a présentée M. Long — portant sur certaines personnes qui, nous le savons tous, avaient été condamnées pour d'autres infractions, comme pour vol ou autre chose.

M. Solomon Friedman:

Ces condamnations ne seront pas suspendues. La possession de cannabis...

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord, sous le régime de cette loi... Ma question est la suivante: devrait-il y avoir un mécanisme pour faciliter le processus? Pensez-vous que ce processus peut avoir des incidences à cet égard?

M. Solomon Friedman:

Comme je l'ai dit, si quelqu'un a plusieurs condamnations criminelles, ce projet de loi ne prévoit que la suspension de la condamnation pour possession de cannabis.

Ce n'est pas négligeable, soit dit en passant. Si on révèle le casier judiciaire d'une personne qui comportait auparavant des condamnations pour vol d'une valeur inférieure à 5 000 $ et pour possession de drogue, alors il ne reste que la condamnation pour vol d'une valeur inférieure à 5 000 $ . Cela change les antécédents criminels d'une personne. La condamnation pour possession de drogue disparaît; seule demeure la condamnation pour vol d'une valeur inférieure à 5 000 $. À mon avis...

M. Glen Motz:

Si on a écopé des deux condamnations, on n'est pas admissible à la suspension.

M. Solomon Friedman:

Oui. C'est assez juste, n'est-ce pas? Je comprends cela. Mon opinion, c'est que toutes les condamnations pour possession de cannabis devraient disparaître. Qu'on ait 1, 5 ou 10 autres condamnations, pourquoi devrait-on subir la stigmatisation de cette condamnation alors que ce n'est plus un crime?

M. Glen Motz:

Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Picard, vous avez quatre minutes.

M. Michel Picard:

Je vais donner mon temps à M. Spengemann.

M. Sven Spengemann (Mississauga—Lakeshore, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Friedman, merci beaucoup. Nous sommes ravis de vous revoir au Comité.

J'ai deux questions avant de laisser la parole à mon collègue.

Pouvez-vous parler un peu plus en détail de l'article qui vise les personnes vulnérables dans la loi actuelle et nous décrire le type de vérifications qui sont effectuées au-delà des vérifications de casier judiciaire habituelles?

Ensuite, pensez-vous à d'autres pays, à l'exception des États-Unis, qui ont trouvé la solution ou qui sont pour nous, à votre avis, des exemples que nous devrions suivre?

M. Solomon Friedman:

L'article 6.3 de la Loi sur le casier judiciaire définit ce qu'est une « personne vulnérable ». Cet article prévoit qu'on peut essentiellement communiquer les dossiers, à la demande d'un particulier responsable du bien-être d'une personne vulnérable.

Il y a ensuite l'annexe 1 qui établit les types d'infractions qui seraient encore communiquées même après une suspension de casier judiciaire. Il s'agit en grande partie d'infractions d'ordre sexuel, et c'est très logique. On parle de quelqu'un qui présente sa candidature pour s'occuper de personnes vulnérables. Même si la personne a maintenant une bonne moralité, je peux certainement comprendre cela.

Ce sont, toutefois — et je suis certain que vous avez étudié cela —, ce qu'on appelle des accusations rejetées. Autrement dit, même si on n'a pas été condamné, on peut nous empêcher de profiter de certaines possibilités parce qu'on a eu des démêlés avec la police, commis des infractions provinciales et fait l'objet de conditions de mise en liberté sous caution et bien d'autres choses.

Cette infraction, cependant — la possession de cannabis —, ne figure pas dans la liste de l'annexe 1. Elle ne serait pas visée par ce mécanisme de communication pour les personnes vulnérables prévu à l'article 6.3.

M. Sven Spengemann:

Très brièvement, y a-t-il d'autres pays qui ont trouvé la solution, à l'exception des États-Unis, et que nous devrions examiner?

M. Solomon Friedman:

Je ne suis pas en mesure de parler d'autres pays que les États-Unis. Je vais mentionner précisément San Francisco, où c'était automatique. Les gens n'avaient pas besoin de présenter une demande; le gouvernement est allé dans la base de données et a simplement effacé les dossiers de la condamnation.

M. Sven Spengemann:

Merci beaucoup.

Michel, vous avez la parole.

M. Michel Picard:

Merci, monsieur.

Disons qu'une réhabilitation — ou peu importe le mot utilisé dans le projet de loi — fait en sorte que, puisque l'activité n'est plus illégale, la condamnation antérieure ne compte pas parce qu'elle est censée être suspendue. Lorsqu'une personne passe une entrevue pour obtenir un emploi et entame ce genre de démarches, étant donné que cette infraction n'est plus illégale, pensez-vous qu'une entreprise devrait examiner des antécédents liés au cannabis? L'entreprise, par exemple, devrait-elle vérifier si la personne a été condamnée pour possession de cannabis, alors que, en fait, ce n'est plus illégal, ou ne devrait-elle pas s'inquiéter de cela?

M. Solomon Friedman:

Vous et moi pouvons convenir que l'entreprise ne devrait pas se préoccuper de cela, mais le gouvernement n'est pas en mesure d'établir les politiques internes des entreprises. Si l'entreprise obtient le casier judiciaire d'un candidat et qu'elle a une politique qui prévoit de ne pas embaucher une personne qui a écopé d'une condamnation liée à la drogue, alors il n'aura pas l'emploi.

Il y a également d'autres facteurs qui entrent en jeu. Il s'agit en partie de questions de cautionnement et d'assurance. La compagnie d'assurances de l'entreprise peut dire que cette dernière ne peut pas prendre à son service une personne qui a un casier judiciaire. Le Parlement ne pourrait rien faire — du moins, il n'y a rien que je peux voir — à cet égard. La chose la plus simple à faire, c'est de retirer cette condamnation du casier judiciaire.

Nous pouvons tous avoir une opinion très éclairée et dire à un candidat potentiel que sa condamnation fait partie du passé, que cette possession est maintenant légale et qu'il peut travailler pour nous — c'est ce que je ferais probablement dans un tel cas —, mais nous ne pouvons pas légiférer cela autrement qu'en retirant le dossier de la condamnation.

(1725)

M. Michel Picard:

Oui, mais disons, par exemple, qu'on se fiche pas mal dans l'industrie du transport routier que la personne ait fait l'objet d'une condamnation ou non. La préoccupation de l'employeur est de savoir si le conducteur consomme du cannabis en travaillant. Que cette consommation soit légale ou non, l'industrie ne peut pas permettre à un conducteur de travailler avec les facultés affaiblies par le cannabis, et, pendant une certaine période, il ne devrait pas y avoir de traces de cannabis. Comme vous l'avez dit, cela figure dans les politiques des entreprises.

Il vient un temps où les gens qui auront évidemment vraiment besoin de cette suspension présenteront une demande, selon le processus que nous proposons, parce qu'ils ont besoin d'un document pour prouver qu'ils n'ont pas de casier judiciaire. Alors, comme il existe déjà un système où un document confirme que la personne a été réhabilitée, pourquoi est-il nécessaire d'aller beaucoup plus loin, selon votre témoignage, puisque les objectifs ont été réalisés?

M. Solomon Friedman:

Je regarde la nature de la population qui est ciblée de manière disproportionnée par ces condamnations. Ce ne sont pas des gens qui ont les capacités ou l'éducation pour savoir qu'il existe un processus de suspension de casier judiciaire ou être en mesure de le suivre sans trop de difficulté, comme retenir les services d'une de ces entreprises prédatrices pour des milliers de dollars.

Si ce que nous tentons d'assurer ici, c'est la justice et l'équité pour les personnes qui ont été condamnées pour une infraction qui n'existe plus, alors il n'est certainement pas nécessaire de leur faire franchir les mêmes obstacles, moins les frais et le processus d'approbation. Nous devons maintenir le processus pour les personnes condamnées pour des infractions qui existent encore.

N'oubliez pas que ce n'est plus un crime, alors, à mon avis, le gouvernement devrait faire tout ce qu'il peut pour lever chaque obstacle auquel se heurte une personne et chaque fardeau qu'elle doit porter pour avoir fait quelque chose qui n'est plus illégal.

Le président:

Avant que je lève la séance, avez-vous une observation concernant une personne qui a écopé de plusieurs condamnations pour possession de cannabis au fil des ans? Faut-il présenter une demande pour toutes ces condamnations, ou en déposer une pour chaque condamnation?

M. Solomon Friedman:

À mon avis, cela devrait se faire automatiquement. Si vous voulez mettre en place un processus de demande, alors il devrait s'agir d'une demande pour toutes les condamnations. Cela devrait s'appliquer aux gens, peu importe leurs autres antécédents. Ces condamnations, selon moi, devraient simplement disparaître.

Le président:

Sur ce, la séance est levée.

Merci.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 01, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.