header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-05-27 SECU 164

Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

Ladies and gentlemen, it's close enough to 3:30 to get started. I see quorum, so I will bring the meeting to order.

We are dealing with Bill C-93 clause by clause.

The first clause has no amendments.

(Clause 1 agreed to)

(On clause 2)

The Chair: On clause 2 we have amendment NDP-1, but I have received a note from the legislative clerk that we want to deal with NDP-1 and NDP-2 together. Consequential to NDP-2, the suggested ruling is that it is inadmissible, which would render NDP-1 null.

As this is, in effect, a discussion about the scope of the bill, I'm perfectly prepared to hear Mr. Dubé's arguments as to why both amendments are within the scope of the bill.

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP):

Thank you, Chair.

NDP-1 and NDP-2 both seek to do something we heard from, dare I say, all witnesses—or nearly all, certainly if we exclude the minister—which is to make the process automatic. In other words, instead of putting the burden on individuals seeking to apply.... We did a lot of research on this, my office in particular, because there were a few back-and-forths about certain considerations.

For example, with regard to the Privacy Act, the exemption already exists with the Parole Board to be able to do the work, instead of asking marginalized Canadians who have been saddled with these records for something that is now legal to be doing the work.

Ultimately, I think it's within the scope of the bill, because we'd be putting the onus on the Parole Board as opposed to on Canadians. Especially if it's not an issue of royal recommendation. In other words, if we're not talking about an issue of money, I think the mechanism for the process that's been created by this bill, which seeks to remediate what the minister refuses to qualify as a historical injustice, is certainly well within our prerogative as a committee, if not something that unfortunately could have been done from the get-go in the drafting of the legislation.

As I said, there was enough back and forth with people who are much smarter than me on this to know that the amendment covers all of our bases in terms of giving the appropriate powers to the Parole Board.

The Chair:

Do any other colleagues have any comments on the admissibility or inadmissibility of amendment NDP-2? Do the witnesses have any comments? Is there any other debate?

Yes, Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I would seek a clear understanding of why it's beyond the scope of the bill. We haven't even gotten to the discussion about expungement yet. This is simply making the record suspension process automatic, and giving the appropriate powers to the Parole Board.

Could any clarification be provided there?

The Chair:

My reaction—and I will turn to the clerk for some clarification here—is that it's a positive obligation on the part of the Parole Board, requiring positive actions. While I agree that we heard a lot of evidence to the effect that this process could be made a lot more, if you will, user friendly by positive actions by the board, it is at this point apparently beyond the scope of the bill.

I will let the legislative clerk weigh in on it.

Mr. William Stephenson (Legislative Clerk):

Essentially, as Mr. McKay said, in this case the scope of the bill is fairly narrow. It creates an onus on the applicant and allows them to apply for a record suspension. It also waives the fee. Because of that fairly narrow scope in this bill, introducing a new concept that would essentially create a positive obligation on the board is beyond the scope of the bill.

(1535)

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I'm just wondering because I can think of tons of amendments that create positive obligations on other entities. I'm not sure I'm following the argument here. For many pieces of legislation that I've studied in committee, we adopted amendments that would clearly force different bodies to undertake actions that were not initially codified in the bill, so I'm not sure if I'm following what the distinction is there.

Mr. William Stephenson:

In other circumstances, there are examples of creating an obligation to report back to the House or something like that, and it's still within what the department does and within what the bill foresees.

In this case, the concept is clearly to allow the applicants to apply on their own initiative. It's kind of meant to restrain the administrative action or the administrative onus, from what I understand. Maybe officials would like to weigh in on that. In this case, the issue of causing the board to identify those records on its own is a new concept.

The Chair:

Do officials want to weigh in?

Mr. Broom.

Mr. Ian Broom (Acting Director General, Policy and Operations, Parole Board of Canada):

Sure, I can weigh in. Thank you very much.

Under this amendment, from the Parole Board of Canada's perspective, we don't currently have the technological capacity to implement what is outlined in this motion. We'd need to consult with partners. We would want to verify some of the privacy and consent implications that could be involved in automatically ordering a records suspension.

As was mentioned, current process now is that applications are received with supporting documents. The onus is placed on the applicant. Examples would be court documents that would outline the nature of the conviction, dispositions involved, or whether or not the sentence was complete. We don't have any memorandum of understanding or information-sharing framework or infrastructure in place that would permit us to do that when conducting inquiries. I think, from the board's perspective of what we could implement, there are a number of challenges that we'd want to assess.

The Chair:

Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Chair.

As for the privacy considerations, as far as I've understood, given that the records suspension branch of the Parole Board is an investigative body, they do have Privacy Act exemptions. We spoke with them, and they confirmed they have access to CPIC, so I do find it a bit unfortunate that we're basically saying it would be too much work and we're not accepting to make it automatic, when the reality is, as has been pointed out by numerous people, that the burden is then put onto marginalized Canadians.

I would also just ask for clarification from the clerk, perhaps. I think back to Bill C-83 when we were studying SIUs and I believe amendments were adopted that created additional criteria for health care professional reviews, for example. I'm not clear on the distinction that creating additional actions on the part of public servants in one instance would be acceptable, but here, because we're prescribing the process in a certain way—even though the end result this amendment seeks would still be one of these individuals having records suspensions—it would no longer be within the scope of the bill. I mean, it's titled “no-cost, expedited”. Ultimately is that what we're relying on, the title? It doesn't seem to make much sense to me.

The Chair:

The general argument is that, when you're going beyond the scope, you're going beyond the purpose of the bill. That's the general argument. I agree that we are down to some fairly narrow points at this point, but I'm perfectly open to any other interpretation or information as to why we would consider this to be beyond the scope.

Mr. William Stephenson:

In the case of adding criteria to something in a bill, when you have a list of criteria, you can always play around within the scope of what's required. In this case, we're going beyond just requirements and giving the board additional responsibility, creating an additional administrative burden. In arriving at our analysis of the bill, we looked at the summary of the bill and we looked to the way the bill is drafted.

The summary of the bill reads as follows: This enactment amends the Criminal Records Act to, among other things, allow persons who have been convicted under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, the Narcotic Control Act and the National Defence Act only of simple possession of cannabis offences committed before October 17, 2018 to apply for a record suspension without being subject to the period required by the Criminal Records Act for other offences or to the fee that is otherwise payable in applying for a suspension.

Basically, the bill does two fairly narrow things. It allows people to apply for a record suspension without being subject to the period required by the Criminal Records Act for other offences, and it waives the fee that's otherwise payable in applying for that suspension. That is what guides us in our analysis, as well as the way the bill is drafted. You'll note there are clauses that specify that the onus is on the applicant to prove various things.

That's how we understand the scope of the bill.

(1540)

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

My concluding argument would be that this just proves the point that there was no actual political will to help these Canadians who are saddled with these records.

It's pretty apparent to me—and we've heard now non-partisan analysis—that the onus is on these applicants. I think it's quite disappointing and I would say that, to me, it just defeats the entire purpose. We're basically telling marginalized Canadians to figure it out. We say, “Don't worry, you won't be charged on our end”, but we've talked about the other fees that'll come with it. I find this extremely disappointing.

With respect to you, Chair, I would move to challenge the chair's ruling if that is what it is.

The Chair:

The chair, reluctantly, rules that NDP-2 is inadmissible, therefore making NDP-1 null.

I do take note of the arguments that you've put forward, which I think, frankly, are good arguments and consistent with the evidence, but the interpretation on the scope of the bill is the interpretation on the scope of the bill. There are certain places that even well-intentioned legislators can't go.

With that, the chair is challenged. I think that's a straight-up, straight-down vote.

Would you like a recorded vote?

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Yes, a recorded vote.

(Ruling of the chair sustained: yeas 8; nays 1)

The Chair:

The ruling of the chair prevails. With that, there are no amendments to clause 2.

(Clause 2 agreed to on division)

(On clause 3)

The Chair:

We now move on to clause 3.

We have Liberal-1 standing in the name of Ms. Dabrusin.

Ms. Dabrusin, would you explain your amendment to the committee, please.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Yes. In fact, I have a series of amendments. They're all related, so you're going to hear me say the same things.

One of the things that really stood out for me was hearing people talk about the fact that we have now legalized simple possession of cannabis, yet they might still have outstanding fines they have not paid. They might have difficulty covering those costs, and that could pose a barrier to people who are applying for record suspensions.

This amendment, Liberal-1, allows people to get a record suspension for cannabis possession even if they have outstanding fines. What it does as well is allow the waiting period for cannabis possession to be waived, even if the person has other offences on their record that they have met the waiting period for. If they've met the waiting period on the other offences, but they haven't met the waiting period that would normally apply for simple possession, we're saying we're going to waive that so that they can apply for it. But the fee is not waived for the second scenario.

(1545)

The Chair:

Matthew, go ahead.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I'm seeking confirmation of how I read this amendment, because I certainly support the intention to make it so that individuals who have unpaid fines or what they call “time served remaining” be able to access this process regardless, in keeping with the testimony we heard.

However, I look at proposed subparagraph (iv), under paragraph (b) “other than”, it says “sections 734.5 or 734.6 of the Criminal Code or section 145.1 of the National Defence Act, in respect of any fine or victim surcharge imposed for any offence referred to in Schedule 3”.

My understanding of that was that it means that, when certain organizations might be doing background checks.... Colleagues will recall that when there were changes brought in by the previous government so that individuals obtaining record suspensions who, for example, were on the sex offender registry, those things would still appear when doing vulnerable checks, background checks and things of that nature. My understanding, reading this amendment, is that even though we're waiving the need to pay the fine, it would still be uncoverable through a background check that the fine remained unpaid, which seems to me to defeat the purpose of the record suspension in the first place. I'm perhaps seeking clarity from smarter people than me to confirm that we have indeed understood that correctly.

The Chair:

I don't think there's anybody in the room who's smarter than you. We're in good shape.

I didn't mean that as an insult, by the way.

Does Ms. Dabrusin want to respond before I go to Mr. Motz on that particular point, or do we want to go to the officials?

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

I understood that Mr. Dubé was asking the officials to weigh in on whether his interpretation was correct in the first instance.

The Chair:

It is your amendment, so I wanted to give you an opportunity.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

I would leave it to the officials to answer the question. My understanding is that it doesn't waive the fine, and that's because it's held by the provinces. It does mean that you're allowed to get the record suspension even though you have not paid the fine. As to how that works—

The Chair:

Mr. Motz, are you on the same point or a different point?

Mr. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, CPC):

It's probably the same take on that.

The Chair:

Then let's get what the members think first, and then we'll hear what the officials think.

Mr. Glen Motz:

I'm just looking for clarity.

The way the act is read is...and the legislative clerk has already said we have to keep the scope of these amendments along with the intention in the bill. If that's the case, then those individuals who are applying for this don't qualify because they have administrative charges on there.

If I'm hearing you correctly, are you trying to ensure that administrative charges don't preclude someone from applying for a record suspension for a marijuana minor possession?

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

I'm just talking about the fines. If their sentence was that they had a fine to pay and they have not yet paid it, they can still apply for a record suspension. It's the fine that was given specifically—

Mr. Glen Motz:

You mean the fine for simple possession, not for any administrative charges.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

This is just for simple possession of cannabis.

I want to clarify. When I mentioned the provinces, the issue is that in Quebec and New Brunswick the system is that the fines are actually paid through the provinces.

The Chair:

I see Mr. Eglinski wants to weigh in here. It's not as if I'm ignoring the officials, but I want to do it all at once.

Mr. Eglinski.

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC):

Following through with the fines, if they can put their application in to have their record removed, then why would they ever intend to pay the fine? Have we consulted with the provinces on that?

If I can put the application in, did your program or your amendment have a process in there to follow back on the provinces? We're going to have a whole bunch of people owing money in provinces who don't have records.

(1550)

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

First, yes.

I think we should get to the officials to explain all the details of how it works. However, the idea is that we don't stop them from being able to get their record suspension because of the outstanding fine.

Mr. Lyndon Murdock (Director, Corrections and Criminal Justice Unit, Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness):

Yes, the effect of clause 3, as was mentioned, is that it removes the fact of an outstanding fine as a barrier to applying for a record suspension. You're quite correct that in the two jurisdictions we did consult—Quebec and New Brunswick—they administered the fine collection for those jurisdictions. The federal Public Prosecution Service administers fine collection for all the other jurisdictions.

With respect to your question, sir, about what the incentive is for individuals to pay their fines. It is civilly enforceable. Admittedly, in the two jurisdictions, Quebec and New Brunswick, where they administer the fine collection, those areas probably have more compelling levers to incentivize the payment of fines, for example, up to and including withdrawing a driver's licence. There are not as many levers at the federal level, other than the fact that a fine still remains on your record and is outstanding.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I want to make sure. I don't think my question was entirely addressed. My question is this: For any organization doing a background check, where normally a record that has been suspended would no longer appear—which is the purpose of providing the record suspension in the first place—would that background check then turn up unpaid fines for what are now schedule 3 offences?

Mr. Ari Slatkoff (Deputy Executive Director and General Counsel, Department of Justice):

No, the effect of the record suspension is still that it is only with respect to the payment of fines that persist. The other effects of the record suspension are valid and will exist for individuals. It would not turn up.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Then how come it's listed in the same enumeration, under the same qualifiers as the proposed subparagraph 2.3(b)(v) in the amendment, which is section 36.1 of the International Transfer of Offenders Act? The other sections, as I said, some of these.... Again, I thought this was a similar provision to what was initially brought in when it was changed to record suspension and we were providing for certain offences still appearing under certain texts.

Mr. Ari Slatkoff:

This amendment to proposed paragraph 2.3(b) enumerates the very limited number of situations in which certain obligations or disqualifications persist. The general effect of the record suspension, that it be kept separate from other criminal records, applies in all situations. These are very narrow exceptions, things such as the firearms prohibitions and driving prohibitions that are referred to in the first part of the provision, and the same for the International Transfer of Offenders Act. The only intention here is to preserve the civil enforcement of the fine.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I'm just confused. You're saying that those are disqualifying or they remain, and proposed subparagraph 2.3(b)(iv) in the amendment specifically refers to “in respect of any fine or victim surcharge imposed for any offence referred to in Schedule 3”. I'm not clear how those other ones can remain on the books, and then that one will not appear anywhere, even if the fine's unpaid.

Mr. Ari Slatkoff:

I'm not sure I fully understand the question. The intention of this amendment is simply to preserve the enforceability of the fine civilly. There's no other effect of the conviction.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

With the indulgence of the chair, just to be clear, in the amendment, in proposed paragraph 2.3(b), five exceptions have been listed. Is that correct?

Mr. Ari Slatkoff:

Yes.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

What's the effect of those exceptions?

Mr. Ari Slatkoff:

I just need a moment to attend to your question, please.

(1555)

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Sure.

Mr. Ari Slatkoff:

Thank you.

I can confirm that section 734.5, which is referred to in proposed subparagraph 2.3(b)(iv) in the amendment, is the ability to recover a fine civilly. Section 734.6 is the ability to refuse a permit or licence. Those are two abilities that a federal or provincial government would have. Those are effects of the conviction that will persist.

Section 145.1 is the civil enforcement under the National Defence Act. Those are the only effects of the conviction that would persist.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Those fines would not appear anywhere that would otherwise undo the effect of receiving the record suspension in the first place.

Mr. Ari Slatkoff:

That's correct. It's just the ability to make the fine still payable and to refuse permits and licences.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

To your knowledge, when provincial governments have this information, does it get shared among departments? If you're revoking licences and things like that and the provinces are responsible, they would ultimately continue to retain the information of the original offence.

Mr. Ari Slatkoff:

I'm not aware of the information-sharing practices in provincial governments, but there is a requirement to keep the record separate, but for those narrow exceptions.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Okay, thank you.

The Chair:

Is there further debate?

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 3 as amended agreed to on division)

(On clause 4)

The Chair: We have an amendment in the name of Ms. Dabrusin, Liberal-2.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

This is a continuation of my issue on fines and trying to resolve it. Each of my amendments seems very wordy and long, but the purpose is that it applies to people with records for other offences in addition to cannabis possession and says that the nonpayment of fines for cannabis possession doesn't make you ineligible for record suspension for those other offences, if you see what I mean.

The fact that you have not yet paid your fine for simple possession of cannabis, as long as you've met all the criteria that you need for the other record suspension that you're seeking, will not be a barrier for you to get that record suspension.

The Chair:

Is there any other discussion on that?

Mr. Glen Motz:

If you don't pay a fine, and it depends on the fine, if they're going by summary conviction, obviously most of them were, you have so long to pay based on the courts, and then a warrant is issued for your arrest. Then if you disappear and you don't get located for the time that your warrant's outstanding, which is until you get located, to me that excludes you from being eligible for applying for this record suspension because you're not in good standing, which the act requires. Then you'd have a failure to comply; you'd have probation....

If I'm hearing you correctly, you're asking for victim surcharges to be removed. You're also asking for administrative charges to potentially be included, so that even though they could be forthcoming, you could still apply for a record suspension, because you will potentially get other charges related to not paying a fine.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

This only deals with a nonpayment of a fine. If you have not paid the fine for simple possession of cannabis, it's only that piece, then if you have met your time requirements and everything else for a record suspension on another charge, that will not stop you. I'm not talking about any of them other than administrative pieces, but again, the officials might be able to answer that question in more detail.

(1600)

Mr. Glen Motz:

Isn't that the whole point of the act, that you have to be in good standing? If you haven't paid a fine, then you're not in good standing to qualify.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Effectively, I'm recognizing that the payment of the fine has been a barrier for people getting record suspensions and that has come up several times. I'm trying to allow these people to get their record suspension for simple possession of cannabis.

The Chair:

Do any of the officials wish to weigh in on the conversation between Mr. Motz and Ms. Dabrusin?

Mr. Lyndon Murdock:

I'd underscore the point that Ms. Dabrusin was raising with respect to the effect of this amendment, which is that it simply removes the outstanding unpaid fine as a barrier to application.

The Chair:

Is there any other debate?

Mr. Eglinski.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Let's get Ms. Dabrusin to clarify what she just said. Your last words were, “for simple possession”, and I thought before that you were referring to somebody who has an outstanding fine for simple possession asking for a record clearance. Is it something else?

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

That's right.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

That conflicts with what you said in the last...because you said—

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

I don't believe so.

The outstanding fine for simple possession of cannabis does not serve as a barrier to being able to get your record suspension on another charge, but I'm not saying we're waiving the fines or sentences in any way with respect to those other charges. People will have to meet all the requirements for those other charges to get a record suspension. All I'm saying is that if the fine for simple possession of cannabis is still outstanding, that's not going to stop you from being able to proceed to get your record suspension.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you.

The Chair:

Are you good?

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I'm good.

The Chair:

All right. If Mr. Eglinski's good, we must all be good.

I see no appetite for further debate on amendment Liberal-2.

(Amendment agreed to on division [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: With that, we move to NDP-3.

Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Chair.

The amendment seeks to remove the word “only”, which means that individuals who have only a record for simple possession are the only ones who are benefiting from this process, so that even individuals who have other records can still apply.

I think this is particularly important, again, in keeping with what I think the objective of the bill is. Certainly, no one is saying that individuals shouldn't be serving their time or taking care of outstanding fines and whatnot for other offences committed, but I see no reason.... If we truly want to provide these individuals with a record suspension, and if we truly believe that certain individuals have been unfairly targeted by the previous iteration of the law, then I think it only makes sense that all Canadians, regardless of whether they have other elements on their record, should be allowed to benefit from this process.

The Chair:

Is there any debate?

Mr. Glen Motz:

I'd like to find out from the officials, Chair, what their thoughts are on the removal of “only” from that particular language.

Mr. Lyndon Murdock:

Thank you very much.

Our understanding of the proposed amendment is that this would essentially have the effect of expunging, for all intents and purposes, an individual's offence for cannabis. It would still be a record suspension, but it would result in a partial record suspension.

Where an individual has other offences, those offences would stay on the individual's record and show as such. It would have the effect of carving out, if you will, just the offence of simple possession of cannabis. The process with respect to record suspension is that you suspend the record in its entirety, not individual offences.

The Chair:

Is there any further debate?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We're now on to NDP-4.

Mr. Dubé.

(1605)

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Chair.

This is, again, just in keeping with removing barriers from the process, removing the requirement to complete a sentence or fee related to a schedule 3 offence to qualify.

Again, it's pretty clear that there are numerous barriers in the process, as outlined in the legislation, for allowing folks to apply. If it's no longer a crime and if we truly want to give them an expedited process—which we believe should be an automatic expungement, frankly—than there's no reason why we should be expecting individuals to serve time in the various ways prescribed by law for that same offence.

The Chair:

Is there debate? [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, CPC):

This is the first comment in French today. We'll make our staff work.

I want to know whether anyone is actually serving time for simple possession of marijuana. An inmate may have it in their record, but there are many other things. As a result, the person isn't eligible for a record suspension. [English]

The Chair:

Mr. Murdock.

Mr. Lyndon Murdock:

Unfortunately—and maybe I can turn it over to my colleague from the RCMP—we don't have that information currently. [Translation]

Ms. Amanda Gonzalez (Manager, Civil Fingerprint Screening Services and Legislative Conformity, Royal Canadian Mounted Police):

I can't answer that. I don't know about the sentences for this type of situation.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

According to the proposed amendment, as I understand it, people who are already in prison would be allowed to apply for a record suspension. However, this would mean that they're in prison for simple possession of cannabis.

Ms. Amanda Gonzalez:

I'd say that it's rare.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

That's right.

Mr. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

The clause can't be applied unilaterally in Canada. The payment of fines in certain jurisdictions is under provincial jurisdiction. As a result, we can't have the federal government impose fines that are currently administered by the provinces. [English]

The Chair:

Is there any comment on Mr. Picard's observation?

Mr. Lyndon Murdock:

I'm sorry. I actually didn't hear it. I missed it.

Mr. Michel Picard:

You cannot apply the law when the fine is administered by a province. It cannot be applied the same way everywhere, because part of it—fines, for example—is administered by Quebec and.... What is the other province?

Mr. Lyndon Murdock:

It's New Brunswick.

Mr. Michel Picard:

We can't do anything about that.

The Chair:

Is there any other debate on NDP-4?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: In PV-1, there's a line conflict with NDP-4.

Ms. May, I'm assuming you wish to speak to PV-1.

Ms. Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, GP):

Yes. You'll recall, Mr. Chair, that I'm here because of the motion this committee passed, in which I am not allowed to vote on things, or move things. The one thing I am allowed to do is to follow your instructions to show up on the time-limited time and speak to my amendments. I do wish to speak to it.

The Chair:

You have reminded the committee of that several times.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

I like to keep it on the record, because I hope that after the next election, no MP in my position will ever be subjected to the motions that were passed in the last government and this one.

In any case, after the election, we'll have more than 12 MPs, so I won't be subjected to it, but it's not fair or nice for any smaller party.

Here's the motion. It's very clear. I think you've all heard the evidence, and I'm sure are sympathetic to the concerns of the Native Women's Association of Canada and the Campaign for Cannabis Amnesty, that the very people we're trying to help with this legislation may be disadvantaged, because they'll be in the midst of their sentence. They won't have been able to pay their fines, so they can't apply, because the time limits, in the way the act currently reads, are such that a person is ineligible to make an application for records suspension until the expiration of their sentence, or including the payment of a fine.

The amendment I'm putting forward here, PV-1, is to say that we would change that to “regardless of whether or not any sentence imposed” or “the payment of any fine, has expired”.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

(1610)

The Chair:

Is there any debate?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Mr. Eglinski.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you.

My amendment is basically that Bill C-93, clause 4, be amended by adding after line 12 on page 2 the following: (3.11) A person who makes an application referred to in subsection (3.1) may do so using electronic means in accordance with regulations made under paragraph 9.1(d).

Right in our mission statement, or our title, it says, “expedited record suspensions”. The fastest way to do it is by electronics, or computer. According to my research, the State of California in one year eliminated as many records as we are told by Mr. Broom.... They got rid of 250,000 records in one year, by going to electronic means.

I do realize that was expungement, but I believe we would not be doing justice in this committee if we didn't encourage one of our government agencies to modernize and simplify the way it does business, and make it easier for our clients out there to make applications. I think that if we were to use an electronic program.... There are people out there who can develop them. We should encourage our government agencies to modernize and be as efficient and as fast as they can be.

If we do not go to some form of electronic monitoring or application, which can get rid of a lot of that groundwork initially—for example, to say if a person is eligible or not eligible—and do a lot of the work that we're now doing manually, I think we'd be doing an injustice. All I'm saying is to put a section in here that gives them the opportunity to look outside and develop a program that might work to make it much more beneficial to people out there, and much quicker for the RCMP and the Parole Board to get rid of these records.

The Chair:

Is there any debate? [Translation]

Mr. Michel Picard:

Subsection 3.1 doesn't limit the capacity to submit an application. In addition, the logistical aspects can be handled in keeping with the regulations. It seems redundant to talk about the electronic aspect. [English]

The Chair:

Are there any comments?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

I was going to ask if they even have the capacity to receive an electronic record.

Mr. Ian Broom:

Currently, we do not.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I just want to point out on the record how disappointing I find it that we would be rejecting amendments because we have a backward system that is clearly inadequate. Quite frankly, I think this is so straightforward—the basic stuff to make this system accessible—and we're just throwing in the towel because we're not in the 21st century when it comes to how these things work. It's mind-boggling.

I wanted to state that, for the record, while I thank my colleague for his amendment and offer my support for it.

Mr. Glen Motz:

I would agree with Mr. Dubé.

I'm wondering about the silence of it. Does it mean that if we ever get with the current technology, we would be able to do it, even though we don't actively mention it here? Can we still apply it down the road if record suspension can be sought electronically in, let's say, six months or a year, should this bill pass the House?

The Chair:

Go ahead, Mr. Broom.

Mr. Ian Broom:

What I could speak to is the operational aspect of this proposed amendment. There are two elements here.

The first is the ability to receive electronic applications, and that could include the supporting documents that would be used to determine eligibility for whatever scheme—in this case, the streamlined record suspension process for simple possession of cannabis convictions.

The second aspect is that information the Parole Board of Canada would use to verify eligibility is third party in nature, so we would also need to take into consideration the means of authenticating the documents we would receive from, for example, courts and police services outside of the national criminal repository.

(1615)

Mr. Glen Motz:

To the legislative clerk, then, my question is more in line with.... The courts now accept electronic versions of things when they're stamped by police departments or courthouses. They're considered to be legit. I don't see that as being a barrier at all.

What I'm asking more specifically is about the language of this. If we don't make mention of it specifically, as Mr. Eglinski's amendment would allow, and we leave it silent, will that preclude the ability to do so, should it ever become possible?

The Chair:

Is that within your capacity to answer?

Mr. William Stephenson:

No, unfortunately.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I'd like to make a comment, Chair. When California decided to go to their system, they went outside of their agency and had three different applicants write up programs. I understand that one of the applicants now has a very elaborate program that she says can work internationally on a number of different programs.

All I'm asking is that we look and not ignore it because it's out there. If we sit back, we're doing no justice. We can write all the stuff we want here, but we're not going any further or any quicker. Let's try to make it quicker. All I'm saying is, let's look at electronic aids and see if it can help your agency be more modern.

We can be like CPIC was before CPIC, recording everything by hand and passing it down. CPIC modernized things for us in the RCMP. All I'm asking for is to modernize your agency to help those people get this done a little quicker.

The Chair:

Let me ask the reverse question. If this amendment doesn't pass, are you limited to doing things the way you're doing them now?

Ms. Brigitte Lavigne (Director, Clemency and Record Suspensions, Parole Board of Canada):

The Parole Board of Canada is always open to looking for ways to modernize the record suspension application process. Certainly, in terms of enabling an electronic or digitized application, we would need to consult and assess the impacts and the available resources in order to pursue something along those lines.

The Chair:

If your consultation went well and resources were available, would you be able to do it with or without this amendment?

Ms. Brigitte Lavigne:

Certainly, if there were amenable means for us to forge something from a modernized standpoint, the Parole Board would be open to those things.

Mr. Michel Picard:

If it's possible, I wouldn't mind inviting my colleague to modify his amendment into a recommendation that can be done after the bill, to bring to the attention of government that, in addition to our amendment, such a recommendation should be taken under consideration so they can proceed with what they're looking for and modernize the system.

The Chair:

Mr. Eglinski, do you want to respond to Mr. Picard's suggestion?

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

To do it as a recommendation...?

I think we're in agreement to work with the committee, if we don't pass the amendment here, to put it in as a recommendation to give them the tools in the future to....

The Chair:

You would like, separate it from the bill itself, a report from the committee recommending that this gets done sooner rather than later. Is that correct?

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Why can't the recommendation be part of the report?

The Chair:

It would be part of the report, yes.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Yes, okay.

(1620)

Mr. Glen Motz:

If I'm hearing correctly, you can't accept this as an amendment to the bill, but you would accept the recommendation?

Mr. Michel Picard:

Again, that's because of logistical issues, but the idea is good because they can do it. Let's push it to the report.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Our suggestion is that we vote on it, and if it gets defeated, then we move to put it in as a recommendation. We'd like to have it on the record, please.

The Chair:

Is there any further debate on Mr. Eglinski's amendment then?

(Amendment negatived)

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

At this time, Mr. Chair, I'd like to take that motion and work with the committee to put it in as a part of a recommendation of our report, so that it gives the Parole Board the opportunity to look into and research more modernized techniques.

The Chair:

I have to say, as chair, that this is entirely consistent with the evidence we heard, and I also have to express a frustration. What's the point of these hearings if things don't move forward? We are trying to make the lives of our citizens somewhat easier, and it just doesn't sound right when officials come in and say, “Well, we can't.” It doesn't sound right.

Anyway, that's too much editorial comment from the chair. That's enough.

We are now on amendment NDP-5.

Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Chair.

This amendment would delete lines 26 to 29 on page 2, which concern the onus. It says: The person referred to in subsection (3.1) has the onus of satisfying the Board that the person has been convicted only of an offence referred to in that subsection.

Again, it is just in keeping with the theme of what we heard through testimony and what we're hearing today, which is unfortunately not getting any kind of support, and that is the fact that these individuals are sometimes far away from the centres where they can acquire fingerprints and background checks, the things that they need to satisfy these requirements. We're talking about individuals who.... If we're talking about a process that's supposed to be a “no cost” one, it's been told to us repeatedly that there actually is a cost associated with it.

A big part of that cost, regardless of what's in this legislation, is due to having to provide all the supporting documents and so on. This is not only tedious but costly as well for individuals who quite frankly will either be taken advantage of by bad actors out there who seek to offer their services, or who quite simply will just not know where to look, regardless of any good intentions the department may have for whatever kind of advertising they have in mind, which is also unclear following the hearings.

Again, if we're going to continue with this non-automatic record suspension process, then I think the very least we could do is to ease the burden a bit with an amendment like this.

The Chair:

I see no further debate.

(Amendment negatived)

(Clause 4 as amended agreed to on division)

(On clause 5)

The Chair:

We are now on clause 5, Ms. Sahota. Do you want to speak to amendment Liberal-3, please?

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

This amendment is that Bill C-93 in clause 5 be amended by replacing line 3 on page 3 with the following: pended, without taking into account any offence referred to in Schedule 3, if the Board is satisfied that

Basically, the purpose of this amendment is so that, for those with criminal offences who are seeking a pardon for their other criminal offences—I'm not talking about cannabis—and have a cannabis possession on their record, that cannabis possession is not taken into account as “bad conduct”. That basically would go against the purpose of our saying that cannabis is now legalized and trying to remove those simple cannabis possessions to begin with.

It would be very harmful for that to be taken into account when individuals are dealing with their other convictions and are trying to seek pardons for those other convictions. They've met the time and they're paying the fees—all of those things—but then there is this cannabis possession charge from maybe a few years back. That is then considered to be bad conduct and they can't even get those other convictions pardoned because of it.

That's my justification for this.

(1625)

The Chair:

Is there any further debate?

(Amendment agreed to on division)

The Chair:

We now have NDP-6, standing in the name of Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Chair.

This is similar to amendment NDP-3. It is another amendment that seeks to make it so that individuals who have other items on their criminal records can still obtain the record suspension for simple possession of cannabis. Again, regardless of whatever other offences they may have, it just seems strange that we would have a double standard, where for some people it's okay now because marijuana has been legalized but for others it's not.

Again, this is just trying to remove that double standard that exists, especially for individuals who might have other offences that are also relatively minor. Those individuals in particular are some of the most penalized by the approach put forward in this legislation.

The Chair:

I see no further debate on NDP-6.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: We now have NDP-7.

The suggestion here is that it is beyond the scope of the bill as it seeks to affect sentences, which is not a concept that is in the bill.

Does anybody want to challenge the chair? It seems to be fashionable these days.

Voices: Oh, oh!

The Chair: Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

It's nothing personal, Chair, but I will because I think the sentences are directly related to the process of applying for your record suspension. I think that if you're talking about offering an expedited process—as the bill purports to, both in its title and its summary—it has been made clear by members on all sides, and by witnesses, that a barrier to the quickness of that process and the ability to do it is any outstanding sentence.

The amendment seeks to set aside “any sentence that was imposed for that offence that, on the day on which the order is made, has not expired according to law”. Again, it's just removing some of these barriers that exist.

Without it being anything personal, I will challenge the chair on that and ask for a recorded vote.

The Chair:

Okay. That is not a debatable motion.

(Ruling of the chair sustained: yeas 8, nays 1)

The Chair:

With that, we are on to PV-2.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

This will be very straightforward to present, because the rationale matches the one I presented on—

The Chair:

Similarly, though, if we ruled NDP-7 inadmissible, so also is PV-2.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Inadmissible in that it's...?

The Chair:

It seeks to affect the sentence. It's the same concept.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Yes. Well, it's a good-faith effort to get you to reconsider.

The Chair:

Given your standing, which you have reminded us of in many instances, you probably don't have the standing to challenge the chair.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

I can't challenge the chair, withdraw my own amendment, or do much else but show up when I have to, based on the motion you passed.

The Chair:

Yes.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

There you go. Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

It was a really touching moment. Thank you for that.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

I could make it more heart-rending if you would like it to be.

The Chair:

I have a limited emotional range, as my wife would point out.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Ms. Elizabeth May:

I think you've covered the full range of A to B.

The Chair:

With that, we are now on to PV-3.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Thank you.

On this one, I believe, as we've gone forward we've had some conversations, and I do want to acknowledge that I think we may have a way forward on this that will allow it to be passed. Rather than take up any time right now in terms of how we're going to deal with the exception to revocation and exempt records, I'm going to ask Julie if she wants to chime in right away, because I think we have a shared approach.

(1630)

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Thank you. I appreciate that.

I'll let Ms. May speak to the motivation behind this amendment and why it stands, but there was a concern that it might have too much breadth as it's currently worded and might apply to convictions well beyond the simple possession of cannabis.

I would like to move a subamendment to PV-3, which reads: (1.2) A record suspension ordered under subsection (1.1) may not be revoked by the Board under paragraph 7(b).

That was really eloquent, wasn't it?

The Chair:

Yes.

Do we have an actual physical copy that we can distribute?

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Yes. There is a copy that's being distributed.

The Chair:

Is it in both official languages?

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

It is.[Translation]

I can read the proposed text in French if you wish.

(1.2) La suspension d'un casier ordonnée en vertu du paragraphe (1.1) ne peut être révoquée par la Commission en vertu de l'alinéa 7b). [English]

The Chair:

The debate is on the subamendment.

Ms. Elizabeth May:

Again, since Julie has left it for me to speak to the rationale behind this—and it was in the evidence that was before the committee, particularly from Solomon Friedman, who represents the practice of criminal defence—there is a real injustice in having a criminal record hanging over one's head for an offence that is no longer a criminal offence. This lifts the requirement to prove good conduct and to obtain the suspension in the first place.

This subamendment complements that. I am very grateful that we have found a solution in a tweaking of the language in my amendment.

Thank you very much.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I have a similar amendment at NDP-9, which says: The Board may not revoke a record suspension in respect of an offence referred to in Schedule 3 on a ground referred to in paragraph 7(a) or (b).

Since we're just getting to this now and we can't run through the whole thing, I'm wondering about the distinction between, first of all, the consequences of schedule 3 no longer being mentioned—whereas it is in both my amendment and Ms. May's amendment—and why we're exclusively mentioning only paragraph 7(b) in this subamendment. I referenced paragraph 7(a) also in my amendment.

I'm wondering if someone can walk through why—

The Chair:

I can't, but I am concerned about order here and doing things in sequence.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Sure.

The Chair:

When we get to NDP-9, I'm sure you'll wish to raise that very point, but I—

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Well I'm just trying to—

The Chair:

The only relevance at this point would be if it is consequential.

Let me just ask the clerk, if the subamendment and the Green Party amendment are moved, is there a consequential impact on any other...?

Mr. William Stephenson:

Because they address the same thing, yes, they're tied together.

The Chair:

Okay, so is it appropriate that we deal with both together, or should we just keep to the order that we have?

Mr. William Stephenson:

I think it would make sense to at least answer Mr. Dubé's question and then see how he can proceed at that point.

The Chair:

Okay.

I see Ms. Dabrusin waving her hand, but I take the point of the clerk, which is that he thinks it's appropriate to answer Mr. Dubé's question sooner rather than later.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

If I may, the legislative clerk can advise, but my understanding is that PV-3, NDP-8, CPC-2, NDP-9 and NDP-10 all seek to.... Maybe NDP-10 might not fit after line 10, but each of the other ones that I mentioned, up to NDP-9, seem to be amending the same space.

If we do it once, can we keep doing it with the other amendments, or do we have to...?

(1635)

The Chair:

It probably has to be at each instance, I would think, but I will defer to the clerk.

Mr. William Stephenson:

In this case, you could add it afterwards. We could deal with whatever is left over from Mr. Dubé's amendment. If we're dealing with paragraph 7(b) and Mr. Dubé would like to deal with paragraph 7(a), we could deal with it, but conceptually it would make sense to address the issues at the same time.

The Chair:

Okay, so we can deal with it conceptually, but I'd prefer to deal with it sequentially as and when we arrive at the affected amendment.

Mr. William Stephenson:

That makes sense.

The Chair:

Is that all right?

Pierre. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

I agree with you, Mr. McKay.

I want to hear from our experts because we have three amendments that deal with paragraph 7(b): the amendment proposed by Ms. May; the amendment proposed by the Liberals, who are suggesting a rewording of the provision; and the amendment proposed by Mr. Dubé, which includes paragraph 7(a). I don't have the text in hand, but it can significantly affect the process. It's just a matter of seeing whether we want to proceed step by step and then come back to Mr. Dubé's amendment or proceed with a comprehensive approach.

Is that the question, Mr. Dubé? [English]

The Chair:

I want to proceed step by step, so— [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

I need to know. [English]

The Chair:

What's on the table right now is the subamendment to Ms. May's amendment. Let's restrict the debate to that for the time being.

Mr. Dubé, do you not like that idea?

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

The reason I raised it was not to debate my amendment. It was just to illustrate the questions I have about this new wording that has been presented and is on the floor currently.

The Chair:

Conceptually, I understand. From a point of order, though, we go subamendment to amendment. If we move this, those in favour of the subamendment—

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

That's my point. Before we get to voting on it I have questions about the subamendment that have remained unanswered.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

In other words, I was asking about the removal of the words “Schedule 3”. What difference does that make? Ms. May and I...that's why I referred to my bill. I'll just say PV-3, before the subamendment, referred to schedule 3, and now we're referring to....

I'm going through the bill and the subsection. Is that just cleaning it up, or does that have a real consequence on which offences are covered?

The Chair:

That's a legitimate point.

First of all, let me just see whether the officials have any opinions on the consequences of moving the subamendment now to amend PV-3.

Mr. Lyndon Murdock:

The subamendment has the effect of essentially ensuring that record suspensions that have been granted cannot be revoked where the concept of good conduct is applied, but it applies exclusively to convictions for cannabis possession.

The original amendment in PV-3 was broader in scope and could have resulted in partial revocation, where an individual could, again, have the prohibition on the revocation, if you will, applied to the cannabis but still have other offences revoked.

The Chair:

As I understand, the concern here is that if you pass this now, there will be further amendments of some consequence throughout. Do the officials have any concerns about that?

The second question is the best way to proceed.

Let me have the clerk speak to this now, and then we'll see whether we resolve this.

Mr. William Stephenson:

Procedurally speaking, right now we are dealing with the subamendment, and we can only deal with one subamendment at a time. We could deal with the subamendment and if Mr. Dubé wants, he could either move another subamendment after we've dealt with this one to further amend it and bring it in line with NDP-9, or we can proceed with NDP-9.

(1640)

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I don't mind dealing with my amendments in the order they'll be presented. Again, Chair, I apologize. My intention is not to get us out of order. I'm just trying to understand the concept.

We're talking about proposed subsection (1.1), which refers to proposed subsection 4(3.1). When you go back to that section, I think that's the one that says “offence referred to in Schedule 3”, if I'm following the bill correctly.

With your permission, Chair, I want to clarify the answer that was provided and understand. When we're saying other records would be partially suspended...I apologize. I'm not quite following what the consequence of the original wording was by referring broadly to schedule 3, as Ms. May did in her original wording.

The Chair:

Mr. Broom, do you want to respond to that?

Mr. Ian Broom:

Sure, I can respond to that.

As the motion is drafted without the subamendment, it would mean it would be a little difficult to implement, given that the Criminal Records Act and the PBC operations hinge on actions with the entire record of conviction. The challenge would be that if the amendment stood, the subamendment would narrow it to an impact only of convictions for simple possession of cannabis.

We wouldn't end up in the situation whereby, subject to good conduct, there would be a revocation and let's say there was another offence in addition to the simple possession of cannabis offence, two different actions would be taking place on the record of conviction. On the one hand, there would be no impact, and on the other hand, there would be.

It would be a challenge for us because we wouldn't be dealing with the criminal record as a whole in that instance. However, narrowed to criminal records that would only have convictions for simple possession of cannabis, then that would be consistent with the framework of the Criminal Records Act in dealing with the whole record.

The Chair:

Are you fine with that?

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Just to make sure I understand, this would mean, in other words, to filter out individuals who have records for other offences?

Mr. Lyndon Murdock:

Yes.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Okay.

Chair, if I may note just for the record, as part of the debate, that clarification is important, because, again, it goes against the spirit that I want the bill to have, which is—again, previous amendments I've presented have sought this—to have individuals who have other offences able to access this process. I don't want to speak for Ms. May, but I imagine that her intentions might have been similar with regard to the way that our amendments have been drafted. That's an important distinction for me, so the clarification has been helpful.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

If I might clarify, my understanding of the way the NDP amendment would work is that, effectively, murderers with simple possession would be in a better position than murderers without a simple possession charge, based on how this works when they're trying to get.... That's effectively why we can't agree to that.

The Chair:

Seeing that this debate has been exhausted, the vote is on Ms. Dabrusin's subamendment.

(Subamendment agreed to)

(Amendment as amended agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Chair: Amendment PV-3 as amended passes and we are now on NDP-8.

Again I've been handed this note about its admissibility. It seeks to grant record suspensions for offences not contained in the bill.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

This was actually a recommendation that was made by a number of witnesses. It was for administration of justice offences relating to schedule 3 offences. In other words, to use an example that's been used in committee, if an indigenous person is unable to appear in court for a variety of geographic considerations and it is an appearance in court related to the offence, then we would also suspend that offence.

Again, it seems strange to me that we would want to right the supposed wrong that these individuals have incurred and then not be able to do so by making them continue to have other marks on their record that will inevitably cause them problems. The remediation the bill seeks to give will not actually be obtained by many people who could use it, frankly. I will again challenge the ruling, with all due respect to the chair.

(1645)

The Chair:

I'm starting to feel bad about this.

(Ruling of the chair sustained: yeas 8, nays 1)

The Chair:

It's another outstanding victory for the chair.

We now go to Mr. Motz with CPC-2, please.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you, Chair.

Colleagues, I'm proposing CPC-2 as a fallback mechanism for the government to decide onus on applicants to prove the convictions they had. Under this bill, the onus is that individuals convicted of minor possession of marijuana will have to prove that they were convicted of only that charge. However, I can tell you from experience, and from the testimony we heard before this committee, that there will be individuals whose records cannot be found or have been lost or destroyed. In those cases, they are unable to prove their case through no fault of their own.

In those circumstances, I am proposing a common-sense addition whereby applicants can demonstrate and swear an oath or an affidavit explaining why that's the case. It would enable the Parole Board to review the application and investigate and determine eligibility in that capacity, as opposed to an outright denial in those circumstances. In the interest of ensuring that all of those who are eligible can access the same process, I am submitting this to provide some procedural fairness.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

In the absence of some of the amendments I've proposed being in order, much less adopted, to make the process automatic, this is a nice plan B, so it's an amendment that I support.

However, I do seek guidance, perhaps, from the clerk to understand why a process that would have been automatic, such as in NDP-1 and NDP-2, where the board would have been doing the work, was too much of an undertaking for the board and beyond the scope of the bill, whereas here the sworn statements lead to the board's making inquiries to ascertain whether conditions have been met. Certainly, the undertaking is not quite as vast, but it, nonetheless, seems to have the same intention. It's not that I want to jinx this amendment—I am glad it's in order—but I do have some difficulty understanding the distinction there.

The Chair:

Your question is that if your amendment was beyond the scope of the bill, why is this one not beyond the scope.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

What's the threshold for ordering the board to do additional work?

Mr. William Stephenson:

In this case, the amendment is dealing more with the issues of parameters and the inquiries that the board would be making. From what we understand, based on our knowledge, they already have the power to make inquiries to ascertain that there has been good conduct...all of those things. In this sense, it's a little bit different from the other amendments because it's affecting the parameters that are already within the scope of the bill—requesting suspension, that the onus on the applicant is fairly narrow—versus the other amendments that are a bit more like new schemes or mechanisms in the bill.

(1650)

Mr. Michel Picard:

I request a three-minute suspension to talk in more detail about this technical issue. We'd like to talk about it.

The Chair:

I think we can suspend for three minutes.

With that, we're suspended for three minutes.

(1650)

(1650)

The Chair:

Colleagues, can we come back to order?

Mr. Picard, do you wish to say something?

Mr. Michel Picard:

I have no debate.

The Chair:

Okay. Is there any further debate on amendment CPC-2?

An hon. member: Could we have a recorded vote?

The Chair: We'll have a recorded vote.

(Amendment agreed to: yeas 9; nays 0 [See Minutes of Proceedings])

Mr. Glen Motz:

Let me write this date down because that's the first time this has happened in any of my committee deliberations.

The Chair:

Such peace and harmony has broken out that I'm not quite sure what we're going to do now.

We're on to NDP-9, which was previously discussed.

Mr. Dubé, do you want to move that?

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Again, this is just to make sure we're not revoking record suspensions, if ultimately the intention of the bill is to allow individuals to move on from an offence related to something that is now legal.

I did have a question on my own amendment, if I can connect back to the previous amended amendment, which was PV-3. I don't have it in front of me, but I included paragraph 7(a), and the subamendment only mentioned paragraph 7(b).

Can someone help out with what the distinction is there?

(1655)

The Chair:

Mr. Murdock, do you want to respond?

Mr. Lyndon Murdock:

Paragraph 7(a) deals with a person who is subsequently convicted of an offence, whereas paragraph 7(b) deals with the issue of good conduct.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I appreciate that clarification.

An important part of why I opposed the previously amended amendment is that an individual who obtains a record suspension for something that is now legal, and goes on to commit another crime deserves the punishment of that crime. If they're found guilty, that's fine, but it's difficult to square the circle of why that person's record for something that is now legal would be reinstated.

Whether we like those individuals or not, whether we agree with the act that has been committed or not, there is a principle here that this is no longer a crime. In keeping with our position, and that of many of the witnesses, expungement is the way to go. To me it seems to make sense that we would not be putting an additional line on someone's criminal record for something that is now legal because it happened to happen to them when it was illegal. The Parliament of Canada has recognized that individuals should more easily obtain a record suspension should that be the fate of this bill.

That is an important addition there, which was absent from the subamended Green Party amendment.

The Chair:

Is there further debate?

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 5 as amended agreed to on division)

The Chair:

With that, I'm going to have to vacate the chair, and ask Mr. Paul-Hus to take over. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Good afternoon, everyone.

We'll now look at Mr. Dubé's NDP-10 amendment.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Mr. Chair[English]

NDP-10 seeks to achieve— [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

I want to tell my colleague that, unfortunately, the chair considers the amendment inadmissible. However, he can still provide an explanation.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The chair has changed, but the outcome may be the same.[English]

NDP-10 seeks to go with expungement, simply put. I refer those listening to us to my exchange with the minister and his complete inability to explain the double standard that exists between Bill C-66 and this legislation. Racialized Canadians, indigenous people, lower-income Canadians have all been unfairly targeted by the law in this case. This is what we are seeking to right here. The only way we can truly do that is with expungement.

The minister and other officials did refer to the need for documentation at the border and such. I would refer colleagues to Bill C-66, the section on destruction and removal. In section 21 is states “For greater certainty, sections 17 to 20 do not apply to documents submitted or produced in respect of an application under this Act.” In other words, as the several calls that we made to the Parole Board confirmed, if people lose the confirmation that their record was expunged, they can request a new confirmation. So the minister's argument is complete bunk that you need this magic document at the border.

I believe, from the witness testimony, that this is the right way to go. I understand that the chair has ruled, so I would, with all the respect that I have for him, challenge the chair.

(1700)

[Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Thank you for your explanation, Mr. Dubé.

The ruling was made, and I'm sustaining it.

Since the request has been made, the recorded division will concern whether to sustain the chair's ruling.

(Ruling of the chair sustained: yeas 7; nays 1)

(Clause 6)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

We'll move on to clause 6 and look at the CPC-3 amendment.

Mr. Motz, you have the floor. [English]

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you, Chair.

The intent of CPC-3 is that clause 6 be amended by deleting proposed paragraph (b) which strips the Parole Board of the power to cause inquiries to be made to determine the applicant's conduct since the date of conviction.

The following two amendments were suggested. Both CPC-3 and CPC-4 were suggested by the Canadian Police Association, which believes the Parole Board should retain some limited authority and discretion to make inquiries to ensure that some consideration is given to the small number of applications that will be made by people who are repeat or habitual offenders, and to ensure they don't take advantage of a process that is clearly not meant for their specific cases.

As we were told by the association president, we know of situations where applications may be made by offenders where a simple possession charge was given by the courts and it was arrived at as a result of a plea bargain. Once the Parole Board would be able to drill down into those cases and have the authority to do so, the agreement by the Crown and the courts could form a more serious charge. They may have accepted those on the assumption that a conviction would be a permanent record of the offence that was made, and a lesser plea wouldn't have been accepted otherwise.

It's just an amendment to allow that to occur. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Thank you, Mr. Motz.

Is this a matter for discussion?[English]

Do you want a recorded vote?

Mr. Glen Motz:

Yes. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Okay.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

We'll move on to the CPC-4 amendment.

Mr. Motz, you have the floor. [English]

Mr. Glen Motz:

Similar to CPC-3, this deals more directly with the Parole Board's discretion as to whether granting a record suspension would bring the administration of justice into disrepute. I believe that the bulk of applicants who would apply for this are upstanding citizens, and they'll have no issues in being approved by the board.

That being said, we should still let the Parole Board do its work. If the government doesn't believe that the Parole Board has work to do, then this government should have introduced expungement of records as opposed to record suspensions.

That's the rationale behind CPC-4.

(1705)

[Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Thank you, Mr. Motz.

We'll proceed with the vote.

(Amendment negatived [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

As the alternate chair, since the two motions were mine, I simply want to remind the committee that the Canadian Police Association made these recommendations. As the regular chair said, we must take into account the recommendations of our witnesses and, above all, of people such as members of the Canadian Police Association.

We'll now move on to the LIB-4 amendment.

Ms. Dabrusin, you have the floor.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Thank you.[English]

This is a consequential amendment, based on the first couple that I have proposed in trying to deal with this fines issue.

It's technical, so I thought it might be best if I ask the officials to describe what it does. These are the technicalities that need to go into place to make it happen.

Mr. Lyndon Murdock:

Sure, I'm happy to.

This amendment to clause 6 modifies Bill C-93 to add proposed subsection 4.2(1.1). This proposed subsection clarifies that the board inquiries related to good conduct and disrepute should not be made where the applicant applies for a record suspension under subsection 4(3.1), that is, where the conviction is simple possession of cannabis only.

The proposed subsection further clarifies that neither simple possession, offences referred to in schedule 3, nor the non-payment of associated fines and victim surcharges, will be considered as part of the board inquiries where there are other convictions on the individual's record. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Is that all?

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

That's all.[English]

These are technical consequential amendments at this point. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

That's fine.

Will there be a discussion or questions? [English]

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I'm more confused than I was in the beginning, but that's all right. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Okay.

We'll proceed with the vote.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

We'll move on to the LIB-5 amendment.

Ms. Dabrusin, you have the floor. [English]

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

The technical changes just keep rolling, with so much fun.

This basically makes sure that the fines can still be applied even after a record suspension has been granted. That was the part we had talked about in regard to Quebec and New Brunswick. They run their fines programs, so this is in order to keep the system cohesive. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Thank you.

Mr. Motz, you have the floor. [English]

Mr. Glen Motz:

I'm curious to know whether the officials were involved in this drafting, or did they review the material prior to submission?

Mr. Lyndon Murdock:

We were not involved in the drafting.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay, that's one part of the question.

Did you review this prior to submission?

Mr. Lyndon Murdock:

I did not review this amendment.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Did any officials in your department do it?

Mr. Lyndon Murdock:

I can't speak for others, sir.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

It's been pretty clear from the beginning what I've been trying to do. I'm trying to run a number of amendments that are all connected to try to make sure we can allow for people to access record suspension for simple cannabis possession, even though they might have an outstanding fine for that simple cannabis possession. The issue we've run into is that fines aren't fully within the federal jurisdiction. We're trying to carve out that you can apply and still get your record suspension. However, the fine is still outstanding and you can be asked to pay for it. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Thank you, Ms. Dabrusin.

Would anyone else like to add something?

Mr. Murdock, you have the floor. [English]

Mr. Lyndon Murdock:

Thank you.

To go back to Mr. Motz's question as to whether others had reviewed it, I can say that, yes, others did review the amendment.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Thank you.

Who opposes the amendment?

What do you think, Mr. Picard?

(1710)

Mr. Michel Picard:

Are the supporters or opponents going first?

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

I'll start with the opponents. I wanted to know whether the system was working.

Let's move on to the vote.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(Clause 6 as amended agreed to on division)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

We'll now move on to clause 6.1 and the CPC-5 amendment.

I must warn the Conservative Party that this amendment is inadmissible because it goes beyond the scope of the bill.

My Liberal colleagues will understand that I'm pleased to be saying this into the microphone today.

Do you want to discuss the amendment? [English]

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I'd just like to follow through. I understand that we're maybe overreaching and giving authority where we can't, but again, it's the following through of my earlier submission and the recommendation that we'll be putting forward at the end. We need to encourage our Parole Board to look at electronic means of recording this information to make it as simple as possible.

My research has shown that there are programs out there that meet the needs of multiple jurisdictions in the United States. All I am basically asking is that we allow the Parole Board to proactively hire a firm or look at design software to help eliminate the problem we have right now and make it more electronically friendly and quicker. That was the idea behind that, but I realize there's a cost to that and we do not have that jurisdiction. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Thank you, Mr. Eglinski.

(Clause 7)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus): We'll move on to clause 7.

Since there's no amendment, we'll proceed with the vote.

(Clause 7 agreed to on division)

(Clause 8)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

We'll look at the LIB-6 amendment.

Ms. Dabrusin, you have the floor. [English]

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

The fun continues on this one again.

It's just allowing for the collection of the fines by the provinces. That's what this aims to do in Liberal-6. It's just completing it. There were consequential amendments that had to fit in with the original amendments that I made, and this is part of that package. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Thank you, Ms. Dabrusin.

Since there are no other comments, we'll proceed with the vote.

(Amendment agreed to [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

We'll move on to the CPC-6 amendment.

Mr. Motz, you have the floor. [English]

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you, Chair.

This minor amendment is to address the question that neither the officials nor the minister was able to answer definitively. It's provided after the fact to the House and to the people of Canada.

When we inquired of him how many people would benefit from this act or how much it would cost, we were provided with basically the officials' best guess. Some academics estimate up to half a million people could use this record suspension process; however, officials estimated that 250,000 are eligible, with about 10,000 who might make use of it. If more than 4% of those who are eligible do make use of this process, the Parole Board will be underfunded based on the numbers that were provided.

The idea of the amendment is to ensure that the costs of free record suspensions for marijuana possession are not passed down to those applying for other record suspensions. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Thank you, Mr. Motz.

Will there be a discussion?

It's too easy with me.

Mr. Michel Picard:

No.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You're very efficient.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

I'm too efficient.

Mr. Michel Picard:

You're too threatening, Mr. Chair.

Voices: Oh, oh! (laughter)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

We'll proceed with the vote. [English]

Mr. Glen Motz:

I'd like a recorded vote. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Okay. We'll proceed with a recorded division.

(Amendment agreed to: yeas 8; nays 0. [See Minutes of Proceedings])

(1715)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

The chair would like to express great satisfaction with the committee's work.

Thank you, everyone.

(Clause 8 as amended agreed to on division)

(Clause 9)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

That's fine.

Let's move on to clause 9.

(Clause 9 agreed to on division)

(Schedule)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus): Let's move on to the next point concerning the schedule, or annexe in French. Mr. Spengermann has proposed the LIB-7 amendment.

Mr. Sven Spengemann (Mississauga—Lakeshore, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.[English]

Amendment Liberal-7 does the same thing in two subclauses, which is to exclude the application of the act to synthetic preparations of cannabis that remain illicit. The act was never intended to apply to these substances.

The only exception to the exception is if they are identical to the plant-based cannabis. In those cases, it could be by happenstance or by some other design, but then—

Mr. Glen Motz:

What if they can't be identical?

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

That's what the language captures. If they are identical to the plant-based, then they fall under it. If they're synthetic in any other respect, they are excluded. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Thank you.

Would you like to discuss it?

Mr. Eglinski, you have the floor. [English]

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

My concern is how we would know unless a trial was held and evidence was prepared at that time. Are you asking these guys to go as far back as the trial and the evidence to determine...?

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

Maybe the officials can comment, but presumably the trial record would capture whether a synthetic substance was involved and it would not be a schedule 3 substance.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Okay, thank you. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Thank you.

Mr. Motz, the floor is yours. [English]

Mr. Glen Motz:

Maybe the officials can weigh in on this. If you're looking just at the record itself, it would indicate minor possession of whatever substance it is. If it's a synthetic cannabinoid, I don't know if the record would ever indicate the schedule that it's from. I don't know if it is. I'm curious to know whether—

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Let's ask the RCMP.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Ms. Gonzalez, could you weigh in on this?

Ms. Amanda Gonzalez:

In many cases we wouldn't know. That would be in court documentation perhaps, but on the record itself, we likely would not know that.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Just for clarity's sake then, it would be up to the Parole Board to go and seek the file specifically on that application. How would you know to do that? The record doesn't indicate it.

Ms. Amanda Gonzalez:

I can't answer that.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Would you be doing that on every case?

Mr. Ian Broom:

Under the Bill C-93, as drafted and with the amendment, if an applicant is seeking a record suspension, they would be providing supporting documents including the court document if it were necessary to ascertain the nature of the convictions. If the court document outlines that this was an offence that involved a synthetic cannabinoid, then that would be found in the court document.

Mr. Glen Motz:

That's fair enough. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Is everything okay, Mr. Motz? [English]

Mr. Glen Motz:

Yes. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Thank you.

Let's vote on the LIB-7 amendment.

(Amendment agreed to on division [See Minutes of Proceedings])

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Let's vote on the schedule, or annexe in French.

(Schedule as amended agreed to on division)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

That's fine.

Let's move on to the next steps.

Shall the title of the bill carry?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Shall this bill as amended carry?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

Some hon. members: On division.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus): Shall the chair report the bill as amended to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed. [English]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

On division. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Is the committee ordering the reprint of the bill as amended?

(1720)

[English]

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

What about the recommendation? [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Under the current procedure, the recommendation can't be an integral part of the bill. However, as in the case of Bill C-83, the recommendation will be made at the same time. The analysts would need information to write the recommendation. [English]

Mr. Glen Motz:

I'm ready when you guys are. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Okay.

We have finished the part on the bill, but someone raised the possibility of making a separate recommendation, and we agreed to discuss it. We have examined the procedure with the clerk's help.

I will just let Mr. Eglinski make his recommendation.

Mr. Michel Picard:

I don't know how all this works.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

The clerk explained the procedure to me and I will let him tell you about it. [English]

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Naaman Sugrue):

There are a couple of different ways we can go about it, but effectively the committee can either go by motion or agree to make certain recommendations. We can either do it by a motion that is then amended to include whatever recommendations are desired, or separate motions to report certain recommendations. My advice would be to include any and all recommendations the committee adopts in one report, but it's up to the committee to decide what those will be.

Mr. Michel Picard:

My understanding is that everything related to the bill itself is done. Maybe we can look at the report where the recommendations can be made as a second step. We can give time to Mr. Eglinski to write the recommendation he wants to propose.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I have it written already.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Man, you're quick.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Yes. I'm prepared to read it and make a motion on it.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I have mine written as well.

Mr. Michel Picard:

I propose that we proceed right away. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Ms. Sahota and Mr. Eglinski are now ready to make their recommendations.

Let's start with you, Mr. Eglinski. [English]

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I move that: That the Committee recommends that the Parole Board, which has a mandate to deliver services quickly, effectively and efficiently, use technology to enable them to better serve Canadians, and that the Minister has a requirement to provide high-quality services to all Canadians, reflecting past recommendations of the Auditor General on program delivery as well as his mandate from the Prime Minister to serve Canadians. Therefore, be it resolved that, the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security recommends the Minister immediately look to implement electronic submissions for record suspensions, in particular for those mentioned in C-93, An Act to provide no-cost, expedited record suspensions for simple possession of cannabis. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Thank you, Mr. Eglinski.

Mr. Dubé, go ahead.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you.

(1725)

[English]

Chair, I want to take the opportunity to thank my colleague for his motion. I support it. I think it's important for the committee to say and particularly in the context of.... I know through this process I've been hard on the officials. I think it's important to note here that the Parole Board will do the job it can with the tools it has been given, and it just hasn't been given the tools to help the marginalized people who require this process, a better process than what's in the bill.

We heard this throughout committee. I think another thing we heard throughout committee that I believe we can conclude, seeing how this bill is going to be reported back, is that the absolute bare minimum was done for what should have been part of a flagship piece of this government's agenda.

This committee has agreed in the past that record suspensions could be looked at as automatic. It was part of a study we did when we discovered what a mess this whole thing was.

Mr. Eglinski's recommendation, while good, I'm sure he would agree is just one step in resolving this whole mess. I come away from this process very disappointed, like many I'm sure, but will look forward to supporting my colleague's motion. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Picard, go ahead.

Mr. Michel Picard:

I would like to suggest that our comments take into account the preliminary steps the department will have to follow if we give it the mandate to implement an electronic system. It will have to assess, among other things, the resources, the equipment, the development costs and the procedures involved.

We all share the desire to modernize services and facilitate work through electronic means. An optimal approach to reach that goal should take into account the necessary elements, costs and procedures that would give the department the means it currently lacks and would enable it to make its electronic services as accessible and efficient as possible.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Thank you, Mr. Picard.

Would anyone else like to comment?

Who is in favour of Mr. Eglinski's recommendation?

Mr. Michel Picard:

My comment had a question mark at the end. Does the recommendation as written engage the department to undertake steps to acquire electronic services? I don't have the text in front of me, so I am relying on my memory.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

You have the floor, Mr. Eglinski. [English]

Mr. Michel Picard:

Does the text give you the latitude to evaluate what's needed before going straight to “let's implement something”?

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

My first line, I think, might clarify that to you. It states that the committee recommends that the Parole Board “has a mandate to deliver services quickly, effectively and efficiently”. Then I go into using the technology. It's just mandating them to look beyond where they are to the modern technology that will enable them to do it. That's all we're asking them to do.

Mr. Glen Motz:

If I may clarify, in answer to Mr. Picard, the actual “be it resolved” states that the standing committee “recommends the minister immediately look” at the implementation of electronic systems for record suspensions.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Yes. Thank you. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Thank you, Mr. Motz.

We will now vote.

(Recommendation agreed to)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus): Thank you.

Ms. Sahota, it is your turn. [English]

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay. The recommendation I have is basically in terms of the fees that are required. We heard from a lot of witnesses that although we're waiving the actual cost of the record suspension, there are other fees involved.

My recommendation is that: After having studied Bill C-93, An Act to provide no-cost, expedited record suspensions for simple possession of cannabis, and having studied the Record Suspension Program pursuant to Motion No. 161, the Committee wishes to make the following recommendation to the Government: That, given witnesses have expressed concerns about additional financial costs in the pardon application process, such as acquiring copies of court and police documents, and given that the Government has recognized the importance of reducing the financial burden of applying for a pardon as evidenced by Bill C-93's proposal to waive the $631 fee, the committee strongly encourages the Department of Public Safety and National Security to study further ways to reduce costs associated with applying for a pardon.

(1730)

[Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Thank you, Ms. Sahota.

Mr. Dubé, go ahead.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

We cannot be against virtue, but I just want to say again how discouraging all this is. We have a government that has been in power for four years. We have carried out a study that was entrusted to us through a motion from a Liberal member. Yet here we are today making another recommendation to say the same thing.

Everyone has known this for 10 years, since the amendment was adopted. So it is unfortunate to have to make recommendations to a department when, ultimately, the minister could have taken action and corrected in a broader way than this bill the damage caused by the program. It is the 11th hour, we are three months away from an election campaign, but nothing has been done yet.

I will vote in favour of the recommendation because we cannot be against virtue, but I deplore all these good intentions we are expressing while a minister, who has had four years to make these changes and to have a real impact on people's lives, has done nothing.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.

Ms. Sahota, go ahead. [English]

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes, I have a correction to my recommendation. I said that it encourages the “Department of Public Safety and National Security”. I mixed up the name of the committee with the actual department. It is actually the “Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness”. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Thank you, Ms. Sahota.

Mr. Motz, you have the floor. [English]

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you, Chair.

I'd like to echo the comments of Mr. Dubé and agree. I think I remember that when we looked at M-161, we made a very similar recommendation to the minister, and the minister agreed that he'd be doing exactly this. I'm wondering whether we actually need that again, because we did talk about it, I know, in M-161, almost word for word. Is he going to act that much faster because we have two recommendations? I don't know.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I think it's good to re-emphasize it because this is a new set of witnesses we've heard from. It doesn't hurt for us to re-recommend it. Obviously it is something we've heard from many witnesses. From Matthew's comments, although he's disappointed, it is the step he wants taken. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Since there are no other comments, we will vote.

(Recommendation agreed to)

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus): Now that both recommendations have been unanimously agreed to, are you okay with putting them in the same document and presenting that document to the House?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Yes, but on condition that we do not ask for a government response, as there is not enough time left for that.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

We could ask for one, but the government will not have time to prepare it.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's right.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Okay.[English]

My point is just that the two motions will be put together in the same report.

Mr. Glen Motz:

With the report, yes.

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

That will be tabled to the House. We will ask for an answer from the government, but they won't have time.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay. [Translation]

The Vice-Chair (Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus):

This brings the meeting to an end.

Thank you very much for your cooperation.

I also want to thank the officials for their work.

Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

Mesdames et messieurs, nous sommes assez près de 15 h 30 pour commencer. Je vois que nous avons le quorum, alors je déclare la séance ouverte.

Nous réalisons l'étude article par article du projet de loi C-93.

Le premier article n'a pas d'amendement.

(L'article 1 est adopté.)

(Article 2)

Le président: Pour ce qui est de l'article 2, nous avons l'amendement NDP-1, mais j'ai reçu une note du greffier législatif, selon laquelle nous devons traiter des amendements NDP-1 et NDP-2 ensemble. En conséquence de l'amendement NDP-2, la décision suggérée, c'est que l'amendement est irrecevable, ce qui aurait pour effet de rendre l'amendement NDP-1 nul.

Puisqu'il s'agit, en fait, d'une discussion sur la portée du projet de loi, je suis tout à fait prêt à entendre les arguments de M. Dubé portant que les deux amendements respectent la portée du projet de loi.

M. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Les amendements NDP-1 et NDP-2 visent à faire quelque chose dont ont parlé, oserais-je dire, tous les témoins — ou presque tous les témoins, bien sûr, à l'exclusion du ministre —, soit de rendre le processus automatique. En d'autres mots, plutôt que d'imposer le fardeau aux personnes qui tentent de présenter une demande... Nous avons réalisé beaucoup de recherches à ce sujet, mon bureau, surtout, parce qu'il y a eu un certain flottement au sujet de certaines considérations.

Par exemple, en ce qui a trait à la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels, il y a déjà une exemption permettant à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles de faire le travail, plutôt que de demander à des Canadiens marginalisés, qui vivent avec un casier judiciaire en raison de gestes qui sont maintenant légaux, de s'en charger.

Au bout du compte, je crois que cela respecte la portée du projet de loi, parce que nous imposerions le fardeau à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles plutôt qu'aux Canadiens. Surtout si ce n'est pas un enjeu faisant intervenir une recommandation royale. En d'autres mots, si on ne parle pas d'argent, je crois que le mécanisme associé au processus créé par le projet de loi, qui tente de corriger ce que le ministre refuse de qualifier d'injustice historique, relève assurément de la prérogative du Comité. Il s'agit de quelque chose qui, malheureusement, aurait dû être fait d'entrée de jeu au moment de la rédaction du projet de loi.

Comme je l'ai dit, il y a eu assez d'échanges faisant intervenir des personnes beaucoup plus intelligentes que moi dans ce dossier pour qu'on sache que l'amendement pare à toutes les éventualités, dans la mesure où il fournit les pouvoirs appropriés à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles.

Le président:

D'autres collègues ont-ils des commentaires à formuler sur la recevabilité ou l'irrecevabilité de l'amendement NDP-2? Les témoins ont-ils des commentaires à formuler? Y a-t-il d'autres interventions?

Oui, monsieur Dubé.

M. Matthew Dubé:

J'aimerais qu'on m'explique clairement la raison pour laquelle l'amendement ne respecterait pas la portée du projet de loi. Nous n'avons même pas commencé à discuter de radiation pour l'instant. On vise ici simplement à rendre le processus de suspension du casier automatique et à donner les pouvoirs appropriés à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles.

Peut-on me fournir des précisions?

Le président:

Ma réaction — et je vais m'en remettre au greffier pour obtenir des précisions — c'est qu'il s'agit d'une obligation positive imposée à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles, qui exige la prise de mesures positives. Même si je reconnais que beaucoup de témoins ont dit que le processus pourrait être beaucoup plus convivial — pour ainsi dire — grâce à la prise de mesures positives par la Commission, c'est, à ce moment-ci, apparemment, au-delà de la portée du projet de loi.

Je vais laisser le greffier législatif formuler des commentaires là-dessus.

M. William Stephenson (greffier législatif):

Essentiellement, comme M. McKay l'a dit, dans ce cas-ci, la portée du projet de loi est assez limitée. Elle impose un fardeau aux demandeurs et leur permet de présenter une demande de suspension du casier. Elle élimine aussi les frais. En raison de la portée assez limitée du projet de loi, inclure une nouvelle notion qui, essentiellement, imposerait une obligation positive à la Commission va au-delà de la portée du projet de loi.

(1535)

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je me questionne, parce que je peux penser à des tonnes d'amendements qui créent des obligations positives à d'autres entités. Je ne suis pas sûr de comprendre l'argument dans ce cas-ci. Dans le cadre de nombreux textes législatifs que j'ai étudiés en comité, nous avons adopté des amendements qui obligeaient clairement différents organismes à prendre des mesures qui n'étaient pas prévues initialement dans le projet de loi, alors je ne suis pas sûr de comprendre quelle est la distinction dans ce cas-ci.

M. William Stephenson:

Dans d'autres circonstances, il y a des exemples, comme lorsqu'on crée l'obligation de faire rapport à la Chambre ou quelque chose du genre, mais cela est conforme à ce que fait le ministère et respecte ce qui était prévu dans le projet de loi.

Dans ce cas-ci, l'idée, c'est clairement de permettre aux demandeurs de présenter une demande de leur propre chef. L'objectif consiste un peu à limiter les mesures administratives ou le fardeau administratif, d'après ce que j'ai compris. Les fonctionnaires pourraient peut-être en parler. Dans ce cas-ci, l'idée d'exiger de la Commission qu'elle cerne elle-même les casiers est un nouveau concept.

Le président:

Les fonctionnaires veulent-ils intervenir?

Monsieur Broom.

M. Ian Broom (directeur général intérimaire, Politiques et opérations, Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada):

Je peux, bien sûr, intervenir. Merci beaucoup.

En vertu de l'amendement en question, du point de vue de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada, nous ne possédons pas la capacité technologique actuelle de mettre en place ce qui est prévu dans la motion. Il faudrait consulter nos partenaires. Il faudrait faire des vérifications relativement à certaines répercussions sur la protection de la vie privée et le consentement qui pourraient intervenir lorsqu'on demande la suspension automatique de casiers.

Comme cela a été mentionné, dans le cadre du processus actuel, les demandes sont assorties de documents à l'appui. Le fardeau revient au demandeur. Par exemple, il pourrait s'agir de documents de la cour qui décrivent la nature de la déclaration de culpabilité, les dispositions visées et si, oui ou non, la peine a été purgée. Nous n'avons pas de protocole d'entente ou d'infrastructure de partage de renseignements en place nous permettant de faire ce travail lorsque nous menons des enquêtes. Selon moi, du point de vue de la Commission et à la lumière de ce que nous pourrions avoir à mettre en place, il y a un certain nombre de défis qu'il faudrait évaluer.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Dubé.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Pour ce qui est des considérations liées à la protection de la vie privée, d'après ce que j'ai compris, puisque la section responsable de la suspension des casiers de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles est un organisme d'enquête, elle bénéficie d'exemptions liées à la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels. Nous avons parlé avec ces représentants, et ils ont confirmé qu'ils ont accès au CIPC, alors j'estime un peu malheureux que, essentiellement, nous disions que c'est trop de travail et nous refusons de rendre le processus automatique, alors que, en réalité, comme de nombreuses personnes l'ont souligné, le fardeau sera alors imposé aux Canadiens marginalisés.

J'aimerais demander des précisions au greffier, si possible. Je repense au projet de loi C-83, lorsque nous avons étudié les unités d'intervention structurée, et je crois que des amendements ont été adoptés afin de créer des critères supplémentaires touchant les examens par des professionnels de la santé, par exemple. Je ne suis pas sûr de comprendre la distinction qui fait en sorte que, dans un cas, l'imposition de tâches supplémentaires à des fonctionnaires est acceptable, alors que, dans ce cas-ci, puisque nous établissons un processus d'une certaine façon — même si le résultat final recherché par cet amendement concernerait encore la suspension des casiers des personnes visées —, eh bien, tout ça ne respecte plus la portée du projet de loi. Vous savez, le titre dit « accélérée et sans frais ». Au bout du compte, est-ce ce sur quoi on s'appuie, sur le titre? Ça ne me semble pas vraiment logique.

Le président:

L'argument général, c'est que, lorsqu'on dépasse la portée, on va au-delà de l'objet du projet de loi. C'est l'argument général. Je conviens que nous touchons là à des points assez précis, mais je suis tout à fait ouvert à une autre interprétation ou à d'autres renseignements quant à savoir pourquoi devrions-nous considérer que tout ça va au-delà de la portée du projet de loi?

M. William Stephenson:

En ce qui concerne le fait d'ajouter des critères à quelque chose qui se trouve déjà dans un projet de loi, lorsqu'il y a une liste de critères, on peut toujours rajuster la portée des exigences. Dans ce cas-ci, nous allons au-delà des simples exigences, et on donne à la Commission des responsabilités supplémentaires, on crée un fardeau administratif supplémentaire. Lorsque nous avons réalisé notre analyse du projet de loi, nous avons tenu compte du sommaire du projet de loi et examiné de quelle façon le projet de loi est rédigé.

Le sommaire du projet de loi porte que: Le texte modifie la Loi sur le casier judiciaire afin, notamment, de permettre aux personnes condamnées au titre de la Loi réglementant certaines drogues et autres substances, la Loi sur les stupéfiants et la Loi sur la défense nationale uniquement pour des infractions de possession simple de cannabis perpétrées avant le 17 octobre 2018 de présenter une demande de suspension du casier judiciaire sans avoir à attendre l’expiration de la période prévue par la Loi sur le casier judiciaire pour les autres infractions ni à débourser les frais prévus normalement pour une telle demande.

Essentiellement, le projet de loi fait deux choses très précises. Il permet aux gens de présenter une demande de suspension du casier sans avoir à attendre l'expiration de la période prévue par la Loi sur le casier judiciaire pour les autres infractions ni à débourser les frais prévus normalement pour une telle demande de suspension. C'est ce qui a fondé notre analyse, tout comme la façon dont le projet de loi est rédigé. Vous constaterez qu'il y a des dispositions qui précisent qu'il revient au demandeur de prouver diverses choses.

C'est ainsi que nous avons compris la portée du projet de loi.

(1540)

M. Matthew Dubé:

Mon dernier argument, c'est que tout ça prouve le point qu'il n'y a pas vraiment de volonté politique d'aider ces Canadiens qui sont pris avec de tels casiers judiciaires.

Ça me semble évident — et nous avons maintenant entendu une analyse non partisane — que le fardeau revient aux demandeurs. Je crois que c'est très décevant et je dirais même que, selon moi, cela va complètement à l'encontre du but recherché. Essentiellement, nous disons aux Canadiens marginalisés de s'y retrouver. Nous disons : « Ne vous en faites pas, on ne vous facturera pas », mais nous avons parlé des autres frais qui seront associés à tout ça. Je trouve tout ça extrêmement décevant.

Respectueusement, monsieur le président, je dépose une motion qui vise à contester la décision du président, si c'est ce que c'est.

Le président:

Le président, à contrecœur, détermine que l'amendement NDP-2 est irrecevable, rendant par conséquent l'amendement NDP-1 nul.

Je prends en note des arguments que vous avez formulés et que je trouve, franchement, valables et conformes aux témoignages, mais l'interprétation de la portée du projet de loi est ce qu'elle est. Il y a des choses que même les législateurs bien intentionnés ne peuvent pas faire.

Cela dit, la présidence est contestée. Je crois qu'il s'agit d'un vote d'approbation ou de rejet.

Aimeriez-vous un vote par appel nominal?

M. Matthew Dubé:

Oui, un vote par appel nominal.

(La décision de la présidence est maintenue par 8 voix contre 1.)

Le président:

La décision de la présidence prévaut. Cela fait, il n'y a pas d'amendement à l'article 2.

(L'article 2 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 3)

Le président:

Nous passons maintenant à l'article 3.

Il y a l'amendement LIB-1 au nom de Mme Dabrusin.

Madame Dabrusin, voulez-vous expliquer votre amendement au Comité, s'il vous plaît.

Mme Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Oui. En fait, j'ai une série d'amendements. Ils sont tous reliés, alors vous allez m'entendre me répéter.

L'une des choses qui sont vraiment ressorties, à mes yeux, c'est que des gens nous ont parlé du fait que nous avons maintenant légalisé la possession simple du cannabis, mais que certains pourraient être encore visés par des amendes qu'ils n'ont pas payées. Ces personnes pourraient avoir de la difficulté à trouver l'argent nécessaire, et cela pourrait constituer un obstacle pour les personnes qui présentent une demande de suspension du casier.

Cet amendement, l'amendement LIB-1, permet aux gens d'obtenir une suspension du casier pour possession de cannabis même s'ils ont des amendes non payées. L'amendement permet aussi d'éliminer le délai lié à la condamnation pour possession de cannabis, même s'il y a d'autres infractions au casier de la personne relativement auxquels les délais ont été observés. Si les personnes ont respecté le délai pour les autres infractions, mais qu'elles n'ont pas écoulé le délai qui s'appliquerait habituellement en cas de possession simple, nous disons que ce délai sera éliminé afin qu'elles puissent présenter leur demande. Cependant, les frais ne sont pas éliminés dans ce deuxième scénario.

(1545)

Le président:

Monsieur Dubé, allez-y.

M. Matthew Dubé:

J'aimerais qu'on me confirme comment je dois lire cet amendement, parce que j'appuie certainement l'intention visant à ce que les personnes qui ont des amendes impayées ou ce qu'on appelle le « reste de la peine à purger » soient en mesure d'accéder à ce processus d'une façon ou d'une autre, conformément aux témoignages que nous avons entendus.

Toutefois, je regarde le sous-alinéa (iv) proposé, à l'alinéa b) « sauf que », et l'on dit « les articles 734.5 ou 734.6 du Code criminel ou l'article 145.1 de la Loi sur la défense nationale à l'égard des amendes et des suramendes compensatoires non payées pour des infractions visées à l'annexe 3 ».

Ce que j'en comprends, c'est que quand certaines organisations pourraient effectuer des vérifications des antécédents... Mes collègues se rappelleront que, lorsque le gouvernement précédent a apporté des changements, de sorte que des personnes obtenant des suspensions de casier qui, par exemple, figuraient sur le registre des délinquants sexuels, ces choses continuaient d'apparaître lorsqu'on effectuait des vérifications des antécédents en vue d'un travail auprès de personnes vulnérables, des vérifications des antécédents et des choses de cette nature. Quand je lis cet amendement, si je comprends bien, même si nous éliminons la nécessité de payer l'amende, on pourrait tout de même découvrir, au moyen d'une vérification des antécédents, que l'amende demeure impayée, ce qui, pour moi, semble aller à l'encontre de l'objectif de la suspension du casier au départ. J'aimerais que des personnes plus futées que moi m'éclairent, peut-être pour confirmer que nous avons bel et bien compris cela correctement.

Le président:

Je ne crois pas qu'il y ait qui que ce soit dans la salle qui soit plus futé que vous. Nous sommes en bonne posture.

Je ne voulais pas vous insulter, en passant.

Mme Dabrusin veut-elle répondre avant que je passe à M. Motz sur ce point particulier ou voulons-nous nous adresser aux représentants?

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

J'ai cru comprendre que M. Dubé demandait aux représentants de dire si son interprétation était bonne au départ.

Le président:

C'est votre amendement, donc je veux vous donner une occasion.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Je laisserais aux représentants le soin de répondre à la question. Selon ce que je comprends, il n'élimine pas l'amende, et c'est parce que c'est détenu par les provinces. Cela veut dire que vous pouvez obtenir la suspension du casier même si vous n'avez pas payé l'amende. Quant à savoir comment cela fonctionne...

Le président:

Monsieur Motz, êtes-vous du même avis ou d'un autre avis?

M. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, PCC):

Je pense probablement la même chose.

Le président:

Dans ce cas, entendons d'abord l'avis des membres, puis ce sera aux représentants.

M. Glen Motz:

Je cherche juste à obtenir des précisions.

Selon le libellé de la loi... et le greffier législatif a déjà dit que nous devons circonscrire la portée de ces amendements au même titre que l'intention dans le projet de loi. Si c'est le cas, les personnes qui demandent cette suspension du casier ne sont pas admissibles, parce qu'il y a des frais administratifs.

Si je vous ai bien compris, essayez-vous de faire en sorte que les frais administratifs n'empêchent pas des personnes de demander une suspension du casier pour possession mineure de marijuana?

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Je parle juste des amendes. Si leur peine consistait à payer une amende et qu'ils ne l'ont pas encore fait, ils peuvent tout de même présenter une demande de suspension du casier. C'est l'amende qui a été imposée précisément...

M. Glen Motz:

Vous parlez de l'amende pour possession simple, pas pour tous frais administratifs.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

C'est juste pour possession simple de cannabis.

Je veux clarifier les choses. Quand j'ai mentionné les provinces, le fait est que, au Québec et au Nouveau-Brunswick, le système prévoit que les amendes sont en réalité payées par l'entremise des provinces.

Le président:

Je vois M. Eglinski qui souhaite intervenir. Ce n'est pas comme si je voulais faire fi des représentants, mais je veux faire tout en même temps.

Monsieur Eglinski, allez-y.

M. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, PCC):

Pour donner suite aux amendes, s'ils peuvent demander la suppression de leur casier, pourquoi auraient-ils jamais l'intention de payer l'amende? Avons-nous consulté les provinces à ce sujet?

Si je peux présenter la demande, votre programme ou votre amendement prévoit-il un processus pour faire le suivi auprès des provinces? Nous aurons dans les provinces tout un tas de personnes qui doivent de l'argent et ne détiennent pas de casier.

(1550)

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

D'abord, oui.

Je crois que nous devrions demander aux représentants d'expliquer tous les détails du fonctionnement. Toutefois, l'idée, c'est de ne pas les empêcher d'obtenir la suspension de leur casier en raison de l'amende impayée.

M. Lyndon Murdock (directeur, Division des affaires correctionnelles et de la justice pénale, ministère de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile):

Oui, l'effet de l'article 3, comme on l'a mentionné, c'est qu'il élimine le fait qu'une amende impayée constitue un obstacle à la présentation d'une demande de suspension du casier. Vous avez bien raison de dire que, dans les deux administrations que nous avons consultées — le Québec et le Nouveau-Brunswick — elles administraient elles-mêmes le recouvrement des amendes. Le Service des poursuites pénales du Canada administre le recouvrement des amendes pour toutes les autres administrations.

Par rapport à votre question, monsieur, concernant ce qui incite les gens à payer leurs amendes, c'est exécutoire à l'échelon civil. Il faut reconnaître que, dans les deux administrations, au Québec et au Nouveau-Brunswick, où on administre le recouvrement des amendes, ces régions ont probablement des leviers plus convaincants pour encourager le paiement des amendes, par exemple jusqu'au retrait d'un permis de conduire. Il n'y a pas autant de leviers à l'échelon fédéral, mis à part le fait qu'une amende apparaît comme impayée dans votre dossier.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je veux obtenir une certitude: je ne crois pas qu'on ait répondu entièrement à ma question. Ma question est la suivante: pour toute organisation qui effectue une vérification des antécédents, lorsque, habituellement un dossier qui a été suspendu n'apparaîtrait plus — ce qui est, au départ, le but de la suspension du casier —, cette vérification des antécédents ferait-elle ensuite apparaître des amendes impayées pour ce qui sont maintenant des infractions visées à l'annexe 3?

Me Ari Slatkoff (sous-directeur exécutif et avocat général, ministère de la Justice):

Non, l'effet de la suspension du casier est le même: il ne concerne que le paiement des amendes toujours en vigueur. Les autres effets de la suspension du casier sont valides et existent pour les personnes. Cela n'apparaîtrait pas.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Dans ce cas, pourquoi est-ce que cela figure dans la même énumération, sous les mêmes éléments que ceux mentionnés dans le sous-alinéa 2.3b)(v) proposé dans l'amendement, qui correspond à l'article 36.1 de la Loi sur le transfèrement international des délinquants? Comme je l'ai dit, certains des autres articles... Encore une fois, je pensais que c'était une disposition semblable à ce qui avait été présenté au départ quand on l'avait changée pour la suspension du casier et que nous prévoyions que certaines infractions continueraient d'apparaître dans certains textes.

Me Ari Slatkoff:

Cet amendement de l'alinéa 2.3b) proposé énumère le nombre très limité de situations où certaines obligations ou incapacités perdurent. L'effet général de la suspension du casier, c'est-à-dire qu'il entraîne le classement à part des autres dossiers judiciaires, s'applique dans toutes les situations. Ce sont des exceptions très précises, des choses comme les interdictions visant les armes à feu et les interdictions de conduire auxquelles on fait allusion dans la première partie de la disposition, et c'est la même chose pour la Loi sur le transfèrement international des délinquants. La seule intention ici est de préserver l'exécution civile de l'amende.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je suis juste confus. Vous dites que ces amendes font cesser toute incapacité ou qu'elles demeurent, et le sous-alinéa 2.3b)(iv) proposé dans l'amendement mentionne précisément « à l'égard des amendes et des suramendes compensatoires non payées pour des infractions visées à l'annexe 3 ». Je ne suis pas certain de savoir comment ces autres amendes peuvent rester dans les livres, et qu'une autre n'apparaîtra nulle part, même si elle est impayée.

Me Ari Slatkoff:

Je ne suis pas certain de comprendre totalement la question. L'intention de cet amendement est simplement de préserver l'exécution de l'amende à l'échelon civil. Il n'y a pas d'autre effet de la condamnation.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Avec l'indulgence du président, pour être clair, à l'alinéa 2.3b) proposé dans l'amendement, cinq exceptions ont été énumérées. Est-ce exact?

Me Ari Slatkoff:

Oui.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Quel est l'effet de ces exceptions?

Me Ari Slatkoff:

J'ai juste besoin d'un moment pour m'occuper de votre question, s'il vous plaît.

(1555)

M. Matthew Dubé:

Bien sûr.

Me Ari Slatkoff:

Merci.

Je peux confirmer que l'article 734.5, dont il est question dans le sous-alinéa 2.3b)(iv) proposé dans l'amendement, a trait à la capacité de recouvrer une amende à l'échelon civil. L'article 734.6 porte sur la capacité de refuser un permis ou une licence. Ce sont les deux capacités qu'un gouvernement fédéral ou provincial devrait détenir. Ce sont des effets de la condamnation qui perdureront.

L'article 145.1 concerne l'exécution civile au titre de la Loi sur la défense nationale. Ce sont les seuls effets de la condamnation qui perdureraient.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Ces amendes n'apparaîtraient à aucun endroit qui annulerait autrement l'effet de la suspension du casier au départ.

Me Ari Slatkoff:

C'est exact. Cela ne concerne que la capacité de faire en sorte que l'amende demeure payable et de refuser d'émettre des permis et des licences.

M. Matthew Dubé:

À votre connaissance, quand les gouvernements provinciaux détiennent ces renseignements, est-ce que c'est communiqué aux ministères? Si vous révoquez des licences et des choses du genre et que les provinces sont responsables, elles continueraient au final de conserver les renseignements sur l'infraction originale.

Me Ari Slatkoff:

Je ne suis pas au courant des pratiques sur la communication de renseignements dans les gouvernements provinciaux, mais il est nécessaire de conserver le dossier à part, sauf pour ces exceptions limitées.

M. Matthew Dubé:

D'accord, merci.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions?

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 3 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 4)

Le président: Nous avons un amendement au nom de Mme Dabrusin, LIB-2.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Cela fait suite à ma question concernant les amendes; j'essaie toujours de régler le problème. Chacun de mes amendements semble très verbeux et long, mais cela vise à ce qu'il s'applique à des gens qui ont des dossiers pour d'autres infractions, en plus de la possession de cannabis, et l'on y dit que le non-paiement d'amendes pour possession de cannabis ne vous rend pas inadmissible à la suspension du casier pour ces autres infractions, si vous voyez ce que je veux dire.

Le fait que vous n'ayez pas encore payé votre amende pour possession simple de cannabis, tant que vous avez respecté tous les critères nécessaires pour l'autre suspension du casier que vous recherchez, ne sera pas un obstacle pour que vous obteniez cette suspension du casier.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres discussions à ce sujet?

M. Glen Motz:

Si vous ne payez pas une amende, et cela dépend de l'amende, et s'il s'agit d'une déclaration de culpabilité par procédure sommaire — c'était évidemment le cas pour la plupart d'entre eux —, vous avez un délai donné pour payer l'amende selon les tribunaux, puis un mandat d'arrestation est pris contre vous. Puis, si vous disparaissez et qu'on ne vous retrouve pas pendant que le mandat est en vigueur, c'est-à-dire jusqu'à ce qu'on vous retrouve, à mes yeux, cela vous empêche d'être admissible à présenter une demande de suspension du casier parce que vous n'êtes pas en règle, ce que la loi exige. Puis, vous auriez à votre dossier un défaut de vous conformer; vous seriez mis en probation...

Si j'entends bien ce que vous dites, vous demandez que les suramendes compensatoires soient retirées. Vous demandez aussi que l'on inclue peut-être les frais administratifs, de sorte que, même s'ils étaient exigibles, vous pourriez tout de même demander une suspension du casier, car vous pourriez éventuellement faire l'objet d'autres accusations liées au non-paiement d'une amende.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Cela concerne seulement le non-paiement d'une amende. Si vous n'avez pas payé l'amende pour possession simple de cannabis, c'est seulement cet élément, puis si vous avez satisfait aux exigences en matière de délai et tout le reste pour une suspension du casier concernant une autre accusation, cela ne va pas vous empêcher de présenter une demande. Je ne parle de rien d'autre que les éléments administratifs, mais encore une fois, les représentants pourraient être en mesure de répondre à cette question plus en détail.

(1600)

M. Glen Motz:

N'est-ce pas là le but de la loi, le fait d'être en règle? Si vous n'avez pas payé une amende, alors vous n'êtes pas en règle pour être admissible.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

En réalité, je reconnais que le paiement de l'amende est un obstacle pour les personnes voulant obtenir une suspension de casier, et cela a été soulevé à plusieurs reprises. J'essaie de permettre à ces personnes d'obtenir leur suspension de casier pour possession simple de cannabis.

Le président:

Est-ce que l'un des fonctionnaires souhaite intervenir dans la conversation entre M. Motz et Mme Dabrusin?

M. Lyndon Murdock:

Je voudrais souligner le point soulevé par Mme Dabrusin au sujet de l'effet de cet amendement, à savoir qu'il supprime simplement l'amende impayée en tant qu'obstacle à la demande.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires à ce sujet?

Monsieur Eglinski, vous avez la parole.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Permettons à Mme Dabrusin de clarifier ce qu'elle vient de dire. Vos derniers mots étaient « pour possession simple », et je pensais auparavant que vous parliez de quelqu'un qui a une amende en souffrance pour possession simple qui demande l'élimination de l'infraction figurant au dossier. Est-ce autre chose?

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

C'est juste.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Cela va à l'encontre de ce que vous avez dit dans le dernier... parce que vous avez dit...

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Je ne le crois pas.

L'amende impayée pour possession simple de cannabis ne constitue pas un obstacle à ce que vous puissiez obtenir la suspension de votre casier sous une autre accusation, mais je ne dis pas que nous renonçons de quelque façon que ce soit aux amendes ou à ces autres accusations. Les gens devront satisfaire à toutes les exigences en ce qui concerne ces autres accusations afin d'obtenir une suspension du casier. Tout ce que je dis, c'est que, si l'amende pour possession simple de cannabis est toujours en souffrance, cela ne vous empêchera pas de pouvoir entamer les démarches en vue d'obtenir la suspension de votre casier.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Merci.

Le président:

Cela vous convient-il?

M. Jim Eglinski:

Cela me convient.

Le président:

Très bien. Si cela convient à M. Eglinski, cela doit nous convenir à nous tous.

Je constate qu'il n'y a pas lieu de poursuivre le débat sur l'amendement LIB-2.

(L'amendement est adopté avec dissidence. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous allons maintenant passer à l'amendement NDP-3.

Monsieur Dubé, je vous en prie.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci, monsieur le président.

L'amendement vise à supprimer le mot « uniquement », ce qui signifie que les personnes ayant un casier judiciaire uniquement pour la possession simple de cannabis sont les seules à pouvoir bénéficier de ce processus. Ainsi, même les personnes possédant un casier judiciaire à l'égard d'autres infractions peuvent toujours présenter une demande.

Je pense que cet élément est particulièrement important, encore une fois, conformément à l'objectif du projet de loi. Bien entendu, on ne dit pas que les personnes ne devraient pas purger leur peine, ni se soucier des amendes impayées ni de toute autre infraction commise, mais je ne vois aucune raison... Si nous voulons vraiment accorder une suspension de casier à ces personnes, et si nous croyons vraiment que certaines personnes ont été injustement ciblées par la précédente version de la loi, alors je pense qu'il est logique que tous les Canadiens, qu'ils aient ou non d'autres éléments figurant dans leur casier judiciaire, devraient pouvoir bénéficier de ce processus.

Le président:

Y a-t-il un débat sur l'amendement?

M. Glen Motz:

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais que les fonctionnaires me disent ce qu'ils pensent de la suppression du mot « uniquement » dans ce libellé particulier.

M. Lyndon Murdock:

Merci beaucoup.

D'après ce que nous comprenons de l'amendement proposé, cela aurait essentiellement pour effet de supprimer, en pratique, l'infraction d'une personne concernant le cannabis. Ce serait toujours une suspension du casier, mais cela entraînerait une suspension partielle.

Dans le cas où une personne a commis d'autres infractions, celles-ci resteraient à son dossier et y figureraient. Cela aurait pour effet d'en extraire, pour ainsi dire, l'infraction de possession simple de cannabis. En ce qui concerne la suspension du casier, le processus consiste à suspendre le casier dans son intégralité, et non pas des infractions individuelles.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous passons maintenant à l'amendement NDP-4.

Monsieur Dubé, allez-y.

(1605)

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Là encore, cela correspond tout à fait à l'élimination des obstacles au processus, à l'élimination de l'obligation de purger une peine ou de payer des frais relatifs à une infraction visée à l'annexe 3 pour être admissible.

Encore une fois, il est assez clair qu'il existe de nombreux obstacles dans le processus, tels que décrits dans la législation, qui empêchent les personnes de présenter une demande. Si ce n'est plus un crime, et si nous voulons vraiment leur offrir un processus accéléré — ce qui, à notre avis, devrait être une radiation automatique, franchement —, il n'y a aucune raison de nous attendre à ce que des personnes purgent leur peine selon les diverses manières prescrites par la loi pour cette même infraction.

Le président:

Souhaitez-vous en débattre? [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, PCC):

C'est la première intervention en français aujourd'hui. Nous allons faire travailler notre personnel.

J'aimerais savoir s'il y a vraiment quelqu'un qui fait de la prison pour possession simple de marijuana. Une personne en prison peut avoir cela dans son dossier, mais il y a beaucoup d'autres choses. Elle n'est donc pas admissible à une suspension de casier judiciaire. [Traduction]

Le président:

Monsieur Murdock, s'il vous plaît.

M. Lyndon Murdock:

Malheureusement — et je peux sans doute laisser la parole à ma collègue de la GRC —, nous n'avons pas cette information pour le moment. [Français]

Mme Amanda Gonzalez (gestionnaire, Service de triage des dactylogrammes civils et Conformité législative, Gendarmerie royale du Canada):

Je ne peux pas vous répondre. Je ne sais pas quelles sont les sentences pour ce genre de situation.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Selon l'amendement présenté, si j'ai bien compris, on permettrait aux gens qui sont déjà en prison de faire une demande de suspension de casier judiciaire. Cependant, cela impliquerait qu'ils sont en prison pour possession simple de cannabis.

Mme Amanda Gonzalez:

Je dirais que c'est rare.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

C'est cela.

M. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

L'article ne peut pas être appliqué de façon unilatérale au Canada. Le paiement des amendes dans certaines zones de responsabilité est de compétence provinciale. Donc, on ne peut pas appliquer au fédéral l'imposition d'amendes qui sont gérées par les provinces en ce moment. [Traduction]

Le président:

Y a-t-il des commentaires au sujet de l'observation de M. Picard?

M. Lyndon Murdock:

Je suis désolé. En fait, je ne l'ai pas entendue. Elle m'a échappé.

M. Michel Picard:

Vous ne pouvez pas appliquer la loi lorsque l'amende est administrée par une province. On ne peut pas l'appliquer partout de la même façon, car une partie de la loi — les amendes, par exemple — est administrée par le Québec... Quelle est l'autre province?

M. Lyndon Murdock:

C'est le Nouveau-Brunswick.

M. Michel Picard:

On ne peut rien faire à ce sujet.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions sur la motion NDP-4?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Dans l'amendement PV-1, il y a un conflit de ligne avec l'amendement NDP-4.

Madame May, je suppose que vous souhaitez parler de l'amendement PV-1.

Mme Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, PV):

Oui. Vous vous rappellerez, monsieur le président, que je suis ici à cause de la motion adoptée par le Comité, selon laquelle je ne suis pas autorisée à voter ou à faire avancer des choses. La seule chose que je suis autorisée à faire est de suivre vos directives afin de me présenter dans le temps imparti et de parler de mes amendements. Je souhaite en parler.

Le président:

Vous l'avez rappelé au Comité à plusieurs reprises.

Mme Elizabeth May:

J'aime que cela soit consigné au compte rendu, car j'espère qu'après les prochaines élections, aucun député dans ma position ne sera jamais soumis aux motions qui ont été adoptées par le dernier gouvernement et celui-ci.

Quoi qu'il en soit, après les élections, nous aurons plus de 12 députés. Je ne serai donc pas soumise à cette formalité, mais ce n'est ni juste ni gentil pour un parti plus petit.

Voici l'amendement. C'est très clair. Je pense que vous avez tous entendu les témoignages, et je suis sûre que vous comprenez les préoccupations de l'Association des femmes autochtones du Canada et de la Campaign for Cannabis Amnesty, selon lesquelles les personnes que nous essayons d'aider avec ce projet de loi pourraient être désavantagées, car elles seront au milieu de leur peine. Elles n'auront pas été en mesure de payer leurs amendes et ne pourront donc pas présenter de demande, car les délais, au sens de la loi actuelle, sont tels qu'une personne est inadmissible à présenter une demande de suspension du casier avant l'expiration de sa peine, y compris le paiement d'une amende.

L'amendement que je présente ici, PV-1, consiste à dire que nous changerions cela pour « que la peine imposée à l'égard de l'infraction » ou « le paiement d'une amende, soit expirée ou non ».

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

(1610)

Le président:

Y a-t-il un débat?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Monsieur Eglinski, la parole est à vous.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Merci.

Mon amendement consiste essentiellement à modifier l'article 4 du projet de loi C-93 en ajoutant, après la ligne 12, à la page 2, ce qui suit: (3.11) La personne qui présente la demande visée au paragraphe (3.1) peut le faire par voie électronique conformément aux règlements pris en vertu de l'alinéa 9.1d).

Dans notre énoncé de mission, ou notre titre, il est écrit « procédure accélérée de suspension de casier judiciaire ». Le moyen le plus rapide de le faire est par voie électronique ou par ordinateur. Selon mes recherches, l'État de Californie a éliminé, en un an, autant de casiers que nous l'a dit M. Broom... L'État a éliminé 250 000 casiers en un an, par voie électronique.

Je me rends bien compte que c'était une radiation, mais je crois que nous ne rendrions pas justice au Comité si nous n'encouragions pas un de nos organismes gouvernementaux à moderniser et à simplifier la façon dont il fonctionne, et à faciliter la tâche de nos clients pour la présentation des demandes. Je pense que si nous utilisions un programme électronique... Il y a des gens qui peuvent les concevoir. Nous devrions encourager nos organismes gouvernementaux à se moderniser et à être aussi efficaces et rapides que possible.

Si nous n'utilisons pas une forme de demande ou de suivi par voie électronique, ce qui peut éliminer une bonne partie du travail initial — par exemple, dire si une personne est admissible ou non — et accomplir une grande partie du travail que nous effectuons actuellement à la main, je pense que nous commettrions une injustice. Tout ce que je dis, c'est de prévoir un article ici qui leur donne l'occasion de regarder à l'externe et d'élaborer un programme susceptible de rendre le processus beaucoup plus bénéfique pour les gens et beaucoup plus rapide pour la GRC et la Commission des libérations conditionnelles en ce qui concerne l'élimination de ces dossiers.

Le président:

Y a-t-il un débat? [Français]

M. Michel Picard:

L'article 3.1 n'est pas limitatif quant à la capacité de présenter une demande. De plus, les aspects logistiques peuvent être traités de façon réglementaire. Cela me paraît donc redondant de parler d'aspect électronique. [Traduction]

Le président:

Y a-t-il des commentaires?

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

J'allais demander s'ils ont même la capacité de recevoir un dossier électronique.

M. Ian Broom:

Actuellement, non.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je tiens simplement à souligner, aux fins du compte rendu, à quel point je trouve décevant le fait que nous rejetions des amendements parce que nous avons un système rétrograde qui est clairement inadéquat. Très franchement, je pense que c'est tellement simple: il s'agit des éléments de base pour rendre ce système accessible, et nous ne faisons que jeter l'éponge parce que nous ne sommes pas au XXIe siècle quant à la façon dont ces choses fonctionnent. C'est ahurissant.

Je tenais à le dire, aux fins du compte rendu, tout en remerciant mon collègue de son amendement et en lui apportant mon soutien.

M. Glen Motz:

Je suis d'accord avec M. Dubé.

Je m'interroge sur le silence à ce sujet. Cela signifie-t-il que, si nous utilisions la technologie actuelle, nous pourrions le faire, même si vous ne le mentionnez pas catégoriquement ici? Pouvons-nous continuer à l'appliquer ultérieurement advenant que l'on puisse demander la suspension du casier par voie électronique dans, disons six mois ou un an, si le projet de loi était adopté à la Chambre?

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Broom.

M. Ian Broom:

Ce dont je pourrais parler, c'est de l'aspect opérationnel de cet amendement proposé. Il y a deux éléments ici.

Le premier est la possibilité de recevoir des demandes électroniques, ce qui pourrait inclure les documents justificatifs qui seraient utilisés pour déterminer l'admissibilité à quelque régime que ce soit, en l'occurrence, le processus accéléré de suspension du casier pour la possession simple de cannabis.

Le deuxième aspect est que les renseignements que la Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada utiliserait pour vérifier l'admissibilité relèvent de tiers. Nous devrions donc également prendre en considération les moyens d'authentifier les documents que nous recevrions, par exemple, des tribunaux et des services de police à l'extérieur du Répertoire national des casiers judiciaires.

(1615)

M. Glen Motz:

Alors, pour le greffier législatif, ma question porte davantage sur... Les tribunaux acceptent maintenant les versions électroniques de documents qui portent le timbre de services de police ou de palais de justice. Ils sont considérés comme légitimes. Je ne vois pas cela comme un obstacle du tout.

Ce que je demande plus précisément concerne le libellé utilisé. Si nous ne le mentionnons pas expressément, comme le permet l'amendement de M. Eglinski, et nous n'en avons pas parlé, cela exclura-t-il la possibilité de le faire, si jamais cela devenait possible?

Le président:

Êtes-vous en mesure de répondre?

M. William Stephenson:

Non, malheureusement.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais formuler un commentaire. Lorsque la Californie a décidé d'adopter son système, elle est allée au-delà de son organisme et a eu recours à trois différents soumissionnaires pour établir des programmes. Je crois comprendre que le programme de l'un des soumissionnaires est maintenant très élaboré et qu'il peut fonctionner avec un certain nombre de programmes différents à l'échelle internationale.

Tout ce que je demande, c'est qu'on examine cette manière de faire et qu'on ne la néglige pas, car elle existe. Si nous faisons simplement attendre, nous ne rendons pas justice à personne. Nous pouvons écrire tout ce que nous voulons ici, mais nous n'allons pas plus loin ni plus vite. Essayons d'accélérer les choses. Tout ce que je dis, c'est que nous devons examiner les moyens électroniques et voir s'ils peuvent aider votre organisme à être plus moderne.

Nous pouvons faire comme on faisait à l'époque de l'ancien CIPC, c'est-à-dire tout consigner à la main et transmettre les renseignements. Le CIPC a modernisé les choses pour nous à la GRC. Ce que je vous demande, c'est de moderniser votre organisme afin d'aider ces personnes en accélérant un peu le processus.

Le président:

Laissez-moi inverser la question. Si l'amendement n'est pas adopté, cela vous oblige-t-il à continuer de faire les choses de la même manière?

Mme Brigitte Lavigne (directrice, Clémence et suspension du casier, Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada):

La Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada est disposée à chercher des manières de moderniser le processus de demande de suspension de casier. Chose certaine, avant de nous doter d'une application électronique ou numérique ou de prendre de telles mesures, il nous faudra tenir une consultation et évaluer les répercussions ainsi que les ressources disponibles.

Le président:

Si votre consultation se déroulait bien et que les ressources étaient disponibles, seriez-vous en mesure de le faire que l'amendement soit adopté ou non?

Mme Brigitte Lavigne:

Il est certain que si nous avions des moyens convenables de créer un système plus moderne, nous serions ouverts à ce genre de choses.

M. Michel Picard:

Si c'est possible, j'aimerais bien inviter mon collègue à modifier son amendement et à en faire une recommandation à mettre en œuvre après l'adoption du projet de loi, afin de porter à l'attention du gouvernement le fait que, en plus de notre amendement, une telle recommandation devrait être prise en considération afin que l'on puisse aller de l'avant et moderniser le système.

Le président:

Monsieur Eglinski, voulez-vous répondre à la suggestion de M. Picard?

M. Jim Eglinski:

D'en faire une recommandation?

Je pense que nous sommes d'accord pour travailler avec le Comité, si nous n'adoptons pas l'amendement ici, afin d'en faire une recommandation, de façon à fournir au gouvernement les outils nécessaires à l'avenir pour...

Le président:

Vous aimeriez que, en marge du projet de loi, le Comité rédige un rapport dans lequel il recommande d'adopter ces mesures le plus rapidement possible. Est-ce exact?

M. Jim Eglinski:

Pourquoi la recommandation ne peut-elle pas faire partie du rapport?

Le président:

Elle ferait partie du rapport, oui.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Oui, d'accord.

(1620)

M. Glen Motz:

Si je comprends bien, vous ne pouvez pas accepter la proposition en tant qu'amendement au projet de loi, mais vous accepteriez la recommandation?

M. Michel Picard:

Encore une fois, c'est pour des questions de logistique, mais l'idée est bonne, car elle peut être réalisée. Intégrons-la au rapport.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Nous suggérons de voter sur l'amendement. S'il est rejeté, nous allons le proposer en tant que recommandation. Nous aimerions que cela figure au compte rendu, s'il vous plaît.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions au sujet de l'amendement de M. Eglinski?

(L'amendement est rejeté.)

M. Jim Eglinski:

Monsieur le président, à ce stade-ci, j'aimerais prendre cette motion et travailler avec le Comité pour l'inclure en tant que recommandation à notre rapport, afin que nous puissions donner à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada l'occasion de se pencher sur la question et de chercher des techniques plus modernes.

Le président:

À titre de président, je dois dire que cela est tout à fait cohérent avec les témoignages que nous avons entendus, et je dois également exprimer une frustration. Quel est le but de ces audiences si les choses n'avancent pas? Nous essayons de rendre la vie de nos citoyens un peu plus facile, et cela ne semble pas juste quand les fonctionnaires viennent ici nous dire: « Eh bien, nous ne pouvons pas le faire. » Cela ne semble pas juste.

Quoi qu'il en soit, c'est beaucoup trop de commentaires de la part du président. C'est assez.

Nous en sommes maintenant à l'amendement NDP-5.

Monsieur Dubé, vous avez la parole.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci, monsieur le président.

L'amendement viendrait supprimer les lignes 28 à 30, page 2, lesquelles concernent le fardeau. Elles sont ainsi libellées: La personne visée au paragraphe (3.1) a le fardeau de convaincre la Commission qu'elle a été condamnée uniquement pour une infraction visée à ce paragraphe.

Encore une fois, cela va dans le même sens que ce que nous avons entendu pendant les témoignages et ce qui a été dit aujourd'hui — et aucun appui n'est malheureusement offert à cet égard —, soit le fait que ces personnes se trouvent parfois loin des centres où elles peuvent faire vérifier leurs empreintes digitales et leurs antécédents et obtenir les éléments dont elles ont besoin pour satisfaire à ces exigences. Nous parlons des gens qui... Nous parlons d'un processus qui est censé être « sans frais », mais on nous a dit à maintes reprises qu'il y avait en fait des frais connexes.

Une grande partie de ces frais, indépendamment de ce qui figure dans le projet de loi, sont attribuables à tous les documents justificatifs qu'il faut fournir et ainsi de suite. Il s'agit d'un processus non seulement fastidieux, mais également coûteux pour des gens qui, en toute franchise, seront exploités par de mauvais joueurs cherchant à leur offrir leurs services, ou qui ne savent tout simplement pas où chercher, sans égard aux bonnes intentions que pourrait avoir le ministère à l'égard d'une publicité quelconque qu'il a en tête, ce qui n'est pas clair non plus à la suite des audiences.

Encore une fois, si nous décidons de continuer d'utiliser ce processus de suspension de casier non automatique, eh bien je pense que nous pourrions, à tout le moins, alléger le fardeau un peu avec un amendement comme celui-ci.

Le président:

Il ne semble pas y avoir d'autres commentaires.

(L'amendement est rejeté.)

(L'article 4 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 5)

Le président:

Nous en sommes maintenant à l'article 5. Madame Sahota, voulez-vous nous parler de l'amendement LIB-3, s'il vous plaît?

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

L'amendement propose que le projet de loi C-93, à l'article 5, soit modifié par substitution, à la ligne 3, page 3, de ce qui suit: suspendu à l'égard d'une infraction lorsque, sans tenir compte des infractions visées à l'annexe 3, elle est

Essentiellement, l'amendement fait en sorte que, pour les personnes ayant commis des infractions criminelles qui cherchent à obtenir un pardon pour ces infractions — je ne parle pas de cannabis — et qui ont commis une infraction de possession de cannabis, la possession de cannabis ne soit pas considérée comme une mauvaise conduite. Essentiellement, cela irait à l'encontre de notre objectif de dire que le cannabis est maintenant légalisé et qu'il faut commencer par éliminer ces infractions de possession simple de cannabis.

Ce serait très nuisible de prendre ces infractions en considération alors que des personnes sont aux prises avec d'autres condamnations pour lesquelles elles essaient d'obtenir le pardon. Ces personnes ont respecté les délais et payé les frais — toutes ces choses —, mais il y a cette infraction de possession de cannabis qui remonte peut-être à quelques années. On considère alors qu'il s'agit d'une mauvaise conduite, et ces personnes ne peuvent être pardonnées pour les autres condamnations à cause de cela.

Voilà mon explication.

(1625)

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions?

(L'amendement est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président:

Nous avons maintenant l'amendement NDP-6, inscrit au nom de M. Dubé.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Cet amendement ressemble à l'amendement NDP-3. Il vise lui aussi à faire en sorte que les personnes qui ont d'autres condamnations dans leur casier judiciaire puissent tout de même obtenir une suspension de casier pour leurs infractions de possession simple de cannabis. Encore une fois, peu importe les autres infractions commises, cela me semble tout simplement étrange qu'il y ait deux poids, deux mesures; pour certaines personnes, c'est acceptable, car la marijuana est maintenant légale, mais pour d'autres, ce n'est pas acceptable.

Je le répète: l'amendement vise simplement à mettre un terme à ce régime de deux poids, deux mesures, particulièrement pour les personnes qui peuvent avoir commis d'autres infractions relativement mineures. Ces personnes en particulier figurent parmi les personnes les plus pénalisées par l'approche mise de l'avant dans le projet de loi.

Le président:

Il ne semble pas y avoir d'autres interventions au sujet de l'amendement NDP-6.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le président: Nous avons maintenant l'amendement NDP-7.

L'idée ici, c'est qu'il dépasse la portée du projet de loi puisqu'il vise à modifier les peines, ce qui n'est pas un concept prévu dans le projet de loi.

Quelqu'un veut-il contester la décision de la présidence? Cela semble être à la mode ces jours-ci.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

Le président: Monsieur Dubé, vous avez la parole.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Ce n'est rien de personnel, monsieur le président, mais je vais contester la décision, car je crois que les peines sont directement liées au processus de demande de suspension de casier. Je pense que, si vous parlez d'offrir un processus accéléré — ce que le projet de loi propose, dans son titre et dans son résumé —, les membres de tous les côtés et les témoins ont énoncé clairement que toute peine qui n'a pas été purgée constitue un obstacle à la rapidité de ce processus et à la capacité de le mettre en œuvre.

L'amendement vise à annuler « toute peine qui a été imposée à l'égard de cette infraction si la date de l'ordonnance précède l'expiration légale de la peine ». Encore une fois, il s'agit simplement d'éliminer certains de ces obstacles.

Sans que ce soit personnel, je vais contester la décision du président à cet égard et demander un vote par appel nominal.

Le président:

D'accord. Ce n'est pas une motion pouvant faire l'objet d'un débat.

(La décision de la présidence est maintenue par 8 voix contre 1.)

Le président:

Sur ce, nous en sommes à l'amendement PV-2.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Cet amendement sera très simple à présenter, car la justification correspond à celle que j'ai présentée à l'égard...

Le président:

Dans le même ordre d'idées, si nous avons décidé que l'amendement NDP-7 n'était pas recevable, il en va de même pour l'amendement PV-2.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Il n'est pas recevable parce qu'il...?

Le président:

Il vise à modifier les peines. C'est le même concept.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Oui. Eh bien, c'est un effort de bonne foi pour vous faire revenir sur votre décision.

Le président:

Compte tenu de votre position, que vous nous avez rappelée de nombreuses fois, vous n'avez pas le pouvoir de contester la décision du président.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Je ne peux contester la décision du président, ni retirer mon propre amendement, ni faire vraiment autre chose, sauf me présenter lorsqu'il le faut, d'après la motion que vous avez adoptée.

Le président:

Oui.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Et voilà. Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

Le président:

C'était vraiment un moment touchant. Je vous en remercie.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Je peux le rendre encore plus poignant si vous voulez.

Le président:

Ma palette d'émotions est limitée, comme le dirait mon épouse.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

Mme Elizabeth May:

Je pense que vous avez couvert toute la gamme de A à B.

Le président:

Sur ce, nous en sommes maintenant à l'amendement PV-3.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Merci.

Pour celui-là, je crois que, à mesure que nous avons progressé, nous avons tenu des discussions, et je tiens à reconnaître que nous avons peut-être un moyen de procéder qui permettra à l'amendement d'être adopté. Au lieu de prendre du temps maintenant pour discuter de la façon dont nous allons gérer l'exception à la révocation et les dossiers exemptés, je vais demander à Mme Dabrusin si elle veut intervenir dès maintenant, car je pense que nous avons une approche commune.

(1630)

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Merci. Je vous en suis reconnaissante.

Je vais laisser Mme May parler des motifs qui sous-tendent cet amendement et sa raison d'être, mais nous craignons que le libellé actuel soit beaucoup trop vaste et qu'il s'applique à des condamnations qui vont bien au-delà de la possession simple de cannabis.

J'aimerais proposer un sous-amendement à l'amendement PV-3, qui se lit comme suit: (1.2) La suspension d'un casier ordonné en vertu du paragraphe (1.1) ne peut être révoquée par la Commission en vertu de l'alinéa 7b).

C'était très éloquent, n'est-ce pas?

Le président:

Oui.

En avons-nous une copie papier que nous pouvons distribuer?

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Oui. Une copie est en train d'être distribuée.

Le président:

Est-elle dans les deux langues officielles?

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Oui.[Français]

Je peux lire le texte proposé en français si vous le voulez.

(1.2) La suspension d'un casier ordonnée en vertu du paragraphe (1.1) ne peut être révoquée par la Commission en vertu de l'alinéa 7b). [Traduction]

Le président:

Le débat porte sur le sous-amendement.

Mme Elizabeth May:

Encore une fois, puisque Julie me laisse le soin d'expliquer la logique qui sous-tend cette proposition — et cela a été mentionné dans les témoignages présentés devant le Comité, plus particulièrement par Solomon Friedman, qui représente les avocats criminalistes —, il est vraiment injuste que certaines personnes aient une épée de Damoclès au-dessus de la tête sous forme d'un casier judiciaire pour une infraction qui n'en est plus une. L'amendement retire l'exigence de prouver la bonne conduite et d'obtenir la suspension en premier lieu.

Ce sous-amendement le complète. Je suis très heureuse que nous ayons trouvé une solution pour peaufiner le libellé de mon amendement.

Merci beaucoup.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je propose un amendement semblable — le NDP-9 —, qui est ainsi libellé: La Commission ne peut révoquer la suspension du casier judiciaire à l'égard d'une infraction visée à l'annexe 3 pour un motif visé à l'un ou l'autre des alinéas 7a) ou b).

Comme nous ne faisons que commencer à aborder cette question et que nous ne pouvons pas l'étudier en entier, je me demande, tout d'abord, quelles sont les conséquences du fait que l'annexe 3 n'est plus mentionnée — alors qu'il l'est dans mon amendement et dans celui de Mme May — et, ensuite, pourquoi nous mentionnons exclusivement l'alinéa 7b) dans ce sous-amendement. Dans le mien, je mentionne également l'alinéa 7a).

Je me demande si quelqu'un peut m'expliquer pourquoi...

Le président:

Je ne le peux pas, mais je veux m'assurer que nous procédons dans l'ordre.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Bien sûr.

Le président:

Quand nous serons rendus à l'amendement NDP-9, je suis certain que vous souhaiterez soulever exactement cette question, mais je...

M. Matthew Dubé:

Eh bien, j'essaie simplement de...

Le président:

Pour l'instant, la seule chose qui rendrait votre intervention pertinente serait que l'amendement soit corrélatif.

Laissez-moi simplement demander au greffier si, advenant que le sous-amendement et l'amendement du Parti vert soient adoptés, cela aura des conséquences corrélatives sur tout autre...

M. William Stephenson:

Comme ils s'attaquent au même problème, oui, ils sont interreliés.

Le président:

D'accord, alors est-il approprié que nous les examinions les deux ensemble, ou bien devrions-nous simplement nous en tenir à l'ordre qui était prévu?

M. William Stephenson:

Je pense qu'il serait logique que l'on réponde au moins à la question posée par M. Dubé, puis nous verrons comment il pourra procéder à ce moment-là.

Le président:

D'accord.

Je vois Mme Dabrusin lever la main, mais je comprends l'observation formulée par le greffier, c'est-à-dire qu'il pense que nous devrions répondre dès que possible à la question de M. Dubé.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Si je peux me permettre, le greffier législatif peut formuler des conseils, mais je crois savoir que les amendements PV-3, NDP-8, CPC-2, NDP-9 et NDP-10 visent tous à... L'amendement NDP-10 ne concorde peut-être pas après la ligne 10, mais chacun des autres que j'ai mentionnés, jusqu'à NDP-9, semble modifier la même chose.

Si nous le faisons une fois, pouvons-nous continuer à le faire dans le cas des autres amendements, ou bien devons-nous...

(1635)

Le président:

Il faut probablement que ce soit dans chaque cas, selon moi, mais je vais laisser le greffier répondre.

M. William Stephenson:

Dans ce cas-ci, vous pourriez l'ajouter par la suite. Nous pourrions débattre de ce qui restera de l'amendement de M. Dubé. Si nous examinons l'alinéa 7b) et que M. Dubé voudrait que nous examinions l'alinéa 7a), nous pourrions le faire, mais, théoriquement, il serait logique d'aborder les questions en même temps.

Le président:

D'accord, alors nous pouvons l'aborder théoriquement, mais je préférerais que nous le fassions de façon séquentielle au moment où nous arriverons à l'amendement visé.

M. William Stephenson:

C'est logique.

Le président:

Est-ce acceptable?

Monsieur Paul-Hus, qu'en dites-vous? [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Je suis d'accord avec vous, monsieur McKay.

J'aimerais avoir l'avis de nos experts parce que nous avons trois amendements qui touchent l'alinéa 7b): l'amendement proposé par Mme May, celui des libéraux, qui proposent une reformulation de la disposition, et celui de M. Dubé, qui y inclut l'alinéa 7a). Je n'ai pas le texte en main, mais cela peut influer sur le processus de façon importante. Il s'agit juste de voir si nous voulons procéder par étape et revenir par la suite à l'amendement de M. Dubé ou procéder globalement.

Est-ce bien la question, Monsieur Dubé? [Traduction]

Le président:

Je veux procéder étape par étape, alors... [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

J'ai besoin de le savoir. [Traduction]

Le président:

Ce dont nous débattons actuellement, c'est le sous-amendement de l'amendement de Mme May. Limitons le débat à cela pour l'instant.

Monsieur Dubé, cette idée ne vous plaît-elle pas?

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je n'ai pas soulevé la question pour que nous débattions de mon amendement; je voulais simplement illustrer les questions que je me pose au sujet de ce nouveau libellé qui a été présenté et dont nous débattons actuellement.

Le président:

Théoriquement, je comprends. Toutefois, conformément au Règlement, nous passons du sous-amendement à l'amendement. Si nous adoptons l'amendement, les personnes qui sont en faveur du sous-amendement...

M. Matthew Dubé:

Voilà où je voulais en venir. Avant que nous mettions le sous-amendement aux voix, j'ai des questions à son sujet qui sont encore sans réponse.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Autrement dit, ma question portait sur le retrait des mots « annexe 3 ». Qu'est-ce que cela change? Mme May et moi-même... voilà pourquoi j'ai mentionné mon projet de loi. Je dirai seulement qu'avant le sous-amendement, l'amendement PV-3 mentionnait l'annexe 3 et que, maintenant, il est question de...

Je parcours le projet de loi et le paragraphe en question. S'agit-il simplement de l'épurer, ou bien cette modification a-t-elle réellement des conséquences sur les infractions qui sont visées?

Le président:

C'est une question légitime.

Tout d'abord, laissez-moi simplement voir si les fonctionnaires ont un avis quant aux conséquences du sous-amendement sur l'amendement PV-3.

M. Lyndon Murdock:

Le sous-amendement a essentiellement pour effet de garantir que les suspensions de casier qui ont été accordées ne pourront pas être révoquées pour des raisons liées à la bonne conduite, mais il s'appliquera exclusivement aux condamnations pour possession de cannabis.

La portée de l'amendement PV-3 initiale était plus vaste et aurait pu entraîner la révocation partielle, dans le cas où une personne, encore une fois, aurait pu faire appliquer l'interdiction de révocation — si on veut — au cannabis, mais tout de même voir la suspension de ses autres infractions révoquée.

Le président:

Par ce que je crois comprendre, la préoccupation tient au fait que, si on adopte cet amendement maintenant, d'autres seront proposés tout au long du processus, lesquels auront des conséquences. Les fonctionnaires ont-ils des préoccupations à cet égard?

L'autre question concerne la meilleure façon de procéder.

Laissez-moi céder la parole au greffier, puis nous verrons si nous pouvons régler ce problème.

M. William Stephenson:

D'un point de vue procédural, actuellement, nous débattons du sous-amendement, et nous ne pouvons en examiner qu'un seul à la fois. Nous pourrions nous pencher sur le sous-amendement et, si M. Dubé le veut, il pourrait proposer un autre sous-amendement après le vote afin de le modifier davantage, de sorte qu'il corresponde à l'amendement NDP-9, ou bien nous pouvons procéder au débat sur l'amendement NDP-9.

(1640)

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je ne vois pas d'inconvénient à débattre de mes motions dans l'ordre où elles seront présentées. Encore une fois, monsieur le président, je m'excuse. Mon intention n'est pas d'enfreindre le Règlement. J'essaie seulement de comprendre l'idée.

Nous parlons du paragraphe (1.1) proposé, lequel renvoie au paragraphe 4(3.1) proposé. Si on retourne à cette disposition, je pense que c'est celle qui concerne l'« infraction visée à l'annexe 3 », si je comprends bien le projet de loi.

Avec votre permission, monsieur le président, je veux clarifier la réponse qui a été donnée et comprendre. Lorsque nous disons que d'autres dossiers seraient partiellement suspendus... Je m'excuse. Je ne suis pas tout à fait certain de savoir quelle aurait été la conséquence du libellé initial de l'amendement de Mme May, qui mentionnait l'annexe 3 au sens large.

Le président:

Monsieur Broom, voulez-vous répondre à cette question?

M. Ian Broom:

Bien sûr, je peux y répondre.

Le libellé actuel de l'amendement, sans le sous-amendement, signifierait que la disposition serait un peu difficile à mettre en œuvre, étant donné que la Loi sur le casier judiciaire et les activités de la CLCC dépendent de mesures prises à l'égard de l'ensemble du dossier du prévenu. Le problème tiendrait au fait que, si l'amendement était adopté, le sous-amendement réduirait sa portée d'une manière à ce qu'il n'y ait d'incidence que sur les condamnations pour possession simple de cannabis.

Nous ne nous retrouverions pas dans la situation où, si le prévenu avait une bonne conduite, son casier serait révoqué, alors que si une autre infraction s'ajoutait à celle de possession simple de cannabis, deux mesures distinctes seraient prises. D'une part, il n'y aurait aucune conséquence et, d'autre part, il y en aurait.

Ce serait problématique pour nous parce que nous n'aurions pas affaire au casier judiciaire dans son ensemble, dans une telle situation. Toutefois, si on réduisait la portée aux casiers judiciaires qui ne reposent que sur des condamnations pour possession simple de cannabis, ce serait conforme au cadre de la Loi sur le casier judiciaire pour ce qui est de traiter le dossier en entier.

Le président:

Cette réponse vous va-t-elle?

M. Matthew Dubé:

Seulement pour m'assurer que je comprends bien: autrement dit, cela signifierait l'exclusion des personnes qui ont un casier judiciaire pour d'autres infractions?

M. Lyndon Murdock:

Oui.

M. Matthew Dubé:

D'accord.

Monsieur le président, j'aimerais tout simplement souligner officiellement que la précision est importante dans le cadre du débat parce que, encore une fois, on en revient à l'esprit que je voudrais que le projet de loi ait, c'est-à-dire — et c'était le but des amendements que j'ai présentés précédemment — qu'il fasse en sorte que les personnes qui ont commis d'autres infractions soient en mesure d'accéder à ce processus. Je ne veux pas parler pour Mme May, mais j'imagine que ses intentions étaient peut-être semblables en ce qui a trait à la façon dont nos amendements ont été rédigés. Il s'agit d'une distinction importante, à mes yeux, alors la précision a été utile.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Si je puis apporter une précision, je crois comprendre que, selon la façon dont fonctionnerait l'amendement du NPD, effectivement, les meurtriers inculpés pour possession simple seraient dans une meilleure position que ceux qui n'ont pas été reconnus coupables de cette infraction, au moment où ils tenteraient d'obtenir... C'est effectivement pour cette raison que nous ne pouvons pas accepter cet amendement.

Le président:

Comme ce débat est épuisé, mettons le sous-amendement de Mme Dabrusin aux voix.

(Le sous-amendement est adopté.)

(L'amendement modifié est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal]

Le président: L'amendement PV-3 modifié est adopté, et nous étudions maintenant l'amendement NDP-8.

Encore une fois, on m'a remis une note au sujet de sa recevabilité. Elle vise l'octroi de la suspension du casier pour des infractions qui ne figurent pas dans le projet de loi.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Il s'agit en fait d'une recommandation qui a été faite par un certain nombre de témoins. Elle concernait des infractions relatives à l'administration de la justice liées à des infractions visées à l'annexe 3. Autrement dit, pour donner un exemple qui a été utilisé au sein du Comité, si un Autochtone est incapable de comparaître devant le tribunal pour une diversité de considérations d'ordre géographique et qu'il s'agit d'une comparution liée à l'infraction, nous suspendrions également cette infraction.

Encore une fois, il me semble étrange que nous voulions réparer ce qui est censé être les torts que ces personnes ont subis, puis que nous ne puissions pas le faire, car nous les obligeons à continuer d'avoir d'autres éléments dans leur casier judiciaire qui leur causeront inévitablement des problèmes. Honnêtement, les personnes qui auraient besoin de la réparation que le projet de loi vise à offrir ne seront pas vraiment nombreuses à l'obtenir. Encore une fois, je contesterai la décision, avec tout le respect que je dois au président.

(1645)

Le président:

Je commence à me sentir mal à ce sujet.

(La décision de la présidence est maintenue par 8 voix contre 1.)

Le président:

C'est une autre victoire éclatante du président.

Nous allons maintenant passer à M. Motz et à l'amendement CPC-2; vous avez la parole.

M. Glen Motz:

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président.

Chers collègues, je propose l'amendement CPC-2 en guise de mécanisme de recours qui permettra au gouvernement de décider qu'il incombe aux demandeurs de prouver les crimes dont ils ont été reconnus coupables. Sous le régime du projet de loi, il incombe aux personnes reconnues coupables de possession mineure de marijuana de prouver qu'elles ont été reconnues coupables uniquement de cet acte criminel. Toutefois, je peux vous dire par expérience, et d'après les témoignages que nous avons entendus devant le Comité, qu'il y aura des personnes dont le casier judiciaire est introuvable, ou a été perdu ou détruit. Dans ces cas-là, elles sont incapables de prouver le bien-fondé de leur cause sans que ce soit de leur faute.

Dans ces situations, je propose un ajout logique qui permettra aux demandeurs de faire la preuve de cette situation et de prêter serment ou de présenter un affidavit expliquant pourquoi c'est le cas. La Commission des libérations conditionnelles pourrait ainsi examiner la demande et enquêter pour déterminer l'admissibilité à ce titre, au lieu de les refuser directement dans ces situations. Dans le but de garantir que toutes les personnes qui sont admissibles pourront accéder au même processus, je propose cet amendement afin d'assurer une certaine équité procédurale.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Comme certains des amendements que j'ai proposés ne sont pas recevables, encore moins adoptés, c'est un bon plan B pour que le processus soit automatique, alors c'est un amendement que j'appuie.

Toutefois, j'aurais peut-être besoin de recevoir des conseils du greffier afin de comprendre pourquoi un processus qui aurait été automatique, comme dans les amendements NDP-1 et NDP-2, et dans le cadre duquel la Commission aurait fait le travail était considéré comme hors de la portée de la Commission et de celle du projet de loi, alors que, dans le cas présent, les déclarations solennelles font en sorte que la Commission mène des enquêtes pour déterminer si les conditions ont été respectées. Cet amendement ne va certainement pas aussi loin, mais il semble néanmoins avoir le même objectif. Je ne veux pas porter malheur à l'amendement — je suis heureux qu'il soit recevable —, mais j'ai de la difficulté à comprendre la distinction entre les deux.

Le président:

Vous vous demandez ce qui suit : si votre amendement allait au-delà de la portée du projet de loi, alors pourquoi ce n'est pas le cas de celui-ci?

M. Matthew Dubé:

Quel est le seuil pour ordonner à la Commission de faire du travail supplémentaire?

M. William Stephenson:

Dans le cas présent, l'amendement porte davantage sur les paramètres et les enquêtes que mènerait la Commission. D'après ce que nous savons et à notre connaissance, elle a déjà le pouvoir de mener des enquêtes afin de déterminer si la personne s'est bien conduite... et toutes ces choses-là. En ce sens, l'amendement diffère un peu des autres parce qu'il touche les paramètres qui font déjà partie de la portée du projet de loi — lorsqu'il s'agit d'une demande de suspension, la responsabilité du demandeur est assez limitée — en comparaison des autres amendements qui sont un peu plus comme de nouveaux modèles ou mécanismes dans le projet de loi.

(1650)

M. Michel Picard:

J'aimerais que nous prenions une pause de trois minutes afin de discuter un peu plus en détail de cette question d'ordre technique. Nous aimerions en parler davantage.

Le président:

Je crois que nous pouvons prendre une pause de trois minutes.

Sur ce, je suspends la séance pour trois minutes.

(1650)

(1650)

Le président:

Chers collègues, reprenons nos travaux.

Monsieur Picard, voulez-vous dire quelque chose?

M. Michel Picard:

Non.

Le président:

D'accord. Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires sur l'amendement CPC-2?

Un député: Pourrions-nous procéder à un vote par appel nominal?

Le président: C'est ce que nous allons faire.

(L'amendement est adopté par 9 voix contre 0. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

M. Glen Motz:

Permettez-moi de prendre en note la date d'aujourd'hui parce que c'est la première fois que cela se produit dans toutes mes délibérations en comité.

Le président:

Je ne sais pas ce que nous allons faire si nous nous entendons tous parfaitement.

Nous sommes rendus à l'amendement NDP-9, dont nous avons déjà discuté.

Monsieur Dubé, voulez-vous proposer l'amendement?

M. Matthew Dubé:

Encore une fois, c'est seulement pour nous assurer de ne pas révoquer la suspension de casier judiciaire si, au bout du compte, l'intention du projet de loi, c'est de permettre aux gens d'aller de l'avant après avoir été reconnus coupables d'une infraction liée à quelque chose qui est maintenant légal.

J'avais une question sur mon propre amendement, si je peux revenir à l'amendement qui a été modifié précédemment, qui était le PV-3. Je ne l'ai pas devant moi, mais j'ai inclus l'alinéa 7a), et le sous-amendement ne mentionnait que l'alinéa 7b).

Quelqu'un peut-il me dire quelle est la distinction entre les deux?

(1655)

Le président:

Monsieur Murdock, voulez-vous répondre?

M. Lyndon Murdock:

L'alinéa 7a) porte sur une personne qui est condamnée à la suite d'une infraction, alors que l'alinéa 7b) traite de la question de la bonne conduite.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je vous remercie de la précision.

La raison pour laquelle j'étais contre l'amendement qui a été modifié précédemment, c'est en grande partie parce qu'une personne qui obtient une suspension de casier judiciaire pour quelque chose qui est maintenant légal et qui commet un autre crime mérite la peine prévue pour ce crime. Si elle est déclarée coupable, c'est très bien, mais il est difficile de comprendre pourquoi on rétablirait le casier judiciaire de cette personne pour quelque chose qui est maintenant légal.

Que nous aimions ou non ces personnes, que nous approuvions ou non l'acte qui a été commis, le principe veut que ce ne soit plus un crime. Conformément à notre position et à celle de nombre de témoins, la radiation est la façon de procéder. À mon avis, il semble logique que nous n'ajoutions pas une ligne supplémentaire dans le casier judiciaire d'une personne pour quelque chose qui est maintenant légal, mais qui s'est produit lorsque c'était illégal. Le Parlement du Canada a reconnu que ces personnes devraient obtenir plus facilement une suspension de casier judiciaire si le projet de loi est adopté.

C'est un ajout important qui était absent de l'amendement modifié du Parti vert.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres interventions?

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 5 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le président:

Sur ce, je vais devoir céder le fauteuil et demander à M. Paul-Hus de me remplacer. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Bonjour, tout le monde.

Nous allons maintenant examiner l'amendement NDP-10 de M. Dubé.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci, monsieur le président.[Traduction]

Le NDP-10 vise à... [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Je voudrais mentionner à mon collègue que, malheureusement, la présidence considère que l'amendement est inadmissible, mais il peut quand même s'expliquer.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci, monsieur le président.

La présidence a changé, mais le résultat risque d'être le même.[Traduction]

Pour dire les choses simplement, le NDP-10 porte sur la radiation. Pour les gens qui nous écoutent, je parle de mon échange avec le ministre et de son incapacité à expliquer pourquoi il existe deux poids, deux mesures avec le projet de loi C-66 et celui-ci. Les Canadiens racialisés, les Autochtones et les Canadiens à faible revenu ont tous été ciblés injustement par la loi dans le cas présent. Voilà ce que nous cherchons à corriger. La seule façon dont nous pouvons vraiment corriger cela, c'est avec la radiation.

Le ministre et d'autres fonctionnaires ont parlé de la nécessité d'avoir des documents à la frontière et de choses du genre. Je renvoie mes collègues à l'article sur la destruction ou la suppression du projet de loi C-66. L'article 21 est ainsi libellé: « Il est entendu que les articles 17 à 20 ne s'appliquent pas relativement aux documents soumis ou produits dans le cadre d'une demande présentée en vertu de la présente loi. » Autrement dit, comme l'ont confirmé plusieurs appels que nous avons faits à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles, si une personne perd la confirmation de la radiation de son casier judiciaire, elle peut présenter une demande pour en obtenir une nouvelle. Alors, l'argument du ministre selon lequel il faut ce document magique à la frontière ne tient pas du tout la route.

À mon avis, selon les témoignages des témoins, c'est la bonne façon de procéder. Je crois comprendre que le président a tranché, alors, je voudrais, avec tout le respect que je lui dois, contester sa décision.

(1700)

[Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Je vous remercie de ces explications, monsieur Dubé.

Effectivement, la décision était prise, et je la maintiens.

Puisqu'on le demande, le vote par appel nominal portera sur le maintien de la décision de la présidence.

(La décision de la présidence est maintenue à 7 voix contre 1.)

(Article 6)

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Nous passons à l'article 6 et nous examinons l'amendement CPC-3.

Monsieur Motz, vous avez la parole. [Traduction]

M. Glen Motz:

Merci, monsieur le président.

L'intention du CPC-3, c'est que l'article 6 soit amendé par suppression de l'alinéa b) proposé, qui enlève à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles le pouvoir de faire des enquêtes afin de déterminer la conduite du demandeur depuis la date de sa condamnation.

Les deux prochains amendements ont été proposés. Les amendements CPC-3 et CPC-4 ont été soumis par l'Association canadienne des policiers, qui croit que la Commission des libérations conditionnelles devrait conserver une discrétion et un pouvoir limités pour procéder à des enquêtes, afin que l'on tienne compte du faible nombre de demandes qui seront présentées par des récidivistes et que ces derniers ne profitent pas d'un processus qui n'est clairement pas conçu pour traiter leurs cas.

Comme nous l'a dit le président de l'association, nous savons qu'il y a des situations où des demandes peuvent être présentées par des délinquants qui ont été condamnés pour possession simple à la suite d'une transaction en matière pénale. Si la Commission des libérations conditionnelles avait le pouvoir de se pencher sur ces cas, l'entente avec la Couronne et les tribunaux pourrait entraîner une accusation plus grave. Elles ont peut-être accepté cette entente en supposant qu'il s'agissait d'une condamnation qui serait permanente dans le casier judiciaire de l'accusé, sans quoi elles auraient refusé une accusation pour une infraction moindre.

L'amendement permet simplement de faire cela. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Merci, monsieur Motz.

Est-ce matière à débat?[Traduction]

Voulez-vous un vote par appel nominal?

M. Glen Motz:

Oui. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

D'accord.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Nous passons à l'amendement CPC-4.

Monsieur Motz, vous avez la parole. [Traduction]

M. Glen Motz:

Comme avec le CPC-3, le présent amendement traite directement de la discrétion de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles de déterminer si le fait d'accorder une suspension du casier judiciaire serait susceptible de déconsidérer l'administration de la justice. Je crois que la grande majorité des demandeurs qui présenteront une demande à cet égard sont des citoyens respectueux des lois et n'auront aucun problème à être approuvés par la Commission.

Cela dit, nous devrions quand même laisser la Commission des libérations conditionnelles faire son travail. Si le gouvernement ne croit pas que cela relève du rôle de la Commission, alors il aurait dû présenter une radiation de casier judiciaire au lieu d'une suspension.

Voilà la justification de l'amendement CPC-4.

(1705)

[Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Merci, monsieur Motz.

Nous passons au vote.

(L'amendement est rejeté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

En tant que président substitut, vu que les deux motions étaient les miennes, je me permets de simplement rappeler au Comité que l'Association canadienne des policiers nous avait fait ces recommandations. Comme le président habituel le mentionnait, il est important de tenir compte des recommandations de nos témoins et, surtout, de gens comme ceux de l'Association canadienne des policiers.

Nous passons maintenant à l'amendement LIB-4.

Madame Dabrusin, vous avez la parole.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Merci.[Traduction]

Il s'agit d'un amendement corrélatif fondé sur les deux ou trois premiers amendements que j'ai proposés afin d'essayer de régler la question des amendes.

C'est un amendement d'ordre technique, alors j'ai pensé qu'il serait préférable de demander aux fonctionnaires de décrire son objectif. Ce sont des aspects techniques qui doivent être mis en place pour permettre l'application.

M. Lyndon Murdock:

Certainement, je suis heureux de le faire.

L'amendement de l'article 6 modifie le projet de loi C-93 pour ajouter le paragraphe 4.2(1.1) proposé. Ce paragraphe précise que les enquêtes de la Commission liées à une bonne conduite et au discrédit ne devraient pas être menées lorsque le demandeur présente une demande de suspension de casier judiciaire en vertu du paragraphe 4(3.1), soit lorsqu'il s'agit seulement d'une condamnation pour possession simple de cannabis.

Le paragraphe proposé précise en outre que ni une possession simple — infractions visées à l'annexe 3 — ni le non-paiement d'amendes et de suramendes compensatoires associées ne seront considérés comme faisant partie des enquêtes de la Commission lorsqu'il y a d'autres condamnations dans le casier judiciaire de la personne. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Est-ce tout?

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

C'est tout.[Traduction]

Ce sont des amendements corrélatifs d'ordre technique à ce stade. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

C'est parfait.

Y a-t-il un débat ou des questions? [Traduction]

M. Jim Eglinski:

Je suis plus mêlé qu'au début, mais ça va aller. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

D'accord.

Nous passons au vote.

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Nous passons à l'amendement LIB-5.

Madame Dabrusin, vous avez la parole. [Traduction]

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

J'éprouve beaucoup de plaisir à poursuivre avec des modifications d'ordre technique.

L'amendement vise essentiellement à ce que les amendes puissent encore être imposées même après l'octroi d'une suspension de casier judiciaire. Cela faisait partie de la discussion que nous avons tenue sur le Québec et le Nouveau-Brunswick. Ces provinces ont leurs propres programmes d'amendes, alors cela nous permet d'assurer la cohésion du système. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Merci.

Monsieur Motz, vous avez la parole. [Traduction]

M. Glen Motz:

Je suis curieux de savoir si les fonctionnaires ont participé à la rédaction de l'amendement ou s'ils l'ont examiné avant sa présentation.

M. Lyndon Murdock:

Nous n'avons pas participé à la rédaction.

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord, c'était une partie de la question.

L'avez-vous examiné avant sa présentation?

M. Lyndon Murdock:

Non, je n'ai pas examiné l'amendement.

M. Glen Motz:

Y a-t-il des fonctionnaires de votre ministère qui l'ont examiné?

M. Lyndon Murdock:

Je ne peux pas parler au nom des autres, monsieur.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Ce que j'essaie de faire est très clair depuis le début. Je tente de présenter un certain nombre d'amendements qui sont tous liés afin que l'on puisse permettre aux gens d'accéder à la suspension de casier judiciaire pour possession simple de cannabis, même s'ils ont peut-être une amende non payée à cet égard. Le problème auquel nous faisons face, c'est que les amendes ne relèvent pas toujours entièrement du fédéral. Nous cherchons à établir qu'on peut présenter une demande et obtenir quand même une suspension de casier judiciaire. Toutefois, l'amende demeure non payée, et il se peut qu'on doive la régler. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Merci, madame Dabrusin.

D'autres intervenants souhaitent-ils ajouter quelque chose?

Monsieur Murdock, vous avez la parole. [Traduction]

M. Lyndon Murdock:

Merci.

Pour revenir à la question de M. Motz à savoir si d'autres personnes ont examiné l'amendement, je peux dire que, oui, c'est le cas.

M. Glen Motz:

Merci. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Merci.

Qui s'oppose à l'amendement?

Que dites-vous, monsieur Picard?

(1710)

M. Michel Picard:

Est-ce le pour ou le contre en premier?

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Je vais commencer par ceux qui s'y opposent. Je voulais savoir si le système fonctionnait.

Passons au vote.

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(L'article 6 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Nous passons maintenant à l'article 6.1 et à l'amendement CPC-5.

Je dois avertir le Parti conservateur que cet amendement est inadmissible, car il dépasse la portée du projet de loi.

Mes collègues libéraux vont comprendre que c'est avec plaisir que je dis cela au microphone, aujourd'hui.

Voulez-vous discuter de l'amendement? [Traduction]

M. Jim Eglinski:

J'aimerais seulement poursuivre dans la même veine. Je crois comprendre que nous dépassons peut-être la portée du projet de loi et que nous accordons des pouvoirs où nous ne le pouvons pas, mais, encore une fois, c'est un suivi de ma présentation antérieure et de la recommandation que nous allons formuler à la fin. Nous devons encourager la Commission des libérations conditionnelles à examiner les moyens électroniques permettant d'enregistrer cette information afin de simplifier le processus le plus possible.

Mes recherches montrent qu'il y a des programmes qui répondent aux besoins de nombreuses administrations aux États-Unis. Tout ce que je demande, essentiellement, c'est que nous permettions à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles de retenir de manière proactive les services d'un cabinet ou d'envisager d'utiliser des logiciels de conception afin d'éliminer le problème actuel et de rendre le processus électronique plus convivial et plus rapide. C'était l'idée derrière l'amendement, mais je comprends qu'il y a un coût à cela et que ce n'est pas de notre ressort. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Merci, monsieur Eglinski.

(Article 7)

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus): Nous passons à l'article 7.

Comme il n'y a pas d'amendement, nous passons au vote.

(L'article 7 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 8)

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Nous examinons l'amendement LIB-6.

Madame Dabrusin, vous avez la parole. [Traduction]

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Nous n'avons pas fini de nous amuser.

Je veux seulement que les provinces puissent percevoir les amendes, d'où l'amendement LIB-6. C'est un amendement complémentaire; je devais apporter des modifications corrélatives en lien avec les amendements initiaux que j'avais proposés. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Merci, madame Dabrusin.

Puisqu'il n'y a pas d'autres commentaires, nous passons au vote.

(L'amendement est adopté. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Nous passons à l'amendement CPC-6.

Monsieur Motz, vous avez la parole. [Traduction]

M. Glen Motz:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Cet amendement mineur concerne un point que ni les fonctionnaires ni le ministre n'ont été en mesure d'éclaircir de façon définitive. Je le présente donc après coup à la Chambre et aux Canadiens.

Quand nous lui avons demandé combien de personnes pourraient tirer parti de ce projet de loi ou combien cela allait coûter, il nous a renvoyés à l'estimation des fonctionnaires, essentiellement. Selon certains chercheurs universitaires, jusqu'à un demi-million de personnes pourraient utiliser cette procédure de suspension de casier judiciaire. Les fonctionnaires, cependant, croient que seulement 250 000 personnes seraient admissibles, et qu'il n'y aura que 10 000 demandes, environ. Si plus de 4 % des gens admissibles décident de présenter une demande, les ressources financières de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles ne suffiront pas, si on se fie aux chiffres qui nous ont été présentés.

Le but de cet amendement est de s'assurer que le processus gratuit de suspension de casier judiciaire pour possession de cannabis n'ait pas de répercussions sur les personnes qui présentent une demande de suspension de casier judiciaire pour d'autres motifs. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Merci, monsieur Motz.

Y a-t-il un débat?

C'est trop facile avec moi.

M. Michel Picard:

Non.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous êtes bien efficace.

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Je suis trop efficace.

M. Michel Picard:

Vous êtes trop menaçant, monsieur le président.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Nous passons au vote. [Traduction]

M. Glen Motz:

Je demande un vote par appel nominal. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

D'accord. Nous procédons à un vote par appel nominal.

(L'amendement est adopté par 8 voix contre 0. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

(1715)

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

La présidence veut souligner qu'elle est très satisfaite du travail de son comité.

Merci, messieurs et mesdames.

(L'article 8 modifié est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Article 9)

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

C'est parfait.

Passons à l'article 9.

(L'article 9 est adopté avec dissidence.)

(Annexe)

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus): Passons au prochain point concernant l'annexe, schedule en anglais. L'amendement LIB-7 est proposé par M. Spengermann.

M. Sven Spengemann (Mississauga—Lakeshore, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.[Traduction]

L'amendement LIB-7 modifie deux alinéas de la même façon afin d'exclure de l'application de la loi les préparations synthétiques semblables au cannabis, qui sont toujours illicites. La loi n'est pas censée s'appliquer à ces substances.

La seule exception à cette exception concerne les substances identiques à celles que produit une plante de cannabis. Cela peut être volontaire ou involontaire, mais...

M. Glen Motz:

Qu'arrive-t-il si ces produits ne peuvent pas être identiques?

M. Sven Spengemann:

C'est ce qui est prévu dans le libellé. Si la substance est identique à un produit de la plante, alors la loi s'applique. Si la substance est synthétique de toute autre façon, elle est exclue. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Merci.

Voulez-vous en débattre?

Monsieur Eglinski, vous avez la parole. [Traduction]

M. Jim Eglinski:

Ce qui me préoccupe, c'est que je ne vois pas comment on pourrait en être certain à moins qu'il y ait eu un procès et que des éléments de preuve aient été présentés à ce moment-là. Voulez-vous qu'on épluche les vieux dossiers juridiques pour trouver des éléments de preuve afin de savoir...

M. Sven Spengemann:

Peut-être que les fonctionnaires pourraient nous le dire, mais je tiens pour acquis que, dans le cadre d'un procès, le dossier d'instruction indique la présence des substances synthétiques en question en précisant qu'il ne s'agit pas de substances visées à l'annexe 3.

M. Jim Eglinski:

D'accord, merci. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Merci.

Monsieur Motz, la parole est à vous. [Traduction]

M. Glen Motz:

Peut-être que les fonctionnaires pourraient nous éclairer. Les dossiers de procès pour possession simple devraient indiquer de quelle substance il s'agissait. Si c'est un cannabinoïde synthétique, je ne sais pas si le dossier préciserait à quelle annexe la substance est visée. Je ne pourrais pas vous le dire. Je me demande si...

M. Jim Eglinski:

Nous pourrions demander à la GRC.

M. Glen Motz:

Madame Gonzalez, pourriez-vous nous éclairer?

Mme Amanda Gonzalez:

Dans bon nombre de cas, ce serait impossible à savoir. Peut-être que ce serait indiqué dans les documents du tribunal, mais probablement pas dans le dossier d'instruction lui-même.

M. Glen Motz:

Donc, pour que ce soit clair, ce serait à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles de demander un dossier pour traiter une demande en particulier. Comment est-elle censée avoir de l'information si ce n'est pas inscrit dans le dossier?

Mme Amanda Gonzalez:

Je n'ai pas de réponse à vous donner.

M. Glen Motz:

Devra-t-elle le faire pour chaque demande?

M. Ian Broom:

Selon le libellé actuel et modifié du projet de loi C-93, une personne qui présente une demande de suspension de son casier devra fournir des documents à l'appui, y compris le dossier d'instruction, au besoin, pour confirmer les détails de la condamnation. S'il est précisé dans le document d'instruction que l'infraction concernait un cannabinoïde synthétique... Cela figurera dans le dossier d'instruction.

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Ça va, monsieur Motz? [Traduction]

M. Glen Motz:

Oui. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Merci.

Passons au vote sur l'amendement LIB-7.

(L'amendement est adopté avec dissidence. [Voir le Procès-verbal])

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Passons au vote sur l'annexe, ou schedule en anglais.

(L'annexe modifiée est adoptée avec dissidence.)

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

C'est parfait.

Passons aux prochaines étapes.

Le titre du projet de loi est-il adopté?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Le projet de loi modifié est-il adopté?

Des députés: D'accord.

Des députés: Avec dissidence.

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):Le président doit-il faire rapport à la Chambre du projet de loi modifié?

Des députés: D'accord. [Traduction]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Avec dissidence. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Le Comité ordonne-t-il la réimpression du projet de loi modifié?

(1720)

[Traduction]

M. Jim Eglinski:

Que fait-on de la recommandation? [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Selon la procédure actuelle, la recommandation ne peut pas faire partie intégrante du projet de loi. Par contre, comme cela a été fait dans le cas du projet de loi C-83, la recommandation sera faite en parallèle. Les analystes auraient besoin d'information pour rédiger la recommandation. [Traduction]

M. Glen Motz:

Je suis prêt. Je vous attends. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

D'accord.

Nous avons terminé la partie portant sur le projet de loi, mais la possibilité de faire une recommandation séparée a été soulevée et il était entendu que nous allions en discuter. Nous avons étudié la procédure avec l'aide du greffier.

Je vais simplement laisser M. Eglinski nous soumettre sa recommandation.

M. Michel Picard:

Je ne sais pas comment tout cela fonctionne.

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Le greffier m'a expliqué la procédure et je vais le laisser vous présenter la façon de faire. [Traduction]

Le greffier du Comité (M. Naaman Sugrue):

Nous pouvons procéder de deux ou trois façons différentes. Essentiellement, le Comité peut procéder par motion ou convenir de présenter des recommandations. Nous pouvons présenter une motion qui sera ensuite modifiée pour inclure les recommandations désirées ou présenter des motions distinctes sur les recommandations à soumettre. Je vous recommande de regrouper en un seul rapport l'ensemble des recommandations que le Comité souhaite adopter, mais il vous appartient de décider des recommandations à proposer.

M. Michel Picard:

Si je comprends bien, nous avons terminé tout ce qui concerne le projet de loi. Nous devrions peut-être considérer le rapport sur les recommandations comme une deuxième étape. Nous pouvons donner à M. Eglinski le temps de rédiger la recommandation qu'il veut proposer.

M. Jim Eglinski:

C'est déjà fait.

M. Michel Picard:

Vous êtes rapide.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Je sais. Je suis prêt à lire et à présenter ma motion.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'ai moi aussi rédigé une recommandation.

M. Michel Picard:

Je propose que nous commencions tout de suite. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Mme Sahota et M. Eglinski sont déjà prêts à soumettre leurs recommandations.

Commençons par vous, monsieur Eglinski. [Traduction]

M. Jim Eglinski:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je propose: Que le Comité recommande que la Commission des libérations conditionnelles, dont le mandat est de fournir des services rapides, efficaces et efficients, se serve de la technologie pour améliorer les services qu'elle offre aux Canadiens, et que le ministre soit tenu d'offrir des services de qualité à tous les Canadiens, conformément aux recommandations précédentes du vérificateur général sur la prestation des programmes et au mandat que le premier ministre lui a confié, soit de servir les Canadiens. Par conséquent, il est résolu que le Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale recommande que le ministre examine immédiatement la possibilité de mettre en œuvre un système électronique de traitement des demandes de suspension de casier, notamment les demandes dont il est question dans le projet de loi C-93, Loi prévoyant une procédure accélérée et sans frais de suspension de casier judiciaire pour la possession simple de cannabis. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Merci, monsieur Eglinski.

Monsieur Dubé, vous avez la parole.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci.

(1725)

[Traduction]

Monsieur le président, je veux prendre le temps de remercier mon collègue de sa motion, que j'appuie, d'ailleurs. Compte tenu du contexte, je crois qu'il est très important que notre comité fasse savoir... Je sais que le processus a été très difficile pour les fonctionnaires. Je crois qu'il importe aussi de souligner que la Commission des libérations conditionnelles fera ce qu'elle peut avec les outils dont elle dispose, mais le problème, c'est qu'on ne lui a pas donné les outils nécessaires pour aider les personnes marginalisées qui voudraient se prévaloir de ce processus, un processus plus efficace que ce qui est prévu dans le projet de loi.

Les témoins n'ont cessé de le dire. Je crois que nous pouvons aussi conclure, en fonction des témoignages que nous avons entendus et puisque le projet de loi sera renvoyé à la Chambre, qu'en réalité, seul le strict minimum a été fait dans ce dossier, alors qu'il aurait dû s'agir d'un élément phare du programme du gouvernement.

Dans le passé, le Comité a convenu que le processus de suspension des casiers judiciaires pourrait se déclencher de façon automatique. Nous en sommes venus à cette conclusion dans le cadre de notre étude, qui a révélé la pagaille de ce système.

Malgré les avantages que présente la recommandation de M. Eglinski, je suis sûr qu'il reconnaîtrait qu'il ne s'agit que de la première étape pour remettre de l'ordre dans ce système. Je dois admettre que tout cela m'a profondément déçu, et je suis sûr que je ne suis pas le seul. C'est pour cette raison que je vais soutenir sans hésiter la motion de mon collègue. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Merci, monsieur Dubé.

Monsieur Picard, vous avez la parole.

M. Michel Picard:

J'aimerais suggérer que nos propos tiennent compte des étapes préalables que le ministère devra suivre si nous lui confions le mandat de mettre en place un système électronique. En effet, il devra évaluer, entre autres, les ressources, l'équipement, les coûts de développement et les procédures que cela implique.

Nous partageons tous le désir de moderniser les services et de faciliter le travail avec des moyens électroniques. Une approche optimale pour atteindre ce but devrait tenir compte des éléments, des coûts et des procédures nécessaires, qui donneraient au ministère les moyens dont il ne dispose pas pour l'instant et qui lui permettraient de rendre ses services électroniques les plus accessibles et efficaces possible.

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Merci, monsieur Picard.

Est-ce que d'autres personnes souhaitent intervenir?

Qui est en faveur de la recommandation de M. Eglinski?

M. Michel Picard:

Mon commentaire comportait un point d'interrogation à la fin. Est-ce que la recommandation telle qu'elle est écrite engage le ministère à entreprendre des démarches pour se doter de services électroniques? Je n'ai pas le texte devant moi, j'y vais par coeur.

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Vous avez la parole, monsieur Eglinski. [Traduction]

M. Michel Picard:

Est-ce que la recommandation, telle qu'elle est écrite, donne une marge de manœuvre pour évaluer les besoins avant de passer directement à l'étape de la mise en œuvre?

M. Jim Eglinski:

Je crois que c'est précisé à la première ligne. Il est écrit que le Comité fait une recommandation à la Commission des libérations conditionnelles « dont le mandat est de fournir des services rapides, efficaces et efficients ». Ensuite, je parle de la technologie. La recommandation a pour but d'engager la Commission des libérations conditionnelles à améliorer ses moyens technologiques afin de pouvoir faire son travail. C'est tout ce qu'on lui demande.

M. Glen Motz:

Pour répondre à la question de M. Picard, j'aimerais préciser que le passage qui dit « il est résolu que » mentionne également que le Comité permanent « recommande que le ministre examine immédiatement la possibilité » de mettre en œuvre un système électronique de traitement des demandes de suspension de casier.

M. Michel Picard:

D'accord. Merci. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Merci, monsieur Motz.

Nous passons au vote.

(La recommandation est adoptée)

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus): Merci.

Madame Sahota, c'est votre tour. [Traduction]

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord. Ma recommandation concerne principalement les frais exigés. Beaucoup de témoins nous ont dit que même si on prévoit une dispense des frais liée à la suspension de casier, d'autres frais s'appliquent.

Je recommande: Après avoir étudié le projet de loi C-93, Loi prévoyant une procédure accélérée et sans frais de suspension de casier judiciaire pour la possession simple de cannabis, et après avoir étudié le programme de suspension de casier, conformément à la motion M-161, le Comité souhaite formuler la recommandation suivante au gouvernement : Que, compte tenu des préoccupations exprimées par les témoins au sujet des coûts supplémentaires liés au processus de traitement des demandes de pardon, par exemple l'acquisition de documents juridiques et policiers, et compte tenu du fait que le gouvernement a reconnu qu'il est important de réduire le fardeau financier imposé à ceux et celles qui présentent une demande de pardon, comme le reflète la proposition du projet de loi C-93 visant à abolir les frais de 631 $, le Comité encourage vivement le ministère de la Sécurité publique et nationale à envisager d'autres mesures pour réduire les coûts liés à la présentation d'une demande de pardon.

(1730)

[Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Merci, madame Sahota.

Monsieur Dubé, la parole est à vous.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Nous ne pouvons pas être contre la vertu, mais je veux simplement dire encore une fois à quel point tout cela est décourageant. Nous avons un gouvernement qui est en poste depuis quatre ans. Nous avons fait une étude qui nous a été confiée par motion d'un député libéral. Pourtant, nous voici aujourd'hui à faire une autre recommandation pour dire la même chose.

Tout le monde le sait depuis 10 ans, quand le changement a été adopté. Il est donc bien malheureux de devoir faire des recommandations à un ministère quand, dans le fond, le ministre aurait pu agir et corriger de façon plus large que ne le fait ce projet de loi les torts que cause le programme. Il est minuit moins dix, nous sommes à trois mois d'une campagne électorale et pourtant rien n'a encore été fait.

Je voterai en faveur de la recommandation parce que nous ne pouvons pas être contre la vertu, mais je trouve déplorable toutes ces belles intentions que nous énonçons alors qu'un ministre, qui avait pourtant quatre ans pour apporter ces changements et avoir un réel impact dans la vie des gens, n'a rien fait.

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Merci, monsieur Dubé.

Madame Sahota, la parole est à vous. [Traduction]

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui, j'ai une correction à apporter à ma recommandation. J'ai dit qu'on encourage le « ministère de la Sécurité publique et nationale ». J'ai confondu les noms du Comité et du ministère. J'aurais dû dire: « le ministère de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile ». [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Merci, madame Sahota.

Monsieur Motz, vous avez la parole. [Traduction]

M. Glen Motz:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je vais me faire l'écho des commentaires de M. Dubé, parce que je suis d'accord avec lui. Je me rappelle que, quand nous avons examiné la motion M-161, nous avons présenté une recommandation très similaire au ministre, qui a dit qu'il la respecterait en tous points. Je ne sais pas pourquoi nous devons recommencer. Je sais que nous en avons déjà parlé, et presque mot pour mot, quand il était question de la motion M-161. Le ministre va-t-il mettre les bouchées doubles parce que nous présentons deux recommandations? J'en doute.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Je tiens à insister sur le fait que nous avons entendu de nouveaux témoins. Présenter à nouveau cette recommandation ne peut pas faire de tort. Bien sûr, de nombreux témoins se sont prononcés sur le sujet. Je sais que M. Dubé est déçu, mais je sais qu'il veut que nous procédions ainsi. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Puisqu'il n'y a pas d'autres commentaires, nous passons au vote.

(La recommandation est adoptée.)

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus): Maintenant que les deux recommandations ont été adoptées à l'unanimité, êtes-vous d'accord pour les regrouper dans un même document et présenter ce dernier à la Chambre?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Oui, mais à condition que nous ne demandions pas de réponse du gouvernement, car il ne reste pas assez de temps pour cela.

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Nous pourrions en demander une, mais le gouvernement n'aurait pas le temps de la préparer.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est cela.

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

D'accord.[Traduction]

Tout ce que je voulais dire, c'est que les deux motions figureront dans le même rapport.

M. Glen Motz:

Dans le rapport, effectivement.

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Ce sera présenté à la Chambre. Nous demanderons une réponse du gouvernement, mais il n'aura pas le temps de la préparer.

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord. [Français]

Le vice-président (M. Pierre Paul-Hus):

Cela met fin à la réunion.

Merci beaucoup de votre collaboration.

Je remercie également les fonctionnaires de leur travail.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 27, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.