header image
The world according to cdlu

Topics

acva bili chpc columns committee conferences elections environment essays ethi faae foreign foss guelph hansard highways history indu internet leadership legal military money musings newsletter oggo pacp parlchmbr parlcmte politics presentations proc qp radio reform regs rnnr satire secu smem statements tran transit tributes tv unity

Recent entries

  1. A podcast with Michael Geist on technology and politics
  2. Next steps
  3. On what electoral reform reforms
  4. 2019 Fall campaign newsletter / infolettre campagne d'automne 2019
  5. 2019 Summer newsletter / infolettre été 2019
  6. 2019-07-15 SECU 171
  7. 2019-06-20 RNNR 140
  8. 2019-06-17 14:14 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  9. 2019-06-17 SECU 169
  10. 2019-06-13 PROC 162
  11. 2019-06-10 SECU 167
  12. 2019-06-06 PROC 160
  13. 2019-06-06 INDU 167
  14. 2019-06-05 23:27 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  15. 2019-06-05 15:11 House intervention / intervention en chambre
  16. older entries...

Latest comments

Michael D on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
Steve Host on Keeping Track - Bus system overhaul coming to Guelph while GO station might go to Lafarge after all
G. T. on Abolish the Ontario Municipal Board
Anonymous on The myth of the wasted vote
fellow guelphite on Keeping Track - Rethinking the commute

Links of interest

  1. 2009-03-27: The Mother of All Rejection Letters
  2. 2009-02: Road Worriers
  3. 2008-12-29: Who should go to university?
  4. 2008-12-24: Tory aide tried to scuttle Hanukah event, school says
  5. 2008-11-07: You might not like Obama's promises
  6. 2008-09-19: Harper a threat to democracy: independent
  7. 2008-09-16: Tory dissenters 'idiots, turds'
  8. 2008-09-02: Canadians willing to ride bus, but transit systems are letting them down: survey
  9. 2008-08-19: Guelph transit riders happy with 20-minute bus service changes
  10. 2008=08-06: More people riding Edmonton buses, LRT
  11. 2008-08-01: U.S. border agents given power to seize travellers' laptops, cellphones
  12. 2008-07-14: Planning for new roads with a green blueprint
  13. 2008-07-12: Disappointed by Layton, former MPP likes `pretty solid' Dion
  14. 2008-07-11: Riders on the GO
  15. 2008-07-09: MPs took donations from firm in RCMP deal
  16. older links...

2019-06-03 SECU 166

Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security

(1530)

[English]

The Chair (Hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

I'm calling this meeting to order.

I want to thank Minister Goodale for his presence. He is here to talk about the main estimates.

Before he starts, I want to note that this is possibly the last time the minister will appear before this particular committee. On behalf of the committee, I want to thank him not only for his attendance here, but for his willingness to co-operate with the committee and to review all of the amendments that have been put forward by this committee to him, and his willingness to accept quite a high percentage of them.

Minister, I want to thank you for your co-operation and for your relationship with the committee.

With that—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

You mean in this Parliament, right?

The Chair:

Pardon?

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: You mean in this Parliament, right?

The Chair: Yes, in this Parliament. We're not going back to the days of Laurier or anything of that nature.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham: It's not the last time ever.

The Chair:

No. Thank you.

Minister.

Hon. Ralph Goodale (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness):

Mr. Chairman, thank you for your very kind remarks. They are much appreciated, and I'm glad to be back with the committee once again, this time, of course, presenting the 2019-20 main estimates for the public safety portfolio.

To help explain all of those numbers in more detail and to answer your questions today, I am pleased to be joined by Gina Wilson, the new deputy minister of Public Safety Canada. I believe this is her first appearance before this committee. She is no stranger, of course, in the Department of Public Safety, but she has been, for the last couple of years, the deputy minister in the Department for Women and Gender Equality, a department she presided over the creation of.

With the deputy minister today, we have Brian Brennan, deputy commissioner of the RCMP; David Vigneault, director of CSIS; John Ossowski, president of CBSA; Anne Kelly, commissioner of the Correctional Service of Canada; and Anik Lapointe, chief financial officer for the Parole Board of Canada.

The top priority of any government, Mr. Chair, is to keep its citizens safe and secure, and I'm very proud of the tremendous work that is being done by these officials and the employees who work following their lead diligently to serve Canadians and protect them from all manner of public threats. The nature and severity of those threats continue to evolve and change over time and, as a government, we are committed to supporting the skilled men and women who work so hard to protect us by giving them the resources they need to ensure that they can respond. The estimates, of course, are the principal vehicle for doing that.

The main estimates for 2019-20 reflect that commitment to keep Canadians safe while safeguarding their rights and freedoms. You will note that, portfolio-wide, the total authorities requested this year would result in a net increase of $256.1 million for this fiscal year, or 2.7% more than last year's main estimates. Of course, some of the figures go up and some go down, but the net result is a 2.7% increase.

One key item is an investment of $135 million in fiscal year 2019-20 for the sustainability and modernization of Canada's border operations. The second is $42 million for Public Safety Canada, the RCMP and CBSA to take action against guns and gangs. Minister Blair will be speaking in much more detail about the work being done under these initiatives when he appears before the committee.

For my part today I will simply summarize several other funding matters affecting my department, Public Safety Canada, and all of the related agencies.

The department is estimating a net spending decrease of $246.8 million this fiscal year, 21.2% less than last year. That is due to a decrease of $410.7 million in funding levels that expired last year under the disaster financial assistance arrangements. There is another item coming later on whereby the number goes up for the future year. You have to offset those two in order to follow the flow of the cash. That rather significant drop in the funding for the department itself, 21.2%, is largely due to that change in the DFAA, for which the funding level expired in 2018-19.

There was also a decrease of some $79 million related to the completion of Canada's presidency of the G7 in the year 2018.

These decreases are partially offset by a number of funding increases, including a $25-million grant to Avalanche Canada to support its life-saving safety and awareness efforts; $14.9 million for infrastructure projects related to security in indigenous communities; $10.1 million in additional funding for the first nations policing program; and $3.3 million to address post-traumatic stress injuries affecting our skilled public safety personnel.

(1535)



The main estimates also reflect measures announced a few weeks ago in budget 2019. For Public Safety Canada, that is, the department, these include $158.5 million to improve our ability to prepare for and respond to emergencies and natural disasters in Canada, including in indigenous communities, of which $155 million partially offsets that reduction in DFAA that I just referred to.

There's also $4.4 million to combat the truly heinous and growing crime of child sexual exploitation online.

There is $2 million for the security infrastructure program to continue to help communities at risk of hate-motivated crime to improve their security infrastructure.

There is $2 million to support efforts to assess and respond to economic-based national security threats, and there's $1.8 million to support a new cybersecurity framework to protect Canada's critical infrastructure, including in the finance, telecommunications, energy and transport sectors.

As you know, in the 2019 federal budget, we also announced $65 million as a one-time capital investment in the STARS air rescue system to acquire new emergency helicopters. That important investment does not appear in the 2019-20 main estimates because it was accounted for in the 2018-19 fiscal year, that is, before this past March 31.

Let me turn now to the 2019-20 main estimates for the other public safety portfolio organizations, other than the department itself.

I'll start with CBSA, which is seeking a total net increase this fiscal year of $316.9 million. That's 17.5% over the 2018-19 estimates. In addition to that large sustainability and modernization for border operations item that I previously mentioned, some other notable increases include $10.7 million to support activities related to the immigration levels plan that was announced for the three years 2018 to 2020. Those things include security screening, identity verification, the processing of permanent residents when they arrive at the border and so forth—all the responsibilities of CBSA.

There's an item for $10.3 million for the CBSA's postal modernization initiative, which is critically important at the border. There is $7.2 million to expand safe examination sites, increase intelligence and risk assessment capacity and enhance the detector dog program to give our officers the tools they need to combat Canada's ongoing opioid crisis.

There's also approximately $100 million for compensation and employee benefit plans related to collective bargaining agreements.

Budget 2019 investments affecting CBSA main estimates this year include a total of $381.8 million over five years to enhance the integrity of Canada's borders and the asylum system. While my colleague Minister Blair will provide more details on this, the CBSA would be receiving $106.3 million of that funding in this fiscal year.

Budget 2019 also includes $12.9 million to ensure that immigration and border officials have the resources to process a growing number of applications for Canadian visitor visas and work and study permits.

There is $5.6 million to increase the number of detector dogs deployed across the country in order to protect Canada's hog farmers and meat processors from the serious economic threat posed by African swine fever.

Also, there's $1.5 million to protect people from unscrupulous immigration consultants by improving oversight and strengthening compliance and enforcement measures.

I would also note that the government announced through the budget its intention to introduce the legislation necessary to expand the role of the RCMP's Civilian Review and Complaints Commission so it can also serve as an independent review body for CBSA. That proposed legislation, Bill C-98, was introduced in the House last month.

(1540)



I will turn now to the RCMP. Its estimates for 2019-20 reflect a $9.2-million increase over last year's funding levels. The main factors contributing to that change include increases of $32.8 million to compensate members injured in the performance of their duties, $26.6 million for the initiative to ensure security and prosperity in the digital age, and $10.4 million for forensic toxicology in Canada's new drug-impaired driving regime.

The RCMP's main estimates also reflect an additional $123 million related to budget 2019, including $96.2 million to strengthen the RCMP's overall policing operations, and $3.3 million to ensure that air travellers and workers at airports are effectively screened on site. The increases in funding to the RCMP are offset by certain decreases in the 2019-20 main estimates, including $132 million related to the completion of Canada's G7 presidency in 2018 and $51.7 million related to sunsetting capital infrastructure projects.

I will now move to the Correctional Service of Canada. It is seeking an increase of $136 million, or 5.6%, over last year's estimates. The two main factors contributing to the change are a $32.5-million increase in the care and custody program, most of which, $27.6 million, is for employee compensation, and $95 million announced in budget 2019 to support CSC's custodial operations.

The Parole Board of Canada is estimating a decrease of approximately $700,000 in these main estimates or 1.6% less than the amount requested last year. That's due to one-time funding received last year to assist with negotiated salary adjustments. There is also, of course, information in the estimates about the Office of the Correctional Investigator, CSIS and other agencies that are part of my portfolio. I simply make the point that this is a very busy portfolio and the people who work within Public Safety Canada and all the related agencies carry a huge load of public responsibilities in the interests of public safety. They always put public safety first while at the same time ensuring that the rights and freedoms of Canadians are properly protected.

With that, Mr. Chair, my colleagues and I would be happy to try to answer your questions.

(1545)

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

With that, Mr. Picard, go ahead for seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I want to welcome Minister Goodale and everyone who has joined us. Thank you for participating in this exercise once again.

First, I'll talk about my favourite subject, which is financial crime. If I combine the funding from the RCMP and Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada, the total is just over $7 million in investments — [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

There's no translation coming through.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Let's look at the money-laundering aspect of the estimates. Combined Public Safety and RCMP is about $7 million more.

What kind of improvement are we looking for? Is it just the money-laundering unit or is it IM/IT as well and other units working closely with financial crimes and/or terrorism financing?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Let me ask Deputy Commissioner Brennan to comment.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Thank you.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Incidentally, he is brand new on the job, just in the last number of months, but he will get used to the very pleasant experience of committee hearings of the House of Commons.

Deputy Commissioner Brian Brennan (Contract and Indigenous Policing, Royal Canadian Mounted Police):

Thank you, Minister and Chairman.

The increase in funding would go to all of those areas. I'm not in a position to speak specifically to the numbers, exactly where all the dollars will go, but that investment is intended to increase our investigational capability and to support systems needed around those types of very specific investigations.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

If I could add to that, Monsieur Picard, the estimates show $4.1 million going to the RCMP directly for enhanced federal policing capacity. There's about $819,000 to Finance Canada to support its work related to money laundering. There's $3.6 million to FINTRAC to strengthen operational capacity. There's $3.28 million to the Department of Public Safety to create the anti-money laundering action, coordination and enforcement team, which is an effort to bring all of these various threads more coherently together so that everybody is operating on exactly the same page with the greatest efficiency and inter-agency co-operation.

Mr. Michel Picard:

Thank you, sir.

With respect to CSIS and the Canadian strategy with respect to the Middle East, what do we have to change in our strategy? What doesn't work or what has to be changed?

Also, with respect to recent events here and close to us, the Middle East doesn't seem to be the only nature of the threats we have, so why the focus on the Middle East?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

David.

Mr. David Vigneault (Director, Canadian Security Intelligence Service):

Thank you, Minister.

Specifically, it's our effort to support the whole-of-government approach to the Middle East operations, the military and diplomatic operations in Syria and Iraq. The monies you see here for the main estimates are the specific allocations for CSIS to support those activities. We do intelligence collection in the region and here in Canada to support that activity.

Also, on your question, the focus of this estimate was on the Middle East, but as you pointed out, Mr. Picard, we are obviously concerned about activities and terrorism all over the world, not just in the Middle East.

(1550)

Mr. Michel Picard:

Thank you.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur Picard, could I add just one small anecdote?

I had the opportunity at an earlier stage to have a discussion with the person who was then the U.S. Secretary of Defense with respect to the the change that had been made in Canada's deployment in the Middle East with respect to the international coalition against Daesh. I noted the very significant increase in the investment we were making with respect to intelligence activities. The U.S. secretary commented very favourably on the work by Canadians in that particular zone, particularly the intelligence work, which he indicated was first class and very helpful to all members of that coalition in dealing effectively with the threats posed by Daesh.

Mr. Michel Picard:

This is my first experience and my first mandate, and I understand that we have to justify why we spend money. My next question would be why we don't spend a specific amount of money on a specific topic, so we'd be justifying to spend more money.... In terms of infrastructure on cyber-threats, I see that we have more than $1.7 million for cyber-threats. My concern is not that we have money for cyber-threats; it's that we don't have money anywhere else.

Based on what we've studied on democratic institutions, ethics and public information here, on cyber-threats and financial crimes, this subject was all over the place. People are getting scared in learning what we learn day in and day out about this threat, which is multi-faceted. I don't see anything about this topic specifically in this budget, so would you please take this chance to explain?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I would be happy to, Monsieur Picard, because it is quite possible for people to look at that one number, $1.8 million, and wonder how that covers the field. Well, it doesn't. This is one little snapshot of one portion of the spending that we are devoting to the whole cause of cybersecurity.

Through our last two or three budgets, we have included a series of investments. They of course roll forward through the estimates process, but you actually need to examine the sections of the budget that lay out the more complete picture.

Through various departments, we are investing, through the budget last year, $750 million to enhance cybersecurity in Canada. A portion of that creates the new cyber response centre. A portion of that creates the new cybercrime unit within the RCMP. There is a whole series of investments to enhance our approach to cybercrime and cybersecurity.

In the last budget, the key investment was $145 million, of which this is the first very small tranche, to support the security of our critical cyber-systems. We have identified four in particular: finance, telecommunications....

Remind me of what they are. I want to make sure I get the four critically....

The Chair:

We can come back to that. Mr. Picard is well over time.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I'm trying to recite the budget speech.

There are four particular areas in which we will be investing to support new legislation that will require certain standards of these critical sectors and create the enforcement mechanisms to make sure those standards are met. It is so vital, Mr. Picard, that our critical cyber-systems protect themselves and employ all the procedures that are necessary to keep themselves safe and secure. We are creating the legislative framework to make sure that happens, with the right kind of enforcement mechanisms backing it up and the funding, of which the $1.8 million is just the very first small tranche. We'll make sure that these systems are indeed safe and secure with the right enforcement to enforce the requirements.

(1555)

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister Goodale, for that lengthy response.

Mr. Paul-Hus, go ahead for seven minutes. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, CPC):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Good afternoon, Minister Goodale and everyone who has joined us.

Minister Goodale, my question concerns several of your agencies. It relates to the information broadcast by the Quebec media, particularly TVA, regarding the Mexican drug cartels doing business in Canada. This morning, I met with His Excellency Mr. Camacho, the Mexican ambassador to Canada. We discussed the situation.

I know that you were already asked about this during the oral question period, and you responded that the information was false. I want to find out what you know and what's really being done in Canada to deal with the Mexican cartels. Canada does business with Mexico, one of its largest partners and a friend. We're not focusing on Mexico here, but on the people who come to Canada with a Mexican passport to work for the Mexican drug cartels. We want to deal with these people. How are we dealing with them? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I appreciate the question, Monsieur Paul-Hus. It is important to get accurate information in the public domain. The figures that you have referred to in certain media outlets are figures that have been very perplexing to CBSA because they have not been able to verify where that arithmetic came from. Mr. Ossowski may well want to comment on this, because over the last number of days he has had his officials in CBSA scouring the records to see where this arithmetic originates, and it simply cannot be verified.

What I can tell you is that CBSA has determined that the number of inadmissibility cases for all types of criminality by Mexican foreign nationals during the period of the last 18 months, from January 2018 until now, is 238. Of these 238, only 27 were reported to be inadmissible due to links to known organized criminality, three of which were for suspected links to cartels.

The real numbers are substantially lower than the numbers that have been referred to in the media. All 27 of those people who were reported to be inadmissible due to links to organized criminality have been removed from Canada. They are no longer in the country. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Thank you for your response, Minister Goodale.

The fact remains that one individual has been clearly identified. Why was this person, whom Mexico has identified as a criminal, able to cross our border? Don't the two countries share information on everyone arriving in Canada? Since Mexico has identified this person as a criminal, isn't that information entered in a database? What process does CBSA follow? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

All of the proper checks in terms of identity, records, background immigration issues and criminality have been done thoroughly by CBSA at the border.

Mr. Ossowski, can you comment on the specific individual that Mr. Paul-Hus is referring to?

Mr. John Ossowski (President, Canada Border Services Agency):

Thank you.

I would just say that, in the first instance, I think it's important to understand the layers of security. We work in airports and with Mexican officials in Mexico to, first, try to prevent people from even getting on flights to Canada if they don't have the proper documentation or if there are any concerns in terms of misrepresentation or criminality. That being said, if they do arrive and there are concerns, our officers are very well trained to deal with those upon arrival. They could be allowed to leave at that point, if they stay at the airport until the next flight and then go home. If they do come in and we suspect that there is some work that we need to do, we will check in secondary inspection for any criminality.

During that same reporting period, I can say that we found 18 people who had used fraudulent travel documents and whom we were able to prevent from entering. There are layers of security.

With respect to that specific individual, he has been removed from the country.

(1600)

[Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

I understand that you can have this information in advance since I know that there are officers in Mexico and agreements with that country. Thousands of Mexicans come to Canada. Aren't there adequate computer mechanisms in CBSA's systems? Isn't passport data available, especially for convicted criminals? Isn't there an exchange of information on these criminals, a bit like Interpol? [English]

Mr. John Ossowski:

I think it's important to understand the differences. With Mexico, visas are not required in order to come to Canada. We lifted the visa requirement a couple of years ago. They travel now on what's called the electronic travel authorization program. That's a lighter touch in terms of criminality.

As I mentioned, if they arrive and there are some concerns or some indicators, we do those criminal checks at the port of entry upon their arrival. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Thank you.

Minister Goodale, on May 10, a fuel tanker collided with an aircraft at Pearson airport. The Globe and Mail informed us that the vehicle had made three attempts to crash into the plane. Peel police are conducting the investigation. However, the situation is very suspicious and the incident could constitute a deliberate attack. Do you have more information on the matter? [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

There's no information that I'm in a position to share at this time, Mr. Paul-Hus, with respect to that particular incident. I would, however, undertake to see if there is some further detail that I can share with you, as a colleague in the House of Commons. I will inquire and determine what information can be put into the public domain.

The Chair:

Thank you for that, Mr. Paul-Hus and Minister.

Mr. Dubé, go ahead for seven minutes, please. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

I want to thank all the witnesses for joining us today.

Minister Goodale, we met with David McGuinty when he presented the first annual report of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians. I forget the exact part of the report and please forgive me, but the report stated that the amounts spent on national security couldn't be disclosed.

Nevertheless, the report provided the amounts and the division of the amounts for Australia. When I pointed out this contradiction to Mr. McGuinty, he confirmed that the committee members had raised the issue with the officials giving the presentation. However, the committee members were told that it was a matter of national security and that the information couldn't be disclosed.

I was wondering whether you could clarify why Australia, an ally and member of the Five Eyes, feels that its expenses can be disclosed, but not Canada. [English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Our concern, Monsieur Dubé, is with providing information in the public domain that could, in fact, reveal sensitive and very critical operational details of the RCMP, CSIS or CBSA in a way that would compromise their ability to keep Canadians safe.

The information can be shared in the context of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians. It would also be available to the new national security and intelligence review agency, which will be created under Bill C-59. Those are classified environments in which members of Parliament around the table have the appropriate clearance level. It's more difficult to share that information here. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I understand that the information is classified and that certain limits must be imposed. I don't want to go on about this issue too much, because I have questions regarding other topics. However, as I said, Australians disclose this information, as stated in the report.

Mr. McGuinty told us that the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians hadn't received an adequate response regarding this matter. Why is there a difference between Canada and Australia? I understand the applicable mechanisms. However, your reasoning seems to contradict the reasoning of the Australians.

(1605)

[English]

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Well, far be it from me to be critical of the Australians, but we have our own Canadian logic, and our obligation here is to protect the public safety and national security of Canadians.

Monsieur Dubé, I would simply encourage Mr. McGuinty and the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians to pursue this issue with the various security agencies, which they have the authority to do under the legislation, to secure the information that they believe they need. I would encourage the agencies to be forthcoming—

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Minister, I'm going to have to interrupt you, because my time is limited and this is probably the only round I'll get to ask you questions.

I just want to say that I do think it's an important thing to raise, because on expenditures there's a particular role for all parliamentarians to play beyond just the committee with clearance, where it can pertain more to operational details. Money is a whole different game, as Monsieur Picard was alluding to in his questions about the role that even we can play as those around this table at this committee.

On that note, I do want to move on to CBSA and the CRCC. We know that Bill C-98 is before the House. I'm wondering if you can clarify. There's $500,000 for CBSA and there's $420,000 for CRCC. I have two questions about that.

One, is that all the money that's going to come out of the Bill C-98 mechanism, or is there more money following that to implement those measures? Two, what explains that discrepancy? If it's $500,000 for CBSA, are they doing the work internally for review and oversight, or is that going to be sent off back to CRCC once Bill C-98 has become law?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Again, the numbers that are in this set of estimates are the initial snapshot, a one-year slice, of the beginning of a process. This is a very significant process. Where the CRCC has previously, as you know, totally focused on the RCMP, we will now be broadening the agency. It will continue its review function with respect to the RCMP, but it will also assume responsibility for the review function with respect to CBSA.

The expectation is that for any complaint the public has with respect to officer behaviour or a particular situation that developed at the border, or some other topic such as the handling of detention, for example, a complaint could be filed with this new expanded body, and they would have the complete jurisdiction to investigate that complaint from the public.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Well, with all due respect, it's better late than never, and I certainly hope it has time to pass before Parliament rises.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

So do I, Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

My last question is on vote 15, which talks about “economic-based national security threats” as part of CSIS's mandate. What is an economic-based national security threat in the context of what you're allowed to tell us here today?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Well, I could give my layman's explanation of that.

David, would you like to provide the official definition?

Mr. David Vigneault:

Yes. Thank you, Minister.[Translation]

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.[English]

Essentially, this is related to overall foreign investment into the country when we're looking at a different country's different state-owned enterprises, different entities, trying to invest in greenfield investment here in Canada.

It's the ability for the service to contribute to the efforts of the national security community to assess if there are any national security links to these transactions. Sometimes it's because of ownership. Sometimes it's because of the nature of the technology that might be acquired. It's our overall ability to investigate and produce the right analysis to support the decision-making of Public Safety, other agencies and ultimately the cabinet, under the Investment Canada Act.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.

Mr. Spengemann, please, for seven minutes.

Mr. Sven Spengemann (Mississauga—Lakeshore, Lib.):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Minister Goodale, we're coming up on the end of the parliamentary term. I just want to take a moment to thank you and your senior team, on behalf of the people of Mississauga—Lakeshore, the riding I represent, for your work and through you, the women and men, the members of our civil service, who do this incredibly important work in public safety and national security day by day.

A couple of days ago I had an opportunity to meet with a group of amazing grades 7 and 8 students at Olive Grove School, which is an Islamic school in my riding. It was part of CIVIX Canada's Rep Day, which is a day to bring elected representatives into the classroom.

There was a great discussion. One of the points we discussed was violent crime, and specifically gun violence. I know Minister Blair will be with us later on. We straw polled the students on the issues that are of importance, and when it came to gun violence and violent crime, almost every hand went up among grades 7s and 8s.

We have a $2-million commitment towards a program to protect community gathering places from hate-motivated crimes, but we also have the Canada Centre for Community Engagement and Prevention of Violence. What are we doing at the moment with respect to addressing the root causes of violent crime, and also to make sure there is a level of security for grades 7 and 8 students who belong to a faith-based school so that they feel safe when they study in their community and in their centre of learning?

(1610)

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

That's a very important question, Mr. Spengemann, and there are several answers to that.

Thank you for flagging the good work of the Canada community outreach centre within my department. Their whole objective is to coordinate and support activities at the community level across the country, some run by municipalities, some run by provincial governments, some run by academic organizations, some run by police services that reach out to the community to counter that insidious process of radicalization to violence.

Some of their work is purely research; other is program delivery; other is assisting groups that provide the countervailing messages to people who are on a negative trajectory towards extremism and violence. The Canada centre has been up and running now for two and a half years, and it has done some very important work.

The specific program I think you're referring to is a different one. It's the security infrastructure program which, when we started in government three and a half years ago, was funded at the rate, I believe, of about $1 million a year. It was a good initiative but fairly limited in its scope. We have quadrupled the funds, so it's now up to $4 million a year. We've expanded the criteria for what this program can, in fact, support.

One of the recent changes, for example, is to allow some of the funding from the security infrastructure program to be used for training in schools or in places of worship or community centres where that training can actually assist with knowing what to do if there is an incident. It's like a fire drill in school. How do you react, say, to an active shooter or to an incident of violence?

It was found, in the case of the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh last fall, that training in advance made a real difference in that situation. There were people on the scene who knew, because they had been properly trained, exactly how to react to an active shooter situation. It's the considered opinion of people in that synagogue that the training made a material difference in saving lives.

We have adjusted the terms of the security infrastructure program to allow for that to be part of what the program can pay for, in addition to closed-circuit television, better doors, barriers and other protective features within the design of a building, and the renovation of the building itself to make it as effective as it can be to keep people safe.

Mr. Sven Spengemann:

Thank you for that.

Let me shift gears and take you to the cyber domain. I think there is $9.2 million going towards protecting the rights and freedoms of Canadians. One concern that's raised is about cyber-bullying, particularly with respect to LGBTQ2+ youth and people but also for other vulnerable communities.

Can you tell the committee what the department is doing with respect to online bullying specifically?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

This is an initiative that involves not only my department but other departments within the Government of Canada as well. The whole purpose is to first of all raise the level of awareness about some of the insidious activity that's going on online. It might be bullying. It might be child sexual exploitation. Often one leads to the other. It might be human trafficking. It might be violent extremism. In another cadre, it could be attacks on our democratic institutions. There is a whole range of social harms perpetrated on the Internet. Our objective is to raise the level of public awareness so that people understand better and have a higher level of digital literacy in terms of what they're being subjected to online and are able to distinguish between what is legitimate activity and what is not.

As I said earlier, we've also created new cyber response systems—one within the Communications Security Establishment, another within the RCMP—making it, in terms of the police unit, more accessible to the public with a one-window reporting mechanism. People know where they can go to report cybercrime and incidents on the Internet that need to be drawn to the attention of public officials.

This is such an all-pervasive problem. It is, quite literally, in our hands every minute. We need to engage all Canadians in this effort to understand their vulnerabilities online, and then make the response mechanisms at all levels of government readily available. That's what we're trying to do.

(1615)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Spengemann—

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

To answer one final little point, Mr. Chair, the critical infrastructure systems that I was referring to earlier are finance, telecommunications, energy and transport.

The Chair:

Thank you for that.

I'm sure Mr. Motz appreciated that.

Mr. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, CPC):

I did. Thank you.

The Chair: You have five minutes, Mr. Motz.

Mr. Glen Motz: Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, Minister and team, for being here.

Minister, there have been lots of rumours floating around recently about your government considering a ban on certain types of firearms, maybe as early as this week. I'll ask you a very simple, clear question: Are you considering an order in council to ban certain firearms, yes or no?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The Prime Minister—

Mr. Glen Motz:

Yes or no.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

—invited Minister Blair to examine that question, and he will be reporting his recommendations very shortly. No final decision has been taken at this stage. He'll be able to give you an accurate description of where he is in his deliberations when he appears.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Minister, I know that generally your party tends to treat law-abiding Canadian firearms owners as second-class citizens—

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

No, that's not true.

Mr. Glen Motz:

—but I want to be clear that the firearm industry in Canada does hundreds of millions of dollars annually in sales and is responsible for thousands upon thousands of jobs. There are real-world consequences to attempts to shore up your left flank for an election year, with precious little in the way of accomplishments so far in your government.

Again, yes or no, do you have plans to ban firearms in this country?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Mr. Motz, you know very well that this is a specific policy area that the Prime Minister has asked Minister Blair to examine and report upon. He has conducted extensive consultations, probably the largest in Canadian history. He will make his recommendations known very shortly.

Mr. Glen Motz:

All right. So we're still waiting.

I'll go to my other question. We know that the majority of firearms-related homicides in this country are not by those who have a valid firearms licence. In the last 15 years or so, that percentage has been extremely low. Targeting a population that is law-abiding to begin with, with Bill C-71, rather than going after the gangs and guns issue that we have in this country.... Your government has loosened penalties for gangs and gang affiliation and made things more difficult for those who are already law-abiding gun owners. How do you reconcile that?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Well, we have invested $327 million in a strategy directly aimed at guns and gangs. Of that total, $214 million is going to provinces and communities to support their local anti-gang strategies. There's about $50 million that's going to CBSA to assist in the interdiction of illegal guns coming across the border, and there's about $35 million going to the RCMP to support their efforts at combatting illegal gun trafficking.

There is a whole collection of—

(1620)

Mr. Glen Motz:

In 2017, you promised $500 million to policing to combat gangs and guns, and then it was $327 million. I wonder how much of that money has actually been given out to provinces to deal with their gang and gun issues.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

The agreements with the provinces are in the process of being concluded.

In my own province of Saskatchewan, the agreement has been concluded, and announced by me and the provincial minister together. The announcements have been made in several provinces and territories across the country. The process is rolling forward.

The commitment that we made was to get to the level of $100 million per year ongoing, and we will meet that target. The $327 million that I referred to is the beginning of that commitment, to help all levels of government be as effective as they possibly can be in dealing with the issue of illegal guns and gangs. You can probably add a third component in that, because it's usually present, and that is drugs.

Guns, gangs and drugs are what this money is to be used for, coupled with the changes in the law that improve background checks, require licence verification and standardize best practices in record-keeping.

The Chair:

You have a little less than a minute.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you, Chair.

Just so you know, we won't get into the Bill C-71 debate, because that's not exactly what's going to happen.

Your colleague, Mr. Blair, said there is no reason for anyone to own what in reality is a modern hunting rifle, because they're purpose built to harm people. That statement isn't only offensive, but it is incredibly misinformed, misguided and deliberately misleads Canadians.

I wonder what your response would be, sir, to the men and women on our Canadian Olympic shooting team, for example, who are representing Canada in Tokyo, when they hear of such a statement by a minister of this government.

The Chair:

You're going to have to save that answer.

Your time has expired, Mr. Motz. I'm sure you'll have an opportunity to ask Mr. Blair directly what he means by his own comment.

Next is Ms. Sahota.

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.):

Thank you, Minister, for being here today, and for all the other occasions you've been before this committee. Your answers are always enlightening.

You mentioned in your statement something about funding going toward enforcement measures for unscrupulous immigration consultants. I know that it's not just from your department, but from Citizenship and Immigration as well.

Can you give me a bit more information as to what that amount is and how enforcement measures will be enacted?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Let me ask Mr. Ossowski to provide some detail on that.

Mr. John Ossowski:

Thank you.

We get about 200 leads a year, which result in about 50 investigations. The additional funds that we're going to be receiving will help us to deal with some of the more complex cases and overall increase our capacity to pursue these investigations and hopefully stop the problem.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Can you elaborate on the leads?

Do clients of these consultants call CBSA and report them?

Mr. John Ossowski:

It could be a variety of different sources that we catch wind of. Sometimes it's our own analysis in terms of working with the Immigration and Refugee Board, if they see something suspicious. It could be a number of different ways that we would be apprised of somebody who is worthy of an investigation.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

What kind of actions or measures can you take against them?

Mr. John Ossowski:

Ultimately, they could face criminal charges.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

That would be within your realm, that—

Mr. John Ossowski:

If it were a criminal offence, then it would depend on whether or not we did something with the RCMP. It depends on the nature of the outcome of the investigation.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

Is this increase for the first time, or is this the regular amount that's usually allocated?

Mr. John Ossowski:

No. This is an increase of $10 million over five years, so it's actually around $2 million a year, if I remember the profile correctly. It's just, as I say, to increase our capacity, because we are starting to see a bit more and, as I said, there's the complexity of some of these cases representing multiple clients and trying to sift through that information and focus our efforts better.

(1625)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Okay.

Recently, Minister, we've heard so much news in Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick about flooding. How much of your budget has been spent on mitigating the effects or dealing with the aftermath of the flooding that has occurred?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

We can actually get you a statement of the DFAA, disaster financial assistance arrangements, payments over the course of the last number of years. It really is instructive. I would be glad to supply that information to the committee, because it shows that the losses covered by DFAA in the last six years, mostly for floods and wildfires, are larger than the amount the program spent in all the previous years, going right back to 1970.

Ms. Ruby Sahota: Wow.

Hon. Ralph Goodale: Something obviously is happening with the climate and with the incidence of wildfires and the incidence of floods in the last number of years. The pace has accelerated dramatically.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

More in the last six years than since 1970?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

Yes.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Have the criteria changed as to under which conditions the government would be funding, or is it mostly just due to climate change and these events occurring more often?

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

It is a larger number of incidents that tend to be more serious and more expensive with every passing year. The criteria are essentially the same. In fact, a few years ago, the previous government adjusted the funding formula so that the provinces would pay for a larger portion before the federal share would kick in, and that would tend to reduce the amount that the federal government would be paying because the cost-sharing formula was adjusted a bit. Despite that, the volume of federal payments is higher because the losses are larger.

You can just think of the spectacular ones, such as the flooding around High River, Alberta, a few years ago. I think that was the most expensive flood in Canadian history. Fort McMurray in northern Alberta had the most expensive fire disaster in Canadian history. That was followed by two very expensive years in British Columbia.

We're also having serious issues this spring, with the floods a few weeks ago in Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick, and now, in the last week or so, with the fires at Pikangikum First Nation in northwestern Ontario, and in northern Alberta. I think that it's about 11,000 people now who are evacuated in northern Alberta, and the entire community at Pikangikum is in the process of being evacuated.

It is a very serious problem. Climate change has its consequences, and they are growing more serious.

The Chair:

We're going to have to leave it there.

We're getting close to the end, but I think Mr. Eglinski might have a couple of minutes to ask a question if he wishes to.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I hope it's about Grande Cache.

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC):

Not that lucky this time....

Thank you to all the witnesses, and congratulations, Brian, on your recent promotion.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

These are former colleagues.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Minister, as you are aware, we did a public safety report on rural crime. My Alberta colleagues and I did quite an extensive round table consultation throughout the province. People are very concerned not only in Alberta but also in Saskatchewan. I understand that you heard from some of their mayors about the shortage of RCMP. Crime increased by about 30% in rural Canada versus in urban.

What really alarms me is that I just looked at the RCMP 2018-19 plan, and it has your manpower progressions over the last five years up to the year 2019-20. Actually, the law enforcement program is calling for a reduction in police officers from 1,366 to 1,319. These are just the manpower numbers. You are increasing the overall strength of the force by 1,033, and you're increasing the administration by 460. Your increase is only about 0.6%, 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.2% over the next few years. The attrition rate has to be 10 times that number.

How are you going to provide policing? How can you tell the people in rural Canada, whether in Saskatchewan, Manitoba, B.C. or Alberta, where that policing is going to come from? Are you going to look at your contract to look at strengthening those numbers? The numbers you have here show that you don't have the manpower.

(1630)

The Chair:

You have about 10 seconds.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

I'll ask the deputy commissioner to respond to that as well.

Mr. Eglinski, I would just point out that we have tripled the capacity of new recruits coming out of the Depot training academy in Regina, with over 1,100 compared to a much smaller number earlier. Also, if I remember correctly, the number last year of new people going into Saskatchewan was about 135, which was a significant increase. This coming year about 90 new officers will be going into that particular region.

Part of your answer is that we're increasing the capacity of training at Depot to generate officers more rapidly. As you know, you can't do this overnight. You want to be sending officers who are fully trained and qualified to do the job of protecting Canadians. It's a serious business, and we are accelerating the recruits.

The commanding officers in both Alberta and Saskatchewan have also taken initiatives in the last two to three years to deploy officers based more on criminal intelligence so that they're being deployed more strategically than was perhaps previously the case.

I note that both the Attorney General of Saskatchewan and the commanding officer in Alberta have observed that in the last year they've actually seen an improvement in the crime statistics.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I have just one quick question, if I may.

The Chair:

You can have one question.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Regarding the recruiting needs, are you getting the recruits?

The Chair:

I'm very pleased to have given you this 10 seconds which has, in the history of our parliamentary procedure, stretched into a couple of minutes.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

I love you for it, big guy.

The Chair:

It's what you call a buzzer beater.

Can you answer that briefly, Mr. Brennan?

D/Commr Brian Brennan:

We're meeting the recruiting numbers to make sure that we are on track for 40 troops a year to go through Depot, and we're continuing to examine ways to increase our recruiting capacity to ensure that it is sustained over a long period of time.

Hon. Ralph Goodale:

At 40 out of 52 weeks in the year, that's a graduating class of almost one a week coming out of Depot.

The Chair:

You're going to have to live with that answer, Mr. Eglinski.

I did pick up on Ms. Sahota's question with respect to the increase in the disaster assistance money. I think that would be of interest to all of us, so if that could be made available to the committee, that would be useful.

With that, again I want to thank you for your appearance here, Minister, and I thank your colleagues. I suspect that you will be leaving and your colleagues remaining. Minister Blair is also up next.

With that we'll suspend.

(1630)

(1635)

The Chair:

We're resuming. I see that we still have quorum.

Welcome, Minister Blair.

We have Minister Blair, but we also have to deal with the estimates themselves. We have another motion to pass with respect to Bill C-93, the recommendations that we would like also to get done.

My proposal is that we leave ourselves 10 minutes at the end of the—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

What about my questions?

The Chair:

I don't know; that may be a problem.

I would encourage colleagues, ministers and witnesses to be economical in their questions and their answers, if that's at all possible.

With that, I welcome Minister Blair to the committee once again.

We look forward to your remarks. Questions are after.

Hon. Bill Blair (Minister of Border Security and Organized Crime Reduction):

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I will endeavour to be judicious in my responses, to adhere to your direction.

It's a pleasure to once again have the opportunity to join the committee to discuss the 2019-20 main estimates. These estimates will include authorities for measures that, of course, were announced in budget 2019.

I'd like to take the opportunity to focus on some of the important measures that will fall within my mandate of ensuring that our borders remain secure and leading efforts to reduce organized crime. On the latter, as I've noted to this committee previously, taking action against gun and gang violence remains a top priority. We've seen an increase in gun violence across the country in recent years. Guns are still getting into the hands of people who would commit crimes with them. While I think the measures in Bill C-71 are exceptional and will go a long way to reversing the trend, I also believe there is more we can do.

Earlier this month, we issued a report outlining what we heard in an extensive cross-country engagement on this issue. In the meantime, funding through these estimates and budget 2019 can and will make a real difference right away.

I've noted before that the $327 million over five years, which the government announced in 2017, is already beginning to help support a variety of initiatives to reduce gun and gang activity in our communities across Canada. Over the past few months, I have been pleased to work with provinces, territories and municipalities as we roll out their portions of that funding specific to initiatives in their regions.

The Government of Canada is investing an additional $42 million through this year's estimates in the guns and gangs initiative. This is a horizontal initiative, which is being led by Public Safety Canada, and it is working in partnership, as always, with the Canada Border Services Agency and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

With respect to policing more specifically, in this year's budget there's substantial funding for policing, including $508.6 million over five years to support the RCMP in strengthening policing operations. Of that $508.6 million, there is $96.2 million allotted for the RCMP policing operations in the estimates provided today. The RCMP is, of course, absolutely key to protecting our national security, to reducing the threat of organized crime and to supporting prevention, intervention and enforcement initiatives right across Canada.

The CBSA supports the RCMP and other law enforcement partners in Canada to counter organized crime and gang activity. Investments made through the estimates and budget will support new technologies, increased detector dog teams, specialized training and tools, and an augmented intelligence and risk assessment capacity. All of this will help to enhance the CBSA's operational responses to better interdict illicit goods, such as firearms and opioids, from crossing our borders. I'm confident the funding we're providing will help all of our partners keep Canada's evolving safety and security needs in place and include addressing gun and gang challenges.

With respect to the border security aspects of my mandate, I'm pleased to report that the government is making significant investments, through the budget and these estimates, to better manage, discourage and prevent irregular migration. Budget 2019 provides $1.2 billion over five years, starting this year, to IRCC, IRB, CBSA, RCMP and CSIS to implement a comprehensive asylum reform and border action plan. While IRCC is the lead on this action plan, the public safety portfolio has a very significant contribution to make.

As the committee is aware, the CBSA is responsible for processing refugee claims, which are made at official points of entry and at their inland offices. The funding approved under budget 2019 will enable the CBSA to strengthen its processes at our border, to help increase the asylum system's capacity and to accelerate claim processing. It will facilitate the removal of individuals found not to be in need of genuine protection from Canada in a more efficient and timely way. The strategy, supported by that funding, will guide these efforts.

Before I close, I'd like to take the opportunity to highlight one further item. Canadians have been hearing a great deal lately about money laundering, terrorism financing and tax evasion happening within our country, and they are rightly concerned. Money laundering is not only a threat to public safety, but it also harms the integrity and stability of the financial sector and the economy more broadly. The government is not waiting to take action to protect Canada's safety, security and quality of life. I'm pleased to note that in budget 2019, the government will invest $24 million over five years for Public Safety Canada to create an anti-money laundering action coordination and enforcement unit, or ACE. This is a pilot project that will strengthen inter-agency action against money laundering and financial crimes.

(1640)



In addition, a further $68.9 million will be invested over five years, allocated to the RCMP, to enhance federal policing capacity, including the effort to fight money laundering, beginning with $4.1 million allocated in this fiscal year.

In addition, $28 million over five years is being invested in CBSA to support a new centre of expertise. The centre will work to identify and prosecute incidents of trade fraud, as well as potential cases of trade-based money laundering to be referred to the RCMP for investigation and prosecution.

As always, these are just a few examples of the important and vital work that the public safety portfolio and, in this case, the many departments that support my mandate are doing to protect Canadians.

Once again, I thank the committee members for their consideration of these estimates and for their ongoing efforts.

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I look forward to members' questions.

The Chair:

Thank you, Minister.

With that, Ms. Dabrusin, you have seven minutes, please.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Thank you, Minister, for being with us today.

I've had the opportunity to raise this before. I would like to continue with the conversation about guns and gangs. You mentioned it in your opening, and I was looking through the main estimates about the work that's being done on border operations as well.

On my first question, when we're looking at gun issues, all the conversations I've had were really talking about supply and demand, both pieces. If we're first looking at the supply side of things, you mentioned it briefly, but could you tell us a bit more about what's being done by the CBSA to prevent gun smuggling?

Hon. Bill Blair:

Yes. Thank you very much, Ms. Dabrusin.

Guns that end up in the hands of criminals and are used to commit violent crimes in our community have a number of different sources. There are various estimates available from the various police services and agencies across the country that are determining the source of those illicit guns. It's quite clear that a significant portion of the guns used by gangs to commit criminal offences in our communities across Canada are illicitly imported into Canada across our borders. CBSA, of course, has a very important role in interdicting that supply.

I had the opportunity on the weekend to go down and visit the Point Edward CBSA facility and had the opportunity to speak about some of the work they're doing there, with the use of new technologies, the dog teams and, frankly, some really extraordinary and dedicated individuals—

(1645)

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

If I could jump in, when you're talking about dog teams, are you actually talking about dogs?

Hon. Bill Blair:

Yes, real dogs. I actually met the dog. His name is Bones.

Voices: Oh, oh!

Hon. Bill Blair: They showed me how he searched a car. It's a really extraordinary use of even that. It's low-tech, but it works, and it works really well.

They were able to also share with me some of the extraordinary successes they've been able to achieve, including, for example, the seizure of a very high-powered assault rifle over the May 24 weekend, along with a number of large capacity magazines and ammunition. There is some excellent work that's taking place across our borders.

I will also tell you that there's an acknowledgement within CBSA and within the law enforcement community that to interdict the supply of guns coming across the border from the United States.... The United States is essentially the largest handgun arsenal in the world. There are many firearms there. Criminals know that if they can bring those guns across our border, they can be sold at a significant premium above what would be paid in the U.S., because they're not as readily available in Canada. It's a crime motivated by profit.

The police and CBSA understand that you can't just interdict the supply at the border, so there are some extraordinary efforts taking place. We are investing in the RCMP and municipal and provincial police services right across Canada that work in integrated border enforcement teams and conduct organized crime investigations to identify the individuals and the criminal organizations who are responsible for purchasing these guns in the United States, smuggling them across the border and then subsequently selling them to criminals in our country.

We have seen some extraordinary successes as a result of that partnership as well, but the work continues and is ongoing. We are making significant investments in this budget in CBSA and in law enforcement's capacity to conduct those investigations to improve the quality of the intelligence they gather and how they use that data to effect good success in their investigations and successful prosecution of the individuals who are responsible.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

Thank you.

Staying on the supply side—I'm hoping we have a few minutes for demand—you have had a study. It was part of your mandate letter. You were asked to study a possible ban on handguns and assault weapons. It was, I believe, a “what we heard” report that was released. Would you be able to tell us about what the next steps are?

Hon. Bill Blair:

We identified a number of ways in which guns were getting into the hands of criminals. As I've already mentioned, a portion of those—some estimate 50%, some estimate as much as 70%—are in fact smuggled across the border. We also know that a number of those firearms that are subsequently used to commit criminal offences in Canada are domestically sourced.

Essentially, there are a number of reasonably well-identified ways in which that takes place. With regard to the first one, there have been a significant number of large-scale thefts where guns have been stolen either from a gun retailer or from an individual Canadian gun owner. Those guns are then subsequently made available on the street, sold to criminal organizations and used in criminal acts across the country. One of the things I heard, and we discussed very extensively, was how we might improve the secure storage of firearms to prevent those thefts, to make it harder for criminals to steal those guns and subsequently for them to go on the street.

There were also a number of cases where firearms were identified that had been purchased legally in this country, but then subsequently diverted into the criminal market by an individual with the intent of profiting by resale of those guns. It's a process that is sometimes referred to as straw purchasing. Essentially, it's an individual who has the legal authority to purchase a handgun, who sometimes tries to conceal its origin by removing the serial number, and then resells it on the street to somebody at a significant profit.

We identified in conversations across the country, and particularly with law enforcement, the importance of improving the tracing of those firearms that are used in criminal offences, so we can determine their origin of sale and better identify—and by detecting, thereby deterring—and hold accountable those individuals who are involved in that criminal activity. There were a number of other measures that we also heard about on interdicting the supply.

I've also heard from a number of people who have expressed concern that certain types of weapons, frankly, are a significant risk, and that additional steps should be considered in making them less available to those who would use them to harm others.

(1650)

The Chair:

You're not quite finished yet, but I'm sure that Mr. Graham will thank you if in fact we finish before seven minutes.

You have 40 seconds left.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

I do. Thank you.

On the demand piece, quickly, we were at an announcement in Toronto in December, specifically about how we help youth and how we help the communities who have been impacted.

Can you tell me a bit about that, please?

Hon. Bill Blair:

Ms. Dabrusin, much of my earlier comments were with respect to interdicting the supply of guns that get into the hands of criminals. However, our government recognizes that you also have to reduce the demand for those guns, so we are also making significant investments in communities and in kids. We are working particularly with municipalities, but I've been to each province and we're providing resources to each of the provinces and territories to make investments in their communities and in those community organizations that do an extraordinary job of working with young people to help them make better choices, safer and more socially responsible choices, to avoid getting involved in gangs in the first place.

There are also a number of initiatives that we are supporting, working with young people who have already been involved in gangs, to help them leave that gang lifestyle and to not engage in violent criminal activity that causes so much trauma in our communities across the country.

There's no one single response. Frankly, it requires very significant investments, and also looking more broadly—

The Chair:

I think we're going to have to leave the answer.

Hon. Bill Blair:

Perhaps I will have the opportunity to come back to some of the other things we're doing that are making a difference.

Thanks, Mr. Chair.

The Chair:

The talent for stretching seconds into minutes is quite extraordinary today.

Hon. Bill Blair:

Thank you, sir.

The Chair:

Mr. Paul-Hus, you have seven minutes, please. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Minister Blair, I want to talk about illegal border crossings.

The Auditor General submitted a damning report on refugee claims. You said that the system was very efficient. However, it was confirmed that the system was overloaded. The main agencies have difficulty working together, and it will take four to five years simply to return to normal.

Do you regret telling us in the committee that everything was fine and wonderful? Do you regret providing inaccurate information? [English]

Hon. Bill Blair:

Of course, I'm telling you the truth, Mr. Paul-Hus.

I was acknowledging the exceptional work that's being done by CBSA and by the RCMP, the police, provincial and municipal, right across the country. Given the resources and support they have had available to them, I think they do an extraordinary job.

We recognize that more needs to be done. It's precisely why we're making significant new investments and increasing their capacity to conduct these very complex investigations. For example, we recognize the importance of all law enforcement and departments and agencies working more collaboratively together. It's one of the reasons we're establishing for the money-laundering thing an action, coordination and enforcement centre. [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

At the time, you told us that everything was fine. However, the Auditor General told us that this wasn't true. Basically, you're confirming that you provided the wrong information at that time. [English]

Hon. Bill Blair:

Could you be specific about which Auditor General's report you are referring to, sir? [Translation]

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

I'm talking about the parliamentary budget officer's report, which confirmed the issues associated with the $1.1 billion cost of handling asylum seekers. This report was published a few months ago. Do you know what I'm referring to? [English]

Hon. Bill Blair:

I'm sorry, I was referring to guns and money laundering. If you're talking about asylum claimants, one of the things that was identified, I believe, in that report was the work that was being done in security screening by CBSA.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

My question, sir, is quite simple.

A few months ago when you came to committee, we asked a question about the issue, and you said everything was fine. But the Auditor General said that there are many issues with that. My question was just whether you are ready to apologize to the committee because you said something wrong at that time.

That was my question, but I've lost too much time for that, so I'll go to my next question, sir.

Hon. Bill Blair:

Do you want an answer to that?

Sir, I'm happy to try to answer your question.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

I've lost enough time, sir. I will ask another question, okay?

Hon. Bill Blair:

If there are any other questions you don't want answered, let me know.

(1655)

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

That's all right because you understand my question.

Your speaking notes refer to that. In the budget, you talk about an investment of $1.2 billion over five years, but is this the same money that the Auditor General mentioned, $1.1 billion in three years?

Is it the same money?

Hon. Bill Blair:

I believe the Auditor General concluded his report and his estimates on what was required last spring, in 2018, and since that time our government.... First of all, budget 2018 made significant new investments in the IRB and CBSA, and of course, in the budget we've just presented before you today, which is $1.18 billion....

Just as an example, we're increasing the capacity of IRB from where it was when the Auditor General conducted his report. They had the ability then to do about 26,000 hearings per year. Under these new investments, by the end of next year, they'll be at approximately 50,000, so it responds very directly to the deficiency that was identified as a result of understaffing and underfunding that had previously been experienced. We made those investments in budgets 2018 and 2019.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Okay, you make a lot of detours.

Your title is Minister of Organized Crime Reduction and Border Security.

On organized crime reduction, you're supposed to talk about the Mexican cartels, drug cartels, too, but why does Minister Goodale's office always answer questions from the media and not your office?

Hon. Bill Blair:

First off, he's the Minister of Public Safety and—

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

But you're the Minister of Border Security and Organized Crime Reduction. Is that true?

Hon. Bill Blair:

I've listened very carefully to Minister Goodale's response and even his response earlier today, and I have exactly the same information as he provided to this committee.

It is a direct result of information provided by our agencies. I believe he did confirm that CBSA has determined that the number of inadmissibility cases for the period was 238 and also mentioned that we have been unable to determine any evidence that suggests—

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

I don't want his, Minister, I want your—

Hon. Bill Blair:

—that on the number you've raised in the House, 400 foreign nationals in Canada, we haven't been able to find any evidence that supports the veracity of that statement.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

I'll go to my next question.

Last week, U.S. Vice President Pence came to meet the Prime Minister. Do you think they raised the question of the safe third country agreement? Did they?

Hon. Bill Blair:

I believe that it did come up—

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Do you have an answer for us or do you think we will change the agreement on safe third countries?

Hon. Bill Blair:

There are discussions. I've been involved in discussions with U.S. officials as well as our officials at both IRCC and CBSA. I know that it has been raised at a number of different levels of discussion, and I think there is an acknowledgement or recognition that it's an agreement that can be modernized and improved to the benefit of both countries, and those discussions are ongoing.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

By "modernized" do you mean like we suggested last year?

Hon. Bill Blair:

As I recall, your suggestion was that we just unilaterally change a bilateral agreement, and that's not how that works. We have begun to have discussions with our treaty partner, the United States, to discuss many aspects of that agreement because we believe there is an opportunity for it to be improved and enhanced. Those discussions are ongoing.

It is not possible nor is it appropriate to simply unilaterally change a bilateral agreement.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

We haven't said that. I know we would never say that. We've said that we have to deal—

Hon. Bill Blair:

Just to be clear, you said you would change it, and we said no, we would enter into discussions with our partner on how it could be improved.

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Of course we have—

I have no more questions.

The Chair:

Thank you Mr. Paul-Hus.

Mr. Dubé, you have seven minutes, please. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Thank you for joining us, Minister Blair.

I'll ask you about your responsibilities regarding the border and the migrant situation. Some long responses have been provided. I'll provide a lengthy introduction and focus on the past, so that you can understand the context of my question. If my colleagues haven't seen the Radio-Canada report, I'd encourage them to watch it.

In 2011, I believe, the previous government implemented a program following two incidents where boats arrived in Canada with Tamil asylum seekers on board. The program still exists and spending has increased. Over $18 million is being spent on the program. People from CSIS, the RCMP and even CSE deal with shady individuals abroad, in countries that could be involved in smuggling migrants into Canada. We can agree that human rights are an issue in these places.

I want to know the following. How can you reconcile the government's approach of showing compassion for people in this situation with the fact that agencies are working for a ban abroad? People are being detained in countries where they may be subject to human rights violations.

If you aren't able to answer the question, I know that the people accompanying you today could do so. In the Radio-Canada report, neither the RCMP nor CSIS was able or willing to respond.

I'll let you answer my question. I'm sorry for the lengthy context, but it was important for my colleagues.

(1700)

[English]

Hon. Bill Blair:

Thank you very much, Mr. Dubé.

If I understand your question appropriately—and I'll certainly invite officials to add any background that will assist you—in my experience there are, unfortunately, individuals.... Those who are seeking refuge and those who are fleeing war and persecution are in a very vulnerable state. Quite often, they are subject to exploitation by those who would intend to profit from that. So we have a responsibility as well to ensure that, to maintain the integrity of our refugee determination system and our borders, CBSA, the RCMP and others who work together have a responsibility, and we do work internationally.... Frankly, we are very concerned, and we've taken a number of steps to deal with those who would exploit people in a vulnerable position.

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

Certainly I don't disagree with that characterization of individuals who want to take advantage of people in vulnerable situations. The issue in this media report, which I'm raising here, is that the Government of Canada has a program and invests millions of dollars—it's $1 million for CSIS and $9 million for the RCMP, if I remember correctly, but I could be mistaken—for them to operate abroad to deal with those unscrupulous individuals in regions where you're dealing with equally, if not more, unscrupulous regimes in those particular countries.

An individual in the Prime Minister's Office, or who at any rate advises the Prime Minister on this program, has gone to these places to thank these regimes on behalf of Canada.

At what cost do we ensure the integrity of the border? In other words, it's not only a responsibility to ensure the integrity of the border and take on these unscrupulous individuals, but also to ensure that we're not, pardon the expression, getting into bed with some pretty problematic individuals abroad, if I may say so diplomatically, as the report outlines, which, again, I would invite colleagues to read, and would be more than happy to provide to members of the committee who haven't seen it.

Hon. Bill Blair:

Yes, sir. I will simply acknowledge, because I don't have particular insight into—and colleagues, if any of you do, I wish you'd jump in.... We deal with transnational organized crime, including the exploitation of vulnerable people, in human trafficking, and with those who would be involved in exploiting those fleeing persecution. It is necessary for our federal officials and our security establishment to extend their work beyond our borders in order.... Some of the most effective work they do in preventing problems and crimes in Canada is by preventing it from coming to our borders in the first place. They are working in some very difficult places in the world, but we expect they would continue to uphold Canadian law and Canadian standards. [Translation]

Mr. Matthew Dubé:

I don't have much time left.

Mr. Vigneault or Mr. Brennan, do you want to talk about your organization's perspective?

Mr. David Vigneault:

Yes. Thank you, Mr. Dubé.[English]

Thank you, Minister.

I would just add, Monsieur Dubé, that the program you referred to has been in place for a number of years now to prevent, as the minister mentioned and as you referred to in your prelude, traffickers from bringing people to Canada irregularly. The reason we are engaged is to protect the integrity of the system in Canada and make sure that criminals...national security concerns or people are not victimized through these processes.

The work we do abroad is governed by our act and by ministerial directives. I cannot go into all the operational details, but I can say that when we do share information with foreign entities, we are under ministerial directives to make sure that the information does not lead to a human rights violation or to mistreatment. I'm familiar with what the media was reporting on this, but I can say that there's been a review of these programs and that all agencies involved are covered by this ministerial directive. So there's another perspective as well to that story.

(1705)

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Dubé.

Ms. Sahota, you have seven minutes, please.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Thank you.

Thank you, Minister Blair, for being here today.

I want to start with the agreements you were speaking of earlier with the different provinces in relation to the funding in terms of gangs and guns. Can you tell me a little bit about how much funding is being provided from the federal level to specifically the Doug Ford government in Ontario?

Hon. Bill Blair:

Approximately $214 million has been identified in the guns and gangs funding for the entire country. That's in addition to the money that's been allocated, some $89 million, for CBSA and RCMP. Of the $214 million, $65 million is allocated to the Province of Ontario. There have been ongoing discussions with the Province of Ontario on how that money will flow to them and what they will do with it. I recently made a joint announcement with the Minister of Community Safety and the Attorney General for Ontario where they accepted $11 million over the first two years of this funding program. I'm not yet aware of whether they've made announcements as to how they intend to allocate that, but it's a total funding allocation over a five-year period of $65 million. So far the Province of Ontario has received $11 million of that.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Why is it only $11 million at this point? Who makes that choice, and how was that decided?

Hon. Bill Blair:

It's part of the ongoing discussions between us. That was all they were prepared to identify various initiatives for. The money remains there for allocation to the Province of Ontario when they're ready to use it. They've identified so far, just in the first two years of the program, $11 million in initiatives that they're prepared to undertake with that money.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Are you telling me there's $65 million available to Ontario? I know that my counterparts in the City of Brampton have been taking a keen interest in wanting to reduce crime in the city. However, they've only accepted $11 million of the $65 million that's been offered.

Hon. Bill Blair:

In fairness, these are ongoing discussions between our government and all the provinces. We've been working out funding allocations for each of the provinces, and so far that has been identified. This money is for municipal and indigenous police services across the provinces and territories but it is appropriately and necessarily allocated through the provincial governments. I would simply encourage all municipalities to reach out to their respective provincial government for discussions on how they might access the money that's coming from the federal government through the provincial governments.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Is there any way to provide the money directly to the municipal governments? I know that my city, Brampton, is very eager to be able to get access to some of these funds to help them with some of the problems they're dealing with. Is the only way to get access to this money to go through the province?

Hon. Bill Blair:

I think it is incumbent upon us to do our very best to work with our provincial partners across the country. I will tell you that in my experience in some other jurisdictions, it's been a very positive experience. I remain hopeful about those allocations in Ontario. I have a strong interest in that place myself. I know the municipalities and policing agencies that are involved. Again, with those decisions, I think the appropriate way....

Policing is administered and overseen by the provincial governments across Canada. We are working with community safety ministers, public safety ministers and attorneys general across the country in each of the provinces and territories. We've certainly done our best. There are some other funding opportunities available that are done directly. That's more with community organizations. There have been a number of significant announcements in Ontario, in addition to the money I've already referenced, where we're supporting community organizations, various crime prevention initiatives and other types of investments in communities.

(1710)

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

When you compare the $65 million offer to past allocated amounts, is this more or less than what the Government of Canada has provided provinces, or Ontario specifically?

Hon. Bill Blair:

I'm not aware of funding of this magnitude previously. I've been involved in a different capacity in dealing with guns and gangs issues. Generally our relationship was with only the provincial government. There was actually some funding made available in 2008 for what was called the police officers recruitment fund, but that money was terminated in 2013.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

Is this kind of funding the first of its kind from the federal government to the provinces?

Hon. Bill Blair:

Public Safety and our government last year brought forward a significant investment in guns and gangs initiatives, and there was also recognition and acknowledgement, after we talked with the provinces and municipal and indigenous police services, that there was important work that needed to be done. When we began making investments, we made sure there was money to flow through the provinces to those municipal and indigenous police services, as well as our federal authorities in the RCMP, CBSA and others, because the guns and gangs issue is a very real concern right across the country. We've seen a significant increase in gun violence and gun murders in our country. Much of that is directly related to drugs and gang activity, so we're making significant investments to support those efforts.

Ms. Ruby Sahota:

From my experience in just these last few years of paying attention and monitoring, because issues now tend to come to the members of Parliament, I've seen that as the weather gets better and the summer comes along, in general there's an increase in criminal activity in Brampton.

Is there a different approach or are different allocations of funding budgeted for certain months? Can you speak from your past experience as to why that is?

Hon. Bill Blair:

Those operational decisions regarding how to allocate their resources and use these new resources are really the responsibility of police services and their leaders under the direction of their boards and their municipalities, and they are made very much in collaboration with the provincial authority.

There are also very significant partnerships that exist right across this country among law enforcement. For example, there are a number of important initiatives led by the RCMP in what we call combined forces special enforcement units. As an example, we have the integrated national security enforcement teams and others in which all police services will participate. I should mention, because they are quite relevant to my mandate, the integrated border enforcement teams, which are usually led by the federal agency but in which other police services participate as well. These types of initiatives are supported by the funding that we provide.

The Chair:

Thank you, Ms. Sahota.

Mr. Motz, you have five minutes.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Thank you, Chair.

Thank you, witnesses, for being here.

Minister, last week you said assault-style rifles are military weapons “designed to hunt people”. I don't know what you refer to as an assault-style rifle, but I suspect you're referring to automatic rifles, automatic firearms, and you know that those firearms have been prohibited in this country since 1976. Could you tell us exactly what firearms you're referring to in that statement?

Hon. Bill Blair:

We've had a number of discussions. As I said, I've travelled across the country, Mr. Motz.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Exactly what firearms are you referring to specifically with that statement?

Hon. Bill Blair:

They are firearms that were designed for a military purpose, firearms that—

Mr. Glen Motz:

I don't know what that means. With that statement, to me, you're referring to, in reality, modern hunting rifles, modern sporting rifles. The very fact that you made that statement.... I find it extremely offensive. I find it misguided. I find it misinformed, and you're misleading the Canadian public with that. Again, what firearms are you referring to specifically?

The Chair:

Mr. Motz, let Mr. Blair answer.

Hon. Bill Blair:

I'm sorry you were offended, but I was thinking about—

Mr. Glen Motz:

Canadian licensed firearm owners are offended by this statement.

The Chair:

Mr. Motz, let Mr. Blair answer the question.

Hon. Bill Blair:

I was thinking about the firearm that was used to kill three Mounties in Moncton. That was a firearm that was designed for military use. It was originally created and used by the military. It was a weapon that was used by that individual to hunt three police officers.

Mr. Glen Motz:

What was it? What was the rifle? What was the firearm?

Hon. Bill Blair:

I believe it was an M14. I was also thinking about the weapons that were used to kill the two officers in Fredericton and two private citizens. I was also thinking about the weapon that was used to kill 14 women at École Polytechnique—

Mr. Glen Motz:

You referred to the AR-15—

Hon. Bill Blair:

—and the weapon that was used to kill worshippers in the mosque in Quebec.

These were all weapons that were not designed as hunting weapons. They were designed for soldiers, soldiers who—

(1715)

Mr. Glen Motz:

You've identified the AR-15 specifically, Mr. Minister. You've identified it. Do you know whether the AR-15 has ever been used in a crime committed in Canada?

Hon. Bill Blair:

The AR-15.... Again, I have mentioned some of the other.... The AR-15 is the number one weapon used—

Mr. Glen Motz:

—a drive-by shooting in 2004, and no one was injured.

Ms. Julie Dabrusin:

On a point of order, Mr. Chair, we're just not getting the answers to these questions.

Mr. Glen Motz:

He needs to answer the question. He doesn't need to dance around the issue.

Hon. Bill Blair:

The AR-15 is the weapon that was used to kill a whole bunch of little kids at Sandy Hook. It was also used to murder 50 people in Christchurch—

Mr. Glen Motz:

We're talking Canada here, Mr. Minister.

The Chair:

Mr. Motz, if you want to ask your question, ask your question, and then let the minister finish his answer. Then you can go back to asking another question.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Minister, can you describe the difference between an AR-15, which is currently restricted in this country, and the WK180-C?

The Chair:

Okay, there's a specific question. A specific answer, if you may, please.

Hon. Bill Blair:

Frankly, I don't consider myself an expert in the classification of those firearms, although I am familiar with both. I don't know whether any of the other witnesses has the expertise to define it. As you know, the classification is determined now by the RCMP.

The Chair:

Okay, we now have a specific answer to a specific question.

The second specific question.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Let me answer the question for you. They are virtually the same firearm. They fire a .223 round. They have the same operational mechanisms. The only difference is—and I'm glad you identified the idea of classifications; the Canadian public wants firearms classified by what they can do, not by what they look like, and that challenge has been ongoing. Bill C-71 is a prime example. We need facts to guide these decisions, not cosmetics, Mr. Minister.

The Chair:

That's a comment, not a question.

Mr. Glen Motz:

It is.

So is there any truth—

The Chair:

Excuse me, Mr. Motz.

Does the Minister wish to respond to Mr. Motz's comment?

Hon. Bill Blair:

No.

The Chair:

No.

Mr. Motz, your question.

Mr. Glen Motz:

Some rumours have been floating around over the last while about your government's plans to ban firearms, ranging from banning specific firearms to banning semi-automatic firearms, to handguns.

So I have a simple yes or no question. Will an order in council be issued banning certain classes of firearms?

Hon. Bill Blair:

Mr. Motz, I don't normally respond to rumours. What we are—

Mr. Glen Motz:

That's not a rumour. I'm asking a direct question.

Hon. Bill Blair:

If I may—

Mr. Glen Motz:

Is an order in council—

The Chair:

Mr. Motz, you've asked a specific question. It took you half a minute to do that. I should allocate similar time to Minister Blair to respond to your question.

Hon. Bill Blair:

We are looking at all the measures that we believe could help keep Canadians safe, and we are examining the right way to deal with those measures.

Mr. Glen Motz:

So no order in council is being planned. Do you have a different plan to ban firearms, as you've indicated?

The Chair:

Okay, that's the end of that question.

Briefly respond to Mr. Motz, and then he has finished his five minutes.

Hon. Bill Blair:

I have a plan to examine every way in which we can keep Canadians safe.

Mr. Glen Motz:

You continue to dance.

The Chair:

Thank you, Mr. Motz.

Mr. Graham.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you.

Mr. Minister, as you know, I'm a rural Canadian who has firearms in the house and I fire them from time to time. The last time I fired an AR-15 was only a month ago, so I want to put that in perspective.

What are you doing to protect lawful users of firearms going forward?

Hon. Bill Blair:

I also want to be very clear. The mandate I was given by the government was to examine every measure that could keep people safe with a very important specific caveat and that was an acknowledgement and a recognition that the overwhelming majority of firearm owners in this country are law abiding and responsible in their ownership. They acquire their firearms legally. They store them securely. They use them responsibly and they dispose of them according to the law.

Firearm ownership in this country is a privilege that is predicated on people's willingness and acceptance of our laws and regulations as they pertain to firearms. In my experience the overwhelming majority of Canadians are exceptionally responsible and law abiding with respect to their firearms, and I think it's really critically important that we always respect that. They are not dangerous people, and particularly hunters and farmers and sport shooters are very careful with their weapons.

At the same time, we have a responsibility to make sure that those weapons don't end up in the hands of people who would commit violent crimes with them. In my experience and from my discussions across the country, I believe those responsible gun owners are equally concerned with public safety and ensuring that their firearms don't end up in the hands of criminals.

(1720)

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I appreciate that.

Do I still have time, Chair?

The Chair:

You have a full five minutes, Mr. Graham, in part due to the efficiency of—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I thought you wanted 10 minutes left at the end.

I appreciate your responses.

I wanted to ask Mr. Tousignant—I believe you're from CSC—a very quick question before I come back to Mr. Blair.

I would have asked this at the previous panel, but I didn't have a chance. In my riding there is the La Macaza Institution, which has 28 Bomarc missile silos. I would like to know if CSC can help us prevent those from being torn down.

Mr. Alain Tousignant (Senior Deputy Commissioner, Correctional Service of Canada):

I'd have to get back to you on that.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

They're on La Macaza Institution land. That's why I ask you.

Mr. Alain Tousignant:

Yes.

Hon. Bill Blair:

I don't have an answer for that either.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

I just want it on the record because it is part of our heritage. I don't want to lose that heritage. It is used as storage units and it has asbestos and they want to take it out. They want to remove these silos. I don't want that to happen.

The Chair:

So we want to save—

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Save the Bomarc silos. Save the missile silos.

The Chair:

—the missile silos. Okay.

That's different.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Mr. Blair, I don't know if it's you or Health or both, but I'd like to dive into the marijuana laws a bit.

As you know, it's a large rural riding. There are a lot of medical marijuana operations being set up. A lot of towns are complaining to me that they're not finding out about them. I would like to know what responsibility a licence requester has to notify the police, fire and municipalities. Could you help me with that?

Hon. Bill Blair:

Those are regulations that are outside of the Cannabis Act, where someone gets an authorization for growing cannabis, but they still have to adhere to, first of all, Health Canada's regulations with respect to those facilities, and they are also subject to municipal bylaws and zoning regulations, where they exist. I say that because not every place has such bylaws.

We've had a number of these incidents where there have been issues with respect to smell, light pollution, noise and other things that are problematic. In those circumstances, Health Canada has a role, and there are regulations that apply specifically to those authorized growers of medical marijuana, which are not the licensed producers under the Cannabis Act. There is also a significant role for local regulatory authorities, particularly bylaw enforcement, to address those things.

I would encourage you, if you have such facilities in your riding that are problematic for your community, to reach out to us and we'll make sure that Health Canada, to the extent it is able, assists with their regulations. In many circumstances we're able to work with the local municipal authority or regional authority in order to address those concerns.

Mr. David de Burgh Graham:

Thank you very much.

The Chair:

With that, I'm going to bring questioning to a close.

Mr. Jim Eglinski:

Wait. I had a really nice question.

The Chair:

It would be the first time in a long time that you've had a nice question.

Hon. Bill Blair:

I'd love to answer your nice question.

The Chair:

You can ask your nice question offline. We do have to pass the estimates, which is the purpose for which we're here.

On behalf of the committee I want to thank you, Minister Blair, and all your officials for being here while we go through these estimates.

With that, I'm going to suggest, and it's up to the colleagues whether we want to do roughly 30 votes all at once, presumably all with one vote on division. Is that a preferable way to proceed, or do you want to divide up the votes?

We're agreed that it will all be done at one. CANADA BORDER SERVICES AGENCY ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$1,550,213,856 ç Vote 5—Capital expenditures..........$124,728,621 ç Vote 10—Addressing the Challenges of African Swine Fever..........$5,558,788 ç Vote 15—Enhancing Accountability and Oversight of the Canada Border Services Agency..........$500,000 ç Vote 20—Enhancing the Integrity of Canada's Borders and Asylum System..........$106,290,000 ç Vote 25—Helping Travellers Visit Canada..........$12,935,000 ç Vote 30—Modernizing Canada's Border Operations..........$135,000,000 ç Vote 35—Protecting People from Unscrupulous Immigration Consultants..........$1,550,000

(Votes 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 agreed to on division) CANADIAN SECURITY INTELLIGENCE SERVICE ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$535,592,804 ç Vote 5—Enhancing the Integrity of Canada's Borders and Asylum System..........$2,020,000 ç Vote 10—Helping Travellers Visit Canada..........$890,000 ç Vote 15—Protecting Canada’s National Security..........$3,236,746 ç Vote 20—Protecting the Rights and Freedoms of Canadians..........$9,200,000 ç Vote 25—Renewing Canada's Middle East Strategy..........$8,300,000

(Votes 1, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 agreed to on division) CIVILIAN REVIEW AND COMPLAINTS COMMISSION FOR THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$9,700,400 ç Vote 5—Enhancing Accountability and Oversight of the Canada Border Services Agency..........$420,000

(Votes 1 and 5 agreed to on division) CORRECTIONAL SERVICE OF CANADA ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures, grants and contributions..........$2,062,950,977 ç Vote 5—Capital expenditures..........$187,808,684 ç Vote 10—Support for the Correctional Service of Canada..........$95,005,372

(Votes 1, 5 and 10 agreed to on division) DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$130,135,974 ç Vote 5—Grants and contributions..........$597,655,353 ç Vote 10—Ensuring Better Disaster Management Preparation and Response..........$158,465,000 ç Vote 15—Protecting Canada's Critical Infrastructure from Cyber Threats..........$1,773,000 ç Vote 20—Protecting Canada’s National Security..........$1,993,464 ç Vote 25—Protecting Children from Sexual Exploitation Online..........$4,443,100 ç Vote 30—Protecting Community Gathering Places from Hate Motivated Crimes..........$2,000,000 ç Vote 35—Strengthening Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime..........$3,282,450

(Votes 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 agreed to on division) OFFICE OF THE CORRECTIONAL INVESTIGATOR OF CANADA ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$4,735,703

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) PAROLE BOARD OF CANADA ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$41,777,398

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE ç Vote 1—Operating expenditures..........$2,436,011,187 ç Vote 5—Capital expenditures..........$248,693,417 ç Vote 10—Grants and contributions..........$286,473,483 ç Vote 15—Delivering Better Service for Air Travellers..........$3,300,000 ç Vote 20—Enhancing the Integrity of Canada's Borders and Asylum System..........$18,440,000 ç Vote 25—Protecting Canada’s National Security..........$992,280 ç Vote 30—Strengthening Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime..........$4,100,000 ç Vote 35—Support for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police..........$96,192,357

(Votes 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 agreed to on division) ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE EXTERNAL REVIEW COMMITTEE ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$3,076,946

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) SECRETARIAT OF THE NATIONAL SECURITY AND INTELLIGENCE COMMITTEE OF PARLIAMENTARIANS ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$3,271,323

(Vote 1 agreed to on division) SECURITY INTELLIGENCE REVIEW COMMITTEE ç Vote 1—Program expenditures..........$4,629,028

(Vote 1 agreed to on division)

The Chair: Shall the chair report the votes on the 2019-20 main estimates, less the amounts voted in interim estimates, to the House?

Some hon. members: Agreed.

The Chair: The meeting is adjourned.

Comité permanent de la sécurité publique et nationale

(1530)

[Traduction]

Le président (L'hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)):

Je déclare la séance ouverte.

Je veux remercier le ministre Goodale de sa présence. Il est ici pour parler du Budget principal des dépenses.

Avant qu'il ne commence, j'aimerais mentionner que c'est peut-être la dernière fois que le ministre comparaîtra devant le Comité. Au nom du Comité, je tiens à le remercier, non seulement de sa présence ici, mais de sa volonté pour ce qui est de coopérer avec le Comité et d'examiner tous les amendements qu'il lui a présentés, ainsi que de sa volonté d'accepter un pourcentage assez élevé d'entre eux.

Monsieur le ministre, je vous remercie de votre coopération et de votre relation avec le Comité.

Cela dit...

M. David de Burgh Graham (Laurentides—Labelle, Lib.):

Vous voulez dire dans la présente législature, n'est-ce pas?

Le président:

Pardon?

M. Graham: Vous voulez dire dans la présente législature, n'est-ce pas?

Le président: Oui, dans la présente législature. Nous n'allons pas revenir aux jours de Laurier ou de quoi que ce soit de cette nature.

M. Graham: Ce n'est pas la toute dernière fois.

Le président:

Non, merci.

Monsieur le ministre, allez-y.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale (ministre de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile):

Monsieur le président, merci de vos très aimables paroles. Je vous en suis très reconnaissant, et je suis heureux de revenir encore une fois au Comité, cette fois-ci, bien sûr, pour présenter le Budget principal des dépenses 2019-2020 pour le portefeuille de la Sécurité publique.

Pour m'aider à expliquer tous ces chiffres plus en détail et répondre à vos questions aujourd'hui, je suis heureux d'être accompagné de Gina Wilson, la nouvelle sous-ministre de Sécurité publique Canada. Je crois que c'est sa première comparution devant le Comité. Bien sûr, elle n'est pas étrangère au ministère de la Sécurité publique, mais elle a été au cours des dernières années sous-ministre des Femmes et de l'Égalité des genres, un ministère dont elle a présidé la création.

Aux côtés de la sous-ministre aujourd'hui, nous accueillons Brian Brennan, sous-commissaire de la GRC; David Vigneault, directeur du Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité; John Ossowski, président de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada; Anne Kelly, commissaire du Service correctionnel du Canada; et Anik Lapointe, dirigeante principale des finances de la Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada.

La priorité absolue de tout gouvernement, monsieur le président, est d'assurer la sécurité des citoyens, et je suis très fier de l'immense travail qui est réalisé par ces représentants et les employés qui travaillent sous leur gouverne afin de servir les Canadiens et de les protéger contre toutes sortes de menaces publiques. La nature et la gravité de ces menaces continuent d'évoluer et de changer au fil du temps, et, en tant que gouvernement, nous sommes déterminés à appuyer les femmes et les hommes qualifiés qui travaillent d'arrache-pied afin de nous protéger en leur fournissant les ressources dont ils ont besoin pour pouvoir intervenir. Le budget des dépenses est bien sûr le principal véhicule qui permet de le faire.

Le Budget principal des dépenses 2019-2020 reflète l'engagement d'assurer la sécurité des Canadiens tout en protégeant leurs droits et leurs libertés. Vous remarquerez que, à l'échelle du portefeuille, les autorisations totales demandées cette année entraîneraient une augmentation nette de 256,1 millions de dollars pour le présent exercice, ou 2,7 % de plus que le budget principal de l'an dernier. Bien sûr, certains des chiffres augmentent, et d'autres diminuent, mais le résultat net est une augmentation de 2,7 %.

Un élément clé est un investissement de 135 millions de dollars au cours de l'exercice 2019-2020 pour assurer la durabilité et la modernisation des opérations frontalières du Canada. Le deuxième est 42 millions de dollars pour Sécurité publique Canada, la GRC et l'ASFC, afin qu'elles puissent prendre des mesures contre les armes et les gangs. Le ministre Blair parlera plus en détail du travail qui est réalisé dans le cadre de ces initiatives lorsqu'il comparaîtra devant le Comité.

Pour ma part, aujourd'hui, je vais simplement résumer plusieurs autres mesures de financement qui touchent mon ministère, Sécurité publique Canada, et tous les organismes connexes.

Le ministère prévoit une diminution des dépenses nettes de 246,8 millions de dollars au cours de l'exercice, soit 21,2 % de moins que l'an dernier. C'est attribuable à une diminution de 410,7 millions de dollars dans les niveaux de financement qui ont expiré l'an dernier dans le cadre des Accords d'aide financière en cas de catastrophe. Il y a un autre poste que je présenterai plus tard où le chiffre augmente pour le prochain exercice. Nous devons compenser ces deux postes afin de respecter le flux de trésorerie. Cette baisse assez importante du financement pour le ministère lui-même, 21,2 %, est en grande partie attribuable au changement des AAFCC, pour lesquels le niveau de financement a expiré en 2018-2019.

Nous avons aussi vu une diminution de quelque 79 millions de dollars liée à la présidence par le Canada du G7 en 2018.

Ces diminutions sont partiellement compensées par un certain nombre d'augmentations au chapitre du financement, y compris une subvention de 25 millions de dollars attribuée à Avalanche Canada pour soutenir ses efforts de sensibilisation, de sécurité et de sauvetage; 14,9 millions de dollars pour des projets d'infrastructure liés à la sécurité dans les collectivités autochtones; 10,1 millions de dollars de financement supplémentaire pour le Programme de services de police des Premières Nations; et 3,3 millions de dollars pour réagir aux blessures de stress post-traumatique qui touchent notre personnel qualifié de la Sécurité publique.

(1535)



Le Budget principal des dépenses reflète aussi des mesures annoncées il y a quelques semaines dans le budget de 2019. Pour Sécurité publique Canada, c'est-à-dire le ministère, ces mesures renferment 158,5 millions de dollars pour veiller à une meilleure préparation et intervention pour la gestion des urgences et des catastrophes naturelles au Canada, y compris dans les collectivités autochtones, dont 155 millions de dollars pour compenser en partie cette réduction dans les AAFCC que je viens de mentionner.

On prévoit aussi 4,4 millions de dollars pour lutter contre les crimes vraiment haineux et grandissants de l'exploitation sexuelle en ligne des enfants.

Il y a une somme de 2 millions de dollars pour le programme d'infrastructure, afin de continuer d'aider les collectivités à risque de crimes haineux à améliorer leur infrastructure de sécurité.

On prévoit 2 millions de dollars pour soutenir les efforts visant à évaluer les menaces pour la sécurité nationale fondées sur l'économie et à intervenir en conséquence, et 1,8 million de dollars pour soutenir un nouveau cadre de cybersécurité pour protéger les infrastructures essentielles du Canada, notamment dans le secteur des finances, de l'énergie, des télécommunications et du transport.

Comme vous le savez, dans le budget fédéral de 2019, nous avons également annoncé 65 millions de dollars comme investissement de capitaux ponctuel dans le système de sauvetage aérien STARS afin d'acquérir de nouveaux hélicoptères d'urgence. Cet investissement important ne figure pas dans le Budget principal des dépenses 2019-2020, puisqu'il a été comptabilisé dans l'exercice 2018-2019, c'est-à-dire avant le 31 mars.

Je vais maintenant passer au Budget principal des dépenses 2019-2020 pour les autres organisations du portefeuille de la Sécurité publique, qui ne sont pas le ministère lui-même.

Je vais commencer par l'ASFC, qui sollicite pour le présent exercice une augmentation nette totale de 316,9 millions de dollars. C'est 17,5 % de plus que le budget des dépenses 2018-2019. En plus de ce poste important concernant la durabilité et la modernisation des opérations frontalières dont j'ai déjà parlé, quelques autres augmentations notables comprennent 10,7 millions de dollars pour soutenir les activités liées au Plan des niveaux d'immigration qui a été annoncé pour les trois années 2018 à 2020. Ces activités comptent notamment le contrôle de sécurité, la vérification de l'identité, le traitement des résidents permanents lorsqu'ils arrivent à la frontière et ainsi de suite — toutes les responsabilités de l'ASFC.

Il y a un poste qui prévoit 10,3 millions de dollars pour l'Initiative de modernisation des opérations postales de l'ASFC; il est d'une importance capitale. On prévoit 7,2 millions de dollars pour élargir les sites d'examen sécuritaires, accroître la capacité en matière de renseignement et d'évaluation du risque et renforcer le programme des chiens de détection afin de donner à nos agents les outils dont ils ont besoin pour lutter contre la crise des opioïdes qui continue de sévir au Canada.

Le budget renferme aussi environ 100 millions de dollars en rémunération et régimes d'avantages sociaux des employés liés aux conventions collectives.

Les investissements du budget de 2019 qui ont une incidence sur le Budget principal des dépenses de l'ASFC cette année comprennent un total de 381,8 millions de dollars sur 5 ans pour accroître l'intégrité des frontières et du système d'octroi de l'asile. Même si mon collègue, le ministre Blair, fournira plus de détails sur cette mesure, l'ASFC recevra 106,3 millions de dollars de ce financement au cours du présent exercice.

Le budget de 2019 prévoit aussi 12,9 millions de dollars pour faire en sorte que les agents d'immigration et les agents frontaliers détiennent les ressources nécessaires pour traiter un nombre croissant de demandes de visas canadiens de visiteur et de permis de travail et d'études.

On prévoit 5,6 millions de dollars pour accroître le nombre de chiens de détection déployés dans l'ensemble du pays, afin de protéger les producteurs de porcs et les transformateurs de viande contre les graves menaces économiques posées par la peste porcine africaine.

De plus, il y a 1,5 million de dollars pour protéger les personnes contre les consultants en immigration sans scrupule, en améliorant la surveillance et en renforçant les mesures de conformité et d'application de la loi.

Je souligne également que le gouvernement a annoncé dans le cadre du budget son intention d'introduire la législation nécessaire pour élargir le rôle de la Commission civile d'examen et de traitement des plaintes de la GRC, de manière à ce qu'elle serve d'organisme d'examen indépendant pour l'ASFC. Cette législation proposée, le projet de loi C-98, a été présentée à la Chambre le mois dernier.

(1540)



Je vais maintenant passer à la GRC. Son budget pour 2019-2020 reflète une augmentation de 9,2 millions de dollars par rapport aux niveaux de financement de l'an dernier. Les principaux facteurs qui contribuent à ce changement comprennent des augmentations de 32,8 millions de dollars pour indemniser les membres blessés dans l'exécution de leurs fonctions, 26,6 millions de dollars pour l'initiative visant à assurer la sécurité et la prospérité à l'ère numérique et 10,4 millions de dollars pour des services de toxicologie judiciaire dans le cadre du nouveau régime concernant la conduite avec facultés affaiblies par la drogue.

Le Budget principal des dépenses pour la GRC reflète aussi 123 millions de dollars supplémentaires liés au budget de 2019, y compris 96,2 millions de dollars pour renforcer les opérations policières et globales de la GRC, et 3,3 millions de dollars pour que l'on puisse s'assurer que les voyageurs aériens et les travailleurs des aéroports font l'objet d'un contrôle efficace sur place. Les augmentations du financement pour la GRC sont contrebalancées par certaines diminutions dans le Budget principal de dépenses 2019-2020, y compris 132 millions de dollars liés à la présidence par le Canada du G7 en 2018 et 51,7 millions de dollars liés à l'élimination progressive de projets d'infrastructure.

Je vais maintenant passer au Service correctionnel du Canada. Il sollicite une augmentation de 136 millions de dollars, ou 5,6 %, par rapport au budget de l'an dernier. Les deux principaux facteurs qui contribuent au changement sont une augmentation de 32,5 millions de dollars dans le programme de prise en charge et garde, dont la plus grande partie, 27,6 millions de dollars, vise la rémunération des employés, et 95 millions de dollars annoncés dans le budget de 2019 pour soutenir les activités de détention du SCC.

La Commission des libérations conditionnelles du Canada prévoit une diminution d'environ 700 000 $ dans le Budget principal des dépenses ou 1,6 % de moins que le montant demandé l'an dernier. Et c'est attribuable à un financement ponctuel reçu l'an dernier pour appuyer les rajustements salariaux négociés. Bien sûr, le budget des dépenses renferme également des renseignements au sujet de Bureau de l'enquêteur correctionnel, du SCRS et d'autres organismes qui font partie de mon portefeuille. Je vais simplement mentionner que c'est un portefeuille très chargé, et que les gens qui travaillent au sein de Sécurité publique Canada et de tous les organismes connexes assument d'énormes responsabilités publiques dans l'intérêt de la sécurité publique. Ils mettent toujours la sécurité publique au premier plan tout en s'assurant que les droits et les libertés des Canadiens sont correctement protégés.

Cela dit, monsieur le président, mes collègues et moi serons heureux d'essayer de répondre à vos questions.

(1545)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur Picard, allez-y, pour sept minutes. [Français]

M. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, mesdames et messieurs, je vous souhaite la bienvenue et je vous remercie de vous prêter encore une fois à cet exercice.

D'entrée de jeu, je vais aborder mon sujet favori: la criminalité financière. Si je combine les crédits de la GRC et du ministère de la Sécurité publique et de la Protection civile du Canada, le total fait un peu plus de sept millions de dollars en investissements... [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je ne reçois aucune interprétation.

M. Michel Picard:

Examinons l'aspect du budget des dépenses qui porte sur le blanchiment d'argent. Le montant combiné pour Sécurité publique et la GRC est d'environ 7 millions de dollars de plus.

Quel type d'amélioration recherchons-nous? S'agit-il seulement du Groupe de lutte contre le blanchiment d'argent ou bien aussi du secteur de GI/TI et d'autres unités qui travaillent en étroite collaboration avec le secteur des crimes financiers ou du financement du terrorisme?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Permettez-moi de demander au sous-commissaire Brennan de répondre.

M. Michel Picard:

Merci.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Incidemment, il vient tout juste d'arriver en poste, au cours des derniers mois, mais il s'habituera à l'expérience très plaisante des audiences des comités à la Chambre des communes.

Sous-commissaire Brian Brennan (Services de police contractuels et autochtones, Gendarmerie royale du Canada):

Merci, monsieur le ministre et monsieur le président.

L'augmentation du financement servirait à tous ces secteurs. Je ne suis pas en mesure de parler précisément des chiffres, de l'endroit où l'argent sera exactement affecté, mais cet investissement vise à accroître notre capacité d'enquête et à soutenir les systèmes nécessaires par rapport à ces types d'enquêtes très particulières.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Si je peux ajouter quelque chose, monsieur Picard, le Budget des dépenses montre 4,1 millions de dollars qui s'en vont directement à la GRC pour rehausser la capacité des services de police fédérale. Environ 819 000 $ sont attribués à Finances Canada pour soutenir son travail lié au blanchiment d'argent. Au total, 3,6 millions de dollars sont destinés à CANAFE pour renforcer sa capacité opérationnelle. On prévoit 3,28 millions de dollars à l'intention du ministère de la Sécurité publique pour la création de l'Équipe d'action, de coordination et d'application de la loi pour la lutte contre le blanchiment d'argent, dans un effort pour réunir avec plus de cohésion tous ces divers filons, de sorte que tout le monde fonctionne exactement de la même manière avec la plus grande efficacité et coopération inter-agences possible.

M. Michel Picard:

Merci, monsieur.

Par rapport au SCRS et à la Stratégie du Canada au Moyen-Orient, qu'avons-nous à changer dans notre stratégie? Qu'est-ce qui ne fonctionne pas ou qui doit être changé?

De plus, par rapport aux récents événements ici et près de nous, le Moyen-Orient ne semble pas être la seule source des menaces que nous recevons, donc pourquoi nous concentrons-nous sur cette région?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Allez-y, monsieur Vigneault.

M. David Vigneault (directeur, Service canadien du renseignement de sécurité):

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Concrètement, nous nous efforçons de soutenir l'approche pangouvernementale à l'égard des activités au Moyen-Orient, et des activités militaires et diplomatiques en Syrie et en Irak. L'argent que vous voyez ici dans le Budget principal des dépenses représente les affectations particulières pour le SCRS afin de soutenir ces activités. Nous procédons à la collecte du renseignement dans la région et ici, au Canada, pour soutenir cette activité.

De plus, par rapport à votre question, le Budget s'est concentré sur le Moyen-Orient, mais comme vous l'avez signalé, monsieur Picard, nous sommes évidemment préoccupés par les activités et le terrorisme dans le monde entier, pas seulement au Moyen-Orient.

(1550)

M. Michel Picard:

Merci.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur Picard, puis-je ajouter juste une petite anecdote?

J'ai eu l'occasion précédemment de discuter avec la personne qui était alors secrétaire à la Défense des États-Unis concernant le changement qui a été apporté au déploiement du Canada au Moyen-Orient dans le cadre de la coalition internationale contre Daech. J'ai remarqué l'augmentation très importante de l'investissement que nous réalisons relativement aux activités du renseignement. Le secrétaire des États-Unis s'est dit très en faveur du travail effectué par les Canadiens dans cette zone particulière, particulièrement les activités du renseignement, qu'il a désignées comme étant de première classe et très utiles pour tous les membres de cette coalition afin qu'ils puissent composer efficacement avec les menaces que présente Daech.

M. Michel Picard:

C'est ma première expérience et mon premier mandat, et je crois savoir que nous devons justifier les postes où nous dépensons de l'argent. Comme prochaine question, j'aimerais savoir pourquoi nous ne dépensons pas un montant d'argent précis sur un sujet précis, et nous justifierions donc des dépenses accrues... Pour ce qui est de l'infrastructure relative aux cybermenaces, je vois que nous avons prévu plus de 1,7 million de dollars. Mon inquiétude, ce n'est pas que nous ayons de l'argent pour les cybermenaces; c'est que nous n'en ayons pas ailleurs.

D'après nos études sur les institutions démocratiques, l'éthique et l'information publique ici, sur les cybermenaces et les crimes financiers, ce sujet était partout. Les gens prennent peur lorsqu'ils entendent parler de ce que nous apprenons chaque jour au sujet de cette menace qui comporte plusieurs facettes. Je ne vois rien dans le budget à propos de ce sujet précisément, donc pourriez-vous profiter de l'occasion pour donner des explications?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je serai heureux de le faire, monsieur Picard, car il est fort possible que des gens examinent ce chiffre de 1,8 million de dollars et se demandent comment cela couvre le domaine. Eh bien, ça ne le fait pas. C'est un petit aperçu d'une partie des dépenses que nous consacrons à toute la cause de la cybersécurité.

Dans nos deux ou trois derniers budgets, nous avons inclus une série d'investissements. Bien sûr, ils sont reportés dans le cadre du processus du Budget des dépenses, mais vous devez en fait examiner les sections du budget qui brossent le portrait le plus complet.

Dans divers ministères, nous investissons, dans le cadre du budget de l'an dernier, 750 millions de dollars pour renforcer la cybersécurité au Canada, dont une partie permet de créer le nouveau Centre pour la cybersécurité, et une partie crée la nouvelle Unité de coordination de la lutte contre la cybercriminalité au sein de la GRC. Il y a toute une série d'investissements pour renforcer notre approche en matière de cybercriminalité et de cybersécurité.

Dans le dernier budget, l'investissement principal était de 145 millions de dollars, dont cet investissement constitue la première très petite tranche, pour soutenir la sécurité de nos cybersystèmes essentiels. Nous avons recensé quatre domaines en particulier: les finances, les télécommunications...

Rappelez-moi ce qu'ils sont. Je veux m'assurer que j'ai bien les quatre cybersystèmes essentiels...

Le président:

Nous pouvons y revenir. M. Picard a largement dépassé le temps.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

J'essaie de réciter le discours sur le budget.

Il y a quatre domaines particuliers dans lesquels nous investirons pour soutenir une nouvelle législation qui exigera certaines normes à l'égard de ces secteurs essentiels et créera les mécanismes d'application de la loi pour que l'on s'assure que ces normes sont respectées. Il est d'une importance capitale, monsieur Picard, que nos cybersystèmes essentiels se protègent et emploient toutes les procédures nécessaires pour rester sécuritaires. Nous travaillons à créer le cadre législatif pour nous assurer que ça se passe, avec le bon type de mécanismes d'application de la loi qui l'appuient et le financement, dont la somme de 1,8 million de dollars ne représente que la toute première petite tranche. Nous nous assurerons que ces systèmes sont bel et bien sécuritaires et sûrs et que nous possédons les bons mécanismes d'application de la loi pour appliquer les exigences.

(1555)

Le président:

Merci, ministre Goodale, de cette réponse détaillée.

Monsieur Paul-Hus, allez-y, pour sept minutes. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, PCC):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, mesdames et messieurs, bonjour.

Monsieur le ministre, j'ai une question qui touche plusieurs de vos agences, en lien avec l'information diffusée par les médias du Québec, particulièrement TVA, concernant les cartels mexicains de la drogue qui brassent des affaires au Canada. Ce matin, j'ai rencontré Son Excellence l'ambassadeur du Mexique au Canada, M. Camacho , et nous avons discuté de la situation.

Je sais que l'on vous a déjà interrogé à ce sujet pendant la période des questions orales et que vous avez répondu que cette information était fausse. Je voudrais donc savoir ce que vous savez et ce qui est vraiment fait au Canada pour y contrer les cartels mexicains. Le Canada fait affaire avec le Mexique, qui est l'un de ses plus grands partenaires et un ami. Ce n'est pas le Mexique qui est visé ici, mais plutôt les gens qui arrivent au Canada avec un passeport mexicain pour travailler pour les cartels mexicains de la drogue. C'est à ces gens que nous voulons nous attaquer. Que fait-on pour les contrer? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je vous remercie de poser la question, monsieur Paul-Hus. Il est important d'obtenir des renseignements exacts dans le domaine public. Les chiffres que vous avez mentionnés au sujet de certains médias ont laissé l'ASFC perplexe, car elle n'a pas été en mesure de vérifier d'où provenaient ces calculs. M. Ossowski pourrait vouloir se prononcer à ce sujet, car au cours des derniers jours, il a demandé à ses représentants de l'ASFC d'éplucher les dossiers pour voir d'où provenaient ces calculs, et on ne peut simplement pas les vérifier.

Ce que je peux vous dire, c'est que l'ASFC a déterminé que le nombre de cas d'interdiction de territoire pour tous les types de criminalité touchant les ressortissants mexicains durant les 18 derniers mois, de janvier 2018 jusqu'à aujourd'hui, s'élève à 238. Sur ces 238 personnes, seulement 27 ont été déclarées interdites de territoire en raison de liens avec une organisation criminelle connue, dont trois concernaient des liens suspects avec des cartels.

Les chiffres réels sont considérablement plus bas que ceux qui ont été mentionnés dans les médias. Toutes ces 27 personnes qui ont été déclarées interdites de territoire en raison de liens avec la criminalité organisée ont été renvoyées du Canada. Elles ne se trouvent plus au pays. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Merci de votre réponse, monsieur le ministre.

Il reste qu'un individu a été clairement identifié. Comment se fait-il que cette personne, reconnue comme un criminel par le Mexique, ait pu franchir notre frontière? N'y a-t-il pas d'échange d'information entre les deux pays sur toute personne arrivant au Canada? Le fait que cette personne est reconnue comme un criminel par le Mexique n'est-il pas inscrit dans une banque de données? Comment cela fonctionne-t-il avec l'ASFC? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Toutes les vérifications appropriées pour ce qui est de l'identité, des dossiers, des questions d'immigration liées aux antécédents et de la criminalité ont été soigneusement effectuées par l'ASFC à la frontière.

Monsieur Ossowski, pouvez-vous parler de la personne précise à laquelle M. Paul-Hus fait allusion?

M. John Ossowski (président, Agence des services frontaliers du Canada):

Merci.

Je dirais juste que, dans le premier cas, je crois qu'il est important de comprendre les niveaux de sécurité. Nous travaillons dans des aéroports et auprès de représentants mexicains au Mexique, d'abord pour empêcher des gens de monter à bord de vols vers le Canada s'ils ne détiennent pas la documentation appropriée ou s'il y a des préoccupations en matière de fausses déclarations ou de criminalité. Cela dit, si ces gens arrivent et que des préoccupations sont soulevées, nos agents sont très bien formés pour composer avec celles-ci dès leur arrivée. Les personnes pourraient être autorisées à partir à ce moment-là, si elles restent à l'aéroport jusqu'au prochain vol, puis retournent chez elles. Si elles arrivent et que nous soupçonnons que nous devons faire un certain travail, nous vérifierons la possibilité de toute criminalité durant l'inspection secondaire.

Durant cette même période de référence, je peux dire que nous avons repéré 18 personnes qui avaient utilisé de faux titres de voyage et avons été en mesure de les empêcher d'entrer. Il y a des niveaux de sécurité.

Pour ce qui est de cette personne particulière, elle a été renvoyée du pays.

(1600)

[Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Je comprends que vous pouvez avoir cette information d'avance puisque je sais qu'il y a des agents au Mexique et des ententes avec ce pays. Il y a des milliers de Mexicains qui viennent au Canada. N'y a-t-il pas de mécanismes informatiques adéquats dans les systèmes de l'ASFC? Les données des passeports n'y sont-elles pas disponibles, surtout dans le cas de criminels reconnus? N'y a-t-il pas d'échanges d'information sur ces criminels, un peu comme Interpol? [Traduction]

M. John Ossowski:

Je crois qu'il est important de comprendre les différences. Pour ce qui est du Mexique, les visas ne sont pas nécessaires pour pouvoir venir au Canada. Nous avons levé l'obligation relative au visa il y a quelques années. Les Mexicains voyagent maintenant grâce à ce qui s'appelle le programme d'autorisation de voyage électronique. C'est allégé sur le plan de la criminalité.

Comme j'ai dit, s'ils arrivent et que l'on cerne quelques préoccupations ou indicateurs, nous procédons à ces vérifications criminelles au point d'entrée dès leur arrivée. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Merci.

Monsieur le ministre, le 10 mai, un camion-citerne est entré en collision avec un avion à l'aéroport Pearson. Le Globe and Mail nous a appris que le véhicule avait tenté à trois reprises d'emboutir l'avion. La police de Peel mène l'enquête, mais la situation est très suspecte et il pourrait s'agir d'un attentat délibéré. Avez-vous plus d'information là-dessus? [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Il n'y a aucun renseignement que je suis en mesure de fournir en ce moment, monsieur Paul-Hus, relativement à cet incident particulier. Toutefois, je m'engage à voir s'il y a d'autres détails que je pourrai vous communiquer, en tant que collègue à la Chambre des communes. Je vais faire enquête et déterminer quel type de renseignements peuvent être diffusés dans le domaine public.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Paul-Hus et monsieur le ministre.

Monsieur Dubé, allez-y, pour sept minutes, s'il vous plaît. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NPD):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Je remercie tous les témoins de leur présence aujourd'hui.

Monsieur le ministre, nous avons accueilli M. David McGuinty lorsqu'il est venu nous présenter le premier rapport annuel du Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement. J'oublie l'endroit précis du rapport et je vous prie de me le pardonner, mais il y était indiqué qu'on ne pouvait pas dévoiler les montants consacrés à la sécurité nationale.

Pourtant, le rapport fournissait ces montants et leur ventilation pour l'Australie. Quand j'ai soulevé cette contradiction avec M. McGuinty, il m'a confirmé que les membres du Comité avaient posé la question aux fonctionnaires qui faisaient la présentation, mais s'étaient fait répondre qu'il s'agissait d'une question de sécurité nationale et que l'on ne pouvait donc pas divulguer cette information.

Je me demandais si vous pouviez clarifier la raison pour laquelle l'Australie, une alliée et membre du Groupe des cinq, estime que ses dépenses peuvent être rendues publiques, mais pas le Canada. [Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur Dubé, notre préoccupation tient à la fourniture de renseignements dans le domaine public qui pourrait en fait révéler des détails opérationnels sensibles et très critiques concernant la GRC, le SCRS ou l'ASFC d'une façon qui pourrait compromettre leur capacité d'assurer la sécurité des Canadiens.

L'information peut être communiquée dans le contexte du Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement. Elle serait également accessible au nouvel Office de surveillance des activités en matière de sécurité nationale et de renseignement, qui sera créé en vertu du projet de loi C-59. Ce sont des environnements classifiés pour lesquels les députés autour de la table possèdent le niveau d'autorisation approprié. C'est plus difficile de communiquer cette information ici. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Je comprends que c'est classifié et que cela impose certaines limites. Je ne veux pas trop m'acharner là-dessus, parce que j'ai des questions à poser sur d'autres sujets. Cependant, comme je l'ai évoqué, les Australiens rendent cette information publique, ce dont le rapport fait état.

M. McGuinty nous a confié que le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement n'avait pas reçu de réponse adéquate à ce sujet. Pourquoi cette différence entre le Canada et l'Australie? Je comprends les mécanismes qui s'appliquent, mais il semblerait que votre logique va à l'encontre de celle des Australiens.

(1605)

[Traduction]

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Loin de moi l'idée de critiquer les Australiens, mais nous avons notre propre logique canadienne, et notre obligation ici consiste à protéger la sécurité publique et la sécurité nationale des Canadiens.

Monsieur Dubé, j'aimerais simplement encourager M. McGuinty et le Comité des parlementaires sur la sécurité nationale et le renseignement à suivre avec attention cette question auprès des divers organismes de sécurité, ce qu'ils ont le pouvoir de faire en vertu de la législation, pour obtenir l'information dont ils estiment avoir besoin. J'encouragerais les organismes à présenter...

M. Matthew Dubé:

Monsieur le ministre, je vais devoir vous interrompre, car mon temps est limité et que c'est probablement le seul tour où je pourrai vous poser des questions.

J'aimerais juste dire que je crois c'est une chose importante à soulever, parce que, au chapitre des dépenses, tous les parlementaires ont un rôle particulier à jouer, au-delà du seul Comité, pour ce qui est de l'autorisation, qui peut concerner davantage les détails opérationnels. L'argent est une affaire complètement différente, comme M. Picard l'a dit dans ses questions concernant le rôle que même nous pouvons jouer en tant que personnes présentes au Comité.

Sur ce, j'aimerais passer à l'ASFC et à la CCETP. Nous savons que le projet de loi C-98 est déposé à la Chambre. Je me demande si vous pourriez clarifier les choses. Au total, 500 000 $ sont destinés à l'ASFC, et 420 000 $ à la CCETP. J'ai deux questions à ce sujet.

D'abord, est-ce là tout l'argent qui découlera du mécanisme associé au projet de loi C-98 ou y a-t-il plus d'argent qui suivra la mise en œuvre de ces mesures? Ensuite, qu'est-ce qui explique cet écart? Si c'est 500 000 $ pour l'ASFC, fait-elle le travail d'examen de surveillance à l'interne, ou ce travail sera-t-il renvoyé à la CCETP une fois que le projet de loi C-98 sera adopté?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Encore une fois, les chiffres qui figurent dans ce Budget des dépenses sont l'aperçu initial, une tranche de un an, du début d'un processus. C'est un processus très important. Alors que, comme vous le savez, la CCETP se concentrait au préalable totalement sur la GRC, nous allons maintenant élargir l'organisme. Il continuera sa fonction d'examen relativement à la GRC, mais il assumera aussi la responsabilité de la fonction d'examen pour l'ASFC.

L'attente est la suivante: pour toute plainte du public concernant le comportement d'un agent ou une situation particulière qui se présente à la frontière ou quelque autre sujet comme la gestion de la détention, par exemple, une plainte pourrait être déposée auprès de cette nouvelle entité élargie, et elle aurait la compétence totale pour enquêter sur cette plainte du public.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Eh bien, avec tout le respect que je vous dois, mieux vaut tard que jamais, et j'espère certainement qu'on l'adoptera avant que le Parlement n'ajourne.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Moi aussi, monsieur Dubé.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Ma dernière question concerne le crédit 15, qui porte sur les « menaces pour la sécurité nationale fondées sur l'économie » dans le cadre du mandat du SCRS. Qu'est-ce qu'une menace pour la sécurité nationale fondée sur l'économie dans le contexte de ce que vous êtes autorisé à nous dire ici aujourd'hui?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Eh bien, je pourrais vous donner mon explication en des termes simples.

Monsieur Vigneault, aimeriez-vous fournir la définition officielle?

M. David Vigneault:

Oui. Merci, monsieur le ministre.[Français]

Merci, monsieur Dubé.[Traduction]

Essentiellement, c'est lié aux investissements étrangers globaux dans le pays, lorsque nous examinons les entreprises étatiques différentes d'un pays différent, les diverses entités, qui essaient d'investir dans de nouvelles installations ici, au Canada.

C'est la capacité du service de contribuer aux efforts de la communauté de la sécurité nationale afin d'évaluer si ces transactions présentent une dimension liée à la sécurité nationale. Parfois, c'est en raison de la propriété, et parfois, de la nature de la technologie qui pourrait être acquise. C'est notre capacité globale d'enquêter et de produire la bonne analyse pour soutenir la prise de décisions de Sécurité publique, d'autres organismes et, au bout du compte, du Cabinet, en vertu de la Loi sur Investissement Canada.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Dubé.

Monsieur Spengemann, s'il vous plaît, pour sept minutes.

M. Sven Spengemann (Mississauga—Lakeshore, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur Goodale, nous arrivons à la fin de la législature. J'aimerais juste prendre un moment pour vous remercier, ainsi que votre équipe de conseillers, au nom des gens de Mississauga—Lakeshore, la circonscription que je représente, de votre travail, et par votre entremise, les hommes et les femmes, les membres de notre fonction publique, qui font ce travail incroyablement important de sécurité publique et de sécurité nationale, jour après jour.

Il y a quelques jours, j'ai eu l'occasion de rencontrer un groupe d'élèves incroyables de 7e et 8e années à l'école Olive Grove, une école islamique dans ma circonscription. Cette rencontre faisait partie de la Journée du représentant du Canada organisée par CIVIX, qui est une journée pour faire venir des représentants élus en classe.

Il y a eu une excellente discussion. Un des points que nous avons abordés était les crimes violents, et particulièrement la violence par les armes à feu. Je sais que le ministre Blair sera avec nous plus tard. Nous avons sondé les élèves pour savoir quelles questions étaient importantes, et quand il s'agissait de la violence commise par les armes à feu et les crimes violents, presque chaque main s'est levée parmi les élèves de 7e et de 8e  années.

Nous avons un engagement de 2 millions de dollars à l'égard d'un programme visant à protéger les lieux de rassemblement communautaire contre les crimes motivés par la haine, mais aussi le Centre canadien d'engagement communautaire et de prévention de la violence. Que faisons-nous en ce moment pour nous attaquer aux causes profondes des crimes violents et pour nous assurer qu'il y a un degré de sécurité pour les élèves de 7e et 8e années qui appartiennent à une école confessionnelle, pour qu'ils se sentent en sécurité quand ils étudient dans leur collectivité et leur centre d'apprentissage?

(1610)

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

C'est une question très importante, monsieur Spengemann, et il y a plusieurs réponses à cette question.

Merci d'avoir souligné le bon travail du Centre d'engagement communautaire du Canada au sein de mon ministère. Son objectif global est de coordonner et de soutenir les activités à l'échelon communautaire partout au pays; certaines sont dirigées par les municipalités, les gouvernements provinciaux ou des organisations universitaires, et d'autres par des services de police qui tendent la main à la collectivité afin de contrer ce processus insidieux de radicalisation menant à la violence.

Une partie de leur travail repose purement sur la recherche; une autre, sur la prestation de programmes; d'autres parties consistent à aider les groupes qui fournissent les messages contraires à des gens qui se dirigent dans une trajectoire négative vers l'extrémisme et la violence. Le centre canadien est opérationnel depuis deux ans et demi, et il a fait un travail très important.

Le programme particulier auquel vous faites référence, je crois, est différent. C'est le Programme de financement des projets d'infrastructure de sécurité qui, quand nous sommes arrivés au pouvoir il y a trois ans et demi, était financé à hauteur d'environ un million de dollars par année, si je ne m'abuse. C'était une bonne initiative, mais sa portée était assez limitée. Nous avons quadruplé les fonds, et ils s'élèvent maintenant à 4 millions de dollars par année. Nous avons élargi les critères par rapport à ce que le programme peut en fait soutenir.

Par exemple, un des récents changements est de permettre qu'une partie du financement du Programme de financement des projets d'infrastructure de sécurité serve à la formation dans des écoles, des lieux de culte ou des centres communautaires, où cette formation peut en fait vous aider à savoir quoi faire en cas d'incident. C'est comme un exercice d'incendie à l'école. Comment réagissez-vous, disons, devant un tireur actif ou un incident de violence?

Dans le cas de la synagogue Tree of Life à Pittsburgh, l'automne dernier, on a découvert qu'une formation préalable avait vraiment servi à changer les choses dans cette situation. Puisqu'ils avaient reçu une formation appropriée, des gens sur les lieux savaient exactement comment réagir devant une situation de tireur actif. Les gens de cette synagogue sont d'avis que la formation a réellement servi à sauver des vies.

Nous avons modifié les conditions du Programme de financement des projets d'infrastructure de sécurité afin de pouvoir payer, en plus de la télévision à circuit fermé, de meilleures portes, des barrières et d'autres mesures de protection qui entrent dans la conception d'un immeuble, et la rénovation de l'immeuble lui-même pour le rendre aussi efficace que possible afin d'assurer la sécurité des gens.

M. Sven Spengemann:

Merci.

Je vais maintenant passer à un autre sujet pour vous amener dans le domaine cybernétique. Je crois que 9,2 millions de dollars servent à la protection des droits et des libertés des Canadiens. Une préoccupation qui est soulevée concerne la cyberintimidation, particulièrement celle dirigée contre les jeunes et les gens LGBTQ2+, mais aussi d'autres communautés vulnérables.

Pouvez-vous dire au Comité ce que fait le ministère au sujet de l'intimidation en ligne, précisément?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

C'est une initiative qui réunit non seulement mon ministère, mais d'autres ministères au sein du gouvernement du Canada. L'objectif global est d'abord de rehausser le degré de sensibilisation par rapport à une partie des activités insidieuses qui ont lieu en ligne. Ce pourrait être de l'intimidation ou de l'exploitation sexuelle des enfants. L'une entraîne souvent l'autre. Ce pourrait être le trafic de personnes ou l'extrémisme violent. Dans un autre cadre, il pourrait s'agir d'attaques contre nos institutions démocratiques. Il y a toute une gamme de préjudices sociaux qui sont perpétrés sur Internet. Notre objectif consiste à élever le degré de sensibilisation publique, de sorte que les gens comprennent et connaissent mieux la littératie numérique, afin qu'ils sachent ce dont ils sont victimes en ligne et puissent établir une distinction entre une activité légitime et une activité illégitime.

Comme je l'ai dit plus tôt, nous avons aussi créé de nouveaux systèmes de cybersécurité — le premier au sein du Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications, et l'autre à la GRC — ce qui les rend, pour ce qui est de l'unité policière, plus accessibles au public, grâce à un mécanisme de signalement à guichet unique. Les gens savent où ils peuvent signaler des cybercrimes et des incidents sur Internet qui doivent être portés à l'attention des agents publics.

C'est un problème vraiment universel, qui nous occupe littéralement chaque minute. Nous devons mobiliser tous les Canadiens dans cet effort pour comprendre leur vulnérabilité en ligne, puis rendre rapidement accessibles les mécanismes d'intervention à tous les ordres de gouvernement. C'est ce que nous essayons de faire.

(1615)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Spengemann...

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Pour répondre à un dernier petit point, monsieur le président, les systèmes d'infrastructures essentielles auxquels je faisais allusion plus tôt sont les finances, les télécommunications, l'énergie et le transport.

Le président:

Merci.

Je suis sûr que M. Motz est heureux de le savoir.

M. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, PCC):

En effet. Merci.

Le président: Vous avez cinq minutes, monsieur Motz.

M. Motz: Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci, monsieur le ministre, à vous et à votre équipe, d'être ici.

Monsieur le ministre, on a entendu beaucoup de rumeurs récemment par rapport au fait que votre gouvernement songe à interdire certains types d'armes à feu, peut-être pas plus tard que cette semaine. Je vais vous poser une question très simple et claire: envisagez-vous d'adopter un décret pour interdire certaines armes à feu, oui ou non?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Le premier ministre...

M. Glen Motz:

Oui ou non.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

... a invité le ministre Blair pour examiner cette question, et il rendra compte de ses recommandations sous peu. Aucune décision finale n'a encore été prise. Il sera en mesure de vous fournir une description exacte de ses délibérations lorsqu'il comparaîtra.

M. Glen Motz:

Monsieur le ministre, je sais que, généralement, votre parti a tendance à traiter les propriétaires d'armes à feu canadiens respectueux de la loi comme des citoyens de seconde classe...

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Non, ce n'est pas vrai.

M. Glen Motz:

... mais je veux dire clairement que l'industrie des armes à feu au Canada produit annuellement des centaines de millions de dollars de ventes et qu'elle est responsable de milliers d'emplois. Il y a des conséquences réelles aux tentatives de renforcer votre flanc gauche durant une année électorale, mais avec fort peu de réalisations jusqu'à maintenant dans votre gouvernement.

Encore une fois, oui ou non, prévoyez-vous interdire les armes à feu au pays?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Monsieur Motz, vous savez très bien que c'est un sujet stratégique précis sur lequel le premier ministre a demandé au ministre Blair de se pencher et de rendre des comptes. Il a mené des consultations élargies, probablement les plus grandes de l'histoire canadienne. Il présentera ses recommandations sous peu.

M. Glen Motz:

Très bien. Donc, nous attendons toujours.

Je vais passer à mon autre question. Nous savons que la majorité des homicides liés aux armes à feu dans notre pays ne sont pas commis par les détenteurs de permis d'arme valides. Au cours des 15 dernières années environ, ce pourcentage a été extrêmement faible. Le fait de cibler une population qui respecte la loi dès le départ, avec le projet de loi C-71, plutôt de s'en prendre aux gangs et aux problèmes des armes à feu que nous connaissons au pays... votre gouvernement a affaibli les sanctions prévues pour les gangs et l'affiliation à des gangs et a complexifié les choses pour les actuels propriétaires d'armes à feu respectueux de la loi. Comment conciliez-vous cela?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Eh bien, nous avons investi 327 millions de dollars dans une stratégie qui se consacre directement à la lutte aux armes à feu et aux gangs. De ce total, 214 millions de dollars serviront aux provinces et aux collectivités, afin qu'elles puissent soutenir leurs stratégies locales de lutte contre les gangs. Environ 50 millions de dollars seront destinés à l'ASFC, pour contribuer à l'interception des armes illégales qui arrivent par la frontière, et environ 35 millions de dollars à la GRC, pour appuyer ses efforts de lutte contre le trafic illégal d'armes à feu.

Il y a tout un ensemble de...

(1620)

M. Glen Motz:

En 2017, vous avez promis 500 millions de dollars aux services de police pour lutter contre les gangs et les armes à feu, puis c'était 327 millions de dollars. Je me demande quelle partie de cet argent a réellement été donnée aux provinces pour qu'elles puissent composer avec leurs problèmes de gangs et d'armes.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Les accords avec les provinces sont sur le point d'être conclus.

Dans ma province, la Saskatchewan, l'accord est conclu, et le ministre provincial et moi en avons fait l'annonce ensemble. Il y a eu des annonces dans plusieurs provinces et territoires du pays. Les choses avancent.

Notre engagement, c'était d'atteindre le niveau de 100 millions de dollars par année de façon permanente, et nous respecterons cette cible. Les 327 millions de dollars dont j'ai parlé étaient au début de cet engagement, pour aider tous les autres ordres de gouvernement à être aussi efficaces que possible dans leur gestion du problème des armes illégales et des gangs. Vous pouvez probablement ajouter une troisième composante à tout ça, les drogues, parce qu'elles sont habituellement présentes, elles aussi.

Les armes, les gangs et les drogues, c'est ce à quoi l'argent servira, de pair avec des modifications de la loi pour améliorer les vérifications des antécédents, exiger une vérification des permis et normaliser les pratiques exemplaires en matière de tenue de dossiers.

Le président:

Il vous reste un peu moins d'une minute.

M. Glen Motz:

Merci, monsieur le président.

À titre informatif, nous n'allons pas entreprendre un débat sur le projet de loi C-71, parce que ce n'est pas exactement vers ça qu'on s'enligne.

Votre collègue, M. Blair, a dit qu'il n'y a aucune raison pour quiconque d'être propriétaire de ce qui est en réalité un fusil de chasse moderne, parce que ce sont des armes conçues pour blesser les gens. Cette déclaration est non seulement offensante, mais incroyablement erronée et mal avisée. En outre, elle vise délibérément à tromper les Canadiens.

J'aimerais savoir quelle est votre réponse à cette affirmation, monsieur, pour les hommes et les femmes de notre équipe olympique canadienne de tir, par exemple, qui représentent le Canada à Tokyo, lorsqu'ils entendent une telle déclaration formulée par un ministre du gouvernement.

Le président:

Vous allez devoir garder votre réponse pour plus tard.

Votre temps est expiré, monsieur Motz. Je suis sûr que vous aurez l'occasion de demander directement à M. Blair ce qu'il a voulu dire en formulant cette déclaration.

Passons maintenant à Mme Sahota.

Mme Ruby Sahota (Brampton-Nord, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le ministre, d'être là aujourd'hui et de l'avoir été toutes les autres fois où vous avez comparu devant le Comité. Vos réponses sont toujours intéressantes.

Vous avez parlé dans votre déclaration du financement futur pour les mesures d'application de la loi touchant les consultants en immigration sans scrupules. Je sais que cela relève non seulement de votre ministère, mais aussi de Citoyenneté et Immigration.

Pouvez-vous nous fournir un peu plus de renseignements sur ce à quoi il faut s'attendre et sur la façon dont les mesures d'application de la loi seront mises en œuvre?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Permettez-moi de demander à M. Ossowski de fournir des renseignements détaillés à ce sujet.

M. John Ossowski:

Merci.

Nous obtenons environ 200 pistes par année, et cela mène à environ 50 enquêtes. Les fonds supplémentaires que nous allons recevoir nous aideront à composer avec certains des cas plus complexes tout en renforçant de façon générale notre capacité de mener de telles enquêtes et, nous l'espérons, de mettre fin au problème.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus sur les pistes?

Les clients de ces consultants appellent-ils l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada, l'ASFC pour les dénoncer?

M. John Ossowski:

Ce peut être une diversité de sources qui nous informent. Parfois, c'est notre propre analyse découlant de notre travail auprès de la Commission de l'immigration et du statut de réfugiés, si les responsables de la Commission estiment que quelque chose est suspect. Il peut y avoir un certain nombre de façons différentes pour nous de découvrir qu'une personne doit faire l'objet d'une enquête.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Quel genre de gestes ou de mesures pouvez-vous prendre contre ces personnes?

M. John Ossowski:

Au bout du compte, elles peuvent faire face à des accusations criminelles.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Cela relèverait de votre compétence, que...

M. John Ossowski:

Si on parle d'une infraction criminelle, alors tout dépend de la question de savoir si nous avons travaillé avec la GRC. Tout dépend de la nature du résultat de l'enquête.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

Cette augmentation est-elle une première ou est-ce le montant régulier qui est habituellement attribué?

M. John Ossowski:

Non. C'est une augmentation de 10 millions de dollars sur cinq ans, donc on parle d'environ de 2 millions de dollars, si je me rappelle bien la structure de tout ça. C'est tout simplement, comme je l'ai dit, pour accroître notre capacité, parce que nous commençons à rencontrer un peu plus de ce type de dossiers et, comme je l'ai dit, certains de ces cas sont complexes et font intervenir plusieurs clients, et nous voulons passer en revue toute cette information et mieux concentrer nos efforts.

(1625)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'accord.

Récemment, monsieur le ministre, nous avons beaucoup entendu parler aux nouvelles des inondations en Ontario, au Québec et au Nouveau-Brunswick. Quelle part de votre budget a été dépensée pour atténuer les répercussions des inondations ou composer avec leurs conséquences?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

En fait, nous pouvons vous fournir un état des paiements liés aux accords d'aide financière en cas de catastrophe, les Accords d'aide financière en cas de catastrophe, les AAFC, des dernières années. C'est vraiment instructif. Je serai heureux de fournir l'information au Comité, parce qu'on peut voir que les pertes couvertes par les AAFC au cours des six dernières années — principalement pour des inondations et des feux de forêt — sont plus élevées que l'ensemble des dépenses du programme au cours des années précédentes, remontant jusqu'en 1970.

Mme Ruby Sahota: Wow.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale : Il est évident qu'il se passe quelque chose du côté climatique et vu l'incidence des feux de forêt et des inondations au cours des dernières années. Le rythme s'accélère de façon marquée.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Il y en a eu plus au cours des six dernières années que depuis 1970?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Oui.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Les critères ont-ils changé quant aux conditions d'admissibilité au financement gouvernemental ou est-ce principalement en raison des changements climatiques et du fait que de tels événements se produisent plus souvent?

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Chaque année, on assiste à un plus grand nombre d'incidents, qui ont tendance à être plus graves et plus dispendieux. Les critères sont essentiellement les mêmes. En fait, il y a quelques années, le gouvernement précédent a rajusté la formule de financement afin que les provinces paient une plus grande part avant que la contribution fédérale entre en jeu, et cela aurait tendance à réduire le montant dépensé par le gouvernement fédéral en raison du léger rajustement de la formule de partage des coûts. Et malgré tout, le montant des paiements fédéraux est plus élevé parce que les pertes sont plus importantes.

Vous n'avez qu'à penser aux événements spectaculaires, comme l'inondation près de High River, en Alberta, il y a quelques années. Je crois qu'il s'est agi de l'inondation la plus onéreuse de l'histoire canadienne. Fort McMurray dans le Nord de l'Alberta a été le théâtre du pire incendie de l'histoire canadienne. Deux années très dispendieuses en Colombie-Britannique ont suivi.

Nous constatons aussi de graves problèmes ce printemps, en raison des inondations survenues il y a quelques semaines au Manitoba, en Ontario, au Québec et au Nouveau-Brunswick, et, maintenant, au cours de la dernière semaine, environ, on est aux prises avec des feux de forêt sur les territoires de la Première Nation de Pikangikum dans le Nord-Ouest de l'Ontario et aussi dans le Nord de l'Alberta. Je crois qu'environ 11 000 personnes ont maintenant été évacuées dans le Nord de l'Alberta, et toute la collectivité de Pikangikum est en train d'être évacuée.

C'est un problème très grave. Les changements climatiques ont des conséquences, et ces conséquences sont de plus en plus graves.

Le président:

Nous devons nous arrêter ici.

Nous approchons de la fin, mais je crois que M. Eglinski peut avoir deux ou trois minutes pour poser une question, s'il le désire.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

J'espère que c'est au sujet de Grande Cache.

M. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, PCC):

Vous n'aurez pas cette chance cette fois-ci...

Merci à tous les témoins et félicitations, monsieur Brennan, de votre récente promotion.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Ce sont d'anciens collègues.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

M. Jim Eglinski:

Monsieur le ministre, comme vous le savez, nous avons produit un rapport sur la sécurité publique portant sur la criminalité en région rurale. Mes collègues de l'Alberta et moi avons réalisé un important processus de consultation à l'échelle de la province. Les gens sont très préoccupés, non seulement en Alberta, mais aussi en Saskatchewan. Je crois savoir que certains maires vous ont fait part des pénuries de membres de la GRC. La criminalité a augmenté d'environ 30 % dans les régions rurales du Canada comparativement aux zones urbaines.

Ce qui me trouble beaucoup, c'est que je viens de regarder le plan 2018-2019 de la GRC, qui fait état de la progression de vos effectifs au cours des cinq dernières années, jusqu'à l'exercice 2019-2020. En fait, le programme d'application de la loi demande une réduction du nombre d'agents de police de 1 366 à 1 319. Il s'agit ici uniquement de la main-d'œuvre. Vous augmentez l'effectif général de la force de 1 033 agents, et vous ajoutez 460 membres du personnel administratif. Vos augmentations sont de seulement 0,6 %, 0,1 %, 0,2 % et 0,2 % au cours des prochaines années. Le taux d'attrition sera 10 fois plus élevé que ça.

De quelle façon allez-vous fournir des services de police? De quelle façon vous pouvez dire aux gens des régions rurales du Canada, que ce soit en Saskatchewan, au Manitoba, en Colombie-Britannique ou en Alberta, d'où viendront les services de police? Allez-vous examiner votre contrat afin d'essayer de renforcer ces chiffres? Les chiffres ici révèlent que vous n'avez pas la main-d'œuvre nécessaire.

(1630)

Le président:

Vous avez environ 10 secondes.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

Je vais demander à mon sous-commissaire de répondre à cette question aussi.

Monsieur Eglinski, je tiens tout simplement à souligner que nous avons triplé le nombre de nouvelles recrues qui sortent de l'École de la GRC à la Division Dépôt, à Regina. Il y en a maintenant plus de 1 100, comparativement à un nombre bien moins élevé avant. De plus, si je me souviens bien, l'année passée, environ 135 nouvelles personnes sont allées en Saskatchewan, ce qui constitue une augmentation importante. Cette année, on parle d'environ 90 nouveaux agents qui iront dans cette région précise.

Une partie de la réponse à votre question, c'est que nous renforçons la capacité de formation à Dépôt pour produire des agents de police plus rapidement. Comme vous le savez, nous ne pouvons pas le faire du jour au lendemain. Nous voulons envoyer là-bas des agents qui sont pleinement formés et qualifiés pour faire le travail et protéger les Canadiens. C'est du sérieux, et nous accélérons la formation des recrues.

Les commandants en Alberta et en Saskatchewan ont aussi réalisé des initiatives au cours des deux ou trois dernières années pour déployer des agents en s'appuyant davantage sur le renseignement criminel afin que les agents soient affectés de façon plus stratégique que c'était peut-être le cas avant.

Je souligne que le procureur général de la Saskatchewan et le commandant de l'Alberta ont souligné que, au cours de la dernière année, il semble en fait y avoir eu une amélioration des statistiques liées à la criminalité.

M. Jim Eglinski:

J'aimerais poser une question rapidement, si vous le permettez.

Le président:

Vous pouvez poser une question.

M. Jim Eglinski:

En ce qui a trait aux besoins en matière de recrutement, trouvez-vous de nouvelles recrues?

Le président:

Je suis très heureux de vous avoir donné ces 10 secondes qui, comme le veut la tradition de nos procédures parlementaires, se sont transformées en deux ou trois minutes.

M. Jim Eglinski:

C'est pour ça que je vous aime, mon bon monsieur.

Le président:

M. Eglinski a réussi à glisser une question au tout dernier moment.

Pouvez-vous répondre rapidement, monsieur Brennan?

S.-comm. Brian Brennan:

Nous atteignons les chiffres en matière de recrutement, de façon à nous assurer de former 40 agents par année à Dépôt, et nous continuons d'examiner des façons d'accroître notre capacité de recrutement pour pouvoir le faire pendant une longue période.

L'hon. Ralph Goodale:

À 40 recrues sur 52 semaines par année, on parle de presque un diplômé par semaine à Dépôt.

Le président:

Vous allez devoir vivre avec cette réponse, monsieur Eglinski.

J'ai pris note de la question de Mme Sahota en ce qui a trait à l'augmentation des fonds d'aide en cas de catastrophe. Je crois que ce serait bien pour nous tous si vous pouviez fournir l'information au Comité.

Cela dit, je tiens à vous remercier à nouveau de votre comparution, ici, monsieur le ministre, et je remercie aussi vos collègues. J'imagine que vous partez, mais que vos collègues resteront. Nous en sommes maintenant au ministre Blair.

Cela dit, nous suspendons nos travaux.

(1630)

(1635)

Le président:

Nous reprenons. Je vois que nous avons encore le quorum.

Bienvenue, monsieur le ministre Blair.

Nous accueillons le ministre Blair, mais nous devons aussi traiter du budget des dépenses en tant que tel. Nous avons une autre motion à adopter relativement au projet de loi C-93, et il y a aussi la question des recommandations que nous aimerions régler.

Je propose qu'on se garde 10 minutes à la fin de...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Et qu'en est-il de mes questions?

Le président:

Je ne sais pas. Ce sera peut-être un problème.

J'encourage mes collègues, les ministres et les témoins à poser des questions et à y répondre rapidement, si possible.

Cela dit, je souhaite la bienvenue au ministre Blair devant le Comité à nouveau.

Nous avons hâte d'entendre votre déclaration. Nous poserons des questions après.

L’hon. Bill Blair (ministre de la Sécurité frontalière et de la Réduction du crime organisé):

Merci, monsieur le président. Je vais essayer de fournir une réponse judicieuse et de respecter votre demande.

Je suis heureux d'avoir de nouveau l'occasion de comparaître devant le Comité pour discuter cette fois-ci du Budget principal des dépenses de 2019-2020. Ces budgets des dépenses comprennent les autorisations pour les mesures qui, bien sûr, ont été annoncées dans le budget de 2019.

J'aimerais profiter de l'occasion pour m'attarder sur certaines des mesures importantes qui relèvent de mon mandat, soit d'assurer la sécurité de notre frontière et de mener des efforts pour réduire le crime organisé. En ce qui concerne ce dernier point, j'ai déjà mentionné au Comité par le passé que la lutte contre la violence liée aux armes à feu et aux gangs est l'une de nos principales priorités. Au cours des dernières années, la violence liée aux armes à feu était en hausse. Il arrive encore que des armes à feu tombent entre les mains de personnes qui les utilisent pour commettre des crimes. Même si je crois que les mesures prévues dans le projet de loi C-71 sont exceptionnelles et contribueront beaucoup à renverser cette tendance, je crois aussi que nous pouvons toujours en faire plus.

Nous avons envoyé, plus tôt ce mois-ci, un rapport décrivant ce que nous avons entendu dans le cadre des consultations exhaustives que nous avons menées à l'échelle du pays sur cette question. En attendant, le financement obtenu dans le cadre du budget de 2019 et du Budget principal des dépenses nous permettra de changer des choses immédiatement.

J'ai mentionné par le passé que l'investissement de 327 millions de dollars sur cinq ans, que le gouvernement a annoncé en 2017, commence déjà à aider à soutenir une diversité d'initiatives visant à réduire les armes à feu et les activités liées aux gangs dans les collectivités partout au Canada. Au cours des quelques derniers mois, j'ai eu le plaisir d'aider les provinces, les territoires et les municipalités à tirer profit des fonds attribués à des initiatives précises dans leurs régions.

Le gouvernement du Canada investit 42 millions de dollars de plus dans l'initiative de lutte contre la violence liée aux armes à feu et aux gangs par l'intermédiaire du budget des dépenses de cette année. Il s'agit d'une initiative horizontale qui est dirigée par Sécurité publique Canada, qui, comme toujours, travaille en partenariat avec l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada et la Gendarmerie royale du Canada.

En ce qui concerne les services policiers plus précisément, le budget de cet exercice prévoit un financement important, notamment un financement de 508,6 millions de dollars sur cinq ans en vue de soutenir le renforcement des opérations policières de la GRC. De ce montant, 96,2 millions de dollars sont attribués aux activités policières de la GRC à même le budget des dépenses fourni aujourd'hui. Bien sûr, la GRC joue un rôle absolument primordial dans la protection de la sécurité nationale et la réduction de la menace du crime organisé, ainsi que dans le soutien des initiatives de prévention, d'intervention et d'application de la loi à l'échelle canadienne.

L'ASFC soutient la GRC et les autres partenaires de l'application de la loi afin de contrer le crime organisé et l'activité des gangs criminels. Les investissements versés dans le cadre du budget des dépenses et du budget permettront d'obtenir de nouvelles technologies, d'accroître l'équipe de chiens détecteurs, d'obtenir des outils et des cours de formation spécialisés et de renforcer les capacités relatives aux renseignements et à l'évaluation des risques. Tous ces ajouts permettront à l'ASFC de renforcer ses interventions opérationnelles afin qu'elle puisse mieux intercepter les biens illicites à la frontière, comme les armes à feu et les opioïdes. J'ai confiance que les fonds que nous fournissons aideront tous nos partenaires à répondre aux besoins changeants du Canada en matière de sécurité, particulièrement en ce qui concerne les défis liés aux armes à feu et aux gangs.

En ce qui concerne les aspects de mon mandat relatif à la sécurité des frontières, j'ai le plaisir de vous informer que le gouvernement prévoit des investissements importants, tant dans le budget que dans le budget des dépenses, pour mieux gérer la migration irrégulière, la décourager et la prévenir. Le budget de 2019 prévoit un investissement de 1,2 milliard de dollars sur cinq ans à compter de cette année. Ces fonds seront répartis entre Immigration, Réfugiés et Citoyenneté Canada, IRCC, la Commmission de l'immigration et du statut de réfugié, la CISR, l'ASFC, la GRC et le SCRS en vue de mettre en œuvre un plan d'action exhaustif pour la réforme de l'asile et la protection des frontières. Même si IRCC est le ministère responsable du plan d'action, le portefeuille de la Sécurité publique joue un rôle vraiment essentiel dans tout ça.

Comme les membres du Comité le savent, l'ASFC est responsable du traitement des demandes d'asile déposées aux points d'entrée officiels et aux bureaux intérieurs. Le financement approuvé dans le cadre du budget de 2019 permettra à l'ASFC de renforcer ses processus à la frontière, en plus de l'aider à renforcer la capacité du régime des demandes d'asile, d'accélérer le traitement des demandes et de faciliter le renvoi des personnes dont on juge qu'elles n'ont pas besoin de protection au Canada, et ce, de façon plus efficiente et plus rapide. La stratégie, grâce à ce financement, encadrera ces efforts.

Avant de conclure, j'aimerais souligner un dernier point. Récemment, les Canadiens entendent souvent parler du blanchiment d'argent, du financement du terrorisme et de l'évasion fiscale, des choses qui se produisent dans notre pays, et tout ça les préoccupe à juste titre. Le blanchiment d'argent est une menace à la sécurité publique et il brime l'intégrité et la stabilité du secteur financier, ainsi que l'économie elle-même, de façon générale. Le gouvernement n'attendra pas avant de passer à l'action pour protéger la sécurité et la qualité de vie des Canadiens. J'ai le plaisir de noter que, dans le budget de 2019, le gouvernement prévoit verser 24 millions de dollars sur cinq ans à Sécurité publique Canada afin de créer une équipe d'action, de coordination et d'exécution de la loi pour la lutte contre le recyclage des produits de la criminalité, l'Équipe ACE. C'est un projet pilote qui renforcera les initiatives interagences contre le blanchiment d'argent et les crimes financiers.

(1640)



De plus, 68,9 millions de dollars de plus seront investis sur cinq ans et attribués à la GRC pour renforcer les capacités de services policiers fédéraux, notamment dans le cadre des efforts de lutte contre le blanchiment d'argent, et tout ça commencera par un investissement de 4,1 millions de dollars durant le présent exercice.

De plus, 28 millions de dollars sur cinq ans sont investis au sein de l'ASFC pour soutenir un nouveau centre d'expertise. Ce centre permettra de cerner les incidents de fraude commerciale et d'entamer des poursuites. Il servira également à cerner les cas de blanchiment d'argent possibles de nature commerciale, afin que la GRC puisse mener une enquête et entamer des poursuites.

Comme toujours, ce ne sont ici que quelques exemples des travaux importants et cruciaux réalisés au sein du portefeuille de la Sécurité publique et, dans ce cas-ci, par les nombreux ministères qui soutiennent mon mandat et qui s'efforcent de protéger les Canadiens.

Encore une fois, je tiens à remercier les membres du Comité de leur examen du présent budget des dépenses et de leurs efforts continus.

Je vous remercie, monsieur le président, et je serai heureux de répondre aux questions des membres.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

Cela dit, madame Dabrusin, vous avez sept minutes, s'il vous plaît.

Mme Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.):

Merci, monsieur le ministre, d'être là aujourd'hui.

J'ai eu l'occasion de soulever la question déjà. J'aimerais continuer la conversation au sujet des armes à feu et des gangs. Vous en avez parlé dans votre déclaration préliminaire, et j'ai consulté le Budget principal des dépenses pour connaître les travaux qui sont aussi réalisés du côté de la frontière.

Ma première question est la suivante: lorsqu'on se penche sur les problèmes liés aux armes à feu, toutes les conversations que j'ai eues parlaient vraiment de l'offre et de la demande, les deux aspects. Si on commence par réfléchir à l'offre — vous l'avez mentionné rapidement —, mais pouvez-vous nous en dire un peu plus sur ce que fait l'ASFC pour prévenir la contrebande d'armes?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Oui, merci beaucoup, madame Dabrusin.

Les armes qui se retrouvent au bout du compte entre les mains des criminels et sont utilisées pour commettre des crimes violents dans nos collectivités viennent de différentes sources. Il y a diverses estimations accessibles auprès des multiples services de police et organismes de partout au pays qui cernent la provenance de ces armes illicites. Il est très clair qu'une part importante des armes à feu utilisées par les gangs pour commettre des infractions criminelles dans nos collectivités partout au Canada sont importées illicitement au Canada et traversent les frontières. L'ASFC, bien sûr, a un rôle très important à jouer pour intercepter cet approvisionnement.

J'ai eu l'occasion durant la fin de semaine de me rendre à l'installation de l'ASFC de Point Edward et de la visiter et j'ai aussi eu l'occasion de parler de certaines des choses que les gens font là-bas, grâce aux nouvelles technologies, aux équipes canines et, franchement, au travail de personnes vraiment extraordinaires et dévouées...

(1645)

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Si vous me permettez de vous interrompre, lorsque vous parlez des équipes canines, vous parlez des chiens?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Oui, de vrais chiens. J'ai rencontré le chien. Il s'appelle Bones.

Des voix: Ha, ha!

L'hon. Bill Blair: Les gens m'ont montré de quelle façon il avait fouillé un véhicule. C'est vraiment un processus remarquable. Ce n'est pas de la haute technologie, mais ça fonctionne; ça fonctionne très bien même.

Les gens ont aussi pu me parler de certaines des grandes réussites qu'ils ont obtenues, y compris, par exemple, la saisie d'une arme d'assaut très puissante durant la fin de semaine du 24 mai en plus d'un certain nombre de chargeurs à grande capacité et de munitions. Il se fait de l'excellent travail le long de nos frontières.

Je peux aussi vous dire que les membres de l'ASFC et du milieu de l'application de la loi reconnaissent que, pour éliminer l'approvisionnement d'armes qui traversent la frontière des États-Unis... Les États-Unis sont essentiellement le plus important arsenal d'armes de poing du monde. Il y a beaucoup d'armes à feu là-bas. Les criminels savent que, s'ils peuvent faire passer ces armes à la frontière, ils peuvent les vendre beaucoup plus cher qu'aux États-Unis, parce qu'ils ne sont pas faciles d'accès au Canada. C'est un crime motivé par le profit.

Les services de police et l'ASFC comprennent qu'on ne peut pas tout simplement intercepter l'approvisionnement à la frontière, alors on déploie des efforts extraordinaires. Nous investissons dans la GRC et dans les services de police municipaux et provinciaux partout au Canada afin qu'ils travaillent de façon intégrée avec les équipes d'application de la loi à la frontière et qu'ils réalisent des enquêtes sur le crime organisé afin de cerner les personnes et les organisations criminelles qui sont responsables de l'achat de ces armes aux États-Unis, qui les font entrer clandestinement au Canada par la frontière et qui les vendent ensuite à des criminels au pays.

Nous avons vu des réussites extraordinaires découlant de tels partenariats aussi, mais le travail se poursuit et est en cours. Nous faisons de grands investissements dans le présent budget pour renforcer la capacité de l'ASFC et des organisations d'application de la loi de mener de telles enquêtes pour améliorer la qualité des renseignements recueillis et la façon dont les données permettent de mener des enquêtes réussies et de poursuivre avec succès les personnes responsables.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Merci.

Toujours au sujet de l'approvisionnement — j'espère que nous aurons quelques minutes pour parler de la demande — vous avez eu une étude. Cela faisait partie de votre lettre de mandat. On vous a demandé d'étudier une possible interdiction des armes de poing et des armes d'assaut. Si je ne m'abuse, vous avez produit un « rapport sur ce que vous avez entendu ». Pouvez-vous nous dire quelles seront les prochaines étapes?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Nous avons cerné un certain nombre de façons dont les armes se retrouvent entre les mains des criminels. Comme je l'ai déjà mentionné, une portion de ces armes — certains estiment que c'est 50 %, et d'autres, jusqu'à 70 % — sont en fait passées en contrebande à la frontière. Nous savons aussi qu'un certain nombre de ces armes à feu qui seront par la suite utilisées pour commettre des infractions criminelles au Canada ont été achetées ici même.

Essentiellement, cela se produit d'un certain nombre de façons assez bien connues. En ce qui a trait à la première façon, il y a eu un grand nombre de vols importants d'armes à feu chez des détaillants d'armes à feu ou des Canadiens qui possèdent des armes à feu. Ces armes sont par la suite vendues dans la rue à des organisations criminelles et utilisées pour commettre des actes criminels partout au pays. L'une des choses que j'ai entendues, et nous en avons beaucoup discuté, c'était la façon dont on pourrait renforcer l'entreposage sécuritaire des armes à feu pour prévenir de tels vols, pour faire en sorte qu'il soit plus difficile pour les criminels de voler ces armes à feu et, qu'elles se retrouvent par la suite dans la rue.

Il y a aussi un certain nombre de cas où on a constaté que des armes à feu avaient été achetées légalement au pays, mais qui ont ensuite été détournées vers le marché criminel par des personnes qui avaient l'intention de profiter de la revente des armes en question. C'est un processus qu'on appelle parfois l'achat par personnes interposées. Essentiellement, il s'agit d'une personne qui a le droit juridique d'acheter une arme à feu, qui essaie d'éliminer toute trace de son origine en retirant le numéro de série, puis qui revend l'arme à quelqu'un, dans la rue, à prix fort.

Dans le cadre de conversations partout au pays — particulièrement auprès des responsables de l'application de la loi —, nous avons constaté l'importance d'améliorer la traçabilité des armes à feu qui sont utilisées dans le cadre des infractions criminelles afin que nous puissions cerner l'origine de la vente et mieux connaître et tenir responsables — et, par le fait même, dissuader davantage — les personnes qui s'adonnent à une telle activité criminelle. Il y a un certain nombre d'autres mesures dont nous avons aussi entendu parler au sujet de l'interception de l'approvisionnement.

J'ai aussi entendu un certain nombre de personnes qui se disaient préoccupées par le fait que divers types d'armes, franchement, constituent un risque important, et des mesures supplémentaires devraient être envisagées afin que de telles armes soient moins accessibles aux personnes pouvant les utiliser pour causer des préjudices à autrui.

(1650)

Le président:

Vous n'avez pas encore terminé, mais je suis sûr que M. Graham vous remerciera si nous finissons avant sept minutes.

Il vous reste 40 secondes.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

Oui. Je vous remercie.

En ce qui concerne la demande, rapidement, nous avons assisté à une annonce à Toronto en décembre concernant notamment la façon dont nous aidons les jeunes et les collectivités touchées.

Pouvez-vous m'en parler un peu, s'il vous plaît?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Madame Dabrusin, mes remarques précédentes portaient en grande partie sur l'interdiction de la fourniture d'armes à feu qui se retrouvent dans les mains de criminels. Cependant, notre gouvernement reconnaît qu'il faut également réduire la demande pour ces armes à feu. Nous investissons donc beaucoup dans les collectivités et les enfants. Nous travaillons particulièrement avec les municipalités, mais je me suis rendu dans chaque province, et nous fournissons des ressources à chaque province et territoire afin de lui permettre d'investir dans ses collectivités et les organismes communautaires qui font un travail extraordinaire auprès des jeunes pour les aider à faire de meilleurs choix, des choix plus sûrs et plus responsables socialement, pour éviter qu'ils s'associent à des gangs.

Nous soutenons également un certain nombre d'initiatives, où l'on travaille auprès de jeunes qui ont déjà fait partie de gangs en vue de les aider à quitter le style de vie des gangs et à éviter de se livrer à des activités criminelles violentes qui causent tellement de traumatismes dans nos collectivités d'un bout à l'autre du pays.

Il n'y a pas une seule réponse. Franchement, cela nécessite des investissements très importants et une approche plus large...

Le président:

Je pense que nous allons devoir laisser tomber la réponse.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

J'aurai peut-être l'occasion de revenir sur certaines des choses que nous faisons qui ont des effets réels.

Merci, monsieur le président.

Le président:

Le talent pour étirer les secondes en minutes est tout à fait extraordinaire aujourd'hui.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Merci, monsieur.

Le président:

Monsieur Paul-Hus, vous avez sept minutes, s'il vous plaît. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, je veux parler des passages illégaux à la frontière.

Le vérificateur général a présenté un rapport très accablant sur les demandes d'asile. Vous avez dit que le système était très efficace, mais on a confirmé qu'il était très surchargé. La collaboration entre les principales agences pose des difficultés et il faudra de quatre à cinq ans uniquement pour revenir à la normale.

Regrettez-vous de nous avoir dit en comité que tout allait bien et que c'était extraordinaire? Regrettez-vous d'avoir donné des informations inexactes? [Traduction]

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Bien sûr, je vous dis la vérité, monsieur Paul-Hus.

Je tenais à souligner le travail exceptionnel de l'ASFC et de la GRC, de la police, des provinces et des municipalités, partout au pays. Compte tenu des ressources et du soutien dont elles disposent, je pense qu'elles font un travail extraordinaire.

Nous reconnaissons qu'il reste encore beaucoup à faire. C'est précisément la raison pour laquelle nous effectuons de nouveaux investissements importants et renforçons leur capacité de mener ces enquêtes très complexes. À titre d'exemple, nous reconnaissons qu'il est important que tous les organismes et ministères chargés de l'application de la loi collaborent davantage. C'est l'une des raisons pour lesquelles nous créons l'équipe d'action, de coordination et d'exécution de la loi pour la lutte contre le recyclage des produits de la criminalité. [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

À l'époque, vous nous avez dit que tout allait bien, mais le vérificateur général nous avait dit que c'était faux. Au fond, vous confirmez que l'information que vous avez donnée à ce moment-là était mauvaise. [Traduction]

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Pouvez-vous préciser à quel rapport du vérificateur général vous faites référence, monsieur? [Français]

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Je parle plutôt du rapport du directeur parlementaire du budget, qui confirmait qu'il y avait des problèmes associés aux coûts de 1,1 milliard de dollars pour la gestion des demandeurs d'asile. Ce rapport a été publié il y a quelques mois. Savez-vous de quoi je parle? [Traduction]

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Je suis désolé, je parlais des armes à feu et du recyclage des produits de la criminalité. Si vous parlez de demandeurs d'asile, l'une des choses relevées, je crois, dans ce rapport est le travail effectué dans le cadre de la vérification de sécurité par l'ASFC.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Ma question, monsieur, est assez simple.

Lors de votre comparution devant le Comité, il y a quelques mois, nous avons posé une question à ce sujet, et vous avez dit que tout allait bien. Or, le vérificateur général a dit que cela posait de nombreux problèmes. Je voulais simplement savoir si vous êtes prêt à présenter des excuses au Comité, car vous avez dit quelque chose qui était erroné à ce moment-là.

C'était ma question, mais j'ai perdu trop de temps à cet égard. Je vais donc passer à ma prochaine question, monsieur.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Voulez-vous une réponse à cette question?

Monsieur, je serai heureux de tenter d'y répondre.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

J'ai perdu assez de temps, monsieur. Je vais poser une autre question, d'accord?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

S'il y a d'autres questions pour lesquelles vous ne voulez pas de réponse, dites-le-moi.

(1655)

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Ça va parce que vous comprenez ma question.

Vos notes d'allocution y font référence. Dans le budget, vous parlez d'un investissement de 1,2 milliard de dollars sur cinq ans, mais s'agit-il du même montant que celui mentionné par le vérificateur général, soit 1,1 milliard de dollars sur trois ans?

S'agit-il du même argent?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Je pense que le vérificateur général a conclu son rapport et ses prévisions sur ce qui était requis au printemps dernier, en 2018, et depuis lors, notre gouvernement... Tout d'abord, le budget de 2018 a consenti de nouveaux investissements importants dans la CISR et l'ASFC, et bien sûr, dans le budget que nous venons de vous présenter aujourd'hui, soit 1,18 milliard de dollars...

À titre d'exemple, nous augmentons la capacité de la CISR par rapport à l'époque où le vérificateur général a présenté son rapport. La Commission avait alors la capacité de tenir environ 26 000 audiences par année. Avec ces nouveaux investissements, ce nombre atteindra environ 50 000 d'ici la fin de l'année prochaine, ce qui répond tout à fait à l'insuffisance constatée en raison d'un sous-effectif et d'un sous-financement antérieurs. Nous avons effectué ces investissements dans les budgets de 2018 et 2019.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

D'accord, vous faites beaucoup de détours.

Votre titre est ministre de la Sécurité frontalière et de la Réduction du crime organisé.

À propos de la réduction du crime organisé, vous êtes censé parler des cartels mexicains, mais aussi des cartels de la drogue. Or, pourquoi le cabinet du ministre Goodale répond-il toujours aux questions des médias et non pas votre cabinet?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Tout d'abord, il est ministre de la Sécurité publique et...

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Mais vous êtes le ministre de la Sécurité frontalière et de la Réduction du crime organisé. Est-ce exact?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

J'ai écouté très attentivement la réponse du ministre Goodale et même sa réponse un peu plus tôt aujourd'hui, et j'ai exactement les mêmes renseignements que ceux qu'il a fournis au Comité.

C'est un résultat direct de l'information fournie par nos organismes. Je crois qu'il a confirmé que l'ASFC avait déterminé que le nombre de cas d'interdiction de territoire était de 238 pour la période en question et il a également mentionné que nous n'avons pas été en mesure d'établir de données probantes selon lesquelles...

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Je ne veux pas sa réponse, monsieur le ministre, je veux votre...

L’hon. Bill Blair:

... en ce qui concerne le nombre que vous avez mentionné à la Chambre, 400 ressortissants au Canada, nous n'avons pas été en mesure de trouver des données probantes pour appuyer la véracité de cette affirmation.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Je vais passer à ma prochaine question.

La semaine dernière, le vice-président américain Pence est venu rencontrer le premier ministre. Pensez-vous qu'ils ont soulevé la question de l'Entente sur les tiers pays sûrs? L'ont-ils soulevée?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Je crois que le sujet a été abordé...

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Avez-vous une réponse à nous donner ou pensez-vous que nous allons changer l'Entente sur les tiers pays sûrs?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Il y a des discussions. J'ai participé à des discussions avec des responsables américains ainsi qu'avec nos fonctionnaires d'IRCC et de l'ASFC. Je sais que le sujet a été abordé à différents niveaux de discussion et je pense que l'on admet ou que l'on reconnaît qu'il s'agit d'une entente qui peut être modernisée et améliorée dans l'intérêt des deux pays, et ces discussions se poursuivent.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Par « modernisée », voulez-vous dire comme nous l'avions suggéré l'année dernière?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Si je me souviens bien, vous avez suggéré de modifier unilatéralement une entente bilatérale, et ce n'est pas la façon de faire. Nous avions commencé à discuter avec nos partenaires de traité, les États-Unis, de nombreux aspects de cette entente, car nous croyons qu'il est possible de l'améliorer et de l'élargir. Ces discussions sont en cours.

Il n'est ni possible ni opportun de modifier unilatéralement une entente bilatérale.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Nous n'avons pas dit cela. Je sais que nous ne dirons jamais cela. Nous avons dit que nous devions...

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Pour que tout soit bien clair, vous avez dit que vous alliez la changer, et nous avons dit non, que nous engagerions des discussions avec notre partenaire sur la manière de l'améliorer.

M. Pierre Paul-Hus:

Bien sûr que nous avons...

Je n'ai plus de questions.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Paul-Hus.

Monsieur Dubé, vous avez sept minutes, s'il vous plaît. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Monsieur le ministre, je vous remercie d'être parmi nous.

Je vais vous poser une question sur vos responsabilités concernant la frontière et la question des migrants. Il y a eu de longues réponses. Je vais me permettre de faire un long préambule et revenir sur le passé, pour que vous compreniez le contexte de ma question. Si mes collègues n'ont pas vu le reportage de Radio-Canada, je les inviterais à le regarder.

En 2011, si je ne m'abuse, un programme a été mis en place par le gouvernement précédent à la suite de deux incidents où des bateaux étaient arrivés au Canada avec à leur bord des demandeurs d'asile tamouls. Ce programme existe toujours et les dépenses qu'on y consacre ont augmenté. Plus de 18 millions de dollars sont consacrés à ce programme. Des gens du SCRS, de la GRC et même du CST interagissent à l'étranger avec des personnages peu reluisants, dans des pays où il pourrait y avoir du trafic de migrants vers le Canada. On conviendra que ce sont des endroits où les droits de la personne posent problème.

Voici ce que j'aimerais savoir. Comment pouvez-vous réconcilier l'approche du gouvernement, qui consiste à faire preuve de compassion à l'égard de personnes dans cette situation, et le fait que des agences agissent à l'étranger pour de l'interdiction? Des gens sont détenus dans des pays où il risque d'y avoir des violations des droits de la personne.

Si vous n'êtes pas en mesure de répondre, je sais que les personnes qui vous accompagnent aujourd'hui pourraient le faire. Dans le reportage de Radio-Canada, ni la GRC ni le SCRS n’était en mesure ou n'avait la volonté de répondre.

Je vous laisse le soin de répondre à ma question. Je suis désolé pour la longue mise en contexte, mais c'était important pour mes collègues.

(1700)

[Traduction]

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Merci beaucoup, monsieur Dubé.

Si je comprends bien votre question — et j'inviterai naturellement les fonctionnaires à ajouter toute l'information qui pourrait vous aider —, d'après mon expérience, il y a malheureusement des personnes... Celles qui cherchent un refuge et celles qui fuient la guerre et la persécution sont dans une situation très vulnérable. Bien souvent, ces personnes sont soumises à l'exploitation de ceux qui voudraient en tirer profit. Nous avons donc également la responsabilité de veiller à maintenir l'intégrité de notre système d'octroi de l'asile et de nos frontières. L'ASFC, la GRC et d'autres personnes qui travaillent ensemble ont une responsabilité, et nous travaillons à l'échelle internationale... Franchement, nous sommes très préoccupés, et nous avons pris un certain nombre de mesures afin de nous occuper de ceux qui exploiteraient les personnes vulnérables.

M. Matthew Dubé:

Certes, je ne suis pas en désaccord avec cette description des gens qui veulent profiter des personnes en situation de vulnérabilité. Le problème dans ce reportage, que je soulève ici, c'est que le gouvernement du Canada a un programme et investit des millions de dollars — 1 million de dollars pour le SCRS et 9 millions de dollars pour la GRC, si je me souviens bien, mais je pourrais me tromper — afin que ces organismes exercent leurs activités à l'étranger pour s'occuper de ces individus sans scrupules dans des régions où vous traitez avec des régimes tout aussi peu scrupuleux, voire plus dénués de tout scrupule, dans ces pays.

Une personne du Cabinet du premier ministre, ou du moins qui conseille le premier ministre sur ce programme, s'est rendue dans ces endroits pour remercier ces régimes au nom du Canada.

À quel coût assurons-nous l'intégrité de la frontière? En d'autres termes, nous avons non seulement la responsabilité de préserver l'intégrité de la frontière et de combattre ces individus sans scrupules, mais aussi de veiller, pardonnez l'expression, à ne pas nous acoquiner avec des individus passablement problématiques à l'étranger, si je puis dire en toute diplomatie, comme l'indique le rapport, que j'inviterais encore une fois mes collègues à lire et que je serais ravi de fournir aux membres du Comité qui ne l'ont pas vu.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Oui, monsieur. Je me contenterai de reconnaître, car je ne suis pas au courant... et, chers collègues, si l'un de vous a l'information, je souhaiterais qu'il intervienne... Nous traitons du crime organisé transnational, y compris l'exploitation de personnes vulnérables, dans la traite de personnes, et avec ceux qui seraient impliqués dans l'exploitation des personnes qui fuient la persécution. Nos fonctionnaires fédéraux et nos organismes de sécurité doivent étendre leur travail au-delà de nos frontières afin... Le travail le plus efficace pour prévenir les problèmes et les crimes au Canada consiste notamment à les empêcher d'arriver à nos frontières en premier lieu. Ils sont à l'œuvre dans des endroits très difficiles du monde, mais nous nous attendons à ce qu'ils continuent à faire respecter les lois et les normes canadiennes. [Français]

M. Matthew Dubé:

Il me reste peu de temps.

Messieurs Vigneault ou Brennan, voulez-vous parler de la perspective de votre organisme?

M. David Vigneault:

Oui. Merci, monsieur Dubé.[Traduction]

Merci, monsieur le ministre.

J'ajouterai simplement, monsieur Dubé, que le programme dont vous avez parlé est en place depuis plusieurs années maintenant, comme l'a mentionné le ministre et comme vous y avez fait référence dans votre préambule, afin d'empêcher les trafiquants de faire entrer des personnes au Canada de façon irrégulière. La raison de notre engagement est de protéger l'intégrité du système au Canada et de veiller à ce que les criminels... à prendre en considération les préoccupations relatives à la sécurité nationale ou à nous assurer que les personnes ne soient pas victimes de ces processus.

Notre travail à l'étranger est régi par notre loi et par des directives ministérielles. Je ne peux pas entrer dans tous les détails opérationnels, mais je peux dire que, lorsque nous échangeons de l'information avec des entités étrangères, nous obéissons à des directives ministérielles afin de nous assurer que ces renseignements ne mènent pas à une violation des droits de la personne ou à de mauvais traitements. Je sais ce que les médias ont déclaré à ce sujet, mais je peux dire que ces programmes font l'objet d'un examen et que tous les organismes concernés sont couverts par cette directive ministérielle. Il y a donc une autre perspective à cette histoire.

(1705)

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Dubé.

Madame Sahota, vous disposez de sept minutes; allez-y.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Merci.

Monsieur Blair, merci d'être parmi nous aujourd'hui.

Je veux commencer par les accords dont vous parliez plus tôt avec les différentes provinces concernant le financement au titre des gangs et des armes à feu. Pouvez-vous m'expliquer un peu à combien s'élève le financement consenti par le gouvernement fédéral, en particulier au gouvernement Doug Ford en Ontario?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Environ 214 millions de dollars ont été réservés par rapport aux armes à feu et aux gangs pour l'ensemble du pays. Cela s'ajoute aux 89 millions de dollars alloués à l'ASFC et à la GRC. Sur les 214 millions de dollars, 65 millions sont alloués à la province de l'Ontario. Des discussions sont en cours avec la province de l'Ontario sur la façon dont cet argent lui sera versé et sur ce qu'elle en fera. J'ai récemment annoncé conjointement avec la ministre de la Sécurité communautaire et la procureure générale de l'Ontario que la province a accepté 11 millions de dollars au cours des deux premières années de ce programme. Je ne sais pas encore si la province a annoncé comment elle prévoit affecter cette somme, mais il s'agit d'une allocation de fonds totalisant 65 millions de dollars sur cinq ans. Jusqu'à présent, la province de l'Ontario a reçu 11 millions de dollars à ce titre.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Pourquoi ne s'agit-il que de 11 millions de dollars à ce moment-ci? Qui a fait ce choix, et comment cette décision a-t-elle été prise?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Cela fait partie des discussions en cours entre nous. C'est le montant pour lequel la province était prête à désigner diverses initiatives. L'argent reste disponible pour être alloué à la province de l'Ontario lorsqu'elle sera prête à l'utiliser. Jusqu'ici, au cours des deux premières années du programme, la province a indiqué être prête à entreprendre des initiatives pour un montant de 11 millions de dollars.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Êtes-vous en train de me dire que 65 millions de dollars sont disponibles pour l'Ontario? Je sais que mes homologues de la Ville de Brampton manifestent un vif intérêt pour la réduction de la criminalité dans la ville. Cependant, les responsables n'ont accepté que 11 millions de dollars sur les 65 millions de dollars offerts.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Pour être juste, ce sont des discussions en cours entre notre gouvernement et toutes les provinces. Nous avons calculé des allocations de fonds pour chacune des provinces, et c'est ce qui a été établi jusqu'à présent. Cet argent est destiné aux services de police municipaux et autochtones des provinces et des territoires, mais il est alloué de manière appropriée et nécessaire par l'entremise des gouvernements provinciaux. J'encouragerais simplement toutes les municipalités à discuter avec leur gouvernement provincial respectif quant à la façon dont elles pourraient avoir accès aux fonds provenant du gouvernement fédéral par l'intermédiaire des gouvernements provinciaux.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Y a-t-il un moyen de verser l'argent directement aux administrations municipales? Je sais que ma ville, Brampton, a très hâte de pouvoir accéder à une partie de ces fonds afin de pouvoir résoudre certains des problèmes auxquels elle est confrontée. Est-ce que le seul moyen d'avoir accès à cet argent est de passer par la province?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Je pense qu'il nous incombe de faire de notre mieux pour collaborer avec nos partenaires provinciaux dans l'ensemble du pays. Je vous dirai que, selon mon expérience dans d'autres administrations, l'expérience a été très positive. Je demeure optimiste quant à ces allocations en Ontario. J'ai moi-même un intérêt marqué pour cet endroit. Je connais les municipalités et les services de police concernés. Encore une fois, avec ces décisions, je pense que la manière appropriée...

Les services de police sont administrés et supervisés par les gouvernements provinciaux du Canada. Nous travaillons avec les ministres de la Sécurité communautaire, les ministres de la Sécurité publique et les procureurs généraux partout au pays, dans chacune des provinces et chacun des territoires. Nous avons certainement fait de notre mieux. Il existe d'autres possibilités de financement disponible directement, en particulier pour les organismes communautaires. Outre les fonds que j'ai déjà mentionnés, plusieurs annonces importantes ont été faites en Ontario, dans le cadre desquelles nous soutenons des organismes communautaires, diverses initiatives de prévention du crime et d'autres types d'investissements dans les collectivités.

(1710)

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Lorsque vous comparez l'offre de 65 millions de dollars aux montants alloués précédemment, est-ce plus ou moins que ce que le gouvernement du Canada a fourni aux provinces ou à l'Ontario en particulier?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Je ne suis pas au courant d'un financement de cette ampleur qui aurait été octroyé auparavant. J'ai participé, à différents titres, au traitement des questions liées aux armes à feu et aux gangs. En règle générale, nos relations étaient uniquement avec le gouvernement provincial. En fait, des fonds ont été dégagés en 2008 pour ce que l'on appelle le Fonds de recrutement de policiers, mais ce fonds a été supprimé en 2013.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

Ce type de financement est-il le premier du genre que le gouvernement fédéral verse aux provinces?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

L'année dernière, le ministre de la Sécurité publique et notre gouvernement ont consenti un investissement important dans les initiatives relatives aux armes à feu et aux gangs. De plus, après discussion avec les provinces et les services de police municipaux et autochtones, on a également reconnu et admis qu'il y avait un travail important à accomplir. Lorsque nous avons commencé à investir, nous nous sommes assurés que de l'argent serait acheminé par l'entremise des provinces à ces services de police municipaux et autochtones, ainsi qu'à nos autorités fédérales à la GRC, à l'ASFC et à d'autres organismes, parce que la question des armes à feu et des gangs est une véritable préoccupation partout au pays. Nous avons constaté une augmentation significative de la violence liée aux armes à feu et des meurtres commis avec une arme à feu au pays. La situation est en grande partie directement liée à la drogue et aux activités de gangs; nous faisons donc des investissements importants afin de soutenir ces efforts.

Mme Ruby Sahota:

D'après mon expérience ces dernières années, en portant attention et en suivant la situation — parce que les problèmes ont désormais tendance à venir aux oreilles des députés —, j'ai constaté que, avec les conditions météorologiques qui s'améliorent et l'arrivée de l'été, il y a généralement une augmentation des activités criminelles à Brampton.

Existe-t-il une approche différente... ou des allocations de fonds différentes sont-elles inscrites au budget pour certains mois? Pouvez-vous parler de votre expérience passée pour expliquer ce qu'il en est?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Ces décisions opérationnelles concernant la répartition des ressources et l'utilisation de ces nouvelles ressources relèvent en réalité de la responsabilité des services de police et de leurs dirigeants, sous la direction de leur conseil et de leur municipalité. Elles sont prises en grande partie en collaboration avec les autorités provinciales.

Il existe également des partenariats très importants dans l'ensemble du pays parmi les organismes d'application de la loi. Par exemple, la GRC mène plusieurs initiatives importantes dans le cadre de ce que nous appelons l'équipe intégrée multidisciplinaire. À titre d'exemple, nous avons les équipes intégrées de la sécurité nationale et d'autres équipes auxquelles participent tous les services de police. Je devrais mentionner, parce qu'elles sont tout à fait pertinentes dans mon mandat, les équipes intégrées de la police des frontières, qui sont généralement dirigées par un organisme fédéral, mais auxquelles participent également d'autres services de police. Ces types d'initiatives sont soutenues grâce au financement que nous versons.

Le président:

Merci, madame Sahota.

Monsieur Motz, vous avez cinq minutes.

M. Glen Motz:

Merci, monsieur le président.

Merci aux témoins d'être ici.

Monsieur le ministre, la semaine dernière, vous avez dit que les fusils d'assaut étaient des armes militaires « conçues pour chasser les gens ». Je ne sais pas ce que vous appelez un fusil d'assaut, mais je suppose que vous parlez de fusils automatiques, d'armes à feu automatiques, et vous savez que ces armes à feu sont interdites au pays depuis 1976. Pourriez-vous nous dire exactement de quelles armes à feu vous parlez dans cette déclaration?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Nous avons eu plusieurs discussions. Comme je l'ai dit, j'ai parcouru le pays, monsieur Motz.

M. Glen Motz:

À quelles armes à feu faites-vous allusion précisément dans cette déclaration?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Ce sont des armes à feu conçues à des fins militaires, des armes à feu qui...

M. Glen Motz:

Je ne sais pas ce que cela signifie. Avec cette déclaration, vous faites allusion, en réalité, aux fusils de chasse modernes, aux fusils de sport modernes. Le fait même que vous ayez fait cette déclaration... Je trouve cela extrêmement choquant. Je trouve votre déclaration malencontreuse. J'estime que c'est être mal informé, et vous induisez la population canadienne en erreur. Encore une fois, de quelles armes à feu parlez-vous spécifiquement?

Le président:

Monsieur Motz, laissez M. Blair répondre.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Je suis désolé que vous ayez été offensé, mais je pensais à...

M. Glen Motz:

Les propriétaires d'armes à feu titulaires d'un permis canadien sont choqués par cette déclaration.

Le président:

Monsieur Motz, laissez M. Blair répondre à la question.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Je pensais à l'arme à feu utilisée pour tuer trois membres de la GRC à Moncton. C'était une arme à feu conçue pour un usage militaire. Elle a été créée et utilisée par l'armée. Il s'agissait d'une arme utilisée par cet individu pour chasser trois policiers.

M. Glen Motz:

Qu'est-ce que c'était? Quel était le fusil? Quelle était l'arme à feu?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Je crois que c'était un M14. Je pensais aussi aux armes utilisées pour tuer les deux agents à Fredericton et deux simples citoyens. Je pensais aussi à l'arme utilisée pour tuer 14 femmes à l'École Polytechnique...

M. Glen Motz:

Vous avez parlé de l'AR-15...

L’hon. Bill Blair:

... et l'arme utilisée pour tuer des fidèles dans la mosquée de Québec.

C'étaient toutes des armes qui n'étaient pas conçues comme des armes de chasse. Elles ont été conçues pour des soldats, des soldats qui...

(1715)

M. Glen Motz:

Monsieur le ministre, vous avez expressément nommé l'AR-15. Vous l'avez nommé. Savez-vous si l'AR-15 a déjà été utilisé dans un crime commis au Canada?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

L'AR-15... Encore une fois, j'ai mentionné certaines des autres... L'AR-15 est l'arme numéro un utilisée...

M. Glen Motz:

... une fusillade au volant en 2004, et personne n'a été blessé.

Mme Julie Dabrusin:

J'invoque le Règlement, monsieur le président. Nous n'obtenons tout simplement pas les réponses à ces questions.

M. Glen Motz:

Il doit répondre à la question. Il n'a pas à tourner autour du pot.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

L'AR-15 est l'arme qui a été utilisée pour tuer tout un groupe de jeunes enfants à Sandy Hook. Elle a également été utilisée pour assassiner 50 personnes à Christchurch...

M. Glen Motz:

Nous parlons du Canada, monsieur le ministre.

Le président:

Monsieur Motz, si vous voulez poser votre question, posez-la, puis laissez le ministre terminer sa réponse. Ensuite, vous pouvez poser une autre question.

M. Glen Motz:

Monsieur le ministre, pouvez-vous décrire la différence entre un AR-15, actuellement restreint au pays, et le WK180-C?

Le président:

D'accord, il y a une question précise. Donnez une réponse précise, si vous le pouvez, je vous prie.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Franchement, je ne me considère pas comme un expert dans la classification de ces armes à feu, même si je connais les deux. Je ne sais pas si l'un des autres témoins a l'expertise pour les définir. Comme vous le savez, le classement est maintenant déterminé par la GRC.

Le président:

D'accord, nous avons maintenant une réponse précise à une question précise.

La deuxième question spécifique.

M. Glen Motz:

Permettez-moi de répondre à la question pour vous. Il s'agit pratiquement de la même arme à feu. Les deux armes tirent des balles de calibre .223. Elles ont les mêmes mécanismes opérationnels. La seule différence est... et je suis heureux que vous ayez mentionné l'idée des classifications. Le public canadien veut que les armes à feu soient classées en fonction de ce qu'elles peuvent faire, et non de ce à quoi elles ressemblent, et ce défi est permanent. Le projet de loi C-71 en est un excellent exemple. Nous avons besoin de faits pour guider ces décisions, non pas d'information superficielle, monsieur le ministre.

Le président:

C'est un commentaire, pas une question.

M. Glen Motz:

C'est le cas.

Alors, est-il vrai...

Le président:

Excusez-moi, monsieur Motz.

Le ministre souhaite-t-il réagir au commentaire de M. Motz?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Non.

Le président:

Non.

Monsieur Motz, posez votre question.

M. Glen Motz:

Certaines rumeurs circulent ces derniers temps selon lesquelles votre gouvernement prévoit interdire les armes à feu, allant de l'interdiction d'armes à feu spécifiques à l'interdiction des armes à feu semi-automatiques, en passant par les armes de poing.

Répondez simplement par oui ou par non: un décret en conseil interdira-t-il certaines catégories d'armes à feu?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Monsieur Motz, je ne réagis normalement pas aux rumeurs. Ce que nous sommes...

M. Glen Motz:

Ce n'est pas une rumeur. Je pose une question directe.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Si je peux me permettre...

M. Glen Motz:

Un décret est-il...

Le président:

Monsieur Motz, vous avez posé une question précise. Cela vous a pris une demi-minute pour le faire. Je devrais allouer un temps similaire au ministre Blair pour qu'il réponde à votre question.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Nous examinons toutes les mesures qui, à notre avis, pourraient contribuer à assurer la sécurité des Canadiens, et nous examinons la bonne façon d'appliquer ces mesures.

M. Glen Motz:

Aucun décret n'est donc prévu. Avez-vous un plan différent pour interdire les armes à feu, comme vous l'avez indiqué?

Le président:

D'accord, c'est la fin de cette question.

Répondez brièvement à M. Motz, qui aura épuisé ses cinq minutes.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

J'ai un plan pour examiner tous les moyens par lesquels nous pouvons assurer la sécurité des Canadiens.

M. Glen Motz:

Vous continuez à éluder la question.

Le président:

Merci, monsieur Motz.

Monsieur Graham, la parole est à vous.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci.

Monsieur le ministre, comme vous le savez, je suis un Canadien du milieu rural qui possède des armes à feu dans la maison et qui les utilise de temps en temps. La dernière fois que j'ai utilisé un AR-15, c'était il y a à peine un mois; je tiens donc à mettre les choses en perspective.

Que faites-vous pour protéger les utilisateurs légitimes d'armes à feu à l'avenir?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Je veux aussi être très clair. Le gouvernement m'a confié le mandat d'examiner toutes les mesures susceptibles d'assurer la sécurité des personnes avec une mise en garde spécifique très importante. Il s'agissait d'une reconnaissance et d'une admission du fait que la très grande majorité des propriétaires d'arme à feu du pays sont respectueux des lois et responsables en cette matière. Ils achètent leurs armes à feu légalement. Ils les entreposent en toute sécurité. Ils les utilisent de manière responsable et en disposent conformément à la loi.

La possession d'arme à feu au pays est un privilège qui repose sur la volonté des gens et l'acceptation de nos lois et règlements en ce qui concerne les armes à feu. D'après mon expérience, les Canadiens, en très grande majorité, sont exceptionnellement responsables et respectueux des lois en ce qui concerne leurs armes à feu, et je pense qu'il est extrêmement important que nous respections toujours cela. Ce ne sont pas des gens dangereux, et en particulier les chasseurs, les agriculteurs et les tireurs sportifs font très attention à leurs armes.

Parallèlement, nous avons la responsabilité de veiller à ce que ces armes ne se retrouvent pas entre les mains de personnes qui s'en serviraient pour commettre des crimes violents. D'après mon expérience et mes discussions d'un bout à l'autre du pays, je crois que les propriétaires d'arme à feu responsables se préoccupent également de la sécurité publique et veillent à ce que leurs armes à feu ne se retrouvent pas entre les mains de criminels.

(1720)

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je comprends.

Me reste-t-il du temps, monsieur le président?

Le président:

Monsieur Graham, vous disposez de cinq minutes complètes, en partie grâce à l'efficacité de...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je pensais que vous vouliez qu'il reste 10 minutes à la fin.

J'apprécie vos réponses.

Je voulais poser à M. Tousignant — je crois que vous êtes du SCC — une très brève question avant de revenir à M. Blair.

J'aurais posé cette question au groupe précédent, mais je n'ai eu aucune occasion de le faire. Dans ma circonscription, il y a l'Établissement de La Macaza, qui compte 28 silos à missiles Bomarc. J'aimerais savoir si le SCC peut nous aider à empêcher que ceux-ci soient démolis.

M. Alain Tousignant (sous-commissaire principal, Service correctionnel du Canada):

Il faudrait que je me renseigne avant de vous répondre à ce sujet.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Ils se trouvent sur le terrain de l'Établissement de La Macaza. C'est pourquoi je vous le demande.

M. Alain Tousignant:

Oui.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Je n'ai pas de réponse à cela non plus.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Je tiens simplement à ce que cela soit consigné au compte rendu, car ces silos font partie de notre patrimoine. Je ne veux pas perdre ce patrimoine. Ces silos sont utilisés comme unités de stockage et contiennent de l'amiante; on veut les supprimer. On veut enlever ces silos. Je ne veux pas que cela se produise.

Le président:

Nous voulons donc préserver...

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Préserver les silos à missiles Bomarc. Sauver les silos à missiles.

Le président:

... les silos à missiles. D'accord.

C'est différent.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Monsieur Blair, je ne sais pas si c'est votre ministère, celui de la Santé ou les deux... mais j'aimerais parler un peu des lois sur la marijuana.

Comme vous le savez, c'est une grande circonscription rurale. De nombreuses exploitations de marijuana à des fins médicales sont en cours de création. Beaucoup de villes se plaignent de ne pas en savoir davantage à leur sujet. J'aimerais savoir quelle est la responsabilité d'un demandeur de licence d'informer la police, les pompiers et les municipalités. Pourriez-vous m'aider à ce sujet?

L’hon. Bill Blair:

Ce sont des règlements qui ne relèvent pas de la Loi sur le cannabis, où quelqu'un obtient une autorisation de cultiver du cannabis, mais doit tout d'abord respecter les règlements de Santé Canada concernant ces installations; il est également assujetti aux règlements municipaux et de zonage, s'ils existent. Je le dis parce que tous les endroits n'ont pas de tels règlements.

Un certain nombre de ces incidents ont entraîné des problèmes liés aux odeurs, à la pollution lumineuse, au bruit et à d'autres complications. Dans ces situations, Santé Canada a un rôle à jouer, et certains règlements s'appliquent spécifiquement aux producteurs autorisés de marijuana à des fins médicales, qui ne sont pas les producteurs autorisés en vertu de la Loi sur le cannabis. Les autorités de réglementation locales ont également un rôle important à jouer, notamment en ce qui concerne l'application des règlements en vue de régler ce genre de problèmes.

Si vous avez dans votre circonscription de telles installations qui posent problème à votre collectivité, je vous encourage à communiquer avec nous, et nous veillerons à ce que Santé Canada, dans la mesure de ses moyens, aide à régler ces problèmes grâce à ses règlements. Dans de nombreux cas, nous pouvons collaborer avec les autorités municipales locales ou régionales afin de donner suite à ces préoccupations.

M. David de Burgh Graham:

Merci beaucoup.

Le président:

Sur ce, je vais mettre fin aux questions.

M. Jim Eglinski:

Attendez, j'ai une très bonne question.

Le président:

Ce serait la première fois depuis longtemps que vous poseriez une bonne question.

L’hon. Bill Blair:

J'aimerais beaucoup répondre à votre bonne question.

Le président:

Vous pouvez poser votre belle question après la séance. Nous devons adopter le budget des dépenses, ce qui est l'objectif de notre réunion aujourd'hui.

Au nom du Comité, je tiens à vous remercier, monsieur le ministre Blair, ainsi que tous vos collaborateurs d'être venus pendant que nous examinons le budget.

Sur ce, je vais suggérer... et c'est aux collègues de décider si nous voulons adopter plus ou moins 30 crédits en même temps, qui seront probablement tous adoptés avec dissidence. Est-ce une façon préférable de procéder ou souhaitez-vous diviser les crédits?

Nous sommes d'accord pour que tout soit fait en même temps. AGENCE DES SERVICES FRONTALIERS DU CANADA ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses de fonctionnement... 1 550 213 856 $ ç Crédit 5 — Dépenses en capital... 124 728 621 $ ç Crédit 10 — Répondre aux défis de la peste porcine africaine... 5 558 788 $ ç Crédit 15 — Renforcer la reddition de comptes et la surveillance de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada... 500 000 $ ç Crédit 20 — Accroître l'intégrité des frontières et du système d'octroi de l'asile du Canada... 106 290 000 $ ç Crédit 25 — Aider les voyageurs à visiter le Canada... 12 935 000 $ ç Crédit 30 — Modernisation des opérations frontalières du Canada... 135 000 000 $ ç Crédit 35 — Protéger les personnes contre les consultants en immigration sans scrupules... 1 550 000 $

(Crédits 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 et 35 adoptés avec dissidence) SERVICE CANADIEN DU RENSEIGNEMENT DE SÉCURITÉ ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme... 535 592 804 $ ç Crédit 5 — Accroître l'intégrité des frontières et du système d'octroi de l'asile du Canada... 2 020 000 $ ç Crédit 10 — Aider les voyageurs à visiter le Canada... 890 000 $ ç Crédit 15 — Protéger la sécurité nationale du Canada... 3 236 746 $ ç Crédit 20 — Protection des droits et des libertés des Canadiens... 9 200 000 $ ç Crédit 25 — Renouveler la Stratégie du Canada au Moyen-Orient... 8 300 000 $

(Crédits 1, 5, 10, 15, 20 et 25 adoptés avec dissidence) COMMISSION CIVILE D'EXAMEN ET DE TRAITEMENT DES PLAINTES RELATIVES À LA GENDARMERIE ROYALE DU CANADA ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme... 9 700 400 $ ç Crédit 5 — Renforcer la reddition de comptes et la surveillance de l'Agence des services frontaliers du Canada... 420 000 $

(Crédits 1 et 5 adoptés avec dissidence) SERVICE CORRECTIONNEL DU CANADA ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses de fonctionnement, subventions et contributions... 2 062 950 977 $ ç Crédit 5 — Dépenses en capital... 187 808 684 $ ç Crédit 10 — Soutien au Service correctionnel du Canada

(Crédits 1, 5 et 10 adoptés avec dissidence) MINISTÈRE DE LA SÉCURITÉ PUBLIQUE ET DE LA PROTECTION CIVILE ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses de fonctionnement... 130 135 974 $ ç Crédit 5 — Subventions et contributions... 597 655 353 $ ç Crédit 10 — Veiller à une meilleure préparation et intervention pour la gestion des catastrophes... 158 465 000 $ ç Crédit 15 — Protéger les infrastructures essentielles du Canada contre les cybermenaces... 1 773 000 $ ç Crédit 20 — Protéger la sécurité nationale du Canada... 1 993 464 $ ç Crédit 25 — Protéger les enfants contre l'exploitation sexuelle en ligne... 4 443 100 $ ç Crédit 30 — Protéger les lieux de rassemblement communautaires contre les crimes motivés par la haine... 2 000 000 $ ç Crédit 35 — Renforcer le régime canadien de lutte contre le recyclage des produits de la criminalité et le financement des activités terroristes... 3 282 450 $

(Crédits 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 et 35 adoptés avec dissidence) BUREAU DE L'ENQUÊTEUR CORRECTIONNEL DU CANADA ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme... 4 735 703 $

(Crédit 1 adopté avec dissidence) COMMISSION DES LIBÉRATIONS CONDITIONNELLES DU CANADA ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme... 41 777 398 $

(Crédit 1 adopté avec dissidence) GENDARMERIE ROYALE DU CANADA ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses de fonctionnement... 2 436 011 187 $ ç Crédit 5 — Dépenses en capital... 248 693 417 $ ç Crédit 10 — Subventions et contributions... 286 473 483 $ ç Crédit 15 — Offrir un meilleur service aux passagers du transport aérien... 3 300 000 $ ç Crédit 20 — Accroître l'intégrité des frontières et du système d'octroi de l'asile du Canada... 18 440 000 $ ç Crédit 25 — Protéger la sécurité nationale du Canada... 992 280 $ ç Crédit 30 — Renforcer le régime canadien de lutte contre le recyclage de produits de la criminalité et le financement des activités terroristes... 4 100 000 $ ç Crédit 35 — Soutien pour la Gendarmerie royale du Canada... 96 192 357 $

(Crédits 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 et 35 adoptés avec dissidence) COMITÉ EXTERNE D'EXAMEN DE LA GENDARMERIE ROYALE DU CANADA ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme... 3 076 946 $

(Crédit 1 adopté avec dissidence) SECRÉTARIAT DU COMITÉ DES PARLEMENTAIRES SUR LA SÉCURITÉ NATIONALE ET LE RENSEIGNEMENT ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme... 3 271 323 $

(Crédit 1 adopté avec dissidence) COMITÉ DE SURVEILLANCE DES ACTIVITÉS DU RENSEIGNEMENT DE SÉCURITÉ ç Crédit 1 — Dépenses du programme... 4 629 028 $

(Crédit 1 adopté avec dissidence)

Le président: Est-ce que le président doit faire rapport des crédits du Budget principal des dépenses 2019-2020, moins les montants approuvés dans les prévisions, à la Chambre?

Des députés: D'accord.

Le président: La séance est levée.

Hansard Hansard

Posted at 17:44 on June 03, 2019

This entry has been archived. Comments can no longer be posted.

(RSS) Website generating code and content © 2006-2019 David Graham <cdlu@railfan.ca>, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Comments are © their respective authors.