header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-05-02 PROC 152

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1125)

[Translation]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning.

Welcome to the 152nd meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.[English]

We had discussions with all parties, and if it's okay with everyone, we will proceed with 45 minutes for each set of witnesses because we have two sets and a half hour less.

Is that okay with everyone?[Translation]

Very well.

This morning, we are continuing our study on the main estimates for 2019-20, vote 1 under Office of the Chief Electoral Officer.

The witnesses are from Elections Canada. We have Stéphane Perrault, Chief Electoral Officer; Michel Roussel, Deputy Chief Electoral Officer, Electoral Events and Innovation; and Hughes St-Pierre, Deputy Chief Electoral Officer, Internal Services.

Thank you for being here today.

I will now hand the floor over to you, Mr. Perrault. You may go ahead with your presentation.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault (Chief Electoral Officer, Elections Canada):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

It is a pleasure to be before the committee today to present Elections Canada's main estimates and plans for 2019-20. This appearance also provides the opportunity to update committee members on the implementation of Bill C-76 and, above all, our final preparations for the general election.

Today, the committee is voting on Election Canada's annual appropriation, which is $39.2 million and represents the salaries of some 440 indeterminate positions. This is an increase of $8.4 million over last year's appropriation. As I indicated when I last appeared before this committee, the increase is essentially a rebalancing of the agency's budgets, moving expenses for terms and contract resources out of the statutory authority and into the annual appropriation in order to fund indeterminate resources. It does not represent any spending increase overall. In fact, it results in a slight spending reduction.

Combined with our statutory authority, which funds all other expenditures under the Canada Elections Act, our 2019-20 main estimates total $493.2 million. This includes $398 million for the October 21 election, which represents the direct election delivery costs that will be incurred in this fiscal year.

Our most recent estimates indicate that total expenditures for the 43rd general election will be some $500 million. The expenditures may vary due to various factors such as the duration of the campaign.

I note that, while preparing our budgets last fall, we had estimated the cost of the election at some $470 million. The difference is mainly due to Bill C-76—$21 million—which had not been passed at the time of preparing our estimates and therefore had not been taken into account.

Elections Canada continues to implement Bill C-76 and bring into force its provisions as preparations are completed.

Following my last appearance, the new privacy policy requirements for political parties, the administrative reintegration of the Commissioner of Canada Elections within the Office of the Chief Electoral Officer, as well as the establishment of the new register of future electors, came into force on April 1.

On May 11, the changes brought by Bill C-76 for electors residing outside Canada will also come into force. The balance of other provisions will come into force in June. From an electoral operation perspective, Elections Canada will then be ready to conduct the election with the required Bill C-76 changes. Our applications, training and instructions will have been updated, tested and ready for use.

In terms of regulatory activities, all guidance on political financing will be finalized and published prior to the beginning of the pre-writ period on June 30. Leading up to that date, we will continue consulting parties on various products through the opinions, guidelines and interpretation notes process.

The agency is also gearing up to complete the audits of political entity returns following the election. We are expecting increases in the audit work stemming from the new requirements introduced by Bill C-76, notably for third parties, as well as the removal of the $1,000 deposit for candidates.

Despite this increase, we aim to reduce the time required to complete the audit of candidate returns by 30% in order to improve transparency and ensure more timely reimbursements. To achieve this, we are implementing a streamlined risk-based audit plan.

(1130)

[English]

A key priority as part of our final preparations is to further improve the quality of the list of electors. Every year some three million Canadians move, 300,000 pass away, more than 100,000 become citizens, and 400,000 turn 18. This translates roughly into 70,000 changes in any given week.

To ensure the accuracy of the register, Elections Canada regularly draws on multiple data sources from more than 40 provincial and federal bodies as well as from information provided directly by Canadians, mostly online. This will be facilitated by recent improvements made to our online registration systems to capture non-standard addresses and upload identification documents.

With the enactment of Bill C-76, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada is now able to share information about permanent residents and foreign nationals. This provides Elections Canada with a much-needed tool to address the long-recognized issue of non-citizens appearing on the register of electors. This spring, we expect to remove approximately 100,000 records as a result.

We have also recently written to 250,000 households for which we believe we have records that need correction. Efforts to improve the accuracy of the list of electors will continue and will be supported by a new pre-writ campaign to encourage Canadians to verify and update their information over the spring and the summer.

On April 18 the agency concluded an extensive three-week election simulation exercise in five electoral districts. The simulation allowed us to test our business processes, handbooks and IT systems in a setting that closely resembles that of an actual election. Election workers were hired and trained, and they participated in simulated voting exercises that factored in changes introduced by Bill C-76. This exercise also gave some of our new returning officers the opportunity to observe local office operations and exchange with more experienced colleagues.

Overall, the simulation exercise confirmed our readiness level while identifying a few areas in which we need to refine some of our procedures, instructions and applications. The final adjustments will be made this spring.

With the assurance provided by our simulation and most recent by-elections, I have a high level of confidence in our state of readiness and our tools to deliver this election.

From an electoral security perspective, the agency is engaged this spring in a number of scenario exercises with the Commissioner of Canada Elections and Canada's lead security agencies to ensure that roles and responsibilities are clear and that proper governance is established to coordinate our actions. As indicated in the Communications Security Establishment's most recent report, Canada is not immune to cyber-threats and disinformation.

Since the last general election, a wide range of organizations, including Elections Canada, have worked to adapt to the new context and strengthen Canada's democratic resilience in the face of these evolving threats. Elections Canada and its security partners approach the next general election with a new level of vigilance and awareness and unprecedented level of co-operation.

General elections are one of Canada's largest civic events. Our role is to provide a trusted and accessible voting service to 27 million electors in some 338 electoral districts. lt involves hiring and training more than 300,000 poll workers deployed in more than 70,000 polls across the country. Our returning officers have been continually engaged in improvements planned for the next election. I had the opportunity to meet with our field personnel across Canada. I can assure you that they are engaged, ready and resolved in their commitment to provide electors and candidates with outstanding service.

(1135)

[Translation]

Mr. Chair, I would be pleased to answer any questions the committee members may have. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much. It's great to have you back again. We have a great working relationship.

We'll go to Mr. Simms for seven minutes.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

I'm going to be sharing my time with Mr. Graham.

First of all, welcome back, as always. I want to talk about some of the good things you've done over the past little while: the new policy requirements for political parties, the register of future electors and of course the administrative reintegration of the Commissioner of Canada Elections, which I think was something very important for them to do their jobs.

In the meantime, one new element of Bill C-76 that many people had questions about was the ramifications, both financial and administrative, for what we now know as the pre-writ period.

Can you comment on that, please?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We have new rules that will be in place for June 30. They're not in force right now; that period starts at that point in time. At that point there are now extensive rules for third parties on the one hand to cover all of their partisan expenditures and rules for parties to limit their partisan advertising expenses, which covers only the direct advertising. This is a new feature that we did not have in previous elections.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Okay.

Let me return to the future electors list, which is also a new process. Can you describe how it's going? I know, as of April 1, it's now in force. However, what do you have left to do to make sure this is ready for the coming fall election?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The register is in place. Right now, we are not very actively pursuing registration of future electors. We are mostly going to focus on that after the election.

We are receiving. It is up and running, but our energy is not focused on the registration of future voters; it is focused on the register of electors for this election.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes, understood. I think Mr. Graham is going to touch on that issue in just a moment—not to presuppose what he is going to ask, but I just did.

I want to get back to another issue. That is, during the last iteration of what was called the Fair Elections Act, Elections Canada found itself constrained in what it could communicate with the public. It's very important that Elections Canada be more outgoing. Certainly it would be great for Elections Canada to be communicating more broadly with the people about the importance of their constitutional right.

Can you tell us some of the things you are doing to reach out to people? I understand about the list itself and cleaning up the list, but what are some of the things you are doing to communicate to people about the vote itself that is coming up in the fall?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

During the writ period itself, we are not changing our approach. During the election period we're focusing strictly on providing information about where and when to register and to vote. That is our focus.

What has changed somewhat is that before the writ period we can now speak more broadly about the electoral process, including to voters, not just non-voters. One of the things we are doing, which I mentioned in my speech, is a pre-writ campaign to promote registration. We want to have Canadians register and update their information, so prior to the writ period we will have an influencer campaign to promote registration and voting. That will run starting this spring and this summer but will stop in the writ period.

We are also going to have a campaign on social media literacy to talk about disinformation, the risk of disinformation and making sure that Canadians check their sources when they go online on social media.

Those are the basic new things we're doing.

(1140)

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you.

My remaining time can go to Mr. Graham.

The Chair:

You have three minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

As I recall, we've changed the rules a bit on foreign electors. Can you tell me the level of interest you're getting, if there is much, from potential foreign electors?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

In terms of the new rules, it's a bit of a complicated process, because there was a ruling by the Supreme Court in February that allows Canadians abroad, who have resided in Canada, to vote notwithstanding the fact that they've been abroad for any number of years. Since that time, based on that ruling, we've received up to 2,000 new Canadians-abroad registrations. Half of them are from people who have been away for more than five years.

On May 11, the new rules will kick in, so that will change and restrict the ability of voters to choose where they can vote. Under the old regime, they could choose a number of places where they could vote; under the new rules, they have to vote at their place of last ordinary residence in Canada. That will kick in on May 11.

In terms of numbers, we've seen some increase but nothing very dramatic.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

In your comments, you talked about the 70,000 changes per week to the voters list, which is obviously significant. If I were to look at a voters list on any given day, what would you say is the percentage of accuracy of that list?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

You have roughly 10,000 changes that happen in any given day. The accuracy of the list evolves as we get closer to the election. At the time we began the last election, the accuracy was around 91.5%, and it ended up around 94.5%.

Based on the number of activities we're doing right now, I'm quite optimistic that we will be at a higher level when we start this election than in the last one, but it's something we'll have to measure then.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay. I have a minute.

You talked about cyber-threats. I'm not sure that's a public discussion. It should probably have been an in camera discussion. Is there material that we would find useful to have in camera during this meeting?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Not really. We had to make a lot of changes to our IT infrastructure just because it had become obsolete. We had the opportunity this cycle to take advantage of that, to renew our IT infrastructure in a way that meets security standards. We have been working quite closely with the CSE to provide us advice on how to do that and make sure that our suppliers are trustworthy, and so forth.

We have, then, been working with them, and that really is the main thing.

The other thing I would add is that we have been doing training for all of our personnel at headquarters and in the field. You can invest enormous amounts of money in IT security, but if somebody clicks on a link, that compromises everything, so many of our efforts have been on awareness. We have many workers during an election at headquarters, and there are people in the field using computers. We want to make sure that everybody who has a computer is trained to recognize phishing attempts, for example.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

And foreign influence is not your bailiwick.

My time is up. Thank you.

The Chair:

Welcome, Pierre Poilievre, to the committee, for seven minutes.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC):

SNC-Lavalin falsified documents to funnel more than $100,000 in illegal money through 18 company officials to the Liberal Party. Do you support the commissioner's decision to let the company off without charges?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I am not aware of the details of the investigation or of all the circumstances that informed this decision. What I can say on this is what is on the public record, which is that the seriousness of the offence is one factor but is not the only factor in making the decision to prosecute or take other steps, such as a compliance agreement. The commissioner has been explicit on that.

One factor, for example, is the availability of evidence. Is there evidence that could support a criminal prosecution? If there is not such evidence, then that's the end of the avenue for prosecution.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

On that point, the CBC did a documentary, and it discovered a list of employees through whom the money was funnelled. I am going to quote: All of the former SNC-Lavalin employees and spouses named in the list who spoke to The Fifth Estate...said they were not contacted by the Commissioner of Canada Elections to let them know their names were on the document.

These are the people through whom the illegal donations were funnelled. You say there's no evidence. How could you possibly conclude that, when none of the people who were used to funnel the illegal donations were even contacted?

(1145)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I did not speak to the existence of evidence in that particular file. I said that this is one factor in general that the commissioner takes into account. I'm not aware of the evidence that was available in that file or the evidence in particular that relates to any of these individuals.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Well there's plenty of evidence, in fact, the company has now conceded that it had generated fictitious bonuses and other benefits which, according to information obtained in the context of the commissioner's investigation, were of a total value of $117,803. That is evidence; that is known.

Knowing this, do you still support your commissioner's decision not to pursue the matter in court?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

As I said, I cannot pronounce on that. I do not, by institutional design, have access to the information.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Who would?

The Chair:

I'm sorry, I have a point of order.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

This is a matter for the elections commissioner, who, because of the Canada Elections Act, was not part of Elections Canada at the time of this investigation.

That's just a quick point. Carry on.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Who would?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The Commissioner of Canada Elections has this information.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Do you support his appearance to answer these questions before this committee?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It's neither for me to support or to oppose his appearance.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

You might want to claim that, but you asked to have control over the commissioner, you now hire the commissioner, you fire the commissioner and you decide how much the commissioner gets paid—that was something you asked for in the legislation. Now you seem no longer to want to have the responsibility that comes with that power. Which is it?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

For the record, the reunification of the commissioner with Elections Canada was not something that was recommended by Elections Canada.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

The original separation was vigorously fought by Elections Canada when you were at the highest level. You also endorsed the bill that reunified them. You asked, then, for the power, but you don't seem to want to have the responsibility.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The unification is an administrative one. The Chief Electoral Officer, under the regime as it is designed under Bill C-76, is at arm's length from any investigation conducted by the commissioner.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

The office is now reunified, and you are now responsible for it; section 509 of the current statute makes it so. That is the hard reality.

Can you understand why Canadians would become cynical about the fair and even-handed enforcement of election law in this country, when well-connected Liberal insiders can engage in a four-year-long conspiracy involving 18 company officials to funnel illegal money using false and fictitious documentation and not face a single day in court? Can you understand why someone might get a little bit suspicious about whether the law is being evenly enforced on elections?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Mr. Chair, as I've said, I do not have the information that allows me to have a sense of that particular file and the reasons that supported the decision of the commissioner. I'm not aware of the discussions that took place with the commissioner or with the DPP, if there were any discussions with the DPP. This is outside of the scope of my activities.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

You said in your opening remarks that it was within your scope, because you pointed out that the reunification affected the budgetary matters of your agency. You have acknowledged the reunification; my friend across the way has celebrated it. All of a sudden it has become very inconvenient for you to have the two offices reunified in one, because while you want the power, you don't want the responsibility.

It sounds to me as though what we need here is the commissioner to come to explain his actions, if you won't explain them for him.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That's something for the committee to decide. It's certainly not for me to decide.

Under the new arrangements, the only thing I would add is that we are responsible—I am responsible—for the administrative support of the commissioner, but not for the specific investigations he may choose to pursue or not pursue, and if he pursues them, the measures that he undertakes pursuant to the—

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

So, are you committing that no one in your office or under your employment will ever speak to the commissioner about investigations?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We certainly will not be involved in any decision regarding the conduct of an investigation—

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

But you discuss them with him?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

The commissioner is empowered to ask my view or the views of others—

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Would you offer them without being asked, ever?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I think that's an abstract question. I don't have the answer—

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Well, it's not abstract. There are investigations that could happen, and you would be able to advise on them. Do you, ever?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

If the commissioner has a question regarding, for example, the importance to the regime of a particular provision, I think that's a fair question.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

So you do discuss investigations with him.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

That is not what I said.

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Well, it seems to be what you said.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

What I have said, Mr. Chair, is that if the commissioner wants to engage in a conversation regarding the importance, for example, of a provision of the act, the integrity of the regime, that is a sound thing. I think the Commissioner of Canada Elections, who enforces the act, and the Chief Electoral Officer need to have a common view on how the regime operates and what the more important aspects of the regime are.

(1150)

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Well, I think, given that you've acknowledged that you can have conversations with the commissioner, you should have a conversation about how it is even possible for an enterprise like SNC-Lavalin to carry out this kind of patent, four-year running fraud involving 18 employees to funnel money, 93% of which went to one political party—the party whose government appointed you to your position—and not face one single day in court for it.

You offered your opinion on a lot of different things over the years. Can you at least offer your opinion on whether you think that state of affairs is correct?

The Chair:

Do so briefly, because the seven minutes are up.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Mr. Chair, I would simply point to the compliance agreement as drafted by the commissioner, in which he was at pains to explain the evidence obtained by SNC-Lavalin and the fact that this was a critical aspect of pursuing the matter. As I said before, the existence or absence of evidence supporting a prosecution is of course critical to the ability to do a prosecution. Anything beyond that relates to the investigation itself, and I cannot speak to it.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now we go to Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you, Chair. With your permission I'd like to move from inquisition back to the matter at hand.

My question to you, first of all, would be, what was the biggest challenge of implementing Bill C-76? What was the toughest part of it?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Certainly, there was quite a large effort required in changing the IT systems that are affected. It's not something that is easy to appreciate from the outside, but many of the business processes in running a launch involve IT systems, and doing comprehensive changes to IT systems in the months leading up to an election is a challenge.

We were able to do it; I can say with confidence that these changes were made. They were tested in January; they were then stress-tested to the volume, and exceeding the volumes, that you can expect in a general election; and they were deployed in a simulated election. We've handled that challenge and we're confident. I am certainly confident going into this election.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I have some security questions, and I know Mr. Graham has too. I can do them now, but I have a funny feeling that they still might be better done in camera, because I want to drill down a bit. I'll leave that to the end, however, and we can make a determination.

As much as the government gets credit for Bill C-76 and unravelling some of the ugliness that was in the “unfair elections act” that the previous government enacted, the way they did it was ham-fisted and borderline incompetent.

However, am I correct in stating that the government, like the previous party in power, did not change the law regarding parties submitting receipts? It's my understanding that for years and years we've been trying to get to the point that parties should have to provide receipts in the same way candidates do when you are evaluating whether they are entitled to their subsidies.

I can't think of the number right now off the top of my head, but $76 million comes to mind, though that could just be a number I'm pulling out of thin air. It's a huge amount of money that the parties get subsidies for, and they don't have to provide receipts.

Is that still the case?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Yes, that's the case. The number you're looking for is $76 million.

We are the only electoral jurisdiction, I believe, in Canada that does not have access to any supporting documentation for parties, so I was disappointed that this was not a part of Bill C-76.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, it is just unbelievable that we've gone through two regimes that changed the law and both have said no to parties having to provide receipts. How the heck do you get subsidy dollar one from the Canadian government without a receipt if they ask for it? This has to be the only example, and it's such an abomination in our democracy; it truly is.

This is my last kick at this thing, which is why I'm going at it. This is just unacceptable.

How many millions of that $76 million should not go to the political parties—my own included—when they're not even providing receipts? We do not know. I put the blame for this squarely with this government and the previous government, who refuse to hold themselves to the same account that they demand from everybody else who deals with government. If there's anything to write about in terms of big things that still need to be done to fix our democracy.... People think security, and that's legitimate, but accountability, folks: $76 million of subsidies goes to political parties with no receipts. Unbelievable.

Now I want to turn to security, so I'll just ask the questions, Chair, and I'll leave it to you and the witnesses to determine whether we should stay in public or not.

Right now, what do you see as the single biggest macro threat to our election?

(1155)

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I can only refer to the recent report of the Communications Security Establishment, which is a public report. It says basically that the biggest threat is disinformation and the biggest target is the ordinary voter. That's the biggest target, and that's why we think it's important in the lead-up to the election to have an awareness campaign to make sure that Canadians check their sources.

We have no indication that there are any foreign actors who intend to favour one party versus another. We have no sense that this is the concern. I think the general sense is that there's an interest in undermining the electoral process itself and the willingness of Canadians to participate and trust in the electoral process. That's where our focus is going to be.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Where are we expecting these threats?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It's not for me to speak to that. It's for a national security agency.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Don't you need to know that, though?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

It really doesn't change what we do. Our role is to protect our infrastructure. Our role is to correct misinformation about the voting process. Our role is to educate Canadians. Whether the disinformation comes from one country or another or whether it's internal to Canada really does not affect our response to this. It affects Global Affairs; it certainly affects CSIS, for example, or CSE, but not Elections Canada.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I see.

I assume that there is a plan in place to be evaluating this question throughout the election. Then, I would also be interested in what your plans are for everybody to regroup after the election, in terms of security, to see what worked, what didn't work and how well we defended our system.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

These are two good points.

In terms of regrouping, we're not there yet, but it is certainly something that is high on my mind. After the election we'll have to touch base to see what happened. What we are doing now, as indicated, is working using scenarios—tabletop exercises with security partners—to make sure that we each understand what the other can do, what the boundaries are, what the contact points are, so that the governance is clear and that nothing falls between the cracks and that we operate efficiently, if we need to intervene during the election.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay.

Are you in consultation if not outright coordination with other allies that are facing the same problem?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolutely. First of all, we take part in various forums that exist around the world and have discussed this issue. We've been in Estonia—I believe last March. There was a forum at the OAS as well this year. We have what we call the four countries, which are the U.K., Australia, New Zealand and Canada.

Mr. David Christopherson:

—the Five Eyes?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

—well, without the Americans.

We are a group that are in fairly constant communication. I will be in London this summer engaging them, looking at what will have occurred in the Australian election, which is just happening. We are, then, keeping abreast of the issues around the world.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you all for being here today.

Can you remind me when the commissioner was appointed?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I believe it was in 2012, but I'd have to confirm.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I also believe that it was in 2012. I believe that was a few years before this government was elected, as a first point.

The next point is that the honourable member from Carleton has mentioned and has criticized Elections Canada as really “a Liberal black dog”. Would you care to comment on that?

(1200)

Hon. Pierre Poilievre:

I'm sorry, that is false.

As a point of order, I said “lap dog”, not “black dog”.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Oh, I'm sorry, Mister. I have a transcript in front of me. It says “black dog”, but we'll go with “lap dog”.

Would you care to comment on that?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

I will not comment on that.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Looking around the world, do you have any concerns with elected officials calling into question the integrity of impartial elected officials?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Again, I will not comment on that.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

The job of Elections Canada is to remain independent and be a beacon to Canadians, but also a beacon to other countries, because we've heard from other individuals at this committee that Elections Canada has a strong profile around the world because of the regulations in place and because of the reputation of Elections Canada—not just this current administration's, but going back many decades.

Is that the role you seek to maintain as Chief Electoral Officer?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We have a strong tradition in Canada. We will be celebrating next year our 100th anniversary, “we” being Elections Canada. One hundred years ago, Canada chose to create an independent chief electoral officer. It was the first country in the world to do that, and it's been considered ever since a model around the world in terms of the independence of the office. It's something we're very proud of.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Before the commissioner was moved back to Elections Canada under Bill C-76, can you remind us where the commissioner was previously housed?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Until recently, he was within the office of the DPP, the Director of Public Prosecutions.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

That's interesting, that he was with the Director of Public Prosecutions. It's also interesting that the opposition is calling, seemingly, for interference in a prosecution, which is ironic, given the debate in this city over other issues the past few months ago.

I appreciate that you don't want to comment and shouldn't comment—and I respect that—on this prosecution. Would you care to comment on the compliance—?

An hon. member: [Inaudible—Editor]

Mr, Chris Bittle: I don't know, Mr. Poilievre. I think in this committee we wait for each other to finish, but I know you're new and that this is your first time being here.

Would you care to comment on the compliance agreement between the Commissioner of Canada Elections and Mr. Poilievre that was signed in 2017?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

For the very same reason that I will not comment on the SNC-Lavalin compliance agreement, I will not comment on that compliance agreement or any compliance agreement.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I appreciate that. It's interesting that Mr. Poilievre, in his glass house over there, is throwing stones. I guess he didn't question whether he should have his day in court to hear this out. I appreciate that he may be up for the Nobel Prize in irony, in coming here today to make this criticism.

I have a few minutes left. I'd like to turn it over to Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I found it very ironic. I hope I got this correct, but Mr. Poilievre mentioned the independence. Listen, I'm all for that. As a former critic.... About the commissioner returning to Elections Canada, it was never suggested by them. It was a decision that we wanted to make as a party, and on becoming government, we wanted to return to that for the independence. I agree with him, but I found it ironic that his very last comment there was about telling this man to tell the commissioner about SNC-Lavalin.

You should have that conversation with him.

They're either independent or they're not, which is what Mr. Poilievre suggested. That's unfortunate. As Mr. Christopherson likes to say, I mean, come along.

Anyway, thank you very much.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I'll move on to another point.

Getting back to the topic at hand, I'd like to ask questions about the simulations and how those ran. I was wondering if you could expand on that a bit, please.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Certainly. It's something that we've done once in the past on a much smaller scale. This time around, we essentially opened five returning offices. We deployed the technology. A lot of our systems are new. We trained the personnel to work on that technology, to use it. We simulated complaints and public inquiries. We tested the governance, not just the systems and the response. They interacted with headquarters, for instance, on those issues. As I said, they hired personnel. They trained them.

Just like in a real election context, they go home for a few days after the training. When they come back, it's not just right after the training. They will have forgotten a few things. Then we run simulations of different kinds of voter ID issues and of people registering in order to make sure they understand the procedures and they run them well. Then we make adjustments to our training as necessary. We also ran scenarios of the wrong things happening. People were not aware of what those scenarios would be, so they had to respond appropriately.

It's a comprehensive test of the systems, the governance, the procedures and the training that go into an election.

(1205)

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I only have a few seconds left. In which regions of the country did you operate these?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

There were five: New Brunswick, Montreal—in Outremont, Toronto, Winnipeg and Ottawa.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you so much.

The Chair:

Now we'll go to Ms. Kusie for five minutes.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

Thank you very much, Chair.

I certainly would like to thank the honourable member for Carleton for being here today to bring these occurrences to light, and I have to say that I have a lot of respect for the Chief Electoral Officer. As a former diplomat, I can see that he's being very gracious in his responses and is certainly doing his best to answer the questions without any overreach for his counterpart, the Commissioner of Canada Elections.

However, it seems to be, following upon the questioning of my colleague, the honourable member for Carleton, that it's necessary to go beyond the responses of the Chief Electoral Officer here. He has indeed indicated that if it is the will of the committee we certainly can ask these questions of the Commissioner of Canada Elections.

As such, Chair, I would like to move the following motion, which is now being table-dropped in both official languages.

I would like to move a motion that the Commissioner of Canada Elections appear before the procedure and House affairs committee on our study of the estimates.

I am moving this motion at this time, Chair, and would like to open it up to debate. Thank you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We should be playing the Jeopardy! song in the background.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

Mr. Chair, if I could just correct the number I gave, the reimbursement of $76 million is the overall number, including candidates, and $39 million is for parties.

The Chair:

Okay.

The clerk and the researcher have pointed out to me that the commissioner's estimates are actually not before this committee. They're before the justice committee, so this motion would be out of order.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

One moment, Chair, please. I'd like to take a pause.

The Chair:

Sure.

(1210)

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Mr. Chair, it sounds like you've made a ruling that this is out of order. Is that correct?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

In that case, I would like to introduce the following motion: that the Commissioner of Canada Elections appear before the procedure and House affairs committee to discuss the illegal contributions made by SNC-Lavalin to the Liberal Party of Canada and his decision to issue a deferred prosecution agreement or whatever it's called.

A voice: A compliance agreement.

Mr. Scott Reid: Yes, a compliance agreement.

The Chair:

You're giving notice?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm introducing that motion right now.

The Chair:

For 48 hours' notice?

Mr. Scott Reid:

No, right now.

The Chair:

You have to give notice because it's not on the topic we're discussing.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Ah. So tell me, what's happening next Tuesday?

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid: No, no, this is relevant, because this will be back next Tuesday.

The Chair:

We haven't determined anything yet. It was basically committee business.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. Well, this will be our first item of committee business, then, Mr. Chair.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

One moment, Chair.

The Chair:

You have about three minutes left.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie: Yes.

The Chair: Okay, Stephanie. I think you have about two minutes left. Then we'll switch our panel of witnesses.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sure. Thank you, Chair.

Monsieur Perrault, you mentioned on Tuesday at the Senate finance committee that you estimate the number of Canadians voting will go from 11,000 electors to 30,000...due to the new provisions set out in Bill C-76. How did you come up with these estimates, please?

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

There were two methods. The main method was looking at the increase in demand after the first Frank ruling, if I'm not mistaken, at the trial that struck down the five-year rule. We then saw an increase for several months, during a number of months, when the five-year rule was removed, so some projections were made based on that.

We also know that in the United States, Americans abroad can vote without restrictions as to the years they've been away, so we looked at the proportion of Americans abroad who vote as compared to the proportions of Americans in the States who vote. You have to take into account that many Americans abroad are in the military, and that's a bit of a skewing of the numbers, so it's not an exact science.

Our projections of 30,000 remain. I would call that a class D estimate, in the sense that it's not an exact science, but we maintain our position on those numbers at this point in time.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you.

If there end up being significantly more Canadian electors voting abroad than the estimated—let's just say 100,000—will Elections Canada have the necessary resources to deal with such a significant increase? Perhaps while you're addressing that you could also address the numbers at home as well, to avoid massive delays in voting. Perhaps you can start with the voting abroad.

Mr. Stéphane Perrault:

We're not at all worried about the numbers of those voting abroad. We have excess capacity to triage large mail numbers. We are acquiring new machines to triage the mail. We will be prepared. I'm not worried about that.

In terms of the voting in Canada, what we are seeing is a trend in the last election, a trend that we've seen provincially and internationally: there is a tremendous increase in voting at advance polls. In New Zealand, they're at 50%. In Australia, they're at close to 50%, and I would suspect that they're going to get to 50% in this election. Federally, we could be well into 30% or 35% in the next election.

There are a few things that we've done. We've streamlined the paper process at the advance polls. We've increased by 20% the number of advance polls. That will also serve to reduce the travel distance in rural areas. It's not just the volume. It will get the polls closer to the people. There's an increase in the voting hours. They used to be only from noon until 8 p.m., and now it's from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. There's a range of tools that we've done.

The other thing that we've seen in Ontario and Quebec provincial elections is a dramatic increase in voting at the returning office. It was 400% in Quebec and 200% in Ontario, so we have streamlined the special ballot process that is used for voting at the RO's office to make it more efficient. We're increasing the capacity as well.

(1215)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Kusie. Now we'll do the standard question for votes on estimates.[Translation]

Shall vote 1 under Office of the Chief Electoral Officer carry?[English] OFFICE OF THE CHIEF ELECTORAL OFFICER ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$39,217,905

(Vote 1 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Thank you very much for coming. We appreciate having you back. I'm sure we'll see you many times in the future.

We'll suspend while we change witness panels.

(1215)

(1215)

The Chair:

Good afternoon. Welcome back to the 152nd meeting of the committee as we continue our study of the main estimates for 2019-20. We now turn our attention to vote 1 under the Leaders' Debate Commission.

We are pleased to be joined today by the Right Honourable David Johnston, the Debates Commissioner. He is accompanied by Bradley Eddison, Director of Policy and Management Services at the Commission.

Thanks to both of you for making yourselves available today. I'll now turn the floor over to you, Mr. Johnston, for your opening remarks. It's great to have you back.

Right Hon. David Johnston (Debates Commissioner, Leaders' Debates Commission):



Good afternoon, Mr. Chair and members of the committee. It's wonderful to be back.[Translation]

Thank you for the opportunity to appear before the committee today.[English]

Thank you inviting the Leaders' Debates Commission to review our main estimates. You've kindly introduced us, so let me jump right in.

As you know, the mandate of the commission is to put on two debates, one in each official language. Within that directive is also a commitment to important elements such as transparency, accessibility and reaching as many Canadians as possible. Since my appointment as debates commissioner in late 2018, the commission has been working to achieve these goals and help give Canadians the best debates possible.

Let me begin with a brief overview of the 2019-20 main estimates. The commission is seeking a total of $4.63 million overall for its core responsibility, which is to organize two leaders debates for the 2019 federal general election, one in each official language.[Translation]

Before I tell you how we plan to use the funding to carry out our mandate, I'd like to talk a bit about what we've accomplished thus far.[English]

Since work began in December 2018, the commission has completed the first phase of our mandate, consulting with over 40 groups and individuals with a wide range of expertise and views. This includes accessibility, youth, indigenous, academic and journalistic groups. We've been pleased with the positive responses from these groups on the existence of a debates commission and our mandate. Our consultation process will continue throughout our mandate.

We have also met with the leaders of the Liberals, Conservatives, NDP, Bloc Québécois, People's Party and Green Party. Overall, there was a positive response to the commission and our mandate. Furthermore, we have set up our communications infrastructure; initiated the process for hiring a debates producer through a request for interest followed by a request for proposal; and, appointed an advisory board of seven members.

We are very proud of the board we have assembled. We're heartened by the enthusiasm from this group of great Canadians to join our cause. Also, I am especially delighted with the quality of the people on our small five-person secretariat.

We are now entering the second phase of our mandate, which will bring us well into the summer. lt consists of initiating an outreach program through partnerships with different groups and enterprises; choosing a debates producer; engaging with the political parties and producers to ensure successful negotiations; and, developing a research strategy that will enable us to measure the impact and engagement of the debates.

The third phase, which will start with the election call, will consist of ongoing consultation on the production of the debates, raising public awareness of the debates and the national outreach initiatives that foster a wide understanding of the importance of debates. We will also be evaluating the interest in, engagement with and influence of the debates.

(1220)

[Translation]

Lastly, the fourth phase of our mandate consists of developing recommendations and reporting to Parliament.[English]

Let me return to the $4.63 million that is being sought. As you know, this is the first time Canada has entrusted a debates commission with the tasks that we are now undertaking. The funds we are seeking represent an “up to” amount that will allow for our work to be guided by the independent pursuit of the public interest. However, as I emphasized previously, we intend to ensure that the commission operates cost-effectively in everything we do, in keeping with the direction provided to us in the order in council establishing our mandate.

I will cite a few examples. Our goal with our request for proposals for the production of the debates will be to focus commission expenditures on areas not generally provided by past debate organizers, such as accessibility initiatives. We are also working to identify and build relationships with existing entities in our work to both raise awareness about debates and assess their effectiveness. Additionally, it is our intention to provide a detailed report on our expenditures in our report to Parliament after the debates so that policy-makers can assess how to resource a future debates commission should that be the path chosen.[Translation]

I hope that overview of the commission's main estimates for 2019-20 demonstrates how we plan to fulfill our mandate in order to deliver the debates Canadians deserve.[English]

Once again, members of the committee, thank you for the opportunity to provide you with this context in which the Leaders' Debates Commission operates.[Translation]

We would now be pleased to answer the committee's questions.

Thank you. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Commissioner.

We'll go to Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you.

Thank you very much, Your Excellency.

That's right, you have a “thing”; every time someone says “Your Excellency”, as you said last time, you come prepared. I believe you have a charity.

Right Hon. David Johnston:

You have a very good memory and you offend frequently.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms:

Actually, it's Mr. Bittle who brought it up with me this morning. It's his memory that's the good one.

Just so you know, we're all in for your charity.

Right Hon. David Johnston:

May the habit be contagious.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's good. Okay, I'll keep that in mind.

Thank you for coming here, and thank you for all the work you've done thus far. I say that because it's always difficult to start from scratch, isn't it? That's essentially what you're doing here. But it's not like a leaders debate is a new concept, obviously. It goes back to the advent of television and radio way back when. I forget when the first one was; it was in the seventies, I believe.

So this is somewhat from scratch, but there are two ways of looking at this—how we have done this in the past and how other countries, such as the United States, have done this. Can we talk about best practices? What would you say are some of the best practices you've discovered so far in your research?

(1225)

Right Hon. David Johnston:

We look also to the provinces and the leaders debates there so that we have some built in Canada examples. As we think about civic engagement, we look to the other occasions when debates, discussions and animated exchanges on political issues are encouraged, right through to an interesting series of experiments going on in the high schools. In several provinces they have local and regional competitions on staging what would be a leaders debate. That's fascinating for me as a teacher.

Two of our senior staff people were in Washington about three weeks ago for the international debates commission meeting. I was there briefly. In fact, I spent some time with the executive director of the U.S. presidential debates commission, which is entirely non-governmental. That has about a 35- or 40-year history. Typical of our American friends in institutions of that kind, they could not be more gracious, welcoming and enthusiastic in sharing their U.S. expertise, which is quite unique as a model. In fact, that non-governmental commission not only carries off the debates but also handles all of the production and dissemination of it. That is, they actually do the production studio, managing the format and so on.

I should just add that other international contacts have come through that. The United Kingdom has a very different experience. The European countries have a different experience. We'll try to capture that, particularly in our final report to Parliament.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes, okay.

I think in the case of Great Britain a public broadcaster was involved or not involved. Of course we have the same sort of dynamic different from what the Americans have, obviously. Their public broadcaster is not as prominent as ours.

You say you have a production team.

Is that correct?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

We do not, the U.S. does.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Are you looking at creating this type of production team for our...?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

No.

We will have a request for proposals. We would expect a consortium would emerge that would undertake the responsibility for the production and the distribution of the debate with high journalistic qualities to make the feed free of charge to a number of other entities. At that point we will also encourage that number of other entities to be as widespread as we possibly can, reaching out in different languages to different regions of the country. Then try to engage social media to be sure we are best taking advantage of that new phenomenon since the debates began 30 years or so ago in a way that's quite encouraging and stimulating.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Yes, dissemination is not what it used to be, as someone once said. Dissemination can take all sorts of forms. I guess what you're doing is open access for any type of platform, whether it's a Facebook element or the CBC or what have you.

Right Hon. David Johnston:

Yes. All of what you said plus more.

Mr. Scott Simms:

When it comes to the journalistic standards—let's look at that one for a moment—how do you decide?

Obviously in the case of the format, who asks the questions? Who determines what is pertinent to a particular election? What are the main issues?

How do you get into that issue of deciding that journalistic principles are upheld?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

Those are two very important questions.

First of all, in our terms of reference in the request for proposals we will establish the conditions that come from our mandate as to the kind and type of debate in the public interest that we want. We'll ask for commentary on the matters that you have just raised. Once a decision has been made to go to a particular consortium to carry off at least the two national debates in each official language and their dissemination, we will enter into further discussions with them as to how one can push the outreach, perhaps more enthusiastically then we've seen in the past, and continue in discussions with that consortium right up to the point of the debate.

The actual format, questions to be asked, etc., will be in the hands of the successful consortium, not our hands. But through the process of following that successful request for proposal and awarding the contract we expect to be in quite frequent discussions to have some sense of how those things are evolving, but not to have the ultimate responsibility.

With respect to journalistic standards, a condition of the feed that will be provided by the successful consortium will be anybody using that feed will have to respect appropriate journalistic standards and quality. That could present some questions down the road. There's nothing in our mandate that permits us to enforce that, nor I suppose in the hands of the consortium other than to seek an injunction or some remedy after the fact.

(1230)

Mr. Scott Simms:

If you felt they weren't handling it with journalistic principles in mind.

Right Hon. David Johnston:

If we came to the conclusion that this was happening there would be a discussion with the successful consortium to seek what remedy was available. Within our mandate we do not have enforcement powers to step in and say thou shall not do that.

In the U.S., the commission on debates, because it is the producer and disseminator of the debates, has a greater degree of control over all the things you mentioned, including the venue, the format, the moderator, the type of questions, the themes, etc.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Control over the product itself, once the debate is held, who gets a copy of it and that sort of that thing?

Who gets to stream it?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

In fairness, we haven't totally sorted out copyright. We're seeking legal advice on that. My own view offhand, without having considered it, is that the copyright would remain with the consortium that produces and disseminates the debate. Any breach of copyright infractions would be handled in that route. They're not totally satisfactory because usually you can't deal with breach of copyright until the breach has occurred and the horse is out of the barn so to speak.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I realize that.

Just for the record, it's not you who would be enforcing the copyright or going after any copyright infringement. It would be the consortium itself.

Right Hon. David Johnston:

That's correct.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

It was good to talk to you again, sir.

Right Hon. David Johnston:

Thank you, and thank you once again for the contribution to the Rideau Hall Foundation, Scott.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Not a problem—I'm on it.

Thank you, sir.

The Chair:

Ms. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you, Chair.

Sorry, I'm just trying to decide how to address you here. There are so many options.

I would like to turn, if I could, please, to the advisory board members. How are these individuals selected to be on the advisory board, please?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

They were chosen by us, with my ultimate responsibility, taking advice from the secretariat, and we were guided by the references that are in our mandate. I can refer that to you, if you wish. It does indicate that one should select some members of the advisory board who have had active engagement in political matters.

We put together a very long list of candidates that, one, had had appropriate political experience and, two, had significant media experience with respect to the production and dissemination of debates, and then there was a broader area of people who had experience in things like public interest and citizen engagement, who would be very helpful in our mandate to extend the reach as far as possible and to see the debates as something that would be quite central in our election process and of high quality.

Three of our members are John Manley—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I'm aware of the membership, sir. Thank you so much.

What you're saying is that it wasn't an open application process.

Right Hon. David Johnston:

Correct.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

All right.

Was there any correspondence or discussion with you and the Office of the Prime Minister, the Privy Council Office or the Minister of Democratic Institutions regarding the selection of these advisory board members?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

No, that was entirely handled by ourselves.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay.

Can you remind us, please, who is on the secretariat that you refer to.

Right Hon. David Johnston:

The secretariat, not the advisory board—is that your question? It's led by Michel Cormier who is a retired senior executive of Radio-Canada. Michel's experience, I think, is probably two decades or more of actually organizing the debate and negotiating the consortium.

He's supported by Jess Milton. Jess is a former CBC person whose responsibility, among other things, was being the producer and director of the Vinyl Cafe with Stuart McLean. My colleague, Jill Clark, just behind me, is our communication expert; she came to us from the Rideau Hall Foundation—a foundation I chair—to handle communications. On my left is Bradley Eddison, who's our research analyst and a person who has been involved in the debates for several years, one, within the Privy Council of Canada, two, within Elections Canada and, more generally, understanding the outreach, particularly social media. We have a coordinator and office manager—

(1235)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That's great. Thank you, sir.

What, then, is the principal role of the advisory board in relation to organizing the 2019 leaders debates, please?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

Very simply, it's to provide advice to the commission with respect to the narrow mandate of carrying off two national debates, in official languages, and engaging with us and assisting in the appropriate awareness of the debates, the publicity in and around them, the citizen engagement that goes with that and preparing our final report and, of course, assisting us on appropriate issue discussion.

In fact, we had an hour and a half meeting this morning with the seven members of the advisory board by telephone. We intersperse those with face-to-face meeting and typically put before them three or four issues that we're working on in a particular month.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

When they come to decisions, do they use consensus or do they vote on the issues?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

We haven't come to any fast rules on that. I would say consensus, but the seven-person advisory board is adviser to me, the commissioner, so I would take responsibility for how that advice is received and acted upon.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Can any decisions that come out of the advisory board be overturned by anyone, including you, if deemed necessary?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

I guess if they were to be overturned, they would be overturned by me, overturning myself. They are an advisory board. The input comes in. Of course, if you do that very often with an advisory board, it somewhat tarnishes the kind of advice you get, so we would work in a way to talk a particular difficult issue through and probably come to some kind of consensus, but ultimately the commissioner has the final responsibility to make a decision and take the heat for it.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

As for the decisions that come out of the advisory board, will they be advising the producer directly, or will these decisions go through you first?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

I missed the question.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I'm referring to the decisions that come out of the advisory board, their discussions and recommendations. Will these recommendations be directly to the producer, or will they go through you first?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

The advisory board helps us with advice on the crafting of the request for proposals and the terms that we put into that. When we evaluate the responses to that, we'll use two steps. We'll use an expert procurement group from within the Government of Canada that has expertise in the technicality of production to determine whether any or some or all of these responses meet the technical requirements.

When that is finished—yes or no—then a small evaluation committee made up of three people will advise myself and the secretariat with respect to who the winning bidder should be. In the next step, they'll continue their work with that winning bidder to determine ways that we can disseminate the debate feed more effectively and, more broadly than that, engage a wider range of parties in taking advantage of that material and putting it into a public engagement process. That group will report to the commissioner.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Will there be a separate producer for each debate, or will a single producer produce all of the debates?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

We've left that open. We have said that a bid for the French debates and a separate bid for the English debates would be fine. We've also invited a consortium to consider putting the two together.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

When you accepted this role of debate commissioner, what motivated you to accept it? Why did you think that this was a good idea, as an alternative to how debates have traditionally been done in elections in Canada?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

I suppose there are three or four reasons. The simplest reason sounds a little hokey, but it's simply because I was asked.

I've spent my life as a tenured university professor, one of the most delightful positions possible in our society, and have been asked frequently to chair different public interest things. I've almost always said yes to that over 40 years or so, subject to, “I don't think I have the qualifications,” and sometimes that's been a debate. From time to time I don't have the time. Typically it's simply because I'm doing another one. I do believe that it's a citizen responsibility, especially when you're lucky enough to be a professor of law in one of Canada's fine universities.

Second, I think it's vitally important that we have timely, predictable, first-class debates where people can make decisions on what kind of leader they want to be leading our country and what kinds of policies that person and his party should be pursuing, and be broadly engaged in the spectrum of choices that good societies have to make about where they want to take their country.

I must say, I have been somewhat worried about erosion of trust in public institutions, which moved me to write a book called Trust. It came out about six months or so ago. I think that was another compelling reason to say, “I suppose I need this like another hole in my head, but it's something I should do.”

(1240)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Now we'll go to Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you, Excellency.

Right Hon. David Johnston:

It's absolutely wonderful. Thank you.

With money changing hands in this House committee, I am a little worried.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. David Christopherson:

I really liked your last answer. We went through a bit of a process in terms of how we got here, but when it came to the who, my comments are on record. Hearing your answer to the last question just reaffirms that in terms of which Canadians should be there and why. There's no better choice, and I'm really glad that you accepted.

Right Hon. David Johnston:

As I said last time, that is touching, and as I said last time, when I told my wife that evening, she didn't agree, but nevertheless, it was helpful.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's probably a big part of keeping you grounded.

If I may, I have a couple of questions. One of the things that Parliament mandated you to do was to deal with the issue of no-shows. I wonder if you have gotten that far in your thinking. If so, where is that leading you? What are your thoughts on that?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

What an important question. In the mandate, we were not given any sanction with respect to no-shows, so it's an open book as to what one does.

I suppose one looks for the sanction of publicity and notoriety for no-shows. We will trigger that somewhat, which is a matter we discussed with our advisory board this morning, through a formal process of inviting all of the appropriate parties to participate in a debate at some point in advance of the debate itself. If the letter turns out to be negative, we would publish it so that, well in advance of the debate, it would be publicly known that a party has chosen not to participate or not to participate under certain conditions.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I realize that there was no mandate to compel. There was a bit of a disconnect in terms of the process between this committee, the government and Parliament. All of that is history now, but certainly from the committee's point of view, there was a desire that you do something to show this, including things like empty seats. Are you not considering that right now? Have you ruled it out?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

Certainly that suggestion has been presented to us on a number of occasions. We have not decided to put that into the terms of reference for the request for proposals. It will be interesting to see what the consortium says with respect to that.

At this stage, we would say that the focus would be on ensuring that there is appropriate publicity about a disinclination to participate and an opportunity for the reason to be stated by that person's being disinclined. I am not sure at this stage whether the commission will make further comments on that, but I think we want it to become a matter of public discussion sufficiently in advance of the debate. It couldn't be too last minute that we can't make a decision on it.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes. We don't want to give anyone an out.

As you know, for a lot of us, the impetus for wanting this done was what happened the last time. Part of that was the all but refusal to find an agreement. If we don't get people there, we fail at the main objective. We can't have the kind of fulsome debate you were talking about if we don't have all the players.

I hope that you give that as much study as possible. What we want to do is create, in our democracy, a situation in which, politically, someone cannot afford not to go. The hit for not going should be greater than any concern a person has about participating. Your being here and continuing to amplify this by letting people know it's coming plays into that very well.

(1245)

Right Hon. David Johnston:

Thank you for emphasizing that, by the way. That discussion in itself is important. What we have done, of course, which I'd like to think was quite thorough, is considered discussions in the last three or four years about this matter, including some of the very important presentations to your committee that led to your very excellent report and others

It's also a matter that we have taken up and will continue to take up with our comparative experts as to how they deal with similar situations.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It's funny you say that, because that was going to be my next question. Having just been down in the U.S., I wonder if you know off the top of your head how they handle those things?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

I would be unwise to cite that now, because I have general information—

Mr. David Christopherson:

You haven't studied it enough yet.

Right Hon. David Johnston:

—based on our most recent discussion with the executive director of the U.S. debates commission. I would want to give you a better answer than the one I have in my head.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's fair enough. It's fine.

One of the other things that came up when we held our hearings in preparation for our report was social media. I'm very much in your category, probably, in terms of trying to stay on top of these things. It was a real eye-opener for me. It was good having Mr. Nater beside me, as he better reflected the younger generation's view of these things.

Wanting to addressing those social media platforms is so key now. What particular kinds of outreach have you done with them? Obviously there's the traditional kind, meeting with the networks and journalists in print and others. Then there are what we would call the other kinds, which are gaining in prominence.

In terms of your consultation, I'm curious as to your approach in allowing them to have input, both at the front end and the back end, in terms of how well they did.

Right Hon. David Johnston:

I begin, personally, with my 14 grandchildren, who are very good at tutoring their grandpa. They call me “Grandpa Book”, but the booking goes both ways.

Mr. David Christopherson:

You wear it with pride, I'll bet.

Right Hon. David Johnston:

Our communication manager Jill Clark is right here. Jill frequently reminds us that she doesn't have a television set in her home and she doesn't need it, and she's more informed than any one of us on what she does. She and Jess Milton have been leading this exercise in reaching out and making contact.

One of the seven members of our advisory board is Craig Kielburger. If you haven't seen the WE headquarters near King East and Parliament in Toronto, do so. It's absolutely extraordinary. They have a digital media studio to figure out how to reach.... I guess they go from about 9- to 21-year-olds with these various programs.

Today we were discussing this very question: what was the number? We've had about 40 consultations, Jill, but how many groups did we have on our list. I think 120 or so, 140.

With more to come, to whom we will reach out and say that they are interested in election debates, in election politics, what can we do to assist you, to engage the audience to which you have a catchment area, in a very positive way and reinforce that? I dare say that of the 40 or so consultations, we probably had eight or ten that would be specifically focused on that kind of—

A voice: Twitter, Facebook, Google as well. We all met with them as a part of our initial consultations.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Those are some of the folks who come in to see us too.

Right Hon. David Johnston:

Your questions would be, what about this budget, and what does it cost to put on debates?

A good portion of it will be to explore exactly that, and to stimulate that broader new social media area, and then to do an evaluation of what worked and what didn't work out of that with the metrics and so on, and in our report, try to do a little future gazing to say here are the paths we're going down. We're trying to approach it very systematically, and I think I may be just smart enough to say, rely on people who have a whole lot less grey hair than I do.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I hear you.

I have two quick things. I know the chair is about to close in on me.

I wanted to compliment you on the political choices—Megan Leslie, John Manley and Deb Grey. All of them would be seen as highly capable of being non-partisan, putting the interest of the election ahead of their own. They are all cross-party respected, so good choices there.

Right Hon. David Johnston:

Thank you for saying that, because we were particularly anxious to have people who would be seen as statespeople, and people with the wisdom, and so on, as well as having the contact that was put in our mandate.

Thank you.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I think you did an excellent job and succeeded.

My last question—

(1250)

The Chair:

It better be pretty short.

Mr. David Christopherson:

It is.

When you're doing your review, will it go all the way to things like looking at whether your method of doing the production was the most effective?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

Yes.

Very broadly, it will be to do a post-mortem on these two debates—what was good, what was bad and what metrics are we setting up to try to do that in some sensible way? Then more broadly, is this experiment of a debates commission good, bad or indifferent—something your committee will look at—ranging from nice, tried, good thing, one time, now put it aside, let life go on, continue along this mode or do something even more adventuresome? And then it's to try, without writing an encyclopedia on it, to look at some of the tough issues, the directions, and what we learn from other experiences, and to provide some thoughtful ideas on that. We will not write a lengthy report, but we hope it will be quite informative and that we'll learn from this experience.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That's excellent, great.

Thank you so much, sir.

Now my payout.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Scarpaleggia.

Mr. Francis Scarpaleggia (Lac-Saint-Louis, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I don't have a fiver on me, so I'll call you “Commissioner”.

My question is essentially around your role. I understand that your independence gives you that moral authority to get reluctant participants to take part in the debate. I think that's one of the most important aspects of your role. It's quite a complex role, and you have quite a complex machine with an advisory council and a consortium and using the government to help choose the right producers and so on.

In a nutshell, how would you describe your role? What will you have a direct say in? What are those things where you're overseeing a process that will unfold—

Right Hon. David Johnston:

We go to our mandate. It's an important question, and we debated this a lot, the degree to which you are standoffish and let the players in the field participate and the degree to which you are pre-emptive.

When we go to our mandate, it asks us to carry off at least two national debates in two official languages that are engaging, as accessible as possible and meet high journalistic standards. We don't say that we will be the people who create those specific rules.

In the response to the proposals, we will expect some detailed commentary on what the consortium winner will in fact do to meet the standards set out in our mandate and make some judgment on that. Having made that judgment, and to be sure that we're not just standing back and saying, “You won the bid, go ahead; we'll see you in late October,” we'll engage first in biweekly discussions and then weekly discussions. Then, in the 10 days leading up to the debate, there will daily discussions, all of which will provide us with information on what they're doing. Also, without becoming too much of a schoolmaster, we'll be in a position to say, “When one thinks about it, perhaps a somewhat different approach on this particular matter might be appropriate.”

Mr. Francis Scarpaleggia:

Thank you.

I do have a fiver, actually.

Your Excellency, thank you for your answer. I'll split my time with my colleague.

Right Hon. David Johnston:

Mr. Chairman, would you be kind enough to invite me back monthly?

Voices: Oh, oh!

Right Hon. David Johnston: I have not given you a thorough answer to that question.

Mr. Francis Scarpaleggia:

No, that's a very good answer. I appreciate it. It helps me understand better.

Right Hon. David Johnston:

It's under continuous consideration.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you, your Excellency.

You mentioned in your opening comments that you talked to the leaders of several parties. I do know that it was only parties that have seats in the House. Is that by design? Is that the intent?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

Can you say that again?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In your opening comments, you listed a number of parties that you've been in consultation with. They reflected the parties that have seats in the House. Is that the intention and is that the approach?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

Our consultations have not concluded as of yet. We, with the assistance of Elections Canada, have begun to reach out to an all-party advisory group that may, in fact, be appropriate for further consultation.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Have you been getting the, let's call them “smaller parties” that have never had seats in the House reaching out to you in any great way?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

I don't think there are any others than the ones we've contacted. Should they do so, we would be quite prepared to meet with that party.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You said you have a request for proposals. What kind of reception are you getting from media organizations? Are they excited?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

The party organizations?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The media. Social media and traditional media.

(1255)

Right Hon. David Johnston:

I would say in general that they are quite positive and quite interested. Much of it has been asking us to explain more about our mandate and what we're doing. The kind of question that Mr. Scarpaleggia just asked is frequently on their minds, and how they interact with us, etc. There's enthusiasm and ambition, I think. I've been generally very pleased, if I can give that general comment, and we've learned a lot through the process, I must say, and are continuing, because those consultations will continue.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How early can you or will you schedule the debates?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

We have given some indication in the request for proposals as to what we think would be the largely appropriate time without insisting that it is the time. It's roughly two to three weeks before the actual debates. We will ask for a specific answer on that from the consortium bidders.

We won't necessarily accept that as written in stone but probably accept their best judgment, knowing that it will be informed by discussions with the parties. I think probably we'll have an override to try to be satisfied that whatever dates are chosen are appropriate. That's perhaps as far as I can go.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

So there's no intent to announce the dates of the debates now? It would be way too early to do that.

Right Hon. David Johnston:

If there's a chance of what?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There would be no intention of announcing the debate from now, as opposed to waiting until the election is called.

Right Hon. David Johnston:

That's an interesting question of timing. I think we would like it as early as possible. That doesn't necessarily work in terms of parties' organizing their schedules and their appropriate activities.

What we will do though, in the discussions with the winning consortium, is try to pin that question down at least as early as possible so that everybody is on notice that it's happening. We will then, ourselves, undertake a kind of awareness campaign to try to ensure Canadians know when that is going to happen, and we can develop a bit of a buildup to it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have only a couple of seconds left. I have a slightly less important question to ask you. Was there any meaning to the binary sequence on your coat of arms?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

Is there what on the coat of arms?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

On your coat of arms, as governor general, you had a binary sequence. Was there a specific meaning to those numbers?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

You know, I'd love to give a The Da Vinci Code answer that we planted something in there. Some have suggested it. I'm very interested in information technology. I chaired the information highway advisory, two councils, some years ago as it was coming. The suggestion is that there's something there in code; you have to look pretty hard to find it. I think it was put in because of, perhaps, my interest in the digital revolution and the new way of handling communication.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

It isn't the Knights Templar?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

Please notice that there were five books on that coat of arms, as well. That's for my five daughters. As Grandpa Book, I believe a lot in learning.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Ms. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you, Chair.

Mr. Johnston, this is very hard for me to ask, one, because I like you; two, because you were previously appointed by a man I respect very much; and three, because I don't have five bucks.

I'm looking at the process by which you were selected. It was not an open application; you were selected by the Liberal government. I am listening to how the advisory board was selected. It was selected by you, appointed by the Liberal government, not through an open application process. I would also have to assume, then, that the secretariat was appointed either by you, appointed by the Liberal government, or by the Liberal government as well through a process. Either way, you were put in place by the Liberal government.

You keep referring to your mandate: our mandate tells us to do this; our mandate drives us to do this. Who gave you your mandate, Mr. Johnston?

Right Hon. David Johnston:

It came by an order in council.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Ultimately, it was the Liberal government.

How can we possibly trust in this being an independent body and organization, and in the independence of these debates, when I have referred to two processes and a mandate that were directed by the Liberal government? We can talk around it, but these are the actions, the sequence of events that occurred, which brought us to these smaller details we are discussing today, such as the producer, etc. All of these things flow from the Liberal government. It's very hard, from where I sit here on the official opposition, to truly see this as independent.

Given all of that, do you believe you'll have enough time and resources necessary to accomplish all that was set out in your mandate, please?

(1300)

Right Hon. David Johnston:

To answer the last question, which is the easiest, we'll certainly do our best and will undertake to fulfill the mandate as well as possible.

With respect to your first question, I can't answer it, and you know that I can't. However, with respect to my independence, for me that's a question of integrity. I would ask you to look at a lifetime and make your own judgment.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I can look at a lifetime and I can certainly make a judgment. I've said before I have nothing but respect for you and the individual who did your previous appointment. I am not questioning you; I am questioning the process that was used to place you there by the Liberal government, Mr. Johnston. There is no disrespect for you. I'm questioning the process of the Liberal government.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Kusie.

Thank you very much for coming again. I'm sure we'll see you again. It's great to have you here and meet some of your staff.

Right Hon. David Johnston:

Thank you for what do every day and for your public service. It's a great delight to be here.

The Chair:

Before the committee goes, I have to let you know that the minister, who was scheduled for next Thursday, cannot make that. We're trying to get her for Tuesday, but we don't know if she's available. We'll get her as soon as she is available.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Our first item of business on Tuesday should be the motion I put forward.

The Chair:

The first item will be committee business. There's a bunch of motions; we have a backlog. However, we'll try to get the minister. I'm sure people want the minister, if we can get her, for Ms. Kusie's motion.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1125)

[Français]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour.

Bienvenue à la 152e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.[Traduction]

Nous avons discuté avec tous les partis et, si tout le monde est d'accord, nous allons consacrer 45 minutes à chaque groupe de témoins, car nous en recevons deux, mais nous disposons d'une demi-heure de moins.

Êtes-vous tous d'accord?[Français]

D'accord.

Ce matin, nous poursuivons notre étude du Budget principal des dépenses 2019-2020, avec l'examen du crédit 1 sous la rubrique Bureau du directeur général des élections.

Les témoins sont des représentants d'Élections Canada. Nous accueillons donc M. Stéphane Perrault, directeur général des élections; M. Michel Roussel, sous-directeur général des élections, Scrutins et innovation; et M. Hughes St-Pierre, sous-directeur général des élections, Services internes.

Merci d'être parmi nous.

Je vous cède maintenant la parole, monsieur Perrault. Vous pouvez commencer votre présentation.

M. Stéphane Perrault (directeur général des élections, Élections Canada):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je suis heureux de comparaître aujourd'hui devant le Comité pour présenter le Budget principal des dépenses et les plans d'Élections Canada pour 2019-2020. Cela me permet également de faire le point sur la mise en œuvre du projet de loi C-76 et, surtout, sur nos derniers préparatifs en vue de l'élection générale.

Aujourd'hui, le Comité se penche sur le crédit annuel d'Élections Canada, qui s'élève à 39,2 millions de dollars. Ce montant représente les salaires liés à environ 440 postes permanents. Il s'agit d'une augmentation de 8,4 millions par rapport à l'an dernier. Comme je l'ai mentionné lors de ma dernière comparution devant le Comité, cette augmentation découle essentiellement d'un rééquilibrage des budgets de l'organisme consistant à réduire les dépenses relatives aux employés à forfait et à ceux nommés pour une période déterminée, qui sont financés par une autorisation législative, et à augmenter celles imputées au crédit annuel afin de financer des postes permanents. Il n'y a aucune augmentation des dépenses globales. En fait, il y a une légère réduction des dépenses qui en découlent.

Si l'on tient compte de l'autorisation législative, qui couvre toutes les autres dépenses effectuées en vertu de la Loi électorale du Canada, notre Budget principal des dépenses pour 2019-2020 s'élève à 493,2 millions de dollars. Cela comprend 398 millions de dollars pour l'élection du 21 octobre. Ce montant correspond aux coûts qui seront engagés pendant l'exercice en cours pour mener l'élection.

Selon nos dernières estimations, la 43e élection générale devrait coûter, au total, environ 500 millions de dollars. Ce montant pourrait cependant changer en raison de différents facteurs tels que la durée de l'élection.

Je note qu'au moment de préparer nos budgets l'automne dernier, nous avions estimé que l'élection coûterait 470 millions de dollars. L'écart est principalement attribuable au fait que le projet de loi C-76 — 21 millions de dollars — n'avait pas été pris en compte dans nos estimations, car il n'avait pas été adopté à ce moment.

Élections Canada poursuit la mise en œuvre du projet de loi C-76 et fait entrer des dispositions en vigueur à mesure que se terminent les préparatifs.

De nouvelles exigences en matière de protection des renseignements personnels pour les partis politiques, la réintégration administrative du commissaire aux élections fédérales au sein du Bureau du directeur général des élections et le nouveau Registre des futurs électeurs sont entrés en vigueur le 1er avril, à la suite de ma dernière comparution.

Les modifications prévues au projet de loi C-76 pour les électeurs qui résident à l'étranger vont entrer en vigueur le 11 mai. Toutes les autres dispositions entreront en vigueur en juin. Du point de vue opérationnel, Élections Canada sera alors prêt à mener l'élection conformément au projet de loi C-76. Nos applications, nos formations et nos procédures auront alors été mises à jour et testées, et elles seront prêtes à être utilisées.

Pour ce qui est des aspects réglementaires, toutes les lignes directrices sur le financement politique seront mises au point et publiées avant le début de la période préélectorale le 30 juin. D'ici là, nous continuerons de consulter les partis politiques sur les divers produits au moyen du processus établi pour les avis écrits, les lignes directrices et les notes d'interprétation.

L'organisme se prépare également à effectuer la vérification des rapports des entités politiques à la suite de l'élection. Nous nous attendons à une augmentation de la charge de travail concernant la vérification en raison des nouvelles exigences introduites par le projet de loi C-76, notamment en ce qui a trait au régime des tiers, et de l'élimination du cautionnement de 1 000 $ pour les candidats.

Malgré cette augmentation, nous voulons réduire de 30 % les délais de vérification des rapports des candidats afin d'accroître la transparence de l'élection et de rembourser les candidats plus rapidement. À cette fin, nous sommes en train de mettre en œuvre un plan rationalisé de vérification axée sur les risques.

(1130)

[Traduction]

Dans le cadre de nos derniers préparatifs, l'une de nos priorités est l'amélioration de la liste électorale. Chaque année, quelque 3 millions de Canadiens déménagent, 300 000 décèdent, plus de 100 000 obtiennent la citoyenneté canadienne et 400 000 atteignent l'âge de 18 ans, ce qui correspond à environ 70 000 changements chaque semaine.

Pour assurer l'exactitude du Registre national des électeurs, Élections Canada recueille régulièrement des données auprès de plus de 40 organismes provinciaux et fédéraux, auxquelles s'ajoutent les renseignements fournis par les Canadiens. Cela sera désormais plus facile en raison des récentes améliorations apportées à nos systèmes d'inscription en ligne pour permettre la saisie d'adresses atypiques et le téléchargement de pièces d'identité.

Avec l'adoption du projet de loi C-76, Immigration, Réfugiés et Citoyenneté Canada peut maintenant partager des renseignements sur les résidents permanents et les étrangers. Élections Canada dispose ainsi d'un outil essentiel pour régler le problème de longue date que représentent les non-citoyens inscrits au registre. Nous comptons ainsi supprimer environ 100 000 dossiers ce printemps.

De plus, nous avons écrit à 250 000 ménages, où nous croyons que nos dossiers requièrent des corrections. Les efforts pour améliorer l'exactitude de la liste électorale se poursuivront et seront appuyés par une nouvelle campagne préélectorale, qui incitera les Canadiens à vérifier et à mettre à jour leurs renseignements au cours du printemps et de l'été.

Le 18 avril, nous avons terminé un vaste exercice d'élection simulée d'une durée de trois semaines dans cinq circonscriptions. Cette simulation nous a permis de mettre à l'essai nos processus opérationnels, nos manuels et nos systèmes informatiques dans un contexte qui ressemble beaucoup à celui d'une vraie élection générale. Des travailleurs électoraux ont été embauchés et formés, puis ont participé à des exercices de vote simulé qui tenaient compte des changements introduits par le projet de loi C-76. La simulation a également permis à certains de nos nouveaux directeurs du scrutin d'observer le fonctionnement d'un bureau local et d'échanger avec des collègues plus expérimentés.

Dans l'ensemble, l'exercice de simulation a confirmé notre niveau de préparation, tout en faisant ressortir quelques éléments à améliorer dans nos procédures, nos instructions et nos applications. Ces ajustements seront faits au printemps.

À la lumière des assurances fournies par notre simulation et des dernières élections partielles, j'ai un niveau élevé de confiance en notre état de préparation et nos outils pour l'élection.

Au chapitre de la sécurité des élections, l'organisme participe ce printemps à un certain nombre de mises en situation avec le commissaire aux élections fédérales et les principaux organismes de sécurité canadiens pour s'assurer que les rôles et responsabilités sont clairs et qu'une gouvernance adéquate est en place pour coordonner nos actions. Comme le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications l'a mentionné dans son dernier rapport, le Canada n'est pas à l'abri des cybermenaces et de la désinformation.

Depuis la dernière élection générale, un large éventail d'organismes, dont Élections Canada, ont travaillé pour s'adapter au nouveau contexte et pour renforcer la résilience de la démocratie canadienne face à ces nouvelles menaces. Élections Canada et ses partenaires du domaine de la sécurité abordent la prochaine élection générale avec un niveau inégalé de vigilance, d'information et de collaboration.

Une élection générale est l'un des plus vastes exercices civiques au pays. Notre rôle est de fournir des services de vote fiables et accessibles à 27 millions d'électeurs dans quelque 338 circonscriptions. Pour ce faire, nous devons embaucher et former plus de 300 000 préposés au scrutin qui seront répartis dans plus de 70 000 bureaux de scrutin à la grandeur du pays. Nos directeurs du scrutin ont contribué de façon continue aux améliorations prévues pour la prochaine élection. J'ai eu l'occasion de rencontrer le personnel en région des quatre coins du pays. Je peux vous assurer qu'ils sont prêts, dévoués et résolus à fournir des services exceptionnels aux électeurs et aux candidats.

(1135)

[Français]

Monsieur le président, je serai heureux de répondre aux questions des membres du Comité. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup. Nous sommes heureux de vous revoir. Nous entretenons une excellente relation de travail.

La parole est à M. Simms. Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Je vais partager mon temps de parole avec M. Graham.

Tout d'abord, nous sommes heureux de vous revoir, comme toujours. J'aimerais parler de certaines des mesures positives que vous avez prises ces derniers temps: les nouvelles exigences stratégiques pour les partis politiques et, bien entendu, la réintégration administrative du commissaire aux élections fédérales, ce qui est, selon moi, d'une grande importance pour faire ce travail.

Entre-temps, un nouvel élément du projet de loi C-76 a fait sourciller beaucoup de gens, à savoir les ramifications, tant financières qu'administratives, de ce que nous appelons aujourd'hui la période préélectorale.

Pouvez-vous dire quelques mots à ce sujet?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Nous avons de nouvelles règles qui seront en place le 30 juin. Elles ne sont pas encore en vigueur; cette période commencera à partir de cette date. À ce moment-là, des règles très détaillées s'appliqueront, d'une part, aux tiers pour couvrir toutes leurs dépenses partisanes et, d'autre part, aux partis pour limiter leurs dépenses de publicité partisane, ce qui englobe uniquement la publicité directe. Il s'agit d'un nouvel élément que nous n'avions pas lors des élections précédentes.

M. Scott Simms:

D'accord.

Permettez-moi de revenir à la liste des futurs électeurs, qui est également un nouveau processus. Pouvez-vous nous dire où en sont les choses? Je sais que c'est en vigueur depuis le 1er avril. Cependant, que vous reste-t-il à faire pour veiller à ce que le tout soit prêt pour les élections de l'automne prochain?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Le registre est en place. Pour l'heure, nous ne nous occupons pas très activement de l'inscription des futurs électeurs. Nous nous concentrerons là-dessus surtout après les élections.

Nous recevons des renseignements. Le système fonctionne déjà, mais nous ne concentrons pas nos énergies sur l'inscription des futurs électeurs; nous mettons plutôt l'accent sur le registre des électeurs pour les élections qui s'en viennent.

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, je comprends cela. Je pense que M. Graham parlera de cette question dans un instant — je ne veux pas prédire ce qu'il va demander, mais c'est ce que je viens de faire.

J'aimerais passer à une autre question. Dans la dernière mouture de ce qu'on a appelé la Loi sur l'intégrité des élections, Élections Canada s'est heurté à des restrictions quant à l'information qu'il pouvait communiquer à la population. Il est très important qu'Élections Canada joue un rôle plus actif. Manifestement, ce serait bien si l'organisme pouvait communiquer de façon plus générale avec les citoyens au sujet de l'importance de leur droit constitutionnel.

Pouvez-vous nous parler de certaines des mesures que vous prenez pour rejoindre les gens? Je comprends ce que vous avez dit au sujet de la liste et de la nécessité de la nettoyer, mais que faites-vous pour parler aux gens du vote qui aura lieu à l'automne?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Durant la période de convocation des électeurs, nous ne changeons pas notre approche. Pendant la période électorale, nous nous employons strictement à fournir de l'information sur le lieu et la date de l'inscription et du vote. C'est notre point de mire.

Ce qui a quelque peu changé, c'est qu'avant la période électorale, nous pouvons maintenant parler de façon plus générale du processus électoral, non seulement aux non-électeurs, mais aussi aux électeurs. Comme je l'ai dit dans mon exposé, nous organisons une campagne préélectorale pour promouvoir l'inscription. Nous voulons que les Canadiens s'inscrivent et mettent à jour leurs renseignements. Ainsi, avant la période électorale, nous lancerons une campagne d'influenceurs pour promouvoir l'inscription et le vote. Cette campagne se déroulera au printemps et en été, mais elle prendra fin au cours de la période électorale.

Nous lancerons également une campagne sur l'initiation aux médias sociaux pour parler de la désinformation et des risques qu'elle présente afin de nous assurer que les Canadiens vérifient leurs sources lorsqu'ils vont en ligne sur les médias sociaux.

Voilà, en gros, les nouvelles initiatives que nous menons.

(1140)

M. Scott Simms:

Merci.

Je cède le reste de mon temps à M. Graham.

Le président:

Vous avez trois minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Si je me souviens bien, nous avons changé un peu les règles concernant les électeurs à l'étranger. Pouvez-vous me dire quel est le niveau d'intérêt, s'il y a lieu, de la part d'éventuels électeurs à l'étranger?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

En ce qui concerne les nouvelles règles, le processus est quelque peu compliqué, car la Cour suprême a rendu, en février, une décision qui permet aux Canadiens à l'étranger, ayant déjà résidé au Canada, de voter, et ce, même s'ils vivent à l'étranger depuis un certain nombre d'années. Depuis cette décision, nous avons reçu jusqu'à 2 000 nouvelles inscriptions de Canadiens à l'étranger. La moitié d'entre elles proviennent de gens qui sont à l'étranger depuis plus de cinq ans.

Le 11 mai, les nouvelles règles entreront en vigueur, ce qui aura pour effet de modifier et restreindre la capacité des électeurs de choisir le lieu du vote. Sous l'ancien régime, ils pouvaient choisir un certain nombre d'endroits où ils pouvaient aller voter; aux termes des nouvelles règles, ils doivent voter dans la circonscription où se trouvait leur dernier lieu de résidence habituelle au Canada. Cela entrera en vigueur le 11 mai.

Pour ce qui est des chiffres, nous avons constaté une certaine hausse, mais rien de très spectaculaire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien.

Dans votre déclaration, vous avez dit que la liste électorale subit 70 000 changements chaque semaine, ce qui est évidemment énorme. Si je devais examiner la liste électorale un jour donné, quel en serait, d'après vous, le pourcentage d'exactitude?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Environ 10 000 changements surviennent chaque jour. L'exactitude de la liste évolue à mesure que les élections approchent. Au début de la dernière campagne électorale, le taux d'exactitude était d'environ 91,5 % et, à l'issue des élections, c'était d'environ 94,5 %.

Vu le nombre d'activités que nous menons à l'heure actuelle, j'ai bon espoir que le taux d'exactitude au début de la campagne électorale sera supérieur à celui enregistré la dernière fois, mais c'est quelque chose que nous devrons mesurer à ce moment-là.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien. Il me reste une minute.

Vous avez parlé des cybermenaces. Je ne suis pas sûr que le sujet se prête à un débat public. Nous aurions probablement dû en discuter à huis clos. Y a-t-il des renseignements qu'il nous serait utile d'avoir à huis clos durant la réunion d'aujourd'hui?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je ne crois pas. Nous avons dû apporter beaucoup de changements à notre infrastructure informatique, parce qu'elle était devenue désuète. Au cours du présent cycle, nous avons eu l'occasion de profiter de ces changements et de renouveler notre infrastructure informatique de manière à répondre aux normes de sécurité. Nous avons travaillé en étroite collaboration avec le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications pour obtenir des conseils sur la façon de nous y prendre et de veiller à ce que nos fournisseurs soient dignes de confiance, et tout le reste.

Nous avons ensuite collaboré avec eux, et c'est vraiment la chose principale.

Par ailleurs, j'aimerais ajouter que nous avons offert une formation à tout notre personnel à l'administration centrale et sur le terrain. On a beau investir des sommes faramineuses dans la sécurité informatique, mais si quelqu'un clique sur un lien, cela compromet tout. C'est pourquoi la plupart de nos efforts ont porté sur la sensibilisation. Lors d'une élection, bon nombre de nos employés travaillent à l'administration centrale, mais il y a aussi des gens sur le terrain qui utilisent des ordinateurs. Nous voulons nous assurer que tous ceux ayant un ordinateur reçoivent la formation nécessaire pour reconnaître les tentatives d'hameçonnage, par exemple.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Précisons aussi que l'influence étrangère n'est pas de votre ressort.

Mon temps est écoulé. Je vous remercie.

Le président:

Bienvenue, Pierre Poilievre, à notre comité. Vous avez sept minutes.

L’hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, PCC):

SNC-Lavalin a falsifié des documents pour verser illégalement, par l'entremise de 18 dirigeants de l'entreprise, plus de 100 000 $ à la caisse du Parti libéral. Appuyez-vous la décision du commissaire de permettre à l'entreprise de s'en tirer à bon compte, sans aucune accusation?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je ne connais pas les détails de l'enquête ni toutes les circonstances ayant mené à cette décision. Je peux me prononcer uniquement sur les faits qui sont de notoriété publique. En effet, la gravité de l'infraction est un facteur, mais ce n'est pas le seul élément dont il faut tenir compte au moment de décider d'intenter une poursuite ou de prendre d'autres mesures, comme la décision de conclure une transaction. Le commissaire a été très clair à cet égard.

Par exemple, un des facteurs est la disponibilité des preuves. Y a-t-il des preuves qui pourraient justifier une poursuite au criminel? S'il n'y en a pas, alors il sera impossible d'intenter une poursuite.

L’hon. Pierre Poilievre:

À ce sujet, CBC/Radio-Canada a produit un documentaire qui a révélé la liste des employés par l'entremise desquels l'argent avait été acheminé. Je vous cite un extrait: Tous les anciens employés de SNC-Lavalin et les conjoints nommés dans la liste et interviewés dans le cadre de l'émission The Fifth Estate [...] ont déclaré n'avoir jamais été informés par le commissaire aux élections fédérales que leurs noms seraient inscrits dans ce document.

C'est par l'intermédiaire de ces gens que des dons illégaux ont été effectués. Vous dites qu'il n'y a pas de preuve. Comment pouvez-vous arriver à une telle conclusion, si aucune de ces personnes n'a même pas été consultée?

(1145)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je n'ai pas parlé de l'existence de preuves dans ce dossier précis. J'ai dit que c'est généralement l'un des facteurs dont le commissaire tient compte. Je ne suis pas au courant des preuves qui étaient disponibles dans cette affaire ou qui concernaient explicitement l'un ou l'autre de ces individus.

L’hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Eh bien, il existe amplement de preuves; en fait, l'entreprise admet maintenant qu'elle a créé des primes fictives et d'autres avantages qui, d'après l'information obtenue dans le contexte de l'enquête du commissaire, représentent une valeur totale de 117 803 $. En voilà une preuve; c'est un fait connu.

Sachant cela, appuyez-vous toujours la décision du commissaire de ne pas porter l'affaire devant les tribunaux?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Comme je l'ai dit, je ne peux pas me prononcer là-dessus. De par mes fonctions institutionnelles, je n'ai pas accès à cette information.

L’hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Qui y aurait accès?

Le président:

Je suis désolé, mais on invoque le Règlement.

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cette question s'adresse plutôt au commissaire aux élections, qui, en raison de la Loi électorale du Canada, ne faisait pas partie d'Élections Canada au moment de l'enquête.

Ce n'est là qu'une brève remarque. Veuillez poursuivre.

L’hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Qui y aurait accès?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est le commissaire aux élections fédérales qui dispose de cette information.

L’hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Êtes-vous d'accord pour que le commissaire vienne répondre à ces questions devant le Comité?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ce n'est pas à moi d'appuyer ou de rejeter une telle décision.

L’hon. Pierre Poilievre:

C'est ce que vous voudriez prétendre, mais vous avez demandé d'exercer un contrôle sur le commissaire. Désormais, c'est vous qui embauchez ou congédiez le commissaire, et c'est vous qui décidez combien il sera payé — c'est ce que vous avez réclamé dans le cadre de la mesure législative. Or, voilà que maintenant vous ne voulez plus assumer la responsabilité qui accompagne ce pouvoir. Qu'en est-il au juste?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Sachez que la réintégration du commissaire aux élections fédérales ne figurait pas parmi les recommandations d'Élections Canada.

L’hon. Pierre Poilievre:

La séparation initiale a été vigoureusement combattue par Élections Canada lorsque vous étiez au plus haut échelon. Vous avez également appuyé le projet de loi qui les a réunis. Vous avez donc demandé le pouvoir, mais vous ne semblez pas vouloir en assumer la responsabilité.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

L'unification est administrative. En vertu du régime défini aux termes du projet de loi C-76, le directeur général des élections n'a aucun lien de dépendance avec les enquêtes menées par le commissaire, quelles qu'elles soient.

L’hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Le bureau est désormais réunifié et vous en êtes le responsable. C'est l'article 509 de la loi actuelle qui le veut. C'est la dure réalité.

Pouvez-vous comprendre pourquoi les Canadiens pourraient devenir cyniques au sujet de l'application juste et équitable de la loi électorale dans ce pays, quand on sait que des initiés libéraux bien branchés peuvent s'engager dans une conspiration de quatre ans impliquant 18 dirigeants d'entreprise pour canaliser à des fins partisanes de l'argent illégal en utilisant des documents faux et fictifs, et ce, sans avoir à passer un seul jour en cour? Pouvez-vous comprendre pourquoi quelqu'un pourrait avoir des doutes sur l'impartialité de l'application de la loi lors des élections?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Monsieur le président, comme je l'ai dit, je n'ai pas l'information qui me permettrait d'avoir une idée du dossier et des raisons qui ont motivé la décision du commissaire. Je ne suis pas au courant des discussions qui ont eu lieu avec le commissaire ou avec la directrice des poursuites pénales, si de telles discussions ont eu lieu. Cela dépasse le cadre de mes activités.

L’hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Vous avez dit dans votre déclaration liminaire que c'était de votre ressort, parce que vous avez fait remarquer que la réunification affectait les questions budgétaires de votre organisme. Vous avez reconnu la réunification; mon collègue d'en face l'a célébrée. Tout d'un coup, il est devenu très gênant pour vous de réunir les deux bureaux en un seul, parce que même si vous voulez le pouvoir, vous ne voulez pas la responsabilité qui va avec.

J'ai l'impression que ce qu'il nous faudrait, ce serait que le commissaire vienne nous expliquer ses actions, puisque vous ne voulez pas les expliquer pour lui.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

C'est au Comité d'en décider. Ce n'est certainement pas à moi de prendre cette décision.

En vertu des nouvelles dispositions, la seule chose que j'ajouterais, c'est que nous sommes responsables — je suis responsable — du soutien administratif du commissaire, mais pas des enquêtes précises qu'il peut choisir de mener ou de ne pas mener, et s'il les mène, des mesures qu'il prend en vertu de...

L’hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Donc, vous vous engagez à ce que personne de votre bureau ou de votre personnel ne parle jamais au commissaire à propos des enquêtes?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Nous ne serons certainement pas impliqués dans quelque décision que ce soit concernant la conduite d'une enquête...

L’hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Mais vous en parlez avec lui?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Le commissaire a le pouvoir de me demander mon point de vue ou celui d'autrui.

L’hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Pourrait-il jamais vous arriver de donner votre point de vue sans qu'on vous le demande?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je pense que c'est une question abstraite. Je n'ai pas la réponse...

L’hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Ce n'est pas abstrait. Il y a des enquêtes qui pourraient avoir lieu, et vous seriez en mesure de donner des conseils en la matière. Vous arrive-t-il parfois de le faire?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Si le commissaire a une question concernant, par exemple, l'importance d'une disposition particulière pour le régime, je pense que c'est une question légitime.

L’hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Donc, vous discutez des enquêtes avec lui.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ce n'est pas ce que j'ai dit.

L’hon. Pierre Poilievre:

On dirait que c'est ce que vous avez dit.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ce que j'ai dit, monsieur le président, c'est que si le commissaire veut engager une conversation sur l'importance, par exemple, d'une disposition de la loi, de l'intégrité du régime, c'est une bonne chose. Je pense que le commissaire aux élections fédérales, qui veille à l'application de la loi, et le directeur général des élections doivent avoir une vision commune de la façon dont le régime fonctionne et des aspects les plus importants de ce régime.

(1150)

L’hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Eh bien, étant donné que vous avez reconnu que vous pouvez avoir des conversations avec le commissaire, je pense que vous devriez avoir une conversation sur la façon dont il est même possible pour une entreprise comme SNC-Lavalin d'effectuer ce genre de fraude de quatre ans impliquant 18 employés pour canaliser de l'argent — dont 93 p. 100 sont allés à un parti politique, au parti du gouvernement qui vous a nommé à votre poste — sans passer une seule journée en cour à cause de cela.

Vous avez donné votre opinion sur beaucoup de choses au fil des ans. Pouvez-vous au moins nous dire si vous croyez que cet état de fait est correct?

Le président:

Faites-le brièvement, car les sept minutes sont écoulées.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Monsieur le président, je me contenterai de mentionner l'entente de conformité telle que rédigée par le commissaire, dans laquelle il s'est efforcé d'expliquer les preuves obtenues par SNC-Lavalin et le fait qu'il s'agissait d'un aspect essentiel de la poursuite du dossier. Comme je l'ai déjà dit, l'existence ou l'absence de preuves à l'appui d'une poursuite est évidemment d'une importance névralgique pour la capacité d'entreprendre ladite poursuite. Tout ce qui va au-delà de cela a trait à l'enquête elle-même, et je ne peux pas en parler.

Le président:

Merci.

Passons maintenant à M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président. Avec votre permission, j'aimerais laisser tomber l'inquisition et revenir à l'affaire qui nous occupe.

J'aimerais tout d'abord savoir ceci: quel était le plus grand défi de la mise en œuvre du projet de loi C-76? Quelle a été la partie la plus difficile?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Certes, beaucoup d'efforts ont dû être déployés pour changer les systèmes informatiques. Ce n'est pas quelque chose qu'il est facile de comprendre de l'extérieur, mais bon nombre des processus opérationnels d'un lancement impliquent des systèmes de TI, et il est difficile d'apporter des modifications en profondeur aux systèmes de TI dans les mois qui précèdent une élection.

Nous y sommes parvenus. Je peux dire avec confiance que ces modifications ont été apportées. Elles ont été mises à l'essai en janvier. Elles ont ensuite été soumises à un test de résistance aux volumes auxquels on peut s'attendre lors d'une élection générale, et même à des volumes supérieurs. Les modifications ont été déployées dans le cadre d'une élection simulée. Nous avons relevé ce défi et nous avons confiance. Assurément, je suis confiant à l'égard des prochaines élections.

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai quelques questions en matière de sécurité, et je sais que M. Graham en a aussi. Je peux les poser maintenant, mais j'ai la drôle d'impression qu'il vaudrait mieux que cela se fasse à huis clos, parce que je compte aller un peu plus en profondeur. Je vais garder ces questions pour la fin. Toutefois, nous pouvons prendre une décision.

Même si le gouvernement s'attribue le mérite du projet de loi C-76 et qu'il réussit à gommer une partie de la laideur de la « loi sur le manque d'intégrité des élections » du gouvernement précédent, la façon dont il a procédé était maladroite, voire quasiment incompétente.

Cependant, ai-je raison de dire que le gouvernement — à l'instar du précédent parti au pouvoir — n'a pas modifié la loi en ce qui a trait aux partis qui présentent des reçus? Je crois comprendre que nous essayons depuis des années et des années de faire en sorte que les partis soient tenus de fournir des reçus — comme on l'exige des candidats — lorsque vous évaluez s'ils ont droit à leurs subventions.

De mémoire, je n'arrive pas à me rappeler le chiffre exact dont il est question, mais je crois que c'est 76 millions de dollars. Même si c'est peut-être un chiffre que je tire de nulle part, c'est une somme d'argent énorme pour laquelle les partis obtiennent des subventions, et pourtant, ils n'ont pas à fournir de reçus.

Est-ce toujours le cas?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Oui, ce l'est. Le chiffre que vous cherchez est 76 millions de dollars.

Nous sommes la seule administration électorale au Canada, je crois, qui n'a pas accès aux documents à l'appui des partis, et j'ai donc été déçu que cela ne fasse pas partie du projet de loi C-76.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, il est tout simplement incroyable que nous ayons connu deux régimes qui ont modifié la loi et qui ont tous deux refusé que les partis soient tenus de fournir des reçus. Comment diable pouvez-vous obtenir un seul dollar en subvention du gouvernement du Canada sans qu'on vous demande un reçu? C'est probablement une situation unique en son genre, et c'est une absolue abomination pour notre démocratie. Ça l'est vraiment.

C'est mon ultime assaut à l'égard de ce projet de loi, c'est pourquoi j'insiste. C'est tout simplement inacceptable.

De ces 76 millions de dollars, combien de millions ne devraient pas être versés aux partis politiques — y compris au mien — parce qu'ils ne fournissent pas de reçus? Nous ne le savons pas. J'en veux carrément au gouvernement actuel et au gouvernement précédent, qui ont refusé d'appliquer les mêmes conditions que celles que l'on impose à tous ceux qui traitent avec l'État. S'il y a quoi que ce soit à écrire au sujet des grandes choses qu'il reste à faire pour réparer notre démocratie... Les gens pensent à la sécurité — et c'est légitime —, mais que dire de l'obligation de rendre des comptes. Soixante-seize millions de dollars de subventions vont à des partis politiques qui n'ont pas de reçus. C'est incroyable.

J'aimerais maintenant aborder la question de la sécurité. Alors, je vais poser mes questions, monsieur le président, et je vais vous laisser à vous et aux témoins le soin de déterminer si nous devrions poursuivre en public ou non.

À l'heure actuelle, quelle est selon vous la plus grande menace pour nos élections?

(1155)

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je ne peux que me référer au récent rapport du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, qui est un rapport public. On y dit essentiellement que la plus grande menace est la désinformation et que la cible la plus importante est l'électeur ordinaire. C'est la cible la plus importante, et c'est pourquoi nous pensons qu'il est important d'avoir une campagne de sensibilisation avant l'élection pour faire en sorte que les Canadiens vérifient leurs sources.

Nous n'avons aucune indication qu'il y ait des acteurs étrangers qui ont l'intention de favoriser un parti aux dépens d'un autre. Nous n'avons pas l'impression que c'est la chose dont nous devrions nous inquiéter le plus. Je pense que le sentiment général, c'est qu'il y a un intérêt à saper le processus électoral lui-même ainsi que la volonté des Canadiens de participer au processus électoral et la confiance qu'ils ont à l'égard de ce processus. C'est là-dessus que nous allons mettre l'accent.

M. David Christopherson:

De qui devrions-nous craindre ces menaces?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ce n'est pas à moi de le dire. C'est l'affaire de l'organisme qui s'occupe de la sécurité nationale.

M. David Christopherson:

Vous n'avez pas besoin de le savoir?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

À vrai dire, cela ne changera rien à ce que nous faisons. Notre rôle est de protéger notre infrastructure. Notre rôle est de corriger la désinformation au sujet du processus de vote. Notre rôle est d'éduquer les Canadiens. Que la désinformation vienne de tel ou tel pays, ou même de l'intérieur, cela n'a pas vraiment d'incidence sur notre réaction à cet égard. C'est quelque chose qui concerne Affaires mondiales Canada. Cela concerne assurément le Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité, par exemple, ou le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications Canada, mais pas Élections Canada.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vois.

Je présume qu'un plan a été mis en place pour garder un œil là-dessus tout au long de la campagne électorale. Ensuite, j'aimerais savoir quels sont vos plans pour que tout le monde se regroupe après les élections afin d'évaluer ce qui a fonctionné, ce qui n'a pas fonctionné et dans quelle mesure nous avons réussi à défendre la sécurité de notre système.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ce sont deux bons points.

Pour ce qui est du regroupement, nous n'en sommes pas encore là, mais c'est certainement quelque chose qui me préoccupe beaucoup. Après les élections, nous devrons nous mettre en rapport pour voir ce qui s'est passé. Ce que nous faisons actuellement, comme nous l'avons indiqué, c'est de travailler à l'aide de scénarios — des exercices de simulation avec nos partenaires de la sécurité — pour veiller à ce que chacun comprenne ce que les autres peuvent faire, quelles sont les limites du processus et quels sont les points de contact. Nous voulons clarifier la gouvernance afin de nous assurer que rien ne passera inaperçu et que nous serons efficaces si nous devons intervenir pendant les élections.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord.

Êtes-vous en consultation, sinon en coordination pure et simple avec d'autres alliés qui sont confrontés au même problème?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Absolument. Tout d'abord, nous participons à divers forums internationaux qui discutent de ces questions. Nous sommes allés en Estonie en mars dernier, je crois. Il y a également eu un forum de l'Organisation des États Américains, cette année. Nous avons ce que nous appelons les quatre pays, soit le Royaume-Uni, l'Australie, la Nouvelle-Zélande et le Canada.

M. David Christopherson:

... le Groupe des cinq?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

... enfin, sans les Américains.

Nos communications sont assez soutenues. Je serai à Londres cet été pour discuter avec eux de ce qui s'est passé lors des élections australiennes, ce qui vient tout juste de se produire. Nous nous tenons donc au courant des problèmes qui arrivent partout dans le monde.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Bittle, vous avez la parole.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Merci à vous tous d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Pouvez-vous me rappeler quand le commissaire a été nommé?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je crois que c'était en 2012, mais il faudrait que je le vérifie.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je crois aussi que c'était en 2012. Je crois que c'était quelques années avant que le gouvernement ne soit élu. C'est mon premier point.

Le point suivant, c'est que l'honorable député de Carleton a critiqué Élections Canada, le traitant littéralement de « chien noir libéral ». Auriez-vous quelque chose à dire à ce sujet?

(1200)

L’hon. Pierre Poilievre:

Je suis désolé, c'est faux.

J'invoque le Règlement. J'ai dit « lap dog » et non « black dog », c'est-à-dire « chien de poche » et non « chien noir ».

M. Chris Bittle:

Oh, je suis désolé, monsieur. J'ai une transcription sous les yeux. C'est écrit « black dog », c'est-à-dire « chien noir », mais allons-y pour « chien de poche ».

Auriez-vous quelque chose à dire à ce sujet?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Je ne ferai pas de commentaires à ce sujet.

M. Chris Bittle:

Dans le monde entier, êtes-vous préoccupé par le fait que des représentants élus remettent en question l'intégrité de représentants élus impartiaux?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Encore une fois, je ne ferai pas de commentaires à ce sujet.

M. Chris Bittle:

Le travail d'Élections Canada est de demeurer indépendant et d'être un phare pour les Canadiens, mais aussi pour les autres pays, parce que d'autres membres du Comité nous ont dit qu'Élections Canada est très respecté dans le monde entier en raison des règles qui sont en place et de sa réputation. Et ce n'est pas quelque chose qui est particulier au gouvernement actuel; c'est le cas depuis des décennies.

Est-ce là le rôle que vous cherchez à préserver en tant que directeur général des élections?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Nous avons une tradition bien ancrée au Canada. Nous célébrerons notre 100e anniversaire l'an prochain, le « nous » étant Élections Canada. Il y a 100 ans, le Canada créait un poste indépendant de directeur général des élections. Il a été le premier pays dans le monde à le faire, et ce poste a toujours été reconnu depuis, partout sur la planète, comme un modèle d'indépendance. Nous en sommes très fiers.

M. Chris Bittle:

Avant que le commissaire soit transféré à Élections Canada dans le projet de loi C-76, pouvez-vous nous rappeler où il se trouvait?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Jusqu'à tout récemment, il se trouvait au bureau du DPP, du directeur des poursuites pénales.

M. Chris Bittle:

Le fait qu'il se trouvait au bureau du directeur des poursuites pénales est intéressant. C'est intéressant aussi que l'opposition demande, apparemment, qu'il y ait ingérence dans une poursuite, ce qui est plutôt ironique, étant donné le débat qui a animé la capitale dans d'autres dossiers au cours des derniers mois.

Je comprends le fait que vous ne vouliez pas et ne devriez pas commenter — et je respecte cela — ce dossier. Pourriez-vous commenter la transaction...

Un député: [Inaudible]

M. Chris Bittle: Je ne sais pas, monsieur Poilievre. Je pense que nous avons l'habitude, au sein de ce comité, d'attendre que chacun ait fini de parler, mais je sais que vous êtes nouveau et que c'est votre première fois ici.

Pourriez-vous nous parler de la transaction entre le commissaire aux élections fédérales et M. Poilievre qui a été signée en 2017?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Pour les mêmes raisons que je ne commenterai pas la transaction avec SNC-Lavalin, je ne commenterai pas cette transaction ou toute autre transaction.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je comprends. C'est intéressant de voir que M. Poilievre, dans sa maison de verre, lance des pierres. Je présume qu'il ne s'est pas demandé s'il devait ou non se présenter devant le tribunal. Je pense qu'il pourrait bien recevoir le prix Nobel de l'ironie en se présentant ici pour faire ces critiques.

Il me reste quelques minutes. J'aimerais céder la parole à M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Je trouve cela très ironique. J'espère ne pas me tromper, mais M. Poilievre a parlé d'indépendance. Écoutez, je n'ai absolument rien contre. En tant qu'ancien porte-parole... au sujet du retour du commissaire à Élections Canada, Élections Canada n'en a jamais proposé cela. C'est une décision que le parti a prise, et quand nous sommes arrivés au pouvoir, nous voulions que le poste y retourne pour une question d'indépendance. Je suis d'accord avec lui, mais je trouve cela ironique qu'il lui dise, dans son tout dernier commentaire, d'avoir une conversation avec le commissaire au sujet de SNC-Lavalin.

Vous devriez avec cette conversation avec lui.

Ils sont indépendants ou ils ne le sont pas, comme M. Poilievre l'a suggéré. C'est malheureux. Comme M. Christopherson aime à le dire, vraiment, soyons réalistes.

Mais peu importe, merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je vais passer à un autre point.

Pour revenir au sujet d'aujourd'hui, j'aimerais vous poser des questions sur les simulations et la façon dont elles sont menées. J'aimerais que vous nous en disiez un peu plus à ce sujet, s'il vous plaît.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Bien sûr. C'est un exercice que nous avons mené une fois dans le passé, mais à beaucoup plus petite échelle. Cette fois-ci, nous avons ouvert essentiellement cinq bureaux de scrutin. Nous avons déployé la technologie. Nous avons beaucoup de nouveaux systèmes. Nous avons formé le personnel pour qu'il puisse travailler avec cette technologie, pour qu'il puisse l'utiliser. Nous avons simulé des plaintes et des demandes du public. Nous avons testé non seulement les systèmes et les réponses, mais aussi la structure de gouvernance. Le personnel a interagi avec l'administration centrale, par exemple, au sujet des demandes. Comme je l'ai dit, nous avons embauché du personnel et il a été formé.

Tout comme cela serait le cas dans le cadre de véritables élections, les travailleurs électoraux retournent à la maison pendant quelques jours après la formation. Lorsqu'ils reviennent, il s'est écoulé un bout de temps depuis la formation. Ils ont donc oublié quelques éléments. Nous procédons alors à des simulations sur différents problèmes d'identification des électeurs et sur leur inscription pour s'assurer qu'ils comprennent bien les procédures et la façon de les appliquer. Nous apportons ensuite des ajustements à la formation si nécessaire. Nous procédons aussi à des scénarios de situations problématiques. Les gens n'étaient pas au courant des scénarios et ils devaient réagir de la bonne façon.

Nous avons testé de manière approfondie les systèmes, la structure de gouvernance, les procédures et la formation nécessaires pendant des élections

(1205)

M. Chris Bittle:

Il ne me reste que quelques secondes. Dans quelles régions du pays avez-vous réalisé ces tests?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Ils ont été réalisés à cinq endroits: au Nouveau-Brunswick, à Montréal — plus précisément à Outremont —, à Toronto, à Winnipeg et à Ottawa.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Nous passons à madame Kusie. Vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Je tiens à remercier l'honorable député de Carleton d'être ici aujourd'hui pour attirer l'attention sur ce qui s'est passé, et je dois dire que j'ai beaucoup de respect pour le directeur général des élections. En tant qu'ancienne diplomate, je constate qu'il est très courtois dans ses réponses et qu'il fait assurément de son mieux pour répondre aux questions sans empiéter sur le mandat de son collègue, le commissaire aux élections fédérales.

Il me semble toutefois, pour poursuivre sur la lancée des questions de mon collègue, l'honorable député de Carleton, qu'il est nécessaire d'aller au-delà des réponses du directeur général des élections. Il a mentionné que nous pouvons très certainement, si c'est la volonté du Comité, poser ces questions au commissaire aux élections fédérales.

Ainsi, monsieur le président, j'aimerais proposer la motion suivante que je dépose dans les deux langues officielles.

J'aimerais proposer une motion, que le commissaire aux élections fédérales témoigne devant le Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre à l'occasion de notre étude des crédits.

Je propose cette motion maintenant, monsieur le président, et j'aimerais qu'on en discute. Merci.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous devrions jouer la musique de Jeopardy! en toile de fond.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais rectifier le chiffre que j'ai donné, le remboursement de 76 millions de dollars est le montant global, et cela inclut les candidats et les 39 millions de dollars pour les partis.

Le président:

Très bien.

Le greffier et l'analyste m'ont souligné que le budget des dépenses du commissaire n'est pas examiné par notre comité. Il l'est par le comité de la justice, alors la motion n'est pas recevable.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Un instant s'il vous plaît, monsieur le président. J'aimerais faire une pause.

Le président:

Bien sûr.

(1210)

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Monsieur le président, il semble que vous ayez décidé que la motion n'est pas recevable. Est-ce exact?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Dans ce cas, j'aimerais présenter la motion suivante: que le commissaire aux élections fédérales comparaisse devant le Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre pour discuter des contributions illégales faites par SNC-Lavalin au Parti libéral du Canada et sa décision d'accorder à l'entreprise un accord de suspension des poursuites, ou peu importe comment on appelle cela.

Un député: On parle d'une transaction.

M. Scott Reid: Oui, une transaction.

Le président:

Vous déposez un avis de motion?

M. Scott Reid:

Je présente la motion maintenant.

Le président:

Vous donnez l'avis de 48 heures?

M. Scott Reid:

Non, je la présente maintenant.

Le président:

Vous devez déposer un avis, car cela ne porte pas sur le sujet à l'étude.

M. Scott Reid:

Ah. Dites-moi alors ce qui est au programme mardi prochain?

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid: Non, non, c'est pertinent, car nous pourrons en discuter mardi prochain.

Le président:

Nous n'avons encore rien décidé. Il était question essentiellement des affaires du Comité.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. Eh bien, ce sera le premier point des affaires du Comité, monsieur le président.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Un instant, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Il vous reste environ trois minutes.

Mme Stephanie Kusie: Oui.

Le président: D'accord, Stephanie. Je pense qu'il vous reste environ deux minutes. Nous allons ensuite passer à notre autre groupe de témoins.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Bien sûr. Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Perrault, vous avez mentionné mardi au comité sénatorial des finances que vous estimiez que le nombre de Canadiens qui allaient voter passerait de 11 000 à 30 000... en raison des nouvelles dispositions du projet de loi C-76. Pouvez-vous nous dire comment vous êtes arrivé à cette estimation, s'il vous plaît?

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Nous avons eu recours à deux méthodes. La première a été d'examiner l'augmentation de la demande après la première décision qui a été rendue dans l'affaire Frank, si je ne me trompe pas, lors du procès qui a invalidé la règle des cinq ans. Nous avons constaté par la suite une augmentation pendant plusieurs mois, un certain nombre de mois, après l'annulation de la règle des cinq ans, alors nous avons fait des projections à partir de cela.

Nous savons également qu'aux États-Unis, les Américains peuvent voter lorsqu'ils se trouvent à l'étranger sans qu'il y ait de restrictions sur le nombre d'années d'absence, alors nous avons fait un calcul à partir du pourcentage d'Américains qui se trouvent à l'étranger et qui votent par rapport au pourcentage d'Américains qui se trouvent aux États-Unis et qui votent. Il faut prendre en considération le fait que de nombreux militaires américains se trouvent à l'étranger, alors cela fausse un peu les estimations. Ce n'est donc pas une science exacte.

Nous maintenons notre estimation de 30 000 personnes. Je parlerais d'une estimation de classe D, en ce sens que ce n'est pas une science exacte, mais nous maintenons notre position au sujet de ce chiffre pour l'heure.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci.

S'il s'avérait que le nombre d'électeurs canadiens qui votent à l'étranger est beaucoup plus élevé que ce qui est prévu — disons 100 000, par exemple — Élections Canada disposera-t-il des ressources nécessaires pour composer avec une telle augmentation? En répondant à cette question, vous pourriez également nous parler du nombre au pays, pour éviter des retards importants au moment du vote. Vous pourriez commencer par nous parler des électeurs à l'étranger.

M. Stéphane Perrault:

Le nombre d'électeurs à l'étranger ne nous inquiète pas du tout. Nous avons une surcapacité pour trier un fort volume de courrier. Nous sommes en train de faire l'acquisition de nouvelles machines pour trier le courrier. Nous sommes bien préparés. Cela ne m'inquiète pas.

Pour ce qui est des électeurs au Canada, nous avons pu constater une tendance lors des dernières élections, une tendance qui se dessine tant dans les provinces que sur la scène internationale, soit une augmentation fulgurante des électeurs qui votent par anticipation. En Nouvelle-Zélande, on parle de 50 %. En Australie, on parle de près de 50 %, et je m'attends à ce qu'ils atteignent 50 % lors la présente élection. Lors des prochaines élections fédérales, il se pourrait bien que nous atteignions les 30 ou 35 %.

Nous avons pris diverses mesures. Nous avons simplifié les procédures papier dans les bureaux de vote par anticipation. Nous avons augmenté de 20 % le nombre de bureaux de vote par anticipation, ce qui permettra également de réduire les déplacements dans les régions rurales. Ce qui est important, ce n'est pas seulement le nombre de bureaux, mais également le fait qu'ils seront plus près des gens. Nous avons aussi allongé les heures d'ouverture des bureaux de vote. Ils étaient habituellement ouverts uniquement de midi à 20 heures, mais ils le seront maintenant de 9 heures à 21 heures. Nous avons donc pris diverses mesures.

Ce que nous avons pu constater, par ailleurs, lors des élections provinciales au Québec et en Ontario, c'est une forte augmentation du vote dans les bureaux du directeur du scrutin. On parle d'une augmentation de 400 % au Québec et de 200 % en Ontario. Nous avons donc simplifié le processus de bulletin de vote spécial utilisé pour voter dans ces bureaux afin de rendre le tout plus efficace. Nous accroissons la capacité également.

(1215)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, madame Kusie. Nous allons passer maintenant à la question pour voter sur le budget des dépenses.[Français]

Le crédit 1 sous la rubrique Bureau du directeur général des élections est-il adopté?[Traduction] BUREAU DU DIRECTEUR GÉNÉRAL DES ÉLECTIONS ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses de programme..........39 217 905 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Merci beaucoup de votre présence. C'est toujours un plaisir de vous revoir. Je suis certain que nous vous reverrons souvent dans l'avenir.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pour permettre au prochain groupe de témoins de s'installer.

(1215)

(1215)

Le président:

Bonjour. Bienvenue encore une fois à la 152e séance du Comité. Nous poursuivons notre étude sur le Budget principal des dépenses de 2019-2020, et nous allons maintenant examiner le crédit 1 sous la rubrique Commission aux débats des chefs.

Nous sommes heureux d'accueillir le très honorable David Johnston, commissaire aux débats. Il est accompagné de M. Bradley Eddison, directeur, Politiques et services de gestion, à la Commission.

Merci à vous deux de vous être libérés pour venir nous rencontrer aujourd'hui. Monsieur Johnson, je vais vous céder la parole pour votre déclaration liminaire. Nous sommes heureux de vous revoir.

Le très hon. David Johnston (commissaire aux débats, Commission aux Débats des Chefs):



Bonjour, monsieur le président, et mesdames et messieurs les membres du Comité. Je suis très heureux d'être de retour.[Français]

Merci de cette occasion de comparaître devant vous et de m'accueillir aujourd'hui.[Traduction]

Je vous remercie d'avoir invité la Commission aux débats des chefs à passer en revue son Budget principal des dépenses. Puisque vous avez eu la gentillesse de nous présenter, je vais pouvoir commencer sans tarder.

Comme vous le savez, le mandat de la Commission est d'organiser deux débats, un dans chacune des langues officielles. Cette directive comporte également un engagement à l'égard d'éléments importants comme la transparence, l'accessibilité et le souci de joindre le plus grand nombre de Canadiens possible. Depuis ma nomination au poste de commissaire aux débats à la fin de 2018, la Commission s'efforce d'atteindre ces objectifs et de faire en sorte que les Canadiens aient les meilleurs débats possible.

J'aimerais commencer par offrir un aperçu de ce qui est prévu dans le Budget principal des dépenses de 2019-2020. La Commission souhaite obtenir un montant total de 4,63 millions de dollars pour s'acquitter de sa principale responsabilité, soit d'organiser deux débats des chefs en vue des élections générales fédérales de 2019, un débat dans chacune des langues officielles.[Français]

Avant de vous dire de quelle façon nous prévoyons utiliser ce financement pour remplir notre mandat, j'aimerais vous parler un peu de ce que nous avons fait jusqu'à maintenant.[Traduction]

Depuis le début de ses travaux en décembre 2018, la Commission a achevé le premier volet de son mandat, c'est-à-dire qu'elle a mené des consultations auprès de plus de 40 groupes et personnes ayant des expertises et des points de vue très variés, notamment des groupes sur l'accessibilité, des groupes autochtones, ainsi que des groupes de jeunes, d'universitaires et de journalistes. Nous sommes heureux des réponses positives que nous avons reçues de ces groupes concernant l'existence d'une commission aux débats et de son mandat. Nous poursuivrons notre processus de consultation tout au long de notre mandat.

Nous avons également rencontré les chefs du Parti libéral, du Parti conservateur, du Nouveau Parti démocratique, du Bloc québécois, du Parti populaire et du Parti vert. Dans l'ensemble, leur réaction était positive à l'égard de la Commission et de son mandat. De plus, nous avons mis en place notre infrastructure des communications, amorcé le processus d'embauche d'un producteur de débats au moyen d'une demande d'expressions d'intérêts et d'une demande de propositions, et nommé un conseil consultatif de sept membres.

Nous sommes fiers du conseil que nous avons formé et avons été ravis de l'enthousiasme manifesté par ce groupe de braves Canadiens à l'idée de se rallier à notre cause. De plus, je suis tout particulièrement fier de la qualité des gens qui composent notre petit secrétariat de cinq personnes.

Nous commençons maintenant le deuxième volet de notre mandat, lequel nous occupera jusqu'à l'été. Ce volet consiste à mettre en place un programme de mobilisation au moyen de partenariats avec un éventail de groupes et d'entreprises; choisir un producteur de débats; collaborer avec les partis politiques et les producteurs pour garantir le succès des négociations; et élaborer une stratégie de recherche qui nous permettra de mesurer l'incidence des débats et la mobilisation du public à la suite de ceux-ci.

Dans le cadre du troisième volet, qui débutera lors du déclenchement des élections, nous réaliserons des activités continues de consultation portant sur la production des débats, nous chercherons à accroître la sensibilisation du public relativement aux débats, et nous mettrons en œuvre des initiatives nationales de mobilisation visant à faire comprendre au grand public l'importance des débats. Nous évaluerons aussi la participation aux débats, l'intérêt qu'ils suscitent et leur influence.

(1220)

[Français]

Enfin, le quatrième volet de notre mandat consistera à rédiger des recommandations et un rapport à l'intention du Parlement.[Traduction]

J'aimerais revenir sur les 4,63 millions de dollars demandés. Comme vous le savez, c'est la première fois que le Canada confie les tâches que nous accomplissons actuellement à une commission aux débats. Les fonds que nous demandons représentent un montant maximal qui nous permettra de réaliser notre travail de façon indépendante pour servir l'intérêt public. Cependant, j'ai souligné plus tôt que j'entends veiller à ce que toutes les activités de la Commission soient menées de façon économique, conformément à la directive que nous avons reçue dans le décret définissant notre mandat.

Pour ne citer que quelques exemples, notre demande de propositions pour la production des débats aura pour objectif de concentrer les dépenses de la Commission dans des secteurs qui n'étaient généralement pas offerts par les organisateurs des débats précédents, comme les initiatives sur l'accessibilité. Nous cherchons également à trouver des entités déjà existantes et à établir des relations avec elles dans le cadre de nos travaux pour accroître la sensibilisation relativement aux débats et pour évaluer leur efficacité. De plus, nous avons l'intention de présenter un compte rendu détaillé de nos dépenses dans le rapport au Parlement après les débats pour que les décideurs puissent évaluer le financement d'une future commission aux débats, si c'est la voie qui est choisie.[Français]

Ce résumé du Budget principal des dépenses de 2019-2020 de la Commission porte sur la façon dont la Commission entend remplir son mandat en vue d'offrir aux Canadiens les débats qu'ils méritent.

[Traduction]

Chers membres du comité, je tiens à vous remercier de nouveau de l'occasion que vous m'avez donnée de vous décrire le contexte dans lequel la Commission aux Débats des Chefs exerce ses activités.[Français]

Nous sommes maintenant prêts à répondre à vos questions.

Merci. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le commissaire.

Nous allons maintenant céder la parole à M. Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci.

Je vous remercie infiniment, Votre Excellence.

C'est vrai, vous avez cette « règle » que vous appliquez chaque fois que quelqu'un prononce les mots « Votre Excellence ». Comme vous l'avez indiqué la dernière fois, vous vous préparez en conséquence. Je crois que vous donnez les fonds recueillis à l'organisme de bienfaisance que vous avez créé.

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Vous avez une très bonne mémoire, et vous enfreignez la règle fréquemment.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Simms:

En fait, c'est, M. Bittle qui me l'a mentionné ce matin. C'est sa mémoire qui est bonne.

Pour votre gouverne, je précise que nous appuyons tous l'organisme de bienfaisance que vous avez créé.

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Puisse cette habitude être contagieuse.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Simms:

Fort bien. Je tâcherai de m'en souvenir.

Je vous remercie de votre présence et de tout le travail que vous avez accompli jusqu'à maintenant. Je dis cela parce qu'il est toujours difficile de partir de rien, n'est-ce pas? C'est essentiellement ce que vous faites en ce moment. Évidemment, ce n'est pas comme si les débats des chefs étaient un nouveau concept. Ces débats remontent à l'avènement de la télévision et de la radio, il y a de cela bien longtemps. J'oublie à quand remonte le premier débat; il a eu lieu dans les années 1970, je crois.

Donc, cet organisme part un peu de zéro, mais il y a deux façons d'envisager la chose — c'est-à-dire la façon dont nous avons procédé dans le passé et la façon dont d'autres pays, comme les États-Unis, procèdent. Pouvons-nous parler des pratiques exemplaires? Quelles sont quelques-unes des pratiques exemplaires que vous avez découvertes jusqu'à maintenant?

(1225)

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Nous nous penchons aussi sur les débats des chefs des provinces, afin de disposer d'exemples conçus au Canada. Au chapitre de l'engagement civique, nous examinons les autres occasions où des débats, des discussions et des échanges animés sur des questions politiques sont encouragés, et nous allons même jusqu'à étudier une série intéressante d'expériences menées dans des écoles secondaires. Dans plusieurs provinces, des compétitions portant sur l'organisation à l'échelle locale et régionale de ce qui serait un débat des chefs. En ma qualité d'enseignant, cela me fascine.

Il y a environ trois semaines, deux de nos cadres supérieurs sont allés à Washington pour assister à la réunion de la commission internationale des débats. J'y suis aussi allé brièvement. En fait, j'ai passé un peu de temps avec le directeur exécutif de la commission des débats présidentiels des États-Unis, qui est entièrement non-gouvernementale. Cette commission a 35 ou 40 ans d'histoire. Comme la plupart de nos collègues américains qui travaillent dans des institutions de ce genre, les membres de son personnel ne pouvaient être plus aimables, accueillants et enthousiastes à l'idée de nous communiquer leur savoir-faire américain, dont le modèle est tout à fait unique en son genre. En fait, cette commission gouvernementale ne se contente pas d'organiser les débats. Elle s'occupe aussi de leur production et de leur diffusion, c'est-à-dire qu'ils exploitent le studio de production, gère le format de la production, etc.

Je devrais ajouter que cette visite m'a permis de nouer d'autres liens internationaux. L'expérience du Royaume-Uni est très différente, tout comme celle des pays européens. Nous essaierons de tenir compte de cela, en particulier dans notre rapport final au Parlement.

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, d'accord.

Je pense que, dans le cas de la Grande-Bretagne, un radiodiffuseur public intervient, ou non. Bien entendu, le même genre de dynamique s'applique à nous, une dynamique qui diffère évidemment de celle des Américains. Leur radiodiffuseur public n'est pas aussi prestigieux que le nôtre.

Vous dîtes que vous disposez d'une équipe de production.

Est-ce exact?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Non, mais les États-Unis en ont une.

M. Scott Simms:

Envisagez-vous de créer ce genre d'équipe de production pour nos...?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Non.

Nous organiserons une demande de propositions. Nous nous attendons à ce que le marché soit adjugé à un consortium qui assumera la responsabilité de la production et de la diffusion du débat, un débat dont les qualités journalistiques élevées nous permettront d'offrir le fil gratuitement à un certain nombre d'autres entités. À ce moment-là, nous encouragerons ces autres entités à être aussi bien réparties que possible afin qu'elles atteignent des personnes de différentes régions du pays ou des personnes qui parlent différentes langues. Nous essaierons ensuite de faire participer les médias sociaux, afin de garantir que nous tirons le meilleur parti de ce nouveau phénomène, étant donné que les débats ont commencé il y a quelque 30 ans, d'une façon tout à fait stimulante et encourageante.

M. Scott Simms:

Oui, comme quelqu'un l'a dit un jour, la diffusion n'est plus ce qu'elle était. Elle peut prendre toutes sortes de formes. J'imagine que vous offrirez un accès ouvert à tout genre de plate-forme, que ce soit un élément de Facebook, de CBC ou peu importe.

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Oui. Tout ce que vous avez dit, et plus encore.

M. Scott Simms:

En ce qui a trait aux normes journalistiques — examinons cet aspect pendant un moment —, comment prendrez-vous ces décisions?

Évidemment, en ce qui concerne le format, qui posera les questions? Qui déterminera ce qui est pertinent pour une campagne électorale donnée, ou quels sont les principaux enjeux?

Comment aborderez-vous la question de savoir si des principes journalistiques ont été respectés?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Voilà deux questions très importantes.

Premièrement, dans le cadre de référence de notre demande de propositions, nous établirons les conditions qui découlent de notre mandat quant au type de débat d'intérêt public que nous souhaitons organiser. Nous demanderons des commentaires sur les questions que vous venez de soulever. Une fois qu'aura été prise la décision de confier à un consortium particulier la tâche d'organiser et de diffuser au moins deux débats nationaux dans chaque langue officielle, nous entamerons d'autres discussions avec eux, en ce qui concerne la façon dont nous pourrions élargir le rayonnement des débats, avec peut-être plus d'enthousiasme que ce que nous avons observé dans le passé. Nous poursuivrons nos discussions avec ce consortium jusqu'au moment du débat.

Le format choisi, les questions à poser, entre autres choses, reposeront entre les mains du consortium retenu, et non entre les nôtres. Toutefois, dans le cadre du processus de suivi de la demande de propositions et de l'adjudication du marché, nous nous attendons à discuter fréquemment avec le consortium pour avoir une idée de la façon dont les choses évoluent, mais non pour en assumer la responsabilité.

En ce qui concerne les normes journalistiques, le fil offert par le consortium retenu sera accordé à condition que toute personne qui l'utilise respecte des normes appropriées de qualité journalistique. Cela pourrait poser des problèmes plus tard, car rien dans notre mandat, ou dans celui du consortium, je suppose, ne nous permet de faire respecter ces normes, si ce n'est que nous pourrions demander une injonction ou exercer un recours quelconque après coup.

(1230)

M. Scott Simms:

Si vous aviez le sentiment que les débats n'étaient pas gérés en gardant à l'esprit des principes journalistiques.

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Si nous parvenions à cette conclusion, nous en discuterions avec le consortium retenu afin d'exercer le recours disponible, car notre mandat ne nous confère pas le pouvoir d'intervenir et de décréter que quelqu'un ne peut pas faire quelque chose.

Étant donné que la commission aux débats des États-Unis produit et diffuse elle-même les débats, elle exerce un plus grand contrôle sur tous les aspects que vous avez mentionnés, y compris le lieu, le format, le modérateur, le type de questions, les thèmes, etc.

M. Scott Simms:

Le contrôle sur le produit en tant que tel, une fois le débat terminé, sur les personnes qui peuvent obtenir une copie du débat et sur d'autres considérations de ce genre?

Qui peut diffuser le débat en continu?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

En toute justice, nous n'avons pas complètement réglé la question des droits d'auteur. Nous cherchons à obtenir des conseils juridiques à cet égard. À mon avis, sans y avoir réfléchi, je dirais que les droits d'auteur appartiendraient au consortium qui produit et diffuse le débat. Toute infraction liée à une violation des droits d'auteur serait gérée de cette façon. Ces mesures ne sont pas totalement satisfaisantes parce qu'habituellement, on ne peut pas gérer une violation d'un droit d'auteur jusqu'à ce qu'elle ait eu lieu et que le mal ait été fait, pour ainsi dire.

M. Scott Simms:

Je m'en rends compte.

Je précise simplement pour le compte rendu que ce n'est pas vous qui feriez respecter les droits d'auteur ou qui poursuivriez les personnes qui les enfreignent. C'est le consortium en tant que tel.

Le très hon. David Johnston:

C'est exact.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

C'était bien de pouvoir vous parler de nouveau, monsieur.

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Merci, et je vous remercie de nouveau, monsieur Simms, de votre contribution à la Fondation Rideau Hall.

M. Scott Simms:

Cela ne pose pas de problème — je m'en occupe.

Merci, monsieur.

Le président:

Madame Kusie, vous avez la parole.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Pardon, j'essaie seulement de choisir le titre que j'utiliserai pour vous adresser la parole. Il y a tellement d'options.

Si je peux me le permettre, j'aimerais maintenant aborder la question des membres du conseil consultatif. Comment les personnes qui siègent à ce conseil ont-elles été sélectionnées?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Nous les avons choisies, puisque j'assume la responsabilité ultime de ce choix. Nous avons reçu des conseils du secrétariat, et nous avons été guidés par les références qui figurent dans notre mandat. Je peux vous les faire parvenir, si vous le souhaitez. Le mandat indique effectivement qu'on doit sélectionner à titre de membres du conseil consultatif des personnes qui ont participé activement à des activités politiques.

Nous avons dressé une très longue liste de candidats qui, premièrement, possédait une expérience politique appropriée et qui, deuxièmement, avait acquis une expérience médiatique considérable en matière de production et de diffusion de débats. Ensuite, il y avait un vaste éventail de gens qui avaient de l'expérience dans des domaines liés à l'intérêt public et à la participation des citoyens, une expérience qui nous serait très utile pour remplir notre mandat qui consiste, entre autres, à élargir autant que possible le rayonnement des débats, et à considérer les débats comme un produit de haute qualité et une activité très cruciale de notre processus électoral.

Trois de nos membres sont John Manley...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je connais l'identité des membres, monsieur. Merci beaucoup.

Ce que vous dîtes, c'est qu'il ne s'agissait pas d'un processus de mise en candidature ouvert.

Le très hon. David Johnston:

C'est exact.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Fort bien.

Avez-vous échangé des lettres ou discuté avec le Cabinet du premier ministre, le Bureau du Conseil privé ou la ministre des Institutions démocratiques au sujet de la sélection des membres du conseil consultatif?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Non, nous avons géré ce processus entièrement par nous-mêmes.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord.

Pouvez-vous, s'il vous plaît, nous rappeler le nom des membres du secrétariat auquel vous faites allusion?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Le secrétariat, et non le conseil consultatif — est-ce bien votre question? Le secrétariat est dirigé par Michel Cormier, un ancien cadre supérieur de Radio-Canada, qui est maintenant à la retraite. Je pense que l'expérience de M. Cormier correspond probablement à au moins deux décennies d'organisation de débats et de négociation de consortiums.

Il est appuyé par Jess Milton. Mme Milton est une ancienne employée de CBC qui jouait, entre autres, le rôle de productrice et de directrice du Vinyl Cafe, avec Stuart McLean. Ma collègue, Jill Clark, qui se trouve directement derrière moi, est notre experte en communication. Elle a quitté la Fondation Rideau Hall — la fondation que je préside — pour s'occuper de nos communications. À ma gauche, il y année a Bradley Eddison, qui est notre analyste et qui a joué un rôle dans les débats pendant plusieurs années, dont une au sein du Conseil privé du Canada et deux années à Élections Canada. Il comprend, en général, le rayonnement et, en particulier, les médias sociaux. Nous avons un coordonnateur et directeur de bureau...

(1235)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

C'est excellent. Merci, monsieur.

Alors, quel est le rôle principal du conseil consultatif relativement à l'organisation des débats des chefs de 2019?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Très simplement, son rôle consiste à donner des conseils à la commission au sujet de son mandat limité en matière d'organisation de deux débats nationaux dans les deux langues officielles, à nouer un dialogue avec nous et à nous aider à obtenir une sensibilisation adéquate aux débats, à organiser la publicité liée à ces débats et la publicité connexe, à faire participer les citoyens dans ce contexte, à préparer notre rapport et, bien entendu, à discuter des enjeux d'une façon appropriée.

En fait, nous avons eu ce matin une réunion par téléphone d'une heure et demie avec les sept membres du comité consultatif. Nous entrecoupons ces séances de réunions en personne et, habituellement, nous présentons aux membres trois ou quatre enjeux auxquels nous travaillons pendant le mois en question.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Pour parvenir à des décisions, les membres ont-ils recours à un processus consensuel, ou votent-ils sur les enjeux?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Nous n'avons pas établi de règles fermes et nettes à ce sujet. Je dirais que nous travaillons par consensus, mais le comité consultatif de sept personnes est là pour conseiller le commissaire, en l'occurrence moi. Je suis donc responsable de la façon dont ces conseils sont reçus et font l'objet d'un suivi.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Les décisions prises par le conseil consultatif peuvent-elles être renversées par qui que ce soit, y compris vous, si cela est jugé nécessaire?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Je suppose que, si elles devaient être renversées, elles le seraient par moi. Je renverserais mes propres décisions. Il s'agit d'un conseil consultatif duquel je reçois des conseils. Bien entendu, si vous agissez ainsi très souvent, cela entachera un peu le genre de conseils que vous donnera le conseil consultatif. Par conséquent, nous travaillerions en vue de discuter à fond d'un enjeu particulièrement difficile et nous parviendrions probablement à un genre de consensus. Mais, au bout du compte, le commissaire a la responsabilité finale de prendre une décision et d'accepter les critiques qu'elle suscite.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

En ce qui concerne les décisions du conseil consultatif, serviront-elles à conseiller directement le producteur, ou passeront-elles par vous d'abord?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

J'ai manqué la question.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je parle des décisions prises par le conseil consultatif, de leurs discussions et de leurs recommandations. Ces recommandations seront-elles communiquées directement au producteur, ou passeront-elles par vous d'abord?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Les conseils du conseil consultatif nous aident à concevoir la demande de propositions et le cadre de référence que nous intégrerons dans cette demande. Lorsque nous évaluerons les réponses qui découlent de ce processus, nous franchirons deux étapes. Nous utiliserons un groupe d'experts chargés des approvisionnements, qui travaillent pour le gouvernement du Canada et qui ont des compétences liées aux aspects techniques de la production, afin de déterminer si toutes les réponses ou seulement certaines d'entre elles satisfont aux exigences techniques de la demande de propositions.

Une fois que sera terminée cette étape, qui détermine si une réponse sera acceptée ou non, un petit comité d'évaluation composé de trois membres conseillera le commissaire, c'est-à-dire moi-même, et le secrétariat quant au soumissionnaire qui devrait être retenu. Au cours de la prochaine étape, ils continueront de travailler avec le soumissionnaire retenu, afin de déterminer les façons dont nous pouvons diffuser le fil des débats de manière plus efficace et générale, convaincre un plus grand éventail de parties de tirer profit de ces diffusions et intégrer cela dans un processus de participation publique. Ce groupe relèvera du commissaire.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Un producteur distinct organisera-t-il chaque débat, ou est-ce qu'un seul producteur organisera tous les débats?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Nous avons laissé la porte ouverte à cet égard. Nous avons indiqué qu'il était acceptable de présenter une soumission pour les débats en français et une autre soumission pour les débats en anglais. Nous avons également invité un consortium à présenter une proposition qui combine les deux.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Qu'est-ce qui vous a motivé à accepter le rôle de commissaire aux débats? Pourquoi avez-vous jugé que c'était une bonne idée et une solution de rechange à la manière traditionnelle dont on tenait des débats au cours des élections au Canada?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Je suppose que c'est pour trois ou quatre raisons. La plus simple semble un peu simpliste, mais c'est juste parce qu'on me l'a demandé.

Toute ma vie, j'ai été professeur d'université permanent, un des postes les plus merveilleux que l'on puisse occuper dans notre société, et je me suis souvent vu demander de présider diverses initiatives d'intérêt public. Sur une quarantaine d'années, j'ai presque toujours accepté, sauf quand je considérais que je ne possédais pas les compétences nécessaires. Cela a parfois donné lieu à des débats. Il est arrivé à l'occasion que je n'aie pas le temps, habituellement parce que je présidais un autre débat. Je pense qu'il s'agit d'une responsabilité citoyenne, particulièrement quand on a la chance d'être professeur de droit dans l'une des excellentes universités du Canada.

Je considère en outre qu'il est crucial de tenir des débats de premier ordre prévisibles en temps opportun afin de permettre aux gens de prendre des décisions au sujet du genre de dirigeant qu'ils souhaitent voir à la tête du pays et du type de politiques que cette personne et son parti devraient proposer. Les citoyens peuvent ainsi participer globalement aux choix que les bonnes sociétés doivent effectuer au sujet de l'orientation que leur pays doit prendre.

Je dois dire que je me préoccupe quelque peu de l'effritement de la confiance à l'égard des institutions publiques. Voilà qui m'a incité à écrire un livre intitulé Trust, paru il y a six mois environ. Je pense que c'est une autre solide raison de dire: « Je suppose que je n'ai absolument pas besoin de cela, mais c'est quelque chose que je devrais faire. »

(1240)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous accorderons maintenant la parole à M. Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président. Je vous remercie, Votre Excellence.

Le très hon. David Johnston:

C'est absolument merveilleux. Merci.

Avec l'argent qui change de main au sein du comité de la Chambre, je suis un peu inquiet.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. David Christopherson:

J'ai vraiment aimé votre dernière réponse. Nous sommes passés par tout un processus pour nous rendre jusqu'ici, mais quand est venu le temps de choisir un titulaire, mes propos figurent au compte rendu. La réponse que vous avez offerte à la dernière question ne fait que confirmer mon opinion sur les Canadiens qui devraient occuper ces fonctions et pourquoi. Il n'existe pas de meilleur choix, et je suis enchanté que vous ayez accepté.

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Comme je l'ai indiqué la dernière fois, c'était touchant. Quand j'en ai parlé à ma conjointe ce soir-là, elle n'était pas d'accord, mais son avis a été néanmoins utile.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est probablement ce qui vous aide en grande partie à garder les pieds sur terre.

Si vous me le permettez, j'ai quelques questions. Le Parlement vous a notamment mandaté pour régler le problème des absences. Je me demande si vous vous êtes rendu jusque là dans vos réflexions. Si c'est le cas, où ces réflexions vous mènent-elles? Que pensez-vous de la question?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Quelle question importante! Dans notre mandat, nous ne sommes pas autorisés à prendre des sanctions à ce sujet. Nous sommes donc devant un livre ouvert.

Je suppose que l'objectif consiste à faire de la publicité et à mettre en lumière le problème des absences. Nous entendons intervenir à cet égard, comme nous en avons d'ailleurs discuté ce matin au sein du conseil consultatif. Nous inviterons tous les partis appropriés avant le débat proprement dit. Si nous recevons une lettre de refus, nous la publierions pour que la population sache, bien avant le débat, qu'un parti a décidé de s'abstenir ou de participer à certaines conditions.

M. David Christopherson:

Je suis conscient que vous n'avez pas de mandat de contrainte. Il y a eu une rupture entre notre comité, le gouvernement et le Parlement au cours du processus. Tout cela est maintenant derrière nous, mais le Comité souhaitait certainement que vous fassiez quelque chose pour mettre le problème en exergue, notamment en montrant des sièges vides. N'envisagez-vous pas d'intervenir actuellement? Avez-vous abandonné l'idée?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

C'est certainement une suggestion qui nous a été faite en un certain nombre d'occasions. Nous n'avons pas décidé d'inclure cet élément dans les paramètres de la demande de propositions. Il sera intéressant de voir ce que le consortium aura à dire à ce sujet.

Pour l'heure, nous dirions que nous cherchons à faire en sorte qu'il y ait une publicité adéquate au sujet du refus de participer et à donner à l'intéressé l'occasion de fournir les motifs de son refus. Pour le moment, je ne sais pas si la commission formulera d'autres observations à cet égard, mais je pense que nous voulons que la question devienne un sujet de discussion publique suffisamment à l'avance du débat. On ne peut agir tellement à la dernière minute qu'on ne peut prendre de décision à cet égard.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui. Nous ne voulons pas laisser aux gens une porte de sortie.

Comme vous le savez, pour un grand nombre de nous, c'est principalement en raison de ce qu'il s'est passé la dernière fois que nous voulions régler la question. Nous voulons que tout le monde soit là, sauf les personnes ayant refusé de participer, afin de trouver un terrain d'entente. Si nous ne pouvons réunir les gens, nous ratons le principal objectif. Si tous les acteurs ne sont pas présents, il est impossible de tenir un débat satisfaisant.

J'espère que vous pourrez examiner le problème autant que possible. Ce que nous voulons, c'est faire en sorte qu'au sein de notre démocratie, une personne ne puisse se permettre, du point de vue politique, de ne pas participer. Il faudrait que les conséquences d'une absence l'emportent sur les préoccupations que la personne pourrait avoir à l'idée de participer. Le fait que vous soyez là pour continuer de mettre le problème en lumière en faisant savoir aux gens que des mesures seront prises cadre fort bien avec cet objectif.

(1245)

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Je vous remercie d'avoir souligné ce problème, soit dit en passant. Cette discussion est en soi importante. Bien entendu, nous avons étudié, d'une manière que j'aime croire exhaustive, les discussions qui ont eu lieu au cours des trois ou quatre dernières années à ce sujet, notamment certains des importants exposés qui vous ont été présentés et qui ont servi de fondements à votre excellent rapport et à d'autres documents.

C'est aussi une question à laquelle nous nous sommes attaqués et que nous continuerons d'analyser avec nos homologues experts afin de voir comment ils composent avec de telles situations.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est drôle que vous disiez cela, car c'était l'objet de la prochaine question. Comme vous revenez à peine des États-Unis, je me demande si vous pouvez expliquer, de mémoire, comment les Américains gèrent ces situations.

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Je serais mal avisé d'en parler maintenant, car j'ai des renseignements généraux...

M. David Christopherson:

Mais vous n'avez pas encore étudié suffisamment la question.

Le très hon. David Johnston:

... issus de notre plus récente discussion avec le directeur général de la commission américaine des débats. Je voudrais vous fournir une meilleure réponse que celle que j'ai en tête.

M. David Christopherson:

Fort bien. D'accord.

Au cours des séances que nous avons tenues en vue de préparer notre rapport, il a également été question des médias sociaux. Tout comme vous, probablement, je tente de me tenir à jour à ce sujet. Ces discussions m'ont vraiment ouvert les yeux. C'est une bonne chose que M. Nater ait été à mes côtés, car il connaissait mieux le point de vue de la jeune génération à ce propos.

De nos jours, il est essentiel de savoir utiliser les plateformes de médias sociaux. Quels genres de démarches avez-vous entreprises auprès d'eux? De toute évidence, on peut emprunter la voie traditionnelle, dans le cadre de laquelle on rencontre les réseaux et les journalistes de la presse et d'autres médias. Puis il y a les autres médias, qui gagnent en popularité.

Je me demande quelle approche vous adoptez dans le cadre de votre consultation pour permettre à ces médias d'avoir leur mot à dire, du début jusqu'à la fin, afin de voir comment les choses se sont déroulées.

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Personnellement, je commence avec mes 14 petits-enfants, qui sont de merveilleux professeurs pour leur grand-père. Ils m'appellent « Papi livre », mais l'enseignement est bidirectionnel.

M. David Christopherson:

Je parie que vous portez ce nom avec fierté.

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Notre gestionnaire des communications, Jill Clark, est ici. Elle nous rappelle souvent qu'elle n'a pas de téléviseur chez elle, qu'elle n'en a pas besoin, et qu'elle est plus informée que nous tous dans le cadre de ses fonctions. Jill et Jess Milton dirigent les efforts déployés pour établir le contact.

Parmi les sept membres de notre conseil consultatif figure Craig Kielburger. Si vous n'avez pas vu le siège social de WE près de l'intersection des rues King est et Parliament, à Toronto, allez y jeter un coup d'œil. C'est absolument extraordinaire. Il s'y trouve un studio de médias numériques grâce auquel on peut savoir comment communiquer... Je suppose que les programmes s'adressent aux jeunes de 9 à 21 ans.

Aujourd'hui, nous nous interrogions sur le nombre. Nous avons tenu une quarantaine de consultations, Jill, mais combien de groupes se trouvaient sur notre liste? Je pense qu'il y en avait 120 ou 140.

Il y en aura d'autres, avec lesquels nous communiquerons. Ils nous indiqueront qu'ils s'intéressent aux débats électoraux et aux politiques électorales, et nous demanderont ce qu'ils peuvent faire pour nous aider afin de faire participer le public cible dans une région donnée, en agissant de manière positive afin de renforcer la participation. J'oserais dire que sur la quarantaine de consultations, huit ou dix ont porté principalement sur ce genre de...

Une voix: Twitter, Facebook et Google également. Nous les avons tous rencontrés lors de nos consultations initiales.

M. David Christopherson:

Ce sont certains des groupes qui viennent nous rencontrer aussi.

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Votre question porterait sur le budget et sur le coût des débats?

Une part substantielle du budget servira à examiner exactement cette question et à mobiliser davantage les médias sociaux. Nous évaluerons ensuite ce qui a fonctionné et ce qui n'a pas marché en nous appuyant sur les chiffres et d'autres données. Dans notre rapport, nous tenterons de faire quelques prédictions afin d'indiquer dans quelles voies nous nous dirigeons. Nous tentons d'approcher la question de manière très systématique, et je pense que je suis peut-être assez avisé pour dire qu'il faut se fier à des gens qui ont beaucoup moins de cheveux gris que moi.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord.

Sachant que le président va bientôt m'interrompre, je veux aborder brièvement deux points.

Je voulais vous complimenter au sujet des choix politiques. Megan Leslie, John Manley et Deb Grey peuvent tous être considérés comme étant parfaitement capables d'être impartiaux et de faire passer les intérêts des élections avant les leurs. Ils sont respectés par tous les partis. Ce sont donc des choix avisés.

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Je vous remercie de le souligner, car nous tenions particulièrement à choisir des gens qui seraient considérés comme des hommes et des femmes d'État possédant la sagesse et les contacts cadrant avec notre mandat.

Merci.

M. David Christopherson:

Je pense que vous avez accompli un excellent travail et que c'est une réussite.

Ma dernière question...

(1250)

Le président:

Il vaudrait mieux qu'elle soit très brève.

M. David Christopherson:

Elle l'est.

Quand vous réaliserez votre examen, irez-vous jusqu'à déterminer si la méthode utilisée aux fins de production était la plus efficace?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Oui.

De façon très générale, nous ferons un bilan après les deux débats pour déterminer ce qui a bien ou mal été, et établir les paramètres que nous instaurerons pour tenter d'agir de manière adéquate. Nous chercherons ensuite à voir si, dans l'ensemble, l'expérience de la commission des débats a reçu un écho favorable, mauvais ou neutre. C'est un point sur lequel votre comité se penchera pour déterminer si l'expérience qui a été tentée a bien été, s'il s'agissait d'une initiative ponctuelle qu'on mettra de côté, si on continuera sur le même mode ou si on se montrera plus aventureux. Ensuite, sans écrire une encyclopédie, on étudiera les problèmes difficiles, les orientations et les leçons que nous tirons d'autres expériences afin de proposer des idées mûrement réfléchies à ce sujet. Nous ne rédigerons pas de long rapport, mais nous espérons qu'il sera très instructif et que nous tirerons des enseignements de l'expérience.

M. David Christopherson:

C'est excellent. Formidable.

Merci beaucoup, monsieur.

J'ai terminé.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Scarpaleggia, vous avez la parole.

M. Francis Scarpaleggia (Lac-Saint-Louis, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Comme je n'ai pas cinq dollars sur moi, je vous appellerai « commissaire ».

Ma question porte essentiellement sur votre rôle. Je crois comprendre que votre indépendance vous confère l'autorité morale pour inciter les participants réticents à prendre part au débat. Je pense que c'est là une des facettes les plus importantes de votre rôle. Vous assumez un rôle fort complexe et disposez d'une machine complexe qui comprend un conseil consultatif et un consortium, en plus d'aider le gouvernement à choisir les bons producteurs et d'autres éléments.

Comment décririez-vous votre rôle en quelques mots? À quels sujets aurez-vous directement votre mot à dire? Dans quels domaines supervisez-vous un processus qui se déroulera...

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Nous prenons appui sur notre mandat. C'est une question importante, et nous en avons considérablement débattu, discutant de la mesure dans laquelle on lâche la bride aux acteurs du domaine et les laisse participer, et du degré auquel on se montre préventif.

Quand on examine notre mandat, on constate qu'il nous demande de tenir au moins deux débats nationaux dans les deux langues officielles. Ces débats doivent être stimulants, aussi accessibles que possible et satisfaire des normes journalistiques élevées. Nous ne disons pas que c'est nous qui établirons les règles du jeu.

Nous nous attendons à ce que dans la réponse aux propositions, nous obtenions des observations détaillées sur ce que le consortium gagnant fera pour satisfaire les normes figurant dans notre mandat, et nous fonderons notre jugement sur ces informations. Une fois ce jugement fait, pour nous assurer de ne pas tout simplement laisser carte blanche au gagnant du concours jusqu'à la fin octobre, nous tiendrons des discussions aux deux semaines, puis une fois par semaine. Dans les 10 jours précédant le débat, nous discuterons chaque jour afin que le producteur nous tienne informés de ce qu'il fait. De plus, sans trop agir comme un professeur, nous serons en position de lui dire qu'à la réflexion, il conviendrait peut-être d'adopter une approche légèrement différente à un quelconque égard.

M. Francis Scarpaleggia:

Merci.

J'ai bien cinq dollars.

Votre Excellence, je vous remercie de votre réponse. Je partagerai mon temps avec mon collègue.

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Monsieur le président, auriez-vous la gentillesse de me réinviter chaque mois.

Des voix: Ha! ha!

Le très hon. David Johnston: Je n'ai pas entièrement répondu à la question.

M. Francis Scarpaleggia:

Non, c'était une excellente réponse, qui m'aide à mieux comprendre.

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Le sujet est sous constante considération.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, vous avez la parole.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci, votre Excellence.

Dans votre exposé, vous avez indiqué que vous avez parlé aux chefs de plusieurs partis. Je sais qu'il s'agit uniquement des partis occupant des sièges à la Chambre. Avez-vous agi ainsi à dessein? Était-ce votre intention?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Pourriez-vous répéter la question?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans votre exposé, vous avez énuméré un certain nombre de partis que vous avez consultés. Il s'agit des partis qui ont des sièges à la Chambre. Était-ce intentionnel? Est-ce l'approche que vous avez adoptée?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Nos consultations ne sont pas encore terminées. Avec l'aide d'Élections Canada, nous avons commencé à collaborer avec un groupe consultatif multipartite qui pourrait, en fait, convenir pour la suite des consultations.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avez-vous reçu des appels de la part de ce que j'appellerais les « petits partis » qui n'ont jamais eu de sièges à la Chambre afin de discuter sérieusement?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Je ne pense pas qu'il existe d'autres partis que ceux avec lesquels nous avons communiqué. Si d'autres partis nous contactaient, nous serions entièrement disposés à les rencontrer.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez indiqué que vous avez lancé une demande de propositions. Quel accueil recevez-vous des organisations médiatiques? Se montrent-elles enthousiastes?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Les organisations de partis?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je parle des médias, tant traditionnels que sociaux.

(1255)

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Je dirais qu'en général, l'accueil est très favorable et les organisations sont fort intéressées. Elles nous ont principalement demandé plus d'information sur notre mandat et sur ce que nous faisons. Elles ont souvent à l'esprit le genre de question que M. Scarpaleggia a posée et souhaitent savoir comment agir en interaction avec nous. Elles font preuve d'enthousiasme et d'ambition, je pense. De façon générale, je suis très satisfait, si je peux faire cette observation générale. Nous avons appris et, je dois le dire, continuons d'apprendre dans le cadre du processus, car ces consultations se poursuivront.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

À partir de quand pourrez-vous fixer ou fixerez-vous les dates des débats?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Dans la demande de propositions, nous avons fourni des indications sur ce que nous considérons comme un moment tout à fait approprié, sans insister sur ce point pour le moment. Ce sera approximativement deux à trois semaines avant les débats. Nous demanderons des réponses précises à ce sujet aux consortiums soumissionnaires.

Nous ne considérerons pas nécessairement que ces dates sont coulées dans le béton, mais nous accepterons qu'il s'agit du meilleur jugement du consortium, sachant que le choix des dates se fondera sur les discussions avec les partis. Je pense que nous pourrons probablement avoir le dernier mot afin de tenter de trouver des dates appropriées. C'est peut-être le plus loin que je puisse aller.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous n'entendez donc pas annoncer les dates des débats maintenant? Ce serait bien trop tôt.

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Est-ce qu'il y a une chance de quoi?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous n'avez pas l'intention d'annoncer les dates des débats maintenant, mais plutôt d'attendre le déclenchement des élections.

Le très hon. David Johnston:

C'est une question intéressante, car il faut choisir le bon moment. Je pense que nous voudrions fixer les dates le plus tôt possible, mais cela ne cadre pas nécessairement avec la manière dont les partis organisent leurs calendriers et leurs activités.

Ce que nous ferons, toutefois, c'est tenter de régler la question le plus tôt possible, en discussion avec le consortium gagnant, afin que tout le monde sache ce qu'il se passe. Nous lancerons ensuite une campagne de sensibilisation pour tenter de faire en sorte que la population canadienne sache ce qu'il se passera, et nous pourrons étoffer un peu l'approche.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il ne me reste que quelques secondes. J'ai une question légèrement moins importante à vous poser. La séquence binaire qui ornait vos armoiries avait-elle une signification?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Il y a quoi sur les armoiries?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Sur les armoiries qui étaient les vôtres à titre de gouverneur général, il y avait une séquence binaire. Quelle en était la signification?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Vous savez, j'aimerais vous donner une réponse digne du Code Da Vinci et dire que nous y avons caché un message. Certains ont proposé ces armoiries, car je m'intéresse fortement aux technologies de l'information. J'ai présidé le Comité consultatif sur l'autoroute de l'information et deux conseils il y a quelques années lors de l'avènement de cette technologie. Il a donc été proposé d'insérer un message codé, qu'il faut chercher très fort pour trouver. Je pense qu'il a été mis là en raison de mon intérêt à l'égard de la révolution numérique et de la nouvelle manière de gérer les communications.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Ce ne sont pas les Templiers?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Vous remarquerez que les armoiries contiennent cinq livres. C'est pour mes cinq filles. À titre de Papi livre, je crois beaucoup à l'instruction.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Kusie, vous avez la parole.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Johnston, il m'est très difficile de vous poser cette question, premièrement parce que je vous aime bien; deuxièmement, parce que vous avez été nommé par un homme que je respecte beaucoup; et troisièmement, parce que je n'ai pas cinq dollars.

Je m'intéresse à votre processus de nomination. Il ne s'agissait pas d'un processus de demande ouvert: vous avez été choisi par le gouvernement libéral. J'écoute la manière dont les membres du conseil consultatif ont été sélectionnés. Ils l'ont été par vous et nommés par le gouvernement libéral plutôt que dans le cadre d'un processus de demande ouvert. Je me dois donc de présumer que le secrétariat a été nommé soit par vous, soit par le gouvernement fédéral dans le cadre d'un processus. D'une manière ou d'une autre, vous avez été choisi par le gouvernement fédéral.

Vous continuez de faire référence à votre mandat, qui vous indique de faire ceci ou de faire cela. Qui vous a confié ce mandat, monsieur Johnston?

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Il m'a été confié par décret.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Au bout du compte, c'est le gouvernement fédéral qui vous a nommé.

Comment pouvons-nous croire à l'indépendance de l'organe, de l'organisation et des débats, alors que le gouvernement libéral est derrière les deux processus et le mandat? On aura beau en discuter, mais c'est ainsi que les choses se sont déroulées, ce qui nous amène aujourd'hui à parler des menus détails, comme le producteur et d'autres éléments. Tout cela a été mis en place par le gouvernement libéral. Pour moi qui suis membre de l'opposition officielle, il est très difficile de croire que le processus est réellement indépendant.

Cela étant dit, pensez-vous vraiment que vous disposerez de suffisamment de temps et de ressources pour accomplir les tâches prévues dans votre mandat?

(1300)

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Pour répondre à la dernière question, qui est plus facile, nous ferons certainement de notre mieux et entreprendrons d'exécuter notre mandat aussi bien que possible.

En ce qui concerne votre première question, je ne peux y répondre, et vous le savez. Pour ce qui est de mon indépendance, toutefois, je considère que c'est une question d'intégrité. Je vous demanderais d'examiner mon parcours de vie et de former votre propre jugement.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je peux étudier votre parcours, et je peux certainement former un jugement. J'ai déjà indiqué que je n'éprouve que du respect pour vous et ceux qui vous ont nommé. Je ne m'interroge pas à votre sujet, mais à celui du processus que le gouvernement libéral a utilisé pour vous nommer, monsieur Johnston. Je ne vous manque pas de respect; je remets en question le processus du gouvernement libéral.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, madame Kusie.

Je vous remercie de tout coeur d'avoir comparu de nouveau. Je suis certain que nous vous reverrons. Nous avons été enchantés de vous recevoir et de rencontrer certains de vos employés.

Le très hon. David Johnston:

Je vous remercie de ce que vous faites quotidiennement au service de la population. C'est un grand plaisir d'être ici.

Le président:

Avant de lever la séance, je dois vous informer que la ministre, qui devait témoigner jeudi prochain, ne peut se présenter. Nous essayons de la faire venir mardi, mais nous ignorons si elle est disponible. Nous la ferons venir dès qu'elle est disponible.

Monsieur Reid, vous voulez intervenir?

M. Scott Reid:

Le premier point à l'ordre du jour de la séance de mardi devrait être la motion dont j'ai donné avis.

Le président:

Le premier point concernera les travaux du Comité. Il y a plusieurs motions, car nous accusons du retard. Nous tenterons toutefois de faire comparaître la ministre. Je suis certain que les membres du Comité veulent qu'elle témoigne si possible pour la motion de Mme Kusie.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 02, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.