header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-05-07 PROC 153

Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs

(1105)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Good morning. Welcome to the 153rd meeting of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs.

For members' information, we're sitting in public.

Before we start, related to what we just saw, do you remember when we were discussing parallel chambers and also the elm tree and there was a question about who has the authority? You'll get this notice soon, but I had the researchers look into it and in 1867 when the Constitution was created, there was a transfer to a government department and then at the same time it was placed under the control of the Department of Public Works and Government Services.

You'll get this. It's being translated but I thought it would be interesting for people to know where the authority rested.

The minister can come on Thursday, May 16, related to the main estimates for the Leaders' Debates Commission.

The order of the day is committee business. I've asked the clerk for a short list of potential items of business that the committee discussed, which has been handed out.

These matters have been raised in committee or put on notice in recent weeks. Although there is no obligation for members to put their items forward for today's discussion, I thought it could help guide us in our deliberations.

I open the floor to the committee.

Ms. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC):

I'm not sure if I have to raise a point of order further to the situation with the bells and unfortunately where we had the time allocation vote on the last visit of the minister, but I wanted to bring forward again the motion I had.

I'm not sure. Was it tabled or did we just dismiss it because we were concerned we didn't have enough time to debate it?

The Clerk of the Committee (Mr. Andrew Lauzon):

The suggestion was that the committee would come back to it.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay, I do have another copy of it today here again.

The motion asks that we “continue the study of Security and Intelligence Threats to Elections; that the study consist of five meetings”—since the group didn't like the original 12 meetings I suggested, although I feel there is enough material for that when we cover all aspects of the spectrum from privacy to disinformation, which is the term that Jennifer Ditchburn prefers as indicated at the Policy Options breakfast this morning. I was happy to see our chair Larry Bagnell there.

Although there is not a lot of new information unfortunately but it would consist of five meetings so I think that seems reasonable. I recognize, in the context of the time that's left, it might be hard to fit this in, but five meetings seems enough.

Especially from my meeting with parliamentary secretary Virani it seems as though this would be a service to the government to help them get information. I'm seeing more and more that it's unfortunate the government wasn't able to consider this earlier because I see the solutions being very high level and complex, but perhaps even if we could provide any recommendations or insight, I think the minister would genuinely benefit from it and appreciate it as would, therefore, the government and Canadians, of course, which is the reason we're here.

As I said, it would consist of five meetings and the findings would be reported to the House.

Mr. Chair, thank you.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Just before I open the discussion I want to welcome Mr. Guy Caron to the committee. Just to let committee members know, I spoke in glowing terms of his role as a member of Parliament yesterday in the House. He comports himself very professionally so we like to have him at this committee because the members here are very forward thinking as well. It's great to have you here.

Mr. Guy Caron (Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, NDP):

Thank you.

The Chair:

To open discussion, we have Mr. Nader.

Mr. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, CPC):

I don't want to say too much. The motion is self-explanatory. I do think it's important that we, as the PROC committee, undertake the study. Five meetings are reasonable, but I don't think it's a hill that we're going to die on. If there's some flexibility, it would be important.

The one point I want to get on record is that it would be important to hear from at least the chair, if not all five members of the panel that's been created to oversee interference in the upcoming election. Even in the short period of time between when it was announced to today, we've seen a change in membership on that committee based on changes in the people who hold those positions.

There's a new Clerk of the Privy Council, who was the DM for foreign affairs, so it's a new position there as well. It would be important to hear from at least the chair, the Clerk of the Privy Council, if not all five members of the committee. Whether we do that in camera, if that's necessary, I don't think anyone would be opposed to that. At least hearing from the chair and members of the committee would be important, given the context of our being five months away from an election.

(1110)

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Thank you, Chair.

I'd like to thank Ms. Kusie for bringing this motion forward. However, we're in the last bit, the final stretch, and we had already gone through these matters. We had extended discussions and debates related to our elections on many occasions, but especially in our consideration of Bill C-76.

I know a lot of that time was filled up with debate unrelated to the matter itself and protecting Canadians, and there was an extended filibuster on that. That would have been an excellent opportunity to extend our study on that, but it's late in the game.

I know there's work already being done by the ethics committee on topics related to this. We've already discussed it and I don't see us getting into this at this particular stage.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC):

I want to confirm, for the discussion of this and any other items that come forward, and I think I'm right in looking at the schedule. We have 11 meetings left, not including today's meeting. One of those is taken up with having the minister, so I believe that's 10 additional meetings.

The Chair:

Half of one would be with the minister.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Fair enough, we have 10 and a half left.

It's probably unlikely that we're going to spend an entire meeting again on the committee schedule, our agenda. Am I right on that? Okay, so we have 10 and a half meetings. For anything we discuss, we should bear that in mind, because the issue now essentially is that one item will crowd another off the list. That is true regardless of which motion we're speaking to, or which subject matter we're speaking to.

The Chair:

Mrs. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I certainly appreciate Mr. Bittle's comments with regard to the discussion and evaluation of topics during Bill C-76. Unfortunately, I was not here for the bulk of it, but I feel as though that was really with regard to the legislation at hand. It was an opportunity to reflect upon, truly, the experts with regard to what I believe is the greatest challenge and the greatest threat facing our democratic institutions in the coming year. I don't think that is outrageous, outlandish or an exaggeration.

I want to be sure that the government is very clear on what it's doing and the message it is sending to Canadians in rejecting such a study. It's very grave. It's very serious. In our committee, this is potentially the greatest responsibility we have to the Canadian public, coming up within the short time frame. To reject a study on this is truly to do a rejection of our due diligence to the integrity of the election.

As a member of Parliament and as a shadow minister for democratic institutions, I don't want to accept that responsibility, that lack of due diligence and evaluation, so I would really ask that the government consider the message that it is sending to Canadians about its seriousness with regard to the integrity of the election in rejecting this motion.

(1115)

The Chair:

Do you have any comment on Mr. Nater's possible proposal that the meetings be in camera?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, I would absolutely be open to anything that we can find that will provide us some insight or shed some light. I genuinely believe the government, as in many nations across the world stage, is struggling to find, in this case, concrete legislative solutions, but also solutions in general to a challenge that has a significant effect on society.

Here, specifically, I'm speaking in terms of the integrity of the election, but beyond. I think it could do a great service to not only the integrity of the election but also to the piggybacking of the work, as my colleague Mr. Bittle mentioned at ethics as well. It would only enhance and maybe even confirm some of the work that they have done before us. I believe that's a piece of what they have done over there in regard to the privacy, largely.

Here we deal with matters that are more concrete, more specific, more real life, more immediate, for certain. Again, they have done this work, which I think is good, valuable work, and I have had conversations with the chair, my colleague—my apologies, the name of his riding escapes me right now—as well as other members of the ethics committee, the member for Thornhill, the member for Beaches—East York—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

You can use their names here.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Sorry. I appreciate that. I am formal by nature too, David, coming from the diplomatic world.

I feel as though this would—

Mr. Scott Reid:

In all fairness, your name is longer than your riding name, I think.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: You have a middle name, too.

Mr. Scott Reid: I do have a middle name but out of courtesy to my colleagues, I don't share it.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Okay, well, now I'm curious. I'll have to sneak a peek at your driver's licence or passport sometime.

The Chair:

The chair is Mr. Zimmer.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Of course, yes, Mr. Zimmer, since I can refer to him by name.... Thank you.

I generally feel that there would be so much to gain from this in so many dimensions of the public sphere and perhaps the private sphere as well, which, of course, we are not obligated to...but can certainly move towards that.

Again, I would really urge the government to consider this. I think even three or four meetings would provide great benefit if we received good briefing notes from ethics on where they left off. As I said, that's only one dimension of privacy. It doesn't get into the disinformation. Disinformation, I guess, would be the greatest other area for study. I really believe this would be of significant benefit to the government, and it would be a disservice to Canadians, since we have this time, to not look into it.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Do we know exactly what the ethics committee did on this?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I would have to check, but their study was largely related to privacy, as I understand it. I would ask our analysts to expand further if they have any more information specifically regarding the Cambridge Analytica scenario. I think they're doing a lot as well, as I understand it, with the grand committee, which is scheduled to meet, I believe, at the end of May in terms of privacy solutions.

But again, privacy is just one.... I see this as a component of election integrity. When I say “component”, maybe if I had to assign a percentile, it's 20% or 30%. Once you get into disinformation and databases, I would say 20% or 25%. I see it as a component, but I don't see it as the full picture or the full evaluation of what is required to attempt.

Again, I take great responsibility for this even within my own party, within the opposition, doing my own research and making recommendations from our point, but here certainly for Canadians it's a piece of it but it's not the entire picture. I think we owe it, as I said, to Canadians to attempt to get a piece of the bigger picture and attempt to provide the executive of our government with some concrete recommendations and potential solutions insofar as the time frame goes, because unfortunately, we are down to a very small time frame. As well, this touches on our time frame, our role as a single-nation state because I think that many of the solutions that are required become multilateral considerations.

Thank you, Chair.

(1120)

The Chair:

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I have a quick question.

What is the objective? What are we actually hoping to achieve?

If we do this study and we table it in the House, all we are really achieving is putting on the record all of the vulnerabilities in our election just before the election happens.

Here are the weaknesses. Good luck, everybody. Thank you.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

As I said, the objective would be to provide recommendations to the minister in an attempt to maintain the integrity of the election insofar as possible. That to me is the objective.

I think that our analysts are capable enough and we as a committee are prudent enough to be able to manage the content of the final report to have some control over that.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Can I ask you a question?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, sure.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

You can continue having the floor. I'm just trying to....

The Chair:

We're missing protocol.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

I'm just curious about how our recommendations are actually going to be....

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Implemented?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

No, not implemented. Sorry.

I wonder how they're going to be better than what they would be able to recommend themselves, those who are responsible for making sure our elections are secure, when we don't really have the clearance to really get the information and what the threats that we're facing actually are. I feel like we're going to get a very surface-level understanding of what the issues are. Those recommendations are really not going to hold a lot of weight because I think there are better people who have the necessary clearance to really know and understand what the threats are that we're facing. They have so much more information and tools at their disposal than our committee would really have to tackle that issue properly.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

First of all, let me say I'm very fortunate to have top secret clearance. It's a process that's very uncomfortable. I'm not sure everyone in this committee would want to undertake it.

Beyond that, I definitely hear what you're saying. I do consider this when I am personally evaluating solutions. Having said that, I think those with the knowledge are only a piece of the puzzle. It falls upon us for two reasons. One is for us to take in coordination the testimony of those with specifically.... It generally seems to fall to those with the technical knowledge. I would expect that, and that's why I proposed five meetings. Considerations from members of the media, academia, policy perspectives, which could be either of those two or other non-government organizations.... It falls upon us to collect the information and evaluate it. That's the one way that I see it.

I do see what you're saying, it's definitely been, not an obstruction but a consideration, and again something that was brought up in the Policy Options breakfast. It's something I also mentioned when I was at ethics as a witness, which is that certainly while as a former member of the public service of Canada I have great faith in our public service, I'm always very concerned about how we retain those candidates with the knowledge necessary. I might have even mentioned it here: Do you have to go to San Jose for a weekend, or go to the headquarters of Fortnite in an effort to obtain them? But I see that only as small piece, because I think there are many facets of society and many players to implicate and listen to.

The second one would be, in consideration of all that information amassed, if you will, the recommendations that we would make.

I just thought of this now as well. I look at the responsibility we agreed to take at the G20, G7 Charlevoix to be a global leader in this area. In fact, I would say that our doing this study helps fulfill our commitment to be this leader. Was it the G20 or the G7? It was G7 Charlevoix.

I think it was G7, anyway, where we committed to be leaders in this space. As parliamentarians, let's follow through on that. Thank you very much.

(1125)

The Chair:

Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

Thank you, Chair.

I just want to make a couple of points, in response to some of the discussion.

Mr. Graham made a point that we're going to have to put a report in and show all our weaknesses. That is a concern, but is it any less concerning than the alternative, which is that we bury our heads in the sand and say there are no threats to our democracy, no cyber-threats or threats from foreign influence? I think that would be an even more concerning direction to take, that we assume there are no threats or we bury our heads in the sand and say that we as parliamentarians don't see that threat.

That would be my first point, that there are threats and we recognize there are threats. There is no sense in denying it. We might as well address the concerns head on.

The second point is more general. Ms. Sahota touched on it a little as well, in terms of who the experts are in this field. Certainly the experts are there, and they are a part of the apparatus of government.

At the end of the day, Mr. Christopherson mentioned not too long ago that the Elections Act and elections are part of the bread and butter of this committee. This is what the committee is mandated to do within our Standing Orders. Our responsibility is the Canada Elections Act, and certainly the protection of our elections from foreign threats, from cyber-threats, is part of what we are mandated as a committee to study and to undertake.

As for shying away from this study because we aren't the experts, well, most parliamentarians aren't the experts on any number of the subject matters that may come before committee. It is our responsibility as democratically elected parliamentarians to undertake these studies, to undertake the recommendations. We do that by going to experts within the field, whether it is CSE, CSIS or other departments responsible for these things.

I sense where the room is at, in terms of where this motion is going. I just think it would be a shame if we, as the procedure and House affairs committee, did not at least undertake a study on this matter. I will leave it there, Chair.

The Chair:

Ms. Sahota, were you saying that the security committee of the House of Commons has more clearance, or whatever it is called, so it could have more information?

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

They do. Yes, the intelligence committee...public safety. All of us don't have the clearance that's needed. I do agree with what Mr. Nater is saying. We undertake a lot of studies. We're not the experts. Our job is to listen to the experts, but I still don't think that those experts.... I feel it's still going to be such a very high-level type of study that we're not going to be able to get down to real solutions in order for our agencies to take appropriate measures and actions.

It'll inform us a little, but I don't know what it will really achieve at the end of the day. If we had lots of time, I would like the idea. We would need lots of time to really get deep into that issue.

(1130)

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion?

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Can we have a recorded vote, please?

(Motion negatived: nays 5; yeas 4)

The Chair:

I just want to put my bias into committee business. Hopefully, sometime before the summer, we will do instructions to the researcher on the parallel chamber, because we've done so much work on it. I know Mr. Reid has a motion on it, too.

Go ahead.

Mr. Scott Reid:

This actually is not on the parallel chamber. On March 1 I circulated a notice of motion. I will not move the motion at the moment. I'd like to invite a little bit of discussion about it first.

The motion is about changing Standing Order 108(3)(a) to amend our own mandate. People can read the motion itself, but essentially it creates a situation where we would have a couple of new responsibilities. We would be reviewing and reporting on all matters related to the Centre Block rehabilitation project and the long-term vision and plan for the precinct—without intruding upon the responsibilities of others in this regard—and providing a report back on an annual basis to the House of Commons regarding any discussions or hearings we've had. Specifically, we would be undertaking a study and reporting back to the House by the end of this Parliament.

People seemed generally receptive to the general idea. I'm not sure if they were as receptive to this specific motion. In particular, I'd asked Mr. Bittle to get a sense of whether or not his own House leadership was generally favourable to the idea—possibly even favourable to the motion itself—and he said he'd get back to me. So I wonder if we could just have a brief discussion about whether or not there is an openness to moving forward with the motion or perhaps, in a less specific way, to moving toward taking some responsibility, and maybe a lot of responsibility, for providing oversight on this very significant and expensive project.

The Chair:

Thank you.

Yes, I think there was not only general support from all the parties. There were also some passionate interventions by members of Parliament that they definitely wanted input into future renovations of both this building and Centre Block—that it's our workplace and we should have some input. I think it was agreed to by the administration that we didn't have sufficient input into the renovations to this building in particular.

I'll open the discussion. I don't want to prejudge the committee, but I think there was certainly positive reception for something in this line. People might have suggestions on the wording, but let's hear from the parties.

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you so much.

I did undertake Mr. Reid's request. I did speak to individuals. It didn't come up again and I forgot to update him, but we have no concerns with this. We're happy to discuss this as an item in positive terms and move forward on it.

I don't know how you wish to structure it. Mr. Simms and I were discussing beforehand how this might look. I don't know if we need more than a meeting to really go through it. I think both of us said that we'd like to hear from you about how you thought a “study” would look, but that might just be a matter for discussion between us.

In terms of a witness, I don't even know who that would be. We were thinking a meeting or two related to this would be reasonable, but we're happy to hear from you on how you see this coming forward. We're more than happy to discuss this and we think it's a good initiative.

Mr. Guy Caron: Mr. Chair—

(1135)

The Chair:

If I may, Mr. Caron, Mr. Christopherson is very passionate about this committee having input into the Centre Block renovations.

Mr. Guy Caron:

I understand, but I have one question for Mr. Reid about this.

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. Guy Caron:

When I was at the public accounts committee, I remember studying the rehabilitation of some of the buildings. Is there such a project with the public accounts committee or with the AG?

Mr. Scott Reid:

The Board of Internal Economy does. I haven't heard of public accounts being involved at all, but that doesn't mean they aren't. It may just be that I'm ill-informed. Definitely, the Board of Internal Economy is involved.

The trouble, in a nutshell, is that the Board of Internal Economy can't report back to the House. Ultimately, it's the House itself that would want to assert—I hesitate to use the word “control”, because we're talking about a building that's shared with the Senate—the kind of oversight that lets us say definitively that we want this feature to be present, or we are profoundly unhappy with the timeline that's been proposed, or that cost structure needs to get signed off by somebody. It has to be the House of Commons as a whole.

The trouble is that the board can't report to the House. We can report to the House. It could be any committee, but it needs to be a committee of Parliament—an actual committee, as opposed to the board—doing the detail work of hearing the witnesses, keeping track of the changes from one year to the next through multiple Parliaments, because the Centre Block won't be finished until multiple Parliaments have gone through, and potentially multiple changes of ministers and even possibly governments.

All we can do is report to the House. Then the report can be debated and potentially enacted, and it becomes a House order to the people who are actually doing this work on our behalf. That's the logic of it.

Does that answer your question?

Mr. Guy Caron:

It does.

I just wanted to see if what was taking place through public accounts or through the AG office was a punctual thing or a recurrent thing, but it seems to be punctual.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes.

The Chair:

David Christopherson is on public accounts. If they were doing anything on those topics, we would have heard loud and clear.

Mr. Guy Caron:

He would have reported it.

Mr. Scott Reid:

May I respond to Mr. Bittle?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

First of all, I want to ask if it would be appropriate, in your opinion, for me to move the motion.

If it would be, why don't I do that? Then I'll speak very briefly to the question of how many meetings and that kind of thing.

The Chair:

Does everyone have this?

A voice: Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Let me move the motion.

In speaking to it, I would just say that I don't have strong opinions on how many meetings we ought to have. Because the report date is the very last day we're sitting, I suggest that we don't have to tie ourselves in. We can fill in empty spots that arise with the other matters we're discussing here.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid, for people listening on the radio, could you read at least the first paragraph of your motion, so they know what we're discussing?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Forgive me. I listen to this, too. Yes, I will read the motion: That the Committee undertake a study of Standing Order 108(3)(a) to consider amending the Committee’s mandate to include the review, study, and report to the House on all matters pertaining to the Centre Block Rehabilitation Project and the Long Term Vision and Plan (LTVP) for the Parliamentary Precinct, notwithstanding other review or oversight authorities, by adding the following new subsections to Standing Order 108(3)(a):

Then it goes to (x) because there's an enumerated list. This is the end of a very long list in that particular standing order: (x) the review of and report on all matters relating to the Centre Block Rehabilitation Project and the Long Term Vision and Plan (LTVP) for the Parliamentary Precinct, notwithstanding other review or oversight authorities that exist or that may be established;

I'll do the rest in French.

(1140)

[Translation] (xi) the review of an annual report on the Centre Block Rehabilitation Project and the Long Term Vision and Plan (LTVP) for the Parliamentary Precinct, including current and projected timelines, the current state of incurred and projected expenditures, and any changes therein since the last report on these matters, provided that the committee may report on these matters at any time, and that the committee annually includes a recommendation respecting the continued retention of Standing Orders 108(3)(a)(x) and 108(3)(a)(xi).”; and, that it report its recommendations to the House no later than its last meeting in June 2019. [English]

The Chair:

Good.

Maybe the minute-taker could use the motion we handed out, because it has the letters behind that you didn't read out.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes, that's right.

The Chair:

Due to timing and everything, I would suggest that we try to do it in May, because you never know what's going to come before this committee. There could be points of privilege or something.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's true.

The Chair:

We wouldn't want it to fall between the cracks.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I agree with that. I do want to say one other thing here, that we submit the recommendations to the House, essentially for the change to the standing order, and then we simply see. If the House is willing to support it by unanimous consent, we could go forward, or if not, we could just let the matter die in the House, but we would report back in time to give the House that choice.

I only think it makes sense to pursue something such as this if it has widespread support.

The Chair:

What if it did die in the House for maybe one vote or something? Is there an option to recommend it to the PROC of the next Parliament? The PROC of the next Parliament can either agree or disagree with our recommendation, but at least it would be on their agenda.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Part of the reason I said that was that the only way to get a vote in the House is to have a concurrence debate. As a practical matter, it's very hard to arrange a concurrence debate that late in the Parliament. My natural inclination on something such as this, to look towards unanimous consent, is doubled when you face that type of practical consideration.

As someone who has been on the committee a long time, I would just say, there's no formal mechanism, but the next PROC is likely to take very seriously that which was said by the current PROC on something such as this.

The Chair:

It is or isn't likely to do so?

Mr. Scott Reid:

It is, pretty much so.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What's stopping us from sending a recommendation letter to the next version of ourselves? Have you thought of that?

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's true.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

PROC could write a letter to say to our future self that it should look at these issues that we raised.

Mr. Scott Reid:

It's like the movie Groundhog Day, where he breaks the pencil so that his future self, when he wakes up, will know.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

That's right.

As a practical matter, that's what we can do with this, and say, “Dear PROC of the 43rd Parliament, follow this.”

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes.

The Chair:

I think I had Mr. Nater on the list.

Mr. John Nater:

Maybe just following up on that, there's also the option for the next PROC, as part of the routine motions at the beginning of the 43rd Parliament, to do a routine motion that PROC undertake an ongoing study every six months or every calendar year on this. That's an option, too.

Just very briefly, in terms of our limited time going forward, personally I think it would be nice to hear from Mr. Wright from the public works department on this matter. He seems to be the designated departmental official on this. It would be nice to hear from him one last time before we adjourn for dissolution.

Perhaps a potential second witness would be the architects we had previously before the committee: Centrus, or something such as that.

The Chair:

Do you mean the ones we had at the December meeting?

Mr. John Nater:

Yes. It would be just to hear whether there have been any updates in terms of what they've found since we vacated the premises, whether there's anything new that they can share on that matter.

The third and final point would be an actual briefing from someone, whether that's Mr. Wright or someone else, on the long-term vision and plan, what is actually currently on record as having been approved going forward. There were different suggestions at the last meeting of what was approved, when it was approved.

Mr. Reid has talked before about the second phase of the visitor welcome centre. I think we're all in the dark as to exactly what is currently approved in terms of this blasting on the front lawn to dig a new visitor welcome centre. It would be nice to know what has been approved and what's currently the plan.

Those are the three points we could do, whether that's in one single meeting or two half meetings. They would generally be the witnesses I'd want to hear. That's somewhat independent of the actual motion itself, because the motion is recommending a change, but it ties in, hand in hand.

(1145)

The Chair:

Would you want them before we finalize the motion?

Mr. John Nater:

I don't think we necessarily need that. They're somewhat independent, because the motion is a structure to report.

I'd personally like to hear from those witnesses before we adjourn this Parliament. I'm flexible on that.

The Chair:

It makes sense to me.

Mr. Bittle, I think you asked the question of Mr. Reid.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

That's fine. If it's a meeting or two, that works for us.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid, you have Mr. Nater's suggestion.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I think we should deal with that as a committee, rather than amending the motion to contain it. I would suggest scheduling it.

The Chair:

Yes.

Did you want to have a meeting on the motion, or do you want to have a meeting with those witnesses and then have the motion at the end of that meeting? What are your thoughts?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Why don't we try to see if we can adopt the motion now and then move towards that?

We aren't actually tying ourselves to a specific number of meetings. That allows maximum flexibility for the committee to have as few as one and as many as the committee decides.

The Chair:

The proposal is to finish discussion on the motion right now, and then I'll go to discussion on the other people. Is there any further discussion on the motion?

(Motion agreed to)

The Chair: It's unanimous.

Now let's discuss a meeting for the witnesses Mr. Nater just suggested. Is anyone opposed to our trying to get those witnesses in as soon as possible for a meeting?

The Clerk:

Committee members will recall that we've had witnesses already on an ongoing study having to do with the Centre Block rehabilitation project. I just asked the chair whether the witnesses suggested by Mr. Nater would be a continuation of that study, or whether the witnesses would be specifically tied to the study on the potential recommended standing order change.

Mr. John Nater:

I think Mr. Reid's motion is almost a stand-alone. I suspect the witnesses won't be speaking directly to the change in the committee's mandate. Certainly, they're connected, but I think it would be a stand-alone motion.

My only question is whether we would need to hear witnesses from the clerk, perhaps on this motion itself, but I don't know if that would be necessary.

The Chair:

Mr. Reid's motion, as the clerk says, does refer to undertaking a study. Do we need the study now that we've approved the motion? We've approved a motion that says we're going to undertake a study.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The study is of Standing Order 108(3)(a).

The Chair:

Right.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The real question is whether this is the right way, whether we want to recommend these changes to the Standing Orders themselves. That's what we would be reporting back to the House on.

If we invite witnesses, it will be not so much to say, “Hey, tell us more about this.” Rather, it's to say we're trying to figure out whether or not this particular change will work, and if so, what sort of reporting over the next decade or more they would be making to us, or who else we should be contacting.

For example, I think in Mr. Wright's most recent appearance, he referred to our parliamentary partners. It was unclear to me who the parliamentary partners were. We would be trying to figure out the practicalities of who they're communicating with now, how authority is flowing through, who is authorizing the contracts that have been, I gather, given out for the changes to the visitor welcome centre—the visitor welcome centre phase two—and who they've consulted with in terms of the impact this is going to have on the other uses for the front lawn.

I'm just looking at that one part of the project, but I assume it's going to have an impact on our Canada Day celebrations for the next decade or so, and that this is being cleared by somebody.

Do you see what I'm saying? It's all about how the reporting works and how they would interact with us, how their other parliamentary partners would interact with us. At the end of hearing some of that witness testimony, we'd be better equipped to say whether or not these suggested changes to the Standing Orders make sense or are a bad idea. Then, our report back could—

(1150)

The Chair:

Those witnesses would be related to this study of the standing order.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's what I would suggest, yes, as a way of figuring out whether.... Even if in the end, the committee decides that these suggested changes to the Standing Orders are not a good idea, we would as a group have a clearer idea about where the lines of communication are and are not. All we know for sure right now is that whatever loop there is, we're outside of it, and so apparently are most of the other people in the House of Commons.

The Chair:

Okay. We'll have a meeting with the witnesses that Mr. Nater suggested, and then we'll have a meeting on your report, basically, reporting back as to whether or not we make a recommendation on those standing order changes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

That's right.

The Chair:

Is that okay?

Just review the witnesses for the clerk again, the ones you suggested, Mr. Nater.

Mr. John Nater:

My suggestions would be Mr. Wright from public works, or whomever else is deemed necessary from public works; the architects we had at the December meeting to see if there's anything new; and then an appropriate authority to go over the long-term vision and plan for what's currently been approved. Whether that would be from House administration or....

The Chair:

Okay, so we have one hour where we would have the first two witnesses, and you said in the second hour there would be a presentation of the long-term vision and plan. They know that there is a presentation of that plan—

Mr. John Nater:

Yes, so whether it's within the same two-hour meeting or one hour and one hour, we'd do whatever works for the witnesses.

The Chair:

Okay. We'll try to do it in the same meeting. If not, is that okay?

We'll set another meeting to make the report and discussion as soon thereafter as we can on the schedule.

Is everyone in agreement with that? Good.

We'll go to further committee business.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I have another two actually.

The next thing I had on the list that was circulated here was that a motion was put on notice about having the commissioner of Canada elections appear in relation to SNC-Lavalin. Should I read that motion, Mr. Chair?

The Chair:

Go ahead.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. The motion is simply: That the Commissioner of Canada Elections appear before the Procedure and House Affairs Committee to discuss the illegal contributions made by SNC-Lavalin to the Liberal Party of Canada and his decision to issue a compliance agreement.

The Chair:

Don't forget, when you're doing your list about committee members, my bias of giving direction to the researcher on the parallel chamber study that we did.

Is there discussion on the motion that was just read?

Go ahead, yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Mr. Côté provided a brief statement on the subject as well. I will read this into the record. Unfortunately, I only have it in English or else I'd distribute it. I apologize for that. He says, and this was on May 2: In light of renewed media interest in a 2016 decision by the Commissioner of Canada Elections to enter into a compliance agreement with SNC-Lavalin Group Inc. and certain allegations made concerning the circumstances surrounding the conclusion of this agreement, the Commissioner wishes to provide clarifications in the interest of maintaining public confidence in the integrity of the Canada Elections Act's compliance and enforcement regime. The Commissioner carries out his compliance and enforcement mandate with complete independence from the government of the day, including from the Prime Minister's Office or any Minister's office, from any elected official or their staff, and from any public servant. At no time, since the current Commissioner was appointed in 2012, has an attempt been made by any elected official or political staffer to influence or to interfere with any compliance or enforcement decision that did not directly involve them as the subject of the investigation.

I guess this next part was intended as a statement by the commissioner. This must be intended as the part that's for media quotation, because it's indented and in italics. The independence of the Commissioner is a key component of our electoral compliance and enforcement regime. In my time as Commissioner, there has never been any attempt by elected officials, political staffers or public servants to influence the course of an investigation or to interfere with our work. And I want to make it clear that if this ever happened, I would promptly and publicly denounce it.

He obviously was very concerned about that. He then provides a little bit of background information. Compliance and enforcement decisions are taken in a manner consistent with the Compliance and Enforcement Policy of the Commissioner of Canada Elections. Paragraph 32 outlines the various factors that go into determining which compliance or enforcement tool is most appropriate in a given case. With respect to SNC-Lavalin, some of the factors that were taken into consideration are outlined in the compliance agreement. As noted at paragraph 32(b) of the Policy, the evidence gathered during an investigation is an important consideration in determining how to deal with a particular case. This calls for an objective review of the evidence that has been assembled to assess its strength. In this regard, it should be noted that a compliance agreement may be entered into on the basis of evidence meeting the civil standard of balance of probabilities, while the laying of criminal charges requires evidence that meets the criminal standard of proof beyond a reasonable doubt. It should be noted that through amendments to the Act made with Bill C-23 in 2014, the longstanding practice of the Commissioner to not provide details of investigations was confirmed, with the adoption of clear confidentiality rules. This is consistent with the manner police and investigative agencies treat information related to their investigations

That's the statement. I think that indicates some limits that we would have to place on ourselves with regard to confidentiality. I think we would, as a committee, as long as we're cognizant of that, be able to get some useful additional information as to how this policy functions and how it functioned in this particular case.

I will just say that I accept at face value the commissioner's statement that there was no attempt made by any elected officials or political staffers to interfere or influence. We're simply trying to figure out how this all works and to see to what extent this is consistent with other practices. The obvious parallel here is with the Dean Del Mastro prosecution that resulted in the laying of charges.

I don't know what the commissioner would say. I can kind of guess based on his statement, but only if he comes here can we get a full explanation, so that is the basis and the rationale for the motion.

(1155)

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Thank you so much.

There has been a troubling pattern over the last little while at this committee. First, we had the Clerk of the House of Commons here, and the Conservatives brought down their whip to question his integrity without any evidence. They did this even though the Clerk had reached out to the House leader's office directly to ask if he could proceed, but there was no response and his integrity was questioned.

Then the Chief Electoral Officer came. I know we may disagree on certain points of policy, and I know we have disagreed with the Conservatives about recommendations that have been made. I haven't been on this committee since the start, but we have had an incredible working relationship with the Chief Electoral Officer. I didn't think it would be possible for any member to stand up and question his integrity. Well, that happened last week as well when the honourable member from Carleton gleefully called him a “Liberal lapdog”. I think I got it wrong last time, and he corrected me, and he was gleeful in that correction. Then they brought someone else in to do this, and I hope the members who are typically here wouldn't engage in this, but they questioned his integrity even though he had no involvement. The law says he has no involvement and there's no evidence that he did, but there was a gleeful willingness to question his integrity

Then in the next hour there were valid concerns about the way in which David Johnston was appointed. We heard it from Mr. Christopherson, and we heard it from the Conservative Party last time, and there was disagreement as to that. I would have thought that David Johnston would have been one of the individuals in this country whose integrity could not be questioned, based on his work, yet we had the Conservative Party question his integrity. He had to defend his own integrity, inviting his detractors to look at his lifetime of work. All of this was done without any evidence, without any provocation. Now, once again, Conservative Party wishes to call in another public official to question their integrity without any evidence.

I don't know if they appreciate the irony of doing this, of calling in an independent prosecutor to question their decision. I've used this term before, “the Nobel Prize for irony”. I don't know if that's a thing but it seems you're in the running. You criticize the government for contemplating asking a question about the direction of a prosecution and a deferred prosecution agreement, and you had that out there for a couple of months. “How dare you?” they said. We heard this for two months and no laws were broken, as stated by the witnesses. “How dare you even think about asking such a question?”

Now we wish to call an investigator, an independent investigator-prosecutor from the office of the director of public prosecutions, and question this person about their decision. It boggles the mind and it is unbelievable how desperate the Conservative Party is to have SNC discussed that they are willing to go back on everything they have said over the last couple of months in order to achieve that goal.

At the end of the day, my understanding is that the justice committee is still going through its estimates process, that the commissioner of Canada elections is still under their jurisdiction in terms of the estimates process, and that there will be an opportunity....

(1200)



I don't think I'll be supporting the motion at the end of the day anyway, but I'd like to clear it up just so we have a really truthful motion. I'd like to propose an amendment so that the motion reads: That the Commissioner of Elections Canada appear before the Committee to discuss the illegal contributions made by SNC-Lavalin to the Liberal Party of Canada and the Conservative Party of Canada and his decision to issue a compliance agreement to SNC-Lavalin and Pierre Poilievre.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Chris, do you have the wording to give to us?

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle, he was just asking if you have the wording.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Forgive me, I was up with David discussing what we'll be doing this summer—

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Scott Reid: —and I suddenly realized we were through the rhetoric and onto the substance. I didn't get back in time to start making notes, so that's my bad.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

The amendment would be at the end of the second line, which would read, “to the Liberal Party of Canada and the Conservative Party of Canada”.

(1205)

Mr. Scott Reid:

Forgive me. Can I just stop and ask a factual question in the middle of that? Was the illegal contribution you're referring to made to the Conservative Party of Canada or was it to a riding association of the Conservative Party of Canada? Do you know?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I'm not 100% familiar, but if you're supportive of that, that's a question that can be asked.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Does anybody know the answer to that question? The compliance agreement with Pierre or with his campaign suggests it was to his riding association as opposed to the Conservative Party itself—unless this was in the context of his being the minister at the time. I'm just trying figure out what.... You can understand my concern for precision. I don't want put down a factually incorrect statement in a motion. If you can figure that out—I just don't have the information in front of me—then we could.... I see what you want to do. I want to make sure it's correct, and then we could probably vote in favour of it.

Chris, Stephanie looked this up on the CBC's website. It says here—and I'm quoting from the relevant news story—“The Conservative Party of Canada netted far less as a result of the scheme. The party received $3,137, while various Conservative Party riding associations and candidates were given $5,050.” Are we sure this is in the context of the...? Yes, it is. Sorry, I'm just seeing this now, $83,534 to the Liberal Party, various Liberal associations....

Would you be open to a bit of an amendment to your amendment, Chris? No. Do you mind if I...?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Let's hear it. I'll hear it, fair enough.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. Yes, that's true. Anyway, let me tell you what it is and you can decide about it.

I think what we're getting at is that if we're going to do this, it would make sense to make it to the Liberal and Conservative parties of Canada and various riding associations of the Liberal and Conservative parties of Canada. That would be the suggestion. What you're really doing is that you're pointing out that, in addition to SNC-Lavalin having given money to the Liberal Party of Canada, it gave it to the Conservative Party of Canada, which is obviously factually correct. Additionally it was to various riding associations of both parties.

If we want to bring in Pierre Poilievre, I assume it's because we're making reference to his riding association. I assume it must have one of them. Nepean—Carleton, I'm guessing. Therefore, we would have to make reference to the riding association donations or we're getting someone who literally can't talk to the subject matter. I would want, as well, to extend it to include the relevant members of Parliament, both Conservatives and Liberals, for both parties. That might take a bit of research to find out who they are, but would that seem reasonable to you? We're basically trying to extend the net to include everybody who has been included on both sides.

The Chair:

Mr. Caron.

Mr. Guy Caron:

To which we should add, actually, that in the same article, they're talking about four candidates for the leadership of the Liberal Party who received funds as well.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is that right?

Mr. Guy Caron:

Yes, according to the article. I have it in French, too.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. Unfortunately, this is not my phone. It just locked, so I can't.....

Maybe, if we're doing that, we should say, “and leadership candidates” and then “consult with any or all of the individuals who were...”.

Guy, I'm looking at you for this. If we're mentioning Pierre by name, we should probably mention any of the people involved who signed compliance agreements.

(1210)

Mr. Guy Caron:

In the article, there are no names involved, so I cannot tell you which ones.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Right.

I'll stop there because I've managed to not actually come up with a single wording, but that would be my suggestion as to how to deal with this amendment.

The Chair:

Where exactly are we, Mr. Reid?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'm waiting for a response from Chris.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I don't agree to this as a friendly amendment. We believe that the hypocrisy of this should be pointed out. That's why the motion should include.... I believe that if we say “Liberal Party of Canada” and “Conservative Party of Canada,” we've included riding associations and whatnot. I think that's—

Mr. Scott Reid:

Including their riding associations...?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

To me it doesn't matter, but I think the important thing is to have.... I guess the most shocking thing was to have Mr. Poilievre come down here and question the integrity of the Chief Electoral Officer and the commissioner of Elections Canada.

He himself received and negotiated a compliance agreement, which is a valid legal settlement, so if the Conservative Party is going to criticize what the commissioner did on one thing, they should also attack Mr. Poilievre's also receiving one, and maybe demand that he see his day in court as well. Let's keep it all in there. I'd like to keep my amendment as it is.

A voice: If he could be asked to provide a wording—

Mr. Scott Reid:

He's not accepting the wording, so there's no need for a revised wording.

I'm going to suggest another revision then. I'm very glad this is not an in camera meeting.

I'm working from what I have written down as Chris's proposed amendment, which is itself an adjustment to my motion. It would read, “That the Commissioner of Canada Elections and Pierre Poilievre appear before the Committee to discuss the illegal contributions made by SNC-Lavalin to the Liberal Party of Canada and the Conservative Party of Canada and their riding associations, and his decision to issue compliance agreements”.

The Chair:

Is that a subamendment to the amendment?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I guess so. I don't actually know at this point what it would be procedurally.

Could it be considered a subamendment? Is that permissible?

The Clerk:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Let's do it that way. That way we can have an up and down vote on that one if we wish, or further debate.

May I assume, Mr. Chair, that we're in the debate on the subamendment now?

The Chair:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay.

I think this accomplishes covering most things. It does not cover the four contributions that Mr. Caron mentioned with regard to party leadership contestants, simply because I think we were spiralling into a lot of confusion, but it does deal with the key subject matter at hand, which is SNC-Lavalin's unlawful contributions. Nobody disputes that because there are compliance agreements out there. Everybody's in agreement, including the recipients, that these were not lawful contributions. This provides a really good opportunity to look at the underlying question.

I went to some lengths, in reading that statement, to make the point that this is not about trying to cast aspersions on any elected official or staffer up here. This is about trying to find out how justice is administered in this particular case, and there is no better way to do it than via a study that encompasses all those who were recipients of these illegal contributions at the level of electoral riding associations.

That's my sales pitch.

(1215)

The Chair:

Ms. Kusie.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

I feel as though, Chair, this has the same theme as my previous suggested motion.

Mr. Bittle, are you sure? This really will be the WWF of PROC. We're getting into the creamed corn here. This is bad. I'd like to offer the government one more opportunity. Let's put the motion as it is. We'll do a recorded vote. If it reveals nothing else, there's no harm, no foul, and we move on. I suggest that to the government, just make sure.

Thank you, Chair.

The Chair:

Is there any further discussion before we vote?

The committee will suspend for a couple of minutes.

(1215)

(1220)

The Chair:

Are we ready to vote on the subamendment?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes. We would like a recorded vote.

The Chair:

We will have a recorded vote.

(Subamendment negatived: nays 5; yeas 4)

The Chair: We're now on the amendment.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I was jotting down my own notes for the subamendment. I didn't get the amendment.

Could either Chris or the clerk read it?

The Chair:

Chris, do you want to?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

At the end of line two, it's “and the Conservative Party of Canada”. Then it ends, “and his decision to issue a compliance agreement to SNC-Lavalin and Pierre Poilievre.”

Mr. Scott Reid:

Would you be able to say "compliance agreements", plural?

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Yes.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Forgive me, but I have one other question to ask. You're aware that the Pierre Poilievre compliance agreement is not with relation to SNC-Lavalin. That's on a separate matter.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I'm aware.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Okay. Good. I have no further comments.

The Chair:

We'll have a recorded vote on the amendment.

(Amendment agreed to: yeas 9; nays 0)

The Chair: Now we'll have the vote on the motion as amended.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'd like a recorded vote.

The Chair:

We'll have a recorded vote.

Just for the wording, Mr. Reid, would it be a friendly amendment that the committee “invite” the Commissioner of Canada Elections to appear?

Mr. Scott Reid:

Yes. If everybody else is agreeable to it, I certainly am.

The Chair:

We have a recorded vote on the motion as amended.

(Motion as amended negatived: nays 5; yeas 4)

The Chair: Carrying on committee business, I'll go to Mr. Caron, but I'm wondering if I could get the permission of the committee to use Thursday's meeting to give instructions to the researcher on our parallel chamber report.

Mr. Reid.

(1225)

Mr. Scott Reid:

I'd be fine with that.

The Chair:

Is anyone opposed?

That's great. We'll do that on Thursday.

Mr. Caron. [Translation]

Mr. Guy Caron:

I'd like to say that I am quite pleased to set aside the motion Mr. Christopherson wanted to present and to let him introduce it at some subsequent date. I will not introduce it this morning. [English]

The Chair:

Okay. We're not discussing that motion today.

On that list I handed out, is there anything we haven't dealt with yet?

Mr. Scott Reid:

There's my point of order, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

We tried to do things while you were away, but it didn't work.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The point of order I wanted to.... You remember when this came up. We had a committee meeting on April 11. The bells were ringing and we had a witness, I believe, so you opened the meeting and sought unanimous consent so that we could hear some testimony from the witness. You obtained unanimous consent as soon as the meeting was in session. We heard from the witness and then people went off to votes in the House.

My own interpretation of the Standing Orders is that the chair of a committee cannot have unanimous consent to begin the meeting. Therefore, it is out of order to begin a meeting when the bells are already ringing. By way of contrast, if the meeting is already taking place, it's an easy matter to get that note.

The practical significance of this—it's not a vast significance—was that a number of people, me included, did not come to the meeting on the assumption that it wasn't happening. This really was a good faith misunderstanding or a different interpretation of where the rule lies.

I think my understanding is correct. I'm prepared to accept that my understanding might be incorrect, but one way or the other, I'd like to see it resolved.

The problem we face is simply this: In this committee, in any committee, you can't make a decision that locks the House in place. We always say we are the masters of our own affairs in committees. Of course the same is true in spades in either direction, but I think it would be helpful to try to figure this out. I'm not exactly sure of the right mechanism for doing that, for getting a yes or no answer to my own interpretation of the Standing Orders. I simply throw that out to other members to think about.

The Chair:

I'll give you two options, Mr. Reid. I'll give you the short answer or the long answer. The short answer is that there's nothing in the Standing Orders that precluded me from doing that. There is a thing in the Standing Orders precluding me from doing it if the bells start during a meeting, which would leave us two choices.

We cannot do anything, but there are two choices. We could make a suggestion for a change in the procedures of our committee so that it's clarified or we could actually do a report to the House and try to get it changed for all committees.

The long answer is that I could read out what I just said in great lengthy terms as prepared by the clerk, if you would like.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Is it an option? You sound somewhat reluctant.

The Chair:

No, I'm fine.

Mr. Scott Reid:

The other option, as I said, is that you could circulate it. It would be helpful to have that in writing.

Ultimately, as I've said, I'd like an instruction from the House to have the standing order explicitly say it means this or it means that; either is satisfactory. Having it explicit is what I'm really after.

(1230)

The Chair:

We could solve it for our committee quite easily by making it something here. If you want it to go to to the House for all committees, then that's more problematic, but we can do that.

Mr. Scott Reid:

I only want to suggest that if committee members are willing to do that. I may be the only one who's fixated on this, and if that's the case, then I would be wasting people's time pursuing it. Could we actually start with getting a sense of what other people think, and whether this is just my own fixation as opposed to a real issue? If they think it's a real issue, then we should, I think, look at taking it to the House, and if they think it's just me, then I should just let the matter drop.

The Chair:

Okay, that's a good point. Just so people know what we're talking about. This is Standing Order 115(5): Notwithstanding Standing Orders 108(1)(a) and 113(5), the Chair of a standing, special, legislative or joint committee shall suspend the meeting when the bells are sounded to call in the Members to a recorded division, unless there is unanimous consent of the members of the committee to continue to sit.

That's what happens if the bells ring while we're here. However, it's silent on what happens if they ring before. That's what we could clarify either for our committee procedures or propose to the House for all committee procedures, because it's not clarified. But as Mr. Reid's asking what the thoughts of the committee are generally, we'll open it up for that.

Mr. Caron. [Translation]

Mr. Guy Caron:

I am reluctant.

What I am trying to avoid in this committee are unforeseen adverse effects. I think that if the bells start to ring and the meeting has not yet begun, it is the responsibility of the chair to reconvene the meeting sometime after the vote the bells signal has taken place.

The possibility of beginning the meeting while the bells are ringing may raise various problems, and different strategic tactics could be used by certain parties, subsequently. I would have trouble accepting an interpretation according to which the chair would be authorized to begin a meeting while the bells are still ringing.

Consequently, I do not agree, not necessarily for reasons I can explain right now, but because of the potential use of that provision as a probable loophole later. [English]

The Chair:

Yes, I think that's a good point.

Just to let you know the context of this particular one, it was a minister who was here on the estimates and ministers are really hard to come by, so we wanted to at least get their opening statement because we might not get it. All the representatives who were here from each party agreed, as well as the two vice-chairs, so that all the parties had agreed at the time, but we did not make the effort to contact Mr. Reid or others who weren't here, which was probably a mistake. That's just to let you know the context.

But you've made a very good point that you wouldn't want that type of interpretation to be misused.

Are there any other thoughts?

Mr. Scott Reid:

I would say that we hopefully can get some Liberal feedback of some sort. They're not normally shy about contradicting me.

The Chair:

Mr. Graham is never shy.

Go ahead.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

My own instinct is that if the chair has the consent of members of all parties, then I don't see a problem. That's my own personal opinion. If any of the parties objected, I totally get it. It shouldn't happen, but when people from all parties present say, yes, we can do it, I can't find a reason not to allow that.

The Chair:

Mr. Bittle.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

I wasn't there for that meeting. Who was in attendance when the meeting started?

The Chair:

Ms. Kusie, do you remember? You were here and Mr. Christopherson was here, I think.

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie:

Yes, I was here. At the very beginning, no one was here except the minister and me. Then it was Mr. Christopherson and I think Linda trickled in at some point. I don't....

The Chair:

There was a quorum.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

There was a quorum and there was consent. I guess that's the question I have. There was quorum and there was consent to hear the witnesses. Even if there were a rule in place, would that have been acceptable?

I appreciate it and I'm happy to just proceed going forward that, in the absence of consent, we wouldn't start a meeting if the bells were ringing. I appreciate Scott's concern. I don't think it was malicious. It was to get a minister's statement in. I guess I don't have strong opinions either way on the subject, but I understand the concern. There seemed to have been, from my understanding, consent to proceed. Even if there were a rule in place, the seven minutes or eight minutes allotted to the minister still would have gone forward. I guess I leave it to the committee. Again, I don't have strong feelings either way.

(1235)

The Chair:

Part of the point in that particular case was that we'd come back after the bells, for sure, but there may not have been time to ask questions of the minister. By getting her statement out of the way, it certainly made sure that when she came back there would be time for questions. It was more of a functional thing—we were just checking out if everyone was okay—rather than a procedural thing.

Mr. Reid.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Again, I emphasize that I think everything was done with the best intention of conforming with the Standing Orders as they were sincerely believed to be in the minds of those who were present. It was unanimous consent. You asked for it and they gave it. Clearly, everybody who was here thought so, and that was the majority of the committee, which means, ipso facto, that the impression I've had of the Standing Orders is a minority impression.

One thing that's clear is that there's not an enormous appetite to discuss this at this time. We've now had a chance to discuss this, and it's a public meeting, so it's on the record. I don't think we're going to be in a position to make recommendations to the House as a whole. Maybe we could just conclude the subject by getting an indication from you as to how you would act in a parallel circumstance, should it arise between now and the end of this Parliament, and we'll know whether to head for the House in such a situation or to head here.

Before I ask you for that, I'll just say that it's not as problematic for this committee. We are meeting directly below the House of Commons, which is one floor up. It would obviously be a more serious practical matter if it was a meeting that was taking place in the Wellington Building, say, or the Valour Building, which will never arise for us but does arise for others.

That's not to push you in either direction, because nothing you do here will have a precedent for anybody else. It is simply to point out that you can validly go one way or the other, as long as you are clear as to which practice you'll be following, we'll know.

The Chair:

My sense, from the comment we just had, is that there didn't seem to be a problem if all parties that have a seat on the committee were in agreement. I think that on the next occasion I would also endeavour to do not only that, but also, if possible, send a quick email to every member of the committee so that one of the few people, like you, who didn't come to the room would know that we were going to proceed that way.

I don't think this would happen very often, but that's how I would proceed.

Mr. Scott Reid:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

Is that okay with everyone? Is there any further business before the end of this meeting?

For Thursday, can you can come back with your ideas for the researcher on our report on parallel chambers, including recommendations to make sure that it doesn't fall off where it goes from here.

Then, on Thursday, May 16, the minister will be here on main estimates on the debates commission.

Mr. Caron, is Mr. Christopherson coming back?

Mr. Guy Caron:

I'm sure Mr. Christopherson would actually know that. You said the one hour for the minister. Do you usually have officials also presenting if there are any further questions?

The Chair:

The ministers usually bring officials with them. I think this minister has always had officials from the Privy Council Office with her to answer questions.

She doesn't make a lot of decisions related to the expenditures of the debates commissioner, so we had the debates commissioner already. He came before committee and answered a lot of the questions that people might have had on the specifics. The committee also asked for her to come. Any time she's come before us, she's always had officials with her.

(1240)

Mr. Guy Caron:

If there were a desire from, say, David to have the officials stay afterwards, if there were more questions but the minister was no longer available, would that be something the committee would consider? At this point I would ask the committee to keep it open until David comes to see if that's his wish.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Typically I wouldn't have an issue with that, but this is very narrow with respect to the debates commission. The official came to answer questions on that, David Johnston. We've already gone through that. I imagine there will be some questions related to the debates commission but it will go beyond that. We had all of the officials who are making the decisions on the debates commission. Otherwise, if there is a grand appetite.... I don't know, but that's already happened.

Mr. Guy Caron:

I just want to leave it open until David comes back.

Mr. Chris Bittle:

Fair enough.

The Chair:

That's it. I thank the committee. I think it was a very professional discussion and we dealt with a lot of business.

Thank you. The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre

(1105)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)):

Bonjour. Bienvenue à la 153e réunion du Comité permanent de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre.

Pour la gouverne des membres, je signale que c'est une séance publique.

Avant de commencer, en ce qui concerne ce que nous venons de voir, vous rappelez-vous lorsque nous discutions des chambres parallèles, de l'orme et de la question de savoir qui a le pouvoir? Vous recevrez cet avis sous peu, mais j'ai demandé aux analystes de se pencher sur ces questions. En 1867, lorsque la Constitution a été créée, il y a eu un transfert de pouvoirs à un ministère gouvernemental et, à l'époque, c'était le ministère des Travaux publics et des Services gouvernementaux.

Vous recevrez cet avis. Il est en train d'être traduit, mais je croyais qu'il serait intéressant que les gens sachent qui détenait ce pouvoir.

La ministre peut venir comparaître le jeudi 16 mai pour discuter du Budget principal des dépenses de la Commission aux débats des chefs.

Les travaux du Comité figurent à l'ordre du jour. J'ai demandé au greffier de fournir une courte liste des affaires dont le Comité a discuté, ce qu'il a fait circuler.

Ces questions ont été soulevées au Comité ou ont fait l'objet d'un avis au cours des dernières semaines. Même si les membres ne sont pas obligés de soulever leurs points dans le cadre de la discussion d'aujourd'hui, je croyais que ce pourrait être utile dans le cadre de nos délibérations.

Je vais céder la parole aux membres du Comité.

Madame Kusie.

Mme Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, PCC):

Je ne suis pas certaine si je dois invoquer le Règlement pour faire suite à la situation avec la sonnerie et, malheureusement, nous avons eu le vote sur l'attribution de temps lors de la dernière visite du ministre, mais je voulais présenter à nouveau ma motion.

Je ne suis pas certaine de ce qu'il en est. A-t-elle été déposée, ou l'avons-nous simplement mise de côté car nous craignions ne pas avoir suffisamment de temps pour en débattre?

Le greffier du Comité (M. Andrew Lauzon):

On avait suggéré que le Comité l'examine subséquemment.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

D'accord, j'en ai une autre copie aujourd'hui.

La motion propose que « soit poursuivie l'étude sur les menaces en matière de sécurité et de renseignements visant les élections ». On propose que l'étude s'échelonne sur cinq réunions, puisque le groupe n'a pas aimé ma proposition initiale de 12 réunions. J'estime néanmoins que ce nombre de réunions aurait été approprié pour couvrir tous les aspects, allant de la protection des renseignements personnels à la désinformation, qui est le terme que Jennifer Ditchburn préfère utiliser, comme nous avons pu le voir au petit-déjeuner sur les options stratégiques ce matin. J'ai été ravie de voir notre président, Larry Bagnell, à cette activité.

Bien qu'il y ait malheureusement peu de nouveaux renseignements, l'étude s'échelonnerait sur cinq réunions, ce que j'estime raisonnable. Je reconnais, étant donné le temps qu'il nous reste, qu'il serait difficile de prévoir une étude d'envergure, mais cinq réunions semblent suffire.

À la lumière de ma rencontre avec le secrétaire parlementaire Virani, il semble que l'on rendrait service au gouvernement en l'aidant à obtenir ces renseignements. C'est de plus en plus fréquent, et il est regrettable que le gouvernement n'ait pas été en mesure d'examiner ces questions plus tôt car les solutions sont très complexes et de très haut niveau. Cependant, même si nous pouvions formuler des recommandations ou des avis, je pense que la ministre en bénéficierait vraiment et en serait reconnaissante, tout comme le gouvernement et les Canadiens, et c'est évidemment la raison pour laquelle nous sommes ici.

Comme je l'ai dit, on tiendrait cinq réunions et les conclusions seraient présentées à la Chambre.

Monsieur le président, merci.

Le président:

Merci.

Juste avant de céder la parole aux membres, je tiens à souhaiter la bienvenue au Comité à M. Guy Caron. Pour la gouverne des membres du Comité, j'ai parlé en termes élogieux du rôle du député hier à la Chambre. Il fait preuve d'un grand professionnalisme, et nous aimons le recevoir à ce comité car les membres sont très tournés vers l'avenir également. Nous sommes ravis de vous recevoir ici.

M. Guy Caron (Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, NPD):

Merci.

Le président:

Pour lancer la discussion, nous allons entendre M. Nader.

M. John Nater (Perth—Wellington, PCC):

Je ne veux pas trop parler. La motion est explicite. Je pense qu'il est important que nous, au Comité de la procédure, entreprenions cette étude. Cinq réunions, c'est raisonnable, mais je ne pense pas que cela deviendra notre Golgotha. Il serait important qu'il y ait une certaine flexibilité.

Le point que je veux faire valoir, c'est qu'il serait important d'entendre l'avis du président, à tout le moins, voire l'avis des cinq membres du groupe qui a été créé pour surveiller l'ingérence lors des prochaines élections. Même durant la courte période depuis qu'on en a fait l'annonce aujourd'hui, on a constaté un changement dans la composition de ce comité en fonction des changements des gens qui occupent ces postes.

Il y a un nouveau greffier du Conseil privé, qui était auparavant le sous-ministre délégué des Affaires étrangères, si bien que c'est un nouveau poste aussi. Il serait important d'entendre à tout le moins l'avis du président, du greffier du Conseil privé, voire des cinq membres du Comité. Nous pouvons le faire à huis clos, si c'est nécessaire, mais je ne crois pas que quiconque s'y opposerait. Il serait au moins important d'entendre l'avis du président et des membres du Comité, puisque nous sommes à cinq mois des élections.

(1110)

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais remercier Mme Kusie d'avoir présenté cette motion. Nous sommes toutefois rendus à la fin, à l'étape finale, de l'étude, et nous avons déjà examiné ces questions. Nous avons discuté et débattu longuement de nos élections à maintes reprises, mais surtout dans le cadre de notre étude du projet de loi C-76.

Je sais que bien souvent, nous avons débattu de sujets non liés à la question à l'étude et de la protection des Canadiens, et il y a eu beaucoup d'obstruction. Ce serait une excellente occasion de prolonger notre étude, mais il est un peu tard.

Je sais que le Comité de l'éthique a déjà mené des travaux sur des sujets connexes. Nous en avons déjà discuté, et je ne nous vois pas nous pencher là-dessus à ce stade-ci.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid.

M. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, PCC):

Je veux confirmer, aux fins de la discussion sur cette question et d'autres enjeux dont nous serons saisis, et je pense que j'ai raison d'examiner le calendrier. Il nous reste 11 réunions, sans compter la réunion d'aujourd'hui. L'une de ces réunions sera avec la ministre, si bien qu'il nous reste 10 réunions, si je ne m'abuse.

Le président:

La moitié d'une de ces réunions sera avec la ministre.

M. Scott Reid:

Très bien, il nous reste 10 réunions et demie.

Il est sans doute peu probable que nous allons consacrer encore une fois une réunion complète à examiner le calendrier des travaux du Comité, notre ordre du jour. Ai-je raison? D'accord, il nous reste donc 10 réunions et demie. Dans le cadre de nos discussions, nous devrions garder cela à l'esprit, car le problème qui se pose maintenant, c'est que l'ajout d'un sujet d'étude fera disparaître un autre point sur la liste. C'est vrai, peu importe la motion ou le sujet dont nous discutons.

Le président:

Madame Kusie, la parole est à vous.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Je comprends les commentaires de M. Bittle sur la discussion et l'évaluation des sujets lors de l'examen du projet de loi C-76. J'ai malheureusement manqué la majeure partie des discussions, mais j'ai l'impression que cela portait vraiment sur le projet de loi. C'était l'occasion de faire une véritable réflexion sur les experts à consulter pour ce qui est, à mon avis, le plus grand défi et la plus grande menace pour nos institutions démocratiques au cours de la prochaine année. Je ne pense pas que ce soit scandaleux, absurde ou exagéré.

Je veux m'assurer que le gouvernement est très conscient de ce qu'il fait et du message qu'il envoie aux Canadiens en rejetant une telle étude. C'est très grave. C'est très sérieux. C'est peut-être la plus grande responsabilité de notre comité à l'égard de la population canadienne, et ce, à très court terme. Rejeter une étude à ce sujet revient à abandonner toute diligence raisonnable concernant l'intégrité des élections.

En tant que députée et ministre du cabinet fantôme chargée des institutions démocratiques, je ne veux pas accepter cette responsabilité, ce manque de diligence raisonnable et d'évaluation. Je demande donc au gouvernement de tenir compte du message qu'il envoie aux Canadiens quant à l'importance qu'il accorde à l'intégrité des élections en rejetant cette motion.

(1115)

Le président:

Avez-vous un commentaire sur la possibilité de tenir la réunion à huis clos, comme le propose M. Nater?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui, je serais tout à fait ouverte à tout processus qui pourrait nous éclairer. Je crois sincèrement qu'à l'instar de bien d'autres pays du monde, le gouvernement s'efforce de trouver, dans ce cas-ci, des solutions législatives concrètes, mais aussi des solutions d'ordre général à un enjeu d'une grande incidence pour la société.

Je parle plus précisément de l'intégrité de l'élection, mais cela va aussi plus loin. Je pense que cela pourrait être extrêmement utile, non seulement pour l'intégrité de l'élection, mais aussi sur le plan de la continuité du travail entrepris au Comité de l'éthique, comme mon collègue M. Bittle l'a mentionné. Cela ne ferait qu'améliorer et peut-être même consolider une partie du travail qu'il a effectué avant nous. Je crois que c'est en grande partie lié à la protection de la vie privée.

De toute évidence, nous traitons ici de sujets plus concrets, plus précis, plus réels et plus immédiats. Je rappelle que ce comité-là a fait un travail que je qualifierais d'utile et de précieux, et j'ai eu l'occasion de discuter avec le président du comité, mon collègue... Je suis désolée, le nom de sa circonscription m'échappe en ce moment. J'ai aussi discuté avec d'autres membres du Comité de l'éthique, soit le député de Thornhill et le député de Beaches—East York...

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Vous pouvez utiliser leurs noms, ici.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Désolée. Je comprends. J'ai aussi tendance à suivre le protocole, David, puisque je viens du monde de la diplomatie.

J'ai l'impression que cela pourrait...

M. Scott Reid:

Pour être juste, je pense que votre nom est plus long que le nom de votre circonscription.

M. David de Burgh Graham: Vous avez aussi un deuxième prénom.

M. Scott Reid: En effet, mais je le tais, par courtoisie envers mes collègues.

Des voix: Oh, oh!

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oh! Là, je suis curieuse. Un jour, j'essaierai de jeter un œil sur votre permis de conduire ou votre passeport.

Le président:

Pour le président, c'est M. Zimmer.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Évidemment. Oui, c'est M. Zimmer, puisque je peux l'appeler par son nom... Merci.

J'ai généralement l'impression qu'il y aurait tant à gagner dans tant de dimensions de la sphère publique et peut-être aussi de la sphère privée... Évidemment, nous n'y sommes pas obligés... Mais nous pouvons certainement aller dans ce sens.

Encore une fois, j'exhorte le gouvernement à étudier la question. Je pense que seulement trois ou quatre réunions seraient très utiles, si le Comité de l'éthique nous fournissait de bonnes notes d'information sur ses travaux. Comme je l'ai dit, ce n'est qu'une dimension de la vie privée. Il ne s'agit pas de désinformation, même si c’était un sujet d'étude des plus intéressants. Je suis convaincue que ce serait très avantageux pour le gouvernement, et refuser d'étudier cet enjeu serait préjudiciable aux Canadiens, puisque nous avons le temps.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Connaissons-nous la nature exacte des travaux du Comité de l'éthique à ce sujet?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Il faudrait que je vérifie, mais l'étude portait en grande partie sur la protection de la vie privée, d'après ce que j'ai compris. Je demanderais aux analystes de nous en dire davantage, s'ils ont d'autres renseignements sur le scénario de Cambridge Analytica. Je crois savoir que ce comité a de nombreux travaux avec le Grand Comité qui doit se réunir à la fin mai, je crois, pour discuter de solutions en matière de protection de la vie privée.

Mais encore une fois, la protection de la vie privée n'est qu'un... Je considère que c'est un élément de l'intégrité électorale. Je parle d'un élément, mais en pourcentage, je dirais que cela représente 20 ou 30 %. Toutefois, lorsqu'il est question de désinformation et de bases de données, je dirais 20 ou 25 %. Je considère cela comme un élément, mais ce n'est pas un portrait complet ou une évaluation complète des mesures à prendre.

Encore une fois, j'assume une grande responsabilité à cet égard, même au sein de mon propre parti, dans l'opposition. Je fais mes propres recherches et je formule des recommandations de notre point de vue, mais ici, pour les Canadiens, cela représente une partie du tableau, et non l'ensemble. Comme je l'ai indiqué, je pense que nous avons le devoir, pour les Canadiens, de chercher à avoir une vue d'ensemble et à formuler, pour le pouvoir exécutif, des recommandations concrètes et des solutions possibles concernant l'échéancier, puisqu'il nous reste peu de temps, malheureusement. De plus, cela touche à notre échéancier, à notre rôle en tant qu'État-nation, car je dirais que bon nombre des solutions qui s'imposent deviennent des considérations multilatérales.

Merci, monsieur le président.

(1120)

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, la parole est à vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

J'ai une petite question.

Quel est l'objectif? Quel résultat espérons-nous?

Essentiellement, si nous faisons cette étude et que nous la déposons à la Chambre, nous ne ferons que mettre au jour toutes les vulnérabilités de notre système électoral juste avant les élections.

Voilà les faiblesses. Bonne chance à tous. Merci.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Comme je l'ai dit, l'objectif serait de faire des recommandations au ministre afin de tenter de maintenir l'intégrité de l'élection dans la mesure du possible. Pour moi, c'est cela l'objectif.

Je pense que nos analystes sont assez compétents et qu'en tant que comité nous aurons la prudence nécessaire pour gérer le contenu du rapport final afin d'exercer un certain contrôle là-dessus.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Puis-je vous poser une question?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Allez-y.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Vous pouvez continuer. Je voulais juste...

Le président:

Nous ne suivons pas le protocole.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

J'aimerais simplement savoir comment vos recommandations seront...

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Mises en oeuvre?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Non, pas mises en oeuvre. Désolée.

Je me demande comment elles pourraient être meilleures que les recommandations de ceux qui sont chargés d'assurer la sécurité de nos élections, alors que nous n'avons pas vraiment l'habilitation nécessaire pour obtenir des renseignements concrets et connaître les menaces réelles qui pèsent sur nous. J'ai l'impression que nous aurions une compréhension très superficielle des enjeux et que nos recommandations n'auront pas beaucoup de poids, en réalité, parce que je pense qu'il y a des personnes mieux qualifiées qui ont l'habilitation nécessaire pour connaître et comprendre les menaces auxquelles nous sommes confrontés. Ils sont tellement mieux renseignés et outillés que notre comité pour régler adéquatement ce problème.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Permettez-moi d'abord de dire que j'ai beaucoup de chance d'avoir une cote de sécurité de niveau « très secret ». C'est un processus très désagréable. Je ne suis pas certaine que tous les membres du Comité voudraient s'y soumettre.

Quoi qu'il en soit, j'ai bien entendu ce que vous dites. J'en tiens compte lorsque j'évalue personnellement les solutions. Cela dit, je pense que ceux qui ont les connaissances ne sont qu'une pièce du casse-tête. Il nous incombe de le faire, pour deux raisons. L'une d'entre elles est de prendre en compte les témoignages de ceux qui ont spécifiquement... En général, la tâche incombe à ceux qui ont les connaissances techniques nécessaires. Je m'y attendais, et c'est pourquoi j'ai proposé cinq réunions. Il s'agirait d'avoir l'avis de membres des médias et du milieu universitaire — ou d'autres organisations non gouvernementales — sur les orientations politiques. Il nous incombe de recueillir l'information et de l'évaluer. C'est la seule façon dont je vois les choses.

Je comprends ce que vous voulez dire. Ce n'est pas un obstacle, mais une considération qui, encore une fois, a été évoquée lors du petit déjeuner sur les options stratégiques. En outre, lorsque j'ai témoigné au Comité de l'éthique, j'ai mentionné qu'à titre d'ancienne membre de la fonction publique du Canada, j'ai une grande confiance à l'égard de la fonction publique canadienne, mais je suis toujours très préoccupée par la rétention des candidats qui ont les connaissances requises. J'en ai peut-être même parlé ici. Pour les trouver, faut-il aller à San Jose pour une fin de semaine, ou aller au siège social de Fortnite? Toutefois, ce n'est pour moi qu'une petite partie, car je pense que la société comporte de nombreuses facettes et de nombreux intervenants qui ont un rôle à jouer et qu'il faut écouter.

La deuxième raison, ce sont les recommandations que nous ferions en fonction des renseignements que nous aurions recueillis, pour ainsi dire.

Je viens juste de penser à un autre aspect. Je pense à la responsabilité que nous avons acceptée au G20, au G7 de Charlevoix, celle d'être un chef de file mondial dans ce domaine. En fait, je dirais que mener cette étude nous aiderait à respecter cet engagement. Je me demande si c'était au G20 ou au G7. C'était au G7 de Charlevoix.

Je pense que c'est au G7 que nous nous sommes engagés à être des chefs de file à cet égard. En tant que parlementaires, respectons cet engagement. Merci beaucoup.

(1125)

Le président:

Monsieur Nater, la parole est à vous.

M. John Nater:

Merci, monsieur le président.

J'aimerais simplement soulever quelques points en réponse à certains propos.

M. Graham a fait valoir que nous devrons présenter un rapport et montrer toutes nos faiblesses. C'est préoccupant, mais est-ce moins préoccupant que l'autre solution, à savoir nous mettre la tête dans le sable et dire qu'aucune menace ne pèse notre démocratie, qu'il n'existe aucune cybermenace ou menace due à l'ingérence étrangère? Je pense qu'il serait encore plus inquiétant de prétendre qu'il n'y a pas de menaces ou de nous cacher la tête dans le sable en disant que nous, les parlementaires, ne voyons pas cette menace.

C'est le premier point que je voulais soulever: les menaces sont réelles et nous le reconnaissons. Le nier n'a aucun sens. Vaut mieux s'attaquer aux problèmes de front.

Le deuxième point est plus général. Mme Sahota en a également parlé un peu; il s'agit de déterminer qui sont les experts dans ce domaine. Il y a des experts, évidemment, et ils font partie de l'appareil gouvernemental.

En fin de compte, comme M. Christopherson l'a mentionné il n'y a pas très longtemps, la Loi électorale et les élections sont au centre des activités du Comité. C'est là le mandat du Comité, conformément au Règlement. La Loi électorale du Canada est de notre responsabilité. La protection de notre processus électoral contre les menaces étrangères et les cybermenaces fait certainement partie du mandat d'examen et d'entreprendre du Comité.

Quant à refuser de faire cette étude sous prétexte que nous ne sommes pas des experts, eh bien, je dirais que la plupart des parlementaires ne sont pas des spécialistes pour bon nombre des enjeux dont le Comité pourrait être saisi. En tant que parlementaires démocratiquement élus, nous avons le devoir d'entreprendre ces études et de formuler des recommandations. C'est pourquoi nous faisons appel à des experts du domaine, notamment des gens du CST, du SCRS ou d'autres ministères chargés de ces questions.

Je vois où nous en sommes quant au sort réservé à cette motion. Je pense simplement qu'il serait dommage que le Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre n'entreprenne pas au moins une étude sur cette question. Je vais en rester là, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Madame Sahota, disiez-vous que le Comité de la sécurité de la Chambre des communes a plus d'habilitation — peu importe comment cela s'appelle —, ce qui lui permet d'avoir plus de renseignements?

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Oui. Le comité du renseignement, de la sécurité publique, pardon... Nous n'avons pas tous la cote de sécurité nécessaire. Je suis d'accord avec les propos de M. Nater. Nous entreprenons beaucoup d'études. Nous ne sommes pas des experts. Notre travail consiste à écouter les experts, mais je ne pense toujours pas que ces experts... J'estime qu'il s'agira encore d'une étude si poussée que nous n'arriverons pas à trouver de vraies solutions pour que nos organismes puissent prendre les mesures et les actions requises.

Nous nous informerons un peu, mais je ne sais pas à quel point cela nous sera utile, en fin de compte. J'y serais favorable si nous avions beaucoup de temps, car il nous faudrait en effet beaucoup de temps pour véritablement aller au fond des choses.

(1130)

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Pouvons-nous avoir un vote par appel nominal, s'il vous plaît?

(La motion est rejetée par 5 voix contre 4.)

Le président:

Je veux simplement donner mon avis sur les travaux du Comité. J'espère que nous pourrons donner des instructions à l'analyste pour notre étude sur la chambre parallèle avant l'été, parce que nous y avons consacré beaucoup de travail. Je sais que M. Reid a aussi une motion à ce sujet.

Allez-y.

M. Scott Reid:

En fait, il n'est pas question des chambres parallèles. Le 1er mars, j'ai fait circuler un avis de motion. Je ne vais pas proposer la motion en ce moment. J'aimerais d'abord vous inviter à en discuter un peu.

La motion vise la modification de l'article 108(3)a) du Règlement en vue de modifier notre propre mandat. Les gens peuvent lire la motion eux-mêmes, mais elle crée essentiellement une situation où nous aurions deux responsabilités nouvelles. Nous ferions la revue de toutes les questions liées au Projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre et à la vision et au plan à long terme de la Cité parlementaire et nous présenterions des rapports à ce sujet — sans nous ingérer dans les responsabilités des autres organismes sur ce plan —, et nous produirions un rapport annuel à l'intention de la Chambre des communes concernant toutes nos discussions ou nos audiences. Plus précisément, nous mènerions une étude et nous présenterions un rapport à la Chambre d'ici la fin de la présente législature.

Les gens semblaient généralement réceptifs à l'idée générale. Je ne sais pas s'ils seraient aussi réceptifs à cette motion particulière. J'ai entre autres demandé à M. Bittle d'essayer de savoir si les dirigeants de son propre parti étaient généralement favorables à cette idée — et peut-être même favorables à l'idée de la motion elle-même —, et il m'a dit qu'il me reviendrait là-dessus. Je me demande donc si nous pouvons simplement discuter brièvement afin de savoir si les gens sont ouverts ou pas à cette motion ou peut-être, de manière moins spécifique, à l'idée d'assumer une part de responsabilité, et peut-être une grande part de la responsabilité de surveillance de ce projet très important et très coûteux.

Le président:

Merci.

En effet, je pense qu'il n'y avait pas qu'un appui général de la part de tous les partis. Il y a eu quelques interventions passionnées de la part de députés qui voulaient absolument intervenir dans les travaux de rénovation futurs de cet édifice et de l'édifice du Centre — c'est notre lieu de travail et nous devrions pouvoir intervenir. Je pense que l'administration a admis que nous n'intervenions pas assez dans les rénovations de cet édifice en particulier.

Je vous invite à en discuter. Je ne veux pas préjuger de l'issue des discussions du comité, mais je pense qu'il y avait certainement un accueil favorable à quelque chose de ce genre. Les gens pourraient avoir des suggestions quant au libellé, mais écoutons les partis.

Monsieur Bittle, allez-y.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci beaucoup.

J'ai donné suite à la demande de M. Reid et j'ai parlé aux gens. Nous n'en avons plus parlé et j'ai oublié de lui revenir là-dessus, mais nous n'avons aucun problème avec cela. Nous serons ravis de discuter de ce point de façon positive et d'aller de l'avant.

Je ne sais pas comment vous souhaitez structurer cela. M. Simms et moi avons discuté de l'allure que cela pourrait prendre. Je ne sais pas s'il nous faudrait plus d'une réunion pour vraiment parcourir cela. Je crois que nous avons tous les deux dit que nous aimerions entendre ce que vous avez à dire sur les allures que prendrait une « étude » d'après vous, mais cela pourrait n'être que le sujet d'une discussion entre nous.

En ce qui concerne un témoin, je n'en ai aucune idée. Nous avons pensé qu'une réunion ou deux à ce sujet serait raisonnable, mais nous serons ravis de vous entendre nous dire comment vous voyez cela. Nous serons plus qu'heureux de discuter de cela, et nous trouvons que c'est une bonne initiative.

M. Guy Caron: Monsieur le président…

(1135)

Le président:

Si vous me le permettez, monsieur Caron, M. Christopherson est très passionné à l'idée d'une contribution du Comité aux rénovations de l'édifice du Centre.

M. Guy Caron:

Je comprends, mais j'ai une question pour M. Reid à ce sujet.

Le président:

Nous vous écoutons.

M. Guy Caron:

Quand j'étais au Comité des comptes publics, je me rappelle avoir étudié la remise en état de certains édifices. Est-ce qu'il y a un tel projet au Comité des comptes publics ou au BVG?

M. Scott Reid:

Le Bureau de régie interne le fait. Je n'ai rien entendu du tout à propos de la participation du Comité des comptes publics, mais cela ne veut pas dire qu'ils ne le font pas. C'est peut-être que je suis mal informé. Le Bureau de régie interne intervient, c'est sûr.

En bref, le problème, c'est que le Bureau de régie interne ne peut pas faire rapport à la Chambre. Au bout du compte, c'est la Chambre elle-même qui voudrait exercer — j'hésite à utiliser le mot « contrôle », parce que nous parlons d'un édifice que nous partageons avec le Sénat — un type de surveillance qui nous permettrait de dire ce que nous voulons absolument avoir comme caractéristique, ou de dire que nous sommes vraiment mécontents de l'échéancier qui est proposé, ou encore, que la structure de coûts doit être approuvée par quelqu'un. Il faut que ce soit la Chambre des communes dans son ensemble.

Le problème, c'est que le Bureau de régie interne ne peut pas faire rapport à la Chambre. Nous ne pouvons pas faire rapport à la Chambre. Ce pourrait être n'importe quel comité, mais il faut que ce soit un comité du Parlement — un vrai comité, par opposition au Bureau de régie interne — qui fait le travail détaillé d'entendre des témoins, de suivre les changements d'une année à l'autre malgré de multiples législatures, parce que l'édifice du Centre ne sera pas terminé avant le passage de multiples législatures. Il y aura vraisemblablement eu de multiples changements de ministres et même de gouvernements.

Tout ce que nous pouvons faire, c'est faire rapport à la Chambre. Le rapport peut ensuite faire l'objet d'un débat et être adopté. Il devient alors un ordre de la Chambre pour les gens qui exécutent les travaux en notre nom.

Est-ce que cela répond à votre question?

M. Guy Caron:

Oui.

Je voulais juste voir si cela se faisait par l'intermédiaire du comité des comptes publics ou du BVG, de façon ponctuelle ou récurrente, mais il semble que ce soit ponctuel.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui.

Le président:

David Christopherson fait partie du Comité des comptes publics. S'ils faisaient quelque chose à cet égard, nous en aurions entendu parler haut et fort.

M. Guy Caron:

Il en aurait parlé.

M. Scott Reid:

Est-ce que je peux répondre à M. Bittle?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Premièrement, j'aimerais vous demander s'il serait approprié, d'après vous, que je propose la motion.

Dans l'affirmative, pourquoi ne le ferais-je pas? Je parlerais ensuite très brièvement de la question du nombre de réunions et de ce genre de choses.

Le président:

Tout le monde a cela?

Une voix: Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Je vais proposer la motion.

Je dirai seulement que je n'ai pas d'opinion arrêtée sur le nombre de réunions que nous devrions tenir. Parce que la date du rapport est la date de notre dernière réunion, je pense qu'il n'est pas nécessaire d'être très rigide. Nous pouvons remplir les espaces libres que nous aurons, compte tenu des autres questions dont nous discutons ici.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, pour les personnes qui écoutent à la radio, pourriez-vous au moins lire le premier paragraphe de votre motion afin qu'ils sachent de quoi nous discutons?

M. Scott Reid:

Pardonnez-moi. Moi aussi j'écoute cela. Oui, je vais vous la lire: Que le Comité entreprenne une étude sur l'article 108(3)a) du Règlement et envisage la possibilité de modifier le mandat du Comité pour y inclure la revue de toute question liée au Projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre et à la Vision et du plan à long terme (VPLT) pour la Cité parlementaire en vue d'en faire rapport à la Chambre des communes, nonobstant les autres organismes de contrôle et de surveillance, en ajoutant les deux sous-alinéas suivants à l'article 108(3)a) du Règlement :

Puis nous nous rendons à l'alinéa x), car il y a une énumération. C'est la fin d'une très longue liste dans cet article précis du Règlement. (x) La revue de toutes les questions liées au Projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre et à la Vision et du plan à long terme (VPLT) de la Cité parlementaire et la présentation de rapport à ce sujet, nonobstant les autres organismes de contrôle et de surveillance existants ou établis ultérieurement;

Je poursuis.

(1140)

[Français] (xi) l'examen et la production d'un rapport annuel sur le Projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre et la Vision et le Plan à long terme (VPLT) pour la Cité parlementaire, y compris les échéanciers actuels et prévus, l'état actuel des dépenses engagées et prévues, tout changement concernant ces aspects depuis le dernier rapport, pour autant que le Comité puisse faire rapport sur ces questions à tout moment, et que le Comité propose chaque année une recommandation tant que les articles 108(3)a)(x) et 108(3)a)(xi) du Règlement seront en vigueur."; et qu'il fasse rapport de ses recommandations à la Chambre d'ici sa dernière réunion en juin 2019. [Traduction]

Le président:

Très bien.

La personne qui prend les notes pourrait utiliser la motion que nous avons distribuée, étant donné qu'il y a les lettres que vous n'avez pas lues.

M. Scott Reid:

Oui, en effet.

Le président:

À cause des contraintes de temps et de tout le reste, je suggère que nous essayions de faire cela en mai, parce que vous ne savez jamais ce qui va se présenter à ce comité. Il pourrait y avoir des questions de privilèges, par exemple.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est vrai.

Le président:

Nous ne voudrions pas que cela tombe dans l'oubli.

M. Scott Reid:

Je suis d'accord. J'aimerais dire une chose, cependant. J'aimerais que nous soumettions les recommandations à la Chambre, concernant les changements au Règlement, puis que nous attendions de voir ce qui se passe. Si la Chambre est prête à donner son consentement unanime à cela, nous pourrions aller de l'avant. Sinon, nous pourrions tout simplement laisser la question s'éteindre à la Chambre, mais nous ferions rapport à temps pour donner ce choix à la Chambre.

Je crois qu'il ne vaut la peine de chercher à réaliser quelque chose de ce genre que si le soutien est généralisé.

Le président:

Et si cela se termine à la Chambre à cause d'un seul vote, par exemple? Est-ce qu'il serait possible de recommander cela au Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre de la prochaine législature? Le PROC de la prochaine législature pourrait être d'accord ou n'être pas d'accord avec notre recommandation, mais au moins, ce serait au programme du Comité.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai dit cela en partie parce que la seule façon d'obtenir un vote à la Chambre est de tenir un débat sur une motion d'adoption. Sur le plan pratique, il est très difficile d'organiser un débat sur une motion d'adoption alors que la législature tire à sa fin. Pour quelque chose de ce genre, j'aurais encore plus tendance à rechercher le consentement unanime, compte tenu de ce facteur d'ordre pratique.

Je suis au Comité depuis très longtemps, et je dirais qu'il n'y a pas de mécanisme officiel, mais le prochain PROC va vraisemblablement prendre très au sérieux ce qui s'est dit dans le PROC actuel sur une question de ce genre.

Le président:

Vraisemblablement ou pas vraisemblablement?

M. Scott Reid:

Très vraisemblablement.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Qu'est-ce qui nous empêche d'envoyer une lettre de recommandation à la prochaine version de nous-mêmes? Avez-vous pensé à cela?

M. Scott Reid:

C'est sensé.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Le PROC pourrait écrire une lettre disant au futur PROC qu'il devrait se pencher sur les questions que nous avons soulevées.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est comme le film Le jour de la marmotte, quand il casse le crayon pour passer un message à la personne qu'il sera quand il va s'éveiller.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

C'est juste.

Sur le plan pratique, nous pouvons faire cela et dire: « Chers membres du PROC de la 43e législature, faites ceci. »

M. Scott Reid:

Oui.

Le président:

Je crois que j'avais M. Nater sur la liste.

M. John Nater:

À ce sujet, au moment d'adopter les motions de régie interne au début de la 43e législature, le prochain PROC peut toujours adopter une motion de régie interne voulant que le PROC mène une étude périodique, tous les six mois ou chaque année civile, à ce sujet. C'est une autre option.

Très brièvement, en ce qui concerne les contraintes de temps, je crois personnellement qu'il serait bien d'entendre M. Wright, du ministère des Travaux publics, sur cette question. Il semble être le fonctionnaire désigné du ministère à ce sujet. Il serait bon de l'entendre une dernière fois avant la dissolution du Parlement.

Nous pourrions aussi entendre les architectes qui ont comparu précédemment devant le Comité. C'était Centrus, ou quelque chose de ce genre.

Le président:

Vous parlez de ceux que nous avons reçus à la réunion de décembre?

M. John Nater:

Oui. Ce serait simplement pour qu'ils fassent le point sur ce qu'ils ont constaté depuis que nous avons vidé les lieux, à savoir s'ils auraient quelque chose de nouveau à nous dire.

Le troisième et dernier point serait une séance d'information qui nous serait présentée par quelqu'un, M. Wright ou quelqu'un d'autre, sur la vision et le plan à long terme, sur ce qu'il y a en ce moment dans les dossiers comme ayant été approuvé. À la dernière réunion, diverses suggestions ont été faites concernant ce qui a été approuvé et le moment où cela a été approuvé.

M. Reid a parlé précédemment de la deuxième phase du Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Je crois que nous sommes tous dans le noir en ce qui concerne ce qui est approuvé — le dynamitage pour faire un trou dans la pelouse avant en vue de la construction du nouveau Centre d'accueil des visiteurs. Il serait bien de savoir ce qui a été approuvé et ce qui est prévu en ce moment.

Ce sont les trois choses que nous pourrions faire, que ce soit lors d'une seule réunion ou de deux demies réunions. Ce sont généralement les témoins que j'aimerais entendre. C'est en quelque sorte indépendant de la motion dont il est question, car la motion recommande un changement. Cependant, c'est très lié à la motion.

(1145)

Le président:

Voulez-vous cela avant que nous finalisions la motion?

M. John Nater:

Je ne crois pas que ce soit nécessaire. Ce sont deux choses indépendantes, parce que la motion vise la structure relative à la reddition de comptes.

J'aimerais personnellement entendre les témoins que j'ai mentionnés avant la dissolution du Parlement. Je suis flexible.

Le président:

Je trouve que c'est sensé.

Monsieur Bittle, je crois que vous avez posé la question à M. Reid.

M. Chris Bittle:

C'est bon. Si c'est une réunion ou deux, cela fonctionne pour nous.

Le président:

Monsieur Reid, vous avez la suggestion de M. Nater.

M. Scott Reid:

Je crois que nous devrions traiter de cela en tant que comité, plutôt que de modifier la motion pour contenir cela. Je suggère que nous mettions cela à l'ordre du jour.

Le président:

Oui.

Vouliez-vous que nous consacrions une réunion à la motion ou que nous tenions une réunion pour entendre les témoins, puis traiter de la motion à la fin de cette réunion? Quelles sont vos idées à ce sujet?

M. Scott Reid:

Pourquoi n'essayons-nous pas de voir si nous pouvons adopter la motion maintenant, puis passer au reste?

Nous ne sommes pas en train de nous contraindre à un nombre précis de réunions. Ainsi, le Comité peut décider de ne se réunir qu'une seule fois ou autant de fois qu'il le veut.

Le président:

Ce qui est proposé, c'est de mettre un terme à la discussion sur la motion dès maintenant, puis j'ouvrirai la discussion au sujet des autres personnes. Quelqu'un d'autre veut parler de la motion?

(La motion est adoptée.)

Le président: La motion est adoptée à l'unanimité.

Discutons maintenant d'une réunion pour entendre les témoins suggérés par M. Nater. Est-ce que quelqu'un s'oppose à ce que nous essayions de convoquer dès que possible ces témoins à une réunion?

Le greffier:

Je rappelle aux membres du Comité que nous avons déjà entendu des témoins dans le cadre de l'étude en cours liée au Projet de réhabilitation de l'édifice du Centre. Je viens de demander au président si les témoins que M. Nater a suggérés viendraient témoigner dans ce qui serait la poursuite de cette étude, ou si ces témoins seraient liés directement à l'étude sur la modification du Règlement qui est recommandée.

M. John Nater:

Je crois que la motion de M. Reid est presque une motion à part entière. J'ai l'impression que les témoins ne parleront pas directement du changement au mandat du Comité. Bien sûr que c'est lié, mais je pense que ce serait une motion à part entière.

Ma seule question est de savoir si nous avons besoin d'entendre des témoins proposés par le greffier, peut-être pour cette motion particulière, mais je ne sais pas si c'est nécessaire.

Le président:

Comme le greffier le dit, la motion de M. Reid fait référence à une étude. Avons-nous besoin d'une étude, maintenant que nous avons adopté la motion? Nous avons adopté une motion qui dit que nous allons entreprendre une étude.

M. Scott Reid:

Il s'agit de l'étude de l'article 108(3)a) du Règlement.

Le président:

C'est juste.

M. Scott Reid:

La vraie question à se poser est celle de savoir si c'est la bonne façon, si nous voulons recommander ces changements au Règlement comme tel. C'est à ce sujet que nous ferions rapport à la Chambre.

Si nous invitons des témoins, ce ne sera pas tant pour leur dire: « Dites-nous en plus à ce sujet. » Ce serait plutôt pour dire que nous essayons de voir si ce changement va fonctionner ou non, et dans l'affirmative, de nous enquérir du type de rapports qu'ils nous présenteraient au cours de la prochaine décennie au moins, et de savoir qui d'autres nous devrions contacter.

Par exemple, je pense qu'au cours de sa plus récente comparution, M. Wright a parlé de nos partenaires parlementaires. Je ne savais pas exactement qui les partenaires parlementaires étaient. Nous essayerions de comprendre les aspects pratiques: les personnes avec lesquelles ils communiquent maintenant, la structure des pouvoirs, les personnes qui autorisent les contrats attribués, je suppose, pour les changements au Centre d'accueil des visiteurs — la phase deux — et les personnes qu'ils ont consultées au sujet des répercussions que cela aura sur les autres utilisations de la pelouse avant.

Je regarde cette partie du projet seulement, mais je présume que cela aura un effet sur les célébrations de la fête du Canada au cours de la prochaine décennie environ et que quelqu'un a approuvé cela.

Voyez-vous ce que je veux dire? C'est toute la question de la façon dont la reddition de comptes fonctionne et de la façon dont ils interagiraient avec nous et dont leurs autres partenaires parlementaires interagiraient avec nous. Après avoir entendu certains de ces témoignages, nous serions mieux outillés pour dire si les changements suggérés au Règlement sont sensés ou sont une mauvaise idée. Alors, notre rapport pourrait…

(1150)

Le président:

Ces témoins seraient liés à cette étude du Règlement.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est ce que je proposerais, oui, comme moyen de déterminer si... Même si à la fin, le Comité décide que ces changements proposés à ces dispositions du Règlement ne sont pas une bonne idée, nous aurions en tant que groupe une meilleure idée de l'endroit où se trouvent les voies de communication. À l'heure actuelle, notre seule certitude, c'est que peu importe quel est le cercle, nous sommes à l'extérieur, et il semble que ce soit la même chose pour la majorité des autres personnes à la Chambre des communes.

Le président:

Bien. Nous tiendrons une séance avec les témoins proposés par M. Nater, et nous en tiendrons ensuite une autre sur votre rapport, essentiellement, pour présenter ou non une recommandation concernant ces modifications au Règlement.

M. Scott Reid:

C'est bien cela.

Le président:

Est-ce que cela vous convient?

Veuillez repasser en revue les témoins pour le greffier, ceux que vous avez proposés, M. Nater.

M. John Nater:

Je propose M. Wright de Travaux publics, ou quiconque d'autre est jugé nécessaire au ministère; les architectes que nous avons entendus à la réunion du mois de décembre pour voir s'il y a du nouveau; et ensuite une autorité compétente pour passer en revue la vision et le plan à long terme, ce qui est actuellement approuvé. Qu'il s'agisse de quelqu'un des services administratifs de la Chambre ou...

Le président:

Bien. Nous prendrons donc une heure pour entendre les deux premiers témoins, et vous dites que la deuxième heure servirait à présenter la vision et le plan à long terme. On sait que ce plan est présenté...

M. John Nater:

Oui. Donc, c'est soit pendant la même séance de deux heures, soit deux séances de deux heures, peu importe ce qui fonctionne pour les témoins.

Le président:

Je vois. Nous allons essayer de nous en tenir à la même séance. Sinon, est-ce que cela vous convient?

Nous allons prévoir une autre réunion pour faire le rapport et discuter le plus tôt possible en fonction du calendrier.

Est-ce que cela convient à tout le monde? Bien.

Nous allons passer à d'autres travaux du Comité.

M. Scott Reid:

J'ai deux autres points.

Le prochain que j'avais sur la liste que j'ai fait circuler porte sur une motion inscrite au Feuilleton des avis pour faire comparaître le commissaire aux élections fédérales au sujet de SNC-Lavalin. Devrais-je la lire, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Allez-y.

M. Scott Reid:

La motion dit simplement: Que le commissaire aux élections fédérales comparaisse devant le Comité de la procédure et des affaires de la Chambre pour parler des contributions illégales que SNC-Lavalin a faites au Parti libéral du Canada et de sa décision de conclure une transaction.

Le président:

N'oubliez pas, lorsque vous faites une liste concernant des membres du Comité, mon penchant qui consiste à donner des directives au chercheur sur l'étude parallèle de la Chambre que nous avons faite.

Quelqu'un veut-il discuter de la motion qui vient tout juste d'être lue?

Allez-y, oui.

M. Scott Reid:

M. Côté a aussi fait une brève déclaration sur le sujet. Je vais la lire pour le compte rendu. Malheureusement, je ne l'ai par écrit qu'en anglais, et je ne l'ai donc pas distribuée. Je m'en excuse. Le 2 mai, il a dit: À la lumière d'un regain d'intérêt médiatique quant à la décision du commissaire aux élections fédérales prise en 2016 de conclure une transaction avec le Groupe SNC-Lavalin inc. ainsi que de certaines allégations faites concernant les circonstances entourant la conclusion de cette transaction, le commissaire désire émettre certaines clarifications dans l'intérêt de maintenir la confiance du public dans l'intégrité du régime d'observation et de contrôle d'application de la Loi électorale du Canada. Le commissaire exerce son mandat d'observation et de contrôle d'application de la Loi d'une manière totalement indépendante du gouvernement de l'heure, y compris du Bureau du premier ministre et de tout ministre, de tout représentant élu et de leur personnel, ainsi que des fonctionnaires. En aucun cas, depuis la nomination du commissaire en 2012, des représentants élus ou des membres de leur personnel politique n'ont tenté d'influencer ou d'interférer relativement à toute décision quant à l'observation ou le contrôle d'application de la Loi qui ne les impliquait pas de façon directe à titre de sujet d'une enquête.

Je suppose que le passage suivant se veut une déclaration du commissaire. C'est probablement la partie qu'on voulait que les médias citent, car c'est en retrait et en italique. L'indépendance du commissaire est un élément primordial de notre système de contrôle d'application en matière électorale. Depuis ma nomination à titre de commissaire, il n'y a jamais eu de tentative d'influencer le déroulement d'une enquête ou d'interférer avec notre travail par des représentants élus, leur personnel politique ou des fonctionnaires. Et je tiens à être clair: si cela devait jamais se produire, je le dénoncerais promptement et publiquement.

Il était manifestement très préoccupé par la question. Il donne ensuite un peu d'informations connexes. Les décisions relatives à l'observation et au contrôle d'application de la Loi sont prises conformément à la Politique du commissaire aux élections fédérales sur l'observation et le contrôle d'application de la Loi électorale du Canada. Le paragraphe 32 énonce les divers facteurs considérés pour déterminer le moyen d'observation ou de contrôle d'application le plus approprié pour faire respecter la Loi dans un cas en particulier. En ce qui concerne SNC-Lavalin, certains des facteurs pris en compte par le commissaire sont énoncés dans la transaction. Tel que noté au paragraphe 32b) de la Politique, la preuve recueillie au cours d'une enquête est un élément important à considérer dans la prise de décision quant à l'approche à prendre dans chaque dossier. Ceci requiert une évaluation objective de la preuve qu'on a recueillie pour en évaluer la force. À cet égard, il importe de souligner qu'une transaction peut être conclue sur la base d'une preuve rencontrant le fardeau de preuve en matière civile, soit la prépondérance des probabilités, alors que le dépôt d'accusations pénales exige une preuve qui rencontre le fardeau pénal de la preuve, soit hors de tout doute raisonnable. Il importe de souligner que, suite à des amendements découlant du projet de loi C-23 en 2014, on a confirmé, par l'adoption de règles claires en matière de confidentialité, la pratique bien établie du commissaire de ne pas fournir de détails relativement à ses enquêtes. Ceci reflète d'ailleurs la manière dont les forces policières et les organismes d'enquête traitent des renseignements qu'ils ont recueillis suite à leurs enquêtes.

C'est la déclaration. Je pense que cela fixe des limites que nous devrions nous imposer en matière de confidentialité. J'estime que, en tant que comité, dans la mesure où nous en sommes conscients, nous serions en mesure d'obtenir d'autres renseignements utiles sur le fonctionnement de cette politique et sur la façon dont elle a fonctionné dans ce cas-ci.

Je me contenterai de dire que j'accepte sur parole la déclaration du commissaire, à savoir qu'aucun élu ni attaché politique a tenté de s'ingérer dans le processus ou de l'influencer. Nous essayons tout simplement de comprendre comment tout cela fonctionne et de voir dans quelle mesure c'est conforme à d'autres pratiques. Il y a un parallèle évident à faire avec les poursuites contre Dean Del Mastro, qui ont mené à des accusations.

Je ne sais pas ce que dirait le commissaire. Je peux deviner un peu en m'appuyant sur sa déclaration, mais nous n'obtiendrons une explication complète que s'il vient ici. C'est donc le fondement et la logique de la motion.

(1155)

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Merci beaucoup.

On observe au Comité une tendance inquiétante depuis quelque temps. Tout d'abord, le greffier de la Chambre des communes a comparu ici, et les conservateurs se sont acharnés à remettre en question son intégrité sans preuve à l'appui. C'est ce qu'ils ont fait même si le greffier s'était adressé directement au bureau de la leader du gouvernement à la Chambre pour lui demander s'il pouvait aller de l'avant, mais il n'a pas reçu de réponse et son intégrité a été remise en question.

Nous avons ensuite reçu le directeur général des élections. Je sais que nous ne nous entendons peut-être pas sur des questions politiques, et je sais que nous étions en désaccord avec les conservateurs pour ce qui est de leurs recommandations. Je ne siège pas au Comité depuis le début, mais nous avons avec le directeur général des élections une relation de travail exceptionnelle. Je ne pensais pas qu'un député pouvait intervenir et remettre en question son intégrité. Eh bien, c'est également ce qui s'est produit la semaine dernière lorsque l'honorable député de Carleton l'a traité avec un air réjoui de « chien de poche des libéraux ». Je pense m'être trompé la dernière fois, et il m'a corrigé, avec un air réjoui. On a ensuite fait venir quelqu'un d'autre à cette fin — j'espère que les députés qui sont normalement ici ne se livreront pas à ce jeu —, et son intégrité a été remise en question même s'il n'y était pour rien. La loi dit qu'il n'y est pour rien et rien ne prouve qu'il a agi ainsi, mais on s'est empressé d'un air réjoui à remettre en question son intégrité.

Ensuite, pendant l'heure qui a suivi, on a soulevé des préoccupations valables à propos de la façon dont David Johnston a été nommé. C'est M. Christopherson qui les a exprimées, et nous les avons entendues de la part du Parti conservateur la dernière fois, ce qui a donné lieu à un désaccord. Je pensais que David Johnston était une des personnes au pays dont l'intégrité ne pouvait pas être remise en question, compte tenu du travail qu'il a accompli. C'est pourtant ce qu'a fait le Parti conservateur. M. Johnston a dû défendre sa propre intégrité, en invitant ses détracteurs à regarder le travail de toute une vie. Tout cela s'est fait sans preuve, sans provocation. Maintenant, le Parti conservateur souhaite encore une fois faire venir un fonctionnaire pour remettre en question son intégrité sans preuve à l'appui.

Je ne sais pas s'ils comprennent le paradoxe de la situation, lorsqu'ils font venir un procureur indépendant pour remettre en question sa décision. J'ai déjà parlé du prix Nobel du paradoxe. Je ne sais pas si cela existe, mais vous seriez apparemment dans la course. Vous critiquez le gouvernement parce qu'il a envisagé de poser une question à propos de la direction prise dans une affaire juridique et d'un accord de suspension des poursuites, et c'est ce qui se produit depuis deux mois. Ils ont dit: « Comment osez-vous? » C'est ce que nous entendons depuis deux mois, mais aucune loi n'a été violée, comme l'ont déclaré les témoins. « Comment osez-vous même songer à poser une telle question? »

Nous voulons maintenant demander la comparution d'un procureur-enquêteur indépendant du Bureau du directeur des poursuites pénales, et interroger cette personne sur sa décision. C'est ahurissant et incroyable de voir à quel point le Parti conservateur cherche désespérément à alimenter la discussion sur SNC, jusqu'à être disposé à revenir sur tout ce qu'il a dit au cours des deux derniers.

Au bout du compte, je crois comprendre que le comité de la justice examine encore les prévisions budgétaires, que cela relève toujours de la compétence du commissaire aux élections fédérales dans le processus budgétaire et que l'occasion se présentera...

(1200)



Quoi qu'il en soit, au bout du compte, je ne pense pas que je vais appuyer la motion, mais j'aimerais mettre les choses au clair pour que nous ayons vraiment une motion sincère. Je propose donc de la modifier ainsi: Que le commissaire aux élections fédérales comparaisse devant le Comité pour parler des contributions illégales que SNC-Lavalin a faites au Parti libéral du Canada et au Parti conservateur du Canada et de sa décision de conclure une transaction avec SNC-Lavalin et Pierre Poilievre.

M. Scott Reid:

Chris, pouvez-vous nous donner le libellé?

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle, il a demandé si vous avez le libellé.

M. Scott Reid:

Excusez-moi. Je parlais avec David de ce que nous allons faire cet été...

Des voix: Oh, oh!

M. Scott Reid: ... et je me rends soudainement compte que nous avons fini les beaux discours pour passer au vif du sujet. Je ne suis pas revenu à temps pour prendre des notes; c'est ma faute.

M. Chris Bittle:

La modification serait à la fin de la deuxième ligne: « au Parti libéral du Canada et au Parti conservateur du Canada ».

(1205)

M. Scott Reid:

Excusez-moi. Puis-je interrompre et poser une question factuelle au milieu de tout cela? La contribution illégale dont vous parlez était-elle pour le Parti conservateur du Canada ou pour une association conservatrice de circonscription? Le savez-vous?

M. Chris Bittle:

Je ne suis pas tout à fait certain, mais si le libellé vous convient, c'est une question qui pourra être posée.

M. Scott Reid:

Quelqu'un connaît-il la réponse à cette question? La transaction conclue avec Pierre ou les responsables de sa campagne laisse entendre que la contribution était pour l'association de circonscription, pas pour le Parti conservateur proprement dit — à moins qu'elle ait été faite en estimant à l'époque qu'il allait être le ministre. J'essaie juste de comprendre ce qui... Vous pouvez comprendre pourquoi je veux des précisions. Je ne veux pas insérer une déclaration inexacte dans une motion. Si vous pouviez vérifier — je n'ai pas l'information sous les yeux —, nous pourrions alors... Je vois ce que vous voulez faire. Je veux que la motion soit exacte, et nous pourrions ensuite probablement l'appuyer.

Chris, Stephanie a vérifié sur le site Web de CBC. Il est écrit — et je lis le bon article — que le Parti conservateur du Canada a beaucoup moins profité du stratagème. Le Parti a reçu 3 137 $, alors que différentes associations de circonscription du Parti conservateur et différents candidats ont obtenu 5 050 $. Sommes-nous certains que c'est dans le contexte de... Oui, c'est le cas. Désolé. Je viens tout juste de voir le montant de 83 534 $ pour le Parti libéral, les différentes associations libérales...

Seriez-vous disposé à modifier un peu votre modification? Non. Cela vous gêne si...

M. Chris Bittle:

Je vous écoute. C'est de bonne guerre.

M. Scott Reid:

Bien. Oui, c'est vrai. Quoi qu'il en soit, laissez-moi vous dire ce que je propose, et vous pourrez décider ensuite.

Je pense que ce qui ressort, c'est que si nous faisons cela, il serait logique de parler du Parti libéral du Canada, du Parti conservateur du Canada et de leurs différentes associations de circonscription. En réalité, ce que vous faites, c'est souligner que SNC-Lavalin a donné de l'argent au Parti libéral du Canada ainsi qu'au Parti conservateur du Canada, ce qui est évidemment exact. L'entreprise en a aussi donné à différentes associations de circonscription des deux partis.

Si nous voulons faire comparaître Pierre Poilievre, je suppose que c'est parce que nous parlons de son association de circonscription. Je suppose que c'est l'une des associations concernées, Nepean—Carleton. Par conséquent, il nous faudrait mentionner les dons aux associations de circonscription, ou nous allons convoquer quelqu'un qui ne peut carrément pas parler de la question. J'aimerais également inclure les députés concernés, tant du côté conservateur que du côté libéral, dans les deux partis. Il faudra peut-être chercher un peu pour savoir de qui il s'agit. Cette façon de procéder ne vous paraît-elle pas raisonnable? Nous tentons essentiellement d'englober toutes les personnes concernées des deux côtés.

Le président:

Allez-y, monsieur Caron.

M. Guy Caron:

À vrai dire, nous devrions ajouter que, dans le même article, on dit que les quatre candidats à la direction du Parti libéral ont également reçu des fonds.

M. Scott Reid:

Est-ce exact?

M. Guy Caron:

Oui, selon l'article. Je l'ai aussi en français.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. Ce n'est malheureusement pas mon téléphone. Il vient de se verrouiller; je ne peux donc pas...

Si nous faisons cela, nous devrions peut-être ajouter « et les candidats à la direction » et aussi « consulter toutes les personnes qui ont ».

Monsieur Caron, je vous pose la question. Si nous nommons M. Poilievre, nous devrions probablement aussi mentionner les personnes impliquées qui ont conclu des transactions.

(1210)

M. Guy Caron:

Dans l'article, il n'y a aucun nom. Je ne peux donc pas vous dire les personnes dont il s'agit.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Je vais m'arrêter là parce que je n'ai en fait pas réussi à proposer un libellé précis, mais ce serait ma suggestion pour ce qui est de cet amendement.

Le président:

Où sommes-nous exactement, monsieur Reid?

M. Scott Reid:

J'attends la réponse de M. Bittle.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je ne suis pas d'accord pour dire que c'est un amendement favorable. Nous estimons qu'il faut souligner l'hypocrisie de tout cela. C'est la raison pour laquelle la motion devrait mentionner... Je suis d'avis que, si nous disons « Parti libéral du Canada » et « Parti conservateur du Canada », cela comprend les associations de circonscription et tout le reste. Je crois que c'est...

M. Scott Reid:

Y compris leurs associations de circonscription?

M. Chris Bittle:

J'estime que cela n'a pas d'importance, mais je crois que c'est important d'inclure... J'imagine que le plus troublant a été de voir M. Poilievre se présenter ici et mettre en doute l'intégrité du directeur général des élections et du commissaire aux élections fédérales.

Il a lui-même reçu et négocié une transaction, ce qui est un règlement juridique valide. Bref, si le Parti conservateur compte critiquer ce qu'a fait le commissaire dans un cas, il devrait aussi se montrer critique à l'endroit de M. Poilievre qui en a aussi conclu une et il devrait peut-être demander que leur collègue subisse aussi un procès. Gardons tout ce qui s'y trouve. J'aimerais que mon amendement demeure tel quel.

Une voix: Pourrions-nous lui demander de formuler...?

M. Scott Reid:

Il n'accepte pas le nouveau libellé. Il n'est donc pas nécessaire de le reformuler.

J'aimerais dans ce cas proposer une autre modification. Je suis très heureux que ce ne soit pas une réunion à huis clos.

Je me fonde sur les notes que j'ai prises concernant la proposition d'amendement de M. Bittle, qui vient modifier ma motion. La motion serait: « Que le commissaire aux élections fédérales et Pierre Poilievre comparaissent devant le Comité pour parler des contributions illégales que SNC-Lavalin a faites au Parti libéral du Canada et au Parti conservateur du Canada et à leurs associations de circonscription et de sa décision de conclure des transactions. »

Le président:

Est-ce un sous-amendement à l'amendement?

M. Scott Reid:

Je crois bien. Je ne sais pas vraiment la forme que cela devrait prendre à ce stade-ci sur le plan de la procédure.

Pouvons-nous le considérer comme un sous-amendement? Est-ce recevable?

Le greffier:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Faisons-le ainsi. Nous pourrons ainsi approuver ou rejeter cette proposition si nous le voulons ou en débattre.

Monsieur le président, ai-je raison de croire que nous sommes maintenant saisis du sous-amendement?

Le président:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord.

Je crois que cette proposition réussit à inclure la majorité des éléments. Cela n'inclut pas les quatre contributions qu'a mentionnées M. Caron concernant les candidats à la direction du parti, tout simplement parce que je crois cela sème beaucoup de confusion, mais cette proposition traite du sujet qui nous préoccupe, c'est-à-dire les contributions illégales de SNC-Lavalin. Personne ne conteste cela, parce que des transactions ont été conclues. Tout le monde est d'accord, y compris les personnes qui les ont reçues, qu'il ne s'agissait pas de contributions légales. C'est une excellente occasion de nous pencher sur la question sous-jacente.

Je me suis efforcé dans mon intervention d'expliquer que l'objectif n'est pas d'essayer de jeter le discrédit sur des élus ou des employés ici. Cela vise à essayer de comprendre la manière dont la justice est administrée dans ce cas précis, et la meilleure manière de le faire est de réaliser une étude qui se penche sur toutes les personnes qui ont reçu ces contributions illégales dans les associations de circonscription.

C'est mon boniment.

(1215)

Le président:

Madame Kusie, allez-y.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Monsieur le président, j'ai l'impression que cette proposition a le même thème que la motion que j'ai proposée précédemment.

Monsieur Bittle, en êtes-vous certain? Le Comité PROC se transformera vraiment en ring de la WWF. C'est grave. C'est du sérieux. J'aimerais offrir une dernière chance au gouvernement. Proposons la motion telle quelle. Nous aurons un vote par appel nominal. Si cela ne permet pas de révéler autre chose, il n'y aura aucun problème, et nous passerons à autre chose. C'est tout simplement ce que je propose au gouvernement.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires avant de passer au vote?

Le Comité suspendra ses travaux quelque minutes.

(1215)

(1220)

Le président:

Sommes-nous prêts à mettre aux voix le sous-amendement?

M. Scott Reid:

Oui. Nous aimerions avoir un vote par appel nominal.

Le président:

Nous aurons donc un vote par appel nominal.

(Le sous-amendement est rejeté par 5 voix contre 4.)

Le président: Nous sommes de retour à l'amendement.

M. Scott Reid:

Je notais rapidement le sous-amendement. Je n'ai pas noté l'amendement.

M. Bittle ou le greffier pourrait-il le lire?

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle, pouvez-vous le lire?

M. Chris Bittle:

Au début de la troisième ligne, nous ajoutons « au Parti conservateur du Canada », puis la fin de la motion serait « et de sa décision de conclure une transaction avec SNC-Lavalin et Pierre Poilievre ».

M. Scott Reid:

Seriez-vous prêt à parler plutôt de « transactions » au pluriel?

M. Chris Bittle:

Oui.

M. Scott Reid:

Je m'excuse, mais j'ai une autre question à poser. Vous êtes au courant que la transaction conclue avec Pierre Poilievre ne concerne pas SNC-Lavalin. C'est une question distincte.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je le suis.

M. Scott Reid:

D'accord. Parfait. Je n'ai pas d'autres commentaires.

Le président:

Nous aurons un vote par appel nominal concernant l'amendement.

(L'amendement est adopté par 9 voix contre 0.)

Le président: Nous devons maintenant mettre aux voix la motion modifiée.

M. Scott Reid:

J'aimerais avoir un vote par appel nominal.

Le président:

Nous aurons un vote par appel nominal.

En ce qui concerne le libellé, monsieur Reid, considéreriez-vous cela comme un amendement favorable si nous disions que le Comité « invite » le commissaire aux élections fédérales à comparaître?

M. Scott Reid:

Oui. Si cela convient à tout le monde, cela me va.

Le président:

Passons au vote par appel nominal sur la motion modifiée.

(La motion modifiée est rejetée par 5 voix contre 4.)

Le président: Poursuivons les travaux du Comité. La parole sera à M. Caron, mais je me demande si le Comité me permettrait d'utiliser la réunion de jeudi pour donner des directives au recherchiste concernant notre rapport sur les chambres parallèles.

Monsieur Reid, allez-y.

(1225)

M. Scott Reid:

Cela me convient.

Le président:

Quelqu'un s'y oppose-t-il?

C'est parfait. Nous le ferons jeudi.

Monsieur Caron, allez-y. [Français]

M. Guy Caron:

Je voudrais dire que je suis très heureux de mettre de côté la motion que M. Christopherson voulait présenter et de lui laisser le soin de la présenter à une date ultérieure. Je ne la présenterai donc pas ce matin. [Traduction]

Le président:

D'accord. Nous ne débattons pas de cette motion aujourd'hui.

Concernant la liste que j'ai distribuée, reste-t-il quelque chose dont nous n'avons pas encore parlé?

M. Scott Reid:

Il y a mon rappel au Règlement, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Nous avons essayé de le faire pendant que vous n'étiez pas là, mais cela n'a pas fonctionné.

M. Scott Reid:

Le rappel au Règlement que je voulais... Vous vous souvenez de ce qui s'est passé. Nous avions une réunion le 11 avril. La sonnerie d'appel retentissait, et nous avions un témoin, si je ne m'abuse. Vous avez donc déclaré la séance ouverte et vous avez demandé le consentement unanime du Comité pour entendre le témoin. Vous avez obtenu le consentement unanime du Comité dès le début de la réunion. Nous avons entendu le témoin, puis les membres du Comité se sont rendus à la Chambre pour voter.

D'après mon interprétation du Règlement, le président d'un comité ne peut pas demander le consentement unanime pour commencer une réunion. Par conséquent, c'est contraire au Règlement de commencer une réunion lorsque la sonnerie retentit déjà. En revanche, si la réunion est déjà commencée, la situation est simple à cet égard.

L'importance concrète de cela — ce n'est pas d'une grande importance — était qu'un certain nombre de personnes, dont moi, ne se sont pas présentées à la réunion en présumant qu'elle n'aurait pas lieu. C'était vraiment une méprise de bonne foi ou une interprétation différente des règles.

Je crois que mon interprétation est la bonne. Je suis prêt à concéder qu'elle est peut-être incorrecte, mais j'aimerais que ce rappel au Règlement soit réglé d'une manière ou d'une autre.

Voici tout simplement notre problème. Au Comité et à tout autre comité, un président ne peut pas prendre une décision qui nuit à la Chambre. Nous disons toujours que nous sommes maîtres de nos travaux dans les comités. Cela va évidemment dans les deux sens, mais je crois qu'il serait utile d'essayer de régler cette question. Je ne suis pas certain du bon mécanisme pour ce faire et confirmer que ma propre interprétation du Règlement est exacte ou inexacte. Je le mentionne simplement à mes collègues pour qu'ils réfléchissent à la question.

Le président:

Je vais vous donner deux options, monsieur Reid. Je vais vous donner la réponse courte et la réponse longue. La réponse courte est qu'il n'y a rien dans le Règlement qui m'empêche de le faire. Il y a quelque chose dans le Règlement qui m'empêche de le faire si la sonnerie d'appel retentit pendant une réunion, ce qui nous laisse alors deux choix.

Nous ne pouvons rien faire, mais il y a deux choix. Nous pouvons proposer de modifier les règles de procédure de notre comité pour préciser cet aspect ou nous pouvons en fait présenter un rapport à la Chambre pour essayer d'appliquer ce changement à l'ensemble des comités.

La réponse longue est que je pourrais lire, si c'est ce que vous souhaitez, ce qu'a préparé le greffier en utilisant de belles grandes tournures de phrase, mais je viens de le résumer.

M. Scott Reid:

Est-ce une option? Vous semblez quelque peu réticent.

Le président:

Non. C'est correct.

M. Scott Reid:

Comme je l'ai mentionné, l'autre option est que vous pourriez faire circuler ce document. Ce serait utile de l'avoir par écrit.

En fin de compte, comme je l'ai mentionné, j'aimerais que la Chambre fasse en sorte que le Règlement mentionne explicitement que cela signifie ceci ou cela. L'un ou l'autre, c'est correct. Je cherche vraiment à ce que ce soit dit de manière explicite.

(1230)

Le président:

Nous pourrions régler la question très facilement pour notre comité en faisant la modification ici. Si vous voulez saisir la Chambre de la question pour que cela s'applique à tous les comités, c'est plus problématique, mais nous pouvons aussi le faire.

M. Scott Reid:

Je veux seulement voir si les membres du Comité souhaitent le faire. Je suis peut-être le seul que cela obsède. Si c'est le cas, je risque de faire perdre du temps aux gens. Pourrions-nous tout d'abord commencer par avoir une idée de ce que les autres pensent et vérifier si je suis le seul que cela obsède et si c'est un véritable enjeu? Si les autres pensent que c'est un véritable enjeu, j'estime que nous devrions donc en saisir la Chambre. Si les autres pensent que c'est seulement moi, je vais laisser tomber.

Le président:

D'accord. C'est un bon point. Pour que les gens sachent ce dont nous parlons, il s'agit du paragraphe 115(5) du Règlement: Nonobstant l’alinéa 108(1)a) et le paragraphe 113(5), le président d’un comité permanent, spécial, législatif ou mixte suspend la réunion lorsque retentit la sonnerie d’appel pour un vote par appel nominal, à moins qu’il y ait consentement unanime de la part des membres du comité pour continuer à siéger.

Voilà ce qui se passe si la sonnerie d'appel retentit pendant une réunion. Cependant, le Règlement ne prévoit rien si la sonnerie d'appel retentit avant le début de la réunion. Nous pourrions préciser cet aspect dans nos procédures ou proposer à la Chambre de modifier les procédures pour l'ensemble des comités, parce que ce n'est pas précisé. Cependant, comme M. Reid veut prendre le pouls du Comité à ce sujet, nous en discuterons.

Monsieur Caron, allez-y. [Français]

M. Guy Caron:

Je suis réticent.

Ce que j'essaie d'éviter à ce comité, ce sont des effets pervers non prévus. Je pense que, si la sonnerie commence à retentir et que la réunion n'a pas encore commencé, c'est la responsabilité du président ou de la présidente de convoquer la réunion à une heure qui va suivre la fin du vote pour laquelle il y a eu une sonnerie.

Avoir la possibilité de commencer la réunion alors que la sonnerie retentit peut soulever différents problèmes, et différentes questions stratégiques pourraient être utilisées par certains partis par la suite. J'aurais du mal à accepter une interprétation voulant que le président soit autorisé à commencer une réunion alors que la sonnerie retentit déjà.

Je suis donc en désaccord, pas nécessairement pour des raisons que je peux expliquer maintenant, mais à cause de l'utilisation possible de cette disposition comme une échappatoire probable par la suite. [Traduction]

Le président:

Oui. Je crois que c'est un bon point.

J'aimerais vous donner un peu de contexte concernant la situation dont il est question. C'était une ministre qui comparaissait devant le Comité pour discuter du budget, et il est difficile de prévoir des ministres à l'horaire. Nous voulions donc au moins entendre l'exposé, parce qu'autrement nous ne l'aurions peut-être pas entendu. Tous les représentants des partis qui étaient là étaient d'accord, de même que les deux vice-présidents. Bref, tous les partis étaient d'accord à l'époque, mais nous n'avons pas essayé de communiquer avec M. Reid ou les autres qui n'étaient pas là, ce qui était probablement une erreur. Vous avez maintenant le contexte.

Toutefois, vous avez fait valoir un très bon point; vous ne voudriez pas qu'une telle interprétation soit utilisée à mauvais escient.

Y a-t-il d'autres commentaires?

M. Scott Reid:

J'aimerais bien entendre ce qu'en pensent les députés libéraux. Ils ne se font pas normalement prier pour me contredire.

Le président:

M. Graham ne se fait jamais prier.

Allez-y.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Instinctivement, si le président a le consentement des députés de tous les partis, cela ne me pose pas de problème. C'est mon opinion. Si l'un ou l'autre des partis s'y oppose, je le comprends tout à fait. Cela ne devrait pas se produire, mais nous pouvons le faire, si les députés de tous les partis y consentent. Je ne vois aucune raison pour ne pas le permettre.

Le président:

Monsieur Bittle, allez-y.

M. Chris Bittle:

Je n'étais pas là à cette réunion. Qui était là quand la réunion a débuté?

Le président:

Madame Kusie, vous en souvenez-vous? Vous étiez là, de même que M. Christopherson, je crois.

Mme Stephanie Kusie:

Oui. J'étais là. Au tout début, il n'y avait personne d'autre que moi et la ministre, puis M. Christopherson et Mme Lapointe, je crois, se sont joints à nous par la suite. Je ne...

Le président:

Nous avions le quorum.

M. Chris Bittle:

Nous avions le quorum et nous avions le consentement du Comité. J'imagine que c'est la question que je me pose. Nous avions le quorum et nous avions le consentement du Comité pour entendre les témoins. Même si nous avions une règle à cet égard, cela aurait-il été acceptable?

Je le comprends et je suis heureux de tout simplement dire qu'à l'avenir, si nous n'avons pas le consentement du Comité, nous ne commencerons pas une réunion si la sonnerie d'alarme retentit. Je comprends la préoccupation de M. Simms. Je ne crois pas que c'était malintentionné. L'objectif était d'entendre l'exposé de la ministre aux fins du compte rendu. Je ne penche ni d'un côté ni de l'autre, mais je comprends la préoccupation. Selon ce que j'en comprends, le Comité a consenti à aller de l'avant. Même s'il y avait une règle en place, nous aurions tout de même accordé sept ou huit minutes à la ministre. Je crois que je vais me plier à la volonté du Comité. Je répète que je n'ai pas d'opinions bien arrêtées sur la question.

(1235)

Le président:

Un aspect important dans cette situation précise, c'était que nous devions évidemment revenir après les votes, mais nous n'aurions peut-être pas eu de temps pour poser des questions à la ministre. En entendant son exposé, cela nous a évidemment permis de nous assurer d'avoir du temps pour poser des questions lorsqu'elle est revenue. C'était davantage lié au fonctionnement — nous vérifiions simplement que tout le monde était d'accord — qu'à la procédure.

Monsieur Reid, allez-y.

M. Scott Reid:

Je répète que je crois que les gens présents cherchaient vraiment à respecter le Règlement et que cela se fondait sur leur interprétation sincère du Règlement. Nous avions le consentement unanime. Vous l'avez demandé et vous l'avez obtenu. Il ne fait donc aucun doute que c'était ce que pensaient les gens qui étaient là. Vous aviez la majorité du Comité, ce qui signifie automatiquement que mon interprétation du Règlement représente ce que pense la minorité.

Il y a un élément qui est clair, et c'est que les gens ne souhaitent pas vraiment en discuter à ce moment-ci. Nous avons maintenant eu l'occasion d'en discuter, et c'est une séance publique. Cela figurera donc au compte rendu. Je ne crois pas que nous serons en mesure de formuler des recommandations à la Chambre. Nous pourrions simplement clore le sujet en vous demandant de nous dire comment vous agiriez dans une circonstance semblable si une telle circonstance se produisait d'ici la fin de la législature, et nous saurons à l'avenir si nous devons nous rendre à la Chambre dans une telle situation ou venir ici.

Avant de vous laisser répondre, j'aimerais seulement dire que ce n'est pas vraiment un problème pour notre comité. Nos réunions ont lieu directement en dessous de la Chambre des communes, qui se trouve à l'étage supérieur. Ce serait évidemment un problème plus grave sur le plan pratique si la réunion avait lieu dans l'édifice Wellington ou l'édifice de la Bravoure. Ce ne sera jamais le cas pour nous, mais c'est possible pour d'autres.

Je ne cherche pas à vous influencer dans un sens ou l'autre, parce que vos décisions au Comité n'établiront pas de précédent pour les autres. Cela vise simplement à souligner que vous pouvez faire l'un ou l'autre. Tant que vous précisez la pratique que vous appliquerez, nous saurons à quoi nous en tenir.

Le président:

En me fondant sur le commentaire que nous venons d'entendre, j'ai l'impression que cela ne semblait pas poser de problème si tous les partis qui sont représentés au Comité étaient d'accord. La prochaine fois, je crois que je m'engagerais à procéder ainsi et à, si c'est possible, envoyer un petit courriel à chaque membre du Comité pour que les quelques membres, comme vous, qui ne se sont pas présentés ici soient au courant que nous procéderons ainsi.

Je ne crois pas que cela se produira très souvent, mais c'est ainsi que je procéderais.

M. Scott Reid:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Cela vous convient-il? Y a-t-il d'autres points avant de clore la réunion?

Pour la réunion de jeudi, j'aimerais vous demander de réfléchir à des idées pour le recherchiste qui s'occupera de notre rapport sur les chambres parallèles, y compris vos recommandations pour nous assurer de maintenir le cap pour la suite des choses.

Ensuite, le jeudi 16 mai, la ministre comparaîtra devant le Comité pour discuter du Budget principal des dépenses concernant la Commission aux débats.

Monsieur Caron, M. Christopherson sera-t-il de retour?

M. Guy Caron:

Je suis certain que M. Christopherson pourrait vous répondre. Vous avez mentionné une heure pour la ministre. Y aura-t-il aussi des fonctionnaires, s'il y a d'autres questions?

Le président:

Les ministres sont normalement accompagnés de fonctionnaires. Je crois que cette ministre a toujours été accompagnée de fonctionnaires du Bureau du Conseil privé pour répondre aux questions.

Elle ne prend pas beaucoup de décisions concernant les dépenses du commissaire aux débats. Le commissaire aux débats a déjà témoigné devant le Comité. Nous l'avons entendu, et il a répondu à beaucoup de questions que les gens avaient sur des aspects précis. Le Comité a aussi demandé à la ministre de comparaître devant le Comité. Lorsqu'elle comparaît devant le Comité, elle est toujours accompagnée de fonctionnaires.

(1240)

M. Guy Caron:

Par exemple, si M. Christopherson souhaitait que les fonctionnaires restent plus longtemps s'il y a d'autres questions et que la ministre ne peut pas rester plus longtemps, est-ce quelque chose que le Comité serait prêt à envisager? J'aimerais demander au Comité de garder cette possibilité en tête jusqu'au retour de M. Christopherson pour voir si c'est ce qu'il souhaite.

M. Chris Bittle:

Cela ne m'aurait normalement pas dérangé, mais les discussions seront vraiment limitées en ce qui concerne la Commission aux débats. Le commissaire David Johnston a témoigné devant le Comité pour répondre aux questions. Nous l'avons déjà fait. Je présume qu'il y aura quelques questions concernant la Commission aux débats, mais les questions déborderont de ce cadre. Nous avons déjà entendu les fonctionnaires qui prennent les décisions concernant la Commission aux débats. Néanmoins, si les gens le souhaitent vraiment... Je ne sais pas, mais nous l'avons déjà fait.

M. Guy Caron:

Je souhaite simplement que le Comité attende le retour de M. Christopherson pour prendre la décision.

M. Chris Bittle:

D'accord.

Le président:

Ce sera tout. Je remercie le Comité. Je crois que nous avons eu des discussions très professionnelles et nous avons réussi à abattre beaucoup de travail.

Merci. La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on May 07, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.