header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-04-29 SECU 158

Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

I am calling this meeting to order.

I see that the minister has his coffee, so clearly he is ready to provide his testimony.

This is the 158th meeting of the Standing Committee on Public Safety, and pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), we are studying the subject matter of Bill C-93, an act to provide no-cost, expedited record suspensions for simple possession of cannabis.

With that, I want to welcome the minister on behalf of the committee, and I would anticipate that he will introduce his colleagues.

Hon. Ralph Goodale (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness):

Thank you, Mr. Chairman, and good afternoon, once again, to the committee.

I am glad for the opportunity to discuss Bill C-93 this afternoon, legislation that will make it much easier for people convicted of simple possession of cannabis to clear their records and move on with their lives.

I am pleased, Mr. Chair, to be joined by Angela Connidis, from the Department of Public Safety; Ian Broom, who is with the Parole Board of Canada; and Jennifer Gates-Flaherty, who deals with criminal records at the RCMP.[Translation]

In the old system, when cannabis was illegal, Canadians were among the biggest, and youngest, consumers of cannabis in the world, to the delight of criminal organizations. Last autumn, we fulfilled our commitment to put an end to that ineffective and counterproductive ban.

However, a number of Canadians still have a criminal record for simple possession of cannabis. With Bill C-93, they will be able to rid themselves of it expeditiously. [English]

For people convicted solely of possessing cannabis for personal use, this legislation will simplify the process of getting a pardon in several ways. Ordinarily, applicants would have to pay a fee to the Parole Board of $631. We are eliminating that fee entirely for these purposes. Applicants also face a waiting period of up to 10 years to become eligible under the usual system, and we are getting rid of that waiting period too.

As the law currently stands, the Parole Board can deny applications based on a variety of subjective factors, such as whether a pardon would provide the applicant with a “measurable benefit”. Under Bill C-93, such factors would not be considered in the context of this legislation. In addition to the measures in the bill, the Parole Board is taking further steps, such as simplifying the application form, creating a 1-800 number and an email address to help people with their applications, and developing a community outreach strategy to encourage as many people as possible to take advantage of this new process.

We're doing all this in recognition of the fact that the criminalization of cannabis had a disproportionate impact on certain Canadians—notably, members of black and indigenous communities. We are doing it because we will all benefit when people with criminal records for nothing more than simple possession of cannabis can get an education and a job, find a place to live, volunteer at their kids' schools and generally contribute more fully to Canadian life. They are impeded in doing those things because of that criminal record.

There were several points raised about the bill during second reading debate and in public discussion that I would like to address. Let me say also that I certainly commend the committee for taking the initiative of holding these hearings with respect to Bill C-93 to do a prestudy and to deal with this matter in as expeditious a manner as possible.

First, there is the question of why we're proposing an application-based system instead of pardoning people's records generically and proactively as has been done, for example, in certain municipalities in California. Unfortunately, doing that same thing in Canada on a national scale is simply a practical impossibility.

For one thing, Canadian conviction records don't generally say “cannabis possession”. That's not the language that's used in the records. They say something like “possession of a schedule II substance,” and then you have to check police and court documents to find out what the particular substance was. The blanket, generic approach is not all that obvious, given the way that charges are entered and records are kept in the Canadian system. Doing this for every drug possession charge that potentially involves cannabis would be a considerable undertaking, even if all the documents were in one central computer database.

(1535)



In reality, that is not the case in Canada. Many of these paper records are kept in boxes in the basements of courthouses and police stations in cities and towns across the country. It's not as simple as just pushing a button on a computer. We could start the process today, but people would still be waiting for their records to be cleared years from now because of the way those records are retained. By contrast, when someone submits an application for a pardon under the provisions that we're proposing in Bill C-93, Parole Board officials can zero in on the relevant documents right away, and the person can get their pardon much faster.

Another question raised at second reading was about the appropriateness of waiving the fee. There was concern that taxpayers would be footing the bill for people who broke the law.

The fact is that if we don't waive the fee, wealthy Canadians with cannabis possession convictions will be able to get their pardons quite easily, but lower-income people will remain saddled with the criminal record and the stigma. Many people with records for cannabis possession don't have that spare $631 lying about. They need the pardon to get a job and earn a paycheque. It's a bit of a vicious circle. Also, waiving the fee is a good investment. A person who gets a pardon is better able to get an education and a job, and contribute to their community in all sorts of ways, including by paying taxes.

Finally, there's the question of why we are proposing an expedited pardons process rather than expungement. I would remind the committee that expungement is a concept that did not exist in Canadian law until we created it last year to destroy the conviction records of people who were criminalized simply for being gay. In those cases, the law itself was a patently unconstitutional violation of fundamental rights and the convictions that flowed from it were never legitimate in the first place.

The prohibition of cannabis on the other hand was not unconstitutional. It was just bad public policy. There is no doubt though that the manner in which it was applied disproportionately impacted certain groups within our society, particularly black and indigenous Canadians among others. That's why we're proposing to waive the fee and the waiting period, and to take numerous other steps to make getting a pardon for cannabis possession much faster and much easier.

As for the practical effects of pardons as opposed to expungement, criminal record checks come up empty in both cases. The effect of a pardon is protected by the Canadian Human Rights Act, and pardons are almost always permanent. Since 1970, more than half a million pardons have been issued and 95% of them are still in force today.

It's important not to minimize the effect of a pardon. Some of the debate in the House has made it sound as though a pardon is an insignificant thing. It's worth remembering that when this committee studied the pardon system in the fall, it heard from witnesses who emphasized just how consequential a pardon can be.

Louise Lafond, from the Elizabeth Fry Society, testified that a pardon is “like being able to turn that page over” and allow people to “to pursue paths that were closed to them.”

Catherine Latimer, from the John Howard Society, testified that pardons “allow the person to be restored to the community, as a contributing member without the continuing penalization of the past wrong.”

Rodney Small testified that for years he wanted to apply to law school, but couldn't for want of a pardon.

In other words, making pardons more accessible, with no fee and no waiting period, will have life-changing impacts for people dealing with the burden and the stigma of a criminal record for cannabis possession. We will all reap the benefits of having those people contribute more fully to their communities and to Canada as a whole.

(1540)



Thank you, Mr. Chairman, for your attention. I'd be happy, along with my colleagues from the various departments and agencies here, to try to answer your questions.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

With that we go to Ms. Sahota for seven minutes, please.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Minister, and thank you, everyone, for being here today.

My first question is going to be along the lines of what you just finished with: the productivity increase.

There has been a lot of argument or debate on the issue of whether taxpayers should be footing the bill for the cost of all of these pardons. I'd like to hear a little more about what you think the cost might be and what tax revenues or benefits we may see as a result of people receiving these pardons.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Obviously, on the cost side of the equation, Ms. Sahota, it will depend exactly on how many people come forward and apply. Based on the best calculations the department can do, cost estimates have been made. My understanding is that the department expects a cost factor of about $2.5 million over a period of time to process the paperwork that's involved to do the necessary investigation.

That would relieve the burden of a criminal record on several thousand individuals. If they're able to get a better job or get a job at all or find themselves in the position of paying taxes for the first time, if that has been their life experience up to then, obviously it wouldn't take society very long to recover the cost. It would end a discriminatory practice that is now really quite out of sync or out of whack because the whole legal regime around cannabis changed last fall. Last fall we stopped the process of criminalizing people for simple possession moving forward. This is an effort at simple fairness to try to rectify the situation as much as that is humanly possible with respect to those who have a record of simple possession that has been impeding their ability to be as productive in society as they would like to be.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

As you know, and as you've referenced in your introductory remarks, there's been a lot of debate about providing pardons over expungement. Are there any benefits that you can see, other than the ones you've pointed to, of pardons over expungement?

I know that our parliamentary secretary mentioned some in the debate in the House regarding crossing the border into the U.S. and prior records the border services there might have on a person and any others you might see. Why is this the step you and your department have chosen to take?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

We've thought this through extensively and had a very good internal discussion about the various alternatives for trying to deal with the issue we're advancing here. As a result of weighing all of the pros and cons of one technique versus another, I think there are six factors that argue in favour of the route that we've laid out in Bill C-93.

Number one, the pardon process is the most efficient process from the point of view of the Parole Board. It is the least expensive and can be done faster than the other alternatives. Therefore, efficiency is one of the arguments.

Number two, it's a very simple piece of legislation. Bill C-93 is not hundreds of pages. It's four or five pages. It's very simple, but we're able to accomplish two important objectives that recognize the unfairness of the situation that we're trying to correct: There's no fee and there is no wait time. That can be done in a very simple way by means of this legislation.

Number three, this approach deals with the reality of how records have been historically kept in this country in a very dispersed manner. They are not all contained in one comprehensive database where you can simply push a button and instantly alter the whole thing by one keystroke. By setting up the system that we're setting up—where people make an application—the system can deal with the reality of how records are kept.

Number four, it's an effective remedy. As I mentioned in my remarks, of all the pardons that have been issued in this country since 1970, 95% of them are still in effect today. It's the rare case when a record suspension is set aside and the record is reopened—in cases only where another criminal offence has been committed, for example. The statistics would verify that the remedy is effective.

Number five, a pardon is fully protected by the Canadian Human Rights Act, which specifies, in section 2, that the existence of a criminal record cannot be used as a form of discrimination if a pardon has been granted. Interestingly enough, because the concept of expungement didn't exist at the time the Canadian Human Rights Act was written, there's no reference in the human rights act to expungement, but there is explicitly to the pardon process.

Number six, finally, is at the border. Because of the extensive information-sharing arrangements between Canada and the United States, U.S. border officers would have access from time to time to Canadian criminal records. They would make their own extraction from those criminal records.

Assume that a person with a conviction for simple possession of cannabis had their record expunged. They go to the border. The U.S. border officer asks them the cannabis question and they say “no,” as they would be entitled to do under Canadian law under expungement. But the American border officer, looking at his computer, sees that this person, in fact, did have a conviction for simple possession. Then the U.S. border officer would probably come to the conclusion that they're lying to him, which raises a very serious predicament at the border. The Canadian would say, “No, no, I've had an expungement.” The U.S. border officer would say, “Prove it.” You can't, because the paper doesn't exist. But if you have a record suspension or a pardon, you are able to prove your status in confronting the predicament at the border.

(1545)

The Chair:

We're going to have to leave that important answer to that important question and go to Mr. Paul-Hus.[Translation]

The floor is yours for seven minutes.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Good afternoon, Mr. Minister.

First of all, I want to say that we are ready to support Bill C-93 at second reading, as we previously announced. However, the work of the committee will provide the response to the next stage.

One of our causes for doubt is the way in which Bill C-45, the legalization of marijuana, has been handled. It was rushed into place to fulfill a campaign promise by the Prime Minister. No one listened to educational experts or the police. No one educated our young people.

Today, six months later, we are already seeing that the basic idea, to get organized crime out of the cannabis market, is not working. Everyone is laughing at the government. Organized crime continues to sell cannabis, and now people are walking round with illegal marijuana with no fear of being caught.

That makes us skeptical of the way in which you want to implement Bill C-93.

One of the topics I would like to discuss with you is the process.

We know that the police often negotiate with people. When they are arrested, some people may have committed other, more serious offences. But the police can choose to charge them with marijuana possession because the consequences for them are less serious. Those kinds of negotiations go on.

Now that cannabis is legal, how are we going to make it so that people who have committed more serious crimes, but have the opportunity to get out of them by being convicted only of marijuana possession, do not slip through the net by applying for a pardon? They have other problems. We do not want this to be a free pass for everyone.

What will the process be?

(1550)

[English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

First of all, Mr. Paul-Hus, thank you for indicating your support at second reading. I hope the discussion in committee and elsewhere can give you the reassurance you need.

I have discussed the new cannabis legislation with a number of different police officers and police chiefs across the country. The vast majority of them have indicated to me—sometimes fulfilling what they had expected and sometimes, perhaps, surprising them—that over the course of the last number of months in which the overall legal framework with respect to cannabis has been changed, their experience in terms of law enforcement has been quite positive. They haven't seen a spike in behaviour that would cause them to be concerned.

Now, granted, it's still early days. It's been barely six months, but they're learning as they go along. They're indicating, by and large, a pretty positive experience with the new legislation.

With respect to the precise point you raised, this legislation, Bill C-93, deals with the reality of what a person was charged with. If they were charged with simple possession of cannabis or simple possession of a substance in schedule II—if that is the offence that's in the application and before the Parole Board—then this legislation applies.

Individuals with more complicated criminal records would generally not be able to take advantage of the provisions of this law. They would have to go through the normal process. For the offence of simple possession of cannabis, Bill C-93 would apply. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

In other words, only people with a record for simple possession of cannabis will come under Bill C-93 and will be able to apply for a pardon at no cost. However, people with a more complex criminal record will have to go through the process and pay the fees.

Will that be any different? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Angela would like to comment on that, Mr. Paul-Hus.

Ms. Angela Connidis (Director General, Crime Prevention, Corrections and Criminal Justice Directorate, Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness):

People who have other offences on their records, aside from or in addition to possession of cannabis, will be required to pay the full fee and to fulfill the wait periods associated with those offences on their records. As the minister said, if their only offence is for possession of cannabis, and that might have been due to plea bargaining, as you mentioned, we are only reacting to the convictions that are on their records. We do not know if they would even have been convicted of any other offences. It's not really our place to second-guess what a court would have done. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Thank you.

Mr. Minister, you mentioned discussions with police groups, but we have not heard a word about any previous consultations with other groups. Have you consulted with any groups in particular? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

With respect to Bill C-93, or...?

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Yes.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

As I recall, Mr. Paul-Hus, the consultation was responsive. In other words, once Bill C-45 was enacted.... Indeed, for a number of months before it finished its parliamentary course and became law, there were large numbers of Canadians—in the general public, in the media, a good many members of Parliament and it came up in question period—who were making the case that upon the change of the legal regime in Bill C-45 the issue of criminal records needed to be dealt with.

Therefore, in the course of our work on Bill C-45, we began considering the alternatives for how you could respond to the criminal records issue in a way that was fair and equitable, effective and efficient. It was really in response to what appeared to be a very broad public consensus. We brought forward the legislation. It would seem to be contradictory to change the law in Bill C-45 but not deal with the issue of previously existing records. That was the very broad public comment that we responded to.

(1555)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Paul-Hus, and thank you, Minister, for the fulsome answer.

Mr. Dubé, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Minister, for being here with your officials.

I have two quick things I want to get on the record before I get to my question.

The first is that I appreciate your use of the word “pardon”, and I wish that your appreciation of the word had led to actually putting it back to “pardon” in the law, as opposed to “record suspension”, which is something we discussed when the committee did that study. But we are in the eleventh hour of this Parliament, so unfortunately I'm not going to hold my breath for that.

The other thing is about the John Howard Society. You quoted Catherine Latimer's testimony from the study we did on the pardon issue. I want to say that on this particular issue.... You're obviously familiar with my colleague Murray Rankin's bill, which favours expungement. The John Howard Society did say, in a Twitter exchange on the said bill when it was being debated, “Agreed. Time to expunge criminal records for cannabis possession-not criminal: end punishment.”

I didn't want to mis-characterize what the John Howard Society thought on this particular issue, given that we're kind of mixing the study this committee did on record suspension with this issue.

I want to go back.... The whole debate between your position in Bill C-93 and what our party is calling for in expungement is couched in the notion of historical injustice. There's no actual precedent for that. There's no legal obligation. This seem to just be something that the government has used rhetorically. When I asked the Prime Minister about it in the House after legalization occurred, I raised, among other things, that in Regina indigenous people were almost nine times more likely to be arrested for cannabis possession. In Halifax, black people were five times more likely to be arrested for cannabis possession. In Toronto, black people with no other criminal convictions were three times more likely to be arrested for cannabis possession.

Just before I get to my question and hear your answer, Minister, I want to quote Kent Roach, who of course you know very well, who says, “The history of miscarriages of justices in this country should not be equated with laws that would now violate the Charter. The Charter is the minimum not the maximum in terms of our sense of justice.”

Are you saying, unlike what Mr. Roach is saying, that your government doesn't believe that that horrendous overrepresentation of indigenous and black Canadians, among others, of course, from minorities, is not an injustice?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

To the contrary, Mr. Dubé, in my remarks I indicated very clearly that the way the previous cannabis laws had been applied to a number of marginalized groups within our society has been patently unfair and has impinged upon them in a way that we need to address.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Minister, I understand that.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

We're addressing it by eliminating the fee and eliminating the waiting period.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

What I'm saying is that when I asked the Prime Minister in the House about this issue, and when I've asked you about it, the response was unlike, for example, the issue of the criminal records that were given to LGBTQ2 Canadians. On those we were specifically told that their records were allowed to be expunged because that was a historical injustice. Why not expunge the records of these Canadians? It seems pretty clear. I'm going to quote Minister Blair. In 2016, he said, “One of the great injustices in this country is the disparity and the disproportionality of the enforcement of these laws and the impact it has on minority communities, Aboriginal communities and those in our most vulnerable neighbourhoods.”

Why the disparity between one issue and another, beyond the fact that your government seems to have defined “historical injustice” in a rhetorical sense, when there's no actual legal or other precedent basis for it?

(1600)

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The technical distinction in the law would be—

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

For historical injustice, you're just making this up.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

No, I'm not. In the case of the laws as they pertained to the gay community in this country, the law itself was a fundamental violation of human rights. In the case of the—

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Minister, we agree on this, but if you go to what Mr. Roach said, when he said the charter is the minimum, you're using the charter as your basis. Would you not agree that those indigenous, black and other Canadians who have been absurdly disproportionately affected by this law are themselves victims of a historical injustice and their records deserve to be expunged?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

They have been treated unfairly in the way the law was applied. That law, when it was in effect, was not unconstitutional, but it was applied unfairly in respect to a number of marginalized groups within our society. We are recognizing that by eliminating the fee, expediting the process, ending the waiting period and making sure that they can get that burden off their record in the most expeditious and cost-effective manner possible.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

It seems clear, Minister, that we disagree on this.

With the minute and a half I have left, I just want to go to your comments. It almost sounded like the implication was that because you don't know what a schedule II possession offence is, that's why it was better to have the applicants apply rather than doing it automatically. It almost seems like the burden's being put, again, on these individuals.

Just in that context, when you look at Bill C-66, to return to that other issue, seven people out of 9,000 have actually applied. Is there not a recognition on the government's part that it would just be better to make it automatic? It's pretty apparent that Canadians who are already marginalized might not be in a position to take advantage of this, as was the case in San Francisco, where only 23 of 9,400 people took advantage of their opportunity to seek pardons for cannabis possession.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

You and I absolutely agree, Mr. Dubé. I think, from what I hear, most people around this table, perhaps most people in the House—hopefully—would agree that if you could accomplish expungement in some kind of automated manner, simply by pushing a button, and abracadabra, the records would disappear—

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

If the staff are going to go through it anyway, why not just go through it?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

They don't disappear until you take the mechanical step of getting the record eliminated.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Why not have your department do the mechanical step and make it automatic within the department, rather than having these individuals apply and still have to go through the process, if they're even aware of it to begin with?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

It's a far more efficient and cost-effective way to base it on applications.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

You're putting the burden on Canadians. That's why it's more efficient.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The reality, Mr. Dubé, is that doing it the other way around would, quite frankly, take decades, and people would be denied a process that they could apply for and get done very quickly.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Graham, you have seven minutes, please.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you.

In your opening comments, Minister, you talked about the application. I'm wondering how long it takes to process an application once it's submitted, mechanically.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Ian, can you comment on that?

Mr. Ian Broom (Acting Director General, Policy and Operations, Parole Board of Canada):

Sure.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Mr. Broom is with the Parole Board. They're the ones who will do the paperwork.

Mr. Ian Broom:

I would start by saying that with the $631 application fee as it currently exists for record suspensions, there are service standards in place, so it would be, say, six months for a summary conviction and 12 months for an indictment.

With the proposal being discussed here with Bill C-93, it is fundamentally different because there is no fee, whereas under the current scheme there's the $631 fee. Also, there is no longer a board member decision involved. It has become an administrative decision. It is actually staff members who are determining eligibility based on the documents that have been provided through the application process. Then from that, the record suspension would be granted.

The other point about this in terms of how quickly it would happen is that, while there is no service standard that would be attached to the scheme as described under Bill C-93, we would expect that it would be an expedited process. Because it's an administrative process, it would move more quickly.

I can't give any exact metrics because we would have to see the volumes before we could fully assess, but we certainly will have the staff in place and the resources in place at the point that this legislation would come into force.

(1605)

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I would add, Mr. Graham, that one of the critical points there is that this is a mechanical, administrative process based on the record. It's not a case where a member of the Parole Board would need to arbitrate or make a judgment call. If the application indicates the facts that comply with the act, then administratively the decision is made, which means it's much quicker than an adjudicative process.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right, but I was wondering if I were submitting an application, as an example, would it take a week, a month or a year to get that paper saying I have my pardon.

Just for the record, I don't have a record.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Broadly speaking, Ian....

Mr. Ian Broom:

Broadly speaking, I am reluctant to give a particular amount of time. Again, I think we would have to assess the volumes we have. There are thousands of applications that come in each year, but certainly it would fall well below the accepted service standards that are put in place for the summary and indictment schemes. To give an actual solid estimate.... Again, until we start assessing the volumes that come in, I would be very reluctant to give a number around that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thanks.

In your comments, you discussed the Kafkaesque experience of crossing the U.S. border with an expungement. Could you expand on that a bit? In some places, especially at the U.S. border, they don't ask you if you have a conviction or a pardon. They ask you whether you have ever been arrested.

Does this have any impact on that?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The reality is that they are in charge of their entrance rules for crossing into the United States, so the Americans will make their decision on who's eligible to come in and who is not.

The point I was making in my remarks is that if there's a dispute that you run into at the border, you're in a better position to explain yourself if you have a piece of paper that lays out your status on the Canadian side as opposed to not being able to at all contest the impression of the U.S. border officer, which may be “you're lying to me”. One of the most difficult circumstances a person will face in crossing the border is when the officer on the other side thinks they are dealing with a liar. That's the problem that having a piece of paper to explain your status would help you address.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned that 95% of pardons over the last 40-odd years are still in force. Can you give us some sense of why the 5% aren't?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The most common reason that the Minister of Public Safety would open a record is that a person is charged with a subsequent offence. That is the most common circumstance where the existence of the record becomes relevant to their current situation.

Ian, did you have something to add on that?

Mr. Ian Broom:

No, that's definitely the case. If we were looking at pardons that would not continue to be in place, it would either be a situation involving good conduct, but most often, it would be a new conviction.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When someone makes an application, if they have a simple possession, is there any circumstance where the pardon would not be granted?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

If an individual meets the requirements laid out in the act...and the Parole Board, as I understand it, is going to be publishing a how-to guide that will be available on the Internet to explain it to people. As there is now for applying for a pardon in the normal way, there will be detailed explanations and the application form.

Presuming that the applicant has submitted a complete application with all the relevant information, then it is simply an administrative decision of whether it has accomplished all the objectives of the act and there's no subjective judgment call to be made in those circumstances. That's why it's faster.

(1610)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you. I think my time is up.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Motz, you have five minutes, please.

Mr. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Minister Goodale, for being here today.

My colleague Ms. Sahota asked about costing and you estimated, or your official suggested—and of course, it depends on the number of people who apply, that you were anticipating about $2.5 million over the coming years to process the paperwork of several thousand individuals. That's the term that was used.

If the cost of a record suspension is around $600 now, that's fewer than 4,000 people. I'm sure your officials have an estimate of how many people you're anticipating will apply for this.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

As you know, Mr. Motz, predicting these things is difficult, because you don't know exactly what the uptake will be. That cost estimate is related to processing approximately 10,000 applications by the simplified methodology that we were just discussing.

Mr. Glen Motz:

How do you plan to cover this cost? Will this come out of an existing budget line? Will it be added to a deficit of a department? How do you anticipate that you will be paying for this?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The $2.5 million...?

Mr. Glen Motz:

I mean the whole amount, the cost of this, whether it's $2.5 million or more.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

We anticipate the cost of the program will be $2.5 million. It will be coming through the normal estimates process, which would have to be approved by Parliament.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Will you undertake to have your officials provide a cost analysis to the committee prior to our passing this, or amending things at the committee?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I would think we could provide you with the analysis, Mr. Motz, to show how we arrive at the arithmetic.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Is there currently a mechanism to levy sales from the current legalization of cannabis to potentially pay for this, as opposed to this being a taxpayer expense? Is that considered, or would you consider it if it hasn't been considered?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Mr. Motz, in a way what you're suggesting is linking two disconnected things. First is the accumulation of old records, which are a burden and cast a stigma on people and which, I guess, now is considered to be particularly inappropriate because the whole legal regime has changed. The new regime, with its revenue-generating capacity, would have nothing to do directly with the pre-existence of those records.

They're two separate issues, but the cost of this would come out of the general revenues of the government—

Mr. Glen Motz:

That's fair enough.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

—which will be augmented by the fact there there is now, or will be, a revenue stream flowing from....

Mr. Glen Motz:

But as the Minister of Public Safety you can't go to general revenues and get more money.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Yes, I can.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Not in the way you're considering, that just because your sales of marijuana go into general revenues you're now going to access that extra money to pay for this. I guess what I'm getting at is—

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

You're right. Whatever the government earns from the revenue from cannabis goes into the general revenue fund. That's correct.

Mr. Glen Motz:

All I'm getting at is that a large portion of the Canadian population is under the impression that this should not be a taxpayer-funded process, so any mechanism that's in place to do that.... I'm also curious to know whether there's some consideration to this legislation allowing individuals to apply through this process, expediting record suspensions and jumping the queue for those who apply for the normal process. They apply, they pay their fees and they wait for that process.

Will there be any impact on the normal record suspension process that exists now? How do we guarantee that? We're using the same staff, unless we add more staff.

(1615)

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The process is different in the sense that those people who have more complicated records would need to go through the normal process, which involves the engagement of a member of the Parole Board. Under Bill C-93, dealing exclusively with simple possession of cannabis is an administrative function for staff to manage and there is a separate financial allotment to make sure we have the personnel in place to handle that administrative function without impinging on the other important work that the Parole Board has to do.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Motz.

Mr. Picard, you have five minutes, please. [Translation]

Mr. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

To start with, I would like to turn to the minister and the officials from the department and the other agencies. The subject is the American border.

But first, let me ask this. I assume that American customs employees have access to Canadian data through the CPIC, the Canadian Police Information Centre.[English]

Are they using the CPIC database to look at the cases?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Could I ask our RCMP expert to explain how that information is available at the border?

Ms. Jennifer Gates-Flaherty (Director General, Canadian Criminal Real Time Identification Services, Royal Canadian Mounted Police):

Yes, you're correct. There is an agreement in place between the RCMP and the FBI to exchange information in a limited sense through the CPIC interface so that when people are crossing the border, if there's information in the system, they are able to view that.

In the context of a record suspension, that information is sequestered so it is not available. No one is able to view it in the system once it's been sequestered during that process. [Translation]

Mr. Michel Picard:

Do you know how long the Americans keep information?

When someone receives a pardon, his or her file is wiped clean immediately, meaning that the next time anyone looks, there is no trace. However, the Americans probably keep the information for longer, unless you are telling me that they consult the database regularly and that they receive information as quickly as Canadians do and so have up-to-date information. That would avoid situations where, for example, an American customs officer might think that someone lied because his file contains old records.

Are people's files kept sufficiently up to date to prevent old data from accumulating in the American system? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

That is exactly the predicament I was referring to that could cause an embarrassing and potentially difficult situation for a Canadian at the border. If the Americans have, in their records, information that they acquired a number of years ago, and subsequently that particular individual received a pardon, there could well be a conflict, on the face of the record, between what the American records show from historical data compared with what the facts are at the current moment. It would be useful to the Canadian to be able to say, “I can verify what my status is”, which you could do with a record suspension and you could not do with an expungement.

In terms of the exact retention period, I will see if I can get a precise answer from the Americans to answer your question. I suspect they retain previous information for quite some time, but I'll see if I can get a reading from American officials on how long they keep it.

Mr. Michel Picard:

That's what I'm afraid of, yes.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Exactly.

Mr. Michel Picard:

I know. It's the old story.

The issue is that the Americans might ask you whether or not you've had a criminal record.[Translation]

However, at customs, they are not necessarily trying to find out whether a person has a criminal record. That is the peculiar thing. They are trying to find out whether that person has used marijuana, because the American do not always see as legal in their country what we see as legal in ours.

We have to tell those Canadians interested in the matter that, although this is an innovation that is more than justified in Canada, it does not guarantee a problem-free open door to the United States, because of the nature of the use.

(1620)

[English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

That's exactly right, Monsieur Picard.

I know it's cold comfort, but there's an example that shows this issue works both ways. In the United States, an impaired driving charge is not a criminal offence. In Canada, it is viewed as a criminal offence. An American coming into Canada with a DWI can, in fact, be denied access to Canada on the basis of that charge. It's a point of some considerable contention with some on the American side that Canadians view this offence with a substantially more serious eye than apparently it is treated under the law in the United States. It works both ways.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Picard.

Mr. Eglinski, you have five minutes, please.

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC):

Thank you.

Mr. Broom, once a person applies for a simple possession pardon—or whatever we're going to call it—and you've looked at it, what do you do? How do you get rid of it?

Mr. Ian Broom:

I'm not sure I follow the question.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

A guy goes through the whole process. You have the document in front of you and you feel it's justified. What do you do?

Mr. Ian Broom:

If an applicant submits the required documents that demonstrate that they've satisfied—

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

No, I've already said that. You're wasting time.

Everything is good. How do you get rid of the record?

Mr. Ian Broom:

We would then issue the record suspension and we would contact the RCMP, and then the RCMP would remove it from the CPIC record. My colleague could confirm—

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

You're talking about a mechanical thing. The minister spoke about a mechanical thing.

Why couldn't you sit down with 100 people and go through the criminal records in Canada, take those things, send them to the RCMP and tell them to get rid of them? You're saying it's simple possession, but you're getting yourself a nightmare of paperwork in looking at each one, forcing Canadians to put an application in, when all you have to do is a simple mechanical thing that you said couldn't be done. You contact the RCMP and you get rid of them.

Why are we going through a process asking Canadians to go through the hurdle again?

Mr. Ian Broom:

As the minister alluded to earlier, if it were possible to do that, that would be fantastic. I think the issue we're faced with is not having a particular offence that's simple possession of cannabis. For example, we need to have the CPIC record, which is verified by fingerprints, so we know the right person is applying. If it's, let's say, a summary conviction, it may not end up in the CPIC repository.

We also need to receive court information, which would verify whether or not the sentence has been completed, the fines paid, etc. Unfortunately, those holdings are in provincial courthouses in various means of storage. I think, as we pointed out, we do require these documents simply because they are not all available to us.

As you were suggesting, if people were to proactively try to gather them, we wouldn't necessarily know where to send them and then if we did, there would be various types of research expeditions—

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

You're telling me the system really isn't going to change very much because you still have to do your CPIC check, your investigation, other things. What's changing from the way it is right now?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

There's no fee and there's no wait period. A person can apply and, assuming they present all the information that satisfies the application form—

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

But Mr. Minister, he says now he's going to check CPIC. They're going to have to check their records to make sure that the—

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

That's if we do it your way, Mr. Eglinski. That's if we did it your way.

If you were to say to the Parole Board, “Okay, you identify all the simple possession records in the country and wave your magic wand and make them go away”, then quite frankly, you'd be searching through the boxes and the records in courthouses and police stations across the country. It would be huge administrative task to ask the Parole Board to undertake that in just a holus-bolus manner. It would be very expensive.

(1625)

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

All right.

The question I'd like to ask the minister is this: Is anyone from your department going to check with our American counterparts?

As brought up by my colleagues across from me, they will choose the wording, whether it's “Were you ever arrested?” or “Were you ever in possession?” It's about having some type of agreement because once I say the wrong thing at the border, they're not going to let me across. Even if I have a little piece of paper from your department, I'm doomed as soon as I'm caught on that wording.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

If they think they're dealing with a person who's not telling them the truth...and that works both ways, in terms of what direction you're moving across the border.

Mr. Eglinski, the reality is that the Americans make the rules about access to their country and they administer those rules. Officials on our side of the border, the Canada Border Services Agency in particular, are in constant dialogue with the Americans about making the border experience as predictable and positive as it can be for travellers in both directions because a thin efficient border that is safe and secure is in everybody's national interest on both sides of the border. They have indicated to us in response to our constant dialogue about the cannabis issue and the impacts at the border....

We all know that moving in either direction, whether you're moving from Canada to the United States or the United States to Canada, if you're taking cannabis across the border, that's illegal. They have said that they do not intend to change their questionnaire at the border unless they have grounds to be suspicious. The experience so far in the first several months of the new law is that the experience at the border has not fundamentally changed.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Eglinski.

Ms. Dabrusin, you have the final four minutes.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Did you say four?

The Chair:

I said four. It's really three and a half.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Okay, I'm just going to get to the question then.

Mr. Minister, in your opening you referenced a study that we did on record suspensions generally. That was a unanimous report in fact from this committee and it was really wonderful to see everyone come together. Recommendation (c) was that “That the Government review the complexity of the record suspension process and consider other measures that could be put in place to support applicants through the record suspension process and make it more accessible”. One of the reasons that was made as a recommendation was that we heard from many witnesses about how the process, the forms themselves, was complicated.

Now that we have a simplified form for this specific process and we have a simplified process it appears, is there something we're putting in place to learn from that so that perhaps we can apply it when we're looking at record suspensions generally?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

This experience with the results of Bill C-93 will undoubtedly be very informative from a public policy point of view and from a public administration point of view, so, yes, I think there could well be important lessons to be learned from how this process goes that may be applicable to other issues in relation to record suspensions.

The one thing, though, to remember is that this is largely an administrative process. If all of the technical criteria are met, then the granting of the record suspension is an automatic administrative function.

In the case of record suspensions more broadly in other cases unrelated to cannabis, there would be judgment factors and subjective factors that members of the Parole Board, not just the administrative staff, would need to be involved in. That makes the broad question of record suspensions more complex than what we're dealing with under Bill C-93. But on your basic point of can we learn from what we're doing under Bill C-93 and make improvements in the broad application of the record suspension process, I hope that is the case. We'll certainly be looking to collect those lessons and apply them wherever possible.

(1630)

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Thank you.

The other thing is that we've heard in the House, and even here today, about waiving the cost of the record suspension program. The cost to taxpayers is referenced as a problem, but when we did our study, in fact, one of the recommendations in our unanimous report was to reconsider the fees that we apply to record suspensions. I remember that we heard testimony from some of the witnesses as to the value that we get back when people have their records waived. It's a fact that a record suspension can save money because people are able to go into the workforce and the like.

Do you know about any of that information? What do we save by actually allowing someone to have a record suspension?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

It's probably difficult to quantify in hard dollars, but a person may be able to get a job or get a better job because they don't carry around the stigma of a record. They may be able to volunteer in the community, which they previously couldn't do, or they may be able to complete their education or find more suitable housing. All of those factors lead to more successful lives and greater contributions back to the economy and back to the community.

It would be difficult to put a number on it, Ms. Dabrusin, but I suspect those kinds of thoughtful changes in the pardons process and the pardons outcomes would make a net-positive contribution to the economy and to the country, and certainly would alleviate cost burdens on the administrative side.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Dabrusin.

Before I let you go and we suspend, Minister, is there any law which prohibits a potential employer from asking the question, “Have you ever received a pardon or an expungement?”

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

There's section 2 of the Canadian Human Rights Act, which lists that very point as a basis upon which you are prohibited from discriminating.

The Chair:

Is that discrimination, though? I get section 2, but it's a pretty broadly based section.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Let me ask Angela to comment.

Ms. Angela Connidis:

Yes, that's a very good distinction to make. The human rights act doesn't prohibit someone from asking. It prohibits them from discriminating on that basis.

The Chair:

Okay. I just wanted to ask that question.

We are going to suspend for five minutes. We have microphone issues.

On behalf of the committee, Minister and officials, thank you. I expect the officials will remain while we fix our microphones.

With that, we're suspended.

(1630)

(1640)

The Chair:

Ladies and gentlemen, we're back on.

The officials stayed with us. It looks like we have two additions—Amanda Gonzalez and Brigitte Lavigne—who I'm sure will introduce themselves in due course.

With that, we will start questions. On panel two, I have Ms. Dabrusin for seven minutes.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

The question is how we get the word out about this new process under Bill C-93. How do we get word out to people that there's a process that's free and simplified?

I googled using the terms “pardons, cannabis, Canada”, and the first thing that came up was New Cannabis Pardons in Canada: Get a Free Record Suspension. It advertises an agency that will charge a fee to help you get this done. It takes a little while to get down to the actual Canadian government website on this.

I have a two-part question. The first part of my question is this: How are we getting word out to communities, and can we have someone work on moving our government site to the top of that list? Then I will have a second part as well.

Ms. Angela Connidis:

I will start and then I will turn it over to Ian, because they are actively working on their plan.

We meet regularly with stakeholders such as the John Howard Society and native associations, organizations that work with offenders across the country. We've had consultations with them on the pardon proposals we've put forward, and on the follow-up and how to get the word out. As a starter, we're asking that they make sure they know and are reaching the clientele that comes to them in these times. That's a word of mouth process that the Department of Public Safety is doing. The Parole Board is developing a much more comprehensive outreach strategy that I will let Ian speak about.

The issue raised about consultants is one that concerns me quite a lot. It's not always easy to regulate the Internet. We would be required to do quite a bit of work and would need extra funding to regulate these independent consultants who are not necessarily under our jurisdiction, but it is something we will be pursuing.

Mr. Ian Broom:

As part of the Parole Board's communication and outreach strategy associated with the expedited pardon approach proposed under Bill C-93, yes, there would be Internet resources available. However, as you point out, it might be somewhat difficult to get those in some cases. They would include a step-by-step guide—a simplified application guide—in terms of the outreach to get the word out.

Yes, there is a focus on our traditional criminal justice partners, so we will be reaching out to law enforcement, the courts, etc., but in addition, focusing and working with our other federal partners to establish a really good sense of how to get the word out to maybe not the most traditional partners in the domain. We want to focus on and target the more marginalized groups that were alluded to earlier today.

We're slowly building and putting together a database and a good sense of where to direct our correspondence. At the point at which this would come into force, we want to target the regular criminal justice partners and organizations that might facilitate, inform or assist individuals in seeking pardons for simple possession of cannabis.

(1645)

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

I'm following up because you mentioned, Ms. Connidis, that you're concerned about people providing these consulting services. It came up during our previous study about record suspensions. It worries me when I see this potential for people to take advantage of something we're trying to do well. We're trying to provide a free opportunity—something that actually is simplified—but we have people who might be putting themselves in between. It concerns me that this is something we have to create a buffer for.

It was one of the issues that was raised as a recommendation when we looked at record suspensions. What are some of the tools to deal with consultants for record suspensions? Is there anything we can do?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

It would require quite a bit of research policy development on our part. My starting point would be Immigration Canada, because they've had some issues with consultants, albeit in a very different context. It would mean working with our communications department to go to the Internet and ask, “What does it take for Public Safety or the Parole Board of Canada to be at the top?” There's probably a fee involved or something like that.

Those would be the starting points. It's not a simple issue. It isn't something that's been in the forefront a lot, as in the immigration context, but it is definitely a concern.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Just to jump back, Mr. Broom, you mentioned several different ways to reach out. Have you considered social media as one of the ways you'll be reaching out to people?

Mr. Ian Broom:

Absolutely. That's definitely part of our overall strategy: leveraging social media.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

In our earlier study, a woman named Louise Lafond testified that one of the most common barriers she'd encountered with her clients was that they had outstanding fines. That was one of the things that stopped them from being able to apply for a record suspension.

When I was looking at the legislation, it looked to me like the delay that might be posed by outstanding fines has been removed in Bill C-93. Is that correct? I'm looking at proposed subsection 4(3.1).

Ms. Angela Connidis:

In Bill C-93, as soon as you've completed your sentence, including a fine, you have no wait period. Therefore, if you have an outstanding fine right now, as soon as you pay it, you can apply. It won't restart your waiting period.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

All right. That's what I misunderstood. Good, thanks.

The Chair:

Thank you.[Translation]

Mr. Paul-Hus, you have the floor for seven minutes.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I have a technical question. I hope that we will be able to understand each other, given the situation with the interpretation.

When it comes to determining whether people are eligible for the removal of the waiting period and the fees, does the bill distinguish between possession of 30 grams or less of cannabis or its equivalent, which is now legal, and possession of more than 30 grams in a public place, which remains illegal? [English]

Ms. Angela Connidis:

We debated that. We do not include it because personal possession has no limit. There was no distinction between public and personal in the previous law, so we don't have a distinction and we don't have a 30-gram limit. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Possessing more than 30 grams of cannabis in a public place remains illegal. So why would someone accused of that previously have the right to get a pardon, if it remains illegal today?

(1650)

[English]

Ms. Angela Connidis:

In the past it wouldn't have been relevant whether it was public or private possession, so they wouldn't have been able to. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

So it is possible for a pardon to be given to someone who has done something that remains illegal today. [English]

Ms. Angela Connidis:

Now you have a very clear law and if they are charged with that, that crime will stay. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Okay.

We have talked about costs with the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness. According to the information we have on our side, about 500,000 Canadians have been charged with simple possession of cannabis. The minister said that he expects 10,000 of them to apply for a pardon.

How do you explain the fact that only 10,000 people out of the 500,000 might apply for a pardon? [English]

Ms. Angela Connidis:

As we've said, it's very difficult to know who has possession for cannabis offences, so we can't just go into a database and say this is how many offences there are. We've extrapolated from statistics collected by the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, and their figure is upwards of 250,000 convictions for the simple possession of cannabis. That is a starting point. The number of people expected to apply is much lower for reasons including that they've passed away—because some of these convictions date back a long time—they've already received a pardon or they have other criminal records on their record.

Let's remember you can only get that pardon if your only offence is for possession of cannabis. While you may have that offence, if you have others on your record, you would not be eligible. It's not an exact science but we've extrapolated from the figure of 250,000 and estimate 10,000. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Okay.

I will give the rest of my time to Mr. Motz. [English]

The Chair:

You have three minutes.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you, Chair.

You estimated 250,000. What is with the other 250,000 from the 500,000 estimation? Where are they?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

I'm not sure where the 500,000 came from. The figures we have used are 250,000.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay.

The Chair:

Just as a point of clarification, it's 10,000 out of 250,000. It's not 10,000 out of 500,000. Is that correct?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

That's correct.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Based on the numbers that you've come up with—and you've committed to providing a cost analysis for this committee on that—$250 per application is what you're estimating over time.

Ms. Angela Connidis:

We're still before committee and we don't have the final bill, so I can't actually say right now what the cost will be.

Mr. Glen Motz:

I'm just going to start into my questions now for the next round.

How much time do I have?

The Chair:

You have two minutes and 15 seconds.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay. I'm going to wait for the next round then.

My colleague, Mr. de Burgh Graham, on the cybercrime side of things, is always technical. I want to ask a very technical question specific to a type of substance. I want to know whether that still qualifies now because of the old NCA, CDSA and the new act that was changed in the fall.

In The Globe and Mail, a commonly cited statistic is that 500,000 people in Canada have a conviction for cannabis possession. A government spokesperson was also quoted in the media and estimated that 10,000 people will apply for the record suspension, as you say. That's where the 500,000 number comes from.

Ms. Angela Connidis:

As I said, we drew our number from the Public Prosecution Service of Canada and the number of convictions they have.

Mr. Glen Motz:

All right.

That's all for now, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

We will look forward to your questions in the next round, Mr. Motz.

Mr. Dubé, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you for sticking with us for this second hour.

For Bill C-66, are confirmations provided to individuals who apply through the process that was created in that legislation, confirmations that their records have been expunged?

(1655)

Ms. Angela Connidis:

I'll have to turn to Ian and Brigitte.

The Chair:

Ms. Lavigne, would you mind introducing yourself since you're not on the record here?

Ms. Brigitte Lavigne (Director, Clemency and Record Suspensions, Parole Board of Canada):

I am Brigitte Lavigne. I'm the director of clemency and record suspensions with the Parole Board of Canada.[Translation]

Thank you for your question.[English]

Your question was regarding whether people received notifications when an expungement is ordered. When the Parole Board of Canada orders an expungement, we do notify the applicant similarly to what we do for pardons and record suspensions. Then we provide notification to the RCMP, who will take it into their hands to have the record permanently removed from the national repository.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I'm just trying to square what the minister said. He used an example where, at the border, an individual who had an expunged record would not have proof, but I'm understanding otherwise now. Would there not be confirmation if the legislation were similar to Bill C-66? In other words, would there be confirmation that expungement had taken place?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

Is it in the form of a certificate?

Ms. Brigitte Lavigne:

We would provide the documentation. I believe the benefit the minister was referring to is that, subsequent to that, we have numerous applicants who return to us to request copies of their pardons or record suspensions. We reissue them once and then we notify the RCMP again, and we contribute it to the criminal record. In the spirit of the act, provinces, territories and municipalities will also go in turn to sequester the record.

We do the same in the case of expungement. We would expect that they would destroy or permanently remove it from their databases. If an applicant were to come back, that record would no longer be made available to them.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

But if the person retained the initial confirmation, they would have a confirmation.

Ms. Brigitte Lavigne:

If they retained that document.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

There would be no record that any kind of deletion took place. I just want to make sure we're distinguishing between the record and the act of deleting the record. There's no trace of the act of deleting the record either?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

No.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I had another question on the same issue.

When the RCMP is notified, would the minister have the ability if there were expungement...? Cannabis is legal in Canada. Supposing all records were to be expunged, putting aside any debate on the process, the minister would have the ability, in theory, to inform his American counterpart, and the agency responsible for the U.S. border could then be properly informed that this act had taken place. There's nothing preventing that. Is that correct?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

I think, practically, that might be prohibitive for every applicant.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Not on an individual basis, I'm just saying that for anyone who has a record pertaining to possession of cannabis, those records have been expunged.

Ms. Angela Connidis:

Yes, but it wouldn't change what the Americans already have in their database. If they already have that in their database, it won't mean anything to them.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Speaking of the American database, am I correct in my understanding of the Criminal Records Act that the minister has the ability to share information, even from a suspended record, with a country allied to Canada?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

I am not sure that's under the Criminal Records Act. I would have to check. I'd be happy to get back to you on that.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Is there any concern that if an individual obtained a record suspension and then went to the border, they might, if they're asked if they have a criminal record...? Has it been your experience that individuals sometimes mistakenly will say no or not think of the proper way to answer the question? I'm going back to how the question being asked on the job application or the apartment application might be if you have a record suspension for a crime for which you were convicted. If a U.S. border officer says it, they might frame the question differently. Is there any data on how often that happens?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

No, I don't have any data about that.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Okay.

In response to an earlier question, we were talking about how to get the word out that this service would be available. What went wrong with Bill C-66? That was seven out of 9,000 people.

Ms. Angela Connidis:

It's hard to know if anything went wrong. We estimated how many people would have those records. Let's remember that the last charges were back in the late 1960s, so a number of years have gone by. We did think to ourselves that there are people who may just not want to bother. That was one of our considerations when asked about automatic pardons. Some people just don't want to have to tell people about it. They don't want to wake it up, or they may have died.

I don't think it's a lack of information. Within that community, information is shared very broadly and we did have a very active campaign.

(1700)

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

In any of the thinking that's gone on around this legislation—and I say this with all due respect and I recognize the importance of that issue—even though there are issues with the rollout, which is to say issues with Bill C-66, and naturally, there's a difference of age and things of that nature.... You've referred to individuals who might have passed away.

I'm just wondering. If we're looking at this particular issue we might have younger Canadians who might be more inclined to want to have some kind of clemency, whether through expungement or record suspension. Has any thought gone into some of the reconfiguration that might be required, given the difference in clientele—if you'll forgive my use of that phrase—in this particular instance, of Canadians who might see a need for this longer term because they're not just reawakening an older issue? They might be in their thirties, let's say, and have difficulties getting a job, for example.

Ms. Angela Connidis:

I'm not quite sure. Do you mean in our approach to attracting them and the outreach?

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Yes. There seems to be some thought within the department that you're providing some of the thinking behind why Bill C-66 might not have been successful. Have you looked at how it might play out differently this time and how to accommodate that?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

As I said, I wouldn't associate Bill C-66 with being unsuccessful. I think the outreach was there. We have no data to show that it's because people didn't know about it. It's their free choice to apply.

With respect to cannabis and the pardon for simple possession of cannabis, the outreach strategy is quite different because we know we have a broader range of clientele. It's not a specific group per se, like the LGBTQ2 community. There are many people in marginalized communities. There are youth, which is one reason for using social media. We're changing the way the application process is, to simplify it with online access, etc.

Perhaps Brigitte or Ian would like to contribute.

The Chair:

We're going to have to leave the answer at that point, but before I turn it over to Mr. Picard, Mr. Dubé asked a question to which you gave a bit of an undertaking. Maybe, just for clarification, you should ask the question for the record so we all understand the response you gave.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I appreciate that, Chair, because my time did run out. I'm just wondering if we can get confirmation on whether or not the Criminal Records Act allows the minister to share information pertaining to suspended records with allied countries.

Ms. Angela Connidis:

I'll check.

The Chair:

Perhaps that could be done expeditiously because the timeline on the study of this bill is quite limited.

Mr. Picard, you have seven minutes, please. [Translation]

Mr. Michel Picard:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

My questions will be about the process of applying for a criminal record suspension.

As I understand it, the applicants are responsible for applying. They have to submit a complete file. The bill states that there will be no fees and no waiting period. So the applicants have to submit an application, and normally, it will be granted.

What would be the grounds for refusing an application? [English]

Ms. Angela Connidis:

Only if they could not demonstrate that it was possession of cannabis and that they had completed their sentence.... If they couldn't demonstrate those two things they wouldn't fit within the parameters of Bill C-93. [Translation]

Mr. Michel Picard:

What is the relevance of having completed a sentence if you are going to erase the criminal record anyway? [English]

Ms. Angela Connidis:

I think that just goes to the credibility of the criminal justice system. You've had a criminal charge. It could have been five or 10 years ago. You didn't complete your sentence or you're still serving your sentence, but once the sentence is completed, it's finished. [Translation]

Mr. Michel Picard:

I would like to push the matter further.

When applicants do the research work in order to obtain all the documents they have to submit, they communicate with courts and police stations. They are the ones doing the work because it would be an extremely onerous, complicated and lengthy task if the department had to do it instead. I fully understand that. So applicants have to ask police stations or courts to send them the information. However, those places are not always in the city where an applicant lives. To facilitate the process, they receive documents by email or the post.

How can you guarantee that the documents submitted to you are valid?

(1705)

[English]

Mr. Ian Broom:

I might turn the answer to this question over to my colleague Brigitte.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Good question, Mike. [Translation]

Ms. Brigitte Lavigne:

At the moment, when people apply for a pardon, a suspension of a criminal record, the documents submitted to us by those applying are official documents from police forces and courts. The applicants obtain documents bearing a seal or some kind of stamp that proves that they are genuine.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Do you then double check to make sure that the information you have been sent is valid? So are you therefore in the position of doing part of the research, on top of the work that applicants have to do?

Ms. Brigitte Lavigne:

The documents come to us in the proper form and bear a seal or a stamp. We can authenticate them and move on to examine the case.

Mr. Michel Picard:

The fact remains that the documents you mention, even though they have been authenticated, were submitted by the applicant.

Ms. Brigitte Lavigne:

Yes.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Okay.

That is all for me.

The Chair:

That's all, Mr. Picard? [English]

Mr. Michel Picard:

Yes.

The Chair:

Just following up on Mr. Picard's question, if someone is applying to have a record suspension, what mechanically is required? Can I submit a notarized copy of my sentence completion? Will that be acceptable to the board?

Ms. Brigitte Lavigne:

What we obtain in terms of the court documents is a document that is filled out by the court. We receive their stamp or their crest confirming that the sentence has been completed and that's also to allow us to determine if there is any fine attached to the sentence that still hasn't been paid in full.

The Chair:

If I don't have that document, do I have to physically go to the courthouse and obtain that document?

Ms. Brigitte Lavigne:

The applicants do obtain documentation from the courts and other documents from police sources. Their local police will do the records check and provide it to us.

The Chair:

In an average case, presumably I have to go to the police station and prove that I haven't done anything bad since the last time I was convicted. I have to provide proof that I was convicted and that my sentence has been completed. Is there anything else I have to show to the Parole Board?

Ms. Brigitte Lavigne:

We also require the fingerprint sheet, which allows us to have the convictions that are in the national repository, and we ask them to fill out the application form. There's a package, a step-by-step guide that will be created. It will be straightforward in nature and will outline the steps and the documents the applicant will need to provide to us in order to undertake the review of the case and determine that the criteria have been met in the legislation. Then we'll be able to order the pardon.

The Chair:

You have a three, four or five-step process for marginalized people to get what should be a simple....

Ms. Brigitte Lavigne:

The Parole Board administers the proposed legislation, the legislation that will come into force. We'll be ready to have a straightforward approach. We'll have tools available to applicants. We have our 1-800 line and a dedicated email. We'll have web information and, as mentioned by my colleagues, an aggressive outreach strategy targeting traditional and non-traditional partners in order to make it as simple as possible for applicants to be able to benefit from the no-cost expedited process that's been proposed here in Bill C-93.

The Chair:

With the greatest respect, that sounds like a fairly complicated process. It's particularly complicated for the two target communities that you're after.

I apologize. I don't generally intervene in questions.

I see that Mr. Graham still wants....

A voice: It's Ms. Sahota.

The Chair: We have a little less than a minute.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Perfect. I'm actually going to ask something.

In terms of the commitment of having a no-fee process, is that just for your application fee? How about the costs that are going to be associated with getting the records from your local courthouse or police department? Those are affiliated with fees. What about those?

(1710)

Mr. Ian Broom:

No. The no-fee is the application fee that is collected by the Parole Board of Canada.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What kinds of fees would the applicant possibly be on the hook for, generally, in any record suspension case? What kinds of costs do they usually incur before the application?

Mr. Ian Broom:

I think the costs vary quite a bit, depending on which police service or which court. I don't have any hard and fast estimates with me to provide right now. I do believe that the department maybe had a cursory examination on this issue. But again, you'd be talking.... I would hesitate to give an estimate right now.

The Chair:

That's a fair response, because it is outside of your jurisdiction to estimate that. But it's a real cost.

Mr. Motz, you have five minutes, please.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I was going to continue on with that.

There is a fee to get fingerprints. There is a fee to get your record from a police service, and there is a fee, generally, to get your records from court, if it has them. In some communities, if it's in the distant past, they might not have the book anymore where they have them. It's a free system, maybe, for the Parole Board's costing, which is a taxpayer pickup, but it will cost an applicant some time, some effort and some resources on their own to do that, just so we're clear.

I want to get more to the schedule. Bill C-93 has schedules attached to it, and that's the technical side of it. It lists the offences for which an offender can apply and immediately receive a record suspension after the sentence is completed, without paying a fee, other than the ones we've just identified.

The schedule refers to three categories of substances for possession offences. One is under schedule II of the old CDSA, the old Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, as it was prior to October of this past year. The second was for the old NCA, the Narcotic Control Act, which was previous to the CDSA. The third was for equivalent offences outlined in the National Defence Act.

However, the lists of substances do not appear to be entirely identical. For example, would an application for record suspension related to an offence concerning possession of Pyrahexyl, or Parahexyl as it's also known, under the old Narcotic Control Act, be assessed without a waiting period or fee being required, since that substance is included in item 3 of the schedule of the Narcotic Control Act, and the applicant would, thus, benefit from the changes proposed in Bill C-93? If so, why would that be the case, being that Parahexyl is still considered an illegal substance in Canada? Your schedules allow that to happen. I'm curious to know why.

Ms. Angela Connidis:

The schedule refers to the acts where you can find the cannabis offence. It is only for possession of cannabis. The documentation they would provide necessarily needs to indicate that the substance for which they've been charged under one of those acts was for cannabis.

Mr. Glen Motz:

I understand what the act says, but your schedules aren't identical. I'm trying to point out that there needs to be some congruency between all the schedules from the CDSA, the NCA, the new act and the National Defence Act to make sure that all of those things are in alignment. I would urge you to have that consideration or that look because that substance is still there and it still remains illegal.

The last question I have has to do with what you mentioned, Ms. Lavigne and Mr. Broom. Does the Parole Board currently have sufficient resources to manage the increase?

We're talking potentially 10,000 over the coming years that's expected with Bill C-93? I know I asked the minister this before. If you don't need new resources, the administrative or clerical functions to do an administrative record suspension will impact the administrative clerical functions required to still do a record suspension for the Parole Board. How does that get navigated, and is $2.5 million really an appropriate cost? I ask because $250 doesn't seem like a whole lot when you look at the time it takes per application.

(1715)

Ms. Brigitte Lavigne:

The Parole Board is going to have the resources in place to process these applications when they come in. We currently have staff who are trained to do similar functions in processing record suspensions and pardon applications and as the volumes increase, we'll be ensured additional resources to meet the service standards that are currently in place for pardon record suspensions as well as these expedited record suspensions for those convicted of simple possession of cannabis.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Do you assume then that the $2.5 million that's been a guesstimation covers the additional staffing costs, or is that just the processing costs?

Ms. Brigitte Lavigne:

At this juncture, the estimates that have been put in place for us and the RCMP to manage this group of applicants would entail the staff resources needed to process the applications and conduct notifications.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Motz.

Ms. Sahota, you have five minutes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

I think we're just going to continue building off each other's questions. I'm also intrigued because the minister was saying, just like Mr. Motz, for the list of substances that would be under a certain offence, it's not very clear as to what they were in possession of. It could be a substance under the one list. The onus is then on the applicant to prove that it was simple possession and not another substance on the list. How would they do that? Is that information always available in the court record or is there another, easier way?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

That would be either the charge from the local police record or from the court record.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Would it list exactly what that substance was?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

The court record should if the police charge didn't.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

But the RCMP records would not...?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

Sometimes, but not always.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

In the case that they are listed in the RCMP records, would that person then be able to perhaps not have to go through the process of getting court records and all that? Would it be easy to just suspend?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

The local police record shows a few things. It will show whether or not it was the right substance, but also whether they have any other records on conviction that were not in the RCMP, and some of those summary convictions could be quite serious. They could be assault, for instance. That's the other reason you do the local police check. The court record would show not just the substance, but whether or not you've completed your sentence and what your sentence was. You don't do those checks just to determine whether it was cannabis or not. There are other reasons for those checks.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

And I believe—I just want to clarify what you have already said—if there was an assault or various other crimes that the person was convicted of along with the possession, then the possession would not be removed either?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

That's right. To get the pardon, you need to have satisfied the wait periods for all of the convictions on your record. In the case where your only conviction is for possession of cannabis, you will have satisfied the wait period, because we've waived the wait period.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

But if that was one of the convictions, that conviction alone could not be suspended?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

No, it could not.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What if somebody had pleaded down a charge and, say, they were convicted of just possession but originally they were charged with trafficking as well? In that case, would they be able to get a record suspension?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

Let's remember a charge is a charge. It hasn't been tried in court. It may have been pleaded down because there wasn't enough evidence. It may not even have been pleaded down. Maybe they looked at it and said, “Really, I shouldn't have done it for that. It should have been possession.” We can't second-guess why something might have originally been one charge and then a conviction for something else. It's based on what their conviction is.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That's fair enough.

I have one more question. When the police are doing a record check, what do they see on their screen if they were to check someone's record who had a record suspension in place versus an expungement? If an officer stops you on the road and they do a quick record check on you, what would they see?

The Chair:

Ms. Gonzalez, would you introduce yourself, please.

Ms. Amanda Gonzalez (Manager, Civil Fingerprint Screening Services and Legislative Conformity, Royal Canadian Mounted Police):

My name is Amanda Gonzalez. I'm with criminal records. I'm also responsible for the unit that takes care of sequestering the information once the RCMP....

In regard to your question, a police officer would be querying CPIC and that information would no longer be available.

(1720)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Under a record suspension...?

Ms. Amanda Gonzalez:

Right.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

An employer would never be able to access any of that information either once your record was suspended. Is that correct?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

Only under very exceptional circumstances. There are provisions in the Criminal Records Act where the minister could disclose to an employer if it was relevant. We often do get requests for disclosure from police forces for an applicant, and if we assess the record and think it is relevant to the job, then the minister has the decision of deciding whether or not....

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Do you see anywhere where simple marijuana possession could be relevant to somebody's job and that would be disclosed?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

No, I can't think of anything offhand where I would see that.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Sahota.

Mr. Eglinski, you have five minutes, please.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I'm going to hit you with some pretty fast questions here.

You were talking about start-up programs. Have you ever suggested going to different community groups like Community Futures Canada, family and community support groups, to encourage them to be trained by you?

All of these community organizations are always looking for funding. They're there for the community. They're not there for their own pocket. We all know there are a lot of unscrupulous characters doing your parole work for you, but have you ever looked at that and would you look at it?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

Sorry, look at them to do what?

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

To assist people in doing parole applications. These are volunteers in communities and they're always looking for funding. You could help them with the funding, help these organizations, and help the communities.

Ms. Angela Connidis:

Yes, we have been thinking about that.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Please keep it in your mind. Thank you.

Number two—

Ms. Angela Connidis:

It's top of my mind; trust me.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Brigitte, you were talking about going to these communities and getting these documents and stuff like that.

In my 35 years in policing, I was stationed in some pretty small places, where there was no courthouse and where the judge was a layperson in those days. He would come out and sit on one side of the detachment to hold court, and the person would go to be convicted.

Where does that person go to get that record? It's not there. The criminal conviction will be there. It will be sent to Amanda and she will have it recorded, but there's no one in the background who's ever going to find that little record that's in that little book that might be buried in a detachment or buried in some community building, because there are no facilities.

How does that person get his record cleared?

Ms. Brigitte Lavigne:

I believe we deal with applicants who are in similar circumstances today who come forward to request a pardon or a record suspension. They are all across the country. They provide us with documentation required for our application.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

If they can't get the documentation, this dies then.

Ms. Brigitte Lavigne:

I couldn't speak to the number of people who have come forward and who we have returned as ineligible for not having the application because of the fact that they were in a remote area. I don't have that data. We do have folks who have been convicted across the country who come forward to access the program and then end up with a pardon or record suspension.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Prior to your bringing out Bill C-93, did you have discussions with any stakeholders? Can you tell us of any concerns that the different groups may have had, whether you were talking to the RCMP or municipalities that may have to provide these records or have people research these records? Can you give me any indication about whom you met with?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

I met with a number of criminal justice organizations: John Howard Society, Elizabeth Fry Society, the St. Leonard's Society, members of the National Associations Active in Criminal Justice. We also had an online survey a couple of years ago about the pardon system generally. One of the responses was that they thought there should be more simplified pardon processes, particularly concerning convictions for same-sex offences. There should be a way of expunging them as well as other offences that are no longer crimes.

The issues that would be raised from the people I consult with regularly would be the marginalized communities and the fact that many of them would have more difficulty accessing pardons. There's been a lot of discussions about expungement versus pardon. Many of the same issues we've discussed here, I've discussed with stakeholders.

(1725)

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Have you addressed any of them? Can you give me some examples?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

Bill C-93 is the result of many of those discussions, and ongoing discussions about how to make it easier for some of these marginalized communities to apply.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

The northern community in the middle of the Arctic is a marginalized community.

Ms. Angela Connidis:

Yes.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

How does that person who's now living in Toronto get that record when there's no one there who might be able to find it because the court might have just been held on an ad-hoc basis?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

That is a very good question.

I'm not sure if you've experienced—

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

It's not fair right across the board, is it?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

It's difficult across a big country. You're exactly right.

The Chair:

I think that's about it.

Mr. Dubé—

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I had another quick one, but that's all right.

The Chair:

You and Mr. Dubé seem to be asking the same questions today.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Our concerns are around the same things, I think.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

It's not always a good thing.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I'm glad you're changing. Are you going to become a Conservative now?

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Careful, there's an election coming up, you know.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Matthew Dubé: I have a couple of quick eligibility questions. I just want to be clear because there might have been some confusion over an earlier question. An individual who has unpaid fines is not eligible for the expedited process proposed in the legislation. Is that correct?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

They can pay their fine and they're eligible right away.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Then if they have unpaid fines, they do not qualify?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

They have not finished their sentence.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Okay, thank you.

It's the same thing with those who have administrative justice charges, so failure to appear in court, for example, would disqualify them from the process proposed in Bill C-93.

Ms. Angela Connidis:

Not if it was not related to this, I don't think.... Go ahead.

The Chair:

Go ahead, Brigitte.

Ms. Brigitte Lavigne:

If they have other convictions, then they would not be eligible under this scheme.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Okay. No exceptions are made for any access to justice issues. If you fail to appear in court, you're...?

Ms. Brigitte Lavigne:

If they have another conviction on their criminal record, they would be streamed through our regular program.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

This is hypothetical, a dangerous exercise in our line of work, but I'm going to try one. An individual who committed a minor offence but who's now on the good behaviour path working toward a record suspension for an unrelated conviction, who then received a possession conviction during the last couple of years as the debate over legalization was occurring, would not qualify because they had not reached the record suspension point. Is that correct? They were only on the path of good behaviour.

Ms. Angela Connidis:

For their first offence...?

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Yes.

Ms. Angela Connidis:

That's right. They have to have finished their waiting period.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

When you look at the 10,000 number out of the 250,000, does that include those who are disqualified based on eligibility such as some of the criteria we discussed?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

The 10,000 includes those who only have a conviction for possession of cannabis.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Okay. Out of the remaining 240,000, I know it's probably difficult, because some folks might be deceased and other reasons, but do you know how many of those 240,000 are not eligible under Bill C-93 because of other related issues such as the ones we just discussed, because they have other convictions?

Ms. Angela Connidis:

I don't know that.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Okay.

The Chair:

Thank you for that.

I have one final question. As you know, the Department of National Defence has a military justice system and it's a bit of a hybrid system, where some part is criminal and some part is disciplinary. What would happen to a soldier who is convicted in the military justice system and a conviction is entered for possession of marijuana under that system?

Ms. Brigitte Lavigne:

Convictions that fall under the National Defence Act would also be eligible for those who have been convicted only for simple possession of cannabis. For members and former members, we would ask them to obtain their military conduct sheet, and then we would be able to process them as we would similarly those who have a conviction that falls under the Criminal Code.

The Chair:

Would the record suspension apply not only to the criminal conviction but also to the disciplinary event?

Ms. Brigitte Lavigne:

We would notify the commanding officer after the record suspension was ordered.

The Chair:

Does the commanding officer have any discretion as to whether to accept that record suspension?

Ms. Brigitte Lavigne:

It is legislated that those convictions fall under the Criminal Records Act so they would be put separate and apart as well.

(1730)

The Chair:

That would get into the soldier's record then.

Ms. Brigitte Lavigne:

It would be removed from the soldier's record when we notify them that the record suspension was ordered.

The Chair:

Thank you.

With that, I want to thank you for your patience and your answers.

We are going to adjourn, but before colleagues disperse, I have two administrative things to do. First of all is to write to Mr. Easter, chair of the Standing Committee on Finance, who sits exactly two chairs away from me—I'm going to save the stamp—that we take on part 4, division 10, of Bill C-97. I need a motion to approve that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I so move.

The Chair:

The second, with respect to the subcommittee that met on April 10, is a presentation of the deliberations of the subcommittee.

We agreed to meet the NSICOP, the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, on Monday, May 13, for an hour to discuss their report in relation to Bill C-93, to provide no-cost, expedited record suspensions. We agreed to start that study, which we have obviously started today, and we agreed that the chair should respond to the April 9 letter from the chair of the Standing Committee on Finance, which we've just done.

Can I have a motion to accept the subcommittee's report?

An hon. member: I so move.

The Chair: Thank you.

With that, we will adjourn, and those on the subcommittee will reconvene in five minutes.

Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

La séance est ouverte.

Je vois que le ministre a son café. Il est donc manifestement prêt à faire son témoignage.

Nous entamons la 158e séance du Comité permanent de la sécurité publique, et conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement, nous étudions l'objet du projet de loi C-93, Loi prévoyant une procédure accélérée et sans frais de suspension de casier judiciaire pour la possession simple de cannabis.

Cela dit, je souhaite la bienvenue au ministre au nom du Comité, et je présume qu'il présentera ses collègues.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale (ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile):

Merci, monsieur le président, et je souhaite encore une fois le bonjour au Comité.

Je suis heureux d'avoir l'occasion de discuter cet après-midi du projet de loi C-93, une mesure législative qui fera en sorte qu'il sera beaucoup plus facile pour les personnes reconnues coupables de possession simple de cannabis de faire effacer leur casier et de tourner la page.

Je suis heureux, monsieur le président, d'être accompagné d'Angela Connidis, du ministère de la Sécurité publique; d'Ian Broom, de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada; et de Jennifer Gates-Flaherty, qui s'occupe des casiers judiciaires à la GRC.[Français]

Dans l'ancien système où le cannabis était illégal, les Canadiens étaient parmi les plus grands et les plus jeunes consommateurs de cannabis au monde au profit d'organisations criminelles. L'automne dernier, nous avons respecté notre engagement de mettre fin à cette prohibition inefficace et contreproductive.

Cependant, plusieurs Canadiens ont toujours un casier judiciaire pour une possession simple de cannabis. Grâce au projet de loi C-93, nous leur permettrons de s'en débarrasser de façon expéditive.[Traduction]

Pour les personnes condamnées uniquement pour possession simple de cannabis à des fins personnelles, cette mesure législative simplifiera le processus d'obtention d'un pardon de plusieurs façons. Normalement, les demandeurs auraient à payer des frais de 631 $ à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles. Nous éliminons entièrement ces frais. Dans le cadre du système habituel, les demandeurs doivent également attendre jusqu'à 10 années avant d'avoir le droit de présenter une demande, et nous éliminons aussi cette période d'attente.

Selon la législation en vigueur, la Commission des libérations conditionnelles peut refuser des demandes en invoquant toutes sortes de facteurs subjectifs, comme la question de déterminer si le pardon apporterait un « bénéfice mesurable » au demandeur. Conformément au projet de loi C-93, ces facteurs ne seraient pas pris en considération dans le contexte de cette mesure législative. Au-delà des mesures prévues dans le projet de loi, la Commission des libérations conditionnelles prend des mesures supplémentaires, comme la simplification du formulaire de demande, la création d'un numéro 1-800 et d'une adresse électronique pour aider les gens à remplir leur demande, et l'élaboration d'une stratégie de sensibilisation communautaire pour encourager le plus de personnes possible à tirer parti de ce nouveau processus.

Nous faisons tout cela en étant conscients que la criminalisation du cannabis a eu des répercussions disproportionnées sur certains Canadiens, notamment les membres des communautés noires et autochtones. Nous le faisons parce que nous serons tous gagnants lorsque des personnes ayant un casier judiciaire uniquement pour possession simple de cannabis pourront faire des études, décrocher un emploi, trouver un endroit où vivre, faire du bénévolat à l'école de leurs enfants et contribuer davantage à la vie au Canada. Ils ne peuvent actuellement pas faire ces choses à cause de leur casier judiciaire.

J'aimerais aborder plusieurs points soulevés à l'étape de la deuxième lecture et lors du débat public. Permettez-moi également de dire que je félicite le Comité d'avoir pris l'initiative de tenir ces audiences sur le projet de loi C-93 dans le but de faire une étude préliminaire et de s'occuper de cette question le plus rapidement possible.

Tout d'abord, on a demandé pourquoi nous proposons un système de demandes plutôt que d'accorder un pardon aux gens de façon générale et proactive comme on l'a déjà fait, par exemple, dans certaines municipalités en Californie. Malheureusement, faire la même chose au Canada à l'échelle nationale est tout simplement impossible.

D'abord, les dossiers canadiens de condamnations ne parlent généralement pas de « possession de cannabis ». Ce n'est pas la terminologie employée. Il est plutôt question de « possession d'une substance inscrite à l'annexe II », et il faut ensuite consulter la police et les documents judiciaires pour savoir de quelle substance il s'agit. L'approche globale ou générale n'est pas très évidente, vu la façon dont les accusations sont inscrites et dont les dossiers sont conservés dans le système canadien. Procéder ainsi pour chaque accusation de possession de drogue pouvant être liée au cannabis serait une tâche considérable, même si tous les documents se trouvaient dans une base de données informatique centrale.

(1535)



En réalité, ce n'est pas le cas au Canada. Beaucoup de ces dossiers papier se trouvent dans des boîtes au sous-sol des palais de justice et des postes de police dans des villes du pays. Il ne suffit pas d'appuyer sur une touche d'ordinateur. Nous pourrions commencer aujourd'hui, mais dans plusieurs années, les gens attendraient encore un pardon compte tenu de la façon dont les casiers sont conservés. Par contre, lorsque quelqu'un présentera une demande de pardon en vertu des dispositions que nous proposons dans le projet de loi C-93, les fonctionnaires de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles pourront se concentrer sans tarder sur les documents pertinents, et la personne pourra obtenir son pardon beaucoup plus rapidement.

Une autre question soulevée à l'étape de la deuxième lecture portait sur la pertinence de l'élimination des frais. On craignait que les contribuables paient la note pour les personnes qui ont enfreint la loi.

Dans les faits, si nous n'éliminons pas les frais, les Canadiens riches ayant été reconnus coupables de possession simple de cannabis pourront obtenir leur pardon très facilement, mais les personnes à faible revenu demeureront aux prises avec un casier judiciaire et les préjugés. Beaucoup de personnes ayant un casier pour possession simple de cannabis n'ont pas 631 $ à portée de la main. Elles ont besoin du pardon pour obtenir un emploi et recevoir un chèque de paye. C'est une sorte de cercle vicieux. De plus, l'élimination des frais est un bon investissement. Une personne qui obtient un pardon est plus en mesure de faire des études et de décrocher un emploi, d'apporter une contribution dans sa collectivité de toutes sortes de façons, y compris en payant des impôts.

Enfin, il y a la question de savoir pourquoi nous proposons un processus accéléré de réhabilitation plutôt qu'une radiation. Je rappelle au Comité que la radiation est un concept qui n'existait pas dans la législation canadienne. Nous l'avons créé l'année dernière pour détruire les casiers judiciaires de personnes accusées d'une infraction criminelle tout simplement en raison de leur homosexualité. Dans ces cas, la loi elle-même était manifestement une violation inconstitutionnelle des droits fondamentaux, et les condamnations qui ont suivi n'ont jamais été légitimes.

En revanche, l'interdiction du cannabis n'était pas inconstitutionnelle. C'était juste une mauvaise politique publique. Il ne fait toutefois aucun doute que la façon dont elle était appliquée avait des répercussions disproportionnées sur certains groupes au sein de la société canadienne, notamment les Noirs et les Autochtones. C'est pour cette raison que nous proposons d'éliminer les frais et la période d'attente, et de prendre de nombreuses autres mesures afin que l'obtention d'un pardon pour possession simple de cannabis soit plus rapide et plus simple.

Pour ce qui est des effets concrets du pardon par rapport à la radiation, les casiers judiciaires se retrouvent vierges dans les deux cas. L'effet d'un pardon est protégé par la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne, et les pardons sont presque toujours permanents. Depuis 1970, plus d'un demi-million de pardons ont été accordés, et 95 % d'entre eux sont toujours en vigueur.

Il est important de ne pas minimiser l'effet d'un pardon. Certaines discussions à la Chambre donnaient l'impression qu'un pardon est une chose insignifiante. Il ne faut pas oublier que lorsque ce comité a étudié le système de pardons à l'automne, il a entendu des témoins qui ont mis l'accent sur l'importance des pardons.

Louise Lafond, de la Société Elizabeth Fry, a déclaré qu'un pardon, « c'est comme pouvoir tourner cette page », que cela permet aux gens d'« emprunter des chemins qui leur étaient fermés. »

Catherine Latimer, de la Société John Howard, a quant à elle déclaré que grâce au pardon, une personne « peut à nouveau se rendre utile à la société sans continuer d'être punie pour ses erreurs passées. »

Rodney Small a déclaré qu'il a essayé pendant des années de s'inscrire à la faculté de droit, mais qu'il ne pouvait pas à défaut d'avoir un pardon.

Autrement dit, rendre les pardons plus accessibles, sans frais ni période d'attente, changera la vie de personnes aux prises avec le fardeau et les préjugés associés à un casier judiciaire pour possession de cannabis. Nous allons tous en profiter lorsque ces personnes pourront se rendre plus utiles au sein de leur collectivité et au Canada dans son ensemble.

(1540)



Merci de votre attention, monsieur le président. Je serai heureux, avec l'aide de mes collègues de divers ministères et organismes qui se trouvent ici, d'essayer de répondre à vos questions.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Nous allons maintenant entendre Mme Sahota pendant sept minutes, s'il vous plaît.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie le ministre et tous les autres témoins de leur présence.

Ma première question renvoie au dernier point que vous avez abordé: l'augmentation de la productivité.

On a beaucoup parlé ou débattu de la question de savoir si les contribuables devraient payer la note pour tous ces pardons. J'aimerais vous entendre un peu plus sur ce que vous pensez que le coût pourrait être et sur les recettes fiscales ou les avantages que nous pourrions voir lorsque ces personnes auront obtenu un pardon.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

De toute évidence, en ce qui concerne le coût dans l'équation, madame Sahota, cela dépendra exactement du nombre de personnes qui se manifestent et présentent une demande. À partir des meilleurs calculs que le ministère peut faire, des estimations de coût ont été faites. D'après ce que j'ai compris, le ministère s'attend à un coût d'environ 2,5 millions de dollars sur une certaine période pour remplir les formalités administratives associées aux enquêtes nécessaires.

On soulagera ainsi plusieurs milliers de personnes du fardeau que représente un casier judiciaire. Si elles peuvent obtenir un meilleur emploi ou en décrocher un et payer des impôts pour la première fois, si c'est la situation qu'elles vivaient jusqu'à maintenant, il est évident qu'il faudra beaucoup de temps pour que la société récupère le montant. Cela mettrait fin à une pratique discriminatoire qui est maintenant vraiment déphasée puisque l'ensemble du régime juridique entourant le cannabis a changé l'automne dernier. L'automne dernier, nous avons cessé d'incriminer des gens pour possession simple. C'est une simple question d'équité pour tenter de remédier autant que possible à la situation dans l'intérêt des personnes ayant un casier pour simple possession qui les empêche d'être productives autant qu'elles le souhaitent dans la société.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Comme vous le savez, et vous y avez fait allusion dans vos observations préliminaires, on a beaucoup débattu du choix entre pardon et radiation. Au-delà de ceux que vous avez soulignés, voyez-vous d'autres avantages au pardon par rapport à la radiation?

Je sais que notre secrétaire parlementaire en a mentionné certains dans la discussion à la Chambre concernant le passage à la frontière américaine et les antécédents que les services frontaliers pourraient avoir sur une personne. Quels sont les autres avantages que vous voyez? Pourquoi votre ministère et vous avez choisi cette façon de procéder?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Nous y avons longuement réfléchi et nous avons eu une très bonne discussion interne à propos des diverses possibilités pour nous attaquer à la question abordée ici. Après avoir pesé l'ensemble des avantages et des inconvénients d'une technique par rapport à l'autre, je pense que six facteurs appuient la façon de procéder que nous avons énoncée dans le projet de loi C-93.

Premièrement, le processus de réhabilitation est l'approche la plus efficace du point de vue de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles. C'est effectivement la solution la moins coûteuse et la plus rapide par rapport aux autres. L'efficacité fait donc partie des arguments.

Deuxièmement, c'est une mesure législative très simple. Le projet de loi C-93 ne compte pas des centaines de pages. Il y en a quatre ou cinq. C'est très simple, mais nous pouvons néanmoins atteindre deux importants objectifs qui tiennent compte de l'injustice dans la situation à laquelle nous voulons remédier. Il n'y a ni frais ni période d'attente. Cela peut être accompli très simplement grâce à cette mesure législative.

Troisièmement, cette approche tient compte de la réalité, de la façon dont les dossiers sont conservés au pays, soit d'une manière très dispersée. Ils ne se trouvent pas tous dans une base de données exhaustive que l'on peut simplement et instantanément modifier en appuyant sur une seule touche. La mise sur pied de notre système, qui permettra aux gens de présenter une demande, tiendra compte de la façon dont les dossiers sont réellement conservés.

Quatrièmement, c'est un moyen efficace. Comme je l'ai mentionné dans mes observations, 95 % de tous les pardons accordés au pays depuis les années 1970 sont encore en vigueur aujourd'hui. Il est rare qu'un casier suspendu soit mis de côté et rouvert — dans les cas où une autre infraction criminelle est commise. Les chiffres permettraient de montrer que le moyen est efficace.

Cinquièmement, un pardon est totalement protégé par la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne, qui précise, à l'article 2, que l'existence d'un casier judiciaire ne peut pas servir comme forme de discrimination si un pardon est accordé. Fait intéressant, étant donné que le concept de la radiation n'existait pas à l'époque où la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne a été écrite, il n'en est pas fait mention dans le libellé de la Loi, mais on mentionne toutefois explicitement le processus de réhabilitation.

Sixièmement, enfin, il y a la frontière. Compte tenu des multiples ententes d'échange de renseignements entre le Canada et les États-Unis, les agents douaniers américains auraient accès de temps à autre aux casiers judiciaires canadiens. Ils prélèveraient eux-mêmes des renseignements dans ces casiers.

Supposons que le casier d'une personne reconnue coupable de possession simple de cannabis est radié. Elle se rend à la frontière. L'agent douanier américain lui pose la question sur le cannabis et elle répond « non », comme elle aurait le droit de le faire en vertu des dispositions de la législation canadienne sur la radiation. Cependant, l'agent douanier américain voit dans son ordinateur que cette personne a déjà été reconnue coupable de possession simple. Il conclurait alors probablement que la personne lui a menti, ce qui donne lieu à une situation très grave à la frontière. La personne mentionnerait la radiation, et l'agent douanier américain lui demanderait de le prouver, ce qui est impossible étant donné que la documentation n'existe pas. Toutefois, lorsqu'un casier est suspendu ou qu'un pardon est accordé, on peut prouver son statut en s'attaquant au problème à la frontière.

(1545)

Le président:

Nous allons devoir interrompre cette réponse importante à une question importante et passer à M. Paul-Hus.[Français]

Vous avez la parole pour sept minutes.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Bonjour, monsieur le ministre.

De prime abord, je veux dire que nous sommes prêts à soutenir le projet de loi C-93 à l'étape de la deuxième lecture, comme nous l'avons déjà annoncé. Par contre, le travail du Comité va donner la réponse à la prochaine étape.

Un des facteurs qui nous font douter, c'est la façon dont a été géré le projet de loi C-45, c'est-à-dire la légalisation de la marijuana. Cela a été imposé en catastrophe pour remplir une promesse électorale du premier ministre. On n'a pas écouté les experts en éducation ni les policiers. On n'a pas éduqué les jeunes.

Aujourd'hui, après six mois, on voit déjà que l'idée de base, soit celle d'éliminer le crime organisé dans le marché du cannabis, ne fonctionne pas. Tout le monde rit du gouvernement. Le crime organisé a continué à vendre du cannabis, et maintenant les gens se promènent avec de la marijuana illégale sans avoir peur de se faire prendre.

Cela nous amène à être sceptiques sur la façon dont vous voulez faire adopter le projet de loi C-93.

Un des facteurs que je voudrais aborder avec vous, c'est le processus.

On sait que, souvent, les policiers vont faire des négociations avec les gens. Certaines personnes qui sont arrêtées peuvent avoir commis d'autres infractions plus graves, mais les policiers peuvent choisir de les inculper de possession de marijuana, parce que les conséquences sont moins graves pour elles. De telles négociations se font.

Maintenant que le cannabis est légal, comment va-t-on faire pour que les gens qui ont commis des crimes plus graves, mais qui ont eu la chance de s'en sauver en étant seulement inculpés de possession de marijuana, ne passent pas à travers les mailles du filet en demandant un pardon? Dans leur cas, il y a d'autres problèmes. On ne veut pas que ce soit un laissez-passer pour tout le monde.

Quel sera le processus?

(1550)

[Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Tout d'abord, monsieur Paul-Hus, merci de votre soutien à l'étape de la deuxième lecture. J'espère que la discussion en comité et ailleurs peut vous rassurer comme il le faut.

J'ai discuté de la nouvelle loi sur le cannabis avec un certain nombre de policiers et de chefs de police de partout au pays. La vaste majorité d'entre eux m'ont dit — ce qui correspond parfois à ce à quoi ils s'attendaient et ce qui les a parfois peut-être surpris — qu'au cours des derniers mois où l'ensemble de la structure juridique concernant le cannabis avait changé, leur expérience de l'application de la loi s'est révélée très positive. Ils n'ont pas vu une augmentation de comportements préoccupants selon eux.

Je conviens que ce n'est encore que le début. Cela fait à peine six mois, mais ils apprennent à mesure. Ils disent avoir, de façon générale, une bonne expérience par rapport à la nouvelle loi.

Pour ce qui est du point précis que vous avez soulevé, cette mesure législative, le projet de loi C-93, porte sur la réalité associée à l'objet de l'accusation d'une personne. Lorsqu'une personne n'a été reconnue coupable que de simple possession de cannabis ou d'une substance inscrite à l'annexe II — si c'est l'infraction mentionnée dans la demande présentée à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles —, alors cette mesure législative s'applique.

Les personnes ayant des casiers judiciaires plus compliqués ne seraient généralement pas en mesure de profiter des dispositions de cette mesure législative. Elles devront suivre le processus normal. En revanche, pour l'infraction de possession simple de cannabis, le projet de loi C-93 s'appliquerait. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Autrement dit, ce sont les personnes qui ont un casier judiciaire seulement pour possession simple de cannabis qui seront privilégiées grâce au projet de loi C-93 et qui pourront demander un pardon sans frais. Cependant, les gens qui ont un casier judiciaire plus complexe vont devoir passer par le processus et payer les frais.

Cela va-t-il être différent? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Mme Connidis aimerait dire quelque chose à ce sujet, monsieur Paul-Hus.

Mme Angela Connidis (directrice générale, Direction générale de la prévention du crime, des affaires correctionnelles et de la justice pénale, ministère de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile):

Les personnes dont le casier judiciaire inclut d'autres infractions, outre la possession de cannabis, devront payer les frais complets, et les périodes d'attente liées à ces infractions s'appliqueront. Comme le ministre l'a dit, si la possession de cannabis est la seule infraction, même si c'est attribuable à la négociation du plaidoyer comme vous l'avez mentionné, nous ne réagissons qu'aux condamnations incluses dans le casier judiciaire. Nous ne savons pas si ces personnes auraient été trouvées coupables d'autres infractions. Ce n'est pas vraiment à nous de remettre en question ce qu'un tribunal aurait fait. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Merci.

Monsieur le ministre, vous avez évoqué des discussions avec des groupes de policiers, mais nous n'avons pas eu vent de consultations effectuées auprès d'autres groupes, au préalable. Avez-vous fait des consultations avec des groupes en particulier? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

En ce qui concerne le projet de loi C-93, ou...?

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Oui.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur Paul-Hus, si je ne m'abuse, la consultation a été réceptive. Autrement dit, une fois que le projet de loi C-45 a été adopté… En fait, pendant les mois qui ont précédé la fin de son cheminement au Parlement et son adoption, de très nombreux Canadiens — le grand public, les médias et un bon nombre de députés, parce que cela a été soulevé pendant la période de questions — ont soutenu qu'avec la modification du régime juridique apporté par le projet de loi C-45, il faudrait se pencher sur la question des casiers judiciaires.

Par conséquent, dans le cadre de notre travail relatif au projet de loi C-45, nous avons commencé à envisager les façons possibles de répondre à l'enjeu des casiers judiciaires d'une façon qui serait juste, équitable et efficace. Cela répond en fait à ce qui semblait faire l'objet d'un large consensus au sein du public. Nous avons présenté le projet de loi. Il semblerait contradictoire de modifier la loi en adoptant le projet de loi C-45 sans traiter de la question des casiers judiciaires préexistants. C'est une observation très générale du public à laquelle nous avons répondu.

(1555)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Paul-Hus, et merci, monsieur le ministre, de votre réponse très complète.

Monsieur Dubé, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur le ministre, d'être venu avec vos fonctionnaires.

Il y a deux petites choses que je tiens à faire entendre officiellement avant de poser ma question.

La première, c'est que je vous sais gré d'utiliser le terme « réhabilitation », et j'aurais aimé que votre point de vue sur ce terme vous amène à remettre « réhabilitation » dans la loi, plutôt que « suspension du casier », comme nous en avons discuté au moment de l'étude réalisée par le Comité. Cependant, nous en sommes à la 11e heure de la présente session, alors je n'y compte pas trop, malheureusement.

Je veux aussi parler de la Société John Howard. Vous avez cité le témoignage présenté par Catherine Latimer dans le cadre de notre étude sur la réhabilitation. Je tiens à dire à propos de cette question particulière… Vous êtes manifestement au courant du projet de loi de mon collègue Murray Rankin qui favorise la radiation des casiers judiciaires. Dans un échange sur Twitter, la Société John Howard a effectivement dit à propos de ce projet de loi, pendant qu'on en discutait, qu'il était temps, en effet, de radier les casiers judiciaires pour possession de cannabis et de cesser de punir la possession puisqu'elle n'est pas criminelle.

Je ne voulais pas causer de méprise sur le point de vue de la Société John Howard sur ce dossier, étant donné que nous mélangeons un peu l'étude que le Comité a réalisée sur la radiation des casiers judiciaires et la question en l'espèce.

J'aimerais revenir… Entre votre position, dans le projet de loi C-93, et ce que notre parti demande, soit la radiation, le débat s'appuie sur la notion d'injustice historique. Il n'y a en fait aucun précédent à cet égard. Il n'existe aucune obligation légale. C'est quelque chose que le gouvernement semble utiliser pour la forme. Quand nous avons interrogé le premier ministre à ce sujet à la Chambre, après la légalisation, j'ai souligné, entre autres choses, qu'à Regina les Autochtones étaient près de neuf fois plus susceptibles d'être arrêtés pour possession de cannabis. À Halifax, les Noirs étaient cinq fois plus susceptibles d'être arrêtés pour possession de cannabis. À Toronto, les Noirs n'ayant fait l'objet d'aucune autre déclaration de culpabilité étaient trois fois plus susceptibles d'être arrêtés pour possession de cannabis.

Juste avant d'en arriver à ma question et d'écouter votre réponse, monsieur le ministre, je veux répéter ce que Kent Roach, que vous connaissez très bien, a dit. Il a affirmé que: « Les erreurs judiciaires commises dans le passé au Canada ne devraient pas être assimilées à des lois qui contreviendraient maintenant à la Charte. La Charte est le minimum à respecter pour qu'on sente que justice a été rendue, pas le maximum. »

Contrairement à ce que M. Roach dit, est-ce que vous dîtes que votre gouvernement ne croit pas que cette épouvantable surreprésentation des Canadiens autochtones et noirs, entre autres minorités, ne représente pas une injustice?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Au contraire, monsieur Dubé. Dans ma déclaration, j'ai indiqué très clairement que la façon dont les lois antérieures visant le cannabis avaient été appliquées à divers groupes marginalisés de notre société relevait d'une injustice flagrante et qu'il fallait que nous nous penchions sur la façon dont elle avait porté atteinte à leurs droits.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Monsieur le ministre, je comprends cela.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Nous nous attaquons à cela en éliminant les frais et en éliminant la période d'attente.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Ce que je dis, c'est que quand j'ai interrogé le premier ministre à la Chambre sur cette question, et quand je vous ai interrogé à ce sujet, la réponse était différente de celle qui avait été donnée, par exemple, pour la question des casiers judiciaires des Canadiens LGBTQ2. Dans ce dernier cas, on nous a précisément dit que leurs casiers judiciaires allaient être radiés parce qu'ils avaient été victimes d'une injustice historique. Pourquoi ne pas radier les casiers judiciaires de ces Canadiens? Cela semble très clair. En 2016, le ministre Blair a dit que l'une des plus grandes injustices de ce pays était la disparité et l'inégalité de l'application de ces lois ainsi que leurs effets sur les communautés minoritaires, les communautés autochtones et les personnes vivant dans nos quartiers les plus vulnérables.

Qu'est-ce qui explique cette disparité entre ces deux cas, si ce n'est que la définition donnée par votre gouvernement à l'expression « injustice historique » semble relever de la rhétorique, alors qu'il n'existe aucun précédent juridique ou autre en ce sens?

(1600)

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

La distinction d'ordre technique que la loi fait serait...

M. Matthew Dubé:

En ce qui concerne l'injustice historique, vous êtes en train d'improviser.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Non. Ce n'est pas le cas. En ce qui concerne les dispositions législatives qui visaient la communauté gaie du pays, la loi elle-même constituait une violation fondamentale des droits de la personne. Dans le cas des...

M. Matthew Dubé:

Monsieur le ministre, nous nous entendons là-dessus. Cependant, si vous revenez à ce que M. Roach a dit concernant la Charte qui constitue le minimum, c'est la Charte que vous utilisez comme base. Ne diriez-vous pas que ces Autochtones, ces Noirs et les autres Canadiens qui ont été touchés d'une façon absurdement disproportionnée par cette loi sont eux-mêmes victimes d'une injustice historique et qu'ils mériteraient de voir leurs casiers judiciaires radiés?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Ils ont été traités de manière injuste à cause de la façon dont la loi était appliquée. Cette loi, quand elle était en vigueur, n'était pas inconstitutionnelle, mais elle a été appliquée de manière injuste pour divers groupes marginalisés de notre société. Nous reconnaissons cela en éliminant les frais, en accélérant le processus, en mettant fin à la période d'attente et en veillant à ce que ce fardeau soit retiré de leur casier judiciaire le plus rapidement et le plus économiquement possible.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Monsieur le ministre, manifestement, nous ne nous entendons pas là-dessus.

Pour la minute et demie qu'il me reste, je veux revenir à vos observations. On dirait presque que parce que vous ne savez pas ce qu'est une infraction pour la possession d'une substance inscrite à l'annexe II, il valait mieux faire en sorte que la personne présente une demande, plutôt que d'avoir un processus automatique. Il semble aussi qu'encore une fois, ce sont ces personnes qui doivent en assumer le fardeau.

Dans ce contexte en particulier, quand vous regardez le projet de loi C-66, pour revenir à cette autre question, 7 personnes sur 9 000 ont présenté une demande. Le gouvernement ne peut-il pas reconnaître qu'il serait simplement préférable de rendre cela automatique? Il semble assez clair que les Canadiens qui sont déjà marginalisés peuvent ne pas être en mesure de profiter de ce processus, comme à San Francisco, où 23 personnes seulement sur 9 400 se sont prévalues de la possibilité de demander la réhabilitation parce qu'elles avaient été trouvées coupables de possession de cannabis.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Nous sommes tout à fait d'accord, vous et moi, monsieur Dubé. D'après ce que j'entends, la plupart des gens à cette table, peut-être la plupart des gens à la Chambre — je l'espère — diraient que s'il était possible de réaliser automatiquement la radiation des casiers judiciaires, et si on pouvait simplement appuyer sur un bouton, et abracadabra, les casiers judiciaires disparaîtraient...

M. Matthew Dubé:

Si le personnel doit de toute façon le faire manuellement, pourquoi ne pas tout simplement le faire?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Le casier judiciaire ne disparaît qu'une fois que vous avez mécaniquement éliminé le casier.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Pourquoi ne pas demander à votre ministère de prendre cette mesure mécanique et de rendre cela automatique au sein du ministère, plutôt que d'obliger ces personnes à faire une demande et à suivre le processus, à condition d'en être au courant pour commencer?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Il est beaucoup plus efficace et économique de fonder cela sur des demandes.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Vous faites porter le poids de cela aux Canadiens. C'est la raison pour laquelle c'est plus efficace.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

La réalité, monsieur Dubé, c'est que si nous faisions ce que vous dîtes, franchement, il faudrait des décennies et on refuserait aux gens un processus leur permettant de faire une demande et d'obtenir un résultat très rapidement.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Dubé.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci.

Dans votre déclaration liminaire, monsieur le ministre, vous avez parlé de la demande. Je me demande combien de temps il faut pour traiter une demande mécaniquement, une fois qu'elle a été soumise.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur Broom, pouvez-vous répondre à cela?

M. Ian Broom (directeur général intérimaire, Politiques et opérations, Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada):

Bien sûr.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur Broom est à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles. Ce sont eux qui vont s'occuper des documents.

M. Ian Broom:

Je vous dirais tout d'abord que des normes de service sont associées aux frais de demande de 631 $ qui sont actuellement exigés pour les suspensions de casiers. Je dirais donc que ce serait 6 mois pour une déclaration de culpabilité par procédure sommaire et 12 mois pour une déclaration de culpabilité par mise en accusation.

Selon la proposition dont on discute pour le projet de loi C-93, c'est fondamentalement différent parce qu'il n'y a pas de frais, alors que dans le régime actuel, il y a des frais de 631 $. De plus, il n'y a plus de décision prise par les commissaires. C'est maintenant une décision administrative. Ce sont les membres du personnel qui déterminent l'admissibilité en fonction des documents qui ont été fournis dans le cadre du processus de demande. De là, la suspension du casier serait accordée.

Un autre facteur entre en jeu concernant le temps qu'il faudra pour cela, et c'est que même s'il n'y a pas de normes de services pour le régime décrit dans le projet de loi C-93, nous nous attendons à ce que ce soit un processus accéléré. Parce qu'il est administratif, le processus serait plus rapide.

Je ne peux pas vous donner de chiffres exacts, car il faudrait que nous connaissions les volumes avant de faire une telle évaluation. Cependant, nous aurons le personnel et les ressources en place quand la loi entrera en vigueur.

(1605)

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

J'aimerais ajouter, monsieur Graham, que l'un des facteurs essentiels est qu'il s'agit d'un processus administratif et mécanique qui se fonde sur le casier judiciaire. Ce n'est pas comme si un membre de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles doit agir comme arbitre ou rendre un jugement. Si les faits de la demande sont conformes à la loi, une décision administrative est prise, ce qui signifie que c'est beaucoup plus rapide qu'un processus décisionnel.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est bon, mais ce que je me demande, c'est s'il faudra une semaine, un mois ou une année pour obtenir ma réhabilitation, si je fais une demande.

Je tiens à préciser que je n'ai pas de casier judiciaire.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

De façon générale, monsieur Broom...

M. Ian Broom:

De façon générale, j'hésite à préciser cela. Encore là, je pense qu'il faudrait que nous puissions évaluer les volumes que nous recevons. Il y a des milliers de demandes chaque année, mais ce serait nettement moins que les normes de services acceptées qui sont en place pour les déclarations de culpabilité par procédure sommaire et pour les déclarations de culpabilité par mise en accusation.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Dans vos commentaires, vous avez parlé de l'expérience kafkaïenne que vivent les personnes dont le casier judiciaire a été radié et qui tentent de franchir la frontière américaine. Pourriez-vous nous en dire un peu plus à ce sujet? À certains endroits, en particulier à la frontière américaine, on ne vous demande pas si vous avez fait l'objet d'une déclaration de culpabilité ou d'une réhabilitation. On vous demande si vous avez déjà été arrêté.

Est-ce que ceci produira un effet?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

La réalité, c'est qu'ils sont responsables des règles qui s'appliquent à l'entrée aux États-Unis. Ce sont donc les Américains qui décident des personnes qui peuvent entrer aux États-Unis et des personnes qui ne le peuvent pas.

Ce que je faisais valoir dans ma déclaration, c'est que s'il y a contestation au moment où vous arrivez à la frontière, vous pouvez mieux expliquer votre cas si vous avez un document qui énonce votre statut au Canada que si vous n'avez aucun moyen de contester l'impression que l'agent frontalier américain a de vous, notamment que vous lui mentez. Ce qui peut être le plus difficile, au moment de franchir la frontière, c'est si l'agent de l'autre côté pense qu'il a affaire à un menteur. Un document qui explique votre statut vous aiderait à régler ce problème.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez dit que 95 % des réhabilitations accordées au cours des quelque 40 dernières années sont toujours en vigueur. Pouvez-vous nous parler des 5 % qui ne le sont plus?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Le plus souvent, quand le ministre de la Sécurité publique décide de rouvrir un casier judiciaire, c'est parce que la personne a été accusée d'une nouvelle infraction. C'est ce qui se produit le plus souvent quand l'existence d'un casier judiciaire devient pertinente dans les circonstances.

Monsieur Broom, avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter à cela?

M. Ian Broom:

Non. C'est tout à fait le cas. Quand une réhabilitation n'est plus en vigueur, c'est soit pour une question de bonne conduite, ou le plus souvent parce qu'il y a une nouvelle accusation.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quand une personne fait une demande, si c'est un cas de possession simple, est-ce qu'il y aurait des circonstances qui empêcheraient la réhabilitation?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Si la personne répond aux exigences énoncées dans la loi… Et la commission des libérations conditionnelles, d'après ce que j'ai compris, va publier un guide qui se trouvera sur Internet et qui expliquera cela aux gens. Comme en ce moment pour la demande de réhabilitation normale, il y aura des explications détaillées et le formulaire de demande.

Si le demandeur a présenté une demande complète et a fourni toutes les informations pertinentes, c'est alors simplement une décision administrative à savoir si les objectifs de la loi sont atteints et s'il n'existe aucune possibilité de porter un jugement subjectif dans les circonstances. C'est la raison pour laquelle c'est plus rapide.

(1610)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci. Je crois que mon temps est écoulé.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Motz, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre Goodale, merci de votre présence aujourd'hui.

Ma collègue Mme Sahota vous a interrogé sur les coûts. Bien sûr, cela dépend du nombre de personnes qui font une demande, mais vous avez donné une estimation — plutôt votre fonctionnaire — d'un montant d'environ 2,5 millions de dollars sur l'année à venir pour traiter la documentation de plusieurs milliers de personnes. C'est ainsi que vous l'avez exprimé.

Si le coût d'une suspension du casier est en ce moment d'environ 600 $, c'est moins de 4 000 personnes. Je suis sûr que vos fonctionnaires ont une estimation du nombre de personnes qui devraient faire une demande.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Comme vous le savez, monsieur Motz, il est difficile de prédire ces choses, car on ne sait pas exactement dans quelle mesure les gens se manifesteront. Cette estimation des coûts est liée au traitement d'environ 10 000 demandes en fonction de la méthode simplifiée dont nous venons de discuter.

M. Glen Motz:

Comment envisagez-vous de recouvrer ce coût? Est-ce que cela va venir d'un poste budgétaire existant? Est-ce que cela va s'ajouter au déficit d'un ministère? Comment vous attendez-vous à payer cela?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Les 2,5 millions de dollars...?

M. Glen Motz:

Le montant complet, le coût de cela, que ce soit 2,5 millions de dollars ou plus.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Nous nous attendons à ce que le programme coûte 2,5 millions de dollars. C'est de l'argent que nous obtiendrons dans le cours normal du processus budgétaire, avec l'approbation du Parlement.

M. Glen Motz:

Ferez-vous en sorte que vos fonctionnaires fournissent une analyse des coûts au Comité avant que nous adoptions la mesure ou que nous la modifions?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je pense que nous pouvons vous fournir l'analyse, monsieur Motz, pour vous montrer comment nous avons fait le calcul.

M. Glen Motz:

Existe-t-il actuellement un mécanisme permettant d'affecter les produits de la vente de cannabis légal à ce programme, au lieu d'utiliser l'argent des contribuables? Cette possibilité a-t-elle été envisagée? Sinon, la prendriez-vous en considération?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur Motz, votre proposition relie en quelque sorte deux choses qui n'ont pas de rapport entre elles. D'un côté, il y a l'accumulation de vieux dossiers, qui constituent un fardeau, qui entachent la réputation des gens et qui sont maintenant considérés comme étant particulièrement importuns en raison de la légalisation. De l'autre côté, il y a le nouveau régime, qui génère des revenus, mais qui n'a pas de rapport direct avec les dossiers préexistants.

Ce sont deux choses distinctes, mais le coût du programme sera couvert par les recettes générales du gouvernement...

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

... qui seront augmentées par la nouvelle source de revenus générés par...

M. Glen Motz:

Mais en tant que ministre de la Sécurité publique, vous ne pouvez pas puiser plus d'argent dans les recettes générales.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Oui, je le peux.

M. Glen Motz:

Pas de la façon dont vous le dites. Juste parce que les produits de la vente de marijuana s'ajoutent aux recettes générales, cela ne veut pas dire que vous pouvez accéder aux fonds supplémentaires pour payer les frais du programme. Ce que j'essaie de dire...

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Vous avez raison. Les profits que le gouvernement réalise grâce à la vente de cannabis sont versés dans le fonds des recettes générales. C'est exact.

M. Glen Motz:

Tout ce que j'essaie de dire, c'est qu'une grande partie de la population canadienne est d'avis que le programme ne devrait pas être financé par les contribuables. Ainsi, tout mécanisme mis en place pour... J'aimerais aussi savoir si l'on a considéré la possibilité que la mesure législative permette à des individus de déposer une demande, de profiter de la procédure accélérée de suspension du casier et de passer avant ceux qui ont recours à la procédure régulière — qui déposent une demande, qui payent les frais et qui attendent.

Y aura-t-il des répercussions sur la procédure régulière de suspension du casier utilisée actuellement? Comment peut-on le garantir? Il s'agit du même personnel, à moins qu'on ajoute des employés.

(1615)

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

La procédure n'est pas la même, en ce sens que les personnes ayant un casier judiciaire plus complexe doivent suivre la procédure régulière, qui implique la participation d'un membre de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles. Aux termes du projet de loi C-93, le traitement d'un casier judiciaire qui se limite à la possession simple de cannabis devient une fonction administrative gérée par le personnel. Le projet de loi prévoit également l'allocation de fonds distincts pour faire en sorte que le personnel nécessaire pour remplir cette fonction administrative soit en place, sans qu'il y ait d'incidence sur les autres fonctions importantes de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Motz.

Monsieur Picard, s'il vous plaît. Vous avez cinq minutes. [Français]

M. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Pour commencer, je vais m'adresser au ministre ainsi qu'aux représentants du ministère et des autres agences, au sujet de la frontière américaine.

J'ai une question préalable. J'imagine que les employés de la douane américaine ont accès aux données canadiennes par l'entremise du CIPC, soit le Centre d'information de la police canadienne.[Traduction]

Utilisent-ils les données du Centre d'information de la police canadienne, CIPC, pour examiner les dossiers?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je demanderais à notre spécialiste de la GRC de donner des détails sur l'accessibilité de l'information à la frontière.

Mme Jennifer Gates-Flaherty (directrice générale, Services canadiens d'identification criminelle en temps réel, Gendarmerie royale du Canada):

Oui, vous avez raison. La GRC et le FBI ont conclu une entente sur l'échange limité d'information par l'entremise du CIPC. Ainsi, lorsque les gens traversent la frontière, les agents ont accès aux données qui se trouvent dans le système, le cas échéant.

Durant le processus de suspension du casier judiciaire, les données sont isolées et elles ne sont donc plus accessibles; personne ne peut les voir dans le système. [Français]

M. Michel Picard:

Savez-vous pendant combien de temps les Américains gardent une information?

Lorsque quelqu'un reçoit un pardon, son dossier est nettoyé immédiatement, de telle sorte qu'à la prochaine consultation, il n'y a pas de traces. Cependant, les Américains conservent probablement l'information plus longtemps, à moins que vous ne me disiez qu'ils consultent la base de données régulièrement, qu'ils reçoivent l'information à la même vitesse que les Canadiens et qu'ils ont donc une information à jour. Cela permettrait d'éviter des situations comme celle où, par exemple, un douanier américain penserait qu'une personne a menti parce qu'il y a des antécédents dans son dossier.

Est-ce que le dossier des gens est mis à jour de façon suffisamment soutenue pour éviter une accumulation d'anciennes données dans le système américain? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

C'est exactement le genre de situation difficile dont je parlais qui pourrait mettre un Canadien dans l'embarras à la frontière. Si les Américains ont, dans leurs dossiers, des données qu'ils ont obtenues il y a plusieurs années, et si la personne a été réhabilitée depuis, il pourrait y avoir une différence entre les anciennes données contenues dans les dossiers des Américains et les faits actuels. Il serait utile que le Canadien puisse prouver son statut, ce qui est possible avec une suspension du casier, mais pas avec une radiation.

En ce qui concerne la période exacte de conservation de l'information, je vais essayer d'obtenir une réponse précise de la part des Américains pour répondre à votre question. Je soupçonne qu'ils la conservent pendant longtemps, mais je vais essayer de m'informer auprès des fonctionnaires américains.

M. Michel Picard:

C'est ce que je crains, oui.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Exactement.

M. Michel Picard:

Je sais. C'est toujours la même histoire.

Le problème, c'est que les Américains peuvent demander si la personne a déjà eu un casier judiciaire.[Français]

Cependant, à la douane, on ne cherche pas nécessairement à savoir si la personne a un casier judiciaire. Cela, c'est la particularité. On cherche plutôt à savoir si la personne a consommé du cannabis, car, aux yeux des Américains, ce qui est légal chez nous ne l'est toujours pas chez eux.

À l'intention du public canadien qui s'intéresse à la question, il faut dire que, bien qu'il s'agisse d'une innovation plus que justifiée au Canada, cela ne garantit pas une porte d'entrée sans problèmes aux États-Unis, en raison de la nature de la consommation.

(1620)

[Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Vous avez tout à fait raison, monsieur Picard.

Je sais que c'est une maigre consolation, mais il y a un exemple qui montre que les divergences de vues vont dans les deux sens. Aux États-Unis, la conduite avec facultés affaiblies n'est pas considérée comme un acte criminel, alors qu'elle l'est au Canada. Un Américain ayant été accusé de conduite avec facultés affaiblies qui tente d'entrer au Canada peut se voir refuser l'accès à cause de cette accusation. Certains Américains s'opposent fortement au fait que les Canadiens considèrent cette infraction comme étant beaucoup plus grave que ce que la loi américaine semble dire. Les divergences de vues vont donc dans les deux sens.

M. Michel Picard:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Picard.

Monsieur Eglinski, s'il vous plaît. Vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, PCC):

Merci.

Monsieur Broom, une fois qu'une personne ayant un casier judiciaire pour possession simple présente une demande de réhabilitation — ou peu importe le terme que vous employez — et que la demande a été examinée, que faites-vous? Comment l'effacez-vous?

M. Ian Broom:

Je ne suis pas certain de comprendre la question.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Une personne suit tout le processus. Vous avez la demande devant vous et vous jugez qu'elle est justifiée. Que faites-vous?

M. Ian Broom:

Si un demandeur soumet les documents requis qui montrent qu'il a satisfait...

M. Jim Eglinski:

Non, j'ai déjà dit cela. Vous perdez du temps.

Tout est en ordre. Comment faites-vous pour effacer le casier judiciaire?

M. Ian Broom:

Nous délivrons alors la suspension du casier et nous communiquons avec la GRC pour qu'elle le retire de la base de données du CIPC. Ma collègue pourrait confirmer...

M. Jim Eglinski:

Vous parlez d'une mesure mécanique, tout comme le ministre.

Pourquoi 100 personnes ne pourraient-elles pas parcourir l'ensemble des casiers judiciaires canadiens, retirer les casiers pertinents, les envoyer à la GRC et lui dire de les effacer? Vous dites qu'il s'agit des casiers judiciaires pour possession simple, mais vous obligez les Canadiens à présenter une demande et vous vous créez une montagne de paperasse à examiner, alors que vous n'auriez qu'à suivre un simple processus mécanique que vous aviez dit impossible. Vous communiquez avec la GRC et vous lui dites d'effacer les casiers judiciaires.

Pourquoi oblige-t-on les Canadiens à franchir un tel obstacle?

M. Ian Broom:

Comme le ministre l'a dit tout à l'heure, ce serait merveilleux de pouvoir procéder ainsi. Le problème, c'est que la possession simple de cannabis n'est pas une infraction particulière. Par exemple, nous avons besoin du dossier du CIPC, qui est vérifié au moyen des empreintes digitales, pour confirmer que la demande est présentée par la bonne personne. S'il s'agit, disons, d'une infraction punissable sur déclaration de culpabilité par procédure sommaire, elle ne se trouve peut-être pas dans la base de données du CIPC.

Nous avons aussi besoin d'information de la part des tribunaux pour confirmer que la peine a été purgée, l'amende payée, etc. Malheureusement, cette information est entreposée de diverses façons dans les palais de justice des provinces. Comme nous l'avons déjà dit, ces documents doivent nous être fournis simplement parce que nous n'y avons pas accès.

Si nous suivions votre suggestion et nous tentions de recueillir tous les casiers judiciaires de manière proactive, nous ne saurions pas nécessairement où envoyer les gens, et il y aurait différents types d'expéditions...

M. Jim Eglinski:

Autrement dit, le processus ne changera pas vraiment parce que vous devrez tout de même vérifier le CIPC, mener une enquête et tout le reste. Quelle est la différence entre le processus actuel et le nouveau processus?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Il n'y a pas de frais et il n'y a pas de période d'attente. Une personne peut déposer une demande, et si elle soumet toute l'information exigée dans le formulaire...

M. Jim Eglinski:

Mais monsieur le ministre, il vient de dire qu'il faudra vérifier le CIPC. Il faudra vérifier les dossiers pour confirmer...

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Ça, c'est si l'on procède de votre façon, monsieur Eglinski.

Si l'on disait à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles de trouver tous les casiers judiciaires pour possession simple au Canada et d'utiliser sa baguette magique pour les faire disparaître, franchement, il faudrait qu'elle fouille dans les boîtes et les dossiers des palais de justice et des postes de police partout au pays. En demandant à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles de partir à la recherche de tous ces casiers judiciaires, on lui imposerait une énorme tâche administrative dont la réalisation coûterait très cher.

(1625)

M. Jim Eglinski:

D'accord.

Ma question pour le ministre est la suivante: est-ce qu'un des agents de votre ministère s'informera auprès de vos homologues américains?

Comme mes collègues d'en face l'ont dit, ce sont eux qui choisiront la formulation, que ce soit « Avez-vous déjà été arrêté? » ou « Avez-vous déjà été en possession? » Il faut qu'il y ait une entente parce que si je donne la mauvaise réponse à la frontière, on ne me laissera pas passer. Même si j'ai un petit bout de papier de votre ministère, je peux me faire piéger par la formulation.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Si les agents pensent que la personne leur ment... Et c'est vrai dans les deux sens, peu importe dans quelle direction la personne essaie de franchir la frontière.

Monsieur Eglinski, le fait est que ce sont les Américains qui fixent les règles d'accès à leur pays et qui les appliquent. Les fonctionnaires de notre côté de la frontière, en particulier ceux de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, discutent constamment avec les Américains en vue de rendre l'expérience à la frontière aussi prévisible et positive qu'elle peut l'être pour les voyageurs venant des deux directions, car c'est dans l'intérêt supérieur des deux pays d'avoir une frontière mince, efficace, sûre et sécuritaire. Dans nos discussions continues sur la légalisation du cannabis et ses répercussions à la frontière, ils nous ont dit...

Nous savons tous qu'il est illégal de franchir la frontière avec du cannabis, que ce soit pour se rendre du Canada aux États-Unis ou des États-Unis au Canada. Ils nous ont dit qu'ils n'avaient pas l'intention de modifier leur questionnaire, à moins que des motifs les poussent à avoir des doutes. Depuis que la nouvelle loi a été adoptée il y a quelques mois, l'expérience à la frontière n'a pas beaucoup changé.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Eglinski.

Madame Dabrusin, les quatre dernières minutes sont à vous.

Mme Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Avez-vous dit quatre?

Le président:

J'ai dit quatre, mais en réalité, c'est trois minutes et demie.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

D'accord, dans ce cas, je vais aller droit au but.

Monsieur le ministre, dans votre déclaration préliminaire, vous avez fait référence à une étude que nous avons faite sur la question générale de la suspension du casier. Le rapport du Comité qui a suivi cette étude a été adopté à l'unanimité; c'était merveilleux de voir tout le monde s'entendre. La recommandation c) était la suivante: « Le Comité recommande que le gouvernement examine la complexité du processus de suspension du casier, et songe à mettre en place d'autres mesures pour appuyer les demandeurs tout au long du processus et ainsi le rendre accessible ». Une des raisons pour lesquelles nous avons fait cette recommandation, c'est que de nombreux témoins nous ont parlé de la complexité du processus et des formulaires.

Maintenant que nous avons un formulaire simplifié pour ce processus précis et même un processus simplifié, est-ce que quelque chose sera mis en place afin d'en tirer des leçons qui pourront ensuite être appliquées à la suspension du casier en général?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Les résultats que nous obtiendrons avec le projet de loi C-93 seront certainement très instructifs sur les plans de la politique publique et de l'administration publique. La réponse est donc oui, à mon avis, on pourrait tirer d'importantes leçons des résultats du nouveau processus, leçons qui pourraient ensuite être appliquées à d'autres questions relatives à la suspension du casier.

Il ne faut pas oublier, toutefois, que dans le cas présent, il s'agit d'un processus principalement administratif. Si tous les critères techniques sont remplis, la suspension est octroyée automatiquement, par voie administrative.

Dans le cas de la suspension d'un casier judiciaire pour des infractions non liées au cannabis, il faut que des membres de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles, et non seulement du personnel administratif, examinent et évaluent des facteurs subjectifs. C'est ce qui rend la question générale de la suspension du casier judiciaire plus complexe que l'objet du projet de loi C-93. Mais pour répondre à votre question, j'espère que oui, nous pourrons tirer des leçons du projet de loi C-93 pour ensuite améliorer l'ensemble du processus de suspension du casier judiciaire. Nous avons certainement l'intention de recueillir ces leçons et de les mettre à profit autant que possible.

(1630)

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Merci.

Un autre sujet qui a été soulevé à la Chambre et même ici aujourd'hui, c'est celui de l'élimination des frais du programme de suspension du casier judiciaire. On dit que le coût pour les contribuables est un problème, mais en réalité, une des recommandations de notre rapport unanime était de réexaminer les frais du programme de suspension du casier. Je me souviens que durant notre étude, des témoins nous ont parlé de la valeur qu'on récupère lorsque les casiers judiciaires sont éliminés. C'est un fait qu'on peut épargner en suspendant un casier judiciaire parce que la suspension permet à la personne touchée d'intégrer la population active, par exemple.

Avez-vous de l'information à ce sujet? Qu'épargnons-nous en suspendant le casier judiciaire de quelqu'un?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

C'est probablement difficile à quantifier en dollars, mais la personne touchée pourrait décrocher un emploi ou un meilleur emploi parce que sa réputation ne serait plus entachée par son casier judiciaire. Elle pourrait faire du bénévolat dans sa communauté, ce qui n'était pas le cas auparavant; elle pourrait finir ses études ou se trouver un logement adéquat. Tous ces facteurs permettent aux personnes de mieux réussir leur vie, ainsi que de contribuer davantage à l'économie et à leur communauté.

C'est difficile à quantifier, madame Dabrusin, mais je crois qu'apporter de tels changements réfléchis au processus de réhabilitation se traduira par une contribution nette positive à l'économie et au pays. De plus, ces changements allégeront certainement le fardeau des coûts administratifs.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, madame Dabrusin.

Monsieur le ministre, avant de vous libérer et de suspendre la séance, j'aimerais savoir s'il y a une loi qui interdit à un employeur potentiel de poser la question suivante: « Avez-vous déjà obtenu un pardon ou une radiation? »

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Ce point précis fait partie des motifs de distinction illicite énoncés à l’article 2 de la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne.

Le président:

Est-ce de la discrimination? Je comprends votre point sur l'article 2, mais cet article est plutôt général.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je vais demander à Angela de répondre.

Mme Angela Connidis:

Il y a en effet une importante distinction à faire. La Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne n'interdit pas de poser la question, mais elle interdit la discrimination pour ce motif.

Le président:

Très bien. Je voulais simplement poser la question.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pour cinq minutes. Nous avons des problèmes avec les microphones.

Je tiens à remercier le ministre et les fonctionnaires, au nom du Comité. Je m'attends à ce que les fonctionnaires demeurent dans la salle pendant que nous réglons les problèmes de microphones.

La séance est suspendue.

(1630)

(1640)

Le président:

Mesdames et messieurs, nous reprenons.

Les fonctionnaires sont restés, mais il semble que deux personnes se sont ajoutées, Mme Amanda Gonzalez et Mme Brigitte Lavigne. Je suis certain qu'elles se présenteront à la première occasion.

Cela dit, nous passons aux questions, en commençant par Mme Dabrusin, pour sept minutes.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

La question est de savoir comment faire connaître le nouveau processus prévu au projet de loi C-93. Comment pouvons-nous informer les gens qu'il existe un processus simplifié et gratuit?

J'ai fait une recherche sur Google avec les termes « pardons, cannabis, Canada » et le premier résultat de recherche était « New Cannabis Pardons in Canada: Get a Free Record Suspension ». Il s'agissait d'une annonce pour une agence qui se charge de cette procédure moyennant certains frais. Il faut descendre plus loin sur la page pour trouver le site Web du gouvernement du Canada pour les demandes de pardon.

J'ai une question à deux volets. La première partie de ma question est la suivante: que faisons-nous pour diffuser ces renseignements dans les communautés, et quelqu'un peut-il faire en sorte que le site du gouvernement se retrouve en haut de la liste? Je poserai ensuite la deuxième partie de la question.

Mme Angela Connidis:

Je vais commencer, puis je céderai la parole à Ian, dont le groupe travaille activement à l'élaboration d'un plan.

Nous rencontrons régulièrement les intervenants, notamment la Société John Howard et des associations autochtones, des organismes qui travaillent avec les délinquants partout au pays. Nous avons consulté ces intervenants au sujet de nos propositions relatives aux pardons, du suivi et des façons de diffuser l'information. Pour commencer, nous leur demandons d'identifier et de rejoindre la clientèle cible susceptible de faire appel à eux. Essentiellement, le ministère de la Sécurité publique fait un travail de bouche à oreille. La Commission des libérations conditionnelles est en train d'élaborer une stratégie de sensibilisation beaucoup plus complète. Je vais laisser Ian en parler.

La question soulevée au sujet des consultants me préoccupe beaucoup. Il n'est pas toujours facile de réglementer Internet. Il faudrait beaucoup de travail et de fonds supplémentaires pour réglementer les consultants indépendants, qui ne relèvent pas nécessairement de notre compétence, mais c'est un enjeu auquel nous nous attaquerons.

M. Ian Broom:

L'utilisation des ressources Internet disponibles fait en effet partie de la stratégie de communication et de sensibilisation de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles associée à la procédure accélérée de suspension de casier judiciaire proposée dans le projet de loi C-93. Toutefois, comme vous le soulignez, l'accès à ces ressources pourrait être quelque peu difficile, dans certains cas. Cela comprendrait un guide étape par étape — un guide pour les demandes simplifiées — pour diffuser l'information.

Nous mettons effectivement l'accent sur nos partenaires habituels du système de justice pénale. Nous interviendrons donc auprès des organismes d'application de la loi, des tribunaux, et cetera, mais nous nous concentrerons et travaillerons aussi avec nos autres partenaires fédéraux pour déterminer comment transmettre le message à d'autres partenaires moins traditionnels. Nous voulons nous concentrer sur les groupes les plus marginalisés dont il a été question plus tôt aujourd'hui et les cibler.

Nous procédons lentement à la création d'une base de données qui nous donnera une bonne idée de la clientèle cible de notre correspondance. Lors de la mise en œuvre, nous comptons cibler les partenaires et les organismes du système de justice pénale qui pourraient faciliter le processus, informer les gens ou les aider à obtenir un pardon pour une condamnation pour possession simple de cannabis.

(1645)

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

J'ai une question complémentaire, madame Connidis, parce que vous vous dites préoccupée que certains offrent de tels services de consultation. Nous avons abordé cet aspect dans notre étude précédente sur la suspension du casier judiciaire. Je crains que certains puissent profiter d'une mesure avantageuse que nous cherchons à créer. Nous essayons d'offrir un service gratuit — une procédure simplifiée, en fait —, mais certains pourraient jouer un rôle d'intermédiaire. Je m'inquiète qu'il faille prendre des mesures pour empêcher cela.

C'est l'une des recommandations qui ont été formulées dans le cadre de notre étude sur la suspension du casier judiciaire. Quels outils utilisons-nous pour traiter avec les intermédiaires pour les suspensions du casier judiciaire? Peut-on faire quelque chose?

Mme Angela Connidis:

Nous devrions sans doute faire des efforts considérables sur les plans de l'élaboration de politiques et de la recherche. Je commencerais par Immigration Canada, parce qu'ils ont eu des problèmes avec les consultants, mais dans un contexte très différent. Nous devrions demander à notre service des communications de chercher à savoir ce qu'il faut faire pour que les sites de Sécurité publique Canada ou de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada se retrouvent en haut de la liste. Il y a probablement des frais à payer ou quelque chose du genre.

Voilà par où nous devrions commencer. Ce n'est pas une question simple. Ce n'est pas un enjeu qui a souvent été à l'avant-plan, comme dans le contexte de l'immigration, mais c'est certainement une préoccupation.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Revenons en arrière, monsieur Broom. Vous avez mentionné diverses méthodes de communication. Avez-vous songé à utiliser les médias sociaux pour rejoindre les gens?

M. Ian Broom:

Absolument. Miser sur les réseaux sociaux est certainement un élément central de notre stratégie globale.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Dans notre étude précédente, une femme, Mme Louise Lafond, a indiqué qu'une des difficultés les plus courantes qu'elle avait rencontrées avec ses clients était qu'ils avaient des amendes impayées. C'est un des facteurs qui empêche les gens de demander la suspension de leur casier judiciaire.

En examinant la mesure législative, il m'a semblé que dans le projet de loi C-93, on éliminait la possibilité qu'une amende non acquittée puisse entraîner des retards. Est-ce que c'est exact? J'examine le paragraphe 4(3.1) proposé.

Mme Angela Connidis:

Aux termes du projet de loi C-93, dès que vous avez purgé votre peine, y compris une amende, vous n'avez plus de période d'attente. Par conséquent, si vous avez une amende impayée à l'heure actuelle, vous pourrez présenter une demande dès qu'elle sera payée. La période d'attente ne se poursuit pas.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Très bien. J'avais mal compris. Très bien, merci.

Le président:

Merci.[Français]

Monsieur Paul-Hus, vous avez la parole pour sept minutes.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'ai une question technique. J'espère que nous pourrons bien nous comprendre, compte tenu de l'interprétation.

Lorsqu'il s'agit de déterminer si les personnes sont admissibles à l'élimination de la période d'attente et des frais, le projet de loi fait-il une distinction entre la possession de 30 grammes ou moins de cannabis ou son équivalent, ce qui est maintenant légal, et l'activité de possession de plus de 30 grammes dans un lieu public, ce qui demeure illégal? [Traduction]

Mme Angela Connidis:

Nous avons débattu de la question, et nous ne l'avons pas inclus parce qu'il n'y a aucune limite pour la possession à des fins personnelles. La loi précédente n'établissait aucune distinction entre la possession dans un lieu public et la possession à des fins personnelles. Donc, nous n'établissons pas de distinction ni une limite de 30 grammes. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

La possession de plus de 30 grammes de cannabis dans un lieu public demeure illégale. Alors, pourquoi une personne accusée de cela à l'époque aurait-elle le droit d'obtenir un pardon, si cet acte demeure illégal aujourd'hui?

(1650)

[Traduction]

Mme Angela Connidis:

Dans le passé, on n'établissait aucune distinction entre la possession dans un lieu public ou un lieu privé, de sorte qu'il n'y a pas moyen de le savoir. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Il est donc possible qu'on accorde un pardon à quelqu'un ayant commis un acte qui demeure illégal aujourd'hui. [Traduction]

Mme Angela Connidis:

Vous avez maintenant une loi très claire; si une personne est accusée de cette infraction, la condamnation ne sera pas effacée. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

D'accord.

Nous avons parlé des coûts avec le ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile. Selon l'information dont nous disposons de notre côté, environ 500 000 Canadiens ont été accusés de possession simple de cannabis. Le ministre a dit qu'il s'attendait à ce que 10 000 d'entre eux fassent une demande de pardon.

Comment expliquez-vous le fait que, parmi ces 500 000 personnes, seulement 10 000 feraient une demande de pardon? [Traduction]

Mme Angela Connidis:

Comme nous l'avons dit, il est très difficile de savoir qui a été déclaré coupable d'infractions liées à la possession de cannabis. Donc, nous ne pouvons pas simplement consulter une base de données et donner un chiffre. Nous avons extrapolé à partir des statistiques recueillies par le Service des poursuites pénales du Canada, et on compte plus de 250 000 condamnations pour possession simple de cannabis. C'est un point de départ. Le nombre de personnes qui devraient présenter une demande est beaucoup moins élevé, pour diverses raisons. Certaines de ces condamnations remontent à longtemps. Donc certaines personnes pourraient être décédées, d'autres pourraient déjà avoir obtenu un pardon, et d'autres encore pourraient avoir d'autres condamnations à leur casier judiciaire.

N'oublions pas que vous ne pouvez obtenir ce pardon que si votre seule infraction est la possession de cannabis. Bien que vous puissiez avoir commis cette infraction, si vous avez d'autres infractions dans votre dossier, vous ne seriez pas admissible. Ce n'est pas une science exacte, mais nous avons extrapolé à partir du chiffre de 250 000 et estimé les demandes à 10 000. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

D'accord.

Je vais donner le reste de mon temps de parole à M. Motz. [Traduction]

Le président:

Vous avez trois minutes.

M. Glen Motz:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Vous estimez le nombre de cas à 250 000. Qu'en est-il des autres 250 000 sur l'évaluation totale de 500 000? Où sont-ils?

Mme Angela Connidis:

Je ne sais pas d'où vient le chiffre de 500 000. Nous nous sommes basés sur 250 000.

M. Glen Motz:

Très bien.

Le président:

Pour que ce soit clair, on parle de 10 000 sur 250 000 et non de 10 000 sur 500 000, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Angela Connidis:

C'est exact.

M. Glen Motz:

Selon les chiffres que vous avez établis — et vous vous êtes engagés à fournir une analyse des coûts au Comité —, vous estimez qu'à terme, les coûts s'élèveront à 250 $ par demande.

Mme Angela Connidis:

Nous sommes toujours devant le Comité et nous n'avons pas la version définitive du projet de loi. Il m'est donc impossible de chiffrer les coûts précis en ce moment.

M. Glen Motz:

Je vais maintenant passer aux questions que j'avais pour le prochain tour.

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Il vous reste deux minutes et 15 secondes.

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord. Dans ce cas-là, je vais attendre au prochain tour.

Mon collègue, M. de Burgh Graham, pose toujours des questions techniques sur la cybercriminalité. J'aimerais poser une question très technique concernant un type de substance. J'aimerais savoir si cela s'applique toujours en raison de l'ancienne LCN, de la LRCDAS et de la nouvelle loi qui a été modifiée à l'automne.

Une statistique fréquemment citée dans le Globe and Mail est que 500 000 personnes ont été condamnées pour possession de cannabis au Canada. Un porte-parole du gouvernement a également été cité dans les médias et a estimé que 10 000 personnes demanderont une suspension de leur casier judiciaire, comme vous l'avez dit. C'est de là que vient le chiffre de 500 000.

Mme Angela Connidis:

Comme je l'ai indiqué, nous avons extrapolé notre chiffre à partir des données du Service des poursuites pénales du Canada. Ce sont ses statistiques sur le nombre de condamnations.

M. Glen Motz:

Très bien.

C'est tout pour le moment, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Nous avons hâte au prochain tour pour entendre vos questions, monsieur Motz.

Monsieur Dubé, vous avez sept minutes.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci d'être restés pour la deuxième heure.

En ce qui concerne le projet de loi C-66, ceux qui présentent une demande par l'intermédiaire du processus créé dans cette mesure législative reçoivent-ils une confirmation?

(1655)

Mme Angela Connidis:

Je demanderais à Ian et à Brigitte de répondre.

Le président:

Madame Lavigne, pourriez-vous vous présenter, aux fins du compte rendu?

Mme Brigitte Lavigne (directrice, Clémence et suspension du casier, Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada):

Je m'appelle Brigitte Lavigne. Je suis directrice, Clémence et suspension du casier, à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada.[Français]

Je vous remercie de votre question.[Traduction]

Votre question visait à savoir si les gens reçoivent un avis lorsqu'une radiation est ordonnée. Lorsque la Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada ordonne une radiation, nous avisons le demandeur, comme nous le faisons pour les pardons et les suspensions du casier. Ensuite, nous avisons la GRC, qui se chargera de faire retirer définitivement le casier du répertoire national.

M. Matthew Dubé:

J'essaie simplement de concilier cela avec les propos du ministre. Il a utilisé un exemple où, à la frontière, une personne dont le casier était radié n'en aurait pas la preuve, mais je comprends qu'il en soit autrement maintenant. N'y aurait-il pas confirmation si la loi était semblable au projet de loi C-66? Autrement dit, la radiation sera-t-elle confirmée?

Mme Angela Connidis:

Est-ce sous forme de certificat?

Mme Brigitte Lavigne:

Nous fournirions la documentation. Je crois que l'avantage dont parlait le ministre, c'est que, par la suite, de nombreux demandeurs nous reviennent pour demander copie des documents relatifs au pardon ou à la suspension du casier. Nous produisons de nouveau les documents, une fois, puis nous en informons la GRC et nous les versons au dossier. Dans l'esprit de la loi, les provinces, les territoires et les municipalités retiendront le casier à leur tour.

Il en va de même pour la radiation. Nous nous attendrions à ce qu'ils détruisent l'information ou la suppriment définitivement de leurs bases de données. Si un demandeur revenait, ce dossier ne serait plus accessible.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Toutefois, la personne qui aurait conservé le document initial aurait une confirmation.

Mme Brigitte Lavigne:

Si elle a conservé le document.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Il n'y aurait aucune trace qu'une information aurait été supprimée. Je veux simplement m'assurer qu'on établit une distinction entre le casier judiciaire et l'acte de suppression du casier. Il n'y aurait pas non plus une trace de la suppression du casier, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Angela Connidis:

Non.

M. Matthew Dubé:

J'ai une autre question sur le même enjeu.

Lorsque la GRC sera informée, le ministre aura-t-il le pouvoir, s'il s'agit d'une radiation... Le cannabis est légal au Canada. En supposant que tous les documents soient effacés, abstraction faite de tout débat sur le processus, le ministre aurait la possibilité, en théorie, d'informer son homologue américain, et les services frontaliers américains pourraient alors être dûment informés que cela s'est produit. Rien n'empêche une telle situation. Est-ce que c'est exact?

Mme Angela Connidis:

Je pense que sur le plan pratique, cela pourrait être prohibitif, pour chaque demandeur.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Pas sur une base individuelle. Je parle simplement de toutes les personnes dont le casier judiciaire pour possession de cannabis a été radié.

Mme Angela Connidis:

Oui, mais cela ne change rien au fait que cela figure déjà dans la base de données des Américains, et si c'est le cas, cela n'aura aucune importance pour eux.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Au sujet de la base de données des Américains, ai-je raison de comprendre qu'en vertu de la Loi sur le casier judiciaire le ministre peut communiquer des renseignements, même des renseignements concernant un casier judiciaire suspendu, à un pays allié du Canada?

Mme Angela Connidis:

Je ne suis pas certaine que ce soit en vertu de la Loi sur le casier judiciaire. Je vais devoir vérifier. Je me ferai un plaisir de vous trouver cette réponse.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Sommes-nous inquiets qu'une personne qui a obtenu la suspension de son casier judiciaire et qui se présente à la frontière puisse, si les agents lui demandent si elle a un casier judiciaire...? D'après votre expérience, arrive-t-il que des gens disent par erreur qu'ils n'ont pas de casier judiciaire ou qu'ils ne sachent pas comment répondre adéquatement à la question? Je reviens sur la manière dont la question peut être posée dans une demande d'emploi ou une demande pour la location d'un appartement si vous avez un casier judiciaire suspendu pour un crime pour lequel vous avez été condamné. Si un agent frontalier américain pose la question, il se peut qu'il la formule différemment. Avons-nous des données qui montrent dans quelle mesure cela se produit?

Mme Angela Connidis:

Non. Je n'ai pas de données à ce sujet.

M. Matthew Dubé:

D'accord.

En réponse à une autre question, nous discutions de la manière de faire savoir que ce service sera offert. Quel a été le problème avec le projet de loi C-66? Nous parlons de 7 personnes sur 9 000.

Mme Angela Connidis:

C'est difficile de savoir s'il y a eu un problème. Nous avons évalué le nombre de personnes qui pourraient avoir de tels casiers judiciaires. Il ne faut pas oublier que les dernières modifications ont été faites à la fin des années 1960. Cela remonte donc à des années. Nous nous sommes dit que certaines personnes ne se donneront peut-être pas la peine de le faire. C'était l'un des facteurs que nous avons pris en considération concernant les réhabilitations automatiques. Certains ne veulent tout simplement pas devoir en parler à d'autres. Il ne veut pas déterrer le passé ou ils sont peut-être décédés.

Je ne crois pas que cela découle d'un manque d'information. Dans cette communauté, l'information est très largement diffusée, et nous avions une campagne très active.

(1700)

M. Matthew Dubé:

Dans toutes vos réflexions concernant le projet de loi — et je le dis en tout respect et je suis conscient de l'importance de cet enjeu —, même s'il y a des problèmes avec la mise en œuvre, soit des problèmes avec le projet de loi C-66, et qu'il y a naturellement une différence d'âge et d'autres éléments de cette nature... Vous avez mentionné que des gens sont peut-être décédés.

Je me pose la question. Si nous prenons cet enjeu en particulier, nous avons peut-être de jeunes Canadiens qui seraient plus portés à vouloir avoir une forme de réhabilitation, que cela se fasse au moyen d'une radiation ou d'une suspension de casier judiciaire. Avez-vous pensé à la reconfiguration qui pourrait être nécessaire, compte tenu de la clientèle différente dans ce cas précis — passez-moi cette expression — de Canadiens qui pourraient en voir la nécessité à long terme, étant donné qu'ils ne ravivent pas un vieux problème? Ce sont des Canadiens qui sont peut-être dans la trentaine, par exemple, et qui ont de la difficulté à se trouver un emploi.

Mme Angela Connidis:

Je ne suis pas certaine de comprendre. Parlez-vous de notre démarche pour les attirer et communiquer l'information?

M. Matthew Dubé:

Oui. Vous semblez indiquer que vous réfléchissez au ministère aux raisons pour lesquelles le projet de loi C-66 n'a peut-être pas été une réussite. Avez-vous regardé ce qui pourrait être différent cette fois-ci et la façon d'en tenir compte?

Mme Angela Connidis:

Comme je l'ai mentionné, je ne dirais pas que le projet de loi C-66 n'a pas été un succès. Je crois que nous avons fait de la sensibilisation à ce sujet. Nous n'avons aucune donnée qui montre que c'est parce que les gens n'en étaient pas au courant. Les gens sont libres de présenter une demande.

En ce qui concerne le cannabis et la réhabilitation pour la possession simple de cannabis, la stratégie de communication est très différente, parce que nous savons que nous avons une clientèle plus vaste. Ce n'est pas un groupe précis en soi, comme la communauté LGBTQ2. Les communautés marginalisées regroupent de nombreuses personnes. Il y a des jeunes, et c'est pourquoi nous avons recours aux médias sociaux. Nous modifions aussi le processus de demande pour le simplifier avec l'accès en ligne, etc.

Brigitte ou Ian aimeraient peut-être ajouter quelque chose.

Le président:

Nous allons devoir nous arrêter là. Toutefois, avant de céder la parole à M. Picard, M. Dubé a posé une question, et vous semblez avoir pris un engagement. Pour bien préciser les choses, je vous invite à poser la question aux fins du compte rendu pour que nous comprenions tous la réponse.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président, d'autant plus que mon temps est écoulé. Pouvez-vous nous confirmer si la Loi sur le casier judiciaire permet au ministre de communiquer des renseignements concernant des casiers judiciaires suspendus à des pays alliés?

Mme Angela Connidis:

Je vais vérifier.

Le président:

Il faudrait que ce soit fait rapidement, parce que l'échéancier de l'étude du projet de loi est très limité.

Monsieur Picard, vous avez sept minutes. [Français]

M. Michel Picard:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Mes questions vont porter sur le processus de demande de suspension du casier judiciaire.

Selon ce que j'ai compris, la responsabilité de faire une demande incombe aux demandeurs. Ceux-ci doivent présenter un dossier complet. Le projet de loi prévoit qu'il n'y aura aucuns frais ni aucune période d'attente. Les demandeurs doivent donc soumettre une demande et, normalement, elle sera acceptée.

Quels seraient les motifs de refus d'une demande? [Traduction]

Mme Angela Connidis:

Seulement si les gens ne peuvent pas démontrer que c'était pour la possession de cannabis et qu'ils ont purgé leur peine... S'ils ne peuvent pas démontrer ces deux choses, ils ne respecteraient pas les paramètres du projet de loi C-93. [Français]

M. Michel Picard:

En quoi est-ce pertinent qu'une personne ait terminé de purger sa peine, si vous allez effacer son casier judiciaire de toute façon? [Traduction]

Mme Angela Connidis:

Je crois qu'il en va de la crédibilité du système de justice pénale. Une accusation criminelle a été portée contre vous. Votre peine était peut-être de 5 ou de 10 ans. Vous n'avez pas purgé toute votre peine ou vous la purgez encore. À l'expiration de votre peine, c'est terminé. [Français]

M. Michel Picard:

J'aimerais pousser plus loin la question qui a été posée.

Lorsque le demandeur fait un travail de recherche pour obtenir tous les documents qu'il doit soumettre, il va communiquer avec les tribunaux et les postes de police. C'est lui qui fera ce travail, parce que ce serait extrêmement onéreux, compliqué et long si c'était le ministère qui le faisait à sa place. Je comprends bien cela. Le demandeur doit donc demander à un poste de police ou à un tribunal de lui transmettre l'information. Cependant, ces établissements ne se trouvent pas toujours dans la ville où demeure le demandeur. Pour faciliter le processus, il recevra les documents par courriel ou par la poste.

Comment pouvez-vous garantir la validité des documents qui vous seront présentés?

(1705)

[Traduction]

M. Ian Broom:

Je crois que je vais laisser ma collègue Brigitte vous répondre.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Bonne question, monsieur Picard. [Français]

Mme Brigitte Lavigne:

Présentement, quand une personne fait une demande de pardon ou de suspension du casier judiciaire, ce sont les documents officiels des corps policiers ou des tribunaux qui nous sont soumis, par l'entremise de la personne qui fait la demande. Les demandeurs obtiennent déjà ces documents qui portent un sceau ou une estampille quelconque prouvant leur authenticité.

M. Michel Picard:

Faites-vous une double vérification par la suite pour vous assurer de la validité de l'information qui vous a été transmise? Vous retrouvez-vous ainsi à faire une partie de la recherche, en plus du travail que doit faire le demandeur?

Mme Brigitte Lavigne:

Les documents nous arrivent en bonne et due forme et portent un sceau ou une estampille. Nous pouvons les authentifier et passer à l'étude du cas.

M. Michel Picard:

Il reste que les documents dont vous faites mention, même s'ils ont été authentifiés, ont été soumis par le demandeur.

Mme Brigitte Lavigne:

Oui.

M. Michel Picard:

D'accord.

C'est tout pour moi.

Le président:

C'est tout, monsieur Picard? [Traduction]

M. Michel Picard:

Oui.

Le président:

Pour revenir sur la question de M. Picard, si quelqu'un présente une demande pour une suspension de casier judiciaire, qu'est-ce qui est nécessaire d'avoir pour le processus? Puis-je soumettre une copie notariée qui explique que j'ai purgé ma peine? Un tel document serait-il acceptable aux yeux de la Commission?

Mme Brigitte Lavigne:

Le document judiciaire que nous obtenons est un document rempli par le tribunal. Nous recevons la confirmation du tribunal que la peine a été purgée, et cela nous permet aussi de déterminer si la peine est assortie d'une amende qui n'a pas encore été payée en totalité.

Le président:

Si je n'ai pas ce document, dois-je me rendre en personne au palais de justice pour l'obtenir?

Mme Brigitte Lavigne:

Les demandeurs obtiennent certains documents des tribunaux et d'autres documents des services de police. Leur corps policier local s'occupera de vérifier le casier judiciaire et de nous le fournir.

Le président:

Dans un cas normal, je présume que je dois me rendre au poste de police pour prouver que je n'ai rien fait de mal depuis la dernière fois que j'ai été condamné. Je dois prouver que j'ai été condamné et que j'ai purgé ma peine. Y a-t-il autre chose que je dois fournir à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles?

Mme Brigitte Lavigne:

Nous demandons aussi la fiche dactyloscopique, ce qui nous permet d'avoir accès aux condamnations inscrites dans le répertoire national, et nous demandons aux gens de remplir le formulaire de demande. Il y a une trousse, et un guide expliquant les étapes sera créé. Ce sera simple, et le guide expliquera les étapes et les documents que le demandeur doit nous fournir en vue de lancer l'examen du dossier et de déterminer si le demandeur répond aux critères prévus dans le projet de loi. Nous pourrons ensuite accorder la réhabilitation.

Le président:

Vous avez un processus qui compte trois, quatre ou cinq étapes que les personnes marginalisées doivent suivre pour obtenir ce qui devrait être un simple...

Mme Brigitte Lavigne:

Le projet de loi, ainsi que la loi qui entrera en vigueur, relève de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles. Nous serons prêts à offrir un processus simple. Les demandeurs auront accès à des outils. Nous avons une ligne sans frais et une adresse courriel réservée à cette fin. Il y aura de l'information sur le Web, et nous aurons, comme mes collègues l'ont mentionné, une stratégie de communication dynamique qui sera axée sur des partenaires traditionnels et non traditionnels en vue de simplifier le plus possible les choses pour les demandeurs qui souhaitent profiter de ce processus accéléré et sans frais qui est proposé dans le projet de loi C-93.

Le président:

Sauf votre respect, cela m'apparaît comme un processus assez complexe. Ce l'est particulièrement pour les communautés que vous visez.

Je m'excuse. Je n'ai pas l'habitude d'intervenir durant les séries de questions.

Je vois que M. Graham souhaite encore...

Une voix: C'est Mme Sahota.

Le président: Il reste un peu moins d'une minute.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Parfait. J'ai en fait une question.

En ce qui concerne l'engagement d'avoir un processus sans frais, cela concerne-t-il seulement les frais relatifs à la demande? Qu'en est-il des frais possibles pour obtenir les documents au palais de justice ou au service de police? Il y aura des frais. Qu'en sera-t-il au sujet de ces frais?

(1710)

M. Ian Broom:

Non. La Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada impose des frais pour présenter une demande, mais le processus sera sans frais dans ce cas-ci.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

De manière générale, quels sont les frais qu'un demandeur pourrait devoir assumer pour demander une suspension de casier judiciaire? Quels sont les frais que les demandeurs doivent normalement assumer avant de présenter leur demande?

M. Ian Broom:

Je crois que les frais varient énormément, parce que cela dépend du service de police ou du tribunal. Je ne peux pas vous donner pour le moment une idée précise des frais. Je crois que le ministère a peut-être réalisé un examen sommaire à ce chapitre. Toutefois, il serait question de... J'hésite à vous donner un ordre de grandeur actuellement.

Le président:

C'est une bonne réponse, parce que cette estimation ne relève pas de vous, même si c'est un coût réel.

Monsieur Motz, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Glen Motz:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais continuer dans la même veine. Il faut payer pour obtenir ses empreintes digitales.

Il faut payer pour obtenir son dossier au service de police et il faut normalement payer pour obtenir son dossier au palais de justice, si le tribunal l'a. Dans certaines collectivités, si l'infraction a eu lieu il y a longtemps, le tribunal n'a peut-être plus le registre où c'est inscrit. C'est peut-être un processus sans frais du côté de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles, et ce sont les contribuables qui financeront le tout, mais ce processus demandera du temps, de l'énergie et des ressources à un demandeur. Je tiens à ce que ce soit clair.

J'aimerais discuter de l'annexe. Le projet de loi C-93 contient une annexe, et cela concerne les aspects techniques de la question. L'annexe recense les infractions pour lesquelles un délinquant peut présenter une demande et immédiatement recevoir une suspension de casier judiciaire à l'expiration de sa peine, et ce, sans frais, autres que ceux que nous venons de mentionner.

L'annexe mentionne trois catégories d'infractions pour la possession de substances. La première concerne l'annexe II de l'ancienne LRCDAS, soit l'ancienne Loi réglementant certaines drogues et autres substances, telle qu'elle était avant octobre de l'année dernière. La deuxième porte sur l'ancienne Loi sur les stupéfiants, soit la loi qui a précédé la Loi réglementant certaines drogues et autres substances. La troisième a trait aux infractions équivalentes prévues par la Loi sur la défense nationale.

Cependant, les listes de substances ne semblent pas être tout à fait identiques. Par exemple, une demande pour une suspension de casier judiciaire concernant une infraction liée à la possession de pyrahexyl — ou de parahexyl dans l'ancienne Loi sur les stupéfiants — sera-t-elle traitée sans délai et sans frais, étant donné que cette substance est inscrite à l'article 3 de l'annexe de la Loi sur les stupéfiants et que le demandeur pourrait alors profiter des changements proposés dans le projet de loi C-93? Dans l'affirmative, pourquoi serait-ce le cas, étant donné que le parahexyl est toujours considéré comme une substance illégale au Canada? Vos annexes le permettent, et je suis curieux de savoir pourquoi.

Mme Angela Connidis:

L'annexe fait référence aux lois où se trouvent les infractions liées au cannabis. Cela concerne seulement la possession de cannabis. Les documents que le demandeur fournira devront nécessairement indiquer que le cannabis était la substance pour laquelle il a été accusé de possession en vertu de l'une de ces lois.

M. Glen Motz:

Je comprends ce que la loi dit, mais vos annexes ne sont pas identiques. J'essaie de souligner qu'il faudrait voir à une certaine cohérence entre toutes les annexes de la Loi réglementant certaines drogues et autres substances, de la Loi sur les stupéfiants, de la nouvelle loi et de la Loi sur la défense nationale pour nous assurer que tout cela concorde. Je vous invite fortement à examiner cela, parce que cette substance est encore inscrite à cette annexe et qu'elle devrait demeurer illégale.

Ma dernière question a trait à ce que Mme Lavigne et M. Broom ont mentionné. La Commission des libérations conditionnelles a-t-elle des ressources suffisantes pour gérer un volume plus élevé?

Nous anticipons que le projet de loi C-93 fasse en sorte qu'il y ait possiblement 10 000 demandes au cours des prochaines années. Je sais que j'ai déjà posé la question au ministre. Si vous n'avez pas besoin de nouvelles ressources, le personnel administratif nécessaire pour procéder sur le plan administratif à une suspension de casier judiciaire aura une incidence sur le personnel administratif nécessaire pour procéder à une suspension de casier judiciaire à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles. Comment procéderons-nous? La somme de 2,5 millions de dollars est-elle vraiment suffisante? Je pose la question, parce que je n'ai pas l'impression que 250 $ est beaucoup, quand nous tenons compte du temps qu'il faut pour traiter une demande.

(1715)

Mme Brigitte Lavigne:

La Commission des libérations conditionnelles disposera des ressources nécessaires pour traiter les demandes lorsqu'elle les recevra. Nous avons actuellement des employés qui sont formés pour effectuer des tâches similaires lorsqu'ils traitent les demandes de suspension de casier et de pardon, et au fur et à mesure que le volume augmentera, nous avons l'assurance de recevoir des ressources additionnelles pour respecter les normes de service actuellement en place pour les demandes de suspension de casier et de pardon, de même que pour la procédure accélérée de suspension de casier pour ceux ayant été condamnés pour la possession simple de cannabis.

M. Glen Motz:

Pensez-vous que les 2,5 millions de dollars prévus au pifomètre couvriront les coûts liés à l'ajout de personnel ou seulement les coûts de traitement des dossiers?

Mme Brigitte Lavigne:

À ce stade-ci, les montants prévus pour que la GRC et nous puissions gérer ce groupe de demandeurs s'appliqueraient au personnel nécessaire pour traiter les demandes et procéder aux notifications.

M. Glen Motz:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Motz.

Madame Sahota, vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

Je pense que nous allons simplement continuer à poser des questions qui s'inspirent les unes des autres. Je m'interroge aussi parce que le ministre a dit, tout comme M. Motz, au sujet de la liste des substances qui seraient visées par un certain type d'infraction, qu'on ne sait pas toujours clairement quelle substance la personne avait en sa possession. Il pourrait s'agir d'une substance qui se trouve sur la liste. Le demandeur a donc la responsabilité de prouver qu'il s'agissait de possession simple et qu'il ne s'agissait pas d'une substance qui se trouve sur la liste. Comment peut-il le prouver? Est-ce que l'information est toujours présente dans le dossier du tribunal, ou est-ce plus facile de la trouver ailleurs?

Mme Angela Connidis:

Les accusations seraient indiquées dans le dossier de la police locale ou dans celui du tribunal.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Est-ce qu'on mentionnerait exactement de quelle substance il s'agissait?

Mme Angela Connidis:

Si l'information ne se trouve pas dans le dossier de la police, elle devrait se trouver dans celui du tribunal

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Mais les dossiers de la GRC ne contiendraient pas…

Mme Angela Connidis:

Ce serait le cas parfois, mais pas toujours.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Si l'information se trouve dans les dossiers de la GRC, est-ce que la personne pourra éviter d'avoir à se procurer le dossier du tribunal et tout le reste? Est-ce que la suspension pourrait se faire facilement dans ce cas?

Mme Angela Connidis:

Le dossier de la police locale contient d'autres éléments. On y indiquera s'il s'agit de la substance en question, mais aussi si la personne a fait l'objet d'autres condamnations qui ne se trouvent pas dans les dossiers de la GRC, et il pourrait s'agir de condamnations par procédure sommaire pour des infractions assez graves, comme les agressions. C'est l'autre raison d'être de la vérification auprès de la police locale. Dans le dossier du tribunal, on indiquerait non seulement le type de substance, mais aussi la peine que la personne a reçue et si elle a été purgée en totalité. Les vérifications ne visent pas seulement à savoir s'il s'agissait de cannabis; elles sont effectuées également pour d'autres raisons.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'aimerais simplement avoir une précision au sujet de ce que vous avez déjà dit. Si la personne a été condamnée pour une agression ou un autre crime, en plus de la possession, il n'y aura pas de suspension du dossier pour possession, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Angela Connidis:

C'est exact. Pour obtenir le pardon, il faut que les périodes d'attente pour toutes les condamnations soient écoulées. Si vous avez été uniquement condamné pour possession de cannabis, la période d'attente sera écoulée, puisque nous l'avons supprimée.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Mais s'il s'agissait d'une condamnation parmi d'autres, la condamnation pour cannabis ne serait pas suspendue, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Angela Connidis:

Non, elle ne pourrait pas l'être.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Qu'arrive-t-il si une personne a obtenu une réduction des accusations et, disons, qu'elle a été condamnée pour possession simple, mais qu'elle était accusée à l'origine également de trafic. Dans ce cas, cette personne pourrait-elle obtenir une suspension de son casier?

Mme Angela Connidis:

N'oublions pas qu'une accusation est une accusation. Le tribunal ne s'est pas encore prononcé. Il se peut qu'il y ait eu réduction des accusations par manque de preuves. Il se peut également qu'il n'y ait pas eu réduction des accusations. Il se peut qu'en examinant le dossier, on se soit dit qu'il s'agissait de possession et non d'autre chose. On ne peut pas conjecturer sur les raisons qui ont fait en sorte que la condamnation ne porte pas sur les accusations originales. La décision se prend en fonction de la condamnation.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

C'est bien.

J'ai une autre question. Lorsqu'un agent de police procède à une vérification du casier judiciaire, qu'est-ce qu'il voit apparaître à l'écran lorsqu'une personne a obtenu une suspension de dossier plutôt qu'une radiation? Si un agent vous arrête sur la route et qu'il procède à une vérification rapide de votre casier, qu'est-ce qu'il voit à l'écran?

Le président:

Madame Gonzalez, pourriez-vous vous présenter, s'il vous plaît?

Mme Amanda Gonzalez (gestionnaire, Service de triage des dactylogrammes civils et Conformité législative, Gendarmerie royale du Canada):

Je m'appelle Amanda Gonzalez. Je travaille avec l'équipe des casiers judiciaires. Je suis également responsable de l'unité qui s'occupe de conserver l'information lorsque la GRC...

Au sujet de votre question, un agent de police effectuerait une recherche dans le Centre d'information de la police canadienne, et l'information ne s'y trouverait plus.

(1720)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Dans le cas d'une suspension du casier...?

Mme Amanda Gonzalez:

C'est exact.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Un employeur ne pourrait pas, lui non plus, avoir accès à cette information après la suspension du casier, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Angela Connidis:

Il pourrait y avoir accès uniquement dans des circonstances exceptionnelles. La Loi sur le casier judiciaire prévoit que le ministre peut divulguer l'information à un employeur si c'est pertinent. Les services de police nous font souvent la demande pour un postulant, et si après avoir examiné le dossier nous considérons que cela est pertinent pour l'emploi, il revient alors au ministre de décider si oui ou non...

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Avez-vous en tête des situations où il pourrait être pertinent de le faire lorsque la personne a été condamnée pour possession simple de marijuana?

Mme Angela Connidis:

Non, je n'ai pas d'exemple qui me vienne à l'esprit en ce moment.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Très bien.

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, madame Sahota.

Monsieur Eglinski, vous avez cinq minutes. Allez-y, s'il vous plaît.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Je vais vous bombarder de petites questions.

Vous avez parlé des programmes de départ. Avez-vous déjà proposé à des groupes communautaires, comme le Réseau de développement des collectivités du Canada ou des groupes de soutien communautaire ou familial, de les former?

Les organismes communautaires ont toujours besoin de financement. Ils sont là pour servir la communauté. Ils ne sont pas là pour se remplir les poches. Nous savons tous qu'il y a beaucoup d'individus sans scrupules qui travaillent aux dossiers de libération conditionnelle, alors avez-vous déjà envisagé cette option, ou allez-vous le faire?

Mme Angela Connidis:

Désolée, vous suggériez de leur demander de faire quoi?

M. Jim Eglinski:

Je parlais de leur demander d'aider les gens à présenter une demande de libération conditionnelle. Ce sont des gens qui travaillent bénévolement au sein de la communauté et ils cherchent toujours du financement. Vous pourriez les aider en leur fournissant du financement, vous pourriez aider ces organismes et aider les communautés.

Mme Angela Connidis:

Oui, nous y réfléchissions.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Gardez cela à l'esprit, s'il vous plaît. Merci.

Deuxièmement...

Mme Angela Connidis:

Je garde cela bien en tête, faites-moi confiance.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Brigitte, vous avez parlé d'aller dans les communautés pour obtenir les documents, etc.

Au cours de mes 35 années au sein de la police, j'ai travaillé dans de très petites communautés où il n'y avait pas de palais de justice et où les juges étaient à l'époque des profanes. Le juge s'assoyait dans un coin du poste pour entendre la cause, et la personne recevait sa condamnation.

Où cette personne doit-elle se rendre pour obtenir son casier? La condamnation s'y trouvera. La condamnation sera envoyée à Amanda qui l'aura consignée, mais personne au poste n'arrivera à trouver ce petit dossier placé dans un petit livre et sans doute enfoui sous une pile de documents quelque part au poste ou dans un édifice communautaire, parce qu'il n'y a pas de palais de justice.

Comment cette personne fait-elle pour que son casier soit suspendu?

Mme Brigitte Lavigne:

Je crois que nous avons des demandeurs qui viennent nous voir aujourd'hui pour obtenir un pardon ou une suspension de casier et qui se trouvent dans la même situation. Il y en a partout au pays. Ils nous fournissent l'information dont ils ont besoin pour leur demande.

M. Jim Eglinski:

S'ils ne peuvent pas obtenir l'information, tout s'arrête là alors.

Mme Brigitte Lavigne:

Je ne saurais vous dire le nombre de personnes qui se trouvent dans une région éloignée et qui ont été considérées comme inadmissibles parce qu'elles n'avaient pas l'information. Nous avons toutefois des gens qui ont été condamnés un peu partout au pays et qui ont fait une demande dans le cadre du programme et qui ont obtenu un pardon ou une suspension de casier.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Avant de déposer le projet de loi C-93, avez-vous discuté avec des intervenants? Pouvez-vous nous parler des préoccupations que les divers groupes, que ce soit la GRC ou les municipalités, pouvaient avoir à propos de fournir ces dossiers ou de demander à des gens de faire des recherches à ce sujet? Pouvez-vous me parler des groupes avec qui vous avez discuté?

Mme Angela Connidis:

J'ai rencontré divers organismes de justice pénale: la Société John Howard, la Société Elizabeth Fry, la Société St-Léonard, des membres des Associations nationales intéressées à la justice criminelle. Nous avions aussi un sondage en ligne il y a quelques années sur le système de pardon en général. Une des réponses que nous avons eues était que les procédures de pardon devraient être plus simples, notamment dans le cas des condamnations pour infractions liées à l'homosexualité. Il devrait y avoir une façon de radier ces condamnations, de même que celles liées à d'autres infractions qui ne sont plus des crimes aujourd'hui.

Les gens que je consulte régulièrement me parlent surtout des problèmes que pourraient avoir les communautés marginalisées et du fait qu'il sera plus difficile pour nombre d'entre elles de demander un pardon. On a beaucoup parlé de la radiation par opposition au pardon. J'ai discuté avec les intervenants de beaucoup de problèmes dont nous parlons ici.

(1725)

M. Jim Eglinski:

En avez-vous réglé certains? Pouvez-vous me donner quelques exemples?

Mme Angela Connidis:

Le projet de loi C-93 est le fruit de nombre de ces discussions, et des discussions que nous continuons d'avoir sur les façons de faire pour que certaines communautés marginalisées puissent plus facilement présenter une demande.

M. Jim Eglinski:

La communauté qui se trouve au beau milieu de l'Arctique est aussi une communauté marginalisée.

Mme Angela Connidis:

Oui.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Comment une personne qui habite maintenant Toronto fait-elle pour se procurer son casier quand il ne se trouve plus personne sur place pour le trouver parce que le tribunal peut n'avoir siégé que de façon ponctuelle?

Mme Angela Connidis:

C'est une très bonne question.

Je ne suis pas certaine si vous avez...

M. Jim Eglinski:

Ce n'est pas équitable pour tout le monde, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Angela Connidis:

C'est difficile que ce le soit dans un grand pays. Vous avez entièrement raison.

Le président:

Je pense que c'est à peu près tout.

Monsieur Dubé...

M. Jim Eglinski:

Il me restait une autre petite question, mais c'est très bien.

Le président:

Monsieur Dubé et vous semblez poser les mêmes questions aujourd'hui.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Nous nous préoccupons des mêmes choses, je présume.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Ce n'est pas toujours une bonne chose.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Je suis heureux de constater que vous changez. Allez-vous devenir conservateur?

M. Matthew Dubé:

Prudence, les élections s'en viennent, vous savez.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Matthew Dubé: J'ai quelques petites questions sur l'admissibilité. J'aimerais simplement avoir une précision, car il se peut qu'il y ait eu un peu de confusion au sujet d'une question précédente. Une personne qui aurait des amendes non payées n'est pas admissible à la procédure accélérée qui est proposée dans le projet de loi. Est-ce exact?

Mme Angela Connidis:

Elle peut payer ses amendes et devenir admissible sur-le-champ.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Si elle n'a pas payé toutes ses amendes, elle n'est pas admissible, n'est-ce pas?

Mme Angela Connidis:

Elle n'a pas terminé d'acquitter sa peine.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Très bien, merci.

Il en va de même pour ceux qui ont des infractions contre l'administration de la justice, si bien que le défaut de comparaître devant un tribunal fera en sorte qu'une personne ne sera pas admissible à la procédure proposée dans le projet de loi C-93.

Mme Angela Connidis:

Si ce n'est pas en lien avec ce qui est prévu, je ne pense pas… allez-y.

Le président:

Allez-y, Brigitte.

Mme Brigitte Lavigne:

Si la personne a d'autres condamnations, elle ne serait pas admissible à la procédure.

M. Matthew Dubé:

D'accord. Il n'y a pas d'exception pour les cas liés à l'administration de la justice. Si une personne ne se présente pas devant le tribunal, elle..?

Mme Brigitte Lavigne:

Si une personne compte une autre condamnation dans son casier judiciaire, elle serait dirigée vers notre programme régulier.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Il s'agit d'un exemple hypothétique, un exercice périlleux dans le type de travail que nous faisons, mais je vais me lancer. Disons qu'une personne a commis une infraction mineure, mais qu'elle fait des démarches pour obtenir une suspension de casier pour une condamnation qui n'a pas de lien, et qu'elle a reçu une condamnation pour possession au cours des dernières années pendant que le débat sur la légalisation se déroulait. Elle ne serait pas admissible parce que son casier n'a pas encore été suspendu, n'est-ce pas? Elle était seulement en train de faire les démarches en ce sens.

Mme Angela Connidis:

Pour la première infraction...?

M. Matthew Dubé:

Oui.

Mme Angela Connidis:

C'est exact. Sa période d'attente doit être terminée.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Quand vous parlez des 10 000 sur les 250 000, est-ce que cela comprend les personnes qui ne sont pas admissibles en raison des critères dont nous avons discuté?

Mme Angela Connidis:

Les 10 000 comprennent ceux qui ont seulement une condamnation pour possession simple de cannabis.

M. Matthew Dubé:

D'accord. Sur les 240 000 qui restent, je sais que c'est probablement difficile parce que certaines personnes peuvent être décédées et qu'il peut y avoir d'autres raisons, mais savez-vous combien ne sont pas admissibles sous le projet de loi C-93 en raison d'autres problèmes comme ceux dont nous venons de discuter, parce qu'elles ont d'autres condamnations?

Mme Angela Connidis:

Je ne sais pas.

M. Matthew Dubé:

D'accord.

Le président:

Merci.

J'ai une dernière question. Comme vous le savez, le ministère de la Défense a un système de justice militaire, un système un peu hybride, qui comporte un volet judiciaire et un volet disciplinaire. Que se produirait-il dans le cas d'un soldat qui a reçu une condamnation dans le système de justice militaire pour possession de marijuana?

Mme Brigitte Lavigne:

Les personnes condamnées sous la Loi sur la défense nationale seraient aussi admissibles si elles ont été condamnées seulement pour possession simple de cannabis. Dans le cas des membres actifs et des anciens membres, nous leur demanderions de nous fournir leur feuille de conduite militaire, et nous pourrions ensuite procéder de la même façon que pour une personne ayant reçu une condamnation sous le Code criminel.

Le président:

La suspension du casier s'appliquerait-elle seulement à la condamnation criminelle ou également à la mesure disciplinaire?

Mme Brigitte Lavigne:

Nous informerions le commandant après que la suspension de casier aurait été ordonnée.

Le président:

Le commandant a-t-il le pouvoir d'accepter ou de refuser la suspension du casier?

Mme Brigitte Lavigne:

Il est prévu dans la loi que ces condamnations relèvent de la Loi sur le casier judiciaire, et elles seraient donc séparées.

(1730)

Le président:

Elles seraient donc inscrites au dossier du soldat dans ce cas.

Mme Brigitte Lavigne:

Cela serait supprimé du dossier du soldat une fois que nous les aurions informés de l'ordonnance de suspension du casier.

Le président:

Merci.

Sur ce, j'aimerais vous remercier de votre patience et de vos réponses.

Nous allons lever la séance, mais avant que mes collègues ne quittent la salle, j'ai deux questions administratives à régler. La première est d'écrire à M. Easter, président du Comité permanent des finances, qui se trouve à deux sièges de moi — je vais économiser un timbre — pour lui dire que nous allons étudier la section 10 de la partie 4 du projet de loi C-97. Il me faut une motion pour approuver cela.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'en fais la proposition.

Le président:

La deuxième concerne la rencontre du sous-comité du 10 avril et le compte rendu de ses délibérations.

Nous avons convenu de rencontrer le CPSNR, le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement, le lundi 13 mai pendant une heure pour discuter de son rapport concernant le projet de loi C-93 pour offrir des suspensions accélérées et sans frais de casier judiciaire. Nous avons convenu de commencer cette étude, ce que nous avons fait de toute évidence aujourd'hui, et nous avons convenu que le président devrait répondre à la lettre du 9 avril du président du Comité permanent des finances, ce que nous venons de faire.

Puis-je avoir une motion pour accepter le rapport du sous-comité?

Un député: J'en fais la proposition.

Le président: Merci.

Sur ce, nous allons lever la séance, et les membres du sous-comité se réuniront dans cinq minutes.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on April 29, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.