header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-04-09 PROC 148

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1100)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. Welcome to the 148th meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

I want to welcome the Conservative whip, Mr. Strahl, and Don Rusnak and Karine Trudel from the NDP, to the most exciting committee on the Hill. I'm sure you'll all enjoy yourselves.

I want to let the committee members know that you'll soon be getting two pieces of information that I've asked for some more research on. One is the number of members who normally attend the dual chambers in Australia and Great Britain, and the second is on when the exact legislation was passed that gave the authority for the parliamentary precinct to Public Works, related to things we've been discussing.

Pursuant to Standing Order 108(3)(a)(iii), we are pleased to be joined by Charles Robert, Clerk of the House of Commons, to brief us on progress on the initiative to modernize the Standing Orders. As you remember, on February 27, 2018, he mentioned that this process was starting. These aren't substantive changes, but an effort at reorganization so that the Standing Orders are clear. It's hard for people to find things. It's that kind of work. You got some documents yesterday from the committee clerk.

The bells will sound shortly, so hopefully we can get through his opening statement soon.

Maybe I should just mention while we're still here what I propose for the meetings when we come back after April. The estimates have to be tabled this week. There are three panels of estimates that we would normally have. On the first panel would be the Clerk, the Speaker and PPS for the House of Commons estimates and the PPS estimates. On the second panel would be the Chief Electoral Officer for the elections estimates, and on the third would be the minister and/or the commissioner of debates for the debates estimates.

Does anyone have any problem with that schedule of having those panels for the estimates?

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

I would like a little more specificity than “the minister and/or the commissioner of debates”—

The Chair:

That's up to the committee. Do you want the—

Mr. Scott Reid:

Can we get back to you on what we would prefer?

The Chair:

Yes. You can get back to me.

Mr. Scott Reid:

This shouldn't be a scheduling issue, unless one of the others has a scheduling issue of their own, but as to the actual breakdown, perhaps we can get back to you on what would be preferable from our perspective—

The Chair:

On that third one, everyone can get back to me as to who you would like for the witnesses.

Hopefully we can get your opening statement in before the bells.

Maybe I can ask for the permission of committee members. Is it okay for a few minutes after the bells have started—because it's just upstairs—to get his opening statement finished? Is that okay?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: That's great. Thank you.

Mr. Mark Strahl (Chilliwack—Hope, CPC):

We'll stay for the statement.

The Chair:

Okay. Thank you.

Mr. Clerk, you're on. Thank you very much for being here again.

Mr. Charles Robert (Clerk of the House of Commons):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

When I became the Clerk in 2017, one of my goals was to unify the administration as one entity serving the members. In terms of procedural services, one way to proactively support the needs of the members was to review the Standing Orders. From my reading, I found them overly complex and not really accessible to members and their staff.

As a consequence, I launched an internally driven project to improve the style and organization of the rules and to enhance their accessibility.

Specifically, my aim was to rewrite the Standing Orders in plain language, using consistent terminology and eliminating internal references, and to reorganize the Standing Orders to improve the navigation of the document by adding a comprehensive table of contents with matching marginal notes, and I proposed a new numbering scheme that acts as a memory device and organizes related procedures in discrete chapters. Finally, I wanted to do this without making any substantive changes to the rules. This was my commitment to you at this committee at my first appearance.

The project has involved two phases of activity.

Phase one was to rewrite and reorganize the Standing Orders with a view to improving the logical flow of the rules, disaggregating complex and lengthy rules into subsections to provide a step-by-step understanding of the procedure and, where possible, combining certain procedures to improve the conciseness of the document.

Phase two was to work with the legislative services to ensure that there are no discrepancies between the English and the French text. To do this, we have involved jurilinguists on the project; these are specialists who work in the Law Clerk's office. This will also improve the level of French in the Standing Orders.

(1105)

[Translation]

I know that you have all received a bundle of documents to prepare for the meeting. Three documents are part of it. There is a general information note describing the genesis of the project, the principles applied in the review and the approach adopted to improve the style and organization of the Standing Orders. There is a proposed table of contents and the first seven corresponding chapters, which provide a basis for the work done in the House. There is an appendix that draws members' attention to inconsistencies between rules, divergence between rules and outdated usages or rules.[English]

Where possible, we have suggested changes to improve the internal consistency of the rules and to improve the alignment of the rules with our practices.

There has been no attempt to introduce new concepts or to recommend substantive changes to the interpretation of any rule.

Let me take some time to walk you through some specific proposals that are designed to improve the accessibility of the document.

Let's begin with the table of contents. As compared with the existing version, the proposal of a comprehensive table of contents using marginal notes or subheadings will improve the ease of navigation of the document.

Another thing users will note is the writing style, using plain language and the active voice. We also placed a premium on concision, which improves the clarity of the text and the ease of comprehension.

The removal of internal references is a major improvement in understanding the operation of the rules. For expert proceduralists, this may not seem to be an obstacle, but for new members and new staff who possess limited procedural knowledge, internal references represent a barrier to understanding the rules and how they work together.

In this same vein, we have added notes and exceptions under rules to explain linkages to other rules, exceptions to the application of rules, and references to statutory and constitutional authorities.

By using consistent terminology, we hope to eliminate the use of redundant text where the application of a term is different.

These are examples of how we propose to improve the writing style of the Standing Orders. Now here are some examples of how we organized the document to improve its navigation.

We found that certain groupings in long chapters were not particularly helpful in finding what the reader is looking for. For example, we reorganized the chapter on financial procedures. We took the procedures dealing with the budget debate and put them in the special debates chapter. We took the ways and means procedures and grouped them with non-debatable motions in the chapter on motions. And we kept the remaining procedures dealing with the business of supply in the chapter named after business of supply.

In addition to adding an index to the document, we are also proposing to include a glossary of terms that we hope will improve the understanding of the Standing Orders.[Translation]

We have completed the first phase of the project for all the chapters, with the exception of the one on private members' bills. We have realized that the framework considered in the Standing Orders to deal with private members bills is archaic and inapplicable. So we are proposing options on the best ways to modernize that chapter.

I would like to hear comments on all aspects of the project.[English]

We very much appreciate your views on how to improve the accessibility of our Standing Orders and on ways to make them best suited for your purposes as members of Parliament.

Over the next few months I will continue to provide you with new chapters as they become available. It is my hope that an iterative dialogue will lead to a revised set of Standing Orders that you and your colleagues will find helpful in your work as parliamentarians.

I'm happy to take any questions you may have.

(1110)

The Chair:

Once it's all finished, my understanding is that this committee will review it in the next Parliament when we do the statutory review of the Standing Orders.

Mr. Charles Robert:

There is a debate that you normally have early in the new Parliament where you can discuss this. If you feel this project has been useful, you can raise it. Because you have the authority under your own mandate, you can pursue this project further to determine whether you think it appropriate to adopt these changes either on a permanent or temporary basis, to see whether they help you understand the rules and practices of the House.

The Chair:

Before we go to the list, does anyone want to ask a question about the scheduling we were just discussing?

We'll see how long people want to stay when the bells start ringing, but we'll start with Mr. Simms for seven minutes.

Mr. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

Mr. Clerk, it's been ages. How have you been?

For those who weren't here last time, he was just here.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Simms: First of all, I think this is a fantastic exercise that you're doing. I think that in most cases it's long overdue. I don't claim to be the smartest person around any table—God forbid I'd do that—but sometimes I read these rules and in my mind I find myself trying to read the language and it's literally like Cirque du Soleil up here, trying to go back and forth between this, that and the other thing. It's just not friendly at all to the average reader or to anybody who is not a—I believe you used the term “jurilinguist”.

What flags initially arose that have brought us to this point where you have a document that's ready to go and ready to be looked at?

The Chair:

Just before you answer that, I want to find out from the committee how long into the bells they want to stay.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

Let's let seven minutes go by, and then—

The Chair:

We'll go about seven minutes and then we'll break. Okay. Then we'll come back.

Mr. Clerk.

Mr. Charles Robert:

For me, in the attempt to be a proactive service to the members.... Whenever you read the Standing Orders and you see the word “pursuant”, you always think, “Okay, is this going to trip me up?” Then, this morning, I was just reviewing that again. I went to one “pursuant”—so I do check these—and it referred me to two other “pursuants”. I don't think that's particularly helpful. I think members are super-loaded with work. Any documents that you have to use that are critical to your work should not be a handicap to that effort. They should be written in a style that is easily accessible and understandable.

You should also be able to find it quickly. I was using the index this morning. I was looking for second reading; I was looking for a specific rule. I looked under bills—then went to public bills—no, I needed to go to government bills. So there is this jumping around that you sometimes have to do, which I think can be avoided. To the extent that we can either minimize that or even totally eliminate it, the Standing Orders will be less intimidating and more useful to you in trying to understand the practices that actually govern how you operate in the chamber or in committees.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I've always been fascinated by your knowledge of the other jurisdictions. Have other jurisdictions undertaken this size of a project? I should say other countries, sorry.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Well, the other chamber of this House has done this. That project actually began in 1998—I'm not particularly trying to wish this on myself here—and didn't end until 2012.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Oh, my.

Mr. Charles Robert:

It really depends on how the standing orders of other jurisdictions are written, whether there is a need to revamp them. Scotland, I know, does several editions of their standing orders virtually every year, and they're becoming quite complex. They may have to go back and change them, simply because they're always adjusting. That leads to a new edition.

(1115)

Mr. Scott Simms:

Well, they're new.

Mr. Charles Robert:

They're new.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I noticed that when I went to Scotland: a lot of their rules take the “best practices of”, but that's probably because of their newness. But I think it's far overdue for us.

You mentioned that one of the other things you want to do is clear up the writing to more of an active style of writing. Can you expand on that?

Mr. Charles Robert:

The notion really is that it's easier to understand if you put something in the active voice as opposed to the passive voice. I remember once there was an exercise in the mid-eighties for the Standing Orders of the House of Commons and there was also some exercise in reviewing the rules of the Senate. The negative passive voice becomes a bit complex. It didn't really help to understand how the rules are meant to operate.

Mr. Scott Simms:

The second part of that was that you referred to the index; that it would be immensely helpful.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Well, when the project was actually done with the rules of the Senate, the index, which was originally 102 pages long, was reduced to 22 pages. The reason was that there was an integration of the marginal notes and the headers and subheaders that you find in the table of contents. That was used as a guide to create the index. As a result, it was simplified.

Mr. Scott Simms:

I like that, too, because, being parliamentarians, we have other duties that take us to our constituencies and so on and so forth. I find that I'm able to catch up only if my flight is a longer flight and I can sit down with this stuff and try to absorb it. With the index, now I can do that in a much quicker fashion, so I strongly endorse that.

You mentioned the fall. I'd say, for committees as much as anything else, that the exercise of having an evening debate on Standing Orders, which usually follows shortly after the election, should come a little bit later to allow new members of Parliament to get more experience with the Standing Orders before making some substantial changes. Not everybody can be David Graham, for goodness sakes.

I think you're saying that's the place where the next one, following the next election, is—

Mr. Charles Robert:

It's certainly an option for you.

Mr. Scott Simms:

Obviously, it would be far more efficient if we chose that.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Again, I'm here to be of help, but the decisions that you make are in fact your decisions.

Mr. Scott Simms:

You're good. You'd be fantastic in a scrum. You know that, don't you?

Thank you, Clerk.

The Chair:

Thank you, members.

We will break to go to vote and then come back.

(1115)

(1155)

The Chair:

Welcome back to the 148th meeting.

We'll give the floor to Mr. Strahl for seven minutes.

Mr. Mark Strahl:

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you for the opportunity to participate today. I am here on behalf of my House leader, Candice Bergen, to discuss the matter before us today.

I think that my characterization of this initiative will not be the same as Mr. Simms', who called it fantastic. In fact, I think it's putting the cart before the horse here.

As you know, when you were hired to the position, we were in the midst of a prolonged multi-week/month debate and dispute about the Standing Orders about who should be bringing forward changes, in what manner they should be considered, and whether there should be consensus, etc.

I'll go back to your testimony in February 2018, when you told this committee, “The commitment that I had made is that there would be no change to the Standing Orders”, and “understanding completely that no changes are being recommended through this exercise.”

You gave us “absolute guarantee that no changes would be made”, yet we have 70 changes here, which may meet Mr. Simms' description of being fantastic. I guess my primary question first of all is, on whose authority or initiative was this? Why did you take it upon yourself to change the Standing Orders? I would argue that is the purview of members of Parliament to decide if the Standing Orders need to be changed.

You referred many times to “we” throughout your presentation: “We decided. We did this.” Who is “we”, and who decided that this would be a good idea to pursue without having members of Parliament give you that charge?

(1200)

Mr. Charles Robert:

The initiative was my own. It was done with the idea—again, as I mentioned earlier—to be proactive in assisting the members.

The 70 changes you may be referring to are the ones in yellow highlights. We recognize that they represent changes, and that's why they are deliberately highlighted that way. We came across them when we were doing the revision.

In the end, nothing changes unless the members themselves want it to change. I'm here basically as a good-faith agent, trying to assist the members in giving them tools that I think are more readily accessible. I have no authority to do anything in any way that can be considered final. That rests entirely with this committee, and ultimately, with the House, because the Standing Orders belong to you.

Again, let me repeat: I am trying to be a good-faith agent, trying to give you tools that will help you do your job better.

Mr. Mark Strahl:

With respect, Mr. Clerk, again, in your February 2018 testimony, you said, “in the meantime, through negotiations and shared information, [if] the House leaders recognize there might be some value in rewriting the Standing Orders...it seemed to me that this would be a worthwhile project.”

Did you ever consult with the House leaders before embarking on this initiative?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I consulted with their chiefs of staff.

Mr. Mark Strahl:

Okay, well that's news to me.

Again, I think that this is a cart-before-the-horse thing. It might be that what you have produced is worthy of adoption or consideration, but the way in which it was put forward I think is very concerning to us.

Mr. Christopherson, who is not here today but is an eminent member of this committee, said at that same meeting, “You start talking Standing Orders, and I mean the House owns the orders, not the Clerk's department.”

I again want to lay down that marker. I don't know what would now prevent a future clerk, or what prevents any part of the apparatus that serves members of Parliament, from embarking on similar good-faith initiatives. They may actually be done in good faith, but if they're not directed by members of this committee, members of the House, then I would argue that they are in fact counter to the very thing Mr. Christopherson stated, that this should be done on the request of the House.

Again, these are our Standing Orders. The Speaker constantly refers to the fact that he cannot act outside of these rules because he is a servant of the House.

I would ask, perhaps in another way, who else has been assisting with this? Have you been assisted through the government House leader's office or the Privy Council Office or the Speaker's office to undertake this initiative and to produce the document that we have in front of us?

Mr. Charles Robert:

No one from any of those three you mentioned has directed any aspect of this project. Again, as I mentioned earlier, this was a good faith initiative on my own part. I would not have taken it this far had I not been in consultation with the chiefs of staff of the government House leader, the opposition House leader and the NDP House leader.

They understood what I was doing. No one told me, “No, don't go any further". The purpose is to provide assistance to the House. As Mr. Christopherson said, I fully recognize and realize that I have no authority to implement anything.

In the same way that we are now reviewing the members' orientation program for the period after the next election, we are trying to improve the service that we give to you. That was the only intent to this.

If you feel this is inadequate or inadvisable, it will be for you to tell me to stop, and I will stop.

(1205)

Mr. Mark Strahl:

You're saying that there are no employees of the Privy Council Office seconded to assist you on this project.

Mr. Charles Robert:

The individual you are referring to is on an attachment to us from the Privy Council Office. He was engaged because he had 10 years of experience in the government House leader's office under both the Conservative government and the Liberal government. The intent was, okay, you're a practitioner. You had to use these Standing Orders day in, day out. You're perhaps well placed to give advice as to how they could be simplified and reorganized so that when members are using them every day, they will be able to access them more easily.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Now, we'll go to Madam Trudel. [Translation]

Ms. Karine Trudel (Jonquière, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I know that I have big shoes to fill, those of Mr. Christopherson, who is absent today. So, I will try to do things properly and represent him well.

Mr. Robert, thank you very much for your presentation. For us, it is too soon to comment on the changes.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Of course, this is presented to you as a draft. So you can decide whether you think it is acceptable or not. If other changes have to be made or a few provisions have to be restored in the current version, if that is what you prefer, it will be up to you to decide.

In fact, this proposal is there just to help you consider what you would like to do about the Standing Orders.

Ms. Karine Trudel:

If I understand correctly, we have received nearly half the chapters. How long do you think it will take you to provide us with the rest of the amendments?

Mr. Charles Robert:

It is now mid-April. So that may happen toward the end of June. You will have a more complete draft. It will depend on the jurilinguists' work schedule, as they are essentially the ones who ensure that the French and the English are fairly consistent.

Ms. Karine Trudel:

Okay.

I would still like to know whether this will be for the next Parliament.

Mr. Charles Robert:

It's up to you. It is brought to your attention, and that is all.

Ms. Karine Trudel:

So members will have to decide whether to discuss this issue in the House of Commons to amend the Standing Orders.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Exactly.

Ms. Karine Trudel:

So that could happen during the next parliamentary session or the next Parliament.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Or not.

Ms. Karine Trudel:

Okay.

So, after it has been referred to committee, it will be debated in the House.

Mr. Charles Robert:

You will decide what to do with this, in the end.

Ms. Karine Trudel:

So we will decide on the provisions of the Standing Orders if our committee has to consider them and vote on them.

You say that you have consulted leaders' offices.

Mr. Charles Robert:

In the beginning, I consulted leaders' offices. I provided them with a few drafts to find out whether they agreed with my objective and whether I have kept my word not to amend Standing Orders without letting you know.

Ms. Karine Trudel:

Okay.

If we decide to amend the standing orders, will we need unanimous consent of the parties recognized in the House or will majority suffice?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Once again, I assume that most members will prefer there to be consensus. In the past, adopting changes to the Standing Orders has sometimes been based on the consent of a majority. When, in the early 1970s, time limits were set for debates on bills, that was adopted by the majority. The opposition was opposed to that because it did not want time limitations to be imposed on it in debates at various stages of bills.

(1210)

Ms. Karine Trudel:

Thank you very much.

That's all for me. [English]

The Chair:

Just before I go to the next speaker, I will say that we have a special guest in the audience, Mr. Derek Lee, who was almost the dean of the House when he left in 2011 after 23 years. He was elected in 1988. He wrote a book called The Power of Parliamentary Houses to Send for Persons, Papers & Records: A Sourcebook on the Law and Precedent of Parliamentary Subpoena Powers for Canadian and other Houses.

The member for Victoria—Haliburton at the time in 1999 said that he fell asleep reading the title, but I told Derek that I thought that Scott Reid and Mr. Nater would be quite interested, as they're academics in this area.

Welcome, Mr. Lee. It's great to have you back on Parliament Hill.

Now we'll go to Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you so much.

I'll be splitting my time with Mr. Graham.

There are just a couple of points that I would like to make. I apologize to our witness. There will be a question at the end, but I will make a couple of points.

It really is unbelievable that the Conservative opposition whip would come down and try to make this a partisan issue, not having been to this committee once and not having heard from the witness before, with a public servant who has had a good record in Parliament. He has brought forward no issues of substance—not one.

This is an issue that has been brought to our attention on a number of occasions, and the Conservatives did not raise their concerns. Yet for him to come down here and attempt to attack the credibility of a respected public servant is just on par with what we've seen from the Conservatives over the past many years.

Mr. Strahl has come here to pick a fight for reasons that we don't know. He has come with pieces of information. He has come explicitly at the behest of the House leader, but clearly has not spoken with the individuals who have been in communication with the witness. He's just come to pick a fight, and that's shameful.

This is a committee that runs into issues and has healthy debates, but it's a committee that works very well together. I know from the practice of law that there's a plain language movement to try to make things more accessible. You can really tell the difference between a judge's written decision now versus one that you read 20, 30 or 40 years ago, even at the highest levels. The issues haven't gotten simpler; it's about making the law more accessible to the public, making it more accessible to the clients.

Here's an objective to make our Standing Orders more accessible, not only to parliamentarians but also to the people of Canada. This is a complex issue, not necessarily one that can be undertaken by a single member of Parliament, and yet you come here to pick a fight. That's unbelievable.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!

Mr. Chris Bittle: The Conservatives want to laugh about it, and I guess that's their right. Again, having not raised these concerns about it, they think this is funny. I guess this is on par with what they do and how they want to operate.

My question, Mr. Robert, is this: When was the first time you brought the notion of the plain language changes to the Standing Orders? When was the first time you brought it before this committee?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I can't recall precisely. I'm not sure if I mentioned it in the hearing I first had after my certificate of nomination was given to the government. If it was not on that occasion, it would have been at the very next appearance I had before the procedure and House affairs committee.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Did you hear any concerns from any of the chiefs of staff to the House leaders when you presented your plan to them or updated them on any progress you were making on the issue?

Mr. Charles Robert:

One of them expressed some.... He didn't express concerns, but raised questions to make sure that if this were to go forward, there really would be no substantive changes to the rules and that the commitment that I was making was, in fact, being upheld.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Are there any substantive changes to the rules?

Mr. Charles Robert:

As explained in the documents that were circulated, if you go to the annex, the final document that was given to you, there are a series of changes that are in yellow. I think they're also yellow in this text. They are things we have discovered.

For example, we suggested that you delete the dinner hour, because you don't observe one anymore. We suggested that you recognize the holiday in May as the Victoria Day holiday, as opposed to the day for celebrating the birthday of the sovereign. Things of that sort were also suggested. There may be some that are more substantive.

There is one that is more substantive, which deals with royal assent by written declaration when the House is sitting. It's something that's been overlooked.

It's been put in, but we discovered these sorts of changes during the course of the rewrite. We wanted to make sure that the commitment was respected, so we deliberately highlighted them.

(1215)

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you.

I'll turn it over to Mr. Graham with the comment that changing the name of the holiday and not changing the fact that we observe the holiday does not seem to be a substantive change worthy of questioning the credibility of a public servant about.

I'll give the rest of my time to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

How much time do I have left?

The Chair:

You have two minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'll use them wisely.

I appreciate Chris's point, but I'm going to go back into the substance of it.

You mentioned the members' orientation program, back at the beginning. When we had the members' orientation in 2015, we had this wonderful meeting in room 237-C, where everybody was invited and they said, “Let's go to the chamber.” I'm just going to propose that you use the bells to call the new members in. Put that on the record somewhere, so that it actually happens.

Have clerks proposed changes like this in the past?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I was part of an effort to do that when I was in the Senate.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

How did it go?

Mr. Charles Robert:

As I said, it took 14 years.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Did it happen?

Mr. Charles Robert:

It did happen. In fact, the experience that we had was that.... It was an initiative that was proposed initially by a Speaker. When his term ended, the project was continued and eventually the rules committee decided that yes, this was probably something worthwhile. They became actively involved in doing it. What mattered and what encouraged them to actually undertake this was that a working draft had been prepared for them.

This is not fun work. It is actually challenging to try to do this. It's not something that even in 1984-85, when the McGrath committee was sitting.... It's not a fun thing for the members themselves to work on revising the Standing Orders. It's more manageable when you have something to work with and you can review and decide that you don't like something so you change the language, or it's not good enough, or you don't think it belongs here or it should belong elsewhere.

If there's any value in trying to update the Standing Orders, you really have to be working with a model that you can accept, reject, change, or whatever you'd like to do.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Graham.

Before we go on, I see we have another guest, Mr. Paul Szabo. By the time he left the House, he was sort of like Kevin Lamoureux; he had spoken over 2,000 times—more than anyone else.

Welcome back, Paul.

We'll go now to Mr. Nater for five minutes.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you Mr. Chair and thank you Mr. Clerk.

Speaking of the McGrath committee, it was a matter that I studied fairly intensively when I was at grad school. I happen to be close personal friends with the chief of staff to the McGrath committee. I'm sure he would have some fascinating comments on this process.

I want to start by asking you about your original appointment. Was this rewrite of the Standing Orders ever discussed during the appointment process?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I can't recall that it was.

Mr. John Nater:

Secondly, I want to talk about the consultations you've had with the chiefs of staff to the House leaders of the recognized party. Would you be able to provide us with any documentation of those consultations with the chiefs of staff?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I could probably give you the dates of the meetings, because I normally note them. I could probably try to recall some of the conversations. That would be about it.

Mr. John Nater:

We would appreciate that.

I want to follow up a little bit. You mentioned the first time the concept of the rewrite of the Standing Orders was mentioned in this committee. I just want to point out that it was in response to a question from our side about rumours that we had heard about the secondment of a PCO official to your group to work on that.

The first response in this committee was actually in response to our questions on the secondment.

I'd be curious to know how much staff time has been used on this project thus far.

(1220)

Mr. Charles Robert:

I would have to do a calculation to find out. I am sure there are several people who have been involved. We began perhaps a year ago last January to undertake this project.

Mr. John Nater:

Who have been the key people working on this project? Is it the seconded officer from PCO?

Mr. Charles Robert:

The seconded officer is in charge of the project, at my request.

Mr. John Nater:

Who else has been involved?

Mr. Charles Robert:

There have been several senior procedural clerks in the table research branch. Then, as I mentioned earlier, there are several jurilinguists who are involved in the Law Clerk's branch.

Mr. John Nater:

Another question I have has to do with the annotated Standing Orders. Would it not have been simpler to create a new draft of the annotated Standing Orders, to explain the Standing Orders, rather than going about a rewrite of the Standing Orders themselves?

Mr. Charles Robert:

The annotated Standing Orders went through a second edition a few years ago, but the purpose wouldn't have changed the text of the Standing Orders, and that really was the driver of the project. The annotated Standing Orders would have perhaps simply given you a more up-to-date account of how the Standing Orders have been used.

The objective, really, was to change the text—again, to make it more accessible. The intent is visible, I think, when you compare the current table of contents with the proposed table of contents. In the current table of contents, it's virtually a blank page. In the revised Standing Orders' table of contents, it's an analytical content that actually helps you to identify the precise rule—and subsection, in some cases—that you might want to consult. That, again, is a proactive initiative on my part to be of assistance to the House, and to all members.

Mr. John Nater:

You mentioned something about recognizing the names of the holidays we celebrate—changing it to Victoria Day, from “a day fixed for the celebration of the birth of the sovereign”. This was raised during the previous Parliament, and there was not a consensus among the recognized parties to make that change at that time. Therefore, even with something that seems relatively simple or innocuous, there are reasons that certain parties may have, whether it's for the dinner-hour concept or the date. That's one of the reasons I think it's essential—as we've always talked about—that there be consensus when dealing with the Standing Order changes.

I wanted to get another point in, though. How much time do I have, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

You have just over a minute.

Mr. John Nater:

With any changes that have been proposed, or that may be proposed in future iterations.... Just last year, we celebrated the release of the third House of Commons Procedure and Practice edition, by Bosc and Gagnon. I'm curious to know whether anything in this will require a rewrite of that almost brand-new book.

Mr. Charles Robert:

We can provide you with a comparative table. If you decide to accept these Standing Orders, we can provide you with a concordance that would allow you to track back to the Standing Orders that were previously numbered in a different way. That was done in the House and the Senate when we were going through a transition period, so that members would not find it too difficult to access the information.

Mr. John Nater:

I have one final comment to make for the record. If we are going ahead with any kind of changes to the Standing Orders, I still fundamentally believe that, no matter how relatively small they are, they should be done by and led by parliamentarians, whether it's in the way that McGrath did so, or the way we did in the previous Parliament. That's the direction that should be taken. It should be parliamentarian-led, and not otherwise.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Nater.

Now we'll go back to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is it a 14-year process to fix the Standing Orders in the Senate? Is it 12 or 14 years?

Mr. Charles Robert:

It's 14 years.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's what I thought you said.

I've been around here a long time, but not 14 years yet.

At any time in that process, did it become a partisan issue in the Senate?

Mr. Charles Robert:

No.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When we pass a report and present it to the House, we always adopt a motion. I forget exactly how it's phrased. The last motion to be passed is that we give permission to the committee clerk and the analyst to make corrections, as necessary. Do you have the wording handy, by any chance?

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

I don't have it offhand. I can find it for you, but it's essentially that the clerk, analyst and chair be authorized to make any necessary editorial changes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Would any of these changes qualify, were we to send you the Standing Orders?

Mr. Charles Robert:

No, these would not count that way.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

When you changed Standing Order 71 to replace a typo that's existed for I don't know how long—

Mr. Charles Robert:

A typo is an editorial change. This goes far beyond that.

(1225)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

We began studying this issue under Standing Order 51 on October 6, 2016, or thereabouts. When looking at this, did you review any of the speeches made in that debate, or is this a case of your looking objectively at the Standing Orders and saying, this is an issue that we should flag and discuss?

Mr. Charles Robert:

It was basically an objective attempt to provide a service to the members.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

As has been clarified before, there's nothing that you can do without our approval, regardless.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Of course.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Of course. Okay.

I don't have a lot more questions on this subject, but one question would be on Standing Order 31. Is that still going to be Standing Order 31, because that's a big thing here?

Mr. Charles Robert:

There's a numbering convention that has been proposed for your consideration. If you want to keep to the consecutive numbering pattern, that, again, is a decision you can take.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's all I've got for the moment, but if we're still going, I might come back to you.

Thank you, Clerk.

The Clerk:

The text of the motion you referred to is that “the chair, clerk and analyst be authorized to make such grammatical and editorial changes as may be necessary without changing the substance of the report.”

The Chair:

Now we'll go to Mr. Reid for five minutes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you very much.

I am a long-time member of this committee, and in the past we've dealt, in some cases quite extensively, with suggested changes to the Standing Orders. The tendency has been for us to engage in a significant amount of discussion without necessarily producing a large amount of substantive change, because we haven't come to consensus.

We went quite far in the last Parliament, and I think those discussions were in camera, so have you had access to those?

Mr. Charles Robert:

No.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You have not. Okay.

Do our rules—I should know this and I don't, but there's no one better to ask than you—permit you, as the Clerk, to have access to in camera meetings of committees?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I can't answer that with any sort of certainty, but I would doubt it, and I wouldn't try.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay, but it might be relevant on a go-forward basis for some of that material to be made available. It might require a motion of this committee so that—

The Chair:

We could do that, if we want.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, let's stop and make sure that I'm not speaking through my hat when I say this about the materials, but maybe we could ask our clerk or our analysts to go back and take a peek at what was discussed in the last Parliament.

There was some discussion to give some idea of where the areas of consensus existed and didn't exist, so that's a thought. Many people are unfamiliar with it, because we had a substantial turnover in this committee after the 2015 election.

I want to deal with a couple of issues that are of concern to me. The book whose title always changes based on its most recent two authors.... Currently it's Gagnon and Bosc. Before that it was—

Mr. Charles Robert:

O'Brien and Bosc.

Mr. Scott Reid:

O'Brien and Bosc. I'm muddled up. Anyway, it's gone through a number of names. That book gets updated from time to time, and the moment it comes out, it starts falling out of date.

Would this project that you're working on cause the next iteration of that—which of course you'll be intimately involved in, as there's no other way of doing it—to be moved back, or do you think that the—

Mr. Charles Robert:

Well, it depends. If this committee and the House decide to accept the proposal that is before you, it might lead to a rush to review for a new edition.

We could do what the Australians do, which is basically update the book every six months online and publish it every two years.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Has that been a successful experiment, in your impression?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Certainly in keeping the book up to date, it would be very helpful. The House of Representatives Practice manual is now in its seventh edition, and it came out originally about 20 years ago.

Odgers', which is for the Senate of the Australian Commonwealth Parliament, is in its 14th or 15th edition. Erskine May, which has been published since 1844, is soon to have its 25th edition.

What will happen, though, with the next edition of the House of Commons Procedure and Practice is, again, that in a more proactive attempt to be of help, there will be a section in the book on what members need to know under each chapter, because when I was reading and studying the book—and I don't mean this as a criticism; please be clear about that—I found out that in the chapter on oral questions—and I've become notorious for this because I just don't let it go—the fact that you're limited to 35 seconds is buried in footnote 41.

An hon. member: Right.

Mr. Charles Robert: You will not find it in the text of the chapter, yet it seems to me that it is something of importance for you as a member, and it's been in footnote 41 for all three editions.

An hon. member: Right.

Mr. Charles Robert: It's based on an understanding that is observed, but it has not been part of our actual practices; it has not been formalized, but the House leaders have made an agreement that this is how it would happen, and it has been observed faithfully since.

In terms of trying to inform members, it seems to me that it's healthy to know that.

(1230)

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's a very good example.

Am I out of time or do I have a little bit more?

The Chair:

You have 45 seconds.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I wouldn't mind returning to this subject a bit later, perhaps in a future round.

I do want to say with regard to the annotated Standing Orders that very few members use it, but it's actually an enormously useful book. My own feeling is that it doesn't get updated as often as it should, number one. I have a concern that I actually think that book should be updated first. That is just to say that I would not want our Standing Orders changed in any meaningful way, particularly with regard to changes in where things are placed and ordered, without having an annotated Standing Orders come out at the same time.

Otherwise we are effectively without that tool until such time as it comes out. I suspect that all you would say in response is that you agree with me, but I should ask: do you agree with that?

Mr. Charles Robert:

No, it's a good point.

It's something that we would consider, but again, that will depend on what happens with respect to how you want to deal with the Standing Orders. I'm perfectly happy to withdraw. I did not intend this to be a provocative gesture.

Again, as I mentioned earlier, this indeed is a good faith effort. If it leads to controversy, then that is the exact opposite of what I intended.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I very much appreciate that.

Thank you.

The Chair:

Now I'll do what we often do in this committee, which is to informally go to anyone who wants to ask a question or make a comment.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I, for one, do see it as an objective effort. I appreciate it. I just wanted to say that on the record.

The Chair:

Thank you.

You want to go again?

Sure.

Mr. Scott Reid:

If we're back to me, now I get to ask the thing I was going to ask before I ran out of time.

With regard to the volume that is currently O'Brien and Bosc, it would make numerous references to—

Mr. Charles Robert:

Forgive me, but it's Bosc and Gagnon.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm sorry—I meant Bosc and Gagnon. It was O'Brien and Bosc, right?

Mr. Charles Robert:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

It's the same problem I have—

Mr. Charles Robert:

It's better keeping it just Erskine May no matter who the editor is.

Mr. Scott Reid:

You know what—you're 100% right about that. This is the better practice. It's a best practice.

I feel the same way about law firms, by the way, and their changing names.

What I want to ask is this, with regard to that volume: it makes reference to the Standing Orders such as they are. Of course they change. There is a problem. I don't know how to resolve this. If the Standing Orders are renumbered in some sense, then it will be difficult to make those references. That volume will be less useful until it's updated.

Mr. Charles Robert:

It will be unless you access it online. I think there's a way to track or trace the changes so that with hyperlinks—I'm not a computer wizard of any kind, but I think there are ways through the online version of the manual to incorporate the changes that would identify the new standing order relative to the old standing order.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

I think we would want to have something that would meet with the satisfaction of all before we tried anything that involved renumbering, for exactly that reason.

I can't think of an area that is more clearly something that needs to have widespread consensus before you change it.

Mr. Charles Robert:

As for the difference between the annotated Standing Orders and the manual and the reason the manual tends to receive more attention, to be facetious, is because it's a bigger book.

The other thing is that the purpose behind the updates is to track the precedents, which simply continue to grow and grow through different rulings.

(1235)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

I just wanted to get that other point on the record.

Thank you, Mr. Chair, for the indulgence.

The Chair:

Okay.

Is there anyone else?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I'd like to make some comments.

The Chair:

It would be better if you asked questions.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

I do have one that's come up. It's sort of tangential to the actual discussion, but you brought up House of Commons Procedure and Practice. How do we break the vicious cycle in Procedure and Practice? There are a lot of things in there, but my favourite example is about wearing a tie in the House. Procedure and Practice says that you have to wear modern business dress, which today is considered to include a tie, in the House. If somebody gets up without his tie on, the Speaker says, “You can't speak because you don't have a tie on”, because the book says so. The book says so because the Speaker says so.

How do we break the vicious cycle?

Mr. Charles Robert:

You present a report to the House from the procedure and House affairs committee saying that this is a ridiculous practice that we want to abandon.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham, you may remember that we tried that and we didn't get agreement.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I know. The point is only that it's a vicious cycle; it's not that particular example itself.

Mr. Scott Reid:

May I?

I agree with that. The Speaker refers to the book.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right, but the book refers to the Speaker.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I know, but the book is merely a compilation of previous Speakers' rulings. It's not that the book gets an independent authority, unless the book accidentally contains an error and therefore is being cited based on an erroneous assumption of about what was said by previous Speakers. I mean, the idea that ties are a part of modern business dress for men is something that may be a declining convention. That would be the argument presented by a number of our colleagues—including, for example, Mr. Housefather—and they might well be right. We have seen an evolution. The best evolution I can think of, or demonstration of this, is our attitude towards having your head covered in the House. At one time, that was not permitted. Then the moment came when a member who had gone through chemotherapy rose to speak with a head covering. There was universal recognition at that moment that something was changing when the Speaker recognized that individual.

So there is a way of doing it. I would suggest that if you can get widespread consensus informally and then have the Speaker recognize somebody and nobody comments on it, you are effectively demonstrating a change. But it requires a widespread consensus. Alternatively, one can simply get a standing order change that actually defines this. A statute always trumps an understanding.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Things like this aren't in the statute. They are by convention.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's my point: Conventions are always trumped by statute.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right.

To what degree is the Speaker bound by previous Speakers' rulings?

Mr. Charles Robert:

They certainly have weight and have to be taken into account. If there's a distinction to be made, the circumstances have to be sufficient to allow a certain leeway for the Speaker to deviate. Differences in distinctions matter.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Right.

If we want to look at your suggestions in more depth—and I submit that we should, or at least look at them, because I think we have a responsibility to do that—what is the process? Would we look at them the way we do clause-by-clause, discussing them one at a time, or would this have to be taken as one change and you couldn't break it in little pieces easily?

Mr. Charles Robert:

If you're talking about the initiative to rewrite the rules, with your permission I would continue to do it. It leads to somewhere or to nowhere, however, depending on what you think about it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My point is that you have 70-odd changes suggested so far.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Those are just the yellow ones that I brought to your attention. I don't give myself the freedom to make it part of a simple rewrite. I think it's a bit more than that. As Mr. Nater pointed out, and he's perfectly right, if there are reasons that the choice was made to keep it the way it is, then it should be kept the way it is.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are a lot of the changes consequential, or can most of them stand on their own?

Mr. Charles Robert:

I think some of the changes are just basically observations. If a practice has fallen into disuse, then is it really good, in an update or rewrite, to keep it? If you want to keep it, keep it. Again, all of this is your choice. I'm only trying to be helpful. I'm not trying to interfere.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Okay.

I have a last quick note. If we were to renumber the Standing Orders—I think several numbers were skipped over the years—we'd call that “renumeration”. Everyone calls giving money “renumeration”, but it's totally backwards. It's a pet peeve of mine, because “remuneration” is getting money and “renumeration” is renumbering a system.

Finally we have the correct use of “renumeration”, so thank you for that.

(1240)

The Chair:

Mr. Clerk, if this procedure were to proceed—I think Ms. Trudel asked this question—when would you have a full proposal related to it for this government or this committee to look at?

Mr. Charles Robert:

If you wanted to have a full text of the Standing Orders in this revised format, I think it could be prepared for the end of June.

The Chair:

When we're not sitting.

Mr. Charles Robert:

Well, again, not that it's my business, but I didn't see this being a realistic prospect for adoption. I think it was just basically put forward for you to consider.

The Chair:

Okay.

Are there any other questions for the Clerk?

Thank you very much for all of your efforts. The staff have gone to so much effort to make our job easier. Stay tuned.

Is there anything else from the committee before we adjourn?

That's a big smile, Ms. Trudel. You're ready to adjourn? Okay.

We're adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1100)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Bienvenue à la 148e séance du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Je tiens à souhaiter la bienvenue au whip conservateur, M. Strahl, ainsi qu'à M. Don Rusnak et Mme Karine Trudel, du NPD, au comité le plus excitant de la Colline. Je suis certain que vous aurez beaucoup de plaisir.

Chers collègues, vous aurez bientôt les renseignements sur les deux aspects pour lesquels j'ai demandé des recherches plus approfondies. Le premier porte sur le nombre de députés habituellement présents aux séances des deux chambres en Australie et en Grande-Bretagne, et le deuxième porte sur la date d'adoption de la mesure législative visant à confier la responsabilité de la Cité parlementaire au ministère des Travaux publics, par rapport aux aspects dont nous avons discuté.

Conformément à l'article 108(3)(a)(iii) du Règlement, nous avons le plaisir d'accueillir M. Charles Robert, le greffier de la Chambre des communes, qui est ici pour nous informer des progrès de l'initiative de modernisation du Règlement. Vous vous souviendrez que le 27 février 2018, le greffier a mentionné que le processus commençait. On ne parle pas de changements importants, mais d'une réorganisation afin de clarifier le Règlement, qui n'est pas facile à consulter. Voilà de quoi il s'agit. Le greffier du Comité vous a fourni des documents hier.

La sonnerie se fera bientôt entendre; il est à espérer que nous pourrons entendre son exposé sous peu.

Pendant que nous y sommes, voici ce que je propose pour nos prochaines réunions, à notre retour après le mois d'avril. Les budgets doivent être déposés cette semaine. Habituellement, nous accueillons trois groupes de témoins pour en discuter. Le premier serait formé du greffier, du Président et du SPP, pour parler des budgets de la Chambre des communes et du SPP. Deuxièmement, nous accueillerions le directeur général des élections pour discuter du budget des élections. Troisièmement, pour parler du budget des débats, nous aurions le ministre et/ou le commissaire aux débats.

Cet horaire pour les séances consacrées aux budgets pose-t-il problème?

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

J'aimerais quelque chose de plus précis que « le ministre et/ou le commissaire aux débats »...

Le président:

C'est le Comité qui décide. Voulez-vous...

M. Scott Reid:

Pouvons-nous vous donner nos préférences plus tard?

Le président:

Oui. Vous pouvez me revenir là-dessus.

M. Scott Reid:

L'horaire ne devrait pas poser problème, à moins que ce soit le cas pour d'autres, mais nous pourrions vous indiquer nos préférences plus tard sur la façon dont cela pourrait être réparti.

Le président:

Concernant le troisième point, j'invite tout le monde à indiquer leurs préférences par rapport aux témoins.

J'espère que nous pourrons entendre votre déclaration préliminaire avant la sonnerie.

Je pourrai demander le consentement du Comité. Acceptez-vous que nous poursuivions pendant quelques minutes pour qu'il puisse terminer sa déclaration préliminaire, même si la sonnerie se fait entendre? C'est juste à l'étage supérieur. Cela vous convient-il?

Des voix: D'accord.

Le président: Excellent; merci.

M. Mark Strahl (Chilliwack—Hope, PCC):

Nous resterons pour la déclaration.

Le président:

Très bien. Merci.

Monsieur le greffier, la parole est à vous. Merci beaucoup d'être venu au Comité encore une fois.

M. Charles Robert (greffier de la Chambre des communes):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Lorsque j'ai été nommé greffier en 2017, un de mes objectifs était d'unifier l'administration pour en faire une seule entité au service des députés. Pour ce qui est des Services de la procédure, une des façons de répondre de façon proactive aux besoins des députés était d'examiner le Règlement. Après lecture, j'ai constaté qu'il était trop complexe et pas assez accessible aux députés et à leur personnel.

J'ai donc lancé un projet interne pour améliorer le style et l'organisation du Règlement et le rendre plus accessible.

Plus précisément, mon objectif était de réécrire le Règlement en langage clair, d'uniformiser la terminologie, d'éliminer les références internes et de réorganiser le Règlement afin de rendre la consultation du document plus conviviale en ajoutant une table des matières complète accompagnée de notes marginales. En outre, j'ai proposé un nouveau système de numérotation dans lequel les procédures semblables sont divisées en chapitres pour faciliter la mémorisation. Enfin, je tenais à faire tout cela sans apporter de changements importants au Règlement, comme je m'étais engagé à le faire auprès de vous lors de ma première comparution au Comité.

Le projet s'est déroulé en deux phases.

La première consistait à réécrire et à réorganiser le Règlement afin d'améliorer l'enchaînement logique des règles, de diviser en paragraphes les dispositions plus complexes et les plus longues afin d'assurer une bonne compréhension des étapes de la procédure, et de regrouper certaines procédures pour améliorer la concision du document, lorsque possible.

La phase deux, menée en collaboration avec le Secteur des services législatifs, visait à assurer la concordance des versions anglaise et française, ce qui a nécessité la participation de jurilinguistes, des spécialistes qui travaillent au Bureau du légiste parlementaire. Cela contribuera aussi à l'amélioration de la qualité de la version française du Règlement.

(1105)

[Français]

Je sais que vous avez tous reçu une trousse de documents en prévision de la réunion. Trois documents en font partie. Il y a une note d'information générale décrivant la genèse du projet, les principes appliqués dans le cadre de la révision et la démarche adoptée pour améliorer le style et l'organisation du Règlement. Il y a la table des matières proposée et les sept premiers chapitres correspondants, qui constituent le fondement du déroulement des travaux à la Chambre. Il y a une annexe qui attire l'attention des députés sur des cas d'incohérence entre des règles, de divergence entre des règles et des usages ou de règles tombées en désuétude.[Traduction]

Lorsque possible, nous avons proposé des modifications pour améliorer la cohérence des règles et améliorer l'arrimage des règles à la pratique.

Il n'a jamais été question d'introduire de nouveaux concepts ou de recommander des changements importants à l'interprétation des dispositions.

Permettez-moi de prendre un peu de temps pour vous présenter certaines propositions précises visant à améliorer l'accessibilité du document.

Commençons par la table des matières. L'ajout de notes marginales et d'en-têtes à la table des matières proposée rendra le document plus facile à consulter que la version actuelle.

Les utilisateurs remarqueront aussi le changement du style de rédaction grâce à l'utilisation d'un langage clair et de la voix active. Nous avons aussi accordé une grande importance à la concision, ce qui améliore la clarté du texte et facilite la compréhension.

L'élimination des références internes est une amélioration importante qui facilite la compréhension de l'application du Règlement. Cela ne pose pas problème pour les spécialistes de la procédure, mais pour les nouveaux députés et employés qui ne connaissent pas très bien les procédures, les références internes sont un obstacle à la compréhension du Règlement et de l'interaction des diverses dispositions.

Dans la même veine, nous avons ajouté aux diverses dispositions des notes explicatives et des exceptions afin de cerner les liens avec d'autres dispositions, les exceptions quant à l'application du Règlement et les renvois aux instruments législatifs et constitutionnels.

Nous espérons que l'uniformisation de la terminologie permettra d'éliminer les redondances du texte dans les cas où les termes sont interprétés différemment.

Ce sont des exemples des modifications que nous proposons pour améliorer le style rédactionnel du Règlement. Je vais maintenant donner des exemples de la façon dont nous avons réorganisé le document pour faciliter la consultation.

Nous avons constaté que certains regroupements, dans de longs chapitres, n'aident pas vraiment le lecteur à trouver ce qu'il cherche. Par exemple, nous avons réorganisé le chapitre sur les procédures financières. Nous avons déplacé les procédures relatives aux débats sur le budget dans le chapitre sur les débats spéciaux. Nous avons regroupé les procédures sur les voies et les moyens et les motions ne pouvant pas faire l'objet d'un débat dans le chapitre sur les motions. Nous avons maintenu les procédures sur les travaux des subsides dans le chapitre sur les travaux des subsides.

Outre l'ajout d'un index, nous proposons aussi l'inclusion d'un glossaire qui, espérons-le, améliorera la compréhension du Règlement.[Français]

Nous avons terminé la première phase du projet pour tous les chapitres, à l'exception de celui sur les projets de loi d'intérêt privé. Nous avons constaté que le cadre envisagé dans le Règlement pour traiter les projets de loi d'intérêt privé est archaïque et inapplicable. Nous vous proposons donc des options sur les meilleures façons de moderniser ce chapitre.

Je sollicite vos commentaires sur tous les aspects du projet.[Traduction]

Nous sommes très reconnaissants de vos observations sur la façon d'améliorer l'accessibilité du Règlement et de l'adapter à vos besoins à titre de députés.

Je continuerai de vous fournir les nouveaux chapitres à mesure qu'ils seront prêts au cours des prochains mois. J'espère que ce dialogue progressif nous permettra de présenter une version révisée du Règlement qui vous sera utile, à vous et vos collègues, dans votre travail de parlementaires.

C'est avec plaisir que je répondrai à vos questions.

(1110)

Le président:

Je crois comprendre que lorsque ce sera terminé, le Comité l'étudiera lors de la prochaine législature dans le cadre de l'examen du Règlement prévu par la loi.

M. Charles Robert:

Vous avez habituellement l'occasion de débattre de ces questions au début d'une nouvelle législature. Vous pouvez soulever ce point si vous jugez que ce projet vous est utile, et puisque votre propre mandat vous y autorise, vous pouvez faire un examen approfondi pour déterminer s'il convient d'adopter ces changements, de manière permanente ou temporaire, pour voir s'ils vous aident à comprendre le Règlement et les pratiques de la Chambre.

Le président:

Avant de passer à la liste, quelqu'un a une question concernant l'horaire dont nous avons discuté?

Nous verrons pendant combien de temps les gens voudront rester lorsque la sonnerie se fera entendre. Nous commençons avec M. Simms, pour sept minutes.

M. Scott Simms (Coast of Bays—Central—Notre Dame, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le greffier, cela fait longtemps. Comment allez-vous?

Pour ceux qui n'étaient pas là la dernière fois, il y était.

Des députés: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Simms: Premièrement, je pense que vous avez entrepris un projet extraordinaire. Je pense que dans la plupart des cas, il aurait fallu le faire bien avant. Je n'ai pas la prétention d'être la personne la plus brillante autour de la table — Dieu m'en préserve —, mais parfois, lorsque je lis le Règlement, je me trouve à faire de la gymnastique mentale digne du Cirque du Soleil pour comprendre ce qui est écrit. Je passe d'un point à l'autre, puis à l'autre. Ce n'est tout simplement pas convivial pour le commun des mortels ou pour quiconque n'est pas jurilinguiste, pour utiliser le terme que vous avez employé.

Vous êtes venu nous présenter un document prêt à être examiné. Qu'est-ce qui vous a incité à entreprendre ce projet?

Le président:

Avant que vous répondiez à la question, j'aimerais savoir pendant combien de temps les membres du Comité sont prêts à rester pendant que la sonnerie se fait entendre.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Écoulons les sept minutes, puis...

Le président:

Très bien; nous allons continuer pendant environ sept minutes, puis nous ferons une pause. Nous reviendrons après.

Monsieur le greffier.

M. Charles Robert:

Pour moi, l'idée d'offrir un service proactif aux députés... Lorsqu'on lit le Règlement et qu'on voit le mot « conformément », on se demande toujours où cela va nous mener. J'ai fait l'exercice encore une fois ce matin. J'ai cherché le mot « conformément » — ici, par exemple — et il renvoyait à deux autres occurrences de « conformément ». Je ne pense pas que ce soit particulièrement utile. Je pense que les députés sont surchargés de travail et que les documents que vous devez utiliser et qui sont essentiels à votre travail ne devraient pas vous nuire. Ils devraient être rédigés de façon claire et compréhensible.

Vous devriez aussi être capables de trouver rapidement ce que vous cherchez. J'ai utilisé l'index ce matin. Je cherchais une disposition précise au sujet de la deuxième lecture. J'ai cherché dans le chapitre sur les projets de loi, puis dans celui sur les projets de loi d'intérêt public. Non, je devais consulter celui sur les projets de loi émanant du gouvernement. Donc, il faut parfois chercher un peu partout et je pense que cela peut être évité. Si nous parvenons à minimiser cela ou même à éliminer complètement cet obstacle, le Règlement sera moins intimidant et vous sera plus utile pour comprendre les pratiques qui régissent le fonctionnement de la Chambre ou des comités.

M. Scott Simms:

J'ai toujours été fasciné par votre connaissance des autres administrations. Ont-elles déjà entrepris un projet de cette envergure? Je devrais plutôt dire d'autres pays, pardon.

M. Charles Robert:

Eh bien, cela a été fait dans l'autre chambre de ce Parlement. Ce projet a été entrepris en 1998 et ne s'est terminé qu'en 2012. Je ne souhaite vraiment pas que ce soit le cas cette fois-ci.

M. Scott Simms:

Oh!

M. Charles Robert:

La nécessité d'une révision dépend vraiment de la façon dont le règlement d'autres administrations a été rédigé. Je sais qu'en Écosse, plusieurs éditions du règlement sont publiées presque chaque année, et il est de plus en plus complexe. Ils devront peut-être le modifier encore, parce qu'ils apportent toujours des ajustements, ce qui mène à une nouvelle version.

(1115)

M. Scott Simms:

Eh bien, c'est parce que c'est nouveau.

M. Charles Robert:

En effet.

M. Scott Simms:

Lorsque je suis allé en Écosse, j'ai remarqué que beaucoup de leurs règlements sont inspirés de pratiques exemplaires d'ailleurs, probablement parce qu'ils sont nouveaux. Cela dit, nous aurions dû le faire depuis longtemps.

Vous avez indiqué que vous souhaitez également clarifier le libellé et employer davantage la voix active. Pouvez-vous en dire plus à ce sujet?

M. Charles Robert:

Essentiellement, les choses sont plus faciles à comprendre lorsqu'on utilise la voie active plutôt que la voix passive. Je me souviens qu'au milieu des années 1980, il y avait eu un exercice pour le Règlement de la Chambre des communes et un exercice de révision du Règlement du Sénat. À la voix passive, la négation devient plutôt complexe, ce qui n'aide pas vraiment à comprendre comment appliquer le Règlement.

M. Scott Simms:

Vous avez aussi indiqué que l'index serait extrêmement utile.

M. Charles Robert:

Eh bien, dans le cas de la révision du Règlement du Sénat, l'index est passé de 102 à 22 pages grâce à l'intégration des notes marginales, des en-têtes et des sous-en-têtes qu'on trouve dans la table des matières. Cela a servi de guide pour créer l'index, ce qui a permis de le simplifier.

M. Scott Simms:

Cette modification me plaît aussi, car nous qui sommes parlementaires, nous avons d'autres tâches qui nous amènent à nos circonscriptions et ailleurs. J'ai constaté que je peux seulement me rattraper si le vol que je prends est long et si j'ai le temps de m'asseoir pour essayer d'absorber la matière. Grâce à l'index, je peux maintenant trouver les renseignements beaucoup plus rapidement; je suis donc tout à fait pour.

Vous avez parlé de l'automne. À mon avis, pour les comités comme pour le reste, le débat sur le Règlement, qui est tenu normalement en soirée peu après les élections, devrait avoir lieu un peu plus tard. Ainsi, les nouveaux députés pourraient se familiariser davantage avec le Règlement avant d'y apporter des modifications de fond. Nous ne pouvons pas tous être comme David Graham, pour l'amour du ciel.

Je pense que vous avez dit que c'est à ce moment-là, après les prochaines élections, que le prochain...

M. Charles Robert:

C'est certainement une possibilité.

M. Scott Simms:

Évidemment, ce serait beaucoup plus efficace de procéder ainsi.

M. Charles Robert:

Encore une fois, je suis ici pour vous aider, mais les décisions vous reviennent.

M. Scott Simms:

Vous êtes bon. Vous seriez excellent dans une mêlée de presse. Vous le savez, n'est-ce pas?

Merci, monsieur le greffier.

Le président:

Merci, mesdames et messieurs.

Nous allons suspendre la séance pour aller voter. Nous reviendrons après.

(1115)

(1155)

Le président:

Nous reprenons notre 148e séance.

Je donne la parole à M. Strahl. Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Mark Strahl:

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci de me permettre de participer à la séance d'aujourd'hui. Je suis ici au nom du leader de mon parti à la Chambre, Mme Candice Bergen, pour discuter du dossier à l'étude aujourd'hui.

M. Simms a appelé l'initiative « extraordinaire »; je ne suis pas du même avis. Quant à moi, on met la charrue devant les boeufs.

Comme vous le savez, lorsque vous avez été nommé au poste, nous étions au milieu d'un long débat de plusieurs semaines au sujet du Règlement. Nous nous demandions qui devrait proposer les modifications à y apporter, quel examen devrait en être fait, s'il devait y avoir consensus, etc.

Lorsque vous avez témoigné devant le Comité en février 2018, vous avez dit: « L'engagement que j'ai pris, c'est qu'aucun changement ne soit apporté au Règlement; » et « soyez assurés qu'aucun changement n'est recommandé dans le cadre de cet exercice. »

Vous nous avez donné « l'absolue garantie qu'aucun changement n'y serait apporté », et pourtant, nous avons devant nous 70 modifications, qui peuvent peut-être être considérées comme « extraordinaires », pour reprendre l'adjectif employé par M. Simms. Ma première question est donc: qui vous a autorisé à apporter ces changements ou qui vous a demandé de le faire? Pourquoi avez-vous pris l'initiative de modifier le Règlement? À mon avis, la décision de modifier le Règlement revient aux députés.

Par ailleurs, vous avez dit « nous » à maintes reprises durant votre exposé: « Nous avons décidé, nous avons fait telle chose. » Qui entendez-vous par « nous »? Qui a décidé que c'était une bonne idée d'aller de l'avant sans que les députés vous en aient donné le mandat?

(1200)

M. Charles Robert:

C'est moi qui ai pris l'initiative. Le but, comme je l'ai déjà dit, était d'agir de manière proactive pour aider les députés.

Les 70 modifications dont vous parlez sont celles qui sont surlignées en jaune. Nous reconnaissons qu'elles représentent des changements, et c'est pour cette raison que nous les avons surlignées ainsi. Nous les avons trouvées en faisant la révision.

Au bout du compte, rien ne changera à moins que les députés le veuillent. Je suis ici de bonne foi; j'essaie d'aider les députés en leur fournissant des outils que je trouve plus conviviaux. Je n'ai pas le pouvoir de prendre de mesures pouvant être considérées comme définitives. Ces décisions reviennent entièrement d'abord au Comité, puis à la Chambre, car le Règlement vous appartient.

Permettez-moi de le répéter: je suis ici de bonne foi; j'essaie de vous fournir des outils pour vous aider à mieux faire votre travail.

M. Mark Strahl:

Sauf votre respect, monsieur le greffier, vous avez aussi dit, durant votre témoignage en février 2018: « Si dans l'intervalle, par la négociation et la diffusion d'information, les leaders à la Chambre reconnaissent qu'il pourrait être bon de réécrire le Règlement [...], il me semble que ce serait un projet valable. »

Avez-vous consulté les leaders à la Chambre avant d'entreprendre ce projet?

M. Charles Robert:

J'ai consulté leurs chefs de cabinet.

M. Mark Strahl:

D'accord, vous me l'apprenez.

Je le répète, à mon avis, vous avez mis la charrue avant les boeufs. Les modifications que vous proposez méritent peut-être d'être adoptées ou examinées, mais la façon dont vous vous y êtes pris nous inquiète beaucoup.

M. Christopherson, qui n'est pas ici aujourd'hui, mais qui est un éminent membre du Comité, a dit durant la même séance: « Vous vous mettez à parler du Règlement, et d'après moi, le Règlement appartient à la Chambre et non au bureau du greffier. »

Je tiens à le redire clairement. J'ignore ce qui empêcherait maintenant un futur greffier ou n'importe quelle partie de l'appareil qui travaille pour les députés d'entreprendre de pareils projets de bonne foi. Il se peut qu'ils soient vraiment réalisés de bonne foi, mais s'ils ne sont pas dirigés par les membres du Comité ou par des députés de la Chambre, d'après moi, ils vont à l'encontre de ce que M. Christopherson a dit, c'est-à-dire qu'un tel travail devrait être fait à la demande de la Chambre.

Je le répète, il s'agit de notre Règlement. Le Président réitère constamment qu'il doit suivre le Règlement parce qu'il est un serviteur de la Chambre.

Je vais vous reposer la question, peut-être un peu différemment: qui vous a aidé à accomplir ce travail? Des employés du bureau du leader du gouvernement à la Chambre, du Bureau du Conseil privé ou du Bureau du Président vous ont-ils aidé à entreprendre ce projet et à produire le document que nous avons devant nous?

M. Charles Robert:

Aucune partie du projet n'a été dirigée par un employé des trois bureaux que vous venez de mentionner. Je le répète, c'est moi qui ai pris l'initiative, de bonne foi. Je ne me serais pas rendu aussi loin sans consulter les chefs de cabinet du leader du gouvernement à la Chambre, du leader de l'opposition à la Chambre et du leader du NPD à la Chambre.

Ils comprenaient ce que je faisais. Personne ne m'a dit de ne pas aller plus loin. Le but est d'aider la Chambre. Comme M. Christopherson l'a dit, je reconnais et je comprends parfaitement que je n'ai pas le pouvoir de mettre quoi que ce soit en oeuvre.

Comme dans le cas de l'examen que nous faisons en ce moment du Programme d'orientation des députés pour la période qui suivra les prochaines élections, notre but est d'améliorer le service que nous vous offrons. C'est notre unique intention.

Si vous croyez que ce travail est inapproprié ou déconseillé, c'est à vous de me dire d'arrêter, et j'arrêterai.

(1205)

M. Mark Strahl:

Vous me dites qu'aucun employé du Bureau du Conseil privé n'a été affecté pour vous aider à réaliser ce projet.

M. Charles Robert:

La personne dont vous parlez est un employé du Bureau du Conseil privé affecté à nous. Il a été engagé parce qu'il a travaillé pendant 10 ans au bureau du leader du gouvernement à la Chambre, avec le gouvernement conservateur et le gouvernement libéral. C'est un praticien qui a dû utiliser le Règlement quotidiennement. Nous avons donc pensé qu'il était bien placé pour nous conseiller sur la façon de le simplifier et de le réorganiser afin que les députés puissent y accéder plus facilement dans leur travail de tous les jours.

Le président:

Merci.

Je donne maintenant la parole à Mme Trudel. [Français]

Mme Karine Trudel (Jonquière, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je sais que je dois remplacer une grosse pointure, M. Christopherson, qui est absent aujourd'hui. Alors, je vais tenter de bien faire les choses et de bien le représenter.

Monsieur Robert, je vous remercie beaucoup de votre présentation. En fait, pour nous, il est trop tôt pour nous prononcer sur les modifications.

M. Charles Robert:

Évidemment, cela vous est présenté comme une ébauche. Alors, vous pouvez déterminer si vous trouvez cela acceptable ou pas. S'il faut faire d'autres changements ou rétablir quelques dispositions dans le libellé actuel, si c'est ce que vous préférez, ce sera à vous de le déterminer.

En fait, le présent propos est juste pour vous aider à examiner ce que vous aimeriez faire à l'égard du Règlement.

Mme Karine Trudel:

Si je comprends bien, nous avons eu droit à presque la moitié des chapitres. Dans combien de temps prévoyez-vous nous fournir le reste des modifications?

M. Charles Robert:

Nous sommes maintenant à la mi-avril. Alors, ce sera possiblement vers la fin de juin. Vous aurez une ébauche plus complète. Cela dépendra de l'horaire de travail des jurilinguistes, puisque ce sont eux qui, essentiellement, s'assurent que le français et l'anglais correspondent assez bien.

Mme Karine Trudel:

D'accord.

J'aimerais encore savoir si cela sera pour la prochaine législature.

M. Charles Robert:

C'est comme vous voulez. Cela est soumis à votre attention, c'est tout.

Mme Karine Trudel:

Alors, les députés devront décider s'ils discuteront de ce sujet à la Chambre des communes, en vue d'apporter les modifications au Règlement.

M. Charles Robert:

Exactement.

Mme Karine Trudel:

Cela pourrait donc avoir lieu lors de la prochaine session parlementaire ou de la prochaine législature.

M. Charles Robert:

Ou pas.

Mme Karine Trudel:

D'accord.

Donc, après avoir été renvoyé en comité, ce sera débattu à la Chambre.

M. Charles Robert:

C'est vous qui allez déterminer quoi faire de cela, finalement.

Mme Karine Trudel:

Donc, c'est nous qui décidons des dispositions du Règlement, si jamais notre comité doit les étudier et les mettre aux voix.

Vous dites que vous avez consulté les bureaux des leaders.

M. Charles Robert:

Au début, j'ai consulté les bureaux des leaders. Je leur ai présenté quelques ébauches pour savoir s'ils acceptaient mon objectif et si j'avais assez bien respecté ma parole de ne pas changer le Règlement sans vous aviser.

Mme Karine Trudel:

D'accord.

Si on décide de modifier le Règlement, faudra-t-il le consentement unanime des partis reconnus à la Chambre ou est-ce que ce sera la majorité qui l'emportera?

M. Charles Robert:

Encore une fois, j'imagine que la plupart des députés préféreront qu'il y ait consensus. Par le passé, l'adoption de changements au Règlement s'est parfois faite sur consentement de la majorité. Quand, au début des années 1970, on a fixé les limites de temps pour débattre des projets de loi, cela avait été adopté par la majorité. L'opposition s'y était opposée parce qu'elle ne voulait pas qu'on lui impose des contraintes de temps dans les débats aux différentes étapes des projets de loi.

(1210)

Mme Karine Trudel:

Merci beaucoup.

C'est tout pour moi. [Traduction]

Le président:

Avant de passer au prochain intervenant, j'aimerais mentionner que nous avons un invité spécial dans la salle: M. Derek Lee, qui était presque le doyen de la Chambre lorsqu'il est parti en 2011, après 23 ans de service. Il a été élu en 1988. Il a écrit un livre intitulé The Power of Parliamentary Houses to Send for Persons, Papers & Records: A Sourcebook on the Law and Precedent of Parliamentary Subpoena Powers for Canadian and other Houses.

À l'époque, en 1999, le député de Victoria—Haliburton a dit qu'il s'était endormi en lisant le titre, mais j'ai dit à Derek que je pensais que MM. Reid et Nater seraient très intéressés, car ils sont spécialistes dans ce domaine.

Bienvenue, monsieur Lee. Nous sommes ravis de vous revoir sur la Colline du Parlement.

Je donne maintenant la parole à M. Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup.

Je vais partager mon temps de parole avec M. Graham.

J'aimerais dire deux ou trois choses. Je demande pardon au témoin. Il y aura une question à la fin, mais j'ai quelques commentaires à faire.

C'est absolument incroyable que le whip de l'opposition, du Parti conservateur, se joigne à la discussion pour essayer d'en faire une question partisane. C'est la première fois qu'il participe à une séance du Comité et qu'il entend le témoin, un fonctionnaire qui a un bon bilan au Parlement. Il n'a présenté aucune question de fond — aucune.

La question à l'étude a été portée à notre attention plusieurs fois, et les conservateurs n'ont soulevé aucune préoccupation. Sa présence ici aujourd'hui et sa tentative de miner la crédibilité d'un fonctionnaire respecté correspondent aux gestes que nous avons vu les conservateurs poser durant les dernières années.

Pour des raisons que nous ignorons, M. Strahl est venu ici aujourd'hui pour chercher la querelle. Il a des bribes d'informations. Il est venu explicitement à la demande du leader à la Chambre, mais il n'a manifestement pas parlé aux personnes ayant été en communication avec le témoin. Il est venu ici dans le seul but de chercher la querelle, et c'est honteux.

Notre comité se heurte à des difficultés et il a des discussions animées, mais nous travaillons très bien ensemble. Comme j'ai pratiqué le droit, je sais qu'on préconise de plus en plus le langage clair, dans un effort de rendre les textes plus accessibles. Il y a une grande différence entre les décisions rédigées par les juges aujourd'hui et celles qui ont été écrites il y a 20, 30 ou 40 ans, même aux niveaux les plus élevés. Les dossiers ne sont pas plus simples aujourd'hui; c'est qu'on cherche à rendre le droit plus accessible à la population et aux clients.

Nous avons ici une initiative qui vise à rendre le Règlement plus accessible non seulement aux parlementaires, mais aussi à la population canadienne. Il s'agit d'un dossier complexe qui ne peut pas nécessairement être traité par un seul député, et pourtant, vous venez ici pour chercher la querelle. C'est incroyable.

Des députés: Ha, ha!

M. Chris Bittle: Les conservateurs veulent en rire; c'est leur droit. Eux qui n'ont jamais soulevé de préoccupations à ce sujet, ils trouvent cela drôle. Ce comportement s'incrit dans leur démarche et leur approche.

Monsieur Robert, ma question est la suivante: quand avez-vous proposé pour la première fois d'apporter des modifications au Règlement en vue d'en simplifier le langage? Quand en avez-vous parlé pour la première fois au Comité?

M. Charles Robert:

Je ne me rappelle pas exactement. Je l'ai peut-être mentionné à la première séance à laquelle j'ai participé après que le gouvernement a reçu mon certificat de nomination. Si ce n'était pas à ce moment-là, c'était à ma comparution suivante devant le Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

M. Chris Bittle:

Des chefs de cabinet des leaders à la Chambre vous ont-ils fait part de préoccupations lorsque vous leur avez présenté votre plan ou lorsque vous avez fait le point sur vos progrès?

M. Charles Robert:

L'un d'eux a soulevé... Il n'a pas soulevé de préoccupations, mais il m'a posé des questions pour s'assurer que si le projet allait de l'avant, aucun changement de fond ne serait apporté au Règlement et que je respectais bel et bien l'engagement que j'avais pris.

M. Chris Bittle:

Des changements de fond ont-ils été apportés au Règlement?

M. Charles Robert:

Comme c'est expliqué dans les documents que vous avez reçus, le dernier document, l'annexe, contient des changements surlignés en jaune. Je pense qu'ils sont aussi en jaune dans le texte. Il s'agit de découvertes que nous avons faites.

Par exemple, nous avons suggéré de supprimer l'heure du souper puisque vous n'en tenez plus compte. Nous avons aussi suggéré de nommer le jour férié du mois de mai la fête de Victoria, plutôt que le jour fixé pour la célébration de l'anniversaire du souverain. Le document contient des modifications de ce genre; certaines sont peut-être plus importantes.

Une des modifications plus importantes concerne la sanction royale par déclaration écrite quand la Chambre siège. C'est un détail qui a été oublié.

Nous avons inclus les changements de ce genre, qui touchent des détails que nous avons découverts durant la réécriture. Nous les avons surlignés dans le but précis de respecter notre engagement.

(1215)

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci.

Je vais céder la parole à M. Graham, en soulignant que modifier le nom d'un jour férié sans changer l'inclusion de ce jour férié n'est pas une modification de fond qui justifie la mise en doute de la crédibilité d'un fonctionnaire.

Je vais donner le reste de mon temps de parole à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Combien de temps me reste-t-il?

Le président:

Il vous reste deux minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais les employer judicieusement.

Je comprends l'argument de Chris, mais je vais revenir aux fondements.

Vous avez parlé au début du Programme d'orientation des députés. Durant l'orientation des députés en 2015, il y a eu une excellente réunion dans la pièce 237-C. Tout le monde était invité, et on nous a emmenés à la Chambre. J'aimerais proposer que vous utilisiez les cloches pour appeler les nouveaux députés. Je veux que ma proposition figure au compte rendu pour que ce soit fait.

Des greffiers ont-ils déjà proposé de telles modifications dans le passé?

M. Charles Robert:

J'ai participé à un projet pareil quand j'étais au Sénat.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comme ce projet s'est-il passé?

M. Charles Robert:

Comme je l'ai déjà dit, il a pris 14 ans.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Cela s'est-il fait?

M. Charles Robert:

Oui, cela s'est fait. Voilà comment les choses se sont passées... C'est une mesure qui a été d'abord proposée par un Président. Son mandat a pris fin, mais le projet s'est poursuivi et le comité du Règlement a décidé qu'il était effectivement valable de le réaliser. Ils se sont engagés activement à participer à la tâche. C'est le fait qu'une ébauche avait été préparée pour eux qui les a encouragés à entreprendre ce projet.

Ce n'est pas un travail amusant. Il est très difficile de le faire. Ce n'était pas plus plaisant, même à l'époque du comité McGrath, en 1984 et 1985. Les députés ne se réjouissent pas de travailler sur la révision du Règlement. C'est plus gérable quand on a une ébauche à partir de laquelle travailler. On peut ainsi décider s'il y a quelque chose qui ne va pas, changer le libellé ou l'améliorer, si quelque chose n'est pas assez bon, n'a pas sa place ou devrait être ailleurs.

Pour que cela vaille le coup de mettre à jour le Règlement, il faut vraiment avoir une ébauche à partir de laquelle il est possible de dire si l'on accepte, rejette ou modifie quelque chose.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Graham.

Avant de poursuivre, je constate qu'il y a un autre invité ici, M. Paul Szabo. Au moment de son départ de la Chambre, il était un peu comme Kevin Lamoureux, dans la mesure où il avait pris la parole plus de 2 000 fois plus que n'importe qui d'autre.

Bon retour, Paul.

Nous passons maintenant à M. Nater qui disposera de cinq minutes.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci, monsieur le greffier.

Parlant du comité McGrath, je tiens à dire que c'était une question que j'ai étudiée de façon assez intensive quand j'étais à l'université. Le chef de cabinet du comité McGrath était un de mes amis proches. Je suis sûr qu'il aurait des observations fascinantes à formuler au sujet de ce processus.

Je tiens à commencer en vous posant des questions au sujet de votre nomination initiale. A-t-on parlé avec vous de la réécriture du Règlement pendant le processus de nomination?

M. Charles Robert:

Je ne me souviens pas qu'on m'en ait parlé.

M. John Nater:

De plus, je voudrais vous parler des consultations que vous avez eues avec les chefs de cabinet des leaders parlementaires des partis reconnus. Pourriez-vous nous fournir les documents qui ont été utilisés dans le cadre de ces consultations?

M. Charles Robert:

Je pourrais probablement vous donner les dates des réunions qui ont lieu parce que je les note normalement. Je pourrais tenter de me souvenir de certaines des conversations. Ce serait à peu près tout.

M. John Nater:

Nous vous en serions reconnaissants.

J'aimerais revenir sur quelque chose que vous avez dit. Vous avez parlé de la première fois que l'idée de la réécriture du Règlement a été mentionnée au Comité. Je tiens à souligner que c'était en réponse à une question posée de notre côté au sujet de rumeurs qui couraient au sujet du détachement possible d'un fonctionnaire du BCP au groupe qui travaille sur ce projet.

Les premières informations à ce propos qui ont été données au Comité l'ont été dans une réponse à une question que nous avions posée sur ce détachement.

J'aimerais savoir combien de temps du personnel a été consacré à ce projet jusqu'à présent.

(1220)

M. Charles Robert:

J'aurais un calcul à faire pour le savoir. Je suis sûr que plusieurs personnes y ont participé. Nous avons entamé le projet il y a à peu près un an, en janvier dernier.

M. John Nater:

Qui sont les personnes principales qui ont travaillé sur ce projet jusqu'à présent? Est-ce l'agent détaché du BCP?

M. Charles Robert:

L'agent détaché du BCP a été chargé du projet à ma demande.

M. John Nater:

Qui d'autre y a participé?

M. Charles Robert:

Plusieurs greffiers principaux à la procédure de la Direction des recherches pour le bureau y ont participé. Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, plusieurs jurilinguistes qui travaillent avec les avocats du Bureau du légiste y ont également participé.

M. John Nater:

J'ai une autre question à poser au sujet du Règlement annoté. N'aurait-il pas été plus simple de faire une nouvelle ébauche du Règlement annoté pour l'expliquer plutôt que de le réécrire au complet?

M. Charles Robert:

Le Règlement annoté a été édité une deuxième fois il y a quelques années, mais l'objectif n'était pas de modifier le texte du Règlement. Or, c'est vraiment l'objectif de ce projet. Le Règlement annoté vous aurait peut-être offert un compte rendu à jour sur la manière dont le Règlement est utilisé.

L'objectif était vraiment de modifier le texte, encore une fois, pour le rendre plus accessible. L'objectif est clair, lorsque l'on compare la table des matières actuelle et la table des matières proposée. Dans la table des matières actuelle, la page est vide. Dans la table des matières proposée du Règlement révisé, on trouve un contenu analytique qui permet d'identifier les dispositions — et les paragraphes dans certains cas — précis que l'on voudrait consulter. Encore une fois, il s'agit d'une mesure proactive que j'ai proposée pour aider la Chambre et les députés.

M. John Nater:

Vous avez parlé de changer le nom des jours fériés, notamment de remplacer « le jour fixé pour la célébration de l’anniversaire du Souverain » par « la fête de Victoria ». C'est une question qui a été soulevée lors de la dernière législature, et les partis reconnus n'étaient pas parvenus à un consensus à l'époque à ce sujet. Ainsi, même quand il s'agit d'une chose qui semble relativement simple ou anodine, certains partis pourraient avoir des raisons, que ce soit l'heure du souper ou la date, de ne pas vouloir que cela soit modifié. C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles il est essentiel, comme nous l'avons déjà dit, que nous parvenions à un consensus lorsqu'il est question de modifier le Règlement.

Je tiens à passer à un autre point. Combien de temps me reste-t-il, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Il vous reste un peu plus d'une minute.

M. John Nater:

En ce qui concerne les changements proposés ou qui pourraient l'être dans l'avenir... L'année dernière seulement, nous avons célébré la parution de la troisième édition de l'ouvrage La procédure et les usages de la Chambre des communes, de Bosc et Gagnon. J'aimerais savoir s'il y a quoi que ce soit dans ce projet de réécriture qui nous forcera à réécrire ce livre qui est presque neuf.

M. Charles Robert:

Nous pouvons vous fournir un tableau comparatif. Si vous décidez d'accepter le Règlement révisé, nous pourrons vous fournir un tableau de concordance qui vous permettra de consulter le Règlement tel qu'il était organisé avant. C'est ce qui s'est fait à la Chambre des communes et au Sénat lorsque nous traversions une période de transition. Cela permettait aux députés et aux sénateurs d'accéder plus facilement à l'information qu'ils cherchaient.

M. John Nater:

J'ai un dernier commentaire à faire. Si nous allons de l'avant avec ce genre de changements au Règlement, je suis toujours convaincu, peu importe combien les changements semblent minimes, qu'ils doivent être apportés par les parlementaires, comme l'a fait McGrath, ou comme cela a été fait dans les autres législatures. C'est la direction qui devrait être prise. Ce projet devrait être mené par les parlementaires.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Nater.

Nous revenons à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le processus de révision du Règlement du Sénat a pris 14 ans? Est-ce 12 ou 14 ans?

M. Charles Robert:

Le processus a duré 14 ans.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est ce que je pensais vous avoir entendu dire.

Je suis ici depuis longtemps, mais pas encore depuis 14 ans.

Est-ce qu'il y a eu un moment dans le processus au Sénat où c'est devenu une question partisane?

M. Charles Robert:

Non.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quand on adopte un rapport et qu'on le présente à la Chambre, on adopte toujours une motion. J'oublie comment c'était formulé. La dernière motion adoptée voulait que l'on donne la permission au greffier du Comité et à l'analyste d'apporter des corrections, au besoin. L'avez-vous par hasard sous la main?

Le greffier du comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

Cela ne me vient pas spontanément. Je peux vous la trouver, mais elle voulait en gros que le greffier, l'analyste et le président aient l'autorisation d'apporter des corrections.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ces changements seraient-ils admissibles si nous vous envoyions le Règlement?

M. Charles Robert:

Non, ils ne le seraient pas de cette façon-là.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Quand vous avez modifié l'article 71 du Règlement pour corriger une faute de frappe qui est restée là pendant je ne sais combien de temps...

M. Charles Robert:

Une faute de frappe constitue une petite correction. Ce qu'on propose va bien au-delà de cela.

(1225)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Nous avons commencé à étudier la question en conformité avec l'article 51 du Règlement le 6 octobre 2016 — ou à peu près. Quand vous vous êtes penché dessus, avez-vous examiné les discours prononcés dans le débat, ou est-ce que vous tentez d'examiner le Règlement de façon objective tout en prévoyant de soulever auprès de nous les problèmes qui pourraient subvenir?

M. Charles Robert:

C'était essentiellement une tentative objective d'offrir un service aux députés.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Comme il a été précisé précédemment, vous ne pouvez rien faire sans notre approbation de toute façon.

M. Charles Robert:

Bien sûr.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Bien sûr. D'accord.

Il ne me reste pas beaucoup de questions à ce sujet, mais une des questions que j'aimerais poser porte sur l'article 31 du Règlement. Va-t-il continuer d'exister, car il est important?

M. Charles Robert:

Nous avons proposé un nouveau système de numérotation. Si vous souhaitez conserver la convention de numérotation consécutive, c'est une décision, encore une fois, que vous pouvez prendre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est tout ce que j'ai à poser comme questions pour le moment, mais si on continue, il se peut que je vous en pose une autre.

Merci, monsieur le greffier.

Le greffier:

Le texte de la motion que vous avez mentionné se lit comme suit: « [...] le président, le greffier et l’analyste soient autorisés à apporter au rapport les modifications jugées nécessaires (erreurs de grammaire et de style). »

Le président:

Nous passons à M. Reid qui disposera de cinq minutes.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci beaucoup.

Je suis membre de ce comité depuis longtemps. Nous avons déjà auparavant géré de façon assez exhaustive des cas de changements proposés au Règlement. La tendance a été d'en discuter ad nauseam sans forcément produire de changements concrets en raison du manque de consensus.

Nous sommes allés assez loin au cours de la dernière législature, et je crois que ces discussions ont eu lieu à huis clos. Y avez-vous eu accès?

M. Charles Robert:

Non.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous n'y avez pas eu accès. D'accord.

Nos règles — je devrais le savoir, mais je ne le sais pas et vous êtes le mieux placé pour me répondre — vous permettent-elles, en tant que greffier, d'avoir accès à des réunions à huis clos de comités?

M. Charles Robert:

Je ne suis pas sûr, mais j'en doute fortement, et je ne tenterais pas le coup.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord, mais il pourrait être utile que vous ayez accès à une partie des discussions. Il faut peut-être que le Comité adopte une motion, de sorte que...

Le président:

Nous pourrions le faire si nous le voulons.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, prenons un moment pour nous assurer que je ne dis pas n'importe quoi à ce sujet, mais nous pourrions demander à notre greffier ou à nos analystes de jeter un coup d'oeil sur les discussions qui ont été tenues au cours de la dernière législature.

Il y a eu des discussions pour donner une idée de ce qui faisait consensus et de ce qui ne faisait pas consensus et c'est donc une idée. Bien des gens ne sont pas au courant de ces choses, car il y a eu des changements substantiels au Comité après les élections de 2015.

Je veux parler de deux ou trois questions qui me préoccupent. L'ouvrage dont le titre change toujours en fonction de ses plus récents auteurs... C'est présentement Gagnon et Bosc. Auparavant, c'était...

M. Charles Robert:

O'Brien et Bosc.

M. Scott Reid:

O'Brien et Bosc. Je suis mêlé. Quoi qu'il en soit, il y a eu un certain nombre de noms. Cet ouvrage est mis à jour de temps en temps, et dès qu'il est publié, il commence à ne plus être à jour.

Est-ce que le projet auquel vous travaillez fait en sorte que la prochaine mouture — à laquelle, bien sûr, vous participerez activement puisqu'il n'y a pas d'autres moyens de procéder — sera reportée, ou croyez-vous que...

M. Charles Robert:

Eh bien, cela dépend. Si votre comité et la Chambre décident d'accepter la proposition dont vous êtes saisis, il se pourrait qu'on révise rapidement l'ouvrage pour en faire une nouvelle édition.

Nous pourrions, comme le font les Australiens, faire une mise à jour de l'ouvrage en ligne tous les six mois et le publier tous les deux ans.

M. Scott Reid:

L'expérience a-t-elle été réussie, selon vous?

M. Charles Robert:

Ce serait très utile en ce sens que l'ouvrage serait tenu à jour. L'ouvrage de référence de l'Australie, House of Representatives Practice, en est à sa septième édition, et il a été publié pour la première fois il y a environ 20 ans.

Odgers', qui est l'ouvrage du Sénat du Parlement d'Australie, en est à sa 14e ou 15e édition. L'ouvrage d'Erskine May, qui a été publié pour la première fois en 1844, en sera bientôt à sa 25e édition.

Ce qui se passera concernant la prochaine édition de La procédure et les usages de la Chambre des communes, c'est que, encore une fois, dans le but que ce soit utile, l'ouvrage contiendra une section sur ce que les députés doivent savoir pour chaque chapitre. En lisant et en étudiant l'ouvrage — et ce n'est vraiment pas une critique; je veux que ce soit bien clair —, j'ai découvert que dans le chapitre qui porte sur les questions orales — et je suis connu pour cela, car je ne lâche pas prise —, ce n'est qu'à la note de bas de page 41 qu'on indique que vous disposez d'au plus 35 secondes.

Un député: Oui.

M. Charles Robert: Cette information ne figure pas dans le libellé du chapitre. Pourtant, il me semble que c'est une information importante pour vous, les députés, mais dans les trois éditions, elle se trouve à la note de bas de page 41.

Un député: Oui.

M. Charles Robert: C'est qu'il s'agit d'un élément qui est respecté, mais qui ne fait pas partie de nos pratiques; cela n'a pas été officialisé, mais les leaders parlementaires ont convenu que les choses fonctionneraient de cette façon, et c'est respecté fidèlement depuis.

Lorsqu'il s'agit d'informer les députés, il me semble qu'il est bon de savoir cela.

(1230)

M. Scott Reid:

C'est un très bon exemple.

Mon temps est-il écoulé? M'en reste-t-il un peu?

Le président:

Il vous reste 45 secondes.

M. Scott Reid:

J'aimerais bien qu'on revienne sur le sujet un peu plus tard, peut-être dans un autre tour.

Je veux dire que très peu de députés utilisent le Règlement annoté de la Chambre des communes, mais c'est un ouvrage vraiment très utile. À mon avis, on ne le met pas à jour aussi souvent qu'on le devrait. C'est la première chose. Je crois qu'on devrait le mettre à jour d'abord. C'est juste pour dire que je ne voudrais pas que le Règlement soit modifié substantiellement, particulièrement quant à l'ordre dans lequel le contenu y est présenté, sans qu'un Règlement annoté de la Chambre des communes soit publié en même temps.

Autrement, nous n'avons pas cet outil tant et aussi longtemps que ce n'est pas publié. J'imagine que tout ce que vous me répondrez, c'est que vous êtes d'accord avec moi, mais je devrais vous poser la question. Êtes-vous d'accord avec moi?

M. Charles Robert:

C'est un bon point.

C'est un aspect que nous prendrions en considération, mais encore une fois, tout dépendra de ce que vous voulez concernant le Règlement. Je serai tout à fait disposé à me retirer. Mon intention n'était pas de poser un geste provocateur.

Comme je l'ai déjà dit, j'ai pris cette initiative de bonne foi. Si cela suscite la controverse, c'est exactement l'opposé de ce que je voulais.

M. Scott Reid:

Je comprends très bien.

Merci.

Le président:

Je vais maintenant faire ce que nous faisons souvent à notre comité, c'est-à-dire donner la parole à quiconque veut poser une question ou faire une observation.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Personnellement, je vois cela comme un effort objectif et je vous remercie. Je voulais seulement le dire.

Le président:

Merci.

Vous voulez intervenir à nouveau?

D'accord.

M. Scott Reid:

Si l'on revient à moi, je peux maintenant poser la question que j'allais poser avant que mon temps s'écoule.

Concernant le volume qui est présentement l'O'Brien et Bosc, il y aurait de nombreuses références à...

M. Charles Robert:

Excusez-moi, mais c'est Bosc et Gagnon.

M. Scott Reid:

J'en suis désolé — je voulais dire Bosc et Gagnon. C'était O'Brien et Bosc, n'est-ce pas?

M. Charles Robert:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

J'ai le même problème...

M. Charles Robert:

Il est préférable de s'en tenir à Erskine May, peu importe qui est le responsable.

M. Scott Reid:

Vous savez — vous avez totalement raison. C'est la meilleure pratique à adopter. C'est une pratique exemplaire.

J'ai la même impression par rapport aux cabinets d'avocats, qui changent de noms, soit dit en passant.

Ma question porte sur ce volume. Il y est question du Règlement tel qu'il existe. Bien sûr, il change. Il y a un problème. J'ignore comment le résoudre. Si l'on numérote de nouveau le Règlement, dans un sens, il sera alors difficile de faire ces références. Ce volume sera moins utile jusqu'à ce qu'il soit mis à jour.

M. Charles Robert:

Ce sera le cas, à moins que vous y accédiez en ligne. Je crois qu'il y a un moyen de trouver les changements, de sorte qu'avec les hyperliens... Je ne suis pas un génie de l'informatique, mais je crois qu'il y a des moyens, dans la version en ligne de l'ouvrage, d'intégrer les changements qui identifieraient le nouveau règlement par rapport à l'ancien.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui.

Je pense que nous voudrions avoir quelque chose qui satisferait tout le monde avant d'essayer de faire quoi que ce soit qui comprendrait des changements dans la numérotation, précisément pour cette raison.

Je ne peux penser à un aspect qui nécessite plus clairement un vaste consensus avant qu'on procède à des modifications.

M. Charles Robert:

Pour ce qui est de la différence entre le Règlement annoté et l'ouvrage et la raison pour laquelle on porte plus d'attention à l'ouvrage, c'est parce qu'il est plus volumineux, si vous me permettez de plaisanter.

L'autre chose, c'est que le but des mises à jour, c'est de suivre les précédents, qui ne cessent de s'ajouter avec les différentes décisions.

(1235)

M. Scott Reid:

C'est vrai.

Je voulais seulement soulever cet autre point.

Je vous remercie de votre indulgence, monsieur le président.

Le président:

D'accord.

Quelqu'un d'autre?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'aimerais faire quelques observations.

Le président:

Il serait préférable que vous posiez des questions.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

J'en ai une. Elle ne présente en quelque sorte qu'un rapport indirect avec la discussion, mais vous avez parlé de l'ouvrage La procédure et les usages de la Chambre des communes. Comment pouvons-nous briser le cercle vicieux quant à cet ouvrage? Il y a beaucoup de choses, mais l'exemple que je préfère concerne le port de la cravate à la Chambre. Selon La procédure et les usages de la Chambre des communes, il faut porter une tenue de ville moderne, ce qui inclut, aujourd'hui, la cravate. Si un député se lève et qu'il ne porte pas de cravate, le Président lui dit qu'il ne peut prendre la parole parce qu'il ne porte pas de cravate, parce que c'est ce que dit l'ouvrage. L'ouvrage le dit parce que le Président le dit.

Comment pouvons-nous briser ce cercle vicieux?

M. Charles Robert:

Vous présentez à la Chambre un rapport du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre pour dire qu'il s'agit d'une pratique ridicule que vous voulez laisser tomber.

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, vous vous souviendrez peut-être que nous avons essayé de le faire et que nous n'avons pas pu nous entendre.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je sais. Je veux seulement dire que c'est un cercle vicieux; il ne s'agit pas de cet exemple en tant que tel.

M. Scott Reid:

Me permettez-vous d'intervenir?

C'est vrai. Le Président fait référence à l'ouvrage.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, mais l'ouvrage fait référence au Président.

M. Scott Reid:

Je sais, mais l'ouvrage est simplement une compilation des décisions des Présidents qui ont précédé. Ce n'est pas qu'il fait autorité, à moins qu'il contienne une erreur par accident et que par conséquent, il est cité sur la base d'une supposition erronée quant à ce qui a été dit par d'anciens Présidents. L'idée selon laquelle la cravate est un élément d'une tenue de ville moderne pour les hommes correspond peut-être à une convention en déclin. Ce serait l'argument que présenterait un certain nombre de nos collègues — M. Housefather, par exemple —, qui pourraient fort bien avoir raison. Nous avons vu les choses évoluer. Le meilleur exemple auquel je peux penser à cet égard, c'est notre attitude par rapport aux couvre-chefs à la Chambre. Ils n'étaient pas autorisés à une certaine époque. Puis, à un moment donné, une personne qui avait subi des traitements de chimiothérapie s'est levée pour prendre la parole et elle portait quelque chose sur sa tête. On s'est alors rendu compte que quelque chose avait changé lorsque le Président a donné la parole à cette personne.

Il y a donc moyen de le faire. Je dirais que si l'on obtient un vaste consensus et que le Président donne ensuite la parole à quelqu'un et que personne ne dit quoi que ce soit à ce sujet, cela indique qu'il y a un changement. Or, il faut un vaste consensus. Par ailleurs, on peut simplement faire modifier un règlement. Une loi l'emporte toujours sur ce qui est convenu.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

De telles choses ne sont pas dans la loi. Ce sont des conventions.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est ce que je dis. La loi l'emporte toujours sur les conventions.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

Dans quelle mesure le Président est-il tenu de respecter les décisions de ses prédécesseurs?

M. Charles Robert:

Il est certain qu'elles ont du poids et qu'elles doivent être prises en considération. S'il y a une distinction à faire, il faut que les circonstances puissent donner au Président une certaine marge de manoeuvre pour dévier. Les différences dans les distinctions importent.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui.

Si nous voulons examiner vos suggestions plus en profondeur — et j'estime que nous devrions le faire, ou du moins les examiner, car je crois que c'est notre responsabilité — quelle est la démarche à suivre? Les examinerions-nous une à la fois, comme nous le faisons dans une étude article par article, ou nous faudrait-il considérer cela comme un changement qu'on ne peut diviser facilement?

M. Charles Robert:

Si vous parlez de l'initiative de réécriture du Règlement, avec votre permission, je continuerais de le faire. Cependant, cela peut mener quelque part ou ne mener nulle part; tout dépend de ce que vous en pensez.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ce que je veux dire, c'est que vous avez proposé 70 modifications jusqu'à maintenant.

M. Charles Robert:

Ce sont seulement celles qui sont surlignées en jaune que j'ai portées à votre attention. Je ne m'accorde pas la liberté d'intégrer cela dans une simple réécriture. Je crois que c'est un peu plus que cela. Comme l'a dit M. Nater, et c'est tout à fait vrai, s'il y a des raisons pour lesquelles on choisit de ne rien changer, alors on ne devrait rien changer.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce que bon nombre des modifications découlent d'autres modifications, ou ce n'est pas le cas pour la plupart d'entre elles?

M. Charles Robert:

Je crois que certaines des modifications ne sont essentiellement que des observations. Si une pratique a été abandonnée, alors est-il vraiment bon, dans le cadre d'une mise à jour ou d'une réécriture, de la conserver? Si vous voulez la conserver, vous le pouvez. Encore une fois, c'est à vous de décider. J'essaie seulement de vous aider. Je n'essaie pas de m'en mêler.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

J'ai une dernière brève remarque à faire. Si nous devions numéroter de nouveau le Règlement — je pense que plusieurs numéros ont été omis au fil des ans —, nous parlerions, en anglais, de « renumeration ». Pour l'idée de « donner de l'argent », les gens disent « renumeration », mais ce n'est pas du tout cela. C'est ma bête noire, car « remuneration » signifie recevoir de l'argent et « renumeration » signifie renuméroter un système.

Nous avons enfin le bon emploi de « renumeration ». Je vous en remercie.

(1240)

Le président:

Monsieur, si l'on devait aller de l'avant — et je crois que Mme Trudel a posé la question —, quand présenteriez-vous une proposition complète pour que le gouvernement ou le Comité puissent l'examiner?

M. Charles Robert:

Si vous vouliez avoir une version complète du Règlement révisé, je crois qu'elle pourrait être prête à la fin de juin.

Le président:

Au moment où nous ne siégeons pas.

M. Charles Robert:

Eh bien, encore une fois, ce n'est pas mon affaire, mais je n'ai pas pensé qu'elle pourrait être adoptée. Je crois qu'elle a été essentiellement soumise à l'examen du Comité.

Le président:

D'accord.

Avez-vous d'autres questions à poser au greffier?

Je vous remercie beaucoup pour tous vos efforts. Le personnel a travaillé fort pour simplifier nos travaux. C'est à suivre.

Y a-t-il autre chose avant que nous levions la séance?

Voilà un grand sourire, madame Trudel. Vous êtes prête pour la levée de la séance? D'accord.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on April 09, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.