header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-05-09 INDU 161

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology

(0950)

[English]

The Chair (Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)):

We're moving on to the second portion of our committee today. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(2), we're going to do a study of the subject matter of private member's motion 208 on rural digital infrastructure.

Today we have with us the mover of that private member's motion, William Amos, MP from Pontiac.

Sir, you have 10 minutes. You have the floor.

Mr. William Amos (Pontiac, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

I appreciate the speed with which you and our colleagues here have agreed to address this issue. I want to thank the members, both of the party I belong to but also members opposite for their unanimous support yesterday. I think that puts Parliament in a good light, and I think this is obviously a crucial issue for Canadians coast to coast. Whether you live in urban or rural Canada, you care that rural Canada is connected.

The exclamation point was placed on this issue in the Pontiac context by the tornado last year and the floods this year. I don't want to wax poetic about that stuff. People who are suffering from floods currently, who have basements underwater, want us to get down to brass tacks, so I'll try to do that today.

I appreciate the opportunity to speak to this before you and I appreciate also that you organized as a committee to get to this quickly. [Translation]

I know that the people in my riding of Pontiac are grateful to you, as well as all of those who live in Canada's rural regions.

Of course the digital infrastructure is an important issue that includes various aspects touching on regulation, finances and the private sector, and the influence of federal, provincial and municipal governments is not always clear.

Since last November, that is to say since I tabled the motion, the situation has changed somewhat because of Budget 2019. We have to be very honest and very clear about that. When a government makes promises and plans for large budgets of approximately $5 billion, it is because, in my opinion, it recognizes the importance of this issue.[English]

Since this motion was first brought forward, the government, with its 2019 budget, has really taken a major step forward. Major steps were taken prior. In the 2016 budget, there was $500 million over five years for connect to innovate. That money has been brought forward in a variety of ridings, my own included, where 20 million dollars' worth of projects have been announced as compared with $1.2 million to $1.3 million in the riding of Pontiac in the decade prior. Major steps are being taken already, but this new budgetary investment is really important.

Where do we go from here? How does the study that would move forward through INDU advance this? I think we need to look to the new Minister of Rural Economic Development. I think we need to appreciate the fact that the government has seen fit to establish this new institution, which is great news for rural Canada, and recognize the responsibility of Minister Bernadette Jordan to develop that strategy and incorporate the issue of digital infrastructure. When one reads the text of the motion, which goes specifically to cellular infrastructure, it's there that we find the first nexus of interest between where this Liberal government is going and where this unanimous motion brings us.

The connection is the following. Such significant investments are planned to be made for the next several years, over $5 billion in a decade, including a new universal broadband fund of $1.7 billion and the CRTC's fund of $750 million over five years that is on the cusp of opening. These are such significant funds that Canadians have reason to be optimistic, but there needs to be greater clarity, in my mind, as to how cellular infrastructure is enabled through this.

Like most Canadians, I'm not a technical expert. I don't know how fibre-to-home infrastructure outlay can enable cellphone service, but I am led to believe that it does. I think that what we need to see is clarity so that the Canadian public has confidence that these investments that are forthcoming will deliver not just high-speed Internet results on the ground for rural Canada, but also cellphone results. Obviously, both are crucial for economic development reasons, for community preservation and development reasons, and also for public safety reasons, as has been discussed in the House during the course of debate around M-208.

I think that it would be a valuable contribution on the part of this committee to discuss how cellular infrastructure can be accelerated through the government's own plans and to also draw upon witness testimony to secure the best ideas possible for achieving this.

I note that this committee has done very good work in relation to Internet in rural Canada. I appreciate that. I applaud that.

(0955)

[Translation]

However, the specific issue of mobile or cellular telephony infrastructure has not been discussed in a complete manner. It would be essential to do so. About ten mayors in the Pontiac believe that this is one of three priorities in the region, and I know that this is also true in other regions of Canada.

In addition to the technical and economic aspects, I would like to see this committee discuss the public safety aspect. The mayor of Waltham, Mr. David Rochon, told me that he would like us to send carrier pigeons to his community so that people can communicate better. He does not think that there will be a mobile telephony system to respond to emergencies, such as when people ask for sandbags or more precise information about water levels.

If the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security does not have time to consider this matter, it would be important for this committee to do so.[English]

I think I'll conclude by requesting that a critical eye be brought, with regard to the role of the CRTC and its regulatory and incentive-creating functions, to help generate a greater impetus towards Internet and cellphone infrastructure development. The 2016 report, “Let's Talk Broadband”, brought some significant advances in terms of establishing standard upload and download rates, defining what high speed is, identifying this as a crucial issue and enabling the creation of a fund. That $750 million over five years I'm sure will be put to good use. I think, though, that we as parliamentarians need to engage in a dialogue with the CRTC to explore what more can be done, and this committee, I believe, is the ideal organ for that dialogue.

We now have before us the CRTC's preferred approach. Does Parliament believe this is adequate?

I for one don't believe that $750 million over five years is sufficient. I believe that the CRTC can go further, and I would like to also explore the Telecommunications Act, which is presently being reviewed. I would like to see how the act enables the deployment of cellphone and Internet infrastructure, and how it could be augmented to better enable it.

With those comments, colleagues, I appreciate the opportunity. Thank you also for the support. I think this motion is demonstrating some positive collegiality, and that's appreciated.

(1000)

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

We're going to rush right into questions, starting off with Mr. Graham.

You have seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Amos, for guiding us in the right direction on the matter of cellular services.

At 7:00 a.m. this morning I took part in an interview with Ghislain Plourde, from CIME FM, to discuss your motion. I think it's extremely important.

Since our meeting in the beginning of 2016, we have worked very hard on telecommunications. Together we made presentations to the CRTC in 2016 to move this file forward. We had some major successes with Internet services. We studied the Internet services file in this committee, but we aren't making much headway on the cellular services file.

We have experienced problems in connection with this in our respective ridings, in the context of the current disasters.

Can you give us a picture of what is happening with cellular services in your riding?

In Amherst, in my riding, people from various services have to meet at city hall to discuss the situation and then go back out into the field, precisely because they are unable to communicate on the ground.

Is the situation the same in your riding?

Mr. William Amos:

Thank you for your very relevant question. I commend your efforts on this issue since you were elected. I know that your fellow citizens in the Laurentides—Labelle riding are really grateful to you for the way you have focused on these issues, not only Internet services, but also cellular telephone services.

As to public safety, it's clear that we could imagine extremely serious consequences for people who happen to be in regions where there is no signal, but it's also a matter of effectiveness, as you mentioned.

It's not only about the mayors, councillors, municipal employees or first responders who are on the ground. Clearly, all of these individuals whose responsibility it is to respond to emergencies must be able to communicate. However, there are also neighbours helping each other out and communities that get together to support each other, as is the case at present. We see that these people are much less effective without cell services.

We also know that members of communities like Waltham will no longer be able to use the pager service as of June.

The lack of technological capability to allow for a proper response to emergencies is another aspect of this issue.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Should we be looking for regulatory solutions, and not just financial ones?

We will not have access to the paging system either after June 30. It will no longer exist. We will no longer be able to call our first responders to have them respond to emergencies on the ground. This is very serious.

Are there regulatory solutions we could look at?

When we ask Bell what it's doing to re-establish or extend the paging service, it replies that it is not obliged to do so. When we ask the CRTC if it is obligatory to provide a paging service, it answers no, there is no obligation to provide that service, which is nevertheless essential in our regions.

Do you see any regulatory solutions?

Mr. William Amos:

With regard to regulations, I would say that what is essential is the way in which the CRTC interprets its mandate under the Telecommunications Act.

The act sets out public policy priorities, priorities as regards competition or the promotion of competition, or the advancement of access to services. There are a whole series of objectives described in the law. However, these objectives are not classified in order of priority.

Some years ago, in 2007 or 2008, I believe, Mr. Bernier, who was the minister at that time, sent a directive wherein he asked the CRTC to put the emphasis on competition. In my opinion, we should find a way to send the CRTC a clear message and even perhaps a directive on the overriding importance of access.

I do believe the CRTC understands the issue, but there is a need to provide direction to it about this.

(1005)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

It has to be guided in the right direction.

If furthering competition is the main objective, but there is no access to the service, we have accomplished nothing. Zero is still zero. We can't support competition until there are at least two service providers. Even if there were only one, we wouldn't be any further ahead.

Do you agree with that opinion?

Mr. William Amos:

Absolutely. We have to set objectives, and the CRTC must take all the needed legislative, regulatory and financial measures to enable complete access. The budget set an objective of access for 100% of households by 2030. In order to reach that, we have to take all of the necessary regulatory and financial means.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There are steps before we reach the 100% target; we are aiming for 90% by 2022, and 95% by 2026. The last segment of 5% by 2030 will probably be the most difficult to attain. Is that correct?

Mr. William Amos:

Yes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Fine.

Thank you for working so hard on this file, Mr. Amos.

I will give the minute I have left to Mr. Longfield. [English]

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

I have less than a minute, but I'd like to, first of all, thank you for bringing this forward.

The committee here has studied broadband. We talked about it in 2017 and 2018. We've gone to Washington to talk about connectivity, the north-south satellite network and the opportunity that might provide us.

We talked about 5G, but you're talking about areas that don't have 3G or 4G. You're talking about carrier pigeons now. I know it was a bit of a joke from the mayor, but some way or another we have to connect, whether it's via satellite or via towers. Is it a 5G play that you're looking at, or is it just getting some basic 3G service?

Mr. William Amos:

I must admit that I'm not a technical expert. As regards the particular technology that would be brought to bear, I would have to say I'm agnostic. I just wouldn't be able to provide a sufficiently informed opinion.

What I would suggest though on cellular is just any access. There are just dead zones. If one drives from Parliament Hill directly west down Highway 148 on the north side of the Ottawa River, the phone will cut off about five or six times between here and the end of my riding, which is about a two and a half hour drive. Those are just the dead zones. There are black holes, entire communities, that aren't served.

Mr. Lloyd Longfield:

Thank you.

Thanks, William.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Mr. Masse, you have seven minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you, Mr. Amos, for being here and congratulations on your bill being passed in the House. It's a motion, really. There's a big difference between a bill and a motion, and I've passed both, but it's good that it's a subject that continues to rise.

You're aware that the committee had an extensive review on this. What was missing out of the committee's report that you'd like to have on another review? What specifically did we miss out or not adequately cover in our report?

Mr. William Amos:

I think that's an important question. Specifically what was missing in my estimation was a comprehensive treatment of the cellular issue, and the linkage between the provision of high-speed Internet—whether that's through fibre to the home, satellite technology or otherwise—and the advancement of cellular infrastructure and coverage across rural Canada.

It's one thing to have access to high-speed Internet—and every Canadian deserves it, absolutely—but it's another thing to go into the regulatory and fiscal measures that would enable better cellphone coverage. They are similar problems that we have throughout rural Canada, but it's not obvious that the two have identical solutions.

(1010)

Mr. Brian Masse:

Is there any other part, other than just the cellular, in the report? Did you agree with all the recommendations of the report? I don't have time to go through them, but is that something I'm assuming is correct? Is there anything else you thought was missing that we could enhance?

Mr. William Amos:

What I would like to see treated more comprehensively is the issue of how the CRTC in its regulatory function, and how the Telecommunications Act as it currently stands, could be augmented to better enable both regulatory and fiscal solutions. There may be limitations that—

Mr. Brian Masse:

I don't disagree with that.

I'm going to move on to another quick question, if I can. You mentioned the tornadoes and their affect on Ottawa. What were the failings of the cellular service at that time?

Mr. William Amos:

In September of 2018, I was on the ground in the small community of Breckenridge in the municipality of Pontiac the day after the tornado. The Premier of Quebec; the Minister of Transport at the time, André Fortin; and Mayor Joanne Labadie were there. We were on the ground—

Mr. Brian Masse:

What was missing though?

Mr. William Amos:

We would be 500 metres away from each other at different homes asking what we could bring—if they needed water, or what support did they needed right then—and we weren't able to relay the message to the emergency response officials or to each other. If the mayor needed to come to meet with an individual I had just encountered, I would have to go and meet up with her personally.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Are you aware that this committee turned down an opportunity to study that—by your members from the Liberal Party? Why do you think this was not an appropriate body then to study it, if you agreed or disagreed with them?

Mr. William Amos:

I don't have comments to make on the decisions made previously by this committee. I would say that members of this committee have treated motion 208 with all of the seriousness that it—

Mr. Brian Masse:

It's not about motion 208. It's about whether or not we actually had an opportunity to study the situation in Ottawa with the tornadoes, which was was turned down by this committee. There was a particular motion moved and it was a study. Do you think that should be studied here at this committee, or why do you think that was turned down?

Mr. William Amos:

As I said, I won't speculate on motives for any—

The Chair:

If I could interject for a moment....

Mr. Brian Masse:

It's a fair question. It was raised by the witness here.

The Chair:

Hold on.

The witness is not a part of the committee and can't really speak to why something was turned down in committee, especially as we might have been in camera at the time.

Mr. Brian Masse:

No, we weren't.

The Chair:

I don't see how the witness can speak to why the committee as a whole turned something down.

Mr. Brian Masse:

It's a part of your caucus. I expect those conversations might have taken place, given the fact that the member raised it as a serious issue as part of something here. I think that would have brought some light to it.

Mr. William Amos:

I'm happy to answer. As the chair indicates, I'm not going to speculate on decisions made in meetings where I wasn't present.

The focus today ought not to be on what might have been in the past. Who is to say if the wording of the motion that was previously brought was adequate or if the study that would have been proposed was going to be comprehensive?

What is proposed here in motion 208 enables both the public security and the economic development aspects of both Internet and cellphones and the connection between the two. Perhaps it was a missed opportunity at that point, but maybe this is a more comprehensive opportunity right now.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Those are my questions.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Thank you very much.

Mr. Chong.

Hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thanks for introducing this motion. I'm looking forward to the committee's study.

I just want to make a point on this, Mr. Chair. I think this lack of access to Internet is certainly a problem in rural and remote Canada, but I think there's another thing that we also need to focus on. I think the bigger problem is less about accessibility to Internet services and more about the unaffordability of Internet in rural and remote areas. I'm going to give you one example to highlight what I'm talking about.

If you live in a city in this country, or in an urban area, you can get 100 gigabytes of Internet for $49.99 a month. You can get unlimited Internet access for about $69.99. Those are the latest pricing plans on the big telecoms' websites. If you wanted 200 gigabytes of access in a rural or remote area over a wireless Internet, which is often the only option available, you can get that wireless Internet, but that 200 gigabytes would cost you somewhere between $800 and $1,000 a month.

I have constituents in my riding who have this issue. It's not that they can't get the Internet access. It's that they can't afford to pay upwards of $500 a month for that access. I put that in front of the committee as something to consider.

You can look at products such as Rogers' Rocket Hub and Bell's Turbo Hub. That covers most rural and remote areas, and even if it doesn't, for about $500 as a one-time installation charge, you can get somebody to install a Yagi antenna to boost the signal to get the Internet. I think most rural residents would be prepared to pay $500 for installation costs. The problem is that the ongoing monthly costs can be well upwards of $500 a month for pretty moderate Internet usage.

That's an issue that as a committee we need to consider when we're drafting our report: It's not only access to the Internet, but it's the cost of that Internet for rural and remote households, many of which are actually in the exurban areas of some of the country's largest city regions. My riding is in the greater Toronto area, and large parts of the north part of Halton region and the southern part of Wellington county have access to Internet, but most people don't have it because it's just so expensive to have.

(1015)

The Chair:

Mr. Oliver.

Mr. John Oliver (Oakville, Lib.):

Thanks very much for bringing forward motion 208 and for the discussion on it. Congratulations on how quickly it went through the House and the all-party support for it.

Like Mr. Chong, I live in Halton. I live in Oakville. We have great coverage down there, but I drive up to Guelph and along the way I lose cellphone access and I'm out of touch. That's almost something that you expect to have with you all the time, and I'm out of touch for about 15 to 20 minutes. I'm driving by farms and houses knowing that all those people are living without wireless. They probably have fixed service, but they don't have that wireless service. It is a real issue and it's closer to home than I think many people think it is. When I think about how reliant we are on our wireless communications, it's a really important issue.

I'm also aware that you've brought the motion forward and there's limited time left in this sitting. There are three areas that you targeted for INDU. One was looking at the causes of and solutions to the gaps in infrastructure for wireless. The second was fiscal and regulatory approaches to improve investments in wireless infrastructure. The third was the regulatory role of the CRTC.

Of those three, what is the priority? When you were speaking to Mr. Masse, I kind of heard that it would be the CRTC regulatory role, or do you think it's incentivizing more investment? What do you think the priority would be for the committee in the time that we might have to look at this?

Mr. William Amos:

Thanks for that question. I really appreciate it, because I did want to provide, in a respectful manner, that kind of prioritization. I do think the CRTC ought to be the focus, and that's just simply because we are legislators and we have the opportunity to review the Telecommunications Act. That is ongoing.

I think it would be important to appreciate that major aspects of the fiscal component have been addressed. The CRTC is providing a degree of financing. The federal government has provided financing over the past several years and is looking to provide even more.

I think the question is, what more can be done? How can the telecommunications sector and the private sector be further stimulated? What options—

Mr. John Oliver:

Could you give us some examples? You've looked at this, obviously, and thought about it quite carefully. Like you, I'm a non-technical guy. Other than net neutrality, I haven't ventured too far into the CRTC space. What specific recommendations would you have to improve the regulatory role, in terms of the provision of wireless infrastructure?

Mr. William Amos:

If I were in the seats of members of this committee, I would want to ask the CRTC what options there are, in terms of legislative reform, to better enable the institution of the CRTC, as regulator, to generate superior access outcomes. That's what we're talking about in this motion: access. I do appreciate Member Chong's comment about affordability. It's important to all Canadians. In the areas that are most affected in my riding, just in the past couple of weeks, we're talking about a region that has a median income of $22,500 per capita. These are individuals who can ill afford to pay the exorbitant amounts being charged right now.

The CRTC has been challenged with the affordability question, as well. Indeed, previous governments have had the opportunity to address that affordability question. It continues to bedevil both regulators and governments.

I think we need to be asking the CRTC about the access question. As Member Graham pointed out, if you don't have access, the affordability question is moot. We need to get to that access question.

With respect to, for example, the objectives of the Telecommunications Act, when the regulator is balancing affordability and access, how is that being done? Are there opportunities to change how that's done?

I do note that the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development recently brought forward a directive to go to that issue of affordability. There's clearly a willingness on the part of our government to address that question. I think Canadians do understand that our government is very strong on the affordability question, but could there not be consideration given to a directive around access? I would ask this question of the CRTC as well. What would best enable them, or what is limiting them right now, from achieving access as an outcome they have identified themselves?

(1020)

Mr. John Oliver:

Again, I'm a bit new to this, but the committee has done a study on broadband connectivity in rural Canada. This is the linking of spectrum and breadth of spectrum to infrastructure. The committee heard from witnesses that they felt one licence was often too broad and covered both rural and urban areas. The rural areas then got insufficient attention when the company that owned the spectrum divvied it up.

Is there an issue with connecting infrastructure investment to licensing for spectrum? Have you thought that through, or am I off the mark on that one?

Mr. William Amos:

Again, I acknowledge my technical limitations. If spectrum auctions—and I understand that specific spectrum auctions are in the offing—can be focused on particular rural-access outcomes, I believe that would be the appropriate policy approach to adopt.

Mr. John Oliver:

Exactly, yes. Do you think part of the awarding of that would be evidence of willingness to invest in infrastructure, in terms of incentivizing that investment?

Mr. William Amos:

Exactly. In some cases, a fiscal tool is required to stimulate. In other cases, a regulatory mechanism is required to force. In other situations, such as the spectrum auction circumstance, I think it's a question of directing the auction to achieve that policy outcome.

Again, an all-of-the-above strategy is required. I look forward to that kind of issue being addressed in the rural economic development strategy, when it's prepared.

Mr. John Oliver:

Absolutely. That's good.

The Chair:

We're going back to Michael Chong. Go ahead.

Hon. Michael Chong:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'd like to go back to this issue of affordability. I represent a rural riding. We don't often get a lot of.... Rural Canada often is overlooked just because it's a lower and lower percentage of the overall population as the country increasingly urbanizes.

However, the example that I'm going to give you next reflects the reality of rural residents not just in Ontario, but also in Quebec and the Maritimes, as well as in Newfoundland and Labrador. I'm just going to use a very local example to Wellington county to really draw to the attention of the committee what I'm talking about.

The monthly cost of Internet and heat for a resident of the City of Guelph in Ontario is about $150 a month. Because residents are on natural gas, they'll pay about $100 a month maximum to the local gas company to heat their homes in the winter, and their Internet bills are about $50 a month. That gives them about 100 gigabytes of high-speed Internet access.

A resident who literally lives two miles outside of the City of Guelph in rural Wellington county will be paying $1,300 a month to get the same service for heat and Internet access. It is $1,000 for heat because there is no access to natural gas. Most rural residents are on oil heat and that costs about $1,000 a month. Most rural residents spend $4,000 to $6,000 a winter to heat their homes through oil heat. Internet access for 100 gigabytes is about $300 a month.

I bring those figures to the attention of the committee. That's very similar to residents of rural Pontiac and rural Gatineau where there is no access to natural gas and where there is no access to affordable high-speed Internet. When you drive through much of the countryside in eastern Canada and see homes being torn down, there's a reason for that. They're just too expensive to carry because the regulators, both federally and provincially, over many decades did not roll out rural natural gas or rural Internet the way that we rolled out rural electricity and rural, plain old telephone service.

As a result, we are now struggling to keep up to try to fix this problem with regard to the heating of homes and access to the modern information highway. Like I said, the example that I've given is the reality of rural Canadians throughout much of central and eastern Canada. It's $1,300 a month to heat your home and to get high-speed Internet access, versus somebody literally a mile away in a built-up urban area who is paying $150 a month. That's one of the things that I think our committee needs to look at.

(1025)

Mr. William Amos:

Could I comment on that, Chair?

(1030)

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. William Amos:

Again, I agree 100% with regard to affordability being a crucial issue for every single family and every household in Canada. We are all confronted with this reality, and in rural Canada, it's often even more acute because there is less competition.

I would pose this question to the honourable member: What lessons should be drawn from a decade in government where a directive was issued by the then-minister of industry to the CRTC around the prioritization of competition? I think the results speak for themselves. That directive did not work. That effort on the part of the Conservative government of the time did not achieve affordability outcomes that Canadians can appreciate now. We are still suffering from unaffordable plans in comparison with other jurisdictions.

On top of that affordability problem, we have major rural access problems, which is what motion 208 goes to. The amounts of fiscal stimulus applied by the previous government were by any measure inadequate, as you point out, to roll out Internet in rural Canada in any manner that provides for equity in digital infrastructure. That seems clear to me.

I did not seek in my motion, nor am I looking today, to turn this into a partisan issue. I think that governments—present, past and prior to the Harper government—bear responsibility for these inequitable outcomes. On affordability and on access to high-speed Internet and cellphone availability in rural Canada, I think there has to be a recognition that the past policies of the Conservative government didn't work. We owe it to our constituents collectively to work in the present, live in the present and deal with the fact that all of our constituents wanted high-speed Internet yesterday and wanted cellphone coverage yesterday. My constituents wanted it two weeks ago when their houses were flooding and they were trying to put sandbags all around them.

The Chair:

Thank you.

We're going to move back to Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Whatever happened with the motion last year—I looked at the record and I wasn't there for it—we are under a directive of the House. I think it's incumbent upon us to act seriously on it.

To Michael's comments before, I have a large rural riding that's quite a bit bigger than Wellington—Halton Hills, which I know quite well because I used to live in Guelph. I'm sure you're not allowed to talk on a cellphone or a CB radio when you're driving, but in my riding there are signs saying which channel of the CB radio you have to announce yourself on to pass safely through these roads. It's a very different environment that we live in. I have to go 200 kilometres at a time on dirt roads to get to events in my riding. This is the reality we have. It's channel 10 in some areas and channel 5 in some areas. You have to use them.

Enough of that. I know that Rémi and Richard both have very large rural Quebec ridings and I want them to get in on this. I'd like to give Richard a quick chance to jump in. [Translation]

Mr. Richard Hébert (Lac-Saint-Jean, Lib.):

Thank you very much, Mr. Graham.

Mr. Amos, thank you for being here.

We know that access to digital infrastructure is extremely important for Canadians today, to secure safety and health or economic development in our regions. This is what your motion indicates.

As stated in the pre-Budget 2019 brief I tabled, in my riding of Lac-Saint-Jean, 22 of the inhabited regions of the territory have neither cell service nor Internet. That is the case for the RCMs of Maria-Chapdelaine and Domaine-du-Roy.

In your opinion, what measures could be taken to advance and facilitate co-operation and the deployment of wireless infrastructure in our rural areas?

Can you tell us how your study of motion M-208 could help your riding and others such as mine, Lac-Saint-Jean, to obtain better digital wireless infrastructure?

Mr. William Amos:

Let me begin, Mr. Hébert, by thanking you for your presence, as parliamentary secretary and government representative for small and medium businesses. We know very well how important it is to support SMEs in the regions with the necessary digital infrastructure, so as to ensure their success. If we want to export, be on the cutting edge and seize business opportunities, we must have this technology.

In my riding as in yours, there are reeves, mayors, councillors and municipal managers who are crying out for help, loudly. Since our election, we have seen an increase in investments and financial support.

I am thinking here particularly of Connect to Innovate, a $500-million program over five years, which in its turn called on the financial participation of the province and the private sector. This program led to overall investments of over $1 billion. However, the Connect to Innovate program did have one gap: cellular services. The program was focused on high-speed Internet services.

I wish the new multi-year budget investments announced by our government also included cellular services, or that the investments in high-speed Internet included improved cell services. We see the convergence of wireless and Internet technologies. However, neither I, nor the electors, the elected representatives, the reeves or mayors in my riding, are technical experts. We want to better understand the path to follow if these two components are to meet with equal success.

We also want to see various models in action. I'll give you an example. In my riding, projects of about $13.4 million in total are being carried out by a private company, Bell Canada, in order to help about 3,200 households in 29 communities. There is also a $7-million project, and half of the funds for that are provided by the non-profit organization 307net; financial support is also provided by the municipality of Cantley.

So, those are some examples of different models made possible by the financial measures taken by the federal government and the support of the provincial government. I think that the discussions that will take place over the next months or years will be aimed at determining the most appropriate and affordable models, with a particular focus on non-profit organizations. Not only must these models satisfy technical requirements, they must be affordable, as the opposition member just said.

(1035)

Mr. Richard Hébert:

Do I still have some time?

The Chair:

You have a few minutes left.

Mr. Richard Hébert:

Thank you, Mr. Amos. We are very grateful to you for having introduced this motion. As you know, this important matter has been under study for some time. I myself live in an outlying region, and I can bear witness to the difficulties we have because of the lack of cell services and access to the Internet.

Let me give you some examples. In my own house, I have to stand in a particular place to be able to get a cell signal and use my phone for calls. It's impossible anywhere else in the house. In addition, if I want to download La Presse in the morning to read it, I have to shout to my boys to get off the Internet so that I can have access to my newspaper. There is an upside: when my boys disconnect and go and play outside, this is probably better for their health.

So this is a big concern in the regions. As you know, studies were done and our government included $1.7 billion in the 2019 budget to ensure that necessary infrastructure is put in place.

The government has just finished auctioning off the 600-megahertz band of the spectrum. It had reserved 43% of the available spectrum for regional suppliers in order to facilitate access to the Internet in the regions.

You mentioned the directive sent to the CRTC by former minister Bernier to get that organization to encourage increased and more affordable access in its decisions.

My question is both simple and complex. In your opinion, what more must we do to ensure that, without further delay, Canadians in all regions have access to wireless or wired Internet services? What is missing in all of the measures we have put in place over the last years? [English]

The Chair:

A very brief answer, please. [Translation]

Mr. William Amos:

Thank you for your question.

I well remember that time once when I was driving toward Rivière-du-Loup for a Liberal Caucus. It was one in the morning, I was a bit lost in the Parliamentary Secretary's riding, and I could not consult my mobile phone GPS, for the reason we are discussing today. It also raises the whole issue of public safety.

Your question is indeed complex, but I will try to give you a simple answer.

In your study, aside for the opinion of private sector experts, it might be useful to find out about the academic opinion on the Telecommunications Act. For instance, it might be useful to ask ourselves whether, rather than trying to count on non-binding objectives, we should not strengthen the current legal provisions around access to the Internet, to give the CRTC a hand and obtain better results.

I'm asking the question without knowing the answer. It may be that we have to amend the act itself to enable this stricter and stronger regulation and impose solutions not only on the private sector, but also on governments.

(1040)

[English]

The Chair:

Mr. Masse, you have the final two minutes.

Mr. Brian Masse:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I'm going to follow up on that. It's a good point.

You mentioned the notice directives by Maxime Bernier and then subsequently Navdeep Bains, and the differences between the two.

If you had a directive right now, where would you focus that in terms of the CRTC, to direct the companies? I believe that the system is broken, but if a directive is what we're at right now, what would you do with that?

Mr. William Amos:

To return to the earlier question that I just responded to, I think my starting point would be that one does have to look at the law itself. If a directive is being applied, it's to provide greater clarity to the regulator as to how certain objectives should be achieved. Perhaps if the law were more clear, and particular outcomes were sought, for example, rural access, then better outcomes could be achieved without having to provide specific direction.

Is it a good thing, generally speaking, to seek greater competition? Absolutely, for the consumer, that's a good thing. Is it proper and appropriate to seek greater affordability? Absolutely, but I'm not sure—

Mr. Brian Masse:

What would your directive be? What would be helpful? I guess that's what I'm looking for. Is there a special carve-out that you're looking for that the CRTC should really zero in on right away? You could send them that message now. That's what I'm trying to provide the opportunity for.

Mr. William Amos:

Sure. I think the regulator is listening to this conversation. It's hearing the desire and has heard the desire through its own “Let's Talk Broadband” and has heard that desire for rural Canada to achieve universal access. Standards have been established. Funds have been allocated.

Of course, as a rural MP who is representing many communities that suffer from a lack of access, I would love to see greater direction provided with regard to the importance of rural access. Our government has taken such a giant leap in terms of the fiscal measures that I think there's great hope for rural Canada through the universal broadband fund, through the CRTC's fund, and potentially, through the Canada Infrastructure Bank. These mechanisms are there. I think the question is, how will this funding roll out and incentivize further behaviour?

We can also assume that the corporate sector, the telecommunications companies across Canada, are going to read this testimony. They're going to hear the voices of members from across Canada and they are going to recognize that this is a national issue that has received unanimous approval from Parliament.

The Chair:

Thank you.

That's all the time we have left for today.

Thank you, everybody. We will see you next Tuesday.

The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie

(0950)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Nous passons à la deuxième partie de notre séance d'aujourd'hui. Conformément au paragraphe 108(2) du Règlement, nous allons examiner l'objet de la motion d'initiative parlementaire M-208 sur l'infrastructure numérique rurale.

Nous accueillons le député qui a présenté la motion d'initiative parlementaire, M. William Amos, député de Pontiac.

Monsieur, vous disposez de 10 minutes. La parole est à vous.

M. William Amos (Pontiac, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie de la rapidité avec laquelle vous et nos collègues avez accepté de vous pencher sur cette question. Je veux remercier les députés, non seulement ceux de mon propre parti, mais aussi ceux des partis de l'opposition, pour leur appui unanime hier. Je pense que cela fait voir le Parlement sous un jour favorable, et je crois que c'est évidemment une question cruciale pour tous les Canadiens. Qu'on vive en milieu urbain ou en milieu rural, on veut que le Canada rural soit branché.

La question a été fortement soulevée dans le Pontiac avec la tornade de l'an dernier et les inondations de cette année. Je ne veux pas m'épancher là-dessus. Les victimes d'inondations, les gens qui ont des sous-sols inondés présentement, veulent que nous passions aux choses sérieuses, alors je vais essayer de le faire aujourd'hui.

Je suis ravi d'avoir l'occasion d'en parler devant vous et je vous remercie également d'avoir organisé aussi rapidement ma comparution sur cette question.[Français]

Je sais que les gens dans ma circonscription, Pontiac, vous en sont reconnaissants, ainsi que tous ceux qui habitent dans des régions rurales du Canada.

Bien sûr, l'infrastructure numérique est un enjeu complexe, qui comprend plusieurs aspects touchant la réglementation, la fiscalité et le secteur privé, et l'influence des gouvernements fédéral, provinciaux et municipaux n'est pas toujours claire.

Depuis novembre dernier, c'est-à-dire depuis que j'ai déposé la motion, la donne a un peu changé, en raison du budget de 2019. Il faut être très honnête et très clair à ce sujet. Quand un gouvernement fait des promesses et prévoit des budgets très importants qui se chiffrent à environ 5 milliards de dollars, c'est à mon avis parce qu'il reconnaît l'importance de cet enjeu.[Traduction]

Depuis que la motion a été présentée, le gouvernement, dans son budget de 2019, a vraiment franchi une étape décisive. D'autres importantes étapes avaient été franchies auparavant. Le budget de 2016 incluait un montant de 500 millions de dollars sur cinq ans pour le programme Brancher pour innover. Cet argent a été versé dans différentes circonscriptions, dont la mienne, où des projets de 20 millions de dollars ont été annoncés comparativement à entre 1,2 et 1,3 million, dans la circonscription de Pontiac, au cours de la décennie antérieure. D'importantes mesures sont déjà prises, mais ce nouvel investissement prévu dans le budget est vraiment important.

Qu'arrivera-t-il ensuite? Comment l'étude qui sera menée par le Comité permanent de l'industrie, des sciences et de la technologie fera-t-elle avancer les choses? Je crois que nous devons nous tourner vers la nouvelle ministre du Développement économique rural. Nous devons comprendre que le gouvernement a jugé bon d'établir ce nouveau ministère, ce qui est une très bonne nouvelle pour le Canada rural, et reconnaître la responsabilité de la ministre Bernadette Jordan d'élaborer cette stratégie et d'inclure la question des infrastructures numériques. Dans le texte de la motion, qui porte précisément sur l'infrastructure cellulaire, c'est là que nous trouvons le premier lien d'intérêt entre l'orientation du gouvernement libéral et celle de la motion unanime.

Je vous explique le lien. Des investissements importants sont prévus pour les prochaines années, plus de 5 milliards dollars en 10 ans, y compris un nouveau fonds pour la large bande universelle de 1,7 milliard de dollars et le fonds du CRTC de 750 millions de dollars sur cinq ans, ce qui est sur le point de commencer. Ce sont des fonds tellement importants que les Canadiens ont raison d'être optimistes, mais il faut, à mon avis, que les choses soient plus claires quant à la façon dont l'infrastructure cellulaire sera développée dans ce cadre.

Comme la plupart des Canadiens, je ne suis pas un expert technique. Je ne sais pas comment les investissements dans l'infrastructure de fibre optique jusqu'au domicile peuvent permettre d'offrir un service de téléphonie cellulaire, mais je suis porté à croire que c'est le cas. Je pense qu'il faut que les choses soient claires pour que la population canadienne soit convaincue que les investissements à venir produiront des résultats non seulement pour l'Internet haute vitesse dans les régions rurales du Canada, mais aussi pour la téléphonie cellulaire. Évidemment, les deux sont cruciaux pour des raisons de développement économique, de préservation et de développement des collectivités, mais aussi pour des raisons de sécurité publique, comme on en a discuté à la Chambre au cours du débat sur la motion M-208.

Je pense que votre comité apporterait une contribution précieuse s'il discutait de la façon dont l'infrastructure cellulaire peut être déployée de façon accélérée dans le cadre des plans du gouvernement et s'il faisait comparaître des témoins pour obtenir les meilleures idées possible pour y parvenir.

Je constate que votre comité a fait du très bon travail relativement à la question du réseau Internet dans le Canada rural. Je vous en remercie.

(0955)

[Français]

Cependant, l'enjeu précis de l'infrastructure de la téléphonie mobile ou cellulaire n'a pas été abordé de façon exhaustive. Il serait capital de le faire. Une dizaine de maires dans le Pontiac croient que c'est l'une des trois priorités dans la région, et je sais que c'est la même chose dans d'autres régions du Canada.

En plus des aspects économique et technique, j'aimerais que ce comité aborde l'aspect de la sécurité publique. Cet aspect a été clairement évoqué. Le maire de Waltham, M. David Rochon, m'a dit qu'il aimerait qu'on amène des pigeons voyageurs dans sa municipalité pour qu'on puisse mieux communiquer. Il ne croit pas qu'il y aura un service de téléphonie mobile pour répondre aux urgences, entre autres lorsque des gens demandent des sacs de sable ou des informations plus précises sur les niveaux de l'eau.

Advenant le cas où le Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale n'aurait pas le temps d'examiner cette question, il serait important que ce comité-ci l'aborde.[Traduction]

Je crois que je vais conclure en demandant qu'un regard critique soit porté sur le rôle du CRTC et sur ses fonctions de réglementation et de création d'incitatifs, afin d'aider à donner une plus grande impulsion au développement des infrastructures Internet et de téléphonie cellulaire. Le rapport de 2016, Parlons large bande, a apporté des avancées significatives pour ce qui est d'établir des taux téléversement et de téléchargement standards; de définir ce qu'est la haute vitesse; de considérer cela comme une question cruciale; et de créer un fonds. Je suis sûr que les 750 millions de dollars sur cinq ans seront utilisés à bon escient. Je pense cependant qu'en tant que parlementaires, nous devons engager un dialogue avec le CRTC pour explorer ce qu'on peut faire de plus, et je crois que votre comité est l'instance idéale pour ce dialogue.

Nous avons l'approche qui est privilégiée par le CRTC. Est-ce que le Parlement croit que cela convient?

Personnellement, je ne crois pas que 750 millions sur cinq ans, c'est suffisant. Je pense que le CRTC peut aller plus loin, et j'aimerais également examiner la Loi sur les télécommunications, qui fait présentement l'objet d'un examen. J'aimerais voir comment la loi permet le déploiement de l'infrastructure Internet et de téléphonie cellulaire, et comment on pourrait l'améliorer à cet égard.

Cela dit, chers collègues, je vous remercie de m'avoir donné cette occasion. Je vous remercie également pour votre appui. Je pense que la motion montre qu'il y a un bel esprit de collégialité, et c'est apprécié.

(1000)

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Nous passons tout de suite aux questions. C'est M. Graham qui commence.

Vous disposez de sept minutes. [Français]

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Je vous remercie, monsieur Amos, de nous amener dans une bonne direction sur la question des services cellulaires.

À 7 heures ce matin, j'ai eu une entrevue avec Ghislain Plourde, de CIME FM, pour parler précisément de votre motion. Je pense que c'est extrêmement important.

Depuis notre rencontre au début de 2016, nous avons travaillé très fort sur l'enjeu des télécommunications. Nous avons fait ensemble, en 2016, des présentations devant le CRTC pour faire avancer ce dossier. Nous avons connu de grandes réussites dans le domaine des services Internet. Nous avons étudié le dossier des services Internet au sein de ce comité-ci, mais le dossier des services cellulaires avance très peu.

Nous avons vécu des problèmes liés à ce sujet dans nos circonscriptions respectives, dans le contexte des sinistres en cours.

Pouvez-vous nous dépeindre ce qui se passe dans votre circonscription du côté des services cellulaires?

Dans le cas d'Amherst, dans ma circonscription, les gens des divers services doivent se réunir à l'hôtel de ville pour jaser de la situation et ensuite repartir sur le terrain, justement parce qu'ils ne sont pas capables de communiquer sur le terrain.

Vivez-vous la même situation dans votre circonscription?

M. William Amos:

Je vous remercie de votre question très pertinente. Je salue vos efforts sur cet enjeu depuis votre élection. Je sais que vos concitoyens de la circonscription de Laurentides—Labelle vous sont réellement reconnaissants de la façon dont vous avez misé sur ces enjeux, non seulement sur les services Internet, mais aussi sur les services cellulaires.

Sur le plan de la sécurité publique, il est clair qu'on pourrait imaginer des conséquences extrêmement graves au fait de se trouver dans une région où il n'y a aucun signal, mais il est question aussi d'efficacité, comme vous le mentionnez.

Il n'est pas uniquement question des maires ou mairesses, des conseillers ou conseillères, des employés municipaux ou des premiers répondants qui sont sur le terrain. Il est clair que tous ces individus qui ont la responsabilité de répondre aux urgences doivent être capables de communiquer ensemble. Cependant, il y a aussi les voisins qui s'entraident et les communautés qui se regroupent pour s'appuyer les unes les autres, comme c'est le cas présentement. On voit que ces gens sont beaucoup moins efficaces sans services cellulaires.

On sait très bien aussi que les membres des communautés comme celle de Waltham n'auront plus, dès le mois de juin, la capacité d'utiliser le service de téléavertisseur.

Le manque de capacité technologique pour bien répondre aux situations d'urgence est un autre aspect de cet enjeu.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce qu'il y a des solutions qu'on doit chercher en matière de réglementation, et non seulement en matière de finances?

Nous non plus ne pourrons plus avoir accès au service de téléavertisseur dès le 30 juin. Cela n'existera plus. Nous ne serons plus capables d'appeler nos premiers répondants afin qu'ils répondent aux urgences sur le terrain. C'est très grave.

Est-ce qu'il y a des solutions qu'on pourrait regarder sur le plan de la réglementation?

Quand nous demandons à Bell ce qu'elle fait pour rétablir ou prolonger le service de téléavertisseur, elle dit qu'elle n'a pas l'obligation de le faire. Quand nous demandons au CRTC s'il est obligatoire de fournir un service de téléavertisseur, le CRTC répond que non, il n'est pas obligatoire de fournir ce service, qui est pourtant essentiel à nos régions.

Est-ce que vous voyez des solutions en matière de réglementation?

M. William Amos:

Sur le plan de la réglementation, je dirais que l'essentiel, c'est la manière dont le CRTC interprète son mandat émanant de la Loi sur les télécommunications.

On y indique les priorités en matière de politiques publiques, les priorités en matière de concurrence ou de promotion de la concurrence, par exemple, ou de promotion de l'accès aux services. Il y a toute une série d'objectifs décrits dans la Loi. Cependant, aucune priorité n'est établie parmi ces objectifs.

Il y a des années, en 2007 ou 2008, je crois, M. Bernier, qui était ministre à cette époque, avait envoyé une directive où il demandait au CRTC de mettre l'accent sur l'aspect de la concurrence. À mon avis, il faudrait trouver la façon d'envoyer au CRTC un message clair, même une directive, sur l'importance primordiale de l'accès.

Je crois bien que le CRTC comprend l'enjeu, mais il est nécessaire de diriger le CRTC à cet égard.

(1005)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il faut le diriger dans la bonne direction.

Si on établit pour principal objectif la promotion de la concurrence, mais qu'il n'y a pas d'accès au service, cela ne donne rien. Zéro, c'est toujours zéro. Nous ne pouvons pas appuyer la concurrence tant qu'il n'y a pas au moins deux fournisseurs de services. Même s'il y en avait un seul, nous ne serions pas plus avancés.

Êtes-vous d'accord sur cette opinion?

M. William Amos:

Absolument. Il faut que nous nous fixions des objectifs et que le CRTC prenne toutes les mesures législatives, réglementaires et financières pour qu'il y ait un accès complet. Dans le budget, nous avons établi comme objectif un accès pour 100 % des foyers d'ici à 2030. Pour l'atteindre, il faut prendre toutes les mesures réglementaires et fiscales nécessaires.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y a des étapes avant d'atteindre la cible de 100 %: nous visons 90 % d'ici à 2022 et 95 % d'ici à 2026. La dernière tranche de 5 % d'ici à 2030 sera probablement la plus difficile à atteindre. Est-ce exact?

M. William Amos:

Oui.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

D'accord.

Je vous remercie de travailler très fort sur ce dossier, monsieur Amos.

Je donne la minute de parole qu'il me reste à M. Longfield. [Traduction]

M. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.):

Je dispose de moins d'une minute, mais j'aimerais tout d'abord vous remercier d'avoir présenté la motion.

Notre comité a examiné la question de la large bande. Nous en avons parlé en 2017 et en 2018. Nous sommes allés à Washington pour parler de connectivité, du réseau satellite nord-sud et de l'occasion que cela pourrait nous offrir.

Nous avons discuté de la 5G, mais on parle de régions qui n'ont pas la 3G ou la 4G. On parle de pigeons voyageurs maintenant. Je sais que c'était une blague du maire, mais d'une façon ou d'une autre, nous devons nous connecter les gens, que ce soit par satellite ou par tours. Pensez-vous à la 5G ou à un service 3G de base?

M. William Amos:

Je dois admettre que je ne suis pas un expert technique. En ce qui concerne la technologie qui serait utilisée, je dois dire que je suis neutre. Je ne serais pas en mesure de donner une opinion suffisamment éclairée.

Ce que je dirais toutefois au sujet du cellulaire, c'est n'importe quel accès. Il y a des zones mortes. Si l'on part de la Colline du Parlement et que l'on prend la route 148, du côté nord de la rivière des Outaouais, le téléphone sera coupé environ cinq ou six fois entre ici et ma circonscription, qui est située à environ deux heures et demie de route. Ce sont des zones mortes. Il y a des trous noirs, des communautés entières qui n'ont pas de services.

M. Lloyd Longfield:

Merci.

Merci, monsieur Amos.

Le président:

Merci.

Monsieur Masse, vous disposez de sept minutes.

M. Brian Masse (Windsor-Ouest, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Amos, je vous remercie de votre présence et je vous félicite pour l'adoption de votre projet de loi à la Chambre. C'est une motion. Il y a une grande différence entre un projet de loi et une motion, et j'ai adopté les deux, mais c'est une bonne chose qu'on continue de soulever cette question.

Vous savez que le Comité a mené un examen approfondi sur le sujet. Que manquait-il dans le rapport du Comité que vous aimeriez voir dans un autre examen? Qu'avons-nous omis ou qu'est-ce que nous aurions dû mieux couvrir dans notre rapport?

M. William Amos:

Je crois que c'est une question importante. Ce qu'il manquait, à mon avis, c'était un examen complet de la question de la téléphonie cellulaire et du lien entre la prestation de services Internet haute vitesse — que ce soit par fibre optique jusqu'au domicile, par satellite ou autre — et l'amélioration de l'infrastructure et de la couverture cellulaires dans tout le Canada rural.

C'est une chose d'avoir accès à Internet haute vitesse — et tous les Canadiens le méritent, absolument —, mais c'en est une autre d'adopter des mesures réglementaires et fiscales qui permettraient une meilleure couverture de téléphonie cellulaire. Ce sont des problèmes semblables à ceux que nous avons dans l'ensemble du Canada rural, mais les solutions à prendre ne sont pas nécessairement les mêmes pour les deux.

(1010)

M. Brian Masse:

Y a-t-il d'autres éléments que le cellulaire, dans le rapport? Approuvez-vous toutes les recommandations du rapport? Je n'ai pas le temps de les passer en revue, mais est-ce que cela va? Manquait-il des choses, à votre avis, que nous pourrions améliorer?

M. William Amos:

J'aimerais que l'on examine plus à fond la question de savoir comment le CRTC, dans sa fonction de réglementation, et comment la Loi sur les télécommunications, dans sa forme actuelle, pourraient être améliorés pour qu'il y ait des solutions tant réglementaires que fiscales. Il peut y avoir des limites qui...

M. Brian Masse:

Je ne m'y oppose pas.

Je vais passer rapidement à une autre question, si possible. Vous avez parlé des tornades et de leurs effets sur Ottawa. Quels étaient les problèmes de service cellulaire à ce moment-là?

M. William Amos:

En septembre 2018, j'étais sur le terrain dans la petite communauté de Breckenridge, dans la municipalité de Pontiac, le lendemain de la tornade. Le premier ministre du Québec, le ministre des Transports de l'époque, André Fortin, et la mairesse, Joanne Labadie, étaient là. Nous étions sur le terrain...

M. Brian Masse:

Qu'est-ce qu'il manquait?

M. William Amos:

Nous étions à 500 mètres de distance, à des endroits différents, à nous demander ce que nous pouvions apporter — si les gens avaient besoin d'eau, ou quels étaient leurs besoins immédiats —, et nous étions incapables de transmettre le message aux responsables des services d'interventions d'urgence ou entre nous. Si la mairesse devait rencontrer une personne que je venais de rencontrer, il m'aurait fallu aller la rencontrer en personne.

M. Brian Masse:

Savez-vous que notre comité a rejeté une occasion de se pencher là-dessus — que les députés libéraux ont refusé de le faire? Pourquoi, à votre avis, il n'était pas approprié qu'il examine cela, si vous étiez d'accord ou non avec eux?

M. William Amos:

Je n'ai pas de commentaires à faire sur les décisions que le Comité a prises précédemment. Je dirais que les membres du Comité ont traité la motion 208 de la façon la plus sérieuse...

M. Brian Masse:

Il ne s'agit pas de la motion 208. Il s'agit de la question de savoir si nous avions une occasion de nous pencher sur la situation causée par les tornades à Ottawa, ce qu'a refusé le Comité. Une motion a été présentée et il s'agissait d'une étude. Pensez-vous que la question devrait être examinée ici, au Comité? Pourquoi la motion a-t-elle été rejetée, à votre avis?

M. William Amos:

Comme je l'ai dit, je n'avancerai pas d'hypothèses sur les motifs...

Le président:

Si je peux intervenir un instant...

M. Brian Masse:

C'est une question légitime. Elle a été soulevée par le témoin.

Le président:

Attendez.

Le témoin n'est pas membre du Comité et il ne peut pas vraiment expliquer pourquoi le Comité a rejeté quelque chose, surtout que nous siégeons peut-être à huis clos à ce moment-là.

M. Brian Masse:

Non, ce n'est pas le cas.

Le président:

Je ne vois pas comment le témoin peut parler des raisons pour lesquelles le Comité a rejeté quelque chose.

M. Brian Masse:

C'est une partie de votre caucus. J'imagine que des discussions ont eu lieu, compte tenu du fait que le député a lui-même soulevé qu'il s'agissait d'une question sérieuse. Je pense que cela aurait pu nous aider à comprendre.

M. William Amos:

Je suis ravi de répondre à la question. Comme le président l'a dit, je ne vais pas faire des hypothèses sur les décisions qui ont été prises lors de réunions auxquelles je n'ai pas participé.

Aujourd'hui, l'accent ne devrait pas être mis sur ce qu'on aurait pu faire dans le passé. Qui sait si le libellé de la motion qui a été présentée auparavant était adéquat ou si l'étude proposée aurait été exhaustive?

Ce qui est proposé dans la motion 208 donne des moyens d'agir à la fois pour ce qui est des aspects de la sécurité publique et du développement économique concernant Internet et les téléphones cellulaires, ainsi que du lien entre les deux. On a peut-être raté une occasion à ce moment-là, mais on a peut-être maintenant une occasion plus complète.

M. Brian Masse:

J'ai posé toutes mes questions.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Merci beaucoup.

Monsieur Chong.

L'hon. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vous remercie d'avoir présenté la motion. J'attends avec impatience que le Comité commence cette étude.

Je veux seulement soulever un point à cet égard, monsieur le président. Il va sans dire que le manque d'accès à Internet est un problème dans les régions rurales et éloignées du Canada, mais je crois qu'il y a un autre élément sur lequel nous devons nous concentrer. Je crois que le plus gros problème n'est pas tant l'accessibilité aux services Internet que le fait que c'est inabordable dans les régions rurales et éloignées. Je vais vous donner un exemple pour illustrer ce que je veux dire.

Dans ce pays, si l'on vit dans une ville ou en zone urbaine, on peut obtenir 100 gigaoctets pour 49,99 $ par mois. On peut avoir un accès illimité à Internet pour environ 69,99 $. Ce sont les derniers plans de tarification offerts sur les sites Web des géants des télécommunications. Si l'on veut 200 gigaoctets dans une région rurale ou éloignée par Internet sans fil, qui est souvent la seule option disponible, on peut avoir accès à Internet sans fil, mais ces 200 gigaoctets coûteraient entre 800 et 1 000 $ par mois.

Dans ma circonscription, il y a des gens qui ont ce problème. Ce n'est pas qu'ils ne peuvent pas avoir accès à Internet. C'est plutôt qu'ils ne peuvent pas se permettre de payer plus de 500 $ par mois pour avoir cet accès. Je soulève cette question au Comité pour qu'il en tienne compte.

On peut examiner certains produits, comme la centrale sans fil de Rogers et la station Turbo de Bell. Cela couvre la plupart des régions rurales et éloignées, et même si ce n'est pas le cas, pour environ 500 $ de frais d'installation, on peut demander à quelqu'un d'installer une antenne Yagi pour amplifier le signal et accéder à Internet. Je pense que la plupart des habitants des régions rurales seraient prêts à payer 500 $ pour les frais d'installation. Le problème, c'est que les coûts mensuels peuvent s'élever à plus de 500 $ par mois pour une utilisation assez modérée d'Internet.

C'est une question dont le Comité doit tenir compte au moment de rédiger son rapport: il ne s'agit pas seulement de l'accès à Internet, mais aussi du coût de ces services Internet pour les ménages des régions rurales et éloignées, dont bon nombre se trouvent en fait dans les zones situées près de certaines des plus grandes régions urbaines du pays. Ma circonscription se trouve dans la région du Grand Toronto, et une bonne proportion de la partie nord de la région de Halton et de la partie sud du comté de Wellington a accès à Internet, mais la plupart des gens ne l'ont pas parce que cela coût tellement cher.

(1015)

Le président:

Monsieur Oliver.

M. John Oliver (Oakville, Lib.):

Je vous remercie beaucoup d'avoir proposé la motion 208 et je vous remercie de la discussion que nous avons à ce sujet. Je vous félicite pour la rapidité avec laquelle la motion a franchi l'étape de la Chambre et pour le soutien qu'elle a obtenu de tous les partis.

Comme M. Chong, j'habite dans la région de Halton. J'habite à Oakville. Nous avons une très bonne connexion là-bas, mais lorsque je me rends en voiture à Guelph, je perds la connexion au réseau cellulaire et personne ne peut communiquer avec moi. De nos jours, on s'attend presque à l'avoir en tout temps, mais je perds la connexion pendant 15 à 20 minutes. Je passe devant des exploitations agricoles et des maisons et je sais que ces gens n'ont pas accès à une connexion sans fil. Ils ont probablement accès à un service de connexion fixe, mais ils n'ont pas de service de connexion sans fil. C'est un véritable problème, et cela se passe beaucoup plus près de nous que nous le pensons habituellement. Étant donné que nous comptons énormément sur nos communications sans fil, je trouve que c'est un enjeu très important.

Je sais aussi que vous avez présenté la motion et qu'il reste peu de temps. Vous avez ciblé trois volets pour le Comité permanent de l’industrie, des sciences et de la technologie. Le premier vise à examiner les causes et les solutions liées aux lacunes dans l'infrastructure du réseau sans fil. Le deuxième volet concerne les approches financières et réglementaires visant à améliorer les investissements dans l'infrastructure du réseau sans fil. Le troisième porte sur le rôle du CRTC en matière de réglementation.

Parmi ces trois volets, lequel représente une priorité? Lorsque vous parliez à M. Masse, j'ai en quelque sorte compris que ce serait le rôle du CRTC en matière de réglementation — ou pensez-vous que c'est l'encouragement à accroître les investissements? Selon vous, à quel volet notre comité devrait-il accorder la priorité dans le temps qu'il nous reste pour examiner ce dossier?

M. William Amos:

Je vous remercie de votre question. Je vous suis très reconnaissant, car je souhaitais établir, de façon très respectueuse, l'ordre des priorités. Je pense effectivement que nous devrions nous concentrer sur le rôle du CRTC, simplement parce que nous sommes des législateurs et que nous avons l'occasion d'examiner la Loi sur les télécommunications. Cet examen est en cours.

Je crois qu'il serait important de comprendre que les principaux éléments de la composante financière ont été abordés. Le CRTC fournit un certain niveau de financement. Le gouvernement fédéral fournit du financement depuis plusieurs années et il envisage même d'augmenter ce financement.

Il ne reste donc qu'à nous demander ce que nous pouvons faire de plus. Comment pouvons-nous stimuler davantage le secteur des télécommunications et le secteur privé? Quelles options...

M. John Oliver:

Pouvez-vous nous donner quelques exemples? Vous avez visiblement étudié la question et vous y avez réfléchi de façon approfondie. Tout comme vous, je n'ai pas beaucoup de connaissances techniques. À l'exception de la neutralité de l'Internet, je ne me suis pas aventuré trop loin dans le domaine du CRTC. Quelles recommandations précises formuleriez-vous pour améliorer son rôle en matière de réglementation lorsqu'il s'agit de fournir l'infrastructure de réseau sans fil nécessaire?

M. William Amos:

Si j'étais à la place des membres de votre comité, je demanderais aux représentants du CRTC de me parler des possibilités de renforcer la capacité du CRTC, à titre d'organisme de réglementation, pour améliorer les résultats en matière d'accès par l'entremise d'une réforme législative. C'est l'objectif de cette motion; elle parle de l'accessibilité. Je suis reconnaissant envers M. Chong pour son commentaire sur les prix abordables. C'est important pour tous les Canadiens. Dans les régions les plus touchées de ma circonscription, ces deux dernières semaines, nous parlons d'une région dont le revenu médian est 22 500 $ par habitant. Ces gens ne peuvent pas vraiment se permettre de payer les montants exorbitants qui sont actuellement facturés.

Le CRTC est également aux prises avec la question des prix abordables. En effet, les gouvernements précédents ont eu l'occasion de se pencher sur la question des prix abordables. Cette question continue d'ailleurs de tourmenter les organismes de réglementation et les gouvernements.

Je crois que nous devons demander au CRTC de se pencher sur la question de l'accessibilité. Comme l'a dit M. Graham, si le service n'est pas accessible, la question des prix abordables ne se pose même pas. Nous devons nous attaquer à la question de l'accessibilité.

Dans le cadre, par exemple, des objectifs de la Loi sur les télécommunications, lorsque l'organisme de réglementation tente d'atteindre l'équilibre entre les prix abordables et l'accessibilité, comment s'y prend-il? Est-il possible de modifier ce processus?

J'aimerais toutefois préciser que le ministre de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique a récemment émis une directive liée à la question des prix abordables. Le gouvernement est visiblement prêt à s'attaquer à cette question. Je crois que les Canadiens comprennent que notre gouvernement se préoccupe grandement de la question des prix abordables, mais ne pourrait-on pas envisager aussi d'adopter une directive sur l'accessibilité? Je poserais également une autre question aux représentants du CRTC, à savoir qu'est-ce qui les aiderait le plus — ou à quel obstacle font-ils face maintenant — lorsqu'il s'agit d'atteindre l'objectif lié à l'accessibilité qu'il se sont fixé?

(1020)

M. John Oliver:

Encore une fois, c'est un peu un nouveau dossier pour moi, mais le Comité a mené une étude sur la connectivité à large bande dans les régions rurales du Canada. Il s'agit de connecter la portée du spectre à l'infrastructure. Des témoins précédents ont dit aux membres du comité qu'ils étaient d'avis qu'une licence était souvent trop vaste lorsqu'elle visait à la fois des régions rurales et urbaines. Dans ces cas, les régions rurales recevaient moins d'attention lorsque l'entreprise propriétaire du spectre le répartissait.

L'établissement d'un lien entre les investissements dans l'infrastructure et les licences de spectre pose-t-il un problème? Avez-vous réfléchi à cela ou ai-je fait fausse route avec cette question?

M. William Amos:

Encore une fois, je reconnais mes limites sur le plan technique. Si la mise aux enchères du spectre — et d'après ce que je comprends, des enchères du spectre précises seront bientôt ouvertes — peut se concentrer sur des résultats précis en matière d'accessibilité dans les régions rurales, je crois que ce serait l'approche stratégique appropriée à adopter.

M. John Oliver:

Oui, c'est exact. À votre avis, une partie de cette attribution pourrait-elle servir à prouver qu'il existe une volonté d'investir dans l'infrastructure, afin de motiver cet investissement?

M. William Amos:

Exactement. Dans certains cas, il est nécessaire d'avoir recours à un outil financier pour les stimuler. Dans d'autres cas, il faut utiliser un mécanisme de réglementation pour les forcer. Dans d'autres situations, par exemple en cas d'enchères du spectre, je crois qu'il s'agit d'orienter les enchères pour atteindre ce résultat stratégique.

Encore une fois, il est nécessaire d'adopter une stratégie globale. J'ai hâte que ce type d'enjeu soit abordé dans le cadre de l'élaboration de la stratégie de développement économique rural.

M. John Oliver:

Certainement. C'est bien.

Le président:

La parole est à M. Chong. Allez-y.

L'hon. Michael Chong:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais revenir sur la question des prix abordables. Je représente une circonscription rurale. Nous n'obtenons pas souvent beaucoup de... Les régions rurales du Canada sont souvent mises de côté tout simplement parce que leurs habitants représentent un pourcentage de moins en moins élevé de l'ensemble de la population à mesure que le pays s'urbanise.

Toutefois, l'exemple que je suis sur le point de vous donner illustre la réalité des habitants des régions rurales non seulement en Ontario, mais aussi au Québec et dans les provinces maritimes, ainsi qu'à Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador. J'utiliserai un exemple à l'échelle locale, c'est-à-dire le comté de Wellington, afin d'attirer réellement l'attention des membres du comité sur ce que j'essaie d'illustrer.

Un résident de la ville de Guelph, en Ontario, paie environ 150 $ par mois pour Internet et le chauffage. Puisque les résidents sont alimentés au gaz naturel, ils paient un montant maximum d'environ 100 $ par mois à l'entreprise locale de distribution de gaz pour chauffer leur logement en hiver, et leur facture d'Internet s'élève à environ 50 $ par mois. Cela leur donne accès à Internet haute vitesse d'une capacité d'environ 100 gigaoctets.

Par contre, un résident qui habite littéralement deux milles à l'extérieur de la Ville de Guelph, dans le comté rural de Wellington, paiera 1 300 $ par mois pour obtenir les mêmes services en matière d'accès à Internet et de chauffage. Le chauffage coûte 1 000 $ par mois, car ces gens n'ont pas accès au gaz naturel. La plupart des habitants des régions rurales chauffent à l'huile et cela leur coûte environ 1 000 $ par mois. La plupart d'entre eux paient donc de 4 000 à 6 000 $ chaque hiver pour chauffer leur logement à l'huile. L'accès à Internet avec une capacité de 100 gigaoctets coûte environ 300 $ par mois.

Je tiens à attirer l'attention des membres du comité sur ces données. La situation est similaire dans les régions rurales de Pontiac et de Gatineau, où les résidents n'ont pas accès au gaz naturel et à Internet haute vitesse à un prix abordable. Lorsqu'on conduit dans la plupart des régions rurales de l'Est du Canada et qu'on voit des maisons en démolition, ce n'est pas sans raison. En effet, ces maisons coûtent maintenant trop cher à entretenir, car les organismes de réglementation, que ce soit à l'échelon fédéral ou provincial, n'ont pas déployé les services nécessaires en matière de gaz naturel ou d'Internet dans les régions rurales de la même façon qu'ils ont déployé les services en matière d'électricité et de téléphone traditionnel dans ces régions.

Par conséquent, nous avons maintenant de la difficulté à régler les problèmes liés au chauffage des logements et à l'accès à l'inforoute moderne. Comme je l'ai dit, l'exemple que j'ai donné représente la réalité des Canadiens qui habitent dans la plupart des régions rurales de l'Est et du centre du Canada. Ces gens paient 1 300 $ par mois pour chauffer leur logement et avoir accès à Internet haute vitesse, alors qu'une personne qui habite littéralement un mille plus loin dans une nouvelle région urbaine paie 150 $ par mois pour les mêmes services. Je pense que c'est l'un des dossiers sur lesquels notre comité doit se pencher.

(1025)

M. William Amos:

Puis-je formuler des commentaires à cet égard, monsieur le président?

(1030)

Le président:

Oui, allez-y.

M. William Amos:

Encore une fois, je suis tout à fait d'accord avec le fait que les prix abordables représentent un enjeu extrêmement important pour chaque famille et chaque foyer au Canada. Nous faisons tous face à cette réalité et dans les régions rurales du Canada, la situation est souvent plus difficile, car il y a moins de concurrence.

J'aimerais poser la question suivante à l'honorable député: quelles leçons doit-on tirer d'une décennie de gouvernement pendant laquelle le ministre de l'Industrie de l'époque a émis une directive au CRTC qui visait à accorder la priorité à la question de la concurrence? Je crois que les résultats sont éloquents. Cette directive n'a pas fonctionné. Cet effort déployé par le gouvernement conservateur de l'époque n'a pas produit des résultats en matière de prix abordables dont les Canadiens pourraient profiter maintenant. Nous sommes toujours aux prises avec des plans à prix inabordables comparativement à d'autres pays.

En plus du problème des prix inabordables, nous avons de gros problèmes liés à l'accessibilité en milieu rural, et c'est le sujet de la motion 208. Les montants affectés à la relance budgétaire par le gouvernement précédent n'étaient absolument pas suffisants, comme vous l'avez indiqué, pour offrir l'accès à Internet dans les régions rurales du Canada de façon à rétablir l'équilibre en matière d'infrastructure numérique. Cela me semble évident.

Avec ma motion, je n'ai pas tenté de transformer cet enjeu en enjeu partisan — et je n'essaie pas de le faire aujourd'hui. Je pense que le gouvernement actuel et les gouvernements précédents — y compris ceux qui ont précédé le gouvernement Harper — sont responsables de ces résultats inéquitables. Je crois qu'il faut reconnaître que les politiques adoptées par le gouvernement conservateur précédent n'ont pas permis d'avoir des prix abordables et l'accès à Internet haute vitesse et aux services de téléphone cellulaire dans les régions rurales du Canada. Tous les électeurs méritent que nous travaillions et que nous vivions dans le présent et que nous nous rendions compte qu'ils veulent avoir accès à Internet haute vitesse et à des services de téléphone cellulaire depuis longtemps. Mes électeurs voulaient avoir accès à ces services il y a deux semaines, lorsque leurs maisons étaient menacées par l'inondation et qu'ils tentaient de les protéger avec des sacs de sable.

Le président:

Merci.

La parole est à M. Graham.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Peu importe ce qui est arrivé avec la motion l'an dernier — j'ai consulté le compte rendu et je n'étais pas là —, nous sommes visés par une directive de la Chambre. Je pense qu'il nous revient de prendre des mesures sérieuses à cet égard.

Pour revenir sur les commentaires formulés plus tôt par M. Chong, j'ai une circonscription rurale qui est un peu plus vaste que celle de Wellington—Halton Hills, une circonscription que je connais très bien, car j'ai déjà habité à Guelph. Je suis sûr qu'il est interdit d'utiliser un téléphone cellulaire ou un poste bande publique au volant, mais dans ma circonscription, il y a des panneaux qui indiquent quelle chaîne de poste bande publique il faut utiliser pour annoncer sa présence, afin de conduire sur ces routes en toute sécurité. Nous vivons dans un environnement très différent. Je dois conduire 200 kilomètres sur des chemins de terre pour participer à des évènements organisés dans ma circonscription. C'est notre réalité. Il faut utiliser la chaîne 10 dans certaines régions et la chaîne 5 dans d'autres régions. Il faut les utiliser.

Mais c'est assez. Je sais que Rémi et Richard ont chacun une très vaste circonscription dans une région rurale du Québec et je veux les rallier à cette cause. J'aimerais donner à Richard la chance de faire un bref commentaire. [Français]

M. Richard Hébert (Lac-Saint-Jean, Lib.):

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Graham.

Monsieur Amos, je vous remercie d'être parmi nous.

On sait que l'accès à l'infrastructure numérique joue aujourd'hui un rôle extrêmement important pour les Canadiens, tant sur le plan de la sécurité qu'en matière de santé ou de développement économique dans nos régions. C'est ce qu'indique votre motion.

Comme il est précisé dans le mémoire que j'ai déposé en vue du budget de 2019, dans ma circonscription, Lac-Saint-Jean, 22 portions habitées du territoire ne disposent ni de connexion cellulaire ni de connexion Internet. C'est le cas des MRC de Maria-Chapdelaine et du Domaine-du-Roy.

Selon vous, quelles mesures pourraient être mises sur pied pour favoriser et faciliter la collaboration et le déploiement d'infrastructures sans fil dans nos milieux ruraux?

Pouvez-vous nous dire de quelle façon votre étude sur la motion M-208 pourrait aider votre circonscription et d'autres comme la mienne, Lac-Saint-Jean, à obtenir une meilleure infrastructure numérique sans fil?

M. William Amos:

Pour commencer, monsieur Hébert, je vous remercie de votre présence, en votre qualité de secrétaire parlementaire et représentant du gouvernement en matière de petites et moyennes entreprises. Nous savons très bien à quel point il est important d'appuyer les PME en région au moyen de l'infrastructure numérique nécessaire pour assurer leur succès. Si nous voulons réaliser des exportations, être à la fine pointe et saisir les occasions d'affaires, il faut avoir cette technologie.

Comme dans la vôtre, il y a dans ma circonscription des préfets, des maires et des mairesses, des conseillers et des conseillères ainsi que des dirigeants municipaux qui crient à l'aide haut et fort. Or depuis notre élection, nous voyons une augmentation des appuis fiscaux et des investissements.

Je songe notamment ici à Brancher pour innover, un programme de 500 millions de dollars sur cinq ans, qui a à son tour entraîné une participation financière des secteurs provincial et privé. En tout, ce programme a permis des investissements de plus de 1 milliard de dollars. Cependant, Brancher pour innover souffrait d'une lacune: les services cellulaires. En effet, ce programme était axé sur les services Internet haute vitesse.

Ce que j'aimerais, c'est que les nouveaux investissements pluriannuels annoncés par notre gouvernement dans le budget fassent une part aux services cellulaires, ou encore que les investissements dans les services Internet haute vitesse réussissent du même coup à améliorer les services cellulaires. Nous constatons une convergence des technologies sans fil et Internet. Cependant, ni moi ni les électeurs, les élus, les préfets, les maires et les mairesses de ma circonscription ne sommes des experts techniques. Nous voulons mieux comprendre la voie à suivre afin que ces deux volets connaissent un égal succès.

Nous voulons également voir différents modèles en action. Je vous donne un exemple. Dans ma circonscription, des projets d'une valeur totale d'environ 13,4 millions de dollars sont menés par une compagnie privée, Bell Canada, afin d'aider environ 3 200 foyers répartis dans 29 collectivités. Nous avons aussi un projet de 7 millions de dollars, dont la moitié des fonds est fournie par l'organisme sans but lucratif 307net et qui reçoit aussi l'appui financier de la municipalité de Cantley.

Voilà donc des exemples de modèles différents rendus possibles par les mesures financières du gouvernement fédéral et l'appui du gouvernement provincial. Je crois que les discussions qui auront lieu dans les prochains mois ou les prochaines années viseront à déterminer les modèles les plus appropriés et les plus abordables, et plus particulièrement du côté des OSBL. Non seulement ces modèles doivent satisfaire aux exigences techniques, mais il faut que ce soit abordable, comme le député de l'opposition vient de le mentionner.

(1035)

M. Richard Hébert:

Me reste-t-il encore un peu de temps?

Le président:

Il vous reste quelques minutes.

M. Richard Hébert:

Merci, monsieur Amos. Nous vous sommes très reconnaissants d'avoir proposé cette motion. Comme vous le savez, cette question importante est à l'étude depuis quelque temps. Je vis moi-même en région et je peux témoigner des difficultés que nous pose le manque de services cellulaires et d'accès à Internet.

Permettez-moi de vous en donner des exemples. Dans ma propre maison, je suis obligé de me placer à un endroit précis pour être capable de capter un signal cellulaire et d'utiliser mon téléphone pour des appels. Partout ailleurs dans la maison, c'est impossible. De plus, si je veux télécharger La Presse le matin pour la lire, je dois crier à mes garçons de se débrancher de leur connexion Internet pour que je puisse avoir accès à mon journal. Remarquez bien qu'il y a un bon côté à la chose: quand mes garçons se débranchent, ils vont s'amuser dehors, ce qui est probablement meilleur pour leur santé.

Il s'agit donc d'une grande préoccupation dans les régions. Comme vous le savez, des études ont été réalisées et notre gouvernement a prévu 1,7 milliard de dollars dans le budget de 2019 pour s'assurer de mettre en place les infrastructures nécessaires.

Le gouvernement vient également de conclure la mise aux enchères du spectre de la bande de 600 mégahertz. Le gouvernement avait réservé 43 % du spectre disponible à des fournisseurs régionaux, de façon à faciliter l'accès à Internet en région.

Vous avez soulevé la directive envoyée au CRTC par l'ancien ministre Bernier pour que cet organisme favorise dans ses décisions un accès accru et plus abordable aux services.

Ma question est à la fois simple et complexe. Selon vous, que devons-nous faire de mieux pour nous assurer que les Canadiens de toutes les régions auront, sans plus tarder, accès à des services Internet sans fil ou câblés? Que manque-t-il à l'ensemble des mesures que nous avons mises en place au cours des dernières années? [Traduction]

Le président:

Veuillez être bref, s'il vous plaît. [Français]

M. William Amos:

Je vous remercie de votre question.

Je me souviens bien de cette fois où je conduisais vers Rivière-du-Loup pour un caucus libéral. Il était 1 heure du matin, j'étais un peu perdu dans la circonscription du secrétaire parlementaire et je ne pouvais pas consulter le géonavigateur de mon téléphone cellulaire, pour la raison dont nous discutons aujourd'hui. Cela soulève aussi toute cette dimension de sécurité publique.

Votre question est effectivement complexe, mais j'essaierai de vous donner une réponse brève et simple.

Dans votre étude, outre l'avis des experts du secteur privé, il pourrait être utile de connaître le point de vue du milieu universitaire sur la Loi sur les télécommunications. Par exemple, il y aurait lieu de se demander si, au lieu de s'en remettre à des objectifs non obligatoires, on ne devrait pas plutôt renforcer les dispositions législatives actuelles entourant l'accès à Internet, pour ainsi prêter main-forte au CRTC et obtenir de meilleurs résultats.

Je pose la question sans savoir la réponse. Il est possible qu'il faille modifier la Loi elle-même pour permettre cette réglementation plus forte et plus stricte et pour imposer des solutions non seulement au secteur privé, mais aussi aux gouvernements.

(1040)

[Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Masse, vous avez les deux dernières minutes.

M. Brian Masse:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais faire un suivi sur cette question, car c'est un bon point.

Vous avez mentionné les avis de directive émis par Maxime Bernier et ensuite par Navdeep Bains, et vous avez parlé des différences entre les deux.

Si vous aviez une directive maintenant, que diriez-vous au CRTC, afin d'orienter les entreprises? Je crois que le système est déficient, mais si nous décidions maintenant d'émettre une directive, que feriez-vous?

M. William Amos:

Pour revenir à la question précédente à laquelle je viens de répondre, je pense que je commencerais par dire qu'il faut d'abord examiner les lois. Si on émet une directive, c'est pour fournir à l'organisme de réglementation des précisions sur la façon d'atteindre certains objectifs. Si les lois étaient plus précises, et surtout si des objectifs étaient établis, par exemple en ce qui concerne l'accessibilité dans les régions rurales, on pourrait peut-être obtenir de meilleurs résultats sans avoir à émettre des directives précises.

En général, est-ce une bonne chose de chercher à accroître la concurrence? C'est certainement une bonne chose pour les consommateurs. Est-il approprié de tenter d'obtenir des prix abordables? Certainement, mais je ne suis pas sûr...

M. Brian Masse:

Quelle serait votre directive? Qu'est-ce qui serait utile? Je présume que c'est ce que je tente de savoir. Cherchez-vous une exclusion spéciale sur laquelle le CRTC devrait se concentrer immédiatement? Vous pourriez lui envoyer ce message dès maintenant. Je tente de vous offrir l'occasion de le faire.

M. William Amos:

Certainement. Je pense que les représentants de l'organisme de réglementation écoutent cette discussion. Ils entendent et ils ont entendu ce souhait par l'entremise de l'initiative intitulée « Parlons large bande » et ils ont entendu les gens souhaiter obtenir l'accès universel dans les régions rurales du Canada. Des normes ont été établies. Des fonds ont été affectés.

Manifestement, à titre de député d'une circonscription rurale qui représente de nombreuses collectivités qui souffrent d'un manque d'accessibilité, j'aimerais beaucoup qu'on précise davantage comment améliorer l'accessibilité dans les régions rurales. Notre gouvernement a fait un pas de géant en ce qui concerne les mesures financières, et je pense que la situation est très encourageante pour les régions rurales du Canada grâce au Fonds pour la large bande universelle et au fonds du CRTC et, possiblement, grâce à la Banque de l'infrastructure du Canada. Ces mécanismes existent. Je pense qu'il faut maintenant se demander comment ce financement sera versé et comment il encouragera d'autres initiatives de ce genre.

Nous pouvons également présumer que les intervenants du secteur des entreprises de télécommunications d'un bout à l'autre du Canada liront ces témoignages. Ils entendront les voix des députés de partout au Canada et ils reconnaîtront qu'il s'agit d'un enjeu national qui a reçu l'approbation unanime du Parlement.

Le président:

Merci.

C'est tout le temps que nous avions aujourd'hui.

J'aimerais remercier tous les participants. À mardi prochain.

La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 09, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.