header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-04-11 PROC 149

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Members, all the committee members aren't here, because we normally don't meet when the bells are ringing. I will ask the permission of the committee to continue for the sole purpose of hearing the minister's opening statement. Nothing else will occur. If we could let her do that, then we would go to vote.

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP):

I'm good with that.

The Chair:

Are you guys good? Okay.

Thank you very much, Minister. We'll get right on with it, because we have to go vote. Then you will come back after the vote.

The Honourable Karina Gould (Minister of Democratic Institutions):

Yes.

Thank you very much for the invitation to address the committee today. I know all of you have a copy of my remarks. I will be giving a slightly shorter version, but you have all of that information.

It is my pleasure to appear and to use the opportunity to outline the government's plan to safeguard the 2019 federal election.[Translation]

I'm pleased to be joined by officials today who will speak about the technical aspects of our plan. These officials are Allen Sutherland, Assistant Secretary to Cabinet, Machinery of Government and Democratic Institutions at the Privy Council; Daniel Rogers, Deputy Chief of SIGNIT at the Communications Security Establishment; and André Boucher, Assistant Deputy Minister of Operations at the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security.

Elections are an opportunity for Canadians to be heard. They can express concerns and opinions through one of the most fundamental rights, which is the right to vote. The next opportunity for Canadians to exercise this right is coming this fall, with Canada's 43rd general election in October.[English]

As we have seen over the past few years, democracies around the world have entered a new era, an era of heightened and dynamic threat that necessitates intensified vigilance by governments, but also by all members of society.[Translation]

Each election plays out in a unique context. This election will be no different. While evidence has confirmed that the 2015 federal election didn't involve any incidents of sophisticated or concerted interference, we can't predict what will happen this fall. However, we can prepare for any possibility.[English]

Earlier this week, along with my colleague, the Minister of National Defence, I announced the release of the 2019 update to the Communications Security Establishment’s report entitled “Cyber Threats to Canada’s Democratic Process”. This updated report highlights that it is very likely Canadian voters will encounter some form of foreign cyber interference in the course of the 2019 federal election.

While CSE underlines that it is unlikely this interference will be on the scale of the Russian activity in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, the report notes that in 2018, half of all the advanced democracies holding national elections, representing a threefold increase since 2015, had their democratic process targeted by cyber-threat activity and that Canada is also at risk. This upward trend is likely to continue in 2019.[Translation]

We've seen that certain tools used to strengthen civic engagement have been co-opted to undermine, disrupt and destabilize democracy. Social media has been misused to spread false or misleading information. In recent years, we've seen foreign actors try to undermine democratic societies and institutions, electoral processes, sovereignty and security.

The CSE's 2017 and 2019 assessments, along with ongoing Canadian intelligence and the experiences of our allies and like-minded countries, have informed and guided our efforts over the past year. This has led to the development of an action plan based on four pillars, engaging all aspects of Canadian society.[English]

Therefore, in addition to reinforcing and protecting government infrastructure, systems and practices, we are also focusing heavily on preparing Canadians and working with digital platforms that have an important role in fostering positive democratic debate and dialogue.

The four pillars of our plan are: enhancing citizen preparedness; improving organizational readiness; combatting foreign interference; and expecting social media platforms to act.

I will highlight some of the most significant initiatives of our plan.[Translation]

On January 30, I announced the digital citizen initiative and a $7 million investment towards improving the resilience of Canadians against online disinformation. In response to the increase in false, misleading and inflammatory information published online and through social media, the Government of Canada has made it a priority to help equip citizens with the tools and skills needed to critically assess online information.

We're also leveraging the “Get Cyber Safe” national public awareness campaign to educate Canadians about cyber security and the simple steps they can take to protect themselves online.

(1110)

[English]

We have established the critical election incident public protocol. This is a simple, clear and non-partisan process for informing Canadians if serious incidents during the writ period threaten the integrity of the 2019 general election. This protocol puts the decision to inform Canadians directly in the hands of five of Canada’s most experienced senior public servants, who have a responsibility to ensure the effective, peaceful transition of power and continuity of government through election periods. The public service has effectively played this role for generations and it will continue to fulfill this important role through the upcoming election and beyond.[Translation]

This protocol will be initiated only to respond to incidents that occur within the writ period and that don't fall within Elections Canada's area of responsibility for the administration of the election.

The threshold for the panel in charge of informing the public will be very high and will be limited to addressing exceptional circumstances that could impair our ability to hold a free and fair election. The panel is expected to come to a decision jointly, based on consensus. It won't be one person deciding what Canadians should know.

I'm thankful that the political parties consulted on the development of this protocol set aside partisanship in the interest of all Canadians. The incorporation of input from all parties has allowed for a fair process that Canadians can trust.[English]

Under the second pillar, improving organizational readiness, one key new initiative is to ensure that political parties are all aware of the nature of the threat, so that they can take the steps needed to enhance their internal security practices and behaviours. The CSE’s 2017 report, as well as its 2019 update, highlight that political parties continue to represent one of the greatest vulnerabilities in the Canadian system. Canada’s national security agencies will offer threat briefings to political party leadership, to ensure that they are able to play their part in securing our elections.[Translation]

Under the third pillar—combatting foreign interference—the government has established the Security and Intelligence Threats to Elections Task Force to improve awareness of foreign threats and support incident assessment and response. The team brings together CSE, CSIS, the RCMP, and Global Affairs Canada to ensure a comprehensive understanding of and response to any threats to Canada. The task force has established a baseline of threat awareness, and has been meeting with international partners to make sure that Canada can effectively assess and mitigate any malicious interference activity.[English]

The fourth pillar is with respect to social media platforms.[Translation]

The transformation of Canada's media landscape affects the whole of society in tangible and pervasive ways. Social media and online platforms are the new arbiters of information and therefore have a responsibility to manage their communities.[English]

We know that they have also been manipulated to spread disinformation, create confusion and exploit societal tension. I have been meeting with social media and digital platforms, including Facebook, Twitter, Google and Microsoft, to secure action to increase transparency, improve authenticity and ensure greater integrity on their platforms. Although discussions are progressing slowly, and have not yet yielded the results we expected at this stage, we remain steadfast in our commitment to secure change from them.[Translation]

Our government has prioritized the protection of Canada's democratic processes and institutions. As a result, we've committed significant new funding towards these efforts. Budget 2019 included an additional $48 million in support of the whole-of-government efforts.[English]

This comprehensive plan is also bolstered by recent legislative efforts. I’d like to also highlight the important advances we’ve made to modernize Canada’s electoral system, making it more accessible, transparent and secure.

(1115)

[Translation]

Bill C-76 takes important steps to counter foreign interference and the threats posed by emerging technologies. [English]

The provisions in this bill, which this committee obviously knows well, are: prohibiting foreign entities from spending any money to influence elections where previously they were able to spend up to $500 unregulated; requiring organizations selling advertising space to not knowingly accept election advertisements from foreign entities; and, adding a prohibition regarding the unauthorized use of computers where there is intent to obstruct, interrupt or interfere with the lawful use of computer data during an election period.[Translation]

Canada has a robust and world-renowned elections administration body in Elections Canada.[English]

While it is impossible to fully predict what kinds of threats we will see in the run-up to Canada's general election, I want to assure this committee that Canada has put in place a solid plan. We continue to test and probe our readiness, and we will continue to take whatever steps we can towards ensuring a free, fair and secure election in 2019.[Translation]

Thank you.

I'll be pleased to answer your questions either now or after the vote. [English]

The Chair:

We'll do that after the vote period.

Before people leave, I have a couple of things.

First, just for the minutes, this is the 149th meeting.

One thing I'll ask you, committee members, when you come back, will relate to future work, which I think we can do really quickly. It's with regard to the estimates on the debate commission and who you want as witnesses. Also, regarding the parallel debating chamber, when we hear from the Australian witness, it has to be in the evening of Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday.

It would be at roughly what time, Mr. Clerk?

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

For us it would be at about 6 p.m., which for them I think would be 8 a.m.

The Chair:

It would be 6 p.m. or 7 p.m. Decide whether you want it to be on a Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday.

Mr. Simms.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

My assistant tells me it's a 14-hour difference. Is that right?

The Clerk: Yes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

What about 7 p.m.?

The Chair:

So that they don't have to get there at eight in the morning?

The Clerk:

It's really up to the committee.

The Chair:

Check with your members before you come back.

Check with all your members, David, as to whether you want a Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday night.

Mr. David Christopherson:

I'll pull them all together, if I can.

The Chair:

Steph, if you could chat with your people, that would be great.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I want to put in dibs for Wednesday.

The Chair:

You're putting in dibs for Wednesday.

Thank you, Minister. We have nine minutes left until the vote. We'll come right back as soon as the vote is over.

(1115)

(1140)

The Chair:

Welcome back to the 149th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. This meeting is being televised.

Today we're joined by the Honourable Karina Gould, Minister of Democratic Institutions, to discuss the government's plan to safeguard the 2019 general election, and the security and intelligence threats to elections task force.

She's accompanied by Allen Sutherland, assistant secretary to the cabinet, machinery of government and democratic institutions, Privy Council Office; and the following officials from the Communications Security Establishment: André Boucher, assistant deputy minister, operations, Canadian Centre for Cyber Security; and Dan Rogers, deputy chief, SIGINT.

Thank you for being here.

Before we start, I have two small points.

Yes, Mr. Simms.

(1145)

Mr. Scott Simms:

I mentioned earlier about the timing of the event. I mentioned that we should do it at 7 p.m. to accommodate the Australians, but really, an hour is not much of a difference.

I've heard from others around the room that 6 p.m. would suffice, and I say that for the sake of my own health.

The Chair:

We'll discuss this after the minister has left.

Just so people know, there's another time allocation debate going on, which is why we're going to rush to make sure we get the minister in.

Could I have unanimous consent to stay partly into the bells for the next vote, to finish the minister's testimony?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Mr. Reid has one other point.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

Yes. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I want to return to this point of order after the minister has departed, probably after we return from voting on the time allocation motion. I just wanted to say that I think there was a technical violation of Standing Order 115(5) in beginning the meeting at all. I will explain my rationale at a later time, once we've dealt with the minister.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you very much for your forbearance in getting this meeting finished.

Let's start with rounds of questioning. Who will be first?

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

You were talking about social media companies. What incentive do social media companies have to change their behaviour?

Hon. Karina Gould:

It's an excellent question. I think the first one is public sentiment. Trust with their users is an important one. Their reputations are also important.

Canadians are some of the most connected people on the planet. In fact, I think the stats indicate that they are the most connected people on the planet. As you may know, 77% of Canadians have a Facebook account; 26% are on Twitter and Instagram, and I think the stat is that about 100% are on Google.

An hon. member: Not in my riding.

Hon. Karina Gould: Maybe not in your riding, so maybe it's 99.9%. We are very connected. We use these platforms on a daily basis and in so many aspects of our lives.

I think platforms want to respond to that. I think you've seen some responses globally, not just here in Canada. They want to be seen as good actors that are promoting democratic values and participation. That's why you've seen some change in behaviour and some more public reporting. I think there's still more to be desired.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are actions such as the recent blocking of Faith Goldy by Facebook the kind of actions you're looking for, or are there different actions you're looking for from social media companies?

Hon. Karina Gould:

One thing I spoke about at the press conference on Monday and in several media interviews since then is that we have been talking to the platforms about a number of different issues that fit within three buckets, which are the authenticity, transparency and integrity of their platforms and of the activity that takes place there.

One item we have discussed with them is just enforcing their own terms of service and their own conditions. Most of the platforms have wording to the effect that they do not accept illegal content or activities that call for violence or that demonstrate violence on their platforms. They have a range of other things. Part of this is just about enforcing their own rules with their users.

I think that Facebook's step on Monday was a step towards that. I welcome that. I think that's important. Those are ongoing conversations we're having with them.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

In another of the committees that I sit on, we're discussing cybersecurity as a threat to national economic security. There's a lot of interesting topic matter coming up relating to physical and technological threats. How severe are these threats against our democracy, against Elections Canada, against parties and against anybody who is involved in the democratic process?

Hon. Karina Gould:

We're taking all of these threats seriously, which is why as soon as I was appointed to this position, I asked the CSE to prepare this report and make it public. It's the first time that any intelligence service around the world has made public a report of this nature. We're seeing more of that happening elsewhere. I also asked the CSE to provide technical support for IT security to all of the political parties that are represented in the House of Commons. That relationship has been established and it's ongoing

We announced on January 30 our plan to protect Canadian democracy, the amendments that were made to Bill C-76, and then this update to the report and the ongoing engagement with social media platforms. I would say that the threat is real. We're taking it seriously and we're acting to protect Canadians.

(1150)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Have you seen any significant culture shift inside the parties, all of them, as a result of this work with the CSE?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I would not be able to comment on that because I'm not engaged in it. I actually don't know about the relationship between the CSE and the parties. I think it's really important that the relationship for trust purposes between the parties and the CSE remain that way, but it's up to the parties to decide how they use that information and how they operate.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's all I have for the moment.

Thank you very much, Minister.

The Chair:

Were you splitting your time?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: Sure.

The Chair: Okay.

Mr. Simms, you have three minutes.

Mr. Scott Simms:

When a serious incident has occurred, what do you see, in your mind, as some of the essential criteria in order for us to be effective?

Hon. Karina Gould:

That's an excellent question. It's one for which I think we can look at past examples around the world to say that these are things that would merit Canadians to be aware of. For example, in the French presidential election, there was the leaking of the Macron campaign emails publicly. That was a pretty big thing which the French government took upon themselves to inform the French people about. There was the consistent and coordinated attempt by the Russians to interfere in the U.S. presidential election which we saw in 2016.

Those are things that we would be alerting Canadians to. It's important to note that this all falls under the critical election incident public protocol, which has a panel of five senior public servants who will receive information from our intelligence agencies and will make that determination based on consensus.

Mr. Scott Simms:

What does the information look like when the panellists for this protocol get it? When they receive that information, will it be a definitive “This is what's happening” or “We suspect and here are the data that we've collected,” and so on and so forth? How comprehensive is that?

Hon. Karina Gould:

It could be either, because it could be difficult to determine attribution specifically at that moment, but our security agencies are professional. They are diligently looking at everything that's going on and should they feel there is something that merits the attention of the panel, they are duty bound to inform them of the information they have at that time.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Speaking of the panel, who constitutes this panel? What are you looking for in the individual panellists to be qualified for this position?

Hon. Karina Gould:

There are five senior public servants who make up this panel. One is the Clerk of the Privy Council. There is the deputy minister of justice, the deputy minister of global affairs, the deputy minister of public safety and the national security and intelligence adviser.

These are five individuals—or five positions, I should say, because it's not about the individual; it's about the position that they hold—who have an extensive background in public service but also have an eye for and an understanding of the global context of the public safety and threat environment. Also we specifically put the deputy minister of justice there as well to have a look at how this impacts things from a rule-of-law perspective.

The Chair:

Now we'll go to Ms. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair, and thank you so much, Minister, for being here again today.

Before I proceed with my questioning and since we are short on time, I'm going to move right into a motion that I know you previously stated you supported, because certainly I do believe you are looking to PROC to assist you in these challenges of trying to come up with appropriate legislation given the balancing nature of all the considerations.

I move: That, pursuant to Standing Order 108(3)(a)(vi), the Committee continue the study of Security and Intelligence Threats to Elections; that the study consist of five meetings; and that the findings be reported to the House.

The Chair:

Do you want to debate this motion now?

(1155)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

No. I will just put that there for the time being.

The Chair:

Then do you want to go on to your questions?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

No, I had given the notice previously, so this is the moving of the motion.

Then I'll move into my questioning.

Of course there's been a lot in the news recently in regard to the social media platforms. We've seen Facebook with two responses now, the first one being the repository, if you will, and the second one in regard to the hate speech earlier.

Then this week Google, of course, has eliminated itself entirely from our electoral process. At present, we're still waiting for Twitter.

Now you have said in the media that the social media platforms have not responded with the appropriate action that you would have hoped for. Certainly we look to you as the government to take some form of action in an effort to find the delicate balance between free speech and the integrity of our elections.

Our leader, Andrew Scheer, said yesterday that he is open to the idea of regulation. Should these social media platforms not be willing to take any action, what are you prepared to do as the minister and the government in an effort to find the balance between these two mediums?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you for the question. I'm glad to hear that it sounds as if we have multi-party support for action, which I think is very encouraging.

I would say that I think we're at a time globally when other countries around the world are also looking at how we can best achieve the objectives that we all share, which is to ensure that people are able to express themselves online, but not do it in a way that would lead to activities or actions that harm our society. I'm really glad to hear the comment you made.

What I've talked about publicly already is to say that this is a moment where, really, all options are on the table. I really welcome the committee looking at this. I think that's a great opportunity.

I'm very interested in following what other countries around the world are doing at the moment. I would point to the U.K., which released a white paper on Monday that puts forward a really interesting concept of the duty of care, which is something that I think is novel and interesting in terms of how social media platforms would have a responsibility to look at—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Minister, if you don't mind, I'll move on.

I don't really feel we're getting a direct answer from you in regard to the action you're willing to take. I understand you are evaluating best practices internationally, but I think Canadians are looking for a response as to what you are willing to do to find that balance. So I, along with Canadians, very much look forward to what is ahead in regard to that.

Moving on, in regard to the third part, you've said that CSE, CSIS, the RCMP and Global Affairs Canada are working together to ensure a comprehensive understanding of and response to any threats to Canada. However, in my evaluation so far, which is laid out in a good document, I think, the CSE 2017 document, we look at the motivations of nation-states, hacktivists, cybercriminals, etc.

In my opinion, Minister, it's not enough that we understand and respond to any threats. What are you doing, along with your counterparts, specifically to deter cybercriminals or foreign adversaries from influencing the election?

Hon. Karina Gould:

We announced, on January 30, a series of measures that we're taking here in Canada to protect Canadians from foreign cyber-threats. Of course, the very nature of foreign cyber-threats means that they are covert, so they're not doing it in a way that says, “Hey, we're here doing it.” There are lots of conversations going on at the global level that are denouncing this kind of activity. Counterparts around the world have stated that, and we have stated that here in Canada. I think the very facts that we have the SITE task force up and running, which is actively monitoring this, and that we have our public protocol that will inform Canadians are really important steps, things that didn't exist before here in Canada, quite frankly. This is a really positive thing.

The other part of the announcement that I think is really important to mention is the $7 million that was announced for civic digital and media literacy initiatives for Canadian citizens to have a broader understanding of the digital environment particularly in elections.

(1200)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you, Minister. I appreciate that.

Again, I'm not really seeing a direct, clear path of action that I think Canadians and I would appreciate.

The one piece of action you have come out on quite clearly is the critical incident protocol, which we, as Conservatives, were very concerned about, being that this group of five would be left in the control of the government and that we as the opposition parties are beholden to accept what they say, through you, to be full and complete information. I think that we are vindicated in our concern, given the absence and departure of the previous Clerk of the Privy Council. To me, that definitely shows the potential flaws within this.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I would just push back on that. In the development of the protocol, all of the parties had input into that. Although it was not parliamentarians, it was each of the political parties.

One thing we did announce, which I think is a very clear and tangible action and is really important to ensure the non-partisan nature of this, is the fact that we have extended security clearances and ongoing briefings to each of the leaders of the political parties represented in the House of Commons and up to four of their top campaign staff. This is something to really ensure that everyone is on the same page and gets information to build that trust and to have that trust. That is something that is ongoing.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I think we should have included the Chief Electoral Officer, but perhaps we can have that conversation another day.

Hon. Karina Gould:

I'd be happy to talk about what the Chief Electoral Officer stated when this announcement was made, which was that, in fact, his job is to administer the election and that he has been engaged in this process, and that it is up to the security agencies to determine whether there has been a threat.

I think that's a really important—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

That sounds ridiculous, Minister, that the one administering the election could provide a free and fair election, very frankly.

The Chair:

We're finished this round.

We'll go to the NDP.

Mr. Christopherson.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Minister, thank you very much for attending again.

I just want to say that, unlike some ministers past, not once have you played a game or taken the opportunity for scheduling changes in order to dodge or avoid the questions. Some of them have been pretty tough meetings. You were always willing to be accountable, and that's appreciated. Thank you, Minister.

I want to ask one question, and then I want to turn to my colleague, Mr. Cullen, who is far more immersed in the minutiae of this and will ask far better questions than I would. However, I have one.

On the protocol panel, I look at the five members: Clerk of the Privy Council, national security and intelligence adviser, deputy minister of this, deputy minister of that, and deputy minister of another. Every one of them is, of course, appointed by the executive. Parliament is much like my dad: Trust everyone, but always cut the cards.

Assuming that nothing is going to change—we have a majority government that has decided this is the way we're going to do it, so this is the way we're going to do it—will there be built into the process an opportunity for Parliament to review the information this panel received and the actions they chose or did not choose to take?

Hon. Karina Gould:

There is a plan to report, following the election, on how it reported and how it functioned. I am sure that this committee, following the election, could take that up.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That sounds a little wishy-washy. They're reporting to whom? Either there's going to be a review by Parliament or there isn't. If they're going to issue a report—

Hon. Karina Gould:

The report will be presented to the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians. The NSICOP can review it.

Mr. David Christopherson:

All right. What about PROC?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I think that because of the classified nature of the information.... NSICOP was set up so that parliamentarians could review classified information.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Yes, I understand that. We might need to have a little bit of a discussion about that. I can appreciate that. Again, I've spent some time in that world, but at the end of the day, they are guided by some pretty strong issues around intelligence, and that's not what we would be seeking. We would be seeking the information that was given and any action that was taken or not taken, as much as can be divulged. If it has to be a two-tier process and we get a report from our committee, fine, but—

Hon. Karina Gould:

Perhaps that's a good way to do it.

Mr. David Christopherson:

At the end of the day, that body should not be allowed to proceed when they're appointed solely by the executive without having, at the very least, a key scrutinizing process at the end to ensure they did what Parliament would expect, and if we can make any improvements going forward.

Clearly, that's a little bit of work. Hopefully, we can tie that up before we rise in June, Mr. Chair.

(1205)

Hon. Karina Gould:

There will be a classified version that goes to NSICOP, and there will be a public report available as well. If PROC wishes to study that, I think that would be absolutely welcome, and I think this process should be reviewed following the next election. I absolutely welcome that from parliamentarians.

Mr. David Christopherson:

That sounds good. We just need to nail down the details, Chair, but we can do that.

Thanks, Minister.

Now I'll pass it to my colleague Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Christopherson.

Welcome, Minister.

It's interesting, because the flaw of the design was somewhat exposed when the Clerk of the Privy Council sat in front of the justice committee and ended up resigning because, as he said in his letter, he had lost the faith of the other political parties. That was inherently one of our concerns with the design of your process going into something as sensitive as an election and the decisions that get made. Whether to divulge that there's been a hack of a political party or not can sway an election, as you would imagine, one way or the other.

Mr. Boucher, I have a quick question.

You said in your recent report, which confirms a report from almost two years ago, that hacking into our elections is—I think the term your agency used was—very likely, in terms of foreign cyber-attack. Is that right?

Mr. André Boucher (Assistant Deputy Minister, Operations, Canadian Centre for Cyber Security, Communications Security Establishment):

Attempts of foreign interference into our elections are very likely.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We've seen in the past, in the U.S., the U.K. and France, that one of the points of attack has been political party databases. Is that correct?

Mr. André Boucher:

That is.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Is that also true for Canada?

Mr. André Boucher:

The intent of the methods by which the opponents are going to try to address foreign interference definitely includes the political parties' key information.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right, because that key information, those databases, voter information, voter preferences.... If somebody is looking to interfere in a Canadian election, getting access to those databases would help weaponize their lies, I suppose, or weaponize their attempts to interfere. Is that a fair point to draw?

Mr. André Boucher:

Absolutely, and that's why we're engaged so proactively with the parties, so they can prepare themselves and detect and react—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right, and you're providing that valuable advice, but there's nothing required under law, under the recent elections changes that this government brought in, to make those parties fall under, say, something like PIPEDA, and there's no legal standard of how to protect that vital information. Is that correct?

Mr. André Boucher:

I can say that, within the current method of work, the parties have been engaging with us, and they are taking hold of what the important measures are and taking action.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I understand. My question is, is there anything required under law in terms of the standard of protection for that information?

Mr. André Boucher:

Not to my knowledge.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Right. So, Minister, why not? You, as the democratic institutions minister, had a report more than a year and a half ago warning of this as the point source of threat. The Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics recommended to you, that parties should be brought in and required by law to have this standard of protection to keep our elections safe. You chose not to do that. The advice is great. The counsel, working with the parties, is great, but you chose not to do that. Why not?

Hon. Karina Gould:

We specifically chose to develop this relationship between CSE and the political parties because political parties are separate from government. They're unique in terms of how they engage with Canadians, and it's important for them to have that independence, I believe, and I think you would agree with me on that. That's why we chose to go down this route, to ensure that we were providing the advice to political parties. It's how they choose to use it, but particularly from a security point of view, it's to give them the best advice and the best tools available to protect their databases and their information.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

We're talking about the safety of our elections. On the safety of our roads, we don't give drivers advice and let them choose how fast to drive. We give them speed limits, because we know there's a danger in going above certain speeds. We know from your own report that you asked for from the CSE 20 months ago now that there is a credible threat and that one of the access points was this. You said to drive at whatever speed you like, and here's some advice that you should only drive this fast, but there's nothing required. That's what concerns me going into this election that's just a few months away.

I have a question about social media. You suggested that you were disappointed with the lack of action from the social media agencies in terms of hate speech and banning certain groups. Facebook banned a few, which is a good first start, but there are many more, and those groups, Faith Goldy and the others, have been spreading that hate for years.

You expressed disappointment, and you also suggested that they have done more in the European context. Europe has laws. Europe is bringing in regulations. England has introduced some more regulations, rules to guide the social media agencies.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Well, they've introduced a white paper to discuss them, and I would say, with regard to the regulations, that what's going on in the EU with social media platforms is that it's a voluntary code of practice that the social media platforms have undertaken themselves. That is basically the conversation we've been having, if they would do the the same thing here in Canada.

(1210)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

They're not.

Hon. Karina Gould:

To date, they have decided that's not something they want to pursue. However, those conversations are ongoing. I would say that after the comments on Monday, there has been a renewed interest in having a conversation about what they will do here in Canada.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I understand all that, but if you look at the main differences between Canada and the European Union, the European Union has done much more in legislation than Canada has. That's—

Hon. Karina Gould:

Canada is the first country—

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Allow me to—

The Chair:

Be brief, Minister.

The time is up.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Sorry, but I haven't actually finished my question.

Europe has actually brought in regulations and rules. Social media groups have actually responded. You seem naive and disappointed that they haven't done the same thing here.

Hon. Karina Gould:

So has Canada, Mr. Cullen. With Bill C-76 we are the first jurisdiction to require online platforms to have an online ad registry. Actually, there has been response from that. Facebook is doing their ad library. Google has actually said they will not have political ads here in Canada. We are still waiting to hear from Twitter.

When you talk about regulation, in fact, Canada has acted. We were a first movement. Political ads are what we saw particularly in the U.S. election, particularly in the British referendum. They were one of the primary tools with regard to foreign interference using an online mechanism. This is a really important step. It's an important method for transparency and to protect our elections.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Madam Lapointe. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I want to thank Minister Gould and everyone for being here today.

When you were answering questions earlier, you were cut off. You mentioned the white paper in the United Kingdom. Do you have anything to add? You spoke about the European Union, but do you have anything to add about Great Britain?

Hon. Karina Gould:

The white paper released on Monday in Great Britain is very good. There's the concept—I don't know how to say it in French—[English] it's a duty of care. [Translation]

The term has been used in the hospitality industry to ensure that accommodation units, for example, have functional elevators, and so on.

This concept has been applied to digital platforms with regard to illegal content or content that may pose risks to people's safety. The platforms must take responsibility in this area.

This is good. The idea is to apply a policy regime to digital platforms, since the platforms can be held accountable for their actions. It's new, it's different and it's forward-looking. We want to avoid creating legislation or policies that resolve past issues, but that aren't flexible for the future.

My officials and I have been carefully studying this matter. However, we've also been looking at other activities, for example, in Germany, France or Australia, where good things are being done. I think that we could find a Canadian solution.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you.

You mentioned France earlier. You just mentioned France again, while also talking about Germany.

At last year's G7 summit in Charlevoix, you discussed the issues concerning social media platforms. You said that there had been issues in France, such as information leaks. We've also been looking at the American election, and it's clear that something was wrong.

Do you share information that makes it possible to go even further? You were just talking about Great Britain and the European Union. However, do you share information to help us learn from the mistakes of others, so to speak?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Yes. I think that the example of Germany is good. Germany has a bill against online hate, which the country wants to apply to digital platforms. To that end, Germany has introduced very heavy fines for digital platforms that fail to erase messages or images that promote hate. That's good.

We need to think about illegal content and about how we can ensure that platforms aren't manipulated to facilitate illegal activity. We also need to think about violent content. We need to think about a number of things to change the experience of people who use digital platforms.

(1215)

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay.

You expressed some disappointment with regard to your meetings with representatives of social media, such as Facebook. Have any other meetings been scheduled?

You said that the European Union has a voluntary code of practice. Is our approach coercive?

Hon. Karina Gould:

We're continuing our discussions with representatives of digital platforms to see what they could do here in Canada before the next federal election. My office has meetings scheduled for next week. I hope that they'll be more open to applying in Canada the election protection measures that they implemented in other countries. I think that Canadians deserve the same treatment as other people around the world.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you, Ms. Gould.

Do I have any time left, Mr. Chair? [English]

The Chair:

You have a minute and a half. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Okay. I'll take it. [English]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Nathan wants it. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

No, it's my turn. I'm very territorial.

Minister Gould, a reference was made earlier to your confidence in the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada. Can you elaborate on this?

Hon. Karina Gould:

I have a great deal of confidence in the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada with regard to the entire administration of federal elections. Canadians can be very proud of this organization, which I believe is the best in the world. A number of countries draw inspiration from the organization of Canadian elections on a technical level. I have a great deal of confidence in the people in this organization, and I'm very proud of their work. They're very professional and they take their responsibilities very seriously.

Canadians have confidence in the electoral process and in the election results, which is the most important thing.

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Thank you, Ms. Gould.

Hon. Karina Gould:

Thank you, Ms. Lapointe. [English]

The Chair:

Thank you.

For one last intervention, we have Ms. Kusie, for five minutes.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

Minister, I'll go back to the critical election incident public protocol. How does the team make their decision on whether or not to inform the public as to a threat within the election?

Hon. Karina Gould:

The decision to inform the public will be based on their assessment that will be derived from consensus as to whether the incident compromises a free and fair election. We have made this bar significantly high, because if there were a public announcement, that would obviously be of significance to the Canadian population. Therefore, it's really important that the bar be set very high.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

What criteria are they using, please?

Hon. Karina Gould:

What we have established is a free and fair election—

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

How do you determine a free and fair election?

Hon. Karina Gould:

They will make that assessment based on the information they have.

One thing I think is important to note is that this will be very context-driven and context-specific, because it could be that an incident that occurred in another country that we may use as an example doesn't have the same kind of impact here in Canada. What's important is for them to make that decision based on the information that our security agencies are providing them.

One thing I would note with regard to the protocol is that when they decide to make that public, they will be advising the CEO of Elections Canada, as well as the leaders of the political parties. Also, as I mentioned earlier, the fact that both the leaders and a number of their senior campaign advisers will be given security clearances, they will be in regular contact with our security agencies to give them an update of what's going on during and in the lead-up to the campaign.

(1220)

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I appreciate this. I feel as though we're just getting information we received previously. I wish there were more specifics and more information. Will the panel meet on a consistent basis or only on the occasion of an incident?

Hon. Karina Gould:

The panel will receive regular briefings.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Will they be meeting regularly to evaluate the briefings?

Hon. Karina Gould:

They will receive regular briefings, and it will be up to them to determine how they deal with that information.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Again, that's not very specific.

Will political parties be notified if the panel is convening?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Not necessarily; only if they feel they will need to make something public. However, the political parties will receive regular briefings from the security agencies.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Which individuals will decide whether or not to bring critical threats to the attention of the panel?

Hon. Karina Gould:

That will be left up to our very capable security agencies.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

If the parties disagree with the decision to bring an incident to the panel, is there a means to appeal the decision?

Hon. Karina Gould:

For the integrity of the process, the parties will not be informed of whether an incident is brought to the panel.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

As I said, we would appreciate a lot more information in regard to the criteria. We know that in other jurisdictions, adversaries have used social media to manipulate the public, and to create and polarize political and social issues. Similar to my question before, what concrete initiatives have you employed to ensure that this type of influence does not happen here in Canada leading up to the 2019 election?

Hon. Karina Gould:

Within Bill C-76, as was noted, social media platforms have been banned from knowingly accepting foreign funding for political advertisements. They are also required, if they do receive political advertisements during the pre-writ and writ periods, to have an ad registry to disclose that information. Those are two really important steps that have been taken that address some of the previous issues we've seen around the world with regard to how social media platforms were manipulated.

In terms of other conversations we've been having with social media platforms, I have discussed with them the idea of a “Canada too” concept for activities they've been willing to undertake in other jurisdictions to safeguard those elections—that they do that here in Canada as well, and that they label bot activity on their platforms. Canadians should know if they're interacting with a person or with a bot when they're interacting online. They should be monitoring for authentic behaviour as well. I do know that the platforms are monitoring this space, and that they are actively removing accounts they find to be problematic. We would just like more clarity and more transparency in those activities, so that Canadians can have greater confidence in the activity they're seeing online.

The Chair:

Thank you very much, Minister. We appreciate that, and I'm sure we'll see you again.

We have 17 minutes left. We have just a couple things for the whip, as I said, before the break.

Scott, one of the things we asked about is the time we meet with the Australians—Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday. Which time were you saying?

Mr. Scott Simms:

I originally said 7 p.m. However, after receiving a wave of apprehension and hate—maybe that's a strong word—six o'clock is fine.

The Chair:

We would meet at six o'clock. Would that be on Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday?

Mr. Scott Reid:

We're not sure which Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday it would be.

The Chair:

It would be the first or second week back.

Mr. Scott Reid:

To state the obvious problem with some of these days, we could be running into votes at that time, which could throw things off. This is relevant to Scott. The problem with trying to schedule something for 6 p.m. on a Tuesday or Wednesday is that it's right in the middle of when votes are likely to be. We stand a very good chance of standing up our Australians, after they've gone to the trouble of arranging to be there for us. Notwithstanding those who expressed hatred and loathing towards you at an earlier point in time, I am concerned that by choosing six instead of seven, when votes are typically over, we could create a situation where they're cooling their heels for an hour. That is, I think, a meaningful consideration.

(1225)

Mr. Scott Simms:

Would you like to hold the meeting at seven?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Seven would be my own preference.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That's seven o'clock and 8:30 in Newfoundland?

The Chair:

We will meet at seven o'clock on the earliest Tuesday possible that the Australians are available. Is that okay?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Chair, before we adjourn to go to vote, could we perhaps vote on the motion I put forward, please?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a question on that. Do we have proper notice of that? I have a notice of motion from Ms. Kusie, but it's not that motion.

The Chair:

Wait a second. There's something else I want to finish first.

On the debates commission estimates, I know you had the witnesses you wanted. Can you just say that?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

We'd do one hour for each of them.

The Chair:

The Conservatives are proposing one hour with the debates commissioner, and one hour with the minister, on the debates commission's main estimates.

Mr. Scott Simms:

That sounds good to me.

The Chair:

Does everyone agree?

Mr. Scott Reid:

We agree. They're separate hours.

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is it concurrent or consecutive?

The Chair:

As soon as they're available....

There's one other thing, Ms. Kusie, before we go to your motion.

Mr. Reid, could you hold up those reports? Do you still have them?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I do, as a matter of fact. I will return them to you.

The Chair:

One of the other committees, yesterday, if you were in the House, actually made a report—it was on foreign policy in the Arctic—in four aboriginal languages. They made a mistake in not saying which ones in the report, but I propose to our committee that we actually get the report that we did on aboriginal languages translated into....

They picked the languages here by picking the languages of the witnesses. Any witnesses who were aboriginal or who spoke an aboriginal language, they picked those languages.

I might suggest that we minimally do that and maybe use the three languages most popularly used in Canada, which would be Inuktitut, Cree and Ojibwa. Mr. Reid, do you have any thoughts on that?

Mr. David Christopherson:

That sounds good. We're getting our report translated.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I was chatting about the point of order, and as a result, I didn't hear what you had to say. If it's the same thing that you said to me earlier, that's a good thought.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The only question I have procedurally is if it matters that it's already been tabled and adopted by the House.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I will raise one concern, Mr. Chair.

This report, if I'm not mistaken, dealt with the north. Am I correct? The indigenous languages that were chosen are effectively the languages of—

The Chair:

—of the witnesses.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's right. The issue we have is in choosing which indigenous languages to use and which not to use. I have no idea how to resolve that.

The Chair:

I just made a proposal on that while you were talking.

I said that, first of all, we use any of the aboriginal languages spoken by the witnesses before us, plus perhaps the three most prevalent ones in Canada: Inuktitut, Cree and Ojibwa. Some of them are covered by witnesses anyway.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have no objection to this. Does anybody else...?

Mr. Scott Simms:

I would like to hear Mr. Cullen's thoughts on this, if that's all right.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

All those languages stop at the Rockies, which would be one thing.

I very much echo the sentiments of the witnesses about having their languages put down properly, but the committee arbitrarily picking three just by volume of speakers, I understand the logic but it does feel a bit arbitrary, especially with something as sensitive as how something is going to be expressed. As good a report as this is, I would maybe give the committee some time to contemplate and maybe even consult with indigenous language speakers as to how to go about it.

The Chair:

Would the committee be in agreement with translating it into the languages of the witnesses who were proposed to us on this study?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: We'll leave it up to you to find the money, Mr. Clerk.

Mr. David Christopherson:

Chair, I know you're about to go to another notice of motion and engage in a debate. I'd just like the opportunity to formally submit a notice of motion, not to be debated today, but also to underscore that I'm just the vehicle for this. This is the work of a number of respected veteran parliamentarians who are looking for changes. Mr. Reid is among them. Hopefully we'll be able to give them an opportunity to have their thoughts aired. That's what this is about.

For now, it's just a technicality. It's in both languages and it won't come up again until the next meeting.

Thank you, Chair.

(1230)

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, strictly speaking, points of order take priority, so I guess I'd be able to have priority over Ms. Kusie's motion, but that is not my objective.

My objective was to say this. We had agreed, in sort of a gentlemen's agreement—or a gentle people's agreement, to be politically correct—that we would deal with the point of order after we return. Given the amount of time we're going to have left, however, may I suggest that we all know what the point of order is about. The section has been mentioned, so I suggest that we leave it and return to it at our next meeting, which would be after the break. That would give people a chance to look over the procedural questions and we'll have a more informed debate. We won't all have to come back with five minutes remaining.

The Chair:

Sure. We'll do it at the next meeting where we have space.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, that's right.

The Chair:

Okay. Ms. Kusie, you want a vote on your motion, you basically said.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I raise a point of order on that, which is that we had a notice of motion for Ms. Kusie on a motion on that topic but not on that motion. I've never seen that motion before. Therefore, it would be procedurally invalid at this point, but it could be brought in as a notice.

The Chair:

Clerk, you can use the microphone.

The Clerk:

The committee's routine motion allows members to move motions when they're relevant to the subject being studied.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay, that's what I was going to say.

Pardon me. Continue, Clerk. [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

Can I have it in French? [English]

The Chair:

Is the motion translated into French?

Well, she did it verbally, right? So you can— [Translation]

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I can introduce it in French if you wish. [English]

The Chair:

When you're discussing a topic, you can do a motion verbally at the committee at the time.

We'll just read it again, and then you'll get it in French. Okay? [Translation]

Ms. Linda Lapointe:

I wanted to have it in writing.

Do you have it in writing in French? [English]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Might I suggest that we start our next meeting on this topic?

The Chair:

Our next meeting is on the estimates.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I would prefer that it be resolved today.

The Chair:

Okay, we can vote. She can do a verbal motion, and we can vote on it.

Just say it again.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay.

The motion reads: That, pursuant to Standing Order 108(3)(a)(vi), the Committee continue the study of Security and Intelligence Threats to Elections; that the study consist of five meetings; and that the findings be reported to the House.

The Chair:

Is the committee ready to vote?

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If we're not going to take the time to have a proper discussion, I'm going to have to vote against it at this time.

It's up to you. If you want to have a proper debate in the future, I'm happy to do that, but if it's now, it's no.

The Chair:

Is there any other debate?

The Chair:

Mr. Cullen.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's a suggestion of openness to the idea and the concept of studying this, but it's just a matter of the process being used. There might simply be a need to have a conversation between parties or within parties, but there is a serious openness to considering it. I think the topic is excellent. Clearly this is something that we should all be—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'm happy to have a proper discussion, but we have six minutes until the votes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I understand, so the time pressure might be a factor.

I wonder, my Conservative colleague, if this is something that we're interested in doing, if standing it for a moment, but with an indication and a commitment to seriously consider it and even look at maybe making this happen prior to Parliament rising would be.... I just don't want to throw the baby out with the bathwater, as they say.

The Chair:

Stephanie, it's up to you. We could vote now or we could discuss it later.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay, we can discuss it later.

The Chair:

Okay, we'll discuss it as soon as possible.

Thank you very much for being effective.

As we said before, we have estimates at the next couple of meetings, and we'll do these two motions.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Chair, before we adjourn, I do have one other thing to say.

Regarding the practice of keeping the committee going with unanimous consent, the consent was given for one purpose and we have morphed into several purposes. Nobody did anything wrong, but I think we agreed to extend it for the purpose of listening to the minister's testimony, and several other items came up.

As a practical matter, I think we should be prepared to discuss that when we return to my point of order, because I think this is related to that point of order.

The Chair:

Is that part of your point of order?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Well, it will be one of the things that we should all be prepared to discuss at that time.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Okay.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Chers collègues, tous les membres du Comité ne sont pas ici, car nous ne nous réunissons normalement pas quand la sonnerie résonne. Je vais demander la permission au Comité de poursuivre dans le seul but d’entendre la déclaration liminaire de la ministre. Écoutons-la et allons voter ensuite.

M. David Christopherson (Hamilton-Centre, NPD):

Cela me convient.

Le président:

Cela vous va-t-il? Bien.

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre. Nous allons commencer tout de suite, parce que nous devons aller voter. Vous reviendrez après le vote.

L'honorable Karina Gould (ministre des Institutions démocratiques):

Bien.

Merci beaucoup de m’avoir invitée à m’adresser au Comité, aujourd'hui. Je sais que vous avez tous une copie de mon exposé. Je vais vous en donner une version abrégée, mais vous avez toute l'information voulue.

Je suis ravie de cette comparution dont je vais profiter pour vous présenter les grandes lignes du plan du gouvernement visant à protéger les élections générales de 2019.[Français]

J'ai le plaisir d'être accompagnée aujourd'hui de fonctionnaires qui vous parleront des aspects techniques de notre plan. Il s'agit d'Allen Sutherland, secrétaire adjoint du Cabinet, Appareil gouvernemental et Institutions démocratiques au Conseil privé; de Daniel Rogers, chef adjoint du SIGINT au Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications; et d'André Boucher, sous-ministre adjoint, Opérations, au Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité.

Les élections offrent à la population l'occasion de se faire entendre. Elles lui permettent d'exprimer ses préoccupations et ses opinions dans le cadre d'un des droits les plus fondamentaux qui soient: le droit de vote. Les Canadiennes et les Canadiens auront l'occasion d'exercer ce droit cet automne lorsque se tiendra la 43e élection générale du Canada, en octobre.[Traduction]

Comme nous l’avons constaté ces dernières années, les démocraties du monde entier sont entrées dans une nouvelle ère. Une ère de menace accrue et dynamique qui nécessite une vigilance resserrée de la part des gouvernements, mais aussi de tous les membres de la société.[Français]

Chaque élection se déroule dans un contexte particulier. Celle-ci ne sera pas différente. Même si les faits ont confirmé l'absence d'incidents d'ingérence sophistiquée ou concertée lors des élections fédérales de 2015, personne ne peut prédire ce qui se produira cet automne. Par contre, nous pouvons nous préparer à faire face à toute éventualité.[Traduction]

Plus tôt cette semaine, en compagnie de mon collègue le ministre de la Défense nationale j’ai annoncé la publication de la mise à jour 2019 du rapport du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications intitulé « Cybermenaces contre le processus démocratique du Canada ». Selon cette mise à jour, il est très probable que les électeurs canadiens seront confrontés à une certaine forme d’ingérence informatique étrangère au cours de l’élection fédérale de 2019.

Même si le CST estime que l’ampleur de cette ingérence risque peu d’être comparable à l’ingérence russe lors des élections présidentielles américaines de 2016, le rapport souligne qu’en 2018, le processus démocratique de la moitié des démocraties avancées ayant tenu des élections nationales — soit trois fois plus qu’en 2015 — a été ciblé par la cybermenace, et que le Canada fait également face à ce risque. Cette tendance à la hausse devrait se poursuivre en 2019.[Français]

Nous avons constaté que certains outils servant à renforcer la participation citoyenne étaient employés pour miner, perturber et déstabiliser la démocratie. Les médias sociaux ont été utilisés à mauvais escient pour diffuser de l'information fausse ou trompeuse. Ces dernières années, nous avons vu des acteurs étrangers chercher à compromettre les sociétés et les institutions démocratiques, les processus électoraux, la souveraineté et la sécurité.

Les évaluations effectuées par le CST en 2017 et en 2019, les efforts constants du Canada en matière de renseignement, de même que l'expérience de nos alliés et des pays aux vues similaires ont éclairé et orienté nos efforts au cours de la dernière année et ont mené à l'élaboration d'un plan d'action fondé sur quatre piliers qui inclut tous les segments de la société canadienne.[Traduction]

Ainsi, en plus de renforcer et de protéger l’infrastructure, les systèmes et les pratiques du gouvernement, nous nous concentrons aussi tout particulièrement à préparer les Canadiennes et les Canadiens et à collaborer avec les plateformes numériques, qui ont un rôle important à jouer pour favoriser un débat et un dialogue démocratiques positifs.

Notre plan comporte quatre piliers: améliorer l’état de préparation des citoyens; renforcer la préparation organisationnelle; lutter contre l’ingérence étrangère; et compter sur les plateformes de médias sociaux pour qu’elles agissent.

Je vais souligner certaines des initiatives les plus importantes prévues à notre plan.[Français]

Le 30 janvier, j'ai annoncé l'Initiative de citoyenneté numérique et un investissement de 7 millions de dollars pour améliorer la résilience de la population face à la désinformation en ligne. En réaction à la présence accrue d'information fausse, trompeuse et incendiaire publiée en ligne ainsi que dans les médias sociaux, le gouvernement s'est donné comme priorité d'aider les citoyens à se doter des outils et des compétences nécessaires pour évaluer de façon critique l'information en ligne.

Nous profitons également de la campagne nationale de sensibilisation publique intitulée « Pensez cybersécurité » pour sensibiliser les Canadiennes et les Canadiens à la cybersécurité et aux mesures simples qu'ils peuvent prendre pour se protéger en ligne.

(1110)

[Traduction]

Nous avons établi le Protocole public en cas d’incident électoral majeur. Il s’agit d’un processus impartial, simple et clair qui nous permettra d’informer la population si un incident grave survenu pendant la période électorale venait à menacer l’intégrité de l’élection générale de 2019. Ce protocole remet la décision d’informer les Canadiennes et les Canadiens directement entre les mains de cinq des hauts fonctionnaires les plus expérimentés du Canada, lesquels veillent à assurer la transition efficace et pacifique du pouvoir et la continuité du gouvernement en période électorale. La fonction publique joue efficacement ce rôle depuis des générations, et elle continuera de s’acquitter de cette importante fonction tout au long de la prochaine élection et par la suite également.[Français]

Le protocole ne sera activé que pour réagir aux incidents qui surviennent pendant la période électorale et qui ne relèvent pas du champ de responsabilité d'Élections Canada, soit l'administration des élections.

Le seuil d'intervention du groupe chargé d'informer la population sera très élevé et se limitera à exposer les circonstances exceptionnelles qui pourraient entraver notre capacité à tenir des élections libres et justes. Le groupe d'experts devrait en arriver à une décision commune, fondée sur le consensus. Il n'incombera pas à une seule personne de décider de la pertinence d'informer ou non la population.

Je me réjouis du fait que les partis politiques consultés au sujet de l'élaboration de ce protocole ont mis de côté la partisanerie au profit de l'intérêt de tous les Canadiens. L'intégration des commentaires de toutes les parties a permis la mise en place d'un processus équitable en lequel les Canadiens peuvent avoir confiance.[Traduction]

Dans le cadre du deuxième pilier, qui est le renforcement de la préparation organisationnelle, l’une des nouvelles initiatives clés consiste à s’assurer que les partis politiques sont tous conscients de la nature de la menace afin qu’ils puissent prendre les mesures nécessaires pour améliorer leurs pratiques et comportements en matière de sécurité interne. Le CST a affirmé, dans son rapport de 2017, ainsi que dans sa mise à jour de 2019, que les partis politiques constituent toujours l’un des maillons faibles du système canadien. Voilà pourquoi les organismes de sécurité nationale du Canada offriront des séances d’information sur les menaces aux dirigeants des partis politiques pour s’assurer qu’ils sont en mesure de contribuer à protéger nos élections. [Français]

Dans le cadre du troisième pilier, à savoir lutter contre l'ingérence étrangère, le gouvernement a mis sur pied le Groupe de travail sur les menaces en matière de sécurité et de renseignements visant les élections afin de mieux faire comprendre les menaces étrangères et de soutenir l'évaluation et l'intervention en cas d'incident. Cette équipe réunit le CST, le SCRS, la GRC et Affaires mondiales Canada, afin de bien comprendre l'ensemble des menaces qui pèsent sur le Canada et d'y réagir. Le Groupe de travail a établi une base de référence sur les menaces et a rencontré des partenaires internationaux pour s'assurer que le Canada est en mesure d'évaluer et d'atténuer efficacement toute activité d'ingérence malveillante.[Traduction]

Le quatrième pilier concerne les plateformes de médias sociaux.[Français]

La transformation du paysage médiatique canadien a des répercussions tangibles et généralisées sur l'ensemble de la société. Les médias sociaux et les plateformes numériques sont les nouveaux arbitres de l'information. Ils ont donc la responsabilité de gérer leurs communautés.[Traduction]

Nous savons qu’ils ont également été manipulés pour diffuser de la désinformation, créer de la confusion et exploiter les tensions sociales. J’ai rencontré les représentants de médias sociaux et de plateformes numériques, dont Facebook, Twitter, Google et Microsoft, afin de m’assurer qu’ils agissent pour accroître la transparence, améliorer l’authenticité et renforcer l’intégrité de leurs plateformes. Bien que les discussions aillent bon train, elles n'ont pas encore débouché sur les résultats anticipés, mais nous demeurons déterminés à obtenir des changements de la part de nos interlocuteurs. [Français]

Le gouvernement est d'avis que la protection des processus et des institutions démocratiques du Canada est une priorité. Voilà pourquoi nous nous sommes engagés à investir d'importants nouveaux fonds pour soutenir ces efforts. Le budget de 2019 prévoit 48 millions de dollars supplémentaires pour appuyer ces efforts pangouvernementaux.[Traduction]

Ce plan global est également soutenu par de récents efforts législatifs. Je tiens également à souligner les progrès importants que nous avons faits pour moderniser le système électoral du Canada, le rendre plus accessible, plus transparent et plus sûr.

(1115)

[Français]

Le projet de loi C-76 prévoit d'importantes mesures pour contrer l'ingérence étrangère et les menaces posées par les nouvelles technologies.[Traduction]

Les dispositions du projet de loi C-76, que ce comité connaît évidemment très bien: interdisent aux entités étrangères de dépenser toute somme d’argent pour influencer l’électorat, alors qu’elles pouvaient auparavant dépenser jusqu’à 500 $ de façon non réglementée; exigent des organisations vendant de l’espace publicitaire qu’elles n’acceptent pas sciemment des publicités électorales provenant d’une entité étrangère; et ajoutent une interdiction en lien avec l’utilisation non autorisée d’un ordinateur dans le dessein d’empêcher, d’interrompre ou de gêner l’emploi légitime de données informatiques en période électorale.[Français]

Le Canada dispose d'un organisme d'administration des élections solide et de renommée mondiale: Élections Canada.[Traduction]

Bien qu’il soit impossible de prévoir avec exactitude la nature des menaces que nous verrons à l’approche des élections générales du Canada, je tiens à assurer au Comité que le Canada s’est doté d’un plan solide. Nous évaluons et testons en permanence notre état de préparation, et nous continuerons de prendre toutes les mesures qui s’imposent pour assurer la tenue d’élections sûres, libres et équitables en 2019.[Français]

Merci beaucoup.

C'est avec plaisir que je vais répondre à vos questions, que ce soit maintenant ou après le vote. [Traduction]

Le président:

Nous le ferons après la période du vote.

Avant que tout le monde ne parte, j’ai deux ou trois choses à dire.

Tout d’abord, pour le procès-verbal, il s’agit de la 149e réunion.

À votre retour, chers collègues, je vous soumettrai la question des travaux futurs, au travers de laquelle je pense que nous pourrons passer rapidement. Il s’agit du budget des dépenses de la commission chargée des débats et des témoins que vous voulez entendre. De plus, en ce qui concerne la Chambre de débat parallèle, c'est dans la soirée du lundi, du mardi ou du mercredi que nous pourrons entendre le témoin australien.

Vers quelle heure environ, monsieur le greffier?

Le greffier du comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

Pour nous, ce serait vers 18 heures, ce qui, je crois, correspond à 8 heures pour lui.

Le président:

Ce serait à 18 heures ou à 19 heures. À vous de décider si vous voulez que ce soit un lundi, un mardi ou un mercredi.

Monsieur Simms.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Mon adjoint me dit que nous avons une différence de 14 heures. Est-ce exact?

Le greffier: Oui.

M. Scott Simms:

Que pensez-vous de 19 heures?

Le président:

Pour qu’ils n’aient pas à se rendre sur place à 8 heures du matin?

Le greffier:

C’est vraiment au Comité de décider.

Le président:

Vérifiez auprès de vos collègues avant de revenir.

Vérifiez auprès de tous vos collègues du Comité, David, si vous préférez lundi, mardi ou mercredi soir.

M. David Christopherson:

Je vais les rassembler, si j'y arrive.

Le président:

Steph, si vous pouviez discuter avec vos gens, ce serait formidable.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je veux qu'on mise sur mercredi.

Le président:

Vous mettez votre nom pour mercredi.

Merci, madame la ministre. Il nous reste neuf minutes avant le vote. Nous reviendrons dès que le vote sera terminé.

(1115)

(1140)

Le président:

Heureux de vous retrouver à cette 149e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre. Cette séance est télévisée.

Aujourd’hui, nous accueillons l’honorable Karina Gould, ministre des Institutions démocratiques, pour discuter du plan du gouvernement visant à protéger les élections générales de 2019, ainsi que des représentants du Groupe de travail sur les menaces en matière de sécurité et de renseignements visant les élections.

La ministre est accompagnée d’Allen Sutherland, secrétaire adjoint du Cabinet, Appareil gouvernemental et institutions démocratiques, Bureau du Conseil privé; et les représentants du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications sont André Boucher, sous-ministre adjoint, Opérations, Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité, et Dan Rogers, chef adjoint, SIGINT.

Merci de votre présence.

Avant de commencer, j’ai deux petits points à soulever.

Oui, monsieur Simms.

(1145)

M. Scott Simms:

Tout à l'heure, j’ai parlé de l'heure de notre réunion. J’ai dit que nous devrions entendre le témoin Australien à 19 heures pour l'arranger, mais en réalité, une heure, ce n'est pas une grande différence.

D'autres ici ont dit que 18 heures pourrait aller; je vous le répète, car ma santé en dépend.

Le président:

Nous en discuterons après le départ de la ministre.

Je vous signale qu'un autre débat sur l’attribution de temps est en cours. Cela étant, nous allons devoir nous dépêcher d'entendre la ministre.

Pourrais-je avoir le consentement unanime pour que nous restions après le début de la sonnerie annonçant le prochain vote, cela afin d'aller au bout du témoignage de la ministre?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: M. Reid a un autre point à soulever.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Oui. Merci, monsieur le président.

Je veux revenir sur ce rappel au Règlement, une fois que la ministre sera partie, sans doute à notre retour du vote sur la motion d’attribution de temps. C'est simplement pour dire que, selon moi, il y a eu une violation technique du paragraphe 115(5) du Règlement au début de la séance. Je vous expliquerai mon raisonnement plus tard, une fois que nous aurons entendu la ministre.

Merci.

Le président:

Je vous remercie beaucoup de votre indulgence et de votre patience.

Commençons par les séries de questions. Qui sera le premier?

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D’accord.

Vous parliez des entreprises de médias sociaux. Qu'est-ce qui peut les inciter à changer leur comportement?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

C’est une excellente question. Je pense qu'il y a d'abord le sentiment du public. La confiance de leurs usagers est importante. Leur réputation aussi est importante.

Les Canadiens sont parmi les gens les plus branchés de la planète. D'ailleurs, d'après les statistiques, les Canadiens sont les plus branchés de la planète. Comme vous le savez peut-être, 77 % des Canadiens ont un compte Facebook; 26 % sont sur Twitter et Instagram, et je crois que, toujours selon les statistiques, ils utilisent presque tous Google.

Un député: Pas dans ma circonscription.

L'hon. Karina Gould: Peut-être pas dans votre circonscription, alors disons qu'ils représentent 99,9 %. Nous sommes très connectés. Nous utilisons ces plateformes quotidiennement et dans de nombreux volets de notre vie.

Je pense que les plateformes veulent réagir à cela. Je pense que vous avez vu certaines réactions à l’échelle mondiale et pas seulement au Canada. Les plateformes veulent être perçues comme de bons acteurs qui font la promotion des valeurs démocratiques et de la participation. C’est la raison pour laquelle vous avez constaté un changement de comportement et une augmentation des rapports publics. Cela étant, il reste encore beaucoup à faire.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les mesures comme le blocage récent de Faith Goldy par Facebook sont-elles le genre de mesures que vous recherchez, ou y a-t-il des mesures différentes que vous recherchez de la part des entreprises de médias sociaux?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Lors de la conférence de presse de lundi et dans plusieurs entrevues médias qui ont suivi, j’ai dit que nous avons abordé, avec les représentants des médias sociaux, un certain nombre de questions que l'on peut répartir en trois catégories: l’authenticité, la transparence et l’intégrité des plateformes et des activités dont elles sont le support.

Nous avons discuté avec nos interlocuteurs de la possibilité qu'ils fassent respecter leurs propres modalités de service et leurs propres exigences. La plupart des plateformes ont un libellé indiquant qu’elles n’acceptent pas de contenu illégal ni d'activités appelant à la violence ou exposant des actes violents en ligne. Il y a bien d'autres choses. Il est notamment question que ces acteurs fassent respecter leurs propres règles par leurs utilisateurs.

Je pense que les mesures prises par Facebook lundi étaient un pas dans cette direction. Je m’en réjouis. Je pense que c’est important. Nous avons des échanges permanents avec les gens des médias sociaux.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans un autre des comités auxquels je siège, nous étudions la cybersécurité au regard des menaces pesant contre la sécurité économique nationale. Beaucoup de choses intéressantes touchent aux menaces physiques et technologiques. Comment évaluez-vous la gravité de ces menaces contre notre démocratie, contre Élections Canada, contre les partis et contre quiconque participe au processus démocratique?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Nous prenons toutes ces menaces au sérieux, et c’est pourquoi, dès ma nomination à ce poste, j’ai demandé au CST de préparer ce rapport et de le rendre public. C’est la première fois au monde qu’un service de renseignement rend public un rapport de cette nature. C’est ce qui se produit de plus en plus ailleurs. J’ai également demandé au CST de fournir un soutien technique pour la sécurité des TI à tous les partis politiques représentés à la Chambre des communes. Cette relation a été établie, et elle se poursuit.

Le 30 janvier, nous avons annoncé notre plan pour protéger la démocratie canadienne, les modifications apportées au projet de loi C-76, puis cette mise à jour du rapport et l’engagement continu à l’égard des plateformes de médias sociaux. Je dirais que la menace est réelle. Nous prenons cela au sérieux et nous prenons des mesures pour protéger les Canadiens.

(1150)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Avez-vous constaté un changement de culture important au sein des partis, de tous les partis, grâce à ce travail avec le CST?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je ne peux rien vous dire à ce propos, parce que je ne participe pas à cela. En fait, je ne sais rien des relations entre le CST et les partis. Je pense qu’il est vraiment important que la relation de confiance entre les partis et le CST demeure ainsi, mais c’est aux parties concernées de décider comment utiliser cette information et comment fonctionner en général.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C’est tout pour l’instant.

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre.

Le président:

Partagez-vous votre temps?

M. David de Burgh Graham: Tout à fait.

Le président: D'accord.

Monsieur Simms, vous avez trois minutes.

M. Scott Simms:

En cas d'incident grave, quels critères, selon vous, devrons-nous respecter absolument au nom de l'efficacité?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

C’est une excellente question. Je pense qu'à partir de ce qui s'est produit ailleurs dans le monde, nous pouvons affirmer qu'il s'agit là de choses dont les Canadiens devraient être conscients. Par exemple, lors de l’élection présidentielle en France, il y a eu la fuite publique des courriels de la campagne Macron. Comme c'était un incident majeur, le gouvernement français a pris l’initiative d’en informer les Français. Il y a eu la tentative constante et coordonnée des Russes d’intervenir dans l'élection présidentielle américaine de 2016.

Voilà ce dont nous alerterions les Canadiens. Il est important de noter que tout cela relève du Protocole public en cas d’incident électoral majeur, géré par un groupe de cinq hauts fonctionnaires qui recevront de l’information de nos organismes de renseignement et qui rendront des décisions consensuelles.

M. Scott Simms:

Sous quelle forme se présentera l’information reçue par les membres du groupe spécial chargé du protocole? L'analyse de la menace sera-t-elle définitive, du genre: « Voici quelle est la situation » ou sera-t-elle davantage l'expression de soupçons fondés sur les données recueillies? À quel point l'information sera-t-elle exhaustive?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Les deux cas de figure pourraient s'appliquer, parce qu’il pourrait être difficile de qualifier la menace à ce moment-là, mais nos organismes de sécurité sont professionnels. Ils examinent avec diligence tout ce qui se passe et, s’ils estiment que quelque chose mérite l’attention du groupe d’experts, ils devront lui transmettre l’information qu'ils ont en main.

M. Scott Simms:

Parlant du groupe, de qui est-il formé? Quelles qualités les membres du groupe doivent-ils présenter afin d'être qualifiés pour le poste?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Cinq hauts fonctionnaires font partie de ce groupe avec, en tête, le greffier du Conseil privé. Il y a aussi le sous-ministre de la Justice, le sous-ministre d'Affaires mondiales, le sous-ministre de la Sécurité publique et le conseiller à la Sécurité nationale et au renseignement.

Ces cinq personnes — ou plutôt les cinq postes qu'elles occupent, parce que ce ne sont pas tant les personnes que les postes qui importent ici — possèdent une vaste expérience de la fonction publique, mais aussi une connaissance et une compréhension du contexte mondial de la sécurité publique et des menaces. Nous avons également invité le sous-ministre de la Justice à examiner l’incidence de cette mesure sur la primauté du droit.

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à Mme Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président, et merci beaucoup, madame la ministre, d’être de nouveau ici aujourd’hui.

Avant de poser mes questions, et puisque nous manquons de temps, je vais directement passer à une motion que vous avez déjà appuyée, je le sais, parce que je suis convaincue que vous comptez sur le Comité de la procédure pour vous aider à trouver une mesure législative appropriée au vu de tous les aspects à prendre en considération.

Je propose: Que, conformément au sous-alinéa 108(3)a)(vi) du Règlement, le Comité poursuive son étude sur les menaces en matière de sécurité et de renseignement visant les élections; que l’étude comporte cinq réunions et que les conclusions soient communiquées à la Chambre.

Le président:

Voulez-vous soumettre cette motion à débat maintenant?

(1155)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Non. Je tenais juste à en faire mention pour le moment.

Le président:

Dans ce cas, voulez-vous passer à vos questions?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Non, j’avais déjà donné avis de la motion et j'en fais la proposition.

Je poserai ensuite mes questions.

Bien sûr, nous avons vu beaucoup de nouvelles récemment au sujet des plateformes de médias sociaux. Facebook a réagi à deux reprises: la première fois en modifiant son référentiel, et la seconde fois en s'attaquant plus rapidement aux discours haineux.

Et puis, cette semaine, Google s’est entièrement retiré de notre processus électoral. Nous attendons toujours de connaître la position de Twitter.

Cela étant, vous avez déclaré dans la presse que les plateformes de médias sociaux n’ont pas réagi en adoptant les mesures que vous auriez espérées. Nous comptons évidemment sur vous, le gouvernement, pour que vous preniez des mesures afin de parvenir au délicat équilibre entre la liberté d’expression et l’intégrité de notre système électoral.

Hier, notre chef, Andrew Scheer, s'est déclaré ouvert à l’idée d’une réglementation. Si ces plateformes de médias sociaux ne sont pas disposées à agir, qu’êtes-vous prête à faire en votre qualité de ministre, et que compte faire gouvernement pour essayer de trouver l’équilibre entre ces deux pôles d'action?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je vous remercie de votre question. Je suis heureuse de savoir que tous les partis semblent s'entendre quant au besoin d'agir. Cela me semble très encourageant.

Je dirais que nous sommes à une époque où, partout dans le monde, d'autres pays cherchent aussi la meilleure façon d'atteindre les mêmes objectifs que tout le monde. C'est-à-dire que les gens devraient pouvoir s'exprimer en ligne, mais pas de façon à mener des activités ou des actions qui nuisent à notre société. Je suis ravie d'avoir entendu votre observation.

Je me suis déjà exprimée publiquement pour souligner qu'il s'agit d'un moment où toutes les options sont réellement envisagées. Je suis heureuse que le Comité se penche sur cette question. Cela est une excellente occasion, à mon avis.

Je suis très intéressée de savoir ce que font actuellement les autres pays à cet égard. Permettez-moi de souligner l'exemple du Royaume-Uni qui, lundi, a publié un livre blanc présentant un concept très intéressant, à savoir l'obligation de diligence. À mon avis, il s'agit d'une proposition innovatrice et intéressante pour veiller à ce que les plateformes de médias sociaux aient la responsabilité d'examiner...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Madame la ministre, si vous n'y voyez pas d'inconvénient, je vais poursuivre.

Je n'ai pas vraiment l'impression que vous nous donnez une réponse directe au sujet des mesures que vous êtes prête à prendre. Je comprends que vous évaluez les pratiques exemplaires à l'échelle internationale, mais je pense que les Canadiens veulent savoir ce que vous entendez faire pour trouver cet équilibre. Donc, tout comme les Canadiens, j'ai très hâte de voir ce qui est prévu à cet égard.

Pour ce qui est de la troisième partie, vous avez dit que le CST, le SCRS, la GRC et Affaires mondiales Canada collaborent pour bien identifier les menaces qui pèsent sur le Canada et pour y réagir. Toutefois, dans mon évaluation jusqu'à maintenant, qui est présentée dans un bon document, je crois, le document de 2017 du CST, nous examinons les motivations des États-nations, des hacktivistes, des cybercriminels, etc.

À mon avis, madame la ministre, il ne suffit pas de comprendre les menaces et d'y réagir. Que faites-vous, avec vos homologues, précisément pour dissuader les cybercriminels ou les adversaires étrangers d'influencer les élections?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le 30 janvier, nous avons annoncé une série de mesures visant à protéger les Canadiens contre les cybermenaces étrangères. Bien sûr, par leur nature même, ces cybermenaces sont secrètes, et personne ne va les crier sur les toits. Un peu partout dans le monde, on dénonce ce genre d'activité. Ça s'est fait ailleurs et ça s'est fait ici, au Canada. Je pense que nous avons des étapes très importantes grâce à des mesures résolument novatrices, comme la création du Groupe de travail sur les menaces en matière de sécurité et de renseignements visant les élections, qui surveille activement la situation, et notre protocole public pour renseigner les Canadiens. Ces résultats sont très positifs.

À mon avis, il est très important de souligner l'autre volet de cette annonce, à savoir l'octroi de 7 millions de dollars pour des initiatives civiques numériques et de sensibilisation aux médias afin que les citoyens canadiens aient une meilleure compréhension de l'environnement numérique, particulièrement en période électorale.

(1200)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci, madame la ministre. Je comprends cela.

Encore une fois, je n'y vois aucune orientation claire et directe susceptible d'éveiller mon enthousiasme ou celle des Canadiens.

L'élément sur lequel vous vous êtes clairement prononcée est le protocole relatif aux incidents critiques qui nous préoccupait beaucoup, nous les conservateurs, étant donné que c'est le gouvernement qui contrôlerait ce groupe de cinq personnes. Cela étant, les partis d'opposition dont nous sommes, seraient tenus de prendre pour argent comptant l'information qui leur est transmise par votre entremise. J'estime que nos préoccupations sont justifiées, compte tenu de l'absence de l'ancien greffier du Conseil privé, suite à son départ. Je crois que cela souligne clairement les lacunes possibles.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je ne suis pas d'accord. Tous les partis ont participé à l'élaboration du protocole et ont eu leur mot à dire. Même si les participants n'étaient pas tous des parlementaires, ils représentaient chacun des partis politiques.

Nous avons annoncé une mesure très importante pour assurer l'impartialité, une mesure très claire et concrète à mon avis: nous avons accordé des attestations de sécurité et offert des séances d'information quotidiennes à tous les chefs des partis représentés à la Chambre des communes et à un maximum de quatre des principaux membres de leur équipe électorale. Il s'agit de veiller à ce que tout le monde soit sur la même longueur d'onde et obtienne l'information nécessaire pour établir cette confiance. Ce processus est en cours.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je pense que nous aurions dû inclure le directeur général des élections, mais nous pourrons peut-être en discuter une autre fois.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je serais heureuse de parler de ce que le directeur général des élections a dit lorsque cette annonce a été faite, à savoir que son travail consiste à administrer les élections, qu'il a participé à ce processus, et qu'il appartient aux organismes de sécurité de déterminer s'il y a eu une menace.

Je pense que c'est vraiment important...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il me semble ridicule, madame la ministre, de prétendre que la tenue d'élections libres et justes dépend de l'organisme qui est simplement chargé d'administrer les élections.

Le président:

Nous avons terminé cette série de questions.

Nous allons passer au NPD.

Monsieur Christopherson.

M. David Christopherson:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre, merci beaucoup d'être venue encore une fois.

Je tiens simplement à dire que, contrairement à certains ministres précédents, vous n'avez jamais joué un jeu ou modifié votre calendrier pour éluder les questions ou éviter d'y répondre. Certaines de ces réunions ont été assez difficiles. Vous étiez toujours prête à rendre des comptes, et nous vous en sommes reconnaissants. Merci, madame la ministre.

J'aimerais poser une question, puis je céderai la parole à mon collègue, M. Cullen, qui est beaucoup plus versé dans les détails et qui posera de bien meilleures questions que moi. Cependant, j'en ai une.

Pour ce qui est du groupe d'experts sur le protocole, je pense au greffier du Conseil privé, au conseiller à la sécurité nationale et au renseignement, au sous-ministre de ceci, au sous-ministre de cela et au sous-ministre de ce qu'on voudra. Chacun d'entre eux est, bien sûr, nommé par l'exécutif. Le Parlement me rappelle ce que dit mon père: fais confiance à tout le monde, mais distribue toujours les cartes.

En supposant que rien ne changera — nous avons un gouvernement majoritaire qui a décidé que c'est la façon dont nous allons procéder, et voilà tout — le Parlement aura-t-il l'occasion d'examiner l'information que ce groupe d'experts a reçue et les mesures qu'il a choisi ou non de prendre?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Il est prévu qu'un rapport sera déposé après les élections sur la façon dont ce groupe aura fait son travail et en aura rendu compte. Je suis certaine que le Comité pourra examiner la question après les élections.

M. David Christopherson:

Cela semble un peu flou. À qui sera adressé le rapport? Ou bien le Parlement examinera la question, ou bien il ne le fera pas. Si on doit produire un rapport...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le rapport sera présenté au Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement. Le CPSNR pourra l'examiner.

M. David Christopherson:

D'accord. Qu'en est-il du PROC?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

À mon avis, en raison de la nature classifiée de l'information... Le CPSNR a été créé pour que les parlementaires puissent examiner les renseignements classifiés.

M. David Christopherson:

J'entends bien. Nous devrons peut-être aborder cette question. J'en suis conscient. J'ai passé un certain temps dans ce milieu, et je sais qu'en fin de compte, les comportements sont guidés par de sérieux enjeux en matière de renseignement, et ce n'est pas ce qui doit retenir notre attention au premier chef. Notre quête devrait avoir pour objet de savoir quelle information a été transmise et quelles mesures éventuelles ont été prises, partant du principe que certaines informations ne peuvent être divulguées. Passe encore si ce processus doit avoir deux volets et que notre Comité dépose un rapport; toutefois...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Il s'agit peut-être d'une bonne façon de procéder.

M. David Christopherson:

En fin de compte, cet organisme ne devrait pas être autorisé à agir étant donné que ses membres sont nommés uniquement par l'exécutif. À tout le moins, un processus d'examen clé devrait être en place pour veiller à ce qu'il remplisse le mandat que lui a confié le Parlement et proposer des améliorations éventuelles.

De toute évidence, cela demande quelques efforts. J'espère que nous pourrons régler cette question avant l'ajournement de juin, monsieur le président.

(1205)

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Une version classifiée sera envoyée au CPSNR, et un rapport public sera également rendu disponible. Je dirais que le Comité de la procédure serait le bienvenu d'étudier cette question et que ce processus devrait être revu après les prochaines élections. Je suis tout à fait favorable à ce genre de rôle pour les parlementaires.

M. David Christopherson:

Cela semble bien. Nous devons simplement préciser les détails, monsieur le président, mais nous pouvons le faire.

Merci, madame la ministre.

Je vais maintenant céder la parole à mon collègue, M. Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

Merci, monsieur Christopherson.

Bienvenue, madame la ministre.

C'est intéressant, parce que le vice de conception a été passablement mis au jour lorsque le greffier du Conseil privé a comparu devant le Comité de la justice et a fini par démissionner parce que, comme il l'a dit dans sa lettre, il avait perdu la confiance des autres partis politiques. C'est l'une de nos préoccupations inhérentes, à savoir que la conception de votre processus aura une incidence sur des questions aussi délicates que les élections et les décisions qui seront prises. Le fait de divulguer si oui ou non un parti politique a été piraté peut influencer une élection, comme vous pouvez l'imaginer, d'une façon ou d'une autre.

Monsieur Boucher, j'ai une petite question.

Vous avez dit dans votre récent rapport, qui confirme un rapport publié il y a près de deux ans, que le piratage de nos élections est très probable — je crois que c'est le terme que votre organisme a utilisé — en ce qui concerne les cyberattaques étrangères. Est-ce exact?

M. André Boucher (sous-ministre adjoint, Opérations, Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité, Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications):

Il est fort probable qu'il y ait des tentatives d'ingérence étrangère dans nos élections.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous avons vu par le passé, aux États-Unis, au Royaume-Uni et en France, que les bases de données des partis politiques ont été parmi les cibles. Est-ce exact?

M. André Boucher:

C'est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Est-ce également le cas pour le Canada?

M. André Boucher:

Les méthodes qu'utiliseront nos adversaires s'ingérer dans les affaires de payse étrangers incluent l'accès aux renseignements clés des partis politiques.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord, parce que ces renseignements clés, soit les bases de données, l'information sur les électeurs, les préférences des électeurs, etc... Celui qui chercherait à s'ingérer dans une élection canadienne, pourrait, je suppose, « militariser » ses mensonges ou ses tentatives d'ingérence. Qu'en pensez-vous?

M. André Boucher:

Absolument, et c'est pourquoi nous sommes si proactifs auprès des partis, afin qu'ils puissent se préparer, détecter et réagir...

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est exact, et vous fournissez ces précieux conseils, mais rien n'est exigé en vertu de la loi, en vertu des récents changements électoraux que le gouvernement a apportés, pour faire en sorte que ces partis soient assujettis, disons, à quelque chose comme la LPRPDE, et il n'y a pas de norme juridique sur la façon de protéger ces renseignements vitaux. Est-ce exact?

M. André Boucher:

Je peux dire que, dans le cadre du mode de fonctionnement actuel, les partis ont communiqué avec nous, et ils prennent connaissance des mesures importantes et passent à l'action.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je comprends. Ma question est la suivante: la loi exige-t-elle quelque chose en matière de normes de protection de ces renseignements?

M. André Boucher:

Pas à ma connaissance.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord. Alors, madame la ministre, pourquoi pas? Il y a plus d'un an et demi, à titre de ministre des Institutions démocratiques, vous avez publié un rapport qui mettait en garde contre cette menace. Le Comité permanent de l'accès à l'information, de la protection des renseignements personnels et de l'éthique vous a recommandé de collaborer avec les partis et que ceux-ci soient tenus par la loi de respecter cette norme de protection pour assurer la sécurité de nos élections. Vous avez choisi de ne pas opter pour cette formule. Le conseil était excellent. L'avocat qui travaille avec les partis est excellent, mais vous avez choisi de ne pas aller dans ce sens. Pourquoi?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Nous avons choisi d'instaurer cette relation entre le CST et les partis politiques parce que les partis politiques sont distincts du gouvernement. Leur interaction avec les Canadiens est unique, et il est important pour eux d'avoir cette indépendance, à mon avis, et je crois que vous serez d'accord avec moi à cet égard. C'est pourquoi nous avons choisi cette voie, c'est pour nous assurer de donner des conseils aux partis politiques. À eux de choisir comment les utiliser surtout sur le plan de la sécurité. Cela leur donnera les meilleurs conseils et outils disponibles pour protéger leurs bases de données et leurs renseignements.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Nous parlons de la sécurité de nos élections. Lorsqu'il s'agit de la sécurité de nos routes, nous ne donnons pas de conseils aux conducteurs et nous ne les laissons pas choisir la vitesse à laquelle ils doivent conduire. Nous leur imposons des limites, parce que nous savons qu'il est dangereux de dépasser certaines vitesses. Nous savons, d'après votre propre rapport que vous avez demandé au CST de produire il y a 20 mois, qu'une menace crédible existe et que l'un des points d'accès était celui-ci. Or, vous avez dit qu'on pouvait choisir de conduire à n'importe quelle vitesse, soulignant qu'on ne devrait pas dépasser une vitesse donnée, sans prévoir de contraintes à cet égard. À l'approche des élections qui auront lieu dans quelques mois, cela m'inquiète.

J'ai une question au sujet des médias sociaux. Vous avez laissé entendre que vous étiez déçue de l'inaction des agences de médias sociaux quant aux discours haineux et l'interdiction de certains groupes. Facebook en a interdit quelques-uns, ce qui est un bon début, mais il y en a beaucoup d'autres, et ces groupes, Faith Goldy et les autres, répandent cette haine depuis des années.

Vous avez exprimé votre déception, et vous avez également laissé entendre que les Européens ont fait mieux. L'Europe a des lois et adopte des règlements. L'Angleterre a adopté d'autres règlements, d'autres règles pour guider les agences de médias sociaux.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Eh bien, ils ont présenté un livre blanc pour en discuter, et je dirais, quant à la réglementation, que les plateformes de médias sociaux de l'UE ont adopté un code de pratique volontaire. Cela reflète essentiellement nos discussions dans le but de savoir s'ils feraient la même chose ici, au Canada.

(1210)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Ce n'est pas le cas.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Jusqu'à maintenant, ils ont décidé qu'ils ne voulaient pas agir ainsi. Toutefois, ces discussions se poursuivent. Les commentaires de lundi ont soulevé un regain d'intérêt pour une conversation sur les mesures qu'ils prendront ici au Canada.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je comprends tout cela, mais si vous regardez les principales différences entre le Canada et l'Union européenne, cette dernière a fait beaucoup plus sur le plan législatif que le Canada. C'est...

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le Canada est le premier pays...

M. Nathan Cullen:

Permettez-moi de...

Le président:

Soyez brève, madame la ministre.

Le temps est écoulé.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Désolé, mais je n'ai pas terminé ma question.

L'Europe a adopté des règlements et des règles. Les entreprises de médias sociaux ont répondu. Vous semblez surprise et déçue qu'ils n'aient pas fait la même chose ici.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le Canada a aussi agi à cet égard, monsieur Cullen. Avec le projet de loi C-76, nous sommes le premier pays à exiger que les plateformes en ligne aient un registre des publicités en ligne. En fait, cela a suscité des réactions. Facebook aménage sa bibliothèque publicitaire. Les dirigeants de Google ont dit qu'ils ne feraient passer aucune publicité politique au Canada. Nous attendons toujours des nouvelles de Twitter.

Lorsque vous parlez de réglementation, en fait, le Canada a pris des mesures. Nous avons été parmi les premiers à agir. Nous avons vu des publicités politiques, notamment lors des élections américaines et du référendum britannique. C'était l'un des principaux outils utilisés pour contrer l'ingérence étrangère au moyen d'un mécanisme en ligne. Il s'agit d'une étape très importante, d'une méthode importante pour assurer la transparence et protéger nos élections.

Le président:

Merci.

Madame Lapointe. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Merci, madame la ministre, ainsi que vous tous, d'être ici, aujourd'hui.

Tantôt, quand vous répondiez à des questions, on vous a coupé la parole. Vous avez parlé de livre blanc au Royaume-Uni. Souhaiteriez-vous ajouter autre chose? Vous avez parlé de l'Union européenne, mais vouliez-vous dire autre chose au sujet de la Grande-Bretagne?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le livre blanc qui a été dévoilé lundi, en Grande-Bretagne, est très intéressant. Il y a le concept — je ne sais pas comment on dit en français —[Traduction] Il s'agit d'un devoir de diligence.[Français]

C'est un terme qui a été utilisé dans l'industrie de l'hébergement pour assurer que les logements, par exemple, ont des ascenseurs fonctionnels, et ainsi de suite.

Ce concept a été appliqué aux plateformes numériques en ce qui concerne le contenu illégal ou celui qui peut poser des risques pour la protection des gens. Les plateformes doivent en prendre la responsabilité.

C'est intéressant. C'est l'idée d'appliquer un régime de politiques aux plateformes numériques, puisqu'elles peuvent être tenues responsables de leurs actions. C'est nouveau, c'est différent et c'est tourné vers l'avenir. Nous voudrions éviter de faire des lois ou des politiques qui résolvent des problèmes du passé, mais qui ne sont pas flexibles pour l'avenir.

Mes fonctionnaires et moi sommes en train de lire là-dessus attentivement, mais nous examinons aussi les autres activités qui ont cours en Allemagne, par exemple, en France ou en Australie où on fait aussi des choses intéressantes. Je crois que nous pourrions trouver une solution canadienne.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Merci.

Tantôt, vous avez parlé de la France. Vous venez d'en parler encore, en mentionnant aussi l'Allemagne.

Au Sommet du G7 qui s'est tenu l'an passé, à Charlevoix, vous avez discuté de ces problèmes des plateformes des médias sociaux. Vous dites qu'il y a eu des problèmes en France, des fuites d'information. On regarde aussi les élections américaines et c'est clair que quelque chose n'était pas correct.

Échangez-vous des éléments d'information qui font qu'on est capable d'aller encore plus loin? Vous parliez tout juste des exemples de la Grande-Bretagne et de l'Union européenne. Toutefois, échangez-vous l'information afin qu'on apprenne des erreurs des autres, si l'on peut dire?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Oui. Je trouve intéressant l'exemple de l'Allemagne qui a un projet de loi contre la haine en ligne, que le pays veut appliquer aux plateformes numériques. Pour ce faire, l'Allemagne a prévu des amendes très élevées destinées aux plateformes numériques si celles-ci n'effacent pas les messages ou les images qui promeuvent la haine. C'est intéressant.

De plus, nous devrons penser aux contenus illégaux et envisager comment nous pouvons nous assurer que les plateformes ne sont pas manipulées pour faciliter les activités illégales. Il faudra aussi réfléchir au contenu violent. Nous devrons aussi penser à plusieurs choses pour changer l'expérience des gens lorsqu'ils sont sur les plateformes numériques.

(1215)

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord.

Vous avez dit être un peu déçue des rencontres que vous avez eues avec des représentants des médias sociaux, par exemple la plateforme Facebook. Y a-t-il d'autres rencontres qui sont prévues?

Vous avez dit que l'Union européenne avait un code de conduite volontaire. La voie qu'on emprunte est-elle de nature coercitive?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Nous poursuivons nos discussions avec des représentants de plateformes numériques pour voir ce qu'ils pourraient faire ici, au Canada, avant les prochaines élections fédérales. Mon bureau a des réunions prévues pour la semaine prochaine. J'espère qu'ils seront plus ouverts à appliquer au Canada les mesures de protection des élections qu'ils ont mises en place dans d'autres pays. Je crois que les Canadiens méritent le même traitement que les autres citoyens partout dans le monde.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Merci, madame Gould.

Me reste-t-il un peu de temps de parole, monsieur le président? [Traduction]

Le président:

Il vous reste une minute et demie. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

D'accord. Je vais la prendre. [Traduction]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nathan désire intervenir. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Non, c'est mon tour. Je suis très territoriale.

Madame la ministre, on a fait allusion tantôt à la confiance que vous accordez au directeur général des élections du Canada. Pouvez-vous m'en dire plus?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je fais beaucoup confiance au directeur général des élections du Canada pour ce qui est de toute l'administration des élections fédérales. Les Canadiens peuvent être très fiers de cette organisation, qui, selon moi, est la meilleure au monde. Plusieurs pays s'inspirent de l'organisation électorale canadienne sur le plan technique. J'ai beaucoup confiance dans les gens de cette organisation et je suis très fière de ce que ses membres font. Ils sont très professionnels et prennent leurs responsabilités très au sérieux.

Les Canadiens ont confiance dans le processus électoral et dans les résultats des élections, et c'est ce qui est le plus important.

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Merci beaucoup, madame Gould.

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Merci, madame Lapointe. [Traduction]

Le président:

Merci.

Une dernière intervention. Madame Kusie, vous avez cinq minutes.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Madame la ministre, je vais revenir au protocole public en cas d'incident électoral majeur. Comment l'équipe prend-elle sa décision d'informer ou non le public d'une menace au cours de l'élection?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

La décision d'informer le public sera fondée sur une évaluation qui représente un consensus quant à savoir si un incident compromet le déroulement d'élections libres et justes. Nous avons fixé la barre très haut, parce que s'il y avait une annonce publique, ce serait évidemment important pour la population canadienne. Par conséquent, il est très important que la barre soit placée très haut.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Quels critères sont appliqués s'il vous plaît?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Ce que nous avons établi, c'est une élection libre et équitable...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Comment définissez-vous une élection libre et équitable?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Le groupe prendra cette décision en fonction des renseignements à sa disposition.

Je pense qu'il est important de souligner que cette décision sera prise en fonction du contexte, parce qu'il est possible qu'un incident survenu dans un autre pays nous serve d'exemple, mais qu'il n'ait pas le même impact ici au Canada. Ce qui est important, c'est que les membres du groupe prennent cette décision en fonction de l'information qu'ils reçoivent de nos organismes de sécurité.

Au sujet du protocole, j'ajouterais que s'ils décident de rendre l'information publique, ils en aviseront d'abord le directeur général d'Élections Canada ainsi que les chefs des partis politiques. De plus, comme je l'ai déjà dit, le fait que les chefs et les conseillers principaux de campagne obtiendront une habilitation de sécurité, ils communiqueront régulièrement avec nos organismes de sécurité pour faire le point sur ce qui se passe pendant la campagne et durant la période préélectorale.

(1220)

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je comprends cela. J'ai l'impression qu'on nous l'a déjà dit. J'aurais aimé avoir plus de détails, plus de renseignements. Le groupe se réunira-t-il régulièrement ou seulement en cas d'incident?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Il recevra de l'information régulièrement.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Se réunira-t-il régulièrement pour évaluer cette information?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Il participera à des séances d'information périodiques et il lui reviendra de déterminer comment traiter cette information.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je le répète, ce n'est pas très précis.

Les partis politiques seront-ils avisés que le groupe se réunit?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Pas nécessairement; seulement si le groupe veut rendre une information publique. Cependant, les organismes de sécurité transmettront régulièrement de l'information aux partis politiques.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Qui décidera s'il y a lieu ou non d'attirer l'attention du groupe sur des menaces graves?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Cette décision incombera au personnel de nos très compétents organismes de sécurité.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Si les partis ne sont pas d'accord avec la décision de signaler un incident au groupe, leur sera-t-il possible de contester cette décision?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Pour garantir l'intégrité du processus, les partis ne seront pas informés qu'un incident est porté à l'attention du groupe.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je le répète, nous aimerions avoir beaucoup plus de détails concernant les critères. Nous savons que dans d'autres pays, des adversaires se sont servis des médias sociaux pour manipuler le public, créer des enjeux politiques et sociaux et polariser l'attention sur ces enjeux. Comme je vous l'ai demandé tout à l'heure, quelles mesures concrètes avez-vous mises en place pour vous assurer que ce genre d'influence ne s'exercera pas ici au Canada durant la période précédant l'élection de 2019?

L'hon. Karina Gould:

Je répète qu'en vertu du projet de loi C-76, il est interdit aux plateformes de médias sociaux d'accepter sciemment des fonds de l'étranger pour des publicités électorales. Elles sont également tenues, si elles reçoivent de telles publicités avant et durant une campagne électorale, de tenir un registre des annonces afin de divulguer cette information. Ce sont deux mesures importantes prises pour régler une partie des problèmes qui se sont posés ailleurs dans le monde concernant la manipulation exercée sur des plateformes de médias sociaux.

Au cours d'autres échanges avec des représentants de ces plateformes, j'ai lancé d'idée d'appliquer un principe « Le Canada aussi » à l'égard des activités qu'ils sont disposés à entreprendre pour protéger le processus électoral. Je leur ai demandé d'inclure le Canada dans ces activités et de signaler toute activité de robot sur leurs plateformes. Les Canadiens doivent savoir s'ils interagissent avec une personne ou un robot lorsqu'ils sont en ligne. Les plateformes doivent s'assurer que les comportements sont authentiques. Je sais que les plateformes surveillent cet espace et qu'elles ont supprimé les comptes qu'elles jugeaient problématiques. Nous demandons simplement plus de clarté et de transparence afin que les Canadiens puissent faire davantage confiance à ce qu'ils voient sur Internet.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup, madame la ministre. Nous sommes heureux de votre venue et je suis certain que nous nous reverrons bientôt.

Il nous reste 17 minutes. Comme je l'ai dit, nous avons quelques questions à soumettre au whip avant la relâche.

Scott, nous avons demandé à quelle heure aura lieu notre réunion avec les Australiens — lundi, mardi ou mercredi. À quelle heure avez-vous dit?

M. Scott Simms:

J'ai d'abord dit à 19 heures. Mais face à la vague d'inquiétude et de hargne — le mot est peut-être fort — que cette réponse a soulevée, je dirais que 18 heures serait bien.

Le président:

Nous nous réunirons donc à 18 heures. Ce sera lundi, mardi ou mercredi?

M. Scott Reid:

Nous ne le savons pas encore avec certitude.

Le président:

Ce sera la première ou la deuxième semaine après notre retour.

M. Scott Reid:

En fait, le problème avec certaines de ces dates, c'est qu'il se peut que nous devions nous dépêcher pour aller voter, ce qui risquerait d'écourter cette rencontre. Scott devrait en prendre note. En voulant programmer une activité à 18 heures, que ce soit un mardi ou un mercredi, nous serons au beau milieu des votes, si jamais il y en a. Nous risquons donc fort de faire faux bond à nos Australiens, après tout le mal qu'ils se seront donné pour nous rencontrer. N'en déplaise aux personnes qui ont exprimé leur hargne et leur dépit à votre égard précédemment, je crains qu'en décidant de nous réunir à 18 heures au lieu de 19 heures, quand les votes sont généralement terminés, nous risquions de faire poireauter nos invités pendant une heure. Il est important d'y réfléchir sérieusement.

(1225)

M. Scott Simms:

Voulez-vous que la réunion ait lieu à 19 heures?

M. Scott Reid:

Personnellement, je préfère 19 heures.

M. Scott Simms:

À 19 heures ici et 20 h 30 à Terre-Neuve?

Le président:

Nous nous réunirons donc à 19 heures le premier mardi où les Australiens seront disponibles. C'est d'accord?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Monsieur le président, avant de suspendre la séance pour aller voter, me permettez-vous de présenter une motion?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une question à ce sujet. Avons-nous reçu un avis en bonne et due forme? J'ai un avis de motion de Mme Kuzie, mais il ne porte pas sur cette motion.

Le président:

Attendez un instant. J'aimerais d'abord terminer ce que j'ai à dire.

Pour l'étude du budget des dépenses de la Commission aux débats des chefs, je sais que vous avez obtenu les témoins que vous souhaitiez. Pouvez-vous simplement le confirmer?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Nous allons consacrer une heure à chacun.

Le président:

Pour l'étude du budget des dépenses de la commission, les conservateurs proposent de consacrer une heure au commissaire aux débats et une heure au ministre.

M. Scott Simms:

Cela me semble bon.

Le président:

Êtes-vous tous d'accord?

M. Scott Reid:

Nous sommes d'accord. Nous les entendrons à des heures différentes.

Le président:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Parallèlement ou l'un après l'autre?

Le président:

Dès qu'ils seront disponibles...

Il y a un autre point à régler, madame Kuzie, avant de passer à votre motion.

Monsieur Reid, pouvez-vous garder ces rapports? Les avez-vous toujours?

M. Scott Reid:

En fait, oui, je les ai. Je vais vous les retourner.

Le président:

Si vous étiez présent à la Chambre hier, vous avez vu que l'un des autres comités a déposé un rapport portant sur la politique étrangère dans l'Arctique, en quatre langues autochtones. Le comité en question a omis de mentionner dans son rapport de quelles langues il s'agissait, mais je propose que nous fassions traduire notre rapport sur les langues autochtones en...

Les membres de l'autre comité ont choisi les langues en fonction de celles des témoins. Tous les témoins autochtones se sont exprimés dans leur propre langue. Ce sont les langues qui ont été choisies pour le rapport.

Je proposerais que nous fassions au moins la même chose et que nous utilisions aussi les trois langues les plus communément parlées au Canada, soit l'inuktitut, le cri et l'ojibwé. Qu'en pensez-vous, monsieur Reid?

M. David Christopherson:

Cela me paraît bien. Notre rapport est en cours de traduction.

M. Scott Reid:

J'étais en train de discuter du rappel au Règlement et je n'ai pas entendu ce que vous avez dit. Si c'est ce que vous m'avez dit tout à l'heure, c'est une bonne idée.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

La seule question que je me pose, sur le plan de la procédure, c'est de savoir si ça change quelque chose si notre rapport a déjà été déposé et adopté par la Chambre.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai une réserve à formuler, monsieur le président.

Si je ne me trompe pas, ce rapport portait sur le Nord. Est-ce exact? Les langues autochtones choisies étaient effectivement celles...

Le président:

... des témoins.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est exact. Nous devons donc déterminer quelles langues autochtones nous utiliserons et lesquelles nous laisserons de côté. Je ne sais vraiment pas comment trancher la question.

Le président:

Je faisais seulement une proposition pendant que vous discutiez.

J'ai d'abord proposé d'utiliser l'une des langues autochtones parlées par les témoins et, en plus, peut-être les trois langues les plus courantes au Canada: l'inuktut, le cri et l'ojibwé. De toute façon, certains témoins parlaient ces langues.

M. Scott Reid:

Je n'ai pas d'objection à cette idée. Quelqu'un veut-il...?

M. Scott Simms:

Monsieur Cullen, j'aimerais savoir ce que vous en pensez. Est-ce correct?

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'abord, aucune de ces langues n'est utilisée au-delà des Rocheuses.

Je suis tout à fait d'accord avec les témoins qui souhaitent que leur langue soit utilisée correctement, mais le fait que le Comité en choisisse arbitrairement seulement trois en fonction du nombre de locuteurs, bien que je comprenne la logique, est une façon de procéder qui me semble un peu arbitraire, surtout quand il s'agit de quelque chose d'aussi délicat que la manière dont les idées seront exprimées. Même si c'est un bon rapport, je donnerais peut-être au Comité du temps pour y réfléchir et pour consulter des locuteurs autochtones pour savoir ce qu'ils en pensent.

Le président:

Le Comité est-il d'accord pour faire traduire le rapport dans les langues des témoins qui nous ont été proposés pour cette étude?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Monsieur le greffier, nous vous confions la tâche de trouver l'argent.

M. David Christopherson:

Monsieur le président, je sais que vous êtes sur le point de passer à un autre avis de motion et de lancer un débat. J'aimerais simplement avoir l'occasion de présenter officiellement un avis de motion, qui ne sera pas débattu aujourd'hui. J'aimerais aussi signaler que je ne suis que le messager. Il s'agit du travail d'un groupe de parlementaires aguerris qui souhaitent des changements. M. Reid en fait partie. Nous espérons pouvoir leur donner l'occasion d'exprimer leurs idées. C'est de cela qu'il s'agit.

Pour l'instant, ce n'est qu'une formalité. L'avis est dans les deux langues et le sujet ne sera pas abordé avant la prochaine réunion.

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

(1230)

Le président:

Merci.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, en principe, les rappels au Règlement ont préséance. Je suppose donc que je pourrais avoir préséance sur la motion de Mme Kuzie, mais ce n'est pas là mon objectif.

Mon objectif était de dire ceci. Nous avons tous convenu, dans le cadre d'une sorte d'entente à l'amiable, que nous traiterions du rappel au Règlement à notre retour. Étant donné le peu de temps qu'il nous restera, puis-je faire remarquer que nous savons tous sur quoi porte ce rappel au Règlement. Comme l'article a déjà été mentionné, je propose donc de mettre de côté ce rappel au Règlement et d'y revenir à notre prochaine réunion, après la relâche. Cela nous donnerait le temps d'examiner les questions de procédure et d'avoir un débat plus éclairé. Nous ne serions pas tous obligés de revenir ici cinq minutes avant l'ajournement.

Le président:

Très bien. Nous l'étudierons à notre prochaine réunion dès que nous aurons un moment.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, c'est exact.

Le président:

Très bien. Madame Kuzie, vous demandez un vote sur votre motion. C'est ce que vous avez dit.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'invoque le Règlement à cet égard. Nous avons eu un avis de motion concernant une motion de Mme Kuzie sur ce sujet, mais non sur cette motion. Je n'ai jamais vu cette motion avant. Par conséquent, sur le plan de la procédure, elle serait irrecevable, mais elle pourrait être présentée en tant qu'avis.

Le président:

Monsieur le greffier, vous pouvez utiliser le microphone.

Le greffier:

La motion de régie interne permet aux membres du comité de présenter des motions qui se rapportent au sujet à l'étude.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Très bien, c'est ce que j'allais dire.

Excusez-moi. Poursuivez, monsieur le greffier. [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Est-ce que je peux l'obtenir en français? [Traduction]

Le président:

La motion est-elle traduite en français?

Bien, elle l'a formulée oralement, exact? Vous pouvez donc... [Français]

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je peux la présenter en français si vous le désirez. [Traduction]

Le président:

Pendant la discussion d'un sujet, vous pouvez présenter une motion oralement au comité.

Nous allons simplement la lire à nouveau, ensuite vous la ferez traduire en français. D'accord? [Français]

Mme Linda Lapointe:

Je voulais l'avoir par écrit.

L'avez-vous par écrit en français? [Traduction]

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Puis-je proposer que nous débutions notre prochaine réunion par ce sujet?

Le président:

Notre prochaine réunion portera sur le budget des dépenses.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je préférerais que nous réglions la question aujourd'hui.

Le président:

D'accord, nous pouvons voter. Mme Kuzie peut présenter une motion oralement et nous nous prononcerons ensuite.

Lisez-la à nouveau, je vous prie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord.

Voici la motion: Que, conformément à l'article 108(3)a)(iv) du Règlement, le Comité poursuive son étude sur les menaces en matière de sécurité et de renseignement visant les élections; que l'étude consiste en cinq réunions et que les conclusions soient rapportées à la Chambre.

Le président:

Le Comité est-il prêt à voter?

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si nous ne prenons pas le temps d'avoir une véritable discussion, je vais devoir voter contre.

C'est votre décision. Si vous voulez avoir un vrai débat à une date ultérieure, j'en serais heureux, mais si c'est maintenant que vous le voulez, la réponse est non.

Le président:

Est-ce que quelqu'un d'autre veut intervenir?

Le président:

Monsieur Cullen.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Il semble y avoir une ouverture à l'idée et au principe d'étudier le sujet, mais il faut seulement savoir comment procéder. Il faut peut-être simplement avoir une discussion à ce sujet entre les partis ou au sein des partis, mais il y a une véritable ouverture à l'idée d'étudier la question. Je pense que c'est un excellent sujet. De toute évidence, nous devrions tous...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je veux bien avoir une discussion en bonne et due forme, mais il nous reste six minutes avant les votes.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je comprends, le manque de temps pourrait entrer en jeu.

Chère collègue conservatrice, je me demande si c'est vraiment ce que nous voulons faire. Reportons la discussion pour un temps, mais avec le ferme engagement d'en parler sérieusement, peut-être même avant l'ajournement du Parlement... Je ne veux simplement pas jeter le bébé avec l'eau du bain, comme on dit maintenant.

Le président:

Stéphanie, la décision vous appartient. Nous pourrions voter maintenant ou nous pourrions en discuter plus tard.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord, reportons la discussion.

Le président:

Très bien, nous en discuterons à la première occasion.

Merci beaucoup de votre sens pratique.

Comme je l'ai dit, nous allons nous pencher sur le budget des dépenses au cours des prochaines réunions et nous examinerons également ces deux motions.

M. Scott Reid:

Monsieur le président, avant de lever la séance, j'ai encore une chose à dire.

Je reviens sur la pratique consistant à demander le consentement unanime du Comité. Le consentement a été donné dans un but, mais nous l'avons utilisé dans plusieurs buts. Personne n'a fait d'erreur, mais nous avons donné notre consentement d'entendre le témoignage du ministre; par la suite, plusieurs autres points ont été soulevés.

Je pense qu'il serait utile que nous en discutions lorsque nous reviendrons à mon rappel au Règlement, parce que le rappel au Règlement couvre également ce point.

Le président:

Est-ce que cela fait partie de votre rappel au Règlement?

M. Scott Reid:

C'est l'un des points que nous devrions tous être prêts à discuter à ce moment-là.

Merci.

Le président:

D'accord.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on April 11, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.