header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-04-30 PROC 150

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning, everyone.

In spite of the fact that our witnesses aren't here yet, welcome to the 150th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

Our first order of business is the main estimates for 2019-20. Today we'll be considering vote 1 under House of Commons and vote 1 under Parliamentary Protective Service.

We are pleased that we will shortly be joined by the Honourable Geoff Regan, Speaker of the House. He will be accompanied by the following officials from the House of Commons: Charles Robert, Clerk of the House of Commons; Michel Patrice, Deputy Clerk, administration, House of Commons; and Daniel Paquette, Chief Financial Officer.

Also here, from Parliamentary Protective Service, are Superintendent Marie-Claude Côté, Interim Director; and Mr. Robert Graham, Administration and Personnel Officer.

Before we start, I want to remind people that we have an official meeting at 7:00 p.m. tonight to hear from Australia. We have something very special for you, too, at the beginning of that meeting, which the clerk has organized. It's a 45-second video of each of the Australian and British Houses, of their second chambers. I think it will be very interesting to see that.

We've already introduced all our guests, and because the bells will be ringing in about 15 minutes, we want to get started.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Very briefly, because we will be having bells, can the witnesses stay a bit past 12:00 today?

The Chair:

Can you stay?

Hon. Geoff Regan (Speaker of the House of Commons):

Yes.

The Chair:

When the bells start ringing, seeing that the chamber is right upstairs, is the committee okay to stay a bit longer, closer to the end of the bells?

Mr. John Nater:

If it's okay with the witnesses.... I know they have to....

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I have to be there, too, at a certain point.

The Chair:

How about 10 minutes before the vote?

Okay.

Mr. Speaker, it's great to have you back. You're on.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair and members of the committee. It's a pleasure to be here.[Translation]

As Speaker of the House of Commons, I will be presenting the main estimates for fiscal year 2019-2020 for the House of Commons and the Parliamentary Protective Service. I am joined by officials from both organizations.[English]

Representing the House of Commons administration we have Charles Robert, Clerk of the House of Commons; Michel Patrice, Deputy Clerk, Administration; and Daniel Paquette, Chief Financial Officer.

From the Parliamentary Protective Service, we are joined by Superintendent Marie-Claude Côté, the service's Acting Director; and Robert Graham, the service's Administration and Personnel Officer.

I'll begin, Mr. Chair, by presenting the key elements of the 2019-20 main estimates for the House. These estimates total $503.4 million. This represents a net decrease of $3.6 million compared with the 2018-19 main estimates.

I want to point out—I think members probably know—that the main estimates have been reviewed and approved by the Board of Internal Economy at a public meeting.[Translation]

The main estimates will be presented along five major themes, corresponding to the handout that you received. The financial impact associated with these themes represents the year-over-year changes from the 2018-2019 Main Estimates.[English]

The five themes are as follows: cost-of-living increases; major investments; conferences, associations and assemblies; MP retiring allowances and MP retirement compensation arrangements; and employee benefit plans.

I'll begin with the funding of $4.9 million that is required for cost-of-living increases. This covers requirements for the House administration, as well as for members' office budgets and House officers' budgets. Ensuring that members and house officers have the necessary resources to meet their evolving needs is essential. The increase to members' office budgets, the House officers' budgets, and the travel status expense account provides members and House officers with the necessary resources to carry out their parliamentary functions on behalf of their constituents. These annual budgetary adjustments are based on the consumer price index.

(1105)

[Translation]

Additionally, members' sessional allowance and additional salaries are statutory in nature and are adjusted every year, in accordance with the Parliament of Canada Act.

Cost-of-living increases are also essential to recruitment efforts for members, House officers and the House Administration as employers, and funding for these increases is accounted for in the estimates.[English]

I'll now move on to the funding for major investments that the board approved, a net increase of $600,000 in support of major House of Commons investments. In light of the renewal of many parliamentary spaces, investments are also needed to deliver support services to members. One notable example of this service delivery initiative has been the implementation of a standardized approach for computer and printing equipment in constituency offices across the country.

This initiative was launched as a pilot project this year and following the next general election will be implemented in all constituency offices. Its purpose is threefold: to ensure parity between the Hill and the constituencies' computing services, to enhance IT support and security, and to simplify purchasing and life cycling of equipment in constituency offices. [Translation]

As part of the long-term vision and plan, the Parliamentary Precinct continues to undergo extensive restoration and modernization to support the efficient operations of Parliament and to preserve Canada's heritage buildings.

The recent West Block rehabilitation project and the construction of the new Visitor Welcome Centre were milestone achievements and, in many ways, will serve as models for the upcoming rehabilitation of Centre Block.[English]

The lessons learned from this project's successes can help guide us in restoring our heritage buildings to their former glory while also incorporating the modern functionality required to support Parliament. For the Centre Block project, the House of Commons administration is committed to engaging members to ensure they're involved in discussions on the design and operational requirements for the building during every step of the project from its outset to its completion.

As the heart of our parliamentary democracy, Centre Block of our Parliament Buildings has great symbolic importance to all Canadians. However, it's also a workplace for members and their staff or will be again once the House returns there. Therefore, their continuous involvement will be crucial to the success of this historic undertaking. Along with the board and its working group, this committee will serve as a forum to consult with members about their views, expectations and needs on a regular basis. [Translation]

Let us now turn to parliamentary diplomacy. The sunsetting of the funds included in the 2018-2019 Main Estimates for conferences and assemblies resulted in a decrease of $1.4 million in the 2019-2020 Main Estimates.[English]

Whether welcoming visiting parliamentarians and dignitaries to the House of Commons or participating in delegations to foreign legislatures and international conferences, MPs play an active role in parliamentary diplomacy. Two important events will be hosted in 2020-21. The 29th annual session of the Parliamentary Assembly, Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, will take place in Vancouver, British Columbia, in July 2020. The 65th Commonwealth Parliamentary Conference will be held in Halifax, Nova Scotia, in January 2021. May I say that's an excellent choice. I'd love to take credit for it; I had nothing to do with it, but it's still an excellent choice. Both of them are, of course. [Translation]

I will now touch on the total funding reduction of $9.3 million for the members of Parliament retiring allowances and members of Parliament retirement compensation arrangements accounts.[English]

The MPs' pension plan serves more than 1,000 active and retired senators and members of the House of Commons. The plan was established in 1952 and is governed by the Members of Parliament Retiring Allowances Act. In January 2017, the contribution rates for plan members increased to bring their share of the current service cost to 50%, thus reducing the cost that must be funded by the House of Commons.

(1110)

[Translation]

The final item included in the House of Commons main estimates is a funding requirement of $1.6 million for employee benefit plans.

In accordance with Treasury Board directives, this non-discretionary statutory expenditure covers costs to the employer for the public service superannuation plan, the Canada pension plan and the Quebec pension plan, death benefits, and the employment insurance account.[English]

I would now like to present the 2019-20 main estimates for the Parliamentary Protective Service, or PPS. For the 2019-20 fiscal year, the budget request for the PPS totals $90.9 million, a modest decrease from the last fiscal year. Within this total, $9.1 million are attributed to statutory requirements, which comprise employee insurance, pension and benefits.

Since the amalgamation of the former parliamentary security services nearly four years ago, the PPS has made important investments and achieved considerable progress in strengthening security on Parliament Hill and within the parliamentary precinct.

Mr. Chair, before I speak about their specific funding requirements, I would like to say once again how grateful I am, and I know all members are, for the protection that PPS members provide to everyone who works here and who visits. These men and women strive to promote a safe and positive experience for more than a million visitors each year.[Translation]

Before each financial cycle, and prior to requesting additional resources, the service conducts a comprehensive analysis of its operational and administrative requirements. In keeping with their strategic priority of sound stewardship, they take every measure to meet the operational needs of both houses of Parliament with existing resources. When additional resources are required, proposals undergo several levels of review and oversight before they are included in the estimates.[English]

For fiscal year 2019-20, the key funding requirements include $1.4 million for 15 full-time equivalents to cover additional posts in new Senate buildings; $775,000 for the establishment of an asset management program to properly maintain security equipment and uniforms; $650,000 to build on existing security investments at the vehicle screening facility, where the service processed an average of 300 vehicles a day last year; $5.5 million in permanent and temporary funding for various payments as a result of labour negotiations; and $600,000 in additional administrative staff in information technology, asset management and communications.

Approximately 92% of the overall annual budget of the service funds the salaries of over 500 uniformed operational members and more than 100 civilian positions. This is in addition to the members of the RCMP who are assigned to the service to provide front-line support.

As the operational lead, the RCMP also provides the service with the necessary operational training. This knowledge transfer from the RCMP to PPS is progressing well, with an increasing number of operational units, such as the mobile response team now being led by the service. For this reason, the service is requesting an additional 70 full-time equivalents through the cost-neutral strategy of reducing RCMP front-line support over the next two years. We'll see that shift happening.

This past year, the service screened nearly a million people, seized 23,000 prohibited or restricted items from visitors, managed hundreds of public demonstrations and events, and addressed numerous security incidents involving acts of civil disobedience on Parliament Hill and within the parliamentary precinct. They also intervened as first responders for various incidents.[Translation]

In preparation for the move to the interim accommodations, the service also redesigned its posture by maximizing the use of existing resources across all parliamentary buildings. They refocused operations on their protective mandate, which allowed them to redeploy resources more strategically and with greater flexibility.

(1115)

[English]

Additionally, the service is prepared to meet the new operational challenges associated with the increasing number of visitors at the new visitor welcome centre, an expanded jurisdiction of the precinct consisting of new parliamentary buildings and the larger physical separation between both Houses of Parliament. As you know, Mr. Chairman, moving out of Centre Block to this and other locations has required us to be a bit more dispersed.

They have also introduced additional measures to improve the management of health and well-being of the workforce. Over the last two years, involuntary overtime has significantly decreased. They have implemented a drug and alcohol policy in response to the legalization of cannabis, enhanced the training curriculum for protection officers and detection specialists, launched an employee engagement survey and improved the accommodations program to facilitate an early return to work.

These measures are aimed at not only promoting healthy living among its workforce, but also to help ensure that employees return home safely from work.[Translation]

The service had the unique mandate of protecting the legislative process—and in doing so, must remain agile and responsive to any threat made against the Parliament of Canada across 40 locations. This means a continuous operation, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, to be able to detect and respond rapidly to emerging global and domestic threats, and to adjust their security posture accordingly.

Last summer, uniformed members intercepted and arrested an individual who breached the security perimeter during the changing of the guard ceremony on Parliament Hill.[English]

They also operate in a multi-jurisdictional environment, which requires a high degree of collaboration with law enforcement and intelligence partners. In the last year, they have strengthened communications with their partners and met with trusted international counterparts to share best practices and develop new ways forward in the field of protection.[Translation]

This concludes my overview of the 2019-2020 Main Estimates for the House of Commons and the Parliamentary Protective Service. My officials and I would be pleased to answer questions. If members have any specific questions with respect to the security posture or labour negotiations, I would recommend that the committee go in camera for that discussion. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Before I begin, can I get clarity that we have permission for some of our colleagues to sit through the first few minutes of the bell?

The Chair:

We already did that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you, Speaker, for being here. It won't be much of a surprise to you that I want to focus on the PPS.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

It's a huge shock.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

A huge shock.

First of all, I want to echo the Speaker's comments, and thank Madame Côté and the front-line officers for the tremendous work they do. They have our strongest support and appreciation.

As you know, there's a great deal of concern around here about the fact that the PPS's mandate requires it to have an RCMP officer in charge, which gives it lines of authority through the commissioner. This has always given us issues of privilege as a basis of concern. You'll notice I have a bill on today's Notice Paper that would address that. It has not been introduced, so I can't go into it more at the moment, but it is there.

I want to focus on your obligations regarding the PPS per the Parliament of Canada Act and the MOU that your predecessors signed some years ago. Subsection 79.52(2) of the Parliament of Canada Act reads: The Speaker of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Commons are, as the custodians of the powers, privileges, rights and immunities of their respective Houses and of the members of those Houses, responsible for the Service.

Section 79.57 reads: Before each fiscal year, the Speaker of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Commons shall cause to be prepared an estimate of the sums that will be required to pay the expenditures of the Service during the fiscal year and shall transmit the estimate to the President of the Treasury Board, who shall lay it before the House of Commons with the estimates of the government for the fiscal year.

I trust you're familiar with these sections. Madam Côté, how often do you personally, as the acting director, meet with the two Speakers?

Superintendent Marie-Claude Côté (Interim Director, Parliamentary Protective Service):

I have communications with the offices of the Speakers every week. We are constantly in communication, so if there are any issues, I take action regarding those issues.

(1120)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My question was, how often do you, Madam Côté, meet Mr. Regan and Mr. Furey?

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

I meet through their staffs, and when there's a need to meet in person, I do so.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Did you meet with both Speakers in preparation for these estimates?

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

It was Madam MacLatchy who was in that position at the time, so I would have to refer the question to her.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

She is not with us today.

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

No.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You're familiar with the MOU that was signed in the spring of 2015.

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

Yes, I am.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are you aware the MOU states that it can be cancelled at any time by any of the parties, but it's moot because, with the Parliament of Canada Act requiring the director of the PPS to be RCMP, it can't be cancelled because it's in law. Is that a fair interpretation?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Isn't this really a question for the House or Parliament to decide, Mr. Graham?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The MOU says it can be cancelled, but the law says it can't, as I understand it. I'll get to my point here.

Paragraph 15 of the MOU reads: Prior to each fiscal year, the Director will consult with any individuals or entities, including the RCMP, the House of Commons, the Senate, the Library of Parliament, to ascertain security requirements, including planned or anticipated events for the Parliamentary precinct and the grounds of Parliament Hill and will prepare a draft estimate, for the approval of both Speakers, of the sums that will be required to pay the charges and expenses relating to the Parliamentary Protective Service during the fiscal year.

An hon. member: Slow it down.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

He talks as fast as I do.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I did learn from you, Mr. Speaker.

Paragraph 16 says: The Speakers will jointly consider the draft estimate, establish an estimate and, upon their approval, transmit it to the President of the Treasury Board, who shall lay it before the House....

In your view, both Mr. Speaker and Madam Côté, are these procedures properly followed?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I've heard that the PPS is setting up an intelligence unit. Is this true?

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

Yes, we have an intelligence unit.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Will intelligence be collected on members and staff, and will that information be shared with the RCMP?

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

Since the creation of PPS, we have had an intelligence unit. This intelligence unit is currently comprised of RCMP members as well as protection officers. It is currently led by PPS employees.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My question is: Is the data collected pertaining to the PPS shared with the RCMP?

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

It's not so much the data that we collect, it's really information sharing in case there's any incident. I would like to answer that question in camera, if it's possible.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

That makes sense.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My only concern on this is the privilege aspect of any information collected. It's not the details of what is collected. I just want assurances that privilege is respected in the collection of any intelligence on the Hill.

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

It is.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Were the estimates as we have them today agreed to completely by both Speakers?

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

Sorry, I didn't hear you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Were the estimates that are before us today agreed to completely by both Speakers?

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

Yes, they were presented to both Speakers and agreed to by them.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is it possible to have a more detailed breakdown, even in camera, of the spending than what we have here?

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

Of course.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How would we go about getting that?

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

I'll ask Mr. Graham.

Mr. Robert Graham (Administration and Personnel Officer, Parliamentary Protective Service):

We can provide that. Maybe we could better understand what level of detail you're looking for, if there's an opportunity to get that through the Speaker's office, perhaps.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How much time do I have left?

The Chair:

A minute and a half.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I don't want to go in camera and disrupt the number of people who are here, but perhaps at the end I could come back for a minute and a half of in camera. Is that permissible?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Mr. Chair, I appreciate that.

I think I would probably have a question for in camera as well, following up on the intelligence unit as well if there is time at the end to put some of that together.

The Chair:

Okay, we'll go in camera at the end.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and witnesses this morning.

I'm probably going to jump around a little bit in my questions, as I often do, to try to touch on a few different things.

In your opening comments, you commented on the Centre Block rehabilitation project. I think that's something this committee is fairly interested in. As you know, it has had a number of conversations on this. You had mentioned in your opening comments that parliamentarians would be consulted and involved in discussions every step along the way.

We understand from the Board of Internal Economy that there is going to be a working group. I would appreciate a little more clarity on that and how that's going to play out on the ground. How will parliamentarians be consulted? What formal jurisdiction will you, as Speaker, and our House, through you, have over this project?

(1125)

Hon. Geoff Regan:

It's a very good question, because I don't know that the jurisdiction is formal; I think it's more informal. This is in development, the committee that we've talked about, but as I've expressed before, I think it's up to us as members of Parliament to continue, on an ongoing basis, to insist on being integrally involved in this process and the development plan.

I know Michel Patrice, the Deputy Clerk, Administration, would like to add a bit of information.

I mean, he may not like to, but I'm going to ask him to.

Mr. Michel Patrice (Deputy Clerk, Administration):

I think at the end of the day what is important is, as we discussed at the last meeting.... The chart will be coming in terms of the many players involved. At the end of the day, what is important and what the administration position is, as supported by the board and this committee, is that the requirements are defined by members. This is your workplace, so your needs and your requirements are the essence of the role and the importance of the House of Commons.

In terms of the execution of the contracts, giving out the contracts, public tendering and all of that, the requirement in terms of the heritage fabric, this rests elsewhere than the House.

Mr. John Nater:

I think from this committee's and parliamentarians' perspective, it's very much the functional aspect we envision. There are multiple tenants, whether it's the House, the Senate or PCO. Of course, the Library and PPS have an actual jurisdiction as well. Going forward, I think this committee will be very active, and recognize that we have seven weeks before this session ends. I'm hoping that in the new Parliament, those of us who, hopefully, will be here again will continue to have a significant role to play in defining that functionality.

I did want to follow up on one specific aspect. A few weeks ago, we had witnesses here talking about the elm tree. It does seem a little silly, but I think it was an important issue, because it underlines where Parliament's role ends and where it begins. At that time, witnesses talked about the second phase of the visitor welcome centre, which is going to be blasting into the bedrock on the front lawn of Parliament. It is a very significant undertaking.

I'm curious to know whether that project has been formally approved by someone or some entity. Has the Board of Internal Economy approved phase two of the visitor welcome centre for the front lawn of Parliament?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I can say that it's certainly been part of the plans, if I recall correctly, that the board has seen over time, but perhaps Michel can tell us about the approval part of that.

Mr. Michel Patrice:

The concept of the visitor welcome centre has been approved by the board. The space it will occupy, the design of it, is still in the works. There are many options on the drawing board, but the final design or proposal, in terms of square footage and all of that, has not been finalized.

Mr. John Nater:

When was the last time the board formally approved the concept?

Mr. Michel Patrice:

I would have to get you the dates. It's many years ago.

Mr. John Nater:

I think that's a concern for this committee and parliamentarians. Something that was approved even a year ago, let alone possibly a decade ago....

Hon. Geoff Regan:

If I may, I think the thing to understand is that the board has had updates on the long-term vision and plan, including various elements as they've been developed. It may not have formally approved it, nor has it said, “Hold on a second, this is a major problem we have with a, b or c.” If concerns have arisen, they've been taken into account, as far as I've seen.

Mr. John Nater:

One of the symptoms we saw when we were discussing the tree.... The argument was that the tree had to be removed for phase two of the visitor welcome centre. Phase two of the visitor welcome centre doesn't seem to be very far along in the process, so we're making decisions based on a concept and approvals that, in some cases, are somewhat outdated and quite unclear, in terms of the process. I think that's a concern for members and for this committee in particular.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Some members have visited other parliaments. I'm thinking, for example, of the Parliament at Westminster in the United Kingdom, which has an interesting set-up for visitors, and particularly for classes and school students. There's a room where they watch an interesting audiovisual presentation, a virtual presentation about Parliament. They get an introduction so that when they go into the building, they have a better understanding of what it's all about. That's among the things I foresee being included in that space.

(1130)

Mr. John Nater:

I think the U.K. is far ahead of us, in terms of that interaction.

I have about 30 seconds left, and you may not have time to answer this in full, but I want to talk about cybersecurity. In the lead-up to the upcoming election, the concept of foreign influence is top of mind for a lot of Canadians. There is a lot of personal data, confidential data and extremely important data kept on computers and servers here within the parliamentary precinct. I'm curious to know what steps have been undertaken by the House, and perhaps by PPS, to ensure that this data is safe, and is not going to be seen as a problem going into the election, and more generally for Canadians on a day-to-day basis.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Before I turn it over, I want to point out the importance, in terms of members of Parliament and our staff, of course, of looking out for phishing emails. Be suspicious of emails that have a strange heading, even if the emails come from someone you know. Sometimes opening emails, especially in terms of opening links, could be a problem and could allow someone to access the information on your phone, computer or tablet. Those are all things to be very aware of, as we've heard before. It bears repeating.

The Chair:

Be quick, please.

Mr. Soufiane Ben Moussa (Chief Technology Officer, Information Services, House of Commons):

Thank you for the question. I don't think I will be able to do it in 30 seconds, but to comfort the honourable member, the House of Commons has invested quite a bit in cybersecurity. We do have a strong program in the House that is composed of many aspects. Awareness is one of the main aspects that we think gives us the biggest value, but also we have a good relationship with national and international partners. We also work with many parliaments similar to ours, the U.K., U.S., Australia and others, to exchange threat vectors and to react to them. We have a service that is now expanding to 24-7.

I don't say that we are 100% safe. I don't think anybody is 100% safe, but we are doing everything possible, everything in our power to protect the institution of Parliament.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

Thank you, Chair.

Speaker, it's good to see you again for the last go-around. It's the last go-around, guaranteed, at least between you and me. With any luck you'll be here many times again, Speaker, and I wish you well on that, but this is our last go.

I know you'd be extremely disappointed if I didn't raise the issue, along with my good friend Mr. Graham, of PPS, but I will take your advice. Your comment at the end was that, if it's due to labour relations, we should do it in camera. It sounds as if we're going in camera anyway, and I will have a couple of questions and will ask for an update.

We'll do that maybe in camera, Chair.

I'll limit my remarks to some financial questions.

In your presentation, a couple of pages in, you said that there's a $650,000 allocation to build on existing security investments at the vehicle screening facility, which we, of course, lovingly refer to as the car wash. Here's my question. The thing was designed, studied, built. By my recollection, there was at least one major upgrade. There may have been even more, but there was at least one major upgrade since then.

Now we're looking at another $650,000, so my question is this. When is the darned thing going to be done, and why weren't the issues that are being addressed now not addressed in the beginning when the planning was done?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

This question sounds familiar to me because I asked the question, and Madam Côté will be able to respond. [Translation]

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

Thank you for the question.

The increase of expenditures for the vehicle screening facility concerns surveillance videos we now must add or improve. That is the portion for which we are requesting funding.

(1135)

[English]

Mr. David Christopherson:

Fair enough, but my question was why this wasn't identified at the beginning when, I'm assuming, millions were spent to build it. Now we're having to come back a few years later and add $650,000 for video cameras, which sounds like sort of an obvious kind of thing if you're dealing with security.

Again, help me to understand why we're having to spend this money now as opposed to it not being built into the original planning.

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

When it comes to any security system, the technology changes very quickly and you need to adapt to those requirements. This is one of the reasons that right now we have some of the increased expenses in that sense. To stay in line with the requirement of the new technology we have to make some adjustments.

Mr. David Christopherson:

If I can, Speaker, I'll go to you.

You raise these questions, but nobody is saying there was any kind of deficiency in the plan, the very question that I asked. There is no evidence of that. This is just new technology and an opportunity to up the game, and this is the cost of that. Is that correct?

Nobody anywhere in the system—because brown envelopes exist—said there was a screw-up at the beginning and now we're having to fix it. This is for legitimate add-on security features as a result of new, evolving technology. Is that correct?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

That is my understanding, but it reminds me a bit of the issue we had with some of the equipment to raise the bars and so forth and the bollards when they had to be replaced, and I thought it didn't seem that long since they were built and I was assured that the life expectancy of these was much shorter than I would have thought for this sort of equipment.

This is a different case because it's new technology that's required, but these are concerns that I certainly have front of mind as we have these discussions.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay. I'm satisfied.

I'll move along. I don't know if this is in the documents we had here, but it must be available because the researchers provided us with a chart. Now it's main estimates to main estimates, as opposed to actuals to main estimates, let alone actuals to actuals. There are some big number differences and I'd like to ask some questions.

In terms of rentals, the main estimates for 2018-19 were $75,000. I'm assuming this is thousands of dollars, I think. In the same category for 2019-20, it jumps to $500,000. Purchased repair and maintenance goes from $50,000 to $600,000. In professional and special services, it actually decreased, so that's a good thing. I want to be fair-minded.

I'm asking you about these two huge increases. For that matter, I'm just noticing that transportation and communication jumped from $100,000 to $350,000.

We have some huge increases in these three areas. Can you give me a little more detail as to why, please?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

You're referring to PPS, I think.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes.

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

I'll ask Mr. Graham to answer this question since he's in charge of the budget.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Okay.

Mr. Robert Graham:

Unfortunately, I don't have the details. I'd be happy to get back to you off-line.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Pardon?

Mr. Robert Graham:

Sorry, I don't have the specifics of the rentals that you're requesting.

What's happening here is an increase in personnel costs and a decline in professional and special services. Mr. Christopherson, that is the transformation.... It's the evolution or reduction in RCMP services, because they're essentially a subcontract to the Parliamentary Protective Service, and an increase in PPS salaries.

As the number of PPS employees increases, there's a reduction of RCMP constables on the Hill. That's why you're seeing that increase in salary and the decrease in professional services.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I really didn't ask.... Well, I asked about services. I understand that. You're good at explaining why it went down. I want to know why some went up from $75,000 to $500,000 and from $50,000 to $600,000. These are big numbers and you're telling me you don't have any idea at this meeting about these numbers?

Mr. Robert Graham:

One of the things is purchased repair and maintenance. That also reflects an increase in the PPS vehicle fleet. We've acquired some vehicles, which you see outside. They weren't part of our fleet in 2018-19. Those vehicles are part of the purchased repair and maintenance.

I just have to check my figures for the rentals, but I believe that is related to some Canada Day equipment rentals. I don't have those details right here.

(1140)

Mr. David Christopherson:

That would suggest we're doing something hugely different for a Canada Day than we have in the past; otherwise, it would have been built into your base, as such, for that line item.

I'll accept that you don't have the exact details here, although I'm surprised you weren't prepared to answer questions like this, given that it's kind of obvious. Chair, I would ask that this supplementary information be provided to the committee as soon as possible.

The Chair:

Yes, I was going to ask you to provide reasons for those two big increases to the committee later on, through the clerk.

Mr. Robert Graham:

Absolutely.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Chair, in fairness, the rest of my time on the labour relations would best be done in camera.

I thank you, and I thank the Speaker.

The Chair:

Okay, that's fine. You've actually gone 30 seconds over time.

We'll have two minutes for Mr. Simms and then we will break for the vote.

Can you come back after the vote?

Okay.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

How long do I have?

The Chair:

Two minutes.

Now it's a minute and 50 seconds. You'd better start.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Can we just wait until we come back? I don't want two minutes.

The Chair:

Okay. We'll come back after.

I'd just like to remind committee about the meeting tonight at 7:00 in this room.

There's a small budget to be adopted to pay for witness expenses for parallel debating chambers. It's a total of $2,950.

Do I have committee approval?

Thank you.

I have a quick question about indigenous languages. As we asked at the last meeting, it will be translated into Dene, Plains Cree, East Cree and Mohawk around the end of May. Would you like hard copies or can we just send it out by video?

My thought is that because some of the constituents we're dealing with may not be totally conversant electronically, it might be nice to have hard copies in those languages available for those indigenous groups, especially for those who speak those languages as a first language or as their only language.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We will also need a copy for the archives.

The Chair:

How many copies are needed? We need to tell the clerk how many copies to make of each.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What does it cost? Is there a cost per copy?

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

There will be a cost for the printed copies. I'll be able to give you a better estimate once I know how many copies the committee would like to have published in each of the....

Mr. David Christopherson:

What's a normal...? Can you give us a ballpark figure?

The Clerk:

It's hard to say. Nowadays we pretty much do not print out paper copies of reports. We put them online and we send—

Mr. David Christopherson:

We need a number.

Chair, we need a number.

The Chair:

Why don't we start with 100 in each language?

Mr. David Christopherson:

That sounds good.

The Chair:

Is that okay with the committee?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Thank you.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Are they for the Hill or are we sending them out? A hundred copies is great if it's going to the communities. A hundred copies in these different languages, I'm willing to—

Mr. David Christopherson:

They'll get out—or somebody is not doing their job and somebody here next time will make sure they get them.

The Chair:

The last thing I'll mention is that on the parallel chambers, we have some good research. We asked how many people normally show up. It is kind of fascinating because when we started this, we thought, “Well, there are two houses and we'll have two houses of commons that sit 338 people, so it's great to discuss this, whether we need two.” It turns out that the two chambers in Australia and Britain normally have between five and 20 people. You can look at that paper but it shows it's a totally different concept from what we were originally thinking of.

Also, in the British papers they talk about a committee of standards. I wanted to know what that was, so the researchers have also sent you something on how the committee of standards works in the British Westminster system.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I'd like clarification on something in relation to Mr. Christopherson.

He was referencing the VSS, which is not the vehicle screening facility. It's the video security system. It's important to note the distinction. I hadn't caught that beforehand.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Oh, that does make a big difference.

The Chair:

There is one other thing that I will raise quickly. Next Thursday, when the minister is coming, the House is able to televise two committees, and four committees have asked. We can discuss that later.

We'll suspend until after the vote.

(1140)

(1210)

The Chair:

Thank you, everyone, for coming back.

We'll start out by having PPS answer Mr. Christopherson's question.

Supt Marie-Claude Côté:

Thank you.

I guess you had the question regarding the rentals and the utilities.

Mr. Graham will provide specifics on this question.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Great, thank you.

Mr. Robert Graham:

On the three specific items, transportation and communication have increased from $100,000 to $350,000. Over the last little while we've increased the number of full-time equivalent employees. From a transportation perspective, there are a few more taxis going around. That's a minimal expense.

On the communication side, that's where we've recently launched a new website. That reflects the cost of developing that website which launched earlier this month.

For the rentals, that rental is an increase in the equipment related to major events like tents, fences and cinder blocks. It's not a new expense but an adjustment to reflect the reality now that we have some internal historical data. You'll notice, for instance, that there's a decrease in the acquisition of machinery and equipment by several million dollars. Some of that is simply being recoded to rentals.

Finally, for repair and maintenance, over the last year or two we've transferred a number of assets from the House of Commons to PPS, in particular, scanning equipment and that sort of thing. The costs of the maintenance of those pieces of security equipment have gone up because they are now our assets.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I appreciate that. Thank you for doing that so quickly.

I have one follow-up. I don't know a lot about these things, but that seems to be an awful lot of money to develop a website.

Mr. Robert Graham:

I don't have the exact breakdown of how much was used to develop the website versus an increase in transportation costs, but we can provide that.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, I think I would like to have a little further detail, if you would, just because the jump is so significant. I really didn't hear a fulsome enough answer to satisfy my curiosity. If you could do some more follow-up on detail, I would appreciate that.

Mr. Robert Graham:

We'll dig into that.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, again, for getting it so quickly.

Thank you very much, Chair.

The Chair:

Okay.[Translation]

Mr. Simms, go ahead for seven minutes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Thank you very much.

(1215)

[English]

I'm going to start with what transpired a while ago in an appearance by Mr. Robert. I'm going to get to that in a minute.

Mr. Speaker, I would love for you to weigh in on this as well, as you weren't present at the time, but I'm sure you're aware of this exercise regarding cleaning up the language in the Standing Orders, which, as I said—and I was quoted by the whip of the Conservatives—I thought it was a fabulous exercise. I think it's fantastic. I thought it was great for the simple reason that it clears up a lot of the language. It makes it more accessible for people who are not familiar, who are not jurilinguists. It makes it far easier to read and understand. It's an exercise, not in changing the Standing Orders, but certainly in making them far more accessible.

It appears, from what I understand, that the exercise has stopped.

Is that correct, Mr. Robert?

Mr. Charles Robert (Clerk of the House of Commons):

When I appeared before the committee on April 9, I indicated that it was an initiative that I undertook in good faith to try to provide a better product for the members. At the same time, I indicated and acknowledged that I would not continue if there was any level of discomfort in proceeding further with it. I received communication indicating that there was some preference that the project be stopped, and it is now suspended.

Mr. Scott Simms:

May I ask what the contention was with this?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I think the notion really is that any initiative that deals with the Standing Orders really belongs to the members. It was regarded as perhaps presumptuous on my part to become involved by initiating a project on my own initiative.

Mr. Scott Simms:

This is not something you can answer, but I find that to be disingenuous at best for a reason as to why this should be done.

Mr. Speaker, do you care to comment?

Hon. Geoff Regan:

Thank you, Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms:

It's what we do.

Hon. Geoff Regan:

I will say that the administration from time to time brings forward to the Board of Internal Economy, for example, suggestions about improvements that could be made to things happening in terms of administration for its consideration. I think that's what was being worked on here.

However, it's very clear, and I know that the Clerk understands this, that the House and its members are the proprietors, so to speak, of the Standing Orders. Clearly, members know that they cannot be changed without the House's decision. If it isn't the wish of members that this sort of review be conducted, then it ought to be halted. That, I think, is the context that I could give to it, as best I can.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I'm going back to Mr. Robert again.

It seems to me, though, you had no intention whatsoever of changing any of the Standing Orders or the fundamental characteristics of anything pertaining to the House business. Is that correct?

Mr. Charles Robert:

That was the objective that drove the project, yes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Has this exercise been done throughout other Westminster parliaments?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I'd have to do a survey to understand what has been done in other parliaments. The movement really began about 30 or 40 years ago in law. In England it was under Lord Rankin, who was a strong proponent of plain language simply because since everyone is subject to the law, they should at least be able to understand it. That movement has spread to other jurisdictions. We in Canada, I think, have made an effort—I'll defer to lawyers who know better than I—when we draft laws now in English and in French, it's done in parallel. It's no longer done as a translation of one to the other.

As a result of that, I think the French version of laws at the federal level are clearer than they might have been otherwise if they were worked out as a translation of the English.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Can you estimate how much time you've put into this thus far?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Personally, probably very little. This is an initiative that I'm able to direct. I think there was maybe one full time and then two others on the procedural side who were probably part time. Then I think the jurilinguists were brought in as the project advanced to a fairly substantial level, so they could participate in clearing up the French technical terminology.

Mr. Scott Simms:

For me, personally—and you don't have to weigh in on this; this is my own thought—I think this is coming. I think we should endeavour to do a project of this nature, and not just for that, maybe, but for other reasons as well, especially for this type of job that we do. Not everybody who comes into the position of member of Parliament is from a legal background, me included. I was a TV weatherman, for God's sake. I don't know what that says, but—

An hon. member: A good one.

(1220)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It never rained on his watch.

Mr. Scott Simms: Yes, that's right.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms:

It appears we've devolved.

I want to congratulate you for doing that. I'm very sad that it is, and I hope that this committee will endeavour in the future to take it upon themselves to give the direction that we do this once again.

Mr. Charles Robert:

I will point out that I was asked to take on another project, which I have happily done, to deal with the annotated Standing Orders. I think what we can do in that regard is to make it an evergreen document; that is to say, we would keep it up in a more active way so that when members want to know where a rule came from and why we are doing it this way, particularly when we have nuance—like, 69.1 dealing with second and third reading of omnibus bills—we can provide information that might be useful to the members in a more timely fashion.

If we're successful in implementing that approach, I think this will be of value to the members.

Mr. Scott Simms:

What do these annotated Standing Orders look like?

Mr. Charles Robert:

The second edition, I think, came out some years ago. I was still in the House when the first edition came out in the mid-1980s. It's the standing order, an explanation of what we think it means, and a history of the standing order going back to 1867, if that's appropriate.

Mr. Scott Simms:

You're undertaking that exercise right now. Is that correct?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I've agreed to do it, yes, because that was the proposal. It seems to me it's the first cousin of the revised Standing Orders, so why not do it? It's a perfectly good project.

Mr. Scott Simms:

The other part—the cousin of that—you've ceased doing and you've told others to stop doing that.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's unfortunate.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're going to suspend briefly to go in camera, because we have three people who had questions for you in camera, which we'll finish with.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

(1220)

(1255)



[Public proceedings resume]

The Chair:

We are now in public. HOUSE OF COMMONS ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$349,812,484

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) PARLIAMENTARY PROTECTIVE SERVICE ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$81,786,647

(Vote 1 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Thank you to all of you for staying extra time. It's much more than normal, but I think it's good this committee has access to you. We really appreciate being able to ask those questions.

You're dismissed, if you like.

We only have three minutes left. Is there anything urgent the committee wants to spend time on in those three minutes?

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

No, and I don't think we have time to deal with anything, but perhaps at a future meeting, we have Ms. Kusie's motion—

The Chair:

—and there are a few others, Mr. Reid's motion, etc.

Mr. John Nater:

Scott is not here today, so....

The Chair:

Okay, thank you.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour, mesdames et messieurs.

Nos témoins ne sont pas encore arrivés, mais je vous souhaite tout de même la bienvenue à la 150e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Le premier point à l'ordre du jour est l'examen du Budget principal des dépenses de 2019-2020. Aujourd'hui, nous nous pencherons sur le crédit 1 sous la rubrique « Chambre des communes » et sur le crédit 1 sous la rubrique « Service de protection parlementaire ».

Nous sommes ravis d'accueillir aujourd'hui l'honorable Geoff Regan, Président de la Chambre, qui arrivera sous peu. Il sera accompagné des représentants suivants de la Chambre des communes: M. Charles Robert, greffier; M. Michel Patrice, sous-greffier, Administration; et M. Daniel Paquette, dirigeant principal des finances.

Nous recevons également la surintendante Marie-Claude Côté, directrice intérimaire, et M. Robert Graham, officier responsable de l'administration et du personnel, du Service de protection parlementaire.

Avant de commencer, j'aimerais vous rappeler que nous avons une séance officielle ce soir, à 19 heures, au sujet de l'Australie. Le greffier vous a préparé quelque chose de très spécial: au début de la séance, nous regarderons une vidéo de 45 secondes montrant les secondes chambres de l'Australie et de la Grande-Bretagne. Je crois que ce sera très intéressant.

Nous avons déjà présenté tous nos témoins, et comme les cloches sonneront dans environ 15 minutes, il faudrait commencer.

Oui, monsieur Nater?

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Très rapidement, puisqu'il y aura un vote, les témoins pourront-ils rester un peu après midi aujourd'hui?

Le président:

Pourrez-vous rester?

L'hon. Geoff Regan (président de la Chambre des communes):

Oui.

Le président:

Comme la Chambre est juste au-dessus de nous, quand les cloches commenceront à sonner, êtes-vous d'accord de rester un peu plus longtemps, d'attendre vers la fin des cloches pour partir?

M. John Nater:

Si les témoins le veulent bien... Je sais qu'ils doivent...

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je vais devoir m'y rendre aussi.

Le président:

Dix minutes avant le vote, est-ce que cela vous convient?

D'accord.

Nous sommes ravis de vous revoir parmi nous, monsieur le Président. La parole est à vous.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président, merci, mesdames et messieurs. C'est un plaisir pour moi d'être ici.[Français]

À titre de Président de la Chambre des communes, je vous présenterai le Budget principal des dépenses pour l'exercice 2019-2020 de la Chambre des communes et du Service de protection parlementaire. Des représentants des deux organisations m'accompagnent.[Traduction]

Pour représenter l'Administration de la Chambre des communes, se joignent à moi, M. Charles Robert, greffier de la Chambre des communes; M. Michel Patrice, sous-greffier, Administration; et M. Daniel Paquette, dirigeant principal des finances.

Et pour représenter le Service de protection parlementaire, nous sommes accompagnés de la surintendante Marie-Claude Côté, directrice intérimaire du Service, et de M. Robert Graham, officier responsable de l'administration et du personnel du Service.

Je commencerai, monsieur le président, par présenter les principaux éléments du Budget principal des dépenses de 2019-2020 de la Chambre des communes. Il s'agit d'un budget total de 503,4 millions de dollars. Cela représente une diminution nette de 3,6 millions de dollars par rapport au Budget principal des dépenses de 2018-2019.

Je tiens à signaler — comme les membres le savent sûrement — que le Budget principal des dépenses a été examiné et approuvé par le Bureau de régie interne lors d'une réunion publique.[Français]

Le Budget principal des dépenses sera présenté selon cinq grands thèmes, ce qui correspond au document que vous avez reçu. L'incidence financière liée à ces thèmes représente les variations annuelles par rapport au Budget principal des dépenses de 2018-2019.[Traduction]

Voici les cinq thèmes en question: les augmentations liées au coût de la vie; les investissements importants; les conférences, associations et assemblées; les allocations de retraite des parlementaires et les conventions de retraite des parlementaires; ainsi que les régimes d'avantages sociaux des employés.

Je commencerai par le financement de la somme de 4,9 millions de dollars qui est requise pour les augmentations liées au coût de la vie. Cette somme couvre les besoins de l'Administration de la Chambre ainsi que les budgets des députés et des agents supérieurs de la Chambre. Il est essentiel de veiller à ce que les députés et les agents supérieurs de la Chambre disposent des ressources nécessaires pour répondre à leurs besoins, qui sont en constante évolution. L'augmentation des budgets de bureau des députés, des budgets des agents supérieurs de la Chambre et du compte de frais de déplacement officiel fournit aux députés et aux agents supérieurs de la Chambre les ressources nécessaires pour s'acquitter de leurs fonctions parlementaires au nom de leurs électeurs. Ces rajustements budgétaires annuels sont basés sur l'indice des prix à la consommation.

(1105)

[Français]

De plus, l'indemnité de session et les rémunérations supplémentaires des députés, qui sont des postes législatifs conformément à la Loi sur le Parlement, sont ajustées annuellement.

En outre, les augmentations liées au coût de la vie sont essentielles aux efforts de recrutement des députés, des agents supérieurs de la Chambre et de l'Administration de la Chambre en tant qu'employeurs, et le financement de ces augmentations est pris en compte dans le budget des dépenses.[Traduction]

Je passerai maintenant au financement des investissements importants. Le Bureau a approuvé une augmentation nette de 600 000 $ pour appuyer les investissements importants de la Chambre des communes. Compte tenu du renouvellement de nombreux espaces voués aux fonctions parlementaires, des investissements sont également nécessaires pour fournir des services de soutien aux députés. Un exemple d'initiative de prestation de services digne de mention est la mise en œuvre d'une approche normalisée pour le matériel informatique et les appareils d'impression dans les bureaux de circonscription partout au pays.

L'initiative a été lancée cette année à titre de projet pilote et sera mise en œuvre dans tous les bureaux de circonscription après les prochaines élections générales. Elle comporte trois objectifs: assurer la parité entre les services informatiques de la Colline et ceux dans les circonscriptions; améliorer le soutien et la sécurité des TI; et simplifier l'achat et la gestion du cycle de vie de l'équipement dans les bureaux de circonscription.[Français]

Dans le cadre de la vision et du plan à long terme, les travaux de restauration et de modernisation d'envergure se poursuivent au sein de la Cité parlementaire pour soutenir l'efficacité des activités du Parlement et préserver les immeubles patrimoniaux du Canada.

Le récent projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice de l'Ouest et la construction du nouveau Centre d'accueil des visiteurs sont une réalisation marquante qui, à plusieurs égards, servira de modèle pour la réhabilitation à venir de l'édifice du Centre.[Traduction]

Les leçons tirées de la réussite de ce projet peuvent nous guider dans nos efforts en vue de redonner à nos édifices patrimoniaux leur splendeur d'antan, tout en y intégrant la fonctionnalité moderne requise pour soutenir le Parlement. En ce qui a trait au projet de l'édifice du Centre, l'Administration de la Chambre des communes est résolue à consulter les députés pour faire en sorte qu'ils participent aux discussions sur la conception et les exigences opérationnelles de l'édifice, et ce, à chaque étape, du début jusqu'à la fin du projet.

Situé au cœur même de la démocratie parlementaire, l'édifice du Centre du Parlement est un immeuble d'une très grande importance symbolique pour tous les Canadiens. Toutefois, c'est aussi un lieu de travail pour les députés et leur personnel, ou ce le sera à nouveau quand ils le réintégreront. Voilà pourquoi leur participation continue sera essentielle à la réussite de ce projet historique. En plus du bureau et de son groupe de travail, votre comité servira de forum pour les consultations avec les députés, où ils pourront exprimer régulièrement leurs opinions, leurs attentes et leurs besoins.[Français]

Passons maintenant aux activités liées à la diplomatie parlementaire. L'élimination graduelle des fonds inclus dans le Budget principal des dépenses de 2018-2019 pour les conférences et les assemblées a donné lieu à une diminution de 1,4 million de dollars dans le Budget principal de dépenses de 2019-2020.[Traduction]

En accueillant des parlementaires et des dignitaires en visite à la Chambre des communes, en prenant part à des délégations à des assemblées législatives étrangères ou en assistant à des conférences internationales, les députés jouent un rôle actif dans la diplomatie parlementaire. Deux événements importants seront organisés en 2020-2021. La 29e Session annuelle de l'Assemblée parlementaire de l'Organisation pour la sécurité et la coopération en Europe aura lieu à Vancouver, en Colombie-Britannique, en juillet 2020, et la 65e Conférence parlementaire du Commonwealth aura lieu à Halifax, en Nouvelle-Écosse, en janvier 2021. Permettez-moi de dire que c'est un excellent choix. J'aimerais m'en attribuer le mérite, mais je n'y suis pour rien. C'est tout de même un excellent choix. Les deux le sont, bien entendu.[Français]

Je vais maintenant vous parler de la réduction totale de 9,3 millions de dollars du financement pour le compte des allocations de retraite des parlementaires et le compte de convention de retraite des parlementaires.[Traduction]

Le Régime de retraite des parlementaires couvre plus de 1 000 sénateurs et députés actifs et retraités. Établi en 1952, il est régi par la Loi sur les allocations de retraite des parlementaires. En janvier 2017, les taux de cotisation des participants ont augmenté pour porter à 50 % leur part du coût actuel du service, ce qui diminue le coût à financer par la Chambre des communes.

(1110)

[Français]

Le dernier élément inclus dans le Budget principal des dépenses de la Chambre des communes est la somme de 1,6 million de dollars destinée aux régimes d'avantages sociaux des employés.

Conformément aux directives du Conseil du Trésor, il s'agit d'une dépense législative non discrétionnaire qui inclut les coûts payés par l'employeur pour le Régime de pension de retraite de la fonction publique, le Régime de pensions du Canada et le Régime des rentes du Québec, les prestations de décès et le compte d'assurance-emploi.[Traduction]

J'aimerais maintenant présenter le Budget principal des dépenses de 2019-2020 du Service de protection parlementaire, ou le SPP. Pour l'exercice 2019-2020, la demande budgétaire pour le Service s'élève à 90,9 millions de dollars, soit une modeste diminution par rapport à l'exercice précédent. De ce montant, 9,1 millions de dollars sont affectés à des obligations légales, comprenant le régime d'assurance, la pension et les avantages sociaux des employés.

Depuis la fusion des anciens services de sécurité du Parlement il y a près de quatre ans, le Service a fait des investissements importants et il a réalisé des progrès considérables pour renforcer la sécurité sur la Colline du Parlement et dans la Cité parlementaire.

Monsieur le président, avant de vous présenter les exigences de financement particulières, j'aimerais vous dire, encore une fois, à quel point je suis reconnaissant — et je sais que tous les députés le sont — de la protection offerte par le Service à tous ceux et celles qui travaillent au Parlement ou qui le visitent. Les hommes et les femmes du Service veillent à ce que chacun des visiteurs, qui sont plus d'un million chaque année, vive une expérience sécuritaire et positive.[Français]

Avant chaque cycle financier, et avant de demander des ressources supplémentaires, le Service mène une analyse approfondie de ses besoins opérationnels et administratifs. Conformément à sa priorité stratégique de saine intendance, le Service prend toutes les mesures nécessaires pour répondre aux besoins opérationnels des deux Chambres du Parlement à l'aide de ses ressources actuelles. Lorsque cela est impossible et que d'autres ressources sont requises, les propositions doivent franchir plusieurs niveaux d'examen et de surveillance avant d'être incluses dans le budget.[Traduction]

Pour l'exercice 2019-2020, les principales exigences de financement comprennent 1,4 million de dollars pour financer 15 équivalents temps plein afin de répondre aux exigences des nouveaux édifices du Sénat; 775 000 $ pour établir un programme de gestion du cycle de vie des biens afin de conserver adéquatement le matériel de sécurité et les uniformes; 650 000 $ pour tirer parti des investissements existants en matière de sécurité au poste de contrôle des véhicules, où le Service a inspecté 300 véhicules par jour en moyenne l'année dernière; 5,5 millions de dollars en financement permanent et temporaire pour effectuer divers paiements liés aux négociations collectives; ainsi que 600 000 $ pour embaucher du personnel administratif supplémentaire dans les domaines des technologies de l'information, de la gestion des biens et des communications.

Environ 92 % du budget annuel total du Service est affecté au salaire de plus de 500 membres opérationnels en uniforme et de plus de 100 employés civils. Ceux-ci s'ajoutent aux membres de la GRC affectés au Service pour lui offrir du soutien de première ligne.

À titre de responsable opérationnel, la GRC offre aussi au Service la formation opérationnelle nécessaire. Ce transfert des connaissances de la GRC vers le Service progresse rondement. Un nombre croissant d'unités opérationnelles sont maintenant dirigées par le Service, dont l'équipe d'intervention rapide. Pour cette raison, le Service demande 70 équivalents temps plein supplémentaires par l'entremise d'une stratégie n'entraînant aucun coût qui consiste à réduire le soutien de première ligne offert par la GRC au cours des deux prochaines années. Nous verrons ce changement se faire.

L'année dernière, le Service a soumis près d'un million de personnes à un contrôle de sécurité, il a saisi 23 000 articles à utilisation restreinte ou prohibée à des visiteurs, il a géré des centaines de manifestations et activités publiques, et il a dû s'occuper de nombreux incidents liés à la sécurité, comme des actes de désobéissance civile sur la Colline du Parlement et dans la Cité parlementaire. Les membres du Service ont aussi agi à titre de premiers intervenants lors de plusieurs incidents graves.[Français]

Afin de se préparer à déménager dans les locaux temporaires, le Service a effectué une refonte de sa posture pour maximiser son utilisation des ressources existantes dans l'ensemble des édifices de la Cité parlementaire. Il a recentré ses activités sur son mandat de protection, ce qui lui a permis de redéployer ses ressources plus stratégiquement et avec plus de flexibilité.

(1115)

[Traduction]

De plus, le Service est prêt à répondre aux nouvelles exigences opérationnelles liées au nombre croissant de visiteurs au nouveau Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, à la plus grande superficie de la Cité parlementaire compte tenu des nouveaux édifices du Parlement et à la distance plus grande entre les deux chambres du Parlement. Comme vous le savez, monsieur le président, nous sommes un peu plus dispersés à cause du déménagement de l'édifice du Centre à cet édifice-ci et à d'autre.

Le Service a aussi adopté des mesures pour mieux gérer la santé et le bien-être de son effectif. Au cours des deux dernières années, les heures supplémentaires imposées ont beaucoup diminué. De plus, le Service a adopté une politique en matière de drogue et d'alcool à la suite de la légalisation du cannabis, il a bonifié le programme de formation des agents de protection et des spécialistes de la détection, il a lancé un sondage sur la mobilisation des employés et il a amélioré le programme de mesures d'adaptation pour favoriser un retour au travail rapide.

En plus de promouvoir un mode de vie sain pour son effectif, ces mesures aident les employés à retourner à la maison sains et saufs.[Français]

Le Service a le mandat unique de protéger le pouvoir législatif tout en demeurant agile et attentif à toute menace envers le Parlement du Canada dans 40 endroits. Cela signifie des opérations continues, 24 heures sur 24, sept jours sur sept, pour être en mesure de détecter rapidement les menaces nationales et mondiales émergentes et d'y répondre, ainsi que d'ajuster sa posture de sécurité au besoin.

L'été dernier, des membres en uniforme ont intercepté et arrêté un individu qui a franchi le périmètre de sécurité pendant la cérémonie de la relève de la garde sur la Colline du Parlement.[Traduction]

Le Service exerce ses activités dans un contexte qui regroupe plusieurs instances, ce qui nécessite un haut niveau de collaboration avec les organismes d'application de la loi et les partenaires du domaine du renseignement. Au cours de la dernière année, le Service a renforcé ses communications avec ses partenaires et il a discuté avec des homologues internationaux de confiance pour échanger des pratiques exemplaires et créer de nouvelles façons de faire dans le domaine de la protection.[Français]

C'est ainsi que se termine mon aperçu du Budget principal des dépenses de 2019-2020 de la Chambre des communes et du Service de protection parlementaire. Mes représentants et moi-même serons heureux de répondre aux questions. Si les députés ont des questions précises concernant la posture de sécurité ou les négociations collectives, je recommande au Comité de tenir ces discussions à huis clos. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

La parole est à vous, monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Avant de commencer, puis-je avoir la confirmation que nous avons la permission de continuer à siéger pendant que les cloches sonnent?

Le président:

Nous avons déjà fait cela.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci d'être ici, monsieur le Président. Vous ne serez pas surpris d'apprendre que mes questions porteront sur le SPP.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

C'est une énorme surprise.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

En effet.

Tout d'abord, comme le Président, je tiens à remercier Mme Côté et les agents de première ligne pour leur excellent travail. Nous les apprécions et les soutenons entièrement.

Comme vous le savez, nombreux sont ceux qui ont des préoccupations liées au fait que selon son mandat, le SPP doit être dirigé par un membre de la GRC, ce qui crée des liens hiérarchiques avec le commissaire. Pour cette raison, les questions de privilège sont depuis le début une source de préoccupations. Je parraine un projet de loi à ce sujet; il figure au Feuilleton des avis d'aujourd'hui. Puisqu'il n'a pas encore été déposé, je ne peux pas en parler davantage, mais il existe.

Je veux parler des obligations relatives au SPP prévues par la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada et le protocole d'entente que vos prédécesseurs ont signé il y a quelques années. Le paragraphe 79.52(2) de la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada se lit comme suit: Le Service est placé sous la responsabilité des présidents du Sénat et de la Chambre des communes agissant en qualité de gardiens des pouvoirs, droits, privilèges et immunités de leurs chambres respectives et de leurs membres.

L'article 79.57 se lit comme suit: Avant chaque exercice, le président du Sénat et le président de la Chambre des communes font dresser un état estimatif des sommes à affecter au paiement des dépenses du Service au cours de l'exercice et le transmettent au président du Conseil du Trésor, qui le dépose devant la Chambre des communes avec les prévisions budgétaires du gouvernement pour l'exercice.

Je suis certain que vous connaissez ces dispositions. Madame Côté, à titre de directrice intérimaire, à quelle fréquence rencontrez-vous personnellement les deux Présidents?

Surintendante Marie-Claude Côté (directrice intérimaire, Service de protection parlementaire):

Je communique avec les bureaux des Présidents chaque semaine. Nous sommes en contact constant, et lorsque des problèmes surviennent, je prends des mesures en vue de les régler.

(1120)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce que je veux savoir, madame Côté, c'est à quelle fréquence vous rencontrez personnellement M. Regan et M. Furey.

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

Je rencontre leur personnel, et lorsque c'est nécessaire, je les rencontre en personne.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avez-vous rencontré les deux Présidents pour préparer le Budget principal des dépenses?

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

C'est Mme MacLatchy qui occupait le poste à ce moment-là; il faudrait donc que je lui pose la question.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Elle n'est pas ici aujourd'hui.

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

Non.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous connaissez le protocole d'entente qui a été signé au printemps de 2015.

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Savez-vous que le protocole d'entente stipule qu'il peut être annulé en tout temps par toute partie? Or, cette disposition est dépourvue d'effet étant donné que la Loi sur le Parlement du Canada exige que le directeur du SPP soit un membre de la GRC. Le protocole d'entente ne peut donc pas être annulé puisqu'il est enchâssé dans la loi. Cette interprétation est-elle juste?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Ne serait-ce pas plutôt à la Chambre ou au Parlement de répondre à cette question, monsieur Graham?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le protocole d'entente stipule qu'il peut être annulé, mais la loi empêche qu'il le soit, si je comprends bien. Or, voici où je veux en venir.

L'article 15 du protocole d'entente se lit comme suit: Avant chaque exercice, le directeur consultera les personnes et les entités concernées, y compris la GRC, la Chambre des communes, le Sénat, la Bibliothèque du Parlement, pour vérifier les besoins en matière de sécurité, notamment les activités prévues, dans la cité parlementaire et sur le terrain de la Colline du Parlement, et préparera un budget des dépenses provisoire à faire approuver par les deux Présidents, qui reflète les sommes nécessaires pour couvrir les frais et les dépenses en lien avec le Service de protection parlementaire durant l'exercice.

Un député: Ralentissez.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Il parle aussi rapidement que moi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai appris de vous, monsieur le Président.

L'article 16 se lit comme suit: Les Présidents examineront conjointement le budget des dépenses provisoire, établiront un budget des dépenses et, une fois leur approbation donnée, le transmettront au président du Conseil du Trésor, qui le déposera devant la Chambre [...]

À votre avis, monsieur le Président et madame Côté, ces procédures sont-elles correctement respectées?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai entendu dire que le Service de protection parlementaire, le SPP, est en train de mettre sur pied une unité de renseignements. Est-ce vrai?

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

Oui, nous avons une unité de renseignements.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Des renseignements seront-ils recueillis sur les membres et le personnel, et seront-ils communiqués à la GRC?

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

Depuis la création du SPP, nous avons une unité de renseignements. Cette unité est actuellement composée de membres de la GRC et d'agents de protection. Elle est actuellement dirigée par des employés du SPP.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ma question est la suivante: les données qui sont colligées concernant le SPP sont-elles communiquées à la GRC?

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

Ce n'est pas tant les données que nous recueillons; c'est l'échange de renseignements au cas où il y a un incident. J'aimerais répondre à cette question à huis clos, si possible.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

C'est raisonnable.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ma seule préoccupation à cet égard est le privilège associé aux renseignements qui sont colligés. On ne parle pas des détails. Je veux seulement qu'on m'assure que le privilège est respecté dans la collecte de renseignements sur la Colline.

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

Il l'est.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le budget des dépenses dans sa forme actuelle a-t-il été complètement approuvé par les deux Présidents?

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

Désolée, mais je n'ai pas entendu ce que vous avez dit.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le budget des dépenses dont nous sommes saisis aujourd'hui a-t-il été complètement approuvé par les deux Présidents?

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

Oui, il a été présenté aux deux Présidents, qui l'ont tous les deux approuvé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce possible d'avoir une ventilation plus détaillée, même à huis clos, des dépenses que nous avons ici?

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

Bien entendu.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comment pourrions-nous obtenir cette ventilation?

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

Je vais demander à M. Graham.

M. Robert Graham (officier responsable de l’administration et du personnel, Service de protection parlementaire):

Nous pouvons vous fournir ces renseignements. Nous pourrions peut-être mieux comprendre le genre de détails que vous souhaitez obtenir, si le bureau du Président peut nous fournir cette précision.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Une minute et demie.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je n'ai pas besoin de passer à huis clos et de déranger les personnes qui sont ici, mais je pourrais peut-être intervenir pendant une minute et demie lorsque nous serons à huis clos. Est-ce possible?

Le président:

Oui.

Monsieur Nater.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président, je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Je pense que j'aurais probablement une question à poser durant la séance à huis clos également, pour revenir sur l'unité de renseignements, s'il reste du temps à la fin.

Le président:

D'accord, nous passerons à huis clos à la fin.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur le Président, et merci aux témoins de ce matin.

Je vais peut-être passer du coq à l'âne un peu avec mes questions, comme je le fais souvent, pour aborder quelques sujets différents.

Dans votre déclaration liminaire, vous avez commenté le projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre. Je pense que c'est un sujet qui intéresse le Comité. Comme vous le savez, il a tenu un certain nombre de conversations à ce sujet. Vous avez mentionné dans vos remarques liminaires que les parlementaires seraient consultés et participeraient aux discussions du début à la fin.

Nous croyons savoir, d'après ce qu'a dit le Bureau de régie interne, qu'il y aura un groupe de travail. J'aimerais obtenir un peu plus de précisions à ce sujet et savoir comment les choses vont se dérouler sur le terrain. Comment les parlementaires seront-ils consultés? Quelle autorité officielle vous, en tant que Président, et notre Chambre, par votre entremise, auront-ils sur ce projet?

(1125)

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

C'est une excellente question, car je ne sais pas si l'autorité est officielle; je pense que c'est plus informel. C'est en cours d'élaboration — le comité dont nous avons parlé —, mais comme je l'ai déjà dit, je pense qu'il nous revient en tant que députés de continuer régulièrement d'insister pour faire partie intégrante de ce processus et du plan de développement.

Je sais que Michel Patrice, sous-greffier, Administration, aimerait ajouter quelques renseignements.

Ce n'est peut-être pas le cas, mais je lui demanderais de le faire.

M. Michel Patrice (sous-greffier, Administration):

Je pense que ce qui est important au final, comme nous en avons discuté à la dernière réunion... Vous recevrez le tableau des nombreux intervenants concernés. En fin de compte, ce qui est important, c'est la position adoptée par l'administration, que le bureau et ce comité appuient, à savoir que les exigences doivent être définies par les membres. C'est votre lieu de travail, si bien que vos besoins et vos exigences sont le fondement même du rôle et de l'importance de la Chambre des communes.

En ce qui concerne l'exécution des contrats, l'adjudication des contrats, les appels d'offres, etc., l'exigence relative à la structure patrimoniale, tout cela relève d'une autre entité que la Chambre.

M. John Nater:

Je pense que du point de vue de ce comité et des parlementaires, c'est essentiellement l'aspect fonctionnel que nous envisageons. Il y a de multiples intervenants, que ce soit la Chambre, le Sénat ou le BCP. Bien entendu, la Bibliothèque et le SPP ont compétence également. À l'avenir, je pense que ce comité sera très actif, et nous reconnaissons que nous avons sept semaines avant la fin de la session. J'espère qu'au cours de la nouvelle législature, ceux d'entre nous qui, espérons-le, seront de retour ici continueront de jouer un rôle important pour définir cette fonctionnalité.

Je voulais revenir sur un aspect précis. Il y a quelques semaines, nous avons reçu des témoins qui sont venus discuter de l'orme. Cela peut sembler un peu ridicule, mais je pense que c'est un sujet important, car il fait ressortir là où le rôle du Parlement commence et là où il se termine. À ce moment-là, les témoins ont parlé de la deuxième phase du projet d'aménagement du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs, où l'on procédera à des travaux de dynamitage dans le substrat rocheux devant le Parlement. C'est un projet d'envergure.

Je suis curieux de savoir si ce projet a été officiellement approuvé par une personne ou une entité. Le Bureau de régie interne a-t-il approuvé la deuxième phase du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs pour les travaux sur la pelouse du Parlement?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je peux dire que cela fait certainement partie des plans, si je me souviens bien, que le Bureau a vu passer au fil du temps, mais Michel peut peut-être nous parler de l'approbation du projet.

M. Michel Patrice:

Le concept du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs a été approuvé par le Bureau. L'espace qu'il occupera et la conception sont encore en cours de préparation. Il y a de nombreuses options sur la table à dessin, mais la conception ou la proposition finale, pour ce qui est de la superficie notamment, n'a pas été achevée.

M. John Nater:

Quand le Bureau a-t-il officiellement approuvé le concept pour la dernière fois?

M. Michel Patrice:

Il faudrait que je vous fasse parvenir les dates. Il y a de nombreuses années de cela.

M. John Nater:

Je pense que c'est une préoccupation pour ce comité et les parlementaires. Un projet qui a été approuvé il y a de cela un an, voire possiblement une décennie...

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Si vous le permettez, je pense que ce que je comprends, c'est que le bureau a reçu des mises à jour sur la vision et le plan à long terme, y compris divers éléments au fur et à mesure qu'ils étaient élaborés. Il n'a peut-être pas officiellement approuvé le plan ou dit, « Attendez un instant, nous avons un gros problème avec tel ou tel autre élément ». Si des préoccupations ont été soulevées, elles ont été prises en considération, pour autant que je sache.

M. John Nater:

L'un des symptômes que nous avons vus lorsque nous discutions de l'arbre... L'argument qu'on a fait valoir était qu'il fallait retirer l'arbre pour procéder à la deuxième phase du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. La deuxième phase du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs ne semble pas être très avancée, si bien que nous prenons des décisions fondées sur un concept et des approbations qui, dans certains cas, sont quelque peu désuets et très flous. Je pense que c'est une source de préoccupation pour les membres et ce comité, plus particulièrement.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Certains membres ont visité d'autres parlements. Je pense, par exemple, au Parlement de Westminster au Royaume-Uni, qui a une infrastructure intéressante pour les visiteurs, et plus particulièrement pour les classes et les écoliers. Il y a une salle où ils regardent une présentation audiovisuelle intéressante, une présentation virtuelle à propos du Parlement. Ils regardent une vidéo d'introduction de manière à ce que, lorsqu'ils entrent dans l'édifice, ils aient une meilleure compréhension des lieux. C'est l'un des éléments que je m'attends que l'on inclura à cet espace.

(1130)

M. John Nater:

Je pense que le Royaume-Uni a beaucoup d'avance sur nous en ce qui concerne cette interaction avec les visiteurs.

Il me reste environ 30 secondes, et vous n'aurez peut-être pas le temps de répondre à cette question intégralement, mais je veux parler de la cybersécurité. En prévision des prochaines élections, le concept d'influence étrangère est au coeur des préoccupations pour de nombreux Canadiens. Il y a de nombreuses données personnelles, données confidentielles et données extrêmement importantes qui sont conservées sur des ordinateurs et des serveurs dans la Cité parlementaire. Je serais curieux de savoir quelles mesures ont été prises par la Chambre, et peut-être par le SPP, pour veiller à ce que ces données soient en sécurité et ne soient pas considérées comme étant un problème durant les élections, et plus généralement pour les Canadiens au jour le jour.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Avant de céder la parole à quelqu'un d'autre, je veux souligner l'importance, pour les députés et notre personnel, bien entendu, de surveiller les courriels d'hameçonnage. Méfiez-vous des courriels qui ont un titre étrange, même s'ils proviennent d'une personne que vous connaissez. Lorsqu'on ouvre des courriels parfois, surtout lorsqu'on clique sur des liens, on peut permettre à quelqu'un d'accéder aux données sur son téléphone, ordinateur ou tablette. Ce sont des choses que nous devons savoir, comme nous en avons déjà entendu parler. Il vaut la peine de le répéter.

Le président:

Soyez bref, s'il vous plaît.

M. Soufiane Ben Moussa (dirigeant des technologies de l'information, Services de l'information, Chambre des communes):

Merci de la question. Je ne pense pas pouvoir y répondre en 30 secondes, mais pour rassurer l'honorable membre, la Chambre des communes a investi beaucoup d'argent dans la cybersécurité. Nous avons un programme solide à la Chambre qui comprend de nombreux volets. La sensibilisation est l'un des principaux aspects qui, d'après nous, est de la plus grande utilité, mais nous avons également une bonne relation avec nos partenaires nationaux et internationaux. Nous travaillons également avec de nombreux Parlements semblables aux nôtres, comme le Royaume-Uni, les États-Unis, l'Australie et d'autres, pour échanger des vecteurs de menaces et y réagir. Nous avons un service qui sera désormais offert 24 heures par jour, 7 jours par semaine.

Je ne dis pas que nous sommes à l'abri des risques à 100 %. Je ne pense pas que personne ne l'est à 100 %, mais nous faisons tout notre possible, tout en notre pouvoir pour protéger l'institution du Parlement.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le Président, je suis ravi de vous revoir pour ce dernier échange. Il est indéniable que c'est le dernier échange que nous aurons, vous et moi. Avec un peu de chance, vous reviendrez à maintes reprises, monsieur le Président, et je vous souhaite bonne chance à cet égard, mais ceci est notre dernier échange.

Je sais que vous seriez très déçu, tout comme mon bon ami M. Graham, du SPP, si je ne soulevais pas la question, mais je vais suivre votre conseil. L'observation que vous avez faite à la fin était que, si c'est attribuable aux relations de travail, nous pourrions étudier la question à huis clos. Il semble que nous allons passer à huis clos quoi qu'il en soit, et j'aurai quelques questions à poser et je vais demander qu'on fasse le point.

Nous allons peut-être le faire durant la partie de la séance à huis clos, monsieur le président.

Je vais limiter mes remarques à quelques questions financières.

Dans votre exposé, après quelques pages, vous avez dit que la somme de 650 000 $ est prévue pour faire fond sur les investissements en matière de sécurité existants au poste de contrôle des véhicules que nous surnommons affectueusement le lave-auto. Ma question est la suivante. L'installation a été conçue, étudiée et construite. Si ma mémoire est bonne, on y a apporté au moins une réfection majeure. Il y en a eu d'autres, mais on a effectué au moins une réfection majeure depuis.

Nous allouons maintenant 650 000 $ supplémentaires, si bien que ma question est la suivante. Quand ce satané projet sera-t-il achevé, et pourquoi les problèmes que l'on règle en ce moment n'ont-ils pas été résolus d'emblée au moment de la planification?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Cette question m'est familière, car je l'ai déjà posée, et Mme Côté sera en mesure d'y répondre. [Français]

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

Je vous remercie de cette question.

L'augmentation des dépenses pour le poste de contrôle des véhicules concerne les vidéos de surveillance que nous devons maintenant ajouter ou améliorer. C'est la portion pour laquelle nous demandons des fonds.

(1135)

[Traduction]

M. David Christopherson:

C'est de bonne guerre, mais ma question visait à savoir pourquoi ces problèmes n'ont pas été relevés au début lorsque, je présume, des millions de dollars ont été dépensés pour la construction. Nous devons maintenant revenir quelques années plus tard et ajouter 650 000 $ pour des caméras vidéo, ce qui semble être évident pour assurer la sécurité.

Là encore, aidez-moi à comprendre pourquoi nous devons dépenser cet argent maintenant et pourquoi ces dépenses n'ont pas été prévues dans le plan initial.

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

Avec n'importe quel système de sécurité, la technologie change très rapidement, et on doit pouvoir s'adapter à ces exigences. C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles nous enregistrons une augmentation des dépenses. Pour continuer de respecter les exigences relatives à la nouvelle technologie, nous devons apporter quelques ajustements.

M. David Christopherson:

Si vous me le permettez, monsieur le Président, je vais m'adresser à vous.

Vous soulevez ces questions, mais personne ne dit qu'il y avait une lacune quelconque dans le plan, et c'est justement la question que j'ai posée. Il n'y a aucune preuve de cela. Il s'agit seulement d'une nouvelle technologie et d'une occasion de s'améliorer, et c'est ce qu'il en coûte. Est-ce exact?

Personne dans le système — car les enveloppes brunes existent — n’a dit qu'il y a eu un fiasco au début et que nous devons maintenant corriger la situation. Ces fonds visent à ajouter des fonctions de sécurité légitimes à la suite de l'arrivée d'une nouvelle technologie en évolution. Est-ce exact?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

C'est ce que j'en comprends, mais cela me rappelle un peu le problème que nous avons connu avec certains équipements et le remplacement des bornes de protection. Il me semblait qu'elles n'avaient pas été construites il y a si longtemps, et on m'avait assuré que le cycle de vie de ce type d'équipements était beaucoup plus court que je l'aurais cru.

C'est un cas différent, car c'est une nouvelle technologie qui est nécessaire, mais ce sont là des préoccupations que nous gardons à l'esprit dans le cadre de ces discussions.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord. Je suis satisfait de cette réponse.

Je vais passer à un autre sujet. Je ne sais pas si c'est dans les documents que nous avons ici, mais cette information doit être disponible, car les analystes nous ont remis un tableau. On compare maintenant des prévisions budgétaires, pas des coûts réels à des prévisions budgétaires, encore moins des coûts réels à des coûts réels. Il y a d'énormes différences, et j'aimerais poser quelques questions.

En ce qui concerne les locations, le Budget principal des dépenses de 2018-2019 prévoyait 75 000 $. Je présume qu'il s'agit de milliers de dollars. Dans la même catégorie pour 2019-2020, le montant passe à 500 000 $. Pour ce qui est de l'achat de services de réparation et d'entretien, les fonds passent de 50 000 $ à 600 000 $. Pour ce qui est des fonds liés aux services professionnels et spéciaux, on constate une baisse, ce qui est une bonne chose. Je veux être juste.

Je vous interroge à propos de ces deux augmentations marquées. D'ailleurs, je suis en train de constater que les fonds au titre des transports et des communications sont passés de 100 000 à 350 000 $.

Nous remarquons des hausses considérables dans ces trois secteurs. Pouvez-vous me fournir un peu plus de détails sur les raisons de ces augmentations, s'il vous plaît?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je crois que vous faites référence au SPP.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui.

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

Je vais demander à M. Graham de répondre à cette question, puisqu'il est responsable du budget.

M. David Christopherson:

Très bien.

M. Robert Graham:

Je n'ai pas les détails, malheureusement. C'est avec plaisir que je vous reviendrai là-dessus plus tard.

M. David Christopherson:

Pardon?

M. Robert Graham:

Je suis désolé. Je n'ai pas les détails que vous demandez concernant les locations.

On observe une augmentation des coûts liés au personnel et une diminution des coûts des services professionnels et spéciaux. Monsieur Christopherson, c'est la transformation.... Cela varie en fonction de l'évolution ou de la réduction des services de la GRC, parce qu'il s'agit essentiellement d'un contrat de sous-traitance du Service de protection parlementaire et d'une augmentation des salaires du SPP.

Le nombre d'agents de la GRC sur la Colline baisse à mesure que l'effectif du SPP augmente, d'où l'augmentation des salaires et la baisse pour les services professionnels que vous voyez.

M. David Christopherson:

Je n'ai pas vraiment demandé... Eh bien, ma question porte sur les services. Je comprends. Vous avez très bien expliqué la baisse, mais j'aimerais savoir pourquoi on voit des augmentations de 75 000 $ à 500 000 $ et de 50 000 $ à 600 000 $. Ce sont des montants importants. Vous me dites que vous ne savez pas de quoi il s'agit, en ce moment?

M. Robert Graham:

Un des aspects est l'achat de services de réparation et d'entretien. Cela comprend aussi l'élargissement de la flotte de véhicules du SPP. Nous avons fait l'acquisition de véhicules. Vous les verrez dehors; nous ne les avions pas en 2018-2019. Ces véhicules sont inclus dans les achats de services de réparation et d'entretien.

Je devrais vérifier les chiffres pour les locations, mais je pense que c'est lié à la location d'équipement pour la fête du Canada. Je n'ai pas les détails sous la main.

(1140)

M. David Christopherson:

Cela laisse croire qu'à la fête du Canada, nous faisons les choses très différemment que dans le passé, car sinon, cela ferait partie intégrante du financement de base pour ce poste budgétaire.

J'accepte que vous n'ayez pas les détails précis sous la main, même si je suis surpris que vous ne soyez pas prêt à répondre à ce type de question, étant donné que c'est plutôt évident. Monsieur le président, je demande que ces renseignements supplémentaires soient fournis au Comité le plus tôt possible.

Le président:

Certainement. J'allais vous demander de nous fournir la justification pour ces deux importantes augmentations plus tard, par l'intermédiaire du greffier.

M. Robert Graham:

Je le ferai sans faute.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, pour être franc, je voulais consacrer le reste de mon temps aux relations de travail, mais il serait préférable que ce soit à huis clos.

Je vous remercie, et je remercie le président de la Chambre.

Le président:

Très bien. En fait, vous avez pris 30 secondes de trop.

Les deux prochaines minutes sont pour M. Simms, puis nous ferons une pause pour aller voter.

Pouvez-vous revenir après le vote?

Très bien.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

J'ai combien de temps?

Le président:

Deux minutes.

Maintenant, il reste une minute et 50 secondes. Vous feriez bien de commencer.

M. Scott Simms:

Pouvons-nous simplement attendre au retour? Je ne veux pas seulement deux minutes.

Le président:

D'accord. Nous reprendrons après.

Chers collègues, j'aimerais simplement vous rappeler que la réunion de ce soir aura lieu dans cette salle, à 19 heures.

Nous avons un petit budget à approuver pour les dépenses des témoins pour notre étude sur les chambres de débats parallèles, pour un total de 2 950 $.

Ai-je l'approbation du Comité?

Merci.

J'ai une petite question sur les langues autochtones. Comme nous l'avons demandé à la dernière réunion, la réunion sera traduite en déné, en cri des plaines, en cri de l'Est et en mohawk, vers la fin mai. Souhaitez-vous des copies papier ou pouvons-nous simplement envoyer la version vidéo?

Je pense qu'il serait peut-être bon d'avoir des exemplaires papier dans ces langues pour ces groupes autochtones, surtout pour ceux dont c'est la langue maternelle ou la seule langue, puisque certains électeurs ne sont peut-être pas tout à fait à l'aise avec l'électronique.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous aurons aussi besoin d'un exemplaire pour les archives.

Le président:

Combien d'exemplaires nous faut-il? Nous devons informer le greffier du nombre d'exemplaires dans chaque langue.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quel est le coût? Combien par exemplaire?

Le greffier du comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

Faire des copies papier a un coût. Je pourrai vous donner un chiffre plus précis lorsque je saurai combien d'exemplaires le Comité souhaite faire publier pour chaque...

M. David Christopherson:

C'est combien, d'habitude? Pouvez-vous nous donner un chiffre approximatif?

Le greffier:

C'est difficile à dire. De nos jours, on n'imprime presque plus les rapports. Nous les publions en ligne et nous les envoyons...

M. David Christopherson:

Nous avons besoin d'un chiffre.

Il nous faut un chiffre, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Pourquoi ne pas commencer par 100 exemplaires dans chaque langue?

M. David Christopherson:

C'est bon.

Le président:

Cela vous convient-il?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Merci.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Sont-ils réservés à la Colline ou seront-ils envoyés un peu partout? Cent exemplaires, c'est bien, s'ils sont envoyés dans les communautés. Si nous avons 100 exemplaires pour ces différentes langues, je suis prêt à...

M. David Christopherson:

Ils seront expédiés; sinon, cela voudrait dire que quelqu'un n'a pas fait son travail et que la prochaine fois, quelqu'un s'assurera que ce soit fait.

Le président:

Une dernière chose: concernant les chambres parallèles, nous avons de bonnes recherches. Nous avons demandé combien de personnes se présentent, habituellement. C'est plutôt fascinant, car au début, nous nous disions: « Eh bien, il y a deux chambres; nous aurons deux chambres des communes qui accueilleront 338 personnes. Il est bien de discuter pour voir s'il nous en faut deux. » Il se trouve qu'en Australie et en Grande-Bretagne, les deux chambres accueillent habituellement entre 5 et 20 personnes. Vous pouvez consulter ce document, mais il montre que le concept est totalement différent de ce qu'on envisageait au départ.

De plus, les journaux britanniques évoquent un comité de normes. Je voulais savoir ce que c'était, alors les analystes vous ont aussi envoyé des informations sur le fonctionnement du comité de normes dans le système britannique de Westminster.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

J'aimerais apporter une précision par rapport aux propos de M. Christopherson.

Il a parlé du SSV, mais il ne s'agit pas des installations de vérification des véhicules; c'est le système de sécurité vidéo. Il est important de souligner la distinction. Je ne l'avais pas saisi au départ.

M. David Christopherson:

Oh, cela fait une grande différence.

Le président:

Il y a un autre point que je vais soulever rapidement. Jeudi prochain, lorsque le ministre viendra, la Chambre peut téléviser deux réunions de comités, et quatre comités en ont fait la demande. On en reparlera plus tard.

Nous allons suspendre la séance jusqu'après le vote.

(1140)

(1210)

Le président:

Merci à tous d'être revenus.

Pour commencer, nous demandons aux gens du SPP de répondre à la question de M. Christopherson.

Surint. Marie-Claude Côté:

Merci.

Je suppose que c'est vous qui avez posé la question concernant les locations et les services publics.

M. Graham vous donnera une réponse détaillée.

M. David Christopherson:

Excellent, merci.

M. Robert Graham:

En ce qui concerne ces trois éléments précis, le montant pour les transports et les communications est passé de 100 000 $ à 350 000 $. Ces derniers temps, nous avons augmenté le nombre d'employés équivalents temps plein. Du côté du transport, il y a quelques taxis supplémentaires. C'est une dépense minimale.

Quant aux communications, nous avons récemment lancé un nouveau site Web. Le montant reflète le coût de développement du site Web qui a été lancé plus tôt ce mois-ci.

Pour les locations, il s'agit d'une augmentation de l'équipement loué pour les événements majeurs: tentes, clôtures et blocs de béton. Il ne s'agit pas d'une nouvelle dépense, mais d'un rajustement pour tenir compte de la réalité, puisque nous avons maintenant des données historiques internes. Par exemple, vous remarquerez une diminution de plusieurs millions de dollars pour l'acquisition de machines et de matériel. Une partie de cette somme est simplement réattribuée sous « locations ».

Enfin, concernant les services de réparation et d'entretien, nous avons transféré au cours des deux dernières années un certain nombre de biens de la Chambre des communes au SPP, en particulier le matériel de détection, etc. Les coûts d'entretien ont augmenté, car ces équipements de sécurité font maintenant partie de nos biens.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vois. Merci d'avoir répondu si rapidement.

J'ai une question complémentaire. Ce n'est pas vraiment mon domaine, mais il semble que c'est énormément d'argent pour la création d'un site Web.

M. Robert Graham:

Je n'ai pas la répartition exacte des coûts de création du site Web et de l'augmentation des coûts de transport, mais nous pourrons vous la fournir.

M. David Christopherson:

Oui, j'aimerais avoir plus de détails, si vous le voulez bien, parce que la hausse est considérable. La réponse ne satisfait pas pleinement ma curiosité. Si vous pouviez donner des informations supplémentaires détaillées, je vous en serais reconnaissant.

M. Robert Graham:

Nous ferons le nécessaire.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci encore une fois d'avoir répondu rapidement.

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Très bien.[Français]

Monsieur Simms, vous avez la parole pour sept minutes.

M. Scott Simms:

Merci beaucoup.

(1215)

[Traduction]

Je vais commencer par les propos tenus par M. Robert lors de sa comparution il y a un certain temps. J'y reviendrai dans une minute.

Monsieur le Président, j'aimerais beaucoup que vous preniez également la parole à ce sujet, puisque vous n'étiez pas présent à l'époque, mais je suis certain que vous êtes au courant de l'exercice visant à rendre le libellé du Règlement plus clair, un exercice qui, comme je l'ai indiqué — et j'ai même été cité par le whip des conservateurs —, a été extraordinaire. Je pense que c'est formidable, simplement parce que le libellé a été en grande partie clarifié. Le Règlement est ainsi plus accessible aux personnes qui le connaissent peu et qui ne sont pas jurilinguistes. Il est beaucoup plus facile à lire et à comprendre. L'idée n'est pas de modifier le Règlement, mais certainement de le rendre beaucoup plus accessible.

Il semble, d'après ce que j'ai compris, que cet exercice a été interrompu.

Est-ce exact, monsieur Robert?

M. Charles Robert (greffier de la Chambre des communes):

Lorsque j'ai comparu devant le Comité le 9 avril, j'ai indiqué que c'était une initiative que j'avais entreprise de bonne foi pour essayer de fournir un meilleur produit aux députés. En même temps, j'ai indiqué et reconnu que je ne continuerais pas si cela suscitait des préoccupations. On m'a écrit pour m'informer que certains préféraient que le projet soit arrêté, et il est maintenant suspendu.

M. Scott Simms:

Puis-je vous demander ce qui posait problème?

M. Charles Robert:

Je pense que l'idée est que fondamentalement, les initiatives liées au Règlement relèvent des députés. On a jugé qu'il était peut-être présomptueux de ma part de lancer un projet de ma propre initiative.

M. Scott Simms:

Vous ne pouvez probablement pas répondre, mais je trouve qu'il est pour le moins fallacieux d'invoquer cette raison pour justifier cette décision.

Monsieur le Président, aimeriez-vous faire un commentaire à ce sujet?

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Merci, monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms:

C'est notre travail.

L'hon. Geoff Regan:

Je dirai que l'administration soumet de temps à autre au Bureau de régie interne, par exemple, des suggestions sur les améliorations possibles aux mesures administratives. Je pense que c'est là-dessus qu'on travaillait.

Toutefois, il est très clair, et je sais que le greffier le comprend, que la Chambre et les députés sont, pour ainsi dire, propriétaires du Règlement. De toute évidence, les députés savent qu'il ne peut être modifié sans l'accord de la Chambre. Si les députés ne souhaitent pas qu'un examen de ce genre soit effectué, il faut y mettre un terme. Je pense que je ne pourrais mieux décrire le contexte.

M. Scott Simms:

Je reviens à M. Robert encore une fois.

Il me semble toutefois que vous n'aviez aucunement l'intention de modifier le Règlement ou les caractéristiques fondamentales de quelque aspect que ce soit lié aux travaux de la Chambre. Est-ce exact?

M. Charles Robert:

C'était en effet mon intention dans le cadre du projet.

M. Scott Simms:

Cela a-t-il été fait dans d'autres parlements d'inspiration britannique?

M. Charles Robert:

Il faudrait que je fasse une recherche pour comprendre ce qui a été fait dans d'autres parlements. Essentiellement, le mouvement a commencé dans le secteur du droit il y a 30 ou 40 ans. En Angleterre, c'était sous Lord Rankin, un ardent promoteur du langage clair, qui estimait que tout le monde devrait au moins pouvoir comprendre la loi, puisqu'elle s'applique à tous. Ce mouvement s'est étendu à d'autres pays. Au Canada, selon des avocats plus versés que moi sur le sujet, nous avons fait un effort en ce sens dans la rédaction des lois. Les versions anglaise et française sont maintenant rédigées en parallèle. Ce ne sont plus des traductions.

Par conséquent, je pense que la version française des lois fédérales est plus claire que si elles avaient été traduites de l'anglais.

M. Scott Simms:

Pouvez-vous dire combien de temps vous y avez consacré jusqu'à maintenant?

M. Charles Robert:

Personnellement? Probablement très peu. C'est une initiative que je peux diriger. Je pense qu'il y avait peut-être une personne à temps plein, puis deux autres à temps partiel, pour les questions de procédure. Je dirais qu'après, le recrutement des jurilinguistes s'est fait à mesure que le projet prenait de l'ampleur, pour qu'ils puissent participer à la simplification de la terminologie technique française.

M. Scott Simms:

Pour moi, personnellement — et vous n'avez pas à répondre à cela, c'est une réflexion personnelle —, je pense que c'est inévitable. Je pense que nous devrions nous efforcer de réaliser un projet de cette nature, et pas seulement pour cette raison, mais aussi pour d'autres, surtout étant donné la nature de notre travail. Les personnes élues au poste de député n'ont pas toutes une formation juridique, moi compris. J'étais présentateur météo à la télé, pour l'amour du ciel! Je ne sais pas à quel point c'est révélateur, mais...

Un député: Et tout un présentateur.

(1220)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Sous sa garde, il ne pleuvait jamais.

M. Scott Simms: Exactement.

Des députés: Ah! Ah!

M. Scott Simms:

Nous semblons avoir régressé.

Je tiens à vous féliciter de l'avoir fait. Je suis très triste que ce soit terminé, et j'espère que le Comité choisira, à l'avenir, de donner des instructions en ce sens pour reprendre ces travaux.

M. Charles Robert:

Je signale qu'on m'a demandé d'entreprendre un autre projet lié au Règlement annoté, ce que j'ai fait avec plaisir. Je pense qu'il est possible d'en faire un document évolutif, c'est-à-dire d'en faire la mise à jour de façon plus proactive. Ainsi, lorsque les députés voudront connaître l'origine d'un règlement et la raison d'être d'une procédure, particulièrement dans les cas où il existe certaines nuances — comme l'article 69.1, qui traite des deuxième et troisième lectures des projets de loi omnibus —, nous pourrons leur fournir plus rapidement des renseignements susceptibles de les aider.

Si nous réussissons à mettre en œuvre cette approche, je pense que cela sera utile pour les députés.

M. Scott Simms:

En quoi le Règlement annoté consiste-t-il?

M. Charles Robert:

Si je ne me trompe pas, la deuxième édition a été publiée il y a quelques années. J'étais toujours à la Chambre lorsque la première édition a été publiée, au milieu des années 1980. Cela comprend le Règlement, des explications quant à son interprétation et l'histoire du Règlement à partir de 1867, lorsque nécessaire.

M. Scott Simms:

Vous avez entrepris cet exercice. Est-ce exact?

M. Charles Robert:

J'ai accepté de le faire, en effet, car c'est ce qui a été proposé. Je vois cela un peu comme le cousin germain du Règlement révisé, alors pourquoi ne pas le faire? C'est un très bon projet.

M. Scott Simms:

L'autre partie — l'autre cousin — a été interrompue et vous avez demandé aux autres de cesser toute activité à cet égard.

M. Charles Robert:

Oui.

M. Scott Simms:

C'est malheureux.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci.

Nous allons suspendre la séance brièvement pour passer à huis clos, car trois personnes souhaitent vous poser des questions à huis clos. C'est là-dessus que se termineront les séries de questions.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

(1220)

(1255)



[La séance publique reprend.]

Le président:

Nous sommes maintenant en séance publique. CHAMBRE DES COMMUNES ç Crédit 1—Dépenses du programme..........349 812 484 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.) SERVICE DE PROTECTION PARLEMENTAIRE ç Crédit 1—Dépenses du programme..........81 786 647 $

(Le crédit 1 est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président: Merci à tous d'être restés plus longtemps que prévu. C'était beaucoup plus long que d'habitude, mais je pense qu'il est bien que le Comité ait pu discuter avec vous. Nous vous sommes très reconnaissants de l'occasion de poser ces questions.

Vous êtes libres de partir, si vous le voulez.

Il nous reste seulement trois minutes. Y a-t-il une question urgente à laquelle vous voudriez consacrer ces trois minutes?

Monsieur Nater, la parole est à vous.

M. John Nater:

Non, et je ne pense pas que nous ayons le temps de faire quoi que ce soit, mais lors d'une prochaine réunion, peut-être, nous avons la motion de Mme Kusie...

Le président:

Et quelques autres, dont celle de M. Reid, etc.

M. John Nater:

Scott n'est pas ici aujourd'hui, alors...

Le président:

Très bien; merci.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on April 30, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.