header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-04-10 SECU 157

Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

It's 3:30 and we have quorum.

We have two witnesses for our first panel, Mr. Ryland and Mr. Fadden.

Before I start, colleagues, we've had a couple of curves thrown at our agenda going forward and we need to give the clerks and the analyst some instructions. The meeting of the subcommittee was scheduled to start at 5:30. However, bells may ring at 5:30, in which case I would not be able to start the subcommittee meeting.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Start at 5:29.

The Chair:

You're running a little tight at 5:29. I was thinking more like 5:20. We may end the current meeting at 5:20, or we can stretch it a bit to 5:25.

Unless there are other considerations, I'll call upon our witnesses to speak, in no particular order, although I take note that Mr. Fadden has spoken at this committee many times, and Mr. Ryland, I believe this is your first opportunity.

Mr. Mark Ryland (Director, Office of the Chief Information Officer, Amazon Web Services, Inc.):

That's correct, yes.

The Chair:

Maybe I should let the pro go first and then you'll see how an excellent witness can make a presentation.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

That sounds good.

The Chair:

Mr. Fadden, please.

Mr. Richard Fadden (As an Individual):

Thank you, Chairman. I'll hold you to that assessment when I'm finished.

The Chair:

Don't put it to a vote.

Mr. Richard Fadden:

Thank you again for the opportunity to speak to you.

As I start, I want to note that in discussions with the clerk and the staff of the committee, I told them that I wasn't an expert on the financial sector, and it was suggested to me that I could make some general comments on national security and cyber, so that's what I'm proposing to do. I hope that will be helpful to the committee.

I want to comment in an odd sort of way on your order of reference, which talks about national economic security. I'm sure that careful thought was given to that, but I'd like to suggest to you—and I'm doing a bit of marketing here—that the issues you're talking about are national security issues, period. They're not a subunit of national security.

This goes to the definition of national security. I hope and think that you use a fairly broad one, but to my mind, it's anything that materially affects a nation's sovereignty. The things that the committee is talking about now can potentially very much affect a nation's sovereignty, just like money laundering conducted by a foreign state, or a devastating national security issue. That's just a small marketing effort on my part.

While I'm not an expert in financial systems, I hope and think that I can offer you a couple of useful context points. One is that context in the environment in which cyber-attacks occur, be they against the financial institutions or anywhere else, is important. These things don't occur in isolation. I would argue that you cannot deal with cyber-threats in the financial sector without an understanding of cyber-threats generally, and you can't understand cyber-threats without understanding threats generally directed against Canada and the west. We all live in a globalized world, and that certainly applies to national security threats.

I say this for a couple of reasons. Some of you may be old enough to remember the Cold War where it was fairly simple: those who were causing trouble and those who were receiving trouble were basically states. I'm oversimplifying, but it was the Warsaw Pact against the west. Some companies were affected.

I think one of the contextual points that are important is that our adversaries or instigators today are states, terrorist groups, criminal organizations—and I'll come back to that—corporations, civil society groups and individuals. I think that any of these could be causing difficulties in the financial systems that you're concerned about.

The targets, on the other hand, used to be basically states. I'd argue that they're now states, corporations, civil society, political parties, non-profits and individuals. The world is fairly complicated, and if either the financial institutions themselves or the government is going to deal with cyber-attacks against them, my suggestion to you is that they have to know and understand the context in which all of that is occurring. They just can't build walls abstractly.

I think the question of who or what might initiate cyber-attacks against our financial sector is very relevant. I don't try very hard to do sound bites, but I have one: National security is not national. It's not national in the sense that no single state can deal with these issues— certainly not a relatively small middle power like Canada—and you need international co-operation.

Second, I would argue that no federal state or nation state can deal with these sorts of things without the help of provincial or regional governments, and corporations and society generally. I would argue with you that it is a significant mistake for financial institutions to argue that they can do it all themselves, just as it is a mistake for the government to accept that hypothesis.

I talked a little bit about context and environment, so I would just like to lay out very quickly the kinds of threats to national security that Canada's facing. I think of the revisionist states, Russia and China; extremisms and extremism generally, including terrorists; the issue of cyber; the dysfunctional west; and the rogue states and issues—Iran and North Korea, come to mind.

I'm emphasizing this a little bit because I think all of these are interrelated far more than they might have been 15 or 20 years ago. They leverage against each other, and they amplify their effects. For example, Russian and China use cyber systems and benefit from a dysfunctional west because we're not fighting them together. Terrorist groups benefit from the discord caused by revisionist states, and they use cyber systems. All of them interact with one another, and I think that we need to keep that in mind when we do that.

(1535)



One of the other issues I want to emphasize and suggest to you is that Canada is very much threatened by cyber-attacks generally and against our financial institutions. I say this, because when I used to be working, one of the things that used to drive me to distraction was the view of many Canadians that Canada wasn't threatened because we had three oceans and the United States. That view made it very difficult for governments and others to deal with a lot of national security threats. The average Canadian, absent an event, didn't think there was a great issue.

I think Canada is very much threatened by a variety of the institutions and entities that I just talked about, but why is this the case? We have an advanced economy, advanced science and technology; we're part of the Five Eyes and NATO, and we're next to the U.S.

To be honest, we're not thought internationally to have the strongest defences on the cyber side, and any institution will go to the weakest link in the chain. Sometimes we are thought to be that, although I don't think we're doing all that badly. Also, we're threatened, sometimes simply because we're hit at random.

I think it's especially important for the committee to make the point that our financial sector is indeed threatened by cyber-attacks, because I don't think a lot of people believe that.

One of the other things I'd like to talk about is who I think are the main instigators of potential attacks. I think they're nation states and international criminal groups.

What are they going to try to do? They're going to try to deny service, old-fashioned theft—and I'll come back to that—information and intelligence acquisition, intellectual property theft, and identification theft, for both the purposes of acquiring money and espionage.

Let me give you a couple of examples about states that play with countries' financial systems.

North Korea finances a lot of their operations, gets a lot of their hard currency by using their cyber-capabilities to access the financial systems of various and sundry countries. For example, they had a program some time ago that allowed them to steal money systematically from ATMs around the world. They also had a program that allowed them to claim ransoms using ransomware. More generally, they are the country that was thought to have frozen the United Kingdom's national health service a few years ago.

My point is that you can find out as much about this as I can just by Googling them. The United States has indicted a number of people from North Korea who have tried to do this, and this is just one example of a state that tries to get into western countries' financial systems.

Another one is Iran. You will have seen in the newspapers over the last five or ten years, a couple of examples of how Iran has tried to do this, in particular against the United States and banks. There are indictments against seven or eight Iranians.

I have a couple of words about Russia and China and how I don't think you cannot ignore them when you talk about this topic. I think their main objective is twofold: one is denial of service, and another is to simply reduce western confidence in our institutions. They do this systematically.

Criminal groups I think are becoming much more prominent in this area, and it's something we don't talk enough about. I hope you've had an opportunity to talk to the RCMP about this. If you look at either RCMP or Statistics Canada figures, the extent to which international criminal groups are playing with our financial institutions has gone through the roof over the last little while.

In summary, cyber-attacks on our financial system are a national security issue in my view. These attacks must be viewed in broad context if we're going to deal with them effectively. There's no silver bullet to any of this. It will only work, and we will only reduce the risk, if governments, corporations and civil society co-operate.

I think government needs to share more information with the private sector. It's something that we do far less of than the United Kingdom and United States. You can't expect private corporations to be an effective partner if they're not aware of what's going on.

The financial sector needs to report these attacks and breaches far more systematically than they do.

These issues are evergreen, and we need to talk about them more than we do.

Thank you, Chairman.

(1540)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Fadden.

Mr. Ryland, you have 10 minutes, please.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Good afternoon, Chairman and members of the committee. My name is Mark Ryland. I'm the director of security engineering with Amazon Web Services. I work in the office of the CISO, so I work directly for the chief information security officer. Thank you for giving us the opportunity to speak with you today.

I suspect you all know a bit about Amazon.com, generally speaking, but allow me to add some Canadian details.

Amazon.ca has been serving our Canadian customers since 2002, and we have maintained a physical presence in the country since 2010. Amazon now employs more than 10,000 full-time employees in Canada, and in 2018 we announced an additional 6,300 jobs. We have two tech hubs, which are important software development centres with multiple office sites in Vancouver and Toronto. We employ hundreds of software designers and engineers who are working on some of our most advanced projects for our global platforms. We also have offices in Victoria with AbeBooks.com and in Winnipeg with a division called Thinkbox.

We also operate seven fulfillment centres in Canada—four in the greater Toronto area, two in the Vancouver area, and one in Calgary. Four more have been announced. Those will be coming online in 2019 in Edmonton and Ottawa.

But why am I here? What is this cloud thing? You might be wondering why we're here discussing the cybersecurity of the financial sector at all. Well, roll back the clock. About 12 years ago, we launched a division of our company we call Amazon Web Services, or AWS for short.

AWS started when the company realized that we had developed our core competency in operating very large-scale technology infrastructure and data centres. With that competency, we embarked on a broader mission of taking that technological understanding and serving an entirely new customer segment—developers and businesses—with an information technology service they can use to build their own very sophisticated, scalable applications.

The term “cloud computing” refers to the on-demand delivery of IT resources over the Internet or over private networks, with pay-as-you-go pricing, so that you pay only for what you use. Instead of buying, owning and maintaining a lot of technology equipment, such as computers, storage, networks, databases and so forth, you simply call an API and get access to these services on an on-demand basis. Sometimes it's called “utility computing”. It's similar to how a consumers flip on a light switch and access electricity in their homes. The power company sort of takes care of all the background.

All this infrastructure is created and built. There is of course physical equipment and infrastructure behind all of this, but from the user perspective, you simply call an API. You call a software interface or click a button with a mouse, get access to all this capability and are then charged for its usage.

It's all fully controlled by software, which means that it's all automatable. That's a really important point that I'll make several times, because the ability to automate things is a big advantage in the security realm. Instead of doing things manually and using.... We don't have enough experts, believe me, to do all the command typing that needs to be done, so you need the right software to automate.

As of today, we provide highly reliable, secure, resilient services to over a million customers in 190 countries. Actually, you can think of our cloud platform as a federation of separate cloud regions. There are 20 of those around the world and 61 availability zones. Each region is made up of separate physical locations to create greater resiliency.

Montreal is home to our AWS Canada region, which has two availability zones. Each availability zone is in one or more distinct geographic areas and is designed with redundancy, for power, for networking, for connectivity and so forth, to minimize the chance they could both fail. With this capability, with these multiple physical locations, our customers can build highly available and very fault-tolerant applications. Even the failure of an entire data centre need not result in an outage for our customers and their applications.

The companies that leverage AWS range from large enterprises such as Porter Airlines, the National Bank of Canada, the Montréal Exchange, TMX Group, Capital One and BlackBerry, to lots of start-ups, such as Airbnb and Pinterest, as well as companies like Netflix, which many of you have heard of, all of which are running on the AWS cloud.

We also work a lot with public sector organizations around the globe, including the Government of Ontario, the Ministry of Justice and the Home Office in the U.K., Singapore, Australia, the U.S.A. and many customers globally in the public sector area.

What are the advantages of moving to the cloud? There are three primary benefits that I want to highlight.

The first is agility and elasticity. Agility allows you to quickly spin up resources, use them, and shut them down when you don't need them. This really means that for the first time, customers can treat information technology in a more experimental fashion because experiments are cheap. You can actually try things, and if they don't work, you spend very little money. Instead of this large capital expenditure with large software licensing costs, you can do this in a much more dynamic model. Experimentation is very helpful when it comes to innovation, so that leads to greater innovation.

(1545)



In terms of elasticity, customers often had to over-provision for their systems. They had to buy too much capacity, because only once a year or once a month was there a need for a great deal of capacity.

Most of the time, the systems are relatively idle. You have a lot of waste in this over-provisioning model. In the cloud, you can provision what you need. You can scale up and add more capacity or subtract capacity dynamically as you go.

Another advantage is cost savings. Part of what I just described also leads to cost savings. You're using only the amount of capacity you need at any one time. You can also treat your expenditures in terms of moving from capital expenses to operational expenses, which many people find very helpful.

In short, our customers are able to maintain very high levels of infrastructure at a price that is very difficult to do when you buy and manage all your own infrastructure.

The third reason, and the one that I really want to emphasize here in my testimony, is actually the benefit of security. The AWS infrastructure puts very strong safeguards in place to protect customer security and privacy. All the data is stored in highly secured data centres. We provide full encryption very easily; you just literally check a box or call an API. All your data is encrypted, which acts as controls in logging, to see what's going on and to monitor and control who has access. Also, our global network provides built-in inherent capabilities for protecting customers from DDoS and other network-type attacks.

Before the cloud, organizations had to spend a lot of time and money managing their own data centres and worrying about all the security of everything inside, and that meant time not focused specifically on their core mission. With the cloud, organizations can function more like start-ups, moving at the speed of ideas, without upfront costs and the worry of defending the full range of security threats.

Previously, organizations had to either adopt this big capital investment program or enter into long-term contracts with vendors. Really, the most difficult part was that the companies and organizations were responsible for the entire stack. Everything from the concrete to the locks on the doors and all the way to the software was completely the responsibility of the customer. With cloud, we take care of a number of those responsibilities.

What about cloud security? More and more, organizations are realizing that there's a link between IT modernization and using the cloud and improving their security posture. Security depends on the ability to stay a step ahead of rapidly and continuously evolving threat landscapes and requires both operational agility and access to the latest technologies. As the legacy infrastructure that many of our customers use approaches obsolescence or needs replacing, organizations move to the cloud to take advantage of our advanced capabilities.

Increased automation is key, as I mentioned before, and the cloud provides the highest level of automation. The possibility of automation is maximized using the cloud platform. Cloud security is our number one priority. In fact, we say that security is job zero, even before job one, and organizations across all sectors will highlight how commercial cloud can offer improved security across their IT infrastructure.

Therefore, many organizations, such as financial institutions, are modernizing their capabilities to use cloud platforms. We've been architected for the security of organizations, and for some of the most security-sensitive organizations, such as financial services.

Now, there is a shared responsibility. Customers are still responsible for maintaining the security of their environments, but the surface area, the amount of things they need to worry about, is greatly reduced, because we take care of a lot of those things and they can focus their attention on what remains. From major banks to federal governments, customers have repeatedly told us—and we have quotes that we can supply to the committee—that they feel more secure in their cloud-based deployments of their applications than they do in their on-premise physical infrastructure in their own data centres.

In sum, cloud should not be seen as a barrier to security, but as a technology that helps security and is therefore very helpful in the financial services realm as a part of a general solution for modernization and improving security.

We also have a few policy recommendations, which we'll provide in our written testimony.

One of the things is that we think there's an overemphasis on the physical location of data. Very often, people think, “I've got to have data physically here in order to protect it.” Actually, if you look at the history of cyber-incidents, everything is done remotely. If you're connected to a network and the network has outside access, that's where all the bad things happen.

Physical location of data, especially when you can encrypt everything, such as physical access to storage drives or whatever, literally is not a threat vector. Really, there should be some flexibility for banks and other institutions as to where they physically place their data, and they should be able to run their workloads around the globe, reaching their global customers with low latency and storing data potentially outside of Canada.

There are another couple of recommendations, including data residency. We believe also that centralizing security assessment makes a lot of sense. Instead of having every agency or every regulatory body separately evaluating cloud security, centralize that in an organization like the CCCS, where they can do a central evaluation and determine whether clouds are meeting the requirements. Then, that authority to operate can be inherited by other organizations throughout the government and under industries that are regulated.

(1550)



Thank you very much for your time.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Ryland.

The first seven minutes go to Mr. Spengemann, please.

Mr. Sven Spengemann (Mississauga—Lakeshore, Lib.):

Thank you very much, gentlemen, for being with us.

Mr. Fadden, it's particularly good to have you here. In terms of your former role as national security adviser, I think you have a unique perspective on how this connects to the Department of National Defence and questions of national defence. I want to start by asking you about that.

Where are the intersections, the grey zones, between what we look at as Public Safety questions and National Defence questions? These two committees have their own mandates. In that way, we're stovepiped, and perhaps there should be a joint study between the two of them.

Can you make some general comments on how much of the national defence component plays a role in good cybersecurity and how much lies on the public safety side?

Mr. Richard Fadden:

Well, I tend to agree with you that drawing distinctions in this area is a little bit artificial and that one of the things that should be avoided to the extent possible is the development of these silos. We have quite enough of them as we are, and we don't need any more.

I think National Defence's main contribution is through the Communications Security Establishment and, insofar as the private sector is concerned, the Centre for Cyber Security. They tend to operate quite co-operatively with other parts of the national security environment in Canada. I would argue, in part on the basis of what I knew when I was working, but in part because I now operate a little bit in the private sector, that they certainly were a welcome development, but they have not solved all the problems of cyber-attacks here or anywhere else.

I think one of the big problems they have, and this is a Defence issue, in the sense that the defence minister is responsible, is that we talk about these things, but we talk about them less and share far less with the private sector than a variety of other countries do. I don't blame any particular government or any particular official. There's something in the Canadian DNA in that we think that national security should be dealt with and not talked about, but I would argue that in many cases we're far better off if we talk about them a little bit, without going into operational detail. It raises awareness. It allows both government and corporations to talk and to share more information than is otherwise the request, but I think the main contributor is CSE.

(1555)

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

I had the opportunity to ask the last panel about the distinction, if there is one, between state actors and non-state actors qualitatively in terms of their capacity to execute a threat. Can you comment on that? Does a state actor simply have more capacity, more hackers and more people? Or are there other qualitative differences that really put that type of actor into a different category altogether?

Mr. Richard Fadden:

I think there are state actors and state actors. I think China and Russia are at the top of the league. They spend almost unlimited resources on their cyber-capabilities. They're very, very good at it. I think it's generally accepted that China uses the vacuum cleaner approach. They'll grab just about anything they can. The Russians, I think, are somewhat better technologically and more surgical in what they seek to acquire.

I think international criminal groups are not at that level, but they're getting to be very, very good. It's a very smart collection of people there, who have figured out that it's easier to enrich themselves using cyber devices than using kinetic action of some form or other. Also, there are no borders, and to the extent that there are no borders, it's far easier.

I guess the last group I would mention is terrorist groups. They're in a different category. Some of them have a limited cyber-capability. It's not really worldwide.

I guess the point I would make again is that the state actors in particular make it important that we regard cyber-defences as evergreen. I'm not talking in particular about Mr. Ryland's company, but for any protective measures that we put in place, if we have a really aggressive actor and we give them enough time and technology, they'll find a way around them. My point is, we need to constantly renew our defensive measures. We need to constantly advance our technology, mostly against nation-states, but increasingly against international criminal groups.

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

I want to ask you a question about content in the digital domain, both on the civilian side and on the military side. Facebook just came out with the decision to ban a number of entities, individuals that are not meeting their standards, including Faith Goldy, who is a white nationalist and Canadian. We've also had discussions in the defence committee about Russian disinformation campaigns and deliberate false content in the social realm.

How much of an issue is content? Where do you see the trends going? Is there a trend towards, quote, unquote, “banning” content? If so, what happens? Do we push that kind of content into the dark web or are we solving some problems?

Mr. Richard Fadden:

I think content is appalling, disgusting and unrealistically terrible. If you sit down some Saturday afternoon or on a rainy Sunday and, with a bit of imagination, start going through the web, you will find right-wing stuff that is as bad as the Nazis, and you will find jihadist literature that advocates the systematic killing of people. That's not talking about the dark web, which is another problem again. I think content is a real issue.

I would argue that what Facebook is trying to do is a good first step, but I really don't want Facebook to become my thought controller. On the other hand, I worry rather the same way about governments. I don't want governments to become my thought controllers by determining what happens. I think we need a bit of a national discussion on who does this.

One way that Parliament has dealt with this issue is in the area of money laundering. You may recall there was a debate years ago about how to deal with money laundering: Were we just going to make it a crime? What Parliament basically did is that they imposed an obligation on banks to know their clients. That has significantly improved the capability of everybody to deal with money laundering. It hasn't eliminated it, but it has helped it.

I think there is something to be said for government setting up a framework, either statutory or regulatory, which requires companies that play in this broad area to know whom they're allowing to access the web and then to direct them as to what they can and can't do.

Because of my old age and after 40 years in government, I've become a bit wary about being told what to think, but whether it's government or the private sector, I think there needs to be a measure of transparency so that we know both what is being done and what is not being done.

But none of this is going to work, I think, if the average Canadian isn't more aware of what's available and that average Canadian has some means of registering his or her displeasure. Right now, yes, you can call the Mounties, but they have so much to worry about that it's pretty low in their priorities.

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

Thanks very much. That's very helpful.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Spengemann. [Translation]

Mr. Paul-Hus, you have seven minutes, please.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Good afternoon, gentlemen.

Mr. Fadden, in 2010, you gave an interview on CBC that was reported in the Globe and Mail. You said that there was interference from foreign governments against officials in provincial ministries and in areas of Canadian politics. At that time, people from the NDP and the Liberal Party demanded your resignation. Fortunately, you remained in office.

This morning, we learned that the report of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, which has just been tabled, confirms what you said and very clearly confirms that China is a danger for Canada’s security.

In your presentation, you talked about problems, but I would also like to know about potential solutions. You talked about the “dysfunctional West”, if I heard the interpretation correctly. Could you shed some more light on what we could do? What does that mean?

(1600)

[English]

Mr. Richard Fadden:

Yes. When I talk about the dysfunctional west, I mean that.... I'm sure you don't want to get into a large discussion about the current U.S. administration, but they are a significant issue right now in the sense that the views of the current U.S. President are promoting massive instability. People are uncertain as to what's going on. The United Kingdom hasn't taken a major decision in a year and a half. Monsieur Macron is concerned about what's going on with les gilets jaunes. Germany is preoccupied with replacing Mrs. Merkel, and God knows what the Italians are doing.

My point is that while we're worrying about these major issues, we're giving an opportunity for Russia and China in particular to poke and prod in a way that they could not do if we were a little bit more together. I'm not suggesting the world's coming to an end. I really am not, but I think our adversaries—and I call them adversaries, not enemies—are very active. They take advantage of every opportunity. I think we need to start rebuilding those close ties that we've had amongst some countries since World War II.

I also think we need to realize more than we do—it's one of the pathways that I think we need to talk about—and appreciate that Russia and China are, in their own way, great countries. They've made great contributions to civilization. But right now they are fundamentally unhappy with their position on this planet and they're trying to change it, using virtually any method. I don't think we think about this very much. If we don't think about it and try to do something about it, we're really behind the eight ball.

I think the first thing is to develop a greater understanding of what's happening. Somebody asked me the other day in the media why Russia went to Syria. There's no prospect of territorial acquisition, except that they are trying to cause trouble, and they have effectively succeeded. They delayed the elimination of the caliphate. They're doing this in a whole raft of areas. They played with the elections in the United States, Germany, France, and I believe Italy. All they're trying to do is not really shift who's going to win; they're trying to diminish public confidence in public institutions.

All of this, I think, needs to be talked about more. We need to get a grip amongst particularly core western countries, about how serious the problem is. Parts of the U.S. administration consider this more important that we do sometimes. The Brits are at another level. We need a consensus in the west that we have a problem. The U.S. has just shifted their national security priorities to great power conflict, after being on terrorism for the last many years. Well, if that's the case, we need to think about what we're going to do about Russia and China, without going to war, which is not what I'm advocating. We need to be talking about it, understanding the nature of the threat and developing closer ties internationally. I do firmly believe that national security is not national, not in the way it's run today; we need to work with everybody. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Thank you.

Let us go back to our basic topic, the financial sector, the banks.

We have met with a number of interested parties, various banks and various other groups. We have the banks, the government’s administration system, and the political side. In terms of security, issues, potential enemies, the political side is always hesitant. The banks take their own measures.

In your opinion, is the administration, the people we do not see, the people in the shadows, currently effective enough to make up for the political side? It can be on one side or the other; I am talking generally. Sometimes, politically, we don’t dare.

After the years you have spent in the political apparatus, do you feel that we are effective or that we need to be taking very vigorous measures? [English]

Mr. Richard Fadden:

I should admit up front that I'm probably prejudiced, having spent a goodly number of years working in this area, but I think there has been a lot of progress over the last little while and there's much more co-operation and collaboration.

But I would argue two things. One is that the world is becoming much, much more complex, and I think it could be argued that we need more resourcing. When I used to work for the government, the last thing you wanted to do was embarrass your minister by saying you wanted more money. I'm not really saying that now, but if you consider the Cold War to terrorism and the current cyber issues and great power conflict generally, yes, all of these institutions have had more resources, but the resources may not be enough today, so I would ask that.

I guess the other issue I would note is this. I was told over the years by several politicians from both sides that there aren't very many votes on national security, and that's one of the reasons why governments are sometimes hesitant to take some of the steps you've implied. However much politicians may get frustrated with officials, officials do take the lead from the political side of things, and I think we need to be a little bit more proactive sometimes than we are, because technology is moving, the threat is moving, and we seem to be playing catch-up.

I don't direct this at any government or any official. It just seems to be the way we do it, largely because, if you're the Minister of Finance or the President of the Treasury Board, the last thing you want to do is to say every two years, “Here's another quarter of a billion dollars.” I'm just picking a number, but you know, there are technological changes, some of which Mr. Ryland talked about, and there are a whole raft of others. It's very hard for government to keep up with these things without a constant ongoing effort, and at the same time, you're worrying about Russia and China and North Korea and Iran. You're worrying about international criminal groups. I think we're beginning to underestimate the problem with terrorists just because we've whacked a few of them.

So, as a long answer to a short question, I think generally speaking people are doing as well as they can, but it's very difficult to galvanize everybody who works on this—political officials and the private sector—unless there's some consensus on how serious the threat is.

I would say, with great respect, there's no such consensus in Canada.

(1605)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Paul-Hus.

Mr. Dubé, go ahead for seven minutes, please. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair

Thank you for being here today, gentlemen.

Mr. Ryland, my first question is for you. In terms of your services, I am not sure whether you are in a position to explain to us how the responsibilities between you and your clients are separated.

What role do your clients play in ensuring the security of the data they store on your servers when they use your services? [English]

Mr. Mark Ryland:

It can be a very long and nuanced conversation, but just to give a kind of summary, if you look at something like what they have in the United States, there's a security control framework based on a NIST standard called FedRAMP that lists something like 250 controls—in other words, the security properties that you want in a system—and if you take that whole security framework, our platform covers more than one-third of those controls. There are simply things that we literally take care of on behalf of our customers. They don't have to worry about them at all. Roughly one-third are shared in that we take care of some of the things but the customer has to do certain configurations and make certain choices that are correct for their requirements. Those are optional because it's reasonable to do either one, but depending on what their needs are, they have to choose. Then roughly one-third are pretty much all the responsibility of the customer.

So we have decreased the scope of concern for the customer. We delineate pretty clearly, and we literally have control documents that say who's responsible for what, and then we have a lot of material—white papers, best practices documents, and what we call a “well-architected framework”—to help people with that one remaining responsibility. We want them to be very successful at that, so we put a lot of effort into helping them design secure systems.

But when you get to that level, it all depends on the needs of the application, so there's not a correct answer to some question. It's going to be “it depends”. It depends on the application. It depends on the requirement.

In general, I think that's a good summary of the kind of model we use with our customers. We take care of a number of things that they normally would worry about; we describe some areas in which we do some things and they need to do others, and then we help them be successful in the remaining parts of building a secure system with lots of tools and features that make it easy to do the remainder. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you.

I want to make sure I fully understand. You said that about one third of the responsibility to configure everything appropriately lies with your clients. Does that create a barrier for people, and especially companies that might wish to use your services, by which I mean that the expertise must already exist in the company or the government agency?

Let me explain. Here is the example that comes to mind. I believe that Shared Services Canada has a contract with you. However, according to what we have been seeing in the news for some time, that organization has a quite dismal record in terms of implementing information systems.

Could the potential shortcomings or lack of expertise in a company or government agency limit the ability of a client to do business with you or with any other company comparable to yours?

(1610)

[English]

Mr. Mark Ryland:

It's certainly possible, in using any technology, to not use it properly. We see a big part of our mission as education and training of our customers, and we do a lot of that. A lot of it's actually free as part of the process of helping them to understand this kind of new paradigm of cloud computing.

That said, there's a lot of commonality with things they've already been doing for a long time. I'll just make up an example. Say, you're running a citizen-facing web application for a government. You already have some kind of understanding of how to secure a web system; you have an authentication system, password reset, those kinds of properties that are built into the system. If you use that similar kind of system on a cloud platform, the security properties of that would be similar to the one you've been doing historically.

It's not a completely new world. It's not a 100% new skill set that is required for security professionals, but there are definitely differences and changes. It's part of the progress of the industry, just like 20 or 30 years ago when we spent a lot of time on mainframe security. Now that's not something people focus on. There are still mainframe systems running, and they still need to be secure, but the focus tends to be on the new things, the new systems and new applications.

I think the transition to cloud computing has a similar property. In any type of modernization and use of new technology there's definitely some learning curve, but you can also get a lot more done with less labour, with fewer actual human beings. Sometimes when automation comes up it's considered controversial because, well, what if we remove people? Will we be taking away jobs from workers? In the cybersecurity area, everyone recognizes we have a huge labour shortage of skilled labourers in this area. Any type of technology that increases automation and enables a skilled worker to come up with a solution and then replicate that broadly is a big win, so everyone can get behind greater automation in the security realm.

I think that's one of the main reasons that people find the cloud platforms to be advantageous. Yes, there's a learning curve, but the ability to automate things is really quite dramatically better than using traditional technology. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I have two quick final questions.

Here is the first one. Perhaps you are not in the best position in your organization to answer it. However, say there was a leak of data, given the shared responsibility, who would ultimately be responsible for the data in legal terms? In the financial sector specifically, if a client were to lose money, would the fault lie with the bank or with the company that allows them to store data in the cloud?

How do you see that? [English]

The Chair:

Be very quick, please.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Yes.

The shared responsibility also includes the line between who takes that responsibility. If there were a problem in one of our systems, we would be responsible for that. If a customer misconfigures or misuses one of our systems, then they are responsible for that.

Again, we do a lot to support customers and we have many cases in the security team that I work in where customers have an issue and some kind of incident, and they ask for our help. Although technically we're not at fault at all, we still are very aggressive in responding to help them get out of the problems that they've caused.

I'll take a simple, non-controversial example. We have systems where customers have accidentally deleted data without having proper backups, and come to us in a panic. At one level, we could say, “Well, the system was working just the way it was described. You made a mistake. There's nothing we can do”. But we will go to great lengths to help them try to figure out solutions to those kinds of problems, and similarly with security incidents.

(1615)

The Chair:

Thank you Mr. Dubé. I'm sorry about that.

Mr. Graham, you have seven minutes, please.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

I'd love to continue on that line, but I'll come back to that in a second.

Mr. Fadden, I don't think anybody will disagree with your assessment that our study is really about national security as opposed to financial cybersecurity as the pigeonhole..

I would say that there are a lot of votes in national security, but only after an incident has happened.

Mr. Richard Fadden:

Point taken. I appreciate it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You said that national security is not national; it's supernational. Does Canada have a network backbone strong enough to handle Canadian needs? Do we have enough intercontinental connections to handle Canadian needs, and does it matter?

Mr. Richard Fadden:

I think it matters a great deal.

Do we have the backbone or the intercontinental connections? I find it difficult to answer that question, because I think it's an answer that requires two parts: one dealing with governments generally, and one dealing with the non-governmental sector.

I think that insofar as governments are concerned, we have very close alliances with the Five Eyes—the United States in particular—and there's an immense sharing of information. I would argue that it's pretty effective, notwithstanding the dysfunction I was talking about.

When I was still working, the approach taken to deal with some of these issues.... It's a bit like talking about cancer. That's not particularly helpful. I notice that some of you have your cancer pins on. Talking generally about cancer is not particularly helpful, because the cure for cancers goes to the 130-odd kinds of cancer. I find that talking generally about cyber is not often very helpful. You have to break it down into its component parts.

We used to divide up the Canadian economy into strategic sectors, such as telecoms, financial, nuclear.... There were 11 or 12 of them. Quite honestly, I think the connections they have with their home offices—with each other in Canada and abroad—vary. For example, our nuclear sector is pretty well organized, and I think the general view, as sectors go, is that financial sector is not doing badly. Some of the others are less so.

I'm not trying to avoid answering your question, but I think it's difficult to just give you a yea or a nay. I think there's no one entity—government or non-governmental—that's responsible. It's just as things have evolved.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll come to Mr. Ryland for a bit more.

You talked about the over-provisioning model. You were talking about the the vast resources and being able to balance them across systems, which we couldn't have before. As an example, what's the computing power of a key fob today versus that of the Apollo?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

There's more power in the key fob, probably. It's a 32-bit microcontroller.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When we have that kind of massive change in computing capacity, what's the security impact of that change? Is the technology changing faster than we're able to keep up with it?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

No, I don't think so.

Technology changes rapidly, but there are people driving those technological changes. In general, experts who build the systems understand how they work and how to secure them. There may be a lag time in terms of broad understanding of those cutting-edge technologies, but often those experts are also designing things to make them more secure by default.

I think IoT is a great example. We don't have time to go into the details, but we've all recognized the problems in the past with the Internet of things—home devices, etc.—being deployed in a very insecure fashion. Historically, it was the cheapest and easiest thing to do. If you look at the newer technology that we provide, or that Microsoft or other large-scale providers give you, by default their systems are far more secure. They're updatable in place, which they didn't use to be. They use secure protocols by default; they didn't use to do that. You can go right down the list of how the business interests of these large providers align with building systems that are secure by default, whereas previously, that was left to the person who was building the smart refrigerator or the smart toaster or whatever.

Technological shifts can actually raise the bar across whole industries by investment and by alignment of business interests with higher security.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll go back to clouds. Does the public or even the organizations you deal with truly understand what a cloud is?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

There's often a lot of confusion. First, there's this idea, what is out there? People think that there must be something out there. There's also the confusion between consumer-use cases. People think Facebook and Google are like a cloud, but provisioning IT services from a cloud-computing vendor is a completely different model. First of all, we don't monetize your data; we lock it down and never look at it. We have a totally different way of thinking about it.

The one thing they typically have in common is network accessibility. It would be able to reach them from anywhere.

There's a lot of confusion. Often when we start our presentations, we'll put up a world map. We actually have little dots on the map showing where our stuff is in that city or that region, so that people know there's physical equipment behind all of this capability.

(1620)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is AWS essentially virtual servers, or is there another system besides that? Are they virtual machines?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

That's one of our core services. It's called EC2, but we literally have a hundred other services. The trend is away from using virtual machine services, because that's where the customer has to take the most responsibility. People would prefer the higher level services where we take increased responsibility and they just have to do very minimal configuration.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

If you're not on a virtual machine and you're using the services provided, how much control can the client actually have? There's a balance to be had. As a client, could I choose what operating system to put on my virtual machine? I could put a Debian system on there, or whatever you want, but what could you put on a non-virtual machine? What are the other options?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Again, it depends on the use case. You don't care what the compute model is for a storage service, as you're just storing data. Databases are in the middle. There are a range of choices and options, but people do tend to prefer what are called “abstract services”. Over time, you'll see more and more use of what those abstract services. I just upload my JavaScript function to this function as a service and the code executes whenever certain events fire. I have no concept of the operating system or anything else; it's handled for me.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I only have about 40 seconds left, so my last question for both of you is about the security advantages versus disadvantages of open versus closed-source software.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

There's something called the “many eyes” hypothesis for open-source software. The fact that people can see the code makes it more likely that security and other flaws will be discovered. I'm not sure there's a really strong empirical backing for that, because lots of security flaws have existed in open code, but there is the big advantage that people have more control over their own destiny because you can do your own investigation. You can make your fixes. You're not dependent on a vendor to discover and fix security problems. On the whole, there are some real advantages to open-source software, but it's not completely black and white.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Richard Fadden:

Chairman, would you allow me to make two quick statements?

Mr. Ryland has been talking about what he does and what his clients do. If we imagine a bank for a minute, I think it's important that we not become mesmerized by the really effective things that Mr. Ryland does. If I took a device that I could probably get if I tried hard and stuck it under the desk of the executive vice-president of the Bank of Montreal, it would be a recording device. As he accessed the information and put in all his passwords, I would be able to access these from the office next door or in another city.

Talking about the Internet of things, I still don't think we've come to grips with developing a relationship with a light bulb. I think things are better than they used to be, but again, if you control the light bulb—and I'm making a joke of it.... But whatever device you want to use has the capacity for acquiring information.

The security of the systems we're talking about has two real components, the part that Mr. Ryland talked about and the environment that the financial institutions use. They're equally important, because if you get in from the financial institution's perspective effectively, either through a device that I've talked about or some other device, you can wreak not only on that financial institution but also complicate Mr. Ryland's life a great deal.

It's not just the highly complex security devices that Mr. Ryland talks about. It's a whole raft of other things as well. I would argue that the Royal Bank of Canada probably does these very well. A lowly Manitoba credit union may not. Forgive me, anyone here from Manitoba. It's the weakest link in the chain issue that we haven't really come to grips with as effectively as we could.

The Chair:

Thank you.

As a result of this study, I've been paranoid talking in front of my refrigerator or my thermostat. Now I have to worry about my key fob and light bulbs.

Mr. Motz, you have five minutes, please.

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC):

You've got lots to hide.

Mr. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, CPC):

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, gentlemen, for being here.

Mr. Fadden, when we were talking previously about combatting terrorism, you referred to our current Canadian model as more like a whack-a-mole where we suppress a problem after it has begun. Is there a mechanism to be more proactive in preventing cybersecurity attacks than just education or literacy?

Mr. Richard Fadden:

Yes, I think there is.

If you look at what you can do—and I'm not an engineer, so I've reduced this to language I can understand—you can have purely defensive measures. You build something in whatever system you have: You have firewalls and whatever.

Then you have what I call “aggressive defensive”: You have the capacity to know when somebody's trying to go out or come in, and you deal with that.

Finally, you have the purely offensive: You have the capacity to go out and either seek trouble or degrade somebody else's capabilities.

I think we're fairly good at the first. We're not so bad at the middle. I don't think we're so great at the third. I'm not sure that we, Canada, have to do this alone. We can do this with a bunch of other countries. However, the capacity of what I will call “cyber adversaries” to use 37 cutouts makes it very difficult for people to know where they're coming from, and whatnot.

You really do need some sort of worldwide monitoring system. I don't think we have that. I think the United States, insofar as I understand, tries, but there's a limit to what even they can do.

You've probably heard of former U.S. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld. He was ridiculed at one point, but I think he said one thing that's true, and it applies to this area: You don't know what you don't know.

I think Mr. Ryland will agree with me—

(1625)

Mr. Mark Ryland:

There are the known unknowns and the unknown unknowns.

Mr. Richard Fadden:

Those are the ones I'm worried about.

Technology is moving so fast that we find it very, very difficult to stay ahead.

This is a long answer to a short question, but I don't think we're doing as well as we might do internationally.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay, to take that further, you recently suggested that we're kind of on the margins when it comes to our ability to monitor ISIS terrorists or foreign fighters who have returned or are returning to our soil. Would you say that we are in a better position when it comes to cybersecurity?

Mr. Richard Fadden:

Well, if you're dealing with the Government of Canada, I would probably say yes. I think that government, over the course of the last and current governments, has made some real strides in developing the capability to defend Government of Canada systems. They've limited the Government of Canada's systems' access to the Internet, which made things a lot easier to control.

I kept coming back to the weakest link in the chain. All you need is one weak link that allows you to access everything. Having said that, I think on the cyber side, the government is doing better than it might do on terrorism. I don't think it's doing terribly on terrorism. I was just trying to suggest that there's a limit somewhere to what you can do.

If you expand that to provincial governments, for example, there are connections between the provinces and the federal government. The provinces vary a great deal, I believe, in how protected they are. Then you keep moving on, and it doesn't take a great deal of imagination.

I'll give you an example: I read a couple of years ago that there was a mom-and-pop metal welding shop—I think it was in Arizona—that had its own little server and whatnot. A foreign state used a problem there to access an element of the U.S. government in China. The point I'm trying to make is that it doesn't take a big hole, to use a physical manifestation, to get in.

I think, generally speaking, we're not doing badly. We really aren't, but if we think that we have blocked every possible cyber-attack against us or our economy, then I think we're being way too optimistic.

Mr. Glen Motz:

We have silos in law enforcement in fighting some battles, sometimes, and in sharing information. You've already alluded to the fact that in Canada, we have a lack of resources applied to this issue.

Do you see the same issue of siloing when it comes to cybersecurity?

Mr. Richard Fadden:

It's not so much siloing. Some of my former colleagues will want to kick me under the table for saying this, but I don't think there's a central controlling brain to deal with cyber issues in the Government of Canada.

I think CSE has a real role. I think Public Safety has a role. The military looks at things slightly differently. GAC has a role in dealing with things internationally. ISED—I think that's what it's called—is involved in the regulation of the Internet and how we play with them.

I don't think the American practice of creating a czar is necessarily the issue. I would suggest, at least on the basis of when I was the national security adviser, that we could have used more coordination, and maybe at some point, more direction. It's a very complex field and departments worry first about themselves.

The machinery of government is the Prime Minister's prerogative. He or she will organize things as he or she wants, but this is one area that I think is so global in its manifestation, so complex, that simply saying to various departments and agencies they have to cooperate may not be enough.

(1630)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Motz.

The final five minutes go to Mr. Picard.

Mr. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Thank you.

Mr. Ryland, my understanding of the cloud is that it is a centralized structure for which security measures and safety levels are so high that clients whose data you store feel pretty sure that they are 99% safe against outsider attacks.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

I think that's a very fair summary. They certainly feel that they have a leg up in building proper defences, because we're taking care of a lot of things they would otherwise have to worry about.

Mr. Michel Picard:

But you just said to Mr. Graham that you had no knowledge about the content stored on your server, because it's not your business to know what your clients put on your server, so how safe is your system from a Trojan horse?

Mr. Mark Ryland:

It's very safe, because we constantly build and test our systems to assume that we have hostile customers. We assume we're being attacked by our customers, and we take that into account and make sure that the isolation properties of the system are very strong.

Mr. Michel Picard:

So there's safety on both sides, from attacks from outside as well as from those from inside.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Yes.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Excellent. Thank you very much.

Mr. Fadden, this study brought us on a journey. We had no clue where we were going, because it's so vast, big, wide and diversified. We totally understand the relevance of any action to be taken on this, especially on my side, with financial institutions. From your knowledge of government and your experience, where would you say we should start in establishing policies, and what are some of the recommendations you might have?

Mr. Richard Fadden:

I think, Chairman, I would go back to one of the points I made earlier. I think Parliament legislatively has to impose obligations on financial institutions, in much the same way it has done with money laundering. It has to require them to do a variety of things. Right now, most of the things are done in the self-interest of the financial institutions. They tend to be pretty good, but we should up, significantly, our reporting of breaches and attempted breaches. There's a regulation, if I remember correctly, that requires that now. It's not as fulsome as it might be.

The Americans and the Brits, in particular, have severe penalties for institutions not reporting breaches. I don't know how we can expect to deal effectively with breaches if we don't know when they're occurring. I think it's better than it has been, but still.... So I would say imposing clear obligations on the institutions and reporting of breaches. Again, some of my former colleagues are going to kick me under the table, but I don't think we share enough classified information with the private sector. I think we do far better than we did 15 or 20 years ago, but if you take the most senior technological official in the Royal Bank—which happens to be where I bank, but I'm not trying to promote it—and you ask them to collaborate on cyber issues, and the Canadian official isn't authorized to share any classified information, I don't see how you can have a real dialogue. The States and the U.K. clear, from a classified information perspective, people in the private sector. I don't mean to suggest that we don't do any of this, because we do. I'm just arguing that we don't do enough of it. I would say those three things.

Mr. Michel Picard:

When you mentioned that we might be tempted to ignore or forget about Russia and China because we are focusing somewhere else, I was surprised. I thought we were focusing so much on Russia and China that we were forgetting about real threats coming from other countries, satellite countries working for those main states. When we looked at Cambridge Analytica at our committee, it was obvious that at the end of the day it might not be Russia, but with so many satellite offices in other countries in action, where should we put our focus?

Mr. Richard Fadden:

That is, I think, Mr. Chairman, the $57,000 question.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Richard Fadden:

Part of the problem is you can't ignore Russia and China. We can't ignore those things that you just listed. I think we ignore international terrorist groups at our own cost. We have a whole bunch of civil society groups that muck around with cyber. I could probably go on, but the truth is we can't ignore any of them.

That's why I think there needs to be more collaboration, more sharing and more efforts to get us to a point that one of your other members suggested. We need to try to get ahead of the problem more than we have in the past. I don't have an answer except to say that while you may well be right in this six-month period, maybe in the next six-month period things are going to shift. We need to be fleet of foot. Again, after working for government for 40 years, I can say that's not one of our strong suits. It's true of governments generally, but I think we need to be fleeter than we have been to deal with all of the topics you're talking about.

(1635)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Picard.

Before I suspend, I just want to thank our witnesses. Usually “fleet” and “government” don't go in the same sentence.

With that, we're going to suspend for a minute or two. Thank you for your presentations.

Mr. Richard Fadden:

It was a pleasure.

Mr. Mark Ryland:

Thank you.

The Chair:

The meeting is suspended.

(1635)

(1635)

The Chair:

We'll manoeuvre around the vote call at 5:30. We'll probably stop around 5:20, as opposed to 5:30. I'll stretch it as far as I can.

With that, we're back on and I'll ask Mr. Drennan for his presentation.

It's for 10 minutes. If you look up, I'll give you an idea of when you're getting close to the 10-minute mark.

Thank you, Mr. Drennan for appearing.

Mr. Steve Drennan (Director, Cybersecurity, ADGA Group):

Thank you. I am Steve Drennan and I'm pleased to be here today representing myself and ADGA in the cybersecurity domain and financial sector in Canada. Thank you for the invitation to provide testimony to the public safety committee at the House of Commons today and for all of your time.

For a bit of background, ADGA is a one hundred per cent Canadian company that has delivered strategic consulting, professional services and world-class technology in defence, security and enterprise computing for over 50 years. It provides high-end solutions, engineering and staffing in the government and commercial spaces. ADGA has a lot of insight, given all of this, and expertise into domains such as cybersecurity. ADGA also has strong views, as do I, on coast-to-coast security requirements and evolution and on our being abreast of the landscape and strategic partners. ADGA has a strong converged security capability with lots of cyber assessment design and compliance background. That's just to give you a feel of where I'm coming from today.

From reviewing previous testimony online, I saw a theme that the committee already had a lot of feedback on cyber-attacks, challenges, ranges and faults in the domain. Given all of that, I thought I'd focus today on cybersecurity solutions. There isn't a silver bullet to it, but there is a lot of capability that can be deployed on scale and a lot of other parts that can be developed to really increase what we do and strengthen the Canadian financial sector.

I like to think of it as critical infrastructure. You probably think of power stations and dams and classified systems as critical infrastructure, but the financial sector certainly is critical infrastructure. It's one large interdependent system that ranges across lots of different entities, like the Bank of Canada, Payments Canada, Interac—who I know were presenting—the Receiver General, merchants, small and large commercial entities and also consumers. Those are a lot of end points. There are a lot of things that can go wrong there. It's all the data, too, that is in transit and in storage. If you've been hearing and thinking about one network, one piece or one solution, it's not the whole story.

There's a shift occurring in cyber. It's shifting to socio-political attacks and brand manipulation, along with small and large volume financial attacks. Given what's at stake and the ability of cyber criminals to hide, obfuscate, and launch attacks on a non-stop basis, Canada needs to have an updated approach to cyber defence in the financial sector. The days of hiding behind walls, actual walls or firewalls, are past. It's a very interconnected space out there.

It's important to understand the adversary too. I think you've been well briefed on that, but cybercriminals and nation states have massive sets of resources. They'd be a very large country by GDP if all the cybercriminals put their wealth together. They are often physically unreachable because of where they come from.

One stat, a brief example, and I won't get into too many, from a recent Mandiant report—Mandiant is the cyber arm of FireEye, one of our strategic partners—is that the global median dwell time is 101 days. Dwell means the time that malware lives in a network until it's found and stopped. Just think about that for a second. That's an incredible amount of time for something to be sitting there exfiltrating and taking data before it's even found. Sometimes it goes up to 2,000 days before it's found. While the cyber problem is complex, it can be tackled in a way that is simplified for users, merchants, businesses and banking organizations. That's what I want to focus on today, that is, on some of the ways we can address this.

I'll focus on cyber solution themes that can address large-scale cyber-threats to the Canadian financial sector. Theme one that I'd like to go over is what I call “convergence of cyber data and protection capability”. Think of this as next generation solutions that could be deployed on scale for everyone to use and take advantage of. The concept is that one organization could actually lead this effort and put this capability in a central location so that it would be turned on for all of the entities I was just speaking about—everything we've been thinking about.

(1640)



There's really fantastic new technology. One of them is linking ideas around centralized artificial intelligence, machine learning, advanced analytics, threat hunting—if you haven't heard about that, you can ask me questions about it later—and security orchestration. You can actually create semi-automatic cybersecurity detection and response. It can be fairly automated. Sometimes you do want somebody to be able to make decisions on key points and react when you sense a cyber-threat, especially if you're shutting down part of a network.

Smart buildings and networks can also be a part of this. It's not just green. Green is good, but when you introduce all kinds of Internet of things sensors, you're introducing a whole bunch of data, and that data can then be compromised. If we have an ability to sense across the physical data—operational data, sometimes called OT data, and the IoT data—we can have solutions that can better sense when there's a problem. For instance, if there's an environmental problem or an attack against a building or data centre, you'd probably want to know about that in the cyber-world and be able to respond to it. Today it's not very merged, but it can be.

There's the notion of moving forward on cyber-active defence or even offence, and that is linked to legislation and what the rules are. When you know you're being probed and attacked, the ability to respond to it, to determine where it is and to shut it down to at least protect yourself, is a very important capability.

The securing of domain name service, which is at the heart of the Internet, has standards around it called DNSSEC and others. That's really important because, if you can't trust your address resolution and where you're going to for data, that's really important.

Cyber-threat intelligence, which we touched on earlier, is really interesting because it can be done vertically. You could have just Canadian data and banking information, so you would see trends in attacks in the Canadian market space, and you'd be seeing them before they hit most of your end points, and then you'd be able to react to it in advance. You'd be able to make decisions and do updates before it became a widespread attack. That could be zero-day attacks or APT attacks, but the ability to see and respond before they become a problem is very important.

(1645)

The Chair:

Excuse me, Mr. Drennan. The antiquated system that we have around here is intruding into a very impressive presentation on cybersecurity. I'm told we have.... Is it not 15 minutes?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Don't use ParlVu.

The Chair:

Initially I thought it was a quorum call, so I didn't say anything, but then the time was running, but it's not. We're going to leave it as a quorum call.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You could save yourself 45 seconds by looking at ourcommons.ca instead of ParlVu. You get a direct feed that way.

The Chair:

I'm having what he looks at.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You're looking at the wrong thing. Get faster.

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Naaman Sugrue):

I'm looking at both.

The Chair:

Okay, we just blew 45 seconds. I apologize for that.

Thank you, Mr. Drennan, for your patience and understanding. Go ahead.

Mr. Steve Drennan:

Thank you.

On the last point about capability, something that could be introduced on scale, as we were talking about in this theme, could be supply-chain and life-cycle management. CSE, the Communications Security Establishment, which also has the cyber centre, used to run a program called the “evaluated products list”.

When we talk about Huawei, people have issues and we talk about them. We have to think about everything that gets introduced, all the software that's built—it's often virtualized and put in the cloud—the hardware and the chips. Where do the chips get manufactured? Where do they come from? You can have a complete cradle-to-grave program so that you evaluate that equipment and that software so that you know you can trust it. The government is the right entity to be able to manage that program.

The second theme I'd like to go over is leveraging a secure public cloud. I think the speaker before me was from AWS, so I'm sure you heard plenty on it. I'm here to say, too, that it's a good idea. When you're trying to bring all of these different groups together, one of the best ways to do that is with a secure Canadian public cloud, and I think we need to start thinking more about that. I know a number of banking entities that are looking at moving that way.

When you have networks inside, that's a private cloud, or a hybrid cloud as you move out to the public cloud, but leveraging a secure public cloud on scale is really important because that would be a great way for the whole community and all of those consumers to speak to each other. If you set up the right security, and policies and filters, everybody will have the same security. There are operators who have true failover within Canada, so if you have a failure, which you have to expect and count on, then, when you have disaster recovery, it stays within Canada. That's really important for the residency and custodianship of the data itself.

Cyber-agility is a piece that's really important here. It lets you move and launch new applications.

The Chair:

You have one minute left.

Mr. Steve Drennan:

All right; I'll move faster. The third theme would be about establishing a lot more trust around critical data. The banking and key banking groups could actually become the trusted single source for registration, authentication and credentials.

My fourth theme is about user awareness. Let's not lose sight that our weakest link is still the user. We could have more specific mandates and more training so that people are more aware of what to click on, what's good behaviour, what's good hygiene.

In conclusion, there are next-generation cyber solutions on scale that can be used to stabilize and empower the financial community, but it's going to take the right funding and drive to make that happen.

(1650)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Drennan.

Colleagues, we have about a half an hour. If I go with seven-minute rounds, that will pretty well use up the half hour. If I drop it to six-minute rounds, I could get one more question in. Is that fine?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: Okay, we'll have a six-minute round. We'll have Ms. Dabrusin, please.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Thank you.

I wanted to start with your fourth theme because that's something that has really caught my attention since the beginning of our hearings when someone talked about having a really secure system delivering information between two cardboard boxes, and the individuals at either end being the cardboard boxes. When you were talking about user-awareness, I know that you didn't get a chance to finish what you were going to say about that, but perhaps you could talk more about it now. What are the specific things we could do better as a government and for public awareness, and how do we increase cybersecurity, cyber hygiene, whatever we call it?

Mr. Steve Drennan:

Good. I'm glad I get to talk more about it. I don't think there are a lot of standards. When I look at the Treasury Board guidelines and MITS and its requirements, it's not very clear. It doesn't really define what you have to do to train users and to provide a lot of cyber guidance. It's a bit passive. We have our cyber-safe websites. We have places people can go to learn, but are we actively promoting enough information? We could have more campaigns. We could have more learning through games and monthly meetings and themes to raise an awareness. I'll take one example on spear phishing. Has that been well covered here?

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

I don't believe so.

Mr. Steve Drennan:

Has phishing been covered?

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Yes.

Mr. Steve Drennan:

Spear phishing is more accurate phishing. If it looks like the Hon. John McKay is sending a message to all of you and he tells you it is urgent and you have to click on it, you may think about clicking on it because it looks like it's coming from John McKay.

The Chair:

That's a bad example.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Steve Drennan:

Well, it was one example. If it looks like it's coming from a position of authority and looks like it's your style of writing and mentions things that are typically in the messages you exchange, it would seem more likely that you should just click on it. They can use pressure. We'll see sometimes formatting problems, misspelled words, but you have to look. How often do we just pull out our devices and work really quickly to click through the messages?

A bit of training, though, and awareness around spear phishing can help, and you can't just do it once. You actually have to do it several times. One of the ways to do that is to do an anonymous type of analysis spear phishing campaign and you actually send almost everyone in the organization a spear-phishing type of email. You're the ethical person, so it's okay. There's a link, and if they click on it all it will do is register anonymously that someone clicked on it. At the end, you end up with a statistic of how many people clicked on it. And it's not going to be good the first time. Then you say, “By the way we ran a spear-phishing campaign. Come and visit at lunch and learn and we'll explain why you shouldn't have clicked on it.” So many people did. The next time you do that, because you do it a second time and a third time, the awareness gets raised. You start raising this awareness with your users and then your users are much better. They're never going to be 100%, but getting the percentage a lot lower is much better.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

That's helpful. That's something an organization can do. I guess what I'm trying to figure out is this. When we're looking at what recommendations we can make, how can we build our role from that?

I note that one issue that came up with one of the witnesses was passwords. We already have a prompt now when you enter a password. It tells you that you need a certain number of characters, capitals, and different numbers, whatever. What it never prompts you for is whether or not you have ever used the same password before. Apparently, a big weakness is that people use the same password over and over again. That's fairly usual. Just having a pop-up box to ask whether you've used a password before would seem simple, but it would mean that the password you were about to use was not a strong one even if it met the other markers. When we're looking at the financial industry, people signing up for online banking and these types of things, are there things that we can try to put out as recommended standards?

Mr. Steve Drennan:

Yes. I think there are two points in here. There's the cyber-awareness training and the passwords, so we'll talk about both.

For the passwords, yes, there should be more standards. They're actually easily set by policies. You should set more policies on it. That can be mandated in legislation. It would be more clear. When I look at MITS or at requirements, it's not always clear what the password guidelines are. It's not prescriptive enough.

Absolutely, that's just one example. You probably want to do away with common and known passwords that people choose often. You want to try to make sure that they don't choose dates that are reflective of their own personal history and that an attacker might also already have.

There are ways of making sure that gets legislated and then enforced. That's a very good example—

(1655)

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Can I just jump in quickly on that? I don't have much time.

Mr. Steve Drennan:

Yes.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Do any countries have that? Are there any examples that we could look to for that type of thing?

Mr. Steve Drennan:

Not that I'm aware of, but Germany and Europe tend to have a lot more legislation around this. With GDPR and other standards, you might see it there. I'm not a hundred per cent sure.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

You can continue. I just wanted to get that in.

Mr. Steve Drennan:

I would say that the other thing, though, is that there are too many passwords, too many different passwords. How many systems does everyone in this room have that they log into just at work?

You can actually have a lot of those passwords synchronized, and then make it two-factor or add biometrics on top of that to create a stronger but more consistent password. That's actually a lot more effective. When you back it up with the ability to audit your users and look for behavioural issues that you might see on the network, it's a much stronger approach than everybody here having 15 passwords that they have to recycle all the time.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Dabrusin.

Mr. Motz, you have six minutes, please.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you, Chair, and thank you, Mr. Drennan, for being here.

As you indicated, your group works with government, industry and law enforcement on issues of security, including national security. Last year, one expert in our security study noted that he had “Zero confidence” in Canada's readiness for emerging technology threats like AI and quantum computing.

In your experience with your work in Canada, how ready do you think we are with respect to that statement?

Mr. Steve Drennan:

We are not as ready as we need to be, but we're not at zero. I would say that, unfortunately, it might vary a lot depending on which group you're looking at. For instance, at the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security they're focusing on analytics and the sharing of indicators of compromise and that sort of thing, where they could play a bigger role and probably will over time in terms of their capabilities and how that can be shared.

There are other organizations, too, that have varying capabilities because they have different security technology deployed. Some of them would have Fortinet firewalls and some other people will have, say, Check Point or Cisco firewalls. Some of those firewalls will have different kinds of capabilities enabled, and some of it is next generation and some of it is not.

Unfortunately, there's a lot of variation in terms of what we can respond to. You mentioned AI, machine learning and quantum. As the attacks become more sophisticated, we do need to have more sophisticated countermeasures on scale, and that's why I was talking about the use of a public cloud. For the financial sector, if it were run from a common place, that more advanced capability would be there for almost everybody connected to that source. That's one way of bringing the level up for everyone.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Canada, and I guess the world, for that matter, is said to have major gaps in talent with respect to cybersecurity. What is your group doing to try to develop more talent? How and where are you investing in skills and target groups in what is certainly an emerging field?

Mr. Steve Drennan:

Yes, that's at the core of what is very important to ADGA.

ADGA is led by a female CEO. We're very proud of that and of our proud Canadian history and diversity as well. We invest heavily in co-op programs and bringing in people who have emerging skills to get them into cybersecurity—because that's what we're talking about today—but also into other fields as well.

There's a lot of work that we all play.... Recruiting is a function that we can get involved in at the university and college level. We can help with the actual programs they're taking. For instance, at Algonquin College, they have a very good program on cybersecurity. There are a number of cybersecurity parts that are being built out now at the university level as well. That's just here in Ottawa. We take an active role in that. We work with other colleges as well.

It's important to purposely recruit diverse talents and diverse skills and have a big diverse population, I guess, in terms of the people you have. We in Canada have to make sure that we maintain that talent. Keeping people excited and energized about the work is a responsibility for all of us. If there's a lot of cyber-work this year but none next year, where does all the talent go?

(1700)

Mr. Glen Motz:

Last week, I believe, we had a gentleman here from Ryerson. Some could argue that there might be some gaps in what they're going to try to roll out as far as their academic program is concerned. Does your group, or do groups like yours in industry, sit down with educational institutions and help them develop curriculum that will help to develop the types of employees and skill sets that you want coming out of our schools?

Mr. Steve Drennan:

Yes. We actually have that opportunity. I've been involved in giving feedback to Algonquin's program in the past. There's also Willis College. We've talked to them. They have a program, and I've given feedback on how much cybersecurity is in there, on what should be in there, and on the Government of Canada security clearances they should get for their students as they go through, which will enable them to have better careers and stay in Canada. We have influenced and we do work with the universities on the programs—for instance, the programs for all the engineering students. We regularly meet with these groups. We're directly involved. We do get an opportunity with the faculties in academia to set those agendas.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Can you explain the difference, if there is any, between cybersecurity in the defence sector and cybersecurity in the IT sector? Is there even a difference?

Mr. Steve Drennan:

I can think of a few key differences. One of them is that it's like a dam bursting. In cybersecurity in Defence, they are just waiting to move from what's called “defence” to “active defence” to “cyber-offence” as the legislation gets moved forward, because it's a critical enabler. Cyber is now seen as a whole new area; just like having naval or air force, cyber is its own theatre of combat. It's pretty critical that we move that legislation forward so that National Defence can do more on the cyber landscape. As they deploy troops and as they're in theatres of operation, they can now win and lose battles based on cyber. That's one difference. They're held back a little bit. They also have a whole bunch of classified networks and other elements that all have to be brought forward. That has to do with funding and large changes that are being looked at right now.

In the private sector, there aren't as many rules. We talked about cyber-threat intelligence earlier. You will see the large vendors being able to gather that data across the world from the nodes they have in different countries, because it's less restrictive on how they operate. That's actually very positive, because then they're able to share that data with government and industry.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Motz.

Mr. Dubé, you have six minutes, please.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you very much for being here.

I want to go back to the labour issue that was raised by my colleague and look at a different aspect of it. Does the industry get hamstrung by the fact that when it comes to security clearances, these are based on things like where people are from and things of that nature? You're involved in procurement on the cyber side, but in traditional procurement, if that's the correct term, around the actual building of fighter jets, helicopters, military equipment and what have you, there have been issues in the past where, depending on where our allies are on a particular issue, or where we're at on a particular issue, different companies have been disqualified and missed out. They have highly qualified people working there, and perhaps the ideal equipment to serve, say, Canada's military, but the U.S. has an issue with a particular country or something like that. Are you seeing this issue play out in the same way in the cyber field? If so, what can we do to address that?

Mr. Steve Drennan:

Yes, we are seeing that issue. For commercial clients, they're much more flexible. If your company has the right reputation and if you have the right people and skills, you can get those cyber engagements. We do a lot of security assessments and design and cloud security work. The message in terms of what you're able to do with the commercial sector, which is very sizable in Canada, is much more straightforward.

It is a challenge. I have lots of security clearances. It's been simpler for me, but for others, if they don't have enough residency in Canada, they can't get the security clearance. Typically, “secret” is required for most things. It can be “top secret”, but “reliability” isn't often the requirement. You need, I think, a five-to-10-year residency in Canada, and often to be a Canadian citizen. It might be good to look at mechanisms on how we could also do other security checks that would get people to secret and how we could make it much more uniform. There's probably no reason that every government department needs its own clearance process and its own rules. If you're trusted, you're trusted. If the company is trusted, it's trusted.

These are things that probably could be reformed over time. We probably should look at other ways to clear individuals. We have a bit of a brain drain in Canada. We should be recruiting talent from other countries. As we get those people here, we need to be able to get them busy and onto important projects and still give comfort to the government and banking that they have the right clearance and the right background.

(1705)

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I appreciate that. In keeping with this issue, is there a particular issue for cyber, though? If you're a company that's building helicopters, you're not selling helicopters to the Department of Finance, but to DND. However, if you're operating in cybersecurity, Finance needs cybersecurity as much as DND does. Is there an issue there even where our traditional sort of military alliances make it easy to cut off people for security clearance when it comes to traditional military procurement, but it's more challenging when...? Is there an issue where, if you're involved in cybersecurity for the Department of Finance, let's say, and you're using a company that has skills coming from people who might not be recognized on the defence side? Do you see what I'm getting at?

You mentioned that security clearances are different. As Canadians, are we losing out on having proper protections, say, for the finance department because we're applying the same rules we would apply in defence because we're trying to create that uniformity where the alliances might be different and how it plays out in terms of—I mean who cares what the Americans have to say if we're protecting the Department of Finance, for example, unlike the military where we actually have an alliance with them?

Mr. Steve Drennan:

I don't think the discrepancy is the issue. I think the issue is time. Now you're losing a year or two years sometimes before you can get key people in on engagements. For some of the cyber knowledge you want, you could take a group of people—I think we talked about how people can be accelerated and there's been witness testimony on how we can get people started quite quickly into cybersecurity, entry level positions and others. If you have a key group of people whom you can clear based on adding some people who are trusted from companies—and sometimes you need subject matter experts, let's say, from the U.S. So comparable clearances and moving quickly on it is fundamental. Sometimes what happens is that it's more about the time that we lose because of all these different clearances and that the impact of that is direct to national defence and to other groups that can't get teams meaningfully started for a year or two sometimes. The Department of Finance might not require as many clearances. DND requires what's also called a VCR at each site, but other entities don't do that. It's about having the same standards applied to everyone. If the data is more sensitive, that's what the clearance should be for everyone.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

With the 20 seconds I have left, I'm just wondering if you believe that we shoehorn or pigeonhole ourselves rather too much by looking at the traditional alliances and some of the countries that are comparable to Canada and that might have the expertise, but because they're not part of the traditional paradigm that we look at, we're maybe missing out on some of that talent.

Mr. Steve Drennan:

Yes and no. I think we can go to the Five Eyes community and get a lot of that talent and have comparable clearances, but yes, we should also look at extending to other countries. How do we have a fast track clearance process from other countries so we can trust individuals for information, and how can we do it quicker?

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé. That was interesting analysis. The analyst here whispered in my ear, “That's exactly one of the big problems, just getting those clearances”.

Mr. Picard you have six minutes please.

Mr. Michel Picard:

It's nice to see you again. You provide services to financial institutions, is that right?

Mr. Steve Drennan:

Yes.

Mr. Michel Picard:

What was the comment you made about the fact they would be the trusted company or the guardian of this critical information? What was that again?

(1710)

Mr. Steve Drennan:

It's a really key point. I just didn't have enough time to go into it too much, so thank you for the opportunity.

We all trust when we walk into a bank, and we all trust when we walk into the Bank of Canada, or one of these trusted places like the Department of Finance. That is something that can be leveraged in a very positive way. One of the things we talk about is passwords. When you're setting up credentials online, you have to be able to trust how you set that up. I think we should be leveraging that space and those personas and organizations more. That can establish more security for those online credentials and it can play a broader role. It can be more uniform as well. That's a key thing. We can set up stronger credentials that are more uniform that could be used in a more specific way for cybersecurity.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Doesn't that create an awkward situation where a bank would be the guardian of my critical information instead of the bank having access to some third party being responsible for that information, because you put the customer in a vulnerable situation where he has to deal with the bank, being secure of course, but at the same time the objective of the bank is to make money, not to guard my information? That puts the customer in a weak situation with the bank.

Mr. Steve Drennan:

The main thing would be that the bank would play a role called a “registration authority”. The bank doesn't have to have the data.

I think you've been briefed on tokenization. The data wouldn't have to be held by the bank; the bank could be the enabler of saying, “You are who you are, we know it, you've come into a bank, we trust you, you trust us, we've done a registration check.” It would be a function in support of setting up the online identity rather than holding the data.

Mr. Michel Picard:

You were quite positive about the earlier comments of AWS about centralized structure and an iCloud type of system where everything is at the same place.

There are two things. First, does that mean you support any initiative towards open banking where everything is in the same place?

At the same time, we talk about those centralized systems with such trust in their security that we don't feel the necessity to discuss an insider job or human risk factors. It's as though they don't exist anymore.

Mr. Steve Drennan:

Yes, I am in favour of using secure public cloud. That would mean large data storage, but the ability, then, to detect attack correctly when it's happening and protect the data better.

In terms of protecting that data, there are lots of mechanisms that can be used. For example, there are good products for cloud that enable you, at the field level, to encrypt data whenever you need to. If you have an insider threat and there's a breach, the data that's stolen is encrypted data. It's protected because it was protected properly as you stored it.

What we don't do a lot sometimes is organize our security design correctly, so when we're breached, we're not protected properly. We don't detect it fast enough and we don't know how to respond. To your point, if we organize ourselves and there is an insider threat, the data can be protected and we can more quickly detect and respond to the event, too.

One example I'm sure everyone is aware of is Snowden. He actually had a lot of access, and then was able to give himself more access. That's not exactly the paradigm you want to have in an environment. There are better ways of doing that.

Mr. Michel Picard:

I'll leave the rest of my time to Mr. Graham.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Mr. Drennan, in the three minutes that Mr. Picard has been asking questions, I logged into a server, and using raw SMTP, sent myself an email from god@heaven.org. I think this brings to a big part of your spear phishing discussion the question, why is it that we are still using protocols that are completely hackable like that?

There's no authentication whatsoever in SMTP. I can put any spoofed address that I want. SMTP SSL is not universal, but it doesn't prevent spoofing in any case. Therefore, is there a role for, say, PGP signing our emails as a standard, or is there something we can do to sign cryptographically? Is that an approach we should be looking at?

For whatever reason, that has not taken off in the 25 years it has been around.

Mr. Steve Drennan:

I'm speaking from some first-hand experience, but it's probably because PKI, or public key infrastructure, can be a bit of a big hammer in actually deploying certificates. Then what assurance of certificates are you deploying, and are they proprietary?

S/MIME was very good, but the point is that there are ways of establishing identity and having digital certificates, or proof of the message originator and who sent it and whether it has been tampered with, that can be added and done better.

Absolutely, there are technologies. If we standardized on one, that would be good. I don't know if we need full public key infrastructure. We have to be careful about what digital certificate approach we take, given the massive community that would be involved in the financial community.

(1715)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What system would you suggest we use to authenticate? Email is the greatest source of all vulnerabilities as far as phishing, and so forth, is concerned, so what should we use?

What do you use?

Mr. Steve Drennan:

Well, we're moving away from email. That's more for productivity reasons. Email is not necessarily being used for what it was created for. There are things such as Slack and other tools that can create more efficient conversations.

Earlier we talked about user awareness. People need to know how to use email and what to click on. Just because everything is encrypted doesn't mean a bad actor didn't send an encrypted email to you, so it still comes down to that point.

There are ways to do it. If we wanted to have a portal service where there would be secure emails kept in a location that you could pull down, that would an option. There's time-to-live encryption, so that when you send messages, they're encrypted, and then if you don't open them fast enough, they expire and disappear.

There are some options to look at.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Like key signatures.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

There are four minutes left. Are there any questions on the Conservative side?

Mr. Eglinski, do you want to use four minutes?

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

You were talking about security along with Mr. Dubé. At your company, which works a lot with many government agencies, what security level do you look at for your people, or do you have to get them a secret or a top secret level?

Mr. Steve Drennan:

In our cybersecurity team in the organization, we have a lot. We have the ability to hold and process top secret information. We have classified environments. We all get top secret clearance and these extra clearances that we were just talking about. We do that because it enables us to be able to do the contracts we were talking about earlier. We know we have to do it. It affects whom we can hire as well, and that's an unfortunate byproduct because we always want to get as much diversity as we can. But we get all the top clearances for sure. And some other parts go with it for—

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

You seem to be a little on the negative side. There seems to be a lot of.... I used to do top secret investigations for security clearances, and a lot of work is involved in them. But you think that we should be reducing our level or our standard?

Mr. Steve Drennan:

No, creating more consistency.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

More consistency?

Mr. Steve Drennan:

So that all government departments can have the same clearance. If an entity or a person is trusted to a level of information or a caveat of information, they should be trusted equally wherever they go. They shouldn't need different clearances for different organizations inside Canada.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

There's no standard with a national set of rules that you have to meet to get to a certain level?

Mr. Steve Drennan:

Absolutely.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Okay.

I have one quick question; I think I've got about two minutes left?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

You spoke briefly about artificial intelligence. I've studied it in a couple of different committees other than this one. Do you think that in time artificial intelligence will be able to do cybersecurity better than we can do it personally ourselves right now?

Mr. Steve Drennan:

I think the interesting way to look at artificial intelligence—hopefully it's not one of those bad movies that we've seen—and the way I've seen it being deployed now is that it can assist the operators. So when you have a security operations centre and you have operators who are very hard to recruit, build and keep, and you only have so many of them, they can make it a lot easier by reducing the datasets that you need to deal with and pre-making decisions, populating and making it very easy for you to make key decisions. So if you think of them as cyber assistance to help you get through all the terabytes of data and make your job easier and more focused, that's the way I think artificial intelligence machine learning is at its best for cyber.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

You don't want to feed them so much.

Mr. Steve Drennan:

You can feed them everything; just don't let them press the button on everything.

The Chair:

I want to thank Mr. Drennan on behalf of the committee for a very fascinating period of time and discussing things that Mr. Graham is pretty well the only one who understood.

Mr. Steve Drennan:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you again.

Colleagues, the subcommittee will start in two minutes.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

Il est 15 h 30, et nous avons le quorum.

Il y a deux témoins dans le premier groupe, M. Ryland et M. Fadden.

Avant de commencer, chers collègues, nous avons deux ou trois écueils à contourner en ce qui concerne notre ordre du jour, et nous devons donner certaines directives aux greffiers et à l'analyste. La réunion du sous-comité devait commencer à 17 h 30. Cependant, la sonnerie se fera peut-être entendre à 17 h 30, faisant ainsi en sorte que nous ne pourrions pas commencer la réunion du sous-comité.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Commençons à 17 h 29.

Le président:

À 17 h 29, c'est un peu serré. Je pensais commencer plutôt à 17 h 20. Nous pourrons mettre fin à la réunion actuelle à 17 h 20 ou peut-être l'étirer un peu jusqu'à 17 h 25.

S'il n'y a pas d'autres considérations, je vais demander à nos témoins de présenter leur exposé. Je n'ai pas prévu d'ordre précis, mais je souligne que M. Fadden a déjà comparu de nombreuses fois devant le Comité, tandis qu'il s'agit, si je ne m'abuse, de la première comparution de M. Ryland.

M. Mark Ryland (directeur, Bureau du dirigeant principal de l'information, Amazon Web Services, Inc.):

C'est exact, oui.

Le président:

Je devrais peut-être laisser l'expert commencer afin que vous puissiez voir de quelle façon un excellent témoin présente son exposé.

M. Mark Ryland:

C'est parfait.

Le président:

Monsieur Fadden, s'il vous plaît.

M. Richard Fadden (à titre personnel):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je m'attends à ce que votre jugement n'ait pas changé lorsque j'aurai terminé.

Le président:

N'exigez pas qu'on passe au vote.

M. Richard Fadden:

Encore merci de me donner l'occasion de discuter avec vous.

Pour commencer, je tiens à souligner que, dans le cadre de discussions avec le greffier et le personnel du Comité, j'ai précisé que je n'étais pas un expert du secteur financier, et on m'a suggéré de formuler quelques commentaires généraux sur la sécurité nationale et la cybersécurité, ce que je me propose donc de faire. J'espère que tout ça sera utile au Comité.

Je tiens à formuler des commentaires un peu inhabituels au sujet de votre ordre de renvoi. Vous parlez de sécurité économique nationale. Je suis sûr que ce titre a été choisi après mûre réflexion, mais j'aimerais dire — et je prêche un peu pour ma paroisse, ici — que les enjeux que vous abordez sont des enjeux de sécurité nationale, un point c'est tout. Il ne s'agit pas d'un sous-ensemble du domaine de la sécurité nationale.

Il est ici question de la définition même de sécurité nationale. J'espère et je crois que vous utilisez une définition assez large, mais, selon moi, c'est tout ce qui a une incidence importante sur la souveraineté d'un État. Les choses dont le Comité parle en ce moment sont susceptibles d'avoir une incidence importante sur la souveraineté d'un État, tout comme les activités de blanchiment d'argent réalisées par un État étranger ou un enjeu de sécurité nationale dévastateur. C'était simplement un petit effort de promotion de ma part.

Même si je ne suis pas un expert des systèmes financiers, j'espère et je crois pouvoir vous fournir deux ou trois éléments contextuels utiles. Le premier, c'est que le contexte ou l'environnement dans lesquels les cyberattaques se produisent — qu'elles soient dirigées contre des institutions financières ou autres — sont importants. Ces événements ne se produisent pas de façon isolée. Selon moi, on ne peut pas composer avec les cybermenaces dans le secteur financier sans une compréhension des cybermenaces en général, et on ne peut pas comprendre les cybermenaces sans comprendre les menaces qui pèsent généralement contre le Canada et l'Occident. Nous vivons tous dans un monde planétaire, et c'est assurément une caractéristique qui s'applique aux menaces à la sécurité nationale.

Je le dis pour deux ou trois raisons. Certains d'entre vous sont peut-être assez vieux pour vous rappeler la Guerre froide, lorsque les choses étaient assez simples: ceux qui causaient des problèmes et ceux qui en étaient victimes étaient essentiellement des États. Je simplifie les choses à outrance, mais c'était le Pacte de Varsovie contre l'Occident. Certaines entreprises étaient touchées.

Selon moi, l'un des éléments contextuels qui sont importants, c'est que, de nos jours, nos adversaires ou les instigateurs sont des États, des groupes terroristes, des organisations criminelles — et, ce sur quoi je vais revenir — des sociétés, des groupes de la société civile et des particuliers. Je crois que n'importe lequel de ces acteurs pourrait créer des problèmes au sein des systèmes financiers qui vous préoccupent.

Par ailleurs, avant, les cibles étaient essentiellement des États. Je dirais qu'il s'agit maintenant d'États, de sociétés, d'acteurs de la société civile, de partis politiques, d'organisations sans but lucratif et de particuliers. Le monde est assez complexe, et si les institutions financières en tant que telles ou le gouvernement veulent s'attaquer aux cyberattaques dont ils sont victimes, à mon avis, ils doivent connaître et comprendre le contexte dans lequel tout ça se produit. Ils ne peuvent pas bâtir des murs de façon abstraite.

Selon moi, la question de savoir qui ou quoi pourrait lancer des cyberattaques contre le secteur financier est très pertinente. Je n'essaie pas vraiment de trouver des phrases chocs, mais en voici une: la sécurité nationale n'est pas nationale. Elle n'est pas nationale au sens où un seul État ne peut pas régler ces problèmes — assurément pas une puissance relativement petite ou intermédiaire comme le Canada —, et une coopération internationale est nécessaire.

Ensuite, je ferais valoir qu'aucun État national ou État nation ne peut composer avec ces genres de choses sans l'aide des gouvernements provinciaux ou régionaux, des entreprises et de la société en général. Je vous dirais que c'est une grande erreur pour les institutions financières d'affirmer qu'elles peuvent le faire seules, tout comme c'est une erreur pour le gouvernement d'accepter une telle hypothèse.

J'ai parlé rapidement du contexte et de l'environnement, alors j'aimerais tout simplement décrire rapidement les types de menaces à la sécurité nationale auxquelles le Canada est confronté. Les États révisionnistes, la Russie et la Chine, les extrémistes et l'extrémisme de façon générale, y compris les terroristes, l'enjeu cybernétique, l'Occident dysfonctionnel et les États voyous — comme l'Iran et la Corée du Nord — et les enjeux connexes, me viennent à l'esprit.

Je vous dis tout ça parce que, selon moi, tous ces éléments sont interreliés, et ce, beaucoup plus qu'ils ne l'étaient il y a 15 ou 20 ans. Ils s'appuient les uns sur les autres pour amplifier leurs effets. Par exemple, la Russie et la Chine utilisent des cybersystèmes et bénéficient d'un Occident dysfonctionnel, parce qu'on ne lutte pas contre eux de façon coordonnée. Les groupes terroristes bénéficient de la discorde provoquée par les États révisionnistes, et ils utilisent des cybersystèmes. Tous ces éléments interagissent les uns avec les autres, et je crois que c'est quelque chose que nous devons garder à l'esprit lorsque nous abordons cette question.

(1535)



Un des autres enjeux que je veux souligner et une des autres choses que je veux vous faire comprendre, c'est que le Canada est très menacé par les cyberattaques de façon générale ainsi que les cyberattaques contre ses institutions financières. Je le dis parce que, lorsque je travaillais, l'une des choses qui me dérangeaient, c'était l'idée qu'avaient bon nombre de Canadiens que le Canada n'était pas menacé parce que nous étions bordés par trois océans et les États-Unis. Cette vision des choses faisait en sorte qu'il était très difficile pour les gouvernements et d'autres intervenants de composer avec bon nombre des menaces à la sécurité nationale. Le Canadien moyen, ne voyant rien se passer, ne croyait pas qu'il y avait là un grave problème.

Je crois que le Canada est très menacé par une diversité d'institutions et d'entités dont je viens de parler, mais pourquoi? Nous avons une économie de pointe, un milieu scientifique et des technologies de pointe, nous faisons partie du Groupe des cinq et de l'OTAN et nous sommes tout juste à côté des États-Unis.

Pour être honnête, nous ne sommes pas considérés à l'échelle internationale comme ayant la meilleure défense cybernétique, et toute institution s'attaquera au maillon le plus faible de la chaîne. Parfois, c'est ainsi qu'on nous voit, même si je ne crois pas que nos résultats sont si mauvais que ça. De plus, nous sommes menacés, parfois, simplement parce que nous sommes victimes d'une attaque aléatoire.

Je crois qu'il est tout particulièrement important pour le Comité de souligner le fait que notre secteur financier est en effet menacé par des cyberattaques, parce que je ne crois pas que beaucoup de personnes le croient.

L'une des autres choses dont j'aimerais parler, c'est l'identité des principaux instigateurs des attaques potentielles. Je crois que ce sont des États nations et des groupes criminels internationaux.

Que vont-ils faire? Ils vont essayer d'empêcher les gens d'avoir accès aux services, s'en tirer avec des vols traditionnels — ce sur quoi je reviendrai —, ils tenteront d'acquérir de l'information et du renseignement, ils voleront de la propriété intellectuelle et des identités, tant afin de s'enrichir qu'à des fins d'espionnage.

Permettez-moi de vous donner deux ou trois exemples d'États qui jouent avec les systèmes financiers d'autres pays.

La Corée du Nord finance beaucoup de ses activités. Elle obtient beaucoup de ses devises fortes en utilisant ses capacités cybernétiques pour avoir accès aux systèmes financiers de pays divers et variés. Par exemple, elle avait un programme il y a un certain temps qui lui permettait de voler de l'argent systématiquement dans les guichets automatiques de partout dans le monde. Elle mise aussi sur un programme qui lui permet d'obtenir des rançons au moyen de rançongiciels. De façon plus générale, on croit que c'est elle qui a gelé le système de santé national du Royaume-Uni il y a quelques années.

Là où je veux en venir, c'est que vous pouvez apprendre tout ça en faisant simplement des recherches sur Google. Les États-Unis ont formellement accusé un certain nombre de personnes de la Corée du Nord qui ont tenté de faire ce genre de choses, et ce n'est là qu'un exemple d'un État qui tente de pénétrer dans les systèmes financiers des pays occidentaux.

L'Iran en est un autre. Vous aurez vu dans les journaux au cours des cinq ou dix dernières années deux ou trois exemples de la façon dont l'Iran a essayé de le faire, particulièrement contre les États-Unis et les banques. Il y a des accusations formelles qui pèsent contre sept ou huit Iraniens.

Je veux dire deux ou trois choses sur la Russie et la Chine et la façon dont, selon moi, vous ne pouvez pas en faire fi lorsque vous abordez ce sujet. Je crois que leur principal objectif est double: le premier, c'est d'empêcher la prestation des services, et l'autre, c'est simplement de réduire la confiance des Occidentaux à l'égard de leurs institutions. C'est quelque chose que ces pays font de façon systématique.

Les groupes criminels sont de plus en plus présents dans le domaine, et c'est quelque chose dont on ne parle pas assez. J'espère que vous avez eu l'occasion de parler à des représentants de la GRC à ce sujet. Si vous regardez les chiffres de la GRC ou de Statistique Canada, la mesure dans laquelle les groupes criminels internationaux s'immiscent dans nos institutions financières a explosé au cours des dernières années.

En résumé, selon moi, les cyberattaques contre notre système financier sont un enjeu de sécurité nationale. Ces attaques doivent être considérées dans un contexte global si vous voulez les éliminer de façon efficace. Il n'y a pas de solution miracle ici. On y arrivera seulement et nous réussirons seulement à réduire le risque si tous les gouvernements, toutes les sociétés et la société civile travaillent en coopération.

Je crois que le gouvernement doit échanger plus de renseignements avec le secteur privé. C'est quelque chose que nous faisons beaucoup moins que le Royaume-Uni et les États-Unis. Vous ne pouvez pas vous attendre à ce que les sociétés privées soient des partenaires efficaces s'ils ne savent pas ce qui se passe.

Le secteur financier doit déclarer de telles attaques et violations de façon beaucoup plus systématique qu'il ne le fait actuellement.

Ces problèmes évoluent constamment, et nous devons en parler beaucoup plus que nous ne le faisons actuellement.

Merci, monsieur le président.

(1540)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Fadden.

Monsieur Ryland, vous avez 10 minutes, s'il vous plaît.

M. Mark Ryland:

Bonjour, monsieur le président, et bonjour aussi aux membres du Comité. Je m'appelle Mark Ryland. Je suis directeur de l'ingénierie de sécurité d'Amazon Web Services. Je travaille directement dans le bureau du DPSI pour le dirigeant principal de la sécurité de l'information. Merci de me donner l'occasion de discuter avec vous aujourd'hui.

J'imagine que, de façon générale, vous en savez tous un peu au sujet d'Amazon.com, mais permettez-moi de fournir quelques renseignements sur notre présence canadienne.

Amazon.ca sert sa clientèle canadienne depuis 2002, et nous maintenons une présence physique au pays depuis 2010. Amazon emploie maintenant plus de 10 000 employés à temps plein au Canada, et, en 2018, nous avons annoncé la création de 6 300 emplois supplémentaires. Nous possédons deux carrefours technologiques, qui sont d'importants centres de développement de logiciels ayant de multiples bureaux à Vancouver et Toronto. Nous employons des centaines de concepteurs de logiciels et d'ingénieurs qui travaillent sur certains des projets les plus avancés pour nos plateformes mondiales. Nous avons aussi des bureaux à Victoria associés à AbeBooks.com ainsi qu'à Vancouver, où se trouve une division appelée Thinkbox.

Nous exploitons aussi sept centres de traitement des commandes au Canada, quatre dans la région du Grand Toronto, deux à Vancouver et un à Calgary. Quatre autres ont été annoncés. Ils ouvriront leurs portes en 2019, à Edmonton et Ottawa.

Mais pourquoi suis-je ici? En quoi consiste l'infonuagique? Vous vous demandez peut-être pourquoi nous sommes ici pour discuter de la cybersécurité du secteur financier. Eh bien, revenons en arrière. Il y a environ 12 ans, nous avons créé une division au sein de notre entreprise: Amazon Web Services, ou AWS par souci de brièveté.

Les AWS ont été créés lorsque l'entreprise s'est rendu compte qu'elle avait acquis une compétence de base en matière d'exploitation de très grandes infrastructures technologiques et de grands centres de données. Grâce à cette compétence, nous nous sommes donné comme mission plus générale d'utiliser cette compréhension technologique afin de servir un tout nouveau segment de clients — des développeurs et des entreprises — en offrant un service de technologie de l'information que nos clients peuvent utiliser pour créer leurs propres applications échelonnables de pointe.

L'expression « infonuagique » renvoie à la prestation sur demande de ressources de TI sur Internet ou par l'intermédiaire de réseaux privés, des services assortis d'une tarification à l'utilisation afin que les gens payent seulement pour ce qu'ils utilisent. Plutôt que d'acheter, de posséder et d'entretenir beaucoup de pièces d'équipement de haute technologie, comme des ordinateurs, des dispositifs de stockage, des réseaux, des bases de données et ainsi de suite, il est possible de seulement appeler une interface de programmation et d'avoir accès à ces services sur demande. C'est ce qu'on appelle parfois une « informatique à la demande ». C'est similaire à la façon dont un client appuie sur un interrupteur et peut avoir de l'électricité chez lui. La société d'électricité prend soin de tout le reste.

Toute cette infrastructure est créée et bâtie. Il y a bien sûr l'équipement physique et l'infrastructure derrière tout ça, mais, du point de vue de l'utilisateur, il faut seulement appeler une interface de programmation. On communique avec une interface de programmation ou on clique sur un bouton à l'aide de la souris pour avoir accès à cette capacité, et on est ensuite facturé à l'utilisation.

Tout ça est totalement contrôlé par logiciel, ce qui signifie que tout est automatisé. C'est un point vraiment important que je vais soulever plusieurs fois, parce que la capacité d'automatiser les choses est un grand avantage lorsqu'il est question de sécurité. Plutôt que de faire des choses manuellement et d'utiliser... Croyez-moi, nous n'avons pas assez d'experts pour consigner toutes les commandes nécessaires pour tout exécuter, alors il faut avoir le bon logiciel pour assurer une automatisation.

En date d'aujourd'hui, nous fournissons des services extrêmement fiables, sécurisés et résilients à plus de 1 million de consommateurs dans 190 pays. En fait, vous pouvez considérer notre plateforme infonuagique comme une fédération de régions infonuagiques distinctes. Il y en a 20 dans le monde et 61 zones d'accessibilité. Chaque région s'appuie sur des emplacements physiques distincts pour accroître la résilience.

Montréal est l'hôte de la région canadienne des AWS, qui compte deux zones d'accessibilité. Chaque zone d'accessibilité se trouve dans une ou plusieurs régions géographiques distinctes et est assortie d'une capacité de redondance du point de vue de l'alimentation, du réseautage, de la connectivité, et ainsi de suite pour réduire au minimum les probabilités de défaillance simultanées. Grâce à cette capacité, grâce à ces emplacements physiques distincts, nos clients peuvent construire des applications extrêmement accessibles et insensibles aux défaillances. Même la défaillance de tout un centre de données n'entraîne pas nécessairement une interruption des applications de nos clients.

Les entreprises qui se tournent vers les AWS vont de grandes entreprises comme Porter Airlines, la Banque Nationale du Canada, la Bourse de Montréal, le Groupe TMX, Capital One et BlackBerry, à beaucoup d'entreprises en démarrage, comme Airbnb et Pinterest, ainsi que des entreprises comme Netflix, dont bon nombre d'entre vous ont entendu parler, et qui utilisent toutes l'infonuagique des AWS.

Nous travaillons aussi auprès de beaucoup d'organisations du secteur public du monde entier, y compris le gouvernement de l'Ontario, le ministère de la justice et le Home Office britannique, Singapour, l'Australie, les États-Unis et de nombreux autres clients du secteur public à l'échelle internationale.

Quels sont les avantages de l'infonuagique? Il y a trois avantages principaux que je veux souligner.

Le premier, c'est l'agilité et la souplesse. L'agilité permet d'acquérir rapidement des ressources, de les utiliser et de les interrompre lorsqu'on n'en a pas besoin. Cela signifie que, pour la première fois, les clients peuvent vraiment traiter les technologies de l'information d'une façon plus expérimentale, parce que les expériences sont peu coûteuses. Les gens peuvent en fait essayer des choses, et si ça ne fonctionne pas, ils ont dépensé très peu d'argent. Plutôt que d'avoir engagé d'importantes dépenses d'immobilisation assorties d'importants coûts pour acquérir des licences, il est possible de le faire selon un modèle beaucoup plus dynamique. L'expérimentation est très utile lorsqu'il est question d'innovation; c'est donc une façon d'accroître l'innovation.

(1545)



Pour ce qui est de la souplesse, nos clients devaient souvent se doter de systèmes trop gros pour leurs besoins. Ils devaient acquérir une trop grande capacité simplement parce que, une fois par année ou une fois par mois, ils avaient besoin d'une capacité de pointe.

La plupart du temps, leurs systèmes roulaient relativement au ralenti, et il y avait beaucoup de pertes associées à un tel modèle de surapprovisionnement. Grâce à l'infonuagique, il est possible d'obtenir ce dont on a besoin. Les services sont échelonnables, et on peut accroître la capacité ou la réduire de façon dynamique en temps réel.

Un autre avantage est l'économie de coût. Ce que je viens de décrire entraîne aussi des économies de coût. On utilise seulement la capacité nécessaire à un moment donné. Il est aussi possible de transformer les dépenses d'immobilisation en dépenses de fonctionnement, ce que beaucoup de personnes trouvent utile.

En bref, nos clients peuvent maintenir des niveaux d'infrastructure très élevés à un prix qui est très difficile à atteindre lorsqu'il faut acheter et gérer sa propre infrastructure.

La troisième raison, et c'est celle sur laquelle je veux vraiment mettre l'accent dans le cadre de mon témoignage, c'est l'avantage du point de vue de la sécurité. L'infrastructure des AWS met de solides mesures de protection en place pour protéger la sécurité et la confidentialité des consommateurs. Toutes les données sont stockées dans des centres de données extrêmement sécurisés. Nous fournissons très facilement un chiffrement complet: littéralement, il suffit de cocher une case ou d'appeler une interface de programmation. Toutes les données sont chiffrées, ce qui permet de contrôler les sessions, de voir ce qui se passe et de surveiller et contrôler les accès. De plus, notre réseau mondial fournit des capacités inhérentes intégrées permettant de protéger les consommateurs des attaques informatiques par saturation et des autres attaques de type réseau.

Avant l'infonuagique, les organisations devaient passer beaucoup de temps et dépenser beaucoup d'argent pour gérer leurs propres centres de données et s'en faire au sujet de la sécurité de tout ce qui s'y trouvait, et cela signifiait qu'ils consacraient moins de temps à leur mission de base en tant que telle. Grâce à l'infonuagique, les organisations peuvent agir davantage comme des entreprises en démarrage, mettre en oeuvre leurs idées sans coûts initiaux et sans avoir à se protéger contre tous les types de menaces à la sécurité.

Avant, les organisations devaient adopter un important programme d'immobilisations ou conclure des contrats à long terme avec des fournisseurs. Vraiment, la partie la plus difficile tenait au fait que les entreprises et les organisations étaient responsables de tout le système. Les clients étaient responsables de tout, du béton aux serrures sur les portes en passant par les logiciels. Grâce à l'infonuagique, nous assumons un certain nombre de ces responsabilités.

Et qu'en est-il de la sécurité de l'infonuagique? De plus en plus, les organisations se rendent compte qu'il y a un lien entre la modernisation des TI et l'utilisation de l'infonuagique pour améliorer leur posture de sécurité. La sécurité dépend de la capacité à toujours avoir une longueur d'avance sur le contexte des menaces qui évolue rapidement et continuellement en plus d'exiger une agilité opérationnelle et l'accès aux toutes dernières technologies. Tandis qu'une bonne partie des anciennes infrastructures de bon nombre de nos clients arrivent en fin de vie ou doivent être remplacées, les organisations passent à l'infonuagique pour tirer profit de nos capacités de pointe.

Une automatisation accrue est essentielle, comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, et l'infonuagique offre le plus haut niveau d'automatisation. La possibilité d'automatisation est maximisée lorsqu'on utilise une plateforme d'infonuagique. La sécurité dans le nuage est notre priorité. En fait, nous disons que la sécurité est la tâche zéro, elle vient avant même la tâche numéro un, et les organisations de tous les secteurs vous diront de quelle façon l'infonuagique commerciale peut accroître la sécurité de leur infrastructure de TI.

Par conséquent, bon nombre d'organisations, comme des institutions financières, modernisent leur capacité d'utilisation des plateformes infonuagiques. Nous avons été conçus pour assurer la sécurité des organisations, et même pour répondre aux besoins de certaines des organisations pour qui la sécurité est la plus importante considération, comme les services financiers.

Mais il s'agit d'une responsabilité commune. Les clients restent responsables d'assurer la sécurité dans leurs environnements, mais la zone de surface, le nombre de choses dont ils doivent s'inquiéter, est grandement limité, parce que nous prenons soin de beaucoup de ces choses afin qu'ils puissent se concentrer sur le reste. Des grandes banques aux gouvernements fédéraux, nos clients nous ont répété — et nous avons des citations que nous pourrons fournir au Comité — qu'ils se sentent plus en sécurité lorsqu'ils déploient leurs applications dans le nuage que lorsqu'ils le font dans leur propre infrastructure physique, sur place, dans leur propre centre de données.

En résumé, l'infonuagique devrait être considérée non pas comme un obstacle à la sécurité, mais comme une technologie qui favorise la sécurité, et elle est parfois très utile dans le domaine des services financiers en tant que composante de la solution globale pour moderniser et améliorer la sécurité.

Nous avons aussi quelques recommandations de nature stratégique, que nous vous fournirons dans notre mémoire écrit.

L'une des choses que nous voulons mentionner, c'est que, selon nous, on met trop l'accent sur l'emplacement physique des données. Très souvent, les gens se disent: « Il faut que j'aie les données avec moi, physiquement, pour les protéger ». En fait, si on regarde les antécédents en matière de cyberincidents, tout est fait à distance. C'est lorsqu'on est connecté à un réseau assorti d'accès vers l'extérieur que le pire peut se produire.

L'emplacement physique des données, surtout lorsqu'on peut tout chiffrer, comme l'accès physique aux lecteurs de stockage ou peu importe, n'est littéralement pas un vecteur de menace. En fait, il faudrait donner une certaine marge de manoeuvre aux banques et aux autres institutions quant à l'endroit physique où leurs données sont conservées, et ces institutions devraient pouvoir réaliser leur charge de travail dans le monde entier, offrant à leurs clients mondiaux des services à faible latence et en stockant possiblement des données à l'extérieur du Canada.

Il y a deux ou trois autres recommandations, y compris la question de la résidence des données. Nous croyons aussi que la centralisation du travail d'évaluation de sécurité est tout à fait appropriée. Plutôt que de demander à chaque agence ou chaque organisme de réglementation d'évaluer séparément la sécurité de l'infonuagique, il faudrait centraliser ce travail dans une organisation comme le Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité où les responsables peuvent réaliser une évaluation centralisée et déterminer si les plateformes d'infonuagique respectent les exigences. Puis, cette autorisation d'utilisation peut servir à d'autres organisations à l'échelle du gouvernement et au sein des industries réglementées.

(1550)



Merci beaucoup du temps que vous m'avez accordé.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Ryland.

Les sept premières minutes reviennent à M. Spengemann, s'il vous plaît.

M. Sven Spengemann (Mississauga—Lakeshore, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, messieurs, d'être là.

Monsieur Fadden, je suis particulièrement heureux que vous soyez là. En ce qui concerne votre ancien rôle de conseiller à la sécurité nationale, je crois que vous avez un point de vue unique sur la façon dont le sujet est lié au ministère de la Défense nationale et aux questions liées à la défense nationale. Je veux commencer par vous poser des questions à ce sujet.

Quelles sont les intersections, les zones grises, entre ce que nous considérons comme des questions liées à la sécurité publique et les questions liées à la défense nationale? Ce sont deux comités qui ont leur propre mandat. De cette façon, il y a des cloisons, et on devrait peut-être réaliser une étude conjointe réunissant les deux comités.

Pouvez-vous formuler des commentaires généraux sur la mesure dans laquelle la composante de défense nationale joue un rôle dans une bonne cybersécurité et quelle part revient à la composante de la sécurité publique?

M. Richard Fadden:

Eh bien, je suis assez d'accord avec vous: les distinctions qu'on fait dans le domaine sont un peu artificielles, et une des choses qu'il faut éviter, dans la mesure du possible, c'est de créer de telles cloisons. Nous en avons déjà assez comme c'est là, nous n'en avons pas besoin de plus.

Je crois que la principale contribution de la Défense nationale, c'est par l'intermédiaire du Centre de la sécurité et des télécommunications et, en ce qui concerne le secteur privé, le Centre pour la cybersécurité. Ces intervenants ont tendance à travailler de façon assez coopérative avec d'autres composantes de l'environnement de la sécurité nationale au Canada. Je dirais, et c'est en partie à la lumière de ce que j'ai su lorsque je travaillais, mais c'est aussi en partie parce que je travaille maintenant un peu dans le secteur privé, qu'il s'agissait assurément là de nouveautés qui ont été les bienvenues, mais ces entités n'ont pas réglé tous les problèmes des cyberattaques, ici et ailleurs.

Selon moi, l'un de leurs gros problèmes, et c'est un problème lié à la Défense, dans la mesure où c'est le ministre de la Défense qui est responsable, c'est que nous parlons de ces choses, mais nous en parlons beaucoup moins et nous partageons beaucoup moins d'information avec le secteur privé que ne le font une diversité d'autres pays. Je ne blâme pas un gouvernement ou un fonctionnaire précis. Il y a quelque chose dans l'ADN canadien lié au fait que nous estimons qu'il faut gérer la sécurité nationale, mais pas en parler. Toutefois, je dirais que, dans de nombreux cas, nous nous en tirerions beaucoup mieux si nous en parlions un peu au secteur privé, sans aller dans les détails opérationnels. C'est une façon d'accroître la sensibilisation. Cela permet au gouvernement et aux sociétés de discuter et de communiquer plus d'information qu'on en demande, mais je crois que le principal contributeur, c'est le CST.

(1555)

M. Sven Spengemann:

J'ai eu l'occasion de demander au dernier groupe de témoins quelle était la distinction — s'il y en a une — entre les acteurs étatiques et les acteurs non étatiques, leur différence qualitative en ce qui a trait à leur capacité de mettre à exécution une menace. Pouvez-vous nous en parler? Un acteur étatique a-t-il tout simplement plus de capacités, plus de pirates, plus de personnes? Ou y a-t-il d'autres différences qualitatives faisant en sorte que ces types d'acteurs sont dans des catégories complètement différentes?

M. Richard Fadden:

Je crois qu'il y a des distinctions à faire entre les acteurs étatiques. Je crois que la Chine et la Russie sont dans une ligue à part. Ils consacrent des ressources quasiment illimitées à leur capacité cybernétique. Ils sont très, très bons. Selon moi, il est généralement accepté que la Chine utilise l'approche de la balayeuse. Elle prend tout simplement tout ce qu'elle peut. Les Russes, selon moi, comptent sur des technologies un peu meilleures et ils sont un peu plus chirurgicaux quant à ce qu'ils tentent d'acquérir.

Selon moi, les groupes criminels internationaux ne sont pas au même niveau, mais ils deviennent très, très bons. Ce sont des gens très intelligents qui ont découvert qu'il était plus facile de s'enrichir en utilisant des appareils cybernétiques qu'au moyen d'interventions cinétiques d'une forme ou d'une autre. En outre, il n'y a pas de frontière, et dans la mesure où il n'y a pas de frontière, c'est beaucoup plus facile.

Le dernier groupe que je mentionnerais, j'imagine, c'est les groupes terroristes. Ils sont dans une catégorie différente. Certains possèdent une capacité cybernétique limitée. Tout cela n'a pas vraiment une envergure mondiale.

J'imagine que ce que je dirais encore une fois, c'est que les acteurs étatiques en particulier font en sorte qu'il est important pour nous de voir les défenses cybernétiques comme étant en constante évolution. Je ne parle pas en particulier de l'entreprise de M. Ryland, mais, quelle que soit la mesure de protection que nous mettons en place, si on se trouve devant une entité très agressive et qu'on lui donne assez de temps et de technologies, elle trouvera une façon de les contourner. Mon point, c'est que nous devons constamment renouveler nos mesures de défense. Nous devons constamment perfectionner nos technologies, surtout contre les États nations, mais de plus en plus aussi contre les groupes criminels internationaux.

M. Sven Spengemann:

Je veux vous poser une question au sujet du contenu dans le domaine numérique, tant du côté civil que du côté militaire. Facebook vient tout juste de décider d'interdire un certain nombre d'entités, des personnes qui ne respectent pas ses normes, y compris Faith Goldy, une nationaliste blanche canadienne. Nous avons aussi eu des discussions au sein du comité de la défense au sujet des campagnes de désinformation russes et du contenu délibérément faux dans la sphère sociale.

Dans quelle mesure le contenu est-il un problème? Où les tendances s'en vont-elles selon vous? Y a-t-il une tendance vers l'interdiction — entre guillemets — de contenu? Dans l'affirmative, qu'est-ce qui arrive? Repoussons-nous ce type de contenu vers le Web invisible ou réglons-nous certains problèmes?

M. Richard Fadden:

Selon moi, le contenu est horrifiant, dégoûtant et exagérément terrible. Si vous preniez le temps un samedi après-midi ou un dimanche pluvieux et que vous faisiez preuve d'un peu d'imagination en vous promenant sur le Web, vous pourriez trouver du contenu d'extrême-droite qui est aussi mauvais que ce qu'écrivaient les nazis, et vous trouverez de la littérature djihadiste qui fait la promotion de la mise à mort systématique des gens. Je ne parle pas du Web profond, qui est, encore là, un autre problème. Je crois que le contenu est un réel problème.

Je dirais que ce que Facebook essaie de faire est une bonne première étape, mais je ne veux pas vraiment que Facebook devienne l'entité qui contrôle mes pensées. Par ailleurs, j'ai la même inquiétude au sujet des gouvernements. Je ne veux pas que les gouvernements se mettent à contrôler nos pensées en déterminant ce qu'il faut faire. Je crois que nous avons besoin d'une certaine discussion nationale pour déterminer qui doit s'occuper de tout cela.

L'une des façons dont le Parlement a composé avec ce problème, c'est dans le domaine du blanchiment d'argent. Vous vous rappelez peut-être qu'il y a eu un débat il y a de ça des années sur la façon de composer avec le blanchiment d'argent: fallait-il tout simplement en faire un crime? Essentiellement, ce que le Parlement a fait, c'est d'imposer une obligation aux banques de connaître leurs clients. Cela a amélioré de façon importante la capacité de tout le monde de composer avec le blanchiment d'argent. On n'a pas éliminé le problème, mais les mesures ont été bénéfiques.

Selon moi, il serait possible pour le gouvernement de mettre en place un cadre, législatif ou réglementaire, exigeant que les entreprises qui oeuvrent dans ce large domaine sachent à qui elles donnent accès au Web et les informent de ce qui est permis et de ce qui est interdit.

En raison de mon grand âge et après 40 ans au sein du gouvernement, j'hésite un peu à laisser des gens me dire ce que je dois penser, que ce soit le gouvernement ou le secteur privé; je crois qu'il doit y avoir une mesure de transparence afin que nous sachions à la fois ce qu'on fait et ce qu'on ne fait pas.

Cependant, rien de tout cela ne fonctionnera, selon moi, si le Canadien moyen ne sait pas plus ce qui est accessible et s'il n'a pas des moyens quelconques de faire connaître ce qui le dérange. Actuellement, oui, on peut appeler la Gendarmerie, mais elle s'occupe de tellement de choses que ce n'est vraiment pas l'une de ses priorités.

M. Sven Spengemann:

Merci beaucoup. C'est très utile.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Spengemann. [Français]

Monsieur Paul-Hus, vous avez sept minutes, s'il vous plaît.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Bonjour, messieurs.

Monsieur Fadden, en 2010, vous avez donné une entrevue à CBC qui a été rapportée dans le Globe and Mail. Vous mentionniez qu'il y avait de l'ingérence d'acteurs d'autres États auprès de fonctionnaires et de ministres provinciaux ainsi que dans les milieux politiques canadiens. À ce moment-là, des gens du NPD et du Parti libéral ont demandé votre démission. Heureusement, vous êtes resté en poste.

Ce matin, nous avons appris que le rapport du Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement, qui vient d'être déposé, confirme ce que vous avez dit et confirme très clairement que la Chine est un acteur dangereux pour la sécurité du Canada.

Dans votre présentation, vous avez parlé des problèmes, mais j'aimerais aussi connaître les pistes de solution. Vous avez parlé de « l'Occident dysfonctionnel ». C'est ce que j'ai entendu à l'interprétation. Pourriez-vous nous éclairer davantage quant à ce que nous pourrions faire? Qu'est-ce que cela veut dire?

(1600)

[Traduction]

M. Richard Fadden:

Oui. Lorsque je parle de l'Occident qui est dysfonctionnel, je veux dire que... Je suis sûr que vous ne voulez pas avoir une longue discussion sur l'administration américaine actuelle, mais c'est là un problème important à l'heure actuelle dans la mesure où les points de vue du président américain actuel favorisent une grande instabilité. Les gens ne savent pas exactement ce qui se passe. Le Royaume-Uni n'a pas pris de décision majeure en un an et demi. M. Macron est préoccupé par ce qui se passe avec les gilets jaunes. L'Allemagne est préoccupée par le remplacement de Mme Merkel, et qui sait ce que font les Italiens.

Ce que j'essaie de dire, c'est que, tandis que nous nous inquiétons de ces enjeux majeurs, nous donnons l'occasion à la Russie et à la Chine en particulier de mettre leur nez dans nos affaires d'une façon qu'ils ne pourraient pas le faire si nous étions un peu plus unis. Je ne dis pas que le monde tire à sa fin. Ce n'est vraiment pas ce que je dis, mais je crois que nos adversaires — et je les appelle des adversaires, pas des ennemis — sont très actifs. Ils profitent de chaque occasion. Je crois que nous devons commencer à rétablir les liens étroits qu'il y avait entre certains pays depuis la Deuxième Guerre mondiale.

Selon moi, il faut aussi nous rendre encore plus compte que nous ne le faisons actuellement — et c'est l'un des moyens dont, selon moi, nous devons parler — et mieux comprendre aussi que la Russie et la Chine sont, à leur façon, de grands pays. Ces pays ont beaucoup contribué à la civilisation. Cependant, pour l'heure, ils sont foncièrement mécontents de leur position sur la planète et ils tenteront de changer la donne en utilisant quasiment n'importe quelle méthode. Selon moi, on n'y pense pas assez. Si on n'y pense pas et qu'on n'essaie pas de faire quoi que ce soit à ce sujet, nous sommes vraiment à la traîne.

Selon moi, la première chose à faire, c'est de mieux comprendre ce qui se passe. Quelqu'un m'a demandé l'autre jour dans les médias pourquoi la Russie est allée en Syrie. Elle n'a aucune possibilité d'acquérir des territoires, mais elle tente de causer du tort, et elle réussit très bien. Elle a retardé l'élimination du califat. Elle fait ce genre de choses dans un paquet de domaines. Elle est intervenue dans les élections des États-Unis, de l'Allemagne, de la France et si je ne m'abuse, de l'Italie. Tout ce qu'elle tente de faire, ce n'est pas vraiment de choisir qui gagnera, mais de réduire la confiance du public à l'égard des institutions publiques.

Ce sont toutes des choses dont, selon moi, nous devons parler davantage. Nous devons vraiment bien comprendre, particulièrement au sein des principaux pays occidentaux, la gravité du problème. Certaines parties de l'administration américaine jugent que tout cela est plus important que nous, parfois. Les Britanniques sont à un tout autre niveau. Nous avons besoin d'un consensus au sein de l'Occident quant au fait qu'il y a un problème. Les États-Unis viennent de changer leurs priorités en matière de sécurité nationale pour remettre l'accent sur les conflits entre grandes puissances après s'être intéressés au terrorisme pendant de nombreuses années. Eh bien, si c'est le cas, il faut commencer à réfléchir à ce qu'on fera au sujet de la Russie et de la Chine, sans partir en guerre, ce qui n'est vraiment pas ce que je propose. Il faut en parler, comprendre la nature de la menace et tisser des liens plus étroits à l'échelle internationale. Je crois vraiment que la sécurité nationale n'est pas nationale, pas de la façon dont on l'assure aujourd'hui. Il faut travailler en collaboration avec tout le monde. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Merci.

Revenons à notre sujet de base, qui est le secteur financier, les banques.

Nous avons rencontré plusieurs intervenants, différentes banques et différents autres groupes. Il y a les banques, le système administratif gouvernemental et le côté politique. Lorsqu'il est question de sécurité, d'enjeux, d'ennemis potentiels, le côté politique est toujours frileux. Les banques prennent des mesures de leur côté.

Selon vous, est-ce que l'administration, c'est-à-dire les gens que nous ne voyons pas, ceux qui sont dans l'ombre, est assez efficace actuellement pour pallier le côté politique? Il peut s'agir d'un côté ou de l'autre, je parle de façon générale. Politiquement, parfois, on n'ose pas.

À la suite des années que vous avez passées au sein de l'appareil politique, pensez-vous que nous sommes efficaces ou qu'il y aurait lieu de prendre des mesures très vigoureuses? [Traduction]

M. Richard Fadden:

Je dois admettre d'entrée de jeu que je ne suis probablement pas objectif, puisque j'ai travaillé pendant beaucoup d'années dans le domaine, mais je crois qu'il y a eu beaucoup de progrès ces derniers temps et qu'il y a beaucoup plus de coopération et de collaboration.

Cependant, je dirais deux choses. Premièrement, c'est que le monde devient beaucoup, beaucoup plus complexe, et je crois qu'on pourrait dire qu'il faut plus de ressources. Lorsque je travaillais pour le gouvernement, la dernière chose que nous voulions faire, c'était de mettre notre ministre dans l'embarras en disant que nous voulions plus d'argent. Ce n'est pas vraiment ce que je dis maintenant, mais si on pense à la guerre froide, puis au terrorisme, et enfin aux enjeux cybernétiques actuels et aux conflits entre grandes puissances de façon générale, oui, toutes ces institutions ont déjà eu plus de ressources, mais ces niveaux de ressources ne sont peut-être plus suffisants de nos jours, alors c'est quelque chose que je demanderais.

J'imagine que l'autre enjeu que je soulèverais est le suivant: plusieurs politiciens des deux côtés m'ont dit au fil des ans que parler de sécurité nationale ne fait pas gagner beaucoup de votes, et que c'est une des raisons pour lesquelles le gouvernement hésite parfois à prendre les mesures que vous avez soulevées. Cependant, si contrariés que soient les politiciens par les fonctionnaires, ce sont les fonctionnaires qui prennent les devants du point de vue politique des choses, et je crois que nous devons être un peu plus proactifs parfois que nous ne le sommes, parce que la technologie avance, la menace change, et nous semblons toujours essayer de rattraper le retard.

Je ne vise aucun gouvernement ni aucun fonctionnaire. Cela semble tout simplement être la façon dont on fait les choses, en grande partie parce que, si vous êtes le ministre des Finances ou le président du Conseil du Trésor, la dernière chose que vous voulez faire, tous les deux ans, c'est de dire: « voici encore 250 millions de dollars ». Je dis un montant comme ça, mais, vous savez, il y a des changements technologiques, et M. Ryland a parlé de certains d'entre eux, et il y en a un paquet d'autres. C'est très difficile pour un gouvernement de maintenir le rythme sans déployer constamment des efforts, et, en même temps, on s'inquiète au sujet de la Russie, de la Chine, de la Corée du Nord et de l'Iran. On s'inquiète au sujet des groupes criminels internationaux. J'ai l'impression qu'on commence à sous-estimer le problème que posent les terroristes tout simplement parce que nous en avons épinglé quelques-uns.

Par conséquent, et c'est une longue réponse à une question courte: je crois que, de façon générale, les gens font tout ce qu'ils peuvent, mais c'est très difficile de mobiliser tous ceux qui travaillent sur ce dossier — les fonctionnaires et le secteur privé —, sauf s'il y a un consensus quelconque quant à la gravité de la menace.

Je dirais, en toute déférence, que ce genre de consensus brille par son absence au Canada.

(1605)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Paul-Hus.

Monsieur Dubé, allez-y pour sept minutes, s'il vous plaît. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Messieurs, merci d'être ici aujourd'hui.

Monsieur Ryland, ma première question est pour vous. En ce qui concerne vos services, je ne sais pas si vous êtes en mesure de nous expliquer la séparation des responsabilités entre vous et vos clients.

Quel est le rôle de vos clients pour assurer la sûreté des données qu'ils vont stocker sur vos serveurs en utilisant vos services? [Traduction]

M. Mark Ryland:

Cette conversation peut être très longue et nuancée, mais juste pour vous donner un genre de résumé, si vous regardez quelque chose comme ce qu'ont les États-Unis... Il y a un cadre de contrôle de sécurité fondé sur une norme NIST appelée FedRAMP, qui dresse la liste de quelque 250 mesures de contrôle — autrement dit, les caractéristiques de sécurité que vous recherchez dans un système — et si vous prenez tout ce cadre de sécurité, notre plateforme couvre plus du tiers de ces mesures de contrôle. Ce sont simplement des choses dont nous nous occupons littéralement au nom de nos clients. Ils n'ont pas du tout besoin de s'en préoccuper. À peu près le tiers est partagé, de manière à ce que nous puissions nous occuper de certaines des choses, mais le client doit effectuer certaines configurations et faire certains choix qui fonctionnent pour ses besoins. Ces mesures de contrôle sont optionnelles, parce qu'il est raisonnable de choisir une option ou une autre, mais selon les besoins des clients, ils doivent faire un choix. Puis, environ le tiers est essentiellement la responsabilité du client.

Nous avons donc rétréci le champ d'action pour le client. Nous délimitons assez clairement qui est responsable de quoi et détenons littéralement des documents de contrôle à ce sujet, puis nous disposons de beaucoup de matériel — des livres blancs, des documents sur les pratiques exemplaires et ce que nous appelons un « cadre bien conçu » — afin d'aider les gens à assumer cette responsabilité restante. Nous voulons qu'ils y parviennent haut la main et nous déployons donc beaucoup d'efforts pour les aider à concevoir des systèmes sécurisés.

Mais lorsque vous arrivez à ce niveau, tout dépend des besoins de l'application, et il n'y a donc pas de bonne réponse à certaines questions. On vous dira « ça dépend ». Ça dépend de l'application et du besoin.

En général, je crois que c'est un bon résumé du type de modèle que nous utilisons avec nos clients. Nous nous occupons d'un certain nombre de choses qui les préoccuperaient habituellement; nous décrivons quelques domaines dans lesquels nous faisons certaines choses et où ils doivent en faire d'autres, puis nous les aidons avec le reste de la conception d'un système sécurisé en leur fournissant beaucoup d'outils et de caractéristiques qui font en sorte qu'il est plus facile de l'achever. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci.

Je veux m'assurer de bien comprendre. Vous avez dit qu'environ un tiers de la responsabilité à bien configurer le tout relevait uniquement du client. Est-ce que cela crée une barrière pour les personnes ou, notamment, les entreprises qui peuvent accéder à vos services, c'est-à-dire que l'expertise doit déjà exister au sein de l'entreprise ou de l'agence gouvernementale?

Je m'explique. Voici l'exemple qui me vient en tête. Je crois que Services partagés Canada a un contrat avec vous. Toutefois, selon ce qu'on voit dans l'actualité depuis un certain temps, cet organisme un bilan assez lamentable en ce qui a trait à la mise en œuvre de système informatique.

Est-ce que les lacunes qui peuvent exister ou le manque d'expertise au sein d'une l'entreprise ou d'une agence gouvernementale pourraient limiter la capacité d'un client de faire affaire avec vous ou avec toute autre entreprise comparable à la vôtre?

(1610)

[Traduction]

M. Mark Ryland:

Chaque fois qu'on utilise une technologie, c'est certainement possible de ne pas bien s'en servir. Une bonne partie de notre mission consiste à renseigner et à former nos clients, et c'est ce que nous faisons dans bien des cas. Et une bonne partie de cette formation est en fait gratuite, dans le contexte où on les aide à comprendre ce type de nouveau paradigme qu'est l'infonuagique.

Cela dit, il y a beaucoup de points communs avec des choses qu'ils font déjà depuis un certain temps. Je vais vous donner juste un exemple. Disons que vous dirigez une application Web accessible aux citoyens pour un gouvernement. Vous savez déjà en quelque sorte comment sécuriser un réseau central; vous détenez un système d'authentification, faites une réinitialisation du mot de passe, ces types de caractéristiques qui sont intégrées dans le système. Si vous utilisez ce type de système semblable sur une plateforme infonuagique, les caractéristiques de sécurité s'apparenteraient à celles que vous avez utilisées par le passé.

Ce n'est pas un monde complètement nouveau. Il ne s'agit pas d'un ensemble de compétences entièrement nouvelles qui sont requises pour les professionnels de la sécurité, mais il y a assurément des différences et des changements. Cela fait partie des progrès de l'industrie, tout comme il y a 20 ou 30 ans, quand nous avons beaucoup travaillé sur l'ordinateur central. Ce n'est pas quelque chose sur quoi les gens se concentrent maintenant. Il y a toujours des systèmes centraux qui fonctionnent, et ils doivent être sécurisés, mais l'on a tendance à se concentrer sur les nouvelles choses, les nouveaux systèmes et les nouvelles applications.

Je crois que la transition vers l'infonuagique comporte une caractéristique semblable. Chaque fois qu'il est question de modernisation et d'utilisation de nouvelles technologies, il y a assurément une certaine courbe d'apprentissage, mais vous pouvez aussi en faire beaucoup plus en travaillant moins, avec moins d'êtres humains réels. Parfois, quand on se sert de l'automatisation, d'aucuns jugent que c'est controversé, parce qu'on se dit, eh bien, qu'arrive-t-il si nous retirons des gens? Allons-nous enlever des emplois à des travailleurs? Dans le domaine de la cybersécurité, tout le monde reconnaît que nous avons une énorme pénurie de main-d'oeuvre qualifiée. Tout type de technologie qui peut accroître l'automatisation et permettre à un travailleur qualifié de trouver une solution, puis de la reproduire à grande échelle, représente un gain énorme, et tout le monde peut donc appuyer une plus grande automatisation dans le domaine de la sécurité.

Je crois que c'est une des principales raisons pour lesquelles les gens estiment que les plateformes infonuagiques sont avantageuses. Oui, il y a une courbe d'apprentissage, mais la capacité d'automatiser des choses est vraiment grandement supérieure à l'utilisation de la technologie traditionnelle. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

J'ai deux dernières questions à poser rapidement.

Voici la première. Vous n'êtes peut-être pas le mieux placé dans votre organisation pour y répondre. Toutefois, advenant le cas où il y aurait une fuite de données, étant donné qu'il y a une responsabilité partagée, qui serait ultimement responsable des données, légalement? En particulier dans le secteur financier, si un client perdait de l'argent, serait-ce la faute de la banque ou de l'entreprise qui permet l'entreposage de données dans le nuage?

Comment voyez-vous cela? [Traduction]

Le président:

Veuillez faire très vite, s'il vous plaît.

M. Mark Ryland:

Oui.

La responsabilité partagée suppose aussi qu'on détermine qui assume cette responsabilité. Si un problème devait apparaître dans un de nos systèmes, nous en serions responsables. Si un client configure ou utilise mal un de nos systèmes, il en est responsable.

Encore une fois, nous faisons beaucoup de choses pour soutenir les clients, et il arrive souvent, dans l'équipe de sécurité où je travaille, que des clients soient en proie à un problème et à un certain type d'incident et viennent nous demander de l'aide. Même si, techniquement, ce n'est pas du tout notre faute, nous répondons tout de même avec grand dynamisme pour les aider à résoudre les problèmes qu'ils ont causés.

Je vais prendre un exemple simple et non controversé. Nous détenons des systèmes où des clients ont accidentellement supprimé des données sans faire les sauvegardes appropriées, et ils viennent nous voir en panique. D'un côté, nous pourrions dire: « Eh bien, le système fonctionnait exactement tel qu'il a été conçu. Vous avez fait une erreur. Nous ne pouvons rien faire. » Pourtant, nous nous donnerons beaucoup de mal pour les aider à trouver des solutions à ces types de problèmes, et il en va de même avec les incidents de sécurité.

(1615)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Dubé. Je suis désolé.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez sept minutes, s'il vous plaît.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

J'aimerais beaucoup poursuivre sur ce sujet, mais j'y reviendrai dans une seconde.

Monsieur Fadden, je ne crois pas que quiconque désapprouvera votre évaluation selon laquelle notre étude concerne vraiment la sécurité nationale, plutôt que la cybersécurité dans le secteur financier comme question primordiale.

Je dirais que beaucoup de questions sont mises aux voix au chapitre de la sécurité nationale, mais seulement une fois que l'incident s'est produit.

M. Richard Fadden:

J'en prends bonne note. Je vous remercie.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez dit que la sécurité n'est pas nationale; qu'elle est supernationale. Le Canada a-t-il un réseau de base assez fort pour répondre aux besoins des Canadiens? Avons-nous des liens intercontinentaux suffisants pour répondre aux besoins des Canadiens, et est-ce important?

M. Richard Fadden:

Je crois que c'est très important.

Avons-nous le réseau de base ou les liens intercontinentaux? Il est difficile de répondre à cette question, car je crois qu'elle suppose une réponse en deux parties: une qui concerne les gouvernements de façon générale, et l'autre, le secteur non gouvernemental.

À mon avis, en ce qui concerne les gouvernements, nous avons des alliances très étroites avec le Groupe des cinq — les États-Unis en particulier — et l'échange de renseignements est énorme. Je dirais que c'est assez efficace, nonobstant le dysfonctionnement dont je parlais.

Quand je travaillais encore, l'approche qui avait été adoptée pour régler certains de ces problèmes... C'est un peu comme parler d'un cancer. Ce n'est pas particulièrement utile. J'ai remarqué que certains d'entre vous portent leur épinglette contre le cancer. Le fait de parler de façon générale au sujet du cancer n'est pas particulièrement utile, parce que le remède contre le cancer concerne les quelque 130 types de cancer. Je trouve que le fait de parler de façon générale de la cybernétique n'est souvent pas très utile. Vous devez la décomposer et vous attacher à ses parties constituantes.

Auparavant, nous divisions l'économie canadienne en secteurs stratégiques, comme les télécommunications, les finances, l'énergie nucléaire... Il y en avait 11 ou 12. Bien honnêtement, je crois que les liens qu'ils entretiennent avec leur établissement principal — l'un avec l'autre au Canada et à l'étranger — varient. Par exemple, notre secteur nucléaire est assez bien organisé, et je crois que le point de vue général, en ce qui concerne les secteurs, c'est que le secteur financier ne se porte pas mal. C'est moins le cas de certains des autres secteurs.

Je n'essaie pas d'éluder votre question, mais je crois qu'il est difficile de juste vous répondre par oui ou non. Je crois qu'il n'y a pas une seule entité — gouvernementale ou non gouvernementale — qui est responsable. C'est juste ainsi que les choses ont évolué.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais demander à M. Ryland de nous fournir plus de précisions.

Vous avez parlé du modèle de surapprovisionnement. Vous parliez des vastes ressources et de la capacité de les répartir entre les systèmes, ce que nous n'aurions pas pu faire auparavant. En guise d'exemple, quelle est la puissance de calcul d'un porte-clé aujourd'hui par rapport à celle d'Apollo?

M. Mark Ryland:

La puissance du porte-clé est probablement plus grande. C'est un microcontrôleur de 32 bits.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Lorsque survient ce type de changement massif dans la capacité de calcul, quelle incidence a-t-il sur la sécurité? La technologie change-t-elle à un rythme plus rapide que ce que nous pouvons soutenir?

M. Mark Ryland:

Non, je ne le crois pas.

La technologie change rapidement, mais des gens motivent ces changements technologiques. En général, les experts qui conçoivent les systèmes comprennent leur fonctionnement et la façon de les sécuriser. Il peut y avoir un temps mort avant que l'on comprenne de façon élargie ces technologies de pointe, mais souvent, ces experts conçoivent aussi des choses afin de les sécuriser davantage par défaut.

Je crois que l'Internet des objets est un excellent exemple. Nous n'avons pas le temps d'en parler en détail, mais nous avons tous reconnu dans le passé les problèmes avec l'IdO — les appareils domestiques, etc. — qui était déployé de façon très peu sécuritaire. Par le passé, c'était la chose la moins coûteuse et la plus facile à faire. Si vous examinez la technologie récente que nous offrons, ou celle que Microsoft ou d'autres gros fournisseurs vous offrent, par défaut, leurs systèmes sont beaucoup plus sécuritaires. Vous pouvez les mettre à jour par substitution, ce qu'il n'était pas possible de faire auparavant. Ils utilisent des protocoles sécurisés par défaut; ils ne le faisaient pas auparavant. Vous pouvez aller directement au bas de la liste pour savoir comment les intérêts commerciaux de ces gros fournisseurs s'harmonisent avec la conception de systèmes qui sont sécurisés par défaut, tandis que, auparavant, cette fonction revenait à la personne qui concevait le réfrigérateur intelligent, le grille-pain intelligent ou quoi que ce soit d'autre.

Les changements technologiques peuvent en fait relever la barre dans des industries entières au moyen d'investissements et de l'harmonisation des intérêts commerciaux avec une sécurité supérieure.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais revenir à l'infonuagique. Le public ou même les organisations avec qui vous traitez comprennent-ils réellement ce qu'est le nuage?

M. Mark Ryland:

Il y a souvent beaucoup de confusion. D'abord, il y a cette idée qui consiste à savoir ce qui existe. Les gens croient qu'il doit y avoir quelque chose qui existe. Il y a aussi la confusion qui apparaît entre les cas d'utilisation des clients. Les gens croient que Facebook et Google sont comme un nuage, mais la prestation de services de TI d'un fournisseur de services d'infonuagique est un modèle tout à fait différent. Tout d'abord, nous ne monétisons pas vos données; nous les verrouillons et ne les examinons jamais. Notre perception est totalement différente.

Une chose qu'ils ont généralement en commun, c'est l'accessibilité aux réseaux. On sera en mesure d'y accéder de n'importe où.

Il y a beaucoup de confusion. Souvent, au début de nos exposés, nous afficherons une mappemonde, où figurent de petits points qui montrent où se trouvent nos choses dans cette ville ou cette région, afin que les gens puissent savoir que de l'équipement physique sous-tend toute cette capacité.

(1620)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Les AWS consistent-ils essentiellement en des serveurs virtuels ou y a-t-il un autre système à part celui-là? Y a-t-il des machines virtuelles?

M. Mark Ryland:

C'est un de nos services principaux. Ça s'appelle EC2, mais nous possédons littéralement une centaine d'autres services. La tendance s'éloigne déjà de l'utilisation de services de machines virtuelles, car c'est là que le client doit assumer la plus grande responsabilité. Les gens préféreraient utiliser les services de niveau supérieur où nous assumons une responsabilité accrue et où ils n'ont qu'à effectuer une configuration très minime.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Si vous utilisez non pas une machine virtuelle, mais plutôt les services fournis, quel contrôle un client peut-il réellement détenir? On doit trouver un juste milieu. En tant que client, serais-je en mesure de choisir le système d'exploitation de ma machine virtuelle? Je pourrais mettre un système Debian, ou quoi que ce soit d'autre, mais que pourriez-vous mettre sur une machine qui n'est pas virtuelle? Quelles sont les autres options?

M. Mark Ryland:

Encore une fois, cela dépend du cas d'utilisation. Le modèle informatique associé à un service de stockage vous importe peu, puisque vous ne faites que stocker des données. Les bases de données se trouvent au milieu. Il y a une panoplie de choix et d'options, mais les gens ont tendance à préférer ce qu'on appelle les « services virtuels ». Au fil du temps, vous verrez que les gens adoptent de plus en plus ces services virtuels. Je n'ai qu'à téléverser ma fonction de JavaScript sur cette fonction comme service, et le code s'exécute dès que certains événements surviennent. Je n'ai aucune notion du système d'exploitation ni de quoi que ce soit d'autre; c'est géré pour moi.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il ne me reste que 40 secondes environ, donc ma dernière question pour vous deux concerne les avantages par rapport aux désavantages en matière de sécurité des logiciels ouverts et des logiciels exclusifs.

M. Mark Ryland:

Il y a quelque chose qui s'appelle l'hypothèse des « yeux multiples » pour les logiciels ouverts. Le fait que les gens peuvent voir le code fait en sorte qu'il est plus probable que l'on découvre des défauts de sécurité et d'autres failles. Je ne sais pas s'il y a des données empiriques vraiment solides qui l'appuient, car beaucoup de défauts de sécurité ont été retrouvés dans le code ouvert, mais le grand avantage, c'est que les gens ont plus de contrôle sur leur propre destin, parce que vous pouvez mener votre propre enquête. Vous pouvez trouver vos solutions. Vous ne dépendez pas d'un fournisseur pour découvrir et régler des problèmes de sécurité. Dans l'ensemble, les logiciels ouverts offrent quelques avantages réels, mais ce n'est pas complètement noir ou blanc.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

M. Richard Fadden:

Monsieur le président, me permettez-vous de dire deux choses rapidement?

M. Ryland a parlé de ce qu'il fait et de ce que ses clients font. Si nous imaginons une banque pour une minute, je crois qu'il importe que nous ne soyons pas hypnotisés par les choses vraiment efficaces que M. Ryland fait. Si je prenais un dispositif, que je pourrais probablement obtenir si j'essayais fort, et que je le mettais sous le bureau du vice-président exécutif de la Banque de Montréal, ce serait un dispositif d'enregistrement. Lorsqu'il accéderait aux renseignements et entrerait tous ses mots de passe, je serais en mesure d'y accéder à partir du bureau voisin ou d'une autre ville.

Si l'on parle de l'Internet des objets, je ne crois toujours pas que nous soyons à même de comprendre l'établissement d'une relation avec une ampoule électrique. Je crois que les choses sont meilleures qu'elles l'étaient auparavant, mais encore une fois, si vous contrôlez l'ampoule électrique — et je blague par rapport à cela... mais le dispositif que vous souhaitez utiliser, quel qu'il soit, a la capacité d'obtenir des renseignements.

La sécurité des systèmes dont nous parlons comporte deux aspects réels: la partie dont M. Ryland a parlé et l'environnement que les institutions financières utilisent. Ils sont tout aussi importants l'un que l'autre, parce que si vous réussissez à pénétrer efficacement dans l'institution financière, que ce soit au moyen du dispositif dont j'ai parlé ou d'un autre, vous pouvez non seulement causer des dommages à cette institution financière, mais aussi compliquer énormément la vie de M. Ryland.

M. Ryland ne parle pas seulement de dispositifs de sécurité très complexes. C'est toute une série d'autres choses également. Je dirais que la Banque Royale du Canada fait probablement très bien ces choses. Une modeste caisse populaire du Manitoba ne le fait peut-être pas. Excusez-moi s'il y a des gens ici du Manitoba. C'est le maillon le plus faible dans le problème de la chaîne que nous n'avons pas vraiment réussi à comprendre aussi efficacement que nous le pourrions.

Le président:

Merci.

À la suite de cette étude, je suis devenu paranoïaque et j'évitais de parler devant mon réfrigérateur ou mon thermostat. Maintenant, je dois m'inquiéter de mon porte-clé et de mes ampoules électriques.

Monsieur Motz, vous avez cinq minutes, s'il vous plaît.

M. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, PCC):

Vous avez beaucoup de choses à cacher.

M. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, messieurs, d'être ici.

Monsieur Fadden, lorsque nous parlions plus tôt de lutter contre le terrorisme, vous avez fait allusion à notre modèle canadien actuel comme s'il s'agissait d'un jeu de la taupe, où nous éliminons un problème une fois qu'il est apparu. Y a-t-il un mécanisme qui permet une plus grande proactivité pour prévenir les cyberattaques, mis à part la seule éducation ou formation?

M. Richard Fadden:

Oui, je crois qu'il y en a un.

Si vous regardez ce que vous pouvez faire — et je ne suis pas ingénieur, donc je limite mes propos à un langage que je peux comprendre —, vous pouvez prévoir des mesures purement défensives. Vous concevez quelque chose dans votre système, quel qu'il soit: vous y mettez des pare-feu et quoi que ce soit d'autre.

Puis, vous avez ce que j'appelle la « défense agressive »: vous pouvez savoir lorsque quelqu'un essaie de sortir ou de pénétrer, et vous vous en occupez.

Enfin, vous avez l'attaque purement offensive: vous êtes en mesure d'aller trouver des problèmes ou d'affaiblir les capacités d'autrui.

Je crois que nous sommes assez bons en ce qui concerne la première option. Nous ne sommes pas si mauvais pour ce qui est de la deuxième. Je ne crois pas que nous soyons vraiment excellents par rapport à la troisième. Je ne crois pas que nous, au Canada, devions le faire seuls. Nous pouvons le faire avec un tas d'autres pays. Toutefois, la capacité de ce que j'appellerai les « cyberadversaires » d'utiliser 37 intermédiaires inconnus fait en sorte qu'il est très difficile pour les gens de savoir d'où ils viennent, et que sais-je encore.

Vous avez vraiment besoin d'un genre de système de surveillance à l'échelle mondiale. Je ne crois pas que nous en ayons un. Je crois que les États-Unis, selon ce que je comprends, essaient de le faire, mais il y a une limite à ce que même eux peuvent faire.

Vous avez probablement entendu parler de l'ancien secrétaire américain à la Défense, Donald Rumsfeld. Il a été couvert de ridicule à un certain moment, mais je crois qu'il a dit une chose qui est vraie, et cela s'applique à ce domaine: vous ne savez pas ce que vous ne savez pas.

Je crois que M. Ryland sera d'accord avec moi pour dire...

(1625)

M. Mark Ryland:

Il y a les inconnus connus et les inconnus inconnus.

M. Richard Fadden:

Ce sont ceux-là qui m'inquiètent.

La technologie avance si rapidement que nous trouvons très difficile de garder une longueur d'avance.

C'est une réponse longue à une question courte, mais je ne crois pas que notre situation soit aussi bonne que ce qu'elle pourrait être à l'échelle internationale.

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord, pour amener cette idée un peu plus loin, vous avez dit récemment que nous étions en quelque sorte à l'écart lorsqu'il s'agit de notre capacité de surveiller les terroristes de l'État islamique ou les combattants étrangers qui sont revenus ou qui reviennent vers notre territoire. Diriez-vous que nous sommes en meilleure position lorsqu'il s'agit de cybersécurité?

M. Richard Fadden:

Eh bien, si vous avez affaire au gouvernement du Canada, je dirais probablement oui. Je crois que, sous l'ancien gouvernement et le gouvernement actuel, l'appareil gouvernemental a fait de réels progrès pour renforcer la capacité de défendre les systèmes du gouvernement du Canada. Il a limité l'accès à Internet aux systèmes du gouvernement du Canada, ce qui a beaucoup facilité le contrôle.

Je revenais sans cesse au maillon le plus faible de la chaîne. Tout ce qu'il vous faut, c'est un maillon faible qui vous permet d'accéder à tout. Cela dit, je crois que, en ce qui concerne la cybersécurité, le gouvernement est mieux placé qu'il le serait par rapport au terrorisme. Je ne crois pas que sa position soit très bonne relativement au terrorisme. J'essayais juste de dire qu'il y a une limite quelque part par rapport à ce que vous pouvez faire.

Si vous étendez cela aux gouvernements provinciaux, par exemple, il y a des liens entre les provinces et le gouvernement fédéral. La protection des provinces varie beaucoup, je crois. Puis, vous continuez d'avancer, et il ne faut pas beaucoup d'imagination.

Je vais vous donner un exemple: j'ai lu il y a quelques années qu'un atelier de soudage familial — je crois que c'était en Arizona — possédait son propre petit serveur et que sais-je encore. Un État étranger s'est servi d'un problème qui est survenu pour accéder à un élément du gouvernement américain en Chine. Ce que j'essaie de dire, c'est qu'il n'est pas nécessaire que la faille soit béante, pour reprendre une manifestation physique, pour y pénétrer.

De façon générale, je crois que nous tirons assez bien notre épingle du jeu. Nous ne faisons vraiment pas mauvaise figure, mais si nous croyons avoir bloqué toutes les cyberattaques possibles contre nous ou notre économie, alors je crois que nous sommes beaucoup trop optimistes.

M. Glen Motz:

Nous avons des vases clos dans l'application de la loi lorsqu'il s'agit de mener quelques batailles, parfois, ainsi que d'échanger des renseignements. Vous avez déjà mentionné que le Canada n'a pas de ressources suffisantes appliquées à ce problème.

Voyez-vous le même problème de cloisonnement pour la cybersécurité?

M. Richard Fadden:

Il ne s'agit pas tant de cloisonnement. Certains de mes anciens collègues voudront me donner des coups de pied en dessous de la table parce que je le dis, mais je ne crois pas qu'il y ait un cerveau dirigeant central qui s'occupe des questions de cybersécurité au gouvernement du Canada.

Je crois que le Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications a un rôle réel à jouer. Je crois que la Sécurité publique a un rôle à jouer. L'armée voit les choses de manière légèrement différente. Affaires mondiales Canada a un rôle à jouer pour s'occuper de choses à l'échelle internationale. Innovation, Sciences et Développement économique — je crois que c'est ainsi qu'il s'appelle — joue un rôle dans la réglementation d'Internet et la façon dont nous interagissons avec lui.

Je ne crois pas que la pratique américaine qui consiste à mettre en place un tsar soit nécessairement la solution. Je dirais, à tout le moins en me fondant sur mon ancien titre de conseiller à la sécurité nationale, que nous aurions pu bénéficier d'une plus grande coordination, et peut-être, à un certain moment, d'une plus grande orientation. C'est un domaine très complexe, et les ministères se préoccupent d'abord d'eux-mêmes.

L'appareil gouvernemental est la prérogative du premier ministre. Il va organiser les choses comme il l'entend, mais c'est un domaine dont la manifestation a une portée si mondiale et si complexe, que le simple fait de dire à divers ministères et organismes qu'ils doivent coopérer n'est peut-être pas suffisant, à mon avis.

(1630)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Motz.

Les cinq dernières minutes vont à M. Picard.

M. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Merci.

Monsieur Ryland, si je comprends bien, le nuage, c'est une structure centralisée pour laquelle les mesures de sécurité et les niveaux de sécurité sont si élevés que les clients pour lesquels vous stockez des données se sentent assez rassurés, estimant qu'ils sont protégés à 99 % contre les attaques extérieures.

M. Mark Ryland:

Je crois que c'est un résumé assez juste. Ils ont certainement l'impression d'avoir une longueur d'avance pour ce qui est d'établir des mesures de défense appropriées, car nous nous occupons de beaucoup de choses dont ils devraient autrement s'inquiéter.

M. Michel Picard:

Mais vous venez de dire à M. Graham que vous ne saviez rien au sujet du contenu stocké sur votre serveur, car ce n'est pas votre affaire de savoir ce que les clients mettent sur votre serveur, donc quelle serait la sécurité de votre système du point de vue d'un cheval de Troie?

M. Mark Ryland:

C'est très sécuritaire, car nous concevons et mettons constamment à l'essai nos systèmes en présumant que nous avons des clients hostiles. Nous présumons que nous sommes attaqués par nos clients, nous en tenons compte et nous nous assurons que les caractéristiques d'isolement du système sont très robustes.

M. Michel Picard:

Il y a donc une sécurité de part et d'autre, contre les attaques provenant de l'extérieur ainsi que celles provenant de l'intérieur.

M. Mark Ryland:

Oui.

M. Michel Picard:

Excellent. Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Fadden, cette étude nous a fait voyager. Nous n'avions aucune idée de l'endroit où nous allions, parce que c'est tellement vaste, gros, large et diversifié. Nous comprenons tout à fait la pertinence de toute mesure à prendre relativement à cette question, particulièrement de mon côté, avec les institutions financières. Selon vos connaissances au sujet du gouvernement et votre expérience, diriez-vous que nous devrions commencer à établir des politiques, et quelles seraient certaines de vos recommandations?

M. Richard Fadden:

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais revenir à un des points soulevés plus tôt. Je crois que, par voie législative, le Parlement doit imposer des obligations aux institutions financières, au même titre que ce qu'il a fait concernant le blanchiment d'argent. Il doit les obliger à faire une diversité de choses. En ce moment, la plupart de ces choses sont faites dans l'intérêt propre des institutions financières. Elles ont tendance à être assez bonnes, mais nous devrions grandement augmenter le nombre de nos signalements d'atteintes et de tentatives d'atteinte. Il y a un règlement, si ma mémoire est bonne, qui en fait une obligation en ce moment. Ce n'est pas aussi complet que ça devrait l'être.

Les Américains et les Britanniques, en particulier, prévoient des sanctions sévères pour les institutions qui ne signalent pas les atteintes. Je ne sais pas comment nous pouvons nous attendre à gérer efficacement les atteintes si nous ne savons pas quand elles se produisent. Je crois que c'est mieux qu'autrefois, mais tout de même... Je dirais donc que l'on doit imposer des obligations claires aux institutions et signaler les atteintes. Encore une fois, certains de mes anciens collègues vont me donner des coups de pied en dessous de la table, mais je ne crois pas que nous transmettions assez de renseignements classifiés au secteur privé. Je crois que nous nous en tirons beaucoup mieux qu'il y a 15 ou 20 ans, mais si vous prenez le représentant du service technologique le plus expérimenté de la Banque Royale — ce qui s'adonne à être ma banque, mais je n'essaie pas de la promouvoir — et que vous lui demandez de collaborer sur des questions de cybersécurité, et que le représentant canadien n'est pas autorisé à communiquer des renseignements classifiés, je ne vois pas comment vous pouvez avoir un dialogue réel. Les États-Unis et le Royaume-Uni autorisent, du point de vue des renseignements classifiés, des gens dans le secteur privé. Je ne veux pas dire que nous ne faisons rien de tout cela, car nous le faisons. Je dis juste que nous ne le faisons pas assez. Je dirais ces trois choses.

M. Michel Picard:

Quand vous avez dit que nous pourrions être tentés de faire abstraction de la Russie et de la Chine ou de les oublier parce que notre intérêt est ailleurs, j'ai été surpris. Je croyais que nous étions tellement concentrés sur la Russie et la Chine que nous avions oublié les menaces réelles provenant d'autres pays, de pays satellites travaillant pour ces États principaux. Lorsque nous avons examiné Cambridge Analytica à notre comité, il a semblé évident, au bout du compte, que la menace n'allait peut-être pas être la Russie, mais avec un si grand nombre de bureaux satellites à l'oeuvre dans d'autres pays, où devrions-nous concentrer nos efforts?

M. Richard Fadden:

Monsieur le président, je crois que c'est la question à 57 000 $.

Des députés: Ha, ha!

M. Richard Fadden:

Une partie du problème tient au fait que vous ne pouvez pas faire abstraction de la Russie et de la Chine. Nous ne pouvons pas fait fi de ces choses que vous venez d'énumérer. Je crois que nous mettons de côté les groupes terroristes internationaux à nos risques et périls. Nous avons tout un tas de groupes de la société civile qui ne prennent pas au sérieux la cybersécurité. Je pourrais probablement en énumérer d'autres, mais la vérité, c'est que nous ne pouvons faire abstraction d'un seul d'entre eux.

C'est pourquoi je crois qu'il doit y avoir une plus grande collaboration, une plus grande communication et plus d'efforts pour nous amener au point suggéré par un des autres députés. Nous voulons essayer de garder une longueur d'avance sur le problème, plus que dans le passé. Je n'ai pas de réponse, sauf pour dire que, même s'il se peut bien que vous ayez raison par rapport à cette période de six mois, peut-être que les choses changeront au cours des prochains six mois. Nous devons être agiles. Encore une fois, après avoir travaillé pour le gouvernement pendant 40 ans, je peux dire que ce n'est pas un de nos points forts. Cela vaut pour les gouvernements de façon générale, mais je crois que nous devons être plus agiles que par le passé pour nous occuper de tous les sujets dont vous parlez.

(1635)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Picard.

Avant de suspendre, j'aimerais juste remercier nos témoins. Habituellement, les mots « agile » et « gouvernement » ne se retrouvent pas dans la même phrase.

Cela dit, nous allons suspendre les travaux pour une minute ou deux. Merci de vos exposés.

M. Richard Fadden:

Tout le plaisir était pour moi.

M. Mark Ryland:

Merci.

Le président:

Nous suspendons nos travaux.

(1635)

(1635)

Le président:

Nous allons composer avec le vote par appel nominal, à 17 h 30. Nous arrêterons probablement autour de 17 h 20, plutôt que 17 h 30. Je vais étirer la discussion autant que je le peux.

Cela dit, nous sommes de retour, et je demanderai à M. Drennan de présenter son exposé.

Vous avez 10 minutes. Si vous me regardez, je vous donnerai un signal quand vous approcherez des 10 minutes.

Merci, monsieur Drennan, de comparaître.

M. Steve Drennan (directeur, Cybersécurity, Groupe ADGA):

Merci. Je m'appelle Steve Drennan, et je suis heureux d'être ici aujourd'hui pour me représenter et représenter ADGA dans le domaine de la cybersécurité et le secteur financier au Canada. Merci de m'avoir invité à présenter un témoignage au comité de la sécurité publique à la Chambre des communes aujourd'hui, et merci de votre temps.

En guise de contexte, ADGA est une entreprise entièrement canadienne qui fournit des services professionnels stratégiques de consultation et une technologie de pointe dans les services informatiques de défense, de sécurité et d'entreprise depuis plus de 50 ans. Elle offre des solutions ainsi que des services d'ingénierie et de dotation haut de gamme dans des locaux gouvernementaux et commerciaux. ADGA possède donc beaucoup de connaissances et d'expertise dans des domaines comme la cybersécurité. ADGA a aussi des opinions tranchées, tout comme moi, sur les besoins et l'évolution de la sécurité d'un océan à l'autre et sur la connaissance du paysage et des partenaires stratégiques. ADGA possède une solide capacité combinée en matière de sécurité, en plus d'une vaste expérience en conception d'évaluations de cybersécurité et en conformité. Voilà qui vous donne une idée de mes antécédents aujourd'hui.

En examinant les témoignages précédents en ligne, j'ai vu un thème ressortir: que le Comité avait déjà reçu beaucoup de commentaires sur les cyberattaques, les difficultés, les catégories et les défauts dans le domaine. Compte tenu de tout cela, je me suis dit que je miserais aujourd'hui sur les solutions en matière de cybersécurité. Il n'y a pas de solution miracle, mais c'est possible de déployer une forte capacité d'échelle, et beaucoup d'autres éléments peuvent être renforcés de manière à vraiment accroître ce que nous faisons et à stimuler le secteur financier et canadien.

J'aime penser que c'est une infrastructure essentielle. Vous voyez probablement les centrales électriques, les barrages et les systèmes classifiés comme de l'infrastructure essentielle, mais le secteur financier représente certainement de l'infrastructure essentielle. C'est un grand système interdépendant qui englobe beaucoup d'entités différentes, comme la Banque du Canada, Paiements Canada, Interac — qui ont comparu —, le receveur général, les commerçants, les petites et grandes entités commerciales et aussi les clients. Il y a beaucoup de points finaux. Il y a beaucoup de choses qui peuvent mal tourner. Ce sont aussi toutes les données qui sont en transit ou en mémoire. Si vous avez entendu parler d'un réseau, d'un aspect ou d'une solution ou y avez réfléchi, ce n'est pas toute l'histoire.

Un changement se produit dans la cybersécurité. On assiste maintenant à des attaques sociopolitiques et à la manipulation de marques, ainsi qu'à des attaques financières de petit et grand volumes. Étant donné tout ce qui est en jeu et la capacité des cybercriminels de cacher, de dissimuler et de lancer des attaques sans interruption, le Canada doit adopter une approche mise à jour à l'égard de la cyberdéfense dans le secteur financier. Les jours où l'on se cachait derrière des murs, des murs réels ou des pare-feu, sont derrière nous. Tout est très interrelié.

Il importe aussi de comprendre l'adversaire. Je crois qu'on vous a tous bien renseignés à ce sujet, mais les cybercriminels et les États nations possèdent d'énormes ensembles de ressources. Ce serait un très grand pays, sur le plan de son PIB, si tous les cybercriminels combinaient leur richesse. On ne peut souvent pas les atteindre physiquement vu leur lieu de provenance.

Je vais vous donner une statistique, un bref exemple, et je n'entrerai pas trop dans les détails: selon un rapport récent de Mandiant — Mandiant est le cyberarmement de FireEye, un de nos partenaires stratégiques —, la durée médiane mondiale durant laquelle un logiciel malveillant vit dans un réseau jusqu'à ce qu'il soit découvert et arrêté est de 101 jours. Pensez-y une seconde. C'est une durée incroyable pour quelque chose qui exfiltre et saisit des données avant qu'on le découvre. Il faut parfois attendre jusqu'à 2 000 jours avant qu'on le découvre. Bien que le problème cybernétique soit complexe, on peut s'y attaquer de façon simplifiée pour les utilisateurs, les commerçants, les entreprises et les organisations bancaires. C'est ce sur quoi je veux insister aujourd'hui, soit certains des moyens qui nous permettent d'y remédier.

Je vais me concentrer sur les thèmes de solutions cybernétiques qui peuvent permettre de lutter contre des attaques cybernétiques à grande échelle à l'endroit du secteur financier canadien. Le premier thème que j'aimerais parcourir est ce que j'appelle la « convergence des données cybernétiques et la capacité de protection ». Voyez cela comme des solutions de prochaine génération qui pourraient être déployées à l'échelle pour que tout le monde puisse les utiliser et en profiter. Le concept, c'est qu'une organisation pourrait en fait diriger cet effort et mettre cette capacité dans un lieu central pour que cela soit activé par toutes les entités dont je parlais. Tout ce à quoi nous avons réfléchi.

(1640)



Il y a de nouvelles technologies vraiment fantastiques. L'une d'entre elles associe des idées sur l'intelligence artificielle centralisée, l'apprentissage machine, l'analytique avancée, la recherche de menaces — si vous n'avez pas entendu parler de ces concepts, vous pouvez me poser des questions plus tard — et l'orchestration de la sécurité. Vous pouvez en fait créer des mesures de détection et d'intervention cybernétiques semi-automatiques. Il est possible de le faire de façon assez automatisée. Parfois, vous voulez qu'une personne soit en mesure de prendre des décisions sur des aspects essentiels et d'intervenir lorsque vous ressentez une cybermenace, particulièrement si vous fermez une partie d'un réseau.

Les immeubles et les réseaux intelligents peuvent aussi jouer un rôle. Ce n'est pas juste nouveau. Ce qui est nouveau est bon, mais lorsque vous introduisez toutes sortes de détecteurs de l'Internet des objets, vous présentez tout un tas de données, et celles-ci peuvent ensuite être compromises. Si vous avez la capacité d'ordonner l'ensemble des données physiques — des données opérationnelles, qu'on appelle parfois données de technologie opérationnelle, et des données de l'IdO —, nous pouvons trouver des solutions qui nous permettent de mieux détecter quand il y a un problème. Par exemple, en cas de problème environnemental ou d'attaque contre un immeuble ou un centre de données, vous voudriez probablement être mis au courant dans le monde cybernétique et être en mesure d'y réagir. Aujourd'hui, ce n'est pas bien fusionné, mais ça pourrait l'être.

Il y a l'idée d'aller de l'avant au chapitre de la défense cyberactive ou même des cyberattaques, et c'est lié à la législation et aux règles existantes. Lorsque vous savez que vous êtes sondé et attaqué, la capacité d'intervenir et de déterminer où se trouve l'attaque et de l'interrompre, ou du moins de vous protéger, est très importante.

La sécurité du service de noms de domaine, qui est au coeur d'Internet, est assortie de règles appelées DNSSEC et d'autres éléments. C'est très important, parce que si vous ne pouvez pas faire confiance à votre résolution d'adresse et à l'endroit où vous allez rechercher vos données, cela se révèle très important.

Les renseignements sur la cybermenace, que nous avons abordés plus tôt, sont vraiment intéressants, parce qu'on peut procéder de façon verticale. Vous pourriez ne disposer que de données et de renseignements bancaires canadiens, et vous verriez donc les tendances dans les attaques sur le marché canadien, et ce, avant qu'elles frappent la plupart de vos points finaux, puis vous seriez en mesure d'y réagir à l'avance. Vous pourriez prendre des décisions et faire des mises à jour avant que l'attaque ne soit généralisée. Il pourrait y avoir des attaques du jour zéro ou des attaques par des menaces sophistiquées et persistantes, mais la capacité de voir les attaques et d'y réagir avant qu'elles deviennent un problème est capitale.

(1645)

Le président:

Excusez-moi, monsieur Drennan. Le système archaïque que nous possédons ici empiète sur un exposé très impressionnant sur la cybersécurité. On me dit que nous avons... Est-ce que ce n'est pas 15 minutes?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

N'utilisez pas ParlVu.

Le président:

Au début, je croyais qu'il s'agissait d'une vérification du quorum, alors je n'ai rien dit, mais ensuite, le temps file... mais ce n'est pas le cas. Nous allons considérer qu'il s'agit d'une vérification du quorum.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous pourriez gagner 45 secondes si vous regardiez le site noscommunes.ca plutôt que ParlVu. Vous recevez donc le fil direct de cette façon.

Le président:

Je vois ce qu'il regarde.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous ne regardez pas la bonne chose. Allez-y plus rapidement.

Le greffier du comité (M. Naaman Sugrue):

Je vérifie les deux.

Le président:

Bon, nous venons de perdre 45 secondes. Je suis désolé.

Merci, monsieur Drennan, de votre patience et de votre compréhension. Allez-y.

M. Steve Drennan:

Merci.

Pour revenir à mon dernier point sur les capacités, vous pourriez mettre en oeuvre à l'échelle une initiative de gestion de la chaîne d'approvisionnement et du cycle de vie, pour rester dans le même thème. Le Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, le CST, exécutait dans le passé un programme appelé la « liste des produits évalués ».

Lorsque nous parlons de Huawei, les gens ont des préoccupations, et nous en discutons; il faut prendre en considération tout ce qui est utilisé: tous les logiciels qui sont programmés — qui sont souvent numérisés et sauvegardés dans le nuage — ainsi que le matériel et les puces. Où les puces sont-elles fabriquées? D'où viennent-elles? Il faudrait un programme intégral qui évalue l'équipement et les logiciels du berceau à la tombe pour que nous puissions être sûrs qu'ils sont sans risque, mais le gouvernement est la bonne organisation pour exécuter ce genre de programme.

Le second thème que j'aimerais aborder concerne les avantages que l'on peut tirer d'un nuage public sécurisé. Je crois que le témoin précédent représentait Amazon Web Services, alors je suis sûr qu'il vous en a parlé de long en large. Je vais dire, à mon tour, que c'est une bonne idée. La meilleure façon de réunir une foule de groupes différents est d'utiliser un nuage public canadien sécurisé. Je crois que c'est une solution que nous devons envisager plus sérieusement. Je sais qu'un certain nombre d'institutions bancaires songent également à utiliser cette technologie.

Lorsque vous avez des réseaux à l'intérieur d'une organisation, c'est un nuage privé ou un nuage hybride, à mesure que vous retirez du contenu du nuage public. Cependant, l'utilisation d'un nuage public sécurisé à grande échelle est capitale, car ce serait une façon géniale de réunir tout le monde et tous les consommateurs afin qu'ils puissent communiquer entre eux. Pourvu que vous preniez des mesures adéquates en matière de sécurité, de politiques et de filtres, tout le monde aura accès au même niveau de sécurité. Certains exploitants se sont dotés de véritables systèmes auxiliaires au Canada, alors s'il y a une panne du système — quelque chose d'inévitable —, la reprise après catastrophe se fait au Canada, ce qui est très important à l'égard de l'hébergement et de la propriété des données.

Dans ce contexte, la flexibilité informatique est capitale, car elle permet de réagir et de lancer de nouvelles applications.

Le président:

Il vous reste une minute.

M. Steve Drennan:

D'accord. Je vais me dépêcher. Comme troisième thème, je vais parler du besoin de veiller à ce que les données de nature délicate soient beaucoup plus fiables. À dire vrai, les banques et les institutions bancaires clés pourraient devenir une ressource unique et fiable en ce qui a trait aux données d'inscription, d'authentification et d'identification.

Le quatrième thème concerne la sensibilisation des utilisateurs. Une chose que nous ne devons pas oublier est que les utilisateurs sont toujours le maillon faible de la chaîne. On pourrait donner à certaines personnes des mandats spécifiques et offrir davantage de formation afin que les gens soient sensibilisés à ce sur quoi ils cliquent sur Internet et afin qu'ils sachent comment se comporter correctement et sainement.

En conclusion, il y a des solutions informatiques de prochaine génération que nous pouvons mettre en oeuvre à grande échelle afin de stabiliser et de renforcer le milieu financier, mais cela suppose d'injecter les fonds nécessaires et de motiver les gens.

(1650)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Drennan.

Chers collègues, il nous reste environ une demi-heure. Nous allons utiliser à peu près tout le temps qu'il nous reste si je vous laisse sept minutes chacun. Si vous acceptez d'avoir chacun six minutes, nous aurons le temps pour une question supplémentaire. Êtes-vous d'accord?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: Parfait, vous aurez six minutes chacun. La parole va à Mme Dabrusin. Allez-y.

Mme Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Merci.

Je voulais d'abord discuter de votre quatrième thème. Un témoin a donné une image qui m'est vraiment restée en tête depuis le début de nos séances. C'était à propos d'un système très sécuritaire qui communiquait de l'information entre deux boîtes en carton. Dans cette métaphore, les deux boîtes en carton représentent les gens qui utilisent le système. Vous n'avez pas eu le temps de terminer ce que vous aviez à dire à propos de la sensibilisation des utilisateurs, mais peut-être pourriez-vous le faire maintenant. Quelles mesures le gouvernement pourrait-il prendre, précisément, afin de s'améliorer de ce côté-là, afin de sensibiliser le public et de renforcer la cybersécurité, l'hygiène informatique ou peu importe comment vous voulez l'appeler.

M. Steve Drennan:

Parfait. Je suis content de pouvoir en parler davantage. Je crois qu'il n'y a pas beaucoup de normes. J'ai consulté les lignes directrices du Conseil du Trésor et les exigences relatives à la Gestion de la sécurité des technologies de l'information, et tout cela n'est pas très clair. On ne définit pas vraiment ce qu'il faut faire pour former les utilisateurs ou pour fournir une orientation suffisante en matière d'informatique. Tout ce qu'on fait est un peu passif. Nous avons des sites Web sur la cybersécurité que les gens peuvent consulter pour en apprendre davantage, mais que faisons-nous pour diffuser activement l'information? Peut-être faudrait-il davantage de campagnes. Peut-être devrait-on organiser des activités d'apprentissage par le jeu, des réunions mensuelles et des activités thématiques pour sensibiliser les gens. Je vais vous donner un exemple de harponnage. A-t-on déjà abordé le sujet ici?

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Je ne crois pas.

M. Steve Drennan:

Vous a-t-on parlé de hameçonnage?

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Oui.

M. Steve Drennan:

Le harponnage est une forme de hameçonnage plus ciblé. Disons que vous recevez tous un message qui semble provenir de l'honorable John McKay. En objet, il vous dit que c'est urgent et que vous devez cliquer dessus. Vous allez probablement vouloir cliquer dessus, puisque le message semble venir de John McKay.

Le président:

Ce n'est pas un bon exemple.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. Steve Drennan:

Eh bien, c'est tout de même un exemple. Si vous recevez un message qui semble venir d'une personne en position d'autorité et que le style d'écriture et les choses qui y sont mentionnées ressemblent à ce qui se trouve habituellement dans les messages que vous échangez, alors vous êtes plus susceptible de cliquer dessus. Vous ressentez la pression. Même si vous remarquez des problèmes avec la mise en page ou des fautes d'orthographe, vous allez tout de même cliquer dessus. J'imagine qu'il vous arrive souvent de sortir vos appareils et de faire défiler vos messages très rapidement.

Une façon de lutter contre le harponnage serait d'offrir une courte formation et de sensibiliser les gens, mais ce n'est pas quelque chose qu'on peut faire seulement une fois. Il faut des interventions répétées. Une façon de procéder serait d'organiser une campagne anonyme pendant laquelle on analyserait du harponnage. Vous pourriez envoyer à tous les membres d'une organisation ce genre de courriel. Vous êtes des gens éthiques, alors cela ne pose pas de problème. Il y a un lien dans le courriel, et si le destinataire clique dessus, cela ne fera qu'enregistrer anonymement que quelqu'un a cliqué sur le lien. Au bout du compte, vous avez une statistique sur le nombre de personnes qui ont cliqué sur le lien. Les résultats ne seront pas reluisants la première fois, mais après, vous pouvez informer les gens que vous avez « organisé une campagne de harponnage. Venez nous voir demain pendant l'heure du dîner et nous vous expliquerons pourquoi vous n'auriez pas dû cliquer sur le lien », parce que beaucoup de personnes l'ont fait. Puis, lorsque vous recommencez — parce que vous allez devoir organiser ce genre de campagne deux ou trois fois afin de sensibiliser les gens —, les utilisateurs vont être beaucoup plus prudents. Vous n'allez jamais atteindre un taux de réussite de 100 %, mais c'est toujours une bonne chose de faire baisser le nombre de personnes prêtes à cliquer sur un tel lien.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Intéressant. Ce serait une initiative que les organisations pourraient mettre en oeuvre. Mais ce que j'aimerais savoir — parce que nous allons devoir formuler des recommandations — c'est ce que nous pouvons faire pour renforcer notre rôle dans tout cela.

J'ai pris en note qu'un témoin a parlé du problème des mots de passe. Il y a déjà des exigences lorsque vous choisissez un mot de passe: il y a un nombre minimal de caractères, de lettres majuscules et de chiffres, etc., qu'il faut entrer. Cependant, il n'est pas interdit d'utiliser le même mot de passe plus d'une fois. Il semble qu'une grande faiblesse des mots de passe tient au fait que les gens utilisent le même encore et encore. C'est très commun. Peut-être pourrait-on afficher un petit message rappelant aux gens qu'il ne faut pas utiliser le même mot de passe. Ce serait simple, parce que même si un mot de passe satisfait à toutes les autres exigences, il ne serait pas sécuritaire. Dans l'industrie de la finance, les gens s'inscrivent aux services bancaires en ligne et à toutes sortes d'autres choses du même genre, alors peut-être que l'on pourrait proposer ce genre de pratiques comme normes.

M. Steve Drennan:

Oui. Vous touchez à deux questions. Il y a d'un côté la sensibilisation à la cybersécurité, et, de l'autre, les mots de passe. Je vais parler des deux.

En ce qui concerne les mots de passe, il devrait effectivement y avoir davantage de normes. Ce serait facile d'établir cela dans les politiques, et vous devriez le faire. Cela pourrait même être visé par une loi. Ce serait plus clair. Si je reviens à la norme de GSTI ou aux exigences connexes, les lignes directrices pour le choix d'un mot de passe ne sont pas toujours claires. Il faudrait une approche plus normative.

Bien sûr, ce que vous dites est un exemple parmi d'autres. Vous voulez probablement éviter les mots de passe répandus que les gens choisissent souvent. Vous devez faire en sorte que les gens savent qu'il ne faut pas choisir des dates qui ont une signification personnelle qu'une personne mal intentionnée connaît déjà.

Il y aurait des façons d'inscrire ce genre d'exigences dans la loi et de les appliquer. Un excellent exemple...

(1655)

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Puis-je vous interrompre rapidement? Je n'ai plus beaucoup de temps.

M. Steve Drennan:

Oui.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Y a-t-il des pays qui ont pris ce genre de mesures? Pouvez-vous nous donner des exemples que nous pourrions examiner?

M. Steve Drennan:

Pas à ma connaissance, mais l'Allemagne et l'Europe ont adopté beaucoup de dispositions législatives sur le sujet. Peut-être devriez-vous consulter le règlement général sur la protection des données et d'autres normes connexes, mais je ne suis pas sûr à 100 %.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Vous pouvez continuer. Je voulais seulement poser la question.

M. Steve Drennan:

Je voulais dire également qu'il y a trop de mots de passe, trop de mots de passe différents. Vous ici présents, à combien de systèmes devez-vous vous connecter juste pour le travail?

Une solution serait d'harmoniser les mots de passe, mais d'adopter l'authentification à deux étapes ou l'authentification biométrique. Cela donnerait des mots de passe très forts et harmonisés. Ce serait beaucoup plus efficace, en vérité. Si en plus vous mettez en oeuvre la capacité de contrôler les utilisateurs afin de cerner des comportements problématiques sur le réseau, cela donnerait un modèle beaucoup plus solide que de demander à tout le monde de se rappeler 15 mots de passe qu'ils vont réutiliser constamment.

Le président:

Merci, madame Dabrusin.

Monsieur Motz, vous avez six minutes. Allez-y.

M. Glen Motz:

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci, monsieur Drennan d'être ici.

Comme vous l'avez déjà dit, votre groupe travaille auprès du gouvernement, de l'industrie et des organismes d'application de la loi sur des questions de sécurité, y compris la sécurité nationale. L'année dernière, un expert s'est exprimé dans le cadre de notre étude sur la sécurité et avait dit qu'il n'avait aucune confiance dans l'état de préparation du Canada à l'égard des menaces technologiques émergentes comme l'intelligence artificielle ou l'informatique quantique.

Vous avez travaillé avec le Canada, et d'après votre expérience, comment évalueriez-vous l'état de préparation de notre pays dans ce contexte?

M. Steve Drennan:

Nous ne sommes pas aussi prêts que nous devrions l'être, mais nous avons au moins commencé. Je dirais, malheureusement, que cela varie beaucoup en fonction du groupe concerné. Par exemple, le Centre canadien pour la cybersécurité met l'accent sur l'analyse et la communication des indicateurs de compromission et d'autres choses du genre, alors qu'il pourrait jouer un rôle beaucoup plus important — et ce sera sans doute le cas dans l'avenir — dans la façon dont ses capacités peuvent être utilisées.

Il y a d'autres organisations dont les capacités varient en fonction des technologies qu'elles utilisent. Par exemple, certaines utilisent le pare-feu de Fortinet, alors que d'autres utilisent celui de Check Point ou de Cisco. Le niveau d'efficacité varie selon les pare-feu; certains appartiennent à la prochaine génération, tandis que d'autres, non.

Malheureusement, les interventions que nous pourrions effectuer visent toutes sortes de choses différentes. Vous avez parlé de l'intelligence artificielle, de l'apprentissage machine et de l'informatique quantique. À mesure que les attaques deviennent plus perfectionnées, nous aurons besoin de mesures de protection plus perfectionnées à grande échelle, et c'est justement pourquoi j'ai proposé l'utilisation d'un nuage public. Si le secteur financier était géré à partir d'un espace commun, les capacités avancées seraient à la portée de tous ceux qui sont connectés à la source. Ce serait une façon de faire en sorte que tout le monde soit sur le même pied.

M. Glen Motz:

On dit qu'il manque énormément de spécialistes en cybersécurité au Canada, et dans le reste du monde aussi, j'imagine. Que fait votre groupe afin de former un bassin de personnes compétentes? De quelle façon et à quels égards investissez-vous pour que les gens et certains groupes cibles puissent acquérir des compétences dans ce domaine émergent?

M. Steve Drennan:

Ce dont vous parlez est effectivement au centre des priorités du Groupe ADGA.

Nous sommes très fiers du fait que le Groupe ADGA est dirigé par une directrice générale, tout comme nous sommes fiers de notre histoire au Canada et de notre diversité. Nous avons investi massivement dans des programmes d'alternance travail-études pour encourager les gens ayant des compétences émergentes à s'intéresser à la cybersécurité. Il y a d'autres domaines également, mais il est question de cybersécurité aujourd'hui.

Nous jouons de nombreux rôles... Nous pouvons faire du recrutement dans les établissements d'enseignement universitaires et collégiaux, et nous pouvons aider les étudiants qui sont inscrits à des programmes pertinents. Par exemple, le Collège algonquin offre un excellent programme sur la cybersécurité. Les universités sont également en train d'élaborer certaines choses relatives à la cybersécurité, et tout cela se passe ici à Ottawa. Nous jouons donc un rôle actif et nous travaillons aussi avec d'autres collèges.

Il est important de recruter intentionnellement des personnes ayant divers talents et compétences et d'avoir beaucoup de diversité parmi les personnes dans le groupe. Nous allons faire en sorte qu'il y ait constamment un bassin de personnes compétentes au Canada. C'est notre responsabilité à tous de veiller à ce que les gens soient motivés et enthousiastes par rapport au domaine. S'il y a énormément de travail en informatique cette année, mais aucun l'année suivante, les personnes compétentes vont aller voir ailleurs.

(1700)

M. Glen Motz:

La semaine dernière — je crois —, un représentant de l'Université Ryerson est venu témoigner. Il a été question d'un programme universitaire, mais il se pourrait que ce qu'on veut mettre en place soit lacunaire à certains égards. Je voulais savoir si les établissements d'enseignement consultaient votre groupe ou des groupes comme le vôtre dans l'industrie afin de recevoir de l'aide pour l'élaboration des programmes servant à former des diplômés qui ont les compétences nécessaires pour travailler dans votre entreprise.

M. Steve Drennan:

Oui, c'est effectivement quelque chose que nous faisons. J'ai déjà aidé à formuler une rétroaction concernant le programme du Collège algonquin. Nous avons aussi eu des discussions avec le Collège Willis. Il a un programme de cybersécurité, et j'ai fourni une rétroaction sur son contenu, sur ce qui manque et sur les autorisations de sécurité du gouvernement du Canada qui seront nécessaires pour les étudiants pendant leurs études et qui leur permettront de trouver de bonnes carrières et de rester au Canada. Nous collaborons avec les universités et proposons une orientation pour leurs programmes, par exemple les programmes dispensés à l'ensemble des étudiants en génie. Nous discutons régulièrement avec ces groupes et nous travaillons directement avec eux. Donc, oui, nous pouvons travailler avec les facultés universitaires pour fixer les objectifs.

M. Glen Motz:

Pouvez-vous nous expliquer la différence, s'il y en a une, entre la cybersécurité en matière de défense et la cybersécurité dans le secteur des technologies de l'information? Y a-t-il bien une différence?

M. Steve Drennan:

Quelques différences clés me viennent à l'esprit. On pourrait comparer l'un des deux à un barrage sur le point d'éclater. La cybersécurité en matière de défense comprend une succession d'étapes: d'abord, ce qu'on appelle la « défense », puis la « défense active », et enfin la « cyberattaque ». À ce chapitre, les lois habilitantes sont d'une importance capitale. De nos jours, l'informatique est considérée comme un tout nouveau théâtre d'opérations à part entière, au même titre que les théâtres d'opérations de la Marine ou de la Force aérienne. Voilà pourquoi il faut absolument adopter des dispositions législatives qui donneront à la Défense nationale une plus grande marge de manoeuvre dans le cyberespace. Lorsque les troupes sont déployées dans les théâtres d'opérations, l'informatique peut faire la différence entre la victoire et la défaite. C'est une différence entre les deux. Il y a aussi un peu plus de restrictions imposées à la cybersécurité en matière de défense. Il y a une foule de réseaux classifiés et toutes sortes d'autres questions qu'il faut régler, notamment le financement et les vastes modifications qui sont présentement à l'étude.

Il n'y a pas autant de règles dans le secteur privé. Nous avons parlé plus tôt des renseignements sur les cybermenaces. Nous savons que les grands fournisseurs peuvent recueillir des données du monde entier grâce à leurs noeuds dans divers pays. Il y a moins de restrictions imposées à leurs activités de cette façon. À dire vrai, c'est une très bonne chose, parce que les fournisseurs peuvent ensuite communiquer les données au gouvernement et à l'industrie.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Motz.

Monsieur Dubé, vous avez six minutes. Allez-y.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci beaucoup d'être parmi nous.

J'aimerais revenir sur la question de la main-d'oeuvre que mon collègue a abordée. Je veux l'étudier d'un angle différent. Pouvez-vous me dire si ce qui paralyse l'industrie, c'est le fait que les autorisations de sécurité sont accordées en fonction de l'origine des personnes et d'autres choses du genre? Vous connaissez le processus d'approvisionnement pour les services informatiques, mais pour ce qui est du processus traditionnel d'approvisionnement — je ne sais pas si j'utilise le bon terme —, par exemple lorsqu'il s'agit de construire des avions de combat à réaction, des hélicoptères, du matériel militaire, etc., il y a déjà eu des problèmes parce que des entreprises étaient disqualifiées ou n'obtenaient pas des contrats en fonction de nos alliés ou de notre position dans un contexte particulier. Il y a des entreprises avec des gens très compétents qui auraient peut-être pu fournir du matériel idéal pour les Forces armées canadiennes, disons, mais on les refuse parce que les États-Unis ont des réserves par rapport à un pays ou quelque chose du genre. Ce genre de choses arrive-t-il également dans le secteur informatique, et si oui, quelles mesures pouvons-nous prendre en conséquence?

M. Steve Drennan:

Oui, nous avons observé la même chose. Les clients privés sont beaucoup plus souples. Pourvu que votre entreprise ait une bonne réputation et embauche des personnes qui ont les bonnes compétences, le contrat pour la fourniture de services informatiques est à vous. En ce qui nous concerne, nos activités touchent beaucoup l'évaluation de la sécurité, la conception de systèmes de sécurité et la sécurité infonuagique. Au Canada, le secteur privé est très vaste, et il exprime bien plus clairement ce que vous pouvez faire.

Une difficulté tient au grand nombre de contrôles de sécurité qu'il faut subir. De mon côté, cela a été plutôt simple, mais pour d'autres, par exemple les gens qui ne résident pas au Canada depuis assez longtemps, il est impossible d'obtenir une autorisation de sécurité. En général, la plupart des contrats exigent une autorisation de sécurité « secret ». Pour certains, il faut une autorisation de sécurité « très secret », mais c'est plutôt rare qu'on demande une simple cote de fiabilité. Je crois que pour réussir un contrôle de sécurité, vous avez besoin de 5 à 10 années de résidence au Canada, et souvent de la citoyenneté canadienne. Ce serait peut-être une bonne idée d'élaborer des contrôles de sécurité supplémentaires pour que les gens puissent obtenir l'autorisation de sécurité « secret » et d'envisager d'uniformiser le processus. Je ne vois vraiment pas pourquoi chaque ministère doit avoir son propre processus de contrôle de sécurité et ses propres règles. Si vous êtes digne de confiance, vous devriez l'être partout. C'est la même chose pour une entreprise.

Il y a probablement des modifications que l'on pourrait apporter au fil du temps. Il faudrait probablement envisager d'autres façons d'accorder une autorisation de sécurité aux gens. Il y a un certain exode des cerveaux au Canada, alors nous devrions chercher à recruter des gens talentueux à l'étranger. Nous devons faire en sorte que les gens qui viennent au Canada puissent travailler à des projets importants, tout en assurant au gouvernement et aux institutions bancaires que ces personnes ont réussi les contrôles de sécurité appropriés et qu'il n'y a pas de problème avec leurs antécédents.

(1705)

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je comprends. Toujours dans le même ordre d'idées, cela poserait-il un problème particulier dans le secteur informatique? Disons que vous êtes une entreprise qui construit des hélicoptères, vous vendez vos hélicoptères non pas au ministère des Finances, mais au ministère de la Défense nationale. Cependant, si vous êtes une entreprise de cybersécurité, le ministère des Finances a besoin de vos services tout autant que la Défense nationale. On peut refuser rapidement d'accorder une autorisation de sécurité à certaines personnes dans le cadre du processus traditionnel d'approvisionnement en matière de défense à cause de nos alliances militaires traditionnelles. Donc, cela peut-il poser un problème?... Va t-il y avoir un problème si vous fournissez des services de cybersécurité au ministère des Finances et que votre entreprise embauche des spécialistes qui ne réussiraient peut-être pas le contrôle de sécurité de la Défense nationale? Voyez-vous ce que je veux dire?

Vous avez dit qu'il y avait différents processus de contrôle de sécurité. Est-ce que le Canada s'empêche, donc, de protéger correctement le ministère des Finances parce que nous avons choisi d'appliquer les mêmes règles que pour le ministère de la Défense nationale, à des fins d'harmonisation, même si les alliances qui entrent en ligne de compte ne sont pas les mêmes... Je veux dire, les Américains n'ont pas à nous dire comment nous devons protéger le ministère des Finances, alors que nous sommes alliés en ce qui concerne la défense.

M. Steve Drennan:

Je ne crois pas que le manque d'uniformité soit un problème. Le véritable problème, c'est le temps. De nos jours, on peut perdre un an ou deux à attendre que les personnes clés puissent participer aux projets. Vous avez parfois besoin de connaissances informatiques précises, alors vous prenez un groupe de personnes... Je crois qu'il a déjà été question d'un processus accéléré; un témoin a déjà parlé de la possibilité de démarrer rapidement des carrières en cybersécurité et d'offrir aux gens des postes de débutant, entre autres choses. Si vous pouvez obtenir une autorisation de sécurité pour un groupe clé en choisissant des employés dignes de confiance provenant d'entreprises... parce que parfois, vous avez besoin d'experts en la matière venant des États-Unis, par exemple. Cela veut dire qu'il est essentiel que les autorisations de sécurité soient similaires et que le processus de contrôle soit rapide. Parfois, le problème est que nous perdons énormément de temps avec tous les différents contrôles de sécurité, et cela a des conséquences directes sur la défense nationale et sur d'autres groupes qui doivent attendre un an ou deux avant que leurs équipes puissent vraiment commencer leur travail. Le ministère des Finances n'a pas nécessairement besoin d'effectuer autant de contrôles de sécurité que le ministère de la Défense nationale, qui lui exige de remplir une demande de permis de visite pour chacune de ses installations, ce qui n'est pas le cas des autres organisations. Il faut cependant que les mêmes normes s'appliquent à tout le monde. Si les données dont il est question sont de nature très délicate, il faudrait tout de même que le processus de contrôle de sécurité soit le même pour tout le monde.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Il me reste 20 secondes, et j'aimerais savoir si, selon vous, le Canada s'impose des restrictions excessives en se tournant uniquement vers nos alliés additionnels. Il y a des pays similaires au Canada qui ont peut-être les spécialistes dont nous avons besoin, mais parce qu'ils ne font pas partie du paradigme traditionnel, nous ratons une occasion d'en tirer parti.

M. Steve Drennan:

Oui et non. Je crois qu'il y a beaucoup de spécialistes qui ont des autorisations de sécurité comparables dans le Groupe des cinq, mais, effectivement, nous devrions également prendre d'autres pays en considération. Nous devons penser à un processus de contrôle de sécurité rapide pour les autres pays afin de savoir que nous pouvons avoir confiance en ces gens et en leur information. Nous devons trouver une façon d'accélérer les choses.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Dubé. J'ai trouvé votre analyse très intéressante. Notre analyste m'a dit à l'oreille: « Un problème majeur est justement de réussir les contrôles de sécurité. »

Monsieur Picard, vous avez six minutes.

M. Michel Picard:

C'est bon de vous revoir. Vous fournissez des services aux institutions financières, n'est-ce pas?

M. Steve Drennan:

Oui.

M. Michel Picard:

Pouvez-vous répéter votre commentaire à propos du fait que les institutions financières pourraient agir à titre d'entreprise de confiance pour conserver les renseignements critiques? Pouvez-vous préciser?

(1710)

M. Steve Drennan:

C'était l'un de mes points clés. Je n'ai pas eu le temps d'entrer dans le détail, alors je vous remercie de m'en donner l'occasion.

Quand nous allons à la banque, disons à la Banque du Canada, nous sommes tous sûrs qu'il s'agit d'une institution qui mérite la confiance, comme le ministère des Finances. On pourrait donc tirer parti de cela. Il a été question des mots de passe; quand vous entrez vos renseignements d'identification en ligne, vous devez avoir confiance dans le processus. Je crois qu'il faudrait tirer parti davantage de cet espace, de ces personnes et de ces organisations. Il serait possible de renforcer les mesures de sécurité relatives aux renseignements d'identification en ligne afin que ces organismes puissent jouer un rôle plus grand. L'uniformité pourrait être renforcée également. C'est une proposition clé: nous pouvons renforcer et uniformiser le processus d'identification afin de pouvoir l'utiliser à des fins de cybersécurité précises.

M. Michel Picard:

Je ne sais pas si les gens seraient à l'aise de savoir qu'une banque conserve leurs renseignements de nature très délicate, au lieu que la banque ait simplement accès à une tierce partie qui, elle, serait responsable de conserver ces renseignements. Le client est en position de vulnérabilité, parce que même si la banque protège correctement ses renseignements, son objectif est non pas de protéger les renseignements, mais de faire de l'argent. Dans cette optique, le client n'est pas sur le même pied que la banque.

M. Steve Drennan:

Principalement, l'institution financière jouerait le rôle d'une « autorité d'enregistrement ». La banque ne conserve pas nécessairement les données.

Je crois qu'on vous a déjà parlé de la tokenisation. Les données ne seront pas nécessairement conservées par la banque; plutôt, la banque agira comme instrument d'habilitation. Elle dira: « Vous êtes bien qui vous dites être. Nous le savons. Vous êtes venu à la banque. Nous vous faisons confiance, et vous avez confiance en nous. Nous avons vérifié vos données d'enregistrement. » Son rôle serait de soutenir le processus d'établissement de l'identité en ligne, et non de conserver les données.

M. Michel Picard:

Plus tôt, vous avez approuvé très vivement les commentaires d'Amazon Web Services à propos d'une structure centralisée, un système du type iCloud, où tout serait au même endroit.

J'ai deux questions: premièrement, êtes-vous en faveur d'un système bancaire ouvert où toutes les données seraient conservées au même endroit?

Deuxièmement, j'ai l'impression que nous faisons tellement confiance à la sécurité des systèmes centralisés que nous ne pensons même pas à évoquer la possibilité d'un délit interne ou d'une erreur humaine. C'est comme si ce genre de choses n'existait plus.

M. Steve Drennan:

Oui, je suis en faveur de l'utilisation d'un nuage public sécurisé. Non seulement cela nous donnerait énormément d'espace pour stocker les données, mais nous aurions aussi la possibilité de détecter correctement les attaques lorsqu'elles se produisent et de protéger les données très efficacement.

À propos de la protection des données, il y a énormément de mécanismes que l'on pourrait utiliser. Par exemple, il y a de bons produits en infonuagique qui vous permettent, à l'échelle locale, de crypter les données lorsque c'est nécessaire. Même en cas de menace interne et d'atteinte à la sécurité, les données volées seraient cryptées. Donc, les données sont protégées, parce que vous avez pris des mesures adéquates lorsque vous les avez stockées.

Trop souvent, les systèmes de sécurité ne sont pas conçus adéquatement, et les données ne sont pas protégées correctement lorsqu'il y a une atteinte à la sécurité. Nous ne sommes pas en mesure de détecter les menaces assez rapidement, et nous ne savons pas comment réagir. Pour répondre à votre question, s'il y a une menace interne, mais que nous nous sommes préparés en conséquence, les données seront protégées, nous pourrons détecter la menace rapidement et réagir.

Un exemple bien connu que je peux donner est le cas de M. Snowden. Il avait un accès très grand au système, et il a été en mesure d'accroître davantage son accès au système. Ce n'est pas le genre de modèle que vous voulez dans ce genre de contexte. Il y a de meilleurs modèles qui pourraient être mis en oeuvre.

M. Michel Picard:

Je cède le reste de mon temps à M. Graham.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Monsieur Drennan, pendant les trois minutes où M. Picard a posé des questions, je me suis connecté à un serveur et, grâce à un simple protocole SMTP, je me suis envoyé un courriel de la part de dieu@paradis.org. Cela me rappelle beaucoup ce dont nous avons discuté à propos du harponnage. Je me demande pourquoi nous utilisons encore des protocoles qui peuvent être aussi facilement piratés.

Le protocole SMTP ne demande absolument aucune authentification. Je peux utiliser n'importe quelle adresse courriel usurpée. Le protocole SSL du SMTP n'est pas universel; il n'empêche pas ce genre d'usurpation de courriel. Serait-il souhaitable, donc, d'imposer une norme PGP pour la signature des courriels? Y a-t-il des mesures que l'on pourrait prendre relativement au traitement cryptographique des signatures? Est-ce une approche que l'on devrait examiner?

Même si cela existe depuis 25 ans, pour une raison ou pour une autre, nous n'y avons pas adhéré massivement.

M. Steve Drennan:

D'après mon expérience, c'est probablement parce que le système d'infrastructure à clés publiques est parfois trop complexe pour ce qui est de la délivrance des certificats. Nous ne pouvons pas être sûrs que les certificats délivrés sont corrects ou exclusifs.

La norme S/MIME a déjà été excellente, mais aujourd'hui, il y a de meilleures façons qui peuvent être mises en place pour vérifier les renseignements d'identification et pour délivrer des certificats numériques ou pour vérifier que l'expéditeur du message est bien qui il prétend être ou pour être sûr que le message n'a pas été modifié.

Ces technologies existent bel et bien. Ce serait une bonne idée d'en choisir une comme norme. Je ne sais pas si nous avons besoin de tous les éléments de l'infrastructure à clés publiques. Nous devons bien réfléchir au modèle de certificat numérique que nous voulons utiliser, parce qu'il y a énormément d'acteurs qui font partie du secteur financier.

(1715)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quel système d'authentification recommanderiez-vous? Les systèmes de messagerie électronique sont probablement les plus vulnérables, compte tenu du hameçonnage et de tout le reste. Que devrions-nous utiliser?

Vous-même, qu'utilisez-vous?

M. Steve Drennan:

À dire vrai, nous utilisons de moins en moins les courriels, pour des raisons de productivité. Les courriels ne sont plus nécessairement utilisés pour les bonnes raisons. Il y a d'autres outils, comme Slack, qui sont plus efficaces pour mener des discussions.

Plus tôt, nous avons parlé de la sensibilisation des utilisateurs. Les gens doivent savoir comment utiliser les courriels et sur quoi cliquer. Simplement parce que tout est crypté, cela ne veut pas dire qu'une personne mal intentionnée ne peut pas vous envoyer un courriel crypté, alors on retourne à la case départ.

Il y a d'autres possibilités. Une option serait de créer un portail unique duquel on pourrait télécharger des courriels sécurisés. Le cryptage qui limite la durée de vie: lorsque vous envoyez un message crypté, le message disparaît au bout d'un certain temps s'il n'est pas ouvert.

Il y a des options intéressantes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comme une signature numérique utilisant une clé.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Il nous reste quatre minutes. Y a-t-il des questions de la part du Parti conservateur?

Monsieur Eglinski, prenez-vous les quatre minutes?

M. Jim Eglinski:

Vous parliez de sécurité avec M. Dubé. Votre entreprise travaille avec de nombreux organismes gouvernementaux, et j'aimerais savoir quelle autorisation de sécurité est exigée pour vos employés? Doivent-ils avoir une autorisation de sécurité secret » ou « très secret »?

M. Steve Drennan:

Les membres de notre équipe de cybersécurité ont dû obtenir énormément d'autorisations de sécurité. Nous pouvons détenir et traiter des renseignements classés très secret. Nous travaillons dans des environnements classifiés. Nous avons tous une autorisation de sécurité très secret ainsi que les autorisations de sécurité supplémentaires dont nous venons de parler. C'est nécessaire, si nous voulons décrocher les contrats dont nous avons parlé plus tôt. Nous savons que c'est obligatoire. Cela a aussi une incidence sur les personnes que nous pouvons embaucher, car même si nous cherchons à avoir le maximum de diversité au sein de notre personnel, cela entraîne parfois des difficultés. Une chose est certaine, cependant, c'est que nous avons tous une autorisation de sécurité très secret. Il y a également...

M. Jim Eglinski:

Vous ne semblez pas être tout à fait d'accord. Je crois qu'il y a beaucoup de... J'ai déjà mené des enquêtes classées très secret pour des contrôles de sécurité, et il y a énormément de choses à vérifier. Croyez-vous que nous devrions abaisser notre niveau d'exigence ou nos normes?

M. Steve Drennan:

Non, mais il faudrait que ce soit plus uniforme.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Plus uniforme?

M. Steve Drennan:

Il faudrait que tous les ministères fédéraux utilisent le même processus de contrôle de sécurité. Si une entité ou une personne est autorisée à accéder à une certaine classe d'information, jusqu'à une certaine limite, l'autorisation devrait être valide à grande échelle. Ce n'est pas nécessaire d'avoir des autorisations de sécurité différentes pour chaque organisme au Canada.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Je crois qu'il n'y a aucune norme qui impose des critères nationaux à respecter pour pouvoir accéder à une certaine classe d'information.

M. Steve Drennan:

Vous avez raison.

M. Jim Eglinski:

D'accord.

Rapidement, j'ai une dernière question. Il doit me rester environ deux minutes, n'est-ce pas?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Vous avez brièvement parlé d'intelligence artificielle. Je me suis penché sur le sujet pendant les études de deux ou trois autres comités. Croyez-vous que l'intelligence artificielle, à un moment donné, arrivera à obtenir de meilleurs résultats en matière de cybersécurité que nous en sommes capables présentement?

M. Steve Drennan:

Je crois que ce qui est intéressant avec l'intelligence artificielle — si nous avons la chance, les choses ne finiront pas comme dans les films, les navets que nous connaissons —, c'est qu'elle peut fournir du soutien aux spécialistes. C'est de cette façon qu'elle est utilisée présentement. Disons que vous avez un centre des opérations de sécurité, et que vous avez énormément de difficulté à recruter et à former des spécialistes, puis à les maintenir en poste. Même si vous en avez très peu, le travail peut être beaucoup plus facile si on réduit les ensembles de données à traiter et qu'on prend des décisions à l'avance. Il suffit donc d'entrer ce genre de données, et ce sera beaucoup plus facile pour vous ensuite de prendre des décisions clés. L'intelligence artificielle doit être considérée comme un assistant numérique qui est là pour vous aider à traiter les téraoctets de données et ainsi de rendre votre travail plus facile et plus ciblé. Je crois que c'est la meilleure façon de voir l'apprentissage machine en informatique.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Vous ne pouvez quand même pas trop lui en donner.

M. Steve Drennan:

Vous pouvez tout lui donner; évitez simplement de lui laisser toutes les décisions.

Le président:

Au nom du Comité, je veux remercier M. Drennan. Nous avons eu une séance tout à fait fascinante. Nous avons aussi discuté de choses que M. Graham est probablement le seul à avoir compris.

M. Steve Drennan:

Merci.

Le président:

Merci encore.

Chers collègues, les travaux du Sous-comité débuteront dans deux minutes.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on April 10, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.