header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-05-06 SECU 160

Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

Ladies and gentlemen, I see quorum, and as far as my eyesight allows, I see that it is close enough to 3:30.

We have with us Elana Finestone from the Native Women's Association, and Mr. Cudjoe from the Canadian Association of Black Lawyers.

I'll ask Mr. Cudjoe to go for the first 10 minutes, only because technology is not necessarily always trustworthy.

Colleagues, we've achieved the first element for the process today, which is to merge the two panels so that we are time efficient. I'm anticipating a lot of questions for both panellists and we may go into the second hour.

Second, I'm hoping that over the course of the two hours today, we will agree on a process going forward for the submission of amendments and picking a date for clause-by-clause.

My suggestion to Mr. Paul-Hus and Mr. Dubé has been that we have amendments done by the end of the week. I appreciate that there are some difficulties with translation, because the drafters don't deal with amendments until the bill is actually referred to the committee. This a difficulty for all parties, by the way.

If, over the course of the two hours we have together, you could indicate to me whether we can go with a motion, we won't have to have a subcommittee meeting, but if we can't agree on a motion, we will have to have a subcommittee meeting to agree on a process.

With that understanding, I'll now ask Mr. Cudjoe to make his initial presentation for 10 minutes.

Thank you, sir, for being here with us today.

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe (Vice-President, Canadian Association of Black Lawyers):

Thank you very much for the opportunity to be heard. On behalf of CABL, we really appreciate the fact that somebody thinks our voice is worth hearing.

My apologies for not attending in person. This assignment came to me quite late in the process, which is why there's also no written material.

Looking at all the material I've seen presented by the other parties, most of the ground has been covered, and I don't think I'll be too long.

The recommendation from the Canadian Association of Black Lawyers, I don't know if you've heard it. I've heard the request to expunge the records and to make changes to the suspension of records. The main concern for young Black and indigenous youth who have gone through the system on possession of marijuana charges will be future employment and how that will affect them.

The suspension of the record will almost seem like a token gesture if the committee considers that these convictions perhaps should not have happened in the first place. Having had a discussion with our board, our recommendation is that simple possession of marijuana charges and associated charges be deemed regulatory offences.

That would not take them off the books completely—reference can always be made to them—but the one advantage, and I'm speaking on behalf of youth who are trying to get their first job, is that one question asked by employers to get around the suspension of records act is, “Have you pleaded guilty to a criminal offence?”

It doesn't matter whether you've been pardoned or not, you can't get around that question. If on that form you say that you have pleaded guilty to a criminal offence, you don't even get your foot in the door for an interview, which is why the suspension of a record for many young men trying to get into the workforce is actually a token gesture. Employers are not asking whether you have a criminal record, but whether you've pleaded guilty to an offence, or you've been found guilty by a court of an offence.

For young people, it's even worse. Your record as a youth may be sealed after three to five years, depending on whether you're convicted of a summary or an indictable offence. For a simple possession of marijuana charge, that record could be opened again for any future occurrences. Even with the suspension, I don't know how that's going to work in sealing your record for good as a youth. The problem is that provinces are reporting records for youth, as there's something on their record, but they can't tell us. For a possession of marijuana charge, that puts an individual in line with somebody who has committed homicide, robbery, break and enter, sexual assault, and guess what? They can't tell you what it is. This makes it even worse for the young person.

Our recommendation is that these be deemed regulatory offences. For example, I coined a phrase, “the simple possession of marijuana act.” From that, you can get around things that are blocking people from getting their first-time employment, by sealing their records for good.

I know that Ms. Finestone is going to get into the administrative charges, but there's one charge in particular that I have seen from the ground level that has arisen for young people as a result of possession of marijuana charges.

The second time a young person of 14 or 15 is met and questioned by a police officer, they get scared. They're already in the court system. They may not actually be committing any offence at the time, but because they have a possession of marijuana charge, many times they've lied about their name. They then get an obstruction of a police officer charge. This is all as a result of their original possession of marijuana charge, and guess what? Their criminal career has begun.

(1535)



For many who live in suburban areas, go to better schools and have better chances in life, this may not be a big stumbling block. However, for many who are coming from extremely poor areas and families who don't have the means to push them forward, this is a huge stumbling block. This is why the suspension of records, which may seem to be carte blanche for everybody across the board, doesn't take into account the numerous people who were charged with possession of marijuana, especially as young people.

I'd ask the committee to look at the numbers of first nation and young black men who were charged with possession of marijuana and to keep these numbers in mind when the recommendations are being followed, or whichever way the committee decides to go. The reality on the ground for black and indigenous youth is very different from the reality for others. Many times we hear police refer to somebody as “known to the police”. Sometimes it is a simple possession of marijuana charge, but it brings that person into the eye of the police who are walking the streets. Many of these young men are not able to stay at home all day playing video games—perhaps they don't have them—and they're out on the streets and come into regular contact with the police.

One particular case went all the way to the Supreme Court: R. v. Mann. Mr. Mann was walking down the street. The police had a call about a break and enter. They saw Mr. Mann, and Mr. Mann, being a young, indigenous man, fit the description. The clothing was completely different, but he fit the description. He was stopped by the police, and the police, for safety reasons, searched him and found marijuana in his pocket. Eventually, the Supreme Court threw it out, but this case went all the way to the Supreme Court.

What does this mean for Mr. Mann and many of the young men who are brought before the court on possession of marijuana charges? Let's review the process. There's a court appearance; it's basically a public shaming of the young man for possession of marijuana. There's the risk of further charges because he is released on conditions. There's the risk of detention if he is arrested for anything else. There's the stigma of walking into the courthouse with people who have been charged with a lot more serious charges. Furthermore, if at the end of it this young person is not given proper advice, he may decide to do what other young people say, that “I want to get it over with.” He is now branded for life with a charge of possession of marijuana. Employment opportunities are going out the window. This is for young men who already find it hard to get into the workforce.

Following that, you have the fail to appear, fail to comply and fail to comply with probation charges, meaning failure of the youth to report to the probation officer. When the record is suspended, what shows up? I say that sometimes for a charge of possession of marijuana, it can actually be more insidious if the provinces are going to report it as “There's something there, but we can't tell you.”

I will respond to one particular comment that was made about deals and how the prosecutor would make deals that would lessen the charges for the possession of marijuana. I think that's questioning the integrity of the prosecutor's office. I doubt they would make deals that were not real. Furthermore, we are well aware—

(1540)

The Chair:

Mr. Cudjoe, I'm not sure if you can see me, but I've been kind of waving at you.

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

Oh.

The Chair:

You had two minutes, and now you're down to one minute.

If you can arrive at a conclusion, that would be good, please.

Thank you.

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.

I was on my last point—

The Chair:

Excellent.

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

—and I didn't think it would take 10 minutes.

Thank you very much.

With regard to some of the deals that were referred to, I'd like the committee to take into account that many deals are made as a result of overcharging. I think that it's a red herring to go down that path.

I'll sit back and wait for any questions.

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Cudjoe. I appreciate that.

Ms. Finestone, you have 10 minutes, please.

Ms. Elana Finestone (Legal Counsel, Native Women's Association of Canada):

Before my 10 minutes start, I want to mention one housekeeping issue. I have some recommendations and proposed amendments that I just submitted. I won't go into depth about those because we can discuss them during the questions if you would like.

Good afternoon. I would like to thank the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security for having me here today to discuss Bill C-93.

I'm here on behalf of the Native Women's Association of Canada—NWAC. For those of you who don't know, NWAC is a national indigenous organization representing the political voice of indigenous women, girls and gender-diverse people in Canada, inclusive of first nations—on and off reserve, status, non-status, Métis and Inuit.

NWAC examines the systemic factors that affect indigenous women's contact with the criminal justice system and seeks reforms that will alleviate the harms faced by indigenous women in contact with the law.

Today, I'm here to talk about justice: correcting historical injustice, accounting for administration of justice offenses and increasing access to justice for indigenous women.

First, I would like to talk about the context of my recommendations. Indigenous women are under-protected by the criminal justice system when they experience violence, go missing or are murdered, yet they are also disproportionately impacted by the criminal justice system.

Too many indigenous women are in poverty, have precarious housing, lack family support and experience mental illness. They tend to lack knowledge of the criminal justice system and are often not represented by lawyers. They experience cultural and language gaps throughout the system.

From the recommendations in the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the testimony of indigenous women themselves, we know that their experience of the criminal justice system can be traced back to colonialism and racism. Indigenous women's criminalization is one aspect of a larger problem.

NWAC recommends that Bill C-93 account for and meaningfully respond to these realities. I'm here on behalf of NWAC today to make concrete recommendations to address the implications for indigenous women as the bill stands.

Bill C-93 is an important step in acknowledging the harms caused by tough drug policies and their adverse effects on indigenous women, especially indigenous women who are poor and convicted of minor offences. Unfortunately, the effects of the bill will go unrealized for many indigenous women with criminal records for simple possession of cannabis. Simply put, the bill remains inaccessible for indigenous women who are poor and have administration of justice issues associated with their simple possession of cannabis conviction.

NWAC ultimately recommends that Bill C-93 be used to expunge criminal records for simple possession of cannabis and related administration of justice offences. In the alternative, NWAC puts forward the following three recommendations.

The first is to correct historical injustice. It is acknowledged in the House that the prohibition of cannabis was bad policy. There is an acknowledgement by the Liberal Party that indigenous people have been “policed differently, convicted differently and managed by the courts differently”, and that these criminal records have a disproportionate impact on youth from poor communities, racialized communities and indigenous communities.

At NWAC we know that indigenous women are much less likely to escape the notice of the criminal justice system. We know that cannabis used to be legal in Canada. It was legal until cannabis used to be associated with people of colour and considered so dangerous that increased law enforcement and police powers were necessary to contain its use.

Let's correct these historical injustices and interpret this bill in a way that rights these historical wrongs.

I borrowed language from the preamble in Bill C-415, but made a few additions. I recommend that the preamble read the way it does on page 3, but I would just add to the second paragraph the following: And whereas the Supreme Court of Canada in R. v. Gladue and R. v. Ipeelee indicates that indigenous people and communities face racism and systemic discrimination in the criminal justice system

(1545)



In the last paragraph, I would add that these convictions have had a negative impact not only on their employment prospects but also on custody and access to children.

Recommendation number 2 deals with the need to account for administration of justice offences, a lived reality for criminalized indigenous women. As a group, women's crimes tend to be on the lower end of seriousness. Over half of women's crimes are property crimes or administration of justice offences. Administration of justice offences are criminal offences, such as failure to attend court and failure to comply with conditions, to name a few. A full list of offences is on pages 4 and 5 of NWAC's recommendations.

Administration of justice offences are also known as the “revolving door of crime”, because it's harder for people charged with these offences to leave the criminal justice system. This is especially the case for criminalized indigenous women. Charges against females accused of administration of justice offences are growing faster than charges against males.

Administration of justice offences can be linked to indigenous women's marginalization. The lived reality for criminalized indigenous women is that they do not have the support or means to comply with the criminal justice system. This is not an excuse for their behaviour, but is a reality. For example, indigenous women in remote communities may be unable to get to a distant town where the court is located, and then may face several failure to appear breaches. Another person may unintentionally breach their bail conditions if they are homeless and do not get their court notices. When an indigenous woman is ordered not to attend her residence as a condition of judicial and term release, and there is no alternative housing or community support available to her, she is forced to violate that order to find shelter. As a result, indigenous people and marginalized Canadians are more likely to be charged, and if released on bail, are more likely to be subject to stricter and more impossible conditions.

All of these administration of justice charges add to indigenous women's criminal records and set them up for failure. As it stands, indigenous women who are initially convicted of simple possession of cannabis and amass these administration of justice offences are not eligible to apply or receive a record suspension under Bill C-93.

That's why NWAC recommends that Bill C-93 allow people with simple possession of cannabis convictions and administration of justice offences associated with simple possession of cannabis to apply for and receive criminal record suspensions for both the simple possession of cannabis convictions and any of the associated administration of justice offences.

My last recommendation is to increase access to justice. In light of poverty and administration of justice offences plaguing racialized and marginalized groups affected by the Cannabis Act, NWAC recommends that people who have not completed their sentence for an offence under subsection 4(3.1) be able to apply for criminal record suspensions. It does not make sense for people to continue sentences for conduct that is now legal. This amendment would ensure that people in poverty who cannot afford to pay outstanding fines would have the benefit of Bill C-93.

For the law to positively impact criminalized indigenous women, a gender-based understanding of Canada's history of racism and systemic discrimination towards indigenous people must be embedded in Bill C-93. The criminalization of indigenous women is one of the legacies of colonization. Indigenous women who are typically criminalized for simple possession of cannabis offences tend to be in poverty, are over-policed, and linger in the criminal justice system because of administration of justice offences.

Criminalized indigenous women are set up to fail in this criminal justice system. By allowing people to no longer be clouded by a criminal record for an act that is now legal, regardless of whether they have finished their sentences, Canada now has an opportunity to take a step towards righting these historical wrongs.

Thank you very much for your time. I look forward to our discussion on this very important issue.

(1550)

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Finestone.

Mr. Cudjoe, thank you.

Mr. Graham, seven minutes.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Thank you. I'm going to start with Mr. Cudjoe.

You made a comment very early on that the following question is often asked, namely, have you pleaded guilty to a criminal offence? I had not run into that before. Does that not run afoul of human rights legislation?

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

Yes. If it does, if it's not been challenged—and the point is that we're talking about young kids filling out applications for Walmart and other places like that, who will not have the legal resources to challenge that.... It would take a group, for example, the Black Legal Action Centre, or something—to challenge that. That question can be changed, on the next form, to something to get around that.

So it may run afoul of human rights-ization. I believe it does. I believe any question that seeks to get around conditional discharges and absolute discharges does run afoul of that. But I have seen three or four variations of that charge, and in actual fact, I believe one was from a government agency, which would be OMVIC. The OMVIC form for a car salesman has a very similar question that doesn't allow you to avoid pointing out a conditional discharge, which would have been done 10 years ago.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Or there's the way one is asked at the American border: Have ever been arrested?

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

Thank you.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Great. Thank you.

I just have some questions for you, Ms. Finestone. You mentioned the addition of a preamble. Does a preamble have any weight in law?

Ms. Elana Finestone:

It helps people interpret what the intent of the law is. So when we interpret this legislation, we would do it in a way that acknowledges historical injustices, which would be a way of correcting those injustices.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

You mentioned in your comments that you didn't want to go over the details in front of us, but for the record, could you just go over the four or five quickly and whether you want, for the sake of argument, each to be forgiven automatically or each one subjectively? Do we have a way of judging if a pardon for the additional offences should be automatic or subjective by application?

Ms. Elana Finestone:

We would like them to be automatic. Would you like me to go over what's on page 4 to 5?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Very quickly, because we have five or six pieces here, it would be nice to—

Ms. Elana Finestone:

Oh, sure.

(1555)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

—have a background on each one, why that one is there and not another one.

Ms. Elana Finestone:

Sure.

I looked at the Criminal Code offences that—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Are common.

Ms. Elana Finestone:

—would be common, just for things like cannabis—not for any sexual offences, because again I'd like to bring us back to talking about cannabis.

For example, we have subsection 145(2) of the Criminal Code, dealing with failure to attend court; subsection 145(3), failure to comply with the condition of undertaking or recognizance; subsection 145(4), failure to appear or to comply with summons; subsection 145(5), failure to comply with appearance notice or promise to appear; and then subsection 733.1(1), failure to comply with a probation order.

I defined administration of justice offences just for the purpose of subclause 4(3.1) of the bill, just so we know that we're talking strictly about simple possession of cannabis when it comes to criminal records, and I included those provisions in the definition.

Then I made amendments, which you'll see starting on page 6, that whereas, as the bill stands, people wouldn't be able to apply for a criminal record suspension if they commit another offence, this would say that if it's an administration of justice offence related to simple possession of cannabis, then they would be able to apply.

Then on the next page where we talk about receiving a record suspension, I made amendments so that it would say something to the effect that people could receive a record suspension not only for the simple possession of cannabis but also for the administration of justice offences associated with it. For example, if someone is convicted or charged with simple possession of cannabis but then doesn't show up for court just for that charge, not for anything else—again just talking about cannabis—then that would also be taken off.

It's really quite meaningless if you just take away one part of the record but there's still a slew of administration of justice offences listed, which would be the case for marginalized and racialized people.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

The way the bill is proposed right now, if people have an administration of justice offence, would they even be able to apply because of the restriction being only—

Ms. Elana Finestone:

No, they wouldn't.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

There is one thing I want to clarify. You gave a very good explanation of why people in some communities are unable to present in court and so forth. However, should somebody who deliberately doesn't jump to court, who just says, “That's the system”, also have that automatic withdrawal of the other related offences?

Ms. Elana Finestone:

I think we need to go back to the fact that this is now something legal, and if this had been legal a few years ago, people wouldn't be ensnared in the criminal justice system. We know that people who are trapped in this system are often marginalized, so I guess the answer is yes—because we need to take this off the books.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Is there any time left?

The Chair:

You have 45 seconds.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I will pass that time to Mr. Picard. [Translation]

Mr. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

How can you connect those files?[English]

Sorry, how can you relate those obstruction files?

Ms. Elana Finestone: How can I.... I'm sorry—

An hon. member: Your time is up.

Mr. Michel Picard: I know.

The Chair:

Your time is up.

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP):

Adjudicate it, Chair.

Mr. Michel Picard:

How can you relate your obstruction files and administration files specifically to the cannabis position file? Is it mentioned on the record that this obstruction has been applied because of the cannabis file, or is there nothing on the administration file that we can read that says it is related? Therefore, how could I take a chance to erase them?

Ms. Elana Finestone:

My understanding is that there would be the charge for simple possession of cannabis and then the person would be summoned to appear in court related to that charge. Perhaps Mr. Cudjoe can expand on this. Basically, there would be a timeline. All of these administration of justice offences would come after the initial simple possession of cannabis charge.

The Chair:

Mr. Cudjoe is going to have to expand on that at another time.

Ms. Elana Finestone:

Yes, please.

(1600)

The Chair:

We'll have Mr. Motz for seven minutes, please.

Mr. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, CPC):

Thank you to both witnesses for being here.

Were either of your organizations consulted prior to this bill? Do you see that your objections.... Obviously, I know the answer to my next question, but your objections are obviously not reflected in the current legislation.

Ms. Elana Finestone:

No, they are not. I was invited to a meeting with Mr. Matthew Dubé and Mr. Murray Rankin to discuss Bill C-415 and because Bill C-93 is related, we were also invited to speak on that. However, it was simply in tangent, so no, not really, and no, they are not reflected.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Mr. Cudjoe.

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

In fact, I'm the chair of the advocacy committee for the Canadian Association of Black Lawyers. The first time this came to our attention was when the notice for this hearing came up.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay. Thank you.

You brought it up, Ms. Finestone, and I just want to cover it off. I'm struggling to combine administration of justice charges and the record suspension related to them because they speak to a different issue. We appreciate that marijuana possession is legal now. However, the fact that you have the administration of justice offence means somebody basically gave the finger to the justice system.

I appreciate from experience that some of the “marginalized” communities, as you termed them—or those with mental health challenges—in the past didn't appreciate the gravity of their actions. I get that—or they're in a spot where they don't comply. There are some pretty serious offences here that impact their moving forward, and currently—this is more a statement than a response—I'm really having trouble seeing how the connection would work.

One of the things the officials told us last week was that there are about 250,000 Canadians, according to their estimates, who have a record for minor possession of marijuana and who might be eligible for these suspensions, yet only about 10,000 of these people might consider this process. Do either one of you have any thoughts on the accuracy of those numbers, based on your experiences?

Ms. Elana Finestone:

Mr. Cudjoe, do you want to start?

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

To be truthful, there's no experience for the numbers, but I think Ms. Finestone has mentioned that point as well. If it's automatic, that changes the number dramatically. If the suspension of the record is automatic and you don't actually have to start the process, that changes the numbers dramatically—

Mr. Glen Motz:

I'm sorry to interrupt, but what the officials told us is that based on the current legislation, they estimate there will be approximately, in their best guess, 10,000 folks.

I want to get into something with a little more meat for both of you. Now, on the issue of the process of how this goes about, which is really what I think you were getting to in a minute if I had let you continue, every group that appeared here before us had an issue with the process. I would note that the Auditor General has repeatedly called out departments for implementing systems based on their processes as opposed to a process to serve Canadians in the best possible way.

In your opinion, does the process that is highlighted in this legislation hinder or help the Canadians who you interact with? Does this process of applying for this application align with the abilities of those who might need it most?

Ms. Elana Finestone:

I would say that it hinders. I believe this committee made a report about how inaccessible criminal record suspensions are. Firstly, a lot of people don't know that they can make them, or they are duped into paying money—crazy amounts of money—when it's actually not that expensive.

I think the issue I was raising before is that a lot of people don't even know about the law. This is not the only issue on which I've spoken about and engaged with community members on a law that specifically affects indigenous communities and they've never heard of it.

If people are forced to apply all over again, I think that's why the numbers you're estimating are lower for the people who will actually use it. Right now, it's a fact: there is no access to justice for these groups that I am speaking about.

(1605)

Mr. Glen Motz:

They're not my numbers. They're numbers the officials provided to us.

Ms. Elana Finestone:

Okay.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Mr. Cudjoe, do you have thoughts on that issue?

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

I just have a couple of thoughts on it. In my personal practice, a lot of the people I represented were homeless, mentally ill or on the verge of being homeless. They also had very low levels of education. By not making it automatic, it won't help a lot of people who actually have been convicted on possession of marijuana charges. Rather, this bill will help those who are able to read and know what's happening in the legal system.

Very quickly, to go off that a bit, in Ontario, because legal aid is funded at so low a level and you have to be going to jail before you get legal aid, many people who started off in the criminal justice system on possession of marijuana charges did not have lawyers. They did the easiest thing that was possible for them and took the first deal they could get from the Crown. They did not challenge the search that led to the possession of marijuana and did not try to get anything like a conditional discharge because on that day that wasn't being offered. I ask that the committee look at this whole situation in light of that.

The Chair:

We'll have to leave it there, Mr. Motz.

Mr. Cullen, welcome to the committee. You have seven minutes, please.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Thank you, Chair, and thank you to both of our witnesses. It's illuminating.

I have what may be a unique experience in this. I grew up in Rexdale, and I now live in and represent a northern community in British Columbia. Friends of mine used to have a term for this when we were growing up: the crime was “walking while black”. Out in my neighbourhood, the chances of getting stopped and potentially picked up if you were young and black were dramatically higher. All of our stats support this. In Vancouver, indigenous people are seven times more likely than white people to be arrested. In Regina, they're nine times more likely to be arrested.

Mr. Cudjoe, I want to pick up on the point from my Conservative colleague. If a white middle-class kid gets picked up for possession and has access to a lawyer, the chances of their ending up with a criminal record or a secondary record of an administrative justice charge are much lower than those for somebody struggling with poverty, in a racialized community or in a marginalized community. Is that correct?

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

That is correct, and that is one group that I focused on, because I had a number of those situations where most parents would not go to the police if they had found marijuana in their kids' clothing. What about the children who are wards of the CAS? All of those charges went straight to the police, and nine out of ten didn't have a lawyer.

The kid who grew up without parents is now ending up with a record disadvantage and did not have a chance from the start.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

If the Supreme Court has acknowledged that marginalized and racialized people face racism and systemic discrimination in the criminal justice system, would consulting with both of your organizations not have been essential if the government's intent was to attempt to prevent marginalized and racialized Canadians from facing that racism and systemic discrimination?

I'm confounded that we're at this stage, five weeks to go in a Parliament, when you have these vital amendments to a piece of legislation. The people who historically have been hurt by the criminal justice system—indigenous people, marginalized people and black Canadians—will now have a pardon system that will in effect not help them because of the circumstances in which they live.

Is this the bill that we're facing right now?

I'll start with you, Mr. Cudjoe, and then I'll turn to Ms. Finestone with a more particular question.

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

I think you've made the point.

Many times I'm invited to the table. On this issue we were not. I suspect it's because other groups were included, and perhaps somebody thought I was not to be heard. I don't know.

(1610)

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

The Prime Minister's argument for this legislation when he was a candidate was particularly about the effects on marginalized and racialized groups within Canada who are disproportionally affected by marijuana laws.

Ms. Finestone, I want to challenge my Conservative colleague's friend about folks giving the “middle finger” to the justice system. I've seen cases in which administrative penalties have been put down on young native women who were eight hours from the court room in their home. They had no public transportation, no Greyhound and no money, and they failed to appear. Under that circumstance, a young native woman who is picked up in northern British Columbia for simple possession and who fails to appear is disqualified from receiving a pardon under this legislation. Is that correct?

Ms. Elana Finestone:

That's correct.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay.

Ms. Elana Finestone:

That's a very broad issue. I went to a conference on indigenous criminal justice after the Gladue decision a few weeks ago. They were talking about how they created this indigenous court on a reserve simply because they noticed that there were so many warrants for people for arrest, and people were not showing up to court simply because there was no public transport and they could not go. It's the reality.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I didn't see this in your notes. Does your organization support Bill C-415?

Ms. Elana Finestone:

Yes.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

That's on expungement.

Mr. Cudjoe, are you of a similar orientation, that expungement would be a more effective way of leaving these charges fully in the past?

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

I really believe that. I have to admit that I'm not fully aware of the cons of expungement, but I really believe these records should be expunged.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

To this point on the circular effect of the criminal justice system on a simple possession charge, an employer asks on employment forms, “Have you plead guilty to a criminal offence?” This a very typical question on that list of questions. Somebody who is able, a young black person in Toronto, Montreal or wherever, and has gone through and secured this relief through the pardon would have to answer that question in the affirmative, would they not?

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

That is correct, which is why I scoured my brain to see what could be done. I got the recommendation from our committee that perhaps deeming them regulatory offences, which cover firearms acts and so many other acts, could work.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

This is a workaround you're attempting to make to this legislation that you weren't consulted on.

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

That's correct.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

You imagine a scenario in which the Crown, in a second case or trial of some sort, would be able to say to the court, “There's something on this defendant's record, but we can't tell you what it is.”

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

No, I was referring to when the criminal records check goes to the employer.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

I see. So, an employer is looking to hire somebody—

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

That's correct.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

—in this case a young black person you've dealt with. They've gotten the pardon, under this government's bill, and the employer would be informed that there is something on their record, but we can't tell you what it is. It's left to the imagination, essentially.

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

That is correct. The way it's reported is that “We can't tell you what it is.”

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

And again, it's left to the imagination of the employer.

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

That's correct.

Mr. Nathan Cullen:

Okay. Thank you very much.

The Chair:

We'll move to Ms. Dabrusin for seven minutes, please.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

I was just going to go Ms. Finestone, because I saw her nodding during that piece.

Could you help the committee by giving more information in response to that last question?

Ms. Elana Finestone:

The last question....

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

When someone has received a pardon, there is information given to an employer that “There is a charge out there; we just can't tell you what it's about.”

Ms. Elana Finestone:

What I know most about is the fact that a pardon doesn't take it away, so the moment someone commits another offence, like an administration of justice offence, it pops right back up.

I think I can speak to that piece. While the intentions are very good, it still ends up showing up.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Okay. I think we'd need to get more information about how that appears, because everything we've heard until now has been that there is a difference between pardons and expungements, but a pardon does not show up when people get their searches. I just need clarification from someone at some point on that point.

A lot of this has been about the process—pardon or expungement, either way. Right now, one of the big issues that keep coming up is that people have to apply. I believe in 1996 there was a change in the way the charges appeared and in the way they're recorded. If it were automatic to 1996, and anything post-1996 were an automatic pardon or expungement, would that help?

(1615)

Ms. Elana Finestone:

Yes, of course.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

I'll ask the same thing of Mr. Cudjoe. Going back to 1996 when there was a change in the way the charges appeared and were recorded, if, from 1996 to now, be it a pardon or an expungement, it were automatic, would that be helpful?

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

It would be very helpful.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

All right.

I understand that pre-1996 there were other record-keeping issues that might change, so that might be something else. But if it were automatic from 1996 onwards, how would we get word out to people to let them know this has happened? That's my other concern. It's a great thing that we've done this, but they might not know. They might be answering questions based on incorrect information. What's the best way for us to let people know this has happened?

Ms. Elana Finestone:

I think a great way is to keep engaging with organizations like NWAC and CABL so that they can tell the people they serve that this is possible. Our organizations do a lot of public legal education and our work is about engaging people in the laws that affect them.

If you keep organizations like ours in the loop, that will really be helpful to our constituents and, subsequently, yours.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Mr. Cudjoe, do you have any ideas about that?

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

I was thinking that an automatic mailing to the address once the automatic suspension is done would be really helpful.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Automatic mailing. Okay. Thank you.

As a procedural point, it's helpful to get some ideas as to how that could work.

I was quite taken with something that was on page 7, I believe, of your submission, Ms. Finestone. It deals with the issue of wiping out the need to complete sentences. Right now, simple cannabis possession is legal, and yet there might be people who still have unpaid fines or outstanding probation they still need to serve based on that.

We heard evidence during a previous study on record suspensions that outstanding fines were in fact one of the main hindrances, because your time would start accumulating. Now, here there is no time-accumulating issue. Can you speak a bit to that point, about why it's important to get rid of the need to complete a sentence?

Ms. Elana Finestone:

Absolutely.

There was one thing that came to mind. I was looking at that report you're discussing when we made that recommendation. There are people who will never be able to afford to pay their fines, because they simply don't have the money and have to pay their rent or buy food. They would never have access to Bill C-93. As you said, if it's now legal, why aren't we giving people the opportunity to apply?

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Mr. Cudjoe, do you have any thoughts about the need to wipe out in legislation the requirement that people have completed their sentence related to the simple possession before they can qualify for the pardon?

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

Ms. Finestone said it best. We are aware of many people who will never be able to pay those fines.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Thanks.

Both of you have raised the administrative offences. It's complicated, because not everyone is in the position of the scenario that Ms. Finestone has drawn, but it's a compelling scenario.

It's a compelling story about why somebody might not have been able to be in court or might not have received notices and all of that, but that's certainly not the case for everyone who has those offences.

Do you have any idea whether there is a fine-tuned way? Say we went to an automatic process. Now we're on an automatic process and the first layer is easy. Post-1996, for everyone with just simple possession, it's gone. Then you have the people who have administrative offences related to that simple possession. It can't as easily work automatically at that point, because now we have other parts to look at, so I guess you need almost a secondary process.

Have you thought about that? How do we parse that out?

(1620)

Ms. Elana Finestone:

I think Mr. Cudjoe was going to expand on this issue earlier and perhaps this would be a good opportunity.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Okay.

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

In order to catch the ones that were related strictly to the possession of marijuana charges, you go back to the wording in the charges. Most times it will say you were charged with possession of marijuana on day x and were asked by the court to come on this day and you missed court. Also, on the possession of marijuana charge, it will show that you didn't attend court. Therefore, you get the two pieces of information together and you can prove that the two were directly related.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

That's very helpful. Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Eglinski, you have five minutes, please.

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC):

Thank you to both witnesses for being here today.

I would like to start with you, sir. You just mentioned that you can go back and check. We've had witnesses here, department officials, who told us the other day, when we were talking about how to deal with those people who might have had a charge reduced from something maybe a little more complicated to minor possession, that there's no way they can really check into that, that it's too complicated. They would only deal with the charge that they were convicted on.

What you and your counterpart here are saying is that they want to deal with the other charges, such as subsections 145(4) and 145(5), section 733 and subsection 145(3). Some of these might have been summary, and some were indictable, depending on the circumstances. Someone is going to have to look into that and you're complicating the whole process.

Some states in the United States have come out with a very simple program of which I am in favour. You just press a button. Someone designs the program that goes into CIPC and cleans out those charges for minor possession and they're gone.

Now you're talking about contacting people. How many of your clients can tell you their addresses since 1996, or where would we get hold of them since 1996? Where have they been?

It needs to be a much simpler process than you are explaining to us, because you're saying some of your clients do not have the capability of filling these forms out and may not be able to tell you the addresses. We need to be able to get it to the public somehow.

The simplest system, which I want you both to comment on, is just a program that can be written in this day and age of science and technology and computer programming. A program can be built that can eliminate it just by the press of a button and let the computer do the work instead of putting a human factor in there.

I see you both putting in a lot of human factor, which is going to be too complicated.

You can start, and Ms. Finestone finish.

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

I have just two issues to respond to. On the first one, when I'm referring to contacting people, that is to inform them that the automatic process has taken place. It doesn't complicate the pushing of the button. The button can always be pushed. It is whether they know if that the system has happened.

The second part, where it becomes complicated with the human factor, is when you're trying to relate your charges to the possession of marijuana. The marijuana offence can always be gone with a button. We don't want to deprive everybody....

[Technical difficulty--Editor]

Then it's up to the government to decide whether they're going to look further into filtered or peer-filtered compliance, and so on. However, to mix the two together at this stage takes....

[Technical difficulty--Editor]

We're referring to the harms that have been done to people as a result of their original charge and we want to go further. That's a second question that is nowhere in the legislation that I see and we're just asking the committee to open its mind to that.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Ms. Finestone.

Ms. Elana Finestone:

One other issue we're talking about is that people tend to be overcharged. In terms of plea deals and the other things you're talking about, and how we ended up with this simple possession charge, sometimes the Crown's just flinging whatever can stick at the wall. We shouldn't let that detract from needing to take away any simple possession conviction on the criminal record.

I think it is important to do it in stages. If it's easy, do the ones with just simple possession. But I think what we're both trying to say is that the reality for the constituents we serve is that it won't help very much, so we need to continue to keep engaging with our organizations.

I know NWAC can do the legal education and tell people what's involved, how to apply, where to connect to do that. There are organizations that do this. But we need to get this process started.

(1625)

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Am I out of time?

The Chair:

You have a few seconds.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

If the record were automatically gone for everybody who had simple possession, wouldn't the word get out on the street that your record's gone? I have a very difficult time understanding your trying to contact these individuals with a notification that they now don't have a criminal record. If it were automatically done with all criminal records dealing with simple possession in Canada, then why would we need to notify people? It should get out there...newspaper article.

Ms. Elana Finestone:

I think it should be automatic.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Eglinski.

Ms. Sahota, for five minutes, please.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thanks for all the different suggestions we're getting today. Obviously, there's a lot we're thinking about in terms of amendments to this bill and making it better. Thank you for contributing to that.

We've talked quite a lot about expungements in the last few meetings. The process of expungement is very new. It wasn't really in existence up until last year. I don't think there's been a lot of experience in undertaking that process.

Mr. Cudjoe, have you helped people with pardons in the past, and what was the experience like for you or your client when you were helping them with that?

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

I have helped people with pardons in the past, but I should say it wasn't my main area. It was just helping them fill in the forms.

Most of my clients had very low earnings, so this had to be by a pro bono process. Raising the funds to apply for the pardon was the biggest hurdle for many of these people.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That's interesting. Was it funding for the application that was the hurdle?

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

The funding for the application was the biggest hurdle for many young people, because they were in either a paycheque-to-paycheque situation or worse. It's about coming up with the $400 to start. It was really difficult for them.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

It's even worse at this point, because the previous government raised it to six hundred and something. This piece of legislation is addressing that. The fee for the application will no longer exist.

You said the biggest hurdle is with regard to employment and that a pardon or an expungement would help a person when it comes to employment. After helping these clients, do you know if they had an easier time once they were able to get a pardon?

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

In my experience, no.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Why do you think that is?

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

Because as I've said, they're starting from very basic jobs—McDonald's, Walmart, factory jobs—and it's a question that's asked. You can't lie on the form. You can't say....

I'm sorry; I didn't mean to interrupt.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Sorry, it's just because I have such minimal time.

If a person were to get an expungement instead of a pardon, would they be able to answer the question of whether they'd ever plead guilty to a crime in any other way?

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

No, you wouldn't be able to answer that in a different way. But if the question were, “Have you ever been convicted of an offence”, then yes they could. That's another question that's asked.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What question they ask, and how they choose to frame it, depends on the employer—

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

That's correct.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

—which could generally change after this bill is implemented, and people and employers know that perhaps the best questions to ask are, “Have you ever smoked marijuana?”, “Have you ever plead guilty?” and “Have you ever been charged?”

You do raise some very good points. I never thought about that very alarming CAS incident. That's true. People grow up with very different situations and, therefore, have different challenges. Thank you for pointing that out.

However, in the past, there have been other crimes that are no longer on the books, and the pardon process has always been undertaken and used. I hope we're able to improve it to some degree, but would you agree that this is a step in the right direction and that it will help some people?

(1630)

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

I do agree that it's a step in the right direction and will help some people. For many of our constituents, given their level of education, how much they read and what they do in life, I think it would be a lot more helpful if it were automatic.

I've had people in court ask if they had a criminal record. They had gone to court and paid a fine, for example, for possession of marijuana, and thought they did not have a criminal record, because they didn't go to jail.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Yes.

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

It would help if it were automatic, and they can learn later on.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay. Thank you.

The Chair:

Mr. Motz.

Mr. Glen Motz:

I want to go back to a series of questions asked by both sides. We've seen your suggestions and recommendations, Ms. Finestone, but Mr. Cudjoe, we didn't have an opportunity to have yours.

If I had asked a question previously about the design process—which seems to be something of a hindrance to those who might need it most.... If you were to design the process based on the clients you deal with, sir, what needs to be done so that those who need it might be able to use it in the manner intended?

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

My experience is that for many young people, a possession of marijuana charge began their criminal career, and that led to so many things.

The administration of justice charges linked to those marijuana charges are crucial for our community, because of the link between those charges and what followed. Unfortunately, if you went on and robbed somebody after that, that's your issue, but the young people facing strictly administration of justice charges are the ones we're concerned about.

So many times—and I do want to go very quickly to the fail-to-appear comment about people showing their finger to the court—we're talking about 14-year-olds who received a ticket, put it in their pocket and may have lost it. That happened very often. The 14-year-old gets arrested for the fail-to-appear charge, goes to jail and has to go for bail. The Crown offers him a deal and says, “Plead guilty to your possession of marijuana, and all this goes away today,” or “Plead guilty of fail to appear, and you can go home today.”

If they had a chance to go to trial, they would have been able to say, “Not guilty”, because they did not intend to give their finger to the court. You're 14 years old, and you lost a slip of paper in your pocket.

Mr. Glen Motz:

You're referring to youth, and I appreciate that their understanding of the jeopardy they face is sometimes wanting, at best, but I am concerned that there are some gaps that will continue with this legislation. To me, one of them is the inconsistency that exists.

If someone were charged with minor possession prior to this offence, minor possession would have meant exceeding 30 grams. If they've been charged since October 2018, it's an offence to have over 30 grams.

Other witnesses have told us they have some concerns about that inconsistency. Are you seeing that being a challenge moving forward—that the group with more in their possession than 30 grams will get suspensions immediately, and others will now have to wait five years to qualify for a suspension?

(1635)

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

I have to admit that the number of grams is not my area of expertise. I don't know where the 30 grams came from. From court, I know police experts have stood up and said that normally, if it's over 30 grams, it means you had it for the purposes of trafficking.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Right.

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

To be honest, I can't really comment on that. There are too many stories to be able to give a comprehensive answer.

Mr. Glen Motz:

I have one last comment or question before my time is up.

Regardless of the government telling us that this is going to be of no cost to those who apply, we do know that the...not counting the hours it's going to take to go around to the jurisdictions where your offences were committed and maybe take fingerprints, confirm your identity, ask for your record and all the things that are going to be required in the legislation. There will be a cost associated with that. There will continue to be a cost associated with that. Will those who would benefit the most from this record suspension still be precluded from even applying for it based on those costs?

The Chair:

Very briefly, please.

Ms. Elana Finestone:

My understanding is that there are even other costs, like the fingerprinting and collecting all the documents, so yes—

Mr. Glen Motz:

That's what I'm saying. It's potentially $200.

Ms. Elana Finestone:

Right, so it's still not nothing, and it's not going as far as I think it should go.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Motz.

Mr. Spengemann, you have five minutes, please.

Mr. Sven Spengemann (Mississauga—Lakeshore, Lib.):

Thank you both for being with us, and for your expertise and advocacy.

I have developed a few categories, just thinking about the issue. They include the impacts of the problem, the cost of the problem and who pays for it, and then there are the legal mechanics. I want to focus my questions on the first two, the impacts on the people you deal with—your clients, the people you're protecting and advocating for—and the question of cost.

I'm wondering if we could start out by dispelling a couple of myths, just for the record. I think it's happened in other conversations the committee has had, and in our understanding it has certainly been dispelled, but I'd just like to have you on the record as well.

The first point is that nobody really cares about single possession convictions anymore because cannabis is legal now, and employers really aren't going to be concerned if that comes back on an employee check. What's your response to that?

Ms. Elana Finestone:

We can't control what other employees think, so we shouldn't leave it to their discretion. If the government makes a law, then everyone has to abide by the same law. It's not at the discretion of employees who don't understand the injustices we're talking about.

In terms of the impact, it's not just youth. If indigenous women are in jail—and they're often single parents—they can't be with their children. That means their children are more likely to be apprehended by the children's aid society. They're also going to be more likely to plead guilty, and they're also going to be more likely to be enmeshed in the criminal justice system.

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

Mr. Cudjoe.

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

I agree with that answer. The question is whether you will make it to the interview stage if you have anything on your record. If the only thing on your record is the possession of marijuana, how sad that you don't get the interview.

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

Right.

If I have time, I'll get to some of that in subsequent questions.

The other point is in terms of who pays. There was debate this morning in the House of Commons on Bill C-93, and one of the lines of argument was, “Well, the median taxpayer really didn't do anything wrong here, and why should she or he pay for the cost of either expungement or a record suspension?”

I wonder if you could go on the record and just tell us not only why is it important for your clients that these costs be covered by the taxpayer but also why it's an economic advantage for the taxpayer to cover those costs, because of the empowerment that takes place vis-à-vis your clients and their ability to become competitive in the job market and on other fronts as well.

Ms. Elana Finestone:

I think—

Oh, sorry.

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

No, Ms. Finestone, go ahead. I was actually waiting for you to start.

Ms. Elana Finestone:

Okay.

I think that when we set people up for success, and they're able to contribute to employment and they're not stuck in shelters and they're given housing, then we're actually living in a better world. The other issue—and I think it's something we've all been alluding to—is that for a lot of people, cannabis is part of their lives, but there are certain people who are stopped and noticed by the police who are criminalized for it. I think we all have to acknowledge that everyone is doing it, not just the constituents that we serve, and that we all have a duty to pay for this.

(1640)

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

Yes. That's helpful. Thank you.

Mr. Cudjoe, do you have anything to add to that?

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

The only thing I would add is that anybody who follows the life of young people who are in the criminal justice system will see that at a certain point, they can go left and they can go right. If they have nowhere to go, they end up with gangs and a life of crime and so on. If they have a chance to get that first job, we all pay a lot less. We pay a lot less for the years they spend in jail and for the life that is not helpful to anyone.

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

Yes. Thank you for that.

I have a minute left, so I will hurry with my last question. I'm assuming that it's fair to say that a good proportion of the problem relates to young offenders, and that young offenders are disproportionately affected or impacted. I want to make sure we're comprehensive in terms of intersectionalities. I thought about the possibility of seniors being affected, especially seniors who are in economic circumstances such that they may have to go out and gain some additional funds through employment. Is it your experience that seniors are part of the equation? These are people who may have gotten a conviction in the seventies or eighties who are now aging and are still affected by that record.

Ms. Elana Finestone:

I can speak to criminal records in other contexts. I've been looking at how the Bedford case has been applying. There was an indigenous women who was caught up by the criminal justice system. They were looking at her record, and they said.... I think there might have been more than 20 convictions for soliciting for the purposes of prostitution and failing to appear.

I think that goes to show that these things stay for a long period of time, regardless. It could be from the seventies.

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

Okay. That's helpful.

The Chair:

We would normally go to you now, Mr. Dubé. Do you wish to have your three-minute round?

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP):

I'm good. Thanks.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Picard, you didn't get much of a—

Mr. Michel Picard:

I'm good.

The Chair:

You're good. Okay.

This would normally complete our questioning. Does anyone else wish to take advantage?

Having said that, I'll do it myself then. The proposal about administrative suspensions simultaneously would add a level of enormous complexity to what is a relatively simple bill. Do you agree with that?

Ms. Elana Finestone:

Yes.

The Chair:

You would.

Mr. Cudjoe, do you have a comment on that?

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

I would agree with that. My only comment is that the work would continue and that this would not be left behind.

Ms. Elana Finestone:

I agree with that.

The Chair:

Yes.

With that, I want to thank both of you....

Mr. Motz, did you have something?

Mr. Glen Motz:

I have one quick comment as a follow-up to that.

The Chair:

Okay.

Mr. Glen Motz:

If there is the opportunity to have a record suspension for the minor possession of marijuana, and we have these administrative charges that follow, potentially, in some circumstances, I appreciate that this would be an onerous process with an entire case-by-case review of the connection. They would only qualify, based on the legislation, if this were the only charge they had. Is there still not an avenue that then, five years later, if this administrative charge were related to the marijuana suspension, it could be automatically done as well? Is that a possibility? We don't include it immediately upon the marijuana possession suspension, but it is flagged or earmarked or whatever to say that because this is related to that, in the five-year wait period we have currently, this is automatically, then, a record suspension after the fact. Is that something that could be workable?

Ms. Elana Finestone:

Yes, I think so, as long as the first thing that gets taken out is the possession.

Mr. Glen Motz:

The marijuana: yes.

Ms. Elana Finestone:

Then we could move on in the five years. We don't want it to take that opportunity away.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Yes.

Mr. Cudjoe.

Mr. Gordon Cudjoe:

It is workable. I would say that in that particular case, it's easy to put the onus on the person who wants it dropped to get a copy of their information to show that it is directly related to their possession of marijuana.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Okay.

Thank you.

The Chair:

With that, I want to thank the witnesses for their patience with us and for the effectiveness of their witnessing.

We'll now suspend the meeting and go in camera to discuss the future business of the committee.

[Proceedings continue in camera]

Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

Mesdames et messieurs, je constate que nous avons le quorum, et si mes yeux ne me jouent pas de tour, il semble qu'il soit tout près de 15 h 30.

Nous accueillons aujourd'hui Mme Elana Finestone de l'Association des femmes autochtones du Canada, et M. Cudjoe de l'Association des avocats noirs du Canada.

Je vais demander à M. Cudjoe de prendre la parole en premier pendant 10 minutes, tout simplement parce que la technologie nous fait faux bond parfois.

Chers collègues, nous avons réalisé le premier élément du processus aujourd'hui, qui consistait à regrouper les deux témoins pour gagner du temps. Je pense qu'il y aura beaucoup de questions et il se pourrait que nous empiétions sur la deuxième heure.

Deuxièmement, j'espère qu'au cours des deux heures aujourd'hui, nous conviendrons d'une façon de procéder pour la présentation des amendements et que nous choisirons une date pour l'étude article par article.

J'ai suggéré à M. Paul-Hus et à M. Dubé que nous terminions les amendements d'ici la fin de la semaine. Je suis conscient qu'il y a des problèmes du côté de la traduction, puisque les rédacteurs ne s'en occupent que lorsque le projet de loi est renvoyé au comité. En passant, c'est un problème pour tous les partis.

Si, pendant les deux heures que nous passons ensemble, vous pouviez m'indiquer si nous pouvons aller de l'avant avec une motion, le Sous-comité n'aurait pas à se réunir. Dans le cas contraire, si nous ne pouvons pas nous entendre, le sous-comité devra se réunir pour convenir d'une façon de procéder.

Sur ce, je vais demander à M. Cudjoe de procéder à sa déclaration liminaire. Vous avez 10 minutes.

Merci, monsieur, d'être avec nous aujourd'hui.

M. Gordon Cudjoe (vice-président, Association des Avocats Noirs du Canada):

Je vous remercie beaucoup de me donner l'occasion de comparaître. Au nom de l'Association des avocats noirs du Canada, j'aimerais vous dire que nous sommes très heureux de savoir que quelqu'un pense que notre voix mérite d'être entendue.

Je m'excuse de ne pas pouvoir être avec vous en personne. On m'a confié la mission de venir témoigner un peu tard, et c'est pourquoi je n'ai pas de mémoire.

J'ai pris connaissance des documents présentés par les autres témoins, et comme presque tous les sujets ont été abordés, mon exposé sera relativement court.

Je ne sais pas si vous avez entendu la recommandation de l'Association des avocats noirs du Canada. J'ai entendu qu'on a demandé de supprimer le casier judiciaire et d'apporter des modifications à la suspension du casier judiciaire. Dans le cas des jeunes Noirs et des jeunes Autochtones qui ont été accusés de possession de marijuana, la principale préoccupation est liée aux répercussions que cela peut avoir pour leurs emplois futurs et pour eux.

Si le comité considère que les condamnations n'auraient sans doute pas dû se produire en premier lieu, la suspension du casier judiciaire ressemblera presque à un geste symbolique. Après en avoir discuté avec notre conseil d'administration, nous recommandons que les accusations pour possession simple de marijuana et les accusations connexes soient considérées comme des infractions réglementaires.

L'ardoise ne sera pas effacée complètement — on peut toujours y faire référence —, mais le grand avantage, et je parle au nom des jeunes qui se cherchent un premier emploi, est que les employeurs peuvent contourner la mesure de suspension du casier en posant la question suivante: « Avez-vous plaidé coupable à une infraction criminelle? »

Peu importe que la personne ait obtenu un pardon ou non, on ne peut pas se soustraire à la question. Sur le formulaire, si vous indiquez que vous avez plaidé coupable à une infraction criminelle, vous ne vous rendrez même pas à l'entrevue, et c'est pourquoi la suspension du casier pour de nombreux jeunes hommes qui tentent d'entrer sur le marché du travail équivaut à un geste symbolique. Les employeurs ne vous demandent pas si vous avez un casier judiciaire, mais si vous avez plaidé coupable à une infraction, ou si un tribunal vous a reconnu coupable d'une infraction.

Pour un jeune, c'est encore pire. Son casier peut être scellé après trois à cinq ans, selon qu'il a été condamné pour une infraction punissable par voie de déclaration sommaire de culpabilité ou par mise en accusation. Dans le cas d'une accusation pour possession simple de marijuana, le casier peut être rouvert s'il y a récidive. Dans le cas d'une suspension, je ne sais pas comment cela fonctionnerait dans le cas du scellement d'un casier pour de bon. Le problème vient du fait que les provinces font rapport du casier des jeunes en disant qu'il y a quelque chose au dossier, mais qu'elles ne peuvent pas nous dire de quoi il s'agit. Dans le cas d'une accusation pour possession de marijuana, le jeune est mis dans le même bain que quelqu'un qui a commis un homicide, un vol, une introduction par effraction, une agression sexuelle, et vous savez quoi? On ne peut pas nous dire de quoi il s'agit. C'est donc pire pour un jeune.

Notre recommandation serait donc d'en faire une infraction réglementaire. Par exemple, j'ai pensé à une expression: « l'acte de possession simple de marijuana ». De cette façon, on peut éviter d'empêcher des jeunes d'obtenir leur premier emploi, contourner le problème du scellement d'un casier pour de bon.

Je sais que Mme Finestone vous parlera des infractions administratives, mais il y a une accusation en particulier que j'ai pu observer sur le terrain et qui découle du fait qu'un jeune a été accusé de possession de marijuana.

La deuxième fois qu'un jeune de 14 ou 15 ans se fait interroger par un agent de police, il prend peur. Il a déjà un pied dans le système judiciaire. Il se peut qu'il ne soit pas arrêté pour une infraction à ce moment-là, mais comme il a déjà été accusé de possession de marijuana, bien souvent, il ment au sujet de son nom. Il est alors accusé d'obstruction à un agent de police. Tout cela découle de sa première accusation de possession de marijuana, et devinez quoi? Sa carrière de criminel vient de commencer.

(1535)



Pour nombre de jeunes qui vivent en banlieue, qui vont dans de bonnes écoles et à qui la vie sourit, il se pourrait que ce ne soit pas un gros obstacle. Toutefois, pour les jeunes qui viennent de milieux extrêmement pauvres et de familles qui n'ont pas les moyens de leur donner un coup de pouce, c'est un obstacle énorme. C'est pourquoi la suspension du casier, qui peut avoir l'apparence d'une carte blanche pour tous, ne tient pas compte de tous ceux qui ont été accusés de possession de marijuana, en particulier lorsqu'ils étaient jeunes.

Je vais demander au Comité de regarder les chiffres sur le nombre de jeunes hommes noirs et des Premières Nations qui ont été accusés de possession de marijuana et de garder ces chiffres à l'esprit au moment des recommandations, peu importe ce que le Comité décide de faire. La réalité sur le terrain pour les jeunes Noirs et Autochtones est très différente des autres. On entend souvent les agents de police parler de quelqu'un qui est « connu de la police ». Il l'est parfois pour avoir été accusé de possession simple de marijuana, mais cette personne retient ensuite l'attention de l'agent de police qui se promène dans les rues. Beaucoup de ces jeunes hommes ne peuvent pas rester à la maison toute la journée pour jouer à des jeux vidéo — ils n'en ont sans doute pas. Ils se promènent donc dans les rues et croisent régulièrement des policiers.

Un cas en particulier s'est même rendu à la Cour suprême: R. c. Mann. M. Mann se promenait dans la rue. Les agents de police venaient d'avoir un appel pour une introduction par effraction. Ils ont aperçu M. Mann, et comme M. Mann était un jeune homme autochtone, il correspondait au profil. Il portait des vêtements totalement différents, mais il correspondait au profil. Il a été arrêté par les agents qui l'ont, pour des raisons de sécurité, fouillé et ont trouvé de la marijuana dans sa poche. La Cour suprême a rejeté les accusations, mais l'affaire s'est tout de même rendue jusqu'en Cour suprême.

Qu'est-ce que cela signifie pour M. Mann et nombre de jeunes hommes qui sont poursuivis en justice pour possession de marijuana? Passons en revue les étapes du processus. Il y a d'abord la comparution devant le tribunal, ce qui correspond essentiellement à l'humiliation publique du jeune homme pour possession de marijuana. Il y a ensuite le risque d'autres accusations, parce qu'il est libéré sous conditions. Il y a le risque de détention s'il est arrêté pour quoi que ce soit d'autre. Il y a la stigmatisation associée au fait de se présenter au tribunal avec des gens qui doivent répondre d'accusations beaucoup plus graves que les siennes. De plus, si ce jeune ne reçoit pas ensuite des conseils avisés, il peut se dire ce que d'autres jeunes se disent: « Je veux en finir. » Il est maintenant étiqueté pour la vie en raison d'une accusation de possession de marijuana. Ses possibilités d'emploi viennent de lui filer entre les doigts. Et on parle ici de jeunes hommes pour qui il est déjà difficile d'entrer sur le marché du travail.

Ensuite, viennent le défaut de se présenter, le non-respect des conditions de probation, ce qui veut dire que le jeune a omis de se présenter à son agent de probation. Lorsque le casier est suspendu, qu'est-ce qui apparaît? Je le mentionne parce qu'il arrive parfois que pour une accusation de possession de marijuana, l'effet puisse être insidieux si les provinces disent qu'il y a quelque chose au dossier, mais qu'elles ne peuvent pas dire de quoi il s'agit.

Je vais répondre à un commentaire en particulier qui a été fait au sujet des procureurs concluant des accords pour revoir à la baisse les accusations de possession de marijuana. Je pense qu'on remet ici en question l'intégrité des procureurs. Je doute qu'ils concluent des accords qui ne soient pas fondés. Qui plus est, nous savons tous…

(1540)

Le président:

Monsieur Cudjoe, je ne suis pas certain que vous puissiez me voir, mais j'essayais d'attirer votre attention.

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Oh.

Le président:

Il vous restait deux minutes, et maintenant il ne vous en reste qu'une.

Si vous pouviez conclure, ce serait bien, s'il vous plaît

Merci.

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur le président.

J'en étais à mon dernier point...

Le président:

Excellent.

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

... et je ne pensais pas en avoir pour 10 minutes.

Merci beaucoup.

Au sujet des accords dont on a parlé, j'aimerais que le Comité prenne en considération le fait que de nombreux accords sont conclus parce qu'il y avait des suraccusations. Je pense qu'il s'agit d'un faux problème.

Je vais maintenant attendre vos questions.

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Cudjoe. Je vous en suis reconnaissant.

Madame Finestone, vous avez 10 minutes.

Mme Elana Finestone (conseillère juridique, Association des femmes autochtones du Canada):

Avant que mes 10 minutes commencent, j'aimerais préciser, à titre d'information, que j'ai quelques recommandations et propositions d'amendements que je viens de déposer. Je ne les aborderai pas en détail, car nous pourrons en discuter durant la période des questions, si vous le souhaitez.

Bonjour à tous. Je tiens à remercier le Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale de m'avoir invitée à comparaître aujourd'hui pour parler du projet de loi C-93.

Je témoigne au nom de l'Association des femmes autochtones du Canada — l'AFAC. Pour ceux qui ne le savent pas, l'AFAC est une organisation autochtone nationale qui représente la voix politique des femmes, des filles et des personnes de diverses identités de genre autochtones au Canada, ce qui comprend les Premières Nations à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur des réserves, les Indiens inscrits et non inscrits, les Métis et les Inuits.

L'AFAC examine les facteurs systémiques qui touchent les interactions des femmes autochtones avec lesystème de justice pénale et cherche à instaurer des réformes qui atténueront les préjudices subis par les femmes autochtones ayant des démêlés avec la justice.

Je suis ici aujourd'hui pour parler de justice: corriger les injustices historiques, tenir compte des infractions contre l'administration de la justice et accroître l'accès des femmes autochtones à la justice.

Tout d'abord, j'aimerais présenter le contexte de mes recommandations. Les femmes autochtones sont mal protégées par le système de justice pénale dans les cas de violence, de disparition ou d'assassinat; pourtant, elles en subissent les conséquences de manière disproportionnée.

Trop de femmes autochtones vivent dans la pauvreté, font face à la précarité en matière de logement, manquent de soutien familial et souffrent de maladies mentales. Elles ont généralement une connaissance insuffisante du système de justice pénale, d'autant plus qu'elles ne sont souvent pas représentées par des avocats. Elles sont confrontées à des barrières culturelles et linguistiques dans l'ensemble du système.

À la lumière des recommandations formulées par la Commission royale sur les peuples autochtones et la Commission de vérité et réconciliation, ainsi que d'après les témoignages de femmes autochtones elles-mêmes, nous savons que leur expérience du système de justice pénale est attribuable au colonialisme et au racisme. La criminalisation des femmes autochtones est un aspect d'un problème plus vaste.

L'AFAC recommande que le projet de loi C-93 tienne compte de ces réalités et y remédie de façon valable. Je suis ici aujourd'hui, au nom de l'AFAC, pour faire des recommandations concrètes destinées à rectifier le tir en ce qui concerne les répercussions du projet de loi, dans sa forme actuelle, sur les femmes autochtones.

Le projet de loi C-93 constitue une étape importante vers la reconnaissance des torts causés par les politiques sévères en matière de lutte antidrogue et leurs effets négatifs sur les femmes autochtones, surtout celles qui sont pauvres et qui sont condamnées pour des infractions mineures. Malheureusement, les effets du projet de loi ne changeront rien dans le cas de nombreuses femmes autochtones ayant un casier judiciaire pour la possession simple de cannabis. Autrement dit, le projet de loi demeure inaccessible pour les femmes autochtones démunies qui sont aux prises avec des problèmes liés à l'administration de la justice parce qu'elles ont été reconnues coupables de possession simple de cannabis.

Au bout compte, l'AFAC recommande que le projet de loi C-93 serve à radier les casiers judiciaires pour la possession simple de cannabis et les infractions connexes contre l'administration de la justice. Comme solution de rechange, l'AFAC met de l'avant trois recommandations.

La première vise à corriger les injustices historiques. La Chambre a reconnu que la prohibition du cannabis était une mauvaise politique. Le Parti libéral a admis que les peuples autochtones ont été « traité[s] différemment par la police [...], jugé[s] différemment et géré[s] différemment par les tribunaux » et que ces casiers judiciaires ont nui de manière disproportionnée aux jeunes démunis, ethnicisés et autochtones.

À l'AFAC, nous savons que les femmes autochtones sont moins susceptibles d'échapper au système de justice pénale. Nous savons également que le cannabis était jadis légal au Canada jusqu'à ce qu'il soit associé aux gens de couleur et jugé tellement dangereux qu'une application plus rigoureuse de la loi s'imposait, le tout accompagné de pouvoirs policiers accrus, pour en limiter la consommation.

Corrigeons donc ces injustices historiques et interprétons le projet de loi de manière à redresser ces torts du passé.

À cette fin, j'ai repris le libellé du préambule du projet de loi C-415, mais j'y ai fait quelques ajouts. Je recommande de maintenir tel quel le préambule qui figure à la page 3, mais j'ajouterais simplement ce qui suit au deuxième paragraphe: Attendu que, dans les arrêts R. c. Gladue et R. c. Ipeelee, la Cour suprême du Canada reconnaît que les peuples et les communautés autochtones font face à du racisme et à de la discrimination systémique dans le système de justice pénale.

(1545)



Au dernier paragraphe, j'ajouterais que de telles condamnations ont eu une incidence négative non seulement sur les perspectives d'emploi de ces personnes, mais aussi sur la garde de leurs enfants et les droits de visite.

La deuxième recommandation concerne la nécessité de tenir compte des infractions contre l'administration de la justice, une réalité que vivent les femmes autochtones criminalisées. En tant que groupe, les femmes ont tendance à commettre des crimes de moindre gravité. Plus de la moitié des crimes commis par les femmes sont des infractions contre les biens ou des infractions contre l'administration de la justice. On entend par là des infractions criminelles, comme l'omission de comparaître et l'omission de se conformer à des conditions, pour ne nommer que celles-là. Vous trouverez une liste complète des infractions aux pages 4 et 5 des recommandations de l'AFAC.

Les infractions contre l'administration de la justice sont également connues comme le « syndrome de la récidive criminelle », parce que les personnes accusées de telles infractions ont plus de mal à quitter le système de justice pénale. C'est tout particulièrement vrai pour les femmes autochtones criminalisées. D'ailleurs, le nombre de femmes accusées d'infractions contre l'administration de la justice augmente plus rapidement que le nombre d'hommes accusés de telles infractions.

Les infractions contre l'administration de la justice peuvent être liées à la marginalisation des femmes autochtones. Compte tenu de leur réalité, les femmes autochtones criminalisées n'ont pas les appuis ou les moyens nécessaires pour se conformer aux conditions du système de justice pénale. Cela n'excuse pas leur comportement, mais c'est une réalité. À titre d'exemple, les femmes autochtones dans les communautés éloignées pourraient ne pas être en mesure de se présenter devant un tribunal situé dans une ville éloignée et, par conséquent, elles pourraient être accusées de plusieurs infractions liées au défaut de comparaître. Une autre personne risque d'enfreindre involontairement les conditions de sa libération sous caution si elle n'a pas de logement, parce qu'elle ne pourrait pas recevoir les avis du tribunal. Lorsqu'une femme autochtone reçoit l'ordre de ne pas se rendre à sa résidence comme condition de sa mise en liberté provisoire et qu'elle n'a accès à aucun autre logement ou soutien communautaire, elle est contrainte d'enfreindre cette ordonnance pour trouver un abri. Par conséquent, les Autochtones et les Canadiens marginalisés sont plus susceptibles de faire l'objet d'accusations et, en cas de libération sous caution, de se voir imposer des conditions plus strictes, voire impossibles à remplir.

Toutes ces infractions contre l'administration de la justice s'ajoutent au casier judiciaire des femmes autochtones et les condamnent à l'échec. Dans l'état actuel des choses, les femmes autochtones qui sont initialement reconnues coupables de possession simple de cannabis et qui accumulent de telles infractions contre l'administration de la justice ne peuvent pas demander ou obtenir une suspension de leur casier aux termes du projet de loi C-93.

C'est pourquoi l'AFAC recommande que le projet de loi C-93 autorise les personnes ayant été condamnées pour possession simple de cannabis et reconnues coupables d'infractions connexes contre l'administration de la justice à demander et à obtenir une suspension de leur casier judiciaire à cet égard.

Ma dernière recommandation est d'accroître l'accès à la justice. Compte tenu de la pauvreté et des infractions contre l'administration de la justice qui affligent les groupes ethnicisés et marginalisés touchés par la Loi sur le cannabis, l'AFAC recommande que les personnes n'ayant pas fini de purger leur peine pour une infraction prévue au paragraphe 4(3.1) soient en mesure de présenter une demande de suspension de leur casier judiciaire. Il n'est pas logique que des gens continuent de purger une peine pour un comportement qui est maintenant légal. Cet amendement ferait en sorte que les personnes en situation de pauvreté qui n'ont pas les moyens de payer leurs amendes puissent profiter du projet de loi C-93.

Pour que la loi ait une incidence positive sur les femmes autochtones criminalisées, le projet de loi C-93 doit prévoir une analyse sexospécifique de l'histoire du racisme et de la discrimination systémique au Canada envers les peuples autochtones. La criminalisation des femmes autochtones est l'une des séquelles de la colonisation. Les femmes autochtones qui sont généralement criminalisées à la suite d'infractions de possession simple de cannabis ont tendance à vivre dans la pauvreté, à faire l'objet d'une surveillance policière excessive et à rester prises dans le système de justice pénale en raison des infractions contre l'administration de la justice.

Les femmes autochtones criminalisées sont condamnées à l'échec dans un tel système de justice pénale. En permettant aux gens de se libérer du fardeau d'un casier judiciaire lié à un acte qui est désormais légal, peu importe s'ils ont fini de purger leur peine ou non, le Canada a maintenant l'occasion de faire un pas dans la bonne direction pour corriger les torts du passé.

Je vous remercie beaucoup d'avoir pris le temps de m'écouter. J'ai hâte de discuter avec vous de cette question très importante.

(1550)

Le président:

Merci, madame Finestone.

Monsieur Cudjoe, merci.

Monsieur Graham, vous avez sept minutes.

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Merci. Je vais commencer par M. Cudjoe.

Vous avez dit au tout début que la question suivante revient souvent: « Avez-vous plaidé coupable à une infraction criminelle? » Je n'en avais pas entendu parler. Cela ne va-t-il pas à l'encontre des lois sur les droits de la personne?

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Oui. Le cas échéant, si ce n'est pas contesté — et on parle ici de jeunes qui remplissent des formulaires de demande d'emploi pour Walmart et d'autres entreprises de ce genre, qui n'auront pas les ressources juridiques pour contester cela... Il faudrait un groupe, par exemple, le Black Legal Action Centre, ou quelque chose de ce genre, pour contester cela. Cette question peut être posée différemment, sur un autre formulaire, pour contourner le problème.

Par conséquent, cela pourrait aller à l'encontre des droits de la personne. Je pense que oui. À mon avis, c'est le cas de toute question qui concerne les absolutions conditionnelles et inconditionnelles. Cependant, j'en ai vu trois ou quatre variantes et, en fait, je crois que dans l'un des cas, c'était un organisme gouvernemental, à savoir le Conseil ontarien du commerce des véhicules automobiles. Son formulaire pour les vendeurs de véhicules automobiles contient une question très semblable qui ne vous permet pas de signaler une libération conditionnelle, ce qui aurait été possible il y a 10 ans.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

On se fait également poser une question semblable à la frontière américaine: « Avez-vous déjà été arrêté? »

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Merci.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très bien. Merci.

J'ai quelques questions à vous poser, madame Finestone. Vous avez parlé de l'ajout d'un préambule. Cela a-t-il le moindre poids dans le cadre d'une loi?

Mme Elana Finestone:

Un préambule aide les gens à interpréter l'esprit de la loi. Par conséquent, lorsque nous interprétons cette mesure législative, nous le ferions d'une manière qui reconnaît les injustices historiques, ce qui permettrait de corriger ces torts.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Vous avez dit dans votre exposé que vous ne vouliez pas entrer dans les détails, mais aux fins du compte rendu, pourriez-vous passer en revue brièvement les quatre ou cinq infractions et nous dire, pour les besoins de la cause, si vous voulez que chaque infraction soit pardonnée automatiquement ou subjectivement? Y a-t-il un moyen de juger si un pardon pour les infractions supplémentaires devrait être automatique ou subjectif en fonction de la demande?

Mme Elana Finestone:

Nous aimerions que ce soit automatique. Voulez-vous que je passe en revue les infractions énumérées aux pages 4 et 5?

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Très brièvement, parce qu'il y en a cinq ou six ici, alors ce serait bien...

Mme Elana Finestone:

Oui, bien sûr.

(1555)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

... d'avoir un contexte pour chacune des infractions afin de comprendre pourquoi certaines figurent sur la liste et d'autres, pas.

Mme Elana Finestone:

Volontiers.

J'ai examiné les infractions au Code criminel qui...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Celles qui sont les plus courantes.

Mme Elana Finestone:

... seraient les plus courantes pour des choses comme le cannabis — et non pour les infractions sexuelles, parce que, là encore, j'aimerais ramener la discussion sur le cannabis.

Par exemple, il y a le paragraphe 145(2) du Code criminel, omission de comparaître; le paragraphe 145(3), omission de se conformer à une condition d'une promesse ou d'un engagement; le paragraphe 145(4), omission de comparaître ou de se conformer à une sommation; le paragraphe 145(5), omission de comparaître ou de se conformer à une citation à comparaître ou à une promesse de comparaître; enfin, le paragraphe 733.1(1), défaut de se conformer à une ordonnance de probation.

J'ai défini les infractions contre l'administration de la justice uniquement dans le contexte du paragraphe 4(3.1) du projet de loi, pour que nous sachions que nous parlons strictement de la possession simple de cannabis en ce qui concerne les casiers judiciaires. J'ai donc inclus ces dispositions dans la définition.

Ensuite, j'ai proposé des amendements, que vous verrez à la page 6, car, dans sa forme actuelle, le projet de loi ne permet pas aux gens de demander une suspension du casier judiciaire s'ils ont commis d'autres infractions. Ainsi, ces amendements feraient en sorte que les gens puissent présenter une demande s'ils ont commis une infraction contre l'administration de la justice mettant en cause la possession simple de cannabis.

Ensuite, à la page suivante où nous parlons de l'obtention d'une suspension du casier, j'ai proposé des amendements pour que les gens puissent obtenir une suspension du casier non seulement pour la possession simple de cannabis, mais aussi pour les infractions connexes contre l'administration de la justice. Par exemple, si une personne est accusée ou reconnue coupable de possession simple de cannabis, mais qu'elle ne se présente pas devant le tribunal concernant cette accusation précise, et rien de plus — encore une fois, nous parlons de cannabis —, alors cela devrait être effacé de son casier.

Il est tout à fait inutile de supprimer une partie du casier, mais de laisser une foule d'infractions contre l'administration de la justice, ce qui serait le cas pour les personnes marginalisées et racialisées.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Dans la version actuelle du projet de loi, si les gens ont commis une infraction contre l'administration de la justice, pourraient-ils présenter une demande, étant donné que la restriction s'applique uniquement...

Mme Elana Finestone:

Non, ils ne pourraient pas.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Il y a une chose que je voudrais éclaircir. Vous avez très bien expliqué pourquoi les gens dans certaines communautés ne sont pas en mesure de se rendre à un tribunal, et tout le reste. Cependant, dans le cas d'une personne qui refuse délibérément de se présenter devant le tribunal et qui se contente de dénoncer le système, devrions-nous, là encore, supprimer automatiquement les autres infractions connexes?

Mme Elana Finestone:

Je crois que nous devons revenir au fait que le cannabis est maintenant légal; en effet, si ce produit était légal il y a quelques années, les gens ne seraient pas piégés dans le système de justice pénale. Nous savons que les personnes qui sont prises dans ce système sont souvent marginalisées. Bref, je suppose que la réponse est oui, parce que nous devons rayer ces infractions des casiers judiciaires.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Est-ce qu'il me reste du temps?

Le président:

Il vous reste 45 secondes.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je vais les céder à M. Picard. [Français]

M. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Comment pouvez-vous lier ces dossiers?[Traduction]

Pardon, comment pouvez-vous lier ces dossiers d'obstruction?

Mme Elana Finestone: Comment puis-je... Je suis désolée...

Un député: Votre temps est écoulé.

M. Michel Picard: Je sais.

Le président:

Votre temps est écoulé.

M. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NPD):

C'est à vous de trancher, monsieur le président.

M. Michel Picard:

Comment pouvez-vous lier les dossiers d'obstruction et d'administration précisément au dossier de possession de cannabis? Est-ce qu'on précise, dans le casier, qu'une obstruction a été appliquée en raison du dossier de cannabis, ou n'y a-t-il rien dans le dossier d'administration pour établir un tel lien? Ainsi, comment puis-je prendre le risque d'effacer ces infractions?

Mme Elana Finestone:

D'après ce que j'ai compris, c'est qu'il y aurait l'accusation de possession simple de cannabis, puis la personne serait citée à comparaître pour cette accusation. M. Cudjoe pourrait peut-être nous en dire plus à ce sujet. Essentiellement, il y aurait un échéancier. Toutes ces infractions relatives à l'administration de la justice viendraient après l'accusation initiale de possession simple de cannabis.

Le président:

À un autre moment, M. Cudjoe va devoir nous donner des précisions à ce sujet.

Mme Elana Finestone:

Oui, ce serait apprécié.

(1600)

Le président:

Nous allons donner la parole à M. Motz, pour sept minutes.

M. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, PCC):

Je remercie nos deux témoins de leur présence.

Est-ce que l'un ou l'autre de vos organismes a été consulté avant l'adoption de ce projet de loi? Pouvez-vous voir que vos objections... Évidemment, je connais la réponse à ma prochaine question, mais vos objections ne sont évidemment pas prises en compte dans les lois actuelles.

Mme Elana Finestone:

Non, elles ne le sont pas. J'ai été invitée à une réunion avec M. Matthew Dubé et M. Murray Rankin pour discuter du projet de loi C-415 et, comme cela a un lien avec le projet de loi C-93, nous avons également été invités à nous prononcer à ce sujet. Cependant, tout cela s'est fait en périphérie, alors non, je dirais que nos objections n'ont pas vraiment été prises en compte.

M. Glen Motz:

Monsieur Cudjoe, nous vous écoutons.

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

En fait, je préside le comité de défense des droits de l'Association des avocats noirs du Canada. La première fois que nous en avons eu connaissance, c'est lorsque l'avis d'audience a été émis.

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord. Je vous remercie.

Vous avez soulevé la question, madame Finestone, et je voudrais juste en parler. J'ai de la difficulté à associer les accusations relatives à l'administration de la justice et la suspension du casier qui s'y rattache parce qu'elles portent sur un autre sujet. Nous sommes conscients que la possession de marijuana est maintenant légale. Toutefois, une infraction relative à l'administration de la justice signifie essentiellement que la personne a envoyé paître le système judiciaire.

L'expérience m'a appris que certaines des communautés « marginalisées », comme vous les avez appelées — ou celles qui ont des problèmes de santé mentale —, ne mesurent pas la gravité de leurs actes passés. Je comprends cela. Il se pourrait aussi qu'elles aient été dans une situation où elles ne se conformaient pas. Il y a ici des infractions passablement graves qui ont une incidence sur la tournure que les choses peuvent prendre pour ces personnes, et à l'heure actuelle — c'est plus une déclaration qu'une réponse —, j'ai vraiment de la difficulté à voir comment le lien pourrait fonctionner.

L'une des choses que les fonctionnaires nous ont dites la semaine dernière, c'est que, selon les estimations, il y a environ 250 000 Canadiens qui ont un casier judiciaire pour possession d'une petite quantité de marijuana et qui pourraient être admissibles à ces suspensions, mais que seulement 10 000 d'entre eux pourraient envisager ce processus. D'après l'expérience que vous avez, est-ce que l'un de vous deux a une idée de l'exactitude de ces chiffres?

Mme Elana Finestone:

Monsieur Cudjoe, voulez-vous commencer?

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Pour être honnête, les chiffres ne sont pas une question d'expérience, mais je pense que Mme Finestone a évoqué cela elle aussi. Si c'est automatique, cela change radicalement le résultat. Si la suspension du casier est automatique et que vous n'avez pas besoin de commencer le processus, cela change radicalement la donne...

M. Glen Motz:

Je suis désolé de vous interrompre, mais ce que les fonctionnaires nous ont dit, c'est qu'avec les lois actuelles, cette possibilité pourrait s'appliquer à environ 10 000 personnes. C'est le chiffre le plus plausible qu'ils ont pu avancer.

J'aimerais vous parler de quelque chose d'un peu plus sérieux. Pour ce qui est de la façon dont le processus se déroule — et je pense que c'est ce à quoi vous étiez sur le point d'arriver si je vous avais laissé continuer —, disons que tous les groupes qui ont comparu devant nous avaient un problème avec le processus. Je signale que le vérificateur général a demandé à maintes reprises aux ministères de mettre en œuvre des systèmes fondés sur leurs processus plutôt que sur un processus visant à servir les Canadiens de la meilleure façon possible.

À votre avis, le processus présenté dans ce projet de loi entrave-t-il ou aide-t-il les Canadiens avec qui vous interagissez? Le processus prévu pour présenter une demande tient-il compte des capacités de ceux qui pourraient en avoir le plus besoin?

Mme Elana Finestone:

Je dirais que c'est un obstacle. Je crois que le Comité a fait un rapport sur l'inaccessibilité des suspensions de casier judiciaire. Tout d'abord, beaucoup de gens ne savent pas qu'ils peuvent se prévaloir de cela. Il arrive aussi qu'on leur fasse croire qu'ils devront payer des sommes astronomiques pour ce faire, alors que, dans les faits, ce n'est pas si cher que cela.

Je pense que le point que j'essayais de faire tout à l'heure, c'est que beaucoup de gens ne connaissent même pas la loi. Ce n'est pas le seul problème que j'ai évoqué et dont j'ai parlé avec des membres de la collectivité. C'est une loi qui touche particulièrement les collectivités autochtones, et elles n'en ont jamais entendu parler.

Je crois que le fait que les gens risquent d'avoir à reprendre tout le processus depuis le début explique les chiffres plutôt modestes que vous évoquez quant au nombre de gens qui vont vraiment faire la démarche. En ce moment, c'est un fait: il n'y a pas d'accès à la justice pour les groupes dont je parle.

(1605)

M. Glen Motz:

Ce ne sont pas mes chiffres. Ce sont les chiffres que les fonctionnaires nous ont fournis.

Mme Elana Finestone:

D'accord.

M. Glen Motz:

Monsieur Cudjoe, avez-vous des idées à ce sujet?

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Seulement quelques réflexions. Dans ma pratique personnelle, bon nombre des personnes que je représentais étaient des sans-abri, des malades mentaux ou des gens qui étaient sur le point de le devenir. C'étaient des gens qui étaient très peu scolarisés. Le fait de ne pas rendre cela automatique ne fera rien pour aider tous ces gens qui ont été reconnus coupables de possession de marijuana. Au contraire, ce projet de loi viendra en aide à ceux qui sont capables de lire et de se tenir au courant de ce qui se passe dans le système judiciaire.

Pour aller un peu plus loin, disons très rapidement qu'en Ontario, parce que l'aide juridique est financée à un niveau si bas et qu'il faut aller en prison avant d'y avoir droit, de nombreuses personnes qui sont entrées dans le système de justice pénale pour des accusations de possession de marijuana n'avaient pas d'avocats. Elles ont fait ce qui était le plus facile pour elles et ont accepté le premier marché que la Couronne leur proposait. Elles n'ont pas contesté la fouille qui a mené à l'accusation de possession et elles n'ont pas tenté d'obtenir quelque chose comme une libération conditionnelle parce que, ce jour-là, cette possibilité ne leur a pas été offerte. Je demande au Comité d'examiner l'ensemble de la question à la lumière de cela.

Le président:

Nous allons devoir nous arrêter là, monsieur Motz.

Monsieur Cullen, bienvenue au Comité. Vous avez sept minutes.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Merci, monsieur le président, et merci à nos deux témoins. Ces échanges sont éclairants.

J'ai ce qui pourrait être une expérience toute particulière dans ce domaine. J'ai grandi à Rexdale, et je vis maintenant dans une collectivité nordique de la Colombie-Britannique, collectivité que je représente. Quand j'étais plus jeune, des amis à moi avaient un terme pour décrire cela: le crime était de « marcher dans la peau d'un Noir ». Dans mon patelin, les risques d'être arrêté ou d'être ramassé par la police étaient considérablement plus grands si vous étiez jeune et noir. Toutes nos statistiques le confirment. À Vancouver, les Autochtones sont sept fois plus susceptibles d'être arrêtés que les Blancs, et à Regina, ils le sont neuf fois plus.

Monsieur Cudjoe, j'aimerais revenir sur ce qu'a dit mon collègue conservateur. Si un enfant blanc de la classe moyenne est arrêté pour possession de drogue et qu'il a accès à un avocat, les risques qu'il ait un casier judiciaire ou un casier judiciaire secondaire pour une accusation relative à l'administration de la justice sont beaucoup plus faibles que pour une personne qui vit dans la pauvreté, ou qui est issue d'une communauté ethnique ou marginalisée. Est-ce que c'est exact?

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

C'est exact, et c'est un groupe sur lequel je me suis focalisé, parce que je sais que dans la plupart des cas, les parents qui trouvaient de la marijuana dans les vêtements de leurs enfants n'allaient pas voir la police. Qu'en est-il des enfants qui sont sous la tutelle de la société d'aide à l'enfance? Toutes ces accusations ont été confiées directement à la police, et neuf fois sur dix, l'accusé n'avait pas d'avocat.

L'enfant qui a grandi sans parents se retrouve maintenant avec un casier qui le désavantage. Dès le début, il n'avait aucune chance.

M. Nathan Cullen:

La Cour suprême ayant reconnu que les personnes marginalisées et racialisées font face à du racisme et à de la discrimination systémique dans le système de justice pénale, si l'intention du gouvernement était de tenter d'empêcher les Canadiens marginalisés et racialisés d'être aux prises avec du racisme et de la discrimination systémique, n'aurait-il pas été essentiel qu'il consulte vos deux organismes?

Je suis navré que nous en soyons rendus là, à cinq semaines de la fin de la présente législature, alors qu'il y a des modifications essentielles à apporter à des mesures législatives. Les personnes qui ont historiquement été blessées par le système de justice pénale — les Autochtones, les personnes marginalisées et les Canadiens noirs — auront maintenant un système de pardon qui ne les aidera pas en raison des circonstances dans lesquelles elles vivent.

Est-ce bien le projet de loi dont nous sommes actuellement saisis?

Je vais commencer par vous, monsieur Cudjoe, puis je vais poser une question plus précise à Mme Finestone.

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Je pense que vous avez mis le doigt dessus.

Je suis souvent invité à donner mon avis, mais ce coup-ci, on ne me l'a pas demandé. Je soupçonne que c'est parce que d'autres groupes ont été inclus. Quelqu'un a peut-être pensé que je ne devais pas être entendu. Je ne sais pas.

(1610)

M. Nathan Cullen:

Lorsqu'il était candidat et qu'il parlait en faveur de ce projet de loi, le premier ministre insistait sur le fait qu'au Canada, les groupes marginalisés et racialisés étaient touchés de façon disproportionnée par les lois sur la marijuana.

Madame Finestone, je veux mettre au défi l'ami de mon collègue conservateur de dire que les gens font un « doigt d'honneur » au système judiciaire. J'ai vu des cas où des sanctions administratives ont été imposées à de jeunes femmes autochtones qui vivaient à huit heures de route de la salle d'audience. Il n'y avait pas de transport en commun, pas de Greyhound, et elles n'avaient pas d'argent pour faire le trajet. Alors, elles ne se sont pas présentées. Ces circonstances étant ce qu'elles sont, une jeune femme autochtone qui est arrêtée dans le Nord de la Colombie-Britannique pour simple possession et qui n'est pas en mesure de se présenter à son audience ne peut, aux termes de cette loi, bénéficier d'un pardon. Est-ce exact?

Mme Elana Finestone:

C'est tout à fait exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord.

Mme Elana Finestone:

C'est une question très vaste. Il y a quelques semaines, j'ai assisté à une conférence sur la justice pénale autochtone après l'arrêt Gladue. Des intervenants parlaient de la façon dont ils avaient créé un tribunal autochtone dans une réserve. En effet, ils avaient remarqué le grand nombre de gens qui faisaient l'objet d'un mandat d'arrestation et le fait que les gens ne se présentaient pas en cour pour la bonne et simple raison qu'il n'y avait pas de transport en commun et qu'ils ne pouvaient donc pas s'y rendre. C'est la réalité.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je n'ai pas vu cela dans vos notes. Votre organisme appuie-t-il le projet de loi C-415?

Mme Elana Finestone:

Oui, nous l'appuyons.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous appuyez la radiation.

Monsieur Cudjoe, êtes-vous du même avis? Croyez-vous que la radiation serait un moyen plus efficace de tourner définitivement la page sur ces accusations passées?

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Je le crois vraiment. Je dois admettre que je ne suis pas tout à fait au courant des inconvénients de la radiation, mais je crois vraiment que ces casiers devraient être supprimés.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Maintenant, en ce qui concerne l'effet circulaire que le système de justice pénale peut avoir pour une simple accusation de possession, rappelons-nous cette question qui figure sur les formulaires d'emploi des employeurs: « Avez-vous plaidé coupable à une infraction criminelle? » C'est une question type de ces formulaires. Quelqu'un qui serait dûment qualifié — un jeune Noir de Toronto, de Montréal ou d'ailleurs — et qui aurait obtenu un pardon aux termes de ces mesures législatives aurait à répondre oui à cette question, n'est-ce pas?

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

C'est exact, c'est pourquoi je me suis creusé les méninges pour essayer de trouver ce qui pouvait être fait à cet égard. J'ai reçu la recommandation de notre comité selon laquelle le fait de les considérer comme des infractions réglementaires — ce qui englobe les lois sur les armes à feu et bien d'autres lois — pourrait fonctionner.

M. Nathan Cullen:

C'est une solution de contournement que vous tentez d'apporter à cette loi au sujet de laquelle vous n'avez pas été consulté.

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

C'est tout à fait cela.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Vous imaginez un scénario dans lequel la Couronne, dans une deuxième affaire ou un procès quelconque, pourrait dire au tribunal: « Il y a quelque chose dans le dossier de l'accusé, mais nous ne pouvons pas vous le dire. »

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Non, je parlais de ce qui se passe quand la vérification du casier judiciaire est transmise à l'employeur.

M. Nathan Cullen:

Je vois. Donc, si un employeur cherche à embaucher quelqu'un...

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

C'est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

... dans ce cas, un jeune noir avec qui vous avez eu affaire et qui aurait obtenu le pardon en vertu de ce projet de loi du gouvernement. L'employeur serait informé qu'il y a quelque chose dans son dossier, mais sans pouvoir savoir de quoi il s'agit. Ce serait laissé à l'imagination, essentiellement.

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

C'est exact. La façon de rapporter cela est « nous ne pouvons pas vous dire de quoi il s'agit ».

M. Nathan Cullen:

Encore une fois, c'est laissé à l'imagination de l'employeur.

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

C'est exact.

M. Nathan Cullen:

D'accord. Je vous remercie beaucoup.

Le président:

Nous allons passer à Mme Dabrusin pour sept minutes.

Mme Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

J'allais m'adresser à Mme Finestone, parce que je l'ai vue hocher la tête pendant ce segment.

Pourriez-vous aider le Comité en lui fournissant de plus amples renseignements en réponse à cette dernière question?

Mme Elana Finestone:

La dernière question...

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Quand quelqu'un a reçu un pardon, on dit à un employeur qu'il y a une accusation, mais qu'on ne peut pas lui dire de quoi il s'agit.

Mme Elana Finestone:

Ce que je sais surtout, c'est que le pardon n'efface pas la faute, de sorte que dès que l'intéressé commet une autre infraction, comme une infraction relative à l'administration de la justice, elle est immédiatement rétablie.

Je pense que je peux parler de cela. Bien que les intentions soient très bonnes, c'est quelque chose qui finit toujours par ressortir.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Je pense qu'il faudrait obtenir plus d'informations sur la façon dont cela apparaît, parce que tout ce que nous avons entendu jusqu'à maintenant, c'est qu'il y a une différence entre un pardon et une radiation, mais qu'un pardon n'apparaît pas lorsque les gens font l'objet de vérifications. Il me faudrait des éclaircissements à ce sujet.

Une bonne partie de ce débat a porté sur le processus — pardon ou radiation, peu importe. À l'heure actuelle, l'un des grands problèmes qui reviennent sans cesse, c'est que les gens doivent présenter une demande. Je crois qu'en 1996, il y a eu un changement dans la façon dont les accusations étaient présentées et portées au dossier. Est-ce que cela aiderait si c'était automatique jusqu'en 1996, et que tout ce qui venait après 1996 faisait l'objet d'un pardon ou une radiation automatique?

(1615)

Mme Elana Finestone:

Oui, bien sûr.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Je vais demander la même chose à M. Cudjoe. Je sais qu'en 1996, la façon dont les accusations étaient affichées et enregistrées a changé. Si les accusations portées de 1996 à aujourd'hui étaient suspendues automatiquement, que ce soit au moyen d'un pardon ou d'une radiation, cela serait-il utile?

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Ce serait très utile.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Fort bien.

Je crois comprendre qu'avant 1996, il y avait d'autres problèmes liés à la tenue des dossiers qui peuvent changer la donne. La situation découle donc peut-être d'un autre facteur. Mais, si la suspension était automatique à partir de 1996, comment ferions-nous parvenir ce message aux gens, afin de les informer que cela s'est produit? Voilà mon autre préoccupation. Il serait merveilleux que nous ayons fait cela, mais il se pourrait que les personnes concernées ne le sachent pas. Elles répondraient peut-être aux questions en fonction de renseignements erronés. Quel est le meilleur moyen pour nous d'informer les gens de ce qui s'est produit?

Mme Elana Finestone:

Je pense qu'une merveilleuse façon d'y arriver consisterait à maintenir un dialogue avec des organisations comme l'AFAC et l'AANC, afin qu'elles puissent dire aux gens qu'elles servent que cela est possible. Nos organisations renseignent de nombreux membres du public sur des questions juridiques, et notre travail consiste à obtenir que les gens se préoccupent des lois qui ont une incidence sur eux.

Si vous tenez des organisations comme les nôtres au courant, cela aidera vraiment nos concitoyens et, par la suite, les vôtres.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Monsieur Cudjoe, avez-vous des idées à ce sujet?

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Je pensais qu'il serait vraiment utile d'organiser un envoi postal automatique adressé à la personne concernée une fois que la suspension automatique a été effectuée.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Un envoi postal automatique. D'accord. Merci.

D'un point de vue procédural, il est utile d'avoir quelques idées de la façon dont cela fonctionnerait.

J'ai été frappée, madame Finestone, par une section qui figure à la page 7 de votre mémoire, je crois. Elle a trait à la question de l'élimination de la nécessité de purger sa peine au complet. À l'heure actuelle, la possession simple de cannabis est légale et, pourtant, il y a peut-être des gens qui ont encore des amendes à payer ou qui sont encore assujettis à une libération conditionnelle liée à une telle infraction.

Au cours d'une étude antérieure sur la suspension des casiers judiciaires, des témoins nous ont dit que les amendes non payées étaient en fait l'un des principaux obstacles, parce que votre temps commençait à s'accumuler. Dans le cas présent, il n'y a pas de problème d'accumulation du temps. Pouvez-vous parler un peu de cette question, de la raison pour laquelle il est important de se débarrasser de la nécessité de purger ces peines complètement?

Mme Elana Finestone:

Absolument.

Il y a une chose qui m'a passé par la tête. J'ai examiné le rapport dont vous parlez avant de faire cette recommandation. Il y a des gens qui n'auront jamais les moyens de payer leurs amendes, parce qu'ils n'ont simplement pas l'argent nécessaire et qu'ils doivent payer leur loyer et acheter de la nourriture. Ils n'auront jamais accès au projet de loi C-93. Comme vous l'avez indiqué, si la possession simple de cannabis est maintenant légale, pourquoi ne donnons-nous pas aux gens l'occasion de présenter une demande?

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Monsieur Cudjoe, que pensez-vous de la nécessité de supprimer dans la loi le fait que les gens sont tenus de purger au complet leur peine liée à une possession simple de cannabis, avant de remplir les conditions pour l'octroi d'un pardon?

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Mme Finestone l'a très bien dit. Nous savons qu'un grand nombre de gens ne seront jamais en mesure de payer ces amendes.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Merci.

Vous avez tous les deux soulevé la question des infractions administratives. Cette question est compliquée, parce que tous les gens ne sont pas dans la situation que Mme Finestone a décrite, mais c'est là un scénario convaincant.

C'est un récit convaincant en ce qui concerne la raison pour laquelle quelqu'un pourrait ne pas être en mesure de se présenter devant les tribunaux ou ne pas avoir reçu les avis à cet égard, mais ce n'est certainement pas le cas de tous les gens qui ont été reconnus coupables de ces infractions.

Savez-vous si une façon de procéder a été mise au point? Disons que nous passons à un processus automatique. La première étape est facile. Le casier judiciaire de toute personne ayant été reconnue coupable de possession simple de cannabis après 1996 est suspendu. Puis, il y a les gens qui ont commis des infractions administratives liées à cette possession simple. À ce moment-là, les choses ne peuvent pas fonctionner automatiquement de façon aussi simple parce que, maintenant, nous devons examiner d'autres éléments. Alors, j'imagine que nous avons pratiquement besoin d'un processus secondaire.

Avez-vous réfléchi à cela? Comment pouvons-nous analyser ces infractions?

(1620)

Mme Elana Finestone:

Je pense que M. Cudjoe avait l'intention de s'étendre sur ce sujet plus tôt, et ce serait peut-être une bonne occasion pour lui de le faire.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

D'accord.

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Pour attraper les infractions qui sont liées uniquement aux accusations de possession de marijuana, vous réexaminez la formulation des accusations. La plupart du temps, elles indiquent que vous avez été accusé de possession de marijuana tel ou tel jour, que le tribunal vous a demandé de comparaître tel ou tel jour et que vous avez omis de le faire. De plus, l'accusation de possession de marijuana indiquera votre absence de comparution. Alors, vous rapprochez ces deux renseignements, et vous pouvez prouver qu'ils sont directement liés.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Ces renseignements sont très utiles. Merci pour.

Le président:

Monsieur Eglinski, vous avez la parole pendant cinq minutes.

M. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, PCC):

Je remercie les deux témoins de leur participation à la séance d'aujourd'hui.

J'aimerais commencer par vous interroger, monsieur. Vous venez de mentionner que vous pouvez réexaminer le dossier et vérifier les accusations. L'autre jour, nous avons entendu des témoins, des fonctionnaires des ministères, alors que nous parlions de la façon de nous occuper de ces gens qui bénéficient d'un chef d'accusation réduit pour une infraction peut-être un peu plus compliquée qu'une simple possession. Ils nous ont dit qu'il leur était impossible de vérifier cela, que c'était trop compliqué et qu'ils s'occuperaient seulement des accusations dont les gens avaient été reconnus coupables.

Ce que vous et votre homologue êtes en train de dire, c'est que vous voulez vous occuper des autres accusations, comme celles portées en vertu des paragraphes 145(4) et 145(5), de l'article 733 et du paragraphe 145(3). Certaines d'entre elles peuvent avoir fait l'objet de déclarations sommaires de culpabilité ou avoir donné lieu à des condamnations pour actes criminels. Quelqu'un va devoir examiner cela, et vous compliquez le processus en entier.

Certains États des États-Unis ont élaboré un programme très simple que j'approuve. Vous appuyez simplement sur un bouton. Quelqu'un conçoit un programme qui passe en revue les dossiers du CIPC et qui élimine tous les chefs d'accusation pour possession simple de cannabis.

Vous parlez maintenant de communiquer avec des gens. Combien de vos clients peuvent vous énumérer les adresses des endroits où ils ont habité depuis 1996 ou les numéros où nous pourrions les joindre depuis 1996? Où sont-ils allés?

Le processus doit être beaucoup plus simple que ce que vous nous expliquez en ce moment, car vous avez mentionné que certains de vos clients n'étaient pas capables de remplir ces formulaires et qu'ils n'étaient peut-être pas en mesure de vous fournir les adresses nécessaires. Nous devons, d'une manière ou d'une autre, être en mesure de permettre au public d'avoir accès à ce processus.

Le système le plus simple, au sujet duquel j'aimerais que vous formuliez des observations, est un simple programme qui peut être codé à l'aide de la science, de la technologie et de la programmation informatique d'aujourd'hui. Il est possible de développer un programme qui permet d'éliminer ces accusations simplement en appuyant sur un bouton et en laissant l'ordinateur faire le travail, au lieu d'intégrer un facteur humain dans ce processus.

Je vous vois tous les deux faire intervenir beaucoup trop d'humains dans ce processus, qui sera trop compliqué.

Vous pouvez commencer, monsieur, et Mme Finestone terminera.

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Il y a seulement deux questions auxquelles je vais répondre. Premièrement, lorsque je parle de communiquer avec des gens, c'est pour les informer que le processus automatique a eu lieu. Cela ne complique pas le processus consistant à appuyer sur un bouton. Il est toujours possible d'appuyer sur le bouton. La question est de savoir si les gens sont au courant que le processus a eu lieu.

Deuxièmement, là où les choses se compliquent et que le facteur humain intervient, c'est lorsque vous tentez de relier des chefs d'accusation à la possession de marijuana. L'infraction liée à la marijuana peut toujours être supprimée à l'aide d'un bouton. Vous ne souhaitez pas priver tous les gens...

[Difficultés techniques]

Ensuite, il incombe au gouvernement de décider s'il ira plus loin en examinant les données filtrées relatives à la conformité, celles qui ont été filtrées par des pairs, etc. Toutefois, pour mêler les deux à ce stade, il faut...

[Difficultés techniques]

Nous faisons allusion aux préjudices dont des gens ont fait l'objet en raison de leur chef d'accusation initial et au fait d'aller plus loin. Il s'agit là d'une deuxième question qui, à ma connaissance, n'est pas abordée par la mesure législative, et nous demandons simplement au Comité de faire preuve d'ouverture à cet égard.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Madame Finestone.

Mme Elana Finestone:

L'autre problème dont nous parlons, c'est que le nombre d'accusations portées contre les gens a tendance à être excessif. En ce qui concerne les plaidoyers négociés, les autres mesures dont vous parlez et la façon dont les gens finissent par faire l'objet d'un seul chef d'accusation pour possession simple de cannabis, je précise que, parfois, les avocats de la Couronne portent toutes les accusations qu'ils croient être en mesure de prouver. Nous ne devrions pas laisser cela nous distraire de la nécessité de supprimer du casier judiciaire toute condamnation pour possession simple de cannabis.

Je pense qu'il est important de procéder par étapes. Occupez-vous des casiers où figure seulement une accusation pour possession simple, s'il est facile de le faire. Toutefois, ce que nous essayons tous les deux de vous dire, je crois, c'est que, compte tenu de la réalité des concitoyens que nous servons, cela ne les aidera pas beaucoup. Par conséquent, vous devez continuer de dialoguer avec nos organisations.

Je sais que l'AFAC peut instruire les gens sur le plan juridique, leur dire en quoi consiste cette suspension, comment présenter une demande et à qui s'adresser pour le faire. Des organisations peuvent accomplir ce travail, mais nous devons amorcer ce processus.

(1625)

M. Jim Eglinski:

Mon temps de parole est-il écoulé?

Le président:

Il vous reste quelques secondes.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Si le casier judiciaire de tous les gens qui ont été accusés de possession simple de cannabis était automatiquement suspendu, les gens n'en entendraient-ils pas parler dans la rue? J'ai beaucoup de mal à comprendre votre tentative de communiquer avec ces gens en leur envoyant un avis de suspension de leur casier judiciaire. Si cette suspension des casiers judiciaires comportant une simple accusation de possession au Canada était effectuée automatiquement, pourquoi aurions-nous besoin d'en aviser les gens? La nouvelle devrait s'ébruiter... au moyen d'articles de journaux.

Mme Elana Finestone:

Je pense que cela devrait être automatique.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Eglinski.

Madame Sahota, vous disposez de cinq minutes.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Je vous remercie de toutes les différentes suggestions que vous nous faites aujourd'hui. Évidemment, il y a de nombreuses modifications que nous envisageons d'apporter à ce projet de loi afin de l'améliorer. Je vous remercie de nous aider dans cette tâche.

Au cours des dernières séances, nous avons parlé à de nombreuses reprises de la radiation. Le processus de radiation est très récent. Il n'existait pas vraiment jusqu'à l'année dernière. Je crois que personne n'a beaucoup d'expérience pour ce qui est d'entreprendre ce processus.

Monsieur Cudjoe, avez-vous aidé des gens à obtenir des pardons dans le passé et, le cas échéant, à quoi cette expérience a-t-elle ressemblé pour vous et votre client?

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

J'ai aidé des gens à obtenir des pardons dans le passé, mais je dois dire que ce n'était pas ma principale responsabilité. Je les aidais simplement à remplir les formulaires.

La plupart de mes clients gagnaient très peu d'argent. Par conséquent, il fallait que je fasse ce travail bénévolement. La plus grande difficulté à laquelle bon nombre de ces personnes faisaient face consistait à réunir les fonds nécessaires.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Voilà qui est intéressant. L'obstacle était-il lié au coût de la demande?

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Le financement de la demande était le plus important obstacle pour un grand nombre de jeunes, parce que soit ils vivaient d'un chèque de paie à l'autre soit leur situation était encore plus précaire. Il fallait qu'ils commencent par réunir les 400 $ nécessaires, et ils avaient vraiment du mal à le faire.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

La situation s'est même aggravée maintenant parce que le gouvernement précédent a fait passer le coût de cette demande à quelque 600 $. La présente mesure législative règle ce problème, car la demande n'exigera plus le versement de frais.

Vous avez dit que le plus gros obstacle était lié à l'emploi et qu'un pardon ou une radiation aiderait la personne à décrocher un emploi. Après avoir aidé ces clients à obtenir un pardon, savez-vous si cela a facilité leur vie?

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

D'après mon expérience, non.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pourquoi est-ce le cas selon vous?

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Parce que, comme je l'ai mentionné, ils commencent par postuler pour des emplois de base — dans des restaurants McDonald, dans des Walmart, dans des usines —, et c'est la question qu'on leur pose. Vous ne pouvez pas inscrire des mensonges sur le formulaire. Vous ne pouvez pas dire...

Pardon. Je ne voulais pas vous interrompre.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Désolée, c'est seulement que je dispose de très peu de temps .

Si une personne obtenait une radiation plutôt qu'un pardon serait-elle en mesure de répondre différemment à la question de savoir si elle a déjà plaidé coupable à un crime?

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Non, vous ne pourriez pas répondre à cette question différemment, mais, oui, vous le pourriez si la question était la suivante: « Avez-vous déjà été reconnu coupable d'une infraction? » C'est là une autre question qu'on leur pose.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

La question qui est posée et la façon dont elle est formulée dépendent de l'employeur...

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

C'est exact.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

... et les questions pourraient changer après la mise en œuvre du projet de loi qui nous occupe, car les gens et les employeurs sauront que les meilleures questions à poser sont peut-être les suivantes: « Avez-vous déjà fumé de la marijuana? », « Avez-vous déjà plaidé coupable à une accusation? » et « Des accusations ont-elles déjà été portées contre vous? ».

Vous soulevez effectivement de très bons arguments. Je n'avais jamais pensé à cet incident très alarmant lié à la SAE. C'est vrai. Les gens grandissent dans des milieux très différents et, par conséquent, ils font face à des difficultés différentes. Je vous remercie de l'avoir signalé.

Toutefois, d'autres crimes ont été légalisés dans le passé, et le processus de pardon a toujours été entrepris et utilisé. J'espère que nous serons en mesure de l'améliorer dans une certaine mesure, mais ne convenez-vous pas que c'est un pas dans la bonne direction et que cela aidera certaines personnes?

(1630)

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

J'admets que c'est un pas dans la bonne direction et que cela aidera certaines personnes. Mais, selon moi, le processus serait beaucoup plus utile à bon nombre de nos concitoyens s'il était automatique, étant donné leur niveau de scolarité, leur propension à lire et les activités qu'ils exercent.

J'ai entendu des gens devant les tribunaux demander s'ils avaient un casier judiciaire. Ils avaient comparu devant un tribunal et versé une amende, par exemple, pour possession de marijuana, mais ils pensaient qu'ils n'avaient pas de casier parce qu'ils n'avaient pas purgé une peine d'emprisonnement.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui.

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Ce serait utile si c'était automatique et qu'ils l'apprenaient plus tard.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord. Merci.

Le président:

Monsieur Motz.

M. Glen Motz:

Je veux revenir à une série de questions que mes collègues, des deux côtés, ont posées. Nous avons vu vos recommandations, madame Finestone, mais nous n'avons pas eu l'occasion de voir les vôtres, monsieur Cudjoe.

Si j'avais posé une question auparavant sur le processus d'élaboration — qui semble être en quelque sorte un obstacle pour ceux qui pourraient en avoir le plus besoin... Si vous deviez élaborer le processus en vous basant sur vos clients, monsieur, qu'est-ce qui devrait être fait, de sorte que ceux qui en ont besoin puissent l'utiliser de la façon prévue?

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

D'après mon expérience, pour bon nombre de jeunes, une accusation de possession de marijuana marque le début de leur carrière de criminels et mène à bien des choses.

Les accusations relatives à l'administration de la justice qui sont liées aux accusations liées à la marijuana sont cruciales pour notre communauté, en raison du lien entre les deux infractions et ce qui a suivi. Malheureusement, si une personne commet un vol après, c'est son problème, mais ce qui nous préoccupe, ce sont les jeunes qui ne font face qu'à des accusations relatives à l'administration de la justice.

Très souvent — et je veux revenir très brièvement sur l'observation concernant le défaut de comparaître et l'idée que les gens envoient paître le tribunal —, nous parlons de jeunes de 14 ans qui ont reçu une contravention, l'ont mise dans leur poche et l'ont perdue. C'est arrivé très souvent. Le jeune de 14 ans se fait arrêter parce qu'il ne s'est pas présenté devant le tribunal, il va en prison et doit demander une mise en liberté sous caution. La Couronne lui offre de plaider coupable à l'accusation de possession de marijuana, et tout se règle, ou encore de plaider coupable à l'accusation de défaut de comparaître, et il pourra rentrer à la maison.

S'il avait eu une chance de subir un procès, il aurait été en mesure de plaider non coupable, parce que son intention n'était pas d'envoyer paître le tribunal. Il a 14 ans, et il a perdu un bout de papier qu'il avait mis dans sa poche.

M. Glen Motz:

Vous parlez des jeunes, et je sais que leur compréhension de ce à quoi ils font face fait parfois défaut, au mieux, mais je crains qu'il existe toujours des lacunes après l'adoption du projet de loi, dont l'incohérence, à mon avis.

Si une personne a été accusée de possession simple avant cette infraction, la possession simple est supérieure à 30 grammes. Si elle a été accusée depuis octobre 2018, avoir en sa possession plus de 30 grammes constitue une infraction.

D'autres témoins nous ont dit avoir certaines préoccupations au sujet de cette incohérence. Pensez-vous que cela posera problème — que les personnes qui ont en leur possession plus de 30 grammes obtiendront une suspension immédiatement, et que d'autres personnes devront maintenant attendre cinq ans avant d'y être admissibles?

(1635)

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Je dois admettre que pour ce qui est du nombre de grammes, je ne suis pas un spécialiste. J'ignore d'où proviennent les 30 grammes. Je sais que devant les tribunaux, des experts policiers ont dit que normalement, si la quantité dépasse 30 grammes, cela veut dire que la personne en avait en sa possession dans le but d'en faire le trafic.

M. Glen Motz:

Oui.

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Honnêtement, je ne peux pas vraiment faire d'observations à ce sujet. Il y a trop d'histoires pour pouvoir donner une réponse complète.

M. Glen Motz:

J'ai une dernière observation à faire, ou une dernière question à poser avant que mon temps soit écoulé.

En dépit du fait que le gouvernement nous dit qu'il n'en coûtera rien à ceux qui en font la demande, nous savons que... C'est sans compter les heures qu'il faudra pour faire le tour des administrations où les infractions ont été commises et peut-être prendre les empreintes digitales, confirmer l'identité, demander le dossier et toutes les choses qui seront exigées par la loi. Un coût sera associé à cela. Il y en aura toujours un. Est-ce que les gens qui bénéficieront le plus de cette suspension du casier seront toujours dans l'impossibilité de même en faire la demande en raison de ces coûts?

Le président:

Répondez très brièvement, s'il vous plaît.

Mme Elana Finestone:

Je crois comprendre qu'il y a même d'autres coûts, comme ceux liés à la prise des empreintes digitales et à tous les documents à réunir, donc, oui...

M. Glen Motz:

C'est ce que je veux dire. Cela peut coûter 200 $.

Mme Elana Finestone:

Oui, alors il y a encore des coûts, et je crois que le projet de loi ne va pas aussi loin qu'il le devrait.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Motz.

Monsieur Spengemann, vous disposez de cinq minutes. Allez-y, s'il vous plaît.

M. Sven Spengemann (Mississauga—Lakeshore, Lib.):

Je vous remercie tous les deux de votre présence, ainsi que de votre expertise et de votre travail de défense.

J'ai élaboré quelques catégories simplement en réfléchissant à la question. Elles incluent les répercussions du problème, le coût du problème et qui paie, et les aspects juridiques. Mes questions porteront sur les deux premières, soit les répercussions sur les gens dont vous vous occupez — vos clients, les gens que vous protégez et défendez — et la question des coûts.

Je me demande si nous pouvons d'abord dissiper deux ou trois mythes, aux fins du compte rendu. Je crois que c'est arrivé dans d'autres discussions au Comité, et nous avons l'impression qu'ils ont été dissipés, mais j'aimerais que vous vous prononciez également là-dessus.

Le premier, c'est que personne ne se soucie plus vraiment des condamnations pour possession simple parce que le cannabis est légal maintenant, et les employeurs ne s'en soucieront pas vraiment si cela apparaît dans les vérifications sur l'employé. Que répondez-vous à cela?

Mme Elana Finestone:

Puisque nous ne pouvons pas contrôler ce que d'autres pensent, nous ne devrions pas laisser cela à leur discrétion. Si le gouvernement adopte une loi, alors tout le monde doit la respecter. Ce n'est pas à la discrétion de ceux qui ne comprennent pas les injustices dont nous parlons.

En ce qui concerne les répercussions, il ne s'agit pas seulement des jeunes. Si des femmes autochtones sont incarcérées — et souvent, ce sont des mères monoparentales —, elles ne peuvent pas être avec leurs enfants. Cela veut dire que leurs enfants risquent davantage d'être pris en charge par la Société d'aide à l'enfance. Il y a donc également plus de risques, dans ce cas, qu'on plaide coupable et qu'on soit pris dans le système de justice pénale.

M. Sven Spengemann:

Monsieur Cudjoe.

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Je suis d'accord avec elle. La question qui se pose, c'est de savoir si l'on se rendra à l'étape de l'entrevue s'il y a quoi que ce soit dans le casier. Si tout ce qui figure dans le casier judiciaire, c'est la possession de marijuana, il est déplorable qu'on ne se rende pas à l'étape de l'entrevue.

M. Sven Spengemann:

D'accord.

S'il me reste du temps, j'aimerais en parler un peu dans d'autres questions.

L'autre point, c'est la question de savoir qui paie. Ce matin, un débat sur le projet de loi C-93 a eu lieu à la Chambre des communes. L'un des arguments qui a été avancé, c'est que puisque le contribuable moyen n'a vraiment rien fait de mal, pourquoi il devrait alors payer les coûts liés à une radiation ou à une suspension du casier judiciaire.

Je me demande si vous pouvez nous dire non seulement pourquoi il est important pour vos clients que ces coûts soient pris en charge par les contribuables, mais également pourquoi cela constitue un avantage économique pour les contribuables, en raison de renforcement de la situation de vos clients et de leur capacité de devenir compétitifs sur le marché du travail et sur d'autres plans également.

Mme Elana Finestone:

Je crois...

Oh, veuillez m'excuser.

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Non, allez-y, madame Finestone. J'attendais que vous commenciez, en fait.

Mme Elana Finestone:

D'accord.

Je crois que lorsque nous donnons aux gens toutes les chances de succès possibles et qu'ils sont capables de contribuer au marché du travail et qu'ils vivent dans un logement plutôt que d'être coincés dans des refuges, alors nous vivons dans un monde meilleur. L'autre chose — et je crois que nous y avons tous fait allusion —, c'est que pour bon nombre de gens, le cannabis fait partie de leur vie, mais il y a certaines personnes qui sont arrêtées et remarquées par la police qui sont criminalisées pour cela. Je pense que nous devons tous reconnaître que tout le monde le fait, pas seulement les gens que nous servons, et que nous avons tous le devoir de payer pour cela.

(1640)

M. Sven Spengemann:

Oui. C'est utile. Merci.

Monsieur Cudjoe, voulez-vous ajouter quelque chose?

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

La seule chose que j'ajouterais, c'est que quiconque suit la vie de jeunes qui ont des démêlés avec la justice verra qu'à un moment donné, ils peuvent aller à gauche et ils peuvent aller à droite. S'ils n'ont nulle part où aller, ils se retrouvent avec des gangs et une vie de criminels, et ainsi de suite. Si on leur donne une chance d'obtenir ce premier emploi, cela nous coûte tous beaucoup moins cher. Nous payons beaucoup moins cher pour les années qu'ils passent en prison et pour la vie qui n'est utile à personne.

M. Sven Spengemann:

Oui. Je vous remercie.

Puisqu'il me reste une minute, je vais me dépêcher de poser ma dernière question. J'imagine qu'on peut dire sans se tromper qu'une bonne partie du problème concerne les jeunes contrevenants et le fait qu'ils sont touchés de façon disproportionnée. J'ai pensé à la possibilité que des aînés soient touchés, surtout ceux qui sont dans une situation économique qui les oblige peut-être à aller chercher de l'argent supplémentaire en travaillant. D'après votre expérience, les aînés font-ils partie de l'équation? Ce sont des gens qui ont peut-être obtenu une condamnation dans les années 1970 ou 1980, qui vieillissent maintenant et qui subissent toujours les répercussions d'avoir un casier.

Mme Elana Finestone:

Je peux parler des casiers judiciaires dans d'autres contextes. J'ai examiné comment l'affaire Bedford est appliquée. Il y avait une femme autochtone qui était coincée dans le système de justice pénale. Ils regardaient son casier, et ils ont dit... Je crois qu'il y avait plus de 20 condamnations pour sollicitation à des fins de prostitution et défaut de comparaître.

Je pense que cela montre que ces choses restent longtemps, quoi qu'il arrive. Cela pourrait s'être passé dans les années 1970.

M. Sven Spengemann:

D'accord. C'est utile.

Le président:

Normalement, ce serait à votre tour, monsieur Dubé. Voulez-vous utiliser votre intervention de trois minutes?

M. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NPD):

Non, ça va. Merci.

Le président:

D'accord.

Monsieur Picard, vous n'avez pas...

M. Michel Picard:

Ça va.

Le président:

D'accord.

Normalement, c'est ici que nous nous arrêterions. Quelqu'un d'autre veut en profiter pour poser une question?

Je vais le faire alors. La proposition d'obtenir, de façon parallèle, une suspension du casier pour les infractions contre l'administration de la justice complexifierait énormément les choses pour ce qui constitue un projet de loi relativement simple. Êtes-vous d'accord avec moi?

Mme Elana Finestone:

Oui.

Le président:

Oui.

Monsieur Cudjoe, avez-vous une remarque à faire à ce sujet?

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Je suis du même avis. La seule chose que je dirais, c'est que le travail se poursuivrait et ce ne serait pas abandonné.

Mme Elana Finestone:

Je suis du même avis.

Le président:

Oui.

Cela dit, je vous remercie tous les deux....

Vouliez-vous dire quelque chose, monsieur Motz?

M. Glen Motz:

Je veux dire quelque chose rapidement à ce sujet.

Le président:

D'accord.

M. Glen Motz:

S'il y a possibilité d'obtenir une suspension de casier pour la possession simple de marijuana, et qu'il y a les infractions contre l'administration ensuite, dans certaines situations, je comprends qu'il s'agirait d'un processus coûteux incluant un examen complet du lien. En fonction des mesures législatives, la personne serait admissible seulement si c'est la seule infraction qu'elle a commise. N'y a-t-il pas toujours moyen alors que, cinq ans plus tard, si l'infraction administrative était liée à la suspension concernant la marijuana, cela se fasse automatiquement également? Est-ce une possibilité? Nous ne l'incluons pas immédiatement au moment de la suspension du casier pour la possession de marijuana, mais c'est signalé, ou peu importe le moyen utilisé, pour dire que parce que c'est lié à cela, dans la période d'attente de cinq ans que nous avons présentement, automatiquement, il y a suspension du casier après coup. Cela pourrait-il fonctionner?

Mme Elana Finestone:

Je crois que oui, tant que la première chose que l'on élimine, c'est la possession.

M. Glen Motz:

La possession de marijuana. Oui.

Mme Elana Finestone:

Ensuite, nous pourrions aller de l'avant dans les cinq ans. Nous ne voulons pas que cette possibilité disparaisse.

M. Glen Motz:

Oui.

Monsieur Cudjoe.

M. Gordon Cudjoe:

Cela peut fonctionner. Je dirais que dans ce cas, il est facile de faire imposer le fardeau sur la personne qui demande la suppression d'obtenir une copie de l'information pour montrer que c'est directement lié à la condamnation pou possession de marijuana.

M. Glen Motz:

D'accord.

Merci.

Le président:

Cela dit, je veux remercier les témoins de leur patience et de l'efficacité de leurs témoignages.

Nous allons maintenant suspendre la séance et nous poursuivrons à huis clos pour discuter des travaux futurs du Comité.

[La séance se poursuit à huis clos.]

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 06, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.